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Sample records for temperature irradiation applied

  1. Low Temperature Irradiation Applied to Neutron Activation Analysis of Mercury In Human Whole Blood

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brune, D.

    1966-02-15

    The distribution of mercury in human whole blood has been studied by means of neutron activation analysis. During the irradiation procedure the samples were kept at low temperature by freezing them in a cooling device in order to prevent interferences caused by volatilization and contamination. The mercury activity was separated by means of distillation and ion exchange techniques.

  2. Modelling property changes in graphite irradiated at changing irradiation temperature

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Kok, S

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A new method is proposed to predict the irradiation induced property changes in nuclear; graphite, including the effect of a change in irradiation temperature. The currently used method; to account for changes in irradiation temperature, the scaled...

  3. Changes in graphite coefficient of thermal expansion due to fast neutron irradiation and applied stress in the temperature range 300C-1200C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marsden, B.J. [AEA Technology Plc, Risley, Warrington, Cheshire (United Kingdom); Arai, Taketoshi [Oarai Research Establishment, Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute JAERI, Ibaraki-ken (Japan); McLachlan, N. [Nuclear Electric Ltd, Edinburgh, Scotland (United Kingdom)

    1998-09-01

    Changes in coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) in nuclear graphite are important because they are related to dimensional change and the thermal stressing of graphite moderated reactor graphite components. The CTE of nuclear graphite can be modified by fast neutron irradiation, stress and creep strain. Various theories exist which relate the CTE of the individual graphite crystallite to the CTE of the polycrystalline graphite through a structure factor. This structure factor is a function of the graphite crystal orientation and the accommodation available due to local crystal porosity. The porosity can be taken up by raising the temperature of the graphite, which causes the lattice `c` spacing to expand, or by fast neutron irradiation induced crystal dimensional changes. It is also proposed that this porosity can be taken up by stressing unirradiated graphite, although there appears to be some evidence from Japan that the anisotropy of graphite is also altered by pre-stress. Annealing of creep strain specimens has shown that not all of irradiation induced creep strain is responsible for modifying CTE. 12 refs.

  4. Thermal analysis applied to irradiated propolis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, Andrea Harumi; Machado, Luci Brocardo; del Mastro, Nélida Lucia

    2002-03-01

    Propolis is a resinous hive product, collected by bees. Raw propolis requires a decontamination procedure and irradiation appears as a promising technique for this purpose. The valuable properties of propolis for food and pharmaceutical industries have led to increasing interest in its technological behavior. Thermal analysis is a chemical analysis that gives information about changes on heating of great importance for technological applications. Ground propolis samples were 60Co gamma irradiated with 0 and 10 kGy. Thermogravimetry curves shown a similar multi-stage decomposition pattern for both irradiated and unirradiated samples up to 600°C. Similarly, through differential scanning calorimetry , a coincidence of melting point of irradiated and unirradiated samples was found. The results suggest that the irradiation process do not interfere on the thermal properties of propolis when irradiated up to 10 kGy.

  5. Thermal analysis applied to irradiated propolis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsuda, Andrea Harumi; Machado, Luci Brocardo; Mastro, N.L. del E-mail: nelida@usp.br

    2002-03-01

    Propolis is a resinous hive product, collected by bees. Raw propolis requires a decontamination procedure and irradiation appears as a promising technique for this purpose. The valuable properties of propolis for food and pharmaceutical industries have led to increasing interest in its technological behavior. Thermal analysis is a chemical analysis that gives information about changes on heating of great importance for technological applications. Ground propolis samples were {sup 60}Co gamma irradiated with 0 and 10 kGy. Thermogravimetry curves shown a similar multi-stage decomposition pattern for both irradiated and unirradiated samples up to 600 deg. C. Similarly, through differential scanning calorimetry , a coincidence of melting point of irradiated and unirradiated samples was found. The results suggest that the irradiation process do not interfere on the thermal properties of propolis when irradiated up to 10 kGy.

  6. Silicon detectors irradiated "in situ" at cryogenic temperatures

    CERN Document Server

    Ruggiero, G; Bell, W; Berglund, P; de Boer, Wim; Borer, K; Buontempo, S; Casagrande, L; Chapuy, S; Cindro, V; Collins, P; D'Ambrosio, N; Da Vià, C; Devine, S R H; Dezillie, B; Dimcovski, Zlatomir; Eremin, V V; Esposito, A P; Granata, V; Grigoriev, E; Grohmann, S; Hauler, F; Heijne, Erik H M; Heising, S; Janos, S; Jungermann, L; Konorov, I; Li, Z; Lourenço, C; Mikuz, M; Niinikoski, T O; O'Shea, V; Pagano, S; Palmieri, V G; Paul, S; Pretzl, Klaus P; Rato-Mendes, P; Smith, K; Sonderegger, P; Sousa, P; Verbitskaya, E; Watts, S; Zavrtanik, M

    2002-01-01

    Though several studies have proved the radiation tolerance of silicon detectors at cryogenic temperatures, following room temperature irradiation, no previous investigation has studied the behaviour of detectors irradiated "in situ" at low temperatures. In this work, effects of irradiation of 450 GeV protons at 83 K will be presented, showing that after a dose of 1.2 * 10/sup 15/ p cm/sup -2/ a charge collection efficiency (CCE) of 55% is reached at 200 V before the annealing. The same results were found at the end of the irradiation, after the sample has spent more then one year at room temperature. This shows that the CCE recovery by low temperature operation is not affected by the temperature of irradiation and by the reverse annealing. (8 refs).

  7. Effect of wound healing period and temperature, irradiation and post irradiation storage temperature on the keeping quality of potatoes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Langerak, D.I.; Wolters, T.C.; Jong, de W.J.H.J.; Hollman, P.C.; Cramwinckel, A.B.; Oortwijn, H.; Vroomen, L.H.M.

    1988-01-01

    The effect of irradiation doses, wound healing temperature, post harvest irradiation time (wound healing period) and storage temperature on a number of quality parameters such as loss of weight, sprout inhibition and rot incidence, chemical parameters such as sugar and vitamin e content, sensory

  8. Path dependent models to predict property changes in graphite irradiated at changing irradiation temperatures

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Kok, S

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available .co.za ] Path dependent models to predict property changes in graphite irradiated at changing irradiation temperatures S KOK CSIR Advanced Mathematical Modelling, Modelling and Digital Science, PO Box 395, Pretoria, 0001, South Africa E-mail: skok...

  9. Tracking with heavily irradiated silicon detectors operated at cryogenic temperatures

    CERN Document Server

    Casagrande, L; Bartalini, P; Bell, W H; Borer, K; Bowcock, T J V; Buytaert, J; Chochula, P; Collins, P; Da Vià, C; Dijkstra, H; Dormond, O; Esposito, A P; Frei, R; Granata, V; Janos, S; Konorov, I; Lourenço, C; Niinikoski, T O; Pagano, S; Palmieri, V G; Parkes, C; Paul, S; Pretzl, Klaus P; Ruf, T; Ruggiero, G; Saladino, S; Schmitt, L; Smith, K; Sonderegger, P; Stavitski, I; Steele, D; Vitobello, F

    1999-01-01

    In this work we show that a heavily irradiated double-sided silicon microstrip detector recovers its performance when operated at cryogenic temperatures. A DELPHI microstrip detector, irradiated to a fluence of $\\sim\\,4\\times 10^{14}$ p/cm$^2$, no longer operational at room temperature, cannot be distinguished from a non-irradiated one when operated at $T<120$~K. Besides confirming the previously observed `Lazarus effect' in single diodes, these results establish for the first time, the possibility of using standard silicon detectors for tracking applications in extremely demanding radiation environments.

  10. Effect of stress and temperature on the micromechanics of creep in highly irradiated bone and dentin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singhal, Anjali, E-mail: anjalisinghal2007@u.northwestern.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL 60208 (United States); Deymier-Black, Alix C., E-mail: alixdeymier2010@u.northwestern.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL 60208 (United States); Almer, Jonathan D., E-mail: almer@aps.anl.gov [X-ray Science Division, Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Dunand, David C., E-mail: dunand@northwestern.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL 60208 (United States)

    2013-04-01

    Synchrotron X-ray diffraction is used to study in situ the evolution of phase strains during compressive creep deformation in bovine bone and dentin for a range of compressive stresses and irradiation rates, at ambient and body temperatures. In all cases, compressive strains in the collagen phase increase with increasing creep time (and concomitant irradiation), reflecting macroscopic deformation of the sample. By contrast, compressive elastic strains in the hydroxyapatite (HAP) phase, created upon initial application of compressive load on the sample, decrease with increasing time (and irradiation) for all conditions; this load shedding behavior is consistent with damage at the HAP–collagen interface due to the high irradiation doses (from ∼ 100 to ∼ 9,000 kGy). Both the HAP and fibril strain rates increase with applied compressive stress, temperature and irradiation rate, which is indicative of greater collagen molecular sliding at the HAP–collagen interface and greater intermolecular sliding (i.e., plastic deformation) within the collagen network. The temperature sensitivity confirms that testing at body temperature, rather than ambient temperature, is necessary to assess the in vivo behavior of bone and teeth. The characteristic pattern of HAP strain evolution with time differs quantitatively between bone and dentin, and may reflect their different structural organization. Highlights: ► First systematic study of varying creep stresses on bone and dentin at nanoscale. ► HAP in highly irradiated bone and dentin sheds load during creep at all stresses. ► This suggests HAP–collagen interfacial damage due to irradiation and applied stress. ► HAP and fibril strain rates increase with stress, temperature and irradiation. ► Temporal evolution of strains different in bone and dentin.

  11. Temperature dependence of the deformation behavior of 316 stainless steel after low temperature neutron irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pawel-Robertson, J.E.; Rowcliffe, A.F.; Grossbeck, M.L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)] [and others

    1996-10-01

    The effects of low temperature neutron irradiation on the tensile behavior of 316 stainless steel have been investigated. A single heat of solution annealed 316 was irradiated to 7 and 18 dpa at 60, 200, 330, and 400{degrees}C. The tensile properties as a function of dose and as a function of temperature were examined. Large changes in yield strength, deformation mode, strain to necking, and strain hardening capacity were seen in this irradiation experiment. The magnitudes of the changes are dependent on both irradiation temperature and neutron dose. Irradiation can more than triple the yield strength over the unirradiated value and decrease the strain to necking (STN) to less than 0.5% under certain conditions. A maximum increase in yield strength and a minimum in the STN occur after irradiation at 330{degrees}C but the failure mode remains ductile.

  12. Thermohydraulic design of saturated temperature capsule for IASCC irradiation test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ide, Hiroshi; Matsui, Yoshinori; Itabashi, Yukio [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Research Establishment] [and others

    2002-10-01

    An advanced water chemistry controlled irradiation research device is being developed in JAERI, to perform irradiation tests for irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) research concerned with aging of LWR. This device enables the irradiation tests under the water chemistry condition and the temperature, which simulate the conditions for BWR core internals. The advanced water chemistry controlled irradiation research device is composed of saturated temperature capsule inserted into the JMTR core and the water chemistry control unit installed in the reactor building. Regarding the saturated temperature capsule, the Thermohydraulic design of capsule structure was done, aimed at controlling the specimen's temperature, feeding water velocity on specimen's surface to the environment of BWR nearer. As the result of adopting the new capsule structure based on the design study, it was found out that feeding water velocity at the surface of specimen's is increased to about 10 times as much as before, and nuclear heat generated in the capsule components can be removed safely even in the abnormal event such as the case of loss of feeding water. (author)

  13. Irradiation temperature dependence of production efficiency of lattice defects in some neutron-irradiated oxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okada, Moritami [Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University, Kumatori-cho, Sennan-gun, Osaka 5900494 (Japan)]. E-mail: okada@rri.kyoto-u.ac.jp; Atobe, Kozo [Faculty of Science, Naruto University of Education, Naruto, Tokushima 7728502 (Japan); Nakagawa, Masuo [Faculty of Education, Kagawa University, Takamatsu, Kagawa 7608522 (Japan)

    2004-11-01

    Temperature dependence of production efficiency of irradiation-induced defects in neutron-irradiated oxides has been investigated. Some oxide single crystals, MgO, {alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} (sapphire) and TiO{sub 2} (rutile), were irradiated at several controlled temperatures, 10, 20, 50, 100, 150 and 200 K, using the low-temperature irradiation facility of Kyoto University Reactor (KUR-LTL), and at ambient temperature ({approx}370 K) in the same facility. Irradiation temperature dependence of production efficiency of a 1 {mu}m band in TiO{sub 2} differs greatly from that of anion vacancy (F-type centers) in MgO and {alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. Results for MgO and {alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} show steep negative gradients from 10 to 370 K, whereas that for TiO{sub 2} includes a valley between 40 and 60 K and a hump at about 130 K, and then disappear at about 200 K. In MgO and {alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, this behavior can be explained by the recombination of Frenkel pairs, which is activated at higher temperature. In TiO{sub 2}, in addition to the recombination mechanism, a covalent bonding property is thought to be exerted strong influence, and it is suggested that a disappearance of the 1 {mu}m band at above 200 K is due to the recombination process of Frenkel pairs which is caused by the irradiation-induced crystallization.

  14. the trends in temperature and solar irradiance for zaria, north ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dogara et al.

    leading to the global warming concept. Keywords: Trend, Temperature, Solar Irradiance, Zaria. INTRODUCTION. The study of the rates of climatic change and their impact on the environment and society is important and essential to predicting global and regional climatic variations and to determining the extent of human ...

  15. The Effects of Solar Irradience and Ambient Temperature on Solar ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Optimizing this conversion, especially in the face of the high cost of solar panels, is thus desirable. Towards this end, it is necessary to know the maximum output periods of solar modules and the conditions for maximum panel output. This paper is the result of a study of the effects of solar irradiance and ambient temperature ...

  16. The impact of microwaves irradiation and temperature manipulation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The impact of microwaves irradiation and temperature manipulation against adults of saw-toothed grain beetle, Oryzaephlius surinamensis (L.) and cigarette beetle, Lasioderma serricorne (F.), over various exposure times and cold storage period was evaluated. The insects were exposed to 2450 MHZ at five different power ...

  17. The effect of irradiation temperature on the non-enzymatic browning reaction in cooked rice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ju-Woon; Oh, Sang-Hee; Kim, Jae-Hun; Byun, Eui-Hong; Ree Kim, Mee; Baek, Min; Byun, Myung-Woo

    2007-05-01

    The effect of irradiation temperature on the non-enzymatic browning reaction in a sugar-glycine solution and cooked rice generated by gamma irradiation was evaluated in the present study. When the sugar-glycine solution and cooked rice were irradiated at room temperature, the browning reaction was dramatically increased during the post-irradiation period. In the case of irradiation at below the freezing point, the browning by irradiation was retarded during not only irradiation but also a post-irradiation period. The changes of the sugar profile, such as a sugar loss or reducing power of the irradiated sugar-glycine solution and the electron spin resonance signal intensity of the irradiated cooked rice were also decreased with lower irradiation temperature. The present results may suggest that the production of free radicals and a radiolysis product is inhibited during gamma irradiation in the frozen state and it may prevent the browning reaction generated by gamma irradiation from occurring.

  18. Preliminary Low Temperature Electron Irradiation of Triple Junction Solar Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stella, Paul M.; Mueller, Robert L.; Scrivner, Roy L.; Helizon, Roger S.

    2007-01-01

    For many years extending solar power missions far from the sun has been a challenge not only due to the rapid falloff in solar intensity (intensity varies as inverse square of solar distance) but also because some of the solar cells in an array may exhibit a LILT (low intensity low temperature) degradation that reduces array performance. Recent LILT tests performed on commercial triple junction solar cells have shown that high performance can be obtained at solar distances as great as approx. 5 AU1. As a result, their use for missions going far from the sun has become very attractive. One additional question that remains is whether the radiation damage experienced by solar cells under low temperature conditions will be more severe than when measured during room temperature radiation tests where thermal annealing may take place. This is especially pertinent to missions such as the New Frontiers mission Juno, which will experience cell irradiation from the trapped electron environment at Jupiter. Recent testing2 has shown that low temperature proton irradiation (10 MeV) produces cell degradation results similar to room temperature irradiations and that thermal annealing does not play a factor. Although it is suggestive to propose the same would be observed for low temperature electron irradiations, this has not been verified. JPL has routinely performed radiation testing on commercial solar cells and has also performed LILT testing to characterize cell performance under far sun operating conditions. This research activity was intended to combine the features of both capabilities to investigate the possibility of any room temperature annealing that might influence the measured radiation damage. Although it was not possible to maintain the test cells at a constant low temperature between irradiation and electrical measurements, it was possible to obtain measurements with the cell temperature kept well below room temperature. A fluence of 1E15 1MeV electrons was

  19. MELT WIRE SENSORS AVAILABLE TO DETERMINE PEAK TEMPERATURES IN ATR IRRADIATION TESTING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    K. L. Davis; D. Knudson; J. Daw; J. Palmer; J. L. Rempe

    2012-07-01

    In April 2007, the Department of Energy (DOE) designated the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) a National Scientific User Facility (NSUF) to advance US leadership in nuclear science and technology. By attracting new users from universities, laboratories, and industry, the ATR will support basic and applied nuclear research and development and help address the nation's energy security needs. In support of this new program, the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has developed in-house capabilities to fabricate, test, and qualify new and enhanced temperature sensors for irradiation testing. Although most efforts emphasize sensors capable of providing real-time data, selected tasks have been completed to enhance sensors provided in irradiation locations where instrumentation leads cannot be included, such as drop-in capsule and Hydraulic Shuttle Irradiation System (HSIS) or 'rabbit' locations. To meet the need for these locations, the INL has developed melt wire temperature sensors for use in ATR irradiation testing. Differential scanning calorimetry and environmental testing of prototypical sensors was used to develop a library of 28 melt wire materials, capable of detecting peak irradiation temperatures ranging from 85 to 1500°C. This paper will discuss the development work and present test results.

  20. Characterization of the National Low-Temperature Neutron Irradiation Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kerchner, H.R.; Coltman, R.R. Jr.; Klabunde, C.E.; Young, F.W. Jr.

    1986-02-01

    The National Low-Temperature Neutron Irradiation Facility (NLTNIF) is now operating at the Bulk Shielding Reactor at ORNL. The facility provides high radiation intensities and special environmental and testing conditions for qualified experiments at no cost to users. A general description and major specifications of the NLTNIF are presented along with the results of performance tests. In addition, the hardware and other considerations required to perform experiments in the NLTNIF are described.

  1. Neutron Irradiation Tests of Calibrated Cryogenic Sensors at Low Temperatures

    CERN Document Server

    Junquera, T; Thermeau, J P; Casas-Cubillos, J

    1998-01-01

    This paper presents the advancement of a program being carried out in view of selecting the cryogenic temperature sensors to be used in the LHC accelerator. About 10,000 sensors will be installed around the 26.6 km LHC ring, and most of them will be exposed to high radiation doses during the accelerator lifetime. The following thermometric sensors : carbon resistors, thin films, and platinum resistors, have been exposed to high neutron fluences (>10$^15$ n/cm$^2$) at the ISN (Grenoble, France) Cryogenic Irradiation Test Facility. A cryostat is placed in a shielded irradiation vault where a 20 MeV deuteron beam hits a Be target, resulting in a well collimated and intense neutron beam. The cryostat, the on-line acquisition system, the temperature references and the main characteristics of the irradiation facility are described. The main interest of this set-up is its ability to monitor online the evolution of the sensors by comparing its readout with temperature references that are in principle insensitive to t...

  2. Gas diffusion and temperature dependence of bubble nucleation during irradiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foreman, A. J. E.; Singh, Bachu Narain

    1986-01-01

    of the diatomic nucleation of helium bubbles, assuming helium to diffuse substitutionally, with radiation-enhanced diffusion at lower temperatures. The calculated temperature dependence of the bubble density shows excellent agreement with that observed in 600 MeV proton irradiations, including a reduction...... in activation energy below Tm/2. The coalescence of diatomic nuclei due to Brownian motion markedly improves the agreement and also provides a well-defined terminal density. Bubble nucleation by this mechanism is sufficiently fast to inhibit any appreciable initial loss of gas to grain boundaries during...

  3. Behaviour of neutron irradiated beryllium during temperature excursions up to and beyond its melting temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pajuste, Elina, E-mail: elina.pajuste@lu.lv; Kizane, Gunta; Avotiņa, Līga; Zariņš, Artūrs

    2015-10-15

    Beryllium pebble behaviour has been studied regarding the accidental operation conditions of tritium breeding blanket of fusion reactors. Structure evolution, oxidation and thermal properties have been compared for nonirradiated and neutron irradiated beryllium pebbles during thermal treatment in a temperature range from ambient temperature to 1600 K. For neutron irradiated pebbles tritium release process was studied. Methods of temperature programmed tritium desorption (TPD) in combination with thermogravimetry (TG) and temperature differential analysis (TDA), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) in combination with Energy Dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX) have been used. It was found that there are strong relation between tritium desorption spectra and structural evolution of neutron irradiated beryllium. The oxidation rate is also accelerated by the structure damages caused by neutrons.

  4. A temperature study of laser-irradiated bone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkler, Jon Philip

    A method for predicting the temperature of laser-irradiated bone has been developed. The method uses a numerical model to predict temperature in a bone sample irradiated with a particular wavelength of light. The model was based on the heat conduction equation with the laser radiation accounted for by a volumetric heat generation term based on the absorption coefficient at the wavelength being used and Beer's Law of exponential absorption. Two beam profiles, top hat and Gaussian, were used to model the incident beam, so the effect of beam profile on temperature distribution could be examined. Experimental runs were performed by irradiating samples of bone with two different laser wavelengths and measuring the temperature of the bone at four locations. A COsb2 laser at 10.6 mum and a Nd:YAG laser at 1.06 mum were used at powers from 5 to 40 Watts using approximately a 10 mm diameter beam. Additional experiments were performed to ascertain the accuracy of reported values for the absorption of 1.06 mum wavelength light by bone. The results of the experiments led to a value for the absorption coefficient for bone at 1.06 mum wavelength of 279/m and a reflectivity of 0.18. Using this value for the absorption coefficient, the model results were reconciled to the YAG experimental data. Charts plotting temperature against time for several locations have been generated and included as a reference for further research. Possibilities for laser-bone applications include cutting, drilling, bone shaping, thermal therapy, welding, and diagnostics and this research may enhance the development of such applications.

  5. High temperature measurements in irradiated environment using Raman fiber optics distributed temperature sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecomte, Pierre; Blairon, Sylvain; Boldo, Didier; Taillade, Frédéric; Caussanel, Matthieu; Beauvois, Gwendal; Duval, Hervé; Grieu, Stéphane; Laffont, Guillaume; Lainé, Frédéric; Carrel, Frédéric

    2016-04-01

    Optical fiber temperature sensors using Raman effect are a promising technology for temperature mapping of nuclear power plant pipes. These pipes are exposed to high temperature (350 °C) and gamma radiations, which is a harsh environment for standard telecom fibers. Therefore metal coated fibers are to be used to perform measurement over 300 °C. Temperature variations can affect the attenuation of the metallic coated fiber before irradiation. The latter induces an extra attenuation, due to light absorption along the fiber by radiation-induced defects. The recombination of these defects can be strongly accelerated by the high temperature value. As backscattered Raman signal is weak it is important to test optical fibers under irradiation to observe how it gets attenuated. Different experiments are described in this conference paper: two in situ irradiation campaigns with different dose rates at, both ambient and high temperature. We observe that the tested off-the-shelf metallic coated fibers have a high attenuation under irradiation. We also noticed the fact that thermal annealing plays a massive role in the +300 °C temperature range.

  6. Irradiation performance of AGR-1 high temperature reactor fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul A. Demkowicz; John D. Hunn; Robert N. Morris; Charles A. Baldwin; Philip L. Winston; Jason M. Harp; Scott A. Ploger; Tyler Gerczak; Isabella J. van Rooyen; Fred C. Montgomery; Chinthaka M. Silva

    2014-10-01

    The AGR-1 experiment contained 72 low-enriched uranium oxide/uranium carbide TRISO-coated particle fuel compacts in six capsules irradiated to burnups of 11.2 to 19.5% FIMA, with zero TRISO coating failures detected during the irradiation. The irradiation performance of the fuel–including the extent of fission product release and the evolution of kernel and coating microstructures–was evaluated based on detailed examination of the irradiation capsules, the fuel compacts, and individual particles. Fractional release of 110mAg from the fuel compacts was often significant, with capsule-average values ranging from 0.01 to 0.38. Analysis of silver release from individual compacts indicated that it was primarily dependent on fuel temperature history. Europium and strontium were released in small amounts through intact coatings, but were found to be significantly retained in the outer pyrocrabon and compact matrix. The capsule-average fractional release from the compacts was 1×10 4 to 5×10 4 for 154Eu and 8×10 7 to 3×10 5 for 90Sr. The average 134Cs release from compacts was <3×10 6 when all particles maintained intact SiC. An estimated four particles out of 2.98×105 experienced partial cesium release due to SiC failure during the irradiation, driving 134Cs release in two capsules to approximately 10 5. Identification and characterization of these particles has provided unprecedented insight into the nature and causes of SiC coating failure in high-quality TRISO fuel. In general, changes in coating morphology were found to be dominated by the behavior of the buffer and inner pyrolytic carbon (IPyC), and infrequently observed SiC layer damage was usually related to cracks in the IPyC. Palladium attack of the SiC layer was relatively minor, except for the particles that released cesium during irradiation, where SiC corrosion was found adjacent to IPyC cracks. Palladium, silver, and uranium were found in the SiC layer of irradiated particles, and characterization

  7. Effects of irradiation at low temperature on V-4Cr-4Ti

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexander, D.J.; Snead, L.L.; Zinkle, S.J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)] [and others

    1996-10-01

    Irradiation at low temperatures (100 to 275{degrees}C) to 0.5 dpa causes significant embrittlement and changes in the subsequent room temperature tensile properties of V-4Cr-4Ti. The yield strength and microhardness at room temperature increase with increasing irradiation temperature. The tensile flow properties at room temperature show large increases in strength and a complete loss of work hardening capacity with no uniform ductility. Embrittlement, as measured by an increase in the ductile-to-brittle transition temperature, increases with increasing irradiation temperature, at least up to 275{degrees}C. This embrittlement is not due to pickup of O or other interstitial solutes during the irradiation.

  8. Low-Temperature and Long-Term Irradiation Testing of HANARO Instrumented Capsule

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choo, Kee Nam; Cho, Man Soon; Lee, Cheol Yong; Yang, Sung Woo; Shin, Yoontaek; Park, Sengjae; Kang, Young Hwan; Park, Sang Jun [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    In this paper, the low-temperature and long-term irradiation capsule technology developed for the irradiation testing of research reactor materials at HANARO are described. A new capsule and capsule system for long-term irradiation at low temperature was designed, fabricated, and irradiated for an evaluation of the neutron irradiation properties of the core materials (Graphite, Be, Zircaloy-4) of a research reactor for the National Project of 'Research Reactor Development'. Two capsules were first designed and fabricated to irradiate materials at low temperature (36-56 .deg .C) for a long cycle of 8 irradiation cycles at HANARO. The safety of the new irradiation capsule and capsule system was thoroughly evaluated through the out-pile and in-pile testing. The new capsule was successfully irradiated for up to 8 cycles at HANARO. HANARO instrumented irradiation capsules have been actively used for the irradiation of nuclear fuels and materials. Capsule technology was basically developed for irradiation testing under a commercial reactor operation environment. Most irradiation testing using capsules has been performed at specimen temperatures of 250-500 .deg. C within 4 reactor operation cycles (about 100 days) at HANARO. Recently, as a part of the research reactor development's project, irradiation testing of materials used as reflector materials in a research reactor such as graphite, beryllium, and zircaloy-4 was required up to 8 reactor operation cycles at low temperature (<100 .deg. C) of specimens.

  9. Irradiation performance of AGR-1 high temperature reactor fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demkowicz, Paul A., E-mail: paul.demkowicz@inl.gov [Idaho National Laboratory, PO Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415-6188 (United States); Hunn, John D. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, PO Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6093 (United States); Ploger, Scott A. [Idaho National Laboratory, PO Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415-6188 (United States); Morris, Robert N.; Baldwin, Charles A. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, PO Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6093 (United States); Harp, Jason M.; Winston, Philip L. [Idaho National Laboratory, PO Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415-6188 (United States); Gerczak, Tyler J. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, PO Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6093 (United States); Rooyen, Isabella J. van [Idaho National Laboratory, PO Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415-6188 (United States); Montgomery, Fred C.; Silva, Chinthaka M. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, PO Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6093 (United States)

    2016-09-15

    Highlights: • Post-irradiation examination was performed on AGR-1 coated particle fuel. • Cesium release from the particles was very low in the absence of failed SiC layers. • Silver release was often substantial, and varied considerably with temperature. • Buffer and IPyC layers were found to play a key role in TRISO coating behavior. • Fission products palladium and silver were found in the SiC layer of particles. - Abstract: The AGR-1 experiment contained 72 low-enriched uranium oxide/uranium carbide TRISO coated particle fuel compacts in six capsules irradiated to burnups of 11.2 to 19.6% FIMA, with zero TRISO coating failures detected during the irradiation. The irradiation performance of the fuel including the extent of fission product release and the evolution of kernel and coating microstructures was evaluated based on detailed examination of the irradiation capsules, the fuel compacts, and individual particles. Fractional release of {sup 110m}Ag from the fuel compacts was often significant, with capsule-average values ranging from 0.01 to 0.38. Analysis of silver release from individual compacts indicated that it was primarily dependent on fuel temperature history. Europium and strontium were released in small amounts through intact coatings, but were found to be significantly retained in the outer pyrocarbon and compact matrix. The capsule-average fractional release from the compacts was 1 × 10{sup −4} to 5 × 10{sup −4} for {sup 154}Eu and 8 × 10{sup −7} to 3 × 10{sup −5} for {sup 90}Sr. The average {sup 134}Cs fractional release from compacts was <3 × 10{sup −6} when all particles maintained intact SiC. An estimated four particles out of 2.98 × 10{sup 5} in the experiment experienced partial cesium release due to SiC failure during the irradiation, driving {sup 134}Cs fractional release in two capsules to approximately 10{sup −5}. Identification and characterization of these particles has provided unprecedented insight into

  10. High temperature deformation behavior, thermal stability and irradiation performance in Grade 92 steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsagabi, Sultan

    The 9Cr-2W ferritic-martensitic steel (i.e. Grade 92 steel) possesses excellent mechanical and thermophysical properties; therefore, it has been considered to suit more challenging applications where high temperature strength and creep-rupture properties are required. The high temperature deformation mechanism was investigated through a set of tensile testing at elevated temperatures. Hence, the threshold stress concept was applied to elucidate the operating high temperature deformation mechanism. It was identified as the high temperature climb of edge dislocations due to the particle-dislocation interactions and the appropriate constitutive equation was developed. In addition, the microstructural evolution at room and elevated temperatures was investigated. For instance, the microstructural evolution under loading was more pronounced and carbide precipitation showed more coarsening tendency. The growth of these carbide precipitates, by removing W and Mo from matrix, significantly deteriorates the solid solution strengthening. The MX type carbonitrides exhibited better coarsening resistance. To better understand the thermal microstructural stability, long tempering schedules up to 1000 hours was conducted at 560, 660 and 760°C after normalizing the steel. Still, the coarsening rate of M23C 6 carbides was higher than the MX-type particles. Moreover, the Laves phase particles were detected after tempering the steel for long periods before they dissolve back into the matrix at high temperature (i.e. 720°C). The influence of the tempering temperature and time was studied for Grade 92 steel via Hollomon-Jaffe parameter. Finally, the irradiation performance of Grade 92 steel was evaluated to examine the feasibility of its eventual reactor use. To that end, Grade 92 steel was irradiated with iron (Fe2+) ions to 10, 50 and 100 dpa at 30 and 500°C. Overall, the irradiated samples showed some irradiation-induced hardening which was more noticeable at 30°C. Additionally

  11. Electric field and temperature effects in irradiated MOSFETs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silveira, M. A. G., E-mail: marcilei@fei.edu.br; Santos, R. B. B.; Leite, F. G.; Araújo, N. E.; Cirne, K. H.; Melo, M. A. A.; Rallo, A. [Centro Universitário da FEI, São Bernardo do Campo, S.P. (Brazil); Aguiar, Vitor A. P.; Aguirre, F.; Macchione, E. L. A.; Added, N.; Medina, N. H. [Instituto de Física da USP, São Paulo, S.P. (Brazil)

    2016-07-07

    Electronic devices exposed to ionizing radiation exhibit degradation on their electrical characteristics, which may compromise the functionality of the device. Understanding the physical phenomena responsible for radiation damage, which may be specific to a particular technology, it is of extreme importance to develop methods for testing and recovering the devices. The aim of this work is to check the influence of thermal annealing processes and electric field applied during irradiation of Metal Oxide Semiconductor Field Effect Transistors (MOSFET) in total ionizing dose experiments analyzing the changes in the electrical parameters in these devices.

  12. Low Temperature Irradiation Embrittlement of Reactor Pressure Vessel Steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jy-An John [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-08-01

    The embrittlement trend curve development project for HFIR reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels was carried out with three major tasks. Which are (1) data collection to match that used in HFIR steel embrittlement trend published in 1994 Journal Nuclear Material by Remec et. al, (2) new embrittlement data of A212B steel that are not included in earlier HFIR RPV trend curve, and (3) the adjustment of nil-ductility-transition temperature (NDTT) shift data with the consideration of the irradiation temperature effect. An updated HFIR RPV steel embrittlement trend curve was developed, as described below. NDTT( C) = 23.85 log(x) + 203.3 log (x) + 434.7, with 2- uncertainty of 34.6 C, where parameter x is referred to total dpa. The developed update HFIR RPV embrittlement trend curve has higher embrittlement rate compared to that of the trend curve developed in 1994.

  13. Temperature dependence of fracture toughness in HT9 steel neutron-irradiated up to 145 dpa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baek, Jong-Hyuk [KAERI; Byun, Thak Sang [ORNL; Maloy, S [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Toloczko, M [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)

    2014-01-01

    The temperature dependence of fracture toughness in HT9 steel irradiated to high doses was investigated using miniature three-point bend (TPB) fracture specimens. These specimens were from the ACO-3 fuel duct wall of the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF), in which irradiation doses were in the range of 3.2 144.8 dpa and irradiation temperatures in the range of 380.4 502.6 oC. A miniature specimen reuse technique has been established for this investigation: the specimens used were the tested halves of miniature Charpy impact specimens (~13 3 4 mm) with diamond-saw cut in the middle. The fatigue precracking for specimens and fracture resistance (J-R) tests were carried out in a MTS servo-hydraulic testing machine with a vacuum furnace following the standard procedure described in the ASTM Standard E 1820-09. For each of five irradiated and one archive conditions, 7 to 9 J-R tests were performed at selected temperatures ranging from 22 C to 600 C. The fracture toughness of the irradiated HT9 steel was strongly dependent on irradiation temperatures rather than irradiation dose. When the irradiation temperature was below about 430 C, the fracture toughness of irradiated HT9 increased with test temperature, reached an upper shelf of 180 200 MPa m at 350 450 C and then decreased with test temperature. When the irradiation temperature 430 C, the fracture toughness was nearly unchanged until about 450 C and decreased with test temperature in higher temperature range. Similar test temperature dependence was observed for the archive material although the highest toughness values are lower after irradiation. Ductile stable crack growth occurred except for a few cases where both the irradiation temperature and test temperature are relatively low.

  14. Improving the antioxidant activity of medicinal and aromatic plants by applying electron beam irradiation

    OpenAIRE

    Pereira, Eliana; Barreira, João C.M.; Barros, Lillian; Antonio, Amilcar L.; Bento, Albino; Ferreira, Isabel C.F.R.

    2015-01-01

    Irradiation techniques have been applied for decontamination of aromatic and medicinal herbs. Their popularity in the pharmaceutical and food industry requires specific criteria in terms of microbiological safety [1, 2]. In this study the objective was to evaluate the effects of different doses of electron beam (EB) irradiation (0 kGy – control, 1 kGy and 10 kGy) on the antioxidant activity of Aloysia citrodora P., Melissa officinalis L., Melittis melissophyllum L. and Mentha piperita L.. The...

  15. Significant stress reduction of cBN layers upon ion irradiation at elevated temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weidner, Stefan; Geburt, Sebastian; Ronning, Carsten [Institut fuer Festkoerperphysik, Friedrich-Schiller-Universitaet Jena (Germany); Ye, Jian; Ulrich, Sven [Institut fuer Materialforschung, Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    Cubic boron nitride (cBN) is the hardest materials beneath diamond and exceeds the properties in terms of chemical resistivity, making it a promising candidate for ultra-hard coatings in extreme environments. Due to the ion assisted growth process, the cBN layers suffer from an intrinsic stress, which limits the layer thickness and therefore possible industrial applications. To investigate new approaches for the synthesis of low stress cBN layers, we applied ion irradiation with various ion species (O,Ne,Kr) and at different temperatures between 300 to 600 K to cBN:O layers. The intrinsic stress and the cBN content were monitored by profilometer and FTIR after each implantation step. As expected, ion irradiation at room temperature leads to a stress reduction with constant cBN content upon an ion induced damage up to 0.5 dpa, but a severe damage is introduced to the layer above this value resulting into a phase transition to hBN. However, irradiation at elevated temperatures results in a significant stress reduction without decrease of the cBN quality even up to 4.3 dpa.

  16. A comprehensive analysis of irradiated silicon detectors at cryogenic temperatures

    CERN Document Server

    Santocchia, A; Hall, G; MacEvoy, B; Moscatelli, F; Passeri, D; Pignatel, Giogrio Umberto

    2003-01-01

    The effect of particle irradiation on high-resistivity silicon detectors has been extensively studied with the goal of engineering devices able to survive the very challenging radiation environment at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The main aspect under investigation has been the changes observed in detector effective doping concentration (N/sub eff/). We have previously proposed a mechanism to explain the evolution of N/sub eff/, whereby charge is exchanged directly between closely-spaced defect centres in the dense terminal clusters formed by hadron irradiation. This model has been implemented in both a commercial finite-element device simulator (ISE-TCAD) and a purpose-built simulation of interdefect charge exchange. To control the risk of breakdown due to the high leakage currents foreseen during ten years of LHC operation, silicon detectors will be operated below room temperature (around -10 degrees C). This, and more general current interest in the field of cryogenic operation, has led us to inve...

  17. Method for analyzing passive silicon carbide thermometry with a continuous dilatometer to determine irradiation temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbell, Anne A., E-mail: campbellaa@ornl.gov [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Porter, Wallace D.; Katoh, Yutai [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Snead, Lance L. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States)

    2016-03-01

    Highlights: • Annealing of SiC via continuous dilatometry to determine irradiation temperature. • Wrote a program to analyze dilatometry results to determine irradiation temperature. • Dilatometry results are consistent with results from a historical technique. • Computer program was written in an open-source language and is available for others. - Abstract: Silicon carbide is used as a passive post-irradiation temperature monitor because the irradiation defects will anneal out above the irradiation temperature. The irradiation temperature is determined by measuring a property change after isochronal annealing, i.e., lattice spacing, dimensions, electrical resistivity, thermal diffusivity, or bulk density. However, such methods are time-consuming since the steps involved must be performed in a serial manner. This work presents the use of thermal expansion from continuous dilatometry to calculate the SiC irradiation temperature, which is an automated process requiring minimal setup time. Analysis software was written that performs the calculations to obtain the irradiation temperature and removes possible user-introduced error while standardizing the analysis. This method has been compared to an electrical resistivity and isochronal annealing investigation, and the results revealed agreement of the calculated temperatures. These results show that dilatometry is a reliable and less time-intensive process for determining irradiation temperature from passive SiC thermometry.

  18. Design of matrix irradiation system for external tissue phototherapy with temperature control

    Science.gov (United States)

    López S., F. Yonadab; Stolik Isakina, Suren; de La Rosa Vázquez, José Manuel

    2013-11-01

    This paper presents the design and development of a matrix irradiation system for studies and application of dermatological phototherapies with temperature control. The developed system has a power control to irradiate the target tissue with an adequate power density. Also, the irradiation time it is automated. Temperature infrared sensor is used in the irradiated sample to control the temperature. The temperature control allows the study of photodynamic therapy effects in synergy with the thermotherapy effects in the treatment of different diseases in external tissue.

  19. Post irradiation characterization of beryllium and beryllides after high temperature irradiation up to 3000 appm helium production in HIDOBE-01

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fedorov, A.V., E-mail: fedorov@nrg.eu [Nuclear Research and Consultancy Group, Westerduinweg 3, Postbus 25, Petten, 1755 ZG (Netherlands); Til, S. van; Stijkel, M.P. [Nuclear Research and Consultancy Group, Westerduinweg 3, Postbus 25, Petten, 1755 ZG (Netherlands); Nakamichi, M. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Rokkasho (Japan); Zmitko, M. [The European Joint Undertaking for ITER and the Development of Fusion Energy, c/ Josep Pla, n° 2, Torres Diagonal Litoral, Edificio B3, Barcelona 08019 (Spain)

    2016-01-15

    Titanium beryllides are considered as advanced candidate material for neutron multiplier for the helium cooled pebble bed (HCPB) and/or the water cooled ceramic breeder (WCCB) breeder blankets. In the HIDOBE-01 (HIgh DOse irradiation of BEryllium) experiment, beryllium and beryllide pellets with 5 at% and 7 at% Ti are irradiated at four different target temperatures (T{sub irr}): 425 °C, 525 °C, 650 °C and 750 °C up to the dose corresponding to 3000 appm He production in beryllium. The pellets were supplied by JAEA. During post irradiation examinations the critical properties of volumetric swelling and tritium retention were studied. Both titanium beryllide grades show significantly less swelling than the beryllium grade, with the difference increasing with the irradiation temperature. The irradiation induced swelling was studied by using direct dimensions. Both beryllide grades showed much less swelling as compare to the reference beryllium grade. Densities of the grades were studied by Archimedean immersion and by He-pycnometry, giving indications of porosity formation. While both beryllide grades show no significant reduction in density at all irradiation temperatures, the beryllium density falls steeply at higher T{sub irr}. Finally, the tritium release and retention were studied by temperature programmed desorption (TPD). Beryllium shows the same strong tritium retention as earlier observed in studies on beryllium pebbles, while the tritium inventory of the beryllides is significantly less, already at the lowest T{sub irr} of 425 °C.

  20. Small Specimen Data from a High Temperature HFIR Irradiation Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burchell, Timothy D [ORNL; McDuffee, Joel Lee [ORNL; Thoms, Kenneth R [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    The HTV capsule is a High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) target-rod capsule designed to operate at very high temperatures. The graphite containing section of the capsule (in core) is approximately 18 inches (457.2 mm) long and is separated into eight temperature zones. The specimen diameters within each zone are set to achieve the desired gas gap and hence design temperature (900 C, 1200 C or 1500 C). The capsule has five zones containing 0.400 inch (10.16 mm) diameter specimens, two zones containing 0.350 inch (8.89 mm) diameter specimens and one zone containing 0.300 inch (7.62 mm) diameter specimens. The zones have been distributed within the experiment to optimize the gamma heating from the HFIR core as well as minimize the axial heat flow in the capsule. Consequently, there are two 900 C zones, three 1200 C zones, and three 1500 C zones within the HTV capsule. Each zone contains nine specimens 0.210 0.002 inches (5.334 mm) in length. The capsule will be irradiated to a peak dose of 3.17 displacements per atom. The HTV specimens include samples of the following graphite grades: SGL Carbon s NBG-17 and NBG-18, GrafTech s PCEA, Toyo Tanso s IG-110, Mersen s 2114 and the reference grade H-451 (SGL Carbon). As part of the pre-irradiation program the specimens were characterized using ASTM Standards C559 for bulk density, and ASTM C769 for approximate Young s modulus from the sonic velocity. The probe frequency used for the determination of time of flight of the ultrasonic signal was 2.25 MHz. Marked volume (specimen diameter) effects were noted for both bulk density (increased with increasing specimen volume or diameter) and Dynamic Young s modulus (decreased with increasing specimen volume or diameter). These trends are extended by adding the property vs. diameter data for unirradiated AGC-1 creep specimens (nominally 12.5 mm-diameter x 25.4 mm-length). The relatively large reduction in Dynamic Young s Modulus was surprising given the trend for increasing density

  1. Temperature dependence of ion irradiation induced amorphization of zirconolite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, K. L.; Blackford, M. G.; Lumpkin, G. R.; Zaluzec, N. J.

    1999-12-22

    Zirconolite is one of the major host phases for actinides in various wasteforms for immobilizing high level radioactive waste (HLW). Over time, zirconolite's crystalline matrix is damaged by {alpha}-particles and energetic recoil nuclei recoil resulting from {alpha}-decay events. The cumulative damage caused by these particles results in amorphization. Data from natural zirconolites suggest that radiation damage anneals over geologic time and is dependant on the thermal history of the material. Proposed HLW containment strategies rely on both a suitable wasteform and geologic isolation. Depending on the waste loading, depth of burial, and the repository-specific geothermal gradient, burial could result in a wasteform being exposed to temperatures of between 100--450 C. Consequently, it is important to assess the effect of temperature on radiation damage in synthetic zirconolite. Zirconolite containing wasteforms are likely to be hot pressed at or below 1,473 K (1,200 C) and/or sintered at or below 1,623 K (1,350 C). Zirconolite fabricated at temperatures below 1,523 K (1,250 C) contains many stacking faults. As there have been various attempts to link radiation resistance to structure, the authors decided it was also pertinent to assess the role of stacking faults in radiation resistance. In this study, they simulate {alpha}-decay damage in two zirconolite samples by irradiating them with 1.5 MeV Kr{sup +} ions using the High Voltage Electron Microscope-Tandem User Facility (HTUF) at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and measure the critical dose for amorphization (D{sub c}) at several temperatures between 20 and 773 K. One of the samples has a high degree of crystallographic perfection, the other contains many stacking faults on the unit cell scale. Previous authors proposed a model for estimating the activation energy of self annealing in zirconolite and for predicting the critical dose for amorphization at any temperature. The authors discuss their results

  2. Cross-linking of polytetrafluoroethylene during room-temperature irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pugmire, David L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wetteland, Chris J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Duncan, Wanda S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lakis, Rollin E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Schwartz, Daniel S [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    Exposure of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) to {alpha}-radiation was investigated to detennine the physical and chemical effects, as well as to compare and contrast the damage mechanisms with other radiation types ({beta}, {gamma}, or thermal neutron). A number of techniques were used to investigate the chemical and physical changes in PTFE after exposure to {alpha}-radiation. These techniques include: Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and fluorescence spectroscopy. Similar to other radiation types at low doses, the primary damage mechanism for the exposure of PTFE to {alpha}-radiation appears to be chain scission. Increased doses result in a change-over of the damage mechanism to cross-linking. This result is not observed for any radiation type other than {alpha} when irradiation is performed at room temperature. Finally, at high doses, PTFE undergoes mass-loss (via smallfluorocarbon species evolution) and defluorination. The amount and type of damage versus sample depth was also investigated. Other types of radiation yield damage at depths on the order of mm to cm into PTFE due to low linear energy transfer (LET) and the correspondingly large penetration depths. By contrast, the {alpha}-radiation employed in this study was shown to only induce damage to a depth of approximately 26 {mu}m, except at very high doses.

  3. Temperature changes on the root surfaces of mandibular incisors after an 810-nm high-intensity intracanal diode laser irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Fonseca Alvarez, Andrea; Moura-Netto, Cacio; Daliberto Frugoli, Alexandre; Fernando, Casemiro; Correa Aranha, Ana Cecilia; Davidowicz, Harry

    2012-01-01

    Temperature changes caused by laser irradiation can promote damage to the surrounding dental tissues. In this study, we evaluated the temperature changes of recently extracted human mandibular incisors during intracanal irradiation with an 810-nm diode laser at different settings. Fifty mandibular incisors were enlarged up to an apical size of ISO No. 40 file. After the final rinse with 17% ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid, 0.2% lauryl sodium sulfate biologic detergent, and sterile water, samples were irradiated with circular movements from apex to crown through five different settings of output power (1.5, 2.0, 2.5, 3.0, and 3.5 W) in continuous mode. The temperature changes were measured on both sides of the apical and middle root thirds using two thermopar devices. A temperature increase of 7 °C was considered acceptable as a safe threshold when applying the diode laser. Results: The results showed that only 3.5-W output power increased the outer surface temperature above the critical value. Conclusion: The recommended output power can be stipulated as equal to or less than 3 W to avoid overheating during diode laser irradiation on thin dentin walls.

  4. Positive bias temperature instability of irradiated n-channel thin film transistors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jelenković, Emil V. [Department of Industrial and System Engineering, State Key Laboratory of Ultra-precision Machining Technology, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong (China); Kovačević, Milan S., E-mail: kovac@kg.ac.rs [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University of Kragujevac, Kragujevac (Serbia); Stupar, Dragan Z. [Faculty of Technical Sciences, University of Novi Sad, Novi Sad (Serbia); Jha, Shrawan [Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College London, South Kensington, London SW72AZ (United Kingdom); Bajić, Jovan S. [Faculty of Technical Sciences, University of Novi Sad, Novi Sad (Serbia); Tong, K.Y.

    2014-04-01

    Differently processed thin film transistors (TFTs) were exposed to gamma irradiation to the total dose of 1200 Gy under positive gate bias and 2500 Gy without electrical bias during radiation. Post-irradiation stability was evaluated by positive bias temperature (PBT) test in the temperature range between 100 and 150 °C and compared to the positive bias temperature test instability (PBTI) of non-irradiated TFTs. It was found that post-irradiation PBTI is affected by the fabrication conditions of TFTs and the level of damage caused by irradiation. - Highlights: • Electrical stability under positive bias temperature (PBT) stress of gamma-ray irradiated and non-irradiated n-channel thin film transistors (TFTs) are investigated. • Total gamma-ray dose is in the range from 1200 to 2500 Gy and PBT stress at 100, 125 and °C are used in the course of the investigation. • Irradiated TFTs showed greater electrical PBT instability and this instability depends on the processing of TFTs. • A larger radiation induced damage in gate oxide results in greater electrical PBT instability of TFTs.

  5. Electron-trapping probability in natural dosemeters as a function of irradiation temperature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wallinga, J.; Murray, A.S.; Wintle, A.G.

    2002-01-01

    The electron-trapping probability in OSL traps as a function of irradiation temperature is investigated for sedimentary quartz and feldspar. A dependency was found for both minerals; this phenomenon could give rise to errors in dose estimation when the irradiation temperature used in laboratory...... procedures is different from that in the natural environment. No evidence was found for the existence of shallow trap saturation effects that Could give rise to a dose-rate dependency of electron trapping....

  6. Effect of irradiation temperature in PWR RPV materials and its inclusion in semi-mechanistic model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Debarberis, L. [Joint Research Centre of the European Commission, Institute for Energy, P.O. Box 2, 1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands); Acosta, B. [Joint Research Centre of the European Commission, Institute for Energy, P.O. Box 2, 1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands)]. E-mail: beatriz.acosta-iborra@jrc.nl; Zeman, A. [Joint Research Centre of the European Commission, Institute for Energy, P.O. Box 2, 1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands); Sevini, F. [Joint Research Centre of the European Commission, Institute for Energy, P.O. Box 2, 1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands); Ballesteros, A. [Tecnatom, Avd. Montes de Oca 1, San Sebasitan de los Reyes, E-28709 Madrid (Spain); Kryukov, A. [Russian Research Centre Kurchatov Institute, Kurchatov Square 1, 123182 Moscow (Russian Federation); Gillemot, F. [AEKI Atomic Research Institute, Konkoly Thege M. ut 29-33, 1121 Budapest (Hungary); Brumovsky, M. [NRI, Nuclear Research Institute, Husinec, Rez 130, 25068 Rez (Czech Republic)

    2005-09-15

    The irradiation temperature is a very important parameter in radiation damage kinetics. In this article the challenge of including temperature into a general semi-mechanistic model for radiation embrittlement is presented. In this manner the model allows data obtained at different temperatures, both in surveillance programmes and in research reactors, to be understood.

  7. In Situ Irradiation and Measurement of Triple Junction Solar Cells at Low Intensity, Low Temperature (LILT) Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, R.D.; Imaizumi, M.; Walters, R.J.; Lorentzen, J.R.; Messenger, S.R.; Tischler, J.G.; Ohshima, T.; Sato, S.; Sharps, P.R.; Fatemi, N.S.

    2008-01-01

    The performance of triple junction InGaP/(In)GaAs/Ge space solar cells was studied following high energy electron irradiation at low temperature. Cell characterization was carried out in situ at the irradiation temperature while using low intensity illumination, and, as such, these conditions reflect those found for deep space, solar powered missions that are far from the sun. Cell characterization consisted of I-V measurements and quantum efficiency measurements. The low temperature irradiations caused substantial degradation that differs in some ways from that seen after room temperature irradiations. The short circuit current degrades more at low temperature while the open circuit voltage degrades more at room temperature. A room temperature anneal after the low temperature irradiation produced a substantial recovery in the degradation. Following irradiation at both temperatures and an extended room temperature anneal, quantum efficiency measurement suggests that the bulk of the remaining damage is in the (In)GaAs sub-cell

  8. Development of a Low Temperature Irradiation Capsule for Research Reactor Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choo, Kee Nam; Cho, Man Soon; Lee, Cheol Yong; Yang, Sung Woo; Shin, Yoon Taek; Park, Seng Jae; Kang, Suk Hoon; Kang, Young Hwan; Park, Sang Jun [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-07-01

    A new capsule design was prepared and tested at HANARO for a neutron irradiation of core materials of research reactors as a part of the research reactor development project. Irradiation testing of the materials including graphite, beryllium, and zircaloy-4 that are supposed to be used as core materials in research reactors was required for irradiation at up to 8 reactor operation cycles at low temperature (<100 .deg. C). Therefore, three instrumented capsules were designed and fabricated for an evaluation of the neutron irradiation properties of the core materials (Graphite, Be, Zircaloy-4) of research reactors. The capsules were first designed and fabricated to irradiate materials at low temperature (<100 .deg. C) for a long cycle of 8 irradiation cycles at HANARO. Therefore, the safety of the new designed capsule should be fully checked before irradiation testing. Out-pile performance and endurance testing before HANARO irradiation testing was performed using a capsule under a 110% condition of a reactor coolant flow amount. The structural integrity of the capsule was analyzed in terms of a vibration-induced fatigue cracking of a rod tip of the capsule that is suspected to be the most vulnerable part of a capsule. Another two capsules were irradiated at HANARO for 4 cycles, and one capsule was transferred to a hot cell to examine the integrity of the rod tip of the capsule. After confirming the soundness of the 4 cycle-irradiated capsule, the remaining capsule was irradiated at up to 8 cycles at HANARO. Based on the structural integrity analysis of the capsule, an improved capsule design will be suggested for a longer irradiation test at HANARO.

  9. Iron salts in solid state and in frozen solutions as dosimeters for low irradiation temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez, T. [Facultad de Quimica UNAM, Ciudad Universitaria, D.F. Mexico (Mexico); Lartigue, J. [Facultad de Quimica UNAM, Ciudad Universitaria, D.F. Mexico (Mexico); Ramos-Bernal, S. [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, UNAM, A.P. 70-543 C.P.4510, Ciudad Universitaria, D.F. Mexico (Mexico); Ramos, A. [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, UNAM, A.P. 70-543 C.P.4510, Ciudad Universitaria, D.F. Mexico (Mexico); Mosqueira, G.F. [Direccion General de Divulgacion de la Ciencia de la UNAM, A.P. 70-487, C:P, D.F. Mexico 04510 (Mexico); Negron-Mendoza, A. [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, UNAM, A.P. 70-543 C.P.4510, Ciudad Universitaria, D.F. Mexico (Mexico)]. E-mail: negron@nuclecu.unam.mx

    2005-12-01

    The aim of this work is to study the irradiation of iron salts in solid state (heptahydrated ferrous sulfate) and in frozen acid solutions. The study is focused on finding their possible use as dosimeters for low temperature irradiations and high doses. The analysis of the samples was made by UV-visible and Moessbauer spectroscopies. The output signal was linear from 0 to 10 MGy for the solid samples, and 0-600 Gy for the frozen solutions. The obtained data is reproducible and easy to handle. For these reasons, heptahydrate iron sulfate is a suitable dosimeter for low temperature and high irradiation doses, in solid state, and in frozen solution.

  10. The high-dose and high-temperature monitors of reactor irradiation based on insulators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.A. Stepanov

    2015-10-01

    It has been experimentally shown that the use of Al2O3 single crystals and BN ceramics provides means of monitoring the temperature of irradiation from 370 to 1900 K. The temperature is derived from measurements of the optical absorption or X-ray diffraction line shifts after post-radiation annealing of the monitors. We discuss the applicability of (a the optical absorption and F-center luminescence spectroscopies of irradiated Al2O3 single crystals for gamma dose evaluation and (b the isotopic analysis of irradiated BN ceramics for neutron dose evaluation.

  11. Should inhomogeneity corrections be applied during treatment planning of tangential breast irradiation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mijnheer, B J; Heukelom, S; Lanson, J H; van Battum, L J; van Bree, N A; van Tienhoven, G

    1991-12-01

    Due to the inclusion of lung tissue in the treatment volume, some parts of the breast will get a higher dose during tangential breast irradiation because of the lower lung density. Data on the accuracy of dose calculation algorithms, investigated by phantom measurements, determinations of the geometry and density of the actual lung in the patient and the results of in vivo dose measurements, are presented. From this information it can be concluded that a lung correction varying between about 3% and 7% is needed but its magnitude is slightly overpredicted in a number of commercial treatment planning systems. Because this increase in dose is already in a high dose region, it is recommended that inhomogeneity corrections should be applied during tangential breast irradiation.

  12. The dependence of thermoluminescence sensitivity upon the temperature of irradiation in meteorites and in terrestrial apatites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durrani, S.A.; Al-Khalifa, I.J.M. (Birmingham Univ. (UK). School of Physics and Space Research)

    1990-01-01

    Measurements are reported on the TL sensitivity (i.e. TL glow output per unit {gamma} ray test dose) of meteoritic specimens as well as terrestrial fluor- and chlor-apatites, as a function of irradiation temperature (T{sub irr}). The irradiation temperatures ranged from liquid nitrogen to room temperature (77 - 293 K). A kilocurie {sup 60}Co {gamma} ray source was used to deliver test doses of 400 Gy (40 krad) and 40 (4 krad) to the various samples. A strong dependence of the TL sensitivity upon the temperature of irradiation was noted in the case of Kirin meteorite: its TL sensitivity (for the 493 K readout peak) decreased by a factor of {similar to} 2 when T{sub irr} rose from liquid nitrogen (77 K) to dry ice in acetone (197 K) temperature, in the case of both 400 Gy and 40 Gy {gamma} ray doses. In the case of the Antarctic meteorite specimen (ALHA 77182.13), there was a smaller effect, viz. a fall of {similar to} 14% in the TL output corresponding to dry ice and higher irradiating temperatures as compared to the 77 K irradiation. For chlorapatite, the TL sensitivity decreased monotonically with increasing temperature for both the 563 K and the 448 K glow peaks. For the fluorapatite, the effect of reduced response was observed only between -17{sup 0}C (256 K) and room temperature (293 K). Both the theoretical and the practical implications of these observations are discussed. (author).

  13. Paradoxical effects of temperature and solar irradiance on the photodegradation state of killed phytoplankton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amiraux, Rémi; Jeanthon, Christian; Vaultier, Frédéric; Rontani, Jean-François

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this paper was to study the effects of temperature and irradiance on the photodegradation state of killed phytoplankton cells. For this purpose, killed cells of the diatom Chaetoceros neogracilis RCC2022 were irradiated (photosynthetically active radiation) at 36 and 446 J · s(-1)  · m(-2) (for the same cumulative dose of irradiation energy) and at two temperatures (7°C and 17°C). Analyses of specific lipid tracers (fatty acids and sterols) revealed that low temperatures and irradiances increased photooxidative damages of monounsaturated lipids (i.e., palmitoleic acid, cholesterol and campesterol). The high efficiency of type II photosensitized degradation processes was attributed to: (i) the relative preservation of the sensitizer (chlorophyll) at low irradiances allowing a longer production of singlet oxygen and (ii) the slow diffusion rate of singlet oxygen through membranes at low temperatures inducing more damages. Conversely, high temperatures and irradiances induced (i) a rapid degradation of the photosensitizer and a loss of singlet oxygen by diffusion outside the membranes (limiting type II photosensitized oxidation), and (ii) intense autoxidation processes degrading unsaturated cell lipids and oxidation products used as photodegradation tracers. Our results may explain the paradoxical relationship observed in situ between latitude and photodegradation state of phytoplankton cells. © 2016 Phycological Society of America.

  14. Simulation of temperature effect on microalgae culture in a tubular photo bioreactor for local solar irradiance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahriar, M.; Deb, Ujjwal Kumar; Rahman, Kazi Afzalur

    2017-06-01

    Microalgae based biofuel is now an emerging source of renewable energy alternative to the fossil fuel. This paper aims to present computational model of microalgae culture taking effect of solar irradiance and corresponding temperature in a photo bioreactor (PBR). As microalgae is a photosynthetic microorganism, so irradiance of sunlight is one of the important limiting factors for the proper growth of microalgae cells as temperature is associated with it. We consider the transient behaviour of temperature inside the photo bioreactor for a microalgae culture. The optimum range of temperature for outdoor cultivation of microalgae is about 16-35°c and out of this range the cell growth inhibits. Many correlations have already been established to investigate the heat transfer phenomena inside a tubular PBR. However, none of them are validated yet numerically by using a user defined function in a simulated model. A horizontal tubular PBR length 20.5m with radius 0.05m has taken account to investigate the temperature effect for the growth of microalgae cell. As the solar irradiance varies at any geographic latitude for a year so an empirical relation is established between local solar irradiance and temperature to simulate the effect. From our simulation, we observed that the growth of microalgae has a significant effect of temperature and the solar irradiance of our locality is suitable for the culture of microalgae.

  15. Influence of the irradiation temperature on the surface structure and physical/chemical properties of Ar ion-irradiated bulk metallic glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menéndez, E., E-mail: Enric.MenendezDalmau@fys.kuleuven.be [KU Leuven, Instituut voor Kern-en Stralingsfysica, Celestijnenlaan 200 D, 3001 Leuven (Belgium); Hynowska, A.; Fornell, J.; Suriñach, S. [Departament de Física, Facultat de Ciències, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, E-08193 Bellaterra (Spain); Montserrat, J. [Institut de Microelectrònica de Barcelona (IMB-CNM), CSIC, Campus Universitat Autònoma Barcelona, E-08193 Bellaterra (Spain); Temst, K.; Vantomme, A. [KU Leuven, Instituut voor Kern-en Stralingsfysica, Celestijnenlaan 200 D, 3001 Leuven (Belgium); Baró, M.D. [Departament de Física, Facultat de Ciències, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, E-08193 Bellaterra (Spain); García-Lecina, E. [Surfaces Division, IK4-CIDETEC, Parque Tecnológico de San Sebastián, E-20009 Donostia (Spain); Pellicer, E., E-mail: Eva.Pellicer@uab.cat [Departament de Física, Facultat de Ciències, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, E-08193 Bellaterra (Spain); Sort, J., E-mail: Jordi.Sort@uab.cat [Institució Catalana de Recerca i Estudis Avançats (ICREA) and Departament de Física, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, E-08193 Bellaterra (Spain)

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • Ion irradiation is performed on bulk metallic glasses at 300 K and close to T{sub g}. • Nanocrystallization is observed after high-temperature irradiation. • The mechanical properties are enhanced after the irradiation procedures. • Corrosion resistance is improved after irradiation close to T{sub g}. - Abstract: Surface treatments using multiple Ar ion irradiation processes with a maximum energy and fluence of 200 keV and 1 × 10{sup 16} ions/cm{sup 2}, respectively, have been performed on two different metallic glasses: Zr{sub 55}Cu{sub 28}Al{sub 10}Ni{sub 7} and Ti{sub 40}Zr{sub 10}Cu{sub 38}Pd{sub 12}. Analogous irradiation procedures have been carried out at room temperature (RT) and at T = 620 K (≈0.9 T{sub g}, where T{sub g} denotes the glass transition). The structure, mechanical behavior, wettability and corrosion resistance of the irradiated alloys have been compared with the properties of the as-cast and annealed (T = 620 K) non-irradiated specimens. While ion irradiation at RT does not significantly alter the amorphous structure of the alloys, ion irradiation close to T{sub g} promotes decomposition/nanocrystallization. Consequently, the hardness (H) and reduced Young’s modulus (E{sub r}) decrease after irradiation at RT but they both increase after irradiation at 620 K. While annealing close to T{sub g} increases the hydrophobicity of the samples, irradiation induces virtually no changes in the contact angle when comparing with the as-cast state. Concerning the corrosion resistance, although not much effect is found after irradiation at RT, an improvement is observed after irradiation at 620 K, particularly for the Ti-based alloy. These results are of practical interest in order to engineer appropriate surface treatments based on ion irradiation, aimed at specific functional applications of bulk metallic glasses.

  16. Displacement rate and temperature equivalence in stochastic cluster dynamics simulations of irradiated pure α-Fe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunn, Aaron [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, 87185 NM (United States); George W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, 30332 GA (United States); Muntifering, Brittany [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, 87185 NM (United States); Northwestern University, Chicago, 60208 IL (United States); Dingreville, Rémi; Hattar, Khalid [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, 87185 NM (United States); Capolungo, Laurent, E-mail: laurent@lanl.gov [George W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, 30332 GA (United States); Material Science and Technology Division, MST-8, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, 87545 NM (United States)

    2016-11-15

    Charged particle irradiation is a frequently used experimental tool to study damage accumulation in metals expected during neutron irradiation. Understanding the correspondence between displacement rate and temperature during such studies is one of several factors that must be taken into account in order to design experiments that produce equivalent damage accumulation to neutron damage conditions. In this study, spatially resolved stochastic cluster dynamics (SRSCD) is used to simulate damage evolution in α-Fe and find displacement rate/temperature pairs under ‘target’ and ‘proxy’ conditions for which the local distribution of vacancies and vacancy clusters is the same as a function of displacement damage. The SRSCD methodology is chosen for this study due to its computational efficiency and ability to simulate damage accumulation in spatially inhomogeneous materials such as thin films. Results are presented for Frenkel pair irradiation and displacement cascade damage in thin films and bulk α-Fe. Holding all other material and irradiation conditions constant, temperature adjustments are shown to successfully make up for changes in displacement rate such that defect concentrations and cluster sizes remain relatively constant. The methodology presented in this study allows for a first-order prediction of the temperature at which ion irradiation experiments (‘proxy’ conditions) should take place in order to approximate neutron irradiation (‘target’ conditions).

  17. Effects of irradiation at lower temperature on the microstructure of Cr-Mo-V-alloyed reactor pressure vessel steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grosse, M.; Boehmert, J.; Gilles, R. [Hahn-Meitner-Institut Berlin GmbH (Germany)

    1998-10-01

    The microstructural damage process due to neutron irradiation [1] proceeds in two stages: - formation of displacement cascades - evolution of the microstructure by defect reactions. Continuing our systematic investigation about the microstructural changes of Russian reactor pressure vessel steel due to neutron irradiation the microstructure of two laboratory heats of the VVER 440-type reactor pressure vessel steel after irradiation at 60 C was studied by small angle neutron scattering (SANS). 60 C-irradiation differently changes the irradiation-induced microstructure in comparison with irradiation at reactor operation temperature and can, thus, provide new insights into the mechanisms of the irradiation damage. (orig.)

  18. Time resolved temperature measurement of polymer surface irradiated by mid-IR free electron laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araki, Mitsunori; Chiba, Tomoyuki; Oyama, Takahiro; Imai, Takayuki; Tsukiyama, Koichi

    2017-08-01

    We have developed the time-resolved temperature measurement system by using a radiation thermometer FLIR SC620. Temporal temperature profiles of an acrylic resin surface by the irradiation of infrared free electron laser (FEL) pulse were recorded in an 8 ms resolution to measure an instantaneous temperature rise and decay profile. Under the single-shot condition, a peak temperature defined as the temperature jump from the ambient temperature was found to be proportional to the absorbance. Under the multi-shot condition, the temperature accumulation was found to reach a roughly constant value where the supply and release of the heat is balanced.

  19. Defect production in Ar irradiated graphene membranes under different initial applied strains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez-Asencio, J., E-mail: jesusmartinez@ua.es [Dept. Física Aplicada, Facultad de Ciencias, Fase II, Universidad de Alicante, Alicante E-036090 (Spain); Ruestes, C.J.; Bringa, E. [CONICET and Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad Nacional de Cuyo, Mendoza 5500 (Argentina); Caturla, M.J. [Dept. Física Aplicada, Facultad de Ciencias, Fase II, Universidad de Alicante, Alicante E-036090 (Spain)

    2017-02-15

    Highlights: • Defects in graphene membranes are formed due to 140 eV Ar ions irradiation using MD. • Different initial strains are applied, which influence the type and number of defects. • Mono-vacancies, di-vacancies and tri-vacancies production behaves linearly with dose. • The total number of defects under compression is slightly higher than under tension. - Abstract: Irradiation with low energy Ar ions of graphene membranes gives rise to changes in the mechanical properties of this material. These changes have been associated to the production of defects, mostly isolated vacancies. However, the initial state of the graphene membrane can also affect its mechanical response. Using molecular dynamics simulations we have studied defect production in graphene membranes irradiated with 140 eV Ar ions up to a dose of 0.075 × 10{sup 14} ions/cm{sup 2} and different initial strains, from −0.25% (compressive strain) to 0.25% (tensile strain). For all strains, the number of defects increases linearly with dose with a defect production of about 80% (80 defects every 100 ions). Defects are mostly single vacancies and di-vacancies, although some higher order clusters are also observed. Two different types of di-vacancies have been identified, the most common one being two vacancies at first nearest neighbours distance. Differences in the total number of defects with the applied strain are observed which is related to the production of a higher number of di-vacancies under compressive strain compared to tensile strain. We attribute this effect to the larger out-of-plane deformations of compressed samples that could favor the production of defects in closer proximity to others.

  20. Effect of temperature and α-irradiation on gas permeability for ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In the present study the polyethersulphone (PES) membranes of thickness (35 ± 2) m were prepared by solution cast method. The permeability of these membranes was calculated by varying the temperature and by irradiation of ions. For the variation of temperature, the gas permeation cell was dipped in a constant ...

  1. Effect of periodic temperature variations on the microstructure of neutron-irradiated metals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zinkle, S.J.; Hashimoto, N.; Hoelzer, D.T.

    2002-01-01

    Specimens of pure copper, a high purity austenitic stainless steel, and V–4Cr–4Ti were exposed to eight cycles of either constant temperature or periodic temperature variations during neutron irradiation in the High Flux Isotopes Reactor to a cumulative damage level of 4–5 displacements per atom....

  2. Damage behavior in helium-irradiated reduced-activation martensitic steels at elevated temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, Fengfeng [Key Laboratory of Artificial Micro- and Nano-Structures of Ministry of Education, Hubei Nuclear Solid Physics Key Laboratory and School of Physics and Technology, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Guo, Liping, E-mail: guolp@whu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Artificial Micro- and Nano-Structures of Ministry of Education, Hubei Nuclear Solid Physics Key Laboratory and School of Physics and Technology, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Chen, Jihong; Li, Tiecheng; Zheng, Zhongcheng [Key Laboratory of Artificial Micro- and Nano-Structures of Ministry of Education, Hubei Nuclear Solid Physics Key Laboratory and School of Physics and Technology, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Yao, Z. [Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Queen’s University, Kingston K7L 3N6, ON (Canada); Suo, Jinping [State Key Laboratory of Mould Technology, Institute of Materials Science and Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China)

    2014-12-15

    Dislocation loops induced by helium irradiation at elevated temperatures in reduced-activation martensitic steels were investigated using transmission electron microscopy. Steels were irradiated with 100 keV helium ions to 0.8 dpa between 300 K and 723 K. At irradiation temperatures T{sub irr} ⩽ 573 K, small defects with both Burger vectors b = 1/2〈1 1 1〉 and b = 〈1 0 0〉 were observed, while at T{sub irr} ⩾ 623 K, the microstructure was dominated by large convoluted interstitial dislocation loops with b = 〈1 0 0〉. Only small cavities were found in the steels irradiated at 723 K.

  3. Optical properties of CsI single crystals irradiated with neutrons at low temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okada, M. [Kyoto Univ., Kumatori, Osaka (Japan). Research Reactor Inst.; Nakagawa, M. [Faculty of Education, Kagawa Univ., Takamatsu, Kagawa (Japan); Atobe, K. [Faculty of Science, Naruto Univ. of Education, Naruto, Tokushima (Japan); Itatani, N.; Ozawa, K. [Horiba Ltd., Minamiku, Kyoto (Japan)

    1998-05-01

    Optical properties of the irradiation-induced-defects in neutron-irradiated CsI single crystals have been investigated. The nominally pure CsI crystals are irradiated by reactor fast neutrons (E>0.1 MeV) with a fluence of 1.4 x 10{sup 15} n/cm{sup 2} at 20 K and by {gamma}-rays from {sup 60}Co source to a dose of 1.5 x 10{sup 4} Gy at liquid nitrogen temperature (LNT). After the irradiations, isochronal annealings are performed to investigate the thermal behavior of the defects. The glow peaks of the thermoluminescence (TL) in each sample irradiated with neutrons at 20 K and with {gamma}-rays at LNT are observed at about 100, 160 and 220 K. In the neutron-irradiated samples at 20 K, the emission band at 338 nm is observed at LNT. It is supposed that this emission band occurs by an excitation of {gamma}-rays from {sup 134}Cs, which is radioactivated by thermal neutrons among the reactor radiations. It is confirmed that the temperature dependence of the 338 nm band is similar with that of the emission band due to the self-trapped exciton which is introduced into the non-irradiated samples illuminated by higher energy photons. (orig.) 13 refs.

  4. Implant Surface Temperature Changes during Er:YAG Laser Irradiation with Different Cooling Systems.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbas Monzavi

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Peri-implantitis is one of the most common reasons for implant failure. Decontamination of infected implant surfaces can be achieved effectively by laser irradiation; although the associated thermal rise may cause irreversible bone damage and lead to implant loss. Temperature increments of over 10ºC during laser application may suffice for irreversible bone damage.The purpose of this study was to evaluate the temperature increment of implant surface during Er:YAG laser irradiation with different cooling systems.Three implants were placed in a resected block of sheep mandible and irradiated with Er:YAG laser with 3 different cooling systems namely water and air spray, air spray alone and no water or air spray. Temperature changes of the implant surface were monitored during laser irradiation with a K-type thermocouple at the apical area of the fixture.In all 3 groups, the maximum temperature rise was lower than 10°C. Temperature changes were significantly different with different cooling systems used (P<0.001.Based on the results, no thermal damage was observed during implant surface decontamination by Er:YAG laser with and without refrigeration. Thus, Er:YAG laser irradiation can be a safe method for treatment of periimplantitis.

  5. An investigation of methods for neutron dose measurement in high temperature irradiation fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kosako, Toshisou; Sugiura, Nobuyuki [Tokyo Univ. (Japan); Kudo, Kazuhiko [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan)] [and others

    2000-10-01

    The Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) has been conducting the innovative basic research on high temperature since 1994, which is a series of high temperature irradiation studies using the High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR). 'The Task Group for Evaluation of Irradiation Dose under High Temperature Radiation' was founded in the HTTR Utilization Research Committee, which is the promoting body of the innovative basic research. The present report is a summary of investigation which has been made by the Task Group on the present status and subjects of research and development of neutron detectors in high temperature irradiation fields, in view of contributing to high temperature irradiation research using the HTTR. Detectors investigated here in the domestic survey are the following five kinds of in-core detectors: 1) small fission counter, 2) small fission chamber, 3) self-powered detector, 4) activation detector, and 5) optical fiber. In addition, the research and development status in Russia has been investigated. The present report will also be useful as nuclear instrumentation of high temperature gas-cooled reactors. (author)

  6. Calcipotriol ointment and cream or their vehicles applied immediately before irradiation inhibit ultraviolet B-induced erythema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Rie, M A; Di Nuzzo, S; Brands, S; Hansen, A B; Bos, J D

    2000-06-01

    Results of ultraviolet (UV) B phototherapy can be improved by the application of calcipotriol, but studies are needed to decide how the two treatments should be combined. We studied the effect of UVB after application of calcipotriol ointment (50 microg g-1) and calcipotriol cream (50 microg g-1) and determined the optimal time of application of calcipotriol when combined with UVB phototherapy (280-350 nm), in a single-blinded randomized vehicle-controlled study of 37 healthy adult volunteers. Calcipotriol ointment or cream was applied randomly on five areas on the back at different time intervals from UVB irradiation. One area was left untreated as the control. Application times were the evening before, the morning before, 2 h before, immediately before, and immediately after irradiation. UVB irradiation was administered by TL20W/12 fluorescent tube lamps at increasing doses (20, 25, 32, 40, 50 and 64 mJ cm-2) to six subunits of each test area. Clinical assessment was performed 24 h after UVB irradiation by a blinded investigator. Calcipotriol ointment and cream were applied in 19 and 18 subjects, respectively, and erythema was measured for each application time quantified. We found that erythemal reactions were significantly smaller when calcipotriol ointment or cream was applied immediately before irradiation compared with all other application times. To explain these findings, a vehicle control study was performed. No difference in erythema was seen between calcipotriol medication and the vehicle controls. Spectrophotometric analysis of the calcipotriol cream and ointment showed no UV absorbance in the UVB range. No signs of photosensitization were noted. In conclusion, the vehicles of the calcipotriol ointment and cream inhibit the induction of erythema by UVB irradiation if applied immediately before phototherapy. Consequently, calcipotriol ointment and cream should not be applied directly before UVB irradiation; however, they may be applied at any time up to

  7. [Design of a thermic detection system applied to chick embryonated eggs irradiated with infrared rays].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avila, R; Plivelic, T; Samar, M E; Benavídez, E

    1996-01-01

    Infrared radiations are widely used in medical therapeutics. It has been argued that the doses and the periods of time employed in experimental animals are higher than those used in clinic. Thus, we considered of interest to analyse aspects of dosimetry and thermic effects of infrared rays with current methods in medical practice, using the in ovo chick embryo as a model of easy control. To this end we designed a system to measure temperatures and their acquisitions and software for its handling. The system consists of: a) thermic points: thermocuples or termistores adaptable to the experimental requirements and calibrated with a greater precision within a range of ten degrees around the incubation temperature; b) acquirer circuit of thermic data (hardware): it generates a time base that varies with the thermic sensor. Software: the PC XT or AT detects changes in the time base by means of a programs' in a Turbo Pascal; c) storage and analysis of data allows, through a menu (expansibles) the scale selection, time of program data to be acquired, storage and recovery of the diskette information and graphic impression; d) chick's embryonated eggs. This system allows to measure temperature distribution in small physical spaces with little disturbance of the system to be measured in irradiated bodies, to analyse variations of the temperatures in time and to secure a greater confidence and automatism to obtain the required data.

  8. Dose dependence of irradiation hardening of neutron irradiated vanadium alloys by using temperature control rig in JMTR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ken-ichi Fukumoto

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available TEM observation and tensile test were examined for vanadium alloys irradiated in a temperature control rig in JMTR at 290°C with damage level ranged from 0.003 to 0.06dpa. With the increase of the neutron dose, irradiation hardening could be observed in all the vanadium alloys except for the V–5Nb alloy. In the case of pure vanadium, the relationship between irradiation hardening and neutron dose was described as Δσ ∝ (ϕt0.35-0.53. For V–5Cr alloy and V–4Cr–4Ti–0.1Si alloy, the dose dependence on irradiation hardening increase was shown as Δσ ∝ (ϕt0.8 and Δσ ∝ (ϕt0.8-1.0, respectively. From the TEM observation, the hardening source of radiation-induced defects was mainly determined to be dislocation loops for pure vanadium, loops with voids for V–5Cr and, loops and {100} precipitates for V–4Cr–4Ti–0.1Si and V–3Fe–4Ti–0.1Si alloys. From the strain rate dependence of 8% stress for V–4Cr–4Ti–0.1Si alloys tested at RT, the strain rate sensitivity, m=1/σ*(dσ/dln(dε/dt shows positive. Therefore, the dynamic interaction between interstitial impurities and dislocation is not strong in V–4Cr–4Ti alloys in the temperature range from RT to 290°C. A discrepancy of deformation mode of irradiated V–4Cr–4Ti–0.1Si alloys with 0.068dpa could be seen when the charpy impact test indicated the brittle behavior and the tensile test indicated the ductile behavior at room temperature. It can be explained by the difference of strain rate for the value of yield stress between tensile test and charpy test and the critical fracture stress.

  9. The effect of irradiation temperature on the quality improvement of Kimchi, Korean fermented vegetables, for its shelf stability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jin-Gyu [Team for Radiation Food Science and Biotechnology, Advanced Radiation Technology Institute, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Jeongeup 580-185 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Food and Biotechnology, Korea University, Chungnam 339-700 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jae-Hun; Park, Jae-Nam [Team for Radiation Food Science and Biotechnology, Advanced Radiation Technology Institute, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Jeongeup 580-185 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Young-Duk [CJ Food Research and Development, CJ Corp., Seoul 152-050 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Wang-Geun [Department of Application Science and Technology, Chosun University, Gwangju 501-759 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Ju-Woon [Team for Radiation Food Science and Biotechnology, Advanced Radiation Technology Institute, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Jeongeup 580-185 (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Han-Joon [Department of Food and Biotechnology, Korea University, Chungnam 339-700 (Korea, Republic of); Byun, Myung-Woo [Team for Radiation Food Science and Biotechnology, Advanced Radiation Technology Institute, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Jeongeup 580-185 (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: mwbyun@kaeri.re.kr

    2008-04-15

    The present study was conducted to evaluate the effect of irradiation temperature on the shelf stability and quality of Kimchi during storage at 35 deg. C for 30 days. Kimchi samples were N{sub 2}-packaged and heated at 60 deg. C and then gamma irradiated at 20 kGy under various temperatures (room temperature, ice, dry ice, and liquid nitrogen). In the results of microbial, pH, and acidity analysis, combination treatment of heating and irradiation was able to sterilize microbes in Kimchi regardless of irradiation temperature. When Kimchi was irradiated under frozen temperatures, especially dry ice, the softening of texture and the deterioration of sensory quality of Kimchi were reduced. Also, ESR signal intensities were weakened due to the decrease of irradiation dose and temperature.

  10. The effect of irradiation temperature on the quality improvement of Kimchi, Korean fermented vegetables, for its shelf stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jin-Gyu; Kim, Jae-Hun; Park, Jae-Nam; Kim, Young-Duk; Kim, Wang-Geun; Lee, Ju-Woon; Hwang, Han-Joon; Byun, Myung-Woo

    2008-04-01

    The present study was conducted to evaluate the effect of irradiation temperature on the shelf stability and quality of Kimchi during storage at 35 °C for 30 days. Kimchi samples were N 2-packaged and heated at 60 °C and then gamma irradiated at 20 kGy under various temperatures (room temperature, ice, dry ice, and liquid nitrogen). In the results of microbial, pH, and acidity analysis, combination treatment of heating and irradiation was able to sterilize microbes in Kimchi regardless of irradiation temperature. When Kimchi was irradiated under frozen temperatures, especially dry ice, the softening of texture and the deterioration of sensory quality of Kimchi were reduced. Also, ESR signal intensities were weakened due to the decrease of irradiation dose and temperature.

  11. Positron annihilation lifetime study of low temperature irradiated metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuramoto, Eiichi [Kyushu Univ., Kasuga, Fukuoka (Japan). Research Inst. for Applied Mechanics

    1997-11-01

    Positron annihilation lifetime measurements have been made for electron and neutron irradiated Fe, Fe-Cr, Fe-Cu, Fe-Si, Fe-16Cr-17Ni specimens, and isochronal annealing behaviors were obtained for these metals and alloys. It was found that vacancies start to migrate at about 200 K in Fe and form microvoids, but by the addition of small amount of alloying elements this behavior was changed depending on the alloying elements. Positron lifetime calculations were made to explain the experimental results using EAM (embedded atom method) type potential for the lattice relaxation and the atomic superposition method for the lifetime calculation. Fairly good agreements were obtained for the positron lifetime in a vacancy in Fe and other alloys. (author)

  12. Low temperature annealing effects on the performance of proton irradiated GaAs detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vanni, P.; Nava, F.; Canali, C.; Castaldini, A.; Cavallini, A.; Polenta, L.; Lanzieri, C

    1999-08-01

    Semi-insulating, undoped, Liquid Encapsulated Czochralski (SI-U LEC) GaAs detectors have been irradiated with 24 GeV/c protons at the fluence of 5.6x10{sup 13} p/cm{sup 2}. The detector charge collection efficiency (CCE), for both electrons and holes is remarkably reduced after irradiation while the reverse current increases. The effect of annealing the detectors at temperatures ranging from 220 deg. C to 280 deg. C has been seen to reduce the reverse current and to increase the electron CCE, while the recovery of the hole CCE is negligible in irradiated detectors. Deep electron traps have been followed in their evolution with the heat treatment temperature by P-DLTS and C-V measurements. They recover by increasing the heat treatment temperature and this can explain the restoration observed in electron CCE.

  13. Intrapupal temperature variation during Er,Cr: YSGG enamel irradiation on carries prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia Moreira de Freitas

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Studies have shown the cariostatic effect of Er,Cr:YSGG (2.78 mm laser irradiation on human enamel and have suggested its use on caries prevention. However there are still no reports on the intrapulpal temperature increase during enamel irradiation using parameters for caries prevention. The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the temperature variation in the pulp chamber during human enamel irradiation with Er,Cr:YSGG laser at different energy densities. Fifteen enamel blocks obtained from third molars (3 x 3 x 3 mm were randomly assigned to 3 groups (n=5: G1 - Er,Cr:YSGG laser 0.25 W, 20 Hz, 2.84 J/cm², G2 - Er,Cr:YSGG laser 0.50 W, 20 Hz, 5.68 J/cm², G3 - Er,Cr:YSGG laser 0.75 W, 20 Hz, 8.52 J/cm². During enamel irradiation, two thermocouples were fixed in the inner surface of the specimens and a thermal conducting paste was used. One-way ANOVA did not show statistically significant difference among the experimental groups (a=0.05. There was intrapulpal temperature variation <0.1ºC for all irradiation parameters. In conclusion, under the tested conditions, the use of Er,Cr:YSGG laser with parameters set for caries prevention lead to an acceptable temperature increase in the pulp chamber.

  14. Quantifying the Effects of Photoperiod, Temperature and Daily Irradiance on Flowering Time of Soybean Isolines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cober, Elroy R.; Curtis, Daniel F.; Stewart, Douglas W.; Morrison, Malcolm J.

    2014-01-01

    Soybean isolines with different combinations of photoperiod sensitivity alleles were planted in a greenhouse at different times during the year resulting in natural variation in daily incident irradiance and duration. The time from planting to first flower were observed. Mathematical models, using additive and multiplicative modes, were developed to quantify the effect of photoperiod, temperature, photoperiod-temperature interactions, rate of photoperiod change, and daily solar irradiance on flowering time. Observed flowering times correlated with predicted times (R2 = 0.92, Standard Error of the Estimate (SSE) = 2.84 d, multiplicative mode; R2 = 0.91, SSE = 2.88 d, additive mode). The addition of a rate of photoperiod change function and an irradiance function to the temperature and photoperiod functions improved the accuracy of flowering time prediction. The addition of a modified photoperiod function, which allowed for photoperiod sensitivity at shorter photoperiods, improved prediction of flowering time. Both increasing and decreasing rate of photoperiod change, as well as low levels of daily irradiance delayed flowering in soybean. The complete model, which included terms for the rate of photoperiod change, photoperiod, temperature and irradiance, predicted time to first flower in soybean across a range of environmental conditions with an SEE of 3.6 days when tested with independent data. PMID:27135515

  15. Damage accumulation in MgO irradiated with MeV Au ions at elevated temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bachiller-Perea, Diana, E-mail: dianabachillerperea@gmail.com [Centre de Sciences Nucléaires et de Sciences de la Matière (CSNSM), Univ. Paris-Sud, CNRS-IN2P3, Université Paris-Saclay, 91405, Orsay Cedex (France); Centro de Micro-Análisis de Materiales, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, C/Faraday 3, 28049, Madrid (Spain); Dpto. de Física Aplicada, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Ciudad Universitaria de Cantoblanco, 28049, Madrid (Spain); Debelle, Aurélien, E-mail: aurelien.debelle@u-psud.fr [Centre de Sciences Nucléaires et de Sciences de la Matière (CSNSM), Univ. Paris-Sud, CNRS-IN2P3, Université Paris-Saclay, 91405, Orsay Cedex (France); Thomé, Lionel [Centre de Sciences Nucléaires et de Sciences de la Matière (CSNSM), Univ. Paris-Sud, CNRS-IN2P3, Université Paris-Saclay, 91405, Orsay Cedex (France); Behar, Moni [Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, C.P. 15051, 91501-970, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil)

    2016-09-15

    The damage accumulation process in MgO single crystals under medium-energy heavy ion irradiation (1.2 MeV Au) at fluences up to 4 × 10{sup 14} cm{sup −2} has been studied at three different temperatures: 573, 773, and 1073 K. Disorder depth profiles have been determined through the use of the Rutherford backscattering spectrometry in channeling configuration (RBS/C). The analysis of the RBS/C data reveals two steps in the MgO damage process, irrespective of the temperature. However, we find that for increasing irradiation temperature, the damage level decreases and the fluence at which the second step takes place increases. A shift of the damage peak at increasing fluence is observed for the three temperatures, although the position of the peak depends on the temperature. These results can be explained by an enhanced defect mobility which facilitates defect migration and may favor defect annealing. X-ray diffraction reciprocal space maps confirm the results obtained with the RBS/C technique. - Highlights: • High-temperature MeV-ion irradiated MgO exhibits a two-step damage process. • The occurrence of the second step is delayed with increasing temperature. • The damage level decreases with increasing temperature. • A shift of the damage peak is observed with increasing fluence. • A high defect mobility at high temperatures in MgO is clearly evidenced.

  16. Thermoluminescence analysis of co-doped NaCl at low temperature irradiations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cruz-Zaragoza, E., E-mail: ecruz@nucleares.unam.m [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, A.P. 70-543, 04510 Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Ortiz, A. [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, A.P. 70-543, 04510 Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Unidad Profesional Interdisciplinaria de Ingenieria y Tecnologias Avanzadas, IPN, Av. Instituto Politecnico Nacional 2580, Col. La Laguna Ticoman, 07340 Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Furetta, C. [Touro University Rome, Circne Gianicolense 15-17, 00153 Rome (Italy); Flores J, C.; Hernandez A, J.; Murrieta S, H. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, A.P. 20-364, 01000 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2011-02-15

    The thermoluminescent response and kinetics parameters of NaCl, doubly activated by Ca-Mn and Cd-Mn ions, exposed to gamma radiation are analyzed. The doped NaCl samples were irradiated at relative low temperature, i.e. at the liquid nitrogen temperature (LNT) and at dry ice temperature (DIT), and the glow curves obtained after 2 Gy of gamma irradiation were analyzed using the computerized glow curve deconvolution (CGCD). An evident variation in the glow curve structure after LNT and DIT was observed. It seems that different kinds of trapping levels are activated at relative low temperature. The original two prominent peaks in compositions A (Ca,Mn) and B (Ca,Mn) have been changed in only one main peak with satellites in the low temperature side of the glow curves. In compositions C (Cd,Mn) and D (Cd,Mn), low temperature peaks become stronger and prominent than the high temperature peaks; this effect could be explained considering that the trapping probability for low temperature traps, the one very close to the conduction band, is enhanced by low temperatures during irradiation.

  17. Effect of irradiation temperature and strain rate on the mechanical properties of V-4Cr-4Ti irradiated to low doses in fission reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zinkle, S.J.; Snead, L.L.; Rowcliffe, A.F.; Alexander, D.J.; Gibson, L.T. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1998-09-01

    Tensile tests performed on irradiated V-(3-6%)Cr-(3-6%)Ti alloys indicate that pronounced hardening and loss of strain hardening capacity occurs for doses of 0.1--20 dpa at irradiation temperatures below {approximately}330 C. The amount of radiation hardening decreases rapidly for irradiation temperatures above 400 C, with a concomitant increase in strain hardening capacity. Low-dose (0.1--0.5 dpa) irradiation shifts the dynamic strain aging regime to higher temperatures and lower strain rates compared to unirradiated specimens. Very low fracture toughness values were observed in miniature disk compact specimens irradiated at 200--320 C to {approximately}1.5--15 dpa and tested at 200 C.

  18. Charge collection efficiency of irradiated silicon detectors operated at cryogenic temperatures

    CERN Document Server

    Borer, K; Palmieri, V G; Dezillie, B; Li, Z; Collins, P; Niinikoski, T O; Lourenço, C; Sonderegger, P; Borchi, E; Bruzzi, Mara; Pirollo, S; Granata, V; Pagano, S; Chapuy, S; Dimcovski, Zlatomir; Grigoriev, E; Bell, W; Devine, S R H; O'Shea, V; Smith, K; Berglund, P; de Boer, Wim; Hauler, F; Heising, S; Jungermann, L; Casagrande, L; Cindro, V; Mikuz, M; Zavrtanik, M; Da Vià, C; Esposito, A P; Konorov, I; Paul, S; Schmitt, L; Buontempo, S; D'Ambrosio, N; Ruggiero, G; Eremin, V V; Verbitskaya, E

    2000-01-01

    The charge collection efficiency (CCE) of heavily irradiated silicon diode detectors was investigated at temperatures between 77 and 200 K. The CCE was found to depend on the radiation dose, bias voltage value and history, temperature, and bias current generated by light. The detector irradiated to the highest fluence 2·1015 n/cm2 yields a MIP signal of at least 15000 e- both at 250 V forward bias voltage, and at 250 V reverse bias voltage in the presence of a light-generated current. The "Lazarus effect" was thus shown to extend to fluences at least ten times higher than was previously studied.

  19. The effect of irradiation, annealing temperature, and artificial aging on the oxidation, mechanical properties, and fracture mechanisms of UHMWPE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luisetto, Yannick; Wesslen, Bengt; Maurer, Frans; Lidgren, Lars

    2003-12-01

    UHMWPE crosslinked using Gamma radiation is believed to have improved wear properties, and this has been extensively studied during the past 10 years. Mechanical properties, oxidation, and wear properties of UHMWPE materials subjected to various thermal treatments have been investigated immediately after irradiation as well as after several years of aging. Nevertheless, the relationship between all these parameters is not yet fully understood. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between the thermal treatments that could be applied to irradiated UHMWPE [lower (gamma 60) or higher (gamma 150) than 140 degrees C, the melting temperature of the polymer] and the mechanical properties, the oxidation and the fracture behavior of the material. The effect of artificial aging on these properties was also investigated. This study concludes that immediately after the annealing, the mechanical properties (UTS and epsilon) of the irradiated and annealed material are improved compared with those of nonirradiated material. Although nonirradiated material has higher fracture toughness than irradiated and annealed materials, the materials break according to the same mechanism of fracture. After aging, no changes could be observed in any of the measured properties for nonirradiated material. On the other hand, important changes could be seen in both irradiated and annealed material after aging. Both UTS and epsilon decreased, much more so in the case of gamma 60. Furthermore, the aging induced a subsurface peak of oxidation in both irradiated and annealed materials, twice as intense for gamma 60 than for gamma 150. The mechanism of fracture of these materials changed drastically after aging, probably due to the presence of the oxidation peak, which seems to occur at a location where cracks initiate easily compared with the nonoxidized bulk of the material. In the case of gamma 60, it seems clear that a correlation between mechanical property, oxidation, and

  20. The effect of irradiation temperatures between ambient and 80 deg. C on the response of alanine dosimeters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sharpe, P.H.G.; Miller, Arne; Sephton, J.P.

    2009-01-01

    Published data on the effect of irradiation temperature on the response of alanine dosimeters does not extend to the temperatures that may be experienced in high-dose industrial irradiations, particularly in the case of electron beams. We describe here results of the irradiation of alanine...... dosimeters at temperatures up to 80 °C and doses up to 70 kGy. Data have been obtained for both 60Co and electron beam irradiations and the effect of temperature on the stability of the radiation-induced signal has also been investigated. At temperatures above 50 °C the irradiation temperature coefficient...... begins to deviate significantly from linearity and shows marked dose dependence. The effect of this behaviour under conditions typically experienced in industrial processing is evaluated and recommendations made concerning the use of alanine dosimeters at high doses and temperatures....

  1. Effects of temperature and irradiance on early development of Chondrus ocellatus Holm (Gigartinaceae, Rhodophyta)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiao; Zhao, Peng; Wang, Gaoge; Li, Dapeng; Wang, Jicheng; Duan, Delin

    2010-05-01

    Chondrus is a type of commercially produced red seaweed that widely used for food and carrageen extraction. Although the natural life history of the alga had been well understood, the factors influencing development of the tetraspore and carpospore remain poorly understood. In the perspective of seedling resources, the regulation of early development is crucial for the seedling nursing; therefore, it is necessary to understand the physiological influences during its early development. In this study, we studied the effects of temperature and irradiance on the early development of Chondrus ocellatus Holm under laboratory conditions. The released tetraspores and carpospores were cultivated at different temperatures (10-28°C) and irradiances (10, 60 μmol photons m-2s-1) with a photoperiod of 12L:12D. The results indicate that both tetraspores and carpospores are tolerant to temperatures of 10-25°C, and have the highest relative growth rate at 20°C. Irradiance variances influenced the growth of the discoid crusts, and the influence was more significant with increasing temperature; 60 μmol photons m-2s-1 was more suitable than 10 μmol photons m-2s-1. The optimum temperature and irradiance for the development of seedlings was 20°C and 60 μmol photons m-2s-1, respectively.

  2. Effects of intermittent flow and irradiance level on back reef Porites corals at elevated seawater temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, L.W.; Birkeland, C.

    2007-01-01

    Corals inhabiting shallow back reef habitats are often simultaneously exposed to elevated seawater temperatures and high irradiance levels, conditions known to cause coral bleaching. Water flow in many tropical back reef systems is tidally influenced, resulting in semi-diurnal or diurnal flow patterns. Controlled experiments were conducted to test effects of semi-diurnally intermittent water flow on photoinhibition and bleaching of the corals Porites lobata and P. cylindrica kept at elevated seawater temperatures and different irradiance levels. All coral colonies were collected from a shallow back reef pool on Ofu Island, American Samoa. In the high irradiance experiments, photoinhibition and bleaching were less for both species in the intermittent high-low flow treatment than in the constant low flow treatment. In the low irradiance experiments, there were no differences in photoinhibition or bleaching for either species between the flow treatments, despite continuously elevated seawater temperatures. These results suggest that intermittent flow associated with semi-diurnal tides, and low irradiances caused by turbidity or shading, may reduce photoinhibition and bleaching of back reef corals during warming events. ?? 2006 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Lipid and carotenoid production by Rhodotorula glutinis under irradiation/high-temperature and dark/low-temperature cultivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhiping; Zhang, Xu; Tan, Tianwei

    2014-04-01

    The capacity of lipid and carotenoid production by Rhodotorula glutinis was investigated under different irradiation conditions, temperatures and C/N ratios. The results showed that dark/low-temperature could enhance lipid content, while irradiation/high-temperature increased the yields of biomass and carotenoid. The optimum C/N ratio for production was between 80 and 100. A two-stage cultivation strategy was used for lipid and carotenoid production in a 5L fermenter. In the first stage, the maximum biomass reached 28.1g/L under irradiation/high-temperature. Then, the cultivation condition was changed to dark/low-temperature, and C/N ratio was adjusted to 90. After the second stage, the biomass, lipid content and carotenoid reached 86.2g/L, 26.7% and 4.2mg/L, respectively. More significantly, the yields of biomass and lipid were 43.1% and 11.5%, respectively. Lipids contained 79.7% 18C and 16.8% 16C fatty acids by GC analysis. HPLC quantified the main carotenoids were β-carotene (68.4%), torularhodin (21.5%) and torulene (10.1%). Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Co-doped sodium chloride crystals exposed to different irradiation temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortiz-Morales, A. [Unidad Profesional Interdisciplinaria de Ingenieria y Tecnologias Avanzadas, IPN, Av. Instituto Politecnico Nacional 2580, Col. La Laguna Ticoman, 07340 Mexico D.F., Mexico and Unidad de Irradiacion y Segurid (Mexico); Cruz-Zaragoza, E.; Furetta, C. [Unidad de Irradiacion y Seguridad Radiologica, Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, A.P. 70-543, 04510 Mexico D.F (Mexico); Kitis, G. [Nuclear Physics Laboratory, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki 54124 (Greece); Flores J, C.; Hernandez A, J.; Murrieta S, H. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, AP. 20-364, 01000 Mexico D.F (Mexico)

    2013-07-03

    Monocrystals of NaCl:XCl{sub 2}:MnCl{sub 2}(X = Ca,Cd) at four different concentrations have been analyzed. The crystals were exposed to different irradiation temperature, such as at room temperature (RT), solid water (SW), dry ice (DI) and liquid nitrogen (LN). The samples were irradiated with photon from {sup 60}Co irradiators. The co-doped sodium chloride crystals show a complex structure of glow curves that can be related to different distribution of traps. The linearity response was analyzed with the F(D) index. The F(D) value was less than unity indicating a sub-linear response was obtained from the TL response on the function of the dose. The glow curves were deconvoluted by using the CGCD program based on the first, second and general order kinetics.

  5. Doubling the critical current density of high temperature superconducting coated conductors through proton irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jia, Y.; LeRoux, M.; Miller, D. J.; Wen, J. G.; Kwok, W. K.; Welp, U. [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Avenue, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Rupich, M. W.; Li, X.; Sathyamurthy, S.; Fleshler, S.; Malozemoff, A. P. [American Superconductor Corp., 64 Jackson Road, Devens, Massachusetts 01434 (United States); Kayani, A. [Department of Physics, Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo, Michigan 49008-5252 (United States); Ayala-Valenzuela, O.; Civale, L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, MS-K764, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

    2013-09-16

    The in-field critical current of commercial YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7} coated conductors can be substantially enhanced by post-fabrication irradiation with 4 MeV protons. Irradiation to a fluence of 8 × 10{sup 16} p/cm{sup 2} induces a near doubling of the critical current in fields of 6 T || c at a temperature of 27 K, a field and temperature range of interest for applications, such as rotating machinery. A mixed pinning landscape of preexisting precipitates and twin boundaries and small, finely dispersed irradiation induced defects may account for the improved vortex pinning in high magnetic fields. Our data indicate that there is significant head-room for further enhancements.

  6. Specific Features of Structural-Phase State and Properties of Reactor Pressure Vessel Steel at Elevated Irradiation Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. A. Kuleshova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper considers influence of elevated irradiation temperature on structure and properties of 15Kh2NMFAA reactor pressure vessel (RPV steel. The steel is investigated after accelerated irradiation at 300°C (operating temperature of VVER-1000-type RPV and 400°C supposed to be the operating temperature of advanced RPVs. Irradiation at 300°C leads to formation of radiation-induced precipitates and radiation defects-dislocation loops, while no carbide phase transformation is observed. Irradiation at a higher temperature (400°C neither causes formation of radiation-induced precipitates nor provides formation of dislocation loops, but it does increase the number density of the main initial hardening phase—of the carbonitrides. Increase of phosphorus concentration in grain boundaries is more pronounced for irradiation at 400°C as compared to irradiation at 300°C due to influence of thermally enhanced diffusion at a higher temperature. The structural-phase changes determine the changes of mechanical properties: at both irradiation temperatures irradiation embrittlement is mainly due to the hardening mechanism with some contribution of the nonhardening one for irradiation at 400°C. Lack of formation of radiation-induced precipitates at T = 400°C provides a small ΔTK shift (17°C. The obtained results demonstrate that the investigated 15Kh2NMFAA steel may be a promising material for advanced reactors with an elevated operating temperature.

  7. Production of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) by benthic diatoms: the effect of irradiance and temperature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolfstein, K.; Stal, L.J.

    2002-01-01

    An axenic culture of Cylindrotheca closterium and a natural community of benthic diatoms were used to study the effect of temperature and irradiance on the production of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS). In the culture, results depended on the growth stage of the algae and on whether

  8. Field-induced transition from room-temperature ferromagnetism to diamagnetism in proton-irradiated fullerene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kyu Won; Kweon, Hyocheon; Lee, Cheol Eui

    2013-10-18

    Room-temperature ferromagnetism in proton-irradiated C60 fullerene is demonstrated. The ferromagnetism turns into diamagnetism intrinsic to the fullerene as the magnetic field increases above a critical field. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Photosynthesis in tropical cover crop legumes influenced by irradiance, external carbon dioxide concentration and temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    In plantation crops perennial tropical legumes are grown as understory plants, receive limited irradiance, and are subjected to elevated levels of CO2 and temperature. Independent short-term effects of photosynthetic photon flux density (PPFD), external carbon dioxide concentration [CO2] and temper...

  10. Dependence of recovery of Si surface damaged by GCIB irradiation on annealing temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isogai, Hiromichi [Processing Technology, Silicon Business Group, Covalent Materials Corporation, 6-861-5 Higashikou Seirou-machi, Kitakanbaragun, Niigata 957-0197 (Japan); Graduate School of Engineering, University of Hyogo, 2167 Shosha, Himeji Hyogo 671-2280 (Japan)], E-mail: isogai@covalent.co.jp; Toyoda, Eiji; Senda, Takeshi; Izunome, Koji [Processing Technology, Silicon Business Group, Covalent Materials Corporation, 6-861-5 Higashikou Seirou-machi, Kitakanbaragun, Niigata 957-0197 (Japan); Kashima, Kazuhiko [New Business Creation, Covalent Materials Corporation, 30 Soya Hadano City, Kanagawa 257-0031 (Japan); Toyoda, Noriaki; Yamada, Isao [Graduate School of Engineering, University of Hyogo, 2167 Shosha, Himeji Hyogo 671-2280 (Japan)

    2008-05-15

    As semiconductor devices become progressively smaller, it is important that wafers are fabricated with extremely uniform thicknesses. Although, GCIB technology can be used for corrective etching of Si wafers with high accuracy, an amorphous Si (a-Si) layer is formed in the process by the collision of cluster ions with the Si surface. We have shown that the a-Si layer formed on Si surfaces by Ar-GCIB and SF{sub 6}-GCIB irradiation disappears completely and atomically smooth surfaces are formed after high-temperature annealing. In this study, the recovery of a surface damaged at various annealing temperatures was investigated in detail by TEM, AFM and SIMS. We found that the disappearance of the a-Si layer occurred by solid phase epitaxy (SPE) from low temperature and atomically smoothing at the surface occur by migration of Si atoms at high-temperature. Moreover, due to Ar-GCIB irradiation, Ar was found in high concentrations in the a-Si layer and crystal defects were formed on the surface after annealing. The Ar concentration on the Si surface could be decreased by irradiating SF{sub 6}-GCIB after Ar-GCIB irradiation.

  11. Temperature response of biological materials to pulsed non-ablative CO2 laser irradiation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brugmans, M. J.; Kemper, J.; Gijsbers, G. H.; van der Meulen, F. W.; van Gemert, M. J.

    1991-01-01

    This paper presents surface temperature responses of various tissue phantoms and in vitro and in vivo biological materials in air to non-ablative pulsed CO2 laser irradiation, measured with a thermocamera. We studied cooling off behavior of the materials after a laser pulse, to come to an

  12. The effect of helium, radiation damage and irradiation temperature on the mechanical properties of beryllium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fabritsiev, S.A. [D.V. Efremov Scientific Research Inst., St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Pokrovsky, A.S.

    1998-01-01

    In this work different RF beryllium grades were irradiated in the BOR-60 reactor to a dose of {approx}5-10 dpa at irradiation temperatures 350, 420, 500, 800degC. Irradiation at temperatures of 350-400degC is shown to result in Be hardening due to the accumulation of radiation defect complexes. Hardening is accompanied with a sharp drop in plasticity at T{sub test} {<=} 300degC. A strong anisotropy in plasticity has been found at a mechanical testing temperature of 400degC and this parameter may be preferable when the samples are cut crosswise to the pressing direction. High-temperature irradiation (T{sub irr} = 780degC) gives rise to large helium pores over the grain boundaries and smaller pores in the grain body. Fracture is brittle and intercrystallite at T{sub test} {>=} 600degC. Helium embrittlement is accompanied as well with a drop in the Be strength properties. (author)

  13. A Study on the High Temperature Irradiation Test Possibility for the HANARO Outer Core Region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Young Hwan; Cho, M. S.; Choo, K. N.; Shin, Y. T.; Sohn, J. M.; Park, S. J.; Kim, B. G

    2008-01-15

    1. Information on the neutron flux levels and the gamma heat of the concerned test holes, which have been produced from a series of nuclear analysis and tests performed at KAERI since 1993, were collected and analyzed to develop the nuclear data for the concerned test holes of HANARO and to develop the new design concepts of a capsule for the high temperature irradiation devices. 2. From the literature survey and analysis about the system design characteristics of the new concepts of irradiation devices in the ATR and MIT reactor, U.S. and the JHR reactor, France, which are helpful in understanding the key issues for the on-going R and D programmes related to a SFR and a VHTR, the most important parameters for the design of high temperature irradiation devices are identified as the neutron spectrum, the heat generation density, the fuel and cladding temperature, and the coolant chemistry. 3. From the thermal analysis of a capsule by using a finite element program ANSYS, high temperature test possibility at the OR and IP holes of HANARO was investigated based on the data collected from a literature survey. The OR holes are recommended for the tests of the SFR and VHTR nuclear materials. The IP holes could be applicable for an intermediate temperature irradiation of the SWR and LMR materials. 4. A thermal analysis for the development of a capsule with a new configuration was also performed. The size of the center hole, which is located at the thermal media of a capsule, did not cause specimen temperature changes. The temperature differences are found to be less than 2%. The introduction of an additional gap in the thermal media was able to contribute to an increase in the specimen temperature by up to 27-90 %.

  14. Microstructural analysis of ferritic-martensitic steels irradiated at low temperature in HFIR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hashimoto, N.; Robertson, J.P.; Rowcliffe, A.F. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Wakai, E. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst. (Japan)

    1998-09-01

    Disk specimens of ferritic-martensitic steel, HT9 and F82H, irradiated to damage levels of {approximately}3 dpa at irradiation temperatures of either {approximately}90 C or {approximately}250 C have been investigated by using transmission electron microscopy. Before irradiation, tempered HT9 contained only M{sub 23}C{sub 6} carbide. Irradiation at 90 C and 250 C induced a dislocation loop density of 1 {times} 10{sup 22} m{sup {minus}3} and 8 {times} 10{sup 21} m{sup {minus}3}, respectively. in the HT9 irradiated at 250 C, a radiation-induced phase, tentatively identified as {alpha}{prime}, was observed with a number density of less than 1 {times} 10{sup 20} m{sup {minus}3}. On the other hand, the tempered F82H contained M{sub 23}C{sub 6} and a few MC carbides; irradiation at 250 C to 3 dpa caused minor changes in these precipitates and induced a dislocation loop density of 2 {times} 10{sup 22} m{sup {minus}3}. Difference in the radiation-induced phase and the loop microstructure may be related to differences in the post-yield deformation behavior of the two steels.

  15. DNA comet assay to identify different freezing temperatures of irradiated liver chicken

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duarte, Renato C.; Mozeika, Michel A.; Fanaro, Gustavo B.; Villavicencio, Anna L.C.H. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)], e-mail: renatocduarte@yahoo.com.br; Marchioni, Eric [Universite de Strasbourg, Illkirch (France). Faculte de Pharmacie. Lab. de Chimie Analytique et Sciences de l' Aliment

    2009-07-01

    The cold chain is a succession of steps which maintain the food at low temperature. The thawed food never be frozen again and the best solution being to consume it quickly to avoid the microorganism growth which causes decay and nutrients damage. One of most important point is that freezing process, unlike irradiation, do not destroy microorganisms, only inactive them as long as they remain in a frozen state. The Comet Assay is an original test used to detect irradiated foods that's recognize the DNA damage and can then be used to control the overall degradation of the food and in a certain extend to evaluate the damage caused by irradiation, different forms of freeze and storage time on liver chicken cells. Different freezing temperatures were used, deep freeze -196 deg C and slow freeze -10 deg C. Samples were irradiated in a {sup 60}Co irradiator with 1.5, 3.0 and 4.5 kGy radiation doses. Fast freezing technique induces a low percent of DNA degradation comparing to slow freezing technique. This procedure could be a good choose to chicken freezing processing. (author)

  16. Electron spin resonance in neutron-irradiated graphite. Dependence on temperature and effect of annealing; Resonance paramagnetique du graphite irradie aux neutrons. Variation en fonction de la temperature et experiences de recuit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kester, T. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Grenoble (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires, Laboratoire de resonance magnetique

    1967-09-01

    The temperature dependence of the electron spin resonance signal from neutron irradiated graphite has been studied. The results lead to an interpretation of the nature of the paramagnetic centers created by irradiation. In annealing experiments on graphite samples, which had been irradiated at low temperature, two annealing peaks and one anti-annealing peak were found. Interpretations are proposed for these peaks. (author) [French] Le graphite irradie aux neutrons a ete etudie par resonance paramagnetique electronique en fonction de la temperature. La nature des centres paramagnetiques crees par irradiation est interpretee a l'aide des resultats. Des experiences de recuit sur des echantillons de graphite irradie a 77 deg. K ont permis de mettre en evidence deux pics de recuit et un pic d'anti-recuit, pour lesquels des interpretations sont proposees. (auteur)

  17. Influence of temperature on the behaviour of INTEGRAL n-type HPGe detectors irradiated with fast neutrons

    CERN Document Server

    Kandel, B; Albernhe, F; Frabel, P; Cordier, B; Tauzin, G; Crespin, S; Coszach, R; Denis, J M; Leleux, P

    1999-01-01

    Several INTEGRAL n-type HPGe detectors have been irradiated by fast neutrons at different temperatures and their performances have been evaluated. Their behaviour during warm-up and cool-down cycles following the irradiations show evidence for irreversible temperature effects above 100 K. The detectors recovery after annealing was also studied.

  18. Mechanisms of radiation embrittlement of VVER-1000 RPV steel at irradiation temperatures of (50-400)°C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuleshova, E. A.; Gurovich, B. A.; Bukina, Z. V.; Frolov, A. S.; Maltsev, D. A.; Krikun, E. V.; Zhurko, D. A.; Zhuchkov, G. M.

    2017-07-01

    This work summarizes and analyzes our recent research results on the effect of irradiation temperature within the range of (50-400)°C on microstructure and properties of 15Kh2NMFAA class 1 steel (VVER-1000 reactor pressure vessel (RPV) base metal). The paper considers the influence of accelerated irradiation with different temperature up to different fluences on the carbide and irradiation-induced phases, radiation defects, yield strength changes and critical brittleness temperature shift (ΔTK) as well as on changes of the fraction of brittle intergranular fracture and segregation processes in the steel. Low temperature irradiation resulted solely in formation of radiation defects - dislocation loops of high number density, the latter increased with increase in irradiation temperature while their size decreased. In this regard high embrittlement rate observed at low temperature irradiation is only due to the hardening mechanism of radiation embrittlement. Accelerated irradiation at VVER-1000 RPV operating temperature (∼300 °C) caused formation of radiation-induced precipitates and dislocation loops, as well as some increase in phosphorus grain boundary segregation. The observed ΔTK shift being within the regulatory curve for VVER-1000 RPV base metal is due to both hardening and non-hardening mechanisms of radiation embrittlement. Irradiation at elevated temperature caused more intense phosphorus grain boundary segregation, but no formation of radiation-induced precipitates or dislocation loops in contrast to irradiation at 300 °C. Carbide transformations observed only after irradiation at 400 °C caused increase in yield strength and, along with a contribution of the non-hardening mechanism, resulted in the lowest ΔTK shift in the studied range of irradiation temperature and fluence.

  19. Liquid-like behavior of UV-irradiated interstellar ice analog at low temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tachibana, Shogo; Kouchi, Akira; Hama, Tetsuya; Oba, Yasuhiro; Piani, Laurette; Sugawara, Iyo; Endo, Yukiko; Hidaka, Hiroshi; Kimura, Yuki; Murata, Ken-Ichiro; Yurimoto, Hisayoshi; Watanabe, Naoki

    2017-09-01

    Interstellar ice is believed to be a cradle of complex organic compounds, commonly found within icy comets and interstellar clouds, in association with ultraviolet (UV) irradiation and subsequent warming. We found that UV-irradiated amorphous ices composed of H2O, CH3OH, and NH3 and of pure H2O behave like liquids over the temperature ranges of 65 to 150 kelvin and 50 to 140 kelvin, respectively. This low-viscosity liquid-like ice may enhance the formation of organic compounds including prebiotic molecules and the accretion of icy dust to form icy planetesimals under certain interstellar conditions.

  20. A new Bayesian model applied to cytogenetic partial body irradiation estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higueras, Manuel; Puig, Pedro; Ainsbury, Elizabeth A; Vinnikov, Volodymyr A; Rothkamm, Kai

    2016-03-01

    A new zero-inflated Poisson model is introduced for the estimation of partial body irradiation dose and fraction of body irradiated. The Bayes factors are introduced as tools to help determine whether a data set of chromosomal aberrations obtained from a blood sample reflects partial or whole body irradiation. Two examples of simulated cytogenetic radiation exposure data are presented to demonstrate the usefulness of this methodology in cytogenetic biological dosimetry. © Crown copyright 2015.

  1. Water color affects the stratification, surface temperature, heat content, and mean epilimnetic irradiance of small lakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houser, J.N.

    2006-01-01

    The effects of water color on lake stratification, mean epilimnetic irradiance, and lake temperature dynamics were examined in small, north-temperate lakes that differed widely in water color (1.5-19.8 m -1). Among these lakes, colored lakes differed from clear lakes in the following ways: (i) the epilimnia were shallower and colder, and mean epilimnetic irradiance was reduced; (ii) the diel temperature cycles were more pronounced; (iii) whole-lake heat accumulation during stratification was reduced. The depth of the epilimnion ranged from 2.5 m in the clearest lake to 0.75 m in the most colored lake, and 91% of the variation in epilimnetic depth was explained by water color. Summer mean morning epilimnetic temperature was ???2??C cooler in the most colored lake compared with the clearest lake. In clear lakes, the diel temperature range (1.4 ?? 0.7??C) was significantly (p = 0.01) less than that in the most colored lake (2.1 ?? 1.0??C). Change in whole-lake heat content was negatively correlated with water color. Increasing water color decreased light penetration more than thermocline depth, leading to reduced mean epilimnetic irradiance in the colored lakes. Thus, in these small lakes, water color significantly affected temperature, thermocline depth, and light climate. ?? 2006 NRC.

  2. Target temperature dependence of contact angle of water for silica glasses irradiated by argon ions without mass-separation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okabe, Yoshio; Tanisawa, Kazuhiko; Ito, Katsutaka; Kawajiri, Kyoji [Saitama Inst. of Tech., Okabe (Japan); Nakao, Aiko; Iwaki, Masaya; Ogiso, Hisato; Nakano, Shizuka

    1995-06-01

    Target temperature dependence of the contact angle of pure water for silica glasses during argon ion irradiation is studied in order to reduce or suppress the adsorption of hydrocarbons on silica glasses accompanying to ion beam irradiation. Argon ions were irradiated with a straight type ion implanter SIT-100 with ion acceleration voltage of 80 kV and a quantity of electricity for ion irradiation of 0.1 to 20 mC/cm{sup 2}. The target temperature during ion irradiation is controlled by the temperature control of the circulating water through the target holder. Temperature of the circulating water is 3 to 57degC. The contact angle of silica glass irradiated with Ar ions is high as 70 - 80deg in case of 1 mC/cm{sup 2} irradiation at a temperature of about 40degC and low as 30 to 40deg at 3 to 31degC. Results of the quantitative analysis of the surface compositions by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy show that the carbon concentration at the glass surface is similar to that of the unirradiated glass in case of low target temperature. Consequently, the target temperature during the irradiation is found to be one of factors to reduce the hydrocarbon adsorption. (T.H.).

  3. Observation, modeling, and temperature dependence of doubly peaked electric fields in irradiated silicon pixel sensors

    CERN Document Server

    Swartz, M.; Allkofer, Y.; Bortoletto, D.; Cremaldi, L.; Cucciarelli, S.; Dorokhov, A.; Hoermann, C.; Kim, D.; Konecki, M.; Kotlinski, D.; Prokofiev, Kirill; Regenfus, Christian; Rohe, T.; Sanders, D.A.; Son, S.; Speer, T.

    2006-01-01

    We show that doubly peaked electric fields are necessary to describe grazing-angle charge collection measurements of irradiated silicon pixel sensors. A model of irradiated silicon based upon two defect levels with opposite charge states and the trapping of charge carriers can be tuned to produce a good description of the measured charge collection profiles in the fluence range from 0.5x10^{14} Neq/cm^2 to 5.9x10^{14} Neq/cm^2. The model correctly predicts the variation in the profiles as the temperature is changed from -10C to -25C. The measured charge collection profiles are inconsistent with the linearly-varying electric fields predicted by the usual description based upon a uniform effective doping density. This observation calls into question the practice of using effective doping densities to characterize irradiated silicon.

  4. Innovations and Challenges by Applying Sublingual Laser Blood Irradiation in Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Marinela Ailioaie

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Sublingual laser blood irradiation (SLBI was applied into a randomized, single-blind, placebo-controlled study in juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA, aimed at inducing disease remission. 105 children with JIA, without an adequate response to classical treatment, were administrated a disease modifying drug (Methotrexate and were randomly assigned to three groups. Group I (36 patients received SLBI with the Weberneedle Lasershower Mouth Applicator with three wavelengths (635 nm, 536 nm, and 405 nm, 5 mW maximum output power each, in continuous mode, simultaneously, for 20 minutes daily, 7 successive sessions per month, repeated every 7 weeks, for three times. Group II (36 patients received placebo SLBI. Group III (33 patients received only treatment with Methotrexate. Evaluation was performed using American College of Rheumatology Pediatric criteria (ACR Pedi at study enrollment and at 8, 16, 24, and 48 weeks. At the end of study, there was an improvement of the ACR Pedi 30 by 86.11% in SLBI group compared to only 61.11% in Group II, respectively, and 60.6% in Group III (P=0.001, with significant statistical differences. SLBI has reduced the pain, lowered the number of articulations with movement limitation, increased the quality of life, and made it possible to avoid the administration of biological agents.

  5. Structural modifications induced by ion irradiation and temperature in boron carbide B{sub 4}C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Victor, G., E-mail: g.victor@ipnl.in2p3.fr [Institut de Physique Nucléaire de Lyon (IPNL), Université Lyon 1, CNRS/IN2P3, 4 rue Enrico Fermi, 69622 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Pipon, Y.; Bérerd, N. [Institut de Physique Nucléaire de Lyon (IPNL), Université Lyon 1, CNRS/IN2P3, 4 rue Enrico Fermi, 69622 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Institut Universitaire de Technologie (IUT) Lyon-1, Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1, 69622 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Toulhoat, N. [Institut de Physique Nucléaire de Lyon (IPNL), Université Lyon 1, CNRS/IN2P3, 4 rue Enrico Fermi, 69622 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); CEA-DEN, Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Moncoffre, N. [Institut de Physique Nucléaire de Lyon (IPNL), Université Lyon 1, CNRS/IN2P3, 4 rue Enrico Fermi, 69622 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Djourelov, N. [Institute for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, 72 Tzarigradsko chaussee blvd, BG-1784 Sofia (Bulgaria); ELI-NP, IFIN-HH, 30 Reactorului Str, MG-6 Bucharest-Magurele (Romania); Miro, S. [CEA-DEN, Service de Recherches de Métallurgie Physique, Laboratoire JANNUS, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Baillet, J. [Institut de Physique Nucléaire de Lyon (IPNL), Université Lyon 1, CNRS/IN2P3, 4 rue Enrico Fermi, 69622 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Pradeilles, N.; Rapaud, O.; Maître, A. [SPCTS, UMR CNRS 7315, Centre Européen de la céramique, University of Limoges (France); Gosset, D. [CEA, Saclay, DMN-SRMA-LA2M, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2015-12-15

    Already used as neutron absorber in the current French nuclear reactors, boron carbide (B{sub 4}C) is also considered in the future Sodium Fast Reactors of the next generation (Gen IV). Due to severe irradiation conditions occurring in these reactors, it is of primary importance that this material presents a high structural resistance under irradiation, both in the ballistic and electronic damage regimes. Previous works have shown an important structural resistance of boron carbide even at high neutron fluences. Nevertheless, the structural modification mechanisms due to irradiation are not well understood. Therefore the aim of this paper is to study structural modifications induced in B{sub 4}C samples in different damage regimes. The boron carbide pellets were shaped and sintered by using spark plasma sintering method. They were then irradiated in several conditions at room temperature or 800 °C, either by favoring the creation of ballistic damage (between 1 and 3 dpa), or by favoring the electronic excitations using 100 MeV swift iodine ions (S{sub e} ≈ 15 keV/nm). Ex situ micro-Raman spectroscopy and Doppler broadening of annihilation radiation technique with variable energy slow positrons were coupled to follow the evolution of the B{sub 4}C structure under irradiation.

  6. Study of the temperature evolution of defect agglomerates in neutron irradiated molybdenum single crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lambri, O.A. [Instituto de Fisica Rosario. Member of the CONICET' s Research Staff, Avda. Pellegrini 250, (2000) Rosario, Santa Fe (Argentina); Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Ingenieria y Agrimensura, Universidad Nacional de Rosario, Laboratorio de Materiales, Escuela de Ingenieria Electrica, Avda. Pellegrini 250, (2000) Rosario, Santa Fe (Argentina)], E-mail: olambri@fceia.unr.edu.ar; Zelada-Lambri, G.I. [Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Ingenieria y Agrimensura, Universidad Nacional de Rosario, Laboratorio de Materiales, Escuela de Ingenieria Electrica, Avda. Pellegrini 250, (2000) Rosario, Santa Fe (Argentina); Cuello, G.J. [Institut Laue Langevin, 6, rue Jules Horowitz, BP 156, 38042 Grenoble (France); Departamento de Fisica Aplicada II, Facultad de Ciencias y Tecnologia, Universidad del Pais Vasco, Apdo. 644, 48080 Bilbao, Pais Vasco (Spain); Bozzano, P.B. [Laboratorio de Microscopia Electronica. Unidad de Actividad Materiales, Centro Atomico Constituyentes, Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Avda. Gral. Paz 1499, (1650) San Martin (Argentina); Garcia, J.A. [Departamento de Fisica Aplicada II, Facultad de Ciencias y Tecnologia, Universidad del Pais Vasco, Apdo. 644, 48080 Bilbao, Pais Vasco (Spain)

    2009-04-15

    Small angle neutron scattering as a function of temperature, differential thermal analysis, electrical resistivity and transmission electron microscopy studies have been performed in low rate neutron irradiated single crystalline molybdenum, at room temperature, for checking the evolution of the defects agglomerates in the temperature interval between room temperature and 1200 K. The onset of vacancies mobility was found to happen in temperatures within the stage III of recovery. At around 550 K, the agglomerates of vacancies achieve the largest size, as determined from the Guinier approximation for spherical particles. In addition, the decrease of the vacancy concentration together with the dissolution of the agglomerates at temperatures higher than around 920 K was observed, which produce the release of internal stresses in the structure.

  7. Time-resolved temperature measurement and numerical simulation of millisecond laser irradiated silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zewen; Zhang, Hongchao; Shen, Zhonghua; Ni, Xiaowu

    2013-07-01

    Thermal process of 1064 nm millisecond pulsed Nd:YAG laser irradiated silicon was time-resolved temperature measured by an infrared radiation pyrometer, temperature evolutions of the spot center for wide range of laser energy densities were presented. The waveforms of temperature evolution curves contained much information about phase change, melting, solidification and vaporization. An axisymmetric numerical model was established for millisecond laser heating silicon. The transient temperature fields were obtained by using the finite element method. The numerical results of temperature evolutions of the spot center are in good agreement with the experimental results. Furthermore, the axial temperature distributions of the numerical results give a better understanding of the waveforms in the experimental results. The melting threshold, vaporizing threshold, melting duration, and melting depth were better identified by analyzing two kinds of results.

  8. Time-resolved temperature measurement and numerical simulation of millisecond laser irradiated silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Zewen; Zhang Hongchao; Shen Zhonghua; Ni Xiaowu [School of Science, Nanjing University of Science and Technology, Nanjing 210094 (China)

    2013-07-21

    Thermal process of 1064 nm millisecond pulsed Nd:YAG laser irradiated silicon was time-resolved temperature measured by an infrared radiation pyrometer, temperature evolutions of the spot center for wide range of laser energy densities were presented. The waveforms of temperature evolution curves contained much information about phase change, melting, solidification and vaporization. An axisymmetric numerical model was established for millisecond laser heating silicon. The transient temperature fields were obtained by using the finite element method. The numerical results of temperature evolutions of the spot center are in good agreement with the experimental results. Furthermore, the axial temperature distributions of the numerical results give a better understanding of the waveforms in the experimental results. The melting threshold, vaporizing threshold, melting duration, and melting depth were better identified by analyzing two kinds of results.

  9. Stability of Y-Ti-O nanoparticles in ODS alloys during heat treatment and high temperature swift heavy ion irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skuratov, V.A. [FLNR, JINR, Dubna (Russian Federation); National Research Nuclear University MEPhI, Moscow (Russian Federation); Dubna State University, Dubna (Russian Federation); Sohatsky, A.S.; Kornieieva, K. [FLNR, JINR, Dubna (Russian Federation); O' Connell, J.H.; Neethling, J.H. [CHRTEM, NMMU, Port Elizabeth (South Africa); Nikitina, A.A.; Ageev, V.S. [JSC VNIINM, Moscow (Russian Federation); Zdorovets, M. [Institute of Nuclear Physics, Astana (Kazakhstan); Ural Federal University, Yekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Volkov, A.D. [Nazarbayev University, Astana (Kazakhstan)

    2016-12-15

    Aim of this report is to compare the morphology of swift (167 and 220 MeV) Xe ion induced latent tracks in Y{sub 2}Ti{sub 2}O{sub 7} nanoparticles during post-irradiation heat treatment and after irradiation at different temperatures in pre-thinned TEM foils and TEM targets prepared from hundreds microns thick irradiated oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) steel. No difference in track parameters was found in room temperature irradiated nanoparticles in pre-thinned and conventional samples. Microstructural data gathered from pre-thinned foils irradiated in the temperature range 350-650 C or annealed at similar temperatures demonstrate that amorphous latent tracks interact with the surrounding matrix, changing the track and nanoparticle morphology, while such effect is not observed in conventional ODS material treated at the same conditions. (copyright 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  10. Influence of γ-irradiation and temperature on the mechanical properties of EPDM cable insulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šarac, T.; Quiévy, N.; Gusarov, A.; Konstantinović, M. J.

    2016-08-01

    The mechanical properties of EPDM polymers, degraded as a result of extensive thermal and radiochemical aging treatment, are studied. The focus is given to dose rate effects in polymer insulation materials extracted from industrial cables in use in Belgian nuclear power plants. All studied mechanical characteristics such as the ultimate tensile stress, the Young's modulus, and the total elongation (or elongation at break) are found to be strongly affected by the irradiation dose. The ultimate tensile stress and Young's modulus are clearly exhibiting the dose rate effect, which originated from oxidation mediated interplay of polymer cross-linking and chain scission processes. The change of crossover between these two processes is found to be gradual, without critical dose rate or temperature values. On the contrary, the total elongation is observed not to be sensitive neither to irradiation temperature nor to the dose rate. Both cross-linking and chain scission seem to affect the total elongation in a similar way by reducing the average polymers chain length. This idea is confirmed by the model which shows that all total elongation data as a function of irradiation time can be reproduced by varying a single parameter, the pre-exponential factor of the irradiation rate constant.

  11. In vitro pulp chamber temperature rise from irradiation and exotherm of flowable composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baroudi, Kusai; Silikas, Nick; Watts, David C

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the pulpal temperature rise induced during the polymerization of flowable and non-flowable composites using light-emitting diode (LED) and halogen (quartz-tungsten-halogen) light-curing units (LCUs). Five flowable and three non-flowable composites were examined. Pulpal temperature changes were recorded over 10 min in a sample primary tooth by a thermocouple. A conventional quartz-tungsten-halogen source and two LEDs, one of which was programmable, were used for light curing the resin composites. Three repetitions per material were made for each LCU. There was a wide range of temperature rises among the materials (P Temperature rises ranged between 1.3 degrees C for Filtek Supreme irradiated by low-power LED and 4.5 degrees C for Grandio Flow irradiated by high-power LED. The highest temperature rises were observed with both the LED high-power and soft-start LCUs. The time to reach the exothermic peak varied significantly between the materials (P temperature rise is related to both the radiant energy output from LCUs and the polymerization exotherm of resin composites. A greater potential risk for heat-induced pulp damage might be associated with high-power LED sources. Flowable composites exhibited higher temperature rises than non-flowable materials, because of higher resin contents.

  12. Testing of Performance of Optical Fibers Under Irradiation in Intense Radiation Fields, When Subjected to Very High Temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blue, Thomas [The Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States); Windl, Wolfgang [The Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States); Dickerson, Bryan [Luna Innovations, Inc. (United States)

    2013-01-03

    The primary objective of this project is to measure and model the performance of optical fibers in intense radiation fields when subjected to very high temperatures. This research will pave the way for fiber optic and optically based sensors under conditions expected in future high-temperature gas-cooled reactors. Sensor life and signal-to-noise ratios are susceptible to attenuation of the light signal due to scattering and absorbance in the fibers. This project will provide an experimental and theoretical study of the darkening of optical fibers in high-radiation and high-temperature environments. Although optical fibers have been studied for moderate radiation fluence and flux levels, the results of irradiation at very high temperatures have not been published for extended in-core exposures. Several previous multi-scale modeling efforts have studied irradiation effects on the mechanical properties of materials. However, model-based prediction of irradiation-induced changes in silica's optical transport properties has only recently started to receive attention due to possible applications as optical transmission components in fusion reactors. Nearly all damage-modeling studies have been performed in the molecular-dynamics domain, limited to very short times and small systems. Extended-time modeling, however, is crucial to predicting the long-term effects of irradiation at high temperatures, since the experimental testing may not encompass the displacement rate that the fibers will encounter if they are deployed in the VHTR. The project team will pursue such extended-time modeling, including the effects of the ambient and recrystallization. The process will be based on kinetic MC modeling using the concept of amorphous material consisting of building blocks of defect-pairs or clusters, which has been successfully applied to kinetic modeling in amorphized and recrystallized silicon. Using this procedure, the team will model compensation for rate effects, and

  13. HIGH-TEMPERATURE SAFETY TESTING OF IRRADIATED AGR-1 TRISO FUEL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stempien, John D.; Demkowicz, Paul A.; Reber, Edward L.; Chrisensen, Cad L.

    2016-11-01

    High-Temperature Safety Testing of Irradiated AGR-1 TRISO Fuel John D. Stempien, Paul A. Demkowicz, Edward L. Reber, and Cad L. Christensen Idaho National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1625 Idaho Falls, ID 83415, USA Corresponding Author: john.stempien@inl.gov, +1-208-526-8410 Two new safety tests of irradiated tristructural isotropic (TRISO) coated particle fuel have been completed in the Fuel Accident Condition Simulator (FACS) furnace at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). In the first test, three fuel compacts from the first Advanced Gas Reactor irradiation experiment (AGR-1) were simultaneously heated in the FACS furnace. Prior to safety testing, each compact was irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor to a burnup of approximately 15 % fissions per initial metal atom (FIMA), a fast fluence of 3×1025 n/m2 (E > 0.18 MeV), and a time-average volume-average (TAVA) irradiation temperature of about 1020 °C. In order to simulate a core-conduction cool-down event, a temperature-versus-time profile having a peak temperature of 1700 °C was programmed into the FACS furnace controllers. Gaseous fission products (i.e., Kr-85) were carried to the Fission Gas Monitoring System (FGMS) by a helium sweep gas and captured in cold traps featuring online gamma counting. By the end of the test, a total of 3.9% of an average particle’s inventory of Kr-85 was detected in the FGMS traps. Such a low Kr-85 activity indicates that no TRISO failures (failure of all three TRISO layers) occurred during the test. If released from the compacts, condensable fission products (e.g., Ag-110m, Cs-134, Cs-137, Eu-154, Eu-155, and Sr-90) were collected on condensation plates fitted to the end of the cold finger in the FACS furnace. These condensation plates were then analyzed for fission products. In the second test, five loose UCO fuel kernels, obtained from deconsolidated particles from an irradiated AGR-1 compact, were heated in the FACS furnace to a peak temperature of 1600 °C. This test had two

  14. Irradiation/temperature synergy effects on degradation and ageing of chlorosulphonated polyethylene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foucault, F.; Esnouf, S. E-mail: esnouf@drecam.cea.fr; Le Moeel, A

    2001-12-01

    Chlorosulphonated polyethylene (CSPE) irradiated with 2.5 MeV {beta} particles has been studied by means of FTIR spectroscopy. The effects of dose rate, temperature and atmosphere on molecular changes were investigated. The main modifications were loss of sulphonyl chloride groups, formation of trans-vinylene groups and in the presence of oxygen formation of oxidation products. Results were discussed in terms of interspur and intraspur reactions.

  15. Irradiation/temperature synergy effects on degradation and ageing of chlorosulphonated polyethylene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foucault, F.; Esnouf, S.; Le Moël, A.

    2001-12-01

    Chlorosulphonated polyethylene (CSPE) irradiated with 2.5 MeV β particles has been studied by means of FTIR spectroscopy. The effects of dose rate, temperature and atmosphere on molecular changes were investigated. The main modifications were loss of sulphonyl chloride groups, formation of trans-vinylene groups and in the presence of oxygen formation of oxidation products. Results were discussed in terms of interspur and intraspur reactions.

  16. Irradiation temperature in a polyethylene capsule and a capacity of a cooling system of the pneumatic irradiation facility in the KUR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okada, Moritami; Kitaoka, Yoshinori; Takada, Jitsuya; Kobayashi, Mitsue; Tsujimoto, Hitomi; Kozuka, Toshihiko; Kodaka, Hisao; Kanda, Kenji

    2000-07-01

    In the pneumatic irradiation facility (Pn facility) of the Kyoto University Reactor (KUR), a polyethylene capsule is used for the sample irradiation. The Pn facility is constructed of three systems of Pn-1, Pn-2 and Pn-3, in which the common polyethylene capsule is used. When the KUR is operating at 5 MW, there is a risk of melting polyethylene by heating from gamma-rays and neutrons, because it has a softening point ({approx}125degC). So, a cooling system of the Pn facility has been installed to refrigerate the polyethylene capsule. First, to estimate the capacity of the cooling system, the capsule-inside temperature in the irradiation position of each Pn facility (Pn-1, Pn-2 and Pn-3) was measured under 1 MW and 2 MW operating powers of the KUR. As the materials with a low cross-section are suitable for measuring temperature, carboxylic acids and amides were selected. The melting of these compounds was referred to estimate the maximum temperature during the irradiation. On the basis of the cooling capacity estimated, the cooling system has been installed in the Pn facilities. Then, under 5 MW operating power the irradiation temperatures of the Pn facilities were measured under operating of the cooling system. After the reconstruction of the Pn facilities in 1999, the irradiation temperature of the inside of the polyethylene capsule was about 60degC, 75degC and 70degC after 1 hour irradiation in the Pn-1, Pn-2 and Pn-3, respectively. (author)

  17. Accelerated corrosion and oxide dissolution in 316L stainless steel irradiated in situ in high temperature water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raiman, Stephen S.; Was, Gary S.

    2017-09-01

    316L stainless steel samples were irradiated with a proton beam while simultaneously exposed to high temperature water with added hydrogen (320 °C, 3 wppm H2, neutral pH) to study the effect of radiation on stainless steel corrosion. Irradiated samples had thinner and more porous inner oxides with a lower chromium content when compared to unirradiated samples. Observations suggest that depletion of chromium from the inner oxide can be attributed to the dissolution of chromium-rich spinel oxides in irradiated water, leading to an accelerated rate of inner oxide dissolution. Sample areas which were not irradiated, but were exposed to the flow of irradiated water were also found to be porous and deficient in chromium, indicating that these phenomena can be attributed primarily to water radiolysis. A new empirical equation for oxide growth and dissolution is used to describe the observed changes in oxide thickness under irradiation. An experiment in which a stainless steel sample was exposed to high temperature water (320 °C, 3 wppm H2, neutral pH) without irradiation, and then exposed for a second time with irradiation was conducted to observe the effect of irradiation on a pre-formed protective film. After the irradiated exposure, the sample exhibited chromium loss in regions which were directly irradiated, but not on regions exposed only to irradiated water, suggesting that a pre-formed protective oxide may be effective in preventing chromium loss due to irradiated water. Additionally, this observation suggests that enhanced kinetics under irradiation may have accelerated dissolution of chromium from the inner oxide.

  18. Solar Arrays for Low-Irradiance Low-Temperature and High-Radiation Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boca, Andreea (Principal Investigator); Stella, Paul; Kerestes, Christopher; Sharps, Paul

    2017-01-01

    This is the Base Period final report DRAFT for the JPL task 'Solar Arrays for Low-Irradiance Low-Temperature and High-Radiation Environments', under Task Plan 77-16518 TA # 21, for NASA's Extreme Environments Solar Power (EESP) project. This report covers the Base period of performance, 7/18/2016 through 5/2/2017.The goal of this project is to develop an ultra-high efficiency lightweight scalable solar array technology for low irradiance, low temperature and high-radiation (LILT/Rad) environments. The benefit this technology will bring to flight systems is a greater than 20 reduction in solar array surface area, and a six-fold reduction in solar array mass and volume. The EESP project objectives are summarized in the 'NRA Goal' column of Table 1. Throughout this report, low irradiance low temperature (LILT) refers to 5AU -125 C test conditions; beginning of life (BOL) refers to the cell state prior to radiation exposure; and end of life (EOL) refers to the test article condition after exposure to a radiation dose of 4e15 1MeV e(-)/cm(exp 2).

  19. A method for evaluation of proton plan robustness towards inter-fractional motion applied to pelvic lymph node irradiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Andreas G; Casares-Magaz, Oscar; Muren, Ludvig P

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The benefit of proton therapy may be jeopardized by dose deterioration caused by water equivalent path length (WEPL) variations. In this study we introduced a method to evaluate robustness of proton therapy with respect to inter-fractional motion and applied it to irradiation of the p......BACKGROUND: The benefit of proton therapy may be jeopardized by dose deterioration caused by water equivalent path length (WEPL) variations. In this study we introduced a method to evaluate robustness of proton therapy with respect to inter-fractional motion and applied it to irradiation......) to the planning target volume (PTV) were investigated. The optimized fluence maps for the pCT for each beam were applied onto all rCTs and the dose distributions were re-calculated. WEPL variation for each beam angle was computed by averaging over beams eye view WEPL distributions. RESULTS: Similarity...

  20. Photoacoustic spectroscopy applied to the study of the influence of laser irradiation on corn seeds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernandez Aguilar, C.; Michtchenko, A. [Instituto Politecnico Nacional (Mexico); Carballo, A. [Colegio de Postgraduados, Programa de Semillas (IREGEP) (Mexico); Cruz-Orea, A. [Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados-IPN (Mexico); Ivanov, R. [Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Unidad Academia de Fisica (Mexico); San Martin Martinez, E. [Centro de Investigacion en ciencia Aplicada y Tecnologia Avanzada-IPN (Mexico)

    2005-06-01

    In the present study we were interested in the effects of low intensity laser irradiation on hybrid corn seeds CL{sub 1} x CL{sub 4} when these seeds were exposed to different laser intensities and irradiation times. In order to observe qualitative differences in chlorophyll a and b optical absorption spectra of seedling's leaves, whose seeds were irradiated and non irradiated, were obtained by using photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS). A randomized complete blocks experimental design with three replications was used. The experimental unit included 10 seeds, from which we randomly choose three seedlings. The variance analysis (ANOVA) for both chlorophylls revealed significant (P < 0.05) differences among treatments. (authors)

  1. Uncertainty quantification of calculated temperatures for advanced gas reactor fuel irradiation experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pham, Binh Thi-Cam [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Hawkes, Grant Lynn [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Einerson, Jeffrey James [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-08-01

    This paper presents the quantification of uncertainty of the calculated temperature data for the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) fuel irradiation experiments conducted in the Advanced Test Reactor at Idaho National Laboratory in support of the Advanced Reactor Technology Research and Development program. Recognizing uncertainties inherent in physics and thermal simulations of the AGR tests, the results of the numerical simulations are used in combination with statistical analysis methods to improve qualification of measured data. The temperature simulation data for AGR tests are also used for validation of the fission product transport and fuel performance simulation models. These crucial roles of the calculated fuel temperatures in ensuring achievement of the AGR experimental program objectives require accurate determination of the model temperature uncertainties. To quantify the uncertainty of AGR calculated temperatures, this study identifies and analyzes ABAQUS model parameters of potential importance to the AGR predicted fuel temperatures. The selection of input parameters for uncertainty quantification of the AGR calculated temperatures is based on the ranking of their influences on variation of temperature predictions. Thus, selected input parameters include those with high sensitivity and those with large uncertainty. Propagation of model parameter uncertainty and sensitivity is then used to quantify the overall uncertainty of AGR calculated temperatures. Expert judgment is used as the basis to specify the uncertainty range for selected input parameters. The input uncertainties are dynamic accounting for the effect of unplanned events and changes in thermal properties of capsule components over extended exposure to high temperature and fast neutron irradiation. The sensitivity analysis performed in this work went beyond the traditional local sensitivity. Using experimental design, analysis of pairwise interactions of model parameters was performed to establish

  2. Tensile and impact properties of vanadium-base alloys irradiated at low temperatures in the ATR-A1 experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsai, H.; Nowicki, L.J.; Billone, M.C.; Chung, H.M.; Smith, D.L. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1998-03-01

    Subsize tensile and Charpy specimens made from several V-(4-5)Cr-(4-5)Ti alloys were irradiated in the ATR-A1 experiment to study the effects of low-temperature irradiation on mechanical properties. These specimens were contained in lithium-bonded subcapsules and irradiated at temperatures between {approx}200 and 300 C. Peak neutron damage was {approx}4.7 dpa. Postirradiation testing of these specimens has begun. Preliminary results from a limited number of specimens indicate a significant loss of work-hardening capability and dynamic toughness due to the irradiation. These results are consistent with data from previous low-temperature neutron irradiation experiments on these alloys.

  3. A study of the physiological changes and the nutritional qualities of irradiated apples and the effect of irradiation on apples stored at room temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Chuanyao; Jiang Mengyue; Gao Meixu; Ma Xiuye; Zhang Shufen; Liu Shucheng (Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Beijing (China). Inst. for Application of Atomic Energy)

    The effects of [gamma]-irradiation on the metabolism and nutritional qualities of Golden Delicious apples and on the lethality of pathogenic fungi have been studied. The storage effect of irradiation on apples at room temperature has been observed. Results showed that the respiratory intensity of irradiated apple at 0.3-0.5 kGy was near or lower than that of unirradiated apple after 15 days irradiation. The amount of ethylene release was obviously inhibited when fruits were irradiated with 0.3-0.7 kGy. The flesh firmness of apples irradiated with 0.3-0.9 kGy was higher than that of unirradiated apple with increased storage time. The negative correlations between the flesh firmness and the activities of pectinesterase (PE), polygalacturonase (PG) were observed when the dosage was lower than 1.5 kGy. The 2.0 kGy irradiation damaged the ultrastructure of cells, induced the softening of apple. When apples were irradiated with 0.7-2.0 kGy, the contents of 4 important volatile components of apple would be decreased. However, this dose had no effects on the pure chemicals. Studies showed that there was no significant effect of irradiation with 0.3-2.0 kGy on the nutritional qualities of apples and this dose range could effectively control the verticillate pathogenic fungi. The result of storage experiment showed that rotting of fruits decreased by 0.3-0.9 kGy irradiation. (author).

  4. Phyocyanin extraction from microalgae Spirulina platensis assisted by ultrasound irradiation: effect of time and temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadiyanto

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This research was aimed to extract phycocyanin from microalgae Spirulina platensis using an extraction assisted by ultrasound irradiation. The extraction was conducted by using variable of extraction time, temperature and ultrasound frequency, while ethanol was used as solvent. The results show that the yield of phycocyanin extract was 15.97% at constant frequency of 42 kHz and 11.24% at constant frequency of 28 kHz, while the soxhlet extraction method obtained yield at 11.13%. The ultrasound could reduce the extraction time from 4 hrs (conventional to 20 minutes, while the optimum temperature of extraction was found at 55°C.

  5. Measurements of extreme orientation-dependent temperature increase around an irradiated gold nanorod

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ma, Haiyan; Bendix, Pól Martin; Oddershede, Lene Broeng

    2012-01-01

    as nanoscopic heat transducers, it is essential to know how the photothermal efficiency depends on parameters like size and shape. Here we present the measurements of the temperature profile around single irradiated gold nanorods and nanospheres placed on a biologically relevant matrix, a lipid bilayer. [1......] We developed a novel assay based on molecular partitioning between two coexisting phases, the gel and fluid phase, within the bilayer. [2, 3] This assay allows for a direct measurement of local temperature gradients, an assay which does not necessitate any pre-assumptions about...

  6. Relationship between Luminosity, Irradiance and Temperature of star on the orbital parameters of exoplanets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavel Pintr

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available For 759 exoplanets detected by radial velocities method we found that distances of exoplanets from central star comply in general Schmidt law and these distances depend on the stellar surface temperature. Every stellar spectral class has a little different distribution. The Luminosity and the Irradiance has not effect on the distribution of distances of exoplanets. We have found the new formulas for calculation of effective temperature of exoplanets for spectral classes F, G, and K. These new formulas we can use for future calculation of habitable planets.

  7. Microstructure Evolution and Mechanical Response of Nanolaminate Composites Irradiated with Helium at Elevated Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Nan; Demkowicz, Michael J.; Mara, Nathan A.

    2017-11-01

    We summarize recent work on helium (He) interaction with various heterophase boundaries under high temperature irradiation. We categorize the ion-affected material beneath the He-implanted surface into three regions of depth, based on the He/vacancy ratio. The differing defect structures in these three regions lead to the distinct temperature sensitivity of He-induced microstructure evolution. The effect of He bubbles or voids on material mechanical performance is explored. Overall design guidelines for developing materials where He-induced damage can be mitigated in materials are discussed.

  8. Role of wing color and seasonal changes in ambient temperature and solar irradiation on predicted flight efficiency of the Albatross.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassanalian, M; Throneberry, G; Ali, M; Ben Ayed, S; Abdelkefi, A

    2018-01-01

    Drag reduction of the wings of migrating birds is crucial to their flight efficiency. Wing color impacts absorption of solar irradiation which may affect drag but there is little known in this area. To this end, the drag reduction induced by the thermal effect of the wing color of migrating birds with unpowered flight modes is presented in this study. Considering this natural phenomenon in the albatross as an example of migrating birds, and applying an energy balance for this biological system, a thermal analysis is performed on the wings during the summer and winter to obtain different ranges of air density, viscosity, and wing surface temperature brought about from a range of ambient temperatures and climatic conditions seen in different seasons and to study their effects. The exact shape of the albatross wing is used and nine different wing colors are considered in order to gain a better understanding of the effect different colors' absorptivities make on the change in aerodynamic performances. The thermal effect is found to be more important during the summer than during the winter due to the higher values of solar irradiation and a maximum drag reduction of 7.8% is found in summer changing the wing color from light white to dark black. The obtained results show that albatrosses with darker colored wings are more efficient (constant lift to drag ratio and drag reduction) and have better endurance due to this drag reduction. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Charge collection in Si detectors irradiated in situ at superfluid helium temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verbitskaya, Elena, E-mail: elena.verbitskaya@cern.ch [Ioffe Institute, 26 Politekhnicheskaya str., St. Petersburg 194021 (Russian Federation); Eremin, Vladimir; Zabrodskii, Andrei [Ioffe Institute, 26 Politekhnicheskaya str., St. Petersburg 194021 (Russian Federation); Dehning, Bernd; Kurfürst, Christoph; Sapinski, Mariusz; Bartosik, Marcin R. [CERN, CH-1211, Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Egorov, Nicolai [Research Institute of Material Science and Technology, 4 Passage 4806, Moscow, Zelenograd 124460 (Russian Federation); Härkönen, Jaakko [Helsinki Institute of Physics, P.O.Box 64 (Gustaf Hallströmin katu 2) FI-00014 University of Helsinki (Finland)

    2015-10-01

    Silicon and diamond detectors operated in a superfluid helium bath are currently being considered for the upgrade of the LHC beam loss monitoring system. The detectors would be installed in immediate proximity of the superconducting coils of the triplet magnets. We present here the results of the in situ irradiation test for silicon detectors using 23 GeV protons while keeping the detectors at a temperature of 1.9 K. Red laser (630 nm) Transient Current Technique and DC current measurements were used to study the pulse response and collected charge for silicon detectors irradiated to a maximum radiation fluence of 1×10{sup 16} p/cm{sup 2}. The dependence between collected charge and irradiation fluence was parameterized using the Hecht equation and assumption of a uniform electric field distribution. The collected charge was found to degrade with particle fluence for both bias polarities. We observed that the main factor responsible for this degradation was related to trapping of holes on the donor-type radiation-induced defects. In contrast to expectations, along with formation of donors, acceptor-type defects (electron traps) are introduced into the silicon bulk. This suggests that the current models describing charge collection in irradiated silicon detectors require an extension for taking into account trapping at low temperatures with a contribution of shallow levels. New in situ irradiation tests are needed and planned now to extend statistics of the results and gain a deeper insight into the physics of low temperature detector operation in harsh radiation environment. - Highlights: • Si detectors irradiated in situ at 1.9 K by 23 GeV protons are further studied. • Trapping parameters are derived from the fits of collected charge vs. fluence data. • Acceptor-type defects are likely to be induced along with donor-type ones. • Trapping of holes has a dominating effect on the collected charge degradation. • New tests are planned to gain deeper insight

  10. Dynamic laser speckle applied to the analysis of maturation process of irradiated fresh fruits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincitorio, F. M.; Budini, N.; Freyre, C.; Mulone, C.; Fiorucci, M. P.; López, A. J.; Ramil, A.

    2012-10-01

    The treatment of fresh fruits with different doses of ionizing radiation has been found effective for delaying ripening and, in this way, to extend shelf life. This preservation method is likely to produce some functional or constitutive changes in the cellular structure of the fruit. In this work, a test of the effectiveness of fruit irradiation with relatively low doses was performed by using dynamic speckle imaging. Bananas from a same lot were chosen, being a first series of them irradiated with different doses of 0.2, 0.4 and 0.6 kGy (Gy = J/kg) and a second series with doses of 0.2, 0.4, 0.6 and 1 kGy. Non irradiated bananas (0 kGy) were considered as the lot reference for contrast. Irradiation was carried out at the Semi-Industrial Cobalt 60 facility of the Ezeiza Atomic Center, with an activity of 6 × 105 Curie and a dose rate of 28.5 Gy/min. The objective of this work is to analyze differences in the maturation process between irradiated and nonirradiated fruits by means of dynamic speckle pattern evaluation.

  11. Effect of pressure applied during casting on temperatures beneath casts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deignan, Brian J; Iaquinto, Joseph M; Eskildsen, Scott M; Woodcock, Cassandra A; Owen, John R; Wayne, Jennifer S; Kuester, Victoria G

    2011-01-01

    Burns and pressure sores are common injuries during cast application. Various factors such as water temperature, padding, and cast material layers may play a role in these injuries; however, the effect of cast molding on temperatures and pressures has not been investigated. This raises the following questions, does the application of molding during cast application: (1) alter skin level temperatures in a variety of cast materials? and (2) risk inducing either thermal injury or pressure necrosis? An upper extremity model was created to measure pressure and temperature underneath casting materials. Cast padding, water bath temperature, and cast thickness were standardized. A 3-point mold was simulated using 3 casting materials-Fiberglass only, Plaster Only splint, and Plaster splint overwrapped with Fiberglass-while pressure and temperature were recorded. : Pressure application led to a statistically significant (PFiberglass combination reached an average peak temperature of 47.9°C, which was maintained for up to 6 minutes. Neither Fiberglass nor Plaster Only reached peak temperatures of this magnitude (average of 42.7 and 43.6°C, respectively). Peak (369 mm Hg) and highest residual (21 mm Hg) pressures were below harmful levels. Pressure application during casting is a risk factor for burn injuries. Care should be taken when molding a plaster splint overwrapped in fiberglass by waiting until the plaster has fully cooled. Combined with other known risk factors, the pressure from molding a cast could increase the likelihood of causing cutaneous burns.

  12. Inactivation of dried bacteria and bacterial spores by means of gamma irradiation at high temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emborg, C

    1974-05-01

    Dried preparations with Streptococcus faecium, strain A(2)1, and spores of Bacillus sphaericus, strain C(I)A, normally used for control of the microbiological efficiency of radiation sterilization plants and preparations with spores of Bacillus subtilis, normally used for control of sterilization by dry heat, formalin, and ethylene oxide, as well as similar preparations with Micrococcus radiodurans, strain R(1), and spores of Bacillus globigii (B. subtilis, var. niger) were gamma irradiated with dose rates from 16 to 70 krad/h at temperatures from 60 to 100 C. At 80 C the radiation response of the spore preparations was the same as at room temperature, whereas the radiation resistance of the preparations with the two vegetative strains was reduced. At 100 C the radiation response of preparations with spores of B. subtilis was unaffected by the high temperature, whereas at 16 and and 25 krad/h the radiation resistance of the radiation-resistant sporeformer B. sphaericus, strain C(I)A, was reduced to the level of radiation resistance of preparations with spores of B. subtilis. It is concluded that combinations of heat and gamma irradiation at the temperatures and dose rates tested may have very few practical applications in sterilization of medical equipment.

  13. Low-temperature TCT characterization of heavily proton irradiated p-type magnetic Czochralski silicon detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Härkönen, J; Luukka, P; Kassamakov, I; Autioniemi, M; Tuominen, E; Sane, P; Pusa, P; Räisänen, J; Eremin, V; Verbitskaya, E; Li, Z

    2007-01-01

    n+/p−/p+ pad detectors processed at the Microelectronics Center of Helsinki University of Technology on boron-doped p-type high-resistivity magnetic Czochralski (MCz-Si) silicon substrates have been investigated by the transient current technique (TCT) measurements between 100 and 240 K. The detectors were irradiated by 9 MeV protons at the Accelerator Laboratory of University of Helsinki up to 1 MeV neutron equivalent fluence of 2×1015 n/cm2. In some of the detectors the thermal donors (TD) were introduced by intentional heat treatment at 430 °C. Hole trapping time constants and full depletion voltage values were extracted from the TCT data. We observed that hole trapping times in the order of 10 ns were found in heavily (above 1×1015 neq/cm2) irradiated samples. These detectors could be fully depleted below 500 V in the temperature range of 140–180 K.

  14. Measurements of extreme orientation-dependent temperature increase around an irradiated gold nanorod

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ma, Haiyan; Bendix, Pól Martin; Oddershede, Lene Broeng

    2012-01-01

    When irradiated at its resonance frequency, a metallic nanoparticle efficiently converts the absorbed energy into heat which is locally dissipated. This effect can be used in photothermal treatments, e.g., of cancer cells. However, to fully exploit the functionality of metallic nanoparticles...... as nanoscopic heat transducers, it is essential to know how the photothermal efficiency depends on parameters like size and shape. Here we present the measurements of the temperature profile around single irradiated gold nanorods and nanospheres placed on a biologically relevant matrix, a lipid bilayer. [1...... of light by the nanorod and the corresponding dissipated heat strongly depends on the orientation of the nanorod with respect to the polarization. Finally, by comparing to spherical gold nanoparticles, we demonstrate how a change in shape, from spherical to rod like, leads to a dramatic enhancement...

  15. Effects of High Energy Electron Irradiation on a Yttrium Barium(2) Copper(3) Oxygen(7-delta) High Temperature Superconductor

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-09-01

    expulsion of magnetic fields from the interior of a superconductor such that B = 0 and is the phenome- non that explains magnetic levitation . From Ohm’s Law...2Cu 30 7 - HIGH TEMPERATURE SUPERCONDUCTOR by Sean Mark Connors September 1991 Thesis Advisor: X. K. Maruyama Approved for public release...if necessary and identify by btock numbe,) FiE GP<P ,€ 5 pCOO HIGH TEMPERATURE SUPERCONDUCTORS , IRRADIATION EFFECTS, ELECTRON IRRADIATION

  16. GENOTYPIC VARIATION IN CHLOROPHYLL FLUORESCENCE PARAMETERS, PHOTOSYNTHESIS AND GROWTH OF TOMATO GROWN AT LOW-TEMPERATURE AND LOW IRRADIANCE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    JANSSEN, LHJ; VANOEVEREN, JC; VANHASSELT, PR; KUIPER, PJC

    1995-01-01

    The genetic variation in low temperature sensitivity of eight tomato genotypes grown at suboptimal temperature (19 degrees C) and at low irradiance (140 mu mol m(-2) s(-1)) was assessed at the plant, chloroplast and thylakoid membrane levels. Temperature effects on the thylakoid membrane were

  17. The Effects of Cells Temperature Increment and Variations of Irradiation for Monocrystalline Photovoltaic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuad Rahman Soeharto, Faishal; Hermawan

    2017-04-01

    Photovoltaic cell technology has been developed to meet the target of 17% Renewable Energy in 2025 accordance with Indonesia Government Regulation No. 5 2006. Photovoltaic cells are made of semiconductor materials, namely silicon or germanium (p-n junction). These cells need the light that comes from solar irradiation which brings energy photons to convert light energy into electrical energy. It is different from the solar heater that requires heat energy or thermal of sunlight that is normally used for drying or heating water. Photovoltaic cells requires energy photons to perform the energy conversion process, the photon energy can be derived from sunlight. Energy photon is taken from the sun light along with the advent of heat due to black-body radiation, which can lead to temperature increments of photovoltaic cells. Increment of 1°C can decreased photovoltaic cell voltage of up to 2.3 mV per cell. In this research, it will be discuss the analysis of the effect of rising temperatures and variations of irradiation on the type monocrystalline photovoltaic. Those variation are analyzed, simulated and experiment by using a module of experiment. The test results show that increment temperature from 25° C to 80° C at cell of photovoltaic decrease the output voltage of the photovoltaic cell at 4.21 V, and it also affect the power output of the cell which decreases up to 0.7523 Watt. In addition, the bigger the value of irradiation received by cell at amount of 1000 W / m2, produce more output power cells at the same temperature.

  18. STATUS OF TRISO FUEL IRRADIATIONS IN THE ADVANCED TEST REACTOR SUPPORTING HIGH-TEMPERATURE GAS-COOLED REACTOR DESIGNS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davenport, Michael; Petti, D. A.; Palmer, Joe

    2016-11-01

    The United States Department of Energy’s Advanced Reactor Technologies (ART) Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program is irradiating up to seven low enriched uranium (LEU) tri-isotopic (TRISO) particle fuel (in compact form) experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). These irradiations and fuel development are being accomplished to support development of the next generation reactors in the United States. The experiments will be irradiated over the next several years to demonstrate and qualify new TRISO coated particle fuel for use in high temperature gas reactors. The goals of the experiments are to provide irradiation performance data to support fuel process development, to qualify fuel for normal operating conditions, to support development and validation of fuel performance and fission product transport models and codes, and to provide irradiated fuel and materials for post irradiation examination (PIE) and safety testing. The experiments, which will each consist of several independent capsules, will be irradiated in an inert sweep gas atmosphere with individual on-line temperature monitoring and control of each capsule. The sweep gas will also have on-line fission product monitoring on its effluent to track performance of the fuel in each individual capsule during irradiation. The first experiment (designated AGR-1) started irradiation in December 2006 and was completed in November 2009. The second experiment (AGR-2) started irradiation in June 2010 and completed in October 2013. The third and fourth experiments have been combined into a single experiment designated (AGR-3/4), which started its irradiation in December 2011 and completed in April 2014. Since the purpose of this experiment was to provide data on fission product migration and retention in the NGNP reactor, the design of this experiment was significantly different from the first two experiments, though the control

  19. Time-resolved temperature measurement and numerical simulation of superposed pulsed Nd:YAG laser irradiated silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Xueming; Pan, Yunxiang; Jia, Zhichao; Shen, Zhonghua; Lu, Jian; Ni, Xiaowu

    2017-05-01

    Time-resolved surface temperature of single crystal silicon was measured by an infrared radiation pyrometer. The silicon sample was irradiated by two pulsed Nd:YAG lasers with pulse duration of 1ms superposed by 7ns pulses, referred to as combined pulse laser (CPL). The change of the damage radius with the millisecond (ms) laser energy density was studied, and then compared with that of single ms laser irradiation. An axisymmetric numerical model was established for calculation of the temperature field distribution while silicon was irradiated by single ms laser and CPL, respectively. Compared with experimental results, the CPL-silicon damage mechanism was discussed.

  20. Theoretical and practical implications of the effects of temperature during irradiation and during pre- and post-irradiation storage on the response of thermoluminescence dosimeters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gail de Planque, E.

    1984-01-01

    Experiments have been conducted to determine the applicability of the Randall-Wilkins theory for describing the behavior of CaF/sub 2/:Mn thermoluminescence dosimeters (Harshaw TLD-400 chips). Results were obtained for four different conditions: irradiation followed by storage, irradiation after storage, irradiation both preceded and followed by storage, and continuous simultaneous irradiation and storage. The experiments were performed for storage intervals of approximately 1, 2, 3, 5, 6 and 7 days at five different storage temperatures: -25, +20, +65, +150 and +175/sup 0/C. The results indicate fading that is described not by the Randall-Wilkins theory but rather as a linear function of the logarithm of the storage time. While the results suggest that the trapping efficiency is independent of temperature, they do demonstrate a small decrease in TL response with storage time prior to irradiation which is independent of temperature and time (>17 hours) and hence probably not dosimetric in origin but perhaps optically related. Glow curve analyses support the concept of a band of traps rather than a single trap. The overall results are compared to other data available in the literature most of which is for room-temperature storage. These data, for storage periods ranging from minutes to one year, can also be described as a linear function of the logarithm of the storage time and are remarkably consistent when uniformly normalized. Although peripheral experiments revealed problems associated with self-irradiation as well as a decline in sensitivity with use, the stability experiment results verify the highly favorable stability properties of CaF/sub 2/:Mn for widespread application.

  1. Evaluation of clip localization for different kilovoltage imaging modalities as applied to partial breast irradiation setup

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buehler, Andreas; Ng, Sook-Kien; Lyatskaya, Yulia; Stsepankou, Dzmitry; Hesser, Jurgen; Zygmanski, Piotr [University Medical Centre Mannheim, University of Heidelberg, Theodor-Kutzer Ufer 1-3, D-68167 Mannheim (Germany); Department of Radiation Oncology and Brigham and Women' s Hospital, and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 (United States); University Medical Centre Mannheim, University of Heidelberg, Theodor-Kutzer Ufer 1-3, D-68167 Mannheim (Germany); Department of Radiation Oncology and Brigham and Women' s Hospital, and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 (United States)

    2009-03-15

    Surgical clip localization and image quality were evaluated for different types of kilovoltage cone beam imaging modalities as applied to partial breast irradiation (PBI) setup. These modalities included (i) clinically available radiographs and cone beam CT (CB-CT) and (ii) various alternative modalities based on partial/sparse/truncated CB-CT. An anthropomorphic torso-breast phantom with surgical clips was used for the imaging studies. The torso phantom had artificial lungs, and the attached breast phantom was a mammographic phantom with realistic shape and tissue inhomogeneities. Three types of clips of variable size were used in two orthogonal orientations to assess their in-/cross-plane characteristics for image-guided setup of the torso-breast phantom in supine position. All studies were performed with the Varian on-board imaging (OBI, Varian) system. CT reconstructions were calculated with the standard Feldkamp-Davis-Kress algorithm. First, the radiographs were studied for a wide range of viewing angles to characterize image quality for various types of body anatomy in the foreground/background of the clips. Next, image reconstruction quality was evaluated for partial/sparse/truncated CB-CT. Since these modalities led to reconstructions with strong artifacts due to insufficient input data, a knowledge-based CT reconstruction method was also tested. In this method, the input data to the reconstruction algorithm were modified by combining complementary data sets selected from the treatment and reference projections. Different partial/sparse/truncated CB-CT scan types were studied depending on the total arc angle, angular increment between the consequent views (CT projections), orientation of the arc center with respect to the imaged breast and chest wall, and imaging field size. The central angles of the viewing arcs were either tangential or orthogonal to the chest wall. Several offset positions of the phantom with respect to the reference position were

  2. Release of fission products from irradiated aluminide fuel at high temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shibata, T.; Kanda, K.; Mishima, K.

    1982-01-01

    Irradiated uranium aluminide fuel plates of 40% U-235 enrichment were heated for the determination of fission products released under flowing helium gas at temperatures up to and higher than the melting point of fuel-cladding material. The release of fission products from the fuel plate at temperature below 500/sup 0/C was found negligible. The firist rapid release of fission products was observed with the occurrence of blistering at 561 +- 1/sup 0/C on the plates. The next release at 585/sup 0/C might be caused by melting of the cladding material of 6061-Al alloy. The last release of fission product gases was occurred at the eutectic temperature of 640/sup 0/C of U-Al/sub x/. The released material was mostly xenon, but small amounts of iodine and cesium were observed.

  3. Temperature effect of irradiated target surface on distribution of nanoparticles formed by implantation

    CERN Document Server

    Stepanov, A L; Popok, V N

    2001-01-01

    The composition layers, containing the metal nanoparticles, synthesized thorough implantation of the Ag sup + ions with the energy of 60 keV and the dose of 3 x 10 sup 1 sup 6 ion/cm sup 2 into the sodium-calcium silicate glass by the ion current of 3 mu A/cm sup 2 and the sublayer temperature of 35 deg C are studied. The obtained implantation results are analyzed in dependence on the temperature effects, developing for the glass samples of various thickness. The data on the silver distribution, the metal nanoparticles formation and growth by depth are obtained from the optical reflection spectra. It is demonstrated that minor changes in the surface temperature of the irradiated glass sublayer lead to noticeable diversities in the regularities of the nanoparticles formation in the sample volume

  4. Pressure and temperature phase diagram of Gd{sub 2}Ti{sub 2}O{sub 7} under irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Catillon, G. [Université Paris-Est, G2I, EA4119, 5 Blvd. Descartes, F-77454 Marne la Vallée Cedex 2 (France); Chartier, A., E-mail: alain.chartier@cea.fr [CEA, DEN, DMN, SCCME, F-91191 Gif-Sur-Yvette Cedex (France)

    2014-11-21

    The pressure and temperature phase diagram of Gd{sub 2}Ti{sub 2}O{sub 7} under irradiation are calculated by means of molecular dynamics calculations. The critical temperature for amorphization obeys a linear law with pressure. Gd{sub 2}Ti{sub 2}O{sub 7} under irradiation transits towards the fluorite above this temperature and amorphizes below. The configuration of the Ti interstitial reveals to be the key of the amorphizability of Gd{sub 2}Ti{sub 2}O{sub 7}. Its stability depends upon disorder and pressure. Low pressure promotes the stabilization of Ti linked-polyhedra that drive the system to the amorphous state under irradiation. Conversely, high pressure activates its destabilization to interstitials that recombine with vacancies, driving the system to the fluorite structure under irradiation.

  5. Results of High-Temperature Heating Test for Irradiated Metallic Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, June-Hyung; Cheon, Jin-Sik; Lee, Byoung-Oon; Kim, Jun-Hwan; Kim, Hee-Moon; Yoo, Boung-Ok; Jung, Yang-Hong; Ahn, Sang-Bok; Lee, Chan-Bock [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    The U and Pu constituents in the fuel, however, tend to interact metallurgically with iron-based claddings at elevated temperatures during nominal steady-state operating conditions and off-normal reactor events. In particular, if the temperature is raised above the eutectic temperature of metallic fuel, e.g., in an off-normal reactor event, the fuel can form a mixture of liquid and solid phases that may promote further cladding interaction. Such fuel-cladding chemical interaction, in conjunction with fission gas pressure loading, can potentially shorten fuel pin lifetime and eventually cause cladding breach. In this work, microstructure observation results through microscope, SEM and EPMA are reported for the irradiated U-10Zr and U-10Zr-5Ce fuel slugs with T92 cladding after high-temperature heating test. Also, the measured eutectic penetration rate is compared with the prediction value by the existing eutectic penetration correlation being used for design and modelling purposes. Microstructure of the irradiated U-10Zr and U-10Zr-5Ce fuel slug with T92 cladding after high-temperature heating test were investigated through the microscope, SEM and EPMA. Also, the measured maximum eutectic penetration rate along cladding direction was compared with the prediction value by existing eutectic penetration correlation. In the case of U-10Zr/T92 specimen, migration phenomena of U, Zr, and Fe as well as Nd lanthanide fission product were observed at the eutectic melting region. The measured penetration rate was almost similar to prediction value by existing eutectic penetration rate correlation.

  6. Formation of rutile fasciculate zone induced by sunlight irradiation at room temperature and its hemocompatibility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Xuan-Hui; Zheng, Xiang; Cheng, Yuan [School of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, Zhejiang University of Technology, Hangzhou 310014 (China); Li, Guo-Hua, E-mail: nanozjut@zjut.edu.cn [School of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, Zhejiang University of Technology, Hangzhou 310014 (China); State Key Laboratory Breeding Base of Green Chemistry Synthesis Technology, Zhejiang University of Technology, Hangzhou 310014 (China); Research Center of Nanoscience and Technology, Zhejiang University of Technology, Hangzhou 310014 (China); Chen, Xiao-Ping, E-mail: chxp@zjut.edu.cn [School of Biological and Environmental Engineering, Zhejiang University of Technology, Hangzhou 310014 (China); Zheng, Jian-Hui [School of Biological and Environmental Engineering, Zhejiang University of Technology, Hangzhou 310014 (China)

    2013-08-01

    The fasciculate zone of phase pure rutile was fabricated under sunlight irradiation at room temperature, using titanium tetrachloride as a sole precursor. The crystal phase, morphology and microstructure, and optical absorption behavior of the samples were characterized by X-ray Diffraction, High-Resolution Transmission Electron Microscope (HRTEM) and UV–vis Diffuse Reflectance Spectra (DRS), respectively. XRD results show that the crystal phase of the sample is composed of rutile only, and a lattice distortion displays in the crystallite of the sample. HRTEM results show that the morphology of rutile particle is fasciculate zone constituted of nanoparticles with a diameter of 4–7 nm, and these particles grow one by one and step by step. The pattern of the selected area electron diffraction of the sample is Kikuchi type, which can be attributed to the predominant orientation growth of rutile nanoparticles along [001] induced by sunlight irradiation. DRS results show that the absorption threshold of the sample is 415 nm, corresponding to the band gap energy of 2.99 eV, which is lower than the band gap energy of rutile, 3.03 eV. Blood compatibility measurement shows that the sample has no remarkable effect on hemolytic and coagulation activity. The percent hemolysis of red blood cells is less than 5% even treated with a big dosage of the fasciculate rutile and under UV irradiation, and there are no obvious changes of plasma recalcification time after the rutile treatment. Thus, the novel structure of rutile fasciculate has low potential toxicity for blood and is hemocompatibility safe. Highlights: • A novel approach to fabricate the fasciculate zone of phase pure rutile • The fasciculate grows from a particle to nanorod and to fasciculate, step by step. • A preferred orientation growth induced by sunlight irradiation in the fasciculate • The rutile fasciculate is low toxicity for blood and is hemocompatibility safe.

  7. Fuzzy Logic Applied to an Oven Temperature Control System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagabhushana KATTE

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes the methodology of design and development of fuzzy logic based oven temperature control system. As simple fuzzy logic controller (FLC structure with an efficient realization and a small rule base that can be easily implemented in existing underwater control systems is proposed. The FLC has been designed using bell-shaped membership function for fuzzification, 49 control rules in its rule base and centre of gravity technique for defuzzification. Analog interface card with 16-bits resolution is designed to achieve higher precision in temperature measurement and control. The experimental results of PID and FLC implemented system are drawn for a step input and presented in a comparative fashion. FLC exhibits fast response and it has got sharp rise time and smooth control over conventional PID controller. The paper scrupulously discusses the hardware and software (developed using ‘C’ language features of the system.

  8. Low-temperature thermochronology applied to ancient settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enkelmann, Eva; Garver, John I.

    2016-01-01

    Low-temperature thermochronometric dating techniques are commonly used to reveal and quantify the spatial and temporal pattern of cooling and exhumation in many active mountain belts. These methods illuminate the relationship between rock exhumation, and the processes that bring rock to the surface, including climate-driven surface processes. Thermochronological studies on rocks in ancient settings (Precambrian and Paleozoic) are far more complicated, and in general have largely failed to reveal exhumation processes in orogenic belts, mainly due to imprecision of the technique, complications from radiation damage, and subsequent resetting. However, in a few locations, remnants of the exhumation record of ancient orogens may be studied with low-temperature dating techniques and in these cases we can gather first-order information on tectonics, thermal events, and exhumation processes that have occurred in the deep past. Here we provide an overview of the most common low-temperature thermochronology methods of fission-track and (U-Th)/He dating of apatite and zircon and discuss methodological challenges in their application to old settings. We review several case studies from the Northern Appalachians, central Argentina, the Canadian Shield, central Wyoming, and the European Variscides where thermochronology data have been successful in reconstructing geologic processes in deep-time that have affected the upper crust. With these examples we provide sampling strategies and analytical approaches that partly circumvent issues related to radiation damage in old mineral grains that result in changes in the retention of helium and fission tracks.

  9. Development of Temperature Distribution and Light Propagation Model in Biological Tissue Irradiated by 980 nm Laser Diode and Using COMSOL Simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shurrab, Kawthar; Kochaji, Nabil; Bachir, Wesam

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: The purpose of this project is to develop a mathematical model to investigate light distribution and study effective parameters such as laser power and irradiated time to get the optimal laser dosage to control hyperthermia. This study is expected to have a positive impact and a better simulation on laser treatment planning of biological tissues. Moreover, it may enable us to replace animal tests with the results of a COMSOL predictive model. Methods: We used in this work COMSOL5 model to simulate the light diffusion and bio-heat equation of the mouse tissue when irradiated by 980 nm laser diode and the effect of different parameters (laser power, and irradiated time) on the surrounding tissue of the tumor treatment in order to prevent damage from excess heat Results: The model was applied to study light propagation and several parameters (laser power, irradiated time) and their impact on light-heat distribution within the tumor in the mouse back tissue The best result is at laser power 0.5 W and time irradiation 0.5 seconds in order to get the maximum temperature hyperthermia at 52°C. Conclusion: The goal of this study is to simulate a mouse model to control excess heating of tissue and reduce the number of animals in experimental research to get the best laser parameters that was safe for use in living animals and in human subjects.

  10. Effects of low temperature neutron irradiation on deformation behavior of austenitic stainless steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pawel, J.E.; Rowcliffe, A.F.; Alexander, D.J.; Grossbeck, M.L. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, TN (United States); Shiba, K.

    1996-04-01

    An austenitic stainless steel, designated 316LN-IG, has been chosen for the first wall/shield (FW/S) structure for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). The proposed operational temperature range for the structure (100 to 250{degree}C) is below the temperature regimes for void swelling (400-600{degree}C) and for helium embrittlement (500-700{degree}C). However, the proposed neutron dose is such that large changes in yield strength, deformation mode, and strain hardening capacity could be encountered which could significantly affect fracture properties. Definition of the irradiation regimes in which this phenomenon occurs is essential to the establishment of design rules to protect against various modes of failure.

  11. Temperature evaluation of dental implant surface irradiated with high-power diode laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rios, F G; Viana, E R; Ribeiro, G M; González, J C; Abelenda, A; Peruzzo, D C

    2016-09-01

    The prevalence of peri-implantitis and the absence of a standard approach for decontamination of the dental implant surface have led to searches for effective therapies. Since the source of diode lasers is portable, has reduced cost, and does not cause damage to the titanium surface of the implant, high-power diode lasers have been used for this purpose. The effect of laser irradiation on the implants is the elevation of the temperature surface. If this elevation exceeds 47 °C, the bone tissue is irreversibly damaged, so for a safety therapy, the laser parameters should be controlled. In this study, a diode laser of GaAsAl was used to irradiate titanium dental implants, for powers 1.32 to 2.64 W (real) or 2.00 to 4.00 W (nominal), in continuous/pulsed mode DC/AC, with exposure time of 5/10 s, with/without air flow for cooling. The elevation of the temperature was monitored in real time in two positions: cervical and apical. The best results for decontamination using a 968-nm diode laser were obtained for a power of 1.65 and 1.98 W (real) for 10 s, in DC or AC mode, with an air flow of 2.5 l/min. In our perspective in this article, we determine a suggested approach for decontamination of the dental implant surface using a 968-nm diode laser.

  12. Gamma-ray irradiation and post-irradiation at room and elevated temperature response of pMOS dosimeters with thick gate oxides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pejović Momčilo M.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Gamma-ray irradiation and post-irradiation response at room and elevated temperature have been studied for radiation sensitive pMOS transistors with gate oxide thickness of 100 and 400 nm, respectively. Their response was followed based on the changes in the threshold voltage shift which was estimated on the basis of transfer characteristics in saturation. The presence of radiation-induced fixed oxide traps and switching traps - which lead to a change in the threshold voltage - was estimated from the sub-threshold I-V curves, using the midgap technique. It was shown that fixed oxide traps have a dominant influence on the change in the threshold voltage shift during gamma-ray irradiation and annealing.

  13. Localized Temperature Variations in Laser-Irradiated Composites with Embedded Fiber Bragg Grating Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Brian Jenkins

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Fiber Bragg grating (FBG temperature sensors are embedded in composites to detect localized temperature gradients resulting from high energy infrared laser radiation. The goal is to detect the presence of radiation on a composite structure as rapidly as possible and to identify its location, much the same way human skin senses heat. A secondary goal is to determine how a network of sensors can be optimized to detect thermal damage in laser-irradiated composite materials or structures. Initial tests are conducted on polymer matrix composites reinforced with either carbon or glass fiber with a single optical fiber embedded into each specimen. As many as three sensors in each optical fiber measure the temporal and spatial thermal response of the composite to high energy radiation incident on the surface. Additional tests use a 2 × 2 × 3 array of 12 sensors embedded in a carbon fiber/epoxy composite to simultaneously measure temperature variations at locations on the composite surface and through the thickness. Results indicate that FBGs can be used to rapidly detect temperature gradients in a composite and their location, even for a direct strike of laser radiation on a sensor, when high temperatures can cause a non-uniform thermal response and FBG decay.

  14. Localized Temperature Variations in Laser-Irradiated Composites with Embedded Fiber Bragg Grating Sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, R Brian; Joyce, Peter; Mechtel, Deborah

    2017-01-27

    Fiber Bragg grating (FBG) temperature sensors are embedded in composites to detect localized temperature gradients resulting from high energy infrared laser radiation. The goal is to detect the presence of radiation on a composite structure as rapidly as possible and to identify its location, much the same way human skin senses heat. A secondary goal is to determine how a network of sensors can be optimized to detect thermal damage in laser-irradiated composite materials or structures. Initial tests are conducted on polymer matrix composites reinforced with either carbon or glass fiber with a single optical fiber embedded into each specimen. As many as three sensors in each optical fiber measure the temporal and spatial thermal response of the composite to high energy radiation incident on the surface. Additional tests use a 2 × 2 × 3 array of 12 sensors embedded in a carbon fiber/epoxy composite to simultaneously measure temperature variations at locations on the composite surface and through the thickness. Results indicate that FBGs can be used to rapidly detect temperature gradients in a composite and their location, even for a direct strike of laser radiation on a sensor, when high temperatures can cause a non-uniform thermal response and FBG decay.

  15. The Temperature Dependence of Void and Bubble Formation and Growth in Aluminium during 600 MeV Proton Irradiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Victoria, M.; Green, W.V; Singh, Bachu Narain

    1984-01-01

    different temperatures in the range from 130°–430°C, to displacement doses of up to 5 dpa and helium contents of over 1000 appm. The TEM examinations have shown that at all irradiation temperatures and displacement doses, helium bubbles are formed uniformly through the whole grain interior. No voids...

  16. Effect of wound healing period and temperature, irradiation and post-irradiation storage temperature on the rot incidence of potatoes, after infection with Fasurium sulfurium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Langerak, D.I.; Wolters, T.C.; Quan, V.H.; Oularbi, S.; Tayeb, Y.; Vroomen, L.H.M.

    1988-01-01

    Losses during star age in potatoes are mainly due to sprouting and rotting. It has indicated that irradiation by low dose (50 to 100 Gy) during the dormancy period is most e ffective for sprout inhibition. Some investigators, however , stated an increase of storage rot after an irradiation

  17. Using the quantum yields of photosystem II and the rate of net photosynthesis to monitor high irradiance and temperature stress in chrysanthemum (Dendranthema grandiflora)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wakjera, Eshetu Janka; Körner, Oliver; Rosenqvist, Eva

    2015-01-01

    Under a dynamic greenhouse climate control regime, temperature is adjusted to optimise plant physiological responses to prevailing irradiance levels; thus, both temperature and irradiance are used by the plant to maximise the rate of photosynthesis, assuming other factors are not limiting...... irradiance, the maximum Pn and ETR were reached at 24 °C. Increased irradiance decreased the PSII operating efficiency and increased NPQ, while both high irradiance and temperature had a significant effect on the PSII operating efficiency at temperatures >28 °C. Under high irradiance and temperature, changes...... in the NPQ determined the PSII operating efficiency, with no major change in the fraction of open PSII centres (qL) (indicating a QA redox state). We conclude that 1) chrysanthemum plants cope with excess irradiance by non-radiative dissipation or a reversible stress response, with the effect on the Pn...

  18. Effects of vacuum-ultraviolet irradiation on copper penetration into low-k dielectrics under bias-temperature stress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, X.; Zheng, H.; Xue, P.; Shohet, J. L. [Plasma Processing and Technology Laboratory and Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); King, S. W. [Logic Technology Development, Intel Corporation, Hillsboro, Oregon 97124 (United States); Nishi, Y. [Department of Electrical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States)

    2015-01-05

    The effects of vacuum-ultraviolet (VUV) irradiation on copper penetration into non-porous low-k dielectrics under bias-temperature stress (BTS) were investigated. By employing x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy depth-profile measurements on both as-deposited and VUV-irradiated SiCOH/Cu stacks, it was found that under the same BTS conditions, the diffusion depth of Cu into the VUV-irradiated SiCOH is higher than that of as-deposited SiCOH. On the other hand, under the same temperature-annealing stress (TS) without electric bias, the Cu distribution profiles in the VUV-irradiated SiCOH were same with that for the as-deposited SiCOH. The experiments suggest that in as-deposited SiCOH, the diffused Cu exists primarily in the atomic state, while in VUV-irradiated SiCOH, the diffused Cu is oxidized by the hydroxyl ions (OH{sup −}) generated from VUV irradiation and exists in the ionic state. The mechanisms for metal diffusion and ion injection in VUV irradiated low-k dielectrics are discussed.

  19. THE INFLUENCE OF NEUTRON-IRRADIATION AT LOW TEMPERATURES ON THE DIELECTRIC PARAMETERS OF 3C-SiC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J.A.A. Engelbrecht; G. Deyzel; E. Minnaar; W.E. Goosen; I. J. van Rooyen

    2014-04-01

    3C-SiC wafers were irradiated with neutrons of various fluences and at low (200 - 400 ?C) irradiation temperatures. Fourier Transform infrared (FTIR) reflectance spectra were obtained for the samples, and the spectra used to extract the dielectric parameters for each specimen, using statistical curve-fitting procedures. Analysis of all data revealed trends in reflectance peak heights as well as in the dielectric parameters. The surface roughness of the irradiated samples was measured by atomic force spectroscopy (AFM) and certain trends could be ascribed to surface roughness.

  20. The influence of neutron-irradiation at low temperatures on the dielectric parameters of 3C-SiC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Engelbrecht, J.A.A., E-mail: Japie.Engelbrecht@nmmu.ac.za [Physics Department, Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University, P.O. Box 77000, Port Elizabeth 6031 (South Africa); Deyzel, G.; Minnaar, E.G.; Goosen, W.E. [Physics Department, Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University, P.O. Box 77000, Port Elizabeth 6031 (South Africa); Rooyen, I.J. van [Fuel Performance and Design Department, Idaho National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415-6188 (United States)

    2014-04-15

    3C-SiC wafers were irradiated with neutrons of various fluences and at low (200–400 °C) irradiation temperatures. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) reflectance spectra were obtained for the samples, and the spectra used to extract the dielectric parameters for each specimen, using statistical curve-fitting procedures. Analysis of all data revealed trends in reflectance peak heights as well as in the dielectric parameters. The surface roughness of the irradiated samples was measured by atomic force spectroscopy (AFM) and certain trends could be ascribed to surface roughness.

  1. Effects of temperature and neutron irradiation on dynamic bearing capacity of structural steels. Part II. Effect of neutron irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buchar, J.; Sykora, M.; Bilek, Z. (Ceskoslovenska Akademie Ved, Brno. Ustav Fyzikalni Metalurgie)

    1980-01-01

    The capacity of structural steels to resist pulsed loads constitutes an important factor in ensuring nuclear power plant components safety. Irradiation hardening and embrittlement are important in connection with the safety of reactor pressure vessels. Experimental testing of a group of weldable structural steels utilizing the Hopkinson Split Bar Technique was performed to investigate the dynamic bearing capacity (dbc) of these materials in the irradiated conditions. It is shown that dbc increases at least three times in the elastic regime after a neutron dose of 5x10/sup 19/ cm/sup -2/. The influence of annealing time (concentration of radiation defects) on materials recovery is demonstrated.

  2. Intrapulpal temperature changes during root surface irradiation with dual-wavelength laser (2780 and 940 nm): in vitro study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franzen, Rene; Rashidisangsary, Borna; Ozturan, Seda; Vanweersch, Leon; Gutknecht, Norbert

    2015-01-01

    The present study evaluated the intrapulpal thermal changes that occurred during the treatment of the root surfaces with a laser system emitting Er,Cr:YSGG 2780- and 940-nm diode laser irradiation in an alternating sequence. Thirty single-rooted human teeth were collected. The teeth were divided into three groups (n=10 each) and irradiated with Er,Cr:YSGG alone or combined with a 940-nm diode laser. To investigate the intrapulpal temperature changes, specimens were embedded in a resin block with a set of thermocouples introduced at different positions within the root canals. The first group was irradiated with only Er,Cr:YSGG (25 mJ, 50 Hz, 50 μs pulse duration, water and air spray); the second group was irradiated with Er,Cr:YSGG (same setting) and a 940-nm diode (2 W, chopped mode with 20% duty cycle); the third group was irradiated with Er,Cr:YSGG (same setting) and a diode (2 W, chopped mode with 50% duty cycle). During all irradiations, thermal changes were recorded in real time with thermocouples. While group 3 showed thermal rises on average of 1.68±0.98°C in the pulp chamber, groups 1 and 2 showed average temperature rises of root surface debridement without inducing intrapulpal thermal damage when using an appropriate water/air spray. All measured temperatures were considerably below the critical value of 5.6°C.

  3. New fixed-point mini-cell to investigate thermocouple drift in a high-temperature environment under neutron irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laurie, M.; Vlahovic, L.; Rondinella, V.V. [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Transuranium Elements, P.O. Box 2340, D-76125 Karlsruhe, (Germany); Sadli, M.; Failleau, G. [Laboratoire Commun de Metrologie, LNE-Cnam, Saint-Denis, (France); Fuetterer, M.; Lapetite, J.M. [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Energy and Transport, P.O. Box 2, NL-1755 ZG Petten, (Netherlands); Fourrez, S. [Thermocoax, 8 rue du pre neuf, F-61100 St Georges des Groseillers, (France)

    2015-07-01

    Temperature measurements in the nuclear field require a high degree of reliability and accuracy. Despite their sheathed form, thermocouples subjected to nuclear radiations undergo changes due to radiation damage and transmutation that lead to significant EMF drift during long-term fuel irradiation experiment. For the purpose of a High Temperature Reactor fuel irradiation to take place in the High Flux Reactor Petten, a dedicated fixed-point cell was jointly developed by LNE-Cnam and JRC-IET. The developed cell to be housed in the irradiation rig was tailor made to quantify the thermocouple drift during the irradiation (about two year duration) and withstand high temperature (in the range 950 deg. C - 1100 deg. C) in the presence of contaminated helium in a graphite environment. Considering the different levels of temperature achieved in the irradiation facility and the large palette of thermocouple types aimed at surveying the HTR fuel pebble during the qualification test both copper (1084.62 deg. C) and gold (1064.18 deg. C) fixed-point materials were considered. The aim of this paper is to first describe the fixed-point mini-cell designed to be embedded in the reactor rig and to discuss the preliminary results achieved during some out of pile tests as much as some robustness tests representative of the reactor scram scenarios. (authors)

  4. Size Class Dependent Relationships between Temperature and Phytoplankton Photosynthesis-Irradiance Parameters in the Atlantic Ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Robinson

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Over the past decade, a number of methods have been developed to estimate size-class primary production from either in situ phytoplankton pigment data or remotely-sensed data. In this context, the first objective of this study was to compare two methods of estimating size class specific (micro-, nano-, and pico-phytoplankton photosynthesis-irradiance (PE parameters from pigment data. The second objective was to analyse the relationship between environmental variables (temperature, nitrate and PAR and PE parameters in the different size-classes. A large dataset was used of simultaneous measurements of the PE parameters (n = 1,260 and phytoplankton pigment markers (n = 2,326, from 3 different institutes. There were no significant differences in mean PE parameters of the different size classes between the chemotaxonomic method of Uitz et al. (2008 and the pigment markers and carbon-to-Chl a ratios method of Sathyendranath et al. (2009. For both methods, mean maximum photosynthetic rates (PmB for micro-phytoplankton were significantly lower than those for pico-phytoplankton and nano-phytoplankton. The mean light limited slope (αB for nano-phytoplankton were significantly higher than for the other size taxa. For micro-phytoplankton dominated samples identified using the Sathyendranath et al. (2009 method, both PmB and αB exhibited a significant, positive linear relationship with temperature, whereas for pico-phytoplankton the correlation with temperature was negative. Nano-phytoplankton dominated samples showed a positive correlation between PmB and temperature, whereas for αB and the light saturation parameter (Ek the correlations were not significant. For the Uitz et al. (2008 method, only micro-phytoplankton PmB, pico-phytoplankton αB, nano- and pico-phytoplankton Ek exhibited significant relationships with temperature. The temperature ranges occupied by the size classes derived using these methods differed. The Uitz et al. (2008 method

  5. Comparative Study of Irradiated and Annealed ZnO Thin Films for Room Temperature Ammonia Gas Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhijeet KSHIRSAGAR

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Ceramic based thin film sensors are well known for gas sensing applications. These sensors are operated at elevated temperature for good sensitivity. ZnO thin film sensors operated at high temperature are used in ammonia sensing application. But to the best of author’s knowledge no room temperature ZnO (Zinc Oxide thin film sensors are reported. The deposited ZnO films are found to be highly unstable with respect to resistance of the films at room temperature. To increase the stability two different techniques viz. annealing and irradiation are tried. Comparative study of annealed and irradiated ZnO films for stability in resistance is done. Further the performance of these films as ammonia (NH3 gas sensor at room temperature has been studied. The results obtained are reported in this paper and analyzed.

  6. Noninvasive temperature measurements during laser irradiation of the retina with optoacoustic techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuele, Georg; Huettmann, Gereon; Brinkmann, Ralf

    2002-06-01

    In all laser treatments at the fundus of the eye the temperature increase is unknown. In order to optimize the treatment modalities, a noninvasive online temperature determination is preferable. Applying laser pulses to the fundus, thermoelastic stress waves are emitted based on the thermal expansion of the heated tissue, mainly the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). The amplitude of the thermoelastic wave is proportional to the thermal expansion coefficient, which linearly depends on temperature between 30-80 degree(s)C for water. The method was evaluated for selective RPE- treatment in vitro and clinically using the microsecond(s) -laser pulses for treatment and temperature determination simultaneously. Conventional laser photocoagulation was investigated in vitro using an Ar Ion laser for coagulation and low-energy N2-pumped dye laser pulses to probe the temperature. In all cases, sufficient pressure amplitudes were detected either by a needle hydrophon in vitro or by a contact lens with embedded transducer during treatment. Depending on the treatment parameter, temperature increase of 60 degree(s)C were evaluated from the pressure transients. All temperatures detected are in close agreement to heat diffusion calculations. We demonstrated a noninvasive online method to detect retinal temperatures during laser treatments. This technique can be adapted to photocoagulation, PDT and TTT.

  7. Air plasma or UV-irradiation applied to surface modification of pectin/poly(vinyl alcohol) blends

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kowalonek, Jolanta [Faculty of Chemistry, Nicolaus Copernicus University, Gagarin 7 street, 87-100 Torun (Poland); Kaczmarek, Halina, E-mail: halina@chem.uni.torun.pl [Faculty of Chemistry, Nicolaus Copernicus University, Gagarin 7 street, 87-100 Torun (Poland); Dabrowska, Aldona [Faculty of Chemistry, Nicolaus Copernicus University, Gagarin 7 street, 87-100 Torun (Poland)

    2010-10-15

    Poly(vinyl alcohol), pectin and their blends with different components ratio were exposed to low-temperature air plasma or high energy UV-irradiation ({lambda} = 254 nm) for the purpose of surface modification. The physico-chemical changes in surface properties have been studied by attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) and contact angle measurements. Surface free energy of polymeric films, its polar and dispersive components have been calculated by Owens-Wendt method. Moreover, the work of adhesion was estimated and the recovery of hydrophobic properties of modified films after storage have been also studied. The few seconds air-plasma treatment caused more effective surface modification than 5-6 h UV-irradiation. The observed changes were partially reversible, contrary to these caused by photo-modification. It was found that pectin/PVA (50:50) blend was characterised by larger susceptibility to plasma modification compared to pure pectin and pure PVA, whereas the photosensitivity to radiation of 254 nm wavelength was the lowest for this specimen in comparison to other studied samples.

  8. Advection of Potential Temperature in the Atmosphere of Irradiated Exoplanets: A Robust Mechanism to Explain Radius Inflation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tremblin, P.; Chabrier, G.; Mayne, N. J.; Amundsen, D. S.; Baraffe, I.; Debras, F.; Drummond, B.; Manners, J.; Fromang, S.

    2017-01-01

    The anomalously large radii of strongly irradiated exoplanets have remained a major puzzle in astronomy. Based on a two-dimensional steady-state atmospheric circulation model, the validity of which is assessed by comparison to three-dimensional calculations, we reveal a new mechanism, namely the advection of the potential temperature due to mass and longitudinal momentum conservation, a process occurring in the Earth's atmosphere or oceans. In the deep atmosphere, the vanishing heating flux forces the atmospheric structure to converge to a hotter adiabat than the one obtained with 1D calculations, implying a larger radius for the planet. Not only do the calculations reproduce the observed radius of HD 209458b, but also reproduce the observed correlation between radius inflation and irradiation for transiting planets. Vertical advection of potential temperature induced by non-uniform atmospheric heating thus provides a robust mechanism to explain the inflated radii of irradiated hot Jupiters.

  9. Fission product release and microstructure changes of irradiated MOX fuel at high temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colle, J.-Y.; Hiernaut, J.-P.; Wiss, T.; Beneš, O.; Thiele, H.; Papaioannou, D.; Rondinella, V. V.; Sasahara, A.; Sonoda, T.; Konings, R. J. M.

    2013-11-01

    Samples of irradiated MOX fuel of 44.5 GWd/tHM mean burn-up were prepared by core drilling at three different radial positions of a fuel pellet. They were subsequently heated in a Knudsen effusion mass spectrometer up to complete vaporisation of the sample (˜2600 K) and the release of fission gas (krypton and xenon) as well as helium was measured. Scanning electron microscopy was used in parallel to investigate the evolution of the microstructure of a sample heated under the same condition up to given key temperatures as determined from the gas release profiles. A clear initial difference for fission gas release and microstructure was observed as a function of the radial position of the samples and therefore of irradiation temperature. A good correlation between the microstructure evolution and the gas release peaks could be established as a function of the temperature of irradiation and (laboratory) heating. The region closest to the cladding (0.58 measurement of Walker et al. [11]. All those data are shown Fig. 2.Fragments of 2-8 mg were chosen for the experiments. Since these specimens are small compared to the drilled sample size and were taken randomly, the precise radial position could not be determined, in particular the specimens of sample type, A and B could be from close radial locations.Specimens from each drilled sample type were annealed up to complete vaporisation (˜2600 K) at a speed of about 10 K min-1 in a Knudsen effusion mass spectrometer (KEMS) described previously [13,14]. In addition to helium and to the FGs all the species present in the vapour between 83 and 300 a.m.u. were measured during the heating. Additionally, the 85Kr isotope was analysed in a cold trap by β and γ counting. The long-lived fission gas isotopes correspond to masses 131, 132, 134 and 136 for Xe and 83, 84, 85 and 86 for Kr. The absolute quantities of gas released from specimens of sample types A and B were also determined using the in-house built Q

  10. Effect of irradiation temperature on crystallization of {alpha}-Fe induced by He irradiations in Fe{sub 80}B{sub 20} amorphous alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    San-noo, Toshimasa; Toriyama, Tamotsu; Wakabayashi, Hidehiko; Iijima, Hiroshi [Musashi Inst. of Tech., Tokyo (Japan); Hayashi, Nobuyuki; Sakamoto, Isao

    1997-03-01

    Since amorphous alloys are generally highly resistant to irradiation and their critical radiation dose is an order of magnitude higher for Fe-B amorphous alloy than Mo-methods, these alloys are expected to become applicable as for fusion reactor materials. The authors investigated {alpha}-Fe crystallization in an amorphous alloy, Fe{sub 80}B{sub 20} using internal conversion electron Moessbauer spectroscopy. The amount of {alpha}-Fe component was found to increase by raising the He-irradiation dose. The target part was modified to enable He ion radiation at a lower temperature (below 400 K) by cooling with Peltier element. Fe{sub 80}B{sub 20} amorphous alloy was cooled to keep the temperature at 300 K and exposed to 40 keV He ion at 1-3 x 10{sup 8} ions/cm{sup 2}. The amount of {alpha}-Fe crystal in each sample was determined. The crystal formation was not observed for He ion radiation below 2 x 10{sup 18} ions/cm{sup 2}, but that at 3 x 10{sup 8} ions/ cm{sup 2} produced a new phase ({delta} +0.40 mm/sec, {Delta} = 0.89 mm/sec). The decrease in the radiation temperature from 430 to 300 K resulted to extremely repress the production of {alpha}-Fe crystal, suggesting that the crystallization induced by He-radiation cascade is highly depending on the radiation temperature. (M.N.)

  11. Response of Bacillus subtilis spores to dehydration and UV irradiation at extremely low temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dose, K; Klein, A

    1996-02-01

    Spores of Bacillus subtilis have been exposed to the conditions of extreme dehydration (argon/silica gel; simulated space vacuum) for up to 12 weeks at 298 K and 80 K in the dark. The inactivation has been correlated with the production of DNA-double strand-breaks. The temperature-dependence of the rate constants for inactivation or production of DNA-double strand-breaks is surprisingly low. Controls kept in the frozen state at 250 K for the same period of time showed no sign of deterioration. In another series of experiments the spores have been UV irradiated (253.7 nm) at 298 K, 200 K and 80 K after exposure to dehydrating conditions for 3 days. Fluence-effect relationships for inactivation, production of DNA-double strand-breaks and DNA-protein cross-links are presented. The corresponding F37-values for inactivation and production of DNA lesions are significantly increased only at 80 K (factor of 4 to 5). The data indicate that the low temperatures that prevail in the outer parts of the Solar System or at the nightside of Mars or the Moon are not sufficiently low to crucially inhibit inactivation by dehydration. Our data place further constraints on the panspermia hypothesis.

  12. Effects of helium and deuterium irradiation on SPS sintered W–Ta composites at different temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mateus, R., E-mail: rmateus@ipfn.ist.utl.pt [Associação Euratom/IST, Instituto de Plasmas e Fusão Nuclear, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade Técnica de Lisboa, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Dias, M. [ITN, Instituto Tecnológico e Nuclear, Estrada Nacional 10, 2686-953 Sacavém (Portugal); Lopes, J. [ITN, Instituto Tecnológico e Nuclear, Estrada Nacional 10, 2686-953 Sacavém (Portugal); ISEL, Instituto Superior de Engenharia de Lisboa, Rua Conselheiro Emídio Navarro, 1, 1959-007 Lisboa (Portugal); Rocha, J.; Catarino, N.; Franco, N. [ITN, Instituto Tecnológico e Nuclear, Estrada Nacional 10, 2686-953 Sacavém (Portugal); Livramento, V. [Associação Euratom/IST, Instituto de Plasmas e Fusão Nuclear, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade Técnica de Lisboa, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); LNEG, Laboratório Nacional de Energia e Geologia, Estrada do Paço do Lumiar, 1649-038 Lisboa (Portugal); and others

    2013-11-15

    Energetic He{sup +} and D{sup +} ions were implanted into different W–Ta composites in order to investigate their stability under helium and deuterium irradiation. The results were compared with morphological and chemical modifications arising from exposure of pure W and Ta. Special attention was given to tantalum hydride (Ta{sub 2}H) formation due to its implications for tritium inventory. Three W–Ta composites with 10 and 20 at.% Ta were prepared from elemental W powder and Ta fibre or powder through low-energy ball milling in argon atmosphere. Spark plasma sintering (SPS) was used as the consolidation process in the temperature range from 1473 to 1873 K. The results obtained from pure elemental samples and composites are similar. However, Ta{sub 2}H is easily formed in pure Ta by using a pre-implantation stage of He{sup +}, whereas in W–Ta composites the same reaction is clearly reduced, and it can be inhibited by controlling the sintering temperature.

  13. Identification of new chemical structures in poly(tetrafluoroethylene-co-perfluoropropyl vinyl ether) irradiated in vacuum at different temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lappan, U. E-mail: lappan@ipfdd.de; Geissler, U.; Scheler, U.; Lunkwitz, K

    2003-06-01

    Electron beam irradiation of perfluorinated copolymer poly(tetrafluoroethylene-co-perfluoropropyl vinyl ether) (PFA) was carried out in vacuum at different temperatures between room temperature and temperature above the melting point of PFA. Changes of chemical structure were studied by {sup 19}F solid-state NMR and IR spectroscopy. Chain scissions and branching reactions occur simultaneously, which are indicated by formation of CF{sub 3}, COF and COOH end groups, CF branching points and CF{sub 3} side groups. Branching density based on concentration of CF groups increases with increasing temperature. Formation of cross-links is concluded for PFA irradiated in molten state. Perfluoropropyl vinyl ether (PPVE) units are found to be more sensitive to radiation than tetrafluoroethylene units. COF and COOH groups are assumed to result from PPVE degradation.

  14. Short-term reductions in irradiance and temperature minimally impact growth and development of five floriculture species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Energy inputs are a major production cost for greenhouse-grown plants, especially heating and supplemental lighting. A possible energy-efficient alternative is to optimize the growing environment on days that have a low heating demand and grow plants at reduced temperature and irradiance on days th...

  15. Radiolysis driven changes to oxide stability during irradiation-corrosion of 316L stainless steel in high temperature water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raiman, Stephen S.; Bartels, David M.; Was, Gary S.

    2017-09-01

    316L stainless steel samples were irradiated with a proton beam while simultaneously exposed to high temperature water with hydrogen (320 °C, 3 wppm H2, neutral pH) to study the effect of radiation on corrosion. The inner oxides on irradiated samples were found to be depleted in chromium when compared to the inner oxides on unirradiated samples exposed to the same conditions. Additionally, hematite was found on the oxide surfaces of irradiated samples, but not on unirradiated samples. Sample areas which were not directly irradiated but were exposed to the flow of irradiated water also exhibited chromium-deficient inner oxides and had hematite on their surfaces, so it is concluded that water radiolysis is the primary driver of both effects. Thermodynamic calculations and radiolysis modeling were used to show that radiolytic production of hydrogen peroxide was sufficient to raise corrosion potential high enough to cause the dissolution of chromium-rich spinel oxides which make up the inner oxide layer on stainless steel in high temperature water.

  16. The effects of temperature and stress variations on the deuteron irradiation creep of type 316L stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scholz, R. (CEC, Joint Research Centre, 21020, Ispra (Vatican City State, Holy See) (Italy))

    1994-09-01

    Type 316L stainless steel samples in both 20% cold-worked (cw) and recrystallised (rc) conditions were irradiated with 19 MeV deuterons under torsional loading. The irradiation creep deformation was measured as a function of temperature from 80 to 400 C. At temperatures below 100 C, the creep curves of both materials are characterised by long-lasting strain transients during which the creep rate slows down before reaching a steady-state value. It is assumed that the total irradiation creep strain is composed of two components, a steady-state component [gamma][sub s] and a transient component [gamma][sub t]. When the steady-state creep rates are represented in an Arrhenius plot, they fit straight lines. Their slopes correspond to an activation energy of 0.11 eV for the irradiation creep process of both the cw and the rc material. The transient strain component [gamma][sub t] recovers completely when the specimen is exposed to the irradiation after removal of the torque. ((orig.))

  17. Thermography Applied During Exercises With or Without Infrared Light-Emitting Diode Irradiation: Individual and Comparative Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lins, Emery C.; Corazza, Adalberto Vieira; Kurachi, Cristina; Bagnato, Vanderlei Salvador

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Objective: The aim of our study was to evaluate the cutaneous temperature during an exercise on a treadmill with or without infrared light-emitting diode (LED) irradiation in postmenopausal women. Background data: Thermography is an imaging technique in which radiation emitted by a body in the middle and far infrared spectrum is detected and associated with the temperature of the body's surface. Materials and methods: Eighteen postmenopausal women were randomly divided into two groups: (1) the LED group, which performed the exercises on a treadmill associated with phototherapy (n=9) and; (2) the exercise group, which performed the exercises on a treadmill without additional phototherapy (n=9). The irradiation parameters for each women's thigh were: array of 2000 infrared LEDs (850 nm) with an area of 1,110 cm2, 100 mW, 39 mW/cm2, and 108 J/cm2 for 45 min. The submaximal constant-speed exercise on the treadmill at intensities between 85% and 90% maximal heart rate (HRmax) with or without phototherapy were performed during 45 min, to perform the thermographic analysis. Thermography images were captured before the exercise (t=0), after 10, 35, and 45 min of exercising (t=10, t=35, and t=45) and at 5 min post-exercising (t=50). Results: The LED group showed an increased cutaneous thigh temperature during the exercise (from 33.5±0.8°C to 34.6±0.9°C, p=0.03), whereas the exercise group showed a reduced cutaneous temperature (from 33.5±0.6 to 32.7±0.7°C, p=0.02). The difference between the groups was significant (p<0.05) at t=35, t=45, and t=50. Conclusions: These data indicate an improved microcirculation, and can explain one possible mechanism of action of phototherapy associated with physical exercises. PMID:23819505

  18. Temperature dependence of the radiation damage microstructure in V-4Cr-4Ti neutron irradiated to low dose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rice, P.M.; Zinkle, S.J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., IL (United States)

    1998-03-01

    Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was performed on the US program heat of V-4Cr-4Ti (heat No. 83665) irradiated to damage levels of 0.1--0.5 displacements per atom (dpa) at 110--505 C in the High Flux Beam Reactor at Brookhaven. A high density ({approximately}1 {times} 10{sup 23}/m{sup 3}) of small ({approximately}3.0 nm diameter) faulted dislocation loops were observed at irradiation temperatures blow 275 C. These dislocation loops became unfaulted at temperatures above {approximately}275 C, and a high density of small Ti-rich defect clusters lying on {l_brace}001{r_brace} planes appeared along with the unfaulted loops at temperatures above 300 C. The density of the {l_brace}001{r_brace} defect clusters was much higher than that of the dislocation loops at all temperatures above {approximately}300 C. The density of both types of defects decreased with increasing temperature above 300 C, with the most rapid decrease occurring for temperatures above 400 C. Based on the TEM and tensile measurements, the dislocation barrier strengths of the faulted dislocation loops and {l_brace}001{r_brace} defect clusters are {approximately}0.4--0.5 and 0.25, respectively. This indicates that both types of defects can be easily sheared by dislocations during deformation. Cleared dislocation channels were observed following tensile deformation in a specimen irradiated at 268 C.

  19. Final report on neutron irradiation at low temperature to investigate plastic instability and at high temperature to study caviation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Singh, B.N; Eldrup, Morten Mostgaard; Golubov, D.J.

    2005-01-01

    Effects of neutron irradiation on defect accumulation and physical and mechanical properties of pure iron and F82H and EUROFER 97 ferritic-martensitic steels have been investigated. Tensile specimens were neutron irradiated to a dose level of 0,23 dpa at333 and 573 K. Electrical resistivity...... studied using the Kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) code during arealistic dynamic irradiation of bcc iron at 300 K. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations have been carried out to study the stress dependencies of dislocation velocity and drag coefficient for an edge dislocation decorated with small SIA loops...

  20. A Physically Based Correlation of Irradiation-Induced Transition Temperature Shifts for RPV Steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eason, Ernest D. [Modeling and Computing Services, LLC; Odette, George Robert [UCSB; Nanstad, Randy K [ORNL; Yamamoto, Takuya [ORNL

    2007-11-01

    The reactor pressure vessels (RPVs) of commercial nuclear power plants are subject to embrittlement due to exposure to high-energy neutrons from the core, which causes changes in material toughness properties that increase with radiation exposure and are affected by many variables. Irradiation embrittlement of RPV beltline materials is currently evaluated using Regulatory Guide 1.99 Revision 2 (RG1.99/2), which presents methods for estimating the shift in Charpy transition temperature at 30 ft-lb (TTS) and the drop in Charpy upper shelf energy (ΔUSE). The purpose of the work reported here is to improve on the TTS correlation model in RG1.99/2 using the broader database now available and current understanding of embrittlement mechanisms. The USE database and models have not been updated since the publication of NUREG/CR-6551 and, therefore, are not discussed in this report. The revised embrittlement shift model is calibrated and validated on a substantially larger, better-balanced database compared to prior models, including over five times the amount of data used to develop RG1.99/2. It also contains about 27% more data than the most recent update to the surveillance shift database, in 2000. The key areas expanded in the current database relative to the database available in 2000 are low-flux, low-copper, and long-time, high-fluence exposures, all areas that were previously relatively sparse. All old and new surveillance data were reviewed for completeness, duplicates, and discrepancies in cooperation with the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) Subcommittee E10.02 on Radiation Effects in Structural Materials. In the present modeling effort, a 10% random sample of data was reserved from the fitting process, and most aspects of the model were validated with that sample as well as other data not used in calibration. The model is a hybrid, incorporating both physically motivated features and empirical calibration to the U.S. power reactor surveillance

  1. Effects of low-temperature pretreatment on enhancing properties of refuse-derived fuel via microwave irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhen; Wang, Han-Qing; Zhou, Yue-Yun; Zhang, Xiao-Dong; Liu, Jian-Wen

    2017-07-01

    The present study focuses on pretreatment of enhancing the properties of refuse-derived fuel (RDF) via low-temperature microwave irradiation. These improved properties include lower chlorine content, a more porous surface structure and better combustion characteristics. In this study, low-temperature microwave irradiation was carried out in a modified microwave apparatus and the range of temperature was set to be 220-300℃. We found that the microwave absorbability of RDF was enhanced after being partly carbonized. Moreover, with the increasing of the final temperature, the organochlorine removal ratio was greatly increased to 80% and the content of chlorine was dramatically decreased to an extremely low level. It was also interesting to find that the chlorine of RDF was mainly released as HCl rather than organic chloride volatiles. The finding is just the same as the polyvinyl chloride pyrolysis process. In addition, pores and channels emerged during the modifying operation and the modified RDF has better combustibility and combustion stability than traditional RDF. This work revealed that low-temperature modification of RDF via microwave irradiation is significant for enhancing the quality of RDF and avoiding HCl erosion of equipment substantially.

  2. Study on the Effects of Liquid Thermal Media on the Irradiation Capsule of High-Temperature Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Man Soon Cho

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Irradiation tests of materials at HANARO have usually been conducted using a standard capsule at temperatures of about 300°C for irradiation of materials used at PWR. Thus, the standard capsule uses aluminum as the specimen holder, which acts to dissipate the thermal energy. Future nuclear systems such as a VHTR and SFR require the irradiation tests at a relatively high temperature. As an alternative to aluminum which has been used as the thermal media in a standard material capsule, the characteristics of liquid metals such as NaK and LBE are reviewed. The temperatures of the capsule are affected by the variation of parameters such as the gap and wall thickness of the container. In particular, the external gap is most important in determining the temperature of the specimen. LBE raises the temperature of the specimen higher than NaK at the same configuration of the capsule. Thus, LBE can lessen the gap of the parts and reduce the vibration for a stable long-term test in reactor.

  3. Immunohistochemical investigation of galectin-3 in the skin of mice applied with Origanum hypericifolium essential oil and irradiated with ultraviolet B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    İli, Pinar; Keskin, Nazan

    2014-01-01

    To demonstrate galectin-3-immunoreactivity in the undiluted essential oil of Origanum hypericifolium when applied to the ultraviolet B (UVB) irradiated skin of mice. Female BALB/c mice were allocated to 4 groups, each comprising 6 mice (Group 1: control; Group 2: UVB irradiated control; Group 3: undiluted O. hypericifolium essential oil applied; Group 4: undiluted O. hypericifolium essential oil applied before UVB irradiation). One week prior to UVB irradiation, the undiluted O. hypericifolium essential oil was applied to, the shaved dorsal skin of mice 3 times a week. Subsequently, the mice were irradiated 3 times per week with UVB (week 1: 50 mJ/cm2, week 2: 70 mJ/cm2, and weeks 3 and 4: 80 mJ/cm2) for 4 weeks. At the end of this period, immunohistochemical staining for galectin-3 was performed on frozen sections of skin specimens, and then they were photographed. Numerous galectin-3-immunoreactive cells, whichwere considered to be immune system cells, were observed in the dermis of Group 3. It is suggested that undiluted O. hypericifolium essential oil may cause an increase in the galectin-3-immunoreactive cells. However, there is a need to research these findings with further molecular analyses.

  4. Influence of temperature histories during reactor startup periods on microstructural evolution and mechanical properties of austenitic stainless steel irradiated with neutrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasahara, Shigeki; Kitsunai, Yuji; Chimi, Yasuhiro; Chatani, Kazuhiro; Koshiishi, Masato; Nishiyama, Yutaka

    2016-11-01

    This paper addresses influence of two different temperature profiles during startup periods in the Japan Materials Testing Reactor and a boiling water reactor upon microstructural evolution and mechanical properties of austenitic stainless steel irradiated with neutrons to about 1 dpa and 3 dpa. One of the temperature profiles was that the specimens experienced neutron irradiation in both reactors, under which the irradiation temperature transiently increased to 290 °C from room temperature with increasing reactor power during reactor startup periods. Another was that the specimens were pre-heated to about 150 °C prior to the irradiation to suppress the transient temperature increase. Tensile tests at 290 °C and Vickers hardness tests at room temperature were carried out, and their microstructures were observed by FEG-TEM. Difference of the temperature profiles was observed obviously in interstitial cluster formation, in particular, growth of Frank loops. Although influence of neutron irradiation involving transient temperature increase to 290 °C from room temperature on the yield strength and the Vickers hardness is buried in the trend curves of existing data, the influence was also found certainly in increment of in yield strength, existence of modest yield drop, and loss of strain hardening capacity and ductility. As a result, Frank loops, which were observed in austenitic stainless steel irradiated at doses of 1 dpa or more, seemed to have important implications regarding the interpretation of not irradiation hardening, but deformation of the austenitic stainless steel.

  5. Significant stress reduction of cBN layers upon ion irradiation at elevated temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weidner, S. [Institut fuer Festkoerperphysik, Friedrich-Schiller-Universitaet Jena, Max-Wien-Platz 1, D-07743 Jena (Germany); Ye, J. [Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie (KIT), Institut fuer Angewandte Materialien-Angewandte Werkstoffphysik (IAM-AWP), Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, D-76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Geburt, S.; Ronning, C. [Institut fuer Festkoerperphysik, Friedrich-Schiller-Universitaet Jena, Max-Wien-Platz 1, D-07743 Jena (Germany); Ulrich, S., E-mail: sven.ulrich@kit.edu [Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie (KIT), Institut fuer Angewandte Materialien-Angewandte Werkstoffphysik (IAM-AWP), Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, D-76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany)

    2012-06-01

    Superhard cubic boron nitride (cBN) thin films can be synthesized nowadays by a variety of PVD and PECVD techniques. Their applications are however still impeded by extremely high film stresses, typically above 20 GPa, resulting from a severe ion bombardment of the growing surface being obligatory for the formation of the cubic phase. This stress was shown to be partly released by an addition of oxygen during film deposition, with deposited films containing approx. 5 at.% of oxygen embedded into the cubic lattice. In this study, further impacts on the stress of such oxygen-incorporated cBN films (cBN:O) are studied by means of post-deposition high-energy implantation of oxygen-, neon-, and krypton-ions, respectively. It is shown, in particular, that the irradiation by krypton ions at 600 K temperature can produce a significant stress reduction of cBN:O from 10 GPa down to 4 GPa, without inducing observable transformation of existing cubic structure into the hexagonal phase.

  6. Inquiry into disintegration control of irradiated low enrichment uranium for high temperature gas cooled reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reitsamer, G.; Stolba, G.; Falta, G.; Strigl, A.; Zeger, J.; Maly, V.

    1984-07-01

    The PyC-coatings of irradiated high temperature reactor (HTR) fuel particles from AVR fuel elements were burnt off by air and oxygen at 1120K (comparable to the current HTR head-end). Experiments on the solubility of this low enrichment uranium fuel prove that 99.93% of the uranium and 99.84% of the plutonium can be dissolved by 7n HNO3. After additional treatment with 7n HNO3/0.01 n NaF, only 0.01% of the original amount of uranium and 0.01% of the original amount of plutonium remain undissolved. Neither the insoluble residues nor the very small amounts of solids formed on standing (before and after concentrating the solution up to 200 g U/1 and acidity of 3 n HNO3) show any enrichment of plutonium compared with the nitric acid solution. Results indicate that LWR-PUREX-technology can be used for reprocessing HTR-LEU-fuel.

  7. Structural and elastic properties of Ge after Kr-ion irradiation at room temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Birtcher, R.C.; Grimsditch, M.H. (Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States)); McNeil, L.E. (Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599-3255 (United States))

    1994-10-01

    Changes in the elastic properties of Ge induced by room-temperature irradiation with 3.5-MeV Kr ions have been determined and correlated with changes in the microstructure determined by transmission electron microscopy. Elastic-shear-moduli changes were measured by Brillouin scattering, and changes in local atomic arrangement were determined by Raman scattering. Amorphization decreased the elastic shear modulus of Ge by 17%. The fractional decrease was correlated with the amorphous volume fraction with a cross section of 4.5[plus minus]0.5 nm[sup 2]/ion. No change was observed in the shear modulus during void formation and growth. The elastic properties of the voided material are described by the Voigt averaging. However, as the voids evolved into a fibrous spongelike microstructure, a second dramatic elastic softening occurs which we attribute to the inability of the fibrous structure to support shear stresses. Raman scattering showed that, once formed, there was no change in the structure of the amorphous material at the atomic scale during void formation and subsequent void coalescence.

  8. [Temperature variation at the external root surface during Nd: YAG laser irradiation in the root canal in vitro].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan-Gao, Li; Xiao, Wang; Kexian, Xie; Dan, Liu

    2014-10-01

    To assess the temperature variation of the root surface using Nd: YAG laser irradiation in the root canal with different power and to evaluate the safety of laser application on the periodontal region. Thirty extracted human teeth with single-roots were collected. The teeth were cross-sectioned in the cervical portion, standardizing the roots at a 12-mm length. The roots were used as specimen. The roots were radiographed in the buccal-lingual direction to measure the thickness of the proximal walls, by means of a digital radiographic system. The specimens were divided into three groups according to the laser potency (1.5, 3.0, and 4.5 W). Each group was subdivided into two subgroups according to laser frequency (15 and 30 Hz). With the Nd: YAG laser irradiation for 20 s, the temperature variation of the root surface was monitored by thermocouples located at different parts of the root external wall and recorded by digital thermometers. The groups irradiated with 4.5 W presented the greatest temperature variation (above 10°C), followed by 3.0 and 1.5 W. The temperatures were statistically different (P 0.05). The apical half of the root presented statistically higher temperature rises than the cervical half of the root (P temperature variation of the root surface was associated with laser power, irradiation time, and the thickness of dentin. Application of Nd: YAG laser in the root at 1.5 W for 20 s can safely be used in endodontic treatment.

  9. Mechanical energy losses in plastically deformed and electron plus neutron irradiated high purity single crystalline molybdenum at elevated temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zelada, Griselda I. [Laboratorio de Materiales, Escuela de Ingenieria Electrica, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Ingenieria y Agrimensura, Universidad Nacional de Rosario, Avda. Pellegrini 250, 2000 Rosario (Argentina); Lambri, Osvaldo Agustin [Laboratorio de Materiales, Escuela de Ingenieria Electrica, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Ingenieria y Agrimensura, Universidad Nacional de Rosario, Avda. Pellegrini 250, 2000 Rosario (Argentina); Instituto de Fisica Rosario - CONICET, Member of the CONICET& #x27; s Research Staff, Avda. Pellegrini 250, 2000 Rosario (Argentina); Bozzano, Patricia B. [Laboratorio de Microscopia Electronica, Unidad de Actividad Materiales, Centro Atomico Constituyentes, Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Avda. Gral. Paz 1499, 1650 San Martin (Argentina); Garcia, Jose Angel [Departamento de Fisica Aplicada II, Facultad de Ciencias y Tecnologia, Universidad del Pais Vasco, Apdo. 644, 48080 Bilbao, Pais Vasco (Spain)

    2012-10-15

    Mechanical spectroscopy (MS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) studies have been performed in plastically deformed and electron plus neutron irradiated high purity single crystalline molybdenum, oriented for single slip, in order to study the dislocation dynamics in the temperature range within one third of the melting temperature. A damping peak related to the interaction of dislocation lines with both prismatic loops and tangles of dislocations was found. The peak temperature ranges between 900 and 1050 K, for an oscillating frequency of about 1 Hz. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  10. Crack initiation behavior of neutron irradiated model and commercial stainless steels in high temperature water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephenson, Kale J.; Was, Gary S.

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to isolate key factors affecting the irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) susceptibility of eleven neutron-irradiated austenitic stainless steel alloys. Four commercial purity and seven high purity stainless steels were fabricated with specific changes in composition and microstructure, and irradiated in a fast reactor spectrum at 320 °C to doses between 4.4 and 47.5 dpa. Constant extension rate tensile (CERT) tests were performed in normal water chemistry (NWC), hydrogen water chemistry (HWC), or primary water (PW) environments to isolate the effects of environment, elemental solute addition, alloy purity, alloy heat, alloy type, cold work, and irradiation dose. The irradiated alloys showed a wide variation in IASCC susceptibility, as measured by the relative changes in mechanical properties and crack morphology. Cracking susceptibility measured by %IG was enhanced in oxidizing environments, although testing in the lowest potential environment caused an increase in surface crack density. Alloys containing solute addition of Ni or Ni + Cr exhibited no IASCC. Susceptibility was reduced in materials cold worked prior to irradiation, and increased with increasing irradiation dose. Irradiation-induced hardening was accounted for by the dislocation loop microstructure, however no relation between crack initiation and radiation hardening was found.

  11. Influence of gamma ray irradiation on thermal conductivity of bismaleimide-triazine-based insulation tape at cryogenic temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Y.; Yoshida, M.; Idesaki, A.; Ogitsu, T.

    2018-01-01

    Recent accelerator-based experiments for particle physics require the superconducting magnets that can be operated under high radiation environment. An electrical insulation tape, which is composed of polyimide film and a boron free glass fabric pre-impregnated with epoxy resin blended with bismaleimide-triazine resin, is developed to enhance the radiation tolerance for superconducting magnets. Since the thermal conductivity of insulation tape is one of key parameters that affects the coil temperature during the operation, the influence of gamma-ray irradiation on the thermal conductivity of the insulation tape is investigated with a maximum dose of 5 MGy. The thermal conductivity is measured at cryogenic temperature from 5 K to 20 K cooled by a Gifford-McMahon cryocooler. By comparing the thermal conductivity before and after the gamma ray irradiation, no significant degradation on the thermal conductivity has been observed.

  12. Myocardial temperature distribution under cw Nd:YAG laser irradiation in in vitro and in vivo situations: theory and experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Splinter, Robert; Littmann, Laszlo; Tuntelder, Jan R.; Svenson, Robert H.; Chuang, Chi Hui; Tatsis, George P.; Semenov, Serguei Y.; Nanney, Glenn A.

    1995-01-01

    Tissue samples ranging from 2 to 16 mm in thickness were irradiated at 1064 nm with energies ranging from 40 to 2400 J. Coagulation lesions of in vitro and in vivo experiments were subjected to temperature profiling and submitted for histology. Irreversible damage was calculated with the damage integral formalism, following the bioheat equation solved with Monte Carlo computer light-distribution simula-tions. Numerical temperature rise and coagulation depth compared well with the in vitro results. The in vivo data required a change in the optical properties based on integrating sphere measurements for high irradiance to make the experimental and numerical data converge. The computer model has successfully solved several light-tissue interaction situations in which scattering dominates over absorption.

  13. Controlling the parameters of YBa2Cu3O(7-delta) high-temperature superconductors through excimer laser irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dovgii, IA.O.; Kityk, I.V.; Lutsiv, R.V.; Malinich, S.Z.; Nosan, A.V.

    1991-02-01

    Single crystals (2x3 sq mm) of YBa2Cu3O(7{minus}{delta}) high-temperature superconductors were irradiated by an XeCl laser pumped by a gas discharge with a voltage of 35 kW and a frequency of 5 Hz. The formation of the superconducting phase was observed at oxygen pressures of 4-8 kbar. With an increase in oxygen pressure to 20 kbar, the transition temperature increased to 90 K. A possible mechanism of the observed phenomenon is examined.

  14. Controlling the parameters of YBa2Cu3O(7-delta) high-temperature superconductors through excimer laser irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dovgii, Ia. O.; Kityk, I. V.; Lutsiv, R. V.; Malinich, S. Z.; Nosan, A. V.

    1991-02-01

    Single crystals (2x3 sq mm) of YBa2Cu3O(7-delta) high-temperature superconductors were irradiated by an XeCl laser pumped by a gas discharge with a voltage of 35 kW and a frequency of 5 Hz. The formation of the superconducting phase was observed at oxygen pressures of 4-8 kbar. With an increase in oxygen pressure to 20 kbar, the transition temperature increased to 90 K. A possible mechanism of the observed phenomenon is examined.

  15. AGC-2 Irradiation Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rohrbaugh, David Thomas [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Windes, William [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Swank, W. David [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-06-01

    The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) will be a helium-cooled, very high temperature reactor (VHTR) with a large graphite core. In past applications, graphite has been used effectively as a structural and moderator material in both research and commercial high temperature gas cooled reactor (HTGR) designs.[ , ] Nuclear graphite H 451, used previously in the United States for nuclear reactor graphite components, is no longer available. New nuclear graphites have been developed and are considered suitable candidates for the new NGNP reactor design. To support the design and licensing of NGNP core components within a commercial reactor, a complete properties database must be developed for these current grades of graphite. Quantitative data on in service material performance are required for the physical, mechanical, and thermal properties of each graphite grade with a specific emphasis on data related to the life limiting effects of irradiation creep on key physical properties of the NGNP candidate graphites. Based on experience with previous graphite core components, the phenomenon of irradiation induced creep within the graphite has been shown to be critical to the total useful lifetime of graphite components. Irradiation induced creep occurs under the simultaneous application of high temperatures, neutron irradiation, and applied stresses within the graphite components. Significant internal stresses within the graphite components can result from a second phenomenon—irradiation induced dimensional change. In this case, the graphite physically changes i.e., first shrinking and then expanding with increasing neutron dose. This disparity in material volume change can induce significant internal stresses within graphite components. Irradiation induced creep relaxes these large internal stresses, thus reducing the risk of crack formation and component failure. Obviously, higher irradiation creep levels tend to relieve more internal stress, thus allowing the

  16. A Nonlinear Multiparameters Temperature Error Modeling and Compensation of POS Applied in Airborne Remote Sensing System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianli Li

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The position and orientation system (POS is a key equipment for airborne remote sensing systems, which provides high-precision position, velocity, and attitude information for various imaging payloads. Temperature error is the main source that affects the precision of POS. Traditional temperature error model is single temperature parameter linear function, which is not sufficient for the higher accuracy requirement of POS. The traditional compensation method based on neural network faces great problem in the repeatability error under different temperature conditions. In order to improve the precision and generalization ability of the temperature error compensation for POS, a nonlinear multiparameters temperature error modeling and compensation method based on Bayesian regularization neural network was proposed. The temperature error of POS was analyzed and a nonlinear multiparameters model was established. Bayesian regularization method was used as the evaluation criterion, which further optimized the coefficients of the temperature error. The experimental results show that the proposed method can improve temperature environmental adaptability and precision. The developed POS had been successfully applied in airborne TSMFTIS remote sensing system for the first time, which improved the accuracy of the reconstructed spectrum by 47.99%.

  17. 15 MeV proton irradiation effects on Bi-based high temperature superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alinejad, N.; Sohrabi, D. [Nuclear Science and Technology Research Institute, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Plasma and Nuclear Fusion Research School; Bolori, F. [Karaj Agricultural, Medical, and Industrial Research School, Karaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-11-15

    Nowadays, superconducting magnetic coils are used in some tokamaks such as EAST, KSTAR, JT-60, and T-15 to generate strong magnetic fields and also in ITER magnetic fields of about 13 tesla will be produced with the help of superconductors. The tokamak superconductors are exposed to the variety of radiations (neutron, ions beam, and gamma) from plasma nuclear reactions which will affect some of the superconductor properties. Therefore, study of the irradiation effects on the superconductor structure and properties are very crucial from technological and scientific point of view. One of the superconductor irradiation effects to be investigated under different conditions of energy and dosage is the potential resistance of the material used in tokamak reactor magnetic coils against activation by radiation. In this work, pellets of high T{sub c} Bi-based superconductors have been prepared and after measurement of parameters, a sample of pellet has been irradiated with 15 MeV protons using Karaj cyclotron facility. The sample's parameters have been measured again after irradiation treatment. X-ray diffraction patterns and SEM images of the sample before and after irradiation treatment have been studied.

  18. Temperature dependence of the rate constant of hydrogen isotope interactions with a lithium capillary-porous system under reactor irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tazhibayeva, Irina, E-mail: tazhibayeva@ntsc.kz [Institute of Atomic Energy NNC RK, Kurchatov (Kazakhstan); Kulsartov, Timur; Gordienko, Yuri [Institute of Atomic Energy NNC RK, Kurchatov (Kazakhstan); Mukanova, Aliya [Al’ Farabi Kazakh National University, Almaty (Kazakhstan); Ponkratov, Yuri; Barsukov, Nikolay; Tulubaev, Evgeniy [Institute of Atomic Energy NNC RK, Kurchatov (Kazakhstan); Platacis, Erik [University of Latvia (IPUL), Riga (Latvia); Kenzhin, Ergazy [Shakarim Semey State University, Semey (Kazakhstan)

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: • The experiments with Li CPS sample were carried out at reactor IVG-1.M. • The gas absorption technique was used to study hydrogen isotope interaction with lithium CPS. • The temperature dependence of constants of interaction rate was obtained for various power rates of the reactor. • Determination of the activation energies, and pre-exponents of Arrhenius dependence. • The effect of increase of the rate constant under reaction irradiation. -- Abstract: Experiments with a sample of a lithium capillary-porous system (CPS) were performed at the reactor IVG-1.M of the Institute of Atomic Energy NNC RK to study the effects of neutron irradiation on the parameters of hydrogen isotope interactions with a lithium CPS. The absorption technique was used during the experiments, and this technique allowed the temperature dependences of the hydrogen isotope interaction rate constants with the lithium CPS to be obtained under various reactor powers. The obtained dependencies were used to determine the main interaction parameters: the activation energies and the pre-exponents of the Arrhenius dependence of the hydrogen interaction rate constants with lithium and the lithium CPS. An increase of the hydrogen isotope interaction rate with the lithium CPS was observed under reactor irradiation.

  19. Investigation of room temperature UV emission of ZnO films with different defect densities induced by laser irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yan; Jiang, Yijian

    2010-08-01

    We studied the room temperature UV emission of ZnO films with different defect densities which is fabricated by KrF laser irradiation process. It is shown room temperature UV photoluminescence of ZnO film is composed of contribution from free-exciton (FX) recombination and its longitudinal-optical phonon replica (FX-LO) (1LO, 2LO). With increase of the defect density, the FX emission decreased and FX-LO emission increased dramatically; and the relative strengths of FX to FX-LO emission intensities determine the peak position and intensity of UV emission. What is more, laser irradiation with moderate energy density could induce the crystalline ZnO film with very flat and smooth surface. This investigation indicates that KrF laser irradiation could effectively modulate the exciton emission and surface morphology, which is important for the application of high performance of UV emitting optoelectronic devices. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Power-feedwater temperature operating domain for Sbwr applying Monte Carlo simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aguilar M, L. A.; Quezada G, S.; Espinosa M, E. G.; Vazquez R, A.; Varela H, J. R.; Cazares R, R. I.; Espinosa P, G., E-mail: sequega@gmail.com [Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana, Unidad Iztapalapa, San Rafael Atlixco No. 186, Col. Vicentina, 09340 Mexico D. F. (Mexico)

    2014-10-15

    In this work the analyses of the feedwater temperature effects on reactor power in a simplified boiling water reactor (Sbwr) applying a methodology based on Monte Carlo simulation is presented. The Monte Carlo methodology was applied systematically to establish operating domain, due that the Sbwr are not yet in operation, the analysis of the nuclear and thermal-hydraulic processes must rely on numerical modeling, with the purpose of developing or confirming the design basis and qualifying the existing or new computer codes to enable reliable analyses. The results show that the reactor power is inversely proportional to the temperature of the feedwater, reactor power changes at 8% when the feed water temperature changes in 8%. (Author)

  1. An AES Study of the Room Temperature Surface Conditioning of Technological Metal Surfaces by Electron Irradiation

    CERN Document Server

    Scheuerlein, C; Taborelli, M; Brown, A; Baker, M A

    2002-01-01

    The modifications to technological copper and niobium surfaces induced by 2.5 keV electron irradiation have been investigated in the context of the conditioning process occurring in particle accelerator ultra high vacuum systems. Changes in the elemental surface composition have been found using Scanning Auger Microscopy (SAM) by monitoring the carbon, oxygen and metal Auger peak intensities as a function of electron irradiation in the dose range 10-6 to 10-2 C mm-2. The surface analysis results are compared with electron dose dependent secondary electron and electron stimulated desorption yield measurements. Initially the electron irradiation causes a surface cleaning through electron stimulated desorption, in particular of hydrogen. During this period both the electron stimulated desorption and secondary electron yield decrease as a function of electron dose. When the electron dose exceeds 10-4 C mm-2 electron stimulated desorption yields are reduced by several orders of magnitude and the electron beam indu...

  2. Effects of Low Temperature on Spider Mite Control by Intermittent Ultraviolet-B Irradiation for Practical Use in Greenhouse Strawberries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakai, Kazuhiro; Murata, Yasumasa; Osakabe, Masahiro

    2018-02-08

    The application of ultraviolet-B (UVB) radiation to control spider mites is challenging as a key technology for integrated pest management (IPM) in greenhouse strawberries in Japan. To address this, concurrent use of phytoseiid mites and reduced UVB irradiance is desirable to ensure control effects in areas shaded from UVB radiation and to minimize the sunscald in winter, respectively. We designed experiments reproducing the UVB dose on the lower leaf surfaces in strawberry and evaluated the effects of intermittent UVB irradiation at midnight for practical application in the greenhouse and low temperature on the survival of the spider mite Tetranychus urticae Koch (Acari: Tetranychidae) and damage to the phytoseiid mite Neoseiulus californicus (McGregor) (Acari: Phytoseiidae). The midnight intermittent UVB irradiation effectively suppressed egg hatching and development of larvae of T. urticae, and the control effect was reinforced at 20°C (no eggs hatched at 0.13 kJ m-2 d-1) rather than, at 25°C (70.8% eggs hatched). In contrast, the hatchability of N. californicus eggs was unaffected by intermittent UVB irradiation at 0.27 kJ m-2 d-1 at 25°C and 20°C. However, residual effects of UVB irradiation to N. californicus eggs on survival of hatched larvae were seen, so that reducing the UVB dose is also advantageous for this phytoseiid mite. N. californicus showed a photoreactivation capacity, whereas their UVB tolerance was improved by prey species, suggesting the possibility of the improvement of phytoseiid mites by diet. The reduction of UVB dose and concurrent use of phytoseiid mites increase reliability of the UVB method in IPM strategies in strawberry greenhouse. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Midwestern streamflow, precipitation, and atmospheric vorticity influenced by Pacific sea-surface temperatures and total solar-irradiance variations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, C.A.

    2006-01-01

    A solar effect on streamflow in the Midwestern United States is described and supported in a six-step physical connection between total solar irradiance (TSI), tropical sea-surface temperatures (SSTs), extratropical SSTs, jet-stream vorticity, surface-layer vorticity, precipitation, and streamflow. Variations in the correlations among the individual steps indicate that the solar/hydroclimatic mechanism is complex and has a time element (lag) that may not be constant. Correct phasing, supported by consistent spectral peaks between 0.092 and 0.096 cycles per year in all data sets within the mechanism is strong evidence for its existence. A significant correlation exists between total solar irradiance and the 3-year moving average of annual streamflow for Iowa (R = 0.67) and for the Mississippi River at St Louis, Missouri (R = 0.60), during the period 1950-2000. Published in 2005 by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Low-temperature positron-lifetime studies of proton-irradiated silicon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mäkinen, S.; Rajainmäki, H.; Linderoth, Søren

    1990-01-01

    The positron-lifetime technique has been used to identify defects created in high-purity single-crystal silicon by irradiation with 12-MeV protons at 15 K, and the evolution of the defects has been studied by subsequent annealings between 20 and 650 K. Two clear annealing steps were seen in the s......The positron-lifetime technique has been used to identify defects created in high-purity single-crystal silicon by irradiation with 12-MeV protons at 15 K, and the evolution of the defects has been studied by subsequent annealings between 20 and 650 K. Two clear annealing steps were seen...

  5. Mechanical properties of SiC composites neutron irradiated under light water reactor relevant temperature and dose conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyanagi, Takaaki; Katoh, Yutai

    2017-10-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC) fiber-reinforced SiC matrix (SiC/SiC) composites are being actively investigated for use in accident-tolerant core structures of light water reactors (LWRs). Owing to the limited number of irradiation studies previously conducted at LWR-coolant temperature, this study examined SiC/SiC composites following neutron irradiation at 230-340 °C to 2.0 and 11.8 dpa in the High Flux Isotope Reactor. The investigated materials were chemical vapor infiltrated (CVI) SiC/SiC composites with three different reinforcement fibers. The fiber materials were monolayer pyrolytic carbon (PyC) -coated Hi-Nicalon™ Type-S (HNS), Tyranno™ SA3 (SA3), and SCS-Ultra™ (SCS) SiC fibers. The irradiation resistance of these composites was investigated based on flexural behavior, dynamic Young's modulus, swelling, and microstructures. There was no notable mechanical properties degradation of the irradiated HNS and SA3 SiC/SiC composites except for reduction of the Young's moduli by up to 18%. The microstructural stability of these composites supported the absence of degradation. In addition, no progressive swelling from 2.0 to 11.8 dpa was confirmed for these composites. On the other hand, the SCS composite showed significant mechanical degradation associated with cracking within the fiber. This study determined that SiC/SiC composites with HNS or SA3 SiC/SiC fibers, a PyC interphase, and a CVI SiC matrix retain their properties beyond the lifetime dose for LWR fuel cladding at the relevant temperature.

  6. PIE of nuclear grade SiC/SiC flexural coupons irradiated to 10 dpa at LWR temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koyanagi, Takaaki [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Katoh, Yutai [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-03-01

    Silicon carbide fiber-reinforced SiC matrix (SiC/SiC) composites are being actively investigated for accident-tolerant core structures of light water reactors (LWRs). Owing to the limited number of irradiation studies previously conducted at LWR-coolant temperature, this study examined SiC/SiC composites following neutron irradiation at 230–340°C to 2.0 and 11.8 dpa in the High Flux Isotope Reactor. The investigated materials are chemical vapor infiltrated (CVI) SiC/SiC composites with three different reinforcement fibers. The fiber materials were monolayer pyrolytic carbon (PyC)-coated Hi-NicalonTM Type-S (HNS), TyrannoTM SA3 (SA3), and SCS-UltraTM (SCS) SiC fibers. The irradiation resistance of these composites was investigated based on flexural behavior, dynamic Young’s modulus, swelling, and microstructures. There was no notable mechanical properties degradation of the irradiated HNS and SA3 SiC/SiC composites except for reduction of the Young’s moduli by up to 18%. The microstructural stability of these composites supported the absence of degradation. In addition, no progressive swelling from 2.0 to 11.8 dpa was confirmed for these composites. On the other hand, the SCS composite showed significant mechanical degradation associated with cracking within the fiber. This study determined that SiC/SiC composites with HNS or SA3 SiC/SiC fibers, a PyC interphase, and a CVI SiC matrix retain their properties beyond the lifetime dose for LWR fuel cladding at the relevant temperature.

  7. Temperature and 8 MeV electron irradiation effects on GaAs solar cells

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2015-11-27

    Nov 27, 2015 ... GaAs solar cells hold the record for the highest single band-gap cell efficiency. Successful application of these cells in advanced space-borne systems demand characterization of cell properties like dark current under different ambient conditions and the stability of the cells against particle irradiation in ...

  8. Temperature and 8 MeV electron irradiation effects on GaAs solar cells

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. GaAs solar cells hold the record for the highest single band-gap cell efficiency. Successful application of these cells in advanced space-borne systems demand character- ization of cell properties like dark current under different ambient conditions and the stability of the cells against particle irradiation in space.

  9. Primary defect transformations in high-resistivity p-type silicon irradiated with electrons at cryogenic temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Makarenko, L.F., E-mail: makarenko@bsu.b [Department of Applied Mathematics and Computer Science, Belarusian State University, Independence Ave. 4, 220030 Minsk (Belarus); Lastovski, S.B.; Korshunov, F.P.; Murin, L.I. [Scientific-Practical Materials Research Centre of NAS of Belarus, Minsk (Belarus); Moll, M. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland)

    2009-12-15

    It has been revealed that self-interstitials formed under low intensity electron irradiation in high resistivity p-type silicon can be retained frozen up to room temperature. Low thermal mobility of the self-interstitials suggests that Frenkel pairs in silicon can be stable at temperatures of about or higher than 100 K. A broad DLTS peak with activation energy of 0.14-0.17 eV can be identified as related to Frenkel pairs. This peak anneals out at temperatures of 120-140 K. Experimental evidences are presented that becoming more mobile under forward current injection the self-interstitials change their charge state to a less positive one.

  10. Temperature and pH responsiveness of poly-(DMAA-co-unsaturated carboxylic acid) hydrogels synthesized by UV-irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kakinoki, Sachiro; Kaetsu, Isao E-mail: kaetsu@ned.kindai.ac.jp; Nakayama, Masashi; Sutani, Kouichi; Uchida, Kumao; Yukutake, Kouji

    2003-07-01

    Stimuli-responsive polyampholyte hydrogels were synthesized by the copolymerization of dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate (DMAA) and acrylic acid (AAc) or itaconic acid (IAc) by UV-irradiation. Temperature and pH responsiveness of these hydrogels were studied. The temperature responsiveness of poly-(DMAA-co-AAc, IAc) hydrogels shown in change of water content became dull compared to that of DMAA homo-polymer hydrogel. The water content of the poly-(DMAA-co-AAc, IAc) hydrogels showed a minimum at pH 8, and increased in more acidic and alkaline regions. This fact can be attributed to the coexistence of anions and cations in the poly-(DMAA-co-AAc, IAc) hydrogels. The poly-(DMAA-co-AAc, IAc) hydrogels were polyampholyte having both temperature responsiveness and pH responsiveness.

  11. Adiabatic capture theory applied to N+NH-->N2+H at low temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frankcombe, Terry J; Nyman, Gunnar

    2007-12-20

    The adiabatic capture centrifugal sudden approximation (ACCSA) has been applied to the ground state reaction N+NH-->N2+H over the temperature range 2-300 K using an existent potential energy surface. The resultant thermal rate constants are in agreement with available rate constants from quasi-classical trajectory calculations but are significantly larger than the available experimentally derived rate. The calculated rate constants monotonically increase with increasing temperature but could only be approximately described with a simple Arrhenius-like form. Subtle quantum effects are evident in the initial rotational state resolved cross sections and rate constants.

  12. Silica–silica Polyimide Buffered Optical Fibre Irradiation and Strength Experiment at Cryogenic Temperatures for 355 nm Pulsed Lasers

    CERN Document Server

    Takala, E; Bordini, B; Bottura, L; Bremer, J; Rossi, L

    2012-01-01

    A controlled UV-light delivery system is envisioned to be built in order to study the stability properties of superconducting strands. The application requires a wave guide from room temperature to cryogenic temperatures. Hydrogen loaded and unloaded polyimide buffered silica–silica 100 microm core fibres were tested at cryogenic temperatures. A thermal stress test was done at 1.9 K and at 4.2 K which shows that the minimal mechanical bending radius for the fibre can be 10 mm for testing (transmission was not measured). The cryogenic transmission loss was measured for one fibre to assess the magnitude of the transmission decrease due to microbending that takes place during cooldown. UV-irradiation degradation measurements were done for bent fibres at 4.2 K with a deuterium lamp and 355 nm pulsed lasers. The irradiation tests show that the fibres have transmission degradation only for wavelengths smaller than 330 nm due to the two photon absorption. The test demonstrates that the fibres are suitable for the ...

  13. Temperature variation at the external root surface during 980-nm diode laser irradiation in the root canal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfredo, E; Marchesan, M A; Sousa-Neto, M D; Brugnera-Júnior, A; Silva-Sousa, Y T C

    2008-07-01

    To assess the temperature variation in the cervical, middle and apical thirds of root external wall, caused by 980-nm diode laser irradiation with different parameters. The roots of 90 canines, had their canals instrumented and were randomly distributed into 3 groups (n=30) according to the laser potency (1.5 W, 3.0 W and 5.0 W). Each group was subdivided into 3 (n=10) according to the frequency (CM, 100 Hz and 1000 Hz), and each subgroup divided into 2 (n=5): dried canal or filled with distilled water. The maximum temperature values were collected by 3 thermocouples located at each third of the root external wall and recorded by digital thermometers. The groups irradiated in the continuous mode (CM) presented the highest values (11.82+/-5.78), regardless of the canals were dry or not, which were statistically different (p0.01). The groups irradiated with 5.0 W presented the greatest temperature variation (12.15+/-5.14), followed by 3.0 W (7.88+/-3.92) and 1.5 W (4.02+/-2.16), differing between them (ptemperature rises (9.68+/-5.80), followed by the middle (7.66+/-4.87) and apical (6.70+/-4.23), with statistical difference among them (ptemperature variation lower than 10 degrees C. Application of 980-nm diode laser in the root, at 1.5 W in all operating modes, and 3.0 W, in the pulsed mode, for 20s, can safely be used in endodontic treatment, irrespective of the presence of humidity.

  14. The behavior of lattice defects produced in Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} irradiated by neutrons at high temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atobe, K.; Koizumi, T. [Naruto Univ. of Education, Tokushima (Japan); Okada, M. [Kyoto Univ., Research Reactor Inst., Kumatori, Osaka (Japan)

    2003-01-01

    Single crystals of {alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} were irradiated by the two reactors, KUR and JMTR, at three different temperatures. Lattice defects produced by irradiation were studied by esr (electron spin resonance). Three kinds of esr spectram, which are denoted as A, B and C spectram, are observed. The spectram A was observed at three different irradiation temperatures and was ascribed to oxygen vacancies. The spectram B showed no angular dependence for the rotation of external magnetic field to the crystal axis, and the defect density of this spectram decreased with an increase of annealing temperature. When the specimen was annealed at 400 degC after irradiation at 200 degC, the spectram C was observed and was presumed to be due to Al-colloids. (Y. Kazumata)

  15. Microstructure of V-4Cr-4Ti alloy after low-temperature irradiation by ions and neutrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gazda, J.; Meshii, M. [Northwestern Univ. (United States); Chung, H.M. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1998-03-01

    Mechanical properties of V-4Cr-4Ti alloy were investigated after low-temperature (<420 C) irradiation. The effects of fast neutrons at 390 C were investigated by irradiation to {approx}4 dpa in the X530 experiment in the EBR-II reactor; these tests were complemented by irradiation with single (4.5-MeV Ni{sup ++}) and dual ion beams (350-keV He{sup +} simultaneously with 4.5-MeV Ni{sup ++}). TEM observations showed the formation of a high density of point-defect clusters and dislocation loops (<30 nm diameter) distributed uniformly in the specimens. Mechanical-property testing showed embrittlement of the alloy. TEM investigations of deformed microstructures were used to determine the causes of embrittlement and yielded observation of dislocation channels propagating through the undeformed matrix. Channels are the sole slip paths and cause early onset of necking and loss of work-hardening in this alloy. Based on a review of the available literature, suggestions are made for further research of slip localization in V-base alloys.

  16. Hardness of Carburized Surfaces in 316LN Stainless Steel after Low Temperature Neutron Irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Byun, TS

    2005-01-31

    A proprietary surface carburization treatment is being considered to minimize possible cavitation pitting of the inner surfaces of the stainless steel target vessel of the SNS. The treatment gives a large supersaturation of carbon in the surface layers and causes substantial hardening of the surface. To answer the question of whether such a hardened layer will remain hard and stable during neutron irradiation, specimens of the candidate materials were irradiated in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) to an atomic displacement level of 1 dpa. Considerable radiation hardening occurred in annealed 316LN stainless steel and 20% cold rolled 316LN stainless steel, and lesser radiation hardening in Kolsterised layers on these materials. These observations coupled with optical microscopy examinations indicate that the carbon-supersaturated layers did not suffer radiation-induced decomposition and softening.

  17. Effect of combination of chitosan coating and irradiation on physicochemical and functional properties of chicken egg during room-temperature storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Xianxe [Department of Animal Science and Biotechnology, Chungnam National University, Daejeon 305-764 (Korea, Republic of); Jang, Aera; Kim, Dong Hun [Quality Control and Utilization of Animal Products, National Institute of Animal Science, Suwon 441-706 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Bong Duk [Department of Animal Science and Biotechnology, Chungnam National University, Daejeon 305-764 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Mooha [Division of Food and Animal Biotechnology and Research Institute of Agriculture and Life Science, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-921 (Korea, Republic of); Jo, Cheorun [Department of Animal Science and Biotechnology, Chungnam National University, Daejeon 305-764 (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: cheorun@cnu.ac.kr

    2009-07-15

    The effect of combination of chitosan coating and irradiation on quality and storage stability of shell egg was investigated. Salmonella typhimurium inoculated on eggshell was not detected by irradiation of 2.0 kGy at day 0 and/or chitosan coating (1%, pH 5.0) after 3 days of storage. One-day-old fresh chicken egg was chitosan coated and irradiated at 0, 0.5, 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0 kGy by gamma ray. The egg samples were stored at room temperature for 14 days and the effects of the combination treatment on internal physicochemical and functional properties were investigated. The Haugh unit of egg was decreased by irradiation even at 0.5 kGy. Irradiation increased the lipid oxidation in egg yolk at 2 kGy but the egg with chitosan coating reduced the level of lipid oxidation. Irradiation increased the foaming ability of egg white and decreased viscosity of egg yolk and white. Results suggested that combination of irradiation and chitosan coating can improve safety of shell egg but irradiation treatment may reduce the egg quality for direct consumption. However, an improved functional property for further processing and efficient separation of egg white and yolk can be expected for egg processing industry using irradiation.

  18. Effects of temperature, packaging and electron beam irradiation processing conditions on the property behaviour of Poly (ether-block-amide) blends

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murray, Kieran A., E-mail: kmurray@research.ait.ie [Materials Research Institute, Athlone Institute of Technology, Dublin Road, Athlone, Co. Westmeath (Ireland); Kennedy, James E., E-mail: jkennedy@ait.ie [Materials Research Institute, Athlone Institute of Technology, Dublin Road, Athlone, Co. Westmeath (Ireland); McEvoy, Brian, E-mail: Brian.Mcevoy@synergyhealthplc.com [Synergy Health, IDA Business and Technology Park, Sragh, Tullamore, Co. Offaly (Ireland); Vrain, Olivier, E-mail: Olivier.Vrain@synergyhealthplc.com [Synergy Health, IDA Business and Technology Park, Sragh, Tullamore, Co. Offaly (Ireland); Ryan, Damien, E-mail: Damien.Ryan@synergyhealthplc.com [Synergy Health, IDA Business and Technology Park, Sragh, Tullamore, Co. Offaly (Ireland); Cowman, Richard, E-mail: Richard.Cowman@synergyhealthplc.com [Synergy Health, IDA Business and Technology Park, Sragh, Tullamore, Co. Offaly (Ireland); Higginbotham, Clement L., E-mail: chigginbotham@ait.ie [Materials Research Institute, Athlone Institute of Technology, Dublin Road, Athlone, Co. Westmeath (Ireland)

    2014-06-01

    The radiation stability of Poly (ether-block-amide) (PEBA) blended with a multifunctional phenolic antioxidant and a hindered amide light stabiliser was examined under various temperatures, packaging and electron beam processing conditions. FTIR revealed that there were slight alterations to the PEBA before irradiation; however, these became more pronounced following irradiation. The effect of varying the temperature, packaging and processing conditions on the resultant PEBA properties was apparent. For example, rheology demonstrated that the structural properties could be enhanced by manipulating the aforementioned criteria. Mechanical testing exhibited less radiation resistance when the PEBA samples were vacuum packed and exposed to irradiation. MFI and AFM confirmed that the melting strength and surface topography could be reduced/increased depending on the conditions employed. From this study it was concluded that virgin PEBA submerged in dry ice with non-vacuum packaging during the irradiation process, provided excellent radiation resistance (20.9% improvement) in contrast to the traditional method. - Highlights: • PEBA was melt blended with Irganox 565 and Tinuvin 783. • All virgin and blended PEBA samples were exposed to electron beam irradiation. • Virgin and blended PEBA was exposed to different temperatures during irradiation. • Non-vacuum and vacuum packed PEBA samples were compared following irradiation. • Virgin PEBA with non-vacuum packaging in dry ice improved the radiation resistance.

  19. Post-irradiation examinations and high-temperature tests on undoped large-grain UO{sub 2} discs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noirot, J., E-mail: jean.noirot@cea.fr [CEA, DEN, DEC, Cadarache, F-13108 St. Paul Lez Durance (France); Pontillon, Y. [CEA, DEN, DEC, Cadarache, F-13108 St. Paul Lez Durance (France); Yagnik, S. [EPRI, P.O. Box 10412, Palo Alto, CA 94303-0813 (United States); Turnbull, J.A. [Independent Consultant (United Kingdom)

    2015-07-15

    Within the Nuclear Fuel Industry Research (NFIR) programme, several fuel variants –in the form of thin circular discs – were irradiated in the Halden Boiling Water Reactor (HBWR) at burn-ups up to ∼100 GWd/t{sub HM}. The design of the fuel assembly was similar to that used in other HBWR programmes: the assembly contained several rods with fuel discs sandwiched between Mo discs, which limited temperature differences within each fuel disc. One such variant was made of large-grain UO{sub 2} discs (3D grain size = ∼45 μm) which were subjected to three burn-ups: 42, 72 and 96 GWd/t{sub HM}. Detailed characterizations of some of these irradiated large-grain UO{sub 2} discs were performed in the CEA Cadarache LECA-STAR hot laboratory. The techniques used included electron probe microanalysis (EPMA), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS). Comparisons were then carried out with more standard grain size UO{sub 2} discs irradiated under the same conditions. Examination of the high burn-up large-grain UO{sub 2} discs revealed the limited formation of a high burn-up structure (HBS) when compared with the standard-grain UO{sub 2} discs at similar burn-up. High burn-up discs were submitted to temperature transients up to 1200 °C in the heating test device called Merarg at a relatively low temperature ramp rate (0.2 °C/s). In addition to the total gas release during these tests, the release peaks throughout the temperature ramp were monitored. Tests at 1600 °C were also conducted on the 42 GWd/t{sub HM} discs. The fuels were then characterized with the same microanalysis techniques as those used before the tests, to investigate the effects of these tests on the fuel’s microstructure and on the fission gas behaviour. This paper outlines the high resistance of this fuel to gas precipitation at high temperature and to HBS formation at high burn-up. It also shows the similarity of the positions, within the grains, where HBS forms

  20. Solution of the neutron point kinetics equations with temperature feedback effects applying the polynomial approach method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tumelero, Fernanda, E-mail: fernanda.tumelero@yahoo.com.br [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (UFRGS), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil). Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Engenharia Mecanica; Petersen, Claudio Z.; Goncalves, Glenio A.; Lazzari, Luana, E-mail: claudiopeteren@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: gleniogoncalves@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: luana-lazzari@hotmail.com [Universidade Federal de Pelotas (DME/UFPEL), Capao do Leao, RS (Brazil). Instituto de Fisica e Matematica

    2015-07-01

    In this work, we present a solution of the Neutron Point Kinetics Equations with temperature feedback effects applying the Polynomial Approach Method. For the solution, we consider one and six groups of delayed neutrons precursors with temperature feedback effects and constant reactivity. The main idea is to expand the neutron density, delayed neutron precursors and temperature as a power series considering the reactivity as an arbitrary function of the time in a relatively short time interval around an ordinary point. In the first interval one applies the initial conditions of the problem and the analytical continuation is used to determine the solutions of the next intervals. With the application of the Polynomial Approximation Method it is possible to overcome the stiffness problem of the equations. In such a way, one varies the time step size of the Polynomial Approach Method and performs an analysis about the precision and computational time. Moreover, we compare the method with different types of approaches (linear, quadratic and cubic) of the power series. The answer of neutron density and temperature obtained by numerical simulations with linear approximation are compared with results in the literature. (author)

  1. Heating and temperature gradients of lipid bilayer samples induced by RF irradiation in MAS solid-state NMR experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jing; Zhang, Zhengfeng; Zhao, Weijing; Wang, Liying; Yang, Jun

    2016-05-09

    The MAS solid-state NMR has been a powerful technique for studying membrane proteins within the native-like lipid bilayer environment. In general, RF irradiation in MAS NMR experiments can heat and potentially destroy expensive membrane protein samples. However, under practical MAS NMR experimental conditions, detailed characterization of RF heating effect of lipid bilayer samples is still lacking. Herein, using (1) H chemical shift of water for temperature calibration, we systematically study the dependence of RF heating on hydration levels and salt concentrations of three lipids in MAS NMR experiments. Under practical (1) H decoupling conditions used in biological MAS NMR experiments, three lipids show different dependence of RF heating on hydration levels as well as salt concentrations, which are closely associated with the properties of lipids. The maximum temperature elevation of about 10 °C is similar for the three lipids containing 200% hydration, which is much lower than that in static solid-state NMR experiments. The RF heating due to salt is observed to be less than that due to hydration, with a maximum temperature elevation of less than 4 °C in the hydrated samples containing 120 mmol l(-1) of salt. Upon RF irradiation, the temperature gradient across the sample is observed to be greatly increased up to 20 °C, as demonstrated by the remarkable broadening of (1) H signal of water. Based on detailed characterization of RF heating effect, we demonstrate that RF heating and temperature gradient can be significantly reduced by decreasing the hydration levels of lipid bilayer samples from 200% to 30%. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Histologic effect of fractionated doses of selectively applied /sup 60/Co irradiation to the teeth of albino rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sweeney, W.T.; Elzay, R.P.; Levitt, S.H.

    1977-01-01

    This study compares the effects of fractionated 2400, 4800 and 7200 rad doses of Co-60 irradiation on the formed and developing teeth of the rats. The 7200 rad dosage was found to cause damage to both odontoblasts and ameloblasts of developing incisors but to spare previously formed molars.

  3. Modeling precipitate evolution in zirconium alloys during irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robson, J.D., E-mail: joseph.robson@manchester.ac.uk

    2016-08-01

    The second phase precipitates (SPPs) in zirconium alloys are critical in controlling their performance. During service, SPPs are subject to both thermal and irradiation effects that influence volume fraction, number, and size. In this paper, a model has been developed to capture the combined effect of thermal and irradiation exposure on the Zr(Fe,Cr){sub 2} precipitates in Zircaloy. The model includes irradiation induced precipitate destabilization integrated into a classical size class model for nucleation, growth and coarsening. The model has been applied to predict the effect of temperature and irradiation on SPP evolution. Increasing irradiation displacement rate is predicted to strongly enhance the loss of particles that arises from coarsening alone. The effect of temperature is complex due to competition between coarsening and irradiation damage. As temperature increases, coarsening is predicted to become increasingly important compared to irradiation induced dissolution and may increase resistance to irradiation induced dissolution by increasing particle size. - Highlights: • Model developed to predict effect of thermal and irradiation exposure on precipitates in zirconium alloys. • Model applied to predict effect of changing irradiation dose rate and temperature on precipitates in Zircaloy-4. • Model reveals competition between thermal coarsening and irradiation-induced dissolution. • Model identifies important areas for further study to understand re-precipitation of precipitates after dissolution.

  4. Results of High-Temperature Heating Test for Irradiated U-10Zr(-5Ce with T92 Cladding Fuel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    June-Hyung Kim

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available A microstructure observation using an optical microscope, SEM and EPMA was performed for the irradiated U-10Zr and U-10Zr-5Ce fuel slugs with a T92 cladding specimen after a high-temperature heating test. Also, the measured eutectic penetration rate was compared with the value predicted by the existing eutectic penetration correlation being used for design and modeling purposes. The heating temperature and duration time for the U-10Zr/T92 specimen were 750 °C and 1 h, and those for the U-10Zr-5Ce/T92 specimen were 800 °C and 1 h. In the case of the U-10Zr/T92 specimen, the migration phenomena of U, Zr, Fe, and Cr as well as the Nd lanthanide fission product were observed at the eutectic melting region. The measured penetration rate was similar to the value predicted by the existing eutectic penetration rate correlation. In addition, when comparing with measured eutectic penetration rates for the unirradiated U-10Zr fuel slug with FMS (ferritic martensitic steel, HT9 or Gr.91 cladding specimens which had been reported in the literature, the measured eutectic penetration rate for the irradiated fuel specimen was higher than that for the unirradiated U-10Zr specimen. In the case of the U-10Zr-5Ce/T92 specimen in which there had been a gap between the fuel slug and cladding after the irradiation test, the eutectic melting region was not found because contact between the fuel slug and cladding did not take place during the heating test.

  5. Thermal buffering performance of composite phase change materials applied in low-temperature protective garments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Kai; Jiao, Mingli; Yu, Yuanyuan; Zhu, Xueying; Liu, Rangtong; Cao, Jian

    2017-07-01

    Phase change material (PCM) is increasingly being applied in the manufacturing of functional thermo-regulated textiles and garments. This paper investigated the thermal buffering performance of different composite PCMs which are suitable for the application in functional low-temperature protective garments. First, according to the criteria selecting PCM for functional textiles/garments, three kinds of pure PCM were selected as samples, which were n-hexadecane, n-octadecane and n-eicosane. To get the adjustable phase change temperature range and higher phase change enthalpy, three kinds of composite PCM were prepared using the above pure PCM. To evaluate the thermal buffering performance of different composite PCM samples, the simulated low-temperature experiments were performed in the climate chamber, and the skin temperature variation curves in three different low temperature conditions were obtained. Finally composite PCM samples’ thermal buffering time, thermal buffering capacity and thermal buffering efficiency were calculated. Results show that the comprehensive thermal buffering performance of n-octadecane and n-eicosane composite PCM is the best.

  6. A study by internal friction of defects produced in iron and nickel irradiated at very low temperatures; Etude au moyen du frottement interne des defauts crees par irradiation a tres basse temperature dans le fer et le nickel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keating-Hart, G. de [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Grenoble (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1969-07-01

    This work represents a contribution to the study of point defects in metals. After a brief review of the theory of internal friction we will discuss some technical innovations aimed at increasing the flexibility of the apparatus at our disposal. These innovations have allowed us to extend our range of measurements down to 20 deg. K. We will then discuss our experimental results. Firstly, we describe preliminary experiments on electron irradiated iron and the evidence for a laminar structure. Secondly, we present and account of the first measurements on nickel after neutron irradiation at 27 deg. K. We will compare the results with those obtained by other methods in this laboratory. Essentially we have observed transitory peaks at low temperature due to close Frenkel pairs and we have noticed the absence of a peak which would correspond to the magnetic after effect band of stage I{sub E}. An attempt is made to explain the disappearance of the observed peaks upon the application of an internal saturating magnetic field. (author) [French] Ce memoire constitue une contribution a l'etude des defauts ponctuels dans les metaux. Apres un bref apercu theorique sur le frottement interne, nous presenterons quelques realisations techniques destinees a accroitre les possibilites des instruments qui nous ont ete confies. Ces dernieres nous ont permis d'etendre la gamme des mesures jusqu'a 20 deg. K. Nous parlerons ensuite de nos resultats experimentaux. En premier lieu, ceux obtenus au cours de premieres experiences, sur le fer irradie aux electrons mettent en evidence des structures de laminage. En second lieu, nous exposerons les premieres mesures realisees sur du nickel irradie aux neutrons; nous comparerons ces resultats avec ceux obtenus par d'autres moyens experimentaux dans le laboratoire. Nous avons observe essentiellement des pics fugitifs a basse temperature dus aux paires proches de Frenckel et nous avons constate l'absence d'un pic

  7. Reduction of anti-ferroelectric temperature region in NBT-BT ceramics using 100 MeV O{sup 7+} ion irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shanmuga Sundari, S. [Crystal Growth Centre, Anna University, Chennai 600025 (India); Murugan, Ramaswamy [Department of Physics, Pondicherry University, Pondicherry 605014 (India); Asokan, K. [Inter University Accelerator Centre, Aruna Asaf Ali Marg, New Delhi 110067 (India); Dhanasekaran, R., E-mail: rdcgc@yahoo.com [Crystal Growth Centre, Anna University, Chennai 600025 (India)

    2014-01-01

    NBT-BT (sodium bismuth titanate-barium titanate) lead-free ceramics were prepared via the conventional solid-state reaction method in the Morphotropic Phase Boundary (MPB) composition. The prepared ceramics were irradiated with 100 MeV O{sup 7+} ions using four different fluences of 5 × 10{sup 11}, 1 × 10{sup 12}, 5 × 10{sup 12} and 1 × 10{sup 13} ions/cm{sup 2}. The dielectric constants of the pristine and irradiated samples were determined from 300 to 623 K for a broad range of frequencies from 20 Hz to 2 MHz. Irradiation with oxygen ions decreased the anti-ferroelectric temperature region present in the samples. The structural stability of the samples against the irradiation was investigated via XRD and Raman spectroscopy before and after the irradiation.

  8. High-temperature electron irradiation and radiation-thermal technology for utilization, purification and production of some metals

    CERN Document Server

    Solovetskii, Y; Lunin, V

    1998-01-01

    High-temperature irradiation by the beam of 1.2-1.6 MeV accelerated electrons has been used for production Pt, Pd, Mo, Co, Cu and Ni from desactivated Pt(Pd)-containing reforming catalysts, molybdenum sulfide hydrodesulphurization catalysts and hydrogenation catalyst waste material. The radiation-induced decomposition of supported Ni(Co)-Mo/Al sub 2 O sub 3 sulfide catalyst and organic fragments of hydrogenation catalyst wastes has been studied. Radiolysis product distributions are shown as function of time (time up to 1,0 h) and temperature (570-1400K). There was made a principle scheme of the first technological unit for radiation-thermal utilization, purification and production of some metals from solid wastes material.

  9. Temperature Development on the External Root Surface During Laser-Assisted Endodontic Treatment Applying a Microchopped Mode of a 980 nm Diode Laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beer, Franziska; Farmakis, Eleftherios Terry R; Kopic, Josip; Kurzmann, Christoph; Moritz, Andreas

    2017-04-01

    The aim of this article was to investigate the temperature increase of the external root surface during laser-assisted endodontic treatment using a diode laser (980 nm) in a microchopped mode. Ten freshly extracted, human maxillary incisors with mature apices were collected, prepared to size F4 at working length (ProTaper; Dentsply Maillefer, Ballaigues, Switzerland), mounted to a holder, and irradiated (using spiral movements in coronal direction) with a diode laser (GENTLEray 980 Classic Plus; KaVo, Biberach, Germany) with a 200 μm fiber in four different treatment groups: Group 1 (control group) was irradiated in six cycles of 5-sec irradiation/20-sec pause with 2.5 W in the pulse mode. Groups 2 to 4 were irradiated at six cycles of 5-sec irradiation/20-sec pause in the microchopped mode (Group 2-1.6 W; Group 3-2.0 W; Group 4-2.5 W). The applied mode was 25 ms on/25 ms off. Within the on period, the laser delivered an intermittent sequence of energy complexes and the maximum output was equal to the nominated output of the device (12 W). Canals were kept moist by sterile saline irrigation in between irradiations, and temperature changes were continuously measured using a thermal imaging camera. Recordings were analyzed by a mixed model (analysis of variance [ANOVA] for repeated measurements). The highest mean of temperature rise, 1.94°C ± 1.07°C, was measured in Group 4, followed by Group 3 (1.74°C ± 1.22°C) and Group 2 (1.58°C ± 1.18°C). The lowest increase occurred in Group 1 (1.06°C ± 1.20°C). There was a significant difference (p = 0.041) between the groups. Significant differences were found between Groups 1 and 4 (p = 0.007) and 1 and 2 (p = 0.035). In addition, a marginally significant difference between Groups 1 and 2 (p = 0.052) was noted. There was no significant difference between Groups 2, 3, and 4. Despite the low mean values reported, the highest temperature increase (+5.7°C) was

  10. The responses of photosynthesis and oxygen consumption to short-term changes in temperature and irradiance in a cyanobacterial mat (Ebro Delta, Spain)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Epping, E.H.G.; Kühl, Michael

    2000-01-01

    at high irradiances, probably as a consequence of increased rates of photosynthate exudation, stimulating respiratory processes in the mat. The compensation irradiance (Ec) marking the change of the mat from a heterotrophic to an autotrophic community, increased exponentially......We have evaluated the effects of short-term changes in incident irradiance and temperature on oxygenic photosynthesis and oxygen consumption in a hypersaline cyanobacterial mat from the Ebro Delta, Spain, in which Microcoleus chthonoplastes was the dominant phototrophic organism. The mat......, did not change with temperature, whereas, JZphot, the flux of oxygen across the lower boundary of the euphotic zone increased linearly with temperature. The rate of oxygen consumption per volume of aphotic mat increased with temperature. This increase occurred in darkness, but was strongly enhanced...

  11. Influence of water activity and temperature on growth and mycotoxin production by Alternaria alternata on irradiated soya beans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oviedo, Maria Silvina; Ramirez, Maria Laura; Barros, Germán Gustavo; Chulze, Sofia Noemi

    2011-09-15

    The aim of this study was to determine the effects of water activity (a(w)) (0.99-0.90), temperature (15, 25 and 30°C) and their interactions on growth and alternariol (AOH) and alternariol monomethyl ether (AME) production by Alternaria alternata on irradiated soya beans. Maximum growth rates were obtained at 0.980 a(w) and 25°C. Minimum a(w) level for growth was dependent on temperature. Both strains were able to grow at the lowest a(w) assayed (0.90). Maximum amount of AOH was produced at 0.98 a(w) but at different temperatures, 15 and 25°C, for the strains RC 21 and RC 39 respectively. Maximum AME production was obtained at 0.98 a(w) and 30°C for both strains. The concentration range of both toxins varied considerably depending on a(w) and temperature interactions. The two metabolites were produced over the temperature range 15 to 30°C and a(w) range 0.99 to 0.96. The limiting a(w) for detectable mycotoxin production is slightly greater than that for growth. Two-dimensional profiles of a(w)× temperature were developed from these data to identify areas where conditions indicate a significant risk from AOH and AME accumulation on soya bean. Knowledge of AOH and AME production under marginal or sub-optimal temperature and a(w) conditions for growth can be important since improper storage conditions accompanied by elevated temperature and moisture content in the grain can favour further mycotoxin production and lead to reduction in grain quality. This could present a hazard if the grain is used for human consumption or animal feedstuff. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Finite element based stress analysis of graphite component in high temperature gas cooled reactor core using linear and nonlinear irradiation creep models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohanty, Subhasish, E-mail: smohanty@anl.gov; Majumdar, Saurindranath

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • High temperature gas cooled reactor. • Finite element based stress analysis. • H-451 graphite. • Irradiation creep model. • Graphite reflector stress analysis. - Abstract: Irradiation creep plays a major role in the structural integrity of the graphite components in high temperature gas cooled reactors. Finite element procedures combined with a suitable irradiation creep model can be used to simulate the time-integrated structural integrity of complex shapes, such as the reactor core graphite reflector and fuel bricks. In the present work a comparative study was undertaken to understand the effect of linear and nonlinear irradiation creep on results of finite element based stress analysis. Numerical results were generated through finite element simulations of a typical graphite reflector.

  13. Irradiation in combination with higher storage temperatures maintains chip-making quality of potato.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, S; Khade, H D; Dhokane, V S; Behere, A G; Sharma, A

    2007-08-01

    Freshly harvested and well-suberized potato (Solanum tuberosum) of varieties Kufri Jyoti, Lady Rosata, Kufri Laukar, and Hermises were processed by radiation at 78/149 Gy (D(min)/D(max)) dose and stored at 12 +/- 2 degrees C for 8 mo from March to October for assessment of chip-making quality. The firmness of the tubers in all the varieties processed remained unchanged during the period of storage. Chips of the desirable quality could be prepared from 7-mo stored Lady Rosata, Hermises, and Kufri Jyoti varieties, whereas, in Kufri Laukar, the quality chips could be prepared with tubers stored not beyond 5 mo. In the present study, varietal differences were found to influence the chip-making quality of irradiated potato. Tubers with high reducing and total sugar (>2%) were found to be unsuitable for chip-making. The quality of chips, however, was not affected much by the change in internal color of the tuber during storage beyond 6 mo. The results suggested the efficacy of gamma irradiation for ensuring availability of the processing quality potato during lean periods from September to October.

  14. Irradiation damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howe, L.M

    2000-07-01

    There is considerable interest in irradiation effects in intermetallic compounds from both the applied and fundamental aspects. Initially, this interest was associated mainly with nuclear reactor programs but it now extends to the fields of ion-beam modification of metals, behaviour of amorphous materials, ion-beam processing of electronic materials, and ion-beam simulations of various kinds. The field of irradiation damage in intermetallic compounds is rapidly expanding, and no attempt will be made in this chapter to cover all of the various aspects. Instead, attention will be focused on some specific areas and, hopefully, through these, some insight will be given into the physical processes involved, the present state of our knowledge, and the challenge of obtaining more comprehensive understanding in the future. The specific areas that will be covered are: point defects in intermetallic compounds; irradiation-enhanced ordering and irradiation-induced disordering of ordered alloys; irradiation-induced amorphization.

  15. Studies on dosimetric tests applying source irradiation force of Cs-137 for using in chambers for calibration and TLD type dosimeters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ribeiro, Laila Lorena X. [Pontificia Univ. Catolica de Goias (PUC-GO), Goiania, GO (Brazil). Dept. de Matematica, Fisica, Quimica e Engenharia de Alimentos; Barbosa, Rugles Cesar, E-mail: rbarbosa@cnen.gov.br [Centro Regional de Ciencias Nucleares do Centro Oeste (CRCN-CO/CNEN-GO), Abadia de Goias, GO (Brazil). Laboratorio de Radioprotecao; Correa, Rosangela S., E-mail: rcorrea@cnen.gov.br [Centro Regional de Ciencias Nucleares do Centro Oeste (CRCN-CO/CNEN-GO), Abadia de Goias, GO (Brazil). Laboratorio de Imagens e Dosimetria

    2011-07-01

    The West Central region of Brazil does not have a basic infrastructure for research, development, training programs, and personnel dosimetry education. All of them applied to environmental, industrial and medical uses. Service deployment for irradiance of TLD, via {sup 137}Cs irradiator J. L. SHEPHERD model 28-8A (444 activity GBq) in CRCN-CO, it is necessary to introduce procedures for calibration of the radiator and other procedures related to dosimetry and calibration. Such procedures should be repeated periodically, as necessary to introduce techniques that make the service of the CRCN-CO a template, and that meet all standards requirements for radioprotection and operation of dosimetry and calibration. The objective of this work was to evaluate the radiation field of Cs-137, and the automatic system which systematizes the calibration procedures attached to a system control target for the radiator/calibration of monitors, and portable dosimeters. (author)

  16. Development of temperature history device for measurement of FBR's irradiation environment

    CERN Document Server

    Abe, K; Satou, M; Tobita, K

    2002-01-01

    New surface modification and machining process which control swelling and exfoliation using rare gas ion beam had been developed. An attempt to make a memory device for temperature history was carried out using the process. As a prototype of the memory, array of the temperature monitor consist of thousand of small bulges was made on the surface of silicon carbide substrate. Baseline properties, which would be needed for the temperature monitor materials were examined. Microstructure observation of the swelling region was carried out by transmission electron microscopy. Mechanism of the changing of the surface morphology due to heating was discussed. Depending on temperature region, it was proposed that two mechanisms could be utilized for the temperature memory device. First one was surface exfoliation due to internal pressure of the implanted gas and second was surface exfoliation due to internal stress which caused by volume shrinking with thermal recovery process.

  17. Impact of Temperature and UV Irradiation on Dynamics of NO₂ Sensors Based on ZnO Nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Procek, Marcin; Stolarczyk, Agnieszka; Pustelny, Tadeusz

    2017-10-11

    The main object of this study is the improvement of the dynamics of NO₂ sensors based on ZnO nanostructures. Investigations presented in this paper showed that the combination of temperature and ultraviolet (UV) activation of the sensors can significantly decrease the sensor response and regeneration times. In comparison with the single activation method (elevated temperature or UV), these times for 1 ppm of NO₂ decreased from about 10 min (or more) to less than 40 s. In addition, at the optimal conditions (200 °C and UV), sensors were very stable, were fully scalable (in the range on NO₂ concentration of 1-20 ppm) and baseline drift was significantly reduced. Furthermore, in this paper, extensive studies of the influence of temperature and carrier gas (nitrogen and air) on NO₂ sensing properties of the ZnO nanostructures were conducted. The NO₂ sensing mechanisms of the sensors operating at elevated temperatures and under UV irradiation were also discussed. Our study showed that sensor responses to NO₂ and response/regeneration times are comparable from sensor to sensor in air and nitrogen conditions, which suggests that the proposed simple technology connected with well-chosen operation conditions is repeatable. The estimated limit of detection of the sensors is within the level of ≈800 ppb in nitrogen and ≈700 ppb in air.

  18. Role of temperature in the radiation stability of yttria stabilized zirconia under swift heavy ion irradiation: A study from the perspective of nuclear reactor applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalita, Parswajit; Ghosh, Santanu; Sattonnay, Gaël; Singh, Udai B.; Grover, Vinita; Shukla, Rakesh; Amirthapandian, S.; Meena, Ramcharan; Tyagi, A. K.; Avasthi, Devesh K.

    2017-07-01

    The search for materials that can withstand the harsh radiation environments of the nuclear industry has become an urgent challenge in the face of ever-increasing demands for nuclear energy. To this end, polycrystalline yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) pellets were irradiated with 80 MeV Ag6+ ions to investigate their radiation tolerance against fission fragments. To better simulate a nuclear reactor environment, the irradiations were carried out at the typical nuclear reactor temperature (850 °C). For comparison, irradiations were also performed at room temperature. Grazing incidence X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy measurements reveal degradation in crystallinity for the room temperature irradiated samples. No bulk structural amorphization was however observed, whereas defect clusters were formed as indicated by transmission electron microscopy and supported by thermal spike simulation results. A significant reduction of the irradiation induced defects/damage, i.e., improvement in the radiation tolerance, was seen under irradiation at 850 °C. This is attributed to the fact that the rapid thermal quenching of the localized hot molten zones (arising from spike in the lattice temperature upon irradiation) is confined to 850 °C (i.e., attributed to the resistance inflicted on the rapid thermal quenching of the localized hot molten zones by the high temperature of the environment) thereby resulting in the reduction of the defects/damage produced. Our results present strong evidence for the applicability of YSZ as an inert matrix fuel in nuclear reactors, where competitive effects of radiation damage and dynamic thermal healing mechanisms may lead to a strong reduction in the damage production and thus sustain its physical integrity.

  19. Sensorial evaluation of irradiated mangoes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Broisler, Paula Olhe; Cruz, Juliana Nunes da; Sabato, Susy Frey [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)]. E-mails: paulabroisler@hotmail.com; juliananc@ig.com.br; sfsabato@ipen.br

    2007-07-01

    Mango (Mangifera indica L.) is a tropical fruit of great economical relevance in the world, mainly for tropical countries like Brazil. It consists in the second tropical fruit more important grown in the world. On the other hand it is a very perishable fruit and its delivery to distant points is restricted due to short shelf life at environmental temperature. Food irradiation process is applied to fruits for their preservation, once it promotes disinfestation and even maturation retard, among other mechanisms. The Brazilian legislation permits the food irradiation and does not restrict the doses to be delivered. In order to verify eventual changes, sensorial evaluation is very important to study how irradiation affects the quality of the fruit and its acceptability. Mangoes were irradiated in a Cobalto-60 source, from the Radiation Technology Center, CTR, of IPEN/CNEN-SP at doses 0,5 kGy e 0,75 kGy. The sensorial evaluation was measured through Acceptance Test where irradiated samples were offered together with control sample to the tasters who answered their perception through hedonic scale. The parameters Color, Odor, Flavor and Texture were analyzed. Statistical analysis showed that only Odor parameter was different from control (sample irradiated at 0.5 kGy). Few tasters indicated that irradiated mangoes had fewer odors in relation to non-irradiated samples. (author)

  20. Comparison of compression properties and swelling of beryllium irradiated at various temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beeston, J.M.; Miller, L.G.; Wood, E.L. Jr.; Moir, R.W.

    1983-01-01

    A beryllium cylinder irradiated in Experimental Breeder Reactor (EBR-II) for four years at 700 to 760 K to a neutron fluence of 8.13 x 10/sup 22/ n/cm/sup 2/ (total) or 1 x 10/sup 22/ n/cm/sup 2/ (E > 1 MeV) was cut into samples and tested. Yield strength and plastic strain was determined in compression tests at 300, 723, 823 K and after annealing at 1173 K for one hour. The immersion density and helium content were measured on samples. An equation for swelling was derived from the data by regression analysis. The microstructure showed agglomeration of helium in voids or bubbles at the grain boundaries.

  1. Dependence of the depth distribution of implanted silver ions on the temperature of irradiated glass

    CERN Document Server

    Stepanov, A L

    2001-01-01

    The peculiarities of the glass ion implantation by the silver ions in dependence on the substrate temperature within the interval of 20-100 deg C are studied. Modeling the profiles of the implanted ions distribution in depth with an account of the thermostimulated increase in the admixture diffusion mobility is carried out. It is shown, that increase in the substrate temperature leads to the diffusion wash-out of the introduced admixture ions distribution. The analysis of the modeling results indicates the necessity of strict control of the substrate temperature by the dielectrics implantation for obtaining the conditions for the metal nanoparticles synthesis

  2. The Effect in Vitro of Ionizing Irradiation and Small Rises in Temperature on the Uptake and Release of Labelled Lipids by the Human Erythrocyte Membrane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Heinz Johs. Max; Karle, H.; Stender, S.

    1978-01-01

    1. The effect of X-irradiation (50 000 rad) and an increase in temperature from 37 to 42° C on the synthesis, uptake and release of labelled lipids by erythrocytes was studied in plasma incubations in vitro. 2. Both irradiation and a rise in temperature resulted in an enhanced synthesis of [32P......]phosphatidic acid in the erythrocytes. 3. The uptake by the erythrocytes of 14C- and 3H-labelled cholesterol, [14C, 32P]phosphatidylethanolamine and [14C, 32P]phosphatidylcholine from plasma lipoproteins was increased by a rise in temperature but not by irradiation. These labelled lipids were apparently taken up...... in the ratio in which they were found in plasma. They were not released from the erythrocytes in the same manner....

  3. Rescue at nonpermissive temperature of complementation group II temperature-sensitive mutants of vesicular stomatitis virus by uv-irradiated VSV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deutsch, V.; Brun, G.

    1978-06-01

    Rescue is group-characteristic. The helper virus can be either the wt strain or a mutant belonging to any group of ts mutants except group II. With regard to genotype, the rescue progeny virus is temperature-sensitive and belongs to group II, and its ts II parent (ts O52(II)) can be characterized. As for phenotype, the in vitro thermal stability of rescue virions is intermediate between that of parental ts O52(II) and uv-irradiated wt virus, suggesting incorporation of some wt protein II molecules in the rescue virions. Different slopes (zero or different from zero) were seen in dose-effect curves representing rescue obtained by structural protein molecules, suggesting that protein II structural role could be distinguished from its functional role(s) by uv sensitivity. Differences in efficiency of the rescue of ts O52(II) by ts I mutants irradiated with low uv fluence may reflect their different transcribing capabilities at 39.6/sup 0/. The results are discussed taking into account the fact that the phenotype of group II mutants is characterized by an unstable nucleocapsid.

  4. Facile Synthesis of BiOI Nanoparticles at Room Temperature and Evaluation of their Photoactivity under Sunlight Irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoodi, Vahid; Ahmadpour, Ali; Rohani Bastami, Tahereh; Hamed Mousavian, Mohammad Taghi

    2017-08-21

    In this study, highly photoactive BiOI nanoparticles (NPs) under sunlight irradiation were synthesized by a facile precipitation method using polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) at room temperature. The as-prepared catalysts were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transition electron microscopy (TEM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and UV-vis diffuse reflectance spectra (UV-vis DRS). The results of XRD showed that PVP did not have any significant effect on tetragonal crystalline structure of BiOI. Also, using different amounts of PVP in the synthesis led to different morphologies and sizes of BiOI particles. It was found that using 0.2 g of PVP in the synthesis method changed morphology from 1-μm platelets to NPs with size under 10 nm. In addition, the photocatalytic performance of prepared photocatalysts was evaluated in the photodegradation of reactive blue 19 (RB19) dye under sunlight irradiation. The BiOI synthesized using 0.2 g PVP (BiOI0.2) showed higher degradation efficiency compared to BiOI prepared without any additive. Excellent visible light photocatalytic properties of nano-scaled BiOI0.2 samples compared to BiOI platelets could be attributed to higher surface-to-volume ratio and narrow band-gap energy of as-prepared BiOI0.2 NPs. © 2017 The American Society of Photobiology.

  5. Improving Flare Irradiance Models with the Low Pass Filter Relation Between EUV Flare Emissions with Differing Formation Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiemann, Edward M. B.; Eparvier, Francis G.

    2016-10-01

    Solar flares are the result of magnetic reconnection in the solar corona which converts magnetic energy into kinetic energy resulting in the rapid heating of solar plasma. As this plasma cools, extreme ultraviolet (EUV) line emission intensities evolve as the plasma temperature passes through line formation temperatures, resulting in emission lines with cooler formation temperatures peaking after those with hotter formation temperatures. At the 2016 American Astronomical Society Solar Physics Division Meeting in Boulder (SPD2016), we showed that Fe XVIII solar flare light curves are highly correlated with Fe XXIII light curves that have been subjected to the single-pole Low Pass Filter Equation (LPFE) with a time constant equal to the time difference between the peak emissions. The single-pole (or equivalently, RC) LPFE appears frequently in analyses of systems which both store and dissipate heat, and the flare LPFE effect is believed to be related to the underlying cooling processes. Because the LPFE is constrained by a single parameter, this effect has implications for both operational EUV flare irradiance models and understanding thermal processes that occur in post-flare loops. At the time of SPD2016, it was ambiguous as to whether the LPFE effect relates hot thermal bremsstrahlung soft x-ray (SXR) or EUV line emissions with cooler EUV line emissions since Fe XXIII flare light curves are highly correlated with SXR flare light curves. In this study, we present new results characterizing the LPFE relation between multiple emission lines with differing formation temperatures ranging from 107.2 to 105.7 K observed by SDO/EVE and SXR thermal bremsstrahlung emissions observed by GOES/XRS. We show that the LPFE equation relates Fe XVIII with cooler EUV line emissions, providing unambiguous evidence that the LPFE effect exists between EUV line emissions rather than thermal bremsstrahlung and line emissions exclusively. The exact nature of this effect remains an open

  6. High sensitivity ethanol gas sensor based on Sn - doped ZnO under visible light irradiation at low temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Peishuo; Pan, Guofeng; Zhang, Bingqiang; Zhen, Jiali; Sun, Yicai, E-mail: pgf@hebut.edu.cn [Institute of Microelectronic, Hebei University of Technology, Tianjin (China)

    2014-07-15

    Pure ZnO and 5at%, 7at%, 9at% Sn - doped ZnO materials are prepared by the chemical co - precipitation method. They were annealed by furnace at temperature range of 300 - 700ºC in air for 1h. The ZnO materials are characterized by X - ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results show that the Sn - doped ZnO materials appear rough porous structures. The maximum sensitivity can be achieved by doping the amount of 7 at%. It has much better sensing performance towards ethanol vapor under visible light irradiation. The response and recovery time are ~1s and ~5s, respectively. The mechanism for the improvement in the sensing properties can be explained with the surface adsorption theory and the photoactivation theory. (author)

  7. Neuro-fuzzy dynamic model with Kalman filter to forecast irradiance and temperature for solar energy systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chaabene, Maher; Ben Ammar, Mohsen [The High Institute of Technological Studies (ISET), Sfax (Tunisia); Unite de commande de machines et energies renouvelables CMER, ENIS (Tunisia)

    2008-07-15

    This paper introduces a dynamic forecasting of irradiance and ambient temperature. The medium term forecasting (MTF) gives a daily meteorological behaviour. It consists of a neuro-fuzzy estimator based on meteorological parameters' behaviours during the days before, and on time distribution models. As for the short term forecasting (STF), it estimates, for a 5 min time step ahead, the meteorological parameters evolution. It is ensured by the Auto-Regressive Moving Average (ARMA) model of the MTF associated to a Kalman filter. STF uses instantaneous measured data, delivered by a data acquisition system, so as to accomplish the forecast. Herein we describe our method and we present forecasting results. Validation is based on measurements taken at the Energy and Thermal Research Centre (CRTEn) in the north of Tunisia. Since our work delivers accurate meteorological parameters forecasting, the obtained results can be easily adapted to forecast any solar conversion system output. (author)

  8. On the assignment of the room temperature ESR spectrum of gamma irradiated poly(ethylene glycol dimethacrylate)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, L.; Carswell-Pomerantz, T.G.; Hill, D.J.T.; Pomery, P.J. [Queensland Univ., Brisbane, QLD (Australia). Polymer Materials and Radiation Group

    1996-11-01

    The ESR spectrum of poly(ethylene glycol dimethacrylate) observed at room temperature following gamma radiolysis is characterized by an eleven-line spectrum. Some authors have assigned the outer lines in this spectrum to the presence of formyl radicals which have been stabilized at the prevailing temperature by the cross linked networked. In this paper we re-evaluate this assignment and show that a more likely explanation of the spectrum is that there are three conformations of the propagating radicals present, corresponding to the three possible rotational conformers which can be formed about the {beta}-methylene group. It is suggested that the third conformer, which is not found for poly(methyl methacrylate) and most other methacrylate polymers, is stabilized by the cross linked structure of this polymer. A similar explanation is suggested as an explanation for the eleven-line ESR spectrum observed for poly(methacrylic acid) following irradiation at room temperature, where the stabilization is suggested to occur due to hydrogen bond through the carboxyl groups. (author).

  9. On the assignment of the room temperature ESR spectrum of gamma irradiated poly(ethylene glycol dimethacrylate)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, L.; Carswell-Pomerantz, T. G.; Hill, D. J. T.; Pomery, P. J.

    1996-11-01

    The ESR spectrum of poly(ethylene glycol dimethacrylate) observed at room temperature following gamma radiolysis is characterized by an eleven-line spectrum. Some authors have assigned the outer lines in this spectrum to the presence of formyl radicals which have been stabilized at the prevailing temperature by the cross linked network. In this paper we re-evaluate this assignment and show that a more likely explanation of the spectrum is that there is that there are three conformations of the propagating radicals present, corresponding to the three possible rotational conformers which can be formed about the β-methylene group. It is suggested that the third conformer, which is not found for poly(methyl methacrylate) and most other methacrylate polymers, is stabilized by the cross linked structure of this polymer. A similar explanation is suggested as an explanation for the eleven-line ESR spectrum observed for poly(methacrylic acid) following irradiation at room temperature, where the stabilization is suggested to occur due to hydrogen bond through the carboxyl groups.

  10. Strand break formation in plasmid DNA irradiated in aqueous solution: effect of medium temperature and hydroxyl radical scavenger concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomita, H; Kai, M; Kusama, T; Aoki, Y

    1995-03-01

    Plasmid pBR322 DNA (4363 base pairs) in aerobic aqueous solution was irradiated with 60Co gamma-radiation. The change of diffusion coefficients (D) of chemical species, rate constants (k) of radical-DNA interaction and solubilities of O2 in water cannot be ignored when a temperature varies more than a few tens of centigrade. It is important to examine the variation of the yields of DNA strand breaks as a function of temperature in order to analyze the mechanisms of DNA strand breaks from the chemical point of view. Hence, we observed the change of the yield of strand breaks with temperatures between -20 and 42 degrees C by agarose gel electrophoresis. We also observed the change of the yield of strand breaks with the concentration of OH scavenger (Tris) from 1 mmol dm-3 to 100 mmol dm-3 and summarized it with previous experiments. This summarization indicated that the order of the lifetime of OH radical in cellular environment is several nanosecond. This value is consistent with the measurement of the lifetime of 8.7 nanosecond for OH radical in mammalian cell (Roots, R. and Okada, S. (1975) Radiat. Res. 64, 306-320).

  11. Effect of Temperature on the Growth of Silver Nanoparticles Using Plasmon-Mediated Method under the Irradiation of Green LEDs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shan-Wei Lee

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Plasmon-mediated shape conversion of spherical silver nanoparticles (NPs to nanostructures with other shapes under the irradiation of green LEDs (520 ± 20 nm, 35 mw/cm2 at various temperatures (60, 40, 20, 10, 5, and 0 °C was performed in this study. It was found that the bath temperature used in the reaction can influence the reaction rates, i.e., the times needed for the shape transformation process were 5, 11.5, 25, 45, 72, and 100 h at 60, 40, 20, 10, 5, and 0 °C, respectively. In addition, the bath temperature can also alter the morphologies of the final products. The major products are silver nanoplates at 60, 40 and 20 °C. However, they became decahedral silver NPs at 5 and 0 °C. The percentages of decahedral silver NPs synthesized at 60, 40, 20, 10, 5, and 0 °C are 0%, 1%, 5%, 45%, 73%, and 89%, respectively. Measuring the surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS spectra of the probe molecule R6G in the presence of KBr showed that both silver nanoplate colloids synthesized at 60 °C and decahedral silver NP colloids synthesized at 0 °C in the absence of PVP had good SERS activities.

  12. Effect of Temperature on the Growth of Silver Nanoparticles Using Plasmon-Mediated Method under the Irradiation of Green LEDs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Shan-Wei; Chang, Shi-Hise; Lai, Yen-Shang; Lin, Chang-Cheng; Tsai, Chin-Min; Lee, Yao-Chang; Chen, Jui-Chang; Huang, Cheng-Liang

    2014-12-05

    Plasmon-mediated shape conversion of spherical silver nanoparticles (NPs) to nanostructures with other shapes under the irradiation of green LEDs (520 ± 20 nm, 35 mw/cm²) at various temperatures (60, 40, 20, 10, 5, and 0 °C) was performed in this study. It was found that the bath temperature used in the reaction can influence the reaction rates, i.e. , the times needed for the shape transformation process were 5, 11.5, 25, 45, 72, and 100 h at 60, 40, 20, 10, 5, and 0 °C, respectively. In addition, the bath temperature can also alter the morphologies of the final products. The major products are silver nanoplates at 60, 40 and 20 °C. However, they became decahedral silver NPs at 5 and 0 °C. The percentages of decahedral silver NPs synthesized at 60, 40, 20, 10, 5, and 0 °C are 0%, 1%, 5%, 45%, 73%, and 89%, respectively. Measuring the surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) spectra of the probe molecule R6G in the presence of KBr showed that both silver nanoplate colloids synthesized at 60 °C and decahedral silver NP colloids synthesized at 0 °C in the absence of PVP had good SERS activities.

  13. Effect of Sintering Temperature and Applied Load on Anode-Supported Electrodes for SOFC Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuan-Vien Nguyen

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Anode-supported cells are prepared by a sequence of hot pressing and co-sintering processes for solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC applications. Commercially available porous anode tape (NiO/YSZ = 50 wt %/50 wt %, anode tape (NiO/YSZ = 30 wt %/70 wt %, and YSZ are used as the anode substrate, anode functional layer, and electrolyte layer, respectively. After hot pressing, the stacked layers are then sintered at different temperatures (1250 °C, 1350 °C, 1400 °C and 1450 °C for 5 h in air. Different compressive loads are applied during the sintering process. An (La,SrMnO3 (LSM paste is coated on the post-sintered anode-supported electrolyte surface as the cathode, and sintered at different temperatures (1100 °C, 1150 °C, 1200 °C and 1250 °C for 2 h in air to generate anode-supported cells with dimensions of 60 × 60 mm2 (active reaction area of 50 × 50 mm2. SEM is used to investigate the anode structure of the anode-supported cells. In addition, confocal laser scanning microscopy is used to investigate the roughness of the cathode surfaces. At sintering temperatures of 1400 °C and 1450 °C, there is significant grain growth in the anode. Furthermore, the surface of the cathode is smoother at a firing temperature of 1200 °C. It is also found that the optimal compressive load of 1742 Pa led to a flatness of 168 µm/6 cm and a deformation of 0.72%. The open circuit voltage and power density of the anode-supported cell at 750 °C were 1.0 V and 178 mW·cm−2, respectively.

  14. Precision rectifier detectors for ac resistance bridge measurements with application to temperature control systems for irradiation creep experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duncan, M. G.

    1977-05-01

    The suitability of several temperature measurement schemes for an irradiation creep experiment is examined. It is found that the specimen resistance can be used to measure and control the sample temperature if compensated for resistance drift due to radiation and annealing effects. A modified Kelvin bridge is presented that allows compensation for resistance drift by periodically checking the sample resistance at a controlled ambient temperature. A new phase-insensitive method for detecting the bridge error signals is presented. The phase-insensitive detector is formed by averaging the magnitude of two bridge voltages. Although this method is substantially less sensitive to stray reactances in the bridge than conventional phase-sensitive detectors, it is sensitive to gain stability and linearity of the rectifier circuits. Accuracy limitations of rectifier circuits are examined both theoretically and experimentally in great detail. Both hand analyses and computer simulations of rectifier errors are presented. Finally, the design of a temperature control system based on sample resistance measurement is presented. The prototype is shown to control a 316 stainless steel sample to within a 0.15/sup 0/C short term (10 sec) and a 0.03/sup 0/C long term (10 min) standard deviation at temperatures between 150 and 700/sup 0/C. The phase-insensitive detector typically contributes less than 10 ppM peak resistance measurement error (0.04/sup 0/C at 700/sup 0/C for 316 stainless steel or 0.005/sup 0/C at 150/sup 0/C for zirconium).

  15. Temperature and pH responsive behaviours of CMC/AAc hydrogels prepared by electron beam irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Naggar, Abdel Wahab M. [Department of Radiation Chemistry, National Center for Radiation Research and Technology, P.O. Box 29, Nasr City, Cairo (Egypt)]. E-mail: ab_nagga@yahoo.com; Alla, Safaa G. Abd [Department of Radiation Chemistry, National Center for Radiation Research and Technology, P.O. Box 29, Nasr City, Cairo (Egypt); Said, Hossam M. [Department of Radiation Chemistry, National Center for Radiation Research and Technology, P.O. Box 29, Nasr City, Cairo (Egypt)

    2006-01-10

    The temperature and pH-responsive characters of hydrogels prepared from aqueous solutions containing 4.2 and 25% (w/v) carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) and acrylic acid (AAc), respectively under the effect of accelerated electrons was investigated. Even though the initial content of hydrogels solution is constant, the swelling in water and responsive characters were greatly dependent on electron beam irradiation dose. In this regard, the percentage swelling in water of the hydrogel prepared at 50 kGy is relatively higher than that prepared at 80 kGy. However, both hydrogels displayed super water absorbing behaviour at room temperature in the range of {approx}3500-4000%. The hydrogels exhibit a relatively low tendency to swell in methanol with respect to water, in which the overall swelling in water is {approx}12 times that in methanol. The deswelling of the hydrogels at 40 deg. C in water from the equilibrium swelling state at 25 deg. C showed a lower rate than the swelling process. The results showed that the CMC/AAc hydrogel prepared at 50 kGy has a temperature-response character within the temperature range 25 + 15 deg. C at any time of swelling, while the hydrogel prepared at 80 kGy, does not show this character within this range of temperature. While the swelling of CMC/AAc hydrogel prepared at 50 kGy was found to substantially increase with increasing pH values from 3 to 10, the hydrogel prepared at 80 kGy was found to display pH responsive character below and above 7.

  16. Thermal Cycling and High Temperature Reverse Bias Testing of Control and Irradiated Gallium Nitride Power Transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Richard L.; Boomer, Kristen T.; Scheick, Leif; Lauenstein, Jean-Marie; Casey, Megan; Hammoud, Ahmad

    2014-01-01

    The power systems for use in NASA space missions must work reliably under harsh conditions including radiation, thermal cycling, and exposure to extreme temperatures. Gallium nitride semiconductors show great promise, but information pertaining to their performance is scarce. Gallium nitride N-channel enhancement-mode field effect transistors made by EPC Corporation in a 2nd generation of manufacturing were exposed to radiation followed by long-term thermal cycling and testing under high temperature reverse bias conditions in order to address their reliability for use in space missions. Result of the experimental work are presented and discussed.

  17. Influence of water activity and temperature on growth and fumonisin production by Fusarium proliferatum strains on irradiated wheat grains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cendoya, Eugenia; Monge, María Del Pilar; Chiacchiera, Stella Maris; Farnochi, María Cecilia; Ramirez, María Laura

    2018-02-02

    Wheat is the most important cereal consumed by the Argentine population. In previous studies performed in durum and common wheat grains in this country it has been observed fumonisin contamination as well as high incidence of Fusarium proliferatum. Fumonisins are toxic fungal metabolites, and consumption of fumonisin-contaminated maize has been epidemiologically associated with oesophageal cancer and neural tube defects in some human populations. Using irradiated wheat-grains, the effects of abiotic factors, temperature (15, 25, and 30°C) and water activity (a W ; 0.995, 0.98, 0.96, 0.94, 0.92, and 0.88), on mycelial growth and fumonisin biosynthesis were compared for three F. proliferatum strains isolated from wheat grains in Argentina. Although all isolates showed similar profiles of growth, the fumonisin production profiles were slightly different. Maximum growth rates were obtained at the highest a W (0.995) and 25°C, with growth decreasing as the a W of the medium was reduced. Maximum amounts of total fumonisins (FB 1 , FB 2 and FB 3 ) were produced at 0.995 a W and 15°C for 2 strains, and at 25°C and 0.995 a W for the third one. Fumonisins concentrations varied considerably depending on the a W and temperature interactions assayed. Studied strains showed different fumonisin production profiles. Two-dimensional profiles of a W by temperature interactions were developed from these data to identify areas where conditions indicate a significant risk of fumonisins accumulation on wheat. As a result, temperature and a W conditions that resulted in fumonisins production are those found during wheat grain development (especially milk and dough stages) in the field. This is the first study made using irradiated wheat grains and provides useful baseline data on conditions representing a low or a high risk for fumonisins contamination of wheat grains which is of concern because this cereal is destined mainly for human consumption. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All

  18. Electron spin resonance of melanin from hair. Effects of temperature, pH and light irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arnaud, R.; Perbet, G. (Clermont-Ferrand-2 Univ., 63 - Aubiere (France)); Deflandre, A.; Lang, G. (Centre de Recherches de la Societe L' Oreal, Aulnay Sous Bois (France) Dept. de Chimie Generale)

    1983-08-01

    The variation with temperature, pH and light of the ESR signal of hydrated melanin powders from Japanese black hair has been studied. An explanation of the results is proposed on the basis of quinhydrone type complexes and of acid-base equilibria of melanin and its semiquinone radicals. During exposure to light of wavelengths 254-600 nm, both stable and unstable radicals have been observed. The action spectrum for the formation of stable melanin radicals has been determined.

  19. Damage buildup in Ar-ion-irradiated 3 C -SiC at elevated temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wallace, J. B.; Bayu Aji, L. B.; Li, T. T.; Shao, L.; Kucheyev, S. O.

    2015-09-14

    Above room temperature, the accumulation of radiation damage in 3C-SiC is strongly influenced by dynamic defect interaction processes and remains poorly understood. Here, we use a combination of ion channeling and transmission electron microscopy to study lattice disorder in 3C-SiC irradiated with 500 keV Ar ions in the temperature range of 25–250 °C. Results reveal sigmoidal damage buildup for all the temperatures studied. For 150 °C and below, the damage level monotonically increases with ion dose up to amorphization. Starting at 200 °C, the shape of damage–depth profiles becomes anomalous, with the damage peak narrowing and moving to larger depths and an additional shoulder forming close to the ion end of range. As a result, damage buildup curves for 200 and 250 °C exhibit an anomalous two-step shape, with a damage saturation stage followed by rapid amorphization above a critical ion dose, suggesting a nucleation-limited amorphization behavior. Despite their complexity, all damage buildup curves are well described by a phenomenological model based on an assumption of a linear dependence of the effective amorphization cross section on ion dose. In contrast to the results of previous studies, 3C-SiC can be amorphized by bombardment with 500 keV Ar ions even at 250 °C with a relatively large dose rate of ~2×1013 cm-2 s-1, revealing a dominant role of defect interaction dynamics at elevated temperatures.

  20. Comparative resistance of nonsporogenic bacteria to low-temperature gamma irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anellis, A; Berkowitz, D; Kemper, D

    1973-04-01

    A total of 36 microorganisms, comprising 19 species of 11 genera, were screened for radiation resistance with (60)Co gamma rays at a radiation temperatore of -80 +/- 2 C in phosphate buffer (pH 7.0) under vacuum. Micrococcus radiodurans was the most resistant organism. An initial population of 2.8 x 10(5) cells per dose of this species survived 2.4 but not 2.7 Mrad. Of the remaining 18 species with initial populations of about 10(6) cells per dose, Streptococcus faecium survived 0.9 to 1.5 Mrad, depending on the strain tested. S. faecalis QM survived 0.9 but not 1.2 Mrad. S. faecalis 1539 and Alcaligenes faecallis survived 0.6 but not 0.9 Mrad. Three species of Salmonella, one strain each of Escherichia coli, Streptococcus lactis, and Aerobacter aerogenes survived 0.3 but not 0.6 Mrad. The remaining 22 bacteria did not survive 0.3 Mrad, the lowest dose tested. Detailed survival curve determinations for four strains of S. faecium, the most resistant of the test bacteria of public health significance, indicated the following order of resistance at -80 C: alpha21 > theta12 = F(6) > FEC. Each strain produced two exponential survival curves with different slopes, the breaks occurring at 0.3 to 0.5 Mrad. The D values (doses which reduce the microbial population by 90%) of the more resistant cell fractions were two- to three-fold higher than the more sensitive cell fraction. The resistance of strain alpha21 was determined at different radiation temperature (+5, -30, -80, -140, -196 C). The D value-radiation temperature relationship followed a quadratic equation. Computations of E(a) and Q(10) values (activation energy and temperature coefficient, respectively) showed a very small thermodynamic effect on radiation death. An Arrhenius evaluation of the temperature effect on cell kill indicated that there was no simple physicochemical mechanism which might explain the change in D value as a function of temperature.

  1. Double modulation pyrometry: A radiometric method to measure surface temperatures of directly irradiated samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potamias, Dimitrios; Alxneit, Ivo; Wokaun, Alexander

    2017-09-01

    The design, implementation, calibration, and assessment of double modulation pyrometry to measure surface temperatures of radiatively heated samples in our 1 kW imaging furnace is presented. The method requires that the intensity of the external radiation can be modulated. This was achieved by a rotating blade mounted parallel to the optical axis of the imaging furnace. Double modulation pyrometry independently measures the external radiation reflected by the sample as well as the sum of thermal and reflected radiation and extracts the thermal emission as the difference of these signals. Thus a two-step calibration is required: First, the relative gains of the measured signals are equalized and then a temperature calibration is performed. For the latter, we transfer the calibration from a calibrated solar blind pyrometer that operates at a different wavelength. We demonstrate that the worst case systematic error associated with this procedure is about 300 K but becomes negligible if a reasonable estimate of the sample's emissivity is used. An analysis of the influence of the uncertainties in the calibration coefficients reveals that one (out of the five) coefficient contributes almost 50% to the final temperature error. On a low emission sample like platinum, the lower detection limit is around 1700 K and the accuracy typically about 20 K. Note that these moderate specifications are specific for the use of double modulation pyrometry at the imaging furnace. It is mainly caused by the difficulty to achieve and maintain good overlap of the hot zone with a diameter of about 3 mm Full Width at Half Height and the measurement spot both of which are of similar size.

  2. Organic materials irradiated at very low temperature and at different stopping powers: examples of polyethylene and of cyclohexane molecules trapped in matrix; Materiaux organiques irradies a tres basse temperature et a differents pouvoirs d'arret: cas du polyethylene et des molecules de cyclohexane isolees en matrice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melot, M

    2003-10-15

    This thesis concerns the formation mechanisms of defects created in organic materials during irradiation under vacuum, at very low temperature and at different electronic stopping powers. Analysis have been realised by infrared spectroscopy. The first part concerns polyethylene. Irradiating at 8 K allows to dissociate the direct irradiation effects (in cage reactions) and the radical recombination effects. According to the considered chemical groups, the radical mobility leads to very different changes for the formation radiochemical yields. The second part concerns the irradiation of cyclohexane molecules trapped in a solid argon matrix. We evaluate the contribution of intermolecular and intramolecular reactions. The intermolecular reactions have limited consequences when using low ionising radiations but are crucial for heavy ion irradiations. (author)

  3. Comprehensive device Simulation modeling of heavily irradiated silicon detectors at cryogenic temperatures

    CERN Document Server

    Moscatelli, F; MacEvoy, B; Hall, G; Passeri, D; Petasecca, M; Pignatel, Giogrio Umberto

    2004-01-01

    Radiation hardness is a critical design concern for present and future silicon detectors in high energy physics. Tracking systems at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) are expected to operate for ten years and to receive fast hadron fluences equivalent to 10/sup 15/cm /sup -2/ 1-MeV neutrons. Recently, low temperature operating conditions have been suggested as a means of suppressing the negative effects of radiation damage on detector charge collection properties. To investigate this effect, simulations have been carried out using the ISE-TCAD DESSIS device simulator. The so-called "three-level model" has been used. A comprehensive analysis of the influence of the V/sub 2/, C/sub i/O/sub i/ and V/sub 2/O capture cross sections on the effective doping concentration (N/sub eff/) as a function of temperature and fluence has been carried out. The capture cross sections have been varied in the range 10/sup -18/-10/sup -12/ cm/sup 2/. The simulated results are compared with charge collection spectra obtained wit...

  4. An enhanced device simulation of heavily irradiated silicon detectors at cryogenic temperatures

    CERN Document Server

    Moscatelli, F; MacEvoy, B; Hall, G; Passeri, D; Merlani, R; Pignatel, Giogrio Umberto

    2004-01-01

    Radiation hardness is a critical design concern for present and future silicon detectors in high energy physics. Tracking systems at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) are expected to operate for ten years and to receive fast hadron fluences equivalent to 10/sup 15/ cm /sup -2/ 1MeV neutrons. Recently, low temperature operating conditions have been suggested as an effective means to mitigate the damaging effects of radiation on detector charge collection properties. In order to investigate this effect, simulations have been carried out using the ISE-TCAD DESSIS device simulator. The so- called "three-level" model has been used. A comprehensive analysis of the influence of the V/sub 2/, C/sub i/O/sub i/ and V/sub 2/O defect capture cross-sections on the effective doping concentration (N/sub eff/) as a function of temperature and fluence has been carried out. The capture cross sections have been varied in the range 10/sup -18 /-10/sup -12/ cm/sup 2/. The simulated results are compared with charge collection s...

  5. Microstructure and Property Evolution in Advanced Cladding and Duct Materials Under Long-Term and Elevated Temperature Irradiation: Modeling and Experimental Investigation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wirth, Brian; Morgan, Dane; Kaoumi, Djamel; Motta, Arthur

    2013-12-01

    The in-service degradation of reactor core materials is related to underlying changes in the irradiated microstructure. During reactor operation, structural components and cladding experience displacement of atoms by collisions with neutrons at temperatures at which the radiation-induced defects are mobile, leading to microstructure evolution under irradiation that can degrade material properties. At the doses and temperatures relevant to fast reactor operation, the microstructure evolves by dislocation loop formation and growth, microchemistry changes due to radiation-induced segregation, radiation-induced precipitation, destabilization of the existing precipitate structure, and in some cases, void formation and growth. These processes do not occur independently; rather, their evolution is highly interlinked. Radiationinduced segregation of Cr and existing chromium carbide coverage in irradiated alloy T91 track each other closely. The radiation-induced precipitation of Ni-Si precipitates and RIS of Ni and Si in alloys T91 and HCM12A are likely related. Neither the evolution of these processes nor their coupling is understood under the conditions required for materials performance in fast reactors (temperature range 300-600°C and doses beyond 200 dpa). Further, predictive modeling is not yet possible as models for microstructure evolution must be developed along with experiments to characterize these key processes and provide tools for extrapolation. To extend the range of operation of nuclear fuel cladding and structural materials in advanced nuclear energy and transmutation systems to that required for the fast reactor, the irradiation-induced evolution of the microstructure, microchemistry, and the associated mechanical properties at relevant temperatures and doses must be understood. Predictive modeling relies on an understanding of the physical processes and also on the development of microstructure and microchemical models to describe their evolution under

  6. Suppression of Brillouin scattering in fibre-optical parametric amplifier by applying temperature control and phase modulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lorenzen, Michael Rodas; Noordegraaf, Danny; Nielsen, Carsten Vandel

    2009-01-01

    An increased gain in a fibre-optical parametric amplifier through suppression of stimulated Brillouin scattering is demonstrated by applying a temperature distribution along the fibre for a fixed phase modulation of the pump. The temperature distribution slightly impacts the gain spectrum....

  7. A Green Platform for Preparation of the Well-Defined Polyacrylonitrile: 60Co γ-ray Irradiation-Initiated RAFT Polymerization at Room Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuangshuang Zhang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available 60Co γ-ray irradiation-initiated reversible addition–fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT polymerization at room temperature with 2-cyanoprop-2-yl 1-dithionaphthalate (CPDN as the chain transfer agent was first applied to acrylonitrile (AN polymerization, providing a “green” platform for preparing polyacrylonitrile (PAN-based carbon fibers using an environment-friendly energy source. Various effects of dose rate, molar ratio of the monomer to the chain transfer agent, monomer concentration and reaction time on the AN polymerization behaviors were performed to improve the controllability of molecular the weight and molecular weight distribution of the obtained PAN. The feature of the controlled polymerization was proven by the first-order kinetics, linear increase of the molecular weight with the monomer conversion and a successful chain-extension experiment. The molecular weight and molecular weight distribution of PAN were characterized by size exclusion chromatography (SEC. 1H NMR and Matrix assisted laser desorption ionization/time of flight mass spectra (MALDI-TOF-MS confirmed the chain-end functionality of PAN, which also was supported by the successful chain-extension experiments of original PANs with acrylonitrile and styrene as the second monomers respectively.

  8. Comparison of Dose Distributions With TG-43 and Collapsed Cone Convolution Algorithms Applied to Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation Patient Plans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thrower, Sara L., E-mail: slloupot@mdanderson.org [The University of Texas Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences at Houston, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Shaitelman, Simona F.; Bloom, Elizabeth [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Salehpour, Mohammad; Gifford, Kent [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences at Houston, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2016-08-01

    Purpose: To compare the treatment plans for accelerated partial breast irradiation calculated by the new commercially available collapsed cone convolution (CCC) and current standard TG-43–based algorithms for 50 patients treated at our institution with either a Strut-Adjusted Volume Implant (SAVI) or Contura device. Methods and Materials: We recalculated target coverage, volume of highly dosed normal tissue, and dose to organs at risk (ribs, skin, and lung) with each algorithm. For 1 case an artificial air pocket was added to simulate 10% nonconformance. We performed a Wilcoxon signed rank test to determine the median differences in the clinical indices V90, V95, V100, V150, V200, and highest-dosed 0.1 cm{sup 3} and 1.0 cm{sup 3} of rib, skin, and lung between the two algorithms. Results: The CCC algorithm calculated lower values on average for all dose-volume histogram parameters. Across the entire patient cohort, the median difference in the clinical indices calculated by the 2 algorithms was <10% for dose to organs at risk, <5% for target volume coverage (V90, V95, and V100), and <4 cm{sup 3} for dose to normal breast tissue (V150 and V200). No discernable difference was seen in the nonconformance case. Conclusions: We found that on average over our patient population CCC calculated (<10%) lower doses than TG-43. These results should inform clinicians as they prepare for the transition to heterogeneous dose calculation algorithms and determine whether clinical tolerance limits warrant modification.

  9. Spectral and raw quasi in-situ energy dispersive X-ray data captured via a TEM analysis of an ODS austenitic stainless steel sample under 1 MeV Kr2+ high temperature irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Adam J; Yao, Zhongwen

    2017-10-01

    The data presented in this article is related to the research experiment, titled: 'Quasi in-situ energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy observation of matrix and solute interactions on Y-Ti-O oxide particles in an austenitic stainless steel under 1 MeV Kr2+ high temperature irradiation' (Brooks et al., 2017) [1]. Quasi in-situ analysis during 1 MeV Kr2+ 520 °C irradiation allowed the same microstructural area to be observed using a transmission electron microscope (TEM), on an oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) austenitic stainless steel sample. The data presented contains two sets of energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) data collected before and after irradiation to 1.5 displacements-per-atom (~1.25×10-3 dpa/s with 7.5×1014 ions cm-2). The vendor software used to process and output the data is the Bruker Esprit v1.9 suite. The data includes the spectral (counts vs. keV energy) of the quasi in-situ scanned region (512×512 pixels at 56k magnification), along with the EDX scanning parameters. The.raw files from the Bruker Esprit v1.9 output are additionally included along with the.rpl data information files. Furthermore included are the two quasi in-situ HAADF images for visual comparison of the regions before and after irradiation. This in-situ experiment is deemed 'quasi' due to the thin foil irradiation taking place at an external TEM facility. We present this data for critical and/or extended analysis from the scientific community, with applications applying to: experimental data correlation, confirmation of results, and as computer based modeling inputs.

  10. Low-temperature low-dose neutron irradiation effects on Brush Wellman S65-C and Kawechi Berylco P0 beryllium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snead, L.L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1998-09-01

    The mechanical property results for two high quality beryllium materials subjected to low temperature, low dose neutron irradiation in water moderated reactors are presented. Materials chosen were the S65-C ITER candidate material produced by Brush Wellman, and Kawecki Berylco Industries P0 beryllium. Both materials were processed by vacuum hot pressing. Mini sheet tensile and thermal diffusivity specimens were irradiated in the temperature range of {approximately}100--275 C from a fast (E > 0.1 MeV) neutron dose of 0.05 to 1.0 {times} 10{sup 25} n/m{sup 2} in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR) at the Brookhaven National Laboratory. As expected from earlier work on beryllium, both materials underwent significant embrittlement with corresponding reduction in ductility and increased strength. Both thermal diffusivity and volumetric expansion were measured and found to be negligible in this temperature and fluence range. Of significance from this work is that while both materials rapidly embrittle at these ITER relevant irradiation conditions, some ductility (>1--2%) remains, which contrasts with a body of earlier work including recent work on the Brush-Wellman S65-C material irradiated to slightly higher neutron fluence.

  11. A New Operational Snow Retrieval Algorithm Applied to Historical AMSR-E Brightness Temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Tedesco

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Snow is a key element of the water and energy cycles and the knowledge of spatio-temporal distribution of snow depth and snow water equivalent (SWE is fundamental for hydrological and climatological applications. SWE and snow depth estimates can be obtained from spaceborne microwave brightness temperatures at global scale and high temporal resolution (daily. In this regard, the data recorded by the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer—Earth Orbiting System (EOS (AMSR-E onboard the National Aeronautics and Space Administration’s (NASA AQUA spacecraft have been used to generate operational estimates of SWE and snow depth, complementing estimates generated with other microwave sensors flying on other platforms. In this study, we report the results concerning the development and assessment of a new operational algorithm applied to historical AMSR-E data. The new algorithm here proposed makes use of climatological data, electromagnetic modeling and artificial neural networks for estimating snow depth as well as a spatio-temporal dynamic density scheme to convert snow depth to SWE. The outputs of the new algorithm are compared with those of the current AMSR-E operational algorithm as well as in-situ measurements and other operational snow products, specifically the Canadian Meteorological Center (CMC and GlobSnow datasets. Our results show that the AMSR-E algorithm here proposed generally performs better than the operational one and addresses some major issues identified in the spatial distribution of snow depth fields associated with the evolution of effective grain size.

  12. A New Operational Snow Retrieval Algorithm Applied to Historical AMSR-E Brightness Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tedesco, Marco; Jeyaratnam, Jeyavinoth

    2016-01-01

    Snow is a key element of the water and energy cycles and the knowledge of spatio-temporal distribution of snow depth and snow water equivalent (SWE) is fundamental for hydrological and climatological applications. SWE and snow depth estimates can be obtained from spaceborne microwave brightness temperatures at global scale and high temporal resolution (daily). In this regard, the data recorded by the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer-Earth Orbiting System (EOS) (AMSR-E) onboard the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) AQUA spacecraft have been used to generate operational estimates of SWE and snow depth, complementing estimates generated with other microwave sensors flying on other platforms. In this study, we report the results concerning the development and assessment of a new operational algorithm applied to historical AMSR-E data. The new algorithm here proposed makes use of climatological data, electromagnetic modeling and artificial neural networks for estimating snow depth as well as a spatio-temporal dynamic density scheme to convert snow depth to SWE. The outputs of the new algorithm are compared with those of the current AMSR-E operational algorithm as well as in-situ measurements and other operational snow products, specifically the Canadian Meteorological Center (CMC) and GlobSnow datasets. Our results show that the AMSR-E algorithm here proposed generally performs better than the operational one and addresses some major issues identified in the spatial distribution of snow depth fields associated with the evolution of effective grain size.

  13. Effects of temperature, salinity, and irradiance on the growth of harmful algal bloom species Phaeocystis globosa Scherffel (Prymnesiophyceae) isolated from the South China Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ning; Huang, Bozhu; Hu, Zhangxi; Tang, Yingzhong; Duan, Shunshan; Zhang, Chengwu

    2017-05-01

    Blooms of Phaeocystis globosa have been frequently reported in Chinese coastal waters, causing serious damage to marine ecosystems. To better understand the ecological characteristics of P. globosa in Chinese coastal waters that facilitate its rapid expansion, the effects of temperature, salinity and irradiance on the growth of P. globosa from the South China Sea were examined in the laboratory. The saturating irradiance for the growth of P. globosa ( I s) was 60 μmol/(m2•s), which was lower than those of other harmful algal species (70-114 μmol/(m2•s)). A moderate growth rate of 0.22/d was observed at 2 μmol/(m2•s) (the minimum irradiance in the experiment), and photo-inhibition did not occur at 230 μmol/(m2•s) (the maximum irradiance in the experiment). Exposed to 42 different combinations of temperatures (10-31°C) and salinities (10-40) under saturating irradiance, P. globosa exhibited its maximum specific growth rate of 0.80/d at the combinations of 24°C and 35, and 27°C and 40. The optimum growth rates (>0.80/d) were observed at temperatures ranging from 24 to 27°C and salinities from 35 to 40. While P. globosa was able to grow well at temperatures from 20°C to 31°C and salinities from 20 to 40, it could not grow at temperatures lower than 15°C or salinities lower than 15. Factorial analysis revealed that temperature and salinity has similar influences on the growth of this species. This strain of P. globosa not only prefers higher temperatures and higher salinity, but also possesses a flexible nutrient competing strategy, adapted to lower irradiance. Therefore, the P. globosa population from South China Sea should belong to a new ecotype. There is also a potentially high risk of blooms developing in this area throughout the year.

  14. Micro-Biocidal Activity of Yeast Cells by Needle Plasma Irradiation at Atmospheric Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurumi, Satoshi; Takahashi, Hideyuki; Taima, Tomohito; Suzuki, Kaoru; Hirose, Hideharu; Masutani, Shigeyuki

    In this study, we report on the biocidal activity technique by needle helium plasma irradiation at atmospheric pressure using borosilicate capillary nozzle to apply for the oral surgery. The diameter of needle plasma was less than 50 µm, and temperature of plasma irradiated area was less than body temperature. Needle plasma showed emission due to OH and O radical. Raman spectra and methylene blue stain showed yeast cells were inactivated by needle plasma irradiation.

  15. Effect of simultaneous ion irradiation on microstructural change of SiC/SiC composites at high temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taguchi, T.; Wakai, E.; Igawa, N.; Nogami, S.; Snead, L. L.; Hasegawa, A.; Jitsukawa, S.

    2002-12-01

    The effect of simultaneous triple ion irradiation of He, H and Si on microstructural evolution of two kinds of SiC/SiC composites (HNS composite (using Hi-Nicalon type S SiC fiber) and TSA composite (using Tyranno SA SiC fiber)) at 1000 °C has been investigated. The microstructure observations of SiC/SiC composites irradiated to 10 dpa were examined by transmission electron microscopy. He bubbles were hardly formed in matrix of TSA composite, but many helium bubbles and some cracks were observed at grain boundaries of matrix of HNS composite. He bubbles and cracks were not, on the other hand, observed in the both fiber fabrics of HNS and TSA composites. Debonding between fiber and carbon layer following irradiation region was not observed in the both composites. Under these irradiation conditions, TSA composite showed the better microstructural stability against ion beams irradiation than one of HNS composite.

  16. Role of Temperature and Suwannee River Natural Organic Matter on Inactivation Kinetics of Rotavirus and Bacteriophage MS2 by Solar Irradiation

    KAUST Repository

    Romero, Ofelia C.

    2011-12-15

    Although the sunlight-mediated inactivation of viruses has been recognized as an important process that controls surface water quality, the mechanisms of virus inactivation by sunlight are not yet clearly understood. We investigated the synergistic role of temperature and Suwannee River natural organic matter (SRNOM), an exogenous sensitizer, for sunlight-mediated inactivation of porcine rotavirus and MS2 bacteriophage. Upon irradiation by a full spectrum of simulated sunlight in the absence of SRNOM and in the temperature range of 14-42 °C, high inactivation rate constants, kobs, of MS2 (k obs ≤ 3.8 h-1 or 1-log10 over 0.6 h) and rotavirus (kobs ≤ 11.8 h-1 or ∼1-log10 over 0.2 h) were measured. A weak temperature (14-42 °C) dependence of kobs values was observed for both viruses irradiated by the full sunlight spectrum. Under the same irradiation condition, the presence of SRNOM reduced the inactivation of both viruses due to attenuation of lower wavelengths of the simulated sunlight. For rotavirus and MS2 solutions irradiated by only UVA and visible light in the absence of SRNOM, inactivation kinetics were slow (kobs < 0.3 h-1 or <1-log10 unit reduction over 7 h) and temperature-independent for the range considered. Conversely, under UVA and visible light irradiation and in the presence of SRNOM, temperature-dependent inactivation of MS2 was observed. For rotavirus, the SRNOM-mediated exogenous inactivation was only important at temperatures >33 °C, with low rotavirus kobs values (kobs ≈ 0.2 h-1; 1-log10 unit reduction over 12 h) for the temperature range of 14-33 °C. These kobs values increased to 0.5 h-1 at 43 °C and 1.5 h-1 (1-log10 reduction over 1.6 h) at 50 °C. While SRNOM-mediated exogenous inactivation of MS2 was triggered by singlet oxygen, the presence of hydrogen peroxide was important for rotavirus inactivation in the 40-50 °C range. © 2011 American Chemical Society.

  17. The Influence of Environmental Salinity, Temperature, Ionizing Irradiation and Yellow or Silver Stage on Lipid Metabolism in the Gills of the European Eel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Heinz Johs. Max; Abraham, S.

    1979-01-01

    The influence of temperature on the incorporation of [32P]phosphate and [14C]acetate into gill lipids in vivo depends also on environmental salinity. - 2. Ionizing irradiation (1000 r) results in a relatively enhanced incorporation of [32P]phosphate into phosphatidyl choline and of [14C]acetate i......The influence of temperature on the incorporation of [32P]phosphate and [14C]acetate into gill lipids in vivo depends also on environmental salinity. - 2. Ionizing irradiation (1000 r) results in a relatively enhanced incorporation of [32P]phosphate into phosphatidyl choline and of [14C......]acetate into triglycerides and wax esters in vivo. - 3. When gill tissue is removed from the animal and incubated in vitro, a pronounced dependence of lipid metabolism on previous environmental salinity is not observed...

  18. Low-temperature (<200 oC solid-phase crystallization of high substitutional Sn concentration (∼10% GeSn on insulator enhanced by weak laser irradiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenta Moto

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Low temperature (8% on insulating substrates is essential to realize next generation flexible electronics. To achieve this, a growth method of high quality GeSn films on insulating substrates by combination of laser irradiation and subsequent thermal annealing is developed. Here, the laser fluence is chosen as weak, which is below the critical fluence for crystallization of GeSn. It is clarified that for samples irradiated with weak laser fluence, complete crystallization of GeSn films is achieved by subsequent thermal annealing at ∼170 oC without incubation time. In addition, the quality of GeSn films obtained by this method is higher compared with conventional growth techniques such as melting growth by pulsed laser annealing or solid-phase crystallization (SPC without pre-laser irradiation. Substitutional Sn concentrations in the grown layers estimated by Raman spectroscopy measurements are 8-10%, which far exceed thermal equilibrium solid-solubility of Sn in Ge (∼2%. These phenomena are explained by generation of a limited number of nuclei by weak laser irradiation and lateral SPC by subsequent thermal annealing. This method will facilitate realization of next-generation high performance devices on flexible insulating substrates.

  19. Exogenously Applied Plant Growth Regulators Enhance the Morpho-Physiological Growth and Yield of Rice under High Temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahad, Shah; Hussain, Saddam; Saud, Shah; Hassan, Shah; Ihsan, Zahid; Shah, Adnan N; Wu, Chao; Yousaf, Muhammad; Nasim, Wajid; Alharby, Hesham; Alghabari, Fahad; Huang, Jianliang

    2016-01-01

    A 2-year experiment was conducted to ascertain the effects of exogenously applied plant growth regulators (PGR) on rice growth and yield attributes under high day (HDT) and high night temperature (HNT). Two rice cultivars (IR-64 and Huanghuazhan) were subjected to temperature treatments in controlled growth chambers and four different combinations of ascorbic acid (Vc), alpha-tocopherol (Ve), brassinosteroids (Br), methyl jasmonates (MeJA), and triazoles (Tr) were applied. High temperature severely affected rice morphology, and also reduced leaf area, above-, and below-ground biomass, photosynthesis, and water use efficiency, while increased the leaf water potential of both rice cultivars. Grain yield and its related attributes except number of panicles, were reduced under high temperature. The HDT posed more negative effects on rice physiological attributes, while HNT was more detrimental for grain formation and yield. The Huanghuazhan performed better than IR-64 under high temperature stress with better growth and higher grain yield. Exogenous application of PGRs was helpful in alleviating the adverse effects of high temperature. Among PGR combinations, the Vc+Ve+MejA+Br was the most effective treatment for both cultivars under high temperature stress. The highest grain production by Vc+Ve+MejA+Br treated plants was due to enhanced photosynthesis, spikelet fertility and grain filling, which compensated the adversities of high temperature stress. Taken together, these results will be of worth for further understanding the adaptation and survival mechanisms of rice to high temperature and will assist in developing heat-resistant rice germplasm in future.

  20. Mitigation of Temperature Induced Single Event Crosstalk Noise by Applying Adaptive Forward Body Bias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhowmik, Pankaj

    Soft Errors due to Single Event (SE) Transients is one of the important reliability issues, which is becoming very prominent in advanced technology and in space applications. Increasing coupling effects among interconnects, on the other hand, can cause SE Transients to contaminate electronically unrelated circuit paths, which in turn can increase circuit sensitivity to radiation. Coupling capacitance increases due to reducing distances between interconnect lines making crosstalk noise more important. On the other hand, chips now experience higher temperatures due to environmental factors and high performance of chips. High-performance VLSI circuits consume more power and hence experience higher temperature due to high utilization factor. The increased temperature affects both interconnect resistance and driving strength of interconnect buffers. This work shows that thermal effects increase the amount of crosstalk noise observed on the victim line at nominal supply voltages. With thermally induced crosstalk contribution, total crosstalk noise may exceed the noise margin of the subsequent gate causing a wrong value to be propagated. The crosstalk prevention measures taken such as victim driver sizing may not be sufficient if thermal effects are not properly considered. This work aims to provide a mitigation method for thermally induced crosstalk noise using adaptive forward body bias. At high temperature, drain current reduces, and adaptive body biasing makes the CMOS recover the lost the drain current. A temperature sensor is proposed here to generate a necessary voltage at the CMOS body. A good temperature sensitivity is achieved with the tiny sensors that keep constant driving strength. Interconnect is modeled in using 10-pi modeling and 45nm technology was use for this simulation. Our proposed method mitigates 90% of temperature induced crosstalk contribution.

  1. Swift heavy ion irradiation of MgB{sub 2} thin films: a comparison between gold and silver ion irradiations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Narayan, Himanshu [Superconductivity Division, National Physical Laboratory, Dr K S Krishnan Marg, New Delhi 110012 (India); Bhatt, Ravindra K [Department of Physics, G B Pant University of Agriculture and Technology, Pantnagar 263145 (India); Agrawal, H M [Department of Physics, G B Pant University of Agriculture and Technology, Pantnagar 263145 (India); Kushwaha, R P S [Department of Physics, G B Pant University of Agriculture and Technology, Pantnagar 263145 (India); Kishan, H [Superconductivity Division, National Physical Laboratory, Dr K S Krishnan Marg, New Delhi 110012 (India)

    2007-04-04

    The effect of 200 MeV Au ion irradiation on the temperature and field dependence of the critical current density, J{sub c}, of MgB{sub 2} thin films on sapphire substrates is reported. The results have been presented in comparison with those obtained after 200 MeV Ag ion irradiation of a similar film. After irradiation, the critical temperature T{sub c} decreased for all samples except for the one with a higher dose of gold ions, where it increased marginally. This observation was also confirmed from measurements of magnetization as a function of temperature with a constant applied field of 10{sup -2} T. The critical current density, J{sub c}, was estimated from the widths of magnetization loops using Bean's critical state model. It has been found that J{sub c} increases after irradiation, the enhancement being more pronounced for the Au ion irradiation. The higher enhancement of J{sub c} by Au ion irradiation may be attributed to higher flux-pinning efficiency of the irradiated samples. It has been concluded that, although the flux-line shear (FLS) model satisfactorily explains the silver ion irradiation induced enhancement of J{sub c}, some other mechanisms also seem to play a role in the J{sub c} enhancement by gold ion irradiation.

  2. Misestimation of temperature when applying Maxwellian distributions to space plasmas described by kappa distributions

    CERN Document Server

    Nicolaou, Georgios

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the misestimation of temperature when observations from a kappa distributed plasma are analyzed as a Maxwellian. One common method to calculate the space plasma parameters is by fitting the observed distributions using known analytical forms. More often, the distribution function is included in a forward model of the instrument's response, which is used to reproduce the observed energy spectrograms for a given set of plasma parameters. In both cases, the modeled plasma distribution fits the measurements to estimate the plasma parameters. The distribution function is often considered to be Maxwellian even though in many cases the plasma is better described by a kappa distribution. In this work we show that if the plasma is described by a kappa distribution, the derived temperature assuming Maxwell distribution can be significantly off. More specifically, we derive the plasma temperature by fitting a Maxwell distribution to pseudo-data produced by a kappa distribution, and then examine the d...

  3. Sampling theory applied to measurement and analysis of temperature for climate studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Howard B.

    1987-01-01

    Of all the errors discussed in climatology literature, aliasing errors caused by undersampling of unsmoothed or improperly smoothed temperature data seem to be completely overlooked. This is a serious oversight in view of long-term trends of 1 K or less. Adequate sampling of properly smoothed data is demonstrated with a Hamming digital filter. It is also demonstrated that hourly temperatures, daily averages, and annual averages free of aliasing errors can be obtained by use of a microprocessor added to standard weather sensors and recorders.

  4. Tungsten as a plasma-facing material in fusion devices: impact of helium high-temperature irradiation on hydrogen retention and damages in the material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernard, E.; Sakamoto, R.; Kreter, A.; Barthe, M. F.; Autissier, E.; Desgardin, P.; Yamada, H.; Garcia-Argote, S.; Pieters, G.; Chêne, J.; Rousseau, B.; Grisolia, C.

    2017-12-01

    Plasma-facing materials for next generation fusion devices, like ITER and DEMO, have to withstand intense fluxes of light elements (notably helium and hydrogen isotopes). For tungsten (W), helium (He) irradiation leads to major changes in the material morphology, rising concerns about properties such as material structure conservation and hydrogen (H) retention. The impact of preceeding He irradiation conditions (temperature, flux and fluence) on H trapping were investigated on a set of W samples exposed to the linear plasma device PSI-2. Positron annihilation spectroscopy (PAS) was carried out to probe the free volume of defects created by the He exposure in the W structure at the atomic scale. In parallel, tritium (T) inventory after exposure was evaluated through T gas loading and desorption at the Saclay Tritium Lab. First, we observed that the material preparation prior to He irradiation was crucial, with a major reduction of the T trapping when W was annealed at 1773 K for 2 h compared to the as-received material. PAS study confirms the presence of He in the bubbles created in the material surface layer, whose dimensions were previously characterized by transmission electron microscopy and grazing-incidence small-angle x-ray scattering, and demonstrates that even below the minimal energy for displacement of He in W, defects are created in almost all He irradiation conditions. The T loading study highlights that increasing the He fluence leads to higher T inventory. Also, for a given fluence, increasing the He flux reduces the T trapping. The very first steps of a parametric study were set to understand the mechanisms at stake in those observed material modifications, confirming the need to pursue the study with a more complete set of surface and irradiation conditions.

  5. Electromagnetic Acoustic Transducers Applied to High Temperature Plates for Potential Use in the Solar Thermal Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Kogia

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Concentrated Solar Plants (CSPs are used in solar thermal industry for collecting and converting sunlight into electricity. Parabolic trough CSPs are the most widely used type of CSP and an absorber tube is an essential part of them. The hostile operating environment of the absorber tubes, such as high temperatures (400–550 °C, contraction/expansion, and vibrations, may lead them to suffer from creep, thermo-mechanical fatigue, and hot corrosion. Hence, their condition monitoring is of crucial importance and a very challenging task as well. Electromagnetic Acoustic Transducers (EMATs are a promising, non-contact technology of transducers that has the potential to be used for the inspection of large structures at high temperatures by exciting Guided Waves. In this paper, a study regarding the potential use of EMATs in this application and their performance at high temperature is presented. A Periodic Permanent Magnet (PPM EMAT with a racetrack coil, designed to excite Shear Horizontal waves (SH0, has been theoretically and experimentally evaluated at both room and high temperatures.

  6. Does universal temperature dependence apply to communities? : An experimental test using natural marine plankton assemblages

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brauer, V.S.; de Jonge, V.N.; Buma, A.G.J.; Weissing, F.J.

    The metabolic theory of ecology (MTE) is an intriguing but controversial theory that tries to explain ecological patterns at all scales on the basis of first principles. Temperature plays a pivotal role in this theory. According to MTE, the Arrhenius relationship that describes the effect of

  7. Temperature effects on an acoustic emission based SHM system - Applied to composite materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vargalui, A.; Martinez, M.J.; Zarouchas, D.; Pant, S.

    2015-01-01

    This study focuses on understanding the effect of temperature variations and the position of the piezoelectric sensors with respect to fiber orientation angle, as it relates to acoustic emission wave velocity in composite structures. A hybrid panel consisting of Unidirectional Carbon Fiber (UDCF)

  8. The simulation of skin temperature distributions by means of a relaxation method (applied to IR thermography)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermey, G.F.

    1975-01-01

    To solve the differential equation for the heat in a two-layer, rectangular piece of skin tissue, a relaxation method, based on a finite difference technique, is used. The temperature distributions on the skin surface are calculated. The results are used to derive a criterion for the resolution for

  9. Nanoporous gold synthesized by plasma-assisted inert gas condensation: room temperature sintering, nanoscale mechanical properties and stability against high energy electron irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weyrauch, S.; Wagner, C.; Suckfuell, C.; Lotnyk, A.; Knolle, W.; Gerlach, J. W.; Mayr, S. G.

    2018-02-01

    With a plasma assisted gas condensation system it is possible to achieve high-purity nanoporous Au (np-Au) structures with minimal contaminations and impurities. The structures consist of single Au-nanoparticles, which partially sintered together due to their high surface to volume ratio. Through electron microscopy investigations a porosity  >50% with ligament sizes between 20–30 nm was revealed. The elastic modulus of the np-Au was determined via peak force quantitative nanomechanical mapping and resulted in values of 7.5  ±  1.5 GPa. The presented structures partially sintered at room temperature, but proved to be stable to electron irradiation with energies of 7 MeV up to doses of 100 MGy. The electron irradiation stability opens the venue for electron assisted functionalization with biomolecules.

  10. Microbial Survival Rates of Escherichia coli and Deinococcus radiodurans Under Low Temperature, Low Pressure, and UV-Irradiation Conditions, and Their Relevance to Possible Martian Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, Benjamin; Schulze-Makuch, Dirk

    2006-04-01

    Viability rates were determined for microbial populations of Escherichia coli and Deinococcus radiodurans under the environmental stresses of low temperature (-35°C), low-pressure conditions (83.3 kPa), and ultraviolet (UV) irradiation (37 W/m2). During the stress tests the organisms were suspended in saltwater soil and freshwater soil media, at variable burial depths, and in seawater. Microbial populations of both organisms were most susceptible to dehydration stress associated with low-pressure conditions, and to UV irradiation. However, suspension in a liquid water medium and burial at larger depths (5 cm) improved survival rates markedly. Our results indicate that planetary surfaces that possess little to no atmosphere and have low water availability do not constitute a favorable environment for terrestrial microorganisms.

  11. Selection of support structure materials for irradiation experiments in the HFIR (High Flux Isotope Reactor) at temperatures up to 500 degrees C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farrell, K.; Longest, A.W.

    1990-01-01

    The key factor in the design of capsules for irradiation of test specimens in the High Flux Isotope Reactor at preselected temperatures up to 500{degree}C utilizing nuclear heating is a narrow gas-filled gap which surrounds the specimens and controls the transfer of heat from the specimens through the wall of a containment tube to the reactor cooling water. Maintenance of this gap to close tolerances is dependent on the characteristics of the materials used to support the specimens and isolate them from the water. These support structure materials must have low nuclear heating rates, high thermal conductivities, and good dimensional stabilities under irradiation. These conditions are satisfied by certain aluminum alloys. One of these alloys, a powder metallurgy product containing a fine dispersion of aluminum oxide, is no longer manufactured. A new alloys of this type, with the trade name DISPAL, is determined to be a suitable substitute. 23 refs., 13 figs., 3 tabs.

  12. Microbial survival rates of Escherichia coli and Deinococcus radiodurans under low temperature, low pressure, and UV-Irradiation conditions, and their relevance to possible Martian life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, Benjamin; Schulze-Makuch, Dirk

    2006-04-01

    Viability rates were determined for microbial populations of Escherichia coli and Deinococcus radiodurans under the environmental stresses of low temperature (-35 degrees C), low-pressure conditions (83.3 kPa), and ultraviolet (UV) irradiation (37 W/m(2)). During the stress tests the organisms were suspended in saltwater soil and freshwater soil media, at variable burial depths, and in seawater. Microbial populations of both organisms were most susceptible to dehydration stress associated with low-pressure conditions, and to UV irradiation. However, suspension in a liquid water medium and burial at larger depths (5 cm) improved survival rates markedly. Our results indicate that planetary surfaces that possess little to no atmosphere and have low water availability do not constitute a favorable environment for terrestrial microorganisms.

  13. Hydride reorientation and its impact on ambient temperature mechanical properties of high burn-up irradiated and unirradiated recrystallized Zircaloy-2 nuclear fuel cladding with an inner liner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auzoux, Q.; Bouffioux, P.; Machiels, A.; Yagnik, S.; Bourdiliau, B.; Mallet, C.; Mozzani, N.; Colas, K.

    2017-10-01

    Precipitation of radial hydrides in zirconium-based alloy cladding concomitant with the cooling of spent nuclear fuel during dry storage can potentially compromise cladding integrity during its subsequent handling and transportation. This paper investigates hydride reorientation and its impact on ductility in unirradiated and irradiated recrystallized Zircaloy-2 cladding with an inner liner (cladding for boiling water reactors) subjected to hydride reorientation treatments. Cooling from 400 °C, hydride reorientation occurs in recrystallized Zircaloy-2 with liner at a lower effective stress in irradiated samples (below 40 MPa) than in unirradiated specimens (between 40 and 80 MPa). Despite significant hydride reorientation, unirradiated recrystallized Zircaloy-2 with liner cladding containing ∼200 wppm hydrogen shows a high diametral strain at fracture (>15%) during burst tests at ambient temperature. This ductile behavior is due to (1) the lower yield stress of the recrystallized cladding materials in comparison to hydride fracture strength (corrected by the compression stress arising from the precipitation) and (2) the hydride or hydrogen-depleted zone as a result of segregation of hydrogen into the liner layer. In irradiated Zircaloy-2 with liner cladding containing ∼340 wppm hydrogen, the conservation of some ductility during ring tensile tests at ambient temperature after reorientation treatment at 400 °C with cooling rates of ∼60 °C/h is also attributed to the existence of a hydride-depleted zone. Treatments at lower cooling rates (∼6 °C/h and 0.6 °C/h) promote greater levels of hydrogen segregation into the liner and allow for increased irradiation defect annealing, both of which result in a significant increase in ductility. Based on this investigation, given the very low cooling rates typical of dry storage systems, it can be concluded that the thermal transients associated with dry storage should not degrade, and more likely should actually

  14. High performance concrete applied to storage system buildings at low temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Maria de Lima

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available According to some estimates, world's population growth is expected about 50% over the next 50 years. Thus, one of the greatest challenges faced by Engineering is to find effective options to food storage and conservation. Some researchers have investigated how to design durable buildings for storing and conserving food. Nowadays, developing concrete with mechanical resistance for room temperatures is a parameter that can be achieved easily. On the other hand, associating it to low temperature of approximately 35 °C negative requires less empiricism, being necessary a suitable dosage method and a careful selection of the material constituents. This ongoing study involves these parameters. The presented concrete was analyzed through non-destructive tests that examines the material properties periodically and verifies its physical integrity. Concrete with and without incorporated air were studied. The results demonstrated that both are resistant to freezing.

  15. AGR-1 Post Irradiation Examination Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demkowicz, Paul Andrew [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-08-01

    The post-irradiation examination (PIE) of the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR)-1 experiment was a multi-year, collaborative effort between Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to study the performance of UCO (uranium carbide, uranium oxide) tristructural isotropic (TRISO) coated particle fuel fabricated in the U.S. and irradiated at the Advanced Test Reactor at INL to a peak burnup of 19.6% fissions per initial metal atom. This work involved a broad array of experiments and analyses to evaluate the level of fission product retention by the fuel particles and compacts (both during irradiation and during post-irradiation heating tests to simulate reactor accident conditions), investigate the kernel and coating layer morphology evolution and the causes of coating failure, and explore the migration of fission products through the coating layers. The results have generally confirmed the excellent performance of the AGR-1 fuel, first indicated during the irradiation by the observation of zero TRISO coated particle failures out of 298,000 particles in the experiment. Overall release of fission products was determined by PIE to have been relatively low during the irradiation. A significant finding was the extremely low levels of cesium released through intact coatings. This was true both during the irradiation and during post-irradiation heating tests to temperatures as high as 1800°C. Post-irradiation safety test fuel performance was generally excellent. Silver release from the particles and compacts during irradiation was often very high. Extensive microanalysis of fuel particles was performed after irradiation and after high-temperature safety testing. The results of particle microanalysis indicate that the UCO fuel is effective at controlling the oxygen partial pressure within the particle and limiting kernel migration. Post-irradiation examination has provided the final body of data that speaks to the quality of the AGR-1 fuel, building

  16. How to apply the dependence structure analysis to extreme temperature and precipitation for disaster risk assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Jieling; Li, Ning; Zhang, Zhengtao; Chen, Xi

    2017-06-01

    IPCC reports that a changing climate can affect the frequency and the intensity of extreme events. However, the extremes appear in the tail of the probability distribution. In order to know the relationship between extreme events in the tail of temperature and precipitation, an important but previously unobserved dependence structure is analyzed in this paper. Here, we examine the dependence structure by building a bivariate joint of Gumbel copula model for temperature and precipitation using monthly average temperature (T) and monthly precipitation (P) data from Beijing station in China covering a period of 1951-2015 and find the dependence structure can be divided into two sections, they are the middle part and the upper tail. We show that T and P have a strong positive correlation in the high tail section (T > 25.85 °C and P > 171.1 mm) (=0.66, p < 0.01) while they do not demonstrate the same relation in the other section, which suggests that the identification of a strong influence of T on extreme P needs help from the dependence structure analysis. We also find that in the high tail section, every 1 °C increase in T is associated with 73.45 mm increase in P. Our results suggested that extreme precipitation fluctuations by changes in temperature will allow the data dependence structure to be included in extreme affect for the disaster risk assessment under future climate change scenarios. Copula bivariate jointed probability distribution is useful to the dependence structure analysis.

  17. Temperature distribution in a sample with second-phase microinclusions during irradiation by a low-energy high-current pulsed electron beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepel', D. A.; Markov, A. B.

    2017-02-01

    Using the methods of numerical integration, a temperature field has been calculated that arose in the surface layer of titanium nickelide target with NiTi2 intermetallic inclusions during irradiation by a lowenergy high-current electron beam with a duration of the order of a microsecond. The calculated temperature field has been compared with that obtained previously for a target of stainless steel 316L containing MnS inclusions. It has been found that, as in the case of stainless steel, the regions of inclusions are overheated. However, the temperature increase for NiTi2 (12 K) is significantly lower than in the case of stainless steel 316L (283 K). The dynamics of melting of these systems are also considerably different.

  18. SiC-based neutron detector in quasi-realistic working conditions: efficiency and stability at room and high temperature under fast neutron irradiations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferone, Raffaello; Issa, Fatima; Ottaviani, Laurent; Biondo, Stephane; Vervisch, Vanessa [IM2NP, UMR CNRS 7334, Aix-Marseille University, Case 231,13397 Marseille Cedex 20, (France); Szalkai, Dora; Klix, Axel [KIT- Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute of Neutron Physics and Reactor Technology Karlsruhe 76344, (Germany); Vermeeren, Ludo [SCK-CEN, Boeretang 200, B-2400 Mol, (Belgium); Saenger, Richard [Schlumberger, Clamart, (France); Lyoussi, Abadallah [CEA, DEN, Departement d' Etudes des Reacteurs, Service de Physique Experimentale, Laboratoire Dosimetrie Capteurs Instrumentation, 13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance, (France)

    2015-07-01

    In the framework of the European I SMART project, we have designed and made new SiC-based nuclear radiation detectors able to operate in harsh environments and to detect both fast and thermal neutrons. In this paper, we report experimental results of fast neutron irradiation campaign at high temperature (106 deg. C) in quasi-realistic working conditions. Our device does not suffer from high temperature, and spectra do show strong stability, preserving features. These experiments, as well as others in progress, show the I SMART SiC-based device skills to operate in harsh environments, whereas other materials would strongly suffer from degradation. Work is still demanded to test our device at higher temperatures and to enhance efficiency in order to make our device fully exploitable from an industrial point of view. (authors)

  19. Simulation of nanostructural evolution under irradiation in Fe-9%CrC alloys: An object kinetic Monte Carlo study of the effect of temperature and dose-rate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Chiapetto

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This work explores the effects of both temperature and dose-rate on the nanostructural evolution under irradiation of the Fe-9%CrC alloy, model material for high-Cr ferritic/martensitic steels. Starting from an object kinetic Monte Carlo model validated at 563K, we investigate here the accumulation of radiation damage as a function of temperature and dose-rate, attempting to highlight its connection with low-temperature radiation-induced hardening. The results show that the defect cluster mobility becomes high enough to partially counteract the material hardening process only above ∼290°C, while high fluxes are responsible for higher densities of defects, so that an increase of the hardening process with increasing dose-rates may be expected.

  20. Study of gem materials by neutron irradiation: characterization of impurities and color centers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leal, Alexandre S.; Menezes, Maria A.B.C.; Brito, Walter de; D' Urco, Ana F.A.; Felix, Marcia C. [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)]. E-mail: asleal@cdtn.br; Krambrock, Klaus [Minas Gerais Univ., Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Dept. de Fisica]. E-mail: klaus@fisica.ufmg.br; Ferreira, Ana F. [Minas Gerais Univ., Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Inst. de Geociencias]. E-mail: lapislazulli@uol.com.br

    2005-07-01

    Since one-century laboratory irradiation techniques are applied to the color enhancement of gem minerals. Its actual status and applications are discussed. Many different colors in a variety of gem minerals can be produced by gamma, electron and neutron irradiation combined with thermal treatments, however, many color centers and coloration processes are not known in detail. In this work we present examples of neutron irradiation applied to colorless topaz, spodumene and diamond. Topaz and diamond turned blue, spodumene orange. All color centers produced by neutron irradiation are stable to elevated temperatures and can be considered as color enhancing processes. (author)

  1. Electrical conductivity of In2O3 and Ga2O3 after low temperature ion irradiation; implications for instrinsic defect formation and charge neutrality level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vines, L.; Bhoodoo, C.; von Wenckstern, H.; Grundmann, M.

    2018-01-01

    The evolution of sheet resistance of n-type In2O3 and Ga2O3 exposed to bombardment with MeV 12C and 28Si ions at 35 K is studied in situ. While the sheet resistance of Ga2O3 increased by more than eight orders of magnitude as a result of ion irradiation, In2O3 showed a more complex defect evolution and became more conductive when irradiated at the highest doses. Heating up to room temperature reduced the sheet resistivity somewhat, but Ga2O3 remained highly resistive, while In2O3 showed a lower resistance than as deposited samples. Thermal admittance spectroscopy and deep level transient spectroscopy did not reveal new defect levels for irradiation up to 2 × 1012 cm‑2. A model where larger defect complexes preferentially produce donor like defects in In2O3 is proposed, and may reveal a microscopic view of a charge neutrality level within the conduction band, as previously proposed.

  2. Defining a therapeutic window for laser irradiation (810 nm) applied to the inguinal region to ameliorate diabetes in diabetic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peplow, Philip V; Baxter, G David

    2014-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine a therapeutic window of antidiabetic effect by laser irradiating the left inguinal region of diabetic mice (810 nm 20.4 and 40.8 J/cm(2)) for 7 days. Irradiation of 810 nm 10.2 J/cm(2) to the left inguinal region of diabetic mice for 7 days significantly decreased blood plasma fructosamine compared with nonirradiated controls. Forty-seven diabetic mice were used. Body weight and water intake of the mice were measured daily for 7 days prior to start of treatment (day 0). Mice were irradiated on the left inguinal region with 810 nm laser 20.4 J/cm(2) (n=15) or 40.8 J/cm(2) (n=15) for 7 days, or were not irradiated (control, n=17). Body weight and water intake were measured to day 7. On day 7, mice were fasted for 5 h, anesthetized with sodium pentobarbitone (i.p.), and blood plasma was collected. The blood plasma was assayed for glucose and fructosamine. Water intake was significantly increased on day 7 compared with day 0 for diabetic mice receiving laser treatment. Blood plasma glucose levels on day 7 for diabetic mice irradiated 20.4 and 40.8 J/cm(2) were not significantly different than for nonirradiated controls. The blood plasma fructosamine level of diabetic mice irradiated with 20.4 J/cm(2) was significantly lower than for nonirradiated controls, whereas that for diabetic mice irradiated with 40.8 J/cm(2) was not significantly different than for nonirradiated controls. Irradiation (810 nm laser 10.2-20.4 J/cm(2)) to the left inguinal region of diabetic mice for 7 days has the potential to ameliorate diabetes, as is shown by decreased blood plasma fructosamine.

  3. Biot Critical Frequency Applied as Common Friction Factor for Chalk with Different Pore Fluids and Temperatures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreassen, Katrine Alling; Fabricius, Ida Lykke

    2010-01-01

    and rate independent b-factor used when describing the time dependent mechanical properties of soft rock or soils. As a consequence it is then possible to further characterize the material constant from the porosity and permeability of the rock as well as from pore fluid density and viscosity which......Injection of water into chalk hydrocarbon reservoirs has lead to mechanical yield and failure. Laboratory experiments on chalk samples correspondingly show that the mechanical properties of porous chalk depend on pore fluid and temperature. Water has a significant softening effect on elastic...... properties of chalk as calculated from wave data, and the softening increases with increasing critical frequency as defined by Biot. The critical frequency is the highest frequency where wave propagation is controlled by solid-fluid friction. The Biot critical frequency is thus a measure of this friction...

  4. Fiber-Optic Temperature and Pressure Sensors Applied to Radiofrequency Thermal Ablation in Liver Phantom: Methodology and Experimental Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniele Tosi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Radiofrequency thermal ablation (RFA is a procedure aimed at interventional cancer care and is applied to the treatment of small- and midsize tumors in lung, kidney, liver, and other tissues. RFA generates a selective high-temperature field in the tissue; temperature values and their persistency are directly related to the mortality rate of tumor cells. Temperature measurement in up to 3–5 points, using electrical thermocouples, belongs to the present clinical practice of RFA and is the foundation of a physical model of the ablation process. Fiber-optic sensors allow extending the detection of biophysical parameters to a vast plurality of sensing points, using miniature and noninvasive technologies that do not alter the RFA pattern. This work addresses the methodology for optical measurement of temperature distribution and pressure using four different fiber-optic technologies: fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs, linearly chirped FBGs (LCFBGs, Rayleigh scattering-based distributed temperature system (DTS, and extrinsic Fabry-Perot interferometry (EFPI. For each instrument, methodology for ex vivo sensing, as well as experimental results, is reported, leading to the application of fiber-optic technologies in vivo. The possibility of using a fiber-optic sensor network, in conjunction with a suitable ablation device, can enable smart ablation procedure whereas ablation parameters are dynamically changed.

  5. Instrumentated indentation test at high temperature for the characterization of irradiated materials; Instrumentierte Eindringpruefung bei Hochtemperatur fuer die Charakterisierung bestrahlter Materialien

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albinski, Bartlomiej

    2014-07-01

    Predicting the behavior of structural materials assigned to the use in future fusion reactors is an essential part in their development and design. Mechanical testing characterizes the new designed materials. In these tests, the expected operating conditions, i. e. high temperatures and radiation damage, have to be simulated. For this purpose, instrumented indentation is a particularly capable testing method. The relationship of force and indentation depth recorded during the indentation of a hard tip into a specimen allows to predict the mechanical parameters of the tested material. Stress and strain appearing in the material can be excerpted when using a spherical indenter tip. Consequently, besides material's hardness and Young's modulus its properties in the plastic regime can be described. Reproducing the operating conditions of a fusion reactor for the indentation test bases on two aspects. First, irradiated samples need to be tested by remote-handling methods. Second, the samples have to be heated for the experiment. Both of these requirements lead to a new testing device that allows instrumented indentation on irradiation damaged materials in a remote-handled way at temperatures up to 650 C. Installation, set-up and initial operation of this newly designed apparatus are described. This includes design and integration of the components contributing to the indentation test, the systems for measurement and feedback control of the testing parameters sample temperature, indentation force, indentation depth and time as well as supporting gear and peripherals. Existing boundary conditions have to be incorporated in this process. Experimental verification and calibration of each subsystem is done. The proper interaction between the subsystems proves the functional capability and reliability of the new high-temperature indentation device. Material tests were accomplished on a reduced-activation ferritic-martensitic steel, tungsten and tantalum using the

  6. Temperature-dependent photoluminescence analysis of 1-MeV electron irradiation-induced nonradiative recombination centers in GaAs/Ge space solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiancheng, Yi; Pengfei, Xiao; Yong, Zheng; Juan, Tang; Rong, Wang

    2016-03-01

    The effects of irradiation of 1-MeV electrons on p+-n GaAs/Ge solar cells have been investigated by temperature-dependent photoluminescence (PL) measurements in the temperature range of 10-290 K. The temperature dependence of the PL peak energy agrees well with the Varnish relation, and the thermal quenching of the total integrated PL intensity is well explained by the thermal quenching theory. Meanwhile, the thermal quenching of temperature-dependent PL confirmed that there are two nonradiative recombination centers in the solar cells, and the thermal activation energies of these centers are determined by Arrhenius plots of the total integrated PL intensity. Furthermore, the nonradiative recombination center, as a primary defect, is identified as the H3 hole trap located at Ev + 0.71 eV at room temperature and the H2 hole trap located at Ev + 0.41 eV in the temperature range of 100-200 K, by comparing the thermal activation and ionization energies of the defects.

  7. Very low temperature OSL-thermochronometry applied to the Siwalik deposits in Nepal and Bhutan

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, G. E.; Grujic, D.; Coutand, I.; Herman, F.

    2016-12-01

    The Himalayan foreland fold-and-thrust belt is made of Neogene synorogenic sediments of the Siwalik Group and accommodates a large fraction of the India-Eurasia convergence. This region receives high precipitation and experiences seismic events of M8 and larger. Along the strike of the 2500-km-long orogenic arc, the eastward narrowing of the fold-and-thrust belt has been attributed to increasing annual rainfall and specific stream power, rather than to lateral changes in shortening rates. However, exhumation/erosion rates of this unit remain unknown. Precisely constraining the erosion rates of this unit at the scale of the orogen would allow an estimate of the relative contributions of tectonic and climatic processes to the erosion of the youngest and frontal part of the Himalayan orogen. Thermochronometry enables the cooling, and therefore exhumation/erosion histories of rocks to be determined. However the exhumation histories of the Siwalik Group, which have experienced limited burial heating not exceeding 100-50 °C remain very difficult to constrain using traditional thermochronometers. Optically stimulated luminescence (OSL)-thermochronometry is a recently developed very low temperature thermochronometer sensitive to temperatures of 30-90 °C. Consequently, its application to the Siwalik deposits may provide insights into their cooling and exhumation histories. K-feldspar extracts from 18 sandstones samples of the Siwalik Group were investigated using a multi-OSL-thermochronometry approach, whereby four different signals, with different thermal stabilities were measured for each sample. The sandstone samples were collected along two traverses across the Himalayan fold-and-thrust belt in western Nepal, and eastern Bhutan. Using signals with different thermal sensitivities enables high precision Quaternary cooling histories to be derived. These data were inverted using a Bayesian approach resulting in preliminary cooling rates of 100 °C/Myr during the last 0

  8. The spectral properties of DNA and RNA macromolecules at low temperatures: fundamental and applied aspects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yashchuk, Valeriy M.; Kudrya, Vladislav Yu

    2017-03-01

    This paper summarizes the results of studies of the spectral properties—optical absorption, fluorescence and phosphorescence—of DNA and RNA macromolecules and synthetic poly-, oligo- and mono-nucleotides, which have been carried out in our laboratory. The system of first excited singlet and triplet energy levels for DNA and RNA is evaluated using low-temperature (4.2 K-77 K) luminescent measurements. The traps of the singlet and triplet electronic excitations in these compounds are identified. An important self-protection mechanism against photo-damage of DNA and RNA by UV photons or penetrative radiation based on the capture of triplet electronic-energy excitations by the most photostable centers—in DNA, the complex formed by neighboring adenosine (A) and thymidine (T) links; in RNA, the adenosine links—is described. It is confirmed that despite similarities in the chemical and partly energy structures DNA is more stable than RNA. The spectral manifestation of the telomeres (the important functional system) in DNA macromolecules is examined. The results obtained on telomere fragments provide the possibility of finding the configuration peculiarities of the triplet excitations traps in DNA macromolecules. The resulting spreading length of the migrating singlet (l s) and triplet (l t) excitations for DNA and RNA macromolecules are evaluated.

  9. 500 keV Ar2+ ion irradiation induced anatase to brookite phase transformation and ferromagnetism at room temperature in TiO2 thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bharati, B.; Mishra, N. C.; Kanjilal, D.; Rath, Chandana

    2018-01-01

    In our earlier report, where we have demonstrated ferromagnetic behavior at room temperature (RT) in TiO2 thin films deposited through electron beam evaporation technique followed by annealing either in Ar or O2 atmosphere [Mohanty et al., Journal of Magnetism and Magnetic Materials 355 (2014) 240-245], here we have studied the evolution of structure and magnetic properties after irradiating the TiO2 thin films with 500 keV Ar2+ ions. The pristine film while exhibits anatase phase, the films become amorphous after irradiating at fluence in the range 1 × 1014 to 1 × 1016 ions/cm2. Increasing the fluence up to 5 × 1016 ions/cm2, amorphous to crystalline phase transformation occurs and the structure becomes brookite. Although anatase to rutile phase transformation is usually reported in literatures, anatase to brookite phase transformation is an unusual feature which we have reported here for the first time. Such anatase to brookite phase transformation is accompanied with grain growth without showing any change in film thickness evidenced from Rutherford's Back Scattering (RBS) measurement. From scanning probe micrographs (SPM), roughness is found to be more in amorphous films than in the crystalline ones. Anatase to brookite phase transformation could be realized by considering the importance of intermediate amorphous phase. Because due to amorphous phase, heat deposited by energetic ions are localized as dissipation of heat is less and as a result, the localized region crystallizes in brookite phase followed by grain growth as observed in highest fluence. Further, we have demonstrated ferromagnetic behavior at RT in irradiated films similar to pristine one, irrespective of their phase and crystallinity. Origin for room temperature ferromagnetism (RTFM) is attributed to the presence of oxygen vacancies which is confirmed by carrying out XPS measurement.

  10. Preliminary results of moving windows approach applied to monthly and seasonal temperature trend in Spanish mainland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salinas Solé, Celia; Gonzalez Hidalgo, Jose Carlos; Peña Angulo, Dhais; Brunetti, Miquele

    2017-04-01

    Length and starting period defines currently de signal of trend, significance and value in temporal climate series. This is one of the main reasons for which it is very difficult task the comparison between climate trend analyses that not share the same exact period. By the other hand, along any temporal series trends can vary from time to time according to starting year and length and thus they can mask variations in the temporal evolution of the variable. In this communication, we present an approach to how results can vary according to the selected period, an interesting point of the research since it detects the moment in which, eventually after identifying the sign of trend, it begins or stops being significant. To do that we have analyzed seasonal and monthly series of maximum and minimum temperatures of Spanish mainland from MOTEDAS dataset using temporal windows between 60 years and 20 years along the 1951-2010 period. The global results are presented in triangular diagrams (for regional series), and specifically two different analyses, which are complementary, will be presented in detail for the entire area by using maps: the progressive moving windows (the vertical of graphical triangle) and regressive moving windows (the hypotenuse of graphical triangle). With the progressive approach (i.e. the same starting year incrementing the length of period) is detected the temporal window when the trend begin to be significant, while on the other hand the regressive windows (i.e. the last year remain constant) show us when those tendencies ceases to be significant. This analysis detects very interesting things, from which we will present examples and case studies for the seasonal and monthly analysis combining both approaches (regressive and progressive) and analyzing the behavior in the space for the thermometric measurements.

  11. Measurement of radio wave reflection due to temperature rising from rock salt and ice irradiated by an electron beam for an ultra-high-energy neutrino detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanikawa, Takahiro; Chiba, Masami; Kamijo, Toshio; Yabuki, Fumiaki; Yasuda, Osamu; Akiyama, Hidetoshi; Chikashige, Yuichi; Kon, Tadashi; Shimizu, Yutaka; Utsumi, Michiaki; Fujii, Masatoshi [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Metropolitan University, 1-1 Minami-Ohsawa, Hachioji-shi, Tokyo 192-0397 (Japan); Faculty of Science and Technology, Seikei University, Musashino-shi, Tokyo 180-8633 (Japan); Department of Applied Science and Energy Engineering, School of Engineering, Tokai University, Hiratsuka-shi, Kanagawa 259-1292 (Japan); School of Medicine, Shimane University, Izumo-shi, Shimane 693-8501 (Japan)

    2012-11-12

    An ultra-high-energy neutrino (UHE{nu}) gives temperature rise along the hadronic and electromagnetic shower when it enters into rock salt or ice. Permittivities of them arise with respect the temperatures at ionization processes of the UHE{nu} shower. It is expected by Fresnel's formula that radio wave reflects at the irregularity of the permittivity in the medium. We had found the radio wave reflection effect in rock salt. The reflection effect and long attenuation length of radio wave in rock salt and ice would yield a new UHE{nu} detection method. An experiment for ice was performed to study the reflection effect. A coaxial tube was filled with rock salt powder or ice. Open end of the coaxial tube was irradiated by a 2 MeV electron beam. Radio wave of 435 MHz was introduced to the coaxial tube. We measured the reflection wave from the open end. We found the radio wave reflection effect due to electron beam irradiation in ice as well as in rock salt.

  12. Rapid responses of mesophyll conductance to changes of CO2 concentration, temperature and irradiance are affected by N supplements in rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Dongliang; Liu, Xi; Liu, Limin; Douthe, Cyril; Li, Yong; Peng, Shaobing; Huang, Jianliang

    2015-12-01

    Photosynthesis in C3 plants is significantly limited by mesophyll conductance (gm ), which can vary with leaf anatomical traits and nitrogen (N) supplements. Several studies have investigated the response of gm to N supplements; however, none examined the implications of N supplements on the response of gm to rapid environmental changes. Here we investigated the effect of N supplement on gm and the response of gm to change of CO2 , temperature and irradiance in rice. High N supplement (HN) increased mesophyll cell wall surface area and chloroplast surface area exposed to intercellular airspace per leaf area, and reduced cell wall thickness. These changes resulted in increased gm . The gm of leaves with HN was more sensitive to changes in CO2 concentration, temperature and irradiance. The difference in leaf structural features between low N supplement and HN indicates that a rapid change in gm is related to the regulation of diffusion through biological membranes rather than leaf structural features. These results will contribute to an understanding of the determinants of gm response to rapid changes in environmental factors. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Effect of Magnetic Flux Density and Applied Current on Temperature, Velocity and Entropy Generation Distributions in MHD Pumps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Kiyasatfar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, simulation of steady state, incompressible and fully developed laminar flow has been conducted in a magneto hydrodynamic (MHD pump. The governing equations are solved numerically by finite-difference method. The effect of the magnetic flux density and current on the flow and temperature distributions in a MHD pump is investigated. The obtained results showed that controlling the flow and the temperature is possible through the controlling of the applied current and the magnetic flux. Furthermore, the effects of the magnetic flux density and current on entropy generation in MHD pump are considered. Our presented numerical results are in good agreement with the experimental data showed in literature.

  14. The effects of hydrothermal temperature on the photocatalytic performance of ZnIn{sub 2}S{sub 4} for hydrogen generation under visible light irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tian, Fei [Harbin Institute of Technology Shenzhen Graduate School, Shenzhen Key Laboratory of Water Resource Utilization and Environmental Pollution Control, Shenzhen 518055 (China); Zhu, Rongshu, E-mail: rszhu@hitsz.edu.cn [Harbin Institute of Technology Shenzhen Graduate School, Shenzhen Key Laboratory of Water Resource Utilization and Environmental Pollution Control, Shenzhen 518055 (China); Public Platform for Technological Service in Urban Waste Reuse and Energy Regeneration, Shenzhen 518055 (China); Song, Kelin; Niu, Minli [Harbin Institute of Technology Shenzhen Graduate School, Shenzhen Key Laboratory of Water Resource Utilization and Environmental Pollution Control, Shenzhen 518055 (China); Ouyang, Feng, E-mail: Ouyangfh@hit.edu.cn [Harbin Institute of Technology Shenzhen Graduate School, Shenzhen Key Laboratory of Water Resource Utilization and Environmental Pollution Control, Shenzhen 518055 (China); Public Platform for Technological Service in Urban Waste Reuse and Energy Regeneration, Shenzhen 518055 (China); Cao, Gang, E-mail: caog@hotmail.com [Harbin Institute of Technology Shenzhen Graduate School, Shenzhen Key Laboratory of Water Resource Utilization and Environmental Pollution Control, Shenzhen 518055 (China); Public Platform for Technological Service in Urban Waste Reuse and Energy Regeneration, Shenzhen 518055 (China)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • The ZnIn{sub 2}S{sub 4} (120, 140, 160, 180, and 200 °C) was prepared. • The activities splitting water to hydrogen under visible light were evaluated. • The activity achieved the best when hydrothermal temperature was 160 °C. • The activity order is related to the surface morphology and surface defects. - Abstract: A series of ZnIn{sub 2}S{sub 4} photocatalysts were successfully synthesized using the hydrothermal method with different hydrothermal temperatures (120, 140, 160, 180, and 200 °C) and characterized by various analysis techniques, such as UV–vis, XRD, SEM, BET and PL. The results indicated that these photocatalysts had a similar band gap. The hydrothermal temperature had a huge influence on the properties of the photocatalysts such as the BET surface area, the total pore volume, the average pore diameter, the defects and the morphology. The photocatalytic activities of ZnIn{sub 2}S{sub 4} were evaluated based on photocatalytic hydrogen production from water under visible-light irradiation. The activity order is attributed to the coefficient of the surface morphology and the surface defects. The hydrogen production efficiency achieved the best when the hydrothermal temperature was 160 °C. On the basis of the characterization of the catalysts, the effects of the hydrothermal temperature on the photocatalytic activity of ZnIn{sub 2}S{sub 4} were discussed.

  15. Inhibitory Effects of 658 nm Laser Irradiation on Skin Temperature in Anesthetized Rats: Preliminary Results from a Controlled Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Litscher

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Red laser light stimulation can have many physiological effects. The goal of this animal experimental study was to investigate how red laser stimulation influences the temperature of anesthetized rats at different acupuncture points and nonacupoints. For that reason 12 adult male Wistar Han rats (300–380 g were investigated. Six anesthetized rats underwent red laser stimulation (wavelength 658 nm, output power 40 mW, diameter 500 µm, and duration 10 min at the Baihui (GV20 acupoint, the Zusanli acupoint (ST36, bilateral, and a control point on the forelimb. The other six rats underwent the same procedure; however, the laser remained switched off. Significant decreases in temperature were found at the acupoints Baihui, Zusanli left, and Zusanli right. In addition there was no significant temperature effect at a control point. During placebo laser irradiation (deactivated laser there were also significant temperature changes. The mechanism underlying the results is currently unknown, but brain stimulation (via laser or mechanical pressure and mainly direct central mechanisms may be responsible for the local and peripheral temperature decrease.

  16. Benefits of applying low-temperature plasma treatment to wound care and hemostasis from the viewpoints of physics and pathology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Tetsuji; Ikehara, Yuzuru

    2017-12-01

    Over the last decade, low-temperature plasma (LTP) technology has reached the life sciences and introduced the benefits of using such technology at atmospheric pressure for medical applications. The active elements from LTP, such as reactive molecular species, charged particles and photons, appear to react with biomolecules on wounds and at bleeding points. This action by LTP might be analogous with semiconductor fabrication techniques such as etching and surface modification. From this perspective, we discuss the general aspects and principles of LTP devices used at atmospheric pressure in wound care and hemostasis as an interdisciplinary fusion of applied physics and pathology.

  17. Establishment of equilibrium of electrostatic potential by photo-irradiation in a GaAs quantum well at low temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamaguchi, Masumi; Nomura, Shintaro; Delbecq, Matthieu; Tamura, Hiroyuki; Akazaki, Tatsushi, E-mail: m-yama@will.brl.ntt.co.j [NTT Basic Research Laboratories, NTT corp. 3-1 Morinosato-Wakamiya, Atsugi, Kanagawa 243-0198 (Japan)

    2010-02-01

    We measured photoluminescence (PL) spectra from a 20-nm GaAs/AlGaAs quantum well (QW) grown on an n-type substrate by selectively exciting the GaAs at 2 K. We observed a two-stage change of PL spectra as a function of the total amount of photo-irradiation (p x t) after cooling down. This corresponds to the process of establishing the equilibrium of electrostatic potential between the sample surface and QW and between the QW and n-doped substrate.

  18. AGC-2 Specimen Post Irradiation Data Package Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Windes, William Enoch [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Swank, W. David [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Rohrbaugh, David T. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Cottle, David L. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-08-01

    This report documents results of the post-irradiation examination material property testing of the creep, control, and piggyback specimens from the irradiation creep capsule Advanced Graphite Creep (AGC)-2 are reported. This is the second of a series of six irradiation test trains planned as part of the AGC experiment to fully characterize the neutron irradiation effects and radiation creep behavior of current nuclear graphite grades. The AGC-2 capsule was irradiated in the Idaho National Laboratory Advanced Test Reactor at a nominal temperature of 600°C and to a peak dose of 5 dpa (displacements per atom). One-half of the creep specimens were subjected to mechanical stresses (an applied stress of either 13.8, 17.2, or 20.7 MPa) to induce irradiation creep. All post-irradiation testing and measurement results are reported with the exception of the irradiation mechanical strength testing, which is the last destructive testing stage of the irradiation testing program. Material property tests were conducted on specimens from 15 nuclear graphite grades using a similar loading configuration as the first AGC capsule (AGC-1) to provide easy comparison between the two capsules. However, AGC-2 contained an increased number of specimens (i.e., 487 total specimens irradiated) and replaced specimens of the minor grade 2020 with the newer grade 2114. The data reported include specimen dimensions for both stressed and unstressed specimens to establish the irradiation creep rates, mass and volume data necessary to derive density, elastic constants (Young’s modulus, shear modulus, and Poisson’s ratio) from ultrasonic time-of-flight velocity measurements, Young’s modulus from the fundamental frequency of vibration, electrical resistivity, and thermal diffusivity and thermal expansion data from 100–500°C. No data outliers were determined after all measurements were completed. A brief statistical analysis was performed on the irradiated data and a limited comparison between

  19. Mustiscaling Analysis applied to field Water Content through Distributed Fiber Optic Temperature sensing measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benitez Buelga, Javier; Rodriguez-Sinobas, Leonor; Sanchez, Raul; Gil, Maria; Tarquis, Ana M.

    2014-05-01

    signal variation, or to see at which scales signals are most correlated. This can give us an insight into the dominant processes An alternative to both of the above methods has been described recently. Relative entropy and increments in relative entropy has been applied in soil images (Bird et al., 2006) and in soil transect data (Tarquis et al., 2008) to study scale effects localized in scale and provide the information that is complementary to the information about scale dependencies found across a range of scales. We will use them in this work to describe the spatial scaling properties of a set of field water content data measured in an extension of a corn field, in a plot of 500 m2 and an spatial resolution of 25 cm. These measurements are based on an optics cable (BruggSteal) buried on a ziz-zag deployment at 30cm depth. References Bird, N., M.C. Díaz, A. Saa, and A.M. Tarquis. 2006. A review of fractal and multifractal analysis of soil pore-scale images. J. Hydrol. 322:211-219. Kravchenko, A.N., R. Omonode, G.A. Bollero, and D.G. Bullock. 2002. Quantitative mapping of soil drainage classes using topographical data and soil electrical conductivity. Soil Sci. Soc. Am. J. 66:235-243. Lark, R.M., A.E. Milne, T.M. Addiscott, K.W.T. Goulding, C.P. Webster, and S. O'Flaherty. 2004. Scale- and location-dependent correlation of nitrous oxide emissions with soil properties: An analysis using wavelets. Eur. J. Soil Sci. 55:611-627. Lark, R.M., S.R. Kaffka, and D.L. Corwin. 2003. Multiresolution analysis of data on electrical conductivity of soil using wavelets. J. Hydrol. 272:276-290. Lark, R. M. and Webster, R. 1999. Analysis and elucidation of soil variation using wavelets. European J. of Soil Science, 50(2): 185-206. Mandelbrot, B.B. 1982. The fractal geometry of nature. W.H. Freeman, New York. Percival, D.B., and A.T. Walden. 2000. Wavelet methods for time series analysis. Cambridge Univ. Press, Cambridge, UK. Tarquis, A.M., N.R. Bird, A.P. Whitmore, M.C. Cartagena, and

  20. Physical-chemical analyses of irradiated papayas (Carica papaya L.)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camargo, R.J. [Radiation Technology Center, IPEN-CNEN/SP, Av. Lineu Prestes, 2242, 05508-900, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Tadini, C.C. [Chemical Engineering Department, Escola Politecnica, Sao Paulo University, P.O. Box 61548, 05424-970, SP (Brazil); Sabato, S.F. [Radiation Technology Center, IPEN-CNEN/SP, Av. Lineu Prestes, 2242, 05508-900, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)], E-mail: sfsabato@ipen.br

    2007-11-15

    Papaya is cultivated in Espirito Santo State/Brazil and as it stands up to irradiation, it is important to validate this technology, since it is already being applied in some countries. Penetration energy, ratio (relation between soluble solids and titrable acidity) and skin color were evaluated to verify the influence of four different doses of irradiation (0.0, 0.5, 0.75 and 1.00 kGy) on papayas, during 21 days. As a result for the skin color and the penetration energy, it was found that in the first days after irradiation, these variables increased with increase in radiation dose; however, after a time lapse, the tendency inverted and the irradiated fruits had a slower ripening process. For the ratio, a very important variable that it is responsible for the fruit taste, no difference was found between irradiated and the control fruit. Color and texture measurements are dependent on the storage temperature.

  1. Physical-chemical analyses of irradiated papayas ( Carica papaya L.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camargo, R. J.; Tadini, C. C.; Sabato, S. F.

    2007-11-01

    Papaya is cultivated in Espírito Santo State/Brazil and as it stands up to irradiation, it is important to validate this technology, since it is already being applied in some countries. Penetration energy, ratio (relation between soluble solids and titrable acidity) and skin color were evaluated to verify the influence of four different doses of irradiation (0.0, 0.5, 0.75 and 1.00 kGy) on papayas, during 21 days. As a result for the skin color and the penetration energy, it was found that in the first days after irradiation, these variables increased with increase in radiation dose; however, after a time lapse, the tendency inverted and the irradiated fruits had a slower ripening process. For the ratio, a very important variable that it is responsible for the fruit taste, no difference was found between irradiated and the control fruit. Color and texture measurements are dependent on the storage temperature.

  2. Test of Capsule (11M-22K) with Double Layered Thermal Media for Irradiation of Future Nuclear System Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Man Soon; Choo, Kee Nam; Yang, Seong Woo; Kang, Young Hwan; Park, Sang Jun [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-05-15

    By the irradiation test, the structural integrity and safety of the capsule during irradiation at high temperature were confirmed. The outlet temperatures of VHTR and SFR are 1,000 .deg. C and 550 .deg. C, respectively, which are much higher than the irradiation temperatures of the material capsules tested at HANARO up to recently. The capsule for high-temperature materials was designed as a double layered thermal media, in which the outer layer is aluminum and the inner layer is Ti or graphite. This capsule aims at allowing irradiation at temperatures of up to 1,000 .deg. C in the near future. As future nuclear systems are to be operated at high temperatures, the irradiation tests at high temperature are necessary. In accordance with this requirement, a capsule suitable for an irradiation test at high temperatures is being developed to overcome a restriction on the use of aluminum at high temperature. A new capsule with thermal media of a double layered structure, the outer of which is Al and the inner is Ti or graphite, was designed. This capsule was applied to an irradiation test up to 900 .deg. C. The capsule for use at the irradiation test up to 1,000 .deg. C will be developed at the beginning in 2014.

  3. Differential calorimeter and temperature controller for stored energy measurements in irradiated alkali halides; Calorimetro diferencial y controlador de temperatura para medidas de energia almacenada en haluros alcalinos irradiados

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delgado Martinez, L.

    1977-07-01

    The design and performance of a simple temperature-controlled differential calorimeter are presented. This system allows to measure radiation-induced stored energy in insulators, above room temperature with a differential thermal analysis method. With platelets of KC1 single crystals, the base lines obtained for T{sub 2} T{sub 1} (with T{sub 2}: irradiated sample temperature and T{sub 1}: reference sample temperature) show a smooth drift less of 0,2 degree centigree in the interval from 25 to 400 degree centigree. The discrepancy between two consecutive base lines is less than {+-} 0,02 degree centigree which implies a calorimeter sensitivity of about {+-}0,004 cal/g. This sensitivity allows to measure stored energy release in samples with a color center concentration low enough to be directly measured with a spectrophotometer so that a search for correlations among the features of the stored energy spectrum and the color center annealing can be made. (Author) 13 refs.

  4. Primary defect transformations in high-resistivity p-type silicon irradiated with electrons at cryogenic temperatures

    CERN Document Server

    Makarenko, L F; Korshunov, F P; Murin, L I; Moll, M

    2009-01-01

    It has been revealed that self-interstitials formed under low intensity electron irradiationin high resistivity p-type silicon can be retained frozen up to room temperature. Low thermal mobility of the self-interstitials suggests that Frenkelpair sinsilicon can be stable at temperatures of about or higher than 100K. A broad DLTS peak with activation energy of 0.14–0.17eV can be identified as related to Frenkel pairs. This peak anneals out at temperatures of 120 140K. Experimental evidences are presented that be coming more mobile under forwardcurrent injection the self-interstitials change their charge state to a less positive one.

  5. Microwave Assisted Synthesis of ZnO Nanoparticles: Effect of Precursor Reagents, Temperature, Irradiation Time, and Additives on Nano-ZnO Morphology Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gastón P. Barreto

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of different variables (precursor reagents, temperature, irradiation time, microwave radiation power, and additives addition on the final morphology of nano-ZnO obtained through the microwave assisted technique has been investigated. The characterization of the samples has been carried out by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM in transmission mode, infrared (FTIR, UV-Vis spectroscopy, and powder X-ray diffraction (XRD. The results showed that all the above-mentioned variables influenced to some extent the shape and/or size of the synthetized nanoparticles. In particular, the addition of an anionic surfactant (sodium di-2-ethylhexyl-sulfosuccinate (AOT to the reaction mixture allowed the synthesis of smaller hexagonal prismatic particles (100 nm, which show a significant increase in UV absorption.

  6. Operation of Silicon, Diamond and liquid Helium Detectors in the range of Room Temperature to 1.9 K and after an Irradiation Dose of several Mega Gray

    CERN Document Server

    Kurfuerst, C; Dehning, B; Eisel, T; Sapinski, M; Eremin, V

    2013-01-01

    At the triplet magnets, close to the interaction regions of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), the current Beam Loss Monitoring (BLM) system is sensitive to the debris from the collision points. For future beams, with higher energy and intensity the expected increase in luminosity implicate an increase of the debris from interaction products covering the quench-provoking beam losses from the primary proton beams. The investigated option is to locate the detectors as close as possible to the superconducting coil, where the signal ratio of both is optimal. Therefore the detectors have to be located inside the cold mass of the superconducting magnets in superfluid helium at 1.9 Kelvin. Past measurements have shown that a liquid helium ionisation chamber, diamond and silicon detectors are promising candidates for cryogenic beam loss monitors. The carrier parameter, drift velocity, and the leakage current changes will be shown as a function of temperature. New high irradiation test beam measurements at room temperat...

  7. Mapping of the Resistance of a Superconducting Transition Edge Sensor as a Function of Temperature, Current, and Applied Magnetic Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shou; Eckart, Megan E.; Jaeckel, Felix; Kripps, Kari L.; McCammon, Dan; Zhou, Yu; Morgan, Kelsey M.

    2017-01-01

    We have measured the resistance R (T, I, B(sub ext) of a superconducting transition edge sensor over the entire transition region on a fine scale, producing a four-dimensional map of the resistance surface. The dimensionless temperature and current sensitivities (alpha equivalence partial derivative log R/partial derivative log T|(sub I) and beta equivalence partial derivative log R/partial derivative log I|(sub T) of the TES resistance have been determined at each point. alpha and beta are closely related to the sensor performance, but show a great deal of complex, large amplitude fine structure over large portions of the surface that is sensitive to the applied magnetic field. We discuss the relation of this structure to the presence of Josephson weak link fringes.

  8. Enhanced performance of CdS/CdTe thin-film devices through temperature profiling techniques applied to close-spaced sublimation deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiaonan Li; Sheldon, P.; Moutinho, H.; Matson, R. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)

    1996-05-01

    The authors describe a methodology developed and applied to the close-spaced sublimation technique for thin-film CdTe deposition. The developed temperature profiles consisted of three discrete temperature segments, which the authors called the nucleation, plugging, and annealing temperatures. They have demonstrated that these temperature profiles can be used to grow large-grain material, plug pinholes, and improve CdS/CdTe photovoltaic device performance by about 15%. The improved material and device properties have been obtained while maintaining deposition temperatures compatible with commercially available substrates. This temperature profiling technique can be easily applied to a manufacturing environment by adjusting the temperature as a function of substrate position instead of time.

  9. Effects of temperature and irradiance on a benthic microalgal community: A combined two-dimensional oxygen and fluorescence imaging approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hancke, Kasper; Sorell, Brian K.; Lund-Hansen, Lars C.

    2014-01-01

    The effects of temperature and light on both oxygen (O2) production and gross photosynthesis were resolved in a benthic microalgae community by combining two-dimensional (2D) imaging of O2 and variable chlorophyll a (Chl a) fluorescence. Images revealed a photosynthetically active community with ...... microbial community, at different temperatures. The present imaging approach demonstrates a great potential to study consequences of environmental effects on photosynthetic activity and O2 turnover in complex phototrophic benthic communities.......The effects of temperature and light on both oxygen (O2) production and gross photosynthesis were resolved in a benthic microalgae community by combining two-dimensional (2D) imaging of O2 and variable chlorophyll a (Chl a) fluorescence. Images revealed a photosynthetically active community...

  10. High Temperature Mechanical Properties, Fractography and Synchrotron Studies of ATF clad materials from the UCSB-NSUF Irradiations.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saleh, Tarik A. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Maloy, Stuart Andrew [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Romero, Tobias J. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Sprouster, David [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Ecker, Lynne [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2015-02-23

    A variety of tensile samples of Ferritic and Oxide Dispersion Strengthened (ODS or nanostructured ferritic) steels were placed the ATR reactor over 2 years achieving doses of roughly 4-6 dpa at temperatures of roughly 290°C. Samples were shipped to Wing 9 in the CMR facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory and imaged then tested in tension. This report summarizes the room temperature tensile tests, the elevated temperature tensile tests (300°C) and fractography and reduction of area calculations on those samples. Additionally small samples were cut from the undeformed grip section of these tensile samples and sent to the NSLS synchrotron for high energy X-ray analysis, initial results will be described here.

  11. Responses of Rapid Viscoanalyzer Profile and Other Rice Grain Qualities to Exogenously Applied Plant Growth Regulators under High Day and High Night Temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahad, Shah; Hussain, Saddam; Saud, Shah; Hassan, Shah; Chauhan, Bhagirath Singh; Khan, Fahad; Ihsan, Muhammad Zahid; Ullah, Abid; Wu, Chao; Bajwa, Ali Ahsan; Alharby, Hesham; Amanullah; Nasim, Wajid; Shahzad, Babar; Tanveer, Mohsin; Huang, Jianliang

    2016-01-01

    High-temperature stress degrades the grain quality of rice; nevertheless, the exogenous application of plant growth regulators (PGRs) might alleviate the negative effects of high temperatures. In the present study, we investigated the responses of rice grain quality to exogenously applied PGRs under high day temperatures (HDT) and high night temperatures (HNT) under controlled conditions. Four different combinations of ascorbic acid (Vc), alpha-tocopherol (Ve), brassinosteroids (Br), methyl jasmonates (MeJA) and triazoles (Tr) were exogenously applied to two rice cultivars (IR-64 and Huanghuazhan) prior to the high-temperature treatment. A Nothing applied Control (NAC) was included for comparison. The results demonstrated that high-temperature stress was detrimental for grain appearance and milling qualities and that both HDT and HNT reduced the grain length, grain width, grain area, head rice percentage and milled rice percentage but increased the chalkiness percentage and percent area of endosperm chalkiness in both cultivars compared with ambient temperature (AT). Significantly higher grain breakdown, set back, consistence viscosity and gelatinization temperature, and significantly lower peak, trough and final viscosities were observed under high-temperature stress compared with AT. Thus, HNT was more devastating for grain quality than HDT. The exogenous application of PGRs ameliorated the adverse effects of high temperature in both rice cultivars, and Vc+Ve+MejA+Br was the best combination for both cultivars under high temperature stress.

  12. Study of the effect of neutron and electron irradiations on the low temperature thermal conductivity of germanium and silicon; Etude de l'effet des irradiations neutronique et electronique sur la conductibilite thermique aux basses temperatures du germanium et du silicium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vandevyver, M. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1967-06-15

    The main results obtained from this work are the following: 1 Neutron irradiation (at 300 deg. K) produces lattice defects in germanium and silicon, and a corresponding very large lowering of the thermal conductivity is observed in the low temperature region (4-300 ). The results obtained have been explained with the help of the following hypotheses: for silicon a scattering of phonons by the stress fields produced by the defects; for germanium, a supplementary scattering of the electron phonon type. 2 Annealing treatments carried out on these materials above 373 deg. K restored the thermal conductivity over the whole temperature range of the measurements (4-300 deg. K); in the case of both germanium and silicon there were two steps in the annealing process. 3 A study of the thermal conductivity of germanium (initially P or N) after an electronic irradiation showed that the scattering of phonons could depend on the state of charge of the defects thus produced. (author) [French] Les principaux resultats obtenus au cours de ce travail sont les suivants : 1 Les irradiations neutroniques (a 300 deg. K) introduisent des defauts de reseau dans le germanium et le silicium et l'on observe correlativement pour ces materiaux, une tres importante diminution de conductibilite thermique dans le domaine des basses temperatures (4-300 deg. K). Les resultats obtenus ont pu etre interpretes en admettant principalement: pour le silicium, une diffusion des phonons par les champs de contrainte dus aux defauts; pour le germanium, une diffusion additionnelle du type electron-phonon. 2 Des recuits effectues sur ces materiaux au-dessus de 373 deg. K ont montre une restauration de la conductibilite thermique dans tout l'intervalle de temperature de mesure (4-300 deg. K) et comportant pour le germanium et le silicium, deux etapes de recuit 3 L'etude de la conductibilite thermique de germanium (initialement N ou P) apres une irradiation electronique, a montre que la diffusion

  13. Effects of Temperature and Amount of Fertilizer Applied after Transplanting on the Development of Axillary Buds on Primary Crowns in Strawberry Forcing Culture

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Yukio Inaba; Tomohiko Yoshida; Nobuo Sugiyama

    2007-01-01

      The effects of temperature and amount of fertilizer applied after transplanting on the development of axillary buds on primary crowns were studied in three leading strawberry cultivars used for forcing, i.e...

  14. Infrared laser irradiation of dental enamel using submicrosecond laser pulses with and without an applied water layer: effect on bond strength to restorative materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarma, Anupama V.; Staninec, Michal; Le, Charles Q.; Fried, Daniel

    2004-05-01

    Previous studies have shown that during IR laser irradiation at CO2 and Er:YAG laser wavelengths, residual particles of fused non-apatite calcium phosphate phases accumulate that may inhibit adhesion to restorative materials. A layer of water added to the enamel surface before ablation prevents the accumulation of such phases. The objective of this study was to investigate the influence of laser pulse duration and wavelength with and without the added water layer on the bond strength of composite to laser prepared enamel surfaces. The surfaces of bovine enamel were irradiated by three lasers systems: a 0.5-μs Er:YSGG laser. a 25-μs Er:YAG laser and a 5-μs TEA CO2 laser operating at 9.6-μm. A motion control system and a pressurized spray system incorporating a microprocessor controlled pulsed nozzle for water delivery, were used to ensure uniform treatment of the entire surface. There was no significant reduction in the shear-bond strength of enamel to composite for the shorter erbium laser pulses if a water-spray was not used, in contrast to previous results for the 200-μs free-running Er:YAG laser in which the water-spray resulted in significantly higher bond-strengths. Shear-bond strengths for both erbium laser systems were significantly higher than for the CO2 laser irradiated samples and the negative control (no acid-etch) but significantly lower than the positive control group (phosphoric acid-etch). The application of the water-spray markedly influenced the surface morphology for all three laser systems with the most uniform surface preparation being produced by the 25-μs Er:YAG laser and the 5-μs CO2 laser with the water-spray.

  15. Viscoplastic equations incorporated into a finite element model to predict deformation behavior of irradiated reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yuanyuan, E-mail: 630wyy@163.com [Key Laboratory of Materials Modification by Laser, Ion and Electron Beams (Ministry of Education), Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Zhao, Jijun, E-mail: zhaojj@dlut.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Materials Modification by Laser, Ion and Electron Beams (Ministry of Education), Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Zhang, Chi [Key Laboratory of Advanced Materials of Ministry of Education, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2017-05-15

    Highlights: • The initial internal variable in the Anand model is modified by considering both temperature and irradiation dose. • The tensile stress-strain response is examined and analyzed under different temperatures and irradiation doses. • Yield strengths are predicted as functions of strain rate, temperature and irradiation dose. - Abstract: The viscoplastic equations with a modified initial internal variable are implemented into the finite element code to investigate stress-strain response and irradiation hardening of the materials under increased temperature and at different levels of irradiated dose. We applied this model to Mod 9Cr-1Mo steel. The predicted results are validated by the experimentally measured data. Furthermore, they show good agreement with the previous data from a constitutive crystal plasticity model in account of dislocation and interstitial loops. Three previous hardening models for predicting the yield strength of the material are discussed and compared with our simulation results.

  16. Dielectric characteristics of HoFeO{sub 3} crystals and their modification on SHI irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhat, Monita [Crystal Growth and Materials Research Laboratory, Department of Physics and Electronics, University of Jammu, Jammu 180 006 (India); Kaur, Balwinder [Crystal Growth and Materials Research Laboratory, Department of Physics and Electronics, University of Jammu, Jammu 180 006 (India); Kumar, Ravi [Nuclear Science Centre, New Delhi (India); Khosa, S.K. [Crystal Growth and Materials Research Laboratory, Department of Physics and Electronics, University of Jammu, Jammu 180 006 (India); Bamzai, K.K. [Crystal Growth and Materials Research Laboratory, Department of Physics and Electronics, University of Jammu, Jammu 180 006 (India); Kotru, P.N. [Crystal Growth and Materials Research Laboratory, Department of Physics and Electronics, University of Jammu, Jammu 180 006 (India)]. E-mail: pn_kotru@yahoo.com; Wanklyn, B.M. [Department of Physics, Clarendon Laboratory, Oxford University, Oxford OX1 3 PU (United Kingdom)

    2006-04-15

    Results on dielectric properties of flux grown HoFeO{sub 3} crystals and their modification on irradiation with 50 MeV Li{sup 3+} ion beam are reported. The dielectric constant ({epsilon}'), dielectric loss (tan {delta}) and conductivity ({sigma}) as a function of frequency of the applied ac field in the range 1 kHz-10 MHz and at temperatures ranging from 30 to 550 deg. C are analyzed for the unirradiated and irradiated crystals. The value of {epsilon}' decreases with frequency for all the temperatures. The rate at which {epsilon}' falls with increase in frequency (1 kHz-1 MHz) at each temperature in the range of 30-250 deg. C gets drastically reduced on irradiation of crystals with SHI. The peak value of dielectric constant depends on temperature and frequency. The relaxor type behaviour is observed for both unirradiated (UIR) and irradiated (IR) crystals with a shift in the peak temperature of irradiated crystal towards higher temperature for all frequencies. The relaxor character of HoFeO{sub 3} is strengthened on irradiation. This relaxor type behaviour is further elaborated using the theoretical fitting. The differences in the conductivity and activation energy for UIR and IR crystals are given. It is shown that irradiation affects the values of activation energies at all the frequencies in the range of 1 kHz-10 MHz.

  17. Food irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1987-02-28

    A brief article examines the controversy over food irradiation regarding the wholesomeness of irradiated food, its microbiological safety, loss of vitamins and changes in flavour. The benefits of food irradiation are also outlined including the destruction of certain food-borne pathogens and the prolongation of the shelf-life of food by killing pests and delaying the deterioration process.

  18. Survey of temperature, reaction time and ultrasound irradiation power on sonochemical synthesis of two new nanostructured lead(II) coordination supramolecule compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayati, Payam; Rezvani, AliReza; Morsali, Ali; Retailleau, Pascal; Centore, Roberto

    2017-03-01

    Nanoparticles of two new 0D, lead(II) coordination supramolecular compounds, [Pb(L)2(I)2] (1) and [Pb(L)(L(/))(H2O)]·3H2O (2), (L=1,10-phenanthroline monohydrate, L(/)=2,6-pyridinedicarboxlic acid), have been synthesized by a sonochemical process and characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD), FT-IR spectroscopy and elemental analyses. The single crystal X-ray data of compounds show that the Pb ion is six coordinated in both 1 and 2. The thermal stability of compound 1 and 2 has been studied by thermal gravimetric (TG) and differential thermal analyses (DTA). The role of temperature, reaction time and ultrasound irradiation power on the size and morphology of the nano-structured compound obtained from 1 and 2, have been investigated. Results indicate that an increase of temperature and sonication power and a decrease in time reaction led to a decrease of particle size. Topological analysis shows that the compound 1 and 2 are new topology for net: 1,4M5-1 and nch, respectively. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Understanding the Irradiation Behavior of Zirconium Carbide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Motta, Arthur [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Sridharan, Kumar [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Morgan, Dane [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Szlufarska, Izabela [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    2013-10-11

    -induced microstructures mapped spatially and temporally, microstructural evolution during post-irradiation annealing, and atomistic modeling of defect formation and transport energetics will provide new, critical understanding about property changes in ZrC. The behavior of materials under irradiation is determined by the balance between damage production, defect clustering, and lattice response. In order to predict those effects at high temperatures so targeted testing can be expanded and extrapolated beyond the known database, it is necessary to determine the defect energetics and mobilities as these control damage accumulation and annealing. In particular, low-temperature irradiations are invaluable for determining the regions of defect mobility. Computer simulation techniques are particularly useful for identifying basic defect properties, especially if closely coupled with a well-constructed and complete experimental database. The close coupling of calculation and experiment in this project will provide mutual benchmarking and allow us to glean a deeper understanding of the irradiation response of ZrC, which can then be applied to the prediction of its behavior in reactor conditions.

  20. Electrochemical measurements of mass transfer in RTILs (Room Temperature Ionic Liquids) medium under low frequency ultrasound irradiation; Mesures electrochimiques de transfert de matiere en milieu RTIL's (Room Temperature Ionic Liquids) sous irradiation ultrasonore basse frequence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costa, C.; Hihn, J.Y.; Rebetez, M.; Doche, M.L. [Universite de Franche Comte - IUT Dept. Chimie, Institut UTINAM-UMR CNRS 6213, 25 - Montbeliard (France); Costa, C.; Bisel, I. [CEA Valrho, Dir. de l' Energie Nucleaire (DEN/DRCP/SCPS/LPCP), 30 - Marcoule (France); Moisy, Ph. [CEA Valrho, Dir. de l' Energie Nucleaire (DEN/DRCP/SCPS/LCA), 30 - Marcoule (France)

    2007-07-01

    The aim of this work is to measure the influence of ultrasounds on the mass transfer at the electrode. The electro diffusional method which consists to measure the limit diffusion current on the polarization curve i=f(E) of a reversible couple in diluted solution in the electrolyte. The used couple changes with the electrolytic medium: potassium ferro/ferricyanide in water, ferrocene/ferricinium for acetonitrile and for the ionic liquid 1-butyl-3-methyl-imidazolium bis(tri-fluoro-methyl-sulfonyl)imide [BuMIm][CF{sub 3}SO{sub 2}){sub 2}N]). The limit diffusion currents are converted into mass transfer coefficients and then into a dimensional Sherwood numbers to allow an easier comparison of the results between the different research teams participating to this study. Recent tests, carried out in partner laboratories (LCMI-UFC, LPCP-CEA and LCA-CEA) have demonstrated the interest of the use of power ultrasounds in Room Temperature Ionic Liquids (RTILs) but revealed too a lot of experimental difficulties. Nevertheless, it appears that the ultrasounds are an aging mode particularly adapted to the RTILs because the mass transfer to the electrode is there 5 times more efficient than in presence of an electrode turning at 4500 tr.min{sup -1}, while limiting their re-hydration. (O.M.)

  1. Development of ODS ferritic-martensitic steels for application to high temperature and irradiation environment; Developpement d'une nouvelle nuance martensitique ODS pour utilisation sous rayonnement a haute temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lambard, V

    2000-07-01

    Iron oxide dispersion strengthened alloys are candidate for nuclear fuel cladding. Therefore, it is crucial to control their microstructure in order to optimise their mechanical properties at temperatures up to 700 deg C. The industrial candidates, ODS ferritic alloys, present an anisotropic microstructure which induces a weakening of mechanical properties in transversal direction as well as the precipitation of brittle phases under thermal aging and irradiation. For this purpose, we tried to develop a material with isotropic properties. We studied several 9Cr-1Mo ferritic/martensitic alloys, strengthened or not by oxide dispersion. The mechanical alloying was performed by attribution and powders were consolidated by hot extrusion. In this work, different metallurgical characterisation techniques and modelling were used to optimise a new martensitic ODS alloy. Microstructural and chemical characterization of matrix has been done. The effect of austenitizing and isochronal tempering treatments on microstructure and hardness has been studied. Oxide distribution, size and chemical composition have been studied before and after high temperature thermal treatment. The study of phase transformation upon heating has permitted the extrapolation to the equilibrium temperature formation of austenite. Phase transformation diagrams upon cooling have been determined and the transformation kinetics have been linked to austenite grain size by a simple relation. Fine grain size is unfavourable for the targeted application, so a particular thermal treatment inducing a coarser grain structure has been developed. Finally, tensile properties have been determined for the different microstructures. (author)

  2. Effect of ion irradiation on dielectric and mechanical characteristics of ErFeO{sub 3} single crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhat, Monita [Crystal Growth and Materials Research Laboratory, Department of Physics and Electronics, University of Jammu, Jammu 180006 (India); Kaur, Balwinder [Crystal Growth and Materials Research Laboratory, Department of Physics and Electronics, University of Jammu, Jammu 180006 (India); Kumar, Ravi [Nuclear Science Centre, New Delhi 110067 (India); Bamzai, K.K. [Crystal Growth and Materials Research Laboratory, Department of Physics and Electronics, University of Jammu, Jammu 180006 (India); Kotru, P.N. [Crystal Growth and Materials Research Laboratory, Department of Physics and Electronics, University of Jammu, Jammu 180006 (India)]. E-mail: pn_kotru@yahoo.com; Wanklyn, B.M. [Department of Physics, Clarendon Laboratory, Oxford University, Oxford OX1 3 PU (United Kingdom)

    2005-07-01

    Results of 50 MeV lithium ion irradiation on mechanical and dielectric behaviour of flux grown erbium orthoferrite crystals are reported. It is shown that indentation induced Vicker's hardness number decreases on irradiation whereas the length of crack induced on indentation increases. Other mechanical parameters including fracture toughness, brittleness index and yield strength are calculated for un-irradiated and irradiated crystals. The change in the values of dielectric constant, dielectric loss and conductivity with temperature and frequency of the applied a.c. field in the range of 1 kHz-10 MHz after irradiation is reported. The dielectric constant versus temperature shows relaxor type of behaviour, irrespective of whether the sample is exposed to ion irradiation or not.

  3. Effects of pre-irradiation annealing at high temperature on optical absorption and electron paramagnetic resonance of natural pumpellyite mineral

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Javier-Ccallata, Henry, E-mail: henrysjc@gmail.com [Escuela de Ingeniería Electrónica y Telecomunicaciones, Universidad Alas Peruanas Filial Arequipa, Urb. D. A. Carrión G-14, J. L. Bustamante y Rivero, Arequipa (Peru); Laboratório de Sistemas Nanoestruturados, Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Florianópolis, Santa Catarina (Brazil); Filho, Luiz Tomaz [Departamento de Física Nuclear, Instituto de Física, Universidade de São Paulo, Rua do Matão, travessa R, 187, CEP 05508-900 São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Faculdade de Tecnologia e Ciências Exatas, Universidade São Judas Tadeu, Rua Taquari 546, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Sartorelli, Maria L. [Laboratório de Sistemas Nanoestruturados, Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Florianópolis, Santa Catarina (Brazil); Watanabe, Shigueo [Departamento de Física Nuclear, Instituto de Física, Universidade de São Paulo, Rua do Matão, travessa R, 187, CEP 05508-900 São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2013-09-15

    Highlights: •Natural pumpellyite mineral presents superposition bands around 900 and 1060 nm due Fe{sup 2+}and Fe{sup 3+}. •High temperature annealing influences the EPR and OA spectra. •The behavior of EPR line for 800 and 900 °C can be attributed to forbidden dd transitions due the Fe{sup 3+}. -- Abstract: Natural silicate mineral of pumpellyite, Ca{sub 2}MgAl{sub 2}(SiO{sub 4})(Si{sub 2}O{sub 7})(OH){sub 2}·(H{sub 2}O), point group A2/m, has been studied concerning high temperature annealing and γ-radiation effects on Optical Absorption (OA) and Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) properties. Chemical analysis revealed that besides Si, Al, Ca and Mg, other oxides i.e., Fe, Mn, Na, K, Ti and P are present in the structure as impurities. OA measurements of natural and annealed pumpellyite revealed several bands in the visible region due to spin forbidden transitions of Fe{sup 2+} and Fe{sup 3+}. The behaviour of bands around 900 and 1060 nm, with pre-annealing and γ radiation dose, indicating a transition Fe{sup 2+} → e{sup −} + Fe{sup 3+}. On the other hand, EPR measurements reveal six lines of Mn{sup 2+}, and satellites due to hyperfine interaction, superimposed on the signal of Fe{sup 3+} around of g = 2. For heat treatment from 800 °C the signal grows significantly and for 900 °C a strong signal of Fe{sup 3+} hides all Mn{sup 2+} lines. The strong growth of this signal indicates that the transitions are due to Fe{sup 3+} dipole–dipole interactions.

  4. ESR identification of gamma-irradiated albendazole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çolak, Seyda

    2010-01-01

    The use of ionizing radiation for sterilization of pharmaceuticals is a well-established technology. In the present work, the spectroscopic and kinetic features of the radicals induced in gamma-irradiated solid albendazole samples is investigated at different temperatures in the dose range of 3-34 kGy by electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy. Irradiation with gamma radiation produced two different radical species in albendazole. They were fairly stable at room temperature but relatively unstable above room temperature, giving rise to an unresolved ESR spectrum consisting of three resonance peaks centered at g=2.0057. Decay activation energies of the contributing radical species were calculated to be 47.8 (±13.5) and 50.5 (±9.7) kJ/mol using the signal intensity decay data derived from annealing studies performed at high temperatures. A linear function of the applied dose was found to best describe the experimental dose-response data. Albendazole does not present the characteristics of good dosimetric materials. However, the discrimination of irradiated albendazole from its unirradiated form was possible even 6 months after storage in normal conditions. Based on these findings, it is concluded that albendazole and albendazole-containing drugs can be safely sterilized by gamma radiation and that ESR spectroscopy could be successfully used as a potential technique for monitoring their radiosterilization.

  5. Status of the NGNP graphite creep experiments AGC-1 and AGC-2 irradiated in the advanced test reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. Blaine Grover

    2014-05-01

    The United States Department of Energy's Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Program will be irradiating six nuclear graphite creep experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The graphite experiments will be irradiated over the next six to eight years to support development of a graphite irradiation performance data base on the new nuclear grade graphites now available for use in high temperature gas reactors. The goals of the irradiation experiments are to obtain irradiation performance data, including irradiation creep, at different temperatures and loading conditions to support design of the next generation nuclear plant (NGNP) very high temperature gas reactor, as well as other future gas reactors. The experiments will each consist of a single capsule that will contain six peripheral stacks of graphite specimens, with half of the graphite specimens in each stack under a compressive load, while the other half of the specimens will not be subjected to a compressive load during irradiation. The six peripheral stacks will have three different compressive loads applied to the top half of three diametrically opposite pairs of specimen stacks, while a seventh stack will not have a compressive load. The specimens will be irradiated in an inert sweep gas atmosphere with on-line temperature and compressive load monitoring and control. There will also be sampling the sweep gas effluent to determine if any oxidation or off-gassing of the specimens occurs during irradiation of the experiment.

  6. Status of Post Irradiation Examination of FCAB and FCAT Irradiation Capsules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Field, Kevin G. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Fuel Cycle Research and Development (FCRD); Yamamoto, Yukinori [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Fuel Cycle Research and Development (FCRD); Howard, Richard H. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Fuel Cycle Research and Development (FCRD)

    2016-09-29

    A series of irradiation programs are ongoing to address the need for determining the radiation tolerance of FeCrAl alloys. These irradiation programs, deemed the FCAT and FCAB irradiation programs, use the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) to irradiate second generation wrought FeCrAl alloys and early-generation powder-metallurgy (PM) oxide dispersion-strengthened (ODS) FeCrAl alloys. Irradiations have been or are being performed at temperatures of 200°C, 330°C, and 550°C from doses of 1.8 dpa up to 16 dpa. Preliminary post-irradiation examination (PIE) on low dose (<2 dpa) irradiation capsules of tensile specimens has been performed. Analysis of co-irradiated SiC thermometry have shown reasonable matching between the nominal irradiation temperatures and the target irradiation temperatures. Room temperature tensile tests have shown typical radiation-induced hardening and embrittlement at irradiations of 200°C and 330°C, but a propensity for softening when irradiated to 550°C for the wrought alloys. The PM-ODS FeCrAl specimens showed less hardening compared to the wrought alloys. Future PIE includes high temperature tensile tests on the low dose irradiation capsules as well as the determination of reference fracture toughness transition temperature, To, in alloys irradiated to 7 dpa and higher.

  7. Effect of the temperature, pH and irradiance on the photosynthetic activity by Scenedesmus obtusiusculus under nitrogen replete and deplete conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabello, Juan; Toledo-Cervantes, Alma; Sánchez, León; Revah, Sergio; Morales, Marcia

    2015-04-01

    This paper evaluates the effect of the irradiance, pH and temperature on the photosynthetic activity (PA) of Scenedesmus obtusiusculus under N-replete and N-deplete conditions through oxygen measurements. The highest PA values were 160 mgO2 gb(-1) h(-1) at 620 μmol m(-2) s(-1), 35 °C and pH of 8 under N-replete conditions and 3.3 mgO2 gb(-1) h(-1) at 100 μmol m(-2) s(-1), 28.5 °C and pH of 5.5 for N-deplete conditions. Those operation conditions were tested in a flat-panel photobioreactor. The biomass productivity was 0.97 gb L(-1) d(-1) under N-replete conditions with a photosynthetic efficiency (PE) of 4.4% yielding 0.85 gb mol photon(-1). Similar biomass productivity was obtained under N-deplete condition; and the lipid productivity was 0.34 gL L(-1) d(-1) with a PE of 7.8% yielding 0.39 gL mol photon(-1). The apparent activation and deactivation energies were 16.1 and 30 kcal mol(-1), and 11.9 and 15.3 kcal mol(-1), for N-replete and N-deplete conditions, respectively. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. A master curve-mechanism based approach to modeling the effects of constraint, loading rate and irradiation on the toughness-temperature behavior of a V-4Cr-4Ti alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Odette, G.R.; Donahue, E.; Lucas, G.E.; Sheckherd, J.W. [Univ. of California, Santa Barbara, CA (United States)

    1996-10-01

    The influence of loading rate and constraint on the effective fracture toughness as a function of temperature [K{sub e}(T)] of the fusion program heat of V-4Cr-4Ti was measured using subsized, three point bend specimens. The constitutive behavior was characterized as a function of temperature and strain rate using small tensile specimens. Data in the literature on this alloy was also analysed to determine the effect of irradiation on K{sub e}(T) and the energy temperature (E-T) curves measured in subsized Charpy V-notch tests. It was found that V-4Cr-4Ti undergoes {open_quotes}normal{close_quotes} stress-controlled cleavage fracture below a temperature marking a sharp ductile-to-brittle transition. The transition temperature is increased by higher loading rates, irradiation hardening and triaxial constraint. Shifts in a reference transition temperature due to higher loading rates and irradiation can be reasonably predicted by a simple equivalent yield stress model. These results also suggest that size and geometry effects, which mediate constraint, can be modeled by combining local critical stressed area {sigma}*/A* fracture criteria with finite element method simulations of crack tip stress fields. The fundamental understanding reflected in these models will be needed to develop K{sub e}(T) curves for a range of loading rates, irradiation conditions, structural size scales and geometries relying (in large part) on small specimen tests. Indeed, it may be possible to develop a master K{sub e}(T) curve-shift method to account for these variables. Such reliable and flexible failure assessment methods are critical to the design and safe operation of defect tolerant vanadium structures.

  9. Influence of Temperature of Applying Glue, Glue Dosage and Feed Rate on Peel Strength of Edge Band from Curved Edge Part

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyu, Jianhua; Jiang, Li; Chen, Ming

    2017-12-01

    The peel strength of polyvinyl chloride (PVC) edge band on curved edge part was tested by using experimental method which was conducted to define the influence of many factors, including temperature of applying glue, glue dosage and feed rate on peel strength of edge band from curved edge part. The results showed that the temperature of applying glue, glue dosage and feed rate have a great effect on the peel strength of PVC edge band. The obtained optimum technical parameters were respectively as follow: temperature of applying glue was 140~150°C, glue dosage was 363~379g/m2 and feed rate was 13~15m/min.

  10. Identification of a gamma-irradiated ingredient (garlic powder) in Korean barbeque sauce by thermoluminescence analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Jae-Jun; Akram, Kashif; Lee, Jeongeun; Kim, Kyong-Su; Kwon, Joong-Ho

    2012-04-01

    Thermoluminescence (TL) analysis was applied to identify gamma-irradiated garlic powder in Korean barbeque sauce before and after pasteurization (85 °C, 30 min), when blended in different ratios (1%, 3%, and 5%). The sauce sample with nonirradiated garlic powder gave a background glow curve. However, the sample blended with irradiated ingredient (1 and 10 kGy) showed typical TL glow curves at temperatures of 150 to 200 °C. The identification properties of sauce samples were more influenced by blending ratios than by irradiation doses, showing that 3% and 5% added samples produced glow curves at 150 to 250 °C. After pasteurization of the samples containing the irradiated ingredient, TL glow intensity decreased but did not change its shape or temperature range. As a result, the pasteurization of Barbeque sauces containing irradiated ingredients had reduced TL glow intensity, but the shape and temperature range of glow curve were still able to provide information required for confirming irradiation treatment. To monitor the irradiated food in international market, thermoluminescence (TL) analysis is considered most promising identification technique because of its sensitivity and long-term stability. In this study the applicability of TL analysis to detect an irradiated ingredient (garlic powder) added in low quantity to a food matrix (sauce) was investigated. The effect of processing (pasteurization) on TL results was also evaluated. © 2012 Institute of Food Technologists®

  11. PRELIMINARY RESULTS OF THE AGC-4 IRRADIATION IN THE ADVANCED TEST REACTOR AND DESIGN OF AGC-5 (HTR16-18469)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davenport, Michael; Petti, D. A.

    2016-11-01

    The United States Department of Energy’s Advanced Reactor Technologies (ART) Program will irradiate up to six nuclear graphite creep experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The graphite experiments are being irradiated over an approximate eight year period to support development of a graphite irradiation performance data base on the new nuclear grade graphites now available for use in high temperature gas reactors. The goals of the irradiation experiments are to obtain irradiation performance data, including irradiation creep, at different temperatures and loading conditions to support design of the Very High Temperature Gas Reactor (VHTR), as well as other future gas reactors. The experiments each consist of a single capsule that contain six stacks of graphite specimens, with half of the graphite specimens in each stack under a compressive load, while the other half of the specimens are not be subjected to a compressive load during irradiation. The six stacks have differing compressive loads applied to the top half of diametrically opposite pairs of specimen stacks. A seventh specimen stack in the center of the capsule does not have a compressive load. The specimens are being irradiated in an inert sweep gas atmosphere with on-line temperature and compressive load monitoring and control. There are also samples taken of the sweep gas effluent to measure any oxidation or off-gassing of the specimens that may occur during initial start-up of the experiment. The first experiment, AGC-1, started its irradiation in September 2009, and the irradiation was completed in January 2011. The second experiment, AGC-2, started its irradiation in April 2011 and completed its irradiation in May 2012. The third experiment, AGC-3, started its irradiation in late November 2012 and completed in the April of 2014. AGC-4 is currently being irradiated in the ATR. This paper will briefly discuss the preliminary irradiation results

  12. Effects of ion beam irradiation on semiconductor devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nashiyama, Isamu; Hirao, Toshio; Itoh, Hisayoshi; Ohshima, Takeshi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Takasaki, Gunma (Japan). Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment

    1997-03-01

    Energetic heavy-ion irradiation apparatus has been developed for single-event effects (SEE) testing. We have applied three irradiation methods such as a scattered-ion irradiation method, a recoiled-atom irradiation method, and a direct-beam irradiation method to perform SEE testing efficiently. (author)

  13. Effects of salinity and temperature on inactivation and repair potential of Enterococcus faecalis following medium- and low-pressure ultraviolet irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, P-Y; Chu, X-N; Liu, L; Hu, J-Y

    2016-03-01

    To investigate the medium-pressure (MP) and low-pressure (LP) Ultraviolet (UV) susceptibility and the repair potential of Enterococcus faecalis (DSM 20478) after UV treatment. A range of UV doses from 4 to 19 mJ cm(-2) was selected in this study. Photoreactivation and dark repair performance were investigated under fluorescent light or in the dark respectively. The inactivation and repair performance of UV disinfection under a range of salinities (0, 1%, 3%) and temperature (4 and 25°C) were compared. Results indicated that MP UV exposure resulted in higher inactivation efficiency against Ent. faecalis than LP UV exposure. For repair potential, LP UV resulted in a greater level of light repair than MP UV. Effect of salinity on the inactivation and repair of Ent. faecalis was correlated with UV sources, whereas low temperature generally adversely affected the inactivation efficiency and final repair levels after both MP and LP UV exposure. Both salinity and temperature demonstrated to play an important role in the inactivation and repair capability when UV light was used to treat ballast water. Considering that UV-treated ballast water is exposed or discharged to marine water environment in many countries with various temperature and salinity conditions, results of this study provide significant implications for the management of public health associated with ballast water treatment and discharge. © 2015 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  14. Study of a Combined Power and Ejector Refrigeration Cycle with Low-temperature Heat Sources by Applying Various Working Fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafarmadar, S.; Habibzadeh, A.

    2017-08-01

    A power and cooling cycle which combines the organic Rankine cycle and the ejector refrigeration cycle supplied by waste heat energy sources is discussed in this paper. Thirteen working fluids including one wet, eight dry and four isentropic fluids are studied in order to find their performances on the combined cycle. First and second law analysis has been performed by using a computer program in order to investigate various operating conditions’ effects on the proposed cycle by fixing power/refrigeration ratio and varying waste heat source and evaporator temperature. According to the results, in general, dry and isentropic ORC fluids have better performance compared with wet fluids. The increase in evaporator temperature leads to the decrease in exergy efficiency. On the other hand, exergy efficiency rises with the turbine inlet temperature decrease and an increase of heat source temperature. Rising expansion ratio and inlet temperature of the turbine causes an increase in the thermal efficiency of the cycle.

  15. Chemical coloring on stainless steel by ultrasonic irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Zuohui; Xue, Yongqiang; Ju, Hongbin

    2018-01-01

    To solve the problems of high temperature and non-uniformity of coloring on stainless steel, a new chemical coloring process, applying ultrasonic irradiation to the traditional chemical coloring process, was developed in this paper. The effects of ultrasonic frequency and power density (sound intensity) on chemical coloring on stainless steel were studied. The uniformity of morphology and colors was observed with the help of polarizing microscope and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and the surface compositions were characterized by X-ray photoelectric spectroscopy (XPS), meanwhile, the wear resistance and the corrosion resistance were investigated, and the effect mechanism of ultrasonic irradiation on chemical coloring was discussed. These results show that in the process of chemical coloring on stainless steel by ultrasonic irradiation, the film composition is the same as the traditional chemical coloring, and this method can significantly enhance the uniformity, the wear and corrosion resistances of the color film and accelerate the coloring rate which makes the coloring temperature reduced to 40°C. The effects of ultrasonic irradiation on the chemical coloring can be attributed to the coloring rate accelerated and the coloring temperature reduced by thermal-effect, the uniformity of coloring film improved by dispersion-effect, and the wear and corrosion resistances of coloring film enhanced by cavitation-effect. Ultrasonic irradiation not only has an extensive application prospect for chemical coloring on stainless steel but also provides an valuable reference for other chemical coloring. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Effect of applied voltage, duration and repetition frequency of RF pulses for pain relief on temperature spikes and electrical field: a computer modelling study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewertowska, Elżbieta; Mercadal, Borja; Muñoz, Víctor; Ivorra, Antoni; Trujillo, Macarena; Berjano, Enrique

    2018-02-01

    The thermal and electrical effects of pulsed radiofrequency (PRF) for pain relief can be controlled by modifying the characteristics of the RF pulses applied. Our goal was to evaluate the influence of such modifications on the thermal and electric performance in tissue. A computational model was developed to compare the temperature and electric field time courses in tissue between a standard clinical protocol (45 V pulses, 20 ms duration, 2 Hz repetition frequency) and a new protocol (55 V pulses, 5 ms duration, 5 Hz repetition frequency) with a higher applied electric field but a smaller impact on temperature alterations in tissue. The effect of including a temperature controller was assessed. Complementarily, an agar-based experimental model was developed to validate the methodology employed in the computer modelling. The new protocol increased the electric field magnitude reached in the tissue by around +20%, without increasing the temperature. The temperature controller was found to be the fundamental factor in avoiding thermal damage to the tissue and reduced the total number of pulses delivered by around 67%. The experimental results matched moderately well with those obtained from a computer model built especially to mimic the experimental conditions. For the same delivered energy, the new protocol significantly increases the magnitude of the applied electric field, which may be the reason why it is clinically more effective in achieving pain relief.

  17. International Developments of Food Irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loaharanu, P. [Head, Food Preservation Section, Joint FAO/IAEA Division of Nuclear Techniques in Food and Agriculture, Wagramerstr. 5, A-1400, Vienna (Austria)

    1997-12-31

    Food irradiation is increasingly accepted and applied in many countries in the past decade. Through its use, food losses and food-borne diseases can be reduced significantly, and wider trade in many food items can be facilitated. The past five decades have witnessed a positive evolution on food irradiation according to the following: 1940`s: discovery of principles of food irradiation; 1950`s: initiation of research in advanced countries; 1960`s: research and development were intensified in some advanced and developing countries; 1970`s: proof of wholesomeness of irradiated foods; 1980`s: establishment of national regulations; 1990`s: commercialization and international trade. (Author)

  18. Characteristics of Humidity-Temperature Changing in the Below-Grade Concrete Structure by Applying Waterproofing Materials on the Exterior Wall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang-Mook Chang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The water leakage in an underground space cannot easily be repaired owing to the characteristics of the underground space, which not only causes continuous inconvenience to the apartment residents but also facilitates condensation. Thus, the effects of different waterproofing methods in underground spaces on changes in temperature and humidity should be quantitatively studied to establish strong measures for the condensation issue. In this study, two types of specimens were produced separately by dividing the waterproofing materials applied to underground structures into exterior and interior waterproofing construction methods; thereafter, changes in the temperature and humidity inside the specimens were observed. The test results of the evaluation regarding condensation in underground structures indicated that when exterior waterproofing materials are applied, thermal insulation maintains a steady interior temperature and keeps the humidity at an appropriate level, thereby preventing the creation of an environment conducive to the occurrence of condensation.

  19. Estimating the approximate firing temperature of burnt archaeological sediments through an unmixing algorithm applied to hysteresis data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linford, N.; Platzman, E.

    2004-11-01

    Estimating the temperature to which burnt archaeological sediments and soils have been exposed in antiquity is of interest as it may well elucidate the interpretation of specific features. Certain semi-industrial activities, such as metal working or the production of pottery, are often associated with the controlled use of intense high-temperature processes (>500 °C). Exposure to such high-temperatures will, inevitably, lead to the thermal alteration of commonly found iron minerals within the soil. Magnetic measurements made on a series of soil samples subjected to controlled laboratory heating, confirms both the sensitivity of iron minerals to thermal alteration and also suggests a correlation between the maximum exposure temperature and the hysteresis properties. From this data a method for estimating the maximum exposure temperature of burnt archaeological samples, recovered from similar soil types is proposed, based on the application of a linear unmixing model. This model compares hysteresis data from the archaeological samples to an end-member data set created from the laboratory heated soil. The maximum exposure temperature for the archaeological samples is estimated from the relative proportion of known temperature end-members present within the final model describing the experimental hysteresis data. The validity of the model is demonstrated through application to samples recovered from a series of actualistic fire experiments and a range of burnt archaeological features recovered during excavation of a multi-period site at Yarnton, near the city of Oxford, UK. A further application of the method, to determine the fidelity of samples collected for archaeomagnetic dating, is presented from the excavation of a large hearth type features at Whitby, North Yorkshire, UK.

  20. Status of irradiation technology development in JMTR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inaba, Y.; Inoue, S.; Izumo, H.; Kitagishi, S.; Tsuchiya, K.; Saito, T.; Ishitsuka, E. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), Ibaraki (Japan)

    2008-11-15

    Irradiation Engineering Section of the Neutron Irradiation and Testing Reactor Centre was organised to development the new irradiation technology for the application at JMTR re-operation. The new irradiation engineering building was remoulded from the old RI development building, and was started to use from the end of September, 2008. Advanced in-situ instrumentation technology(high temperature multi-paired thermocouple, ceramic sensor,application of optical measurement), {sup 99}Mo production technology by new Mo solution irradiation method,recycling technology on used beryllium reflector, and so on are planned as the development of new irradiation technologies. The development will be also important for the education and training programs through the development of young generation in not only Japan but also Asian countries. In this report, as the status of the development the new irradiation technology, new irradiation engineering building, high temperature multi-paired thermocouple, experiences of optical measurement, recycling technology on used beryllium reflector are introduced.

  1. Status of Irradiation technology development in JMTR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inaba, Y.; Inoue, S.; Izumo, H.; Kitagishi, S.; Tsuchiya, K.; Saito, T.; Ishitsuka, E. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Ibaraki Ken (Japan)

    2008-11-15

    Irradiation Engineering Section of the Neutron Irradiation and Testing Reactor Center was organized to development the new irradiation technology for the application at JMTR re operation. The new irradiation engineering building was remodeled from the old RI development building, and was started to use from the end of September, 2008. Advanced in situ instrumentation technology (high temperature multi paired thermocouple, ceramic sensor, application of optical measurement), {sup 99M}o production technology by new Mo solution irradiation method, recycling technology on used beryllium reflector, and so on are planned as the development of new irradiation technologies. The development will be also important for the education and training programs through the development of young generation in not only Japan but also Asian counties. In this report, as the status of the development the new irradiation technology, new irradiation engineering building, high temperature multi paired thermocouple, experiences of optical measurement, recycling technology on used beryllium reflector are introduced.

  2. The effect of temperature on the biology of Phytoseiulus macropilis (Banks (Phytoseiidae in applied biological control program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catiane Dameda

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Phytoseiulus macropilis (Banks (Phytoseiidae is a natural enemy of Tetranychus urticae Koch (TSSM, a common pest in several cultures, especially in greenhouses. This research aimed to know the biological parameters of a strain of P. macropilis from Vale do Taquari, State of Rio Grande do Sul, feeding on TSSM at different temperatures. The study was initiated with 30 eggs individualized in arenas under the temperature of 20, 25 and 30 ± 1°C and relative humidity of 80 ± 10%. The average length (T of each generation decreased with the increase of temperature, ranging from 25.71 days at 20°C to 11.14 days at 30°C. The net reproductive rate (Ro ranged from 45.47 at 20°C to 18.25 at 30°C; the innate capacity for increase (rm was 0.15 at 20°C, reaching 0.26 at 30°C and the finite increase rate (λ ranged from 1.41 to 1.82 females day-1 at 20 and 30°C, respectively. In the present study, it was observed that the strain of the evaluated predatory mite from mild climate of South Brazil, might present a good performance to control TSSM when exposed to a temperature range between 20 and 30°C.

  3. High-temperature and melting behaviour of nanocrystalline refractory compounds: an experimental approach applied to thorium dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cappia, F.; Hudry, D.; Courtois, E.; Janßen, A.; Luzzi, L.; Konings, R. J. M.; Manara, D.

    2014-04-01

    The behaviour from 1500 K up to melting of nanocrystalline (nc) thorium dioxide, the refractory binary oxide with the highest melting point (3651 K), was explored here for the first time using fast laser heating, multi-wavelength pyrometry and Raman spectroscopy for the analysis of samples quenched to room temperature. Nc-ThO2 was melted at temperatures hundreds of K below the melting temperature assessed for bulk thorium dioxide. A particular behaviour has been observed in the formed liquid and its co-existence with a partially restructured solid, possibly due to the metastable nature of the liquid itself. Raman spectroscopy was used to characterize the thermal-induced structural evolution of nc-ThO2. Assessment of a semi-empirical relation between the Raman active T2g mode peak characteristics (peak width and frequency) and crystallites size provided a powerful, fast and non-destructive tool to determine local crystallites growth within the nc-ThO2 samples before and after melting. This semi-quantitative analysis, partly based on a phonon-confinement model, constitutes an advantageous, more flexible, complementary approach to electron microscopy and powder x-ray diffraction (PXRD) for the crystallite size determination. The adopted experimental approach (laser heating coupled with Raman spectroscopy) is therefore proven to be a promising methodology for the high temperature investigation of nanostructured refractory oxides.

  4. The Birmingham Irradiation Facility

    CERN Document Server

    Dervan, P; Hodgson, P; Marin-Reyes, H; Wilson, J

    2013-01-01

    At the end of 2012 the proton irradiation facility at the CERN PS [1] will shut down for two years. With this in mind, we have been developing a new ATLAS scanning facility at the University of Birmingham Medical Physics cyclotron. With proton beams of energy approximately 30 MeV, fluences corresponding to those of the upgraded Large Hadron Collider (HL-LHC) can be reached conveniently. The facility can be used to irradiate silicon sensors, optical components and mechanical structures (e.g. carbon fibre sandwiches) for the LHC upgrade programme. Irradiations of silicon sensors can be carried out in a temperature controlled cold box that can be scanned through the beam. The facility is described in detail along with the first tests carried out with mini (1 x 1 cm^2 ) silicon sensors.

  5. EPR investigation of some traditional oriental irradiated spices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duliu, Octavian G. [University of Bucharest, Department of Atomic and Nuclear Physics, Magurele, C.P. MG-11, RO-077125 Bucharest (Romania)]. E-mail: duliu@pcnet.ro; Georgescu, Rodica [National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering -Horia Hulubei, C.P. MG-6, RO-077125 Bucharest (Romania); Ali, Shaban Ibrahim [University of Bucharest, Department of Atomic and Nuclear Physics, Magurele, C.P. MG-11, RO-077125 Bucharest (Romania)

    2007-06-15

    The 9.50 GHz electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectra of unirradiated and {sup 60}Co {gamma}-ray irradiated cardamom (Elettaria cardamomum L. Maton, Zingiberaceae), ginger ((Zingiber officinale Rosc., Zingiberaceae), and saffron (Crocus sativus L., Iridaceae) have been investigated at room temperature. All unirradiated spices presented a weak resonance line with g-factors around free-electron ones. After {gamma}-ray irradiation at an absorbed dose of up to 11.3 kGy, the presence of EPR spectra whose amplitude increase monotonously with the absorbed dose has been noticed with all spices. A 100 {sup o}C isothermal annealing of 11.3 kGy irradiated samples has shown a differential reduction of amplitude of various components that compose initial spectra, but even after 3.6 h of thermal treatment, the remaining amplitude represents no less then 30% of the initial ones. The same peculiarities have been noticed after 83 days storage at room temperature but after 340 days storage at ambient conditions only irradiated ginger displays a weak signal that differs from those of unirradiated sample. All these factors could be taken into account in establishing at which extent the EPR is suitable to evidence any irradiation treatment applied to these spices.

  6. EPR investigation of some traditional oriental irradiated spices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duliu, Octavian G.; Georgescu, Rodica; Ali, Shaban Ibrahim

    2007-06-01

    The 9.50 GHz electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectra of unirradiated and 60Co γ-ray irradiated cardamom ( Elettaria cardamomum L. Maton, Zingiberaceae), ginger (( Zingiber officinale Rosc., Zingiberaceae), and saffron ( Crocus sativus L., Iridaceae) have been investigated at room temperature. All unirradiated spices presented a weak resonance line with g-factors around free-electron ones. After γ-ray irradiation at an absorbed dose of up to 11.3 kGy, the presence of EPR spectra whose amplitude increase monotonously with the absorbed dose has been noticed with all spices. A 100 °C isothermal annealing of 11.3 kGy irradiated samples has shown a differential reduction of amplitude of various components that compose initial spectra, but even after 3.6 h of thermal treatment, the remaining amplitude represents no less then 30% of the initial ones. The same peculiarities have been noticed after 83 days storage at room temperature but after 340 days storage at ambient conditions only irradiated ginger displays a weak signal that differs from those of unirradiated sample. All these factors could be taken into account in establishing at which extent the EPR is suitable to evidence any irradiation treatment applied to these spices.

  7. Temperature and upwelling / downwelling irradiance data from drifting buoy in the Southern Oceans as part of the Joint Global Ocean Flux Study/Southern Ocean (JGOFS/Southern Ocean) project, from 1994-12-25 to 1998-06-28 (NODC Accession 9900183)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature and upwelling / downwelling irradiance data were collected using drifting buoy in the Southern Oceans from December 25, 1994 to June 28, 1998. Data were...

  8. Experimental research on molten salt thermofluid technology using a high-temperature molten salt loop applied for a fusion reactor Flibe blanket

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toda, Saburo; Chiba, Shinya E-mail: schiba@karma.qse.tohoku.ac.jp; Yuki, Kazuhisa; Omae, Masahiro; Sagara, Akio

    2002-12-01

    Experimental research on molten salt thermofluid technology using a high-temperature molten salt loop (MSL) is described in this paper. The MSL was designed to be able to use Flibe as a coolant, however, a simulant, heat transfer salt (HTS) has to be used alternatively since Flibe is difficult to operate under avoiding a biohazard of Be. Experiment on heat-transfer enhancement, that is required for applying to cool the high heat flux components of fusion reactors, is ongoing. Preliminary experimental results showed that an internal structure of a mixing chamber in the MSL was important to obtain accurate bulk temperatures under severe thermal conditions. For operating the loop, careful handling are needed to proceed how to melt the salt and to circulate it in starting the operation of the MSL. It is concluded that several improvements proposed from the present experiences should be applied for the future Flibe operation.

  9. Room temperature observation of photocurrent dependence on applied bias in Si{sub 1-x}Ge{sub x}/Si multiquantum wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chowdhury, A.A.; Rashed, M.M.; Maziar, C.M. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States)] [and others

    1993-07-01

    We report the observation of the dependence of photocurrent on applied bias in Si{sub 1-x}Ge{sub x}/Si multiquantum wells at room temperature. The photocurrents were measured on reverse biased p-i-n diodes containing an intrinsic region comprised of Si{sub 1-x}Ge{sub x}/Si multiquantum wells. These Si{sub 1-x}Ge{sub x}/Si multiquantum. wells were grown by the remote plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition method. Using the technique employed by Park et al. to analyze similar experimental observations at lower temperature (77 K), we have estimated the absorption edges from the photocurrents and showed a large transition energy shift under electric field. The observed shape of the absorption coefficient as a function of the photon energy differs from that observed previously at lower temperature. 21 refs., 5 figs.

  10. Fuzzy logic based temperature control applying programmable controllers; Controle de temperatura baseado em logica nebulosa utilizando controladores programaveis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amaral, Jose Franco Machado do [Universidade do Estado, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Amaral, Jorge Luis Machado do [Amsys Eletronica e Sistemas Ltda, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    1998-07-01

    This work presents an example of an application that uses fuzzy logic and general purpose programmable logic controllers (PLCs) to implement the control of temperature. A high level (linguistic) model for the system is shown and the control strategy is expressed in a set of IF-THEN rules. A program for a micro-PLC implements the control logic based on the rules. Experimental data are shown and demonstrates that is possible to implement fuzzy logic control techniques in low cost micro-PLCs with good results. (author)

  11. Irradiation subassembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seim, O.S.; Filewicz, E.C.; Hutter, E.

    1973-10-23

    An irradiation subassembly for use in a nuclear reactor is described which includes a bundle of slender elongated irradiation -capsules or fuel elements enclosed by a coolant tube and having yieldable retaining liner between the irradiation capsules and the coolant tube. For a hexagonal bundle surrounded by a hexagonal tube the yieldable retaining liner may consist either of six segments corresponding to the six sides of the tube or three angular segments each corresponding in two adjacent sides of the tube. The sides of adjacent segments abut and are so cut that metal-tometal contact is retained when the volume enclosed by the retaining liner is varied and Springs are provided for urging the segments toward the center of the tube to hold the capsules in a closely packed configuration. (Official Gazette)

  12. Copper Aluminum Nano Junction Normal Temperature Processes and Methods Applied to the LED High Heat Transfer Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Wen Wang

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available High-power light-emitting diodes (LED have extremely broad applications. However, with the job requirements of high-brightness and high color temperature from light-emitting diodes, it must be followed to enlarge the operating current, thus heating up more rapidly. If its heat dissipation problem cannot be effectively solved, operation will be prone to bring about color shift, and it may even considerably shorten its life. Moreover, application value will therefore be greatly reduced. So in order to enhance the high-power LED luminous brightness and life to cope with the future development needs of high-power LED components, it is necessary to replace the use of conductive silver paste to stick thermally conductive Cu slug fixing grain and lead frame heat dissipation aluminum sheet. This is done by directly bonding thermally conductive Cu slug with pure aluminum, the formation of highly efficient direct heat conduction cooling structure. Therefore the topic points at the crux of the LED heat dissipation difficulty, puts forward of copper and aluminum bonding technology in the ordinary temperature and pressure, method to effectively improve thermal conductivity performance between LED die bond Cu slug and joining aluminum cooling module. This will ultimately make the LED's operation and applications perfect.

  13. Effects of high temperatures on UV-B/visible irradiation induced postharvest anthocyanin accumulation in ‘Yunhongli No. 1’ (Pyrus pyrifolia Nakai) pears

    Science.gov (United States)

    Red Chinese sand pears (Pyrus pyrifolia Nakai) have seen increased cultivation in China in recent years, prized for their attractive market value and nutritional benefits. However, poor fruit coloration has been a noticeable problem. Postharvest ultraviolet-B (UV-B)/visible irradiation has been used...

  14. Characteristics of radiation porosity and structural phase state of reactor austenitic 07C-16Cr-19Ni-2Mo-2Mn-Ti-Si-V-P-B Steel after neutron irradiation at a temperature of 440-600°C to damaging doses of 36-94 dpa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portnykh, I. A.; Panchenko, V. L.

    2016-06-01

    The phase composition and the characteristics of vacancy voids in cold-worked steel 07C-16Cr-19Ni-2Mo-2Mn-Ti-Si-V-P-B (CW EK164-ID) after neutron irradiation at damaging doses of 36-94 dpa and temperatures of 440-600°C are investigated. In the entire range of damaging doses and temperatures, voids with different sizes are observed in the material. The maximum void size increases with irradiation temperature up to ~550°C, whereas their concentration decreases. At higher irradiation temperatures, almost no coarse voids are observed. The concentration of fine voids (to 10 nm in size) sharply increases with temperature from 440 to 480°C. Further increases in the temperature do not result in the noticeable concentration growth. In the irradiation temperature range of 440-515°C, second phases precipitate ( G phase, γ' phase, and complex fcc carbides). At higher irradiation temperatures, there are Laves-phase particles, fine second carbides of the MC type, and needle shape precipitates identified as phosphides in the material.

  15. Electrochemical Study of Ni20Cr Coatings Applied by HVOF Process in ZnCl2-KCl at High Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porcayo-Calderón, J.; Sotelo-Mazón, O.; Casales-Diaz, M.; Ascencio-Gutierrez, J. A.; Salinas-Bravo, V. M.; Martinez-Gomez, L.

    2014-01-01

    Corrosion behavior of Ni20Cr coatings deposited by HVOF (high velocity oxygen-fuel) process was evaluated in ZnCl2-KCl (1 : 1 mole ratio) molten salts. Electrochemical techniques employed were potentiodynamic polarization curves, open circuit potential, and linear polarization resistance (LPR) measurements. Experimental conditions included static air and temperatures of 350, 400, and 450°C. 304-type SS was evaluated in the same conditions as the Ni20Cr coatings and it was used as a reference material to assess the coatings corrosion resistance. Coatings were evaluated as-deposited and with a grinded surface finished condition. Results showed that Ni20Cr coatings have a better corrosion performance than 304-type SS. Analysis showed that Ni content of the coatings improved its corrosion resistance, and the low corrosion resistance of 304 stainless steel was attributed to the low stability of Fe and Cr and their oxides in the corrosive media used. PMID:25210645

  16. Electron acoustic wave propagation in a two-electron-temperature plasma layer applied to the problem of hypersonic vehicle communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotnikov, Vladimir; Rose, David

    2008-11-01

    Problem of electromagnetic wave propagation through a plasma sheath surrounding reentry vehicles and vehicles traveling at hypersonic velocities at high altitudes attracts the attention of many researchers. High plasma density inside a plasma sheath around a hypersonic vehicle prevents propagation of electromagnetic waves with the frequencies below the local plasma frequency. This results in RF frequency communication problems. One possibility to mitigate this problem is to induce a two-temperature electron distribution inside the plasma sheath. This allows electron acoustic waves (EAWs) with frequencies well below the local plasma frequency (fp ˜ 9 GHz) to propagate through a plasma layer, enabling communication. A small hot electron population is produced in the sheath by injection of an energetic electron beam in the sheath from the vehicle. Excitation, propagation, and attenuation of EAWs inside a plasma sheath in the presence of an electron beam has been investigated as well as efficiency of transformation of EAWs into electromagnetic waves on the sheath boundary.

  17. MSW oxy-enriched incineration technology applied in China: combustion temperature, flue gas loss and economic considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Zhe; Zhang, Shihong; Li, Xiangpeng; Shao, Jingai; Wang, Ke; Chen, Hanping

    2015-04-01

    To investigate the application prospect of MSW oxy-enriched incineration technology in China, the technical and economical analyses of a municipal solid waste (MSW) grate furnace with oxy-fuel incineration technology in comparison to co-incineration with coal are performed. The rated capacity of the grate furnace is 350 tonnes MSW per day. When raw MSW is burned, the amount of pure oxygen injected should be about 14.5 wt.% under 25% O2 oxy-fuel combustion conditions with the mode of oxygen supply determined by the actual situation. According to the isothermal combustion temperature (Ta), the combustion effect of 25% O2 oxy-enriched incineration (α = 1.43) is identical with that of MSW co-incineration with 20% mass ratio of coal (α = 1.91). However, the former is better than the latter in terms of plant cost, flue gas loss, and environmental impact. Despite the lower costs of MSW co-incineration with mass ratio of 5% and 10% coal (α = 1.91), 25% O2 oxy-enriched incineration (α = 1.43) is far more advantageous in combustion and pollutant control. Conventional combustion flue gas loss (q2) for co-incineration with 0% coal, 20% coal, 10% coal, 5% coal are around 17%, 13%, 14% and 15%, respectively, while that under the condition of 25% O2 oxy-enriched combustion is approximately 12% (α = 1.43). Clearly, q2 of oxy-enriched incineration is less than other methods under the same combustion conditions. High moisture content presents challenges for MSW incineration, therefore it is necessary to dry MSW prior to incineration, and making oxy-enriched incineration technology achieves higher combustion temperature and lower flue gas loss. In conclusion, based on technical and economical analysis, MSW oxy-enriched incineration retains obvious advantages and demonstrates great future prospects for MSW incineration in China. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. The High-Temperature Synthesis of the Nanoscaled White-Light Phosphors Applied in the White-Light LEDs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao-Ying Lu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The white-light phosphors consisting of Dy3+ doped YPO4 and Dy3+ doped YP1-XVXO4 were prepared by the chemical coprecipitation method. After the 1200°C thermal treatment in the air atmosphere, the white-light phosphors with particle sizes around 90 nm can be obtained. In order to reduce the average particle size of phosphors, the alkaline washing method was applied to the original synthesis process, which reduces the particle sizes to 65 nm. From the PLE spectra, four absorption peaks locating at 325, 352, 366, and 390 nm can be observed in the YPO4-based phosphors. These peaks appear due to the following electron transitions: 6H15/2→4K15/2, 6H15/2→4M15/2+6P7/2, 6H15/2→4I11/2, and 6H15/2→4M19/2. Besides, the emission peaks of wavelengths 484 nm and 576 nm can be observed in the PL spectra. In order to obtain the white-light phosphors, the vanadium ions were applied to substitute the phosphorus ions to compose the YP1-XVXO4 phosphors. From the PL spectra, the strongest PL intensity can be obtained with 30% vanadium ions. As the concentration of vanadium ions increases to 40%, the phosphors with the CIE coordinates locating at the white-light area can be obtained.

  19. Corrosion of non-irradiated UAl{sub x}-Al fuel in the presence of clay pore solution. A quantitative XRD secondary phase analysis applying the DDM method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neumann, Andreas [Halle-Wittenberg Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Mineralogy and Geochemistry; RWTH Aachen Univ. (Germany). Inst. of Crystallography; Klinkenberg, Martina; Curtius, Hildegard [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (Germany). Inst. of Energy and Climate Research, IEK-6 Nuclear Waste Management

    2017-04-01

    Corrosion experiments with non-irradiated metallic UAl{sub x}-Al research reactor fuel elements were carried out in autoclaves to identify and quantify the corrosion products. Such compounds, considering the long-term safety assessment of final repositories, can interact with the released inventory and this constitutes a sink for radionuclide migration in formation waters. Therefore, the metallic fuel sample was subjected to clay pore solution to investigate its process of disintegration by analyzing the resulting products and the remnants, i.e. the secondary phases. Due to the fast corrosion rate a full sample disintegration was observed within the experimental period of 1 year at 90 C. The obtained solids were subdivided into different grain size fractions and prepared for analysis. The elemental analysis of the suspension showed that, uranium and aluminum are concentrated in the solids, whereas iron was mainly dissolved. Non-ambient X-ray diffraction (XRD) combined with the derivative difference minimization (DDM) method was applied for the qualitative and quantitative phase analysis (QPA) of the secondary phases. Gypsum and hemihydrate (bassanite), residues of non-corroded nuclear fuel, hematite, and goethite were identified. The quantitative phase analysis showed that goethite is the major crystalline phase. The amorphous content exceeded 80 wt% and hosted the uranium. All other compounds were present to a minor content. The obtained results by XRD were well supported by complementary scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) analysis.

  20. Low temperature formation of ferroelectric PbTiO3 films by laser ablation with 2nd laser irradiation; Reiki hikari laser heiyo laser ablation ho ni yoru kyoyudentai PbTiO3 usumaku no teion keisei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tabata, H.; Kawai, T. [Osaka University, Osaka (Japan)

    1997-08-20

    The unique advantage of the pulsed laser deposition is its ability to produce highly oriented stoichiometric films at a low substrate temperature. Ferroelectric PbTiO3 thin films have been formed using 2nd laser assisted laser ablaion technique at low temperature, i.e., 350degC, on Sr7iO3 single-crystal substrates and Pt/MgO electrodes. The second laser irradiation at the substrate surface is quite effective for crystallization of the films at low substrate temperature below 400degC. The suitable energy density (fluence) of the irradiation laser is in the range of 30-100 mJ/cm{sup 2}. X-ray diffraction patterns of PbTiO3 thin films show c-axis orientation, with a rocking angle of 1.0 - 0.5deg. These films exhibit ferroelectric hysteresis loop. The dielectric constant and remanent polalyzation of the PbTiO3 films are in the range of 120-150 and 60-80 {mu}C/cm{sup 2}, respectively. 31 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Irradiation-induced hardening and softening of CLAM steel under Fe ion irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qingshan; Shen, Yinzhong; Huang, Xi; Xu, Zhiqiang; Zhu, Jun

    2017-11-01

    The irradiation-induced hardening and softening of CLAM steel irradiated with 3.5 MeV Fe13+ ions at temperatures of 300 °C and 550 °C were investigated by nanoindentation tests in combination with microstructures. Irradiation- induced hardening occurred in the steel irradiated at 300 °C to doses of 0.46 dpa, 0.94 dpa, and 2.79 dpa. The hardening occurred at 300 °C is mainly attributed to the formation of irradiation-produced dislocation loops and a network of tangled dislocations in the irradiated steel samples. Significant hardening was found in the steel irradiated at 550 °C to 0.38 dpa. On the contrary, irradiation-induced softening occurred in the steel irradiated at 550 °C to both 0.76 dpa and 2.75 dpa. Irradiation-produced dislocation loops are not dominant effect on the irradiation hardening of the steel samples irradiated at 550 °C. The hardening and softening of the irradiated steel were explained in terms of the irradiation-produced defects and recovery process occurred during the irradiation.

  2. Growth anisotropy effect of bulk high temperature superconductors on the levitation performance in the applied magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, J., E-mail: jzheng@swjtu.edu.cn; Liao, X.L.; Jing, H.L.; Deng, Z.G.; Yen, F.; Wang, S.Y.; Wang, J.S.

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: • The single-layer bulk HTSC with AGSBP obtains better levitation performance than that of MGSBP. • The double-layer bulk with AGSBP obtains better levitation performance than that of MGSBP too. • The double-layer bulk finding is contrast to MGSBP if pursuing high trapped field. • The optimization is highlighted by simple and easy operation, thus economical in the practice. -- Abstract: Growth anisotropies of bulk high temperature superconductors (HTSCs) fabricated by a top-seeded melt texture growth process, that is, different pinning effect in the growth sectors (GSs) and growth sector boundaries (GSBs), possess effect on the macro flux trapping and levitation performance of bulk HTSCs. Previous work (Physics Procedia, 36 (2012) 1043) has found that the bulk HTSC array with aligned GSB pattern (AGSBP) exhibits better capability for levitation and suppression of levitation force decay above a permanent magnet guideway (PMG) compared with misaligned GSB pattern (MGSBP). In this paper, we further examine this growth anisotropy effect on the maglev performance of a double-layer bulk HTSC. In contrast to reported trapped flux cases (Supercond. Sci. Technol. 19 (2006) S466), the two superposed bulk HTSCs with same AGSBP with PMG are found to show better maglev performance. These series of results are helpful and support a new way for the performance optimization of present HTS maglev systems.

  3. Electrochemical Study of Ni20Cr Coatings Applied by HVOF Process in ZnCl2-KCl at High Temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Porcayo-Calderón

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Corrosion behavior of Ni20Cr coatings deposited by HVOF (high velocity oxygen-fuel process was evaluated in ZnCl2-KCl (1 : 1 mole ratio molten salts. Electrochemical techniques employed were potentiodynamic polarization curves, open circuit potential, and linear polarization resistance (LPR measurements. Experimental conditions included static air and temperatures of 350, 400, and 450°C. 304-type SS was evaluated in the same conditions as the Ni20Cr coatings and it was used as a reference material to assess the coatings corrosion resistance. Coatings were evaluated as-deposited and with a grinded surface finished condition. Results showed that Ni20Cr coatings have a better corrosion performance than 304-type SS. Analysis showed that Ni content of the coatings improved its corrosion resistance, and the low corrosion resistance of 304 stainless steel was attributed to the low stability of Fe and Cr and their oxides in the corrosive media used.

  4. A study of the x-irradiated Cs sub 5 H sub 3 (SO sub 4) sub 4 centre dot H sub 2 O crystal by EPR in the 80-415 K temperature range

    CERN Document Server

    Waplak, S; Baranov, A I; Shuvalov, L A

    1997-01-01

    The EPR spectra of the x-irradiated fast proton conductor Cs sub 5 H sub 3 (SO sub 4) sub 4 centre dot H sub 2 O were investigated in the temperature range of 80-415 K. Two kinds of paramagnetic SO sub 4 sup - centres with different proton configurations below about 370 K and freeze-out behaviour of one of them below about 200 K were observed. The role of acid proton dynamics with respect to the glassy-like transition is discussed. (author)

  5. Radionuclides release from re-irradiated fuel under high temperature and pressure conditions. Gamma-ray measurements of VEGA-5 test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hidaka, Akihide; Kudo, Tamotsu; Nakamura, Takehiko; Kanazawa, Toru; Kiuchi, Toshio; Uetsuka, Hiroshi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2003-03-01

    The VEGA (Verification Experiments of radionuclides Gas/Aerosol release) program is being performed at JAERI to clarify mechanisms of radionuclides release from irradiated fuel during severe accidents and to improve source term predictability. The fifth VEGA-5 test was conducted in January 2002 to confirm the reproducibility of decrease in cesium release under elevated pressure that was observed in the VEGA-2 test and to investigate the release behavior of short-life radionuclides. The PWR fuel of 47 GWd/tU after about 8.2 years of cooling was re-irradiated at Nuclear Safety Research Reactor (NSRR) for 8 hours before the heat-up test. After that, the two pellets of 10.9 g without cladding were heated up to about 2,900 K at 1.0 MPa under the inert He condition. The experiment reconfirmed the decrease in cesium release rate under the elevated pressure. The release data on short-life radionuclides such as Ru-103, Ba-140 and Xe-133 that have never been observed in the previous VEGA tests without re-irradiation was obtained using the {gamma} ray measurement. (author)

  6. Vacancy effects on the formation of helium and krypton cavities in 3-C-SiC irradiated and annealed at elevated temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zang, Hang; Liu, Wenbo; Li, Tao; He, Chaohui; Yun, Di; Jiang, Weilin; Devaraj, Arun; Edwards, Danny J.; Henager, Charles H.; Kurtz, Richard J.; Wang, Zhiguang

    2017-02-27

    Polycrystalline 3C-SiC was sequentially irradiated at 400 and 750°C with 120 keV He2+ and 4 MeV Kr15+ ions to 1017 and 41016 cm-2, respectively. The Kr15+ ions penetrated the entire depth of the He2+ ion implantation region. Three areas of He2+, Kr15+ and He2+ + Kr15+ ion implanted 3C-SiC were created through masked overlapping irradiations. The sample was subsequently annealed at 1600°C in vacuum and characterized using cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy and energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy. Compared to the He2+ ion only implanted 3C-SiC, helium cavities in the He2+ and Kr15+ co-implanted 3C-SiC had a smaller size but higher density. At 25 dpa, presence of He in the co-implanted 3C-SiC significantly promoted cavity growth; much smaller voids were formed in the Kr15+ ion only irradiated 3C-SiC at the same dose. In addition, local Kr migration and trapping at cavities occurred, but long-range Kr diffusion in 3C-SiC was not observed up to 1600°C.

  7. Advanced Numerical Model for Irradiated Concrete

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giorla, Alain B. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-03-01

    In this report, we establish a numerical model for concrete exposed to irradiation to address these three critical points. The model accounts for creep in the cement paste and its coupling with damage, temperature and relative humidity. The shift in failure mode with the loading rate is also properly represented. The numerical model for creep has been validated and calibrated against different experiments in the literature [Wittmann, 1970, Le Roy, 1995]. Results from a simplified model are shown to showcase the ability of numerical homogenization to simulate irradiation effects in concrete. In future works, the complete model will be applied to the analysis of the irradiation experiments of Elleuch et al. [1972] and Kelly et al. [1969]. This requires a careful examination of the experimental environmental conditions as in both cases certain critical information are missing, including the relative humidity history. A sensitivity analysis will be conducted to provide lower and upper bounds of the concrete expansion under irradiation, and check if the scatter in the simulated results matches the one found in experiments. The numerical and experimental results will be compared in terms of expansion and loss of mechanical stiffness and strength. Both effects should be captured accordingly by the model to validate it. Once the model has been validated on these two experiments, it can be applied to simulate concrete from nuclear power plants. To do so, the materials used in these concrete must be as well characterized as possible. The main parameters required are the mechanical properties of each constituent in the concrete (aggregates, cement paste), namely the elastic modulus, the creep properties, the tensile and compressive strength, the thermal expansion coefficient, and the drying shrinkage. These can be either measured experimentally, estimated from the initial composition in the case of cement paste, or back-calculated from mechanical tests on concrete. If some

  8. Technical Report for a Study on the Improvement of Extraction Process and Physiological Activities of Polysaccharides from Undaria pinnatifida by Gamma Irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Jong Il; Lee, Ju Won; Kim, Jae Hun; Yoon, Yo Han; Song, Beom Seok; Yoon, Min Chul; Sung, Nak Yun; Lee, Hak Jyung

    2010-06-15

    By reason of Undaria pinnatifida growth is temperature dependent, U. pinnatifida produced in April and May are obtained as the main byproducts and it is normally wasted. The objective of the this study was investigated to the improvement of extraction process and physiological activities of polysaccharides from U. pinnatifida by gamma irradiation. The extraction yield of fucoidan and laminarrin was increased by gamma irradiation, and the molecular weight of extracted polysaccharides was decreased by irradiation. The effect of gamma irradiation on storage of U. pinnatifida was investigated. No viable cells were observed in samples irradiated at 3 and 5 kGy. Finally, fucoidan and laminarin were applied in the pork patty, and it was shown that lower lipid oxidation and positive effect on microbial stability and quality of the pork patty. These results will suggest that radiation technology can be applied for the extraction of functional materials and storages safe of the seaweeds

  9. ESR detection procedure of irradiated papaya containing high water content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikuchi, Masahiro; Shimoyama, Yuhei; Ukai, Mitsuko; Kobayashi, Yasuhiko

    2011-05-01

    ESR signals were recorded from irradiated papaya at liquid nitrogen temperature (77 K), and freeze-dried irradiated papaya at room temperature (295 K). Two side peaks from the flesh at the liquid nitrogen temperature indicated a linear dose response for 3-14 days after the γ-irradiation. The line shapes recorded from the freeze-dried specimens were sharper than those at liquid nitrogen temperature.

  10. ESR detection procedure of irradiated papaya containing high water content

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kikuchi, Masahiro, E-mail: kikuchi.masahiro@jaea.go.j [Quantum Beam Science Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 1233 Watanuki-machi, Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292 (Japan); Shimoyama, Yuhei [Quantum Beam Science Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 1233 Watanuki-machi, Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292 (Japan); Ukai, Mitsuko [Hokkaido University of Education, 1-2 Hachiman-cho, Hakodate, Hokkaido 040-8567 (Japan); Kobayashi, Yasuhiko [Quantum Beam Science Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 1233 Watanuki-machi, Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292 (Japan)

    2011-05-15

    ESR signals were recorded from irradiated papaya at liquid nitrogen temperature (77 K), and freeze-dried irradiated papaya at room temperature (295 K). Two side peaks from the flesh at the liquid nitrogen temperature indicated a linear dose response for 3-14 days after the {gamma}-irradiation. The line shapes recorded from the freeze-dried specimens were sharper than those at liquid nitrogen temperature.

  11. Effect of Gamma and electron beam irradiation on PAN-carbon fiber composite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jafari, R.; Kasaei, H.; Hajihashemi, M.; Daneshvari, V.; Emamalizadeh, M.; Kasaei, M.H., E-mail: rvzreza@gmail.com [Materials Research School, Nuclear Science and Technology Research Institute, Isfahan, I. R. (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of irradiation on structural, mechanical and thermal properties of PAN- carbon fiber composite. The overall applied doses were 250, 500, 750, and 1000 kGy. Irradiated and non-irradiated samples were characterized by Scanning electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and differential scanning calorimetry. Tensile strength test was conducted in order to measure mechanical properties. Scanning electron microscopy was used to evaluate microstructural behavior. Thermal behavior of the samples was studied by thermogravimetric analysis and differential scanning calorimetry. The results showed that by increasing gamma and electron doses the thermal behavior of the composite indicated higher decomposition degree as a function of the temperature. Electron irradiated carbon fiber surfaces are relatively smoothed than that virgin fibers. Bulges after gamma treatment were decreased and surface was unrough. (author)

  12. Vacancy effects on the formation of He and Kr cavities in 3C-SiC irradiated and annealed at elevated temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zang, Hang, E-mail: zanghang@xjtu.edu.cn [Department of Nuclear Science and Technology, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an 710049 (China); Jiang, Weilin, E-mail: weilin.jiang@pnnl.gov [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); Liu, Wenbo [Department of Nuclear Science and Technology, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an 710049 (China); Devaraj, Arun; Edwards, Danny J.; Henager, Charles H.; Kurtz, Richard J. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); Li, Tao; He, Chaohui; Yun, Di [Department of Nuclear Science and Technology, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an 710049 (China); Wang, Zhiguang [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China)

    2016-12-15

    Highlights: • He and Kr cavities are formed in ion-implanted and 1600 °C annealed 3C-SiC. • A higher vacancy concentration leads to formation of cavities with a smaller size and higher density. • Presence of He in irradiated 3C-SiC can significantly promote cavity growth. • Small voids are formed in Kr ion penetrated 3C-SiC during thermal annealing at 1600 °C. • Local Kr migration and trapping at cavities in SiC are observed, but long-range Kr diffusion does not occur at 1600 °C. - Abstract: Polycrystalline 3C-SiC was sequentially irradiated at 400 and 750 °C with 120 keV He{sup 2+} and 4 MeV Kr{sup 15+} ions to 10{sup 17} and 4 × 10{sup 16} cm{sup −2}, respectively. The Kr{sup 15+} ions penetrated the entire depth region of the He{sup 2+} ion implantation. Three areas of He{sup 2+}, Kr{sup 15+} and He{sup 2+} + Kr{sup 15+} ion implanted SiC were created through masked overlapping irradiation. The sample was subsequently annealed at 1600 °C in vacuum and characterized using cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Compared to the He{sup 2+} ion only implanted SiC, He cavities show a smaller size and higher density in the co-implanted SiC. At 25 dpa, presence of He in the co-implanted 3C-SiC significantly promotes cavity growth; much smaller voids are formed in the Kr{sup 15+} ion only irradiated SiC at the same dose. In addition, local Kr migration and trapping at cavities occurs, but long-range Kr diffusion in SiC is not observed up to 1600 °C.

  13. Neutron scattering techniques for betaine calcium chloride dihydrate under applied external field (temperature, electric field and hydrostatic pressure); Etude par diffusion de neutrons du chlorure de calcium et de betaine dihydrate sous champ externe applique (temperature, champ electrique et pression hydrostatique)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernandez, O

    1997-11-17

    We have studied with neutron scattering techniques betaine calcium chloride dihydrate (BCCD), a dielectric aperiodic crystal which displays a Devil`s staircase type phase diagram made up of several incommensurate and commensurate phases, having a range of stability very sensitive to temperature, electric field and hydrostatic pressure. We have measured a global hysteresis of {delta}(T) of about 2-3 K in the two incommensurate phases. A structural study of the modulated commensurate phases 1/4 and 1/5 allows us to evidence that the atomic modulation functions are anharmonic. The relevance of the modelization of the modulated structure by polar Ising pseudo-spins is then directly established. On the basis of group theory calculation in the four dimensional super-space, we interpret this anharmonic modulation as a soliton regime with respect to the lowest-temperature non modulated ferroelectric phase. The continuous character of the transition to the lowest-temperature non modulated phase and the diffuse scattering observed in this phase are accounted for the presence of ferroelectric domains separated by discommensurations. Furthermore, we have shown that X-rays induce in BCCD a strong variation with time of irradiation of the intensity of satellite peaks, and more specifically for third order ones. This is why the `X-rays` structural model is found more harmonic than the `neutron` one. Under electric field applied along the vector b axis, we confirm that commensurate phases with {delta} = even/odd are favoured and hence are polar along this direction. We have evidenced at 10 kV / cm two new higher order commensurate phases in the phase INC2, corroborating the idea of a `complete` Devil`s air-case phase diagram. A phenomenon of generalized coexistence of phases occurs above 5 kV / cm. We have characterized at high field phase transitions between `coexisting` phases, which are distinguishable from classical lock-in transitions. Under hydrostatic pressure, our results

  14. Efficacy of methoprene applied at different temperatures and rates on surface substrates to control eggs and fifth instars of Plodia interpunctella.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenson, Emily A; Arthur, Frank H; Nechols, James R

    2009-10-01

    A series of studies was conducted to determine the effects of temperature on toxicity of the insect growth regulator methoprene to eggs and larvae of Plodia interpunctella (Hübner), the Indianmeal moth. When methoprene was applied to Kraft paper at the rate of 0.0003 mg of active ingredient [(AI)]/cm2, there was little direct toxicity against eggs of P. interpunctella, and temperature did not affect insecticide efficacy. Similarly, exposure of eggs on a paperboard surface treated with different rates of methoprene resulted in delayed adult emergence but not a reduction in adult emergence. However, wandering-phase larvae ofP. interpuctella were susceptible to methoprene, and exposure of larvae for 0.5, 1, and 2 h on different packaging materials resulted in reduced adult emergence. There was variation in emergence depending on the specific surface, but temperature had no effect on resulting adult emergence from exposed larvae. A partial budget analysis described treatment costs and reduction of risks associated with control of eggs and larvae of P. interpunctella. Results indicate methoprene could be used in management programs to control larvae of P. interpunctella, but eggs may be able to compensate for exposure to methoprene residues on treated surfaces.

  15. Low-Temperature Catalytic Performance of Ni-Cu/Al2O3 Catalysts for Gasoline Reforming to Produce Hydrogen Applied in Spark Ignition Engines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Le Anh Tuan

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The performance of Ni-Cu/Al2O3 catalysts for steam reforming (SR of gasoline to produce a hydrogen-rich gas mixture applied in a spark ignition (SI engine was investigated at relatively low temperature. The structural and morphological features and catalysis activity were observed by X-ray diffractometry (XRD, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, and temperature programmed reduction (TPR. The results showed that the addition of copper improved the dispersion of nickel and therefore facilitated the reduction of Ni at low temperature. The highest hydrogen selectivity of 70.6% is observed over the Ni-Cu/Al2O3 catalysts at a steam/carbon ratio of 0.9. With Cu promotion, a gasoline conversion of 42.6% can be achieved at 550 °C, while with both Mo and Ce promotion, the gasoline conversions were 31.7% and 28.3%, respectively, higher than with the conventional Ni catalyst. On the other hand, initial durability testing showed that the conversion of gasoline over Ni-Cu/Al2O3 catalysts slightly decreased after 30 h reaction time.

  16. URAM-2 Cryogenic Irradiation Facility

    CERN Document Server

    Shabalin, E P; Kulikov, S A; Kulagin, E N; Melihov, V V; Belyakov, A A; Golovanov, L B; Borzunov, Yu T; Konstantinov, V I; Androsov, A V

    2002-01-01

    The URAM-2 irradiation facility has been built and mounted at the channel No. 3 of the IBR-2 reactor. It was constructed for study of radiolysis effects by fast neutron irradiation in some suitable for effective cold neutron production materials (namely: solid methane, methane hydrate, water ice, etc.). The facility cooling system is based on using liquid helium as a coolant material. The original charging block of the rig allows the samples to be loaded by condensing gas into irradiation cavity or by charging beads of ice prepared before. Preliminary tests for each facility block and assembling them at the working position were carried out. Use of the facility for study accumulation of chemical energy under irradiation at low temperature in materials mentioned above and its spontaneous release was started.

  17. Room-temperature fracture in V-(4-5)Cr-(4-5)Ti tensile specimens irradiated in Fusion-1 BOR-60 experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gazda, J.; Meshii, M. [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States); Tsai, H. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1998-09-01

    Specimens of V-(4-5)Cr-(4-5)Ti alloys were irradiated to {approx}18 dpa at 320 C in the Fusion-1 capsule inserted into the BOR-60 reactor. Tensile tests at 23 C indicated dramatic yield strength increase (>300%), lack of work hardening, and minimal (<1%) total elongations. SEM analysis of fracture and side surfaces were conducted to determine reduction in are and the mode of fracture. The reduction of area was negligible. All but one specimen failed by a combination of ductile shear deformation and cleavage crack growth. Transgranular cleavage cracks were initiated by stress concentrations at the tips of the shear bands. In side-view observations, evidence was found of slip bands typically associated with dislocation channeling. No differences due to pre-irradiation heat treatment and heat-to-heat composition variations were detected. The only deviation from this behavior was found in V-4Cr-4Ti-B alloy, which failed in the grip portion by complete cleavage cracking.

  18. Saturation behavior of irradiation hardening in F82H irradiated in the HFIR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirose, T. [Blanket Engineering Group, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Naka, Ibaraki (Japan); Shiba, K.; Tanigawa, H.; Ando, M. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai-mura, Naga-gun, Ibaraki-ken (Japan); Klueh, R.L. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, TN (United States); Stoller, R. [ORNL - Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Materials Science and Technology Div., Oak Ridge, AK TN (United States)

    2007-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: Post irradiation tensile tests on reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steel, F82H have been conducted over the past two decades using Japan Materials Testing Reactor (JMTR) of JAEA, and Fast Flux Testing Facility (FFTF) of PNNL and High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) of ORNL, USA, under Japan/US collaboration programs. According to these results, F82H does not demonstrate irradiation hardening above 673 K up to 60 dpa. The current study has been concentrated on hardening behavior at temperature around 573 K. A series of low temperature irradiation experiment has been conducted at the HFIR under the international collaborative research between JAEA/US-DOE. In this collaboration, the irradiation condition is precisely controlled by the well matured capsule designing and instrumentation. This paper summarizes recent results of the irradiation experiments focused on F82H and its modified steels compared with the irradiation properties database on F82H. Post irradiation tensile tests have been conducted on the F82H and its modified steels irradiated at 573 K and the dose level was up to 25 dpa. According to these results, irradiation hardening of F82H is saturated by 9 dpa and the as-irradiated 0.2 % proof stress is less than 1 GPa at ambient temperature. The deterioration of total elongation was also saturated by 9 dpa irradiation. The ductility of some modified steels which showed larger total elongation than that of F82H before irradiation become the same level as that of standard F82H steel after irradiation, even though its magnitude of irradiation hardening is smaller than that of F82H. This suggests that the more ductile steel demonstrates the more ductility loss at this temperature, regardless to the hardening level. The difference in ductility loss behavior between various tensile specimens will be discussed as the ductility could depend on the specimen dimension. (authors)

  19. Embrittlement of irradiated ferritic/martensitic steels in the absence of irradiation hardening

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klueh, R.L. [Oak Ridge Noational Laboratory, TN (United States); Shiba, K. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai-mura, Naga-gun, Ibaraki-ken (Japan); Sokolov, M. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Materials Science and Technology Div., TN (United States)

    2007-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: Neutron irradiation of 9-12% Cr ferritic/martensitic steels below 425-450 deg. C produces microstructural defects that cause an increase in yield stress and ultimate tensile strength. This irradiation hardening causes embrittlement, which is observed in Charpy impact and toughness tests as an increase in ductile-brittle transition temperature (DBTT). Based on observations that show little change in strength in these steels irradiated above 425-450 deg. C, the general conclusion has been that no embrittlement occurs above this irradiation-hardening temperature regime. In a recent study of F82H steel irradiated at 300, 380, and 500 deg. C, irradiation hardening-an increase in yield stress-was observed in tensile specimens irradiated at the two lower temperatures, but no change was observed for the specimens irradiated at 500 deg. C. As expected, an increase in DBTT occurred for the Charpy specimens irradiated at 300 and 380 deg. C. However, there was an unexpected increase in the DBTT of the specimens irradiated at 500 deg. C. The observed embrittlement was attributed to the irradiation-accelerated precipitation of Laves phase. This conclusion was based on results from a detailed thermal aging study of F82H, in which tensile and Charpy specimens were aged at 500, 550, 600, and 650 deg. C to 30,000 h. These studies indicated that there was a decrease in yield stress at the two highest temperatures and essentially no change at the two lowest temperatures. Despite the strength decrease or no change, the DBTT increased for Charpy specimens irradiated at all four temperatures. Precipitates were extracted from thermally aged specimens, and the amount of precipitate was correlated with the increase in transition temperature. Laves phase was identified in the extracted precipitates by X-ray diffraction. Earlier studies on conventional elevated-temperature steels also showed embrittlement effects above the irradiation-hardening temperature

  20. Ceramography of Irradiated tristructural isotropic (TRISO) Fuel from the AGR-2 Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rice, Francine Joyce [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Stempien, John Dennis [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-09-01

    Ceramography was performed on cross sections from four tristructural isotropic (TRISO) coated particle fuel compacts taken from the AGR-2 experiment, which was irradiated between June 2010 and October 2013 in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR). The fuel compacts examined in this study contained TRISO-coated particles with either uranium oxide (UO2) kernels or uranium oxide/uranium carbide (UCO) kernels that were irradiated to final burnup values between 9.0 and 11.1% FIMA. These examinations are intended to explore kernel and coating morphology evolution during irradiation. This includes kernel porosity, swelling, and migration, and irradiation-induced coating fracture and separation. Variations in behavior within a specific cross section, which could be related to temperature or burnup gradients within the fuel compact, are also explored. The criteria for categorizing post-irradiation particle morphologies developed for AGR-1 ceramographic exams, was applied to the particles in the AGR-2 compacts particles examined. Results are compared with similar investigations performed as part of the earlier AGR-1 irradiation experiment. This paper presents the results of the AGR-2 examinations and discusses the key implications for fuel irradiation performance.

  1. Thermal Damage Analysis in Biological Tissues Under Optical Irradiation: Application to the Skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanjul-Vélez, Félix; Ortega-Quijano, Noé; Solana-Quirós, José Ramón; Arce-Diego, José Luis

    2009-07-01

    The use of optical sources in medical praxis is increasing nowadays. In this study, different approaches using thermo-optical principles that allow us to predict thermal damage in irradiated tissues are analyzed. Optical propagation is studied by means of the radiation transport theory (RTT) equation, solved via a Monte Carlo analysis. Data obtained are included in a bio-heat equation, solved via a numerical finite difference approach. Optothermal properties are considered for the model to be accurate and reliable. Thermal distribution is calculated as a function of optical source parameters, mainly optical irradiance, wavelength and exposition time. Two thermal damage models, the cumulative equivalent minutes (CEM) 43 °C approach and the Arrhenius analysis, are used. The former is appropriate when dealing with dosimetry considerations at constant temperature. The latter is adequate to predict thermal damage with arbitrary temperature time dependence. Both models are applied and compared for the particular application of skin thermotherapy irradiation.

  2. The modification of low-temperature magnetic properties of the Fe-based double-zigzag single-chain magnet under irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Val'kov, V. V.; Shustin, M. S.

    2017-10-01

    An exact solution for a generalized Ising model describing single-chain magnet [ FeIII (Tp*)(CN)3 ] 2 FeII (bpmh) } · 2H2 O with alternating high-spin and low-spin iron ions and double-zigzag magnetic topology has been calculated making use of the transfer-matrix technique. The introduction of a statistical ensemble taking into account the presence of iron ions with high-spin (HS) and low-spin (LS) states made it possible to describe the modification of magnetic susceptibility under optical irradiation. It has been shown that joint implementation of iron ions with photoinduced magnetic states and non-magnetic intersite repulsion ions of these states is caused by the difference of the ionic radii of HSFeII and LSFeII leads to the quantum phase transitions in the system.

  3. Tensile properties of vanadium-base alloys irradiated in the Fusion-1 low-temperature experiment in the BOR-60 reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsai, H.; Gazda, J.; Nowicki, L.J.; Billone, M.C.; Smith, D.L. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1998-09-01

    The irradiation has been completed and the test specimens have been retrieved from the lithium-bonded capsule at the Research Institute of Atomic Reactors (RIAR) in Russia. During this reporting period, the Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) tensile specimens were received from RIAR and initial testing and examination of these specimens at ANL has been completed. The results, corroborating previous findings showed a significant loss of work hardening capability in the materials. There appears to be no significant difference in behavior among the various heats of vanadium-base alloys in the V-(4-5)Cr-(4-5)Ti composition range. The variations in the preirradiation annealing conditions also produced no notable differences.

  4. Inverted Fuel Cell: Room-Temperature Hydrogen Separation from an Exhaust Gas by Using a Commercial Short-Circuited PEM Fuel Cell without Applying any Electrical Voltage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friebe, Sebastian; Geppert, Benjamin; Caro, Jürgen

    2015-06-26

    A short-circuited PEM fuel cell with a Nafion membrane has been evaluated in the room-temperature separation of hydrogen from exhaust gas streams. The separated hydrogen can be recovered or consumed in an in situ olefin hydrogenation when the fuel cell is operated as catalytic membrane reactor. Without applying an outer electrical voltage, there is a continuous hydrogen flux from the higher to the lower hydrogen partial pressure side through the Nafion membrane. On the feed side of the Nafion membrane, hydrogen is catalytically split into protons and electrons by the Pt/C electrocatalyst. The protons diffuse through the Nafion membrane, the electrons follow the short-circuit between the two brass current collectors. On the cathode side, protons and electrons recombine, and hydrogen is released. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Development of data base on food irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ito, Hitoshi; Kume, Tamikazu; Hashimoto, Shoji [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Takasaki, Gunma (Japan). Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment; Izumi, Fumio

    1995-12-01

    For the exact understanding on food irradiation in Japan, it is important to provide information of food irradiation to consumers, industries and government offices. However, many of information on food irradiation are only restricted in a few experts or institutes relating to this field. For this reason, data base of food irradiation has been completed together with the systems necessary for input the data using computer. In this data base, about 630 data with full reports were inputted in computer in the field of wholesomeness studies, irradiation effects on food, radiation engineering, detection methods of irradiated food and Q and A of food irradiation for easy understanding. Many of these data are inputted by Japanese language. Some English reports on wholesomeness studies are also included which were mainly obtained from international projects of food irradiation. Many of data on food irradiation are responsible in the fields of food science, dietetics, microbiology, radiation biology, molecular biology, medical science, agricultural science, radiation chemistry, radiation engineering and so on. Data base of food irradiation contains many useful data which can apply to many other fields of radiation processing not only on food irradiation but also on sterilization of medical equipments, upgrading of agricultural wastes and others. (author).

  6. Applying Petroleum the Pressure Buildup Well Test Procedure on Thermal Response Test—A Novel Method for Analyzing Temperature Recovery Period

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomislav Kurevija

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The theory of Thermal Response Testing (TRT is a well-known part of the sizing process of the geothermal exchange system. Multiple parameters influence the accuracy of effective ground thermal conductivity measurement; like testing time, variable power, climate interferences, groundwater effect, etc. To improve the accuracy of the TRT, we introduced a procedure to additionally analyze falloff temperature decline after the power test. The method is based on a premise of analogy between TRT and petroleum well testing, since the origin of both procedures lies in the diffusivity equation with solutions for heat conduction or pressure analysis during radial flow. Applying pressure build-up test interpretation techniques to borehole heat exchanger testing, greater accuracy could be achieved since ground conductivity could be obtained from this period. Analysis was conducted on a coaxial exchanger with five different power steps, and with both direct and reverse flow regimes. Each test was set with 96 h of classical TRT, followed by 96 h of temperature decline, making for almost 2000 h of cumulative borehole testing. Results showed that the ground conductivity value could vary by as much as 25%, depending on test time, seasonal period and power fluctuations, while the thermal conductivity obtained from the falloff period provided more stable values, with only a 10% value variation.

  7. RPM-WEBBSYS: A web-based computer system to apply the rational polynomial method for estimating static formation temperatures of petroleum and geothermal wells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong-Loya, J. A.; Santoyo, E.; Andaverde, J. A.; Quiroz-Ruiz, A.

    2015-12-01

    A Web-Based Computer System (RPM-WEBBSYS) has been developed for the application of the Rational Polynomial Method (RPM) to estimate static formation temperatures (SFT) of geothermal and petroleum wells. The system is also capable to reproduce the full thermal recovery processes occurred during the well completion. RPM-WEBBSYS has been programmed using advances of the information technology to perform more efficiently computations of SFT. RPM-WEBBSYS may be friendly and rapidly executed by using any computing device (e.g., personal computers and portable computing devices such as tablets or smartphones) with Internet access and a web browser. The computer system was validated using bottomhole temperature (BHT) measurements logged in a synthetic heat transfer experiment, where a good matching between predicted and true SFT was achieved. RPM-WEBBSYS was finally applied to BHT logs collected from well drilling and shut-in operations, where the typical problems of the under- and over-estimation of the SFT (exhibited by most of the existing analytical methods) were effectively corrected.

  8. Juvenile Rhus glabra leaves have higher temperatures and lower gas exchange rates than mature leaves when compared in the field during periods of high irradiance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snider, John L; Choinski, John S; Wise, Robert R

    2009-05-01

    We sought to test the hypothesis that stomatal development determines the timing of gas exchange competency, which then influences leaf temperature through transpirationally driven leaf cooling. To test this idea, daily patterns of gas exchange and leaflet temperature were obtained from leaves of two distinctively different developmental stages of smooth sumac (Rhus glabra) grown in its native habitat. Juvenile and mature leaves were also sampled for ultrastructural studies of stomatal development. When plants were sampled in May-June, the hypothesis was supported: juvenile leaflets were (for part of the day) from 1.4 to 6.0 degrees C warmer than mature leaflets and as much as 2.0 degrees C above ambient air temperature with lower stomatal conductance and photosynthetic rates than mature leaflets. When measurements were taken from July to October, no significant differences were observed, although mature leaflet gas exchange rates declined to the levels of the juvenile leaves. The gas exchange data were supported by the observations that juvenile leaves had approximately half the number of functional stomata on a leaf surface area basis as did mature leaves. It was concluded that leaf temperature and stage of leaf development in sumac are strongly linked with the higher surface temperatures observed in juvenile leaflets in the early spring possibly being involved in promoting photosynthesis and leaf expansion when air temperatures are cooler.

  9. IRRADIATION DEVICE FOR IRRADIATION TESTING OF COATED PARTICLE FUEL AT HANARO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BONG GOO KIM

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The Korean Nuclear-Hydrogen Technology Development (NHTD Plan will be performing irradiation testing of coated particle fuel at HANARO to support the development of VHTR in Korea. This testing will be carried out to demonstrate and qualify TRISO-coated particle fuel for use in VHTR. The testing will be irradiated in an inert gas atmosphere without on-line temperature monitoring and control combined with on-line fission product monitoring of the sweep gas. The irradiation device contains two test rods, one has nine fuel compacts and the other five compacts and eight graphite specimens. Each compact contains about 260 TRISO-coated particles. The irradiation device is being loaded and irradiated into the OR5 hole of the in HANARO core from August 2013. The device will be operated for about 150 effective full-power days at a peak temperature of about 1030°C in BOC (Beginning of Cycle during irradiation testing. After a peak burn-up of about 4 atomic percentage and a peak fast neutron fluence of about 1.7×1021 n/cm2, PIE (Post-Irradiation Examination of the irradiated coated particle fuel will be performed at IMEF (Irradiated Material Examination Facility. This paper reviews the design of test rod and irradiation device for coated particle fuel, and discusses the technical results for irradiation testing at HANARO.

  10. Phytosanitary Irradiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guy J. Hallman

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Phytosanitary treatments disinfest traded commodities of potential quarantine pests. Phytosanitary irradiation (PI treatments use ionizing radiation to accomplish this, and, since their international commercial debut in 2004, the use of this technology has increased by ~10% annually. Generic PI treatments (one dose is used for a group of pests and/or commodities, although not all have been tested for efficacy are used in virtually all commercial PI treatments, and new generic PI doses are proposed, such as 300 Gy, for all insects except pupae and adult Lepidoptera (moths. Fresh fruits and vegetables tolerate PI better than any other broadly used treatment. Advances that would help facilitate the use of PI include streamlining the approval process, making the technology more accessible to potential users, lowering doses and broadening their coverage, and solving potential issues related to factors that might affect efficacy.

  11. Steam-chemical reactivity for irradiated beryllium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderl, R.A.; McCarthy, K.A.; Oates, M.A.; Petti, D.A.; Pawelko, R.J.; Smolik, G.R. [Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    1998-01-01

    This paper reports the results of an experimental investigation to determine the influence of neutron irradiation effects and annealing on the chemical reactivity of beryllium exposed to steam. The work entailed measurements of the H{sub 2} generation rates for unirradiated and irradiated Be and for irradiated Be that had been previously annealed at different temperatures ranging from 450degC to 1200degC. H{sub 2} generation rates were similar for irradiated and unirradiated Be in steam-chemical reactivity experiments at temperatures between 450degC and 600degC. For irradiated Be exposed to steam at 700degC, the chemical reactivity accelerated rapidly and the specimen experienced a temperature excursion. Enhanced chemical reactivity at temperatures between 400degC and 600degC was observed for irradiated Be annealed at temperatures of 700degC and higher. This reactivity enhancement could be accounted for by the increased specific surface area resulting from development of a surface-connected porosity in the irradiated-annealed Be. (author)

  12. Thermoluminescence of pure LiF and Lif (TLD-100) irradiated at room temperature; Termoluminiscencia en LiF puro y LiF dosimetrico (TLD-100), irradiados a temperatura ambiente

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sagastibelza Chivite, F.

    1980-07-01

    The thermoluminescence of pure LiF and LiF (TLD-100) crystals irradiated at room temperature with x - or gamma-rays has been studied up to 460 degree centigree. For most of the glow peaks found the kinetics, preexponential factors and activation energies have been determined. These parameters have been obtained by means of the isothermal method. The study of the thermal annealing of the radiation induced F and Z centres has allow to show that there is a correlation among the glow peaks and the annealing stages of these centres. It is concluded that the F and Z - centres play the role of recombination centres for halogen interstitial atom thermally released from traps. Light emission occurs in this recombination. (Author) 120 refs.

  13. Structural and thermal properties of γ – irradiated Bombyx mori silk fibroin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Madhukumar, R.; Asha, S.; Rao, B. Lakshmeesha; Shivananda, C. S.; Harish, K. V.; Sangappa, E-mail: syhalabhavi@yahoo.co.in [Department of Studies in Physics, Mangalore University, Mangalagangotri, Mangalore - 574199 (India); Sarojini, B. K. [Department of Studies in Chemistry, Mangalore University, Mangalagangotri, Mangalore - 574199 (India); Somashekar, R. [Department of Studies in Physics, University of Mysore, Manasagangotri, Mysore - 570006 (India)

    2015-06-24

    The gamma radiation-induced change in structural and thermal properties of Bombyx mori silk fibroin films were investigated and have been correlated with the applied radiation doses. Irradiation of samples were carried out in dry air at room temperature using Co-60 source, and radiation doses are in the range of 0 - 300 kGy. Structural and thermal properties of the irradiated silk films were studied using X-ray diffraction (XRD), Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) and Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and compared with unirradiated sample. Interesting results are discussed in this report.

  14. Effect of low irradiation temperature on the thermoluminescent response of doped crystal NaCl:XCl{sub 2} :MnCl{sub 2}(X=Ca, Cd); Efecto de baja temperatura de irradiacion sobre la respuesta termoluminiscente del cristal dopado NaCl:XCl{sub 2} :MnCl{sub 2}(X=Ca, Cd)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortiz M, A.; Cruz Z, E. [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, UNAM, A. P. 70-543, 04510 Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Furetta, C. [Touro University Rome, Circne Gianicolense 15-17, 00153 Rome (Italy); Kitis, G. [Nuclear Physics Laboratory, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, 54124 Thessaloniki (Greece)

    2009-10-15

    Production of crystalline materials suitable thermoluminescent properties over a wide range of doses is becoming more important to evaluate different radiation fields. However, the thermoluminescence response and the structure of the glow curves may be modified by the participation of defects to low irradiation temperature. In this work it is analyzed the effect of the irradiation temperature, 77 and 200 K on the thermoluminescence response of crystal NaCl:XCl{sub 2}:MnCl{sub 2} (X=Ca, Cd) doubly doped. The glow curves obtained were analyzed using a deconvolution program of CGCD, and the response linearity was analyzed by supra linearity index. (Author)

  15. Improvement of mechanical property of polyimide blends with {sup 60}Co-irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Zhen; Deng Pengyang; Sun Jiazhen; Ding Mengxian E-mail: mxding@ns.ciac.jl.cn

    2002-08-01

    Radiation effects on polyimide blends were studied at different irradiation temperatures and with different irradiation doses. The irradiation polyimides were the blends of linear polyimide (HQDPA/ODA) and 4-phenylethynyl phthalic anhydride end-capped oligomer polyimide. The tensile strength and the elongation at break of irradiated films were determined as the function of irradiation temperature and dose. Under proper conditions crosslinking reaction occurred when the polyimide blends were irradiated at high temperature. The mechanical properties of irradiated polyimide blends were found to be different from the linear polyimide.

  16. Mechanical response of proton beam irradiated nitinol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Afzal, Naveed [Centre for Advanced Studies in Physics, GC University, Lahore (Pakistan); Ghauri, I.M., E-mail: ijaz.phys@gmail.co [Centre for Advanced Studies in Physics, GC University, Lahore (Pakistan); Mubarik, F.E.; Amin, F. [Centre for Advanced Studies in Physics, GC University, Lahore (Pakistan)

    2011-01-01

    The present investigation deals with the study of mechanical behavior of proton beam irradiated nitinol at room temperature. The specimens in austenitic phase were irradiated over periods of 15, 30, 45 and 60 min at room temperature using 2 MeV proton beam obtained from Pelletron accelerator. The stress-strain curves of both unirradiated and irradiated specimens were obtained using a universal testing machine at room temperature. The results of the experiment show that an intermediate rhombohedral (R) phase has been introduced between austenite and martensite phase, which resulted in the suppression of direct transformation from austenite to martensite (A-M). Stresses required to start R-phase ({sigma}{sub RS}) and martensitic phase ({sigma}{sub MS}) were observed to decrease with increase in exposure time. The hardness tests of samples before and after irradiation were also carried out using Vickers hardness tester. The comparison reveals that the hardness is higher in irradiated specimens than that of the unirradiated one. The increase in hardness is quite sharp in specimens irradiated for 15 min, which then increases linearly as the exposure time is increased up to 60 min. The generation of R-phase, variations in the transformation stresses {sigma}{sub RS} and {sigma}{sub MS} and increase in hardness of irradiated nitinol may be attributed to lattice disorder and associated changes in crystal structure induced by proton beam irradiation.

  17. Electron irradiation of carbon dioxide-carbon disulphide ice analog ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Carbon dioxide (CO2) and carbon disulphide (CS2) molecular ice mixture was prepared under low temperature (85 K) astrochemical conditions. The icy mixture irradiated with keV electrons simulates the irradiation environment experienced by icy satellites and Interstellar Icy Mantles (IIM). Upon electron irradi-.

  18. Explosive phenomena in heavily irradiated NaCl

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    denHartog, HW; Vainshtein, DI; Matthews, GE; Williams, RT

    1997-01-01

    In heavily irradiated NaCl crystals explosive phenomena can be initiated during irradiation or afterwards when samples are heated to temperatures between 100 and 250 degrees C. During irradiation of NaCl Na and Cl-2 precipitates and void structures are produced along with the accumulation of stored

  19. HRB-22 capsule irradiation test for HTGR fuel. JAERI/USDOE collaborative irradiation test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minato, Kazuo; Sawa, Kazuhiro; Fukuda, Kousaku [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment] [and others

    1998-03-01

    As a JAERI/USDOE collaborative irradiation test for high-temperature gas-cooled reactor fuel, JAERI fuel compacts were irradiated in the HRB-22 irradiation capsule in the High Flux Isotope Reactor at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Postirradiation examinations also were performed at ORNL. This report describes 1) the preirradiation characterization of the irradiation samples of annular-shaped fuel compacts containing the Triso-coated fuel particles, 2) the irradiation conditions and fission gas releases during the irradiation to measure the performance of the coated particle fuel, 3) the postirradiation examinations of the disassembled capsule involving visual inspection, metrology, ceramography and gamma-ray spectrometry of the samples, and 4) the accident condition tests on the irradiated fuels at 1600 to 1800degC to obtain information about fuel performance and fission product release behavior under accident conditions. (author)

  20. Off-stoichiometric defect clustering in irradiated oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalil, Sarah; Allen, Todd; EL-Azab, Anter

    2017-04-01

    A cluster dynamics model describing the formation of vacancy and interstitial clusters in irradiated oxides has been developed. The model, which tracks the composition of the oxide matrix and the defect clusters, was applied to the early stage formation of voids and dislocation loops in UO2, and the effects of irradiation temperature and dose rate on the evolution of their densities and composition was investigated. The results show that Frenkel defects dominate the nucleation process in irradiated UO2. The results also show that oxygen vacancies drive vacancy clustering while the migration energy of uranium vacancies is a rate-limiting factor for the nucleation and growth of voids. In a stoichiometric UO2 under irradiation, off-stoichiometric vacancy clusters exist with a higher concentration of hyper-stoichiometric clusters. Similarly, off-stoichiometric interstitial clusters form with a higher concentration of hyper-stoichiometric clusters. The UO2 matrix was found to be hyper-stoichiometric due to the accumulation of uranium vacancies.

  1. Effect of electrical field strength applied by PEF processing and storage temperature on the outgrowth of yeasts and moulds naturally present in a fresh fruit smoothie.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timmermans, R A H; Nederhoff, A L; Nierop Groot, M N; van Boekel, M A J S; Mastwijk, H C

    2016-08-02

    Pulsed electrical field (PEF) technology offers an alternative to thermal pasteurisation of high-acid fruit juices, by extending the shelf life of food products, while retaining its fresh taste and nutritional value. Substantial research has been performed on the effect of electrical field strength on the inactivation kinetics of spoilage and pathogenic micro-organisms and on the outgrowth of spoilage micro-organisms during shelf life. However, studies on the effect of electrical field strength on the inactivation and outgrowth of surviving populations during shelf life are missing. In this study, we assessed the influence of electrical field strength applied by PEF processing and storage temperature on the outgrowth of surviving yeast and mould populations naturally present in fresh fruit smoothie in time. Therefore, an apple-strawberry-banana smoothie was treated in a continuous-flow PEF system (130L/h), using similar inlet and outlet conditions (preheating temperature 41°C, maximum temperature 58°C) to assure that the amount of energy across the different conditions was kept constant. Smoothies treated with variable electrical field strengths (13.5, 17.0, 20.0 and 24.0kV/cm) were compared to smoothies without treatment for outgrowth of yeasts and moulds. Outgrowth of yeasts and moulds stored at 4°C and 7°C was analysed by plating and visual observation and yeast growth was modelled using the modified logistic growth model (Zwietering model). Results showed that the intensity of the electrical field strength had an influence on the degree of inactivation of yeast cells, resulting in a faster outgrowth over time at lower electrical field strength. Outgrowth of moulds over time was not affected by the intensity of the electrical field strength used. Application of PEF introduces a trade-off between type of spoilage: in untreated smoothie yeasts lead to spoilage after 8days when stored at 4 or 7°C, whereas in PEF treated smoothie yeasts were (partly

  2. Release of fission products from irradiated SRP fuels at elevated temperature. Data report on the first stage of the SRP source term study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woodley, R.E.

    1986-06-01

    For a sound evaluation of the consequences of a hypothetical nuclear reactor accident, a knowledge of the extent of fission product release from the fuel at anticipated temperatures and atmosphere conditions is required. Measurements of fission product release have been performed with a variety of nuclear fuels under various conditions of temperature and atmosphere. While the use of data obtained on fuels similar to the fuel of interest may provide a reasonable estimate of release fractions, precise information of this nature can only be obtained from measurements employing specimens of the actual fuels used in the nuclear reactor under consideration. The two fuels of interest in the present study are an alloy, a dispersion of UAl/sub 4/ in an aluminum matrix, and a cermet, a dispersion of U/sub 3/O/sub 8/ in an aluminum matrix. Both fuels are clad in aluminum.

  3. Chemical form of released tritium from molten Li{sub 2}BeF{sub 4} salt under neutron irradiation at elevated temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, Akihiro; Terai, Takayuki; Yoneoka, Toshiaki; Tanaka, Satoru [Tokyo Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Engineering

    1996-10-01

    Chemical forms of released tritium from FLIBE (the 2:1 mixture of LiF and BeF{sub 2}) by in-pile tritium release experiment were HT and TF and their proportion depended on the chemical composition of purge gas and the dehumidification time of specimen at high temperatures. The chemical form of tritium was determined by the thermodynamic equilibrium of the isotopic exchange reaction (T{sup +} + H{sub 2} {yields} H{sup +} + HT). (author)

  4. Heat-to-heat variability of irradiation creep and swelling of HT9 irradiated to high neutron fluence at 400-600{degrees}C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toloczko, M.B.; Garner, F.A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1996-10-01

    Irradiation creep data on ferritic/martensitic steels are difficult and expensive to obtain, and are not available for fusion-relevant neutron spectra and displacement rates. Therefore, an extensive creep data rescue and analysis effort is in progress to characterize irradiation creep of ferritic/martensitic alloys in other reactors and to develop a methodology for applying it to fusion applications. In the current study, four tube sets constructed from three nominally similar heats of HT9 subjected to one of two heat treatments were constructed as helium-pressurized creep tubes and irradiated in FFTF-MOTA at four temperatures between 400 and 600{degrees}C. Each of the four heats exhibited a different stress-free swelling behavior at 400{degrees}C, with the creep rate following the swelling according to the familiar B{sub o} + DS creep law. No stress-free swelling was observed at the other three irradiation temperatures. Using a stress exponent of n = 1.0 as the defining criterion, {open_quotes}classic{close_quotes} irradiation creep was found at all temperatures, but, only over limited stress ranges that decreased with increasing temperature. The creep coefficient B{sub o} is a little lower ({approx}50%) than that observed for austenitic steel, but the swelling-creep coupling coefficient D is comparable to that of austenitic steels. Primary transient creep behavior was also observed at all temperatures except 400{degrees}C, and thermal creep behavior was found to dominate the deformation at high stress levels at 550 and 600{degrees}C.

  5. Irradiation Facilities at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Gkotse, Blerina; Carbonez, Pierre; Danzeca, Salvatore; Fabich, Adrian; Garcia, Alia, Ruben; Glaser, Maurice; Gorine, Georgi; Jaekel, Martin, Richard; Mateu,Suau, Isidre; Pezzullo, Giuseppe; Pozzi, Fabio; Ravotti, Federico; Silari, Marco; Tali, Maris

    2017-01-01

    CERN provides unique irradiation facilities for applications in many scientific fields. This paper summarizes the facilities currently operating for proton, gamma, mixed-field and electron irradiations, including their main usage, characteristics and information about their operation. The new CERN irradiation facilities database is also presented. This includes not only CERN facilities but also irradiation facilities available worldwide.

  6. Development of detection methods for irradiated foods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Jae Seung; Kim, Chong Ki; Lee, Hae Jung [Korea Atomic Energy Research Insitiute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Kyong Su [Chosun University, Kwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-04-01

    To identify irradiated foods, studies have been carried out with electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy on bone containing foods, such as chicken, pork, and beef. The intensity of the signal induced in bones increased linearly with irradiation doses in the range of 1.0 kGy to 5.0 kGy, and it was possible to distinguish between samples given low and high doses of irradiation. The signal stability for 6 weeks made them ideal for the quick and easy identification of irradiated meats. The analysis of DNA damage made on single cells by agarose gel electrophoresis (DNA 'comet assay') can be used to detect irradiated food. All the samples irradiated with over 0.3 kGy were identified to detect post-irradiation by the tail length of their comets. Irradiated samples showed comets with long tails, and the tail length of the comets increased with the dose, while unirradiated samples showed no or very short tails. As a result of the above experiment, the DNA 'comet assay' might be applied to the detection of irradiated grains as a simple, low-cost and rapid screening test. When fats are irradiated, hydrocarbons contained one or two fewer carbon atoms are formed from the parent fatty acids. The major hydrocarbons in irradiated beef, pork and chicken were 1,7-hexadecadiene and 8-heptadecene originating from leic acid. 1,7 hexadecadiene was the highest amount in irradiated beef, pork and chicken. Eight kinds of hydrocarbons were identified from irradiated chicken, among which 1,7-hexadecadiene and 8-heptadecen were detected as major compounds. The concentration of radiation-induced hydrocarbons was relatively constant during 16 weeks.

  7. Status of preliminary tests on innovative basic researches for HTTR irradiation programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arai, Taketoshi [Oarai Research Establishment, Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute JAERI, Ibaraki-ken (Japan); Itoh, Hisayoshi [Takasaki Research Establishment, JAERI, Gunma-ken (Japan); Terai, Takayuki [University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan); Ishino, Shiori [Tokai University, Kanagawa-ken (Japan)

    1998-09-01

    Innovative basic researches using the HTTR concern with the basic science and applied technology which are associated with high temperature radiation environments. Proposed research themes constitute a wide variety of scientific and technological interests in the fields of new material development, fusion technology, radiation chemistry and high temperature technology. In order to demonstrate scientific feasibility and advantages in HTTR irradiations, JAERI has been conducting the preliminary tests on some selected subjects. Studies on high-Tc oxide superconductor samples irradiated by fast neutrons and annealed at higher temperatures has shown significantly improved superconducting properties. Implantation with P{sup +} ions into polycrystalline SiC samples at high temperatures up to 1200C have been found to be favorable in reducing residual defects. Candidates ceramic-based composites for structural components have been selected for characterizing micro/mesoscopic structural changes due to neutron irradiation and heat treatments. These preliminary tests are providing the technical bases for HTTR irradiation programs to be conducted in cooperation with domestic and foreign researchers. 6 refs.

  8. On the induction of homogeneous bulk crystallization in Eu-doped calcium aluminosilicate glass by applying simultaneous high pressure and temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muniz, R. F., E-mail: robsonfmuniz@yahoo.com.br [Institut Lumière Matière, UMR 5306 CNRS-Université Lyon 1, Université de Lyon, 69622 Villeurbanne (France); Departamento de Física, Universidade Estadual de Maringá, 87020900, Maringá, PR (Brazil); Ligny, D. de [Department of Materials Science, Glass and Ceramics, University of Erlangen Nürnberg, Martensstr. 5, 91058 Erlangen (Germany); Le Floch, S.; Martinet, C.; Guyot, Y. [Institut Lumière Matière, UMR 5306 CNRS-Université Lyon 1, Université de Lyon, 69622 Villeurbanne (France); Rohling, J. H.; Medina, A. N.; Sandrini, M.; Baesso, M. L. [Departamento de Física, Universidade Estadual de Maringá, 87020900, Maringá, PR (Brazil); Andrade, L. H. C.; Lima, S. M. [Grupo de Espectroscopia Óptica e Fototérmica, Universidade Estadual de Mato Grosso do Sul, C.P. 351, Dourados, MS (Brazil)

    2016-06-28

    From initial calcium aluminosilicate glass, transparent glass-ceramics have been successfully synthesized under simultaneous high pressure and temperature (SHPT). Possible homogeneous volumetric crystallization of this glassy system, which was not achieved previously by means of conventional heat treatment, has been put in evidence with a SHPT procedure. Structural, mechanical, and optical properties of glass and glass-ceramic obtained were investigated. Raman spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction allowed to identify two main crystalline phases: merwinite [Ca{sub 3}Mg(SiO{sub 4}){sub 2}] and diopside [CaMgSi{sub 2}O{sub 6}]. A Raman scanning profile showed that the formation of merwinite is quite homogeneous over the bulk sample. However, the sample surface also contains significant diopside crystals. Instrumented Berkovich nanoindentation was applied to determine the effect of SHPT on hardness from glass to glass-ceramic. For Eu-doped samples, the broadband emission due to 4f{sup 6}5d{sup 1} → 4f{sup 7} transition of Eu{sup 2+} was studied in both host systems. Additionally, the {sup 5}D{sub 0} → {sup 7}F{sub J} transition of Eu{sup 3+} was used as an environment probe in the pristine glass and the glass-ceramic.

  9. The response of previously irradiated mouse skin to heat alone or combined with irradiation: influence of thermotolerance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wondergem, J.; Haveman, J.

    1983-01-01

    The skin of the mouse foot was used to study the effects of previous irradiation on the response to hyperthermia (44 degrees C), to irradiation, or to irradiation combined with hyperthermia (43 degrees C or 44 degrees C). Hyperthermia was applied by immersing the mouse foot into a hot waterbath and

  10. Cherry Irradiation Studies. 1984 annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eakin, D.E.; Hungate, F.P.; Tingey, G.L.; Olsen, K.L.; Fountain, J.B.; Burditt, A.K. Jr.; Moffit, H.R.; Johnson, D.A.; Lunden, J.D.

    1985-04-01

    Fresh cherries, cherry fruit fly larvae, and codling moth larvae were irradiated using the PNL cobalt-60 facility to determine the efficacy of irradiation treatment for insect disinfestation and potential shelf life extension. Irradiation is an effective disinfestation treatment with no significant degradation of fruit at doses well above those required for quarantine treatment. Sufficient codling moth control was achieved at projected doses of less than 25 krad; cherry fruit fly control, at projected doses of less than 15 krad. Dose levels up to 60 krad did not adversely affect cherry quality factors tested. Irradiation above 60 krad reduced the firmness of cherries but had no significant impact on other quality factors tested. Irradiation of cherries below 80 krad did not result in any significant differences in sensory evaluations (appearance, flavor, and firmness) in tests conducted at OSU. Irradiation up to 200 krad at a temperature of about 25/sup 0/C (77/sup 0/F) did not measurably extend shelf life. Irradiation at 500 krad at 25/sup 0/C (77/sup 0/F) increased mold and rotting of cherries tested. There is no apparent advantage of irradiation over low-temperature fumigation.

  11. H2O2 Synthesis Induced by Irradiation of H2O with Energetic H(+) and Ar(+) Ions at Various Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baragiola, R. A.; Loeffler, M. J.; Raut, U.; Vidal, R. A.; Carlson, R. W.

    2004-01-01

    The detection of H2O2 on Jupiter's icy satellite Europa by the Galileo NIMS instrument presented a strong evidence for the importance of radiation effects on icy surfaces. A few experiments have investigated whether solar flux of protons incident on Europa ice could cause a significant if any H2O2 production. These published results differ as to whether H2O2 can be formed by ions impacting water at temperatures near 80 K, which are appropriate to Europa. This discrepancy may be a result of the use of different incident ion energies, different vacuum conditions, or different ways of processing the data. The latter possibility comes about from the difficulty of identifying the 3.5 m peroxide OH band on the long wavelength wing of the much stronger water 3.1 m band. The problem is aggravated by using straight line baselines to represent the water OH band with a curvature, in the region of the peroxide band, that increases with temperature. To overcome this problem, we use polynomial baselines that provide good fits to the water band and its derivative.

  12. Tensile and fracture toughness test results of neutron irradiated beryllium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chaouadi, R.; Moons, F.; Puzzolante, J.L. [Centre d`Etude de l`Energie Nucleaire, Mol (Belgium)

    1998-01-01

    Tensile and fracture toughness test results of four Beryllium grades are reported here. The flow and fracture properties are investigated by using small size tensile and round compact tension specimens. Irradiation was performed at the BR2 material testing reactor which allows various temperature and irradiation conditions. The fast neutron fluence (>1 MeV) ranges between 0.65 and 2.45 10{sup 21} n/cm{sup 2}. In the meantime, un-irradiated specimens were aged at the irradiation temperatures to separate if any the effect of temperature from irradiation damage. Test results are analyzed and discussed, in particular in terms of the effects of material grade, test temperature, thermal ageing and neutron irradiation. (author)

  13. Magnetic resonance thermometry for monitoring photothermal effects of interstitial laser irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goddard, Jessica; Jose, Jessnie; Figueroa, Daniel; Le, Kelvin; Liu, Hong; Nordquist, Robert E.; Hode, Tomas; Chen, Wei R.

    2012-03-01

    Selective photothermal interaction using dye-assisted non-invasive laser irradiation has limitations when treating deeper tumors or when the overlying skin is heavily pigmented. We developed an interstitial laser irradiation method to induce the desired photothermal effects. An 805-nm near-infrared laser with a cylindrical diffuser was used to treat rat mammary tumors by placing the active tip of the fiber inside the target tumors. Three different power settings (1.0 to 1.5 watts) were applied to treat animal tumors with an irradiation duration of 10 minutes. The temperature distributions of the treated tumors were measured by a 7.1-Tesla magnetic resonance imager using proton resonance frequency (PRF) method. Three-dimensional temperature profiles were reconstructed and assessed using PRF. This is the first time a 7.1-Tesla magnetic resonance imager has been used to monitor interstitial laser irradiation via PRF. This study provides a basic understanding of the photothermal interaction needed to control the thermal damage inside tumor using interstitial laser irradiation. It also shows that PRF can be used effectively in monitoring photothermal interaction. Our long-term goal is to develop a PRF-guided laser therapy for cancer treatment.

  14. Highly enhanced photocatalytic reduction of Cr(VI) on AgI/TiO{sub 2} under visible light irradiation: Influence of calcination temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Qi; Shi, Xiaodong; Xu, Jianjia [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Zhejiang Gongshang University, Hangzhou 310018 (China); Crittenden, John C. [The Brook Byer Institute for Sustainable Systems and School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta,GA 30332 (United States); Liu, Enqin; Zhang, Yi [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Zhejiang Gongshang University, Hangzhou 310018 (China); Cong, Yanqing, E-mail: yqcong@hotmail.com [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Zhejiang Gongshang University, Hangzhou 310018 (China)

    2016-04-15

    Highlights: • β-AgI riched AgI/TiO2 was obtained after simple heat pretreatment at 350 °C. • Greatly enhanced visible light response was observed on AgI/TiO2-350. • AgI/TiO2-350 exhibited superior photocatalytic activity and stability. • 5 times rate constant for Cr(VI) reduction was achieved. • More efficient separation and easier transfer of e{sup −}–h{sup +} pairs were facilitated. - Abstract: AgI/TiO{sub 2} was prepared using a dissolution-precipitation method, followed by calcination at different temperatures (100–700 °C). The as-prepared AgI/TiO{sub 2} powders were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), ultraviolet-visible diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (UV–Vis-DRS) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The results revealed that calcination temperature significantly impacted the visible light absorption of AgI/TiO{sub 2} along with a shift from metastable γ-AgI to relatively stable β-AgI. We found that highest photocatalytic reduction rate of Cr(VI) and β-AgI content were obtained for a calcination temperature of 350 °C. Furthermore, the pseudo-first order rate constant was five times that for a photocatalyst calcined at 100 °C. The dramatically enhanced reduction rate of Cr(VI) was attributed to enhanced visible light absorption and greatly reduced charge transfer resistance, which eventually facilitates more efficient separation and easier transfer of photogenerated electron–hole pairs to the catalyst surface. Other experimental conditions were also carefully investigated and optimized with initial AgI loading percentage (5%), catalyst dosage (1.0 g/L), coexisting organics (1.0 mmol/L EDTA) and pH (1–2). The optimal AgI/TiO{sub 2} exhibited good stability with little change in activity after 5 cycles.

  15. Ultrasonic Transducer Irradiation Test Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daw, Joshua [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Palmer, Joe [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Ramuhalli, Pradeep [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Keller, Paul [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Montgomery, Robert [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Chien, Hual-Te [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Kohse, Gordon [MIT (Massachusetts Inst. of Technology), Cambridge, MA (United States); Tittmann, Bernhard [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Reinhardt, Brian [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Rempe, Joy [Rempe and Associates, Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-02-01

    Ultrasonic technologies offer the potential for high-accuracy and -resolution in-pile measurement of a range of parameters, including geometry changes, temperature, crack initiation and growth, gas pressure and composition, and microstructural changes. Many Department of Energy-Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE) programs are exploring the use of ultrasonic technologies to provide enhanced sensors for in-pile instrumentation during irradiation testing. For example, the ability of small diameter ultrasonic thermometers (UTs) to provide a temperature profile in candidate metallic and oxide fuel would provide much needed data for validating new fuel performance models. Other ongoing efforts include an ultrasonic technique to detect morphology changes (such as crack initiation and growth) and acoustic techniques to evaluate fission gas composition and pressure. These efforts are limited by the lack of identified ultrasonic transducer materials capable of long term performance under irradiation test conditions. For this reason, the Pennsylvania State University (PSU) was awarded an ATR NSUF project to evaluate the performance of promising magnetostrictive and piezoelectric transducers in the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Research Reactor (MITR) up to a fast fluence of at least 1021 n/cm2. The goal of this research is to characterize and demonstrate magnetostrictive and piezoelectric transducer operation during irradiation, enabling the development of novel radiation-tolerant ultrasonic sensors for use in Material Testing Reactors (MTRs). As such, this test is an instrumented lead test and real-time transducer performance data is collected along with temperature and neutron and gamma flux data. The current work bridges the gap between proven out-of-pile ultrasonic techniques and in-pile deployment of ultrasonic sensors by acquiring the data necessary to demonstrate the performance of ultrasonic transducers. To date, one piezoelectric

  16. Solar Spectral Irradiance and Climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilewskie, P.; Woods, T.; Cahalan, R.

    2012-01-01

    Spectrally resolved solar irradiance is recognized as being increasingly important to improving our understanding of the manner in which the Sun influences climate. There is strong empirical evidence linking total solar irradiance to surface temperature trends - even though the Sun has likely made only a small contribution to the last half-century's global temperature anomaly - but the amplitudes cannot be explained by direct solar heating alone. The wavelength and height dependence of solar radiation deposition, for example, ozone absorption in the stratosphere, absorption in the ocean mixed layer, and water vapor absorption in the lower troposphere, contribute to the "top-down" and "bottom-up" mechanisms that have been proposed as possible amplifiers of the solar signal. New observations and models of solar spectral irradiance are needed to study these processes and to quantify their impacts on climate. Some of the most recent observations of solar spectral variability from the mid-ultraviolet to the near-infrared have revealed some unexpected behavior that was not anticipated prior to their measurement, based on an understanding from model reconstructions. The atmospheric response to the observed spectral variability, as quantified in climate model simulations, have revealed similarly surprising and in some cases, conflicting results. This talk will provide an overview on the state of our understanding of the spectrally resolved solar irradiance, its variability over many time scales, potential climate impacts, and finally, a discussion on what is required for improving our understanding of Sun-climate connections, including a look forward to future observations.

  17. Microstructure evolution in pressurized creep tube specimens of neutron-irradiated ferritic/martensitic steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ando, M.; Tanigawa, H. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai-mura, Naga-gun, Ibaraki-ken (Japan); Li, M. [Oak Ridge Noational Laboratory, TN (United States); Nakata, T. [Muroran Institute of Technology, Dept. of Materials Science and Engineeering, Hokkaido (Japan); Stoller, R. [ORNL - Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Materials Science and Technology Div., AK TN (United States); Kohn, Y. [Muroran Institute of Technology, Muroran, Hokkaido (Japan)

    2007-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: Reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steels (RAF/M) are the most promising candidates for blanket structural materials in fusion reactors. Irradiation creep has been recognized as one of the most important properties for engineering data due to the ITER test blanket structural design. In a previous work, it was reported that the relationship between an irradiation creep strain and a hoop stress for pressurized tube specimens irradiated at 573 K and 773 K up to 5 dpa was obtained. The objective of this work is to examine an irradiation creep mechanism by using a microstructural observation in pressurized tubes of irradiated F82H and JLF-1. The materials are F82H IEA heat (8Cr-2WVTa) and JLF-1 (9Cr-2WVTa). Pressurized tubes were fabricated with hoop stress conditions ranging from 0 to 400 MPa at irradiation temperatures. Irradiation was performed in the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) up to 5 dpa in the removable beryllium (RB) position. Nominal irradiation temperatures were 573 and 773 K. A small piece was cut from the center of each irradiated tube after diametral measurement. Transmission electron microscope (TEM) samples were prepared from each small piece by a focused-ion beam (FIB) method and an extraction replica method. The microstructural examination was carried out using a JEM- 2000FX transmission electron microscope (TEM) operated at 200 kV. At 573 K, Creep strain for all steels shows linear dependence on the applied hoop stress up to {approx}250 MPa, but shows larger creep strain than this tendency at the highest stress level ({approx}400 MPa). At 773 K, Creep strain indicates linear dependence on the hoop stress up to {approx}100 MPa. As results of extraction replica samples irradiated at 573 K, finer spherical precipitations were observed in highest hoop stress level. The detailed discussion will be presented along with the results of microstructure observation for irradiation

  18. Food irradiation and sterilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Josephson, Edward S.

    Radiation sterilization of food (radappertization) requires exposing food in sealed containers to ionizing radiation at absorbed doses high enough (25-70 kGy) to kill all organisms of food spoilage and public health significance. Radappertization is analogous to thermal canning is achieving shelf stability (long term storage without refrigeration). Except for dry products in which autolysis is negligible, the radappertization process also requires that the food be heated to an internal temperature of 70-80°C (bacon to 53°C) to inactivate autolytic enzymes which catalyze spoilage during storage without refrigeration. To minimize the occurence of irradiation induced off-flavors and odors, undesirable color changes, and textural and nutritional losses from exposure to the high doses required for radappertization, the foods are vacuum sealed and irradiated frozen (-40°C to -20°C). Radappertozed foods have the characteristic of fresh foods prepared for eating. Radappertization can substitute in whole or in part for some chemical food additives such as ethylene oxide and nitrites which are either toxic, carcinogenic, mutagenic, or teratogenic. After 27 years of testing for "wholesomeness" (safety for consumption) of radappertized foods, no confirmed evidence has been obtained of any adverse effecys of radappertization on the "wholesomeness" characteristics of these foods.

  19. Irradiation apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldie, C.H.; Fernald, R.A.

    1974-01-29

    An apparatus for introducing ionizing radiation into compressed gas insulation systems, such as high-voltage generators or transmission lines to smooth out electrical discontinuities, particularly those caused by foreign particulates that produce high gradients, and to increase the voltage holding capability of the system is described. The apparatus of the invention may also be used to regulate and stabilize the voltage of the system by varying the amount of applied load. A corona discharge device may also be used in conjunction with the invention. (Official Gazette)

  20. Identification of irradiated pepper with comet assay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prieto Miranda, Enrique Fco.; Moreno Alvarez, Damaris L.; Carro Palacio, Sandra [Centro de Aplicaciones Tecnologicas y Desarrollo Nuclear. (CEADEN), Ciudad de La Habana (Cuba)]. E-mail: efprieto@ceaden.edu.cu; damaris@ceaden.edu.cu; Iglesia Enriquez, Isora [Instituto de Investigacion para la Industria Alimenticia (IIIA), Ciudad de La Habana (Cuba)

    2007-07-01

    The treatment of foods with ionizing radiations is a technological process utilized in order to increase the hygienic quality and the storage time of the foods. Several methods of detection of irradiated foods have been recommended. The comet assay of DNA is one fast and economical technique for the qualitative identification of irradiated foods. The objective of the present paper was to identify with the comet assay technique the modifications of the DNA molecule of irradiated pepper storage at environment and refrigeration temperatures and different post-irradiation times for different absorbed dose values, (0.1, 0.3 and 0.5 kGy). It was demonstrated that for the high absorbed dose values was observed a greater break into fragments of the DNA molecule, which shows the application of this technique for the identification of irradiated foods. (author)

  1. Facile room-temperature synthesis of carboxylated graphene oxide-copper sulfide nanocomposite with high photodegradation and disinfection activities under solar light irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Shuyan; Liu, Jincheng; Zhu, Wenyu; Hu, Zhong-Ting; Lim, Teik-Thye; Yan, Xiaoli

    2015-01-01

    Carboxylic acid functionalized graphene oxide-copper (II) sulfide nanoparticle composite (GO-COOH-CuS) was prepared from carboxylated graphene oxide and copper precursor in dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) by a facile synthesis process at room temperature. The high-effective combination, the interaction between GO-COOH sheets and CuS nanoparticles, and the enhanced visible light absorption were confirmed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), thermo gravimetric analysis (TGA), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), UV-vis diffuse reflectance spectra (DRS) and Photoluminescence (PL) spectra. The as-synthesized GO-COOH-CuS nanocomposite exhibited excellent photocatalytic degradation performance of phenol and rhodamine B, high antibacterial activity toward E. coli and B. subtilis, and good recovery and reusability. The influence of CuS content, the synergistic reaction between CuS and GO-COOH, and the charge-transfer mechanism were systematically investigated. The facile and low-energy synthesis process combined with the excellent degradation and antibacterial performance signify that the GO-COOH-CuS has a great potential for water treatment application. PMID:26553709

  2. Facile room-temperature synthesis of carboxylated graphene oxide-copper sulfide nanocomposite with high photodegradation and disinfection activities under solar light irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Shuyan; Liu, Jincheng; Zhu, Wenyu; Hu, Zhong-Ting; Lim, Teik-Thye; Yan, Xiaoli

    2015-11-01

    Carboxylic acid functionalized graphene oxide-copper (II) sulfide nanoparticle composite (GO-COOH-CuS) was prepared from carboxylated graphene oxide and copper precursor in dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) by a facile synthesis process at room temperature. The high-effective combination, the interaction between GO-COOH sheets and CuS nanoparticles, and the enhanced visible light absorption were confirmed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), thermo gravimetric analysis (TGA), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), UV-vis diffuse reflectance spectra (DRS) and Photoluminescence (PL) spectra. The as-synthesized GO-COOH-CuS nanocomposite exhibited excellent photocatalytic degradation performance of phenol and rhodamine B, high antibacterial activity toward E. coli and B. subtilis, and good recovery and reusability. The influence of CuS content, the synergistic reaction between CuS and GO-COOH, and the charge-transfer mechanism were systematically investigated. The facile and low-energy synthesis process combined with the excellent degradation and antibacterial performance signify that the GO-COOH-CuS has a great potential for water treatment application.

  3. Evaluation of temperature variation in pulp chamber after high power diode laser irradiation ({lambda}=830 nm) on dental enamel: 'in vitro' study; Avaliacao da variacao da temperatura na camara pulpar apos a irradiacao de diodo laser de alta potencia de 830 nanometros em esmalte dental: estudo 'in vitro'

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Macri, Rodrigo Teixeira

    2001-07-01

    The aim of this study was to observe the variation of temperature in the pulp chamber caused by irradiation of a commercial diode laser operating in continuous wave with wavelength 830 nm over the dental enamel. In the first part of this study, two types of tooth models were tested: 3,5 mm slice and whole tooth. In the second part, we irradiated the buccal si de of the enamel in 2 primary lower incisors from cattle with Opus 10 diode laser for 10 s with power levels of 1 W and 2 W, always using an absorber. Two thermocouples were used. The first one was inserted in the dentin wall closest to the irradiation site, while the second was inserted in the middle of the pulp chamber. It was observed that the thermocouples registered different temperatures. Always, the dentin thermocouple registered higher temperatures. Considering the dentin records, the irradiation of 1 W for 10 s can be safe for the pulp. Further studies must be developed related to the correct positioning of the thermocouples inside the pulp chamber. This was a first step of using diode laser in enamel, and in this study, we concluded that the Opus 10 diode laser shown to be safe for this use, with 1 W power for 10 S. (author)

  4. Neutron irradiation creep in stainless steel alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schuele, Wolfgang (Commission of the European Union, Institute for Advanced Materials, I-21020 Ispra (Vatican City State, Holy See) (Italy)); Hausen, Hermann (Commission of the European Union, Institute for Advanced Materials, I-21020 Ispra (Vatican City State, Holy See) (Italy))

    1994-09-01

    Irradiation creep elongations were measured in the HFR at Petten on AMCR steels, on 316 CE-reference steels, and on US-316 and US-PCA steels varying the irradiation temperature between 300 C and 500 C and the stress between 25 and 300 MPa. At the beginning of an irradiation a type of primary'' creep stage is observed for doses up to 3-5 dpa after which dose the secondary'' creep stage begins. The primary'' creep strain decreases in cold-worked steel materials with decreasing stress and decreasing irradiation temperature achieving also negative creep strains depending also on the pre-treatment of the materials. These primary'' creep strains are mainly attributed to volume changes due to the formation of radiation-induced phases, e.g. to the formation of [alpha]-ferrite below about 400 C and of carbides below about 700 C, and not to irradiation creep. The secondary'' creep stage is found for doses larger than 3 to 5 dpa and is attributed mainly to irradiation creep. The irradiation creep rate is almost independent of the irradiation temperature (Q[sub irr]=0.132 eV) and linearly dependent on the stress. The total creep elongations normalized to about 8 dpa are equal for almost every type of steel irradiated in the HFR at Petten or in ORR or in EBR II. The negative creep elongations are more pronounced in PCA- and in AMCR-steels and for this reason the total creep elongation is slightly smaller at 8 dpa for these two steels than for the other steels. ((orig.))

  5. Effect of irradiation on the shear bond strength of self-adhesive ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Preparation was done before irradiation and resin cement was placed on the irradiated enamel and dentin surface (Groups E2, D2). The resin cement was first placed on their enamel and dentin surfaces and then the specimens were irradiated (Groups E3, D3). Irradiation was done with a total dose of 60 Gy, applied in ...

  6. Influence of irradiation with energy-rich particles on the hardness of the Fe-Cr alloy; Einfluss der Bestrahlung mit energiereichen Teilchen auf die Haerte von Fe-Cr-Legierungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heintze, Cornelia

    2013-01-14

    Ferritic/martensitic and oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic/martensitic steels are candidate structural materials for components exposed to high neutron fluxes in future nuclear applications like fusion and generation IV fission reactors. The ductilebrittle transition and its shift to higher temperatures which is predominantly caused by irradiation hardening are main concerns for these materials. In the present work, the irradiation behaviour of binary Fe-Cr model alloys, which represent a simplified model for ferritic/martensitic steels, is studied. To this end irradiation with iron ions is used in order to simulate the neutron-induced damage. Due to the limited penetration depth characterization methods suitable for thin layers have to be applied. In the present case, nanohardness testing and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) are employed. The results, including the irradiation-induced hardness change of the layer as a function of chromium content, fluence and irradiation temperature and, for selected cases, quantitative TEM analyses, were exploited to identify irradiation-induced dislocation loops as one source of irradiation hardening. Additional results of small-angle neutron scattering experiments on neutron-irradiated specimens of the same alloys show that nm-scaled α'-phase precipitates also significantly contribute to the irradiation-induced hardness increase. An Orowan model is used to estimate the obstacle strengths posed to dislocation glide by these lattice defects. The topic is stepwise extended to more complex situations with respect to the irradiation conditions and the materials. Considering simultaneous and sequential irradiations with iron- and helium-ions it is shown that the effect of helium on irradiation hardening depends on the chronological order of the irradiations and that the simultaneous introduction of helium in fusion-relevant concentrations amplifies irradiation hardening based on a synergistic effect. There is no

  7. Effects of residual stress on irradiation hardening in stainless steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okubo, N.; Kondo, K.; Kaji, Y. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai-mura, Naga-gun, Ibaraki-ken (Japan); Miwa, Y. [Nuclear Energy and Science Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai-mura, Ibaraki-ken (Japan)

    2007-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: Structural materials in fusion reactor with water cooling system will undergo corrosion in aqueous environment and heavier irradiation than that in LWR. Irradiation assisted stress corrosion (IASCC) may be induced in stainless steels exposed in these environment for a long term of reactor operation. The IASCC is considered to be caused in a welding zone. It is difficult to predict and estimate the IASCC, because several irradiation effects (irradiation hardening, swelling, irradiation induced stress relaxation, etc) work intricately. Firstly, effects of residual stress on irradiation hardening were investigated in stainless steels. Specimens used in this study were SUS316 and SUS316L. By bending deformation, the specimens with several % plastic strain, which corresponds to weld residual stress, were prepared. Ion irradiations of 12 MeV Ni{sup 3+} were performed at 330, 400 and 550 deg. C to 45 dpa in TIARA facility at JAEA. No bent specimen was simultaneously irradiated with the bent specimen. The residual stress was estimated by X-ray residual stress measurements before and after the irradiation. The micro-hardness was measured by using nano-indenter. The irradiation hardening and the stress relaxation were changed by irradiation under bending deformation. The residual stress did not relax even for the case of the higher temperature aging at 500 deg. C for the same time of irradiation. The residual stress after ion irradiation, however, relaxed at these experimental temperatures in SUS316L. The hardness was obviously suppressed in bent SUS316L irradiated at 300 deg. C to 6 or 12 dpa. It was evident that irradiation induced stress relaxation occasionally suppressed the irradiation hardening in SUS316L. (authors)

  8. Investigation of the stability of polysilicon layers in SOI-structures under irradiation by electrons and hard magnetic field influence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khoverko Yu. N.

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The properties of recrystallized polysilicon on insulator layers of p-type conductive SOI-structures with different carrier concentration irradiated with high-energy electrons flow about 1017 сm–2 in temperature range 4,2—300 К and high magnetic fields were investigated. It was found that heavily doped laser recrystallized polysilicon on insulator layers show its radiation resistance under irradiation with high-energy electrons and magnetoresistance of such material remains quite low in magnetic field about 14 T does not exceed 1—2%. Such qulity can be applied in designing of microelectronic sensors of mechanical values operable in hard conditions of exploitation.

  9. Temperature effects in photodynamic processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hovhannisyan, Vladimir A.; Avetisyan, Hasmik A.; Mathevosyan, Margarita B.; Elbakyan, Egishe G.

    2005-04-01

    Photodynamic activity of several dyes on Drosophila melanogaster at different temperatures (15-35°C) inside of test-tubes was investigated. Both phototoxic sensitizers (chlorin e6, methylene blue, etc. -group A) and non active compounds (hemoglobin, brilliant green, pyronine, etc.-group B) were used. Dyes of 10-5-10-3 M concentration were added to the food for drosophila 24 hours before irradiation. Solar radiation, narrow-band halogen lamps, LEDs and laser were used as a photo-stimulator. Irradiation parameters: I dyes in the control test-tubes at all doses of irradiation and temperatures applied percentage of survived insects was approximately 100%. In the darkness with the use of all dyes observations also indicated no damage to the insects. At the temperatures up to 25°C when using dyes of group B insects were not affected at all, while with the dyes of group A findings showed dose-dependent insect mortality. At high temperatures (30-35°C) when using group B dyes flies were losing their mobility and in the case of group A dyes the drosophila"s survival value sharply dropped. Combination of dyes from A group with some dyes from B group leads to the partial disappearance of photodynamic effect. This, probably, is concerned with the toxic photoproduct suppression by the inactive dye. Experimental model of drosophila allows to investigate photosensitization impact within wide temperature range, to find out the processes, when using combination of dyes, as well as to study photodynamic effect on reproductive functions of insects.

  10. Application of gamma irradiation for inhibition of food allergy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Byun, M.-W. E-mail: mwbyun@kaeri.re.kr; Lee, J.-W.; Yook, H.-S.; Jo, Cheorun; Kim, H.-Y

    2002-03-01

    This study was carried out to evaluate the application of food irradiation technology as a method for reducing food allergy. Milk {beta}-lactoglobulin, chicken egg albumin, and shrimp tropomyosin were used as model food allergens for experiments on allergenic and molecular properties by gamma irradiation. The amount of intact allergens in an irradiated solution was reduced by gamma irradiation depending upon the dose. These results showed that epitopes on the allergens were structurally altered by radiation treatment and that the irradiation technology can be applied to reduce allergenicity of allergic foods.

  11. Production behavior of irradiation defects in solid breeder materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moriyama, Hirotake; Moritani, Kimikazu [Kyoto Univ. (Japan)

    1998-03-01

    The irradiation effects in solid breeder materials are important for the performance assessment of fusion reactor blanket systems. For a clearer understanding of such effects, we have studied the production behavior of irradiation defects in some lithium ceramics by an in-situ luminescence measurement technique under ion beam irradiation. The luminescence spectra were measured at different temperatures, and the temperature-transient behaviors of luminescence intensity were also measured. The production mechanisms of irradiation defects were discussed on the basis of the observations. (author)

  12. Correlation between locally deformed structure and oxide film properties in austenitic stainless steel irradiated with neutrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chimi, Yasuhiro, E-mail: chimi.yasuhiro@jaea.go.jp [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), 2-4 Shirakata, Tokai-mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Kitsunai, Yuji [Nippon Nuclear Fuel Development, 2163 Narita-cho, Oarai-machi, Higashi-ibaraki-gun, Ibaraki 311-1313 (Japan); Kasahara, Shigeki [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), 2-4 Shirakata, Tokai-mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Chatani, Kazuhiro; Koshiishi, Masato [Nippon Nuclear Fuel Development, 2163 Narita-cho, Oarai-machi, Higashi-ibaraki-gun, Ibaraki 311-1313 (Japan); Nishiyama, Yutaka [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), 2-4 Shirakata, Tokai-mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan)

    2016-07-15

    To elucidate the mechanism of irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) in high-temperature water for neutron-irradiated austenitic stainless steels (SSs), the locally deformed structures, the oxide films formed on the deformed areas, and their correlation were investigated. Tensile specimens made of irradiated 316L SSs were strained 0.1%–2% at room temperature or at 563 K, and the surface structures and crystal misorientation among grains were evaluated. The strained specimens were immersed in high-temperature water, and the microstructures of the oxide films on the locally deformed areas were observed. The appearance of visible step structures on the specimens' surface depended on the neutron dose and the applied strain. The surface oxides were observed to be prone to increase in thickness around grain boundaries (GBs) with increasing neutron dose and increasing local strain at the GBs. No penetrative oxidation was observed along GBs or along surface steps. - Highlights: • Visible step structures depend on the neutron dose and the applied strain. • Local strain at grain boundaries was accumulated with the neutron dose. • Oxide thickness increases with neutron dose and local strain at grain boundaries. • No penetrative oxidation was observed along grain boundaries or surface steps.

  13. Turbulent flux modelling with a simple 2-layer soil model and extrapolated surface temperature applied at Nam Co Lake basin on the Tibetan Plateau

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Gerken

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper introduces a surface model with two soil-layers for use in a high-resolution circulation model that has been modified with an extrapolated surface temperature, to be used for the calculation of turbulent fluxes. A quadratic temperature profile based on the layer mean and base temperature is assumed in each layer and extended to the surface. The model is tested at two sites on the Tibetan Plateau near Nam Co Lake during four days during the 2009 Monsoon season. In comparison to a two-layer model without explicit surface temperature estimate, there is a greatly reduced delay in diurnal flux cycles and the modelled surface temperature is much closer to observations. Comparison with a SVAT model and eddy covariance measurements shows an overall reasonable model performance based on RMSD and cross correlation comparisons between the modified and original model. A potential limitation of the model is the need for careful initialisation of the initial soil temperature profile, that requires field measurements. We show that the modified model is capable of reproducing fluxes of similar magnitudes and dynamics when compared to more complex methods chosen as a reference.

  14. Irradiated gelatin-potato starch blends: evaluation of physicochemical properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inamura, Patricia Y.; Regis, Wellington; Mastro, Nelida L., E-mail: nlmastro@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    Macromolecular polysaccharides of large chains as starch can interlace with gelatin modifying their mechanical resistance. In this work, biodegradable bovine gelatin-potato starch blends films were developed using glycerol as plasticizer. Three formulations of gelatin/starch proportions (w/w) were used (1:0; 3:1; 1:1) and casting was the chosen method. The dried samples were then submitted to ionizing radiation coming from an electron beam (EB) accelerator with doses of 20 and 40 kGy, at room temperature, in the presence of air. Mechanical properties such as puncture strength and elongation at break were measured. Color measurements, water absorption, moisture, and film solubility were assessed. The results showed that starch addition to films based on gelatin as well as irradiation affected physical and structural properties of the films. Although the increase of starch content in the mixture led to decrease of the puncture force even in samples irradiated with the higher dose, there was a decrease of water absorption of films with the increase of the dose, and also by the higher starch content. Samples irradiated at 20 kGy presented higher moisture and film solubility. The methodology developed in this paper can be applied to other composite systems to establish the best protein:starch ratio, and the contribution of the radiation crosslinking in each specific case. (author)

  15. Tensile properties of CLAM steel irradiated up to 20.1 dpa in STIP-V

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Hongen; Peng, Lei; Dai, Yong; Huang, Qunying; Ye, Minyou

    2016-01-01

    Specimens of China low activation martensitic steel (CLAM) were irradiated in the fifth experiment of SINQ Target Irradiation Program (STIP-V) up to 20.1 dpa/1499 appm He/440 °C. Tensile tests were performed at room temperature (R.T) and irradiation temperatures (Tirr) in the range of 25-450 °C. The tensile results demonstrated strong effect of irradiation dose and irradiation temperature on hardening and embrittlement. With Tirr below ˜314 °C, CLAM steel specimens tested at R.T and Tirr showed similar evolution trend with irradiation dose, compared to other reduced activation ferritic/martensitic (RAFM) steels in similar irradiation conditions. At higher Tirr above ˜314 °C, it is interesting that the hardening effect decreases and the ductility seems to recover, probably due to a strong effect of high irradiation temperature.

  16. Triple ion beam irradiation facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, M.B.; Allen, W.R.; Buhl, R.A.; Packan, N.H.; Cook, S.W.; Mansur, L.K.

    1988-12-01

    A unique ion irradiation facility consisting of three accelerators is described. The accelerators can be operated simultaneously to deliver three ion beams on one target sample. The energy ranges of the ions are 50 to 400 keV, 200 keV to 2.5 MeV, and 1.0 to 5.0 MeV. Three different ions in the appropriate mass range can be simultaneously implanted to the same depth in a target specimen as large as 100 mm/sup 2/ in area. Typical depth ranges are 0.1 to 1.0 ..mu..m. The X-Y profiles of all three ion beams are measured by a system of miniature Faraday cups. The low-voltage accelerator can periodically ramp the ion beam energy during the implantation. Three different types of target chambers are in use at this facility. The triple-beam high-vacuum chamber can hold nine transmission electron microscopy specimens at elevated temperature during a irradiation by the three simultaneous beams. A second high-vacuum chamber on the medium-voltage accelerator beamline houses a low- and high-temperature translator and a two-axis goniometer for ion channeling measurements. The third chamber on the high-energy beamline can be gas-filled for special stressed specimen irradiations. Special applications for the surface modification of materials with this facility are described. Appendixes containing operating procedures are also included. 18 refs., 27 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Effects of electron beam irradiation on bovine pericardium tissue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polak, Roberta; Pitombo, Ronaldo N.M. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Ciencias Farmaceuticas. Dept. de Tecnologia Bioquimico-Farmaceutica], e-mail: robertaplk@gmail.com, e-mail: pitombo@usp.br; Rodas, Andrea C.D.; Higa, Olga Z. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN-CNEN/SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Centro de Biotecnologia], e-mail: andrea.ipen@gmail.com, e-mail: ozhiga@ipen.br; Kodama, Yasko; Machado, Luci D.B. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN-CNEN/SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Centro de Tecnologia das Radiacoes], e-mail: ykodama@ipen.br

    2009-07-01

    In this work, electron beam irradiation was studied as a way for bovine pericardium (BP) tissue crosslinking. BP samples were irradiated in an electron beam accelerator at different doses (12.5 and 25 kGy), at three different dose ratios (4.67, 9.34 kGy/s), in the presence and absence of oxygen. Irradiated samples were analyzed by Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC), Thermogravimetry (TGA), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and swelling degree. DSC analysis showed a decrease in shrinkage temperature. However, for all irradiated samples, the energy required in the process was higher than the non irradiated BP. The TGA analysis showed that the thermal behavior, both the control and the irradiated samples, was characterized by three stages concerned in the loss of mass. The BP structure was characterized by swelling degree and SEM. The structure of the BP tissue suffered alteration, becoming looser, or more compact. By swelling degree, when the BP was irradiated in the presence of oxygen, the swelling degree value was higher than non irradiated BP, in the other hand the swelling degree value of BP irradiated in oxygen absence were lower than the non irradiated BP. Those results indicate that the BP irradiated in absence of oxygen could predominantly crosslinks. The BP degradation when it was irradiated in presence of oxygen was confirmed by SEM. (author)

  18. Determination of absorbed dose in crystalline and thyroid gland with irradiation protocols applied in orthopantomography equipment for dental examination; Determinacion de dosis absorbida en cristalino y glandula tiroides con protocolos de irradiacion aplicados en equipos de ortopantomografia para panoramica dental

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munoz A, A. A.; Ramirez A, L. M. [Instituto Tecnologico Metropolitano, Grupo de Investigacion e Innovacion Biomedica, Medellin, Antioquia (Colombia); Sosa A, M. A.; Azorin V, J. C.; Vallejo H, M. A. [Universidad de Guanajuato, Departamento de Fisica, Loma del Bosque 103, Lomas del Campestre, 37150 Leon, Guanajuato (Mexico)

    2016-10-15

    Ionizing radiations are very useful in the medical field for the diagnostic use of different pathologies. Currently there are different technologies for diagnostic imaging using conventional X-ray, computed tomography, mammography, angiography, dental panoramic X-ray, among others. However, it should be noted that exposure to radiation in this type of diagnostic tests has increased considerably in recent years, because radiological examinations are not always carried out according to the actual clinical needs of each patient, increasing the risk to develop cancer. In this paper, the absorbed dose in the lens and thyroid gland was measured with the help of TLD-100 dosimeters located in a PMMA phantom adapted for orthopantomography (dental panoramic X-ray) equipment in 5 hospitals; using the parameters pre-configured for normal adult for irradiation. A Harshaw 3500 equipment was used to read the dosimeters, obtaining a value of 1.324 ± Sd 0.01 mGy for crystalline and 1.044 ± Sd 0.03 mGy values which are intended to be validated under other conditions and protocols. (Author)

  19. Vanderbilt University Gamma Irradiation of Nano-modified Concrete (2017 Milestone Report)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deichert, Geoffrey G. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Linton, Kory D. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Terrani, Kurt A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Selby, Aaron P. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Reches, Yonathan [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-08-01

    This document outlines the irradiation of concrete specimens in the Gamma Irradiation Facility in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Two gamma irradiation runs were performed in July of 2017 on 18 reference mortar bar specimens, 26 reference cement paste bar specimens, and 28 reference cement paste tab specimens to determine the dose and temperature response of the specimens in the gamma irradiation environment. Specimens from the first two gamma irradiations were surveyed and released to Vanderbilt University. The temperature and dose information obtained informs the test parameters of the final two gamma irradiations of nano-modified concrete planned for FY 2018.

  20. AGC-1 Post Irradiation Examination Status

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David Swank

    2011-09-01

    The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Graphite R&D program is currently measuring irradiated material property changes in several grades of nuclear graphite for predicting their behavior and operating performance within the core of new Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) designs. The Advanced Graphite Creep (AGC) experiment consisting of six irradiation capsules will generate this irradiated graphite performance data for NGNP reactor operating conditions. All six AGC capsules in the experiment will be irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), disassembled in the Hot Fuel Examination Facility (HFEF), and examined at the INL Research Center (IRC) or Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). This is the first in a series of status reports on the progress of the AGC experiment. As the first capsule, AGC1 was irradiated from September 2009 to January 2011 to a maximum dose level of 6-7 dpa. The capsule was removed from ATR and transferred to the HFEF in April 2011 where the capsule was disassembled and test specimens extracted from the capsules. The first irradiated samples from AGC1 were shipped to the IRC in July 2011and initial post irradiation examination (PIE) activities were begun on the first 37 samples received. PIE activities continue for the remainder of the AGC1 specimen as they are received at the IRC.

  1. Influence of gamma-irradiation on thermally-induced mesoscopic gelation of degalactosylated xyloglucans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todaro, S.; Sabatino, M. A.; Walo, M.; Mangione, M. R.; Bulone, D.; Dispenza, C.

    2014-01-01

    Thermoresponsive degalactosylated xyloglucans have been already proposed as in situ gelling scaffolds for tissue engineering, due to their reversible macroscopic thermal gelation at body temperature and biodegradability. The highly branched, hydroxyl group-rich molecular structure renders xyloglucans interesting raw materials also in the form of micro/nanoparticles for application as nanoscalar drug delivery devices in cosmetic and pharmaceutical formulations. Owing to their natural source, xyloglucans show high average molecular weight, broad molecular weight distribution and poor water solubility, as large and compact aggregates usually form via inter-molecular hydrogen bonding. 60Co γ-irradiation has been here applied to reduce the molecular weight. The aqueous solutions of irradiated xyloglucan were characterized by dynamic light scattering measurements and gel filtration chromatography. The aggregation kinetics at 37 °C were studied by dynamic light scattering measurements to confirm the temperature-responsive behavior of this polymer even when dispersed in water at low concentration after γ-irradiation. Irradiation dose-molecular properties relationship has been sought.

  2. {sup 197}Au irradiation study of phase-change memory cell with GeSbTe alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Liangcai; Song, Zhitang; Lian, Jie; Rao, Feng; Liu, Bo; Song, Sannian; Liu, Weili; Feng, Songlin [State Key Laboratory of Functional Materials for Informatics, Laboratory of Nanotechnology, Shanghai Institute of Micro-system and Information Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200050 (China); Zhou, Xilin; Liu, Xuyan [State Key Laboratory of Functional Materials for Informatics, Laboratory of Nanotechnology, Shanghai Institute of Micro-system and Information Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200050 (China); Graduate School of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100080 (China)

    2010-10-15

    A {sup 197}Au ion source was used to irradiate a Ge{sub 2}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 5}-alloy-based phase-change memory (PCM) cell to study the ion-irradiation effect on the properties of the cell. The PCM devices with the tungsten (W) heating electrode of 260 nm diameter were fabricated by 0.18 {mu}m complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) technology. Four different doses (10{sup 10}, 10{sup 11}, 10{sup 12}, and 5 x 10{sup 12} ions/cm{sup 2}, respectively) were applied to irradiate the PCM cell. The samples before and after irradiation were characterized by current-voltage and resistance measurements at room temperature. It is found that the cell properties (resistance value of the amorphous and crystalline states, threshold voltage, and current for phase transition, etc.) have hardly changed, even for the sample irradiated up to 10{sup 12} ions/cm{sup 2} dose, and the cell still has good set-reset operation ability (above 10{sup 5} cycles). Furthermore, the resistance ratio remains at 1000 even after 10{sup 5} cycles of the set-reset operation. The results show the PCM cell with Ge{sub 2}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 5} alloy has a strong ion-irradiation tolerance. (Abstract Copyright [2010], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  3. The status and prospects of the irradiation tests at HANARO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Man Soon; Choo, Kee Nam; Yang, Seong Woo; Park, Sang Jun [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    The integrity assessment of NPP and the extension of lifetime are being considered as important issue, and so the irradiation tests for the structural materials and fuels of NPP should necessarily be conducted. And, the capability of irradiation test is important because Korea participates in developing SFR and VHTR while the development of future nuclear systems is going on to obtain new energy sources all over the world. To effectively support the R and D for new nuclear systems at HANARO, the advanced irradiation technologies such as high-temperature irradiation, instrumentation, and long-term irradiation are being developed. In addition, the researches on the irradiation characteristics of super-conductor materials and new chemical materials are being progressed as a part of fundamental research. Korea is conducting R and D programs relevant to new nuclear systems including research reactor, future nuclear system such as VHTR, SFR and fusion reactor system. In addition, research on the irradiation characteristics of super-conductor materials and new electronic materials is being conducted as a part of fundamental research. Irradiation tests in HANARO are mostly related to the R and D relevant to the ageing management and safety evaluation of NPP and development of the future nuclear system and production of design data of research reactor. The HANARO irradiation capsule system has been developed and actively utilized for the irradiation testing of fuels and materials. The irradiation tests of materials up to the present have been performed usually at temperatures below 300 .deg. C, at which the RPV of PWR materials is being operated. As the irradiation tests of the materials and fuels for a Gen-IV nuclear system are recently required and the development of new research reactors is going on, the capsules for high- and low-temperature irradiation are being developed at HANARO.

  4. Reducing, by pulse width modulation, the curing temperature of a prototype high-power LED light curing unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ta-Ko; Hung, Chun-Cheng; Tsai, Chi-Cheng

    2006-06-01

    Third-generation LEDs have high irradiance and efficiency, but the associated temperature rise is potentially hazardous to the pulp of teeth. We evaluated, during composite polymerization, the irradiance and temperature rise of a prototype high-power LED light curing unit (LCU) with optimal pulse width modulation (PWM), and then compared the results with four off-the-shelf high-power LCUs. A cavity was prepared in a tooth, and a composite resin layer was applied and cured. For each LCU, the irradiance and temperature changes at the pulp-dentin junction were measured. Microhardness (Vickers hardness) of cured composite samples was measured for each LCU. Our prototype had a final temperature of 36.4 +/- 1.3 degrees C and irradiance of 1,182 +/- 1 mW/cm2. The unit with the highest temperature had a temperature of 48.7 +/- 1.2 degrees C and an irradiance of 1,194 +/- 1 mW/cm2. Based on the results of the present study, it was shown that PWM technology reduced the curing temperature while retaining the polymerization effectiveness of a high-power LED LCU.

  5. Mechanical analysis of ferritic stainless steel applied in radiation tubes in high temperature; Analise mecanica de acos inoxidaveis ferriticos aplicados em tubos de radiacao em altas temperaturas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreto, J.A.; Ponte, H.A.; Oliveira, V.L.; Silva, C.A. [Universidade Federal do Parana (UFPR), Curitiba, PR (Brazil)

    2008-07-01

    Nowadays Brazilian oil refineries face an important challenge: to adjust their units to the processing of more aggressive crudes. The use of this kind of oil has caused an increase on corrosion on process streams in high temperatures. This study's objective is to evaluate the changes in mechanic properties and phases processing occurred in tubes from de radiation furnaces type A268/446 Tp ferritic stainless steel tubes used in conditions of high temperatures. For comparison samples of the APM/Kanthal alloy tube were examined. Hot tensile tests were performed in the studied materials evidence bodies. The evidence bodies for the hot tensile tests were extracted from the longitudinal position of the tubes and were machined with cylindrical shape with threads. There was a series of trials for each tube (at different traction speeds) at temperature of 600 deg C. With the traction test it was possible to evaluate resistance and ductility characteristics and was used to establish criteria for quality control to ensure satisfactory performance in certain applications. Data testing creep were performed in the evidence bodies taken from the longitudinal position of the tubes in constant charge form. Data testing creep were executed in the constant stress mode at various levels of temperature. Through data testing creep it was possible to predict for how long the material is good for use. Data from testing creep were treated by the method of Larson and Miller. (author)

  6. Change of Tensile Properties of High Cr Ferritic/Martensitic Stainless Steel after Irradiation at HANARO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sung Ho; Ryu, W. S.; Cho, Hae Dong; Han, Chang Hee; Ahn, S. B.; Choo, K. N

    2005-12-15

    In present study, we evaluated the irradiation properties of high Cr ferritic/martensitic steels. These steels were irradiated in HANARO for 14 days at 297{+-}5 .deg. C, and for 15 days at 307{+-}5 .deg. C, and then the fluence was 2.9x10{sup 20}n/cm{sup 2} (E>1.0Mev). High temperature tensile test after irradiation was performed at hot cell in IMEF. Tensile test temperature range was from room temperature to 700 .deg. C. The yield and ultimate tensile strength of specimens increased, and the elongation of specimens decreased by neutron irradiation. Especially elongation was greatly decreased. As the tensile test temperature increased, the increase of strength by irradiation was diminished. But elongation was not recovered at high temperature tensile test. As the irradiation fluence increased, the increase of yield and tensile strength became larger. But the elongation was not influenced by the increase of irradiation fluence.

  7. Identification of gamma-irradiated papaya, melon and watermelon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marin-Huachaca, N.S.; Mancini-Filho, Jorge E-mail: jmancini@usp.br; Delincee, Henry E-mail: henry.delincee@bfe.uni-karlsruhe.de; Villavicencio, A.L.C.H. E-mail: villavic@net.ipen.br

    2004-10-01

    Ionizing radiation can be used to control spoilage microorganisms and to increase the shelf life of fresh fruits and vegetables in replacement for the treatment with chemical fumigants. In order to enforce labelling regulations, methods for detecting the irradiation treatment directly in the produce are required. Recently, a number of detection methods for irradiated food have been adopted by the Codex Comission. A rapid screening method for qualitative detection of irradiation is the DNA Comet Assay. The applicability of the DNA Comet Assay for distinguishing irradiated papaya, melon, and watermelon was evaluated. The samples were treated in a {sup 60}Co facility at dose levels of 0.0, 0.5, 0.75, and 1.0 kGy. The irradiated samples showed typical DNA fragmentation whereas cells from non-irradiated ones appeared intact. In addition to the DNA Comet Assay also the half-embryo test was applied in melon and watermelon to detect the irradiation treatment.

  8. Identification of gamma-irradiated papaya, melon and watermelon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marín-Huachaca, Nélida S.; Mancini-Filho, Jorge; Delincée, Henry; Villavicencio, Anna Lúcia C. H.

    2004-09-01

    Ionizing radiation can be used to control spoilage microorganisms and to increase the shelf life of fresh fruits and vegetables in replacement for the treatment with chemical fumigants. In order to enforce labelling regulations, methods for detecting the irradiation treatment directly in the produce are required. Recently, a number of detection methods for irradiated food have been adopted by the Codex Comission. A rapid screening method for qualitative detection of irradiation is the DNA Comet Assay. The applicability of the DNA Comet Assay for distinguishing irradiated papaya, melon, and watermelon was evaluated. The samples were treated in a 60Co facility at dose levels of 0.0, 0.5, 0.75, and 1.0kGy. The irradiated samples showed typical DNA fragmentation whereas cells from non-irradiated ones appeared intact. In addition to the DNA Comet Assay also the half-embryo test was applied in melon and watermelon to detect the irradiation treatment.

  9. An Overview of Irradiation Creep of Stainless Steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryu, Woo Seog [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    This paper reviewed systematically a state-of-art of irradiation creep for stainless steels to provide a background information for perform