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Sample records for temperature fixed-bed reactor

  1. Temperature and time influence on the waste plastics pyrolysis in the fixed bed reactor

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    Papuga Saša V.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Pyrolysis as a technique of chemical recycling of plastic materials is causing an increasing level of interest as an environmentally and economically acceptable option for the processing of waste materials. Studies of these processes are carried out under different experimental conditions, in different types of reactors and with different raw materials, which makes the comparison of different processes and the direct application of process parameters quite complex. This paper presents the results of investigation of the influence of temperature in the range of 450°C to 525°C, on the yield of the process of pyrolysis of waste plastics mixture, composed of 45% polypropylene, 35% low density polyethylene and 25% high density polyethylene. Also, this paper presents results of the investigation of the effect of the reaction, atintervals of 30-90 [min], on the yield of pyrolysis of the mentioned waste plastics mixture. Research was conducted in a fixed bed pilot reactor, which was developed for this purpose. The results of the research show that at a temperature of 500°C, complete conversion of raw materials was achieved, for a period of 45 [min], with a maximum yield of the pyrolysis oil of 32.80%, yield of the gaseous products of 65.75% and the solid remains of 1.46%. Afurther increase of temperature increases the yield of gaseous products, at the expense of reducing the yield of pyrolysis oil. Obtained pyrolysis oil has a high calorific value of 45.96 [MJ/kg], and in this regard has potential applications as an alternative fuel.

  2. A kinetic study of gaseous potassium capture by coal minerals in a high temperature fixed-bed reactor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zheng, Yuanjing; Jensen, Peter Arendt; Jensen, Anker Degn

    2008-01-01

    The reactions between gaseous potassium chloride and coal minerals were investigated in a lab-scale high temperature fixed-bed reactor using single sorbent pellets. The applied coal minerals included kaolin, mullite, silica, alumina, bituminous coal ash, and lignite coal ash that were formed...... when heated at temperatures above 450°C. The amounts of potassium captured by metakaolin pellet decreases with increasing reaction temperature in the range of 900-1300°C and increases again with further increasing the temperature up to 1500°C. There is no reaction of pre-made mullite with KCl...

  3. ANALISIS TRANSIEN PADA FIXED BED NUCLEAR REACTOR

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    M. Rizaal

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Desain teras Fixed Bed Nuclear Reactor (FBNR yang modular memungkinkan pengendalian daya dapat dilakukan dengan mengatur ketinggian suspended core dan laju aliran massa pendingin. Tujuan penelitian ini adalah mempelajari perubahan daya termal teras sebagai akibat perubahan laju aliran massa pendingin yang masuk ke teras reaktor dan perubahan ketinggian suspended core serta mempelajari karakteristik keselamatan melekat yang dimiliki FBNR saat terjadi kegagalan pelepasan kalor (loss of heat sink. Keadaan neutronik teras dimodelkan pada kondisi tunak dengan menggunakan paket program Standard Reactor Analysis Code (SRAC untuk memperoleh data fluks neutron, konstanta grup, fraksi neutron kasip, konstanta peluruhan prekursor neutron kasip, dan beberapa parameter teras penting lainnya. Selanjutnya data tersebut digunakan pada perhitungan transien sebagai syarat awal. Analisis transien dilakukan pada tiga kondisi, yaitu saat terjadi penurunan laju aliran massa pendingin, saat terjadi penurunan ketinggian suspended core, dan saat terjadi kegagalan sistem pelepasan kalor. Hasil yang diperoleh dari penelitian ini menunjukkan bahwa penurunan laju aliran massa pendingin sebesar 50%, dari kondisi normal, menyebabkan daya termal teras turun 28% dibanding daya sebelumnya. Penurunan ketinggian suspended core sebesar 30% dari ketinggian normal menyebabkan daya termal teras turun 17% dibanding daya sebelumnya. Sementara untuk kondisi kegagalan sistem pelepasan kalor, daya termal teras mengalami penurunan sebesar 76%. Dengan demikian, pengendalian daya pada FBNR dapat dilakukan dengan mengatur laju aliran massa pendingin dan ketinggian suspended core, serta keselamatan melekat yang handal pada kondisi kegagalan sistem pelepasan kalor. Kata kunci: FBNR, transien, daya, laju aliran massa, suspended core Modular in design enables Fixed Bed Nuclear Reactor (FBNR power controlled by the adjustment of suspended core and coolant flow rate. The main purposes of this paper

  4. A Fixed Bed Barrier Reactor with Separate Feed of Reactants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Neomagus, H.W.J.P.; Saracco, G.; Versteeg, G.F.

    2001-01-01

    A new type of gas-solid reactor was developed and characterised in the series of reactor configurations with separate feed of reactants studied by our group. The novelty in the proposed design lies in the use of a fixed bed of small catalytic particles instead of a porous catalytic membrane. The

  5. Nonlinear dynamics and control of a recycle fixed bed reactor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Recke, Bodil; Jørgensen, Sten Bay

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is twofold. Primarily to describe the dynamic behaviour that can be observed in a fixed bed reactor with recycle of unconverted reactant. Secondly to describe the possibilities of model reduction in order to facilitate control design. Reactant recycle has been shown...... to introduce periodic solution to the fixed bed reactor, a phenomenon which is not seen for the system without the recycle, at least not within the Peclet number range investigated in the present work. The possibility of model reduction by the methods of modal decomposition, and by characteristics...

  6. Dimensioning of aerated submerged fixed bed biofilm reactors ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The description of a biofilm mathematical model application for dimensioning an aerated fixed bed biofilm reactor (ASFBBR) for petrochemical wastewater polishing is presented. A simple one-dimensional model of biofilm, developed by P Harremöes, was chosen for this purpose. The model was calibrated and verified ...

  7. PERKEMBANGAN BIOFILM NITRIFIKASI DI FIXED BED REACTOR PADA SALINITAS TINGGI

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    Sudarno

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Development of nitrification biomass that is growing attached on carried material was examined by measuring its ammonium or nitrit oxidation rates. Porous ceramic rings (36 pieces were put into the fixed bed reactor (FBR . The fixed bed reactor that was operated continuously for more than 500 day was continued to be operated at a HRT of 1 day, a DO of above 5 mg L-1 and pH of 8. Ammonia concentration in the feeding was 50 mg NH4+-N L-1. At days 1, 5, 12, 20, 33 and 50, six porous ceramic rings were taken out and then ammonia and nitrite removal rate by biofilm in the ceramic rings was separately measured. The measurement of rates was done in small cylindrical glass reactors with initial concentration of ammonia and nitrite was 10 mg N L-1. Until 50 days of incubation AORs were always higher than NORs. Additionally, ammonia oxidizers attach or grow faster in the porous ceramic material than nitrite oxidizers.

  8. Kinetics of thermophilic anaerobes in fixed-bed reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, M; Romero, L I; Sales, D

    2001-08-01

    The main objective of this study is to estimate growth kinetic constants and the concentration of "active" attached biomass in two anaerobic thermophilic reactors which contain different initial sizes of immobilized anaerobic mixed cultures and decompose distillery wastewater. This paper studies the substrate decomposition in two lab-scale fixed-bed reactors operating at batch conditions with corrugated tubes as support media. It can be demonstrated that high micro-organisms-substrate ratios favor the degradation activity of the different anaerobic cultures, allowing the stable operation without lag-phases and giving better quality in effluent. The kinetic parameters obtained--maximum specific growth rates (mu(max)), non-biodegradable substrate (S(NB)) and "active or viable biomass" concentrations (X(V0))--were obtained by applying the Romero kinetic model [L.I. Romero, 1991. Desarrollo de un modelo matemático general para los procesos fermentativos, Cinética de la degradación anaerobia, Ph.D. Thesis, University of Cádiz (Spain), Serv. Pub. Univ. Cádiz], with COD as substrate and methane (CH4) as the main product of the anaerobic process. This method is suitable to calculate and to differentiate the main kinetic parameters of both the total anaerobic mixed culture and the methanogenic population. Comparison of experimental measured concentration of volatile attached solids (VS(att)) in both reactors with the estimated "active" biomass concentrations obtained by applying Romero kinetic model [L.I. Romero, 1991. Desarrollo de un modelo matemático general para los procesos fermentativos, Cinética de la degradación anaerobia, Ph.D. Thesis, University of Cádiz (Spain), Serv. Pub. Univ. Cádiz] shows that a large amount of inert matter is present in the fixed-bed reactor.

  9. Comparison of slurry versus fixed-bed reactor costs for indirect liquefaction applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prakash, A.; Bendale, P.G.

    1991-12-01

    This work is a comparative evaluation of slurry reactors and fixed-bed reactors, with special emphasis on cost. Relative differences between slurry reactors and fixed-bed reactors have been pointed out in previous reviews; the differences pertinent to indirect liquefaction are summarized here. Design of both types is outlined.

  10. Hydrogen production from cassava in anaerobic fixed bed reactor

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    Andressa Nóe Nunes

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The use of agro-industrial waste for the production of hydrogen has shown a very promising trend, because its improper disposal creates environmental problems. Thus, the objective of the research was to evaluate the production of hydrogen from cassava processing residue in anaerobic fixed bed reactor operated under progressively increasing organic loading rate (OLR of 12 kg.m-3.d-1 a 96 kg.m-3.d-1. The support material for the adhesion of biomass was expanded clay with a diameter between 2.80 - 3.35 mm, and the reactor was inoculated with anaerobic sludge pre heat-treated. The reactor was operated for 250 days and the progressive increase of ORL was carried out keeping the COD affluent around 4000 mg. L-1, throughout the operation of the reactor and varying the hydraulic retention time (HRT of 8 hours to 1 hour. The maximum yield of hydrogen was obtained in HRT of 2h (1.66 mol H2 / mol glucose. The soluble metabolites present during operation of the reactor were acetic acid (30.72% to 84.9%, butyric acid (2.89% to 29.13%, propionic acid (3.98 to 13.09%, caproic acid (0.55% and 22.79% and ethanol (3.64% to 10.46%. Methane production was observed along with hydrogen in all operating phases.

  11. Alkylation of benzene using batch and continuous fixed-bed reactors.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nenoff, Tina Maria; Buelna Quijada, Genoveva (Universidad Autonoma de Tamaulipas, Tamaulipas, Mexico)

    2004-09-01

    Alkylation reactions of benzene with propylene using heterogeneous catalysts H{sup +}-{beta} zeolite, MCM-22, and ZSM-5 were studied for their affinity for cumene production. This work focused on the gas-phase reaction using different crystalline catalysts at several temperatures and amounts of reactants using both batch and continuous fixed-bed reactors. The properties of baseline commercial H{sup +}-{beta} catalysts versus versions modified with Ga, La, and Pt were studied. Quantitative analysis of product mixture was performed by gas chromatography. For the batch reactor, {beta}-zeolite produced the highest cumene yield and selectivity of 72% and 92%, respectively, at 225 C. At this temperature, a benzene:propylene dilution of 7:1 molar ratio was the optimum. For the continuous system, cumene production is favored at lower space velocities, higher benzene-to-propylene ratio, and temperatures close to 225 C. Ga modification of the H{sup +}-{beta} zeolite significantly enhanced cumene yield in the continuous fixed-bed reactor at 225 C, from 27% of the unmodified {beta}-zeolite to 36% for the Ga-modified one. The life span of modified {beta}-catalysts was studied in the fixed-bed reactor for the first eight hours of reaction.

  12. Homogeneity of Continuum Model of an Unsteady State Fixed Bed Reactor for Lean CH4 Oxidation

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    Subagjo

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the homogeneity of the continuum model of a fixed bed reactor operated in steady state and unsteady state systems for lean CH4 oxidation is investigated. The steady-state fixed bed reactor system was operated under once-through direction, while the unsteady-state fixed bed reactor system was operated under flow reversal. The governing equations consisting of mass and energy balances were solved using the FlexPDE software package, version 6. The model selection is indispensable for an effective calculation since the simulation of a reverse flow reactor is time-consuming. The homogeneous and heterogeneous models for steady state operation gave similar conversions and temperature profiles, with a deviation of 0.12 to 0.14%. For reverse flow operation, the deviations of the continuum models of thepseudo-homogeneous and heterogeneous models were in the range of 25-65%. It is suggested that pseudo-homogeneous models can be applied to steady state systems, whereas heterogeneous models have to be applied to unsteady state systems.

  13. Transient Effects in Fischer-Tropsch Reactor with a Fixed Bed of Catalyst Particles

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    I. V. Derevich

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on analysis of small temperature disturbances in the Fischer-Tropsch reactor with a fixed bed of catalyst particles various scenarios of thermal instability were investigated. There are two possible scenarios of thermal instability of the reactor. First, thermal explosion may occur due to growth of temperature disturbances inside a catalytic granule. Second scenario connected with loss of thermal stability as a result of an initial increase in temperature in the reactor volume. The boundaries of thermal stability of the reactor were estimated by solving the eigenvalue problems for spherical catalyst particles and cylindrical reactor. Processes of diffusional resistance inside the catalytic granule and heat transfer from wall of the reactor tube are taken into account. Estimation of thermal stability area is compared with the results of numerical simulation of behavior of temperature and concentration of synthesis gas.

  14. Biohydrogen production from tequila vinasses using a fixed bed reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buitrón, Germán; Prato-Garcia, Dorian; Zhang, Axue

    2014-01-01

    In Mexico, the industrial production of tequila leads to the discharge of more than 31.2 million of m(3) of vinasse, which causes serious environmental issues because of its acidity, high organic load and the presence of recalcitrant compounds. The aim of this research was to study the feasibility of a fixed bed reactor for the production of biohydrogen by using tequila vinasse as substrate. The experiments were carried out in a continuous mode under mesophilic and acidic conditions. The maximum hydrogen yield and hydrogen production rate were 1.3 mol H2 mol/mol glucose and 72 ± 9 mL H2/(Lreactor h), respectively. Biogas consisted of carbon dioxide (36%) and hydrogen (64%); moreover methane was not observed. The electron-equivalent mass balance fitted satisfactorily (sink of electrons from 0.8 to 7.6%). For vinasses, hydrogen production accounted for 10.9% of the total available electron-equivalents. In the liquid phase, the principal metabolites identified were acetic, butyric and iso-butyric acids, which indicated a butyrate-acetate type fermentation. Tequila vinasses did not result in potential inhibition of the fermentative process. Considering the process as a water treatment system, only 20% of the original carbon was removed (as carbon dioxide and biomass) when the tequila vinasses are used.

  15. Sustainability and the Fixed Bed Nuclear Reactor (FBNR

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    Farhang Sefidvash

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Sustainability as a multifaceted and holistic concept is analyzed. Sustainability involves human relationship with elements such as natural environment, economy, power, governance, education and technology with the ultimate purpose of carrying forward an ever-advancing civilization. The Fixed Bed Nuclear Reactor (FBNR is an innovative, small, simple in design, inherently safe, non-proliferating, and environmentally friendly concept that its deployment can generate energy in a sustainable manner contributing to the prosperity of humanity. The development of FBNR will provide electricity as well as desalinated water through a simple but advanced technology for the developing, as well as developed countries. FBNR is environmentally friendly due to its inherent safety and the convenience of using its spent fuel as the source of radiation for irradiation purposes in agriculture, industry, and medicine. Politically, if a ping pong game brought peace between China and USA, a program of development of FBNR supported by the peace loving international community can become a more mature means to bring peace among certain apparently hostile nations who crave sustainable energy, desalinated water and simple advanced technology.

  16. Characteristic Studies of Micron Zinc Particle Hydrolysis in a Fixed Bed Reactor

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    Lv Ming

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Zinc fuel is considered as a kind of promising energy sources for marine propeller. As one of the key steps for zinc marine energy power system, zinc hydrolysis process had been studied experimentally in a fixed bed reactor. In this study, we focus on the characteristics of micron zinc particle hydrolysis. The experimental results suggested that the steam inner diffusion is the controlling step of accumulative zinc particles hydrolysis reaction at a relative lower temperature and a relative higher water partial pressure. In other conditions, the chemical reaction kinetics was the controlling step. And two kinds of chemical reaction kinetics appeared in experiments: the surface reaction and the gas-gas reaction. The latter one occurs usually for larger zinc particles and high reaction temperature. Temperature seems to be one of the most important parameters for the dividing of different reaction mechanisms. Several parameters of the hydrolysis process including heating rate, water partial pressure, the particle size and temperature were also studied in this paper. Results show that the initial reaction temperature of zinc hydrolysis in fixed bed is about 410°C. And the initial reaction temperature increases as the heating rate increases and as the water partial pressure decreases. The total hydrogen yield increases as the heating rate decreases, as the water partial pressure increases, as the zinc particle size decreases, and as the reaction temperature increases. A hydrogen yield of more than 81.5% was obtained in the fixed bed experiments.

  17. Hydrogen-rich gas production by steam gasification of char from biomass fast pyrolysis in a fixed-bed reactor: influence of temperature and steam on hydrogen yield and syngas composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Feng; Luo, Si-yi; Hu, Zhi-quan; Xiao, Bo; Cheng, Gong

    2010-07-01

    Steam gasification experiments of biomass char were carried out in a fixed-bed reactor. The experiments were completed at bed temperature of 600-850 degrees C, a steam flow rate of 0-0.357 g/min/g of biomass char, and a reaction time of 15min. The aim of this study is to determine the effects of bed temperature and steam flow rate on syngas yield and its compositions. The results showed that both high gasification temperature and introduction of proper steam led to higher yield of dry gas and higher carbon conversion efficiency. However, excessive steam reduced gas yield and carbon conversion efficiency. The maximum dry gas yield was obtained at the gasification temperature of 850 degrees C and steam flow rate of 0.165 g/min/g biomass char. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Complex nonlinear behaviour of a fixed bed reactor with reactant recycle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Recke, Bodil; Jørgensen, Sten Bay

    1999-01-01

    The fixed bed reactor with reactant recycle investigated in this paper can exhibit periodic solutions. These solutions bifurcate from the steady state in a Hopf bifurcation. The Hopf bifurcation encountered at the lowest value of the inlet concentration turns the steady state unstable and marks......,that the dynamic behaviour of a fixed bed reactor with reactant recycle is much more complex than previously reported....

  19. Modeling and Experimental Studies of Mercury Oxidation and Adsorption in a Fixed-Bed Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buitrago, Paula A.; Morrill, Mike; Lighty, JoAnn S.; Silcox, Geoffrey D.

    2009-06-15

    This report presents experimental and modeling mercury oxidation and adsorption data. Fixed-bed and single-particle models of mercury adsorption were developed. The experimental data were obtained with two reactors: a 300-W, methane-fired, tubular, quartz-lined reactor for studying homogeneous oxidation reactions and a fixed-bed reactor, also of quartz, for studying heterogeneous reactions. The latter was attached to the exit of the former to provide realistic combustion gases. The fixed-bed reactor contained one gram of coconut-shell carbon and remained at a temperature of 150°C. All methane, air, SO2, and halogen species were introduced through the burner to produce a radical pool representative of real combustion systems. A Tekran 2537A Analyzer coupled with a wet conditioning system provided speciated mercury concentrations. At 150°C and in the absence of HCl or HBr, the mercury uptake was about 20%. The addition of 50 ppm HCl caused complete capture of all elemental and oxidized mercury species. In the absence of halogens, SO2 increased the mercury adsorption efficiency to up to 30 percent. The extent of adsorption decreased with increasing SO2 concentration when halogens were present. Increasing the HCl concentration to 100 ppm lessened the effect of SO2. The fixed-bed model incorporates Langmuir adsorption kinetics and was developed to predict adsorption of elemental mercury and the effect of multiple flue gas components. This model neglects intraparticle diffusional resistances and is only applicable to pulverized carbon sorbents. It roughly describes experimental data from the literature. The current version includes the ability to account for competitive adsorption between mercury, SO2, and NO2. The single particle model simulates in-flight sorbent capture of elemental mercury. This model was developed to include Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms, rate equations, sorbent feed rate, and

  20. Simulation and analysis of a tubular fixed-bed Fischer-Tropsch synthesis reactor with Co-based catalyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, J.; Zhang, H.; Ying, W.; Fang, D. [State Key Laboratory of Chemical Engineering, Engineering Research Center of Large-Scale Reactor Engineering and Technology, Ministry of Education, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai (China)

    2010-07-15

    A two-dimensional pseudohomogeneous reactor model is proposed to simulate the performance of fixed-bed Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FTS) reactors by lumped thought. A CO consumption kinetics equation and a carbon chain growth probability model were incorporated into the reactor model. The model equations discretized by a two-dimensional orthogonal collocation method were solved by the Broyden method. Concentration and temperature profiles were obtained. The validity of the reactor model against the pilot plant test data was investigated. Satisfactory agreements between model prediction values and experiment results were obtained. Further simulations were carried out to investigate the effect of operating conditions on the reaction behavior of the fixed-bed FTS reactor. (Abstract Copyright [2010], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  1. Co-pyrolysis characteristics of sawdust and coal blend in TGA and a fixed bed reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Dong Kyoo; Kim, Sang Done; Lee, See Hoon; Lee, Jae Goo

    2010-08-01

    Co-pyrolysis characteristics of sawdust and coal blend were determined in TGA and a fixed bed reactor. The yield and conversion of co-pyrolysis of sawdust and coal blend based on volatile matters are higher than those of the sum of sawdust and coal individually. Form TGA experiments, weight loss rate of sawdust and coal blend increases above 400 degrees C and additional weight loss was observed at 700 degrees C. In a fixed bed at isothermal condition, the synergy to produce more volatiles is appeared at 500-700 degrees C, and the maximum synergy exhibits with a sawdust blending ratio of 0.6 at 600 degrees C. The gas product yields remarkably increase at lower temperature range by reducing tar yield. The CO yield increases up to 26% at 400 degrees C and CH(4) yield increases up to 62% at 600 degrees C compared with the calculated value from the additive model. (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Pyrolysis and combustion of oil palm stone and palm kernel cake in fixed-bed reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razuan, R; Chen, Q; Zhang, X; Sharifi, V; Swithenbank, J

    2010-06-01

    The main objective of this research was to investigate the main characteristics of the thermo-chemical conversion of oil palm stone (OPS) and palm kernel cake (PKC). A series of combustion and pyrolysis tests were carried out in two fixed-bed reactors. The effects of heating rate at the temperature of 700 degrees C on the yields and properties of the pyrolysis products were investigated. The results from the combustion experiments showed that the burning rates increased with an increase in the air flow rate. In addition, the FLIC code was used to simulate the combustion of the oil palm stone to investigate the effect of primary air flow on the combustion process. The FLIC modelling results were in good agreement with the experimental data in terms of predicting the temperature profiles along the bed height and the composition of the flue gases. (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Modelling of turbulent flow in a radial reactor with fixed bed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhapbasbayev, U. K.; Ramazanova, G. I.; Kenzhaliev, O. B.

    2015-03-01

    The data of the computation of turbulent flow in the CF- π and CP- π configurations of the radial reactor with a fixed bed are presented. The Reynolds motion equations have been solved jointly with the k- ɛ turbulence model. To couple the parameters of flows at the interface free part-fixed bed the classical continuity equations were used. The computational data are obtained for the averaged and turbulent characteristics, and it is shown that the flow in the fixed bed causes the generation of the turbulence kinetic energy and its dissipation rate; the flow in the CF- π configuration is distributed more uniformly as compared to the CP- π configuration of the radial reactor. Computed data are compared with the experimental ones.

  4. Atomic layer deposition on porous powders with in situ gravimetric monitoring in a modular fixed bed reactor setup.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strempel, V E; Naumann d'Alnoncourt, R; Driess, M; Rosowski, F

    2017-07-01

    A modular setup for Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD) on high-surface powder substrates in fixed bed reactors with a gravimetric in situ monitoring was developed. The design and operation are described in detail. An integrated magnetically suspended balance records mass changes during ALD. The highly versatile setup consists of three modular main units: a dosing unit, a reactor unit, and a downstream unit. The reactor unit includes the balance, a large fixed bed reactor, and a quartz crystal microbalance. The dosing unit is equipped with a complex manifold to deliver gases and gaseous reagents including three different ALD precursors, five oxidizing or reducing agents, and two purge gas lines. The system employs reactor temperatures and pressures in the range of 25-600 °C and 10 -3 to 1 bar, respectively. Typically, powder batches between 100 mg and 50 g can be coated. The capabilities of the setup are demonstrated by coating mesoporous SiO 2 powder with a thin AlO x (submono) layer using three cycles with trimethylaluminium and H 2 O. The self-limiting nature of the deposition has been verified with the in situ gravimetric monitoring and full saturation curves are presented. The process parameters were used for a scale-up in a large fixed bed reactor. The samples were analyzed with established analytics such as X-ray diffraction, N 2 adsorption, transmission electron microscopy, and inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry.

  5. Atomic layer deposition on porous powders with in situ gravimetric monitoring in a modular fixed bed reactor setup

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strempel, V. E.; Naumann d'Alnoncourt, R.; Driess, M.; Rosowski, F.

    2017-07-01

    A modular setup for Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD) on high-surface powder substrates in fixed bed reactors with a gravimetric in situ monitoring was developed. The design and operation are described in detail. An integrated magnetically suspended balance records mass changes during ALD. The highly versatile setup consists of three modular main units: a dosing unit, a reactor unit, and a downstream unit. The reactor unit includes the balance, a large fixed bed reactor, and a quartz crystal microbalance. The dosing unit is equipped with a complex manifold to deliver gases and gaseous reagents including three different ALD precursors, five oxidizing or reducing agents, and two purge gas lines. The system employs reactor temperatures and pressures in the range of 25-600 °C and 10-3 to 1 bar, respectively. Typically, powder batches between 100 mg and 50 g can be coated. The capabilities of the setup are demonstrated by coating mesoporous SiO2 powder with a thin AlOx (submono) layer using three cycles with trimethylaluminium and H2O. The self-limiting nature of the deposition has been verified with the in situ gravimetric monitoring and full saturation curves are presented. The process parameters were used for a scale-up in a large fixed bed reactor. The samples were analyzed with established analytics such as X-ray diffraction, N2 adsorption, transmission electron microscopy, and inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry.

  6. Conversion of Xylose to Furfuryl Alcohol and 2-Methylfuran in a Continuous Fixed-Bed Reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Jinglei; Tan, Jingjing; Cui, Xiaojing; Zhu, Yulei; Deng, Tiansheng; Ding, Guoqiang; Li, Yongwang

    2016-06-08

    An efficient process was designed for the synthesis of furfuryl alcohol and 2-methylfuran from xylose using a continuous fixed-bed reactor over a catalyst combining Hβ zeolite and Cu/ZnO/Al2 O3 in γ-butyrolactone (GBL)/water as solvent. The cooperative effect of Hβ zeolite and GBL facilitated the dehydration of xylose and enhanced largely the furfural yield. The production of furfuryl alcohol and 2-methylfuran can be simply tuned by changing the hydrogenation temperature for furfural over the Cu/ZnO/Al2 O3 catalyst. The yield for furfuryl alcohol reached 87.2 % at 150 °C whereas a yield of 86.8 % was achieved for 2-methylfuran at 190 °C. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. CFD analysis of hot spot formation through a fixed bed reactor of Fischer-Tropsch synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamed Aligolzadeh

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available One of the interesting methods for conversion of synthesis gas to heavy hydrocarbons is Fischer–Tropsch process. The process has some bottlenecks, such as hot spot formation and low degree of conversion. In this work, computational fluid dynamics technique was used to simulate conversion of synthetic gas and product distribution. Also, hot spot formation in the catalytic fixed-bed reactor was investigated in several runs. Simulation results indicated that hot spot formation occurred more likely in the early and middle part of reactor due to high reaction rates. Based on the simulation results, the temperature of hot spots increased with increase in the inlet temperature as well as pressure. Among the many CFD runs conducted, it is found that the optimal temperature and pressure for Fischer–Tropsch synthesis are 565 K and 20 bar, respectively. As it seems that the reactor shall work very well under optimal conditions, the reaction rates and catalyst duration would simultaneously be maximum .

  8. Esterification of oleic acid in a three-phase, fixed-bed reactor packed with a cation exchange resin catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Sung Mo; Kimura, Hiroko; Kusakabe, Katsuki

    2011-01-01

    Esterification of oleic acid was performed in a three-phase fixed-bed reactor with a cation exchange resin catalyst (Amberlyst-15) at high temperature, which was varied from 80 to 120 °C. The fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) yields in the fixed-bed reactor were increased with increases in the reaction temperature, methanol flow rate and bed height. Moreover, the FAME yields were higher than those obtained using a batch reactor due to an equilibrium shift toward the product that resulted from continuous evaporation of the produced water. In addition, there was no catalyst deactivation during the esterification of oleic acid. However, addition of sunflower oil to the oleic acid reduced the FAME yield obtained from simultaneous esterification and transesterification. The FAME yield was 97.5% at a reaction temperature of 100 °C in the fixed-bed with a height of 5 cm when the methanol and oleic acid feed rates were 8.6 and 9.0 mL/h, respectively. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Computer-aided modeling framework – a generic modeling template for catalytic membrane fixed bed reactors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fedorova, Marina; Sin, Gürkan; Gani, Rafiqul

    2013-01-01

    and users to generate and test models systematically, efficiently and reliably. In this way, development of products and processes can be faster, cheaper and very efficient. In this contribution, as part of the framework a generic modeling template for the systematic derivation of problem specific catalytic...... membrane fixed bed models is developed. The application of the modeling template is highlighted with a case study related to the modeling of a catalytic membrane reactor coupling dehydrogenation of ethylbenzene with hydrogenation of nitrobenzene....

  10. Continuous biodiesel production in a fixed bed reactor packed with anion-exchange resin as heterogeneous catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Yanbiao; He, Benqiao; Yan, Feng; Wang, Hong; Cheng, Yu; Lin, Ligang; Feng, Yaohui; Li, Jianxin

    2012-06-01

    A continuous biodiesel production from the transesterification of soybean oil with methanol was investigated in a fixed bed reactor packed with D261 anion-exchange resin as a heterogeneous catalyst. The conversion to biodiesel achieved 95.2% within a residence time 56 min under the conditions: reaction temperature of 323.15K, n-hexane/soybean oil weight rate of 0.5, methanol/soybean oil molar ratio of 9:1 and feed flow rate of 1.2 ml/min. The resin can be regenerated in-situ and restored to the original activity to achieve continuous production after the resin deactivation. The product obtained was mainly composed of methyl esters. No glycerol in the product was detected due to the resin adsorbing glycerol in the fixed bed, which solved the issue of glycerol separation from biodiesel. It is believed that the fixed bed reactor with D261 has a potential commercial application in the transesterification of triglyceride. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Pyrolysis of Date palm waste in a fixed-bed reactor: Characterization of pyrolytic products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bensidhom, Gmar; Ben Hassen-Trabelsi, Aïda; Alper, Koray; Sghairoun, Maher; Zaafouri, Kaouther; Trabelsi, Ismail

    2017-09-11

    The pyrolysis of several Tunisian Date Palm Wastes (DPW): Date Palm Rachis (DPR), Date Palm Leaflets (DPL), Empty Fruit Bunches (EFB) and Date Palm Glaich (DPG) was run using a fixed-bed reactor, from room temperature to 500°C, with 15°C/min as heating rate and -5°C as condensation temperature, in order to produce bio-oil, biochar and syngas. In these conditions, the bio-oil yield ranges from 17.03wt% for DPL to 25.99wt% for EFB. For the biochar, the highest yield (36.66wt%) was obtained for DPL and the lowest one (31.66wt%) was obtained from DPG while the syngas production varies from 39.10wt% for DPR to 46.31wt% DPL. The raw material and pyrolysis products have been characterized using elemental analysis thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The syngas composition has been characterized using gas analyzer. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. [Transformation of sulfur forms during coal pyrolysis and partial gasification in a fixed bed reactor].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bin; Cao, Yan; Zhang, Jianmin; Huang, Jiejie; Wang, Yang; Chen, Fuyan

    2003-03-01

    The development of various process to the pre-desulfurization of coal was drawn more attention. In present study, the transformation of sulfur forms of three different ranks high sulfur coals during coal pyrolysis and partial gasification were investigated in a fixed bed reactor. The sulfur and carbon content analysis of original coal and coal char produced were determined by LECO SC-444 and wet chemical analysis according to Sugawara's method. The results showed that half of inorganic sulfur and partial of organic sulfur were removed during coal pyrolysis. And the sulfur removal was much more than carbon during pyrolysis process; and the sulfur in the coal char, especially the sulfide sulfur was removed completely during partial gasification process for both Datong coal and Xishan coal, the degree of sulfide sulfur removal could be increased with increasing temperature. At the same time, the results of Yima coal showed that the effect of fixed-sulfur by alkaline metals increased when the temperature was higher than 700 degrees C, which attribute to the increase of the fixed sulfur reaction rate and the decrease of mass-transfer limitation.

  13. Comparison of slurry versus fixed-bed reactor costs for indirect liquefaction applications. A supplement to final report: Design of slurry reactor for indirect liquefaction applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prakash, A.; Bendale, P.G.

    1991-12-01

    This work is a comparative evaluation of slurry reactors and fixed-bed reactors, with special emphasis on cost. Relative differences between slurry reactors and fixed-bed reactors have been pointed out in previous reviews; the differences pertinent to indirect liquefaction are summarized here. Design of both types is outlined.

  14. Mathematical Modeling and Simulation of the Dehydrogenation of Ethyl Benzene to Form Styrene Using Steady-State Fixed Bed Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaidon M. Shakoor

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available In this research, two models are developed to simulate the steady state fixed bed reactor used for styrene production by ethylbenzene dehydrogenation. The first is one-dimensional model, considered axial gradient only while the second is two-dimensional model considered axial and radial gradients for same variables.The developed mathematical models consisted of nonlinear simultaneous equations in multiple dependent variables. A complete description of the reactor bed involves partial, ordinary differential and algebraic equations (PDEs, ODEs and AEs describing the temperatures, concentrations and pressure drop across the reactor was given. The model equations are solved by finite differences method. The reactor models were coded with Mat lab 6.5 program and various numerical techniques were used to obtain the desired solution.The simulation data for both models were validated with industrial reactor results with a very good concordance.

  15. Synthesis of biodiesel from waste cooking oil using immobilized lipase in fixed bed reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Yingming [School of Environment and Urban Construction, Wuhan University of Science and Engineering, Wuhan 430073 (China)]|[Guangzhou Institute of Energy Conversion, Chinese Academy of Science, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Xiao, Bo [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Chang, Jie; Fu, Yan [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510641 (China); Lv, Pengmei; Wang, Xuewei [Guangzhou Institute of Energy Conversion, Chinese Academy of Science, Guangzhou 510640 (China)

    2009-03-15

    Waste cooking oil (WCO) is the residue from the kitchen, restaurants, food factories and even human and animal waste which not only harm people's health but also causes environmental pollution. The production of biodiesel from waste cooking oil to partially substitute petroleum diesel is one of the measures for solving the twin problems of environment pollution and energy shortage. In this project, synthesis of biodiesel was catalyzed by immobilized Candida lipase in a three-step fixed bed reactor. The reaction solution was a mixture of WCO, water, methanol and solvent (hexane). The main product was biodiesel consisted of fatty acid methyl ester (FAME), of which methyl oleate was the main component. Effects of lipase, solvent, water, and temperature and flow of the reaction mixture on the synthesis of biodiesel were analyzed. The results indicate that a 91.08% of FAME can be achieved in the end product under optimum conditions. Most of the chemical and physical characters of the biodiesel were superior to the standards for 0diesel (GB/T 19147) and biodiesel (DIN V51606 and ASTM D-6751). (author)

  16. Synthesis of dimethyl carbonate from methyl carbamate and methanol using a Fixed-Bed reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, D. [Zaozhuang University, College of Chemistry, Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, Zaozhuang (China); Zhang, X. [Zaozhuang University, College of Chemistry, Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, Zaozhuang (China); Chinese Academy of Sciences, Institute of Coal Chemistry, State Key Laboratory of Coal Conversion, Taiyuan (China); Wei, W.; Sun, Y. [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Institute of Coal Chemistry, State Key Laboratory of Coal Conversion, Taiyuan (China)

    2012-12-15

    Several mixed oxide catalysts were prepared by coprecipitation for dimethyl carbonate (DMC) synthesis from methyl carbamate and methanol. During the batch process, the DMC yield was below 35 %. In order to minimize the unfavorable thermodynamic equilibrium and side reactions for the DMC synthesis, a fixed-bed reactor was designed. A maximum DMC yield of {proportional_to} 73 % could be realized over a ZnO-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst. The effects of reaction conditions for this type of reactor were investigated in detail. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  17. Kinetic studies of elemental mercury adsorption in activated carbon fixed bed reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skodras, G. [Chemical Process Engineering Laboratory, Department of Chemical Engineering, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki (Greece); Laboratory of Energy and Environmental Processes, Chemical Process Engineering Research Institute, Thessaloniki (Greece); Institute for Solid Fuels Technology and Applications, Ptolemais (Greece); Diamantopoulou, Ir. [Chemical Process Engineering Laboratory, Department of Chemical Engineering, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki (Greece)], E-mail: ediamant@vergina.eng.auth.gr; Pantoleontos, G. [Institute for Solid Fuels Technology and Applications, Ptolemais (Greece); Sakellaropoulos, G.P. [Chemical Process Engineering Laboratory, Department of Chemical Engineering, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki (Greece); Laboratory of Energy and Environmental Processes, Chemical Process Engineering Research Institute, Thessaloniki (Greece)

    2008-10-01

    Activated carbons are suitable materials for Hg{sup 0} adsorption in fixed bed operation or in injection process. The fixed bed tests provide good indication of activated carbons effectiveness and service lives, which depend on the rates of Hg{sup 0} adsorption. In order to correlate fixed bed properties and operation conditions, with their adsorptive capacity and saturation time, Hg{sup 0} adsorption tests were realized in a bench-scale unit, consisted of F400 activated carbon fixed bed reactor. Hg{sup 0} adsorption tests were conducted at 50 deg. C, under 0.1 and 0.35 ng/cm{sup 3} Hg{sup 0} initial concentrations and with carbon particle sizes ranging between 75-106 and 150-250 {mu}m. Based on the experimental breakthrough data, kinetic studies were performed to investigate the mechanism of adsorption and the rate controlling steps. Kinetic models evaluated include the Fick's intraparticle diffusion equation, the pseudo-first order model, the pseudo-second order model and Elovich kinetic equation. The obtained experimental results revealed that the increase in particle size resulted in significant decrease of breakthrough time and mercury adsorptive capacity, due to the enhanced internal diffusion limitations and smaller external mass transfer coefficients. Additionally, higher initial mercury concentrations resulted in increased breakthrough time and mercury uptake. From the kinetic studies results it was observed that all the examined models describes efficiently Hg{sup 0} breakthrough curves, from breakpoint up to equilibrium time. The most accurate prediction of the experimental data was achieved by second order model, indicating that the chemisorption rate seems to be the controlling step in the procedure. However, the successful attempt to describe mercury uptake with Fick's diffusion model and the first order kinetic model, reveals that the adsorption mechanism studied was complex and followed both surface adsorption and particle diffusion.

  18. Production of biocrudes from biomass in a fixed-bed tubular reactor: product yields and compositions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Putun, A.E.; Ozcan, A.; Gercel, H.F.; Putun, E. [Anadolu University, Eskisehir (Turkey). Dept. of Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering and Architecture

    2001-08-10

    Fixed-bed pyrolysis in a tubular reactor was conducted on three biomass samples. Euphorbia rigida, sunflower (Helianthus annus L.) pressed bagasse and hazelnut (Corylus avellana) shells, to determine the possibility of each being a potential source of renewable fuels and chemical feedstocks. The effects of pyrolysis temperature and sweep gas (N{sub 2}) flow rate on the pyrolysis yields and chemical compositions of the biocrudes obtained were investigated. The maximum biocrude yield of 45.7 wt% was obtained from sunflower pressed bagasse in N{sub 2} atmosphere at a pyrolysis temperature of 823 K and fixed heating rate of 7 K min{sup -1}. However, this biocrude yield can be compared with the biocrude of Euphorbia rigida (31.5 wt%) at optimum conditions. The biocrude yield of sunflower pressed bagasse increased by 26.4% as the final temperature was increased from 673 to 823 K whereas the biocrude yield of Euphorbia rigida increased by 30.8% more than sunflower pressed bagasse when the final temperature was increased from 673 to 823 K. The pyrolysis products were characterized by elemental analysis, high performance size exclusion chromatography (HPSEC) and {sup 1}H NMR spectroscopy, and also compared with the currently utilized transport fuels by simulated distillation. The pentane subfractions of biocrudes were analyzed for the quantification of hydrocarbons by gas chromatography. The chemical characterizations have shown that the biocrudes obtained from Euphorbia rigida, sunflower pressed bagasse and hazelnut shells were quite similar to crude oil and shale oil. 30 refs., 4 figs., 6 tabs.

  19. Post-treatment of Fly Ash by Ozone in a Fixed Bed Reactor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Kim Hougaard; Melia, M. C.; Jensen, Anker Degn

    2009-01-01

    The residual carbon in fly ash produced from pulverized coal combustion can adsorb the air-entraining admixtures (AEAs) added to enhance air entrainment in concrete. This behavior of the ash can be suppressed by exposing the fly ash to oxidizing species, which oxidizes the carbon surface and thus...... prevents the AEA to be adsorbed. In the present work, two fly ashes have been ozonated in a fixed bed reactor and the results showed that ozonation is a potential post-treatment method that can lower the AEA requirements of a fly ash up to 6 times. The kinetics of the carbon oxidation by ozone was found...

  20. A Photocatalytic Active Adsorbent for Gas Cleaning in a Fixed Bed Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Pucher

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Efficient photocatalysis for gas cleaning purposes requires a large accessible, illuminated active surface in a simple and compact reactor. Conventional concepts use powdered catalysts, which are nontransparent. Hence a uniform distribution of light is difficult to be attained. Our approach is based on a coarse granular, UV-A light transparent, and highly porous adsorbent that can be used in a simple fixed bed reactor. A novel sol-gel process with rapid micro mixing is used to coat a porous silica substrate with TiO2-based nanoparticles. The resulting material posses a high adsorption capacity and a photocatalytic activity under UV-A illumination (PCAA = photocatalytic active adsorbent. Its photocatalytic performance was studied on the oxidation of trichloroethylene (TCE in a fixed bed reactor setup in continuous and discontinuous operation modes. Continuous operation resulted in a higher conversion rate due to less slip while discontinuous operation is superior for a total oxidation to CO2 due to a user-defined longer residence time.

  1. Modeling and Experimental Studies of Mercury Oxidation and Adsorption in a Fixed-Bed and Entrained-Flow Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buitrago, Paula A. [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Morrill, Mike [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Lighty, JoAnn S. [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Silcox, Geoffrey D. [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

    2009-06-01

    This report presents experimental and modeling mercury oxidation and adsorption data. Fixed-bed and single-particle models of mercury adsorption were developed. The experimental data were obtained with two reactors: a 300-W, methane-fired, tubular, quartz-lined reactor for studying homogeneous oxidation reactions and a fixed-bed reactor, also of quartz, for studying heterogeneous reactions. The latter was attached to the exit of the former to provide realistic combustion gases. The fixed-bed reactor contained one gram of coconut-shell carbon and remained at a temperature of 150°C. All methane, air, SO2, and halogen species were introduced through the burner to produce a radical pool representative of real combustion systems. A Tekran 2537A Analyzer coupled with a wet conditioning system provided speciated mercury concentrations. At 150°C and in the absence of HCl or HBr, the mercury uptake was about 20%. The addition of 50 ppm HCl caused complete capture of all elemental and oxidized mercury species. In the absence of halogens, SO2 increased the mercury adsorption efficiency to up to 30 percent. The extent of adsorption decreased with increasing SO2 concentration when halogens were present. Increasing the HCl concentration to 100 ppm lessened the effect of SO2. The fixed-bed model incorporates Langmuir adsorption kinetics and was developed to predict adsorption of elemental mercury and the effect of multiple flue gas components. This model neglects intraparticle diffusional resistances and is only applicable to pulverized carbon sorbents. It roughly describes experimental data from the literature. The current version includes the ability to account for competitive adsorption between mercury, SO2, and NO2. The single particle model simulates in-flight sorbent capture of elemental mercury. This model was developed to include Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms, rate equations, sorbent feed rate, and

  2. Determination of the enzyme reaction rate in a differential fixed-bed reactor: a case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baruque Filho E.A.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The reaction rate of starch hydrolysis catalyzed by a glucoamylase covalently bound to chitin particles was measured in a Differential Fixed-Bed Reactor (DFBR. Under selected test conditions the initial reaction rate may represent biocatalyst activity. Some aspects which influence measurement of the initial reaction rate of an immobilized enzyme were studied: the amount of desorbed enzyme and its hydrolytic activity, the extent of pore blockage of the biocatalyst caused by substrate solution impurities and the internal and external diffusional mass transfer effects. The results showed that the enzyme glucoamylase was firmly bound to the support, as indicated by the very low amount of desorbed protein found in the recirculating liquid. Although this protein was very active, its contribution to the overall reaction rate was negligible. It was observed that the biocatalyst pores were susceptible to being blocked by the impurities of the starch solution. This latter effect was accumulative, increasing with the number of sequential experiments carried out. When the substrate solution was filtered before use, very reliable determinations of immobilized enzyme reaction rates could be performed in the DFBR. External and internal diffusional resistences usually play a significant role in fixed-bed reactors. However, for the experimental system studied, internal mass transfer effects were not significant, and it was possible to select an operational condition (recirculation flow rate value that minimized the external diffusional limitations.

  3. Co-pyrolysis behaviors of saw dust and Shenfu coal in drop tube furnace and fixed bed reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shuaidan; Chen, Xueli; Wang, Li; Liu, Aibin; Yu, Guangsuo

    2013-11-01

    Co-pyrolysis behaviors of saw dust (SD) and Shenfu bituminous coal (SF) were studied in a drop tube furnace and a fixed bed reactor at different temperatures respectively. Six different biomass/coal ratios (B:C) were used. Compared the results with the calculated value obtained by the additional behavior, CO volume yields were lower while H2, CH4, CO2, volume yields were higher. Blend char yields had a good agreement with the calculated values, and their structures remained similar with SD and SF char's. Synergy effect occurred in gaseous phase, which was mainly caused by the secondary reactions. Compared the blend char yields in the drop tube furnace with those in the fixed bed reactor, the results showed the contacting way of biomass and coal particles had little influence on char yield in co-pyrolysis process. The reactivity index of blend char achieved the minimum at B:C=40:60 and the maximum at B:C=80:20. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Alkylation of Benzene with Propylene in a Flow-Through Membrane Reactor and Fixed-Bed Reactor: Preliminary Results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sibele Pergher

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Benzene alkylation with propylene was studied in the gas phase using a catalytic membrane reactor and a fixed-bed reactor in the temperature range of 200–300 °C and with a weight hourly space velocity (WHSV of 51 h−1. β-zeolite was prepared by hydrothermal synthesis using silica, aluminum metal and TEAOH as precursors. The membrane’s XRD patterns showed good crystallinity for the β-zeolite film, while scanning electron microscopy SEM results indicated that its random polycrystalline film was approximately 1 μm thick. The powders’ specific area was determined to be 400 m2×g−1 by N2 adsorption/desorption, and the TPD results indicated an overall acidity of 3.4 mmol NH3×g−1. Relative to the powdered catalyst, the catalytic membrane showed good activity and product selectivity for cumene.

  5. Light and electron microscopic examinations of methane-producing biofilms from anaerobic fixed-bed reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, R W; Akin, D E; Nordstedt, R A; Thomas, M V; Aldrich, H C

    1984-07-01

    Ultrastructural examinations were performed on biofilms from eight anaerobic fixed-bed reactors filled with various packing materials and operated on fresh swine waste. By using light, UV, scanning, and transmission electron microscopy, the distribution of a diverse microbial population composed of bacteria and a few yeasts was determined. This is the first time that the ultrastructure of in situ anaerobic digestor biofilms has been reported. A large number of methanogenic bacteria were identified by their fluorescence under 420 nm of radiation. Of these, two morphologically distinct types were most prevalent in the films. Methanothrix spp. was present in high numbers at the film surface, whereas Methanosarcina spp. were commonly embedded in the lower regions of the film. Inhabitants of the film were surrounded by an exopolysaccharide matrix that was very dense toward the base. An extensive network of channels was observed throughout the matrix that may facilitate gas and nutrient exchange to the lower regions of the film.

  6. Catalytic steam gasification of pig compost for hydrogen-rich gas production in a fixed bed reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jingbo; Xiao, Bo; Liu, Shiming; Hu, Zhiquan; He, Piwen; Guo, Dabin; Hu, Mian; Qi, Fangjie; Luo, Siyi

    2013-04-01

    The catalytic steam gasification of pig compost (PC) for hydrogen-rich gas production was experimentally investigated in a fixed bed reactor using the developed NiO on modified dolomite (NiO/MD) catalyst. A series of experiments have been performed to explore the effects of catalyst, catalytic temperature, steam to PC ratio and PC particle size on the gas quality and yield. The results indicate that the NiO/MD catalyst could significantly eliminate the tar in the gas production and increase the hydrogen yield, and the catalyst lives a long lifetime in the PC steam gasification. Moreover, the higher catalytic temperature and smaller PC particle size can contribute to more hydrogen production and gas yield. Meanwhile, the optimal ratio of steam to PC (S/P) is found to be 1.24. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Cultivation and Differentiation of Encapsulated hMSC-TERT in a Disposable Small-Scale Syringe-Like Fixed Bed Reactor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weber, Christian; Pohl, Sebastian; Pörtner, Ralf

    2007-01-01

    The use of commercially available plastic syringes is introduced as disposable small-scale fixed bed bioreactors for the cultivation of implantable therapeutic cell systems on the basis of an alginate-encapsulated human mesenchymal stem cell line. The system introduced is fitted with a noninvasive...... the fixed bed reactor an interesting option for GMP processes. The cultivation of the encapsulated cells in the fixed bed bioreactor system offered vitalities and adipogenic differentiation similar to well-mixed suspension cultures....

  8. Design and fabrication of a fixed-bed batch type pyrolysis reactor for pilot scale pyrolytic oil production in Bangladesh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aziz, Mohammad Abdul; Al-khulaidi, Rami Ali; Rashid, MM; Islam, M. R.; Rashid, MAN

    2017-03-01

    In this research, a development and performance test of a fixed-bed batch type pyrolysis reactor for pilot scale pyrolysis oil production was successfully completed. The characteristics of the pyrolysis oil were compared to other experimental results. A solid horizontal condenser, a burner for furnace heating and a reactor shield were designed. Due to the pilot scale pyrolytic oil production encountered numerous problems during the plant’s operation. This fixed-bed batch type pyrolysis reactor method will demonstrate the energy saving concept of solid waste tire by creating energy stability. From this experiment, product yields (wt. %) for liquid or pyrolytic oil were 49%, char 38.3 % and pyrolytic gas 12.7% with an operation running time of 185 minutes.

  9. Mathematical Modelling of Catalytic Fixed-Bed Reactor for Carbon Dioxide Reforming of Methane over Rh/Al2O3 Catalyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nor Aishah Saidina Amin

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available A one-dimensional mathematical model was developed to simulate the performance of catalytic fixed bed reactor for carbon dioxide reforming of methane over Rh/Al2O3 catalyst at atmospheric pressure. The reactions involved in the system are carbon dioxide reforming of methane (CORM and reverse water gas shift reaction (RWGS. The profiles of CH4 and CO2 conversions, CO and H2 yields, molar flow rate and mole raction of all species as well as reactor temperature along the axial bed of catalyst were simulated. In addition, the effects of different reactor temperature on the reactor performance were also studied. The models can also be applied to analyze the performances of lab-scale micro reactor as well as pilot-plant scale reactor with certain modifications and model verification with experimental data. © 2008 BCREC UNDIP. All rights reserved.[Received: 20 August 2008; Accepted: 25 September 2008][How to Cite: N.A.S. Amin, I. Istadi, N.P. Yee. (2008. Mathematical Modelling of Catalytic Fixed-Bed Reactor for Carbon Dioxide Reforming of Methane over Rh/Al2O3 Catalyst. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering and Catalysis, 3 (1-3: 21-29.  doi:10.9767/bcrec.3.1-3.7120.21-29][How to Link/DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.9767/bcrec.3.1-3.7120.21-29 || or local: http://ejournal.undip.ac.id/index.php/bcrec/article/view/7120

  10. Axial Changes of Catalyst Structure and Temperature in a Fixed-Bed Microreactor During Noble Metal Catalysed Partial Oxidation of Methane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hannemann, S.; Grunwaldt, Jan-Dierk; Kimmerle, B.

    2009-01-01

    The catalytic partial oxidation of methane (CPO) over flame-made 2.5%Rh-2.5%Pt/Al2O3 and 2.5%Rh/Al2O3 in 6%CH4/3%O-2/He shows the potential of in situ studies using miniaturized fixed-bed reactors, the importance of spatially resolved studies and its combination with infrared thermography and on...... zone of the oxidation state/maximum in temperature towards the inlet. At the same time the hydrogen concentration in the reactor effluent increased. In contrast, at low temperatures a movement of the transition zone towards the outlet was observed at increasing flux, except if the self...... catalytic reactions involving different reaction zones and gradients even in micro scale fixed-bed reactors....

  11. Comparative study on pyrolysis of lignocellulosic and algal biomass using a thermogravimetric and a fixed-bed reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Ting; Tahmasebi, Arash; Yu, Jianglong

    2015-01-01

    Pyrolysis characteristics of four algal and lignocellulosic biomass samples were studied by using a thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA) and a fixed-bed reactor. The effects of pyrolysis temperature and biomass type on the yield and composition of pyrolysis products were investigated. The average activation energy for pyrolysis of biomass samples by FWO and KAS methods in this study were in the range of 211.09-291.19kJ/mol. CO2 was the main gas component in the early stage of pyrolysis, whereas H2 and CH4 concentrations increased with increasing pyrolysis temperature. Bio-oil from Chlorellavulgaris showed higher content of nitrogen containing compounds compared to lignocellulosic biomass. The concentration of aromatic organic compounds such as phenol and its derivatives were increased with increasing pyrolysis temperature up to 700°C. FTIR analysis results showed that with increasing pyrolysis temperature, the concentration of OH, CH, CO, OCH3, and CO functional groups in char decreased sharply. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Catalytic pyrolysis of Alcea pallida stems in a fixed-bed reactor for production of liquid bio-fuels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aysu, Tevfik

    2015-09-01

    Pyrolysis of Alcea pallida stems was performed in a fixed-bed tubular reactor with and without catalyst at three different temperatures. The effects of pyrolysis parameters including temperature and catalyst on the product yields were investigated. It was found that higher temperature resulted in lower liquid (bio-oil) and solid (bio-char) yields and higher gas yields. Catalysts had different effects on product yields and composition of bio-oils. Liquid yields were increased in the presence of zinc chloride and alumina but decreased with calcium hydroxide, tincal and ulexite. The highest bio-oil yield (39.35%) by weight including aqueous phase was produced with alumina catalyst at 500 °C. The yields of bio-char, bio-oil and gas produced, as well as the compositions of the resulting bio-oils were determined by elemental analysis, TGA, FT-IR and GC-MS. 160 different compounds were identified by GC-MS in the bio-oils obtained at 500 °C. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Pressurized pyrolysis of dried distillers grains with solubles and canola seed press cake in a fixed-bed reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ateş, Funda; Miskolczi, Norbert; Saricaoğlu, Beyza

    2015-02-01

    Pressurized pyrolysis of biomasses was carried in a fixed bed reactor to obtain gases, bio-oils and chars at elevated temperatures. The products were characterized by GC-MS, FTIR, viscometer, SEM, BET and EDXRFS methods. Experiments were performed at 1, 5 and 10 bar pressure and 400, 500 and 600°C temperatures. The experimental results show that in all the experimental condition the yield of bio-oil from DDGS as higher than that of canola. Yield of non-condensable gases and chars increased, while that of liquid products decreased by pressure. Increasing pressure favoured the formation of low molecular weight gas, such as H2. Maximum surface area of chars was obtained at atmospheric pressure and the surface areas decreased rapidly with increasing pressure. GC/MS results shows that the amount of fatty acids in bio-oils was increased by increasing pressure and bio-oils showed non-Newtonian behavior. Based on EDXRFS results, bio-oils and char contained lots of elements. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Effects of reaction conditions on hydrogen production and carbon nanofiber properties generated by methane decomposition in a fixed bed reactor using a NiCuAl catalyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suelves, I.; Pinilla, J.L.; Lazaro, M.J.; Moliner, R. [Instituto de Carboquimica CSIC, Miguel Luesma Castan, 4, 50015 Zaragoza (Spain); Palacios, J.M. [Instituto de Catalisis y Petroleoquimica, CSIC, Cantoblanco, Marie Curie 2, 28049 Madrid (Spain)

    2009-07-01

    In this paper, the results obtained in the catalytic decomposition of methane in a fixed bed reactor using a NiCuAl catalyst prepared by the fusion method are presented. The influences of reaction temperature and space velocity on hydrogen concentration in the outlet gases, as well as on the properties of the carbon produced, have been investigated. Reaction temperature and the space velocity both increase the reaction rate of methane decomposition, but also cause an increase in the rate of catalyst deactivation. Under the operating conditions used, the carbon product is mainly deposited as nanofibers with textural properties highly correlated with the degree of crystallinity. (author)

  15. Study on co-pyrolysis characteristics of rice straw and Shenfu bituminous coal blends in a fixed bed reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shuaidan; Chen, Xueli; Liu, Aibin; Wang, Li; Yu, Guangsuo

    2014-03-01

    Co-pyrolysis behaviors of rice straw and Shenfu bituminous coal were studied in a fixed bed reactor under nitrogen atmosphere. The pyrolysis temperatures were 700°C, 800°C and 900°C, respectively. Six different biomass ratios were used. Gas, tar components were analyzed by a gas chromatograph and a gas chromatography-mass spectrometry respectively. Under co-pyrolysis conditions, the gas volume yields are higher than the calculated values. Co-pyrolysis tar contains more phenolics, less oxygenate compounds than calculated values. The addition of biomass changes the atmosphere during the pyrolysis process and promotes tar decomposition. The SEM results show that the differences between the blended char and their parents char are not significant. The results of char yields and ultimate analysis also show that no significant interactions exist between the two kinds of particles. The changes of gas yield and components are caused by the secondary reactions and tar decomposition. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. A two-stage fixed-bed reactor for direct hydrotreatment of volatiles from the hydropyrolysis of biomass: effect of catalyst temperature, pressure and catalyst ageing time on product characteristics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pindoria, R.V.; Megaritis, A.; Herod, A.A.; Kandiyoti, R. [Imperial College of Science, Technology and Medicine, London (United Kingdom). Dept. of Chemical Engineering and Chemical Technology

    1998-12-01

    This investigation involved the hydropyrolysis of biomass (eucalyptus globulus) and the immediate catalytic hydrocracking of pyrolytic oils in the second stage of the reactor. The effects of temperature, pressure and the catalyst ageing time on the final product tar have been studied using the catalyst Zeolite H-ZSM5. The catalytically hydrocracked tar/oil products were characterised and compared with the hydropyrolysis product from the first stage of the reactor to determine the effect of catalytic hydrocracking. The carbon deposition on the catalyst has been examined using thermogravimetric analysis. The tar yields after catalytic hydrocracking decreased with increasing pressure and temperature of the cracking stage. The tar yields at 10 bar pressure were greater than those at 40 bar pressure. The fresh zeolite catalyst trapped more than 40% of the product from the hydropyrolysis stage and TGA evidence indicated that this was not as carbon deposition but as volatiles trapped in the zeolite matrix. Reuse of the catalyst resulted in little more uptake of volatiles; however, extended use of the catalyst did not result in increased yields of liquid products but in increased production of light volatiles or gas. The H-ZSM5 catalyst appeared to act as a more active cracking catalyst rather than to promote hydrogenation or deoxygenation of the liquids produced in the hydropyrolysis stage. Characterisation of the liquids by SEC and UV fluorescence indicated that structural changes were relatively minor despite the significant changes in yields of liquids with process conditions. Available reaction routes do not appear to allow specific deoxygenation pathways to predominate without disintegration of parent molecules to lighter volatiles, under the conditions used here. 41 refs., 10 figs., 4 tabs.

  17. Evaluation of a catalytic fixed bed reactor for sulphur trioxide decomposition / Barend Frederik Stander

    OpenAIRE

    Stander, Barend Frederik

    2014-01-01

    The world energy supply and demand, together with limited available resources have resulted in the need to develop alternative energy sources to ensure sustainable and expanding economies. Hydrogen is being considered a viable option with particular application to fuel cells. The Hybrid Sulphur cycle has been identified as a process to produce clean hydrogen (carbon free process) and can have economic benefits when coupled to nuclear reactors (High Temperature Gas Reactor) or solar heaters fo...

  18. Media arrangement impacts cell growth in anaerobic fixed-bed reactors treating sugarcane vinasse: Structured vs. randomic biomass immobilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Aquino, Samuel; Fuess, Lucas Tadeu; Pires, Eduardo Cleto

    2017-07-01

    This study reports on the application of an innovative structured-bed reactor (FVR) as an alternative to conventional packed-bed reactors (PBRs) to treat high-strength solid-rich wastewaters. Using the FVR prevents solids from accumulating within the fixed-bed, while maintaining the advantages of the biomass immobilization. The long-term operation (330days) of a FVR and a PBR applied to sugarcane vinasse under increasing organic loads (2.4-18.0kgCODm -3 day -1 ) was assessed, focusing on the impacts of the different media arrangements over the production and retention of biomass. Much higher organic matter degradation rates, as well as long-term operational stability and high conversion efficiencies (>80%) confirmed that the FVR performed better than the PBR. Despite the equivalent operating conditions, the biomass growth yield was different in both reactors, i.e., 0.095gVSSg -1 COD (FVR) and 0.066gVSSg -1 COD (PBR), indicating a clear control of the media arrangement over the biomass production in fixed-bed reactors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Light and Electron Microscopic Examinations of Methane-Producing Biofilms from Anaerobic Fixed-Bed Reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Ralph W.; Akin, Debra E.; Nordstedt, Roger A.; Thomas, Michael V.; Aldrich, Henry C.

    1984-01-01

    Ultrastructural examinations were performed on biofilms from eight anaerobic fixed-bed reactors filled with various packing materials and operated on fresh swine waste. By using light, UV, scanning, and transmission electron microscopy, the distribution of a diverse microbial population composed of bacteria and a few yeasts was determined. This is the first time that the ultrastructure of in situ anaerobic digestor biofilms has been reported. A large number of methanogenic bacteria were identified by their fluorescence under 420 nm of radiation. Of these, two morphologically distinct types were most prevalent in the films. Methanothrix spp. was present in high numbers at the film surface, whereas Methanosarcina spp. were commonly embedded in the lower regions of the film. Inhabitants of the film were surrounded by an exopolysaccharide matrix that was very dense toward the base. An extensive network of channels was observed throughout the matrix that may facilitate gas and nutrient exchange to the lower regions of the film. Images PMID:16346579

  20. Anaerobic degradation of landfill leachate using an upflow anaerobic fixed-bed reactor with microbial sulfate reduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ben Dhia Thabet, Olfa [Laboratory of Ecology and Microbial Technology, National Institute of Applied Sciences and Technology, 2 Boulevard de la Terre, P.O. Box 676, 1080 Tunis (Tunisia); Laboratory of Microbiology IRD, UMR 180, University of Provence and the Mediterranean, ESIL P.O. Box 925, 163 Avenue Luminy, 13288 Marseille Cedex 9 (France); Bouallagui, Hassib, E-mail: hassibbouallagui@yahoo.fr [Laboratory of Ecology and Microbial Technology, National Institute of Applied Sciences and Technology, 2 Boulevard de la Terre, P.O. Box 676, 1080 Tunis (Tunisia); Cayol, Jean-luc; Ollivier, Bernard; Fardeau, Marie-Laure [Laboratory of Microbiology IRD, UMR 180, University of Provence and the Mediterranean, ESIL P.O. Box 925, 163 Avenue Luminy, 13288 Marseille Cedex 9 (France); Hamdi, Moktar [Laboratory of Ecology and Microbial Technology, National Institute of Applied Sciences and Technology, 2 Boulevard de la Terre, P.O. Box 676, 1080 Tunis (Tunisia)

    2009-08-15

    This study evaluated the anaerobic degradation of landfill leachate and sulfate reduction as a function of COD/(SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}) ratio in an upflow anaerobic fixed-bed reactor. The reactor, which was inoculated with a mixed consortium, was operated under a constant hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 5 days. We investigated the effect of COD/(SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}) ratio variation on the sulfate reduction efficiency, hydrogen sulfide production, chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal, conductivity, and pH variation. The best reactor performance, with significant sulfate reduction efficiency and COD removal efficiency of 91% and 87%, respectively, was reached under a COD/(SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}) ratio of 1.17. Under these conditions, microscopic analysis showed the abundance of vibrios and rod-shaped bacterial cells. Two anaerobic bacteria were isolated from the reactor sludge. Phylogenetic studies performed on these strains identified strain A1 as affiliated to Clostridium genus and strain H1 as a new species of sulfate-reducing bacteria affiliated to the Desulfovibrio genus. The closest phylogenetic relative of strain H1 was Desulfovibrio desulfuricans, at 96% similarity for partial 16S RNA gene sequence data. Physiological and metabolic characterization was performed for this strain.

  1. Mathematical Modelling of Catalytic Fixed-Bed Reactor for Carbon Dioxide Reforming of Methane over Rh/Al2O3 Catalyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    New Pei Yee

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available A one-dimensional mathematical model was developed to simulate the performance of catalytic fixed bedreactor for carbon dioxide reforming of methane over Rh/Al2O3 catalyst at atmospheric pressure. The reactionsinvolved in the system are carbon dioxide reforming of methane (CORM and reverse water gas shiftreaction (RWGS. The profiles of CH4 and CO2 conversions, CO and H2 yields, molar flow rate and molefraction of all species as well as reactor temperature along the axial bed of catalyst were simulated. In addition,the effects of different reactor temperature on the reactor performance were also studied. The modelscan also be applied to analyze the performances of lab-scale micro reactor as well as pilot-plant scale reactorwith certain modifications and model verification with experimental data. © 2008 BCREC UNDIP. All rights reserved.[Received: 20 August 2008; Accepted: 25 September 2008][How to Cite: N.A.S. Amin, I. Istadi, N.P. Yee. (2008. Mathematical Modelling of Catalytic Fixed-Bed Reactor for Carbon Dioxide Reforming of Methane over Rh/Al2O3 Catalyst. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering and Catalysis, 3 (1-3: 21-29. doi:10.9767/bcrec.3.1-3.19.21-29

  2. Sintering study in vertical fixed bed reactor for synthetic aggregate production; Estudo da sinterizacao em reator vertical de leito fixo para producao de agregado sintetico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quaresma, D.S.; Neves, A.S.S.; Melo, A.O.; Pereira, L.F.S.; Bezerra, P.T.S.; Macedo, E.N.; Souza, J.A.S., E-mail: danysq@gmail.com [Universidade Federal do Para (UFPA), Belem, PA (Brazil). Faculdade de Engenharia Quimica

    2017-04-15

    The synthetic aggregates are being employed in civil construction for the reduction of mineral extraction activities. Within this context, the recycling of industrial waste is the basis of the majority of processes to reduce the exploitation of mineral resources. In this work the sintering in a vertical fixed bed reactor for synthetic aggregate production using 20% pellets and 80% charcoal was studied. The pellets were prepared from a mixture containing clay, charcoal and fly ash. Two experiments varying the speed of air sucking were carried out. The material produced was analyzed by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, measures of their ceramic properties, and particle size analysis. The results showed that the solid-state reactions, during the sintering process, were efficient and the produced material was classified as coarse lightweight aggregate. The process is interesting for the sintering of aggregates, and can be controlled by composition, particle size, temperature gradient and gaseous flow. (author)

  3. Development of a fixed-bed anammox reactor with high treatment potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, Hiroyuki; Kawamura, Kimito; Nishiyama, Takashi; Fujii, Takao; Furukawa, Kenji

    2013-02-01

    A plug-flow type anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) reactor was developed using malt ceramics (MC) produced from carbonized spent grains as the biomass carriers for anammox sludge. Partial nitrified effluent of the filtrate from the sludge dehydrator of a brewery company was used as influent to a 20 L anammox reactor using MC. An average volumetric nitrogen removal rate (VNR) of 8.78 kg-N/m(3)/day was maintained stably for 76 days with 1 h of HRT. In a larger anammox reactor (400 L), an average VNR of 4.84 kg-N/m(3)/day could be maintained for 86 days during the treatment of low strength synthetic inorganic wastewater. As a result of bacterial community analysis for the 20 L anammox reactor, Asahi BRW1, probably originating from the wastewater collected at Asahi Breweries, was detected as the dominant anammox bacterium. These anammox reactors were characterized by a high NH(4)-N removal capacity for low strength wastewater with a short hydraulic retention time.

  4. Absorption of CO2 and H2S in Aqueous Alkanolamine Solutions using a Fixed-Bed Reactor with Cocurrent Downflow Operation in the Pulsing Flow Regime

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Versteeg, G.F.; Swaaij, W.P.M. van

    1988-01-01

    Absorption rates of H2S and CO2 in several aqueous alkanolamines in a cocurrent downflow fixed-bed reactor operated in the pulse flow regime have been measured in order to obtain information on the potential selectivity and on the mass transfer parameters. From these experiments it can be concluded

  5. Structural characterisation of pretreated solids from flow-through liquid hot water treatment of sugarcane bagasse in a fixed-bed reactor

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Reddy, P

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Untreated sugarcane bagasse and sugarcane bagasse pretreated with flow-through liquid hot water (LHW) treatment (170-207°C and 204-250 ml/min) in a fixed-bed reactor have been structurally characterised. Field emission gun scanning electron...

  6. Factors affecting biological reduction of CO{sub 2} into CH{sub 4} using a hydrogenotrophic methanogen in a fixed bed reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jae Hyung; Pak, Daewon [Seoul National University of Science and Technology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Chang, Won Seok [Korea District Heating Corp, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    Biological conversion of CO{sub 2} was examined in a fixed bed reactor inoculated with anaerobic mixed culture to investigate influencing factors, the type of packing material and the composition of the feeding gas mixture. During the operation of the fixed bed reactor by feeding the gas mixture (80% H{sub 2} and 20% CO{sub 2} based on volume basis), the volumetric CO{sub 2} conversion rate was higher in the fixed bed reactor packed with sponge due to its large surface area and high mass transfer from gas to liquid phase compared with PS ball. Carbon dioxide loaded into the fixed bed reactor was not completely converted because some of H{sub 2} was used for biomass growth. When a mole ratio of H{sub 2} to CO{sub 2} in the feeding gas mixture increased from 4 to 5, CO{sub 2} was completely converted into CH{sub 4}. The packing material with large surface area is effective in treating gaseous substrate such as CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}. H{sub 2}, electron donor, should be providing more than required according to stoichiometry because some of it is used for biomass growth.

  7. Electrochemical treatment of water containing Microcystis aeruginosa in a fixed bed reactor with three-dimensional conductive diamond anodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mascia, Michele, E-mail: michele.mascia@unica.it; Monasterio, Sara; Vacca, Annalisa; Palmas, Simonetta

    2016-12-05

    Highlights: • Inactivation of M. aeruginosa was achieved by electrolysis with BDD anodes. • A fixed bed reactor with 3-D electrodes was tested in batch and continuous mode. • The kinetics of the process was determined from batch experiments. • A mathematical model of the process was implemented and validated. • The model was used to predict the system behaviour under different conditions. - Abstract: An electrochemical treatment was investigated to remove Microcystis aeruginosa from water. A fixed bed reactor in flow was tested, which was equipped with electrodes constituted by stacks of grids electrically connected in parallel, with the electric field parallel to the fluid flow. Conductive diamond were used as anodes, platinised Ti as cathode. Electrolyses were performed in continuous and in batch recirculated mode with flow rates corresponding to Re from 10 to 160, current densities in the range 10–60 A m{sup −2} and Cl{sup −} concentrations up to 600 g m{sup −3}. The absorbance of chlorophyll-a pigment and the concentration of products and by-products of electrolysis were measured. In continuous experiments without algae in the inlet stream, total oxidants concentrations as equivalent Cl{sub 2}, of about 0.7 g Cl{sub 2} m{sup −3} were measured; the maximum values were obtained at Re = 10 and i = 25 A m{sup −2}, with values strongly dependent on the concentration of Cl{sup −}. The highest algae inactivation was obtained under the operative conditions of maximum generation of oxidants; in the presence of microalgae the oxidants concentrations were generally below the detection limit. Results indicated that most of the bulk oxidants electrogenerated is constituted by active chlorine. The prevailing mechanism of M. aeruginosa inactivation is the disinfection by bulk oxidants. The experimental data were quantitatively interpreted through a simple plug flow model, in which the axial dispersion accounts for the non-ideal flow behaviour of the

  8. Treatment of petroleum refinery wastewater containing heavily polluting substances in an aerobic submerged fixed-bed reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vendramel, S; Bassin, J P; Dezotti, M; Sant'Anna, G L

    2015-01-01

    Petroleum refineries produce large amount of wastewaters, which often contain a wide range of different compounds. Some of these constituents may be recalcitrant and therefore difficult to be treated biologically. This study evaluated the capability of an aerobic submerged fixed-bed reactor (ASFBR) containing a corrugated PVC support material for biofilm attachment to treat a complex and high-strength organic wastewater coming from a petroleum refinery. The reactor operation was divided into five experimental runs which lasted more than 250 days. During the reactor operation, the applied volumetric organic load was varied within the range of 0.5-2.4 kgCOD.m(-3).d(-1). Despite the inherent fluctuations on the characteristics of the complex wastewater and the slight decrease in the reactor performance when the influent organic load was increased, the ASFBR showed good stability and allowed to reach chemical oxygen demand, dissolved organic carbon and total suspended solids removals up to 91%, 90% and 92%, respectively. Appreciable ammonium removal was obtained (around 90%). Some challenging aspects of reactor operation such as biofilm quantification and important biofilm constituents (e.g. polysaccharides (PS) and proteins (PT)) were also addressed in this work. Average PS/volatile attached solids (VAS) and PT/VAS ratios were around 6% and 50%, respectively. The support material promoted biofilm attachment without appreciable loss of solids and allowed long-term operation without clogging. Microscopic observations of the microbial community revealed great diversity of higher organisms, such as protozoa and rotifers, suggesting that toxic compounds found in the wastewater were possibly removed in the biofilm.

  9. Modeling and Performance of Waste Tires as Media in Fixed Bed Sequence Batch Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Derakhshan

    2016-12-01

    Results: The maximum removal efficiencies of dissolved chemical oxygen demand for FBSBR and SBR reactors were 98.3 % and 97.9 %, respectively. In addition, Stover-Kincannon model provided a very suitable fitness (R2   > 0.99 for loading the bioreactor FBSBR. Conclusion: According to the results, not only waste tires can be reused, but also these wastes can be employed as a proper biological bed in wastewater refineries to improve their efficiency.

  10. Phosphorus removal by a fixed-bed hybrid polymer nanocomposite biofilm reactor

    OpenAIRE

    Oliveira, M.; Rodrigues,A.L.; Ribeiro, D.C.; Nogueira, R; Machado, A.V.

    2014-01-01

    Eutrophication is one of the main challenges regarding the ecological quality of surface waters, phosphorus bioavailability being its main driver. In this context, a novel hybrid polymer nanocomposite (HPN-Pr) biofilm reactor aimed at integrated chemical phosphorus adsorption and biological removal was conceived. The assays pointed to removal of 1.2 mg P/g of reactive phosphorus and 1.01 mg P/g of total phosphorus under steady-state conditions. A mathematical adsorption–biological model was a...

  11. Benzene and ethylbenzene removal by denitrifying culture in a horizontal fixed bed anaerobic reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gusmao, V.R.; Chinalia, F.A.; Sakamoto, I.K.; Varesche [Univ. de Sao Paulo (Brazil). Dept. de Hidraulica e Saneamento; Thiemann, O.H. [Univ. de Sao Paulo (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica de Sao Carlos

    2004-07-01

    Benzene, ethylbenzene, toluene, and xylene are toxic and are important constituents of gasoline and other petroleum fuels. These compounds are potential health hazards because of their high solubility and hence their ability to contaminate groundwater. Anaerobic immobilized biomass is a way of treating wastewater contaminated with the above compounds. The performance of a specially adapted biofilm is critical in the viability of this idea. In this investigation, an especially adapted biofilm was obtained using a denitrifying bacterial strain isolated from a slaughterhouse wastewater treatment plant. The strain was cultured in a liquid medium with added ethanol, nitrate, ethylbenzene, and benzene. To assess the viability of the strain for the purposes of degradation of ethylbenzene, and benzene two separate horizontal reactors were prepared with polyurethane foam in order to immobilize the biomass. Various concentrations of the two compounds were admitted. At high concentrations chemical oxygen demand decreased dramatically and benzene and ethylbenzene removal almost 100 per cent. DNA sequencing of the biofilm showed that Paracoccus versutus was the dominant species in the ethylbenzene reactor. 7 refs., 6 figs.

  12. Thin-film fixed-bed reactor for solar photocatalytic inactivation of Aeromonas hydrophila: influence of water quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Sadia J; Reed, Robert H; Rasul, Mohammad G

    2012-11-29

    Controlling fish disease is one of the major concerns in contemporary aquaculture. The use of antibiotics or chemical disinfection cannot provide a healthy aquaculture system without residual effects. Water quality is also important in determining the success or failure of fish production. Several solar photocatalytic reactors have been used to treat drinking water or waste water without leaving chemical residues. This study has investigated the impact of several key aspects of water quality on the inactivation of the pathogenic bacterium Aeromonas hydrophila using a pilot-scale thin-film fixed-bed reactor (TFFBR) system. The level of inactivation of Aeromonas hydrophila ATCC 35654 was determined using a TFFBR with a photocatalytic area of 0.47 m(2) under the influence of various water quality variables (pH, conductivity, turbidity and colour) under high solar irradiance conditions (980-1100 W m(-2)), at a flow rate of 4.8 L h(-1) through the reactor. Bacterial enumeration were obtained through conventional plate count using trypticase soy agar media, cultured in conventional aerobic conditions to detect healthy cells and under ROS-neutralised conditions to detect both healthy and sub-lethally injured (oxygen-sensitive) cells. The results showed that turbidity has a major influence on solar photocatalytic inactivation of A. hydrophila. Humic acids appear to decrease TiO(2) effectiveness under full sunlight and reduce microbial inactivation. pH in the range 7-9 and salinity both have no major effect on the extent of photoinactivation or sub-lethal injury. This study demonstrates the effectiveness of the TFFBR in the inactivation of Aeromonas hydrophila under the influence of several water quality variables at high solar irradiance, providing an opportunity for the application of solar photocatalysis in aquaculture systems, as long as turbidity remains low.

  13. Thin-film fixed-bed reactor for solar photocatalytic inactivation of Aeromonas hydrophila: influence of water quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khan Sadia J

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Controlling fish disease is one of the major concerns in contemporary aquaculture. The use of antibiotics or chemical disinfection cannot provide a healthy aquaculture system without residual effects. Water quality is also important in determining the success or failure of fish production. Several solar photocatalytic reactors have been used to treat drinking water or waste water without leaving chemical residues. This study has investigated the impact of several key aspects of water quality on the inactivation of the pathogenic bacterium Aeromonas hydrophila using a pilot-scale thin-film fixed-bed reactor (TFFBR system. Results The level of inactivation of Aeromonas hydrophila ATCC 35654 was determined using a TFFBR with a photocatalytic area of 0.47 m2 under the influence of various water quality variables (pH, conductivity, turbidity and colour under high solar irradiance conditions (980–1100 W m-2, at a flow rate of 4.8 L h-1 through the reactor. Bacterial enumeration were obtained through conventional plate count using trypticase soy agar media, cultured in conventional aerobic conditions to detect healthy cells and under ROS-neutralised conditions to detect both healthy and sub-lethally injured (oxygen-sensitive cells. The results showed that turbidity has a major influence on solar photocatalytic inactivation of A. hydrophila. Humic acids appear to decrease TiO2 effectiveness under full sunlight and reduce microbial inactivation. pH in the range 7–9 and salinity both have no major effect on the extent of photoinactivation or sub-lethal injury. Conclusions This study demonstrates the effectiveness of the TFFBR in the inactivation of Aeromonas hydrophila under the influence of several water quality variables at high solar irradiance, providing an opportunity for the application of solar photocatalysis in aquaculture systems, as long as turbidity remains low.

  14. Effects of Fe(III) on biofilm and its extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) in fixed bed biofilm reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xuewei; Chen, Kai; Lai, Xinke; Ji, Siping; Kaiser, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    The effects of Fe(III) on the biofilm mass and activity, the biofilm micromorphology as well as the composition and functional groups characteristics of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) in biofilm were investigated in laboratory-scale fixed bed biofilm reactors. The results showed that 2 mg/L of Fe(III) promoted the biofilm mass and improved the biofilm activity, but 16 mg/L of Fe(III) adversely affected biofilm development. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) study indicated a high concentration (16 mg/L) of Fe(III) led to significant reduction of the filaments, great promotion of the EPS secretion in biofilm. The result of the EPS composition suggested 2 mg/L of Fe(III) increased soluble EPS and loosely bound EPS which contributed to the microbial aggregation, while 16 mg/L of Fe(III) promoted tightly bound EPS production unfavourable for substrate mass transfer. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis demonstrated that Fe(III) exerted a significant influence on the -CONH- groups of proteins and the C-O groups of polysaccharides in EPS. This study reveals that Fe(III) influences biofilm development and activity not only by directly impacting the microbial physiology but by indirectly affecting the EPS constituents, and it helps to provide theoretical guidance for iron ion containing wastewater treatment.

  15. Carbonaceous materials in petrochemical wastewater before and after treatment in an aerated submerged fixed-bed biofilm reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trojanowicz Karol

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Results of the studies for determining fractions of organic contaminants in a pretreated petrochemical wastewater flowing into a pilot Aerated Submerged Fixed-Bed Biofilm Reactor (ASFBBR are presented and discussed. The method of chemical oxygen demand (COD fractionation consisted of physical tests and biological assays. It was found that the main part of the total COD in the petrochemical, pretreated wastewater was soluble organic substance with average value of 57.6%. The fractions of particulate and colloidal organic matter were found to be 31.8% and 10.6%, respectively. About 40% of COD in the influent was determined as readily biodegradable COD. The inert fraction of the soluble organic matter in the petrochemical wastewater constituted about 60% of the influent colloidal and soluble COD. Determination of degree of hydrolysis (DH of the colloidal fraction of COD was also included in the paper. The estimated value of DH was about 62%. Values of the assayed COD fractions were compared with the same parameters obtained for municipal wastewater by other authors.

  16. Investigations on humic acid removal from water using surfactant-modified zeolite as adsorbent in a fixed-bed reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsheikh, Awad F.; Ahmad, Umi Kalthom; Ramli, Zainab

    2017-10-01

    Natural organic matter (NOM) is ubiquitous in aquatic environments and has recently become an issue of worldwide concern in drinking water treatment. The major component of NOM is humic acids (HA). In this study, a natural zeolite (mordenite) was modified employing hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide (HDTMA) to enhance greater efficient sites for sorption of HA. The natural zeolite and surfactant-modified zeolite (SMZ) were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier-transform infrared spectrometer (FT-IR), N2 Adsorption-desorption isotherms and BET-specific surface area, thermographic analysis, derivative thermographic analysis (TGA-DTA) and Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM). A fixed-bed reactor was used for the removal of HA and the effects of different experimental parameters such as HDTMA loading levels, HA solution flow rate, solution pH and eluent concentration were investigated. The results indicated that the SMZ bed with HDTMA loading of 75% of external cation exchange capacity (ECEC) at a flow rate of 2 BV/h and pH of 10 showed the greatest enhanced removal efficiency of HA while ethanol solutions (25%v/v) with feed flow rate of 2 BV/h were sufficient for complete regeneration of SMZ and desorption of HA. Measurements of surface area of SMZ indicated that a monolayer formation of the surfactant at those conditions allowed the optimum removal of HA.

  17. Performance, kinetic, and biodegradation pathway evaluation of anaerobic fixed film fixed bed reactor in removing phthalic acid esters from wastewater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadi, Ehsan; Yousefzadeh, Samira; Ansari, Mohsen; Ghaffari, Hamid Reza; Azari, Ali; Miri, Mohammad; Mesdaghinia, Alireza; Nabizadeh, Ramin; Kakavandi, Babak; Ahmadi, Peyman; Badi, Mojtaba Yegane; Gholami, Mitra; Sharafi, Kiomars; Karimaei, Mostafa; Ghoochani, Mahboobeh; Brahmand, Masoud Binesh; Mohseni, Seyed Mohsen; Sarkhosh, Maryam; Rezaei, Soheila; Asgharnia, Hosseinali; Dehghanifard, Emad; Jafari, Behdad; Mortezapour, Alireza; Moghaddam, Vahid Kazemi; Mahmoudi, Mohammad Molla; Taghipour, Nader

    2017-02-01

    Emerging and hazardous environmental pollutants like phthalic acid esters (PAEs) are one of the recent concerns worldwide. PAEs are considered to have diverse endocrine disrupting effects on human health. Industrial wastewater has been reported as an important environment with high concentrations of PAEs. In the present study, four short-chain PAEs including diallyl phthalate (DAP), diethyl phthalate (DEP), dimethyl phthalate (DMP), and phthalic acid (PA) were selected as a substrate for anaerobic fixed film fixed bed reactor (AnFFFBR). The process performances of AnFFFBR, and also its kinetic behavior, were evaluated to find the best eco-friendly phthalate from the biodegradability point of view. According to the results and kinetic coefficients, removing and mineralizing of DMP occurred at a higher rate than other phthalates. In optimum conditions 92.5, 84.41, and 80.39% of DMP, COD, and TOC were removed. DAP was found as the most bio-refractory phthalate. The second-order (Grau) model was selected as the best model for describing phthalates removal.

  18. Demand-driven biogas production from sugar beet silage in a novel fixed bed disc reactor under mesophilic and thermophilic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terboven, Christiane; Ramm, Patrice; Herrmann, Christiane

    2017-10-01

    A newly developed fixed bed disc reactor (FBDR) which combines biofilm formation on biofilm carriers and reactor agitation in one single system was assessed for its applicability to demand-driven biogas production by variable feeding of sugar beet silage. Five different feeding patterns were studied at an organic loading of 4g VS L -1 d -1 under mesophilic and thermophilic conditions. High methane yields of 449-462L N kg VS were reached. Feeding variable punctual loadings caused immediate response with 1.2- to 3.5-fold increase in biogas production rates within 15min. Although variable feeding did not induce process instability, a temporary decrease in pH-value and methane concentration below 40% occurred. Thermophilic temperature was advantageous as it resulted in a more rapid, higher methane production and less pronounced decrease in methane content after feeding. The FBDR was demonstrated to be well-suited for flexible biogas production, but further research and comparison with traditional reactor systems are required. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Electrochemical treatment of water containing Microcystis aeruginosa in a fixed bed reactor with three-dimensional conductive diamond anodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mascia, Michele; Monasterio, Sara; Vacca, Annalisa; Palmas, Simonetta

    2016-12-05

    An electrochemical treatment was investigated to remove Microcystis aeruginosa from water. A fixed bed reactor in flow was tested, which was equipped with electrodes constituted by stacks of grids electrically connected in parallel, with the electric field parallel to the fluid flow. Conductive diamond were used as anodes, platinised Ti as cathode. Electrolyses were performed in continuous and in batch recirculated mode with flow rates corresponding to Re from 10 to 160, current densities in the range 10-60Am(-2) and Cl(-) concentrations up to 600gm(-3). The absorbance of chlorophyll-a pigment and the concentration of products and by-products of electrolysis were measured. In continuous experiments without algae in the inlet stream, total oxidants concentrations as equivalent Cl2, of about 0.7gCl2m(-3) were measured; the maximum values were obtained at Re=10 and i=25Am(-2), with values strongly dependent on the concentration of Cl(-). The highest algae inactivation was obtained under the operative conditions of maximum generation of oxidants; in the presence of microalgae the oxidants concentrations were generally below the detection limit. Results indicated that most of the bulk oxidants electrogenerated is constituted by active chlorine. The prevailing mechanism of M. aeruginosa inactivation is the disinfection by bulk oxidants. The experimental data were quantitatively interpreted through a simple plug flow model, in which the axial dispersion accounts for the non-ideal flow behaviour of the system; the model was successfully used to simulate the performances of the reactor in the single-stack configuration used for the experiments and in multi-stack configurations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Ex-situ catalytic fast pyrolysis of biomass over HZSM-5 in a two-stage fluidized-bed/fixed-bed combination reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Changsong; Xiao, Rui; Zhang, Huiyan

    2017-11-01

    Ex-situ and in-situ catalytic fast pyrolysis (CFP) of biomass over HZSM-5 were compared in a two-stage fluidized-bed/fixed-bed combination reactor. Ex-situ CFP gave a similar carbon yield of aromatics+olefins (∼20%) with in-situ CFP but produced much more olefins (10.3% vs. 5.8%) and less char+coke (42.7% vs. 48.4%). The effects of weight hourly space velocity (WHSV), carrier gas flow rate, pyrolysis temperature and catalysis temperature on product distribution in ex-situ CFP were further studied. The maximum carbon yield of aromatics+olefins (21.7%) was obtained at pyrolysis temperature of 550°C and catalysis temperature of 600°C with the highest carrier gas flow rate (1.2L/min) and WHSV of 1.33h(-1). Obviously less coke was generated at higher pyrolysis temperature. When catalysis temperature increased to 700°C, ethylene and benzene carbon selectivities boosted to 79.4% and 60.5%, respectively. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Thin-film fixed-bed reactor (TFFBR for solar photocatalytic inactivation of aquaculture pathogen Aeromonas hydrophila

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khan Sadia J

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Outbreaks of infectious diseases by microbial pathogens can cause substantial losses of stock in aquaculture systems. There are several ways to eliminate these pathogens including the use of antibiotics, biocides and conventional disinfectants, but these leave undesirable chemical residues. Conversely, using sunlight for disinfection has the advantage of leaving no chemical residue and is particularly suited to countries with sunny climates. Titanium dioxide (TiO2 is a photocatalyst that increases the effectiveness of solar disinfection. In recent years, several different types of solar photocatalytic reactors coated with TiO2 have been developed for waste water and drinking water treatment. In this study a thin-film fixed-bed reactor (TFFBR, designed as a sloping flat plate reactor coated with P25 DEGUSSA TiO2, was used. Results The level of inactivation of the aquaculture pathogen Aeromonas hydrophila ATCC 35654 was determined after travelling across the TFFBR under various natural sunlight conditions (300-1200 W m-2, at 3 different flow rates (4.8, 8.4 and 16.8 L h-1. Bacterial numbers were determined by conventional plate counting using selective agar media, cultured (i under conventional aerobic conditions to detect healthy cells and (ii under conditions designed to neutralise reactive oxygen species (agar medium supplemented with the peroxide scavenger sodium pyruvate at 0.05% w/v, incubated under anaerobic conditions, to detect both healthy and sub-lethally injured (oxygen-sensitive cells. The results clearly demonstrate that high sunlight intensities (≥ 600 W m-2 and low flow rates (4.8 L h-1 provided optimum conditions for inactivation of A. hydrophila ATCC 3564, with greater overall inactivation and fewer sub-lethally injured cells than at low sunlight intensities or high flow rates. Low sunlight intensities resulted in reduced overall inactivation and greater sub-lethal injury at all flow rates. Conclusions This

  2. Comparison of the Effects of Fluidized-Bed and Fixed-Bed Reactors in Microwave-Assisted Catalytic Decomposition of TCE by Hydrogen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lili Ren

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Trichloroethylene (TCE decomposition by hydrogen with microwave heating under different reaction systems was investigated. The activities of a series of catalysts for microwave-assisted TCE hydrodechlorination were tested through the fixed-bed and the fluidized-bed reactor systems. This study found that the different reaction system is suitable for different catalyst type. And there is an interactive relationship between the catalyst type and the reaction bed type.

  3. Gaseous Hydrocarbon Synfuels from H2/CO2 based on Renewable Electricity - Kinetics, Selectivity and Fundamentals of Fixed-Bed Reactor Design for Flexible Operation

    OpenAIRE

    Iglesias Gonzalez, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Conversion of electrical energy into chemical energy carriers has the potential to replace fossil fuels and can be attractive as long-term storage. The present work considers different aspects of the electricity-to-fuel process chain using a combination of experimental work and mathematical modelling. This work discusses in detail the production of gaseous hydrocarbons from H2 and CO2 via Fischer-Tropsch synthesis and the potential to operate fixed-bed reactors under flexible conditions.

  4. Structural characterisation of pretreated solids from flow-through liquid hot water treatment of sugarcane bagasse in a fixed-bed reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Prashant; Lekha, Prabashni; Reynolds, Wienke; Kirsch, Christian

    2015-05-01

    Untreated sugarcane bagasse and sugarcane bagasse pretreated with flow-through liquid hot water (LHW) treatment (170-207°C and 204-250 ml/min) in a fixed-bed reactor have been structurally characterised. Field emission gun scanning electron microscopy (FEG-SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were used to investigate changes in the residues, in particular due to the fate of lignin. FEG-SEM results show that the LHW treatment modified the surface morphology of the pretreated bagasse with lignin droplets being observed on the fibre surface. TEM showed an increase in the plant cell wall porosity and lignin migration across the plant cell wall. Increases in pretreatment temperature were observed to increase the average size and density of lignin droplets on the fibre surface. The results provide evidence that for LHW flow-through treatment, just as for batch treatment, lignin repolymerisation and deposition on the surface of pretreated sugarcane bagasse is an important consideration. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Pyrolysis of oil palm mesocarp fiber and palm frond in a slow-heating fixed-bed reactor: A comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabir, G; Mohd Din, A T; Hameed, B H

    2017-10-01

    Oil palm mesocarp fiber (OPMF) and palm frond (PF) were respectively devolatilized by pyrolysis to OPMF-oil and PF-oil bio-oils and biochars, OPMF-char and PF-char in a slow-heating fixed-bed reactor. In particular, the OPMF-oil and PF-oil were produced to a maximum yield of 48wt% and 47wt% bio-oils at 550°C and 600°C, respectively. The high heating values (HHVs) of OPMF-oil and PF-oil were respectively found to be 23MJ/kg and 21MJ/kg, whereas 24.84MJ/kg and 24.15MJ/kg were for the corresponding biochar. The HHVs of the bio-oils and biochars are associated with low O/C ratios to be higher than those of the corresponding biomass. The Fourier transform infrared spectra and peak area ratios highlighted the effect of pyrolysis temperatures on the bio-oil compositions. The bio-oils are pervaded with numerous oxygenated carbonyl and aromatic compounds as suitable feedstocks for renewable fuels and chemicals. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. A comprehensive small and pilot-scale fixed-bed reactor approach for testing Fischer–Tropsch catalyst activity and performance on a BTL route

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piyapong Hunpinyo

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Ruthenium (Ru-based catalysts were prepared by the sol–gel technique for biomass-to-liquid (BTL operation and had their performance tested under different conditions. The catalytic study was carried out in two steps using a simple and reliable method. In the first step, the effects of reaction temperatures and inlet H2/CO molar feed ratios obtained from biomass gasification were investigated on the catalyst performance. A set of experimental results obtained in a laboratory fixed bed reactor was described and summarized. Moreover, a simplified Langmuir–Hinshelwood–Hougen–Watson (LHHW kinetic model was proposed with two promising models, where the surface decomposition of carbon monoxide was assumed as the rate determining step (RDS. In the second step, a FT pilot plant was conducted to validate the catalyst performance, especially the conversion efficiency, heat and mass transfer effects, and system controllability. The results indicated that our catalyst performances under mild conditions were not significantly different in many regards from those previously reported for a severe condition, as especially Ru-based catalyst can be performed to vary over a wide range of conditions to yield specific liquid productivity. The results in terms of the hydrocarbon product distribution obtained from the pilot scale operations were similar with that obtained from the related lab scale experiments.

  7. Pyrolysis of waste animal fats in a fixed-bed reactor: production and characterization of bio-oil and bio-char.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Hassen-Trabelsi, A; Kraiem, T; Naoui, S; Belayouni, H

    2014-01-01

    Several animal (lamb, poultry and swine) fatty wastes were pyrolyzed under nitrogen, in a laboratory scale fixed-bed reactor and the main products (liquid bio-oil, solid bio-char and syngas) were obtained. The purpose of this study is to produce and characterize bio-oil and bio-char obtained from pyrolysis of animal fatty wastes. The maximum production of bio-oil was achieved at a pyrolysis temperature of 500 °C and a heating rate of 5 °C/min. The chemical (GC-MS analyses) and spectroscopic analyses (FTIR analyses) of bio-oil showed that it is a complex mixture consisting of different classes of organic compounds, i.e., hydrocarbons (alkanes, alkenes, cyclic compounds...etc.), carboxylic acids, aldehydes, ketones, esters,...etc. According to fuel properties, produced bio-oils showed good properties, suitable for its use as an engine fuel or as a potential source for synthetic fuels and chemical feedstock. Obtained bio-chars had low carbon content and high ash content which make them unattractive for as renewable source energy. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Morphological study of biomass during the start-up period of a fixed-bed anaerobic reactor treating domestic sewage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cláudio Antonio Andrade Lima

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available This work focused on a morphological study of the microorganisms attached to polyurethane foam matrices in a horizontal-flow anaerobic immobilized biomass (HAIB reactor treating domestic sewage. The experiments consisted of monitoring the biomass colonization process of foam matrices in terms of the amount of retained biomass and the morphological characteristics of the cells attached to the support during the start-up period. Non-fluorescent rods and cocci were found to predominate in the process of attachment to the polyurethane foam surface. From the 10th week of operation onwards, an increase was observed in the morphological diversity, mainly due to rods, cocci, and Methanosaeta-like archaeal cells. Hydrodynamic problems, such as bed clogging and channeling occurred in the fixed-bed reactor, mainly due to the production of extracellular polymeric substances and their accumulation in the interstices of the bed causing a gradual deterioration of its performance, which eventually led to the system's collapse. These results demonstrated the importance and usefulness of monitoring the dynamics of the formation of biofilm during the start-up period of HAIB reactors, since it allowed the identification of operational problems.Este trabalho apresenta um estudo morfológico de microrganismos aderidos à espuma de poliuretano em reator anaeróbio horizontal de leito fixo (RAHLF, aplicado ao tratamento de esgoto sanitário. O processo de colonização do suporte pela biomassa anaeróbia e as características morfológicas das células aderidas foram monitorados durante o período de partida do reator. Bacilos e cocos não fluorescentes foram predominantes no processo de aderência direta à espuma de poliuretano. Aumento na diversidade biológica foi observado a partir da 10ª semana de operação do reator, com predominância de bacilos, cocos e arqueas metanogênicas semelhantes a Methanosaeta. Problemas hidrodinâmicos, tais como formação de

  9. Start-up and long-term operation of the Anammox process in a fixed bed reactor (FBR) filled with novel non-woven ring carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tao; Zhang, Hanmin; Yang, Fenglin; Li, Yifei; Zhang, Guangyi

    2013-04-01

    A novel kind of non-woven ring carriers was used to improve a fixed bed reactor (FBR) as Anammox reactor. The improved FBR was operated for about 1 year. The Anammox activity occurred on day 39. On day 367, the maximum total nitrogen removal rate reached 9.2 kg Nm(-3)d(-1). FISH analysis showed that Anammox bacteria predominated in the mature sludge and accounted for 78% of the total bacteria. Phylogenetic analysis further showed that Candidatus Kuenenia stuttgartiensis occupied 70% of Anammox bacteria, which benefited keeping the stability of Anammox reactor. The FBR was proved to be a suitable reactor for start-up and long-term operation of Anammox process. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Steady-State Multiplicity Features of an Adiabatic Fixed-Bed Reactor with Langmuir-Hinshelwood Kinetics; CO or CO2 Methanation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wedel, Stig; Lues, Dan

    1984-01-01

    The steady-state multiplicity features of an adiabatic fixed bed reactor were Investigated experimentally by the methanation of either CO or CO2 as test reactions. No more than two stable steady states were found at any operating conditions. The Langmuir-Hinshelwood kinetics of these reactions...... caused the conversion along the lower branch to decrease with increasing feed concentration. The experimental results have been explained and simulated by a one-dimensional two-phase model which accounts for axial dispersion as well as inter- and intraphase transport resistances. The surface describing...

  11. Creation of Pd/Al2O3 Catalyst by a Spray Process for Fixed Bed Reactors and Its Effective Removal of Aqueous Bromate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yu; Sun, Wuzhu; Yang, Weiyi; Li, Qi

    2017-02-01

    Palladium nanoparticles were grown on sub-millimeter activated Al2O3 particle support by spraying H2PdCl4 solution evenly onto the support, followed with a thermal reduction under H2 atmosphere. Compared with its counterpart created by the conventional impregnation method, the Pd/Al2O3 catalyst created by the spray process could enrich the existence of active Pd nanoparticles on the surface of the catalyst support and increase their degree of dispersion, resulting in a much higher activity in the catalytic reduction of bromate in water. The effect of Al2O3 support particle size on the bromate removal rate was also investigated, which demonstrated that smaller support particle size could have higher activity in the catalytic reduction of bromate in water because of its larger exposed surface. This Pd/Al2O3 catalyst could be easily used in the fixed bed reactor due to its large support size and demonstrated excellent stability in the catalytic reduction of bromate in mineral water. This Pd/Al2O3 catalyst also exhibited a good catalytic reduction performance on azo dyes as demonstrated by its effective catalytic hydrogenation of methyl orange. Thus, catalysts prepared by the spray method developed in this work could have the potential to be used in fixed bed reactors for various water treatment practices.

  12. The use of the carbon/nitrogen ratio and specific organic loading rate as tools for improving biohydrogen production in fixed-bed reactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mélida del Pilar Anzola-Rojas

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This study assessed the effect of the carbon/nitrogen (C/N ratio on the hydrogen production from sucrose-based synthetic wastewater in upflow fixed-bed anaerobic reactors. C/N ratios of 40, 90, 140, and 190 (g C/g N were studied using sucrose and urea as the carbon and nitrogen sources, respectively. An optimum hydrogen yield of 3.5 mol H2 mol−1 sucrose was obtained for a C/N ratio of 137 by means of mathematical adjustment. For all C/N ratios, the sucrose removal efficiency reached values greater than 80% and was stable after the transient stage. However, biogas production was not stable at all C/N ratios as a consequence of the continuous decreasing of the specific organic loading rate (SOLR when the biomass accumulated in the fixed-bed, causing the proliferation of H2-consuming microorganisms. It was found that the application of a constant SOLR of 6.0 g sucrose g−1 VSS d−1 stabilized the system.

  13. Thin-film fixed-bed reactor (TFFBR) for solar photocatalytic inactivation of aquaculture pathogen Aeromonas hydrophila

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Khan, Sadia J; Reed, Robert H; Rasul, Mohammad G

    2012-01-01

    ...) is a photocatalyst that increases the effectiveness of solar disinfection. In recent years, several different types of solar photocatalytic reactors coated with TiO2 have been developed for waste water and drinking water treatment...

  14. Determination of Kinetic Parameters for Methane Oxidation over Pt/γ-Al2O3 in a Fixed-Bed Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vita Wonoputri

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes akinetic study for the determination of the kinetic parameters of lean methane emission oxidation over Pt/γ-Al2O3 in a dedicated laboratory scale fixed bed reactor. A model ofthemechanistic reaction kinetic parameters has been developed. The reaction rate model was determined using therate-limiting step method, which was integrated and optimized to find the most suitable model and parameters. Based on this study, the Langmuir-Hinshelwood reaction rate model with the best correlationis the one where the rate-limiting step is thesurface reaction between methane and one adsorbed oxygen atom. The pre-exponential factor and activation energy were 9.19 x 105 and 92.04 kJ/mol, while the methane and oxygen adsorption entropy and enthalpy were –17.46 J/mol.K, –2739.36 J/mol,–16.34 J/mol.K, and –6157.09 J/mol, respectively.

  15. Catalytic Intermediate Pyrolysis of Napier Grass in a Fixed Bed Reactor with ZSM-5, HZSM-5 and Zinc-Exchanged Zeolite-A as the Catalyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isah Yakub Mohammed

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The environmental impact from the use of fossil fuel cum depletion of the known fossil oil reserves has led to increasing interest in liquid biofuels made from renewable biomass. This study presents the first experimental report on the catalytic pyrolysis of Napier grass, an underutilized biomass source, using ZSM-5, 0.3HZSM-5 and zinc exchanged zeolite-A catalyst. Pyrolysis was conducted in fixed bed reactor at 600 °C, 30 °C/min and 7 L/min nitrogen flow rate. The effect of catalyst-biomass ratio was evaluated with respect to pyrolysis oil yield and composition. Increasing the catalyst loading from 0.5 to 1.0 wt % showed no significant decrease in the bio-oil yield, particularly, the organic phase and thereafter decreased at catalyst loadings of 2.0 and 3.0 wt %. Standard analytical methods were used to establish the composition of the pyrolysis oil, which was made up of various aliphatic hydrocarbons, aromatics and other valuable chemicals and varied greatly with the surface acidity and pore characteristics of the individual catalysts. This study has demonstrated that pyrolysis oil with high fuel quality and value added chemicals can be produced from pyrolysis of Napier grass over acidic zeolite based catalysts.

  16. Pressurized pyrolysis of rice husk in an inert gas sweeping fixed-bed reactor with a focus on bio-oil deoxygenation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Yangyang; Zhang, Jie; Wang, Jie

    2014-12-01

    The pyrolysis of rice husk was conducted in a fixed-bed reactor with a sweeping nitrogen gas to investigate the effects of pressure on the pyrolytic behaviors. The release rates of main gases during the pyrolysis, the distributions of four products (char, bio-oil, water and gas), the elemental compositions of char, bio-oil and gas, and the typical compounds in bio-oil were determined. It was found that the elevation of pressure from 0.1MPa to 5.0MPa facilitated the dehydration and decarboxylation of bio-oil, and the bio-oils obtained under the elevated pressures had significantly less oxygen and higher calorific value than those obtained under atmospheric pressure. The former bio-oils embraced more acetic acid, phenols and guaiacols. The elevation of pressure increased the formation of CH4 partially via the gas-phase reactions. An attempt is made in this study to clarify "the pure pressure effect" and "the combined effect with residence time". Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Effect of bacterial lipase on anaerobic co-digestion of slaughterhouse wastewater and grease in batch condition and continuous fixed-bed reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Affes, Maha; Aloui, Fathi; Hadrich, Fatma; Loukil, Slim; Sayadi, Sami

    2017-10-10

    This study aimed to investigate the effects of bacterial lipase on biogas production of anaerobic co-digestion of slaughterhouse wastewater (SHWW) and hydrolyzed grease (HG). A neutrophilic Staphylococcus xylosus strain exhibiting lipolytic activity was used to perform microbial hydrolysis pretreatment of poultry slaughterhouse lipid rich waste. Optimum proportion of hydrolyzed grease was evaluated by determining biochemical methane potential. A high biogas production was observed in batch containing a mixture of slaughterhouse composed of 75% SHWW and 25% hydrolyzed grease leading to a biogas yield of 0.6 L/g COD introduced. Fixed bed reactor (FBR) results confirmed that the proportion of 25% of hydrolyzed grease gives the optimum condition for the digester performance. Biogas production was significantly high until an organic loading rate (OLR) of 2 g COD/L. d. This study indicates that the use of biological pre-treatment and FBR for the co-digestion of SHWW and hydrolyzed grease is feasible and effective.

  18. Application of acidogenic fixed-bed reactor prior to anaerobic membrane bioreactor for sustainable slaughterhouse wastewater treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saddoud, Ahlem [Laboratoire des Bio-procedes, Centre de Biotechnologie de Sfax, BP: K, Sfax 3038 (Tunisia); Sayadi, Sami [Laboratoire des Bio-procedes, Centre de Biotechnologie de Sfax, BP: K, Sfax 3038 (Tunisia)], E-mail: sami.sayadi@cbs.rnrt.tn

    2007-11-19

    High rate anaerobic treatment systems such as anaerobic membrane bioreactors (AMBR) are less popular for slaughterhouse wastewater due to the presence of high fat oil and suspended matters in the effluent. This affects the performance and efficiency of the treatment system. In this work, AMBR has been tried for slaughterhouse wastewater treatment. After the start up period, the reactor was operated with an average organic loading rate (OLR) of 4.37 kg TCOD m{sup -3} d{sup -1} with gradual increase to an average of 13.27 kg TCOD m{sup -3} d{sup -1}. At stable conditions, the treatment efficiency was high with an average COD and BOD{sub 5} reduction of 93.7 and 93.96%, respectively. However, a reduction in the AMBR performance was shown with the increase of the OLR to 16.32 kg TCOD m{sup -3} d{sup -1}. The removal efficiencies of SCOD and BOD{sub 5} were drastically decreased to below 53.6 and 73.3%, respectively. The decrease of the AMBR performance was due to the accumulation of VFAs. Thus, a new integrated system composed of a FBR for the acidogenesis step followed by the AMBR for methanogenesis step was developed. At high ORL, the integrated system improved the performance of the anaerobic digestion and it successfully overcame the VFA accumulation problem in the AMBR. The anaerobic treatment led to a total removal of all tested pathogens. Thus, the microbiological quality of treated wastewater fits largely with WHO guidelines.

  19. Kinetic Study of Methyl Acetate Oxidation in a Pt/Al2O3 Fixed-Bed Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoy, Michael; Li, K. Y.; Li, Jeffrey S.; Chen, S. M.; Yaws, C. L.; Chu, H. W.; Simon, W. E.

    1994-01-01

    To support technology development for future long-term missions, a metabolic simulator will be used in a closed chamber to test the functions of a Controlled Ecological Life Support System (CELSS). Methyl acetate (MA) was selected as the fuel because its metabolic respiratory quotient is near that of humans. A kinetic study of the catalytic oxidation of MA over Pt/Al203 was then conducted to support the design and operation of the simulator. Kinetic data were obtained as a conversion percentage of MA versus retention time. The reaction was studied at one atmosphere and temperatures from 220 to 340 deg. C. The inlet MA concentration was varied from 100 to 2000 ppm with retention times from 0.01 to 10 sec. A first-order rate law and a Langmuir-Hinshelwood rate equation were tested by nonlinear regression of the kinetic data to estimate rate constants in the rate law. Regression results of the L-H equation explain the kinetic data better than the results of the first-order rate law. A Taguchi experimental design was used to study the effects of temperature, retention time, and concentrations of MA, CO2, and O2 on the conversion of MA. Results indicate that temperature has greatest effect, followed by retention time, and finally MA concentration. It was further determined that the effects of CO2 and O2 concentrations, and the cross effects, are negligible.

  20. Adsorptive Removal of Trichloroethylene in Water by Crop Residue Biochars Pyrolyzed at Contrasting Temperatures: Continuous Fixed-Bed Experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Biochar (BC has attracted great attention as an alternative sorbent to activated carbon (AC. Objective of this study was to determine trichloroethylene (TCE removal by soybean stover BC pyrolyzed at 300 (BC300 and 700°C (BC700 in continuous fixed-bed column. Columns packed with BC300, BC700, and AC reached breakthrough time in 1.1, 27.0, and 50.7 h, respectively. BC700 had higher TCE adsorption capacity than BC300 due to its higher surface area, nonpolarity, and aromaticity. The sorption capacities of AC (774.0 mg g−1 and BC700 (515.1 mg g−1 were 21.6 and 14.4 times higher than that of BC300 (35.9 mg g−1. The lower desorption rate of TCE from BC300 than BC700 and AC may be attributed to the strong binding/partition of TCE to the noncarbonized part of BC. Thomas model also adequately described the adsorption data indicating interphase mass transfer. Overall, AC showed best efficiency for removing TCE from water in column experiments. However, although sorption and desorption capabilities of BC700 were a little lower than AC, it is still a good alternative for AC to remove organic contaminants such as TCE from water due to its cost-effectiveness.

  1. Kinerja Upflow Anaerobic Fixed Bed Reactor dengan Media Penunjang Batu Apung dalam Penyisihan Organik dan Pembentukan Biogas dari Biowaste Fase Cair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prismita Nursetyowati

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Dalam penelitian ini, biowaste yang digunakan adalah sampah pasar. Sampah pasar menyumbang sekitar 12% dari berat total sampah kota. Upflow Anaerobic Fixed Bed Reactor (UAFB-R yang digunakan dalam penelitian ini memakai media penunjang batu apung dengan resirkulasi efluen dan tanpa pengatur pH. Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk melihat kinerja UAFB-R dengan media penunjang batu apung dalam penyisihan organik dan pembentukan biogas terutama gas metan biowaste fasa cair. Hydraulic Retention Time UAFB-R ditentukan sebesar 6 hari dengan volume operasi sebesar 9 liter. Variasi beban organik influen dalam penelitian adalah ± 0,32 kg COD/m3.hari, ± 0,64 kg COD/m3.hari, ± 0,96 kg COD/m3.hari, ± 1,28 kg COD/m3.hari, ± 1,6 kg COD/m3.hari, dan ± 1,92 kg COD/m3.hari. Pada rentang beban organik influen ± 0,32 kg COD/m3.hari sampai ± 1,92 kg COD/m3.hari di kondisi tunak, semakin besar beban organik influen maka efisiensi penyisihan COD semakin kecil dan rasio TAV/Alkalinitas semakin besar. Namun, semakin kecil beban organik influen maka komposisi dan volume gas metan serta methane yield cenderung semakin besar. Saat variasi beban influen ± 0,96 kg COD/m3.hari dihasilkan volume gas metan terbesar sebanyak 1,77 liter, sedangkan saat variasi beban organik influen ± 0,64 kg COD/m3.hari dicapai komposisi gas metan dan methane yield terbesar sebesar 77,4% dan 0,249. Selain itu, semakin tinggi konsentrasi sulfat maka maka volume biogas yang terbentuk menjadi lebih kecil.

  2. The effect of temperature and flow rate on the clarification of the aqueous stevia-extract in a fixed-bed column with zeolites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mantovaneli I. C. C.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Stevia is being used as a sweetener due to its low calorific value and its taste, which is very similar to that of sucrose. After extraction from dried leaves, stevia extract is dark in colour so needs to be clarified for better acceptance by consumers. Adsorption is one of the most important processes in this clarification. In this work the clarification of extract stevia extract in fixed-bed columns with calcium zeolites was studied. Two temperatures (10ºC and 30ºC and six different flow rates (2, 5, 9, 12, 16 and 19 mL/min were studied. The results showed that the mass-transfer coeffcient increases with an increase in flow rate and the length of unused bed reaches a maximum at 9 mL/min for both temperatures. The fit of the Thomas model with the breakthrough data was not very good.

  3. Growth of single-walled carbon nanotubes on a Co-Mo-MgO supported catalyst by the CVD of methane in a fixed bed reactor: Model setting and parameter estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izadi, Nosrat; Rashidi, Ali Morad; Horri, Bahman Amini; Mosoudi, Mohamad Reza; Bozorgzadeh, Hamid Reza; Zeraatkar, Ahmad

    2011-06-01

    In this work methane was decomposed to hydrogen and carbon to determine its kinetic behavior during reaction over a Co-Mo-MgO supported catalyst using the CVD (Chemical Vapor Deposition) technique. Decomposition of methane molecules was performed in a continuous fixed bed reactor to obtain data to simulate methane decomposition in a gas phase heterogeneous media. The products and reactants of reaction were analyzed by molecular sieve column followed by GC-analysis of the fractions to determine the amount of product converted or reactant consumed. The synthesis of single-walled carbon nanotubes was performed at atmospheric pressure, different temperatures and reactant concentrations. The experimental data analyzed to suggest the formula for calculation of the initial specific reaction rate of the carbon nanotubes synthesis, were fitted by several mathematical models derived from different mechanisms based on Longmuir-hinshelwood expression. The suggested mechanism according to dissociation adsorption of methane seems to explain the catalytic performance in the range of operating conditions studied. The apparent activation energy for the growth of SWNTs was estimated according to Arrhenius equation. The as grown SWNTs products were characterized by SEM, TEM and Raman spectroscopy after purification. The catalyst deactivation was found to be dependent on the time, reaction temperature and partial pressure of methane and indicated that the reaction of deactivation can be modeled by a simple apparent second order of reaction.

  4. A comparative study of anaerobic fixed film baffled reactor and up-flow anaerobic fixed film fixed bed reactor for biological removal of diethyl phthalate from wastewater: a performance, kinetic, biogas, and metabolic pathway study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousefzadeh, Samira; Ahmadi, Ehsan; Gholami, Mitra; Ghaffari, Hamid Reza; Azari, Ali; Ansari, Mohsen; Miri, Mohammad; Sharafi, Kiomars; Rezaei, Soheila

    2017-01-01

    Phthalic acid esters, including diethyl phthalate (DEP), which are considered as top-priority and hazardous pollutants, have received significant attention over the last decades. It is vital for industries to select the best treatment technology, especially when the DEP concentration in wastewater is high. Meanwhile, anaerobic biofilm-based reactors are considered as a promising option. Therefore, in the present study, for the biological removal of DEP from synthetic wastewater, two different anaerobic biofilm-based reactors, including anaerobic fixed film baffled reactor (AnFFBR) and up-flow anaerobic fixed film fixed bed reactor (UAnFFFBR), were compared from kinetic and performance standpoints. As in the previous studies, only the kinetic coefficients have been calculated and the relationship between kinetic coefficients and their interpretation has not been evaluated, the other aim of the present study was to fill this research gap. In optimum conditions, 90.31 and 86.91% of COD as well as 91.11 and 88.72% of DEP removal were achieved for the AnFFBR and UAnFFFBR, respectively. According to kinetic coefficients (except biomass yield), the AnFFBR had better performance as it provided a more favorable condition for microbial growth. The Grau model was selected as the best mathematical model for designing and predicting the bioreactors' performance due to its high coefficients of determination (0.97 regulations and should be coupled with further technology.

  5. Evaluation of the effectiveness factor along immobilized enzyme fixed-bed reactors: design of a reactor with naringinase covalently immobilized into glycophase-coated porous glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manjon, A.; Iborra, J.L.; Gomez, J.L.; Gomez, E.; Bastida, J.; Bodalo, A.

    1987-09-01

    A design equation is presented for packed-bed reactors containing immobilized enzymes in spherical porous particles with internal diffusion effects and obeying reversible one-intermediate Michaelis-Menten kinetics. The equation is also able to explain irreversible and competitive product inhibition kinetics. It allows the axial substrate profiles to be calculated and the dependence of the effectiveness factor along the reactor length to be continuously evaluated. The design equation was applied to explain the behavior of naringinase immobilized in Glycophase-coated porous glass operating in a packed-bed reactor and hydrolyzing both p-nitrophenyl-alpha-L-rhamnoside and naringin. The theoretically predicted results were found to fit well with experimentally measured values. (Refs. 28).

  6. Multifaceted effects of HZSM-5 (Proton-exchanged Zeolite Socony Mobil-5) on catalytic cracking of pinewood pyrolysis vapor in a two-stage fixed bed reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yimeng; Wang, Jie

    2016-08-01

    The pinewood was pyrolyzed in the first reactor at a heating rate of 10°Cmin(-1) from room temperature to 700°C, and the vapor was allowed to be cracked through the second reactor in a temperature range of 450-750°C without and with HZSM-5. Attempts were made to determine a wide spectrum of gaseous and liquid products, as well as the mass and element partitions to gas, water, bio-oil, coke and char. HZSM-5 showed a preferential deoxygenation effect via the facilitated decarbonylation and decarboxylation with the inhibited dehydration at 550-600°C. This catalyst also displayed a high selectivity for the formations of aromatic hydrocarbons and olefins by the promoted hydrogen transfer to these products at 550-600°C. The bio-oil produced with HZSM-5 at 500-600°C had the yields of 14.5-16.8%, the high heat values of 39.1-42.4MJkg(-1), and the energy recoveries of 33-35% (all dry biomass basis). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Treatment of screened dairy manure by upflow anaerobic fixed bed reactors packed with waste tyre rubber and a combination of waste tyre rubber and zeolite: effect of the hydraulic retention time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umaña, Oscar; Nikolaeva, Svetlana; Sánchez, Enrique; Borja, Rafael; Raposo, Francisco

    2008-10-01

    Two laboratory-scale anaerobic fixed bed reactors were evaluated while treating dairy manure at upflow mode and semicontinuous feeding. One reactor was packed with a combination of waste tyre rubber and zeolite (R1) while the other had only waste tyre rubber as a microorganism immobilization support (R2). Effluent quality improved when the hydraulic retention time (HRT) increased from 1.0 to 5.5 days. Higher COD, BOD5, total and volatile solids removal efficiencies were always achieved in the reactor R1. No clogging was observed during the operation period. Methane yield was also a function of the HRT and of the type of support used, and was 12.5% and 40% higher in reactor R1 than in R2 for HRTs of 5.5 and 1.0 days, respectively. The results obtained demonstrated that this type of reactor is capable of operating with dairy manure at a HRT 5 times lower than that used in a conventional reactor.

  8. Techno-economic analysis of sorption-enhanced steam methane reforming in a fixed bed reactor network integrated with fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diglio, Giuseppe; Hanak, Dawid P.; Bareschino, Piero; Mancusi, Erasmo; Pepe, Francesco; Montagnaro, Fabio; Manovic, Vasilije

    2017-10-01

    Sorption-enhanced steam methane reforming (SE-SMR) is a promising alternative for H2 production with inherent CO2 capture. This study evaluates the techno-economic performance of SE-SMR in a network of fixed beds and its integration with a solid oxide fuel cell (SE-SMR-SOFC) for power generation. The analysis revealed that both proposed systems are characterised by better economic performance than the reference systems. In particular, for SE-SMR the levelised cost of hydrogen is 1.6 €ṡkg-1 and the cost of CO2 avoided is 29.9 €ṡtCO2-1 (2.4 €ṡkg-1 and 50 €ṡtCO2-1, respectively, for SMR with CO2 capture) while for SE-SMR-SOFC the levelised cost of electricity is 0.078 €ṡkWh-1 and the cost of CO2 avoided is 36.9 €ṡtCO2-1 (0.080 €ṡkWh-1 and 80 €ṡtCO2-1, respectively, for natural gas-fired power plant with carbon capture). The sensitivity analysis showed that the specific cost of fuel and the capital cost of fuel cell mainly affect the economic performance of SE-SMR and SE-SMR-SOFC, respectively. The daily revenue of the SE-SMR-SOFC system is higher than that of the natural gas-fired power plant if the difference between the carbon tax and the CO2 transport and storage cost is > 6 €ṡtCO2-1.

  9. The Hydrodynamic Characteristics of Cocurrent Downflow and Cocurrent Upflow Gas-Liquid-Solid Catalytic Fixed Bed Reactors: the Effect of Pressure Les caractéristiques hydrodynamiques des réacteurs gaz-liquide-solide à lit de catalyseur fixe à écoulement cocourant montant et descendant : l'influence de la pression

    OpenAIRE

    Wild G.; Larachi F.; Laurent A.

    2006-01-01

    While most catalytic fixed bed gas-liquid reactors of the petrol industry work at quite high pressures, the academic scientific work in this field concerned itself almost exclusively with the domain of approximatively atmospheric pressures. The authors present the results of some years of experimental investigations on the hydrodynamic characteristics of trickle bed reactors and lately of cocurrent upflow reactors. During the last years, results were also obtained under pressures up to 8 MPa....

  10. Absorption of CO2 and H2S in aqueous alkanolamine solutions using a fixed-bed reactor with cocurrent downflow operation in the pulsing flow regime = Absorption von CO2 und H2S in wäßrigen alkanolamin-lösungen in einem Festbettreaktor bei abwärtsfließendem Gleichstrombetrieb und pulsierendem Arbeiten

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Versteeg, Geert; van Swaaij, Willibrordus Petrus Maria

    1988-01-01

    Absorption rates of H2S and CO2 in several aqueous alkanolamines in a cocurrent downflow fixed-bed reactor operated in the pulse flow regime have been measured in order to obtain information on the potential selectivity and on the mass transfer parameters. From these experiments it can be concluded

  11. Thin-film fixed-bed reactor for solar photocatalytic inactivation of Aeromonas hydrophila: influence of water quality

    OpenAIRE

    Khan Sadia J; Reed Robert H; Rasul Mohammad G

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Controlling fish disease is one of the major concerns in contemporary aquaculture. The use of antibiotics or chemical disinfection cannot provide a healthy aquaculture system without residual effects. Water quality is also important in determining the success or failure of fish production. Several solar photocatalytic reactors have been used to treat drinking water or waste water without leaving chemical residues. This study has investigated the impact of several key aspec...

  12. Numerical Simulation of Fixed-Bed Catalytic Reforming Reactors: Hydrodynamics / Chemical Kinetics Coupling Simulation numérique des réacteurs de reformage catalytique en lit fixe : couplage hydrodynamique-cinétique chimique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferschneider G.

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Fixed bed reactors with a single fluid phase are widely used in the refining or petrochemical industries for reaction processes catalysed by a solid phase. The design criteria for industrial reactors are relatively well known. However, they rely on a one-dimensional writing and on the separate resolution of the equation of conservation of mass and energy, and of momentum. Thus, with complex geometries, the influence of hydrodynamics on the effectiveness of the catalyst bed cannot be taken into account. The calculation method proposed is based on the multi-dimensional writing and the simultaneous resolution of the local conservation equations. The example discussed concerns fixed-bed catalytic reactors. These reactors are distinguished by their annular geometry and the radial circulation of the feedstock. The flow is assumed to be axisymmetric. The reaction process is reflected by a simplified kinetic mechanism involving ten chemical species. Calculation of the hydrodynamic (mean velocities, pressure, thermal and mass fields (concentration of each species serves to identify the influence of internal components in two industrial reactor geometries. The map of the quantity of coke formed and deposited on the catalyst, calculated by the model, reveals potential areas of poor operation. Les réacteurs à lit fixe avec une seule phase fluide sont largement utilisés dans l'industrie du raffinage et de la pétrochimie, pour mettre en oeuvre un processus réactionnel catalysé par une phase solide. Les règles de conception des réacteurs industriels sont relativement bien connues. Cependant, elles reposent sur l'écriture monodimensionnelle et la résolution séparée, d'une part, des équations de conservation de la masse et de l'énergie et d'autre part, de la quantité de mouvement. Ainsi dans le cas de géométries complexes, l'influence de l'hydrodynamique sur l'efficacité du lit catalytique ne peut être prise en compte. La méthode de calcul

  13. Numerical modeling of straw combustion in a fixed bed

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhou, Haosheng; Jensen, Anker; Glarborg, Peter

    2005-01-01

    . The straw combustion processes include moisture evaporation, straw pyrolysis, gas combustion, and char combustion. The model provides detailed information of the structure of the ignition flame front. Simulated gas species concentrations at the bed surface, ignition flame front rate, and bed temperature...... packing condition, and heat capacity of the straw have considerable effects on the model predictions of straw combustion in the fixed bed....

  14. Impact of different catalysis supported by oyster shells on the pyrolysis of tyre wastes in a single and a double fixed bed reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kordoghli, Sana; Khiari, Besma; Paraschiv, Maria; Zagrouba, Fethi; Tazerout, Mohand

    2017-09-01

    The treatment and disposal of tyres from vehicles has long been of considerable environmental importance. Studies have been undertaken to reduce their environmental impact. In this study, an alternative gas was produced from automobile tyre wastes by the means of a controlled pyrolysis. To do so, a novel catalytic system was designed with the aim of increasing the rate of conversion and improving the quality of the pyrolysis products. This work aimed also to reduce the severity of the overall reactions, by using powder catalysts (MgO, Al2O3, CaCO3, and zeolite ZSM-5) uniformly distributed on two layers of oyster shells (OS) particles. The catalyst/tyres mass ratio was kept for all the tests at 1/30. The pyrolysis reactor was maintained at 500°C and the influence of each catalyst and of the number of shell beds (0, 1 or 2), on the yield and composition of the derived products, was examined. The gas yields could contribute by 1.2% of total consumption in Tunisia. Furthermore, some combinations could upgrade the derived gas and made it possible to use it as such or with the minimum of post-treatment. It was found that, with the use of supported catalyst, the gas produced is 45% greater compared to classical thermal pyrolysis. The Heating value of the produced gas was also improved by the use of supported catalysts; it was found 16% greater with the use of Al2O3/OS compared to non-catalytic pyrolysis. When compared to the gas obtained from only one catalytic supported bed, the sulfur content was reduced by 80% with the use of CaCO3/OS on two catalytic beds. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Valorization of algal waste via pyrolysis in a fixed-bed reactor: Production and characterization of bio-oil and bio-char.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aboulkas, A; Hammani, H; El Achaby, M; Bilal, E; Barakat, A; El Harfi, K

    2017-11-01

    The aim of the present work is to develop processes for the production of bio-oil and bio-char from algae waste using the pyrolysis at controlled conditions. The pyrolysis was carried out at different temperatures 400-600°C and different heating rates 5-50°C/min. The algal waste, bio-oil and bio-char were successfully characterized using Elemental analysis, Chemical composition, TGA, FTIR, 1H NMR, GC-MS and SEM. At a temperature of 500°C and a heating rate of 10°C/min, the maximum yield of bio-oil and bio-char was found to be 24.10 and 44.01wt%, respectively, which was found to be strongly influenced by the temperature variation, and weakly affected by the heating rate variation. Results show that the bio-oil cannot be used as bio-fuel, but can be used as a source of value-added chemicals. On the other hand, the bio-char is a promising candidate for solid fuel applications and for the production of carbon materials. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Remoção de compostos fenólicos em reatores anaeróbios de leito fixo com diferentes materiais suporte Removal of the phenolic compounds in fixed bed anaerobic reactors with different support material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fátima R. L. Fia

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Objetivou-se, com a realização deste estudo, efetuar a avaliação operacional de três reatores anaeróbios de leito fixo e com escoamento ascendente, contendo biomassa imobilizada na remoção de compostos fenólicos presentes na água residuária do processamento dos frutos do cafeeiro (ARC. Os suportes utilizados na imobilização da biomassa foram: escória de alto-forno espuma de poliuretano e brita. Os reatores, confeccionados em PVC e com volume total de 139,5 L, foram alimentados com concentrações crescentes de compostos fenólicos (13, 19,7 e 42,7 mg L-1, sendo que o tempo de detenção hidráulica (TDH foi mantido em torno de 1,3 dias. No final de cada condição avaliada foram coletadas amostras de ARC, ao longo da altura dos reatores, para estudo cinético. A rápida aclimatação da biomassa aderida à escória resultou em uma eficiência maior de remoção de compostos fenólicos no período de partida bem como no melhor desempenho deste reator quanto à remoção desses compostos ao longo do período de experimentação. Os resultados indicaram que a escória de alto-forno apresentou maior potencial de utilização como material suporte de reatores anaeróbios, visando à remoção de compostos fenólicos da ARC.The operation of three fixed-bed anaerobic reactors with upflow and containing immobilized biomass were evaluated as regards to the removal of phenolic compounds found in the wastewater from coffee bean processing (RWC. The supports used in immobilization of the biomass were blast-furnace cinders, polyurethane foam and crushed stone. The PVC-made reactors with 139.5 L total volume were fed with increasing concentrations (13, 19.7 and 42.7 mg L-1 of phenolic compounds, and the hydraulic residence time (HRT was maintained constant (around 1.3 days. At the end of each evaluated condition, samples were collected from the RWC along the height of the reactor for kinetic studies. Rapid acclimation of biomass attached to the

  17. Investigation of radiative heat transfer in fixed bed biomass furnaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    T. Klason; X.S. Bai; M. Bahador; T.K. Nilsson; B. Sunden [Lund Institute of Technology, Lund (Sweden). Division of Fluid Mechanics

    2008-08-15

    This paper presents an investigation of the radiative heat transfer process in two fixed bed furnaces firing biomass fuels and the performance of several widely used models for calculation of radiative heat transfer in the free-room of fixed bed furnaces. The effective mean grey gas absorption coefficients are calculated using an optimised version of the exponential wide band model (EWBM) based on an optical mean beam length. Fly-ash and char particles are taken into account using Mie scattering. In the investigated updraft small-scale fixed bed furnace radiative transfer carries heat from the bed to the free-room, whereas in the cross-current bed large-scale industry furnace, radiative transfer brings heat from the hot zones in the free-room to the drying zone of the bed. Not all the investigated models can predict these heat transfer trends, and the sensitivity of results to model parameters is fairly different in the two furnaces. In the small-scale furnace, the gas absorption coefficient predicted by using different optical lengths has great impact on the predicted temperature field. In the large-scale furnaces, the predicted temperature field is less sensitive to the optical length. In both furnaces, with the same radiative properties, the low-computational-cost P1 model predicts a temperature field in the free-room similar to that by the more time consuming SLW model. In general, the radiative heat transfer rates to the fuel bed are not very sensitive to the radiative properties, but they are sensitive to the different radiative heat transfer models. For a realistic prediction of the radiative heat transfer rate to the fuel bed or to the walls, more computationally demanding models such as the FGG or SLW models should be used. 37 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. Fixed bed gasification of solid biomass fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haavisto, I. [Condens Oy, Haemeenlinna (Finland)

    1996-12-31

    Fixed bed biomass gasifiers are feasible in the effect range of 100 kW -10 MW. Co-current gasification is available only up to 1 MW for technical reasons. Counter-current gasifiers have been used in Finland and Sweden for 10 years in gasification heating plants, which are a combination of a gasifier and an oil boiler. The plants have proved to have a wide control range, flexible and uncomplicated unmanned operation and an excellent reliability. Counter-current gasifiers can be applied for new heating plants or for converting existing oil and natural gas boilers into using solid fuels. There is a new process development underway, aiming at motor use of the producer gas. The development work involves a new, more flexible cocurrent gasifier and a cleaning step for the counter-current producer gas. (orig.)

  19. Interactive Matching between the Temperature Profile and Secondary Reactions of Oil Shale Pyrolysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Yu; Han, Zhennan; Wu, Hao

    2016-01-01

    degrees C and a shale char bed operating at different temperatures. At low temperatures (550 degrees C), severe cracking occurred, converting both heavy and light oil to carbon and gas. The desirably matched reactor temperature profile for high oil yield is discussed via analysis of the tendency......This article investigates the effect of the reactor temperature profile on the distribution and characteristics of the products from fixed-bed pyrolysis of oil shale. Experiments were performed in a one-stage fixed-bed reactor and in a two-stage fixed-bed reactor. In the one-stage reactor......, the shale oil yield reached 7.40 wt % with a reactor temperature profile from 900 to 550 degrees C and decreased to 2.23 wt % with the reverse temperature profile. The effect of the temperature profile was investigated further in the two-stage fixed-bed reactor combining a pyrolysis stage operating at 550...

  20. Calibration and verification of models of organic carbon removal kinetics in Aerated Submerged Fixed-Bed Biofilm Reactors (ASFBBR): a case study of wastewater from an oil-refinery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trojanowicz, Karol; Wójcik, Włodzimierz

    2011-01-01

    The article presents a case-study on the calibration and verification of mathematical models of organic carbon removal kinetics in biofilm. The chosen Harremöes and Wanner & Reichert models were calibrated with a set of model parameters obtained both during dedicated studies conducted at pilot- and lab-scales for petrochemical wastewater conditions and from the literature. Next, the models were successfully verified through studies carried out utilizing a pilot ASFBBR type bioreactor installed in an oil-refinery wastewater treatment plant. During verification the pilot biofilm reactor worked under varying surface organic loading rates (SOL), dissolved oxygen concentrations and temperatures. The verification proved that the models can be applied in practice to petrochemical wastewater treatment engineering for e.g. biofilm bioreactor dimensioning.

  1. Scale-up of fixed-bed chemical looping combustion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kimball, E.; Geerdink, P.; Goetheer, E.L.V.

    2011-01-01

    Fixed-bed chemical looping combustion is currently being studied experimentally with the optimization of systems up to 1 kW. One of the key advantages for using the fixed-bed configuration over fluidized-beds is the flexibility in operating parameters that allows for application of CLC not only to

  2. Numerical and experimental studies on effects of moisture content on combustion characteristics of simulated municipal solid wastes in a fixed bed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Rui, E-mail: Sunsr@hit.edu.cn [School of Energy Science and Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, 92, West Dazhi Street, Harbin 150001 (China); Ismail, Tamer M., E-mail: temoil@aucegypt.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Suez Canal University, Ismailia (Egypt); Ren, Xiaohan [School of Energy Science and Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, 92, West Dazhi Street, Harbin 150001 (China); Abd El-Salam, M. [Department of Basic Science, Cairo University, Giza (Egypt)

    2015-05-15

    Highlights: • The effects of moisture content on the burning process of MSW are investigated. • A two-dimensional mathematical model was built to simulate the combustion process. • Temperature distributions, process rates, gas species were measured and simulated. • The The conversion ratio of C/CO and N/NO in MSW are inverse to moisture content. - Abstract: In order to reveal the features of the combustion process in the porous bed of a waste incinerator, a two-dimensional unsteady state model and experimental study were employed to investigate the combustion process in a fixed bed of municipal solid waste (MSW) on the combustion process in a fixed bed reactor. Conservation equations of the waste bed were implemented to describe the incineration process. The gas phase turbulence was modeled using the k–ε turbulent model and the particle phase was modeled using the kinetic theory of granular flow. The rate of moisture evaporation, devolatilization rate, and char burnout was calculated according to the waste property characters. The simulation results were then compared with experimental data for different moisture content of MSW, which shows that the incineration process of waste in the fixed bed is reasonably simulated. The simulation results of solid temperature, gas species and process rate in the bed are accordant with experimental data. Due to the high moisture content of fuel, moisture evaporation consumes a vast amount of heat, and the evaporation takes up most of the combustion time (about 2/3 of the whole combustion process). The whole bed combustion process reduces greatly as MSW moisture content increases. The experimental and simulation results provide direction for design and optimization of the fixed bed of MSW.

  3. Fixed bed pyrolysis of biomass solid waste for bio-oil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Mohammad Nurul; Ali, Mohamed Hairol Md; Haziq, Miftah

    2017-08-01

    Biomass solid waste in the form of rice husk particle is pyrolyzed in a fixed bed stainless steel pyrolysis reactor of 50 mm diameter and 50 cm length. The biomass solid feedstock is prepared prior to pyrolysis. The reactor bed is heated by means of a cylindrical heater of biomass source. A temperature of 500°C is maintained with an apperent vapor residence time of 3-5 sec. The products obtained are liquid bio-oil, solid char and gases. The liquid product yield is found to be 30% by weight of solid biomass feedstock while the solid product yield is found to be 35% by weight of solid biomass feedtock, the rest is gas. The bio-oil is a single-phase brownish color liquid of acrid smell. The heating value of the oil is determined to be 25 MJ/kg. The density and pH value are found to be 1.125 kg/m3 and 3.78 respectively.

  4. Syngas production from olive tree cuttings and olive kernels in a downdraft fixed-bed gasifier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skoulou, V.; Zabaniotou, A. [Laboratory of Plant Design, Department of Chemical Engineering, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, University Box 455, University Campus, Thessaloniki 54124 (Greece); Stavropoulos, G.; Sakelaropoulos, G. [Chemical Process Engineering Laboratory (CPEL), Department of Chemical Engineering, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, University Box 455, University Campus, Thessalonki 54124 (Greece)

    2008-02-15

    This study presents a laboratory fixed-bed gasification of olive kernels and olive tree cuttings. Gasification took place with air, in a temperature range of 750-950 C, for various air equivalence ratios (0.14-0.42) and under atmospheric pressure. In each run, the main components of the gas phase were CO, CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2} and CH{sub 4}. Experimental results showed that gasification with air at high temperatures (950 C) favoured gas yields. Syngas production increased with reactor temperature, while CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}, light hydrocarbons and tar followed the opposite trend. An increase of the air equivalence ratio decreased syngas production and lowered the product gas heating value, while favouring tar destruction. It was found that gas from olive tree cuttings at 950 C and with an air equivalence ratio of 0.42 had a higher LHV (9.41MJ/Nm{sup 3}) in comparison to olive kernels (8.60MJ/Nm{sup 3}). Olive kernels produced more char with a higher content of fixed carbon (16.39 w/w%) than olive tree cuttings; thus, they might be considered an attractive source for carbonaceous material production. (author)

  5. Anaerobic digestion of cassava wastewater in fixed bed reactor using bamboo medium support; Digestao anaerobica de agua residuaria de fecularia em reator de leito fixo utilizando meio suporte de aneis de bambu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watthier, Elisangela; Andreani, Cristiane L.; Silva, Jefferson L.G. [Universidade Estadual do Oeste do Parana (UNIOESTE), Cascavel, PR (Brazil)], E-mail: eliswa@hotmail.com; Gomes, Simone D. [Universidade Estadual do Oeste do Parana (UNIOESTE), Cascavel, PR (Brazil). Dept. de Recursos Hidricos e Saneamento Ambiental

    2012-11-01

    Cassava wastewater causes damage to the environment due to high organic loads and presence of cyanide and hydrocyanic acid. An alternative treatment anaerobic which add value for biogas production. To allow use of higher load sand reducing the TDH support means are used. This study aimed to evaluate the performance of the anaerobic treatment of liquid effluent of cassava industry, using bamboo as support media. The wastewater used was derived from starch factory located in Toledo. Was used PVC reactor with a diameter of 15 cm and length 90 cm. Were used as support means 52 bamboo rings and useful reactor volume 61. A total of 13 load increasing, from 1,675 to 15.158 g.L{sup -1}.d{sup -1}, until reaching the maximum load bearable. For each load data was collected for 15 days by daily samples at entrance and exit of the reactors. The samples were analyzed: DQO, alkalinity, volatile acidity and biogas production. There was a system instability in 12,394 g.L{sup -1}.d{sup -1}, with values of AV/AT above 0.5, but the system began to show signs of stability in the next load. The reactor showed biogas production up 1.57 L.L{sup -1}.d{sup -1}. (author)

  6. Preliminary study on fixed bed coal liquefaction. Jutensho ekikaho no kiso kenkyu. 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oshima, S.; Kawamura, M.; Yumura, M.; Kuriki, Y.; Ikazaki, F.; Kamisawa, C. (National Chemical Laboratory for Industry, Tsukuba (Japan))

    1990-11-29

    Coal liquefaction reaction was carried out in the presence of six kinds of iron sulfide differing in mean grain size as catalyst in order to investigate the liquefaction using a fixed bed reactor. The experimental liquefaction reaction was performed using Wandoan coal, anthracene oil and a specified amount of catalyst in an autoclave in the conditions of 100kg/cm[sup 2] hydrogen, 450[degree]C control temperature and 60mins of duration. The reaction rate increases as the diameter of catalyst particles becomes smaller and the added amount increases. It was found that the generation of C1-C5 hydrocarbon and CO and CO2 is not affected by particle diameter and the added amount and the reaction rate increases with high comsumption of hydrogen. The rate constant kt of THF-soluble fraction generating reaction and the outer surface area Ap of catalyst were obtained from a definition formula. In the range of Ap from 0(no catalyst) to 0.4, kt is 2.0[times]10[sup [minus]2] showing no catalytic effect, but kt increases with the increase of Ap when Ap>8. A liquefaction reaction was performed using a packed bed. In this reaction, 30wt.% slurry of Wandoan coal with hydrogenated anthracene used as solvent was circulated. 3 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  7. Particle Distribution in a Fixed Bed Down Draft Wood Gasifier

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hindsgaul, Claus

    2005-01-01

    Char particle samples were collected from six distances above the grate in a fixed bed of a down draft biomass gasifier. Each sample was separated into twelve size fractions by screening through standard sieves in order to determine the local particle size distribution. The ash contents of each...

  8. Operation of fixed-bed chemical looping combustion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kimball, E.; Hamers, H.P.; Cobden, P.D.; Gallucci, F.; Sint Annaland, M. van

    2013-01-01

    Chemical Looping Combustion is an alternative technology for CO2 capture. While most systems utilize dual circulating fluidized-beds, this work shows that fixed-bed Chemical Looping Combustion is a feasible configuration for this technology. The inherent separation of the CO2 from the depleted air

  9. FIXED-BED COLUMN ADSORPTION OF METHYL BLUE USING ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    userpc

    ABSTRACT. Axle Wood Carbon (AWC) was used to study the removal of Methyl Blue (MB) from its aqueous solution in a fixed-bed column adsorption system. The adsorbent (AWC) was characterized using SEM and pHPZC. SEM revealed the surface morphology and from the pHPZC determination, it was found that at pH ...

  10. Influence of the sensor location on the practical observability of a fixed bed bioreactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tali-Maamar, N.; Babary, J.P. [Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), 31 - Toulouse (France); Dochain, D. [Universite Catholique de Louvain (UCL), Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium)

    1995-12-31

    This paper deals with the state observability analysis of a distributed parameter fixed bed reactor. The objective of this paper is to analyze the influence of the position of the `internal` sensor(s) on the observability in order to determine the best observability possible in practice. The criterion is the conditioning number of the observability matrix of the linearized tangent model of the discretized model of the process. It is shown that there is an optimal location for which the conditioning number is minimized. (authors) 18 refs.

  11. Optimization of annatto (Bixa orellana L.) drying in fixed bed

    OpenAIRE

    Faria L.J.G.; Rocha S.C.S.

    2000-01-01

    ABSTRACT: The drying of annatto seeds (Bixa orellana L.), red piave cultivate, was studied in a fixed bed dryer. The best conditions were estimated to minimize the loss of coloring and to obtain final moisture of the seeds in appropriate levels to its conservation and maintenance of quality. The quantification of the influence of entrance variables in the final contents of bixin and moisture seeds and the identification of the optimal point was performed through the techniques of factorial de...

  12. ELECTRODEPOSITION OF COPPER IONS ON FIXED BED ELECTRODES: KINETIC AND HYDRODYNAMIC STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.A.M. Ruotolo

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available The kinetic and hydrodynamic behaviour of a fixed-bed electrochemical reactor was studied in terms of current efficiency (CE and energy efficiency (EE. In the kinetic experiments the effects of fixed bed thickness (L, current density (i and initial concentration of copper (C0 were studied. In the hydrodynamic experiments the permeability (k of the electrode and the coefficient for inertial forces (c were also studied as functions of the applied current density. At low current densities and bed thicknesses greater than 1.0 cm, negative CE and EE were observed as a consequence of the dissolution of the porous matrix. At high current densities low CE and EE were observed and a powdery deposit was formed on the surface of the particles. From the results of the kinetic study bed thickness and the range of current densities employed in the hydrodynamic experiments were chosen. In these experiments the electrodeposition process continued until the whole electrode had been clogged and no more electrolyte could pass through it. The relationship between pressure drop and flow rate was well described by the Forchheimer equation. It was observed that the reduction in porosity due to copper electrodeposition causes the flow rate to decrease because of the decrease in electrode permeability, but it had no influence on current efficiency.

  13. Operation of fixed-bed chemical looping combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kimball, E. [TNO, Gas Treatment, Leeghwaterstraat 46, 2628 CA Delft (Netherlands); Hamers, H.P.; Gallucci, F.; Van Sint Annaland, M. [Technische Universiteit Eindhoven, Den Dolech 2, 5612 AZ Eindhoven (Netherlands); Cobden, P. [Energy research Center of the Netherlands, Westerduinweg 3, 1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands)

    2013-07-01

    Chemical Looping Combustion is an alternative technology for CO2 capture. While most systems utilize dual circulating fluidized-beds, this work shows that fixed-bed Chemical Looping Combustion is a feasible configuration for this technology. The inherent separation of the CO2 from the depleted air stream gives a very low efficiency penalty, which is further improved by the possibility of using a pressurized fixed-bed system, a factor much more difficult to realize with circulating fluidized beds. A laboratory scale experimental system has been constructed for the purpose of validating a numerical model. The results from the numerical model have agreed well with experimental data over full oxidation-reduction cycles and will be presented in subsequent publications. The work briefly described here, and to be presented in detail in coming publications, forms a basis which proves feasibility, but also opens up several possibilities for further investigations needed to scale-up and eventually commercialize CLC for power generation with inherent CO2 capture.

  14. Optimization of annatto (Bixa orellana L. drying in fixed bed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faria L.J.G.

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The drying of annatto seeds (Bixa orellana L., red piave cultivate, was studied in a fixed bed dryer. The best conditions were estimated to minimize the loss of coloring and to obtain final moisture of the seeds in appropriate levels to its conservation and maintenance of quality. The quantification of the influence of entrance variables in the final contents of bixin and moisture seeds and the identification of the optimal point was performed through the techniques of factorial design, response surfaces methodology, canonical analysis and desirability function. It was verified that the final moisture of the seeds may be estimated by a second-order polynomial model and that the final content of bixin is only significantly influenced by the time of drying being described properly by a linear model, for the seeds used in this study.

  15. Effect of particle size and humidity on sugarcane bagasse combustion in a fixed bed furnace

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zamir Sánchez Castro

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The panela industry is one of the most important Agro Industries in Colombia, making it the largest per- capita consumer and the second largest producer worldwide. The fuel used in this process is traditionally the sugarcane bagasse (SB which is a byproduct of milling. However, due to the low efficiency of panela furnaces additional fuel is required such as wood, used rubber tires and coal. The fixed-bed furnaces inefficiency is mainly due to incomplete combustion of SB caused by the influence of process variables. Therefore, the aim of this work was to study the influence of particle size (PS and moisture content (MC over the combustion stages of SB in fixed-bed furnaces. A three-level factorial design was proposed for PS and MC of SB where the temperature and gas concentration were considered as response variables to evaluate the furnace performance. The results obtained in this work show that if the MC increases then the SB yield in the combustion is decreased. On the other hand, the increasing PS can counteract the effect of the MC of SB.

  16. The Hydrodynamic Characteristics of Cocurrent Downflow and Cocurrent Upflow Gas-Liquid-Solid Catalytic Fixed Bed Reactors: the Effect of Pressure Les caractéristiques hydrodynamiques des réacteurs gaz-liquide-solide à lit de catalyseur fixe à écoulement cocourant montant et descendant : l'influence de la pression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wild G.

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available While most catalytic fixed bed gas-liquid reactors of the petrol industry work at quite high pressures, the academic scientific work in this field concerned itself almost exclusively with the domain of approximatively atmospheric pressures. The authors present the results of some years of experimental investigations on the hydrodynamic characteristics of trickle bed reactors and lately of cocurrent upflow reactors. During the last years, results were also obtained under pressures up to 8 MPa. The measurements were made in a small scale cold flow equipment (diameter 23 mm. Different aqueous and organic more or less viscous, eventually coalescence inhibiting liquids, four gases and a number of non porous more or less wettable particles were used. The liquid holdup was determined in all cases by measuring liquid phase residence time distribution by different tracers. The following conclusions may be drawn:(a In the high interaction regime, it is the inertia of the gas and the liquid phases which is the main cause of the dissipation of mechanical energy. In this regime, results obtained in cocurrent upflow and downflow are approximately equal. (b Most correlations of literature are unable to predict the effect of pressure on the pressure drop or the liquid holdup. (c The gas viscosity has no influence on the hydrodynamics. It is therefore possible to simulate for example hydrogen under high pressure conditions by another gas of the same density (at a much lower pressures. A critical evaluation of the correlations and/or models of literature is presented, concerning their ability to represent the different characteristics as a function of pressure. Tandis que la plupart des réacteurs industriels gaz-liquide à lit de catalyseur fixe fonctionnent à assez hautes pressions, les travaux scientifiques académiques sont, dans ce domaine, presque exclusivement consacrés aux pressions avoisinant la pression atmosphérique. Les auteurs présentent les r

  17. Modeling of the fixed - bed adsorption of carbon dioxide and a carbon dioxide - nitrogen mixture on zeolite 13X

    OpenAIRE

    Dantas,T. L. P; Luna,F. M. T; Silva Jr.,I. J.; Torres,A. E. B.; Azevedo, D. C. S.; Rodrigues,A.E.; Moreira,R.F.P.M.

    2011-01-01

    In this study, the fixed - bed adsorption of carbon dioxide and a carbon dioxide - nitrogen mixture on zeolite 13X was investigated. The adsorption equilibrium and breakthrough curves were determined at different temperatures - 301 - 306 K, 323 K, 373 K and 423 K. A model based on the LDF approximation for the mass transfer, considering the energy and momentum balances, was used to describe the adsorption kinetics of carbon dioxide and a carbon dioxide - nitrogen mixture. The model acceptably...

  18. A FIXED BED SORPTION SYSTEM FOR DEFLUORIDATION OF GROUND WATER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayoob Sulaiman

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The presence of excess fluoride in ground water has become a global threat with as many as 200 million people affected in more than 35 countries in all the continents. Of late, there have been significant advances in the knowledge base regarding the effects of excess fluoride on human health. As a result, defluoridation of ground water is regarded as one of the key areas of attention among the universal water community triggering global research. This study describes the sorptive responses of a newly developed adsorbent, alumina cement granules (ALC, in its real-life application in fixed beds, for removing fluoride from the ground waters of a rural Indian village. ALC exhibited almost consistent scavenging capacity at various bed depths in column studies with an enhanced adsorption potential of 0.818 mg/g at a flow rate of 4 ml/min. The Thomas model was examined to describe the sorption process. The process design parameters of the column were obtained by linear regression of the model. In all the conditions examined, the Thomas model could consistently predict its characteristic parameters and describe the breakthrough sorption profiles in the whole range of sorption process.

  19. A FIXED BED SORPTION SYSTEM FOR DEFLUORIDATION OF GROUND WATER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayoob Sulaiman

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The presence of excess fluoride in ground water has become a global threat with as many as 200 million people affected in more than 35 countries in all the continents. Of late, there have been significant advances in the knowledge base regarding the effects of excess fluoride on human health. As a result, defluoridation of ground water is regarded as one of the key areas of attention among the universal water community triggering global research. This study describes the sorptive responses of a newly developed adsorbent, alumina cement granules (ALC, in its real-life application in fixed beds, for removing fluoride from the ground waters of a rural Indian village. ALC exhibited almost consistent scavenging capacity at various bed depths in column studies with an enhanced adsorption potential of 0.818 mg/g at a flow rate of 4 ml/min. The Thomas model was examined to describe the sorption process. The process design parameters of the column were obtained by linear regression of the model. In all the conditions examined, the Thomas model could consistently predict its characteristic parameters and describe the breakthrough sorption profiles in the whole range of sorption process.

  20. PENJERAPAN GAS CO HASIL PEMBAKARAN SAMPAH MENGGUNAKAN SORBENT TERMODIFIKASI DALAM REAKTOR FIXED BED

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Mariana

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available ADSORPTION OF CO FROM WASTE COMBUSTION USING MODIFIED SORBENT IN A FIXED BED REACTOR. Gases produced by garbage burning consist of dangerous gases such as CO, SO2 and other gases. Technology for reducing dangerous gases from incinerator outlet can be done by using a dry or wet process. The dry process is more economical process because of simple process, easy maintenance and no liquid waste as product. However, the weakness of the dry process is low absorption conversion and low gas removal efficiency. One way to overcome these problems is to use sorbent which has high reactivity. An inexpensive sorbent that commonly used is Ca(OH2. The aim of this research was to increase the reactivity of Ca(OH2 sorbent by using diatomaceous earth and compost as a source of silica and biosorbent, respectively. Diatomaceous earth contains CaO, SiO2 and Al2O3 and compost contains bacteria as a biosorbent that can convert CO to CO2 and CH4. The reaction between SiO2 and Ca(OH2 would form calcium silicate hydrate (CaO.SiO2.2H2O that has a high porosity and reactivity. The results showed that the reactivity of Ca(OH2 sorbent increased by addition of diatomaceous earth and compost. The results also showed that the sorption of CO gas increases with increasing of height of sorbent bed and temperature. The highest CO gas sorption was obtained at temperature of 150oC and sorbent bed height of 6 cm using the modified sorbent with Ca(OH2/DE/compost ratio of 3:1:1. Gas hasil pembakaran sampah terdiri dari gas-gas yang berbahaya seperti CO, SO2 dan lain sebagainya. Teknologi penghilangan gas-gas tersebut dapat dilakukan dengan menggunakan proses kering maupun proses basah. Penghilangan dengan proses kering lebih ekonomis karena sederhana, mudah pemeliharaan dan tidak menghasilkan limbah cair. Namun demikian, kelemahan proses kering adalah konversi absorpsi rendah dan efisiensi penyisihan  gas relatif kecil. Salah satu cara mengatasi masalah tersebut di atas adalah dengan

  1. Gasification of biomass in a fixed bed downdraft gasifier--a realistic model including tar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barman, Niladri Sekhar; Ghosh, Sudip; De, Sudipta

    2012-03-01

    This study presents a model for fixed bed downdraft biomass gasifiers considering tar also as one of the gasification products. A representative tar composition along with its mole fractions, as available in the literature was used as an input parameter within the model. The study used an equilibrium approach for the applicable gasification reactions and also considered possible deviations from equilibrium to further upgrade the equilibrium model to validate a range of reported experimental results. Heat balance was applied to predict the gasification temperature and the predicted values were compared with reported results in literature. A comparative study was made with some reference models available in the literature and also with experimental results reported in the literature. Finally a predicted variation of performance of the gasifier by this validated model for different air-fuel ratio and moisture content was also discussed. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. A batch and fixed bed column study for fluorescein removal using chitosan modified by epichlorohydrin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, P M O; Francisco, J E; Cajé, J C M; Cassella, R J; Pacheco, W F

    2018-01-02

    This study evaluates the feasibility of commercial chitosan (CQ) and modified chitosan (MQ) by epichlorohydrin to be used as a solid phase to remove fluorescein (FSC) from aqueous solutions by two different approaches: in batch and on a fixed column bed. For the batch study, all parameters that influence sorption capacity were evaluated, such as: pH, mass, ionic strength, temperature and time of contact. In the optimized condition, 75% removal was obtained for FSC using CQ, while the modification allowed an increase up to 99%, as well as an increase in the stability of the polymer. In the fixed column bed study, the influence of all the parameters was evaluated through breakthrough curves, and the thermodynamics parameters of each approach were obtained. The results of these studies demonstrate that the modification with epichlorohydrin enhanced the sorptive properties (from 35% to 95% in fixed bed experiments) and the polymer stability (making it insoluble), making it suitable to be used in wastewater treatment.

  3. Integrated operation of a pressurized fixed-bed gasifier, hot gas desulfurization system, and turbine simulator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bevan, S.; Ayala, R.E.; Feitelberg, A.; Furman, A.

    1995-11-01

    The overall objective of the General Electric Hot Gas Cleanup (HGCU) Program is to develop a commercially viable technology to remove sulfur, particulates, and halogens from a high-temperature fuel gas stream using a moving bed, regenerable mixed metal oxide sorbent based process. The HGCU Program is based on the design and demonstration of the HGCU system in a test facility made up of a pilot-scale fixed bed gasifier, a HGCU system, and a turbine simulator in Schenectady, NY, at the General Electric Research and Development Center. The objectives of the turbine simulator testing are (1) to demonstrate the suitability of fuel gas processed by the HGCU system for use in state-of-the-art gas turbines firing at 2,350 F rotor inlet temperature and (2) to quantify the combustion characteristics and emissions on low-Btu fuel gas. The turbine simulator program also includes the development and operation of experimental combustors based on the rich-quench-lean concept (RQL) to minimize the conversion of ammonia and other fuel-bound nitrogen species to NO{sub x} during combustion. The HGCU system and turbine simulator have been designed to process approximately 8,000 lb/hr of low heating value fuel gas produced by the GE fixed bed gasifier. The HGCU system has utilized several mixed metal oxide sorbents, including zinc ferrite, zinc titanate, and Z-Sorb, with the objective of demonstrating good sulfur removal and mechanical attrition resistance as well as economic cost characteristics. Demonstration of halogen removal and the characterization of alkali and trace metal concentrations in the fuel gas are subordinate objectives of the overall program. This report describes the results of several long-duration pilot tests.

  4. Performance Analysis of an Integrated Fixed Bed Gasifier Model for Different Biomass Feedstocks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharmina Begum

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Energy recovery from biomass by gasification technology has attracted significant interest because it satisfies a key requirement of environmental sustainability by producing near zero emissions. Though it is not a new technology, studies on its integrated process simulation and analysis are limited, in particular for municipal solid waste (MSW gasification. This paper develops an integrated fixed bed gasifier model of biomass gasification using the Advanced System for Process ENngineering (Aspen Plus software for its performance analysis. A computational model was developed on the basis of Gibbs free energy minimization. The model is validated with experimental data of MSW and food waste gasification available in the literature. A reasonable agreement between measured and predicted syngas composition was found. Using the validated model, the effects of operating conditions, namely air-fuel ratio and gasifier temperature, on syngas production are studied. Performance analyses have been done for four different feedstocks, namely wood, coffee bean husks, green wastes and MSWs. The ultimate and proximate analysis data for each feedstock was used for model development. It was found that operating parameters have a significant influence on syngas composition. An air-fuel ratio of 0.3 and gasifier temperature of 700 °C provides optimum performance for a fixed bed gasifier for MSWs, wood wastes, green wastes and coffee bean husks. The developed model can be useful for gasification of other biomasses (e.g., food wastes, rice husks, poultry wastes and sugarcane bagasse to predict the syngas composition. Therefore, the study provides an integrated gasification model which can be used for different biomass feedstocks.

  5. Numerical modelling of biomass combustion: Solid conversion processes in a fixed bed furnace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karim, Md. Rezwanul; Naser, Jamal

    2017-06-01

    Increasing demand for energy and rising concerns over global warming has urged the use of renewable energy sources to carry a sustainable development of the world. Bio mass is a renewable energy which has become an important fuel to produce thermal energy or electricity. It is an eco-friendly source of energy as it reduces carbon dioxide emissions. Combustion of solid biomass is a complex phenomenon due to its large varieties and physical structures. Among various systems, fixed bed combustion is the most commonly used technique for thermal conversion of solid biomass. But inadequate knowledge on complex solid conversion processes has limited the development of such combustion system. Numerical modelling of this combustion system has some advantages over experimental analysis. Many important system parameters (e.g. temperature, density, solid fraction) can be estimated inside the entire domain under different working conditions. In this work, a complete numerical model is used for solid conversion processes of biomass combustion in a fixed bed furnace. The combustion system is divided in to solid and gas phase. This model includes several sub models to characterize the solid phase of the combustion with several variables. User defined subroutines are used to introduce solid phase variables in commercial CFD code. Gas phase of combustion is resolved using built-in module of CFD code. Heat transfer model is modified to predict the temperature of solid and gas phases with special radiation heat transfer solution for considering the high absorptivity of the medium. Considering all solid conversion processes the solid phase variables are evaluated. Results obtained are discussed with reference from an experimental burner.

  6. Arsenic removal in a sulfidogenic fixed-bed column bioreactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Altun, Muslum, E-mail: muslumaltun@hotmail.com [Hacettepe University, Department of Chemistry, Beytepe, Ankara (Turkey); Sahinkaya, Erkan [Istanbul Medeniyet University, Bioengineering Department, Goztepe, Istanbul (Turkey); Durukan, Ilknur; Bektas, Sema [Hacettepe University, Department of Chemistry, Beytepe, Ankara (Turkey); Komnitsas, Kostas [Technical University of Crete, Department of Mineral Resources Engineering, Chania (Greece)

    2014-03-01

    Highlights: • Sulfidogenic treatment of As-containing AMD was investigated. • High rate simultaneous removal of As and Fe was achieved. • As was removed without adding alkalinity or adjusting pH. • As and Fe removal mechanisms were elucidated. - Abstract: In the present study, the bioremoval of arsenic from synthetic acidic wastewater containing arsenate (As{sup 5+}) (0.5–20 mg/L), ferrous iron (Fe{sup 2+}) (100–200 mg/L) and sulfate (2000 mg/L) was investigated in an ethanol fed (780–1560 mg/L chemical oxygen demand (COD)) anaerobic up-flow fixed bed column bioreactor at constant hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 9.6 h. Arsenic removal efficiency was low and averaged 8% in case iron was not supplemented to the synthetic wastewater. Neutral to slightly alkaline pH and high sulfide concentration in the bioreactor retarded the precipitation of arsenic. Addition of 100 mg/L Fe{sup 2+} increased arsenic removal efficiency to 63%. Further increase of influent Fe{sup 2+} concentration to 200 mg/L improved arsenic removal to 85%. Decrease of influent COD concentration to its half, 780 mg/L, resulted in further increase of As removal to 96% when Fe{sup 2+} and As{sup 5+} concentrations remained at 200 mg/L and 20 mg/L, respectively. As a result of the sulfidogenic activity in the bioreactor the effluent pH and alkalinity concentration averaged 7.4 ± 0.2 and 1736 ± 239 mg CaCO{sub 3}/L respectively. Electron flow from ethanol to sulfate averaged 72 ± 10%. X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray fluorescence (XRF), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) analyses were carried out to identify the nature of the precipitate generated by sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) activity. Precipitation of arsenic in the form of As{sub 2}S{sub 3} (orpiment) and co-precipitation with ferrous sulfide (FeS), pyrite (FeS{sub 2}) or arsenopyrite (FeAsS) were the main arsenic removal mechanisms.

  7. Thermal Shield and Reactor Structure Temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collier, A.R.

    2001-07-31

    The purpose of this report is to present reactor structure and thermal shield temperature data taken during P-3 and P-5 cycles and compare them with design calculations in order to predict temperatures at higher power levels.

  8. The contrast study of anammox-denitrifying system in two non-woven fixed-bed bioreactors (NFBR) treating different low C/N ratio sewage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Fan; Zhang, Hanmin; Yang, Fenglin; Qiang, Hong; Zhang, Guangyi

    2012-06-01

    Two non-woven fixed-bed bioreactors (NFBR) based on different substrates (nitrite and nitrate) were constructed to study the environmental adaptability for temperature and organic matter of anammox-denitrifying system and nitrogen removal performance. The two reactors were successfully operated for 200 days. The average removal rates of nitrogen and COD of R2 were 81% and 93%, respectively. Besides, the nitrogen removal rate of R1 was 95% under not more than 105 mg/l of COD. The experimental results indicated that the R2 based on nitrate had a good nitrogen removal performance at room temperature (25 °C). Additionally, the analysis results of fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) showed that the percentage compositions of anammox in R1 and R2 were 84% and 65% on day 189. Finally, the possible nitrogen removal model of anammox-denitrifying system was constructed. According to nitrogen balance and C/N ratios of denitrification, the nitrogen removal approaches of R1 and R2 were obtained. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Modeling of the fixed - bed adsorption of carbon dioxide and a carbon dioxide - nitrogen mixture on zeolite 13X

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. L. P Dantas

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the fixed - bed adsorption of carbon dioxide and a carbon dioxide - nitrogen mixture on zeolite 13X was investigated. The adsorption equilibrium and breakthrough curves were determined at different temperatures - 301 - 306 K, 323 K, 373 K and 423 K. A model based on the LDF approximation for the mass transfer, considering the energy and momentum balances, was used to describe the adsorption kinetics of carbon dioxide and a carbon dioxide - nitrogen mixture. The model acceptably reproduced all of the breakthrough curves and can be considered as adequate for designing a PSA cycle to separate carbon dioxidenitrogen mixtures.

  10. Helium-cooled high temperature reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trauger, D.B.

    1985-01-01

    Experience with several helium cooled reactors has been favorable, and two commercial plants are now operating. Both of these units are of the High Temperature Graphite Gas Cooled concept, one in the United States and the other in the Federal Republic of Germany. The initial helium charge for a reactor of the 1000 MW(e) size is modest, approx.15,000 kg.

  11. Co-pyrolysis of rice straw and polypropylene using fixed-bed pyrolyzer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izzatie, N. I.; Basha, M. H.; Uemura, Y.; Mazlan, M. A.; Hashim, M. S. M.; Amin, N. A. M.; Hamid, M. F.

    2016-11-01

    The present work encompasses the impact of temperature (450, 500, 550, 600 °C) on the properties of pyrolysis oil and on other product yield for the co-pyrolysis of Polypropylene (PP) plastics and rice straw. Co-pyrolysis of PP plastic and rice straw were conducted in a fixed-bed drop type pyrolyzer under an inert condition to attain maximum oil yield. Physically, the pyrolysis oil is dark-brown in colour with free flowing and has a strong acrid smell. Copyrolysis between these typically obtained in maximum pyrolysis oil yields up to 69% by ratio 1:1 at a maximum temperature of 550 °C. From the maximum yield of pyrolysis oil, characterization of pyrolysis product and effect of biomass type of the composition were evaluated. Pyrolysis oil contains a high water content of 66.137 wt.%. Furfural, 2- methylnaphthalene, tetrahydrofuran (THF), toluene and acetaldehyde were the major organic compounds found in pyrolysis oil of rice straw mixed with PP. Bio-char collected from co-pyrolysis of rice straw mixed with PP plastic has high calorific value of 21.190 kJ/g and also carbon content with 59.02 wt.% and could contribute to high heating value. The non-condensable gases consist of hydrogen, carbon monoxide, and methane as the major gas components.

  12. Impact of feedstock properties and operating conditions on sewage sludge gasification in a fixed bed gasifier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werle, Sebastian

    2014-10-01

    This work presents results of experimental studies on the gasification process of granulated sewage sludge in a laboratory fixed bed gasifier. Nowadays, there is a large and pressing need for the development of thermal methods for sewage sludge disposal. Gasification is an example of thermal method that has several advantages over the traditional combustion. Gasification leads to a combustible gas, which can be used for the generation of useful forms of final energy. It can also be used in processes, such as the drying of sewage sludge directly in waste treatment plant. In the present work, the operating parameters were varied over a wide range. Parameters, such as air ratio λ = 0.12 to 0.27 and the temperature of air preheating t = 50 °C to 250 °C, were found to influence temperature distribution and syngas properties. The results indicate that the syngas heating value decreases with rising air ratio for all analysed cases: i.e. for both cold and preheated air. The increase in the concentration of the main combustible components was accompanied by a decrease in the concentration of carbon dioxide. Preheating of the gasification agent supports the endothermic gasification and increases hydrogen and carbon monoxide production. © The Author(s) 2014.

  13. Batch and fixed-bed biosorption of Cd(II) from aqueous solution using immobilized Pleurotus ostreatus spent substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Yu; Teng, Chunying; Yu, Sumei; Song, Tao; Dong, Liying; Liang, Jinsong; Bai, Xin; Liu, Xuesheng; Hu, Xiaojing; Qu, Juanjuan

    2018-01-01

    To prevent the blockage in a continuous fix-bed system, Pleurotus Ostreatus spent substrate (POSS), a composite agricultural waste, was immobilized into granular adsorbents (IPOSS) with polymeric matrix, and used to remove Cd(II) from synthetic wastewater in batch experiment as well as in continuous fixed-bed column system. In batch experiment, higher pH, temperature and Cd(II) initial concentration were conducive to a higher biosorption capacity, and the maximum biosorption capacity reached up to 87.2 mg/g at Cd(II) initial concentration of 200 mg/L, pH 6 and 25 °C. The biosorption of Cd(II) onto IPOSS followed the Langmuir isotherm model with the maximum adsorption capacity(qmax) of 100 mg/g. The biosorption was an endothermic reaction and a spontaneous process based on positive value of ΔH0 and negative value of ΔG0. In fixed-bed column system, higher bed depth, lower flow rate and influent Cd(II) concentration led to a longer breakthrough and exhaustion time, and the best performance (equilibrium uptake (qe) of 14.4 mg, breakthrough time at 31 h and exhaustion time at 78 h) was achieved at a bed depth of 110 cm, a flow rate of 1.2 L/h and an influent concentration of 100 mg/L. Furthermore, regeneration experiment revealed a good reusability of IPOSS with 0.1 M HNO3 as eluting agent during three cycles of adsorption and desorption. Cd(II) biosorption onto IPOSS mainly relied on a chemical process including ion exchange and complexation or coordination revealed by SEM-EDX, FTIR and XRD analysis. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  14. Batch and continuous (fixed-bed column) biosorption of crystal violet by Artocarpus heterophyllus (jackfruit) leaf powder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Papita Das; Chakraborty, Sagnik; Chowdhury, Shamik

    2012-04-01

    In this study, batch and fixed-bed column experiments were performed to investigate the biosorption potential of Artocarpus heterophyllus (jackfruit) leaf powder (JLP) to remove crystal violet (CV) from aqueous solutions. Batch biosorption studies were carried out as a function of solution pH, contact time, initial dye concentration and temperature. The biosorption equilibrium data showed excellent fit to the Langmuir isotherm model with maximum monolayer biosorption capacity of 43.39 mg g(-1) at pH 7.0, initial dye concentration=50 mg L(-1), temperature=293 K and contact time=120 min. According to Dubinin-Radushkevich (D-R) isotherm model, biosorption of CV by JLP was chemisorption. The biosorption kinetics followed the pseudo-second-order kinetic model. Thermodynamic analysis revealed that biosorption of CV from aqueous solution by JLP was a spontaneous and exothermic process. In order to ascertain the practical applicability of the biosorbent, fixed-bed column studies were also performed. The breakthrough time increased with increasing bed height and decreased with increasing flow rate. The Thomas model as well as the BDST model showed good agreement with the experimental results at all the process parameters studied. It can be concluded that JLP is a promising biosorbent for removal of CV from aqueous solutions. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Effect of Calcination and Reduction Temperatures on the Reduction ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2003-12-05

    Dec 5, 2003 ... The reduction temperature did not affect the product selectivity. KEYWORDS. Fischer-Tropsch synthesis, carbon monoxide hydrogenation, syngas conversion, cobalt; titania, fixed-bed reactor. 1. Introduction. Supported cobalt catalysts have been widely employed for. Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) synthesis of ...

  16. Fixed-bed gasification research using US coals. Volume 14. Gasification of Kemmerer subbituminous coal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thimsen, D.; Maurer, R.E.; Pooler, A.R.; Pui, D.; Liu, B.; Kittelson, D.

    1985-05-01

    A single-staged, fixed-bed Wellman-Galusha gasifier coupled with a hot, raw gas combustion system and scrubber has been used to gasify numerous coals from throughout the United States. The gasification test program is organized as a cooperative effort by private industrial participants and governmental agencies. The consortium of participants is organized under the Mining and Industrial Fuel Gas (MIFGa) group. This report is the fourteen volume in a series of reports describing the atmospheric pressure, fixed-bed gasification of US coals. This specific report describes the gasification of Kemmerer subbituminous coal, from August 11, 1984 to August 15, 1984. 4 refs., 20 figs., 13 tabs.

  17. Fixed-bed gasification research using US coals. Volume 10. Gasification of Benton lignite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thimsen, D.; Maurer, R.E.; Pooler, A.R.; Pui, D.; Liu, B.; Kittelson, D.

    1985-05-01

    A single-staged, fixed-bed Wellman-Galusha gasifier coupled with a hot, raw gas combustion system and scrubber has been used to gasify numerous coals from throughout the United States. The gasification test program is organized as a cooperative effort by private industrial participants and governmental agencies. The consortium of participants is organized under the Mining and Industrial Fuel Gas (MIFGa) Group. This report is the tenth volume in a series of reports describing the atmospheric pressure, fixed-bed gasification of US coals. This specific report describes the gasification of Benton lignite. The period of gasification test was November 1-8, 1983. 16 refs., 22 figs., 19 tabs.

  18. Exchange between the stagnant and flowing zone in gas-flowing solids-fixed bed contactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ALEKSANDAR P. DUDUKOVIC

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available In countercurrent gas – flowing solids – fixed bed contactors, a fraction of the flowing solids is in motion (dynamic holdup, while the other fraction is resting on the fixed bed elements. In this study it was experimentally proved that the stagnant zone should not be considered as a dead part of the column, but that there is a dynamic exchange between these two portions of flowing solids particles. Combining a mathematical model with tracer experiments, the rate of exchange was determined and it was shown that only a small part (ca. 20 % of the stagnant region should be considered as a dead one.

  19. Fixed-bed gasification research using US coals. Volume 13. Gasification of Blind Canyon bituminous coal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thimsen, D.; Maurer, R.E.; Pooler, A.R.; Pui, D.; Liu, B.; Kittelson, D.

    1985-05-01

    A single-staged, fixed-bed Wellman-Galusha gasifier coupled with a hot, raw gas combustion system and scrubber has been used to gasify numerous coals from throughout the United States. The gasification test program is organized as a cooperative effort by private industrial participants and governmental agencies. The consortium of participants is organized under the Mining and Industrial Fuel Gas (MIFGa) Group. This report is the thirteenth volume in a series of reports describing the atmospheric pressure, fixed-bed gasification of US coals. This specific report describes the gasification of Blind Canyon bituminous coal, from July 31, 1984 to August 11, 1984. 6 refs., 22 figs., 20 tabs.

  20. Air gasification of biogas-derived digestate in a downdraft fixed bed gasifier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Guanyi; Guo, Xiang; Cheng, Zhanjun; Yan, Beibei; Dan, Zeng; Ma, Wenchao

    2017-11-01

    Digestate is a byproduct from biomass anaerobic digestion process. Gasification of dried digestate to produce gasesous product might be a promising route. In this work, air gasification of digestate with high ash content was performed in a downdraft fixed bed gasifier at temperature varying from 600°C to 800°C and air equivalence ratio (ER) ranging from 0.25 to 0.30. The ash melting properties were firstly detected by the Intelligent Ash Melting Point Test, and the by-products (biochar and ash) were analyzed. The results showed that no ash slagging was observed and therefore it is feasible to operate digestate gasification under 800°C and ER ranging from 0.25 to 0.30. High temperature favored gas production, 800°C is proposed for digestate gasification in the present study. ER with a medium value improved gas quality and cold gas efficiency (CGE), and the optimal LHV of 4.78MJ/Nm 3 and CGE of 67.01% were obtained with ER of 0.28. High ER favored the increase of gas yield and decrease of tar concentration, and the optimal gas yield of 2.15 Nm 3 /kg and tar concentration of 1.61g/Nm 3 were achieved with ER of 0.30. Improved molar ratio of H 2 /CO varying from 1.03 to 1.08 was obtained at 800°C, indicating gaseous product has the potential for chemical synthesis processes (1

  1. Heat Transfer in a Fixed Bed of Straw Char

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fjellerup, Jan Søren; Henriksen, Ulrik Birk; Jensen, Anker

    2003-01-01

    A model for the thermal conductivity of a straw char bed has been developed. The model extends the work of Yagi and Kunii to describe heat transfer in a bed of cylinders, using a relationship between the interparticle distance and the external porosity. To verify the model, thermal conductivity...... the experimental uncertainty over the range of conditions investigated. The heat transfer model was used in a parametric study to evaluate the effect of gas flow rate, particle diameter, porosity, and temperature on the thermal conductivity in a straw char bed....

  2. Simulation of a low temperature water gas shift reactor using the heterogeneous model/application to a pem fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giunta, Pablo; Amadeo, Norma; Laborde, Miguel

    In the last few years, a renewed interest in the water gas shift (WGS) reaction at low temperature has arisen due to its application to fuel cells. In this work, a simulation of a fixed bed reactor for this reaction, which forms part of a hydrogen production-purification train for a 10 kW PEM fuel cell using ethanol as the raw material, was carried out. A commercial Cu/Zn/Ba/Al 2O 3 catalyst was employed and a one-dimensional heterogeneous model was applied for the simulation. The catalyst deactivation due to thermal factors (sintering) was taken into account in the model. Isothermal and adiabatic regimes were analyzed as well. Results of the simulation indicate that the pellet can be considered isothermal but temperature gradients in the film cannot be disregarded. On the other hand, concentration gradients in the film can be ignored but CO profiles are established inside the pellet. Adiabatic operation can be recommended because of its simplicity of operation and construction. The reactor volume is strongly sensitive to the CO outlet concentration at CO levels lower than 6000 ppm. For a 10 kW PEM fuel cell, using adequate pellet size and taking into account the catalyst deactivation, a reactor volume of 0.64 l would be enough to obtain an outlet CO concentration of about 7160 ppm. This concentration value can be handled by the next purification stage, COPROX.

  3. Adsorption of ciprofloxacin and norfloxacin from aqueous solution onto granular activated carbon in fixed bed column.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darweesh, Teeba M; Ahmed, Muthanna J

    2017-04-01

    Carbonization of Phoenix dactylifera L stones followed by microwave K 2 CO 3 activation was adopted for preparation of granular activated carbon (KAC). High yield and favorable pore characteristics in terms of surface area and pore volume were reported for KAC as follows: 44%, 852m 2 /g, and 0.671cm 3 /g, respectively. The application of KAC as adsorbent for attraction of ciprofloxacin (CIP) and norfloxacin (NOR) was investigated using fixed bed systems. The effect of flow rate (0.5-1.5ml/min), bed height (15-25cm), and initial drug concentration (75-225mg/l) on the behavior of breakthrough curves was explained. The fixed bed analysis showed the better correlation of breakthrough data by both Thomas and Yoon-Nelson models. Inlet drug concentration was of greatest effect on breakthrough data compared to other fixed bed variables. Experimental and calculated breakthrough data were obtained for CIP and NOR adsorption on KAC, thus being important for design of fixed bed column. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Mathematical Modelling of the Fixed-Bed Biomass-Coal Co-Gasification Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donskoy Igor G.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper considers mathematical modelling of downdraft fixed-bed gasification process of the mixtures of woody biomass and coal. Biomass/coal ratio, biomass moisture content and air equivalence ratio are varying parameters. Boundaries of the efficient gasification regimes are estimated.

  5. Mathematical modelling and optimization of biomass-plastic fixed-bed downdraft co-gasification process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donskoy Igor

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Co-gasification of woody biomass and polyethylene is studied using mathematical modeling. The gasification process is downdraft fixed-bed. Comparison of modeling results with some experimental data is made. Influence of biomass/plastic ratio and air equivalence ratio on gasification efficiency is investigated.

  6. Microbial community dynamics in a submerged fixed bed bioreactor during biological treatment of saline urban wastewater

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cortés-Lorenzo, C.; Sipkema, D.; Rodríguez-Díaz, M.; Fuentes, S.; Juárez-Jiménez, B.; Rodelas, B.; Smidt, H.; González-López, J.

    2014-01-01

    The influence of salt (NaCl) on bacterial and archaeal communities in a submerged fixed bed bioreactor system for the treatment of urban wastewater was determined by DGGE and 454 pyrosequencing of PCR-amplified 16S ribosomal RNA gene fragments. Cluster analysis of DGGE fingerprints showed

  7. Performance of a sisal fibre fixed-bed anaerobic digester for biogas ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A single stage anaerobic digester employing a sisal fibre waste fixed bed was studied for biogas production from sisal pulp waste. The fibre was colonized by microorganisms involved in biogas production. The sisal pulp waste to be digested was fed from the top and was sprinkled intermittently with recirculating leachate ...

  8. Mathematical modelling and optimization of biomass-plastic fixed-bed downdraft co-gasification process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donskoy, Igor

    2017-10-01

    Co-gasification of woody biomass and polyethylene is studied using mathematical modeling. The gasification process is downdraft fixed-bed. Comparison of modeling results with some experimental data is made. Influence of biomass/plastic ratio and air equivalence ratio on gasification efficiency is investigated.

  9. performance of a sisal fibre fixed-bed anaerobic digester for biogas

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mgina

    Lund, P.O Box 124, S-22100, Lund, Sweden. ABSTRACT. A single stage anaerobic digester employing a sisal fibre waste fixed bed was studied for biogas production from sisal pulp waste. The fibre was colonized by microorganisms involved in biogas production. The sisal pulp waste to be digested was fed from the top ...

  10. Flow, turbulence, and drag associated with engineered log jams in a fixed-bed experimental channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engineered log jams (ELJs) have become attractive alternatives for river restoration and bank stabilization programs. Yet the effects of ELJs on turbulent flow and the fluid forces acting on the ELJs are not well known, and such information could inform design criteria. In this study, a fixed-bed ph...

  11. Fixed-bed column adsorption of methyl blue using carbon derived ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Axle Wood Carbon (AWC) was used to study the removal of Methyl Blue (MB) from its aqueous solution in a fixed-bed column adsorption system. The adsorbent (AWC) was characterized using SEM and pHPZC. SEM revealed the surface morphology and from the pHPZC determination, it was found that at pH of 8.21 the ...

  12. A review of sorbent materials for fixed bed alkali getter systems in biomass gasifier combined cycle power generation applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turn, S.Q.; Kinoshita, C.M.; Ishimura, D.M.; Masutani, S.M. [Hawaii Natural Energy Inst., Honolulu, HI (United States); Zhou, J. [Hawaii Univ., Mechanical Engineering Dept., Honolulu, HI (United States)]|[Hawaii Natural Energy Inst., Honolulu, HI (United States); Hiraki, T.T. [Hawaii Univ., Biosystems Engineering Dept., Honolulu, HI (United States)

    1998-12-01

    Gas phase alkali metal compounds contribute to fouling, slagging, corrosion, and agglomeration problems in energy conversion facilities. One method of mitigation applicable at high temperature is to pass the gas stream through a fixed bed of sorbent or getter material that preferentially adsorbs alkali via physical adsorption or chemisorption. This paper reviews studies in which such materials, primarily alumina and silicate compounds, in inert and simulated combustor flue gas conditions were screened. Emathlite, diatomaceous earth, kaolinite, and activated bauxite were identified as potential sorbents and were tested thermogravimetrically or in packed beds under various process conditions. Test experience with candidate sorbent materials in an environment representative of process conditions following a hot filter in a biomass integrated gasifier combined cycle system was found to be lacking. (Author)

  13. Reactor for exothermic reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Jr., Lawrence A.; Hearn, Dennis; Jones, Jr., Edward M.

    1993-01-01

    A liquid phase process for oligomerization of C.sub.4 and C.sub.5 isoolefins or the etherification thereof with C.sub.1 to C.sub.6 alcohols wherein the reactants are contacted in a reactor with a fixed bed acid cation exchange resin catalyst at an LHSV of 5 to 20, pressure of 0 to 400 psig and temperature of 120.degree. to 300.degree. F. Wherein the improvement is the operation of the reactor at a pressure to maintain the reaction mixture at its boiling point whereby at least a portion but less than all of the reaction mixture is vaporized. By operating at the boiling point and allowing a portion of the reaction mixture to vaporize, the exothermic heat of reaction is dissipated by the formation of more boil up and the temperature in the reactor is controlled.

  14. Start-up of horizontal anaerobic reactors with sludge blanket and fixed bed for wastewater treatment from coffee processing by wet method Partida de reatores anaeróbios horizontais com manta de lodo e de leito fixo para tratamento de águas residuárias do beneficiamento de frutos do cafeeiro por via úmida

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto A. de Oliveira

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available In this study it was evaluated the start-up procedures of anaerobic treatment system with three horizontal anaerobic reactors (R1, R2 and R3, installed in series, with volume of 1.2 L each. R1 had sludge blanket, and R2 and R3 had half supporter of bamboo and coconut fiber, respectively. As an affluent, it was synthesized wastewater from mechanical pulping of the coffee fruit by wet method, with a mean value of total chemical oxygen demand (CODtotal of 16,003 mg L-1. The hydraulic retention time (HRT in each reactor was 30 h. The volumetric organic loading (VOL applied in R1 varied from 8.9 to 25.0 g of CODtotal (L d-1. The mean removal efficiencies of CODtotal varied from 43 to 97% in the treatment system (R1+R2+R3, stabilizing above 80% after 30 days of operation. The mean content of methane in the biogas were of 70 to 76%, the mean volumetric production was 1.7 L CH4 (L reactor d-1 in the system, and the higher conversions were around at 0.20 L CH4 (g CODremoved-1 in R1 and R2. The mean values of pH in the effluents ranged from 6.8 to 8.3 and the mean values of total volatile acids remained below 200 mg L-1 in the effluent of R3. The concentrations of total phenols of the affluent ranged from 45 to 278 mg L-1, and the mean removal efficiency was of 52%. The start-up of the anaerobic treatment system occurred after 30 days of operation as a result of inoculation with anaerobic sludge with active microbiota.Foram avaliados os procedimentos de partida de sistema de tratamento com três reatores anaeróbios horizontais (R1, R2 e R3, instalados em série, com volume de 1,2 L cada. O R1 com manta de lodo e o R2 e R3 através de suporte de bambu e fibra de coco, respectivamente. Como afluente,foram sintetizadas águas residuárias do despolpamento mecânico dos frutos do cafeeiro por via úmida, com valor médio de demanda química de oxigênio total (DQOtotal de 16.003 mg L-1. O tempo de detenção hidráulica (TDH em cada reator foi de 30 h. As

  15. Fixed-bed gasification research using US coals. Volume 9. Gasification of Elkhorn bituminous coal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thimsen, D.; Maurer, R.E.; Pooler, A.R.; Pui, D.; Liu, B.; Kittelson, D.

    1985-05-01

    A single-staged, fixed-bed Wellman-Galusha gasifier coupled with a hot, raw gas combustion system and scrubber has been used to gasify numerous coals from throughout the United States. The gasification test program is organized as a cooperative effort by private industrial participants and governmental agencies. The consortium of participants is organized under the Mining and Industrial Fuel Gas (MIFGa) group. This report is the ninth volume in a series of reports describing the atmospheric pressure, fixed-bed gasification of US coals. This specific report describes the gasification of Elkhorn bituminous coal. The period of gasificastion test was September 13 to October 12, 1983. 9 refs., 24 figs., 35 tabs.

  16. Fixed-bed gasification research using US coals. Volume 4. Gasification of Leucite Hills subbituminous coal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thimsen, D.; Maurer, R.E.; Pooler, A.R.; Pui, D.; Liu, B.; Kittelson, D.

    1985-03-31

    A single-staged, fixed-bed Wellman-Galusha gasifier coupled with a hot, raw gas combustion system and scrubber has been used to gasify numerous coals from throughout the United States. The gasification test program is organized as a cooperative effort by private industrial participants and governmental agencies. The consortium of participants is organized under the Mining and Industrial Fuel Gas (MIFGa) Group. This report is the fourth volume in a series of reports describing the atmospheric pressure, fixed-bed gasification of US coals. This specific report describes the gasification of Leucite Hills subbituminous coal from Sweetwater County, Wyoming. The period of the gasification test was April 11-30, 1983. 4 refs., 23 figs., 27 tabs.

  17. Parameters estimation for amino acids adsorption in a fixed bed by moment analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.A. Cremasco

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available Equilibrium constant and mass transfer parameters are needed for the study of amino acid separation in any process involving adsorption in fixed beds. The adsorption constants, effective diffusion coefficients, and axial dispersion coefficients for two amino acids, L-phenylalanine (Phe and L-tyrosine (Tyr, are determined from a series of pulse tests in a fixed bed packed with PVP (poly-4-vinylpyridine resin. Total bed voidage at different flow rates is estimated from NaCl pulse test data. The effective pore diffusivities of Phe, Tyr, and NaCl are estimated from moment analysis of pulse data. A detailed rate model is then solved numerically and adsorption constants, effective diffusion coefficients, axial dispersion coefficients are determined by moment analysis and compared with the pulse data. The advantage of this method is that the effective intraparticle diffusivities can be determined without the influence of extracolumn dispersion or intracolumn axial dispersion effects.

  18. Fixed-bed gasification research using US coals. Volume 7. Gasification of Piney Tipple bituminous coal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thimsen, D.; Maurer, R.E.; Pooler, A.R.; Pui, D.; Liu, B.; Kittelson, D.

    1985-05-01

    A single-staged, fixed-bed Wellman-Galusha gasifier coupled with a hot, raw gas combustion system and scrubber has been used to gasify numerous coals from throughout the United States. The gasification test program is organized as a cooperative effort by private industrial participants and governmental agencies. The consortium of participants is organized under the Mining and Industrial Fuel Gas (MIFGa) Group. This report is the seventh volume in a series of reports describing the atmospheric pressure, fixed-bed gasification of US coals. This specific report describes the gasification of Piney Tipple bituminous coal. The period of the gasification test was July 18-24, 1983. 6 refs., 20 figs., 17 tabs.

  19. Co-pyrolysis of rice straw and Polyethylene Terephthalate (PET) using a fixed bed drop type pyrolyzer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izzatie, N. I.; Basha, M. H.; Uemura, Y.; Hashim, M. S. M.; Amin, N. A. M.; Hamid, M. F.

    2017-10-01

    In this work, co-pyrolysis of rice straw and polyethylene terephthalate (PET) was carried out at different temperatures (450,500,550, and 600°C) at ratio 1:1 by using fixed bed drop-type pyrolyzer. The purpose of this work is to determine the effect of pyrolysis temperature on the product yield. As the temperature increased, the pyrolysis oil increased until it reaches certain high temperature (600°C), the pyrolysis oil decreased as of more NCG were produced. The temperature 550°C is considered as the optimum pyrolysis temperature since it produced the highest amount of pyrolysis oil with 36 wt.%. In pyrolysis oil, the calorific value (13.98kJ/g) was low because of the presence of high water content (52.46 wt.%). Main chemicals group from pyrolysis oil were an aldehyde, ketones, acids, aromatics, and phenol and all compound have abundant of hydrogen and carbon were identified. Co-pyrolysis of rice straw and PET produced a higher amount of carbon oxides and recycling back the NCG could increase liquid and char yields.

  20. Simultaneous production of laccase and decolouration of the diazo dye Reactive Black 5 in a fixed-bed bioreactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Enayatzamir, Kheirghadam [Department of Chemical Engineering, Rovira i Virgili University, Av. Paisos Catalans 26, 43007 Tarragona (Spain); Department of Soil Science Engineering, University of Tehran, Karaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Alikhani, Hossein A. [Department of Soil Science Engineering, University of Tehran, Karaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Rodriguez Couto, Susana [Department of Chemical Engineering, Rovira i Virgili University, Av. Paisos Catalans 26, 43007 Tarragona (Spain)], E-mail: susana.rodriguez@urv.cat

    2009-05-15

    In this paper the production of laccase and the decolouration of the recalcitrant diazo dye Reactive Black 5 (RB5) by the white-rot fungus Trametes pubescens immobilised on stainless steel sponges in a fixed-bed reactor were studied. Laccase production was increased by 10-fold in the presence of RB5 and reached a maximum value of 1025 U/l. Enhanced laccase production in the presence of RB5 in this fungus is an added advantage during biodegradation of RB5-containing effluents. The decolouration of RB5 was due to two processes: dye adsorption onto the fungal mycelium and dye degradation by the laccase enzymes produced by the fungus. RB5 decolouration was performed during four successive batches obtaining high decolouration percentages (74%, 43% and 52% in 24 h for the first, third and four batch, respectively) without addition of redox mediators. Also, the in vitro decolouration of RB5 by the concentrated culture extract, containing mainly laccase, produced in the above bioreactor was studied. The decolouration percentages obtained were considerably lower (around 20% in 24 h) than that attained with the whole culture.

  1. Feasibility analysis of As(III) removal in a continuous flow fixed bed system by modified calcined bauxite (MCB).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhakat, P B; Gupta, A K; Ayoob, S

    2007-01-10

    This study examine the feasibility of As(III) removal from aqueous environment by an adsorbent, modified calcined bauxite (MCB) in a continuous flow fixed bed system. MCB exhibited excellent adsorption capacity of 520.2 mg/L (0.39 mg/g) with an adsorption rate constant 0.7658 L/mgh for an influent As(III) concentration of 1mg/L. In a 2 cm diameter continuous flow fixed MCB bed, a depth of only 1.765 cm was found necessary to produce effluent As(III) concentration of 0.01 mg/L, from an influent of 1 mg/L at a flow rate of 8 mL/min. Also, bed heights of 10, 20, and 30 cm could treat 427.85, 473.88 and 489.17 bed volumes of water, respectively, to breakthrough. A reduction in adsorption capacity of MCB was observed with increase in flow rates. The theoretical service times evaluated from bed depth service time (BDST) approach for different flow rates and influent As(III) concentrations had shown good correlation with the corresponding experimental values. The theoretical breakthrough curve developed from constantly mixed batch reactor (CMBR) isotherm data also correlated well with experimental breakthrough curve.

  2. Kraft pulp and paper mill wastewater treatment using fixed bed anaerobic reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Damianovic, M. H. R. Z; Ruas, D.; Pires, E. C.; Foresti, E.

    2009-07-01

    The effluents of pulp mills contain a myriad of toxic compounds, biodegradable organic matter and sulfur compounds. to decrease the amount of fresh water required for pulp and paper production closed circuits are in use, however, higher concentrations of slat, as oxidized sulfur compounds, are encountered in the wastewaters. energy costs and new environmental concerns are motivating the use of anaerobic pretreatment as a way to decrease energy expenditure in the treatment plant together with lower sludge production. In anaerobic environment, the organic matter removal can follow methanogenic or sulfidogenic paths and with the latter simultaneous reduction of the oxidized sulfur compounds also occurs. (Author)

  3. Fixed-bed adsorption study of methylene blue onto pyrolytic tire char

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makrigianni, Vassiliki; Giannakas, Aris; Papadaki, Maria; Albanis, Triantafyllos; Konstantinou, Ioannis

    2016-04-01

    In this work, the adsorption efficiency of acid treated pyrolytic tire char to cationic methylene blue (MB) dye adsorption from aqueous solutions was investigated by fixed-bed adsorption column experiments. The effects of the initial dye concentration (10 - 40 mg L-1) and feed flow rate (50 - 150 mL min -1) with a fixed bed height (15 cm) were studied in order to determine the breakthrough characteristics of the adsorption system. The Adams-Bohart, Yoon-Nelson and Thomas model were applied to the adsorption of MB onto char at different operational conditions to predict the breakthrough curves and to determine the characteristic parameters of the column. The results showed that the maximum adsorbed quantities decreased with increasing flow rate and increased with increasing initial MB concentration. Breakthrough time and exhaustion time increased with decreasing inlet dye concentration and flow rate. In contrast with Adams-Bohart model, Yoon-Nelson model followed by Thomas model were found more suitable to describe the fixed-bed adsorption of methylene blue by char. The correlation coefficient values R2 for both models at different operating conditions are higher than 0.9 and the low average relative error values provided very good fittings of experimental data at different operating conditions. Higher adsorption capacity of 3.85 mg g -1 was obtained at 15 cm of adsorbent bed height, flow rate of 100 mL min -1and initial MB concentration of 40 mg L-1. Although that activated carbons exhibited higher adsorption capacities in the literature, acid-treated pyrolytic tire char was found to be considerably efficient adsorbent for the removal of MB dye column taking into account the advantages of the simpler production process compared to activated carbons, as well as, the availability of waste tire feedstock and concurrent waste tire management.

  4. Large-scale Clinical-grade Retroviral Vector Production in a Fixed-Bed Bioreactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiuyan; Olszewska, Malgorzata; Qu, Jinrong; Wasielewska, Teresa; Bartido, Shirley; Hermetet, Gregory; Sadelain, Michel

    2015-01-01

    The successful genetic engineering of patient T cells with γ-retroviral vectors expressing chimeric antigen receptors or T-cell receptors for phase II clinical trials and beyond requires the large-scale manufacture of high-titer vector stocks. The production of retroviral vectors from stable packaging cell lines using roller bottles or 10- to 40-layer cell factories is limited by a narrow harvest window, labor intensity, open-system operations, and the requirement for significant incubator space. To circumvent these shortcomings, we optimized the production of vector stocks in a disposable fixed-bed bioreactor using good manufacturing practice–grade packaging cell lines. High-titer vector stocks were harvested over 10 days, representing a much broader harvest window than the 3-day harvest afforded by cell factories. For PG13 and 293Vec packaging cells, the average vector titer and the vector stocks’ yield in the bioreactor were higher by 3.2- to 7.3-fold, and 5.6- to 13.1-fold, respectively, than those obtained in cell factories. The vector production was 10.4 and 18.6 times more efficient than in cell factories for PG13 and 293Vec cells, respectively. Furthermore, the vectors produced from the fixed-bed bioreactors passed the release test assays for clinical applications. Therefore, a single vector lot derived from 293Vec is suitable to transduce up to 500 patients cell doses in the context of large clinical trials using chimeric antigen receptors or T-cell receptors. These findings demonstrate for the first time that a robust fixed-bed bioreactor process can be used to produce γ-retroviral vector stocks scalable up to the commercialization phase. PMID:25751502

  5. Fixed-bed gasifier and cleanup system engineering summary report through Test Run No. 100

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pater, K. Jr.; Headley, L.; Kovach, J.; Stopek, D.

    1984-06-01

    The state-of-the-art of high-pressure, fixed-bed gasification has been advanced by the many refinements developed over the last 5 years. A novel full-flow gas cleanup system has been installed and tested to clean coal-derived gases. This report summarizes the results of tests conducted on the gasifier and cleanup system from its inception through 1982. Selected process summary data are presented along with results from complementary programs in the areas of environmental research, process simulation, analytical methods development, and component testing. 20 references, 32 figures, 42 tables.

  6. Numerical simulation of flow field and the study of the uniform distribution of fluid in uranium hydrometallurgy fixed bed based on CFD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Jian; Lei, Zeyong; Zhong, Lin

    2017-10-01

    Uranium hydrometallurgy fixed bed is used to separate and extracting uranium compounds from the leaching of uranium ore. It is a very important equipment in the process of uranium purification. The distribution of the internal flow field of uranium hydrometallurgy fixed bed has great effect on the running efficiency of fixed bed. In this paper, on the basis of fluid mechanics, computational fluid dynamics software Fluent is used to numerical simulation for resin adsorption process in axial flow uranium hydrometallurgy, fixed bed that the diameter is 1600 mm and the height is 6800 mm and to research internal flow field distribution of the fixed bed. The results shows that the fluid distribution in the fixed bed is uneven in the process of adsorbent resin adsorption. The groove shunt filter plate at the exit is a powerful measure to realize the uniform distribution of fluid in the resin layer of fixed bed.

  7. Uptake of Cd(II Using Natural Zeolite: Batch and Continuous Fixed-Bed Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luna M. LMarashdeh

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Uptake of Cd(II ions by natural phillipsite tuff was investigated both in shake-flask and fixed-bed columns. Equilibrium uptake, qe, was found to best fit Langmuir adsorption isotherm with a maximum value of 25.78 mg/g. Percent removal of Cd ions was close to 100% from initial metal ion concentrations in the range 50 - 75 mg/L at 5.0 g zeolite/L. Also, qe was found to vary exponentially with zeolite dose. Break points as high as 350 minutes were obtained from bed treatment at favorable conditions of a low solution flow rate and high bed depth. In batch experiments, equilibrium pH increased to < 8.0 excluding chemical precipitation as part of the removal while in fixed-beds the final pH exceeded 9.0. It is suggested that a sieve action of zeolite porous structure plays a role as an uptake mechanism in addition to the ion exchange.

  8. Dynamic studies of nitrophenols adsorption on perfil in a fixed-bed column: application of single and two resistance model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaneva, Zvezdelina; Koumanova, Bogdana; Meshko, Vera

    2010-01-01

    The mechanism of 4-nitrophenol (4-NP) and 2,4-dinitrophenol (2,4-DNP) adsorption on perfil-natural mineral taken from Bulgarian deposits, in a fixed-bed column was investigated. The single component experiments were conducted at constant initial sorbate concentration, volumetric flow rate, temperature and pH. The effect of adsorbent bed depth (Z 1, 2, 3, 6 cm) and sorbate nature on the adsorption capacity, mass transfer parameters and mechanisms was studied. The equilibrium behaviour of the system 4-NP-perfil was described by Langmuir, Freundlich and Redlich-Peterson models. The single resistance Thomas model, including Reynolds-Richards and Walter solutions, and the two-resistance Arnold model were applied for mathematical modeling of the experimental data. The comparative analyses indicated that external mass transfer was the rate limiting mechanism during the initial adsorption stages, while intraparticle diffusion was dominant in the middle and high concentration ranges. The effect of axial dispersion on the dynamics of adsorption was evaluated.

  9. K-capture by Al-Si based Additives in an Entrained Flow Reactor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Guoliang; Jensen, Peter Arendt; Wu, Hao

    2016-01-01

    A water slurry, consisting of KCl and Al-Si based additives (kaolin and coal fly ash) was fed into an entrained flow reactor (EFR) to study the K-capturing reaction of the additives at suspension-fired conditions. Solid products collected from the reactor were analysed with respect to total...... of KCl to K-aluminosilicate decreased. When reaction temperature increased from 1100 °C to 1450 °C, the conversion of KCl does not change significantly, which differs from the trend observed in fixed-bed reactor....

  10. Core Physics of Pebble Bed High Temperature Nuclear Reactors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Auwerda, G.J.

    2014-01-01

    To more accurately predict the temperature distribution inside the reactor core of pebble bed type high temperature reactors, in this thesis we investigated the stochastic properties of randomly stacked beds and the effects of the non-homogeneity of these beds on the neutronics and

  11. Empirical correlations for axial dispersion coefficient and Peclet number in fixed-bed columns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rastegar, Seyed Omid; Gu, Tingyue

    2017-03-24

    In this work, a new correlation for the axial dispersion coefficient was obtained using experimental data in the literature for axial dispersion in fixed-bed columns packed with particles. The Chung and Wen correlation, the De Ligny correlation are two popular empirical correlations. However, the former lacks the molecular diffusion term and the latter does not consider bed voidage. The new axial dispersion coefficient correlation in this work was based on additional experimental data in the literature by considering both molecular diffusion and bed voidage. It is more comprehensive and accurate. The Peclet number correlation from the new axial dispersion coefficient correlation on the average leads to 12% lower Peclet number values compared to the values from the Chung and Wen correlation, and in many cases much smaller than those from the De Ligny correlation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Effect of air-assisted backwashing on the performance of an anaerobic fixed-bed bioreactor that simultaneously removes nitrate and arsenic from drinking water sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upadhyaya, Giridhar; Clancy, Tara M; Snyder, Kathryn V; Brown, Jess; Hayes, Kim F; Raskin, Lutgarde

    2012-03-15

    Contaminant removal from drinking water sources under reducing conditions conducive for the growth of denitrifying, arsenate reducing, and sulfate reducing microbes using a fixed-bed bioreactor may require oxygen-free gas (e.g., N2 gas) during backwashing. However, the use of air-assisted backwashing has practical advantages, including simpler operation, improved safety, and lower cost. A study was conducted to evaluate whether replacing N2 gas with air during backwashing would impact performance in a nitrate and arsenic removing anaerobic bioreactor system that consisted of two biologically active carbon reactors in series. Gas-assisted backwashing, comprised of 2 min of gas injection to fluidize the bed and dislodge biomass and solid phase products, was performed in the first reactor (reactor A) every two days. The second reactor (reactor B) was subjected to N2 gas-assisted backwashing every 3-4 months. Complete removal of 50 mg/L NO3- was achieved in reactor A before and after the switch from N2-assisted backwashing (NAB) to air-assisted backwashing (AAB). Substantial sulfate removal was achieved with both backwashing strategies. Prolonged practice of AAB (more than two months), however, diminished sulfate reduction in reactor B somewhat. Arsenic removal in reactor A was impacted slightly by long-term use of AAB, but arsenic removals achieved by the entire system during NAB and AAB periods were not significantly different (p>0.05) and arsenic concentrations were reduced from approximately 200 μg/L to below 20 μg/L. These results indicate that AAB can be implemented in anaerobic nitrate and arsenic removal systems. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Reactor modeling to simulate catalytic partial oxidation and steam reforming of methane. Comparison of temperature profiles and strategies for hot spot minimization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barrio, V.L.; Cambra, J.F.; Arias, P.L.; Gueemez, M.B. [School of Engineering (UPV/EHU), c/Alameda Urquijo s/n, 48013 Bilbao (Spain); Schaub, G.; Rohde, M. [Engler-Bunte-Institut, Universitaet Karlsruhe, Engler-Bunte-Ring 1, 76131 Karlsruhe (Germany); Rabe, S.; Vogel, F. [Paul Scherrer Institute, Laboratory for Energy and Materials Cycles, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland)

    2007-07-15

    Catalytic partial oxidation (CPO) reactions of methane in the presence of steam (low temperature CPO, LTCPO) over a noble metal catalyst were investigated. A quasi-homogeneous one-dimensional model was developed in order to model a lab-scale fixed-bed reactor to produce syngas. These model calculations can contribute to the optimization of the process with respect to the formation of important hot spots ({delta} T{>=}130 ). These useful data can enable the model development in order to study the influence of the space velocity, product composition and other variables. Furthermore, a feed splitting study was performed. In the heat balance an overall heat transport term was included to account for small heat losses/gains along the reactor. The agreement between simulations and the degree of detail in the model is appropriate for the amount and kind of experimental data available. Thus, this model can also assist in a pilot reactor design, materials and further scale-up. (author)

  14. Fixed-bed gasification research using US coals. Volume 11. Gasification of Minnesota peat. [Peat pellets and peat sods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thimsen, D.; Maurer, R.E.; Pooler, A.R.; Pui, D.; Liu, B.; Kittelson, D.

    1985-05-01

    A single-staged, fixed-bed Wellman-Galusha gasifier coupled with a hot, raw gas combustion system and scrubber has been used to gasify numerous coals from throughout the United States. The gasification test program is organized as a coooperative effort by private industrial participants and governmental agencies. The consortium of participants is organized under the Mining and Industrial Fuel Gas (MIFGa) Group. This report is the eleventh volume in a series of reports describing the atmospheric pressure, fixed-bed gasification of US coals. This specific report describes the gasification of peat pellets and peat sods during 3 different test periods. 2 refs., 20 figs., 13 tabs.

  15. 1 - Aromatization of n-hexane and natural gasoline over ZSM-5 zeolite, 2- Wet catalytic oxidation of phenol on fixed bed of active carbon; 1 - Aromatisation de n-hexane et d'essence sur zeolithe ZSM-5, 2 - Oxydation catalytique en voie humide du phenol sur charbon actif

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suwanprasop, S.

    2005-04-15

    I - The production of aromatic hydrocarbons from n-hexane and natural gasoline over Pd loaded ZSM-5 zeolite in a tubular reactor was achieved under the suitable conditions at 400 deg. C, and 0.4 ml/min reactant feeding rate, employing ZSM-5 (0.5% Pd content) as a catalyst. Under these conditions, n-hexane and natural gasoline conversions were found to be 99.7% and 94.3%, respectively (with respective aromatic selectivity of 92.3% and 92.6%). II - Wet catalytic air oxidation of phenol over a commercial active carbon was studied in a three phase fixed bed reactor under mild temperature and oxygen partial pressure. Exit phenol concentration, COD, and intermediates were analysed. Oxidation of phenol was significantly improved when increasing operating temperature, oxygen partial pressure, and liquid space time, while up or down flow modes had only marginal effect. A complete model involving intrinsic kinetics and all mass transfer limitations gave convenient reactor simulation. (author)

  16. Batch and fixed-bed adsorption of tartrazine azo-dye onto activated carbon prepared from apricot stones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albroomi, H. I.; Elsayed, M. A.; Baraka, A.; Abdelmaged, M. A.

    2017-07-01

    This work describes the potential of utilizing prepared activated carbon from apricot stones as an efficient adsorbent material for tartrazine (TZ) azo-dye removal in a batch and dynamic adsorption system. The results revealed that activated carbons with well-developed surface area (774 m2/g) and pore volume (1.26 cm3/g) can be manufactured from apricot stones by H3PO4 activation. In batch experiments, effects of the parameters such as initial dye concentration and temperature on the removal of the dye were studied. Equilibrium was achieved in 120 min. Adsorption capacity was found to be dependent on the initial concentration of dye solution, and maximum adsorption was found to be 76 mg/g at 100 mg/L of TZ. The adsorption capacity at equilibrium ( q e) increased from 22.6 to 76 mg/g with an increase in the initial dye concentrations from 25 to 100 mg/L. The thermodynamic parameters such as change in free energy (Δ G 0), enthalpy (Δ H 0) and entropy (Δ S 0) were determined and the positive value of (Δ H) 78.1 (K J mol-1) revealed that adsorption efficiency increased with an increase in the process temperature. In fixed-bed column experiments, the effect of selected operating parameters such as bed depth, flow rate and initial dye concentration on the adsorption capacity was evaluated. Increase in bed height of adsorption columns leads to an extension of breakthrough point as well as the exhaustion time of adsorbent. However, the maximum adsorption capacities decrease with increases of flow rate. The breakthrough data fitted well to bed depth service time and Thomas models with high coefficient of determination, R 2 ≥ 94.

  17. Pneumatic control loops save water and energy with fixed-bed filters; Pneumatische Steuerkreise sparen Wasser und Energie bei Festbettfiltern

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rieger, Wolfgang [Festo AG und Co. KG, Esslingen (Germany)

    2010-09-15

    Handwheel control or an automated shut-off valve? The trend world-wide is clearly towards automation. Automation saves energy and water, particularly flushing water, and increases operational reliability. This is illustrated, for example, by the pneumatic automation of fixed-bed filters in a waterworks. (orig.)

  18. Flow of power-law fluids in fixed beds of cylinders or spheres

    KAUST Repository

    Singh, John P.

    2012-10-29

    An ensemble average of the equations of motion for a Newtonian fluid over particle configurations in a dilute fixed bed of spheres or cylinders yields Brinkman\\'s equations of motion, where the disturbance velocity produced by a test particle is influenced by the Newtonian fluid stress and a body force representing the linear drag on the surrounding particles. We consider a similar analysis for a power-law fluid where the stress τ is related to the rate of strain e by τ = 2m en-1e, where m and n are constants. In this case, the ensemble-averaged momentum equation includes a body force resulting from the nonlinear drag exerted on the surrounding particles, a power-law stress associated with the disturbance velocity of the test particle, and a stress term that is linear with respect to the test particle\\'s disturbance velocity. The latter term results from the interaction of the test particle\\'s velocity disturbance with the random straining motions produced by the neighbouring particles and is important only in shear-thickening fluids where the velocity disturbances of the particles are long-ranged. The solutions to these equations using scaling analyses for dilute beds and numerical simulations using the finite element method are presented. We show that the drag force acting on a particle in a fixed bed can be written as a function of a particle-concentration-dependent length scale at which the fluid velocity disturbance produced by a particle is modified by hydrodynamic interactions with its neighbours. This is also true of the drag on a particle in a periodic array where the length scale is the lattice spacing. The effects of particle interactions on the drag in dilute arrays (periodic or random) of cylinders and spheres in shear-thickening fluids is dramatic, where it arrests the algebraic growth of the disturbance velocity with radial position when n≥ 1 for cylinders and n≥ 2 for spheres. For concentrated random arrays of particles, we adopt an

  19. Fungi solubilisation of low rank coal: performances of stirred tank, fluidised bed and packed bed reactors

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Oboirien, BO

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Coal biosolubilisation was investigated in stirred tank reactor, fluidised bed and fixed bed bioreactors with a view to highlight the advantages and shortcomings of each of these reactor configurations. The stirred aerated bioreactor and fluidised...

  20. Adiabatic Fixed-Bed Gasification of Colombian Coffee Husk Using Air-Steam Blends for Partial Oxidation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Bonilla

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The increasing energy consumption, mostly supplied by fossil fuels, has motivated the research and development of alternative fuel technologies to decrease the humanity’s dependence on fossil fuels, which leads to pollution of natural sources. Small-scale biomass gasification, using air-steam blends for partial oxidation, is a good alternative since biomass is a neutral carbon feedstock for sustainable energy generation. This research presents results obtained from an experimental study on coffee husk (CH gasification, using air-steam blends for partial oxidation in a 10 kW fixed-bed gasifier. Parametric studies on equivalence ratio (ER (1.53 < ER < 6.11 and steam-fuel (SF ratio (0.23 < SF < 0.89 were carried out. The results show that increasing both SF and ER results in a syngas rich in CH4 and H2 but poor in CO. Also, decreased SF and ER decrease the peak temperature (Tpeak at the gasifier combustion zone. The syngas high heating value (HHV ranged from 3112 kJ/SATPm3 to 5085 kJ/SATPm3 and its maximum value was obtained at SF = 0.87 and ER = 4.09. The dry basis molar concentrations of the species, produced under those operating conditions (1.53 < ER < 6.11 and 0.23 < SF < 0.89, were between 1.12 and 4.1% for CH4, between 7.77 and 13.49% for CO, and between 7.54 and 19.07% for H2. Other species were in trace amount.

  1. Developmental research study of coal-fines agglomeration for fixed-bed gasification. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elmquist, S.A.; Girimont, J.A.; Korosi, F.A.; Kuby, O.A.; Nelson, S.G.; Paulin, M.O.; Peterson, C.A.; Baker, R.L.; Saller, E.

    1983-05-31

    This report presents the results of an intensive program to develop and evaluate agglomerates made from coal fines for use in a fixed-bed gasifier. There were several tasks completed earlier and their results published prior to this final report. These included: Task 1-A, a literature survey of coal agglomeration, binders and techniques used in coal agglomeration, coal and binder treatments and the results of work done by others; Task 1-B, an examination of performance of lump coals in coal gasification, testing and evaluation of the properties of these coals, and evaluation of mine site coal upgrading methods; and Task 1-C/D, a laboratory investigation of coal agglomerates, including wafers, briquettes and pellets, in which the agglomerated coal fines were formed and tested, and the performance of various coal/binder combinations was recorded and evaluated, and factors affecting commercial scale coal agglomeration and gasification were evaluated. These three prior tasks are presented in this report in condensed form.

  2. Fixed bed column study for heavy metal removal using phosphate treated rice husk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohan, S; Sreelakshmi, G

    2008-05-01

    This paper reports the results of the study on the performance of low-cost adsorbent such as raw rice husk (RRH) and phosphate treated rice husk (PRH) in removing the heavy metals such as lead, copper, zinc and manganese. The adsorbent materials adopted were found to be an efficient media for the removal of heavy metals in continuous mode using fixed bed column. The column studies were conducted with 10 mg/l of individual and combined metal solution with a flow rate of 20 ml/min with different bed depths such as 10, 20 and 30 cm. The breakthrough time was also found to increase from 1.3 to 3.5 h for Pb(II), 4.0 to 9.0 h for Cu(II), 12.5 to 25.4h for Zn(II) and 3.0 to 11.3 h for Mn(II) with increase in bed height from 10 to 30 cm for PRH. Different column design parameters like depth of exchange zone, adsorption rate, adsorption capacity, etc. were calculated. It is found that the adsorption capacity and adsorption rate constant were increased and the minimum column bed depth required was reduced when the rice husk is treated with phosphate, when compared with that of RRH.

  3. Competitive effect of glucose-fructose adsorption in a fixed-bed chromatographic column.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tangpromphan, Preuk; Kaewchada, Amaraporn; Jaree, Attasak

    2016-11-01

    A continuous separation system such as a simulated moving-bed process requires adsorption data with precise equilibrium and kinetic model parameters of a single chromatographic column. The adsorption of glucose and fructose in a fixed-bed chromatographic column was investigated to determine the competition effect of each component resulting from their initial molar ratios. The model parameters including bed porosity and axial dispersion coefficient were determined using the moment analysis method. The equilibrium isotherm parameters were estimated by conducting experiments at various molar ratios and initial sugar concentrations. The parameters obtained were then used for the simulation of dynamic breakthrough curves of glucose and fructose. The equilibrium isotherms revealed that the linear adsorption pattern provided good prediction for each molar ratio using the Henry equation. In addition, the modified Langmuir model was proposed to account for the competitive adsorption, due to the cooperative competition effect whereby glucose was promoted to the active sites by fructose to a greater degree than vice versa. A good agreement between the experimental and numerical data of the adsorption time profiles was also observed. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Color removal from textile wastewater by using treated flute reed in a fixed bed column.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inthorn, Duangrat; Tipprasertsin, Kannika; Thiravetyan, Paitip; Khan, Eakalak

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated the ability of acid treated flute reed to adsorb color (dye) from synthetic reactive dye solutions, and actual dyeing and printing textile wastewaters in a laboratory scale fixed bed column. The effects of particle size, initial reactive dye concentration, bed depth and flow rate on adsorption performances were examined. The results from experiments with synthetic reactive dye solutions showed that the volume treated (until the breakthrough occurred) increased with decreasing particle size, influent reactive dye concentration and flow rate, and increasing bed depth. The bed depth service time model was suitable for describing the experimental data. The treated flute reed was able to reduce color efficiently, 99% for dyeing textile wastewater with ten adsorption columns in series and 78% for printing textile wastewater with a single adsorption column. The difference in the numbers of columns used for the two types of actual textile wastewater led to a substantial discrepancy in suspended solids removal, 99% for dyeing wastewater and 12% for printing wastewater. Similar pH and chemical oxygen demand (COD) results were obtained for the two types of textile wastewater. The acid pretreatment of flute reed resulted in dramatic decreases in pH after the adsorption and very acidic effluents (pH 3). Increases of COD after the adsorption due to organic leaching from the treated flute reed were observed. A different pretreatment method to solve these pH and COD problems is needed before flute reed can be used in practice.

  5. Measured gas and particle temperatures in VTT's entrained flow reactor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Sønnik; Sørensen, L.H.

    2006-01-01

    Particle and gas temperature measurements were carried out in experiments on VTTs entrained flow reactor with 5% and 10% oxygen using Fourier transform infrared emission spectroscopy (FTIR). Particle temperature measurements were performed on polish coal,bark, wood, straw particles, and bark...... and wood particles treated with additive. A two-color technique with subtraction of the background light was used to estimate particle temperatures during experiments. A transmission-emission technique was used tomeasure the gas temperature in the reactor tube. Gas temperature measurements were in good...

  6. HIGH TEMPERATURE, HIGH POWER HETEROGENEOUS NUCLEAR REACTOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammond, R.P.; Wykoff, W.R.; Busey, H.M.

    1960-06-14

    A heterogeneous nuclear reactor is designed comprising a stationary housing and a rotatable annular core being supported for rotation about a vertical axis in the housing, the core containing a plurality of radial fuel- element supporting channels, the cylindrical empty space along the axis of the core providing a central plenum for the disposal of spent fuel elements, the core cross section outer periphery being vertically gradated in radius one end from the other to provide a coolant duct between the core and the housing, and means for inserting fresh fuel elements in the supporting channels under pressure and while the reactor is in operation.

  7. Entrained Flow Reactor Study of K-Capture by Solid Additives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Guoliang; Jensen, Peter Arendt; Wu, Hao

    2016-01-01

    A method to simulate the reaction between gaseous K-species and solid additives, at suspension fired conditions has been developed, using an entrained flow reactor (EFR). A water slurry containing solid additives (kaolin or coal fly ash) and KCl, is injected into the EFR and the solid products...... of additives, rose when increasing the molar ratio of K/(Al+Si) in the reactants. A change of the reaction temperature, from 1100 °C to 1450 °C, did not significantly influence the extent of the reaction, which is in contradiction to the trend observed in previous fixed-bed reactor studies. The method using...

  8. Computational Fluid Dynamics Simulations of Gas-Phase Radial Dispersion in Fixed Beds with Wall Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony G. Dixon

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The effective medium approach to radial fixed bed dispersion models, in which radial dispersion of mass is superimposed on axial plug flow, is based on a constant effective dispersion coefficient, DT. For packed beds of a small tube-to-particle diameter ratio (N, the experimentally-observed decrease in this parameter near the tube wall is accounted for by a lumped resistance located at the tube wall, the wall mass transfer coefficient km. This work presents validated computational fluid dynamics (CFD simulations to obtain detailed radial velocity and concentration profiles for eight different computer-generated packed tubes of spheres in the range 5.04 ≤ N ≤ 9.3 and over a range of flow rates 87 ≤ Re ≤ 870 where Re is based on superficial velocity and the particle diameter dp. Initial runs with pure air gave axial velocity profiles vz(r averaged over the length of the packing. Then, simulations with the tube wall coated with methane yielded radial concentration profiles. A model with only DT could not describe the radial concentration profiles. The two-parameter model with DT and km agreed better with the bed-center concentration profiles, but not with the sharp decreases in concentration close to the tube wall. A three-parameter model based on classical two-layer mixing length theory, with a wall-function for the decrease in transverse radial convective transport in the near-wall region, showed greatly improved ability to reproduce the near-wall concentration profiles.

  9. Fixed-bed gasification research using US coals. Volume 12. Gasification of Absaloka/Robinson subbituminous coal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thimsen, D.; Maurer, R.E.; Pooler, A.R.; Pui, D.; Liu, B.; Kittelson, D.

    1985-05-01

    A single-staged, fixed-bed Wellman-Galusha gasifier coupled with a hot, raw gas combustion system and scrubber has been used to gasify numerous coals from throughout the United States. The gasification test program is organized as a cooperative effort by private industrial particpants and governmental agencies. The consortium of participants is organized under the Mining and Industrial Fuel Gas (MIFGa) Group. This report is the twelfth volume in a series of reports describing the atmospheric pressure, fixed-bed gasification of US coals. this specific reports describes the gasification of Absaloka/Robinson subbituminous coal. This volume covers the test period June 18, 1984 to June 30, 1984. 4 refs., 20 figs., 18 tabs.

  10. Fixed-bed gasification research using US coals. Volume 8. Gasification of River King Illinois No. 6 bituminous coal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thimsen, D.; Maurer, R.E.; Pooler, A.R.; Pui, D.; Liu, B.; Kittelson, D.

    1985-05-01

    A single-staged, fixed-bed Wellman-Galusha gasifier coupled with a hot, raw gas combustion system and scrubber has been used to gasify numerous coals from throughout the United States. The gasification test program is organized as a cooperative effort by private industrial participants and governmental agencies. The consortium of participants is organized under the Mining and Industrial Fuel Gas (MIFGa) Group. This report is the eighth volume in a series of reports describing the atmospheric pressure, fixed-bed gasification of US coals. This specific report describes the gasification of River King Illinois No. 6 bituminous coal. The period of gasification test was July 28 to August 19, 1983. 6 refs., 23 figs., 25 tabs.

  11. Containment for the low temperature district nuclear-heating reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He Shuyan (Institute of Nuclear Energy Technology, Tsinghua Univ., Beijing (China)); Dong Duo (Institute of Nuclear Energy Technology, Tsinghua Univ., Beijing (China))

    1993-04-01

    An integral arrangement is adopted for the Low Temperature District Nuclear-Heating Reactor. The primary heat exchangers, control rod drives and spent fuel elements are put in the reactor pressure vessel together with the reactor core. The primary coolant flows in natural circulation through the reactor core and the primary heat exchangers. The primary coolant pipes penetrating the wall of the reactor pressure vessel are all of small diameters. The reactor vessel constitutes the main part of the pressure boundary of the primary coolant. Therefore a small sized metallic containment closed to the wall of the reactor vessel can be used for the reactor. Design principles and functions of the containment are the same as for the containment of a PWR. But the adoption of a small sized containment brings about some benefits such as a short period of manufacturing, relatively low cost, and ease for sealing. A loss of primary coolant accident would not be happening during a rupture accident of the primary coolant pressure boundary inside the containment owing to its intrinsic safety. (orig.).

  12. Experimental investigation of wood combustion in a fixed bed with hot air

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Markovic, Miladin, E-mail: m.markovic@utwente.nl; Bramer, Eddy A.; Brem, Gerrit

    2014-01-15

    Highlights: • Upward combustion is a new combustion concept with ignition by hot primary air. • Upward combustion has three stages: short drying, rapid devolatilization and char combustion. • Variation of fuel moisture and inert content have little influence on the combustion. • Experimental comparison between conventional and upward combustion is presented. - Abstract: Waste combustion on a grate with energy recovery is an important pillar of municipal solid waste (MSW) management in the Netherlands. In MSW incinerators fresh waste stacked on a grate enters the combustion chamber, heats up by radiation from the flame above the layer and ignition occurs. Typically, the reaction zone starts at the top of the waste layer and propagates downwards, producing heat for drying and devolatilization of the fresh waste below it until the ignition front reaches the grate. The control of this process is mainly based on empiricism. MSW is a highly inhomogeneous fuel with continuous fluctuating moisture content, heating value and chemical composition. The resulting process fluctuations may cause process control difficulties, fouling and corrosion issues, extra maintenance, and unplanned stops. In the new concept the fuel layer is ignited by means of preheated air (T > 220 °C) from below without any external ignition source. As a result a combustion front will be formed close to the grate and will propagate upwards. That is why this approach is denoted by upward combustion. Experimental research has been carried out in a batch reactor with height of 4.55 m, an inner diameter of 200 mm and a fuel layer height up to 1 m. Due to a high quality two-layer insulation adiabatic conditions can be assumed. The primary air can be preheated up to 350 °C, and the secondary air is distributed via nozzles above the waste layer. During the experiments, temperatures along the height of the reactor, gas composition and total weight decrease are continuously monitored. The influence of

  13. Tritium Formation and Mitigation in High Temperature Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piyush Sabharwall; Carl Stoots

    2012-08-01

    Tritium is a radiologically active isotope of hydrogen. It is formed in nuclear reactors by neutron absorption and ternary fission events and can subsequently escape into the environment. In order to prevent the tritium contamination of proposed reactor buildings and surrounding sites, this paper examines the root causes and potential solutions for the production of this radionuclide, including materials selection and inert gas sparging. A model is presented that can be used to predict permeation rates of hydrogen through metallic alloys at temperatures from 450–750°C. Results of the diffusion model are presented for one steadystate value of tritium production in the reactor.

  14. High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Test Reactor Point Design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sterbentz, James William [Idaho National Laboratory; Bayless, Paul David [Idaho National Laboratory; Nelson, Lee Orville [Idaho National Laboratory; Gougar, Hans David [Idaho National Laboratory; Kinsey, James Carl [Idaho National Laboratory; Strydom, Gerhard [Idaho National Laboratory; Kumar, Akansha [Idaho National Laboratory

    2016-04-01

    A point design has been developed for a 200 MW high-temperature gas-cooled test reactor. The point design concept uses standard prismatic blocks and 15.5% enriched UCO fuel. Reactor physics and thermal-hydraulics simulations have been performed to characterize the capabilities of the design. In addition to the technical data, overviews are provided on the technological readiness level, licensing approach and costs.

  15. Quantification of genes and gene transcripts for microbial perchlorate reduction in fixed-bed bioreactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Long, S K; Li, X; Bae, S; Brown, J C; Raskin, L; Kinney, K A; Kirisits, M J

    2012-03-01

    Optimization of full-scale, biological perchlorate treatment processes for drinking water would benefit from knowledge of the location and quantity of perchlorate-reducing bacteria (PRB) and expression of perchlorate-related genes in bioreactors. The aim of this study was to quantify perchlorate removal and perchlorate-related genes (pcrA and cld) and their transcripts in bioreactors and to determine whether these genes or transcripts could serve as useful biomarkers for perchlorate treatment processes. Quantitative PCR (qPCR) assays targeting pcrA and cld were applied to two pilot-scale, fixed-bed bioreactors treating perchlorate-contaminated groundwater. pcrA and cld genes per microgram of DNA were two- to threefold higher and three- to fourfold higher, respectively, in the bioreactor showing superior perchlorate-removal performance. In a laboratory-scale bioreactor, quantities of pcrA and cld genes and transcripts were compared under two distinct performance conditions (c.60 and 20% perchlorate removal) for a 5-min empty bed contact time. cld genes per microgram of DNA were approximately threefold higher and cld transcripts per microgram of RNA were approximately sixfold higher under the higher perchlorate-removal condition. No differences in pcrA genes or transcripts per microgram of DNA or RNA, respectively, were detected between the c.60 and 20% perchlorate-removal conditions, possibly because these assays did not accurately quantify pcrA genes and transcripts in the mixed culture present. Quantities of cld genes and transcripts per microgram of DNA and RNA, respectively, were found to be higher when perchlorate removal was higher. However, quantities of pcrA and cld genes or transcripts were not found to directly correlate with perchlorate-removal rates. To our knowledge, this study represents the first application of qPCR assays to quantify perchlorate-related genes and transcripts in continuous-flow bioreactors. The results indicate that cld gene and

  16. CO-FIRING COAL: FEEDLOT AND LITTER BIOMASS (CFB AND CLB) FUELS IN PULVERIZED FUEL AND FIXED BED BURNERS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalyan Annamalai; John Sweeten; Saqib Mukhtar; Ben Thein; Gengsheng Wei; Soyuz Priyadarsan; Senthil Arumugam; Kevin Heflin

    2003-08-28

    Intensive animal feeding operations create large amounts of animal waste that must be safely disposed of in order to avoid environmental degradation. Cattle feedlots and chicken houses are two examples. In feedlots, cattle are confined to small pens and fed a high calorie grain-diet diet in preparation for slaughter. In chicken houses, thousands of chickens are kept in close proximity. In both of these operations, millions of tons of manure are produced every year. The manure could be used as a fuel by mixing it with coal in a 90:10 blend and firing it in an existing coal suspension fired combustion systems. This technique is known as co-firing, and the high temperatures produced by the coal will allow the biomass to be completely combusted. Reburn is a process where a small percentage of fuel called reburn fuel is injected above the NO{sub x} producing, conventional coal fired burners in order to reduce NO{sub x}. The manure could also be used as reburn fuel for reducing NO{sub x} in coal fired plants. An alternate approach of using animal waste is to adopt the gasification process using a fixed bed gasifier and then use the gases for firing in gas turbine combustors. In this report, the cattle manure is referred to as feedlot biomass (FB) and chicken manure as litter biomass (LB). The report generates data on FB and LB fuel characteristics. Co-firing, reburn, and gasification tests of coal, FB, LB, coal: FB blends, and coal: LB blends and modeling on cofiring, reburn systems and economics of use of FB and LB have also been conducted. The biomass fuels are higher in ash, lower in heat content, higher in moisture, and higher in nitrogen and sulfur (which can cause air pollution) compared to coal. Small-scale cofiring experiments revealed that the biomass blends can be successfully fired, and NO{sub x} emissions will be similar to or lower than pollutant emissions when firing coal. Further experiments showed that biomass is twice or more effective than coal when

  17. Proliferation resistance assessment of high temperature gas reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chikamatsu N, M. A. [Instituto Tecnologico y de Estudios Superiores de Monterrey, Campus Santa Fe, Av. Carlos Lazo No. 100, Santa Fe, 01389 Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Puente E, F., E-mail: midori.chika@gmail.com [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2014-10-15

    The Generation IV International Forum has established different objectives for the new generation of reactors to accomplish. These objectives are focused on sustain ability, safety, economics and proliferation resistance. This paper is focused on how the proliferation resistance of the High Temperature Gas Reactors (HTGR) is assessed and the advantages that these reactors present currently. In this paper, the focus will be on explaining why such reactors, HTGR, can achieve the goals established by the GIF and can present a viable option in terms of proliferation resistance, which is an issue of great importance in the field of nuclear energy generation. The reason why the HTGR are being targeted in this writing is that these reactors are versatile, and present different options from modular reactors to reactors with the same size as the ones that are being operated today. Besides their versatility, the HTGR has designed features that might improve on the overall sustain ability of the nuclear reactors. This is because the type of safety features and materials that are used open up options for industrial processes to be carried out; cogeneration for instance. There is a small section that mentions how HTGR s are being developed in the international sector in order to present the current world view in this type of technology and the further developments that are being sought. For the proliferation resistance section, the focus is on both the intrinsic and the extrinsic features of the nuclear systems. The paper presents a comparison between the features of Light Water Reactors (LWR) and the HTGR in order to be able to properly compare the most used technology today and one that is gaining international interest. (Author)

  18. The Status of the US High-Temperature Gas Reactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew C. Kadak

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In 2005, the US passed the Energy Policy Act of 2005 mandating the construction and operation of a high-temperature gas reactor (HTGR by 2021. This law was passed after a multiyear study by national experts on what future nuclear technologies should be developed. As a result of the Act, the US Congress chose to develop the so-called Next-Generation Nuclear Plant, which was to be an HTGR designed to produce process heat for hydrogen production. Despite high hopes and expectations, the current status is that high temperature reactors have been relegated to completing research programs on advanced fuels, graphite and materials with no plans to build a demonstration plant as required by the US Congress in 2005. There are many reasons behind this diminution of HTGR development, including but not limited to insufficient government funding requirements for research, unrealistically high temperature requirements for the reactor, the delay in the need for a “hydrogen” economy, competition from light water small modular light water reactors, little utility interest in new technologies, very low natural gas prices in the US, and a challenging licensing process in the US for non-water reactors.

  19. A probabilistic consequence assessment for a very high temperature reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Joeun; Kim, Jintae; Jae, Moosung [Hanyang Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering

    2017-02-15

    Currently, fossil fuel is globally running out. If current trends continue, crude oil will be depleted in 20 years and natural gas in 40 years. In addition, the use of fossil resource has increased emissions of green gas such as carbon dioxide. Therefore, there has been a strong demand in recent years for producing large amounts of hydrogen as an alternative energy [1]. To generate hydrogen energy, very high temperature more than 900 C is required but this level is not easy to reach. Because a Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR), one of next generation reactor, is able to make the temperature, it is regarded as a solution of the problem. Also, VHTR has an excellent safety in comparison with existing and other next generation reactors. Especially, a passive system, Reactor Cavity Cooling System (RCCS), is adopted to get rid of radiant heat in case of accidents. To achieve variety requirements of new designed-reactors, however, it needs to develop new methodologies and definitions different with existing method. At the same time, an application of probability safety assessment (PSA) has been proposed to ensure the safety of next generation NPPs. For this, risk-informed designs of structures have to be developed and verified. Particularly, the passive system requires to be evaluated for its reliability. The objective of this study is to improve safety of VIITR by conducting risk profile.

  20. High temperature reactors for cogeneration applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verfondern, Karl [Forschungszentrum Juelich (Germany). IEK-6; Allelein, Hans-Josef [Forschungszentrum Juelich (Germany). IEK-6; RWTH Aachen (Germany). Lehrstuhl fuer Reaktorsicherheit und -technik (LRST)

    2016-05-15

    There is a large potential for nuclear energy also in the non-electric heat market. Many industrial sectors have a high demand for process heat and steam at various levels of temperature and pressure to be provided for desalination of seawater, district heating, or chemical processes. The future generation of nuclear plants will be capable to enter the wide field of cogeneration of heat and power (CHP), to reduce waste heat and to increase efficiency. This requires an adjustment to multiple needs of the customers in terms of size and application. All Generation-IV concepts proposed are designed for coolant outlet temperatures above 500 C, which allow applications in the low and medium temperature range. A VHTR would even be able to cover the whole temperature range up to approx. 1 000 C.

  1. Fixed bed sorption of phosphorus from wastewater using iron oxide-based media derived from acid mine drainage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibrell, Philip L.; Tucker, T.W.

    2012-01-01

    Phosphorus (P) releases to the environment have been implicated in the eutrophication of important water bodies worldwide. Current technology for the removal of P from wastewaters consists of treatment with aluminum (Al) or iron (Fe) salts, but is expensive. The neutralization of acid mine drainage (AMD) generates sludge rich in Fe and Al oxides that has hitherto been considered a waste product, but these sludges could serve as an economical adsorption media for the removal of P from wastewaters. Therefore, we have evaluated an AMD-derived media as a sorbent for P in fixed bed sorption systems. The homogenous surface diffusion model (HSDM) was used to analyze fixed bed test data and to determine the value of related sorption parameters. The surface diffusion modulus Ed was found to be a useful predictor of sorption kinetics. Values of Ed process with the HSDM confirmed that if Ed was known, the shape of the breakthrough curve could be calculated. The surface diffusion coefficient D s was a critical factor in the calculation of Ed and could be estimated based on the sorption test conditions such as media characteristics, and influent flow rate and concentration. Optimal test results were obtained with a relatively small media particle size (average particle radius 0.028 cm) and resulted in 96 % removal of P from the influent over 46 days of continuous operation. These results indicate that fixed bed sorption of P would be a feasible option for the utilization of AMD residues, thus helping to decrease AMD treatment costs while at the same time ameliorating the impacts of P contamination.

  2. Baseline Concept Description of a Small Modular High Temperature Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hans Gougar

    2014-05-01

    The objective of this report is to provide a description of generic small modular high temperature reactors (herein denoted as an smHTR), summarize their distinguishing attributes, and lay out the research and development (R&D) required for commercialization. The generic concepts rely heavily on the modular high temperature gas-cooled reactor designs developed in the 1980s which were never built but for which pre-licensing or certification activities were conducted. The concept matured more recently under the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) project, specifically in the areas of fuel and material qualification, methods development, and licensing. As all vendor-specific designs proposed under NGNP were all both ‘small’ or medium-sized and ‘modular’ by International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and Department of Energy (DOE) standards, the technical attributes, challenges, and R&D needs identified, addressed, and documented under NGNP are valid and appropriate in the context of Small Modular Reactor (SMR) applications. Although the term High Temperature Reactor (HTR) is commonly used to denote graphite-moderated, thermal spectrum reactors with coolant temperatures in excess of 650oC at the core outlet, in this report the historical term High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) will be used to distinguish the gas-cooled technology described herein from its liquid salt-cooled cousin. Moreover, in this report it is to be understood that the outlet temperature of the helium in an HTGR has an upper limit of 950 degrees C which corresponds to the temperature to which certain alloys are currently being qualified under DOE’s ARC program. Although similar to the HTGR in just about every respect, the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) may have an outlet temperature in excess of 950 degrees C and is therefore farther from commercialization because of the challenges posed to materials exposed to these temperatures. The VHTR is the focus of R&D under the

  3. Baseline Concept Description of a Small Modular High Temperature Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gougar, Hans D. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2014-10-01

    The objective of this report is to provide a description of generic small modular high temperature reactors (herein denoted as an smHTR), summarize their distinguishing attributes, and lay out the research and development (R&D) required for commercialization. The generic concepts rely heavily on the modular high temperature gas-cooled reactor designs developed in the 1980s which were never built but for which pre-licensing or certification activities were conducted. The concept matured more recently under the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) project, specifically in the areas of fuel and material qualification, methods development, and licensing. As all vendor-specific designs proposed under NGNP were all both ‘small’ or medium-sized and ‘modular’ by International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and Department of Energy (DOE) standards, the technical attributes, challenges, and R&D needs identified, addressed, and documented under NGNP are valid and appropriate in the context of Small Modular Reactor (SMR) applications. Although the term High Temperature Reactor (HTR) is commonly used to denote graphite-moderated, thermal spectrum reactors with coolant temperatures in excess of 650oC at the core outlet, in this report the historical term High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) will be used to distinguish the gas-cooled technology described herein from its liquid salt-cooled cousin. Moreover, in this report it is to be understood that the outlet temperature of the helium in an HTGR has an upper limit of 950 degrees C which corresponds to the temperature to which certain alloys are currently being qualified under DOE’s ARC program. Although similar to the HTGR in just about every respect, the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) may have an outlet temperature in excess of 950 degrees C and is therefore farther from commercialization because of the challenges posed to materials exposed to these temperatures. The VHTR is the focus of R&D under the

  4. Alcohol synthesis in a high-temperature slurry reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberts, G.W.; Marquez, M.A.; McCutchen, M.S. [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States)

    1995-12-31

    The overall objective of this contract is to develop improved process and catalyst technology for producing higher alcohols from synthesis gas or its derivatives. Recent research has been focused on developing a slurry reactor that can operate at temperatures up to about 400{degrees}C and on evaluating the so-called {open_quotes}high pressure{close_quotes} methanol synthesis catalyst using this reactor. A laboratory stirred autoclave reactor has been developed that is capable of operating at temperatures up to 400{degrees}C and pressures of at least 170 atm. The overhead system on the reactor is designed so that the temperature of the gas leaving the system can be closely controlled. An external liquid-level detector is installed on the gas/liquid separator and a pump is used to return condensed slurry liquid from the separator to the reactor. In order to ensure that gas/liquid mass transfer does not influence the observed reaction rate, it was necessary to feed the synthesis gas below the level of the agitator. The performance of a commercial {open_quotes}high pressure {close_quotes} methanol synthesis catalyst, the so-called {open_quotes}zinc chromite{close_quotes} catalyst, has been characterized over a range of temperature from 275 to 400{degrees}C, a range of pressure from 70 to 170 atm., a range of H{sub 2}/CO ratios from 0.5 to 2.0 and a range of space velocities from 2500 to 10,000 sL/kg.(catalyst),hr. Towards the lower end of the temperature range, methanol was the only significant product.

  5. Mathematical modeling of the motion of a portion of helium under pulsed injection over a fixed bed of cenospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vereshchagin, A. S.; Vereshchagin, S. N.; Fomin, V. M.

    2007-05-01

    A mathematical model is constructed and an analytical solution is obtained for the problem of a one-dimensional steady flow of a mixture of different gases with hollow permeable particles. The case of a one-dimensional unsteady flow of such a mixture is analyzed numerically. The numerical solutions are compared with experimental data on the motion of the peak concentration of helium in a fixed bed filled with cenospheres (solid hollow permeable spherical particles). The permeability of cenosphere walls and the drag coeficient of cenospheres in the gas flow are determined.

  6. Tritium Formation and Mitigation in High-Temperature Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piyush Sabharwall; Carl Stoots

    2012-10-01

    Tritium is a radiologically active isotope of hydrogen. It is formed in nuclear reactors by neutron absorption and ternary fission events and can subsequently escape into the environment. To prevent the tritium contamination of proposed reactor buildings and surrounding sites, this study examines the root causes and potential mitigation strategies for permeation of tritium (such as: materials selection, inert gas sparging, etc...). A model is presented that can be used to predict permeation rates of hydrogen through metallic alloys at temperatures from 450–750 degrees C. Results of the diffusion model are presented for a steady production of tritium

  7. Tritium Formation and Mitigation in High-Temperature Reactor Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piyush Sabharwall; Carl Stoots; Hans A. Schmutz

    2013-03-01

    Tritium is a radiologically active isotope of hydrogen. It is formed in nuclear reactors by neutron absorption and ternary fission events and can subsequently escape into the environment. To prevent the tritium contamination of proposed reactor buildings and surrounding sites, this study examines the root causes and potential mitigation strategies for permeation of tritium (such as: materials selection, inert gas sparging, etc...). A model is presented that can be used to predict permeation rates of hydrogen through metallic alloys at temperatures from 450–750 degrees C. Results of the diffusion model are presented for a steady production of tritium

  8. Modeling, simulation, and optimization of a front-end system for acetylene hydrogenation reactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Gobbo

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available The modeling, simulation, and dynamic optimization of an industrial reaction system for acetylene hydrogenation are discussed in the present work. The process consists of three adiabatic fixed-bed reactors, in series, with interstage cooling. These reactors are located after the compression and the caustic scrubbing sections of an ethylene plant, characterizing a front-end system; in contrast to the tail-end system where the reactors are placed after the de-ethanizer unit. The acetylene conversion and selectivity profiles for the reactors are optimized, taking into account catalyst deactivation and process constraints. A dynamic optimal temperature profile that maximizes ethylene production and meets product specifications is obtained by controlling the feed and intercoolers temperatures. An industrial acetylene hydrogenation system is used to provide the necessary data to adjust kinetics and transport parameters and to validate the approach.

  9. Technologies for Upgrading Light Water Reactor Outlet Temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniel S. Wendt; Piyush Sabharwall; Vivek Utgikar

    2013-07-01

    Nuclear energy could potentially be utilized in hybrid energy systems to produce synthetic fuels and feedstocks from indigenous carbon sources such as coal and biomass. First generation nuclear hybrid energy system (NHES) technology will most likely be based on conventional light water reactors (LWRs). However, these LWRs provide thermal energy at temperatures of approximately 300°C, while the desired temperatures for many chemical processes are much higher. In order to realize the benefits of nuclear hybrid energy systems with the current LWR reactor fleets, selection and development of a complimentary temperature upgrading technology is necessary. This paper provides an initial assessment of technologies that may be well suited toward LWR outlet temperature upgrading for powering elevated temperature industrial and chemical processes during periods of off-peak power demand. Chemical heat transformers (CHTs) are a technology with the potential to meet LWR temperature upgrading requirements for NHESs. CHTs utilize chemical heat of reaction to change the temperature at which selected heat sources supply or consume thermal energy. CHTs could directly utilize LWR heat output without intermediate mechanical or electrical power conversion operations and the associated thermodynamic losses. CHT thermal characteristics are determined by selection of the chemical working pair and operating conditions. This paper discusses the chemical working pairs applicable to LWR outlet temperature upgrading and the CHT operating conditions required for providing process heat in NHES applications.

  10. REDUCTION OF THE ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT OF OLEAGINUOS WATER BY MEANS OF A FIX BED COLUMN FILLED WITH SUGAR CANE BAGASSE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pastora de la C. Martínez Nodal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available From the environmental assessment conducted in the centrifugation process fuel that is used as raw material for generating electricity in Power Plants (CE operating with diesel and the physicochemical characterization of oleaginuos water (ARO that it generates, it was performed the environmental impact assessment of these waters if they are discharged without any treatment. A matrix of importance was made, which allowed us to identify the impact on the actions and factors by the activity and the generated waste. From the physico-chemical characterization of ARO, a sustainable treatment is proposed with the use of a fixed-bed column filled with sugar cane bagasse as biosorbent material to minimize the environmental impact caused by oleaginous water if spilled. A physicochemical characterization was made to the natural sugar cane bagasse in terms of moisture, density, porosity and high adsorption capacity. The results allowed to define the fraction of interest (+1 -2 mm, given by the performance in the screening (41%, the homogeneity of this fraction and sorption capacity (2g diesel/g BN. The breakthrough curve was obtained by a continuous flow system 2 l/h of ARO through a fixed bed of 59.997 g of BN and an initial concentration of hydrocarbon of 1444.9 mg/l. Studies showed that the sugarcane bagasse has potential as biosorbent oil, achieving a significant removal of the indicator total hydrocarbon, of 65%.

  11. Fixed-bed adsorption separation of xylene isomers over sio2/silicallite-1 core-shell adsorbents

    KAUST Repository

    Khan, Easir A.

    2013-12-29

    SiO2/Silicalite-1 core-shell material has been demonstrated as potential shape selective adsorbent in gas phase separation of p-xylene from a mixture of p/o-xylene isomers. The core-shell composite comprised of large silica core and thin polycrystalline silicalite-1 shell which was synthesized via a self-assembly of silicalite-1 nanocrystals on core silica surface followed by a secondary seeded growth method. The core materials, SiO2 used in this study has mesoporosity with an average pore diameter of 60Å and hence offers no shape selectivity for xylene isomers. However, the shell, silicalite-1 contains rigid pore structures and preferentially adsorbs p-xylene from their isomers mixtures. A series of adsorption fixed bed breakthrough adsorption/desorption experiment was performed to obtain the equilibrium isotherms and adsorption isotherm parameters of xylene isomers. The equilibrium isotherms of xylene isomers follow the Langmuir\\'s model. A chromatographic adsorption model has been used to describe the fixed-bed breakthrough profiles of xylene isomers. The model has successfully predicted the responses of the binary mixtures of p/o-xylene isomers. The SiO2/silicalite-1 core-shell adsorbents have shown para-selectivity as high as 15. © Bangladesh Uni. of Engg. & Tech.

  12. Fixed-bed biosorption of cadmium using immobilized Scenedesmus obliquus CNW-N cells on loofa (Luffa cylindrica) sponge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bor-Yann; Chen, Chun-Yen; Guo, Wan-Qian; Chang, Hao-Wei; Chen, Wen-Ming; Lee, Duu-Jong; Huang, Chieh-Chen; Ren, Nan-Qi; Chang, Jo-Shu

    2014-05-01

    A continuous fixed-bed biosorption process was established for cadmium (Cd) removal by Scenedesmus obliquus CNW-N (isolated from southern Taiwan) cells immobilized onto loofa sponge. This immobilized-cell biosorption process allows better recovery and reusability of the microalgal biomass. The growth of microalgae on the matrix support with appropriate nutrient supplementation could enhance the overall metal removal activity. Major operating parameters (e.g., feeding flow rate, cycle number of medium replacement, and particle diameter of the sponge) were studied for treatability evaluation. The most promising cell growth on the sponge support was obtained at a flow rate of 0.284 bed volume (BV)/min, sponge particle diameter of 1 cm, and with one cycle of medium replacement. The performance of fixed-bed biosorption (adsorption capacity of 38.4 mg, breakthrough time at 15.5 h) was achieved at a flow rate of 5 ml/min with an influent concentration of 7.5 mg Cd/l. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Modeling competitive adsorption of mixtures of volatile organic compounds in a fixed-bed of beaded activated carbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tefera, Dereje Tamiru; Hashisho, Zaher; Philips, John H; Anderson, James E; Nichols, Mark

    2014-05-06

    A two-dimensional mathematical model was developed to study competitive adsorption of n-component mixtures in a fixed-bed adsorber. The model consists of an isotherm equation to predict adsorption equilibria of n-component volatile organic compounds (VOCs) mixture from single component isotherm data, and a dynamic adsorption model, the macroscopic mass, energy and momentum conservation equations, to simulate the competitive adsorption of the n-components onto a fixed-bed of adsorbent. The model was validated with experimentally measured data of competitive adsorption of binary and eight-component VOCs mixtures onto beaded activated carbon (BAC). The mean relative absolute error (MRAE) was used to compare the modeled and measured breakthrough profiles as well as the amounts of adsorbates adsorbed. For the binary and eight-component mixtures, the MRAE of the breakthrough profiles was 13 and 12%, respectively, whereas, the MRAE of the adsorbed amounts was 1 and 2%, respectively. These data show that the model provides accurate prediction of competitive adsorption of multicomponent VOCs mixtures and the competitive adsorption isotherm equation is able to accurately predict equilibrium adsorption of VOCs mixtures.

  14. The effects of fixed-bed drying on the yield and composition of essential oil from long pepper (Piper hispidinervium C. DC leaves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. P. Braga

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Piper hispidinervium C.DC (Piperaceae is popularly known as long pepper. It grows in degraded areas of natural fields in the state of Acre, Brazil. Its leaves are 3 to 4 % essential oil rich in safrole, within the range of 90 to 94 %. In the chemical industry, safrole is an important raw material, mainly due to two of its derivatives: heliotropin, which is widely used as a fragrance and flavoring agent, and piperonyl butoxide (PBO, a vital ingredient of pyrethroid insecticides. Natural pyrethrum in particular would not be an economical insecticide without the synergistic effect of PBO; therefore, its industrial future is linked to the continued availability of PBO. As a fragrance, safrole has many applications in household products such as floor waxes, polishes, soaps, detergents and cleaning agents. In this work, leaves were dried in a fixed-bed dryer using different drying-air temperatures (35, 40, 45, 50, 55 and 60 ºC and drying times (900, 2700 and 3600 seconds. Essential oil was extracted by cohobation (meaning that the condensed water that comes out of the flask is recycled from both raw and dried leaves. The essential oil yield and safrole content are susceptible to rapid loss of moisture by Piper hispidinervium C. DC leaves. It was observed that the essential oil yield increased twice after the drying process. However, safrole content decreased about 20 percent when temperature was above 50 ºC and drying times were more than 2700 minutes.

  15. CO-FIRING COAL, FEEDLOT, AND LITTER BIOMASS (CFB AND LFB) FUELS IN PULVERIZED FUEL AND FIXED BED BURNERS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalyan Annamalai; John Sweeten; Saqib Mukhtar; Ben Thien; Gengsheng Wei; Soyuz Priyadarsan

    2002-01-15

    result as the levels of N are higher in the biomass fuel than in coal. Further experiments showed that biomass is twice or more effective than coal when used in a reburning process to reduce NO{sub x} emissions. Since crushing costs of biomass fuels may be prohibitive, stoker firing may be cost effective; in order simulate such a firing, future work will investigate the performance of a gasifier when fired with larger sized coal and biomass. It will be a fixed bed gasifier, and will evaluate blends, coal, and biomass. Computer simulations were performed using the PCGC-2 code supplied by BYU and modified by A&M with three mixture fractions for handling animal based biomass fuels in order to include an improved moisture model for handling wet fuels and phosphorus oxidation. Finally the results of the economic analysis show that considerable savings can be achieved with the use of biomass. In the case of higher ash and moisture biomass, the fuel cost savings will be reduced, due to increased transportation costs. A spreadsheet program was created to analyze the fuel savings for a variety of different moisture levels, ash levels, and power plant operating parameters.

  16. Rendimiento de los productos del proceso de pirólisis en lecho fijo de los residuos de naranja del proceso de obtención de jugos concentrados en la provincia de Pinar del Río, Cuba. // Yields in pirolysis process in fixed bed of solid residues of orange i

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Aguiar-Trujillo

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available En la Provincia de Pinar Río en Cuba, existe un residuo de la biomasa, como son los residuos sólidosde naranja del proceso de obtención de jugos concentrados. Este desecho se podría transformarpor medio de un proceso termoquímico, como es la pirólisis. No se han encontrado datos en laliteratura acerca del comportamiento de la pirólisis de este tipo de biomasa, que se utilizanormalmente para la comida animal. En este trabajo, se ha estudiado el proceso de pirólisis deestos residuos, realizando experimentos en un reactor de lecho fijo a escala de laboratorio. Elproducto obtenido (carbón, gas y el alquitrán y la composición de la distribución de los gases hansido obtenidas para diferentes tamaños de partículas (menores a 300 micrómetros y mayores a 800micrómetros y temperaturas del proceso 3000, 4500 y 6000 C.Los resultados fundamentales que se obtienen:Rendimiento a carbón oscila entre 25 y 35 %, Rendimiento a gas oscilan entre 21 y 29 %,Rendimiento a alquitrán entre 5 y 9 %. Los gases fundamentales que se obtienen en el proceso son:H2, CO, CH4, CO2, C2H4, C2H6, C2H2, con una energía máxima entregada entre 150 y 1000 Kcal.______________________________________________________________________________AbstractIn Pinar del Río, Cuba, a residue of the biomass exists, such as the solid residues of orange in theconcentrated juices process. This waste would be able to transform through a termo-chemicalprocess, such as in the pirolysis in fixed bed. No data in the literature about the behavior of thepirolysis of this type of biomass have been found, which is employed normally for animal feeding.In this work we has been study the pirolysis process in fixed bed of early residues, carrying outexperiments in a reactor of fixed bed to scale of laboratory. The product obtained (coal, gas andthe tar and the composition of distribution of gases, they have been obtained for different sizes ofparticles (smaller to 300 micrometers and greater to

  17. System and method for temperature control in an oxygen transport membrane based reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelly, Sean M.

    2017-02-21

    A system and method for temperature control in an oxygen transport membrane based reactor is provided. The system and method involves introducing a specific quantity of cooling air or trim air in between stages in a multistage oxygen transport membrane based reactor or furnace to maintain generally consistent surface temperatures of the oxygen transport membrane elements and associated reactors. The associated reactors may include reforming reactors, boilers or process gas heaters.

  18. Preparation of a carbon molecular sieve and application to separation of N2, O2 and CO2 in a fixed bed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soares J.L.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The emission of CO2 from power plants that burn fossil fuels is the major cause of the accumulation of CO2 in the atmosphere. The separation of CO2 from CO2/air mixtures can play a key role in alleviating this problem. This separation can be carried out by using suitable adsorbents, such as carbon molecular sieves. In this work, a CMS was prepared by deposition of polyfurfuryl alcohol polymer on activated carbon. After deposition of the polymer, the material was carbonized at 800masculineC for 2 hours. This material was used to separate O2/N2 mixtures and CO2 in a fixed bed at room temperature. Experimental breakthrough curves obtained were fitted to theoretical models in order to establish the main mechanisms of mass transfer. The breakthrough curves showed that it is possible to separate O2, N2 and CO2. The shape of the breakthrough curves was not influenced by the total flow, indicating that the gas contact for the gas mixture was good. The experimental data were fitted to theoretical models and it was established that the main mechanism of mass transfer was intraparticle diffusion.

  19. Fixed-bed drying simulation with constant enthalpy, using the improved Michigan State University model - doi: 10.4025/actascitechnol.v34i2.7812

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valdecir Antoninho Dalpasquale

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Drying of agricultural products at high temperatures can be simulated by mathematical models, which intend to describe the drying process close to commercial patterns. They are based on simultaneous heat and mass transfer between the product that is losing moisture, and the air that is supplying energy to the process. All models use these balances, never allowing values of relative humidity of the air to be greater than 100%. However, it has not been common to evaluate air enthalpy, which should not have significant variation during the entire process, accepted as adiabatic. In this work, a mathematical model is proposed for fixed-bed corn (Zea mays L. drying simulation, according to the Michigan State University (MSU model. In the numerical solution, the enthalpy of the drying air was maintained constant as a quantitative physical indicator for correction of the heat and mass exchange in each step of the process, in order to obtain more real evaluations in all drying stages, and in the results for final moisture of the grain. As a result, greater space and time intervals for the simulation were possible. The simulation was validated by comparisons with literature results.  

  20. Specificities of micro-structured reactors for hydrogen production and purification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dupont, N.; Germani, G.; Van Veen, A.C.; Schuurman, Y.; Mirodatos, C. [Institut de Recherches sur la Catalyse - CNRS, 2, Avenue Albert Einstein, 69626 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Schaefer, G. [Atotech Deutschland GmbH, PO Box 210780, 10507 Berlin (Germany)

    2007-07-15

    This paper presents the specificities of micro-structured reactors as compared to conventional fixed-bed reactors through two case studies devoted to (i) hydrogen production by methanol steam reforming, (ii) hydrogen purification by water-gas shift (WGS). Key features like catalyst coating stability, temperature and pressure management, effects of operating conditions (residence time, pressure drops, etc.) are well identified as controlling the micro-reactor performances for methanol reforming. These devices are also shown to be excellent tools for fast access to reaction kinetics as exemplified for the WGS reaction, subject to operating conditions carefully chosen to ensure proper hydrodynamics, in order to use conventional plug flow reactor models for extracting rate constants. (author)

  1. Advanced High Temperature Reactor Systems and Economic Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holcomb, David Eugene [ORNL; Peretz, Fred J [ORNL; Qualls, A L [ORNL

    2011-09-01

    The Advanced High Temperature Reactor (AHTR) is a design concept for a large-output [3400 MW(t)] fluoride-salt-cooled high-temperature reactor (FHR). FHRs, by definition, feature low-pressure liquid fluoride salt cooling, coated-particle fuel, a high-temperature power cycle, and fully passive decay heat rejection. The AHTR's large thermal output enables direct comparison of its performance and requirements with other high output reactor concepts. As high-temperature plants, FHRs can support either high-efficiency electricity generation or industrial process heat production. The AHTR analysis presented in this report is limited to the electricity generation mission. FHRs, in principle, have the potential to be low-cost electricity producers while maintaining full passive safety. However, no FHR has been built, and no FHR design has reached the stage of maturity where realistic economic analysis can be performed. The system design effort described in this report represents early steps along the design path toward being able to predict the cost and performance characteristics of the AHTR as well as toward being able to identify the technology developments necessary to build an FHR power plant. While FHRs represent a distinct reactor class, they inherit desirable attributes from other thermal power plants whose characteristics can be studied to provide general guidance on plant configuration, anticipated performance, and costs. Molten salt reactors provide experience on the materials, procedures, and components necessary to use liquid fluoride salts. Liquid metal reactors provide design experience on using low-pressure liquid coolants, passive decay heat removal, and hot refueling. High temperature gas-cooled reactors provide experience with coated particle fuel and graphite components. Light water reactors (LWRs) show the potentials of transparent, high-heat capacity coolants with low chemical reactivity. Modern coal-fired power plants provide design experience

  2. Groundwater Defluoridation in a Fixed Bed of Aluminium Infused Diatomaceous Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oladoja, Nurudeen; Drewes, Jorg; Helmreich, Brigitte

    2015-04-01

    Aluminum was infused into diatomaceous earth (AD), via the sol-gel process, to produce a functional, permeable, reactive, filter material for groundwater (GW) defluoridation. The AD was characterized and packed in a column reactor for the defluoridation of simulated water contaminated with F- and GW spiked with F-. The column breakthrough profile, the operation and mass transfer parameters were determined in the AD column reactor at two process variables (i.e. AD bed heights of 6.25, 12.5 and 25 cm and influent F- concentration of 4.16, 19.12 and 35.9 mg/L), to obtain the design parameters for the GW defluoridation in the AD column reactor. The effects of the defluoridation process on pH, electrical conductivity and Al3+ concentration of the treated water was determined. Additionally, the regeneration potential of the spent AD was appraised in different solutions (deionized water, 0.1 and 0.05M of HCl, HNO3, H2SO4, NaOH, and CH3COOH) in a batch system. The breakthrough profile, the operation and mass transfer parameters of the column reactor, when used for the defluoridation of the simulated water, were influenced by the two process variables studied. The magnitude of the primary adsorption zone (PAZ) factors increased with increasing column bed height while reductions in the values of the PAZ factors were observed when the influent F- concentrations increased. The linear coefficient values (r2), obtained when the breakthrough profile parameters of the two process variables studied were analyzed with different mass transfer equations, showed that the experimental data fitted more to the Thomas, Yoon and Nelson model than the Bohart, Adams and Wolborska mass transfer equations. The maximum regeneration potential of the spent AD was achieved in solutions of HCl, HNO3, H2SO4, and NaOH while deionized water showed the least regeneration ability. The spent AD exhibited poor stability, identified by high Al3+ leaching, in the solvents that showed maximum regeneration

  3. Pebble Bed Reactors Design Optimization Methods and their Application to the Pebble Bed Fluoride Salt Cooled High Temperature Reactor (PB-FHR)

    OpenAIRE

    Cisneros, Anselmo Tomas

    2013-01-01

    The Fluoride salt cooled High temperature Reactor (FHR) is a class of advanced nuclear reactors that combine the robust coated particle fuel form from high temperature gas cooled reactors, direct reactor auxillary cooling system (DRACS) passive decay removal of liquid metal fast reactors, and the transparent, high volumetric heat capacitance liquid fluoride salt working fluids - flibe (33%7Li2F-67%BeF) - from molten salt reactors. This combination of fuel and coolant enables FHRs to operate i...

  4. Methane reforming in a temperature-controlled DBD reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levko, Dmitry; Raja, Laxminarayan

    2015-09-01

    Methane and carbon dioxide are among the main products of human activity. Therefore, they are considered among greenhouse gases, which may cause the global warming. On the other hand, methane is widely used in everyday life as an energy source and in industry for the synthesis of different chemicals. In order to utilize greenhouse gases or to generate chemicals from methane, one needs first to dissociate it. Then, this gas converts into desired products such as methanol, gasoline, syn-gas etc. Nowadays, there are several methods for CH4 conversion. Steam reforming, partial oxidation, thermal and non-thermal plasmas are among them. During the last decades, the use of non-thermal plasma for methane reforming attracts more and more attention. This is caused by the possibility to control the process of methane conversion as well as the gas component content at the reactor outlet. In addition, the use of non-thermal plasma facilitates the control of reactor start up. The goal of the present work is the deep understanding of the plasma chemical processes accompanying the methane-air conversion in a temperature-controlled DBD reactor. To do this, we have developed the kinetic mechanism of CH4/N2/O2 conversion for the gas temperature range 300-800 K and applied it to the global model.

  5. Fixed-bed gasification research using US coals. Volume 3. Gasification of Rosebud sub-bituminous coal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thimsen, D.; Maurer, R.E.; Pooler, A.R.; Pui, D.; Liu, B.; Kittelson, D.

    1985-03-31

    A single-staged, fixed-bed Wellman-Galusha gasifier coupled with a hot, raw gas combustion system and scrubber has been used to gasify numerous coals from throughout the United States. The gasification test program is organized as a cooperative effort by private industrial participants and governmental agencies. The consortium of participants is organized under the Mining and Industrial Fuel Gas (MIFGa) Group. This report is the third volume in a series of documents prepared by Black, Sivalls and Bryson, Incorporated and describes the gasification of Rosebud subbituminous coal during the time period November 2-20, 1982. Test results and data are presented for the gasification of the coal and the operation of a slipstream tar scrubber to cool the gas and remove condensed tar. 5 refs., 29 figs., 18 tabs.

  6. Environmental implications of small fixed-bed gasifiers for industry. [Assumes 500 small gasifiers in 1990 and 2500 in 2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dobson, J.E.; Cushman, R.M.; Walsh, P.J.

    1981-05-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory is responsible for an assessment of the environmental implications of small fixed-bed coal gasifiers for industry. The assessment focuses on the industrial utilization of low energy gas (often called low-Btu gas) in the range of 3708 to 7416 kJ/m/sup 3/ manufactured on-site or nearby in a coal-air-steam reaction process. The major risk is in occupational health due to potential exposure to toxic substances. This risk to workers is considerably greater than the risk to the public at large. The major sources of occupational exposure will be process steam leaks, accidental spills, and maintenance operations. The composition of the process stream produced during low-Btu gasification is not well know at present.

  7. Evaluation of Two Biosorbents in the Removal of Metal Ions in Aqueous Using a Pilot Scale Fixed-bed System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andre Gadelha Oliveira

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present work was to investigate the adsorption of toxic metal ions copper, nickel and zinc from aqueous solutions using low cost natural biomass (sugar cane bagasse and green coconut fiber in pilot scale fixed-bed system. The Hydraulic retention time (HRT was 229 minutes and the lowest adsorbent usage rate (AUR found was 0.10 g.L-1 for copper using green coconut fibers. The highest values of adsorption capacities founded were 1.417 and 2.772 mg.g-1 of Cu(II ions for sugarcane bagasse and green coconut fibers, respectively. The results showed that both sugarcane bagasse and green coconut fiber presented potential in the removal of metal ions copper, nickel and zinc ions from aqueous solution and the possible use in wastewater treatment station.

  8. Fixed bed column study for Cu (II) removal from aqueous solution using water hyacinth (Eichornia crassipes) biomass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandhimathi, R; Ramesh, S T; Yadu, Anubhav; Bharathi, K S

    2013-07-01

    This paper reports the results of the study on the performance of low-cost biosorbent water hyacinth (WH) in removing Cu (II) from aqueous solution. The adsorbent material adopted was found to be an efficient media for the removal of Cu (II) in continuous mode using fixed bed column. The column studies were conducted with 10 mg/L metal solution with a flow rate of 10 mL/min with different bed depths such as 10, 20 and 30 cm. The column design parameters like adsorption rate constant, adsorption capacity and minimum bed depth were calculated. It was found that, the adsorption capacity of copper ions by water hyacinth increased by increasing the bed depth and the contact time.

  9. Computer modeling of the Morgantown Energy Research Center's fixed bed gasifier. [Theory and development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeSai, P.R.; Wen, C.Y.

    1978-03-01

    This report describes the modeling of a fixed bed stirred gasifier operated by the Morgantown Energy Research Center. One objective of this project was to increase the fundamental understanding of existing gasification processes with mathematical modeling, and thereby assist the Department of Energy in its overall project planning. Models are used for scale-up and optimization purposes and also for extrapolation beyond the normal operating conditions. However, very often, due to the complexity of the real system and the mathematical limitations, certain simplifying assumptions are made. Therefore, before using any model, its assumptions and hence its limitations should be examined and clearly understood. The theory and the development of the model are described. Background information about the MERC's and similar commercial gasifiers is provided.

  10. Algal Foams Applied in Fixed-Bed Process for Lead(II Removal Using Recirculation or One-Pass Modes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shengye Wang

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The incorporation of brown algae into biopolymer beads or foams for metal sorption has been previously reported. However, the direct use of these biomasses for preparing foams is a new approach. In this study, two kinds of porous foams were prepared by ionotropic gelation using algal biomass (AB, Laminaria digitata or alginate (as the reference and applied for Pb(II sorption. These foams (manufactured as macroporous discs were packed in filtration holders (simulating fixed-bed column and the system was operated in either a recirculation or a one-pass mode. Sorption isotherms, uptake kinetics and sorbent reuse were studied in the recirculation mode (analogous to batch system. In the one-pass mode (continuous fixed-bed system, the influence of parameters such as flow rate, feed metal concentration and bed height were investigated on both sorption and desorption. In addition, the effect of Cu(II on Pb(II recovery from binary solutions was also studied in terms of both sorption and desorption. Sorption isotherms are well fitted by the Langmuir equation while the pseudo-second order rate equation described well both sorption and desorption kinetic profiles. The study of material regeneration confirms that the reuse of the foams was feasible with a small mass loss, even after 9 cycles. In the one-pass mode, for alginate foams, a slower flow rate led to a smaller saturation volume, while the effect of flow rate was less marked for AB foams. Competitive study suggests that the foams have a preference for Pb(II over Cu(II but cannot selectively remove Pb(II from the binary solution.

  11. Emission characteristics of toxic pollutants from an updraft fixed bed gasifier for disposing rural domestic solid waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Ming; Hai, Jing; Cheng, Jiang; Gui, Li; Lu, Jiawei; Ren, Ming-Zhong; Zhu, Feng; Yang, Zong-Hui

    2017-08-01

    Gasification has gained advantage as an effective way to dispose domestic solid waste in mountainous rural of China. However, its toxic emissions such as PCDD/Fs and heavy metals, as well as their potential environmental risks, were not well studied in engineering application. In this study, an updraft fixed bed gasifier was investigated by field sampling analysis. Results showed that low toxic emissions (dust, SO2, NOx, HCl, CO, H2S, NH3, PCDD/Fs and heavy metals) in the flue gas were achieved when the rural solid waste was used as feedstock. The mass distribution of heavy metals showed that 94.00% of Pb, 80.45% of Cu, 78.00% of Cd, 77.31% of Cr, and 76.25% of As were remained in residual, whereas 86.58% of Hg was found in flue gas. The content of PCDD/Fs in the flue gas was 0.103 ngI-TEQ·Nm-3, and the total emission factor of PCDD/Fs from the gasifier was 50.04 μgI-TEQ·t-waste-1, among which only 0.04 μgI-TEQ·t-waste-1 was found in the flue gas. The total output of PCDD/Fs was1.89 times as high as input, indicting the updraft fixed bed gasifier increased emission of PCDD/Fs during the treatment domestic solid waste. In addition, the distribution characteristics of PCDD/Fs congeners reflected that PCDD/Fs was mainly generated in the gasification process rather than the stage of flue gas cleaning, suggesting the importance to effectively control the generation of PCDD/Fs within the gasifier chamber in order to obtain a low PCDD/Fs emission level.

  12. Development of a simulation tool based on a segregated model to optimize the design and the scale up of animal cell culture in fixed-bed bioreactor [abstract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gelbgras, V.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The fixed-bed bioreactor is a promising system for the process intensification of the adherent animal cell culture. Nevertheless the fixed-bed bioreactor presents heterogeneity of the cell and the species concentrations which can complicate its optimization and its scale-up. The aim of this work is to develop a mathematical model of the evolution of the cell concentration and the species concentrations to study the process optimization and the bioreactor scale-up. The developed model is used as a simulation tool to study the influence of different phenomena on the cell heterogeneity. In this work, the importance of the adherent phase is investigated. This phase takes place in the beginning of the process. To realize a good implementation of the process, it is important to control the adherent cell concentration and to minimize the heterogeneity during this phase. If cell concentration heterogeneity appears, it will have repercussions during the whole process. In the model, four cell populations are considered: the viable cells in suspension in the medium, the captured cells by the fixed-bed in suspension in the medium, the adherent cells on the fixed-bed and the dead cells in suspension in the medium. Five extracellular species are considered: glucose, glutamine, oxygen, ammonia and lactate. Five phenomena are modeled: the culture medium flow through the fixed-bed (with axial convection, radial dispersion and axial dispersion, the cell capture by the fixed-bed, the cell adherence on the fixed-bed, the cell growth with a maximal cell concentration imposed by the specific area of the fixed-bed and the cell death. The interaction between cells and species is modeled by a Monod equation for the specific growth rate. The model equations are solved with a routine developed with Matlab 6.5. This routine used the Finite Volume Method coupled with a Newton-Raphson algorithm. The model parameters are experimentally identified by cell cultures in a pilot

  13. Effect of rice husk ash mass on sustainability pyrolysis zone of fixed bed downdraft gasifier with capacity of 10 kg/hour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surjosatyo, Adi; Haq, Imaduddin; Dafiqurrohman, Hafif; Gibran, Felly Rihlat

    2017-03-01

    The formation of pyrolysis sustainability (Sustainable Pyrolysis) is the objective of the gasification process. Pyrolysis zone in the gasification process is the result of the endothermic reaction that get heat from oxidation (combustion) of the fuel with oxygen, where cracking biomass rice husk result of such as charcoal, water vapor, steam tar, and gas - gas (CO, H 2, CH 4, CO 2 and N 2) and must be maintained at a pyrolysis temperature to obtain results plentiful gas (producer gas) or syngas (synthetic gas). Obtaining continuously syngas is indicated by flow rate (discharge) producer gas well and the consistency of the flame on the gas burner, it is highly influenced by the gasification process and the operation of the gasifier and the mass balance (mass balance) between the feeding rate of rice husk with the disposal of ash (ash removal). In experiments conducted is using fixed bed gasifier type downdraft capacity of 10 kg/h. Besides setting the mass of rice husks into the gasifier and disposal arrangements rice husk ash may affect the sustainability of the pyrolysis process, but tar produced during the gasification process causes sticky rice husk ash in the plenum gasifier. Modifications disposal system rice husk ash can facilitate the arrangement of ash disposal then could control the temperature pyrolysis with pyrolysis at temperatures between 500-750 ° C. The experimental study was conducted to determine the effect of mass quantities of rice husk ash issued against sustainability pyrolysis temperature which is obtained at each time disposal of rice husk ash to produce 60-90 grams of ash issued. From some experimental phenomena is expected to be seen pyrolysis and its effect on the flow rate of syngas and the stability of the flame on the gas burner so that this research can find a correlation to obtain performance (performance) gasifier optimal.

  14. Generation IV Reactors Integrated Materials Technology Program Plan: Focus on Very High Temperature Reactor Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corwin, William R [ORNL; Burchell, Timothy D [ORNL; Katoh, Yutai [ORNL; McGreevy, Timothy E [ORNL; Nanstad, Randy K [ORNL; Ren, Weiju [ORNL; Snead, Lance Lewis [ORNL; Wilson, Dane F [ORNL

    2008-08-01

    Since 2002, the Department of Energy's (DOE's) Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems (Gen IV) Program has addressed the research and development (R&D) necessary to support next-generation nuclear energy systems. The six most promising systems identified for next-generation nuclear energy are described within this roadmap. Two employ a thermal neutron spectrum with coolants and temperatures that enable hydrogen or electricity production with high efficiency (the Supercritical Water Reactor-SCWR and the Very High Temperature Reactor-VHTR). Three employ a fast neutron spectrum to enable more effective management of actinides through recycling of most components in the discharged fuel (the Gas-cooled Fast Reactor-GFR, the Lead-cooled Fast Reactor-LFR, and the Sodium-cooled Fast Reactor-SFR). The Molten Salt Reactor (MSR) employs a circulating liquid fuel mixture that offers considerable flexibility for recycling actinides and may provide an alternative to accelerator-driven systems. At the inception of DOE's Gen IV program, it was decided to significantly pursue five of the six concepts identified in the Gen IV roadmap to determine which of them was most appropriate to meet the needs of future U.S. nuclear power generation. In particular, evaluation of the highly efficient thermal SCWR and VHTR reactors was initiated primarily for energy production, and evaluation of the three fast reactor concepts, SFR, LFR, and GFR, was begun to assess viability for both energy production and their potential contribution to closing the fuel cycle. Within the Gen IV Program itself, only the VHTR class of reactors was selected for continued development. Hence, this document will address the multiple activities under the Gen IV program that contribute to the development of the VHTR. A few major technologies have been recognized by DOE as necessary to enable the deployment of the next generation of advanced nuclear reactors, including the development and qualification of

  15. Development and Optimization of AAV hFIX Particles by Transient Transfection in an iCELLis(®) Fixed-Bed Bioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, Alicia D; Piras, Bryan A; Clark, Robert K; Lockey, Timothy D; Meagher, Michael M

    2016-06-01

    Adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors are increasingly popular in gene therapy because they are unassociated with human disease, replication dependent, and less immunogenic than other viral vectors and can infect a variety of cell types. These vectors have been used in over 130 clinical trials, and one AAV product has been approved for treatment of lipoprotein lipase deficiency in Europe. To meet the demand for the increasing quantities of AAV required for clinical trials and treatment, a scalable high-capacity technology is required. Bioreactors meet these requirements but limited options are available for adherent HEK 293T/17 cells. Here we optimize the transient transfection of HEK293T/17 cells for the production of AAV human factor IX in a disposable fixed-bed bioreactor, the iCELLis(®) Nano (PALL Corporation). A fixed bed in the center of the iCELLis bioreactor is surrounded by culture medium that is pumped through the bed from the bottom of the bioreactor so that a thin film of the medium overflows the bed and is replenished with oxygen and depleted of CO2 as it returns to the surrounding medium reservoir. We show that this fixed-bed bioreactor can support as many as 2.5 × 10(8) cells/ml of fixed bed (1.9 × 10(6) cells/cm(2)). By optimizing culture and transfection parameters such as the concentration of DNA for transfection, day of harvest, size of PEI/DNA particles, and transfection medium, and adding an additional medium change to the process, we increased our yield to as high as 9.0 × 10(14) viral particles per square meter of fixed bed. We also show an average GFP transfection of 97% of cells throughout the fixed bed. These yields make the iCELLis a promising scalable technology for the clinical production of AAV gene therapy products.

  16. Experimental investigation of a 125 kW twin-fire fixed bed gasification pilot plant and comparison to the results of a 2 MW combined heat and power plant (CHP)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kramreiter, Robert; Url, Michael; Kotik, Jan; Hofbauer, Hermann [Institute of Chemical Engineering, Vienna University of Technology, Getreidemarkt 9/166, A-1060 Vienna (Austria)

    2008-01-15

    Fixed bed biomass gasification is a promising technology to produce heat and power from a renewable energy source. A twin-fire fixed bed gasifier based CHP plant was realized in the year 2003 in Wr. Neustadt, Austria. Wood chips are used as fuel, which are dried and sieved before being gasified to a low calorific gas of about 5.8 MJ/Nm{sup 3}{sub dry}. Before the clean gas is fed into a gas engine a cyclone and a RME (rapemethylester)/H{sub 2}O quench system followed by a wet electrostatic precipitator (ESP) is used for gas cleaning. The CHP plant has a fuel power of 2 MW{sub th} and an electric output of 550 kW{sub el}. As scale up and optimization tool a hot test rig with a capacity of 125 kW{sub th} was built. Basic parameters like the type of wood chips, power and air distribution were varied to investigate the effect on gas composition, tar content in the producer gas and carbon content in the ash. Additionally a temperature profile over the height of the 125 kW hot test rig was measured. Furthermore, the results from the hot test rig are discussed and compared with the results from the 2 MW{sub th} demonstration plant. (author)

  17. Preliminary Demonstration Reactor Point Design for the Fluoride Salt-Cooled High-Temperature Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qualls, A. L. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Betzler, Benjamin R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Brown, Nicholas R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Carbajo, Juan [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Greenwood, Michael Scott [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Hale, Richard Edward [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Harrison, Thomas J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Powers, Jeffrey J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Robb, Kevin R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Terrell, Jerry W. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-12-01

    Development of the Fluoride Salt-Cooled High-Temperature Reactor (FHR) Demonstration Reactor (DR) is a necessary intermediate step to enable commercial FHR deployment through disruptive and rapid technology development and demonstration. The FHR DR will utilize known, mature technology to close remaining gaps to commercial viability. Lower risk technologies are included in the initial FHR DR design to ensure that the reactor can be built, licensed, and operated within an acceptable budget and schedule. These technologies include tristructural-isotropic (TRISO) particle fuel, replaceable core structural material, the use of that same material for the primary and intermediate loops, and tube-and-shell heat exchangers. This report provides an update on the development of the FHR DR. At this writing, the core neutronics and thermal hydraulics have been developed and analyzed. The mechanical design details are still under development and are described to their current level of fidelity. It is anticipated that the FHR DR can be operational within 10 years because of the use of low-risk, near-term technology options.

  18. Modification of reference temperature program in reactor regulating system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Sung Sik; Lee, Byung Jin; Kim, Se Chang; Cheong, Jong Sik [Korea Power Engineering Company, Inc., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Ji In; Doo, Jin Yong [Korea Electric Power Cooperation, Yonggwang (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-12-31

    In Yonggwang nuclear units 3 and 4 currently under commercial operation, the cold temperature was very close to the technical specification limit of 298 deg C during initial startup testing, which was caused by the higher-than-expected reactor coolant system flow. Accordingly, the reference temperature (Tref) program needed to be revised to allow more flexibility for plant operations. In this study, the method of a specific test performed at Yonggwang nuclear unit 4 to revise the Tref program was described and the test results were discussed. In addition, the modified Tref program was evaluated on its potential impacts on system performance and safety. The methods of changing the Tref program and the associated pressurizer level setpoint program were also explained. Finally, for Ulchin nuclear unit 3 and 4 currently under initial startup testing, the effects of reactor coolant system flow rate on the coolant temperature were evaluated from the thermal hydraulic standpoint and an optimum Tref program was recommended. 6 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs. (Author)

  19. Adsorption behavior of levulinic acid onto microporous hyper-cross-linked polymers in aqueous solution: Equilibrium, thermodynamic, kinetic simulation and fixed-bed column studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Xiaoqing; Huang, Qianlin; Qi, Gaoxiang; Xiong, Lian; Huang, Chao; Chen, Xuefang; Li, Hailong; Chen, Xinde

    2017-03-01

    The recovery of levulinic acid (LA) from aqueous solution and actual biomass hydrolysate by a microporous hyper-cross-linked polymer, SY-01, was investigated for the first time under batch and fixed-bed column conditions. The results showed that the optimum pH should be in the acidic range (pH adsorption onto SY-01 resin better than the Freundlich isotherm model, indicating that LA adsorption onto SY-01 resin under the concentration range studied is a monolayer homogeneous adsorption process. The maximum adsorption capacity of LA onto SY-01 resin decreased with increasing temperature, ranging from 103.74 to 95.70 mg/g. The obtained thermodynamic parameters suggested that the adsorption of LA on SY-01 was spontaneous (ΔG 0 adsorption of LA onto SY-01 resin at various operating conditions follows the pore diffusion model and the intraparticle diffusion is the rate-limiting step for the adsorption of LA onto SY-01 resin. The effective pore diffusivity was dependent upon temperature, but independent of initial LA concentration, and were 3.306 × 10 -10 , 5.274 × 10 -10 and 7.707 × 10 -10  m 2 /s at 298, 318 and 338 K, respectively. In desorption process, the recovery efficiency of LA from SY-01 resin was 99.39%, and LA concentration in the eluent was raised 2.97-fold. In conclusion, our results show that the SY-01 resin has potential application in product recovery of LA from biomass hydrolysate. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Lipase production by solid-state fermentation in fixed-bed bioreactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa d'Avila Costa Cavalcanti

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available In the present work, packed bed bioreactors were employed with the aim of increasing productivity and scaling up of lipase production using Penicillium simplicissimum in solid-state fermentation. The influence of temperature and air flow rate on enzyme production was evaluated employing statistical experimental design, and an empirical model was adjusted to the experimental data. It was shown that higher lipase activities could be achieved at lower temperatures and higher air flow rates. The maximum lipase activity (26.4 U/g was obtained at the temperature of 27°C and air flow rate of 0.8 L/min.O fungo Penicillium simplicissimum se mostrou, em trabalhos anteriores, um ótimo produtor de lipase por fermentação no estado sólido, quando cultivado em biorreatores do tipo bandeja, utilizando a torta de babaçu como meio de cultura. Com o objetivo de aumentar a produtividade e possibilitar uma ampliação de escala, foi investigado, no presente trabalho, o emprego de biorreatores de leito fixo com aeração forçada. Os biorreatores utilizados tinham 4 cm de diâmetro interno e 14 cm de altura útil. Empregando-se planejamento estatístico de experimentos como ferramenta, foram avaliadas as influências da temperatura e da vazão de ar sobre a produção de lipase nestes biorreatores. Os resultados obtidos permitiram ajustar um modelo empírico, o qual indicou que maiores atividades lipásicas são alcançadas para temperaturas mais baixas e vazões de ar mais altas. A atividade lipásica máxima (26,4 U/g foi obtida para temperatura de 27°C e vazão de ar de 0,8 L/min.

  1. Advanced High-Temperature, High-Pressure Transport Reactor Gasification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michael Swanson; Daniel Laudal

    2008-03-31

    . Higher-reactivity (low-rank) coals appear to perform better in a transport reactor than the less reactive bituminous coals. Factors that affect TRDU product gas quality appear to be coal type, temperature, and air/coal ratios. Testing with a higher-ash, high-moisture, low-rank coal from the Red Hills Mine of the Mississippi Lignite Mining Company has recently been completed. Testing with the lignite coal generated a fuel gas with acceptable heating value and a high carbon conversion, although some drying of the high-moisture lignite was required before coal-feeding problems were resolved. No ash deposition or bed material agglomeration issues were encountered with this fuel. In order to better understand the coal devolatilization and cracking chemistry occurring in the riser of the transport reactor, gas and solid sampling directly from the riser and the filter outlet has been accomplished. This was done using a baseline Powder River Basin subbituminous coal from the Peabody Energy North Antelope Rochelle Mine near Gillette, Wyoming.

  2. Low Temperature Irradiation Embrittlement of Reactor Pressure Vessel Steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jy-An John [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-08-01

    The embrittlement trend curve development project for HFIR reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels was carried out with three major tasks. Which are (1) data collection to match that used in HFIR steel embrittlement trend published in 1994 Journal Nuclear Material by Remec et. al, (2) new embrittlement data of A212B steel that are not included in earlier HFIR RPV trend curve, and (3) the adjustment of nil-ductility-transition temperature (NDTT) shift data with the consideration of the irradiation temperature effect. An updated HFIR RPV steel embrittlement trend curve was developed, as described below. NDTT( C) = 23.85 log(x) + 203.3 log (x) + 434.7, with 2- uncertainty of 34.6 C, where parameter x is referred to total dpa. The developed update HFIR RPV embrittlement trend curve has higher embrittlement rate compared to that of the trend curve developed in 1994.

  3. Reaction engineering simulations of a fluidized-bed reactor for selective oxidation of fluorene to 9-fluorenone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mleczko, L. (Bochum Univ. (Germany). Lehrstuhl fuer Technische Chemie); Pannek, U. (Bochum Univ. (Germany). Lehrstuhl fuer Technische Chemie); Baerns, M. (Bochum Univ. (Germany). Lehrstuhl fuer Technische Chemie)

    1994-06-01

    The catalytic oxidation of fluorene to 9-fluorenone in a fluidized-bed reactor was investigated by modeling of the reactor and simulation of its performance. The ''Bubble Assemblage Model'' of Kato and Wen, the ''Bubbling Bed Model'' of Kunii and Levenspiel and the ''Countercurrent Backmixing Model'' of Potter were applied. From a comparison of simulation results obtained by the various fluidized-bed models and a fixed-bed model conclusions were drawn about the influence of interphase mass transfer and gas backmixing on the conversion of fluorene and selectivity of 9-fluorenone formation. Furthermore, the dependence of conversion and selectivity on temperature and hydrodynamic conditions was investigated. In particular, the implications of a change of hydrodynamic conditions for scale-up were analysed. The highest yield of 9-fluorenone predicted for a bench-scale fluidized bed amounted to 88% (X[sub F] = 97%, S[sub NON] = 91%). This yield was lower than in a fixed-bed reactor (Y[sub NON] = 92%, X[sub F] = 99%, S[sub NON] = 93%). A further drop of the yield was predicted when scaling-up from a bench-scale reactor to a commercial size unit (Y[sub NON] = 54%, X[sub F] = 86%, S[sub NON] = 63%). (orig.)

  4. More efficient energy yield. Wet fermentation fixed bed fermenter as an alternative to dry fermentation; Effizientere Energieausbeute. Nassvergaerung im Festbettfermenter als Alternative zur Trockenvergaerung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Landwehr, Sandra [Borgmeier PR, Delmenhorst (Germany)

    2012-10-15

    The fermentation of biowaste as a solid can be used to generate energy in the form of biogas. In a research project supported by the Federal Government, the input-output relation between different methods was studied. A newly developed wet procedure in a fixed bed digester shows a much more efficient energy yield can be achieved with less effort.

  5. Optimization of Reactor Temperature and Catalyst Weight for Plastic Cracking to Fuels Using Response Surface Methodology

    OpenAIRE

    Istadi Istadi; S Suherman; Luqman Buchori

    2011-01-01

    The present study deals with effect of reactor temperature and catalyst weight on performance of plastic waste cracking to fuels over modified catalyst waste as well as their optimization. From optimization study, the most operating parameters affected the performance of the catalytic cracking process is reactor temperature followed by catalyst weight. Increasing the reactor temperature improves significantly the cracking performance due to the increasing catalyst activity. The optimal operat...

  6. Study of the obtainment of Mo{sub 2}C by gas-solid reaction in a fixed and rotary bed reactor; Estudo da obtencao de Mo{sub 2}C por reacao gas-solido em reator de leito fixo e rotativo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Araujo, C.P.B. de; Souza, C.P. de; Souto, M.V.M.; Barbosa, C.M.; Frota, A.V.V.M., E-mail: cpbaraujo@gmail.com [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte (UFRN), Natal, RN (Brazil)

    2016-07-01

    Carbides' synthesis via gas-solid reaction overcomes many of the difficulties found in other processes, requiring lower temperatures and reaction times than traditional metallurgic routes, for example. In carbides' synthesis in fixed bed reactors (FB) the solid precursor is permeated by the reducing/carburizing gas stream forming a packed bed without mobility. The use of a rotary kiln reactor (RK) adds a mixing character to this process, changing its fluid-particle dynamics. In this work ammonium molybdate was subjected to carbo-reduction reaction (CH4 / H2) in both reactors under the same gas flow (15L / h) and temperature (660 ° C) for 180 minutes. Complete conversion was observed Mo2C (dp = 18.9nm modal particles sizes' distribution) in the fixed bed reactor. In the RK reactor this conversion was only partial (∼ 40%) and Mo2C and MoO3 (34nm dp = bimodal) could be observed on the produced XRD pattern. Partial conversion was attributed to the need to use higher solids loading in the reactor CR (50% higher) to avoid solids to centrifuge. (author)

  7. Fixed bed adsorption of tetracycline on a mesoporous activated carbon: Experimental study and neuro-fuzzy modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mojtaba Hedayati Marzbali

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the use of synthesized mesoporous carbon in the fixed bed adsorption, as a promising process, to eliminate tetracycline from wastewater. In order to study the adsorptive capability of adsorbent, particles were embedded in a laboratory-scale Pyrex glass tube. An increase in initial concentration and decrease in bed height and flow rate led to the higher adsorption capacity. The highest bed capacity of 76.97 mg g−1 was obtained using 4 cm bed depth, 4 mL min−1 and 50 mg L−1 influent concentration. The initial part of breakthrough curve perfectly matched the Adams–Bohart model at all experimental conditions. However, it was anticipated that Yoon–Nelson model could predict the whole curve acceptably, the results showed an inaccurate fitting. Therefore, the adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system (ANFIS was used to predict the breakthrough curve using data series of adsorption experiments. This model indicated a good statistical prediction in terms of relative errors. Keywords: Apricot shell, Tetracycline, Column adsorption, Machine learning, Neuro-fuzzy

  8. Cobalt (II) removal from aqueous solutions by natural hemp fibers: Batch and fixed-bed column studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tofan, Lavinia; Teodosiu, Carmen; Paduraru, Carmen; Wenkert, Rodica

    2013-11-01

    Natural hemp fibers were explored as sorbent for the removal of Co(II) ions from aqueous solutions in batch and dynamic conditions. The batch Co(II) sorption capacity increased up to pH 5, reached the maximum (7.5-7.8 mg/g) over the initial pH of 4.5-5. As the initial concentration of metal ion increased (in the range of 25-200 mg/L), the cobalt uptake was enhanced, but the Co(II) removal efficiency decreased. The batch sorption of Co(II) on the tested hemp follows a pseudo-second order model, which relies on the assumption that the chemisorptions may be the rate-controlling step. The Langmuir model better described the Co(II) sorption process on the natural hemp fibers in comparison with the Freundlich model. This finding complies with the results of fixed-bed studies which emphasize that the optimal solution for describing the behavior of the investigated hemp bed column is provided by the Thomas model. The sorption capacity of the hemp fibers column (15.44 mg/g) performed better than that of the Co(II)-hemp batch system (13.58 mg/g). The possibility to use hemp fibers as an alternative in the Co(II) wastewater treatment should be studied under pilot scale applications, so as to complete the studies concerning the removal efficiencies with technical and economic factors that influence process scale-up.

  9. Effect of Air Staging Ratios on the Burning Rate and Emissions in an Underfeed Fixed-Bed Biomass Combustor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Araceli Regueiro

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This experimental work studies a small-scale biomass combustor (5–12 kW with an underfed fixed bed using low air staging ratios (15%–30%. This document focuses on the influence of the operative parameters on the combustion process, so gaseous emissions and the distribution and concentration of particulate matter have also been recorded. The facility shows good stability and test repeatability. For the studied airflow ranges, the results show that increasing the total airflow rate does not increase the overall air excess ratio because the burning rate is proportionally enhanced (with some slight differences that depend on the air staging ratio. Consequently, the heterogeneous reactions at the bed remain in the so-called oxygen-limited region, and thus the entire bed operates under sub-stoichiometric conditions with regards of the char content of the biomass. In addition, tests using only primary air (no staging may increase the fuel consumption, but in a highly incomplete way, approaching a gasification regime. Some measured burning rates are almost 40% higher than previous results obtained in batch combustors due to the fixed position of the ignition front. The recorded concentration of particulate matter varies between 15 and 75 mg/Nm3, with a main characteristic diameter between 50 and 100 nm.

  10. On the effect of cross sectional shape on incipient motion and deposition of sediments in fixed bed channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Safari Mir-Jafar-Sadegh

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The condition of incipient motion and deposition are of the essential issues for the study of sediment transport. This phenomenon is of great importance to hydraulic engineers for designing sewers, drainage, as well as other rigid boundary channels. This is a study carried out with the objectives of describing the effect of cross-sectional shape on incipient motion and deposition of particles in rigid boundary channels. In this research work, the experimental data given by Loveless (1992 and Mohammadi (2005 are used. On the basis of the critical velocity approach, a new incipient motion equation for a V-shaped bottom channel and incipient deposition of sediment particles equations for rigid boundary channels having circular, rectangular, and U-shaped cross sections are obtained. New equations were compared to the other incipient motion equations. The result shows that the cross-sectional shape is an important factor for defining the minimum velocity for no-deposit particles. This study also distinguishes incipient motion of particles from incipient deposition for particles. The results may be useful for designing fixed bed channels with a limited deposition condition.

  11. Fixed-bed column studies on biosorption of crystal violet from aqueous solution by Citrullus lanatus rind and Cyperus rotundus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bharathi, Kandaswamy Suyamboo; Ramesh, SriKrishna Perumal Thanga

    2013-12-01

    In this study, fixed-bed column experiments were performed to investigate the biosorption potential of two agricultural wastes, Citrullus lanatus rind and Cyperus rotundus to remove Crystal violet (CV) from aqueous solution. The experiments were conducted to study the effects of important parameters such as bed depth (10-30 cm), flow rate (10-20 mL min-1) and initial dye concentration (10-25 mg L-1). Different models like Bed Depth Service Time (BDST) model, Thomas model and Yoon-Nelson model were applied to the experimental sorption data. In the biosorption of Crystal violet by both the sorbents, the BDST model fitted well with the experimental data in the initial region of the breakthrough curve. Also, Yoon-Nelson model was found to show good agreement with the experimental kinetic results as compared to the Thomas model. The sorbents were found to be very potential, as it showed good sorption capacities of 46.68 and 54.24 mg g-1 for CV biosorption by Citrullus lanatus rind and Cyperus rotundus. Recovery of dye was made by eluting 1 N CH3COOH through the exhausted column in downward direction.

  12. Fixed-bed column study for hexavalent chromium removal and recovery by short-chain polyaniline synthesized on jute fiber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Potsangbam Albino; Chakraborty, Saswati

    2009-03-15

    Fixed-bed column studies were conducted to evaluate performance of a short-chain polymer, polyaniline, synthesized on the surface of jute fiber (PANI-jute) for the removal of hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] in aqueous environment. Influent pH, column bed depth, influent Cr(VI) concentrations and influent flow rate were variable parameters for the present study. Optimum pH for total chromium removal was observed as 3 by electrostatic attraction of acid chromate ion (HCrO(4)(-)) with protonated amine group (NH(3)(+)) of PANI-jute. With increase in column bed depth from 40 to 60 cm, total chromium uptake by PANI-jute increased from 4.14 to 4.66 mg/g with subsequent increase in throughput volume from 9.84 to 12.6L at exhaustion point. The data obtained for total chromium removal were well described by BDST equation till 10% breakthrough. Adsorption rate constant and dynamic bed capacity at 10% breakthrough were observed as 0.01 L/mgh and 1069.46 mg/L, respectively. Adsorbed total chromium was recovered back from PANI-jute as non-toxic Cr(III) after ignition with more than 97% reduction in weight, minimizing the problem of solid waste disposal.

  13. Coalesced chitosan activated carbon composite for batch and fixed-bed adsorption of cationic and anionic dyes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auta, M; Hameed, B H

    2013-05-01

    A renewable waste tea activated carbon (WTAC) was coalesced with chitosan to form composite adsorbent used for waste water treatment. Adsorptive capacities of crosslinked chitosan beads (CCB) and its composite (WTAC-CCB) for Methylene blue dye (MB) and Acid blue 29 (AB29) were evaluated through batch and fixed-bed studies. Langmuir, Freundlich and Temkin adsorption isotherms were tested for the adsorption process and the experimental data were best fitted by Langmuir model and least by Freundlich model; the suitability of fitness was adjudged by the Chi-square (χ(2)) and Marquadt's percent standard deviation error functions. Judging by the values of χ(2), pseudo-second-order reaction model best described the adsorption process than pseudo-first-order kinetic model for MB/AB29 on both adsorbents. After five cycles of adsorbents desorption test, more than 50% WTAC-CCB adsorption efficiency was retained while CCB had adsorption efficiency. The results of this study revealed that WTAC-CCB composite is a promising adsorbent for treatment of anionic and cationic dyes in effluent wastewaters. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Fixed bed column study for water defluoridation using neem oil-phenolic resin treated plant bio-sorbent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manna, Suvendu; Saha, Prosenjit; Roy, Debasis; Adhikari, Basudam; Das, Papita

    2018-02-15

    Fluoride has both detrimental and beneficial effects on living beings depending on the concentration and consumption periods. The study presented in this article investigated the feasibility of using neem oil phenolic resin treated lignocellulosic bio-sorbents for fluoride removal from water through fixed bed column study. Results indicated that treated bio-sorbents could remove fluoride both from synthetic and groundwater with variable bed depth, flow rate, fluoride concentration and column diameter. Data obtained from this study indicated that columns with the thickest bed, lowest flow rate, and fluoride concentration showed best column performance. Bio-sorbents used in this study are regenerable and reusable for more than five cycles. The initial materials cost needed to remove one gram of fluoride also found to be lower than the available alternatives. This makes the process more promising candidate to be used for fluoride removal. In addition, the process is also technically advantageous over the available alternatives. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Influence of the bed height on the dynamic behavior of a fixed-bed column during mercury biosorption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Candelaria N. Tejada-Tovar

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the packing density of residual biomass of cocoa bean husk as adsorbent of Hg (II dissolved in an aqueous solution inside a continuous fixed-bed system. The effects of the height of the bed on the removal of the pollutant were evaluated. This experimental work was based on biomass preparation, adsorber design and assembly, and mathematical modelling. The variables considered in the process were initial concentration of the metal, pH, flow rate and particle size. The incident-independent variable was the packing density (mg biomass/bed volume, which translated into the height (cm of the packing. The FTIR analyses of the husk revealed the presence of functional groups in the spectrum that favour the adsorption of the metal. The residual concentration of the solution was measured by UV/Vis spectroscopy; the maximum adsorption capacity was 99.62%, by the 10g (7.5 cm bed. In addition, the Thomas model was the best-fitting for the experimental data. On the basis of these results, we concluded that cocoa bean husk has potential to be used as bioadsorbent of Hg (II from aqueous solutions and that the increase in bed height in the continuous system favours the removal of the pollutant.

  16. Adsorption of phosphate from aqueous solutions and sewage using zirconium loaded okara (ZLO): Fixed-bed column study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, T.A.H. [Centre for Technology in Water and Wastewater, School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Technology, Sydney (UTS), 15 Broadway, Ultimo, NSW 2007 (Australia); Ngo, H.H., E-mail: ngohuuhao121@gmail.com [Centre for Technology in Water and Wastewater, School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Technology, Sydney (UTS), 15 Broadway, Ultimo, NSW 2007 (Australia); Guo, W.S. [Centre for Technology in Water and Wastewater, School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Technology, Sydney (UTS), 15 Broadway, Ultimo, NSW 2007 (Australia); Pham, T.Q. [Faculty of Geography, University of Science, Vietnam National University, Hanoi (Viet Nam); Li, F.M. [College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Ocean University of China, Qingdao 266100 (China); Nguyen, T.V. [Centre for Technology in Water and Wastewater, School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Technology, Sydney (UTS), 15 Broadway, Ultimo, NSW 2007 (Australia); Bui, X.T. [Environmental Engineering and Management Research Group, Ton Duc Thang University, Ho Chi Minh City (Viet Nam); Faculty of Environment and Natural Resources, Ho Chi Minh City University of Technology-Vietnam National University, Ho Chi Minh City (Viet Nam)

    2015-08-01

    This study explores the potential of removing phosphorus from aqueous solutions and sewage by Zr(IV)-loaded okara (ZLO) in the fixed-bed column. Soybean residue (okara) was impregnated with 0.25 M Zr(IV) solution to prepare active binding sites for phosphate. The effect of several factors, including flow rate, bed height, initial phosphorus concentration, pH and adsorbent particle size on the performance of ZLO was examined. The maximum dynamic adsorption capacity of ZLO for phosphorus was estimated to be 16.43 mg/g. Breakthrough curve modeling indicated that Adams–Bohart model and Thomas model fitted the experimental data better than Yoon–Nelson model. After treatment with ZLO packed bed column, the effluent could meet the discharge standard for phosphorus in Australia. Successful desorption and regeneration were achieved with 0.2 NaOH and 0.1 HCl, respectively. The results prove that ZLO can be used as a promising phosphorus adsorbent in the dynamic adsorption system. - Highlights: • Dynamic adsorption of P from water and wastewater by Zr(IV)-loaded okara was tested. • Effects of column design parameters on the adsorption performance were investigated. • The dynamic adsorption capacity of Zr(IV)-loaded okara for P was reasonably high. • The spent column was effectively regenerated with 0.2 M NaOH followed by 0.1 M HCl. • Zr(IV)-loaded okara column was efficient in eliminating P from municipal sewage.

  17. Competitive sorption of antimony with zinc, nickel, and aluminum in a seaweed based fixed-bed sorption column

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bakir, Adil; McLoughlin, Peter; Fitzgerald, Eddy [Estuarine Research Group, Eco-Innovation Research Centre, Department of Chemical and Life Sciences, Waterford Institute of Technology, Waterford (Ireland); Tofail, Syed A.M. [Materials and Surface Science Institute, University of Limerick, Limerick (Ireland)

    2009-09-15

    The removal of heavy metals such as Ni(II), Zn(II), Al(III), and Sb(III) from aqueous metal solutions was investigated using novel, cost effective, seaweed derived sorbents. Studies with a laboratory scale fixed-bed sorption column, using a seaweed waste material (referred to as waste Ascophyllum product (WAP)) from the processing of Ascophyllum nodosum as biosorbent, demonstrated high removal efficiencies (RE) for a variety of heavy metals including Ni(II), Zn(II) and Al(III), with 90, 90 and 74% RE achieved from initial 10 mg/L metal solutions, respectively. The presence of Sb(III) in multi component metal solutions suppressed the removal of Ni(II), Zn(II) and Al(III), reducing the RE to 28, 17 and 24%, respectively. The use of Polysiphonia lanosa as a biosorbent showed a 67% RE for Sb(III), both alone and in combination with other metals. Potentiometric and conductometric titrations, X-ray photoelectron and mid-infrared spectroscopic analysis demonstrated that carboxyl, alcohol, sulfonate and ether groups were heavily involved in Sb(III) binding by P. lanosa. Only carboxyl and sulfonate groups were involved in Sb(III) binding by WAP. Furthermore, a greater amount of weak acidic groups (mainly carboxylic functions) were involved in Sb(III) binding by P. lanosa, compared to WAP which involved a greater concentration of strong acidic groups (mainly sulfonates). (Abstract Copyright [2009], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  18. Helium turbine power generation in high temperature gas reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mori, Yasuo [Tokyo Inst. of Tech. (Japan)

    1995-03-01

    This paper presents studies on the helium turbine power generator and important components in the indirect cycle of high temperature helium cooled reactor with multi-purpose use of exhaust thermal energy from the turbine. The features of this paper are, firstly the reliable estimation of adiabatic efficiencies of turbine and compressor, secondly the introduction of heat transfer enhancement by use of the surface radiative heat flux from the thin metal plates installed in the hot helium and between the heat transfer coil rows of IHX and RHX, thirdly the use of turbine exhaust heat to produce fresh water from seawater for domestic, agricultural and marine fields, forthly a proposal of plutonium oxide fuel without a slight possibility of diversion of plutonium for nuclear weapon production and finally the investigation of GT-HTGR of large output such as 500 MWe. The study of performance of GT-HTGR reduces the result that for the reactor of 450 MWt the optimum thermal efficiency is about 43% when the turbine expansion ratio is 3.9 for the turbine efficiency of 0.92 and compressor efficiency of 0.88 and the helium temperature at the compressor inlet is 45degC. The produced amount of fresh water is about 8640 ton/day. It is made clear that about 90% of the reactor thermal output is totally used for the electric power generation in the turbine and for the multi-puposed utilization of the heat from the turbine exhaust gas and compressed helium cooling seawater. The GT-Large HTGR is realized by the separation of the pressure and temperature boundaries of the pressure vessel, the increase of burning density of the fuel by 1.4 times, the extention of the nuclear core diameter and length by 1.2 times, respectively, and the enhancement of the heat flux along the nuclear fuel compact surface by 1.5 times by providing riblets with the peak in the flow direction. (J.P.N.).

  19. Mitigate Strategy of Very High Temperature Reactor Air-ingress Accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ham, Tae Kyu [KHNP CRI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Arcilesi, David J.; Sun, Xiaodong; Christensen, Richard N. [The Ohio State University, Columbus (United States); Oh, Chang H.; Kim, Eung S. [Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho (United States)

    2016-10-15

    A critical safety event of the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) is a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA). Since a VHTR uses graphite as a core structure, if there is a break on the pressure vessel, the air in the reactor cavity could ingress into the reactor core. The worst case scenario of the accident is initiated by a double-ended guillotine break of the cross vessel that connects the reactor vessel and the power conversion unit. The operating pressures in the vessel and containment are about 7 and 0.1 MPa, respectively. In the VHTR, the reactor pressure vessel is located within a reactor cavity which is filled with air during normal operation. Therefore, the air-helium mixture in the cavity may ingress into the reactor pressure vessel after the depressurization process. In this paper, a commercial computational fluid dynamics (CFD) tool, FLUENT, was used to figure out air-ingress mitigation strategies in the gas-turbine modular helium reactor (GT-MHR) designed by General Atomics, Inc. After depressurization, there is almost no air in the reactor cavity; however, the air could flow back to the reactor cavity since the reactor cavity is placed in the lowest place in the reactor building. The heavier air could flow to the reactor cavity through free surface areas in the reactor building. Therefore, Argon gas injection in the reactor cavity is introduced. The injected argon would prevent the flow by pressurizing the reactor cavity initially, and eventually it prevents the flow by making the gas a heavier density than air in the reactor cavity. The gate opens when the reactor cavity is pressurized during the depressurization and it closes by gravity when the depressurization is terminated so that it can slow down the air flow to the reactor cavity.

  20. High temperature gas-cooled reactor: gas turbine application study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-12-01

    The high-temperature capability of the High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) is a distinguishing characteristic which has long been recognized as significant both within the US and within foreign nuclear energy programs. This high-temperature capability of the HTGR concept leads to increased efficiency in conventional applications and, in addition, makes possible a number of unique applications in both electrical generation and industrial process heat. In particular, coupling the HTGR nuclear heat source to the Brayton (gas turbine) Cycle offers significant potential benefits to operating utilities. This HTGR-GT Application Study documents the effort to evaluate the appropriateness of the HTGR-GT as an HTGR Lead Project. The scope of this effort included evaluation of the HTGR-GT technology, evaluation of potential HTGR-GT markets, assessment of the economics of commercial HTGR-GT plants, and evaluation of the program and expenditures necessary to establish HTGR-GT technology through the completion of the Lead Project.

  1. Simulation of one adsorption column of fixed bed for pollutants removal in petroleum and gas industry; Simulacao de uma coluna de adsorcao em leito fixo para a remocao de poluentes da industria de petroleo e gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lavich, R.R.; Cerutti, E.L.; Barbosa, H.T.; Souza, A.A. Ulson de; Souza, S.M.A. Guelli U. de [Santa Catarin Univ., Florianopolis, SC (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Quimica e Engenharia de Alimentos]. E-mail: selene@enq.ufsc.br

    2003-07-01

    The adsorption process is applied to some stages of the production in petroleum and gas industry, being used in separation processes and in the hydrocarbons purification in refineries and petrochemical industries. By using software to solve the numerical models, that represent the transfer phenomena and equilibrium, it is possible to obtain the behavior of adsorption column and to determine the optimum conditions of operation. This work is developed using the computational software CFX-5.5 of the AEA Technology, to simulate the adsorption phenomenon in a column of fixed bed, considering that this is used in the removal of undesired compounds of the petroleum and gas industry. These results are used to determine the operational conditions that maximize the efficiency of process. The results are presented under the form of breakthrough curves and three-dimensional profile of the velocity and concentration inside of the column, for different temperatures, being compared to data from literature. (author)

  2. High Temperature Gas-Cooled Test Reactor Options Status Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sterbentz, James William [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Bayless, Paul David [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-08-01

    Preliminary scoping calculations are being performed for a 100 MWt gas-cooled test reactor. The initial design uses standard prismatic blocks and 15.5% enriched UCO fuel. Reactor physics and thermal-hydraulics simulations have been performed to identify some reactor design features to investigate further. Current status of the effort is described.

  3. Thermohydraulic modeling of very high temperature reactors in regimes with loss of coolant using CFD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreira, Uebert G.; Dominguez, Dany S. [Universidade Estadual de Santa Cruz (UESC), Ilh´eus, BA (Brazil). Programa de P´os-Graduacao em Modelagem Computacional em Ciencia e Tecnologia; Mazaira, Leorlen Y.R.; Lira, Carlos A.B.O. [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Departamento de Energia Nuclear; Hernandez, Carlos R.G., E-mail: uebert.gmoreira@gmail.com, E-mail: dsdominguez@gmail.com, E-mail: leored1984@gmail.com, E-mail: cabol@ufpe.br, E-mail: cgh@instec.cu [Instituto Superior de Tecnologas y Ciencias Aplicadas (InSTEC), La Habana (Cuba)

    2017-07-01

    The nuclear energy is a good alternative to meet the continuous increase in world energy demand. In this perspective, VHTRs (Very High Temperature Reactors) are serious candidates for energy generation due to its inherently safe performance, low power density and high conversion efficiency. However, the viability of these reactors depends on an efficient safety system in the operation of nuclear plants. The HTR (High Temperature Reactor)-10 model, an experimental reactor of the pebble bed type, is used as a case study in this work to perform the thermohydraulic simulation. Due to the complex patterns flow that appear in the pebble bed reactor core, and advances in computational capacity, CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) techniques are used to simulate these reactors. A realistic approach is adopted to simulate the central annular column of the reactor core, which each pebble bed element is modeled in detail. As geometrical model of the fuel elements was selected the BCC (Body Centered Cubic) arrangement. Previous works indicate this arrangement as the configuration that obtain higher fuel temperatures inside the core. Parameters considered for reactor design are available in the technical report of benchmark issues by IAEA (TECDOC-1694). Among the results obtained, we obtained the temperature profiles with different mass flow rates for the coolant. In general, the temperature distributions calculated are consistent with phenomenological behaviour. Even without consider the reactivity changes to reduce the reactor power or other safety procedures, the maximum temperatures do not exceed the recommended limits for fuel elements. (author)

  4. Incorporation of alpha-Ketoglutaric Acid as a Fixed Bed Scrubber Media for the Neutralization of Hydrazine Family Hypergolic Fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeVor, R. W.; Santiago-Maldonado, E.; Parkerson, J. K.

    2010-01-01

    A candidate scrubber media, alpha-ketoglutaric acid (aKGA) adsorbed onto a silica-based substrate was examined as a potential alternative to the hydrazine-family hypergolic fuel neutralization techniques currently utilized at NASA/Kennedy Space Center (KSC). Helvenson et. al. has indicated that aKGA will react with hydrazines to produce non-hazardous, possibly biodegradable products. Furthermore, the authors have previously tested and demonstrated the use of aKGA aqueous solutions as a replacement neutralizing agent for citric acid, which is currently used as a scrubbing agent in liquid scrubbers at KSC. Specific properties examined include reaction efficiency, the loading capacity of aKGA onto various silica substrates, and the comparison of aKGA media performance to that of the citric acid vapor scrubber systems at KSC and a commercial vapor scrubber media. Preliminary investigations showed hydrophobic aerogel particles to be an ideal substrate for the deposition of the aKGA. Current studies have shown that the laboratory produced aKGA-Aerogel absorbent media are more efficient and cost effective than a commercially available fixed bed scrubber media, although much less cost effective than liquid-based citric acid scrubbers (although possibly safer and less labor intensive). A comparison of all three alternative scrubber technologies (liquid aKGA, solid-phase aKGA, and commercially available sorbent materials) is given considering both hypergolic neutralization capabilities and relative costs (as compared to the current citric acid scrubbing technology in use at NASA/KSC).

  5. Treatment of mature landfill leachate using hybrid processes of hydrogen peroxide and adsorption in an activated carbon fixed bed column.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eljaiek-Urzola, Monica; Guardiola-Meza, Luis; Ghafoori, Samira; Mehrvar, Mehrab

    2018-02-23

    In this study, the treatment of mature landfill leachate is evaluated by oxidation with hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ) combined with adsorption in a granular activated carbon (GAC) fixed bed column to determinate the increase in the biodegradability index, the reduction of chemical oxygen demand (COD) as well as the increase in the useful life of the GAC bed. The sample leachate from Loma de Los Cocos Landfill (Cartagena de Indias, Colombia) has a very low biodegradability ratio ranging from 0.034 to 0.048 that makes it difficult to meet the required water quality level according to the regulations. The COD removal is initially monitored in the H 2 O 2 oxidation treatment process. The operating conditions such as pH, H 2 O 2 dosage, and the reaction time are optimized in this process based on the percentage of COD removal. A maximum COD removal of 29.9% is achieved at an initial H 2 O 2 concentration of 5000 mg L -1 with a pH of 8 and the reaction time of 60 min. The hybrid treatment by H 2 O 2 -GAC achieved 97.3% COD removal and 116% increase in the biodegradability ratio (from 0.072 to 0.134) while this ratio was increased by 6.5% with H 2 O 2 alone. Moreover, the useful life of the GAC bed is increased from 45 min in the column fed with raw leachate to 170 min in the column fed with pretreated leachate and 5000 mg L -1 of H 2 O 2 at pH of 8 that subsequently increased the activated carbon adsorption capacity. An adsorption model for leachate treated with H 2 O 2 is also developed.

  6. Characterisation of Particulate Matter Emitted from Cofiring of Lignite and Agricultural Residues in a Fixed-Bed Combustor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nattasut Mantananont

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This study is focused on the emission of fixed bed combustor batch operated. Real-time analyser ELPI (electrical low-pressure impactor system was used to size-segregated particulate matter emission ranging from 40 nm to 10 μm. The results show that total number concentration were 3.4×103, 1.6×104, and 1.5×105 particles/cm3⋅kgfuel, while total mass of particles were 12.2, 8.0, and 6.5 mg/Nm3⋅kgfuel for combustion of lignite, rice husk and bagasse, respectively. But it can be noticed that cofiring released more particulate matter. Meanwhile it was found that the effect of ratio of over-fired air to total air supply is more pronounced, since decrease in this ratio, the amount of particles are decreased significantly. For particle size distribution, it can be observed that submicron-sized particles dominate and the most prevailing size is in the range: 50 nm

  7. Continuous adsorption of Pb(II) and methylene blue by engineered graphite oxide coated sand in fixed-bed column

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gong, Ji-Lai, E-mail: jilaigong@gmail.com [College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Key Laboratory of Environmental Biology and Pollution Control, Ministry of Education, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Zhang, Yong-Liang; Jiang, Yan [College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Key Laboratory of Environmental Biology and Pollution Control, Ministry of Education, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Zeng, Guang-Ming, E-mail: zgming@hnu.edu.cn [College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Key Laboratory of Environmental Biology and Pollution Control, Ministry of Education, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Cui, Zhi-Hui; Liu, Ke; Deng, Can-Hui; Niu, Qiu-Ya; Deng, Jiu-Hua [College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Key Laboratory of Environmental Biology and Pollution Control, Ministry of Education, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Huan, Shuang-Yan [State Key Laboratory for Chemo/Biosensing and Chemometrics, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China)

    2015-03-01

    Highlights: • GO-sand was prepared by coating GO on the surface of sand. • Pb(II) and MB were efficiently removed by GO-sand filter in column. • The removal of MB was enhanced with the presence of Pb(II). • GO-sand is low-cost and convenient for its application as packed bed filter. - Abstract: The mixture of several effluents, caused by the improper handling and management of effluents, generated multi-component wastewater containing both metals and dyes, leading to the complicated treatment process. In this study, a continuous adsorption of Pb(II) and methylene blue (MB) has been studied in single and binary solutions by using graphite oxide coated sand (GO-sand) as an adsorbent in a fixed-bed column. GO-sand was analyzed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy before and after analyte adsorption. Compared with sand filter, adsorption quantity and capacity for Pb(II) and MB by GO-sand filter were greatly increased. In Pb(II) and MB single solutions, the experimental parameters were investigated in detail including initial concentration, flow rate, bed depth and pH. Exhaustion time decreased with increasing initial concentration and flow rate, and increased with increasing bed depth and pH. In the Pb(II)-MB binary solution, exhaustion time significantly decreased for Pb(II) adsorption, but increased for MB adsorption. The reason was explained that the more favorable adsorption for MB onto the surface of GO-sand than that for Pb(II), which was derived from π–π interaction between MB and GO on sand surface in packed filter. The Yoon–Nelson model was applied at different concentration of Pb(II) and MB to predict the breakthrough curves. The experimental data were well fit with the model indicating that it was suitable for this column design.

  8. Biomass gasification in fixed bed type down draft: theoretical and experimental aspects; Gasificacao de biomassa em leito fixo tipo concorrente: aspectos teoricos e experimentais

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez, Juan Daniel; Andrade, Rubenildo Vieira; Lora, Electo Eduardo Silva [Universidade Federal de Itajuba (UNIFEI), MG (Brazil). Inst. de Engenharia Mecanica. Nucleo de Excelencia em Geracao Termeletrica e Distribuida

    2008-07-01

    Actually are recognizing the advantages of biomass in reducing dependence on fossil fuels and significant reduction in emissions of greenhouse effect gases such as Co2. Also are known the different conversion of biomass routes for their use or exploitation, such as thermochemical process (gasification, pyrolysis and combustion), the biological process (fermentation and transesterification) and the physical process (densification, reducing grain and mechanical pressing). In this sense, the gasification is regarded as the most promising mechanism to obtain a homogeneous gaseous fuel with sufficient quality in the small scale distributed generation. This work presents some aspects of biomass gasification in fixed bed, as well as some preliminary results in the evaluation and operation of fixed bed down draft gasifier with double stage air supply of the NEST, identifying the adequate air supply quantity (equivalence ratio in the range of 0,35 to 0,45) for obtaining a fuel gas with lower heating value around 4 MJ/N m3. (author)

  9. Mussel-inspired Functionalization of Cotton for Nano-catalyst Support and Its Application in a Fixed-bed System with High Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xi, Jiangbo; Xiao, Junwu; Xiao, Fei; Jin, Yunxia; Dong, Yue; Jing, Feng; Wang, Shuai

    2016-01-01

    Inspired by the composition of adhesive and reductive proteins secreted by marine mussels, polydopamine (PDA) was used to coat cotton microfiber (CMF), and then acted as reducing agent for the growth of Pd nanoparticles on PDA coated CMF (PDA@CMF) composites. The resultant CMF@PDA/Pd composites were then packed in a column for the further use in fixed-bed system. For the catalysis of the reduction of 4-nitrophenol, the flow rate of the 4-aminophenol solution (0.5 mM) was as high as 60 mL/min. The obtained fixed-bed system even exhibited superior performance to conventional batch reaction process because it greatly facilitated the efficiency of the catalytic fibers. Consequently, its turnover frequency (TOF) was up to 1.587 min−1, while the TOF in the conventional batch reaction was 0.643 min−1. The catalytic fibers also showed good recyclability, which can be recycled for nine successive cycles without a loss of activity. Furthermore, the catalytic system based on CMF@PDA/Pd can also be applied for Suzuki coupling reaction with the iodobenzene conversion up to 96.7%. The strategy to prepare CMF@PDA/Pd catalytic fixed bed was simple, economical and scalable, which can also be applied for coating different microfibers and loading other noble metal nanoparticles, was amenable for automated industrial processes. PMID:26902657

  10. Proposed Advanced Reactor Adaptation of the Standard Review Plan NUREG-0800 Chapter 4 (Reactor) for Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactors and Modular High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belles, Randy [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Poore, III, Willis P. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Brown, Nicholas R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Flanagan, George F. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Holbrook, Mark [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Moe, Wayne [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Sofu, Tanju [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2017-03-01

    This report proposes adaptation of the previous regulatory gap analysis in Chapter 4 (Reactor) of NUREG 0800, Standard Review Plan (SRP) for the Review of Safety Analysis Reports for Nuclear Power Plants: LWR [Light Water Reactor] Edition. The proposed adaptation would result in a Chapter 4 review plan applicable to certain advanced reactors. This report addresses two technologies: the sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR) and the modular high temperature gas-cooled reactor (mHTGR). SRP Chapter 4, which addresses reactor components, was selected for adaptation because of the possible significant differences in advanced non-light water reactor (non-LWR) technologies compared with the current LWR-based description in Chapter 4. SFR and mHTGR technologies were chosen for this gap analysis because of their diverse designs and the availability of significant historical design detail.

  11. Systems and methods for enhancing isolation of high-temperature reactor containments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peterson, Per F.

    2017-09-26

    A high-temperature containment-isolation system for transferring heat from a nuclear reactor containment to a high-pressure heat exchanger is presented. The system uses a high-temperature, low-volatility liquid coolant such as a molten salt or a liquid metal, where the coolant flow path provides liquid free surfaces a short distance from the containment penetrations for the reactor hot-leg and the cold-leg, where these liquid free surfaces have a cover gas maintained at a nearly constant pressure and thus prevent high-pressures from being transmitted into the reactor containment, and where the reactor vessel is suspended within a reactor cavity with a plurality of refractory insulator blocks disposed between an actively cooled inner cavity liner and the reactor vessel.

  12. Cow bones char as a green sorbent for fluorides removal from aqueous solutions: batch and fixed-bed studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nigri, Elbert M; Cechinel, Maria Alice P; Mayer, Diego A; Mazur, Luciana P; Loureiro, José M; Rocha, Sônia D F; Vilar, Vítor J P

    2017-01-01

    Cow bone char was investigated as sorbent for the defluoridation of aqueous solutions. The cow bone char was characterized in terms of its morphology, chemical composition, and functional groups present on the bone char surface using different analytical techniques: SEM, EDS, N2-BET method, and FTIR. Batch equilibrium studies were performed for the bone chars prepared using different procedures. The highest sorption capacities for fluoride were obtained for the acid washed (q = 6.2 ± 0.5 mg/g) and Al-doped (q = 6.4 ± 0.3 mg/g) bone chars. Langmuir and Freundlich models fitted well the equilibrium sorption data. Fluoride removal rate in batch system is fast in the first 5 h, decreasing after this time until achieving equilibrium due to pore diffusion. The presence of carbonate and bicarbonate ions in the aqueous solution contributes to a decrease of the fluoride sorption capacity of the bone char by 79 and 31 %, respectively. Regeneration of the F-loaded bone char using 0.5 M NaOH solution leads to a sorption capacity for fluoride of 3.1 mg/g in the second loading cycle. Fluoride breakthrough curve obtained in a fixed-bed column presents an asymmetrical S-shaped form, with a slow approach of C/C 0 → 1.0 due to pore diffusion phenomena. Considering the guideline value for drinking water of 1.5 mg F(-)/L, as recommended by World Health Organization, the service cycle for fluoride removal was of 71.0 h ([F(-)]feed ∼ 9 mg/L; flow rate = 1 mL/min; m sorbent = 12.6 g). A mass transfer model considering the pore diffusion was able to satisfactorily describe the experimental data obtained in batch and continuous systems.

  13. High Temperature Gas-Cooled Test Reactor Point Design: Summary Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sterbentz, James William [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Bayless, Paul David [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Nelson, Lee Orville [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Gougar, Hans David [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Strydom, Gerhard [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-01-01

    A point design has been developed for a 200-MW high-temperature gas-cooled test reactor. The point design concept uses standard prismatic blocks and 15.5% enriched uranium oxycarbide fuel. Reactor physics and thermal-hydraulics simulations have been performed to characterize the capabilities of the design. In addition to the technical data, overviews are provided on the technology readiness level, licensing approach, and costs of the test reactor point design.

  14. High Temperature Gas-Cooled Test Reactor Point Design: Summary Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sterbentz, James William [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Bayless, Paul David [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Nelson, Lee Orville [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Gougar, Hans David [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Kinsey, J. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Strydom, Gerhard [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-03-01

    A point design has been developed for a 200-MW high-temperature gas-cooled test reactor. The point design concept uses standard prismatic blocks and 15.5% enriched uranium oxycarbide fuel. Reactor physics and thermal-hydraulics simulations have been performed to characterize the capabilities of the design. In addition to the technical data, overviews are provided on the technology readiness level, licensing approach, and costs of the test reactor point design.

  15. Co-pyrolysis of Chinese lignite and biomass in a vacuum reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiao; Yuan, Chengyong; Xu, Jiao; Zhang, Weijiang

    2014-12-01

    A vacuum fixed bed reactor was applied to pyrolyze lignite, biomass (rice husk) and their blend with high temperature (900 °C) and low heating rate (10 °C/min). Pyrolytic products were kept in the vacuum reactor during the whole pyrolysis process, guaranteeing a long contact time (more than 2 h) for their interactions. Remarkable synergetic effects were observed. Addition of biomass obviously influenced the tar and char yields, gas volume yield, gas composition, char structure and tar composition during co-pyrolysis. It was highly possible that char gasification, gaseous phase interactions, and secondary tar cracking were facilitated when lignite and biomass were co-pyrolyzed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) Deep Burn Core and Fuel Analysis -- Complete Design Selection for the Pebble Bed Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    B. Boer; A. M. Ougouag

    2010-09-01

    The Deep-Burn (DB) concept focuses on the destruction of transuranic nuclides from used light water reactor fuel. These transuranic nuclides are incorporated into TRISO coated fuel particles and used in gas-cooled reactors with the aim of a fractional fuel burnup of 60 to 70% in fissions per initial metal atom (FIMA). This high performance is expected through the use of multiple recirculation passes of the fuel in pebble form without any physical or chemical changes between passes. In particular, the concept does not call for reprocessing of the fuel between passes. In principle, the DB pebble bed concept employs the same reactor designs as the presently envisioned low-enriched uranium core designs, such as the 400 MWth Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (PBMR-400). Although it has been shown in the previous Fiscal Year (2009) that a PuO2 fueled pebble bed reactor concept is viable, achieving a high fuel burnup, while remaining within safety-imposed prescribed operational limits for fuel temperature, power peaking and temperature reactivity feedback coefficients for the entire temperature range, is challenging. The presence of the isotopes 239-Pu, 240-Pu and 241-Pu that have resonances in the thermal energy range significantly modifies the neutron thermal energy spectrum as compared to a ”standard,” UO2-fueled core. Therefore, the DB pebble bed core exhibits a relatively hard neutron energy spectrum. However, regions within the pebble bed that are near the graphite reflectors experience a locally softer spectrum. This can lead to power and temperature peaking in these regions. Furthermore, a shift of the thermal energy spectrum with increasing temperature can lead to increased absorption in the resonances of the fissile Pu isotopes. This can lead to a positive temperature reactivity coefficient for the graphite moderator under certain operating conditions. The effort of this task in FY 2010 has focused on the optimization of the core to maximize the pebble discharge

  17. Neutron analysis of the fuel of high temperature nuclear reactors; Analisis neutronico del combustible de reactores nucleares de alta temperatura

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bastida O, G. E.; Francois L, J. L., E-mail: gbo729@yahoo.com.mx [UNAM, Facultad de Ingenieria, Departamento de Sistemas Energeticos, Paseo Cuauhnahuac 8532, 62550 Jiutepec, Morelos (Mexico)

    2014-10-15

    In this work a neutron analysis of the fuel of some high temperature nuclear reactors is presented, studying its main features, besides some alternatives of compound fuel by uranium and plutonium, and of coolant: sodium and helium. For this study was necessary the use of a code able to carry out a reliable calculation of the main parameters of the fuel. The use of the Monte Carlo method was convenient to simulate the neutrons transport in the reactor core, which is the base of the Serpent code, with which the calculations will be made for the analysis. (Author)

  18. Fuel particles for high temperature reactors; Combustibles a particules pour reacteurs a haute temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pheip, M. [CEA Cadarache (DEN/CAD/DEC/SESC/LIPA), 13 - Saint Paul lez Durance (France). Dept. d' Etudes des Combustibles; Masson, M. [CEA Valrho, Dept. Radiochimie et Procedes, 30 (France); Perrais, Ch. [CEA Cadarache (DEN/DEC/SPUA), 13 - Saint Paul lez Durance (France). Dept. d' Etudes des Combustibles; Pelletier, M. [CEA Cadarache (DEN/DEC/SESC), 13 - Saint Paul lez Durance (France). Dept. d' Etudes des Combustibles

    2007-07-15

    The concept of fuel particles with a millimeter size was born at the end of the 1950's and is the reference concept of high or very high temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTR/VHTR). The specificity of this fuel concerns its fine divided structure, its all-ceramic composition and its micro-confining properties with respect to fission products. These 3 properties when combined together allow the access to high temperatures and to a high level of safety. This article presents: 1 - the general properties of particle fuels; 2 - the fabrication and control of fuel elements: nuclei elaboration processes, vapor deposition coating of nuclei, shaping of fuel elements, quality control of fabrication; 3 - the fuel particles behaviour under irradiation: mechanical and thermal behaviour, behaviour and diffusion of fission products, ruining mode; 4 - the reprocessing of particle fuels: stakes and options, direct storage, separation of constituents, processing of carbonous wastes; 5 - conclusion. (J.S.)

  19. Spectral emissivity of candidate alloys for very high temperature reactors in high temperature air environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao, G., E-mail: gcao@wisc.edu; Weber, S.J.; Martin, S.O.; Sridharan, K.; Anderson, M.H.; Allen, T.R.

    2013-10-15

    Emissivity measurements for candidate alloys for very high temperature reactors were carried out in a custom-built experimental facility, capable of both efficient and reliable measurements of spectral emissivities of multiple samples at high temperatures. The alloys studied include 304 and 316 austenitic stainless steels, Alloy 617, and SA508 ferritic steel. The oxidation of alloys plays an important role in dictating emissivity values. The higher chromium content of 304 and 316 austenitic stainless steels, and Alloy 617 results in an oxide layer only of sub-micron thickness even at 700 °C and consequently the emissivity of these alloys remains low. In contrast, the low alloy SA508 ferritic steel which contains no chromium develops a thicker oxide layer, and consequently exhibits higher emissivity values.

  20. Spectral emissivity of candidate alloys for very high temperature reactors in high temperature air environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, G.; Weber, S. J.; Martin, S. O.; Sridharan, K.; Anderson, M. H.; Allen, T. R.

    2013-10-01

    Emissivity measurements for candidate alloys for very high temperature reactors were carried out in a custom-built experimental facility, capable of both efficient and reliable measurements of spectral emissivities of multiple samples at high temperatures. The alloys studied include 304 and 316 austenitic stainless steels, Alloy 617, and SA508 ferritic steel. The oxidation of alloys plays an important role in dictating emissivity values. The higher chromium content of 304 and 316 austenitic stainless steels, and Alloy 617 results in an oxide layer only of sub-micron thickness even at 700 °C and consequently the emissivity of these alloys remains low. In contrast, the low alloy SA508 ferritic steel which contains no chromium develops a thicker oxide layer, and consequently exhibits higher emissivity values.

  1. STATUS OF TRISO FUEL IRRADIATIONS IN THE ADVANCED TEST REACTOR SUPPORTING HIGH-TEMPERATURE GAS-COOLED REACTOR DESIGNS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davenport, Michael; Petti, D. A.; Palmer, Joe

    2016-11-01

    The United States Department of Energy’s Advanced Reactor Technologies (ART) Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program is irradiating up to seven low enriched uranium (LEU) tri-isotopic (TRISO) particle fuel (in compact form) experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). These irradiations and fuel development are being accomplished to support development of the next generation reactors in the United States. The experiments will be irradiated over the next several years to demonstrate and qualify new TRISO coated particle fuel for use in high temperature gas reactors. The goals of the experiments are to provide irradiation performance data to support fuel process development, to qualify fuel for normal operating conditions, to support development and validation of fuel performance and fission product transport models and codes, and to provide irradiated fuel and materials for post irradiation examination (PIE) and safety testing. The experiments, which will each consist of several independent capsules, will be irradiated in an inert sweep gas atmosphere with individual on-line temperature monitoring and control of each capsule. The sweep gas will also have on-line fission product monitoring on its effluent to track performance of the fuel in each individual capsule during irradiation. The first experiment (designated AGR-1) started irradiation in December 2006 and was completed in November 2009. The second experiment (AGR-2) started irradiation in June 2010 and completed in October 2013. The third and fourth experiments have been combined into a single experiment designated (AGR-3/4), which started its irradiation in December 2011 and completed in April 2014. Since the purpose of this experiment was to provide data on fission product migration and retention in the NGNP reactor, the design of this experiment was significantly different from the first two experiments, though the control

  2. Coupling of Modular High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor with Supercritical Rankine Cycle

    OpenAIRE

    Shutang Zhu; Ying Tang; Kun Xiao; Zuoyi Zhang

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents investigations on the possible combination of modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (MHTGR) technology with the supercritical (SC) steam turbine technology and the prospective deployments of the MHTGR SC power plant. Energy conversion efficiency of steam turbine cycle can be improved by increasing the main steam pressure and temperature. Investigations on SC water reactor (SCWR) reveal that the development of SCWR power plants still needs further research and develop...

  3. Concepts and design of chemical reactors. Volume 3 in the chemical engineering: Concepts and reviews series

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whitaker, S.; Cassano, A.E.

    1986-01-01

    This work provides researchers and practitioners with information regarding concepts in chemical reactor design. The text presents the fundamentals of multiphase transport phenomena with heterogeneous reactions and the efficient computational determination of effectiveness factors. The most recent developments, applications, and current design strategies for each of the classic types of chemical reactors: fixed bed, fluidized bed, slurry, trickle bed, and photoreactors are reviewed.

  4. Thermal analysis of heat and power plant with high temperature reactor and intermediate steam cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fic Adam

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Thermal analysis of a heat and power plant with a high temperature gas cooled nuclear reactor is presented. The main aim of the considered system is to supply a technological process with the heat at suitably high temperature level. The considered unit is also used to produce electricity. The high temperature helium cooled nuclear reactor is the primary heat source in the system, which consists of: the reactor cooling cycle, the steam cycle and the gas heat pump cycle. Helium used as a carrier in the first cycle (classic Brayton cycle, which includes the reactor, delivers heat in a steam generator to produce superheated steam with required parameters of the intermediate cycle. The intermediate cycle is provided to transport energy from the reactor installation to the process installation requiring a high temperature heat. The distance between reactor and the process installation is assumed short and negligable, or alternatively equal to 1 km in the analysis. The system is also equipped with a high temperature argon heat pump to obtain the temperature level of a heat carrier required by a high temperature process. Thus, the steam of the intermediate cycle supplies a lower heat exchanger of the heat pump, a process heat exchanger at the medium temperature level and a classical steam turbine system (Rankine cycle. The main purpose of the research was to evaluate the effectiveness of the system considered and to assess whether such a three cycle cogeneration system is reasonable. Multivariant calculations have been carried out employing the developed mathematical model. The results have been presented in a form of the energy efficiency and exergy efficiency of the system as a function of the temperature drop in the high temperature process heat exchanger and the reactor pressure.

  5. Thermal analysis of heat and power plant with high temperature reactor and intermediate steam cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fic, Adam; Składzień, Jan; Gabriel, Michał

    2015-03-01

    Thermal analysis of a heat and power plant with a high temperature gas cooled nuclear reactor is presented. The main aim of the considered system is to supply a technological process with the heat at suitably high temperature level. The considered unit is also used to produce electricity. The high temperature helium cooled nuclear reactor is the primary heat source in the system, which consists of: the reactor cooling cycle, the steam cycle and the gas heat pump cycle. Helium used as a carrier in the first cycle (classic Brayton cycle), which includes the reactor, delivers heat in a steam generator to produce superheated steam with required parameters of the intermediate cycle. The intermediate cycle is provided to transport energy from the reactor installation to the process installation requiring a high temperature heat. The distance between reactor and the process installation is assumed short and negligable, or alternatively equal to 1 km in the analysis. The system is also equipped with a high temperature argon heat pump to obtain the temperature level of a heat carrier required by a high temperature process. Thus, the steam of the intermediate cycle supplies a lower heat exchanger of the heat pump, a process heat exchanger at the medium temperature level and a classical steam turbine system (Rankine cycle). The main purpose of the research was to evaluate the effectiveness of the system considered and to assess whether such a three cycle cogeneration system is reasonable. Multivariant calculations have been carried out employing the developed mathematical model. The results have been presented in a form of the energy efficiency and exergy efficiency of the system as a function of the temperature drop in the high temperature process heat exchanger and the reactor pressure.

  6. An Evaluation Report on the High Temperature Design of the KALIMER-600 Reactor Structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Chang Gyu; Lee, Jae Han

    2007-03-15

    This report is on the validity evaluation of high temperature structural design for the reactor structures and piping of the pool-type Liquid Metal Reactor, KALIMER-600 subjected to the high temperature thermal load condition. The structural concept of the Upper Internal Structure located above the core is analyzed and the adequate UIS conceptual design for KALIMER-600 is proposed. Also, the high temperature structural integrity of the thermal liner which is to protect the UIS bottom plate from the high frequency thermal fatigue damage was evaluated by the thermal stripping analysis. The high temperature structural design of the reactor internal structure by considering the reactor startup-shutdown cycle was carried out and the structural integrity of it for a normal operating condition as well as the transient condition of the primary pump trip accident was confirmed. Additionally the structure design of the reactor internal structural was changed to prevent the non-uniform deformation of the primary pump which is induced by the thermal expansion difference between the reactor head and the baffle plate. The arrangement of the IHTS piping system which is a part of the reactor system is carried out and the structural integrity and the accumulated deformation by considering the reactor startup-shutdown cycle of a normal operating condition were evaluated. The structural integrity and the accumulated deformation of the PDRC hot leg piping by considering the PDRC operating condition were evaluated. The validity of KALIMER-600 high temperature structural design is confirmed through this study, and it is clearly found that the methodology research to evaluate the structural integrity considering the reactor life time of 60 years ensured is necessary.

  7. Temperature uniformity mapping in a high pressure high temperature reactor using a temperature sensitive indicator

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grauwet, T.; Plancken, van der I.; Vervoort, L.; Matser, A.M.; Hendrickx, M.; Loey, van A.

    2011-01-01

    Recently, the first prototype ovomucoid-based pressure–temperature–time indicator (pTTI) for high pressure high temperature (HPHT) processing was described. However, for temperature uniformity mapping of high pressure (HP) vessels under HPHT sterilization conditions, this prototype needs to be

  8. Production test PTA-002, increased graphite temperature limit -- B, C and D Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russell, A.

    1965-12-17

    The fundamental objective of the graphite temperature limit is to prevent excessive oxidation of the graphite moderator blocks with carbon dioxide and water vapor in the reactor atmosphere. Laboratory tests have shown that 10% uniform oxidation of graphite results in a loss in strength of approximately 50%. Production Test IP-725 was conducted at F Reactor for a period of six months at graphite temperatures approximately 50 and 100 C higher than the present graphite temperature limit of 650 C. The results from the F Reactor test suggest that an increase in the graphite temperature limit from 650 C to 700 C is technically feasible from the standpoint of oxidation of the graphite moderator with CO{sub 2}. Any significant additional increase was shown to lead to excessively high oxidation rates and is therefore not considered feasible. The objective of this test, therefore, is to extend the higher temperature investigations to B, C, and D Reactors. For the duration of this test, the graphite temperature limit will be increased from 650 C and 700 C, corresponding to an increase in the graphite stringer temperature limit from 735 C to 790 C. The test is expected to last for approximately six months but may be terminated early on any or all the reactors.

  9. Considerations of Alloy N for Fluoride Salt-Cooled High-Temperature Reactor Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ren, Weiju [ORNL; Muralidharan, Govindarajan [ORNL; Wilson, Dane F [ORNL; Holcomb, David Eugene [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    Fluoride Salt-Cooled High-Temperature Reactors (FHRs) are a promising new class of thermal-spectrum nuclear reactors. The reactor structural materials must possess high-temperature strength and chemical compatibility with the liquid fluoride salt as well as with a power cycle fluid such as supercritical water while remaining resistant to residual air within the containment. Alloy N was developed for use with liquid fluoride salts and it possesses adequate strength and chemical compatibility up to about 700 C. A distinctive property of FHRs is that their maximum allowable coolant temperature is restricted by their structural alloy maximum service temperature. As the reactor thermal efficiency directly increases with the maximum coolant temperature, higher temperature resistant alloys are strongly desired. This paper reviews the current status of Alloy N and its relevance to FHRs including its design principles, development history, high temperature strength, environmental resistance, metallurgical stability, component manufacturability, ASME codification status, and reactor service requirements. The review will identify issues and provide guidance for improving the alloy properties or implementing engineering solutions.

  10. Measurement of cryogenic moderator temperature effects in a small heterogeneous thermal reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoovler, G.S.; Ball, R.M.; Lewis, R.H.

    1994-12-31

    Past papers have described a critical experiment (CX) built at Sandia National Laboratories to investigate the neutronic behavior of the particle-bed reactor (PBK). Among the experiments previously reported were tests to measure the reactivity effect of uniform temperature variations between 20 and 80{degree}C. This paper describes additional experiments designed to examine the effects of cryogenic moderator temperatures on core reactivity and neutron spectrum. The general importance of temperature effects to the design of the PBR have been previously discussed. A unique feature of the PBR is that the moderator may be at cryogenic temperatures during reactor startup. Because temperature effects in small, heterogeneous thermal reactors can be significant and because we found no integral measurements with cryogenic moderators in such systems, an experiment with a cryogenic moderator was designed and performed in the CX as an extension to the isothermal measurements previously reported.

  11. High-temperature nuclear reactor power plant cycle for hydrogen and electricity production – numerical analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dudek Michał

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available High temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactor (called HTR or HTGR for both electricity generation and hydrogen production is analysed. The HTR reactor because of the relatively high temperature of coolant could be combined with a steam or gas turbine, as well as with the system for heat delivery for high-temperature hydrogen production. However, the current development of HTR’s allows us to consider achievable working temperature up to 750°C. Due to this fact, industrial-scale hydrogen production using copper-chlorine (Cu-Cl thermochemical cycle is considered and compared with high-temperature electrolysis. Presented calculations show and confirm the potential of HTR’s as a future solution for hydrogen production without CO2 emission. Furthermore, integration of a hightemperature nuclear reactor with a combined cycle for electricity and hydrogen production may reach very high efficiency and could possibly lead to a significant decrease of hydrogen production costs.

  12. Polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell grade hydrogen production by methanol steam reforming: A comparative multiple reactor modeling study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katiyar, Nisha; Kumar, Shashi; Kumar, Surendra

    2013-12-01

    Analysis of a fuel processor based on methanol steam reforming has been carried out to produce fuel cell grade H2. Six reactor configurations namely FBR1 (fixed bed reactor), MR1 (H2 selective membrane reactor with one reaction tube), MR2 (H2 selective membrane reactor with two reaction tubes), FBR2 (FBR1 + preferential CO oxidation (PROX) reactor), MR3 (MR1 + PROX), and MR4 (MR2 + PROX) are evaluated by simulation to identify the suitable processing scheme. The yield of H2 is significantly affected by H2 selective membrane, residence time, temperature, and pressure conditions at complete methanol conversion. The enhancement in residence time in MR2 by using two identical reaction tubes provides H2 yield of 2.96 with 91.25 mol% recovery at steam/methanol ratio of 1.5, pressure of 2 bar and 560 K temperature. The exit retentate gases from MR2 are further treated in PROX reactor of MR4 to reduce CO concentration to 4.1 ppm to ensure the safe discharge to the environment. The risk of carbon deposition on reforming catalyst is highly reduced in MR4, and MR4 reactor configuration generates 7.4 NL min-1 of CO free H2 from 0.12 mol min-1 of methanol which can provide 470 W PEMFC feedstock requirement. Hence, process scheme in MR4 provides a compact and innovative fuel cell grade H2 generating unit.

  13. Development of ceramic membrane reactors for high temperature gas cleanup. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberts, D.L.; Abraham, I.C.; Blum, Y.; Gottschlich, D.E.; Hirschon, A.; Way, J.D.; Collins, J.

    1993-06-01

    The objective of this project was to develop high temperature, high pressure catalytic ceramic membrane reactors and to demonstrate the feasibility of using these membrane reactors to control gaseous contaminants (hydrogen sulfide and ammonia) in integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) systems. Our strategy was to first develop catalysts and membranes suitable for the IGCC application and then combine these two components as a complete membrane reactor system. We also developed a computer model of the membrane reactor and used it, along with experimental data, to perform an economic analysis of the IGCC application. Our results have demonstrated the concept of using a membrane reactor to remove trace contaminants from an IGCC process. Experiments showed that NH{sub 3} decomposition efficiencies of 95% can be achieved. Our economic evaluation predicts ammonia decomposition costs of less than 1% of the total cost of electricity; improved membranes would give even higher conversions and lower costs.

  14. Beneficial synergetic effect on gas production during co-pyrolysis of sewage sludge and biomass in a vacuum reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Weijiang; Yuan, Chengyong; Xu, Jiao; Yang, Xiao

    2015-05-01

    A vacuum fixed bed reactor was used to pyrolyze sewage sludge, biomass (rice husk) and their blend under high temperature (900°C). Pyrolytic products were kept in the vacuum reactor during the whole pyrolysis process, guaranteeing a long contact time (more than 2h) for their interactions. Remarkable synergetic effect on gas production was observed. Gas yield of blend fuel was evidently higher than that of both parent fuels. The syngas (CO and H2) content and gas lower heating value (LHV) were obviously improved as well. It was highly possible that sewage sludge provided more CO2 and H2O during co-pyrolysis, promoting intense CO2-char and H2O-char gasification, which benefited the increase of gas yield and lower heating value. The beneficial synergetic effect, as a result, made this method a feasible one for gas production. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  15. Simulation of a reactor for the partial oxidation of o-xylene to phthalic anhydride packed with ceramic foam monoliths

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reitzmann, A.; Pias Peleteiro, P.M.; Bareiss, A.; Kraushaar-Czarnetzki, B. [Institute of Chemical Process Engineering, University of Karlsruhe (T.H.) (Germany)

    2005-07-01

    In order to evaluate the potential of ceramic foams as catalyst carriers, the performance of reactors for the partial oxidation of o-xylene have been simulated using pseudo homogeneous models. Here only the results were presented applying a one-dimensional model, though strongly exothermic processes, like the PA process, should be simulated with two-dimensional models due to radial temperature gradients. Regarding that only a few certain and suitable heat transfer data are available for foams, the one dimensional models are sufficient for the present to show general trends. The results achieved with fixed beds of catalyst particles were used as reference for different case studies which were performed with reactors packed with ceramics foams. (orig.)

  16. Batch and fixed bed adsorption of levofloxacin on granular activated carbon from date (Phoenix dactylifera L.) stones by KOH chemical activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darweesh, Teeba M; Ahmed, Muthanna J

    2017-03-01

    Granular activated carbon (KAC) was prepared from abundant Phoenix dactylifera L. stones by microwave- assisted KOH activation. The characteristics of KAC were tested by pore analyses, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Fourier transforms infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The adsorption behavior of levofloxacin (LEV) antibiotic on KAC with surface area of 817m2/g and pore volume of 0.638cm3/g were analyzed using batch and fixed bed systems. The equilibrium data collected by batch experiments were well fitted with Langmuir compared to Freundlich and Temkin isotherms. The effect of flow rate (0.5-1.5ml/min), bed height (15-25cm), and initial LEV concentration (75-225mg/l) on the behavior of breakthrough curves was explained. The fixed bed analysis showed the better correlation of breakthrough data by both Thomas and Yoon-Nelson models. High LEV adsorption capacity of 100.3mg/g was reported on KAC, thus being an efficient adsorbent for antibiotic pollutants to protect ecological systems. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Joining and fabrication techniques for high temperature structures including the first wall in fusion reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ho Jin; Lee, B. S.; Kim, K. B

    2003-09-01

    The materials for PFC's (Plasma Facing Components) in a fusion reactor are severely irradiated with fusion products in facing the high temperature plasma during the operation. The refractory materials can be maintained their excellent properties in severe operating condition by lowering surface temperature by bonding them to the high thermal conducting materials of heat sink. Hence, the joining and bonding techniques between dissimilar materials is considered to be important in case of the fusion reactor or nuclear reactor which is operated at high temperature. The first wall in the fusion reactor is heated to approximately 1000 .deg. C and irradiated severely by the plasma. In ITER, beryllium is expected as the primary armour candidate for the PFC's; other candidates including W, Mo, SiC, B4C, C/C and Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}. Since the heat affected zones in the PFC's processed by conventional welding are reported to have embrittlement and degradation in the sever operation condition, both brazing and diffusion bonding are being considered as prime candidates for the joining technique. In this report, both the materials including ceramics and the fabrication techniques including joining technique between dissimilar materials for PFC's are described. The described joining technique between the refractory materials and the dissimilar materials may be applicable for the fusion reactor and Generation-4 future nuclear reactor which are operated at high temperature and high irradiation.

  18. Extension of the reactor dynamics code MGT-3D for pebblebed and blocktype high-temperature-reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, Dunfu

    2015-07-01

    The High Temperature Gas cooled Reactor (HTGR) is an improved, gas cooled nuclear reactor. It was chosen as one of the candidates of generation IV nuclear plants [1]. The reactor can be shut down automatically because of the negative reactivity feedback due to the temperature's increasing in designed accidents. It is graphite moderated and Helium cooled. The residual heat can be transferred out of the reactor core by inactive ways as conduction, convection, and thermal radiation during the accident. In such a way, a fuel temperature does not go beyond a limit at which major fission product release begins. In this thesis, the coupled neutronics and fluid mechanics code MGT-3D used for the steady state and time-dependent simulation of HTGRs, is enhanced and validated [2]. The fluid mechanics part is validated by SANA experiments in steady state cases as well as transient cases. The fuel temperature calculation is optimized by solving the heat conduction equation of the coated particles. It is applied in the steady state and transient simulation of PBMR, and the results are compared to the simulation with the old overheating model. New approaches to calculate the temperature profile of the fuel element of block-type HTGRs, and the calculation of the homogeneous conductivity of composite materials are introduced. With these new developments, MGT-3D is able to simulate block-type HTGRs as well. This extended MGT-3D is used to simulate a cuboid ceramic block heating experiment in the NACOK-II facility. The extended MGT-3D is also applied to LOFC and DLOFC simulation of GT-MHR. It is a fluid mechanics calculation with a given heat source. This calculation result of MGT-3D is verified with the calculation results of other codes. The design of the Japanese HTTR is introduced. The deterministic simulation of the LOFC experiment of HTTR is conducted with the Monte-Carlo code Serpent and MGT-3D, which is the LOFC Project organized by OECD/NEA [3]. With Serpent the burnup

  19. Analysis of Air Temperatures around Reactor Vessel in EU-APR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Won Seok; Lee, Keun Sung; Hwang, Do Hyun [KHNP CRI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    EU-APR, modified and improved from its original design of APR1400, has been developed to comply with European Utility Requirements (EUR) and nuclear design requirements of the European countries. In EU-APR, the removable concrete shielding blocks is newly adopted to reduce the radioactive dose rate in order to allow personnel access to the containment building during power operation. During plants startup, hot shutdown and power operation, the reactor cavity HVAC system maintains temperature and humidity for the in-core instrument (ICI) chase, ex-core detector spaces, reactor cavity and the hot and cold leg penetration opening. CFD analysis has been performed in order to check if the air temperature in the reactor cavity and concrete in EU-APR are exceeded the temperature limits. Six calculations for EU-APR have been carried out with different opening areas of the relief damper plate and air flow rates sucked out through six ventilation pipes. For the temperature distribution in the reactor cavity, it is found that there are the regions above a temperature of 120℉(48.9℃). However, these regions are relatively small and are observed very near the reactor vessel insulation. Therefore, these high temperature regions do not directly influence on concrete. Furthermore, the heat emission used in the current calculations already includes 20% margin including the conservative margins used for the metal reflective heat losses and the margins used to estimate Gamma and neutron heat into the primary wall. Totally, 10% margin is included.

  20. Experimental estimation of moderator temperature coefficient of reactivity of the IPEN/MB-01 research reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Rubens C. da; Bitelli, Ulysses D.; Mura, Luiz Ernesto C., E-mail: rubensrcs@usp.br, E-mail: ubitelli@ipen.br, E-mail: credidiomura@gmail.com [Universidade de Sao Paulo (PNV/POLI/USP), SP (Brazil). Arquitetura Naval e Departamento de Engenharia Oceanica; Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    The aim of this article is to present the procedure for the experimental estimation of the Moderator Temperature Coefficient of Reactivity of the IPEN/MB-01 Research Reactor, a parameter that has an important role in the physics and the control operations of any reactor facility. At the experiment, the IPEN/MB-01 reactor went critical at the power of 1W (1% of its total power), and whose core configuration was 28 x 26 rectangular array of UO{sub 2} fuel rods, inside a light water (moderator) tank. In addition, there was a heavy water (D{sub 2}O) reflector installed in the West side of the core to obtain an adequate neutron reflection along the experiment. The moderator temperature was increased in steps of 4 °C, and the measurement of the mean moderator temperature was acquired using twelve calibrated thermocouples, placed around the reactor core. As a result, the mean value of -4.81 pcm/°C was obtained for such coefficient. The curves of ρ(T) (Reactivity x Temperature) and α{sup M}{sub T}(T)(Moderator Temperature Coefficient of Reactivity x Temperature) were developed using data from an experimental measurement of the integral reactivity curves through the Stable Period and Inverse Kinetics Methods, that was carried out at the reactor with the same core configuration. Such curves were compared and showed a very similar behavior between them. (author)

  1. Design, scale-up, Six Sigma in processing different feedstocks in a fixed bed downdraft biomass gasifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boravelli, Sai Chandra Teja

    This thesis mainly focuses on design and process development of a downdraft biomass gasification processes. The objective is to develop a gasifier and process of gasification for a continuous steady state process. A lab scale downdraft gasifier was designed to develop the process and obtain optimum operating procedure. Sustainable and dependable sources such as biomass are potential sources of renewable energy and have a reasonable motivation to be used in developing a small scale energy production plant for countries such as Canada where wood stocks are more reliable sources than fossil fuels. This thesis addresses the process of thermal conversion of biomass gasification process in a downdraft reactor. Downdraft biomass gasifiers are relatively cheap and easy to operate because of their design. We constructed a simple biomass gasifier to study the steady state process for different sizes of the reactor. The experimental part of this investigation look at how operating conditions such as feed rate, air flow, the length of the bed, the vibration of the reactor, height and density of syngas flame in combustion flare changes for different sizes of the reactor. These experimental results also compare the trends of tar, char and syngas production for wood pellets in a steady state process. This study also includes biomass gasification process for different wood feedstocks. It compares how shape, size and moisture content of different feedstocks makes a difference in operating conditions for the gasification process. For this, Six Sigma DMAIC techniques were used to analyze and understand how each feedstock makes a significant impact on the process.

  2. High temperature ceramic membrane reactors for coal liquid upgrading

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsotsis, T.T.

    1992-01-01

    In this project we will study a novel process concept, i.e., the use of ceramic membrane reactors in upgrading of coal model compounds and coal derived liquids. In general terms, the USC research team is responsible for constructing and operating the membrane reactor apparatus and for testing various inorganic membranes for the upgrading of coal derived asphaltenes and coal model compounds. The USC effort will involve the principal investigator of this project and two graduate research assistants. The ALCOA team is responsible for the preparation of the inorganic membranes, for construction and testing of the ceramic membrane modules, and for measurement of their transport properties. The ALCOA research effort will involve Dr. Paul K. T. Liu, who is the project manager of the ALCOA research team, an engineer and a technician. UNOCAL's contribution will be limited to overall technical assistance in catalyst preparation and the operation of the laboratory upgrading membrane reactor and for analytical back-up and expertise in oil analysis and materials characterization. UNOCAL is a no-cost contractor but will be involved in all aspects of the project, as deemed appropriate.

  3. Effect of post-digestion temperature on serial CSTR biogas reactor performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boe, Kanokwan; Karakashev, Dimitar Borisov; Trably, Eric

    2009-01-01

    of 5.3 days. Three post-digestion temperatures (55 degrees C, 37 degrees C and 15 degrees C) were compared in terms of biogas production, process stability, microbial community and methanogenic activity, The results showed that the post-digesters operated at 55 degrees C, 37 degrees C and 15 degrees C...... gave extra biogas production of 11.7%, 8.4% and 1.2%, respectively. The post-digester operated at 55 degrees C had the highest biogas production and was the most stable in terms of low VFA concentrations. The specific methanogenic activity tests revealed that the main reactor and the post-digester......The effect of post-digestion temperature on a lab-scale serial continuous-flow stirred tank reactor (CSTR) system performance was investigated. The system consisted of a main reactor operated at 55 degrees C with hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 15 days followed by post-digestion reactors with HRT...

  4. Effect of temperature on selenium removal from wastewater by UASB reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dessì, Paolo; Jain, Rohan; Singh, Satyendra; Seder-Colomina, Marina; van Hullebusch, Eric D; Rene, Eldon R; Ahammad, Shaikh Ziauddin; Carucci, Alessandra; Lens, Piet N L

    2016-05-01

    The effect of temperature on selenium (Se) removal by upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactors treating selenate and nitrate containing wastewater was investigated by comparing the performance of a thermophilic (55 °C) versus a mesophilic (30 °C) UASB reactor. When only selenate (50 μM) was fed to the UASB reactors (pH 7.3; hydraulic retention time 8 h) with excess electron donor (lactate at 1.38 mM corresponding to an organic loading rate of 0.5 g COD L(-1) d(-1)), the thermophilic UASB reactor achieved a higher total Se removal efficiency (94.4 ± 2.4%) than the mesophilic UASB reactor (82.0 ± 3.8%). When 5000 μM nitrate was further added to the influent, total Se removal was again better under thermophilic (70.1 ± 6.6%) when compared to mesophilic (43.6 ± 8.8%) conditions. The higher total effluent Se concentration in the mesophilic UASB reactor was due to the higher concentrations of biogenic elemental Se nanoparticles (BioSeNPs). The shape of the BioSeNPs observed in both UASB reactors was different: nanospheres and nanorods, respectively, in the mesophilic and thermophilic UASB reactors. Microbial community analysis showed the presence of selenate respirers as well as denitrifying microorganisms. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Modular High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor Safety Basis and Approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David Petti; Jim Kinsey; Dave Alberstein

    2014-01-01

    Various international efforts are underway to assess the safety of advanced nuclear reactor designs. For example, the International Atomic Energy Agency has recently held its first Consultancy Meeting on a new cooperative research program on high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) safety. Furthermore, the Generation IV International Forum Reactor Safety Working Group has recently developed a methodology, called the Integrated Safety Assessment Methodology, for use in Generation IV advanced reactor technology development, design, and design review. A risk and safety assessment white paper is under development with respect to the Very High Temperature Reactor to pilot the Integrated Safety Assessment Methodology and to demonstrate its validity and feasibility. To support such efforts, this information paper on the modular HTGR safety basis and approach has been prepared. The paper provides a summary level introduction to HTGR history, public safety objectives, inherent and passive safety features, radionuclide release barriers, functional safety approach, and risk-informed safety approach. The information in this paper is intended to further the understanding of the modular HTGR safety approach. The paper gives those involved in the assessment of advanced reactor designs an opportunity to assess an advanced design that has already received extensive review by regulatory authorities and to judge the utility of recently proposed new methods for advanced reactor safety assessment such as the Integrated Safety Assessment Methodology.

  6. Experimental evaluation of methane dry reforming process on a membrane reactor to hydrogen production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Fabiano S.A.; Benachour, Mohand; Abreu, Cesar A.M. [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Dept. of Chemical Engineering], Email: f.aruda@yahoo.com.br

    2010-07-01

    In a fixed bed membrane reactor evaluations of methane-carbon dioxide reforming over a Ni/{gamma}- Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst were performed at 773 K, 823 K and 873 K. A to convert natural gas into syngas a fixed-bed reactor associate with a selective membrane was employed, where the operating procedures allowed to shift the chemical equilibrium of the reaction in the direction of the products of the process. Operations under hydrogen permeation, at 873 K, promoted the increase of methane conversion, circa 83%, and doubled the yield of hydrogen production, when compared with operations where no hydrogen permeation occurred. (author)

  7. High Temperature Ultrasonic Transducers for In-Service Inspection of Liquid Metal Fast Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griffin, Jeffrey W.; Posakony, Gerald J.; Harris, Robert V.; Baldwin, David L.; Jones, Anthony M.; Bond, Leonard J.

    2011-12-31

    In-service inspection of liquid metal (sodium) fast reactors requires the use of ultrasonic transducers capable of operating at high temperatures (>200°C), high gamma radiation fields, and the chemically reactive liquid sodium environment. In the early- to mid-1970s, the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission supported development of high-temperature, submersible single-element transducers, used for scanning and under-sodium imaging in the Fast Flux Test Facility and the Clinch River Breeder Reactor. Current work is building on this technology to develop the next generation of high-temperature linear ultrasonic transducer arrays for under-sodium viewing and in-service inspections.

  8. Thermal-hydraulic code selection for modular high temperature gas-cooled reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Komen, E.M.J.; Bogaard, J.P.A. van den

    1995-06-01

    In order to study the transient thermal-hydraulic system behaviour of modular high temperature gas-cooled reactors, the thermal-hydraulic computer codes RELAP5, MELCOR, THATCH, MORECA, and VSOP are considered at the Netherlands Energy Research Foundation ECN. This report presents the selection of the most appropriate codes. To cover the range of relevant accidents, a suite of three codes is recommended for analyses of HTR-M and MHTGR reactors. (orig.).

  9. Temperature oscillations near natural nuclear reactor cores and the potential for prebiotic oligomer synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam, Zachary R.

    2016-06-01

    Geologic settings capable of driving prebiotic oligomer synthesis reactions remain a relatively unexplored aspect of origins of life research. Natural nuclear reactors are an example of Precambrian energy sources that produced unique temperature fluctuations. Heat transfer models indicate that water-moderated, convectively-cooled natural fission reactors in porous host rocks create temperature oscillations that resemble those employed in polymerase chain reaction (PCR) devices to artificially amplify oligonucleotides. This temperature profile is characterized by short-duration pulses up to 70-100 °C, followed by a sustained period of temperatures in the range of 30-70 °C, and finally a period of relaxation to ambient temperatures until the cycle is restarted by a fresh influx of pore water. For a given reactor configuration, temperature maxima and the time required to relax to ambient temperatures depend most strongly on the aggregate effect of host rock permeability in decreasing the thermal expansion and increasing the viscosity and evaporation temperature of the pore fluids. Once formed, fission-fueled reactors can sustain multi-kilowatt-level power production for 105-106 years, ensuring microenvironmental longevity and chemical output. The model outputs indicate that organic synthesis on young planetary bodies with a sizeable reservoir of fissile material can involve more sophisticated energy dissipation pathways than modern terrestrial analog settings alone would suggest.

  10. Temperature oscillations near natural nuclear reactor cores and the potential for prebiotic oligomer synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam, Zachary R

    2016-06-01

    Geologic settings capable of driving prebiotic oligomer synthesis reactions remain a relatively unexplored aspect of origins of life research. Natural nuclear reactors are an example of Precambrian energy sources that produced unique temperature fluctuations. Heat transfer models indicate that water-moderated, convectively-cooled natural fission reactors in porous host rocks create temperature oscillations that resemble those employed in polymerase chain reaction (PCR) devices to artificially amplify oligonucleotides. This temperature profile is characterized by short-duration pulses up to 70-100 °C, followed by a sustained period of temperatures in the range of 30-70 °C, and finally a period of relaxation to ambient temperatures until the cycle is restarted by a fresh influx of pore water. For a given reactor configuration, temperature maxima and the time required to relax to ambient temperatures depend most strongly on the aggregate effect of host rock permeability in decreasing the thermal expansion and increasing the viscosity and evaporation temperature of the pore fluids. Once formed, fission-fueled reactors can sustain multi-kilowatt-level power production for 10(5)-10(6) years, ensuring microenvironmental longevity and chemical output. The model outputs indicate that organic synthesis on young planetary bodies with a sizeable reservoir of fissile material can involve more sophisticated energy dissipation pathways than modern terrestrial analog settings alone would suggest.

  11. One centimeter spatial resolution temperature measurements in a nuclear reactor using Rayleigh scatter in optical fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sang, A. K.; Gifford, D. K.; Dickerson, B. D.; Fielder, B. F.; Froggatt, M. E.

    2007-07-01

    We present the use of swept wavelength interferometry for distributed fiber-optic temperature measurements in a Nuclear Reactor. The sensors consisted of 2 m segments of commercially available, single mode optical fibers. The interrogation technique is based on measuring the spectral shift of the intrinsic Rayleigh backscatter signal along the optical fiber and converting the spectral shift to temperature.

  12. Optimization of Reactor Temperature and Catalyst Weight for Plastic Cracking to Fuels Using Response Surface Methodology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Istadi Istadi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study deals with effect of reactor temperature and catalyst weight on performance of plastic waste cracking to fuels over modified catalyst waste as well as their optimization. From optimization study, the most operating parameters affected the performance of the catalytic cracking process is reactor temperature followed by catalyst weight. Increasing the reactor temperature improves significantly the cracking performance due to the increasing catalyst activity. The optimal operating conditions of reactor temperature about 550 oC and catalyst weight about 1.25 gram were produced with respect to maximum liquid fuel product yield of 29.67 %. The liquid fuel product consists of gasoline range hydrocarbons (C4-C13 with favorable heating value (44,768 kJ/kg. ©2010 BCREC UNDIP. All rights reserved(Received: 10th July 2010, Revised: 18th September 2010, Accepted: 19th September 2010[How to Cite: I. Istadi, S. Suherman, L. Buchori. (2010. Optimization of Reactor Temperature and Catalyst Weight for Plastic Cracking to Fuels Using Response Surface Methodology. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering and Catalysis, 5(2: 103-111. doi:10.9767/bcrec.5.2.797.103-111][DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.9767/bcrec.5.2.797.103-111 || or local:  http://ejournal.undip.ac.id/index.php/bcrec/article/view/797

  13. Scaling Studies for High Temperature Test Facility and Modular High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richard R. Schult; Paul D. Bayless; Richard W. Johnson; James R. Wolf; Brian Woods

    2012-02-01

    The Oregon State University (OSU) High Temperature Test Facility (HTTF) is an integral experimental facility that will be constructed on the OSU campus in Corvallis, Oregon. The HTTF project was initiated, by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), on September 5, 2008 as Task 4 of the 5-year High Temperature Gas Reactor Cooperative Agreement via NRC Contract 04-08-138. Until August, 2010, when a DOE contract was initiated to fund additional capabilities for the HTTF project, all of the funding support for the HTTF was provided by the NRC via their cooperative agreement. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) began their involvement with the HTTF project in late 2009 via the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) project. Because the NRC's interests in HTTF experiments were only centered on the depressurized conduction cooldown (DCC) scenario, NGNP involvement focused on expanding the experimental envelope of the HTTF to include steady-state operations and also the pressurized conduction cooldown (PCC).

  14. An investigation of moving bed biofilm reactor nitrification during long-term exposure to cold temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoang, Valerie; Delatolla, Robert; Laflamme, Edith; Gadbois, Alain

    2014-01-01

    Biological treatment is the most common and economical means of ammonia removal in wastewater; however, nitrification rates can become completely impeded at cold temperatures. Attached growth processes and, specifically, moving bed biofilm reactors (MBBRs) have shown promise with respect to low-temperature nitrification. In this study, two laboratory MBBRs were used to investigate MBBR nitrification rates at 20, 5, and 1 degree C. Furthermore, the solids detached by the MBBR reactors were investigated and Arrhenius temperature correction models used to predict nitrification rates after long-term low-temperature exposure was evaluated. The nitrification rate at 5 degrees C was 66 +/- 3.9% and 64 +/- 3.7% compared to the rate measured at 20 degrees C for reactors 1 and 2, respectively. The nitrification rates at 1 degree C over a 4-month exposure period compared to the rate at 20 degrees C were 18.7 +/- 5.5% and 15.7 +/- 4.7% for the two reactors. The quantity of solids detached from the MBBR biocarriers was low and the mass of biofilm per carrier did not vary significantly at 20 degrees C compared to that after long-term exposure at 1 degree C. Lastly, a temperature correction model based on exposure time to cold temperatures showed a strong correlation to the calculated ammonia removal rates relative to 20 degrees C following a gradual acclimatization period to cold temperatures.

  15. New steady-state microbial community compositions and process performances in biogas reactors induced by temperature disturbances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Gang; De Francisci, Davide; Kougias, Panagiotis G; Laura, Treu; Zhu, Xinyu; Angelidaki, Irini

    2015-01-01

    The microbial community in a biogas reactor greatly influences the process performance. However, only the effects of deterministic factors (such as temperature and hydraulic retention time (HRT)) on the microbial community and performance have been investigated in biogas reactors. Little is known about the manner in which stochastic factors (for example, stochastic birth, death, colonization, and extinction) and disturbance affect the stable-state microbial community and reactor performances. In the present study, three replicate biogas reactors treating cattle manure were run to examine the role of stochastic factors and disturbance in shaping microbial communities. In the triplicate biogas reactors with the same inoculum and operational conditions, similar process performances and microbial community profiles were observed under steady-state conditions. This indicated that stochastic factors had a minor role in shaping the profile of the microbial community composition and activity in biogas reactors. On the contrary, temperature disturbance was found to play an important role in the microbial community composition as well as process performance for biogas reactors. Although three different temperature disturbances were applied to each biogas reactor, the increased methane yields (around 10% higher) and decreased volatile fatty acids (VFAs) concentrations at steady state were found in all three reactors after the temperature disturbances. After the temperature disturbance, the biogas reactors were brought back to the original operational conditions; however, new steady-state microbial community profiles were observed in all the biogas reactors. The present study demonstrated that temperature disturbance, but not stochastic factors, played an important role in shaping the profile of the microbial community composition and activity in biogas reactors. New steady-state microbial community profiles and reactor performances were observed in all the biogas reactors

  16. Hybrid sulfur cycle operation for high-temperature gas-cooled reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorensek, Maximilian B

    2015-02-17

    A hybrid sulfur (HyS) cycle process for the production of hydrogen is provided. The process uses a proton exchange membrane (PEM) SO.sub.2-depolarized electrolyzer (SDE) for the low-temperature, electrochemical reaction step and a bayonet reactor for the high-temperature decomposition step The process can be operated at lower temperature and pressure ranges while still providing an overall energy efficient cycle process.

  17. Analysis of Fluid Flow and Heat Transfer Model for the Pebble Bed High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor

    OpenAIRE

    S. Yamoah; E.H.K. Akaho; Nana G.A. Ayensu; M. Asamoah

    2012-01-01

    The pebble bed type high temperature gas cooled nuclear reactor is a promising option for next generation reactor technology and has the potential to provide high efficiency and cost effective electricity generation. The reactor unit heat transfer poses a challenge due to the complexity associated with the thermalflow design. Therefore to reliably simulate the flow and heat transport of the pebble bed modular reactor necessitates a heat transfer model that deals with radiation as well as ther...

  18. Simultaneous removal of nitrate and arsenic from drinking water sources utilizing a fixed-bed bioreactor system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upadhyaya, Giridhar; Jackson, Jeff; Clancy, Tara M; Hyun, Sung Pil; Brown, Jess; Hayes, Kim F; Raskin, Lutgarde

    2010-09-01

    A novel bioreactor system, consisting of two biologically active carbon (BAC) reactors in series, was developed for the simultaneous removal of nitrate and arsenic from a synthetic groundwater supplemented with acetic acid. A mixed biofilm microbial community that developed on the BAC was capable of utilizing dissolved oxygen, nitrate, arsenate, and sulfate as the electron acceptors. Nitrate was removed from a concentration of approximately 50 mg/L in the influent to below the detection limit of 0.2 mg/L. Biologically generated sulfides resulted in the precipitation of the iron sulfides mackinawite and greigite, which concomitantly removed arsenic from an influent concentration of approximately 200 ug/L to below 20 ug/L through arsenic sulfide precipitation and surface precipitation on iron sulfides. This study showed for the first time that arsenic and nitrate can be simultaneously removed from drinking water sources utilizing a bioreactor system. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Probabilistic Structural Integrity Analysis of Boiling Water Reactor Pressure Vessel under Low Temperature Overpressure Event

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsoung-Wei Chou

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The probabilistic structural integrity of a Taiwan domestic boiling water reactor pressure vessel has been evaluated by the probabilistic fracture mechanics analysis. First, the analysis model was built for the beltline region of the reactor pressure vessel considering the plant specific data. Meanwhile, the flaw models which comprehensively simulate all kinds of preexisting flaws along the vessel wall were employed here. The low temperature overpressure transient which has been concluded to be the severest accident for a boiling water reactor pressure vessel was considered as the loading condition. It is indicated that the fracture mostly happens near the fusion-line area of axial welds but with negligible failure risk. The calculated results indicate that the domestic reactor pressure vessel has sufficient structural integrity until doubling of the present end-of-license operation.

  20. Dynamic behavior of the HTR-10 reactor: Dual temperature feedback model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hosseini Seyed Ali

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The current work aims at presenting a simple model for PBM-type reactors' dynamic behavior analysis. The proposed model is based on point kinetics equations coupled with feedbacks from fuel and moderator temperatures. The temperature reactivity coefficients were obtained through MCNP code and via available experimental data. Parameters such as heat capacity and heat conductivity were carefully analyzed and the final system of equations was numerically solved. The obtained results, while in partial agreement with previously proposed models, suggest lower sensitivity to step reactivity insertion as compared to other reactor designs and inherent safety of the design.

  1. Application of Gamma code coupled with turbomachinery models for high temperature gas-cooled reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang Oh

    2008-02-01

    The very high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (VHTR) is envisioned as a single- or dual-purpose reactor for electricity and hydrogen generation. The concept has average coolant temperatures above 9000C and operational fuel temperatures above 12500C. The concept provides the potential for increased energy conversion efficiency and for high-temperature process heat application in addition to power generation. While all the High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor (HTGR) concepts have sufficiently high temperature to support process heat applications, such as coal gasification, desalination or cogenerative processes, the VHTR’s higher temperatures allow broader applications, including thermochemical hydrogen production. However, the very high temperatures of this reactor concept can be detrimental to safety if a loss-ofcoolant accident (LOCA) occurs. Following the loss of coolant through the break and coolant depressurization, air will enter the core through the break by molecular diffusion and ultimately by natural convection, leading to oxidation of the in-core graphite structure and fuel. The oxidation will accelerate heatup of the reactor core and the release of a toxic gas, CO, and fission products. Thus, without any effective countermeasures, a pipe break may lead to significant fuel damage and fission product release. Prior to the start of this Korean/United States collaboration, no computer codes were available that had been sufficiently developed and validated to reliably simulate a LOCA in the VHTR. Therefore, we have worked for the past three years on developing and validating advanced computational methods for simulating LOCAs in a VHTR. GAMMA code is being developed to implement turbomachinery models in the power conversion unit (PCU) and ultimately models associated with the hydrogen plant. Some preliminary results will be described in this paper.

  2. Design of a fixed-bed ion-exchange process for the treatment of rinse waters generated in the galvanization process using Laminaria hyperborea as natural cation exchanger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazur, Luciana P; Pozdniakova, Tatiana A; Mayer, Diego A; Boaventura, Rui A R; Vilar, Vítor J P

    2016-03-01

    In this study, the removal of zinc from galvanization wastewaters was performed in a fixed bed column packed with brown macro-algae Laminaria hyperborea, acting as a natural cation exchanger (resin). The rinse wastewater presents a zinc concentration between 9 and 22 mg/L, a high concentration of light metals (mainly Na and Ca), a high conductivity (0.5-1.5 mS/cm) and a low organic content (DOC = 7-15 mg C/L). The zinc speciation diagram showed that approximately 80% of zinc is in the form of Zn(2+) and ≅20% as ZnSO4, considering the effluent matrix. From all operational conditions tested for zinc uptake (17 treatment of 2.4 m(3)/day of galvanization wastewater, resulting in an estimated reactants cost of 2.44 €/m(3). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Advanced High-Temperature Reactor Dynamic System Model Development: April 2012 Status

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qualls, A L; Cetiner, M S; Wilson, Jr, T L

    2012-04-30

    The Advanced High-Temperature Reactor (AHTR) is a large-output fluoride-salt-cooled high-temperature reactor (FHR). An early-phase preconceptual design of a 1500 MW(e) power plant was developed in 2011 [Refs. 1 and 2]. An updated version of this plant is shown as Fig. 1. FHRs feature low-pressure liquid fluoride salt cooling, coated-particle fuel, a high-temperature power cycle, and fully passive decay heat rejection. The AHTR is designed to be a “walk away” reactor that requires no action to prevent large off-site releases following even severe reactor accidents. This report describes the development of dynamic system models used to further the AHTR design toward that goal. These models predict system response during warmup, startup, normal operation, and limited off-normal operating conditions. Severe accidents that include a loss-of-fluid inventory are not currently modeled. The scope of the models is limited to the plant power system, including the reactor, the primary and intermediate heat transport systems, the power conversion system, and safety-related or auxiliary heat removal systems. The primary coolant system, the intermediate heat transport system and the reactor building structure surrounding them are shown in Fig. 2. These systems are modeled in the most detail because the passive interaction of the primary system with the surrounding structure and heat removal systems, and ultimately the environment, protects the reactor fuel and the vessel from damage during severe reactor transients. The reactor silo also plays an important role during system warmup. The dynamic system modeling tools predict system performance and response. The goal is to accurately predict temperatures and pressures within the primary, intermediate, and power conversion systems and to study the impacts of design changes on those responses. The models are design tools and are not intended to be used in reactor qualification. The important details to capture in the primary

  4. Copper(II) and lead(II) removal from aqueous solution in fixed-bed columns by manganese oxide coated zeolite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Runping; Zou, Weihua; Li, Hongkui; Li, Yanhu; Shi, Jie

    2006-09-21

    The ability of manganese oxide coated zeolite (MOCZ) to adsorb copper and lead ions in single- (non-competitive) and binary- (competitive) component sorption systems was studied in fixed-bed column. The experiments were applied to quantify particle size, bed length, influent flow rate and influent metal concentration on breakthrough time during the removal of copper and lead ions from aqueous solutions using MOCZ column. Results of fixed-bed adsorption showed that the breakthrough time appeared to increase with increase of the bed length and decrease of influent metal concentration, but decreased with increase of the flow rate. The Thomas model was applied to adsorption of copper and lead ions at bed length, MOCZ particle size, different flow rate and different initial concentration to predict the breakthrough curves and to determine the characteristic parameters of the column useful for process design. The model was found suitable for describing the adsorption process of the dynamic behavior of the MOCZ column. The total adsorbed quantities, equilibrium uptakes and total removal percents of Cu(II) and Pb(II) related to the effluent volumes were determined by evaluating the breakthrough curves obtained at different conditions. The results suggested that MOCZ could be used as an adsorbent for an efficient removal of copper and lead ions from aqueous solution. The removal of metal ion was decreased when other additional heavy metal ion was added, but the total saturation capacity of MOCZ for copper and lead ions was not significantly decreased. This competitive adsorption also showed that adsorption of lead ions was decreased insignificantly when copper ions was added to the influent, whereas a dramatic decrease was observed on the adsorption of copper ions by the presence of lead ions. The removal of copper and lead ion by MOCZ columns followed the descending order: Pb(II) > Cu(II). The adsorbed copper and lead ions were easily desorbed from MOCZ with 0.5 mol l(-1

  5. Synthesis and characterization of organic–inorganic core–shell structure nanocomposite and application for Zn ions removal from aqueous solution in a fixed-bed column

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghasemi, Shokoofeh [Faculty of Chemical, Gas and Petroleum Engineering, Semnan University, Semnan 35131-19111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ghorbani, Mohsen, E-mail: M.ghorbani@nit.ac.ir [Faculty of Chemical Engineering, Babol University of Technology, P.O. Box 484, Babol (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ghazi, Mohsen Mehdipour [Faculty of Chemical, Gas and Petroleum Engineering, Semnan University, Semnan 35131-19111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-12-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • The γ-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles were prepared in one step using ultrasonic radiation and coated by polyrhodanine. • Nanocomposite synthesized with core average diameter of 15 nm and polyrhodanine as shell with thickness of 1.5 nm • Application of products was investigated to separate zinc ions from aqueous solution in a fixed-bed column. • The Adams–Bohart, BDST, Thomas and Yoon–Nelson models used to predict model parameters. • The models were nearly in good agreement with the experimental data. - Abstract: An organic–inorganic core/shell structure, γ-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}/polyrhodanine nanocomposite with γ-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticle as core with average diameter of 15 nm and polyrhodanine as shell with thickness of 1.5 nm, has been synthesized via chemical oxidation polymerization and applied for adsorption of Zn ions from aqueous solution in a fixed-bed column. The properties of nanocomposite were characterized with transmission electron microscope (TEM), Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy and vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). The performance of the column was assessed under variable bed heights (10, 15 and 20 cm) and influent Zn concentrations (50, 100 and 150 ppm) at a constant flow rate (0.5 mL/min). The results demonstrated that the breakthrough curves are S-shaped and the breakthrough time increases with increasing bed height and decreases with increasing influent concentration. Moreover, the dynamics of the adsorption process were evaluated by using Adams–Bohart, bed depth service time (BDST), Thomas and Yoon–Nelson kinetic models. The models were nearly in good agreement with the experimental data.

  6. Feasibility study of high temperature reactor utilization in Czech Republic after 2025

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Losa, Evžen, E-mail: evzen.losa@fjfi.cvut.cz [Czech Technical University in Prague, Faculty of Nuclear Sciences and Physical Engineering, Department of Nuclear Reactors (Czech Republic); Heřmanský, Bedřich; Kobylka, Dušan; Rataj, Jan; Sklenka, Ľubomír [Czech Technical University in Prague, Faculty of Nuclear Sciences and Physical Engineering, Department of Nuclear Reactors (Czech Republic); Souček, Václav; Kohout, Petr [AZIN CZ, s.r.o., Hanusova 3, 140 00 Praha 4 (Czech Republic)

    2014-05-01

    High temperature reactors (HTRs) were examined as an option to intended future broadening of the nuclear energy production in Czech Republic. The known qualities as the inherent safety, high thermal utilization and non-electrical applications have been assessed in years 2009–2011 during the survey funded by Czech Ministry of Industry and Trade. The survey of high temperature reactors with spherical fuel was initiated by reason of mature state of the art of this technology type in South Africa and in China, where in both countries pilot plants were planned. Unfortunately, the global financial crisis caused the decision of stopping the governmental support in South African programme was made. In China, however, the development still continues. Czech Republic has almost 60 years nuclear research history and the knowledge of operation of gas cooled and heavy water moderated reactor has been gained in the past. Nevertheless, the design of light water reactors was more developed in former Soviet Union, which provided Czech scientists by initial knowledge base; hence the research has been reoriented to this technology. But, the demands on future nuclear reactors application are still growing and the same or even higher living standard of next generations have to be taken into consideration. Therefore the systems, which can produce more energy and less waste, are getting into foreground of interest of Czech decision makers. The high temperature reactor technology seems to be the successful representative of the GEN IV reactor types, which will be operated commercially in the near future. The broad spectrum of utilization enables this system to be an option after 2030, when the electricity demand is planned to be covered from about 50% by nuclear in our country.

  7. Advance High Temperature Inspection Capabilities for Small Modular Reactors: Part 1 - Ultrasonics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bond, Leonard J. [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States); Bowler, John R. [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2017-08-30

    The project objective was to investigate the development non-destructive evaluation techniques for advanced small modular reactors (aSMR), where the research sought to provide key enabling inspection technologies needed to support the design and maintenance of reactor component performance. The project tasks for the development of inspection techniques to be applied to small modular reactor are being addressed through two related activities. The first is focused on high temperature ultrasonic transducers development (this report Part 1) and the second is focused on an advanced eddy current inspection capability (Part 2). For both inspection techniques the primary aim is to develop in-service inspection techniques that can be carried out under standby condition in a fast reactor at a temperature of approximately 250°C in the presence of liquid sodium. The piezoelectric material and the bonding between layers have been recognized as key factors fundamental for development of robust ultrasonic transducers. Dielectric constant characterization of bismuth scantanate-lead titanate ((1-x)BiScO3-xPbTiO3) (BS-PT) has shown a high Curie temperature in excess of 450°C , suitable for hot stand-by inspection in liquid metal reactors. High temperature pulse-echo contact measurements have been performed with BS-PT bonded to 12.5 mm thick 1018-low carbon steel plate from 20C up to 260 C. High temperature air-backed immersion transducers have been developed with BS-PT, high temperature epoxy and quarter wavlength nickel plate, needed for wetting ability in liquid sodium. Ultrasonic immersion measurements have been performed in water up to 92C and in silicone oil up to 140C. Physics based models have been validated with room temperature experimental data with benchmark artifical defects.

  8. Status of Preconceptual Design of the Advanced High-Temperature Reactor (AHTR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ingersoll, D.T.

    2004-07-29

    A new reactor plant concept is presented that combines the benefits of ceramic-coated, high-temperature particle fuel with those of clean, high-temperature, low-pressure molten salt coolant. The Advanced High-Temperature Reactor (AHTR) concept is a collaboration of Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Sandia National Laboratories, and the University of California at Berkeley. The purpose of the concept is to provide an advanced design capable of satisfying the top-level functional requirements of the U.S. Department of Energy Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP), while also providing a technology base that is sufficiently robust to allow future development paths to higher temperatures and larger outputs with highly competitive economics. This report summarizes the status of the AHTR preconceptual design. It captures the results from an intense effort over a period of 3 months to (1) screen and examine potential feasibility concerns with the concept; (2) refine the conceptual design of major systems; and (3) identify research, development, and technology requirements to fully mature the AHTR design. Several analyses were performed and are presented to quantify the AHTR performance expectations and to assist in the selection of several design parameters. The AHTR, like other NGNP reactor concepts, uses coated particle fuel in a graphite matrix. But unlike the other NGNP concepts, the AHTR uses molten salt rather than helium as the primary system coolant. The considerable previous experience with molten salts in nuclear environments is discussed, and the status of high-temperature materials is reviewed. The large thermal inertia of the system, the excellent heat transfer and fission product retention characteristics of molten salt, and the low-pressure operation of the primary system provide significant safety attributes for the AHTR. Compared with helium coolant, a molten salt cooled reactor will have significantly lower fuel temperatures (150-200-C lower) for the

  9. Representative Source Terms and the Influence of Reactor Attributes on Functional Containment in Modular High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petti, D. A.; Hobbins, R. R.; Lowry, P.; Gougar, H.

    2013-11-01

    Modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactors (MHTGRs) offer a high degree of passive safety. The low power density of the reactor and the high heat capacity of the graphite core result in slow transients that do not challenge the integrity of the robust TRISO fuel. Another benefit of this fuel form and the surrounding graphite is their superior ability to retain fission products under all anticipated normal and off-normal conditions, which limits reactor accident source terms to very low values. In this paper, we develop estimates of the source term for a generic MHTGR to illustrate the performance of the radionuclide barriers that comprise the MHTGR functional containment. We also examine the influence of initial fuel quality, fuel performance/failure, reactor outlet temperature, and retention outside of the reactor core on the resultant source term to the environment.

  10. Analysis of Precooling Injection Transient of Steam Generator for High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Wang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available After a postulated design basis accident leads high temperature gas cooled reactor to emergency shutdown, steam generator still remains with high temperature level and needs to be cooled down by a precooling before reactor restarts with clearing of fault. For the large difference of coolant temperature between inlet and outlet of steam generator in normal operation, the temperature distribution on the components of steam generator is very complicated. Therefore, the temperature descending rate of the components in steam generator needs to be limited to avoid the potential damage during the precooling stage. In this paper, a pebble-bed high temperature gas cooled reactor is modeled by thermal-hydraulic system analysis code and several postulated precooling injection transients are simulated and compared to evaluate their effects, which will provide support for the precooling design. The analysis results show that enough precooling injection is necessary to satisfy the precooling requirements, and larger mass flow rate of precooling water injection will accelerate the precooling process. The temperature decrease of steam generator is related to the precooling injection scenarios, and the maximal mass flow rate of the precooling injection should be limited to avoid the excessively quick temperature change of the structures in steam generator.

  11. Fast pyrolysis of rice straw, sugarcane bagasse and coconut shell in an induction-heating reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsai, W.T.; Chang, Y.M. [Department of Environmental Engineering and Science, Chia Nan University of Pharmacy and Science, Tainan 717 (Taiwan); Lee, M.K. [Department of Occupational Safety and Health, Chia Nan University of Pharmacy and Science, Tainan 717 (Taiwan)

    2006-06-01

    With the application of induction heating, a fast pyrolysis was used for producing valuable products from rice straw, sugarcane bagasse and coconut shell in an externally heated fixed-bed reactor. The effect of process parameters such as pyrolysis temperature, heating rate and holding time on the yields of pyrolysis products and their chemical compositions were investigated. The maximum yield of ca. 50% on the pyrolysis liquid product could be obtained at the proper process conditions. The chemical characterization by elemental (CHNO), calorific, Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC-MS) showed that the pyrolysis liquid products contain large amounts of water (>65wt.%), and fewer contents of oxygenated hydrocarbons composing of carbonyl groups, resulting in low pH and low heating values. The results were very similar to bio-oils obtained from other biomass materials. The residual solid (char or charcoal) was also characterized in the present study. (author)

  12. High Temperature Reactor (HTR) Deep Burn Core and Fuel Analysis: Design Selection for the Prismatic Block Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Francesco Venneri; Chang-Keun Jo; Jae-Man Noh; Yonghee Kim; Claudio Filippone; Jonghwa Chang; Chris Hamilton; Young-Min Kim; Ji-Su Jun; Moon-Sung Cho; Hong-Sik Lim; MIchael A. Pope; Abderrafi M. Ougouag; Vincent Descotes; Brian Boer

    2010-09-01

    The Deep Burn (DB) Project is a U.S. Department of Energy sponsored feasibility study of Transuranic Management using high burnup fuel in the high temperature helium cooled reactor (HTR). The DB Project consists of seven tasks: project management, core and fuel analysis, spent fuel management, fuel cycle integration, TRU fuel modeling, TRU fuel qualification, and HTR fuel recycle. In the Phase II of the Project, we conducted nuclear analysis of TRU destruction/utilization in the HTR prismatic block design (Task 2.1), deep burn fuel/TRISO microanalysis (Task 2.3), and synergy with fast reactors (Task 4.2). The Task 2.1 covers the core physics design, thermo-hydraulic CFD analysis, and the thermofluid and safety analysis (low pressure conduction cooling, LPCC) of the HTR prismatic block design. The Task 2.3 covers the analysis of the structural behavior of TRISO fuel containing TRU at very high burnup level, i.e. exceeding 50% of FIMA. The Task 4.2 includes the self-cleaning HTR based on recycle of HTR-generated TRU in the same HTR. Chapter IV contains the design and analysis results of the 600MWth DB-HTR core physics with the cycle length, the average discharged burnup, heavy metal and plutonium consumptions, radial and axial power distributions, temperature reactivity coefficients. Also, it contains the analysis results of the 450MWth DB-HTR core physics and the analysis of the decay heat of a TRU loaded DB-HTR core. The evaluation of the hot spot fuel temperature of the fuel block in the DB-HTR (Deep-Burn High Temperature Reactor) core under full operating power conditions are described in Chapter V. The investigated designs are the 600MWth and 460MWth DB-HTRs. In Chapter VI, the thermo-fluid and safety of the 600MWth DB-HTRs has been analyzed to investigate a thermal-fluid design performance at the steady state and a passive safety performance during an LPCC event. Chapter VII describes the analysis results of the TRISO fuel microanalysis of the 600MWth and 450

  13. Thermal activation and characterization of clay aiming their use as sorbent in fixed bed columns to remove cadmium; Ativacao termica e caracterizacao da argila visando sua utilizacao como adsorvente em colunas de leito fixo para a remocao de cadmio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, M.M. da; Rodrigues, M.G.F. [Universidade Federal de Campina Grande (UFCG), PB (Brazil); Silva, M.L.P. [Universidade Federal Rural do Semi-Arido (UFERSA), RN (Brazil); Kleinübing, S.J.; Silva, M.G.C., E-mail: marciliomaximo@yahoo.com.br [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), SP (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    In this work we studied the removal of cadmium in a synthetic wastewater using clay of Pernambuco - Brazil, in systems of fixed bed column. Clay was thermally activated at 500 °C. The materials were characterized using X-ray Fluorescence (XRF), X-ray Diffraction (XRD) and nitrogen adsorption (BET method). For tests in fixed bed column, we applied a factorial design 2{sup 2} and found that increasing the flow adversely affects the process of removing cadmium concentration while acting positively. The studies showed these materials as promising for the removal of Cd{sup 2+} ions in synthetic wastewater containing low levels of this metal. (author)

  14. Design of a Compact and Versatile Bench Scale Tubular Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Prasad

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available A compact and versatile laboratory tubular reactor has been designed and fabricated keeping in view of reducing capital cost and minimising energy consumption for gas/vapor-phase heterogeneous catalytic reactions. The reactor is consisted of two coaxial corning glass tubes with a helical coil of glass tube in between the coaxial tubes serving as vaporiser and pre-heater, the catalyst bed is in the inner tube. A schematic diagram of the reactor with detailed dimensions and working principles are described. The attractive feature of the reactor is that the vaporiser, pre-heater and fixed bed reactor are merged in a single compact unit. Thus, the unit minimises separate vaporiser and pre-heater, also avoids separate furnaces used for them and eliminate auxiliary instrumentation such as temperature controller etc. To demonstrate the system operation and illustrate the key features, catalyst screening data and the efficient collection of complete, and accurate intrinsic kinetic data are provided for oxidation of CO over copper chromite catalyst. CO oxidation is an important reaction for auto-exhaust pollution control. The suitability of the versatile nature of the reactor has been ascertained for catalytic reactions where either volatile or vaporizable feeds can be introduced to the reaction zone, e.g. oxidation of iso-octane, reduction of nitric oxide, dehydrogenation of methanol, ethanol and iso-propanol, hydrogenation of nitrobenzene to aniline, etc. Copyright (c 2009 by BCREC. All Rights reserved.[Received: 10 February 2009, Accepted: 9 May 2009][How to Cite: R. Prasad, G. Rattan. (2009. Design of a Compact and Versatile Bench Scale Tubular Reactor. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering and Catalysis, 4(1: 5-9.  doi:10.9767/bcrec.4.1.1250.5-9][How to Link/ DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.9767/bcrec.4.1.1250.5-9

  15. An Analysis of Testing Requirements for Fluoride Salt Cooled High Temperature Reactor Components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holcomb, David Eugene [ORNL; Cetiner, Sacit M [ORNL; Flanagan, George F [ORNL; Peretz, Fred J [ORNL; Yoder Jr, Graydon L [ORNL

    2009-11-01

    This report provides guidance on the component testing necessary during the next phase of fluoride salt-cooled high temperature reactor (FHR) development. In particular, the report identifies and describes the reactor component performance and reliability requirements, provides an overview of what information is necessary to provide assurance that components will adequately achieve the requirements, and then provides guidance on how the required performance information can efficiently be obtained. The report includes a system description of a representative test scale FHR reactor. The reactor parameters presented in this report should only be considered as placeholder values until an FHR test scale reactor design is completed. The report focus is bounded at the interface between and the reactor primary coolant salt and the fuel and the gas supply and return to the Brayton cycle power conversion system. The analysis is limited to component level testing and does not address system level testing issues. Further, the report is oriented as a bottom-up testing requirements analysis as opposed to a having a top-down facility description focus.

  16. Low temperature oxidation of hydrocarbons using an electrochemical reactor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ippolito, Davide

    at different reaction temperatures. The study of the effect of the infiltration of different electroactive materials on the electrode behavior has been carried on by the use of electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). Both the methods have been employed to understand the relationship between the catalytic...... the catalytic activity at open circuit voltage and the effect of polarization on propene oxidation rate at low temperature. The future development of this technology will see the infiltration of an active catalyst towards propene oxidation together with a NOx storage compound for the simultaneous oxidation...... high propene conversion at open circuit voltage together high rate enhancement ratio and faradaic efficiency values at low temperatures (300-350 °C). Although some stability problems affected the performance of multiple infiltrated Ce0.9Gd0.1O1.95 on LSM/CGO backbone, the strong activation of LSM upon...

  17. Removal of mercury in fixed-bed continuous upflow reactors by mercury-resistant bacteria and effect of sodium chloride on their performance

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    De, J.; Leonhauser, J.; Vardanyan, L.

    Urgent need to reduce the amount of toxic mercury compounds in the wastewater of industries and subsequent reuse of metal ions, has led to an increasing interest in microbial bioremediation. Two Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains, namely, isolate CH07...

  18. Wet Air Oxidation of Methyl-tertiary-butyl-ether (MTBE) in a fixed bed tubular reactor over a Ruthenium-Cerium/Alumina catalyst

    OpenAIRE

    El Khoury, Alexis; Bejjany, Bouchra; Debacq, Marie; Porte, Catherine

    2004-01-01

    International audience; Treatment of polluted industrial wastes is one of the challenging research topics that occupy an important position in various chemical processes. Among the various types of processes which can be used for treating aqueous wastes polluted with organic matter, the biological and chemical treatments, as well as the incineration are the most commonly used techniques. Each of the mentioned techniques can be used separately or combined with other procedures in order to opti...

  19. Porosity Effect in the Core Thermal Hydraulics for Ultra High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Motoo Fumizawa

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available This study presents an experimental method of porosity evaluation and a predictive thermal-hydraulic analysis with packed spheres in a nuclear reactor core. The porosity experiments were carried out in both a fully shaken state with the closest possible packing and in a state of non-vibration. The predictive analysis considering the fixed porosity value was applied as a design condition for an Ultra High Temperature Reactor Experiment (UHTREX. The thermal-hydraulic computer code was developed and identified as PEBTEMP. The highest outlet coolant temperature of 1316 oC was achieved in the case of an UHTREX at Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory, which was a small scale UHTR. In the present study, the fuel was changed to a pebble type, a porous media. In order to compare the present pebble bed reactor and UHTREX, a calculation based on HTGR-GT300 was carried out in similar conditions with UHTREX; in other words, with an inlet coolant temperature of 871oC, system pressure of 3.45 MPa and power density of 1.3 w/cm3. As a result, the fuel temperature in the present pebble bed reactor showed an extremely lower value compared to that of UHTREX.

  20. High Temperature Fusion Reactor Cooling Using Brayton Cycle Based Partial Energy Conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juhasz, Albert J.; Sawicki, Jerzy T.

    2003-01-01

    For some future space power systems using high temperature nuclear heat sources most of the output energy will be used in other than electrical form, and only a fraction of the total thermal energy generated will need to be converted to electrical work. The paper describes the conceptual design of such a partial energy conversion system, consisting of a high temperature fusion reactor operating in series with a high temperature radiator and in parallel with dual closed cycle gas turbine (CCGT) power systems, also referred to as closed Brayton cycle (CBC) systems, which are supplied with a fraction of the reactor thermal energy for conversion to electric power. Most of the fusion reactor's output is in the form of charged plasma which is expanded through a magnetic nozzle of the interplanetary propulsion system. Reactor heat energy is ducted to the high temperature series radiator utilizing the electric power generated to drive a helium gas circulation fan. In addition to discussing the thermodynamic aspects of the system design the authors include a brief overview of the gas turbine and fan rotor-dynamics and proposed bearing support technology along with performance characteristics of the three phase AC electric power generator and fan drive motor.

  1. Integration of High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors into Industrial Process Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee Nelson

    2011-09-01

    This report is a summary of analyses performed by the NGNP project to determine whether it is technically and economically feasible to integrate high temperature gas cooled reactor (HTGR) technology into industrial processes. To avoid an overly optimistic environmental and economic baseline for comparing nuclear integrated and conventional processes, a conservative approach was used for the assumptions and calculations.

  2. Sustainability and Efficiency Improvements of Gas-Cooled High Temperature Reactors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marmier, A.

    2012-01-01

    The work presented in this thesis covers three fundamental aspects of High Temperature Reactor (HTR) performance, namely fuel testing under irradiation for maximized safety and sustainability, fuel architecture for improved economy and sustainability, and a novel Balance of Plant concept to enable

  3. Power cycle assessment of nuclear high temperature gas-cooled reactors

    OpenAIRE

    Herranz, L.E.; Linares, J.I.; Moratilla, B.Y.

    2009-01-01

    Power cycle assessment of nuclear high temperature gas-cooled reactors correspondance: Corresponding author. Tel.: +34 91 346 62 36; fax: +34 91 346 62 33. (Herranz, L.E.) (Herranz, L.E.) Unit of Nuclear Safety Research (CIEMAT) Avda. Complutense--> , 22 - 28040 Madrid - Spain--> - (Herranz, L.E.) Unit of Nuclear Safety Research (CIEMAT) Avda. Complutense--> , 22 - 28040 Madrid - Spain--...

  4. Effect of reactor temperature on direct growth of carbon nanomaterials on stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edzatty, A. N.; Syazwan, S. M.; Norzilah, A. H.; Jamaludin, S. B.

    2016-07-01

    Currently, carbon nanomaterials (CNMs) are widely used for various applications due to their extraordinary electrical, thermal and mechanical properties. In this work, CNMs were directly grown on the stainless steel (SS316) via chemical vapor deposition (CVD). Acetone was used as a carbon source and argon was used as carrier gas, to transport the acetone vapor into the reactor when the reaction occurred. Different reactor temperature such as 700, 750, 800, 850 and 900 °C were used to study their effect on CNMs growth. The growth time and argon flow rate were fixed at 30 minutes and 200 ml/min, respectively. Characterization of the morphology of the SS316 surface after CNMs growth using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) showed that the diameter of grown-CNMs increased with the reactor temperature. Energy Dispersive X-ray (EDX) was used to analyze the chemical composition of the SS316 before and after CNMs growth, where the results showed that reduction of catalyst elements such as iron (Fe) and nickel (Ni) at high temperature (700 - 900 °C). Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) analysis showed that the nano-sized hills were in the range from 21 to 80 nm. The best reactor temperature to produce CNMs was at 800 °C.

  5. Methanation of CO2 on Ni/Al2O3 in a Structured Fixed-Bed Reactor—A Scale-Up Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Türks

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Due to the ongoing change of energy supply, the availability of a reliable high-capacity storage technology becomes increasingly important. While conventional large-scale facilities are either limited in capacity respective supply time or their extension potential is little (e.g., pumped storage power stations, decentralized units could contribute to energy transition. The concepts of PtX (power-to-X storage technologies and in particular PtG (power-to-gas aim at fixation of electric power in chemical compounds. CO2 hydrogenation (methanation is the foundation of the PtG idea as H2 (via electrolysis and CO2 are easily accessible. Methane produced in this way, often called substitute natural gas (SNG, is a promising solution since it can be stored in the existing gas grid, tanks or underground cavern storages. Methanation is characterized by a strong exothermic heat of reaction which has to be handled safely. This work aims at getting rid of extreme temperature hot-spots in a tube reactor by configuring the catalyst bed structure. Proof of concept studies began with a small tube reactor (V = 12.5 cm3 with a commercial 18 wt % Ni/Al2O3 catalyst. Later, a double-jacket tube reactor was built (V = 452 cm3, reaching a production rate of 50 L/h SNG. The proposed approach not only improves the heat management and process safety, but also increases the specific productivity and stability of the catalyst remarkably.

  6. Monte Carlo Analysis of the Battery-Type High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grodzki, Marcin; Darnowski, Piotr; Niewiński, Grzegorz

    2017-12-01

    The paper presents a neutronic analysis of the battery-type 20 MWth high-temperature gas cooled reactor. The developed reactor model is based on the publicly available data being an `early design' variant of the U-battery. The investigated core is a battery type small modular reactor, graphite moderated, uranium fueled, prismatic, helium cooled high-temperature gas cooled reactor with graphite reflector. The two core alternative designs were investigated. The first has a central reflector and 30×4 prismatic fuel blocks and the second has no central reflector and 37×4 blocks. The SERPENT Monte Carlo reactor physics computer code, with ENDF and JEFF nuclear data libraries, was applied. Several nuclear design static criticality calculations were performed and compared with available reference results. The analysis covered the single assembly models and full core simulations for two geometry models: homogenous and heterogenous (explicit). A sensitivity analysis of the reflector graphite density was performed. An acceptable agreement between calculations and reference design was obtained. All calculations were performed for the fresh core state.

  7. Monte Carlo Analysis of the Battery-Type High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grodzki Marcin

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a neutronic analysis of the battery-type 20 MWth high-temperature gas cooled reactor. The developed reactor model is based on the publicly available data being an ‘early design’ variant of the U-battery. The investigated core is a battery type small modular reactor, graphite moderated, uranium fueled, prismatic, helium cooled high-temperature gas cooled reactor with graphite reflector. The two core alternative designs were investigated. The first has a central reflector and 30×4 prismatic fuel blocks and the second has no central reflector and 37×4 blocks. The SERPENT Monte Carlo reactor physics computer code, with ENDF and JEFF nuclear data libraries, was applied. Several nuclear design static criticality calculations were performed and compared with available reference results. The analysis covered the single assembly models and full core simulations for two geometry models: homogenous and heterogenous (explicit. A sensitivity analysis of the reflector graphite density was performed. An acceptable agreement between calculations and reference design was obtained. All calculations were performed for the fresh core state.

  8. Recycling of polyethene and polypropene in a novel bench-scale rotating cone reactor by high temperature pyrolysis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerhout, R.W.J.; Westerhout, R.W.J.; Waanders, J.; Kuipers, J.A.M.; van Swaaij, Willibrordus Petrus Maria

    1998-01-01

    The high-temperature pyrolysis of polyethene (PE), polypropene (PP), and mixtures of these polymers was studied in a novel bench-scale rotating cone reactor (RCR). Experiments showed that the effect of the sand or reactor temperature on the product spectrum obtained is large compared to the effect

  9. Current hurdles to the success of high temperature membrane reactors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saracco, G.; Versteeg, Geert; van Swaaij, Willibrordus Petrus Maria

    1994-01-01

    High-temperature catalytic processs performed using inorganic membranes have been in recent years a fast growing area of research, which seems to have not yet reached its peak. Chemical engineers, catalysts and materials scientists have addressed this topic from different viewpoint in a common

  10. THERMAL COUPLE FOR MEASURING TEMPERATURE IN A REACTOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanne, W.

    1959-11-24

    A thermocouple device for measuring the temperature of a flowing fluid in a conduit within which is positioned a metallic rod is presented. A thermocouple junction is secured to the rod centrally, and thermal insulating support disks having a diameter greater than the rod are secured to the end portions of the rod and adapted to fit transversely in the conduit.

  11. Commercialization of modular high temperature gas-cooled reactors in the world

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayakawa, Hitoshi; Okamoto, Futoshi; Ohhashi, Kazutaka [Fuji Electric Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    2001-07-01

    The construction programs of the commercial high temperature gas-cooled reactors have been activated extraordinarily all over the world. This paper gives an overview of the three major programs, the South African PBMR project (US utility Exelon announced recently their plan to import PBMRs), the international GT-MHR project (by US DOE, General Atomics, MINATOM of Russian Federation, FRAMATOME ANP, Fuji Electric) and Chinese HTR-PM project. And the reasons why the utilities selected small modular HTGRs as next generation reactors, the superior characteristics of the small modular HTGRs for power generation plant and prospects of them are summarized and discussed. (author)

  12. Evaluation of proposed German safety criteria for high-temperature gas-cooled reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barsell, A.W.

    1980-05-01

    This work reviews proposed safety criteria prepared by the German Bundesministerium des Innern (BMI) for future licensing of gas-cooled high-temperature reactor (HTR) concepts in the Federal Republic of Germany. Comparison is made with US General Design Criteria (GDCs) in 10CFR50 Appendix A and with German light water reactor (LWR) criteria. Implications for the HTR design relative to the US design and safety approach are indicated. Both inherent characteristics and design features of the steam cycle, gas turbine, and process heat concepts are taken into account as well as generic design options such as a pebble bed or prismatic core.

  13. Licensing topical report: interpretation of general design criteria for high-temperature gas-cooled reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orvis, D.D.; Raabe, P.H.

    1980-01-01

    This Licensing Topical Report presents a set of General Design Criteria (GDC) which is proposed for applicability to licensing of graphite-moderated, high-temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGRs). Modifications as necessary to reflect HTGR characteristics and design practices have been made to the GDC derived for applicability to light-water-cooled reactors and presented in Appendix A of Part 50, Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations, including the Introduction, Definitions, and Criteria. It is concluded that the proposed set of GDC affords a better basis for design and licensing of HTGRs.

  14. Experimental facility for development of high-temperature reactor technology: instrumentation needs and challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabharwall Piyush

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A high-temperature, multi-fluid, multi-loop test facility is under development at the Idaho National Laboratory for support of thermal hydraulic materials, and system integration research for high-temperature reactors. The experimental facility includes a high-temperature helium loop, a liquid salt loop, and a hot water/steam loop. The three loops will be thermally coupled through an intermediate heat exchanger (IHX and a secondary heat exchanger (SHX. Research topics to be addressed include the characterization and performance evaluation of candidate compact heat exchangers such as printed circuit heat exchangers (PCHEs at prototypical operating conditions. Each loop will also include an interchangeable high-temperature test section that can be customized to address specific research issues associated with each working fluid. This paper also discusses needs and challenges associated with advanced instrumentation for the multi-loop facility, which could be further applied to advanced high-temperature reactors. Based on its relevance to advanced reactor systems, the new facility has been named the Advanced Reactor Technology Integral System Test (ARTIST facility. A preliminary design configuration of the ARTIST facility will be presented with the required design and operating characteristics of the various components. The initial configuration will include a high-temperature (750 °C, high-pressure (7 MPa helium loop thermally integrated with a molten fluoride salt (KF-ZrF4 flow loop operating at low pressure (0.2 MPa, at a temperature of ∼450 °C. The salt loop will be thermally integrated with the steam/water loop operating at PWR conditions. Experiment design challenges include identifying suitable materials and components that will withstand the required loop operating conditions. The instrumentation needs to be highly accurate (negligible drift in measuring operational data for extended periods of times, as data collected will be

  15. HYBRID SULFUR CYCLE FLOWSHEETS FOR HYDROGEN PRODUCTION USING HIGH-TEMPERATURE GAS-COOLED REACTORS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gorensek, M.

    2011-07-06

    Two hybrid sulfur (HyS) cycle process flowsheets intended for use with high-temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGRs) are presented. The flowsheets were developed for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) program, and couple a proton exchange membrane (PEM) electrolyzer for the SO2-depolarized electrolysis step with a silicon carbide bayonet reactor for the high-temperature decomposition step. One presumes an HTGR reactor outlet temperature (ROT) of 950 C, the other 750 C. Performance was improved (over earlier flowsheets) by assuming that use of a more acid-tolerant PEM, like acid-doped poly[2,2'-(m-phenylene)-5,5'-bibenzimidazole] (PBI), instead of Nafion{reg_sign}, would allow higher anolyte acid concentrations. Lower ROT was accommodated by adding a direct contact exchange/quench column upstream from the bayonet reactor and dropping the decomposition pressure. Aspen Plus was used to develop material and energy balances. A net thermal efficiency of 44.0% to 47.6%, higher heating value basis is projected for the 950 C case, dropping to 39.9% for the 750 C case.

  16. A high temperature drop-tube and packed-bed solar reactor for continuous biomass gasification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellouard, Quentin; Abanades, Stéphane; Rodat, Sylvain; Dupassieux, Nathalie

    2017-06-01

    Biomass gasification is an attractive process to produce high-value syngas. Utilization of concentrated solar energy as the heat source for driving reactions increases the energy conversion efficiency, saves biomass resource, and eliminates the needs for gas cleaning and separation. A high-temperature tubular solar reactor combining drop tube and packed bed concepts was used for continuous solar-driven gasification of biomass. This 1 kW reactor was experimentally tested with biomass feeding under real solar irradiation conditions at the focus of a 2 m-diameter parabolic solar concentrator. Experiments were conducted at temperatures ranging from 1000°C to 1400°C using wood composed of a mix of pine and spruce (bark included) as biomass feedstock. The aim of this study was to demonstrate the feasibility of syngas production in this reactor concept and to prove the reliability of continuous biomass gasification processing using solar energy. The study first consisted of a parametric study of the gasification conditions to obtain an optimal gas yield. The influence of temperature and oxidizing agent (H2O or CO2) on the product gas composition was investigated. The study then focused on solar gasification during continuous biomass particle injection for demonstrating the feasibility of a continuous process. Regarding the energy conversion efficiency of the lab scale reactor, energy upgrade factor of 1.21 and solar-to-fuel thermochemical efficiency up to 28% were achieved using wood heated up to 1400°C.

  17. Advanced High-Temperature, High-Pressure Transport Reactor Gasification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michael L. Swanson

    2005-08-30

    The transport reactor development unit (TRDU) was modified to accommodate oxygen-blown operation in support of a Vision 21-type energy plex that could produce power, chemicals, and fuel. These modifications consisted of changing the loop seal design from a J-leg to an L-valve configuration, thereby increasing the mixing zone length and residence time. In addition, the standpipe, dipleg, and L-valve diameters were increased to reduce slugging caused by bubble formation in the lightly fluidized sections of the solid return legs. A seal pot was added to the bottom of the dipleg so that the level of solids in the standpipe could be operated independently of the dipleg return leg. A separate coal feed nozzle was added that could inject the coal upward into the outlet of the mixing zone, thereby precluding any chance of the fresh coal feed back-mixing into the oxidizing zone of the mixing zone; however, difficulties with this coal feed configuration led to a switch back to the original downward configuration. Instrumentation to measure and control the flow of oxygen and steam to the burner and mix zone ports was added to allow the TRDU to be operated under full oxygen-blown conditions. In total, ten test campaigns have been conducted under enriched-air or full oxygen-blown conditions. During these tests, 1515 hours of coal feed with 660 hours of air-blown gasification and 720 hours of enriched-air or oxygen-blown coal gasification were completed under this particular contract. During these tests, approximately 366 hours of operation with Wyodak, 123 hours with Navajo sub-bituminous coal, 143 hours with Illinois No. 6, 106 hours with SUFCo, 110 hours with Prater Creek, 48 hours with Calumet, and 134 hours with a Pittsburgh No. 8 bituminous coal were completed. In addition, 331 hours of operation on low-rank coals such as North Dakota lignite, Australian brown coal, and a 90:10 wt% mixture of lignite and wood waste were completed. Also included in these test campaigns was

  18. Research Activities on Development of Piping Design Methodology of High Temperature Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huh, Nam-Su [Seoul National Univ. of Science and Technology, Seoul(Korea, Republic of); Won, Min-Gu [Sungkyukwan Univ., Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Oh, Young-Jin [KEPCO Engineering and Construction Co. Inc., Gimcheon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Hyeog-Yeon; Kim, Yoo-Gon [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon(Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    A SFR is operated at high temperature and low pressure compared with commercial pressurized water reactor (PWR), and such an operating condition leads to time-dependent damages such as creep rupture, excessive creep deformation, creep-fatigue interaction and creep crack growth. Thus, high temperature design and structural integrity assessment methodology should be developed considering such failure mechanisms. In terms of design of mechanical components of SFR, ASME B and PV Code, Sec. III, Div. 5 and RCC-MRx provide high temperature design and assessment procedures for nuclear structural components operated at high temperature, and a Leak-Before-Break (LBB) assessment procedure for high temperature piping is also provided in RCC-MRx, A16. Three web-based evaluation programs based on the current high temperature codes were developed for structural components of high temperature reactors. Moreover, for the detailed LBB analyses of high temperature piping, new engineering methods for predicting creep C*-integral and creep COD rate based either on GE/EPRI or on reference stress concepts were proposed. Finally, the numerical methods based on Garofalo's model and RCC-MRx have been developed, and they have been implemented into ABAQUS. The predictions based on both models were compared with the experimental results, and it has been revealed that the predictions from Garafalo's model gave somewhat successful results to describe the deformation behavior of Gr. 91 at elevated temperatures.

  19. Fluoride Salt-Cooled High-Temperature Reactor Technology Development and Demonstration Roadmap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holcomb, David Eugene [ORNL; Flanagan, George F [ORNL; Mays, Gary T [ORNL; Pointer, William David [ORNL; Robb, Kevin R [ORNL; Yoder Jr, Graydon L [ORNL

    2013-11-01

    Fluoride salt-cooled High-temperature Reactors (FHRs) are an emerging reactor class with potentially advantageous performance characteristics, and fully passive safety. This roadmap describes the principal remaining FHR technology challenges and the development path needed to address the challenges. This roadmap also provides an integrated overview of the current status of the broad set of technologies necessary to design, evaluate, license, construct, operate, and maintain FHRs. First-generation FHRs will not require any technology breakthroughs, but do require significant concept development, system integration, and technology maturation. FHRs are currently entering early phase engineering development. As such, this roadmap is not as technically detailed or specific as would be the case for a more mature reactor class. The higher cost of fuel and coolant, the lack of an approved licensing framework, the lack of qualified, salt-compatible structural materials, and the potential for tritium release into the environment are the most obvious issues that remain to be resolved.

  20. SuPer-Homogenization (SPH) Corrected Cross Section Generation for High Temperature Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sen, Ramazan Sonat [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Hummel, Andrew John [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Hiruta, Hikaru [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2017-03-01

    The deterministic full core simulators require homogenized group constants covering the operating and transient conditions over the entire lifetime. Traditionally, the homogenized group constants are generated using lattice physics code over an assembly or block in the case of prismatic high temperature reactors (HTR). For the case of strong absorbers that causes strong local depressions on the flux profile require special techniques during homogenization over a large volume. Fuel blocks with burnable poisons or control rod blocks are example of such cases. Over past several decades, there have been a tremendous number of studies performed for improving the accuracy of full-core calculations through the homogenization procedure. However, those studies were mostly performed for light water reactor (LWR) analyses, thus, may not be directly applicable to advanced thermal reactors such as HTRs. This report presents the application of SuPer-Homogenization correction method to a hypothetical HTR core.

  1. Potential for use of high-temperature superconductors in fusion reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hull, J.R.

    1991-01-01

    The present rate of development of high-temperature superconductors (HTSs) is sufficiently rapid that there may be opportunities for their use in contemporary fusion devices such as the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). The most likely 1application is for delivering power to the superconducting magnets, especially in substituting for the current leads between the temperatures of 4 K and 77K. A second possible application of HTSs is as a liquid-nitrogen-cooled power bus, connecting the power supplies to the magnets, thus reducing the ohmic heating losses over these relatively long cables. A third potential application of HTSs is as an inner high-field winding of the toroidal field coils that would operate at {approx}20 K. While the use of higher temperature magnets offers significant advantages to the reactor system, it is unlikely that tested conductors of this type will be available within the ITER time frame. 23 refs., 2 figs.

  2. Critical evaluation of high-temperature gas-cooled reactors applicable to coal conversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spiewak, I.; Jones, J.E. Jr.; Rittenhouse, P.L.; DeStefano, J.R.; Delene, J.G.

    1975-12-01

    A critical review is presented of the technology and costs of very high-temperature gas-cooled reactors (VHTRs) applicable to nuclear coal conversion. Coal conversion processes suitable for coupling to reactors are described. Vendor concepts of the VHTR are summarized. The materials requirements as a function of process temperature in the range 1400 to 2000/sup 0/F are analyzed. Components, environmental and safety factors, economics and nuclear fuel cycles are reviewed. It is concluded that process heat supply in the range 1400 to 1500/sup 0/F could be developed with a high degree of assurance. Process heat at 1600/sup 0/F would require considerably more materials development. While temperatures up to 2000/sup 0/F appear to be attainable, considerably more research and risk were involved. A demonstration plant would be required as a step in the commercialization of the VHTR.

  3. Facility Configuration Study of the High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor Component Test Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. L. Austad; L. E. Guillen; D. S. Ferguson; B. L. Blakely; D. M. Pace; D. Lopez; J. D. Zolynski; B. L. Cowley; V. J. Balls; E.A. Harvego, P.E.; C.W. McKnight, P.E.; R.S. Stewart; B.D. Christensen

    2008-04-01

    A test facility, referred to as the High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor Component Test Facility or CTF, will be sited at Idaho National Laboratory for the purposes of supporting development of high temperature gas thermal-hydraulic technologies (helium, helium-Nitrogen, CO2, etc.) as applied in heat transport and heat transfer applications in High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors. Such applications include, but are not limited to: primary coolant; secondary coolant; intermediate, secondary, and tertiary heat transfer; and demonstration of processes requiring high temperatures such as hydrogen production. The facility will initially support completion of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant. It will secondarily be open for use by the full range of suppliers, end-users, facilitators, government laboratories, and others in the domestic and international community supporting the development and application of High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor technology. This pre-conceptual facility configuration study, which forms the basis for a cost estimate to support CTF scoping and planning, accomplishes the following objectives: • Identifies pre-conceptual design requirements • Develops test loop equipment schematics and layout • Identifies space allocations for each of the facility functions, as required • Develops a pre-conceptual site layout including transportation, parking and support structures, and railway systems • Identifies pre-conceptual utility and support system needs • Establishes pre-conceptual electrical one-line drawings and schedule for development of power needs.

  4. Nitrogen Removal by Anammox Biofilm Column Reactor at Moderately Low Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuty Emilia Agustina

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox as a new biological approach for nitrogen removal has been considered to be more cost-effective compared with the combination of nitrification and denitrification process. However, the anammox bioreactors are mostly explored at high temperature (>300C in which temperature controlling system is fully required. This research was intended to develop and to apply anammox process for high nitrogen concentration removal at ambient temperature used for treating wastewater in tropical countries. An up-flow biofilm column reactor, which the upper part constructed with a porous polyester non-woven fabric material as a carrier to attach the anammox bacteria was operated without heating system. A maximum nitrogen removal rate (NRR of 1.05 kg-N m3 d-1 was reached in the operation days of 178 with a Total Nitrogen (TN removal efficiency of 74%. This showed the biofilm column anammox reactor was successfully applied to moderate high nitrogen removal from synthetic wastewater at moderately low temperature. Keywords: Anammox, biofilm column reactor, ambient temperature, nitrogen removal

  5. Evaluation of temperature distribution sensing method for fast reactor using optical fiber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kimura, Atsushi; Nakazawa, Masaharu [Tokyo Univ. (Japan); Ichige, Satoshi [Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Inst., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Engineering Center

    1999-12-01

    Optical fiber sensors (OFSs) have many advantages like flexible configuration, intrinsic immunity for electromagnetic fields, and so on. For these reasons, it is very useful to apply OFSs to fast reactor plants for remote inspection and surveillance. However, under irradiation, because of radiation-induced transmission loss of optical fibers, OFSs have radiation-induced errors. Therefore, to apply OFSs to nuclear facilities, we have to estimate and correct the errors. In this report, Raman Distributed Temperature Sensor (RDTS; one of the OFSs) has been installed at the primary coolant loop of the experimental fast reactor JOYO of JNC (Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute). Two correction techniques (correction technique with two thermocouples and correction technique with loop arrangement) for radiation-induced errors have been developed and demonstrated. Because of the radiation-induced loss, measured temperature distributions had radiation-induced errors. However, during the continuous measurements with the total dose of more than 8 x 10{sup 3}[C/kg](3 x 10{sup 7}[R]), the radiation induced errors showed a saturation tendency. In case of the temperature distributions with fluorine doped fiber, with one of the correction techniques, the temperature errors reduced to 1{approx}2degC and the feasibility of the loss correction techniques was demonstrated. For these results, it can be said that RDTS can be applied as a temperature distribution monitor in harsh radiation environments like fast reactor plants. (author)

  6. Sulfur dioxide removal by sol-gel sorbent derived CuO/Alumina sorbents in fixed bed adsorber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhong-Min Wang

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Nanostructured alumina supported copper oxide granular sorbents were prepared by the sol-gel method. The properties of the sol-gel derived sorbents were compared with a similar commercial sorbent which has been used in the pilot scale moving-bed copper oxide process for flue gas treatment. The crushing strength of the sol-gel derived sorbents is about 6–7 times that of the commercial samples, while the attrition rate of the former is at least 3 times smaller. At temperatures below 400 °C, SO2 sorption capacity of the sol-gel derived sorbent is about 3 times that of the commercial sorbent with a similar amount of CuO loading (7–9 wt%. The better mechanical properties and higher sulfation capacity of the sol-gel derived alumina supported copper oxide sorbents are due to their unique microstructure and the coating method for CuO.

  7. Paraffin Alkylation Using Zeolite Catalysts in a slurry reactor: Chemical Engineering Principles to Extend Catalyst Lifetime

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, K.P. de; Mesters, C.M.A.M.; Peferoen, D.G.R.; Brugge, P.T.M. van; Groot, C. de

    1996-01-01

    The alkylation of isobutane with 2-butene is carried out using a zeolitic catalyst in a well stirred slurry reactor. Whereas application of fixed bed technology using a solid acid alkylation catalyst has in the led to catalysts lifetimes in the range of minutes, in this work we report catalyst

  8. Material Control and Accounting Design Considerations for High-Temperature Gas Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trond Bjornard; John Hockert

    2011-08-01

    The subject of this report is domestic safeguards and security by design (2SBD) for high-temperature gas reactors, focusing on material control and accountability (MC&A). The motivation for the report is to provide 2SBD support to the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) project, which was launched by Congress in 2005. This introductory section will provide some background on the NGNP project and an overview of the 2SBD concept. The remaining chapters focus specifically on design aspects of the candidate high-temperature gas reactors (HTGRs) relevant to MC&A, Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) requirements, and proposed MC&A approaches for the two major HTGR reactor types: pebble bed and prismatic. Of the prismatic type, two candidates are under consideration: (1) GA's GT-MHR (Gas Turbine-Modular Helium Reactor), and (2) the Modular High-Temperature Reactor (M-HTR), a derivative of Areva's Antares reactor. The future of the pebble-bed modular reactor (PBMR) for NGNP is uncertain, as the PBMR consortium partners (Westinghouse, PBMR [Pty] and The Shaw Group) were unable to agree on the path forward for NGNP during 2010. However, during the technology assessment of the conceptual design phase (Phase 1) of the NGNP project, AREVA provided design information and technology assessment of their pebble bed fueled plant design called the HTR-Module concept. AREVA does not intend to pursue this design for NGNP, preferring instead a modular reactor based on the prismatic Antares concept. Since MC&A relevant design information is available for both pebble concepts, the pebble-bed HTGRs considered in this report are: (1) Westinghouse PBMR; and (2) AREVA HTR-Module. The DOE Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE) sponsors the Fuel Cycle Research and Development program (FCR&D), which contains an element specifically focused on the domestic (or state) aspects of SBD. This Material Protection, Control and Accountancy Technology (MPACT) program supports the present work

  9. Effect of process parameters on removal and recovery of Cd(II) and Cu(II) from electroplating wastewater by fixed-bed column of nano-dimensional titanium (IV) oxide agglomerates

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Debnath, S

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Removal performances of Cd(II) and Cu(II) from water was investigated using agglomerated nanoparticle of hydrous titanium(IV) oxide (NTO) packed fixed bed. The parameters varied were the bed depth, flow rate and feed solution concentrations...

  10. Development of a Low Temperature Irradiation Capsule for Research Reactor Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choo, Kee Nam; Cho, Man Soon; Lee, Cheol Yong; Yang, Sung Woo; Shin, Yoon Taek; Park, Seng Jae; Kang, Suk Hoon; Kang, Young Hwan; Park, Sang Jun [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-07-01

    A new capsule design was prepared and tested at HANARO for a neutron irradiation of core materials of research reactors as a part of the research reactor development project. Irradiation testing of the materials including graphite, beryllium, and zircaloy-4 that are supposed to be used as core materials in research reactors was required for irradiation at up to 8 reactor operation cycles at low temperature (<100 .deg. C). Therefore, three instrumented capsules were designed and fabricated for an evaluation of the neutron irradiation properties of the core materials (Graphite, Be, Zircaloy-4) of research reactors. The capsules were first designed and fabricated to irradiate materials at low temperature (<100 .deg. C) for a long cycle of 8 irradiation cycles at HANARO. Therefore, the safety of the new designed capsule should be fully checked before irradiation testing. Out-pile performance and endurance testing before HANARO irradiation testing was performed using a capsule under a 110% condition of a reactor coolant flow amount. The structural integrity of the capsule was analyzed in terms of a vibration-induced fatigue cracking of a rod tip of the capsule that is suspected to be the most vulnerable part of a capsule. Another two capsules were irradiated at HANARO for 4 cycles, and one capsule was transferred to a hot cell to examine the integrity of the rod tip of the capsule. After confirming the soundness of the 4 cycle-irradiated capsule, the remaining capsule was irradiated at up to 8 cycles at HANARO. Based on the structural integrity analysis of the capsule, an improved capsule design will be suggested for a longer irradiation test at HANARO.

  11. Validation of SCALE for High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ilas, Germina [ORNL; Ilas, Dan [ORNL; Kelly, Ryan P [ORNL; Sunny, Eva E [ORNL

    2012-08-01

    This report documents verification and validation studies carried out to assess the performance of the SCALE code system methods and nuclear data for modeling and analysis of High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) configurations. Validation data were available from the International Handbook of Evaluated Reactor Physics Benchmark Experiments (IRPhE Handbook), prepared by the International Reactor Physics Experiment Evaluation Project, for two different HTGR designs: prismatic and pebble bed. SCALE models have been developed for HTTR, a prismatic fuel design reactor operated in Japan and HTR-10, a pebble bed reactor operated in China. The models were based on benchmark specifications included in the 2009, 2010, and 2011 releases of the IRPhE Handbook. SCALE models for the HTR-PROTEUS pebble bed configuration at the PROTEUS critical facility in Switzerland have also been developed, based on benchmark specifications included in a 2009 IRPhE draft benchmark. The development of the SCALE models has involved a series of investigations to identify particular issues associated with modeling the physics of HTGRs and to understand and quantify the effect of particular modeling assumptions on calculation-to-experiment comparisons.

  12. Fluoride Salt-Cooled High-Temperature Demonstration Reactor Point Design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qualls, A. L. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Brown, Nicholas R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Betzler, Benjamin R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Carbajo, Juan [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Hale, Richard Edward [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Harrison, Thomas J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Powers, Jeffrey J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Robb, Kevin R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Terrell, Jerry W. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Wysocki, Aaron J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-02-01

    The fluoride salt-cooled high-temperature reactor (FHR) demonstration reactor (DR) is a concept for a salt-cooled reactor with 100 megawatts of thermal output (MWt). It would use tristructural-isotropic (TRISO) particle fuel within prismatic graphite blocks. FLiBe (2 LiF-BeF2) is the reference primary coolant. The FHR DR is designed to be small, simple, and affordable. Development of the FHR DR is a necessary intermediate step to enable near-term commercial FHRs. Lower risk technologies are purposely included in the initial FHR DR design to ensure that the reactor can be built, licensed, and operated within an acceptable budget and schedule. These technologies include TRISO particle fuel, replaceable core structural material, the use of that same material for the primary and intermediate loops, and tube-and-shell primary-to-intermediate heat exchangers. Several preconceptual and conceptual design efforts that have been conducted on FHR concepts bear a significant influence on the FHR DR design. Specific designs include the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) advanced high-temperature reactor (AHTR) with 3400/1500 MWt/megawatts of electric output (MWe), as well as a 125 MWt small modular AHTR (SmAHTR) from ORNL. Other important examples are the Mk1 pebble bed FHR (PB-FHR) concept from the University of California, Berkeley (UCB), and an FHR test reactor design developed at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). The MIT FHR test reactor is based on a prismatic fuel platform and is directly relevant to the present FHR DR design effort. These FHR concepts are based on reasonable assumptions for credible commercial prototypes. The FHR DR concept also directly benefits from the operating experience of the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE), as well as the detailed design efforts for a large molten salt reactor concept and its breeder variant, the Molten Salt Breeder Reactor. The FHR DR technology is most representative of the 3400 MWt AHTR

  13. Dynamic determination of the concentration of volatile alcohols in a fixed bed of zeolite 13X by FT-IR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Cheng-Yuan; Chung, Tsair-Wang; Yang, Thomas C K; Chen, Mai-Tzu

    2006-09-21

    A series of dynamic adsorptions of volatile methanol, ethanol, and iso-propanol (IPA) onto zeolite 13X were studied. Instead of traditional gas chromatography (GC), a gas-phase Fourier Transformation-IR (FT-IR) spectrometer was used to measure the evolution of concentrations of these volatile alcohols due to its quick response to the instantaneous changes of the gas concentration. Even though it has rarely been used in dynamic adsorption experiments in the literature, an FT-IR equipped with a constant-temperature gas cell was shown to be adequate to obtain breakthrough curves. In this study, the experiments were carried out at different gas flow rates and feed concentrations for each type of alcohol. Significant influences of the operating conditions on the breakthrough time, the shape of the breakthrough curve, and the uptake of each alcohol were found. A simple mathematical model proposed by Yoon and Nelson was applied to fit the experimental data. Good consistency between the experimental data and the regressed breakthrough curves was observed.

  14. High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor Projected Markets and Scoping Economics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larry Demick

    2010-08-01

    The NGNP Project has the objective of developing the high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) technology to supply high temperature process heat to industrial processes as a substitute for burning of fossil fuels, such as natural gas. Applications of the HTGR technology that have been evaluated by the NGNP Project for supply of process heat include supply of electricity, steam and high-temperature gas to a wide range of industrial processes, and production of hydrogen and oxygen for use in petrochemical, refining, coal to liquid fuels, chemical, and fertilizer plants.

  15. Effect of temperature on two-phase anaerobic reactors treating slaughterhouse wastewater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone Beux

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available The effectiveness of the anaerobic treatment of effluent from a swine and bovine slaughterhouse was assessed in two sets of two-phase anaerobic digesters, operated with or without temperature control. Set A, consisting of an acidogenic reactor with recirculation and an upflow biological filter as the methanogenic phase, was operated at room temperature, while set B, consisting of an acidogenic reactor without recirculation and an upflow biological filter as the methanogenic phase, was maintained at 32°C. The methanogenic reactors showed COD (Chemical Demand of Oxygen removal above 60% for HRT (Hydraulic Retention Time values of 20, 15, 10, 8, 6, 4, and 2 days. When the HRT value in those reactors was changed to 1 day, the COD percentage removal decreased to 50%. The temperature variations did not have harmful effects on the performance of reactors in set A.Avaliou-se a eficiência do tratamento anaeróbio de efluente de matadouro de suínos e bovinos em dois conjuntos de biodigestores anaeróbios de duas fases, operados com e sem controle de temperatura. O conjunto A, formado por um reator acidogênico com recirculação e um filtro biológico de fluxo ascendente, foi operado a temperatura ambiente e o conjunto B, formado por um reator de fluxo ascendente e um filtro biológico de fluxo ascendente, foi mantido a 32°C. Os reatores metanogênicos apresentaram remoção de DQO acima de 60 % para os TRHs de 20, 15, 10, oito, seis, quatro e dois dias. Quando o TRH destes reatores foi mudado para um dia observou-se uma queda da porcentagem de remoção de DQO para 50 %. As variações de temperatura parecem não ter prejudicado o desempenho dos reatores do conjunto A.

  16. Severe water ingress accident analysis for a Modular High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Zuoyi [Inst. of Nuclear Energy Technology Tsinghua Univ., Beijing, BJ (China); Scherer, Winfried

    1997-12-31

    This paper analyzes the severe water ingress accidents in the SIEMENS 200MW Modular High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor (HTR-Module) under the assumption of no active safety protection systems in order to find the safety margin of the current HTR-Module design. A water, steam and helium multi-phase cavity model is originally developed and implemented in the DSNP simulation system. The developed DSNP system is used to simulate the primary circuit of HTR-Module power plant. The comparisons of the models with the TINTE calculations validate the current simulation. After analyzing the effects of blower separation on water droplets, the wall heat storage, etc., it is found that the maximum H{sub 2}O density increase rate in the reactor core is smaller than 0.3 kg/(m{sup 3}s). The liquid water vaporization in the steam generator and H{sub 2}O transport from the steam generator to the reactor core reduces the impulse of the H{sub 2}O in the reactor core. The nuclear reactivity increase caused by the water ingress leads to a fast power excursion, which, however, is inherently counterbalanced by negative feedback effects. Concerning the integrity of the fuel elements, the safety relevant temperature limit of 1600degC was not reached in any case. (author)

  17. Irradiation performance of AGR-1 high temperature reactor fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demkowicz, Paul A., E-mail: paul.demkowicz@inl.gov [Idaho National Laboratory, PO Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415-6188 (United States); Hunn, John D. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, PO Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6093 (United States); Ploger, Scott A. [Idaho National Laboratory, PO Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415-6188 (United States); Morris, Robert N.; Baldwin, Charles A. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, PO Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6093 (United States); Harp, Jason M.; Winston, Philip L. [Idaho National Laboratory, PO Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415-6188 (United States); Gerczak, Tyler J. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, PO Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6093 (United States); Rooyen, Isabella J. van [Idaho National Laboratory, PO Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415-6188 (United States); Montgomery, Fred C.; Silva, Chinthaka M. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, PO Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6093 (United States)

    2016-09-15

    Highlights: • Post-irradiation examination was performed on AGR-1 coated particle fuel. • Cesium release from the particles was very low in the absence of failed SiC layers. • Silver release was often substantial, and varied considerably with temperature. • Buffer and IPyC layers were found to play a key role in TRISO coating behavior. • Fission products palladium and silver were found in the SiC layer of particles. - Abstract: The AGR-1 experiment contained 72 low-enriched uranium oxide/uranium carbide TRISO coated particle fuel compacts in six capsules irradiated to burnups of 11.2 to 19.6% FIMA, with zero TRISO coating failures detected during the irradiation. The irradiation performance of the fuel including the extent of fission product release and the evolution of kernel and coating microstructures was evaluated based on detailed examination of the irradiation capsules, the fuel compacts, and individual particles. Fractional release of {sup 110m}Ag from the fuel compacts was often significant, with capsule-average values ranging from 0.01 to 0.38. Analysis of silver release from individual compacts indicated that it was primarily dependent on fuel temperature history. Europium and strontium were released in small amounts through intact coatings, but were found to be significantly retained in the outer pyrocarbon and compact matrix. The capsule-average fractional release from the compacts was 1 × 10{sup −4} to 5 × 10{sup −4} for {sup 154}Eu and 8 × 10{sup −7} to 3 × 10{sup −5} for {sup 90}Sr. The average {sup 134}Cs fractional release from compacts was <3 × 10{sup −6} when all particles maintained intact SiC. An estimated four particles out of 2.98 × 10{sup 5} in the experiment experienced partial cesium release due to SiC failure during the irradiation, driving {sup 134}Cs fractional release in two capsules to approximately 10{sup −5}. Identification and characterization of these particles has provided unprecedented insight into

  18. Effects of Surface Roughness, Oxidation, and Temperature on the Emissivity of Reactor Pressure Vessel Alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, J. L. [University of Wisconsin–Madison, Department of Engineering Physics, Madison, Wisconsin; Jo, H. [University of Wisconsin–Madison, Department of Engineering Physics, Madison, Wisconsin; Tirawat, R. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Concentrating Solar Power Group, Golden, Colorado; Blomstrand, K. [University of Wisconsin–Madison, Department of Engineering Physics, Madison, Wisconsin; Sridharan, K. [University of Wisconsin–Madison, Department of Engineering Physics, Madison, Wisconsin

    2017-08-31

    Thermal radiation will be an important mode of heat transfer in future high-temperature reactors and in off-normal high-temperature scenarios in present reactors. In this work, spectral directional emissivities of two reactor pressure vessel (RPV) candidate materials were measured at room temperature after exposure to high-temperature air. In the case of SA508 steel, significant increases in emissivity were observed due to oxidation. In the case of Grade 91 steel, only very small increases were observed under the tested conditions. Effects of roughness were also investigated. To study the effects of roughening, unexposed samples of SA508 and Grade 91 steel were roughened via one of either grinding or shot-peening before being measured. Significant increases were observed only in samples having roughness exceeding the roughness expected of RPV surfaces. While the emissivity increases for SA508 from oxidation were indeed significant, the measured emissivity coefficients were below that of values commonly used in heat transfer models. Based on the observed experimental data, recommendations for emissivity inputs for heat transfer simulations are provided.

  19. Design of Helium Brayton Cycle for Small Modular High Temperature Gas cooled Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahn, Yoon Han; Lee, Je Kyoung; Lee, Jeong Ik [Korea Advanced Institue of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-05-15

    The small modular reactor (SMR) is gaining a lot of interest recently. Not only it can achieve better passive safety, but also it can be potentially utilized for the diverse applications to respond to the increasing global energy demands. As a part of the SMR development effort, SM-HTGR (Small Modular-High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor), a 20MWth reactor is under development by the Korean Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) for the complete passive safety, desalination and industrial process heat application. The Helium Brayton cycle is considered as a promising candidate for the SM-HTGR power conversion. The advantages of Helium Brayton cycles are: 1) helium is an inert gas that does not interact with structure material. 2) helium is chemically stable that helium Brayton cycle can be utilized under the high temperature circumstance. 3) higher thermal efficiency is achievable under higher outlet temperature range. Moreover, high temperature advantage can be utilized (reinforced) by diverting part of the heat for industrial process heat. This paper will discuss the progress on the helium power conversion cycle operating condition optimization by studying the sensitivity of the maximum pressure, pressure ratio and the component cooling on the total cycle efficiency

  20. Experimental assessment of accident scenarios for the high temperature reactor fuel system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seeger, O.; Avincola, V.; Bottomley, P.D.W.; Rondinella, V.V. [European Commission Joint Research Centre - Institute for Transuranium Elements (JRC-ITU) (Germany)

    2012-11-01

    The High Temperature Reactor (HTR) is an advanced reactor concept with particular safety features. Fuel elements are constituted by a graphite matrix containing sub-mm-sized fuel particles with TRISO (tri-isotropic) coating designed to provide high fission product retention. Passive safety features of the HTR include a low power density in the core compared to other reactor designs; this ensures sufficient heat transport in a loss of coolant accident scenario. The temperature during such events would not exceed 1600 C, remaining well below the melting point of the fuel. An experimental assessment of the fuel behaviour under severe accident conditions is necessary to confirm the fission product retention of TRISO coated particles and to validate relevant computer codes. Though helium is used as coolant for the HTR system, additional corrosion effects come into play in case of an in-leakage affecting the primary circuit. The experimental scope of the present work focuses on two key aspects associated with the HTR fuel safety. Fission product retention at high temperatures (up to {proportional_to}1800 C) is analyzed with the so-called cold finger apparatus (KueFA: Kuehlfinger-Apparatur), while the performance of HTR fuel elements in case of air/steam ingress accidents is assessed with a high temperature corrosion apparatus (KORA: Korrosions-Apparatur). (orig.)

  1. Plasma flow reactor for steady state monitoring of physical and chemical processes at high temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koroglu, Batikan; Mehl, Marco; Armstrong, Michael R.; Crowhurst, Jonathan C.; Weisz, David G.; Zaug, Joseph M.; Dai, Zurong; Radousky, Harry B.; Chernov, Alex; Ramon, Erick; Stavrou, Elissaios; Knight, Kim; Fabris, Andrea L.; Cappelli, Mark A.; Rose, Timothy P.

    2017-09-01

    We present the development of a steady state plasma flow reactor to investigate gas phase physical and chemical processes that occur at high temperature (1000 < T < 5000 K) and atmospheric pressure. The reactor consists of a glass tube that is attached to an inductively coupled argon plasma generator via an adaptor (ring flow injector). We have modeled the system using computational fluid dynamics simulations that are bounded by measured temperatures. In situ line-of-sight optical emission and absorption spectroscopy have been used to determine the structures and concentrations of molecules formed during rapid cooling of reactants after they pass through the plasma. Emission spectroscopy also enables us to determine the temperatures at which these dynamic processes occur. A sample collection probe inserted from the open end of the reactor is used to collect condensed materials and analyze them ex situ using electron microscopy. The preliminary results of two separate investigations involving the condensation of metal oxides and chemical kinetics of high-temperature gas reactions are discussed.

  2. Variação de diferentes tempos de revolvimento em secador de camada fixa para café = Evaluation of different revolving time in a fixed bed-coffee drier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Torres Campos

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Objetivou-se no presente trabalho avaliar a eficiência energética na secagem de café (Coffea arabica L. em secador de camada fixa, empregando-se diferentes combinações de tempo de revolvimento. O experimento foi realizado no mês de julho de 2004, no município de Jesuítas – Estado do Paraná. O secador, dotado de um sistema mecânico com pás, promovia o revolvimento rotatório do produto a diferentes intervalos de tempo. A temperatura do ar de secagem foi de 75 ± 5ºC. A ventilação e a secagem mantiveram-se contínuas no teste. Observou-se que a eficiência energética média foi de 12,3 MJ kg-1, nãosendo verificadas diferenças significativas entre os tratamentos. Para o modelo de secador utilizado recomenda-se a utilização do sistema de revolvimento com intervalos de 3h e secagem contínua.This study aimed to evaluate the energetic efficiency in coffee drying (Coffee arabica L. with different combinations of revolving time in a fixed-bed coffee dryer. The experiment was conducted in July 2004 in Jesuítas – Paraná state/Brazil. The dryer featured a mechanic system with rotating blades to revolve of the product at different intervals. The drying air temperature was 75°C ± 5ºC. The ventilation and drying was kept constant during the tests. It was observed that the average energy efficiency was 12.3 MJ kg-1 and there was no significant difference between the treatments. For theadopted dryer model, the revolving system is recommended with three-hour intervals and continuous drying.

  3. Advanced Catalytic Hydrogenation Retrofit Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reinaldo M. Machado

    2002-08-15

    Industrial hydrogenation is often performed using a slurry catalyst in large stirred-tank reactors. These systems are inherently problematic in a number of areas, including industrial hygiene, process safety, environmental contamination, waste production, process operability and productivity. This program proposed the development of a practical replacement for the slurry catalysts using a novel fixed-bed monolith catalyst reactor, which could be retrofitted onto an existing stirred-tank reactor and would mitigate many of the minitations and problems associated with slurry catalysts. The full retrofit monolith system, consisting of a recirculation pump, gas/liquid ejector and monolith catalyst, is described as a monolith loop reactor or MLR. The MLR technology can reduce waste and increase raw material efficiency, which reduces the overall energy required to produce specialty and fine chemicals.

  4. High-temperature gas-cooled reactor technology development program. Annual progress report for period ending December 31, 1982

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kasten, P.R.; Rittenhouse, P.L.; Bartine, D.E.; Sanders, J.P.

    1983-06-01

    During 1982 the High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) Technology Program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) continued to develop experimental data required for the design and licensing of cogeneration HTGRs. The program involves fuels and materials development (including metals, graphite, ceramic, and concrete materials), HTGR chemistry studies, structural component development and testing, reactor physics and shielding studies, performance testing of the reactor core support structure, and HTGR application and evaluation studies.

  5. A study of temperature sensor location based on fractal analysis for cascade control schemes in tubular reactors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eduardo Ramirez-Castelan, Carlos; Moguel-Castañeda, Jazael; Puebla, Hector

    2016-01-01

    Temperature sensor location for cascade control schemes in tubular reactors is still an open research problem. Several studies have pointed out that most temperature sensitive zones along the length of the reactor are suitable to this end. In this work, we have studied the problem of sensor...... location in a cascade control configuration using fractal analysis of time series obtained by random forcing of the jacket rector. A benchmark dispersion axial model displaying different temperature profiles is used to illustrate our findings....

  6. Irradiation performance of AGR-1 high temperature reactor fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul A. Demkowicz; John D. Hunn; Robert N. Morris; Charles A. Baldwin; Philip L. Winston; Jason M. Harp; Scott A. Ploger; Tyler Gerczak; Isabella J. van Rooyen; Fred C. Montgomery; Chinthaka M. Silva

    2014-10-01

    The AGR-1 experiment contained 72 low-enriched uranium oxide/uranium carbide TRISO-coated particle fuel compacts in six capsules irradiated to burnups of 11.2 to 19.5% FIMA, with zero TRISO coating failures detected during the irradiation. The irradiation performance of the fuel–including the extent of fission product release and the evolution of kernel and coating microstructures–was evaluated based on detailed examination of the irradiation capsules, the fuel compacts, and individual particles. Fractional release of 110mAg from the fuel compacts was often significant, with capsule-average values ranging from 0.01 to 0.38. Analysis of silver release from individual compacts indicated that it was primarily dependent on fuel temperature history. Europium and strontium were released in small amounts through intact coatings, but were found to be significantly retained in the outer pyrocrabon and compact matrix. The capsule-average fractional release from the compacts was 1×10 4 to 5×10 4 for 154Eu and 8×10 7 to 3×10 5 for 90Sr. The average 134Cs release from compacts was <3×10 6 when all particles maintained intact SiC. An estimated four particles out of 2.98×105 experienced partial cesium release due to SiC failure during the irradiation, driving 134Cs release in two capsules to approximately 10 5. Identification and characterization of these particles has provided unprecedented insight into the nature and causes of SiC coating failure in high-quality TRISO fuel. In general, changes in coating morphology were found to be dominated by the behavior of the buffer and inner pyrolytic carbon (IPyC), and infrequently observed SiC layer damage was usually related to cracks in the IPyC. Palladium attack of the SiC layer was relatively minor, except for the particles that released cesium during irradiation, where SiC corrosion was found adjacent to IPyC cracks. Palladium, silver, and uranium were found in the SiC layer of irradiated particles, and characterization

  7. High Temperature Gas Reactors: Assessment of Applicable Codes and Standards

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDowell, Bruce K.; Nickolaus, James R.; Mitchell, Mark R.; Swearingen, Gary L.; Pugh, Ray

    2011-10-31

    Current interest expressed by industry in HTGR plants, particularly modular plants with power up to about 600 MW(e) per unit, has prompted NRC to task PNNL with assessing the currently available literature related to codes and standards applicable to HTGR plants, the operating history of past and present HTGR plants, and with evaluating the proposed designs of RPV and associated piping for future plants. Considering these topics in the order they are arranged in the text, first the operational histories of five shut-down and two currently operating HTGR plants are reviewed, leading the authors to conclude that while small, simple prototype HTGR plants operated reliably, some of the larger plants, particularly Fort St. Vrain, had poor availability. Safety and radiological performance of these plants has been considerably better than LWR plants. Petroleum processing plants provide some applicable experience with materials similar to those proposed for HTGR piping and vessels. At least one currently operating plant - HTR-10 - has performed and documented a leak before break analysis that appears to be applicable to proposed future US HTGR designs. Current codes and standards cover some HTGR materials, but not all materials are covered to the high temperatures envisioned for HTGR use. Codes and standards, particularly ASME Codes, are under development for proposed future US HTGR designs. A 'roadmap' document has been prepared for ASME Code development; a new subsection to section III of the ASME Code, ASME BPVC III-5, is scheduled to be published in October 2011. The question of terminology for the cross-duct structure between the RPV and power conversion vessel is discussed, considering the differences in regulatory requirements that apply depending on whether this structure is designated as a 'vessel' or as a 'pipe'. We conclude that designing this component as a 'pipe' is the more appropriate choice, but that the ASME BPVC

  8. Adsorption of Hg(II) and Pb(II) ions by nanoscale zero valent iron supported on ostrich bone ash in a fixed-bed column system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amiri, Mohammad Javad; Abedi-Koupai, Jahangir; Eslamian, Saeid

    2017-07-01

    In this research, ostrich bone ash (OBA) was modified with nanoscale zerovalent iron (nZVI) particles and applied as a novel composite adsorbent (OBA/nZVI) for dynamic adsorption/reduction of Hg(II) and Pb(II) ions in a fixed-bed column system. Entrapment of nZVI in OBA beads barricades the particles from oxidation and aggregation. The dynamic behavior of metal ions removal by OBA/nZVI was assessed as a function of inlet flow rates, bed height, initial pollutants concentration and pH. The synthesized OBA/nZVI composite was characterized by several physicochemical techniques. Increase in pH and bed height and decrease in flow rates and initial metal concentration resulted in delay of breakthrough time. OBA breakthrough profile is sharper than the OBA/nZVI breakthrough curve for both metal ions and the breakthrough times increase in the order OBA/nZVI-Hg(II) > OBA/nZVI-Pb(II) > OBA-Pb(II) > OBA-Hg(II). Based on the experiment results, redox reaction is expected to occur to a certain extent, as the standard reduction potentials of Hg(II) and Pb(II) are more than that of Fe(II). From a practical point of view, the OBA/nZVI could be applied as a material to remove Hg(II) and Pb(II) ions from natural surface and ground water with a pH value of 5-9.

  9. Synthesis and characterization of organic-inorganic core-shell structure nanocomposite and application for Zn ions removal from aqueous solution in a fixed-bed column

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghasemi, Shokoofeh; Ghorbani, Mohsen; Ghazi, Mohsen Mehdipour

    2015-12-01

    An organic-inorganic core/shell structure, γ-Fe2O3/polyrhodanine nanocomposite with γ-Fe2O3 nanoparticle as core with average diameter of 15 nm and polyrhodanine as shell with thickness of 1.5 nm, has been synthesized via chemical oxidation polymerization and applied for adsorption of Zn ions from aqueous solution in a fixed-bed column. The properties of nanocomposite were characterized with transmission electron microscope (TEM), Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy and vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). The performance of the column was assessed under variable bed heights (10, 15 and 20 cm) and influent Zn concentrations (50, 100 and 150 ppm) at a constant flow rate (0.5 mL/min). The results demonstrated that the breakthrough curves are S-shaped and the breakthrough time increases with increasing bed height and decreases with increasing influent concentration. Moreover, the dynamics of the adsorption process were evaluated by using Adams-Bohart, bed depth service time (BDST), Thomas and Yoon-Nelson kinetic models. The models were nearly in good agreement with the experimental data.

  10. A hybrid treatment of ozonation with limestone adsorption processes for the removal of Fe2+ in groundwater: Fixed bed column study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbar, Nor Azliza; Aziz, Hamidi Abdul; Adlan, Mohd Nordin

    2017-10-01

    During pumping of groundwater to the surface, the reaction between dissolved iron (Fe2+) and oxygen causes oxidation to ferric iron (Fe3+), thereby increasing the concentration of Fe2+. In this research, the potential application of ozonation with limestone adsorption to remove Fe2+ from groundwater was investigated through batch ozonation and fixed-bed-column studies. Groundwater samples were collected from a University Science Malaysia tube well (initial concentration of Fe2+, Co=1.563 mg/L). The effect of varying ozone dosages (10, 12.5, 15, 17.5, 20, 22.5, and 25 g/Nm3) was analyzed to determine the optimum ozone dosage for treatment. The characteristics of the column data and breakthrough curve were analyzed and predicted using mathematical models, such as Adam Bohart, Thomas, and Yoon-Nelson models. The data fitted well to the Thomas and Yoon-Nelson models, with correlation coefficient r2>0.93, but not to the Adam Bohart (r2=0.47). The total Fe2+ removed was 72% (final concentration of Fe2+, Ct=0.426 mg/L) at the maximum dosage of 25 g/Nm3 through ozonation only. However, the efficiency of Fe2+ removal was increased up to 99.5% (Ct=0.008 mg/L) when the hybrid treatment of ozonation with limestone adsorption was applied in this study. Thus, this integrated treatment was considerably more effective in removing Fe2+ than single ozonation treatment.

  11. Dynamics of Pb(II) adsorption on nanostructured γ-alumina: calculations of axial dispersion and overall mass transfer coefficients in the fixed-bed column.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saadi, Zahra; Saadi, Reyhaneh; Fazaeli, Reza

    2015-09-01

    In the present study, the removal of metal ions Pb(II) using nanostructured γ-alumina was investigated by tests on batch operations and fixed-bed columns. Optimization was determined for factors effective on adsorption such as pH, contact time of metal solution with adsorbent and initial solution concentration. The optimum pH level was determined at 4.5 and the maximum adsorption percentage was achieved at 150 minutes. pHpzc was measured 8.3 for nanostructured γ-Al2O3. The Langmuir, Freundlich and Temkin isotherms were used to analyze the experimental data. The Langmuir isotherm model showed the best agreement with the experimental data. The model showed evaluations for maximum adsorption capacity of adsorbent at 119.04 mg/g and adsorbent bed performance for different flow rates, bed heights and influent concentrations were also investigated. The lumped method was used to solve the bed equations, to predict the breakthrough curve and model overall mass transfer coefficient (Koverall) and axial dispersion coefficient (Dz) parameters to make comparisons with experimental results.

  12. Evaluation and modification of ASPEN fixed-bed gasifier models for inclusion in an integrated gasification combined-cycle power plant simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stefano, J.M.

    1985-05-01

    Several Advanced System for Process Engineering (ASPEN) fixed-bed gasifier models have been evaluated to determine which is the most suitable model for use in an integrated gasification combined-cycle (IGCC) power plant simulation. Four existing ASPEN models were considered: RGAS, a dry ash gasifier model developed by Halcon/Scientific Design Company; USRWEN, the WEN II dry ash gasifier model originally developed by C.Y. Wen at West Virginia University; the slagging gasifier model developed by Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and based on Continental Oil Company's (CONOCO) design study for the proposed Pipeline Demonstration Plant; and the ORNL dry ash gasifier model developed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory for the simulation of the Tri-States Indirect Liquefaction Process. Because none of the models studied were suitable in their present form for inclusion in an IGCC power plant simulation, the SLAGGER model was developed by making significant modifications to the MIT model. The major problems with the existing ASPEN models were most often inaccurate material and energy balances, limitations of coal type, or long run times. The SLAGGER model includes simplifications and improvements over the MIT model, runs quickly (less than 30 seconds of computer time on a VAX-11/780), and gives more accurate mass and energy balances.

  13. Adsorption in a Fixed-Bed Column and Stability of the Antibiotic Oxytetracycline Supported on Zn(II-[2-Methylimidazolate] Frameworks in Aqueous Media.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janine dos Santos Ferreira da Silva

    Full Text Available A metal-organic framework, Zn-[2-methylimidazolate] frameworks (ZIF-8, was used as adsorbent material to remove different concentrations of oxytetracycline (OTC antibiotic in a fixed-bed column. The OTC was studied at concentrations of 10, 25 and 40 mg L(-1. At 40 mg L(-1, the breakthrough point was reached after approximately 10 minutes, while at 10 and 25 mg L(-1 this point was reached in about 30 minutes. The highest removal rate of 60% for the 10 mg L(-1 concentration was reached after 200 minutes. The highest adsorption capacity (28.3 mg g(-1 was attained for 25 mg L(-1 of OTC. After the adsorption process, a band shift was observed in the UV-Vis spectrum of the eluate. Additional studies were carried out to determine the cause of this band shift, involving a mass spectrometry (MS analysis of the supernatant liquid during the process. This investigation revealed that the main route of adsorption consisted of the coordination of OTC with the metallic zinc centers of ZIF-8. The materials were characterized by thermal analysis (TA, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, powder X-ray diffraction (XRD, and infrared spectroscopy (IR before and after adsorption, confirming the presence of OTC in the ZIF-8 and the latter's structural stability after the adsorption process.

  14. Competitive Fixed-Bed Adsorption of Pb(II, Cu(II, and Ni(II from Aqueous Solution Using Chitosan-Coated Bentonite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wan-Chi Tsai

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Fixed-bed adsorption studies using chitosan-coated bentonite (CCB as adsorbent media were investigated for the simultaneous adsorption of Pb(II, Cu(II, and Ni(II from a multimetal system. The effects of operational parameters such as bed height, flow rate, and initial concentration on the length of mass transfer zone, breakthrough time, exhaustion time, and adsorption capacity at breakthrough were evaluated. With increasing bed height and decreasing flow rate and initial concentration, the breakthrough and exhaustion time were observed to favorably increase. Moreover, the adsorption capacity at breakthrough was observed to increase with decreasing initial concentration and flow rate and increasing bed height. The maximum adsorption capacity at breakthrough of 13.49 mg/g for Pb(II, 12.14 mg/g for Cu(II, and 10.29 mg/g for Ni(II was attained at an initial influent concentration of 200 mg/L, bed height of 2.0 cm, and flow rate of 0.4 mL/min. Adsorption data were fitted with Adams-Bohart, Thomas, and Yoon-Nelson models. Experimental breakthrough curves were observed to be in good agreement (R2>0.85 and E%<50% with the predicted curves generated by the kinetic models. This study demonstrates the effectiveness of CCB in the removal of Pb(II, Cu(II, and Ni(II from a ternary metal solution.

  15. Pebble Fuel Handling and Reactivity Control for Salt-Cooled High Temperature Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peterson, Per [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering; Greenspan, Ehud [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering

    2015-02-09

    This report documents the work completed on the X-PREX facility under NEUP Project 11- 3172. This project seeks to demonstrate the viability of pebble fuel handling and reactivity control for fluoride salt-cooled high-temperature reactors (FHRs). The research results also improve the understanding of pebble motion in helium-cooled reactors, as well as the general, fundamental understanding of low-velocity granular flows. Successful use of pebble fuels in with salt coolants would bring major benefits for high-temperature reactor technology. Pebble fuels enable on-line refueling and operation with low excess reactivity, and thus simpler reactivity control and improved fuel utilization. If fixed fuel designs are used, the power density of salt- cooled reactors is limited to 10 MW/m3 to obtain adequate duration between refueling, but pebble fuels allow power densities in the range of 20 to 30 MW/m3. This can be compared to the typical modular helium reactor power density of 5 MW/m3. Pebble fuels also permit radial zoning in annular cores and use of thorium or graphite pebble blankets to reduce neutron fluences to outer radial reflectors and increase total power production. Combined with high power conversion efficiency, compact low-pressure primary and containment systems, and unique safety characteristics including very large thermal margins (>500°C) to fuel damage during transients and accidents, salt-cooled pebble fuel cores offer the potential to meet the major goals of the Advanced Reactor Concepts Development program to provide electricity at lower cost than light water reactors with improved safety and system performance.This report presents the facility description, experimental results, and supporting simulation methods of the new X-Ray Pebble Recirculation Experiment (X-PREX), which is now operational and being used to collect data on the behavior of slow dense granular flows relevant to pebble bed reactor core designs. The X

  16. Pebble Bed Reactors Design Optimization Methods and their Application to the Pebble Bed Fluoride Salt Cooled High Temperature Reactor (PB-FHR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cisneros, Anselmo Tomas, Jr.

    The Fluoride salt cooled High temperature Reactor (FHR) is a class of advanced nuclear reactors that combine the robust coated particle fuel form from high temperature gas cooled reactors, direct reactor auxillary cooling system (DRACS) passive decay removal of liquid metal fast reactors, and the transparent, high volumetric heat capacitance liquid fluoride salt working fluids---flibe (33%7Li2F-67%BeF)---from molten salt reactors. This combination of fuel and coolant enables FHRs to operate in a high-temperature low-pressure design space that has beneficial safety and economic implications. In 2012, UC Berkeley was charged with developing a pre-conceptual design of a commercial prototype FHR---the Pebble Bed- Fluoride Salt Cooled High Temperature Reactor (PB-FHR)---as part of the Nuclear Energy University Programs' (NEUP) integrated research project. The Mark 1 design of the PB-FHR (Mk1 PB-FHR) is 236 MWt flibe cooled pebble bed nuclear heat source that drives an open-air Brayton combine-cycle power conversion system. The PB-FHR's pebble bed consists of a 19.8% enriched uranium fuel core surrounded by an inert graphite pebble reflector that shields the outer solid graphite reflector, core barrel and reactor vessel. The fuel reaches an average burnup of 178000 MWt-d/MT. The Mk1 PB-FHR exhibits strong negative temperature reactivity feedback from the fuel, graphite moderator and the flibe coolant but a small positive temperature reactivity feedback of the inner reflector and from the outer graphite pebble reflector. A novel neutronics and depletion methodology---the multiple burnup state methodology was developed for an accurate and efficient search for the equilibrium composition of an arbitrary continuously refueled pebble bed reactor core. The Burnup Equilibrium Analysis Utility (BEAU) computer program was developed to implement this methodology. BEAU was successfully benchmarked against published results generated with existing equilibrium depletion codes VSOP

  17. Design aspects of the Chinese modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactor HTR-PM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Zuoyi [Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Wu Zongxin [Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Sun Yuliang [Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Li Fu [Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)]. E-mail: lifu@tsinghua.edu.cn

    2006-03-15

    The modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (MHTGR) has distinct advantages in terms of inherent safety, economics potential, high efficiency, potential usage for hydrogen production, etc. The Chinese design of the MHTGR, named as high-temperature gas-cooled reactor-pebble bed module (HTR-PM), based on the technology and experience of the HTR-10, is currently in the conceptual phase. The HTR-PM demonstration plant is planned to be finished by 2012. The main philosophy of the HTR-PM project can be pinned down as: (1) safety, (2) standardization, (3) economy, and (4) proven technology. The work in the categories of marketing, organization, project and technology is done in predefined order. The biggest challenge for the HTR-PM is to ensure its economical viability while maintaining its inherent safety. A design of a 450 MWth annular pebble bed core connected with steam turbine is aimed for and presented in this paper.

  18. Estimativa das propriedades térmicas efetivas de grãos em um secador de leito fixo Estimation of effective grain thermal properties in a fixed bed dryer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. V. Fregolente

    2004-06-01

    parameters can be obtained from the adjustment of a steadystate two-dimensional pseudohomogeneous model to several fixed bed temperature measurements at the end of the drying process. The results show that the strategy used to evaluate the effective thermal conductivity and the effective wall heat transfer coefficient was appropriate. In addition, among the grains analysed - soy, bean, corn and wheat-, soy presents the smallest values of effective radial conductivity, while wheat presents the greatest effective wall heat transfer value.

  19. The modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactor: A cost/risk competitive nuclear option

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gotschall, H.L. (Gas-Cooled Reactor Associates, San Diego, CA (United States))

    1994-01-01

    The business risks of nuclear plant ownership are identified as a constraint on the expanded use of nuclear power. Such risks stem from the exacting demands placed on owner/operator organizations of current plants to demonstrate ongoing compliance with safety regulations and the resulting high costs for operation and maintenance. This paper describes the Modular High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (MHTGR) design, competitive economics, and approach to reducing the business risks of nuclear plant ownership.

  20. Reference modular High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor Plant: Concept description report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1986-10-01

    This report provides a summary description of the Modular High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (MHTGR) concept and interim results of assessments of costs, safety, constructibility, operability, maintainability, and availability. Conceptual design of this concept was initiated in October 1985 and is scheduled for completion in 1987. Participating industrial contractors are Bechtel National, Inc. (BNI), Stone and Webster Engineering Corporation (SWEC), GA Technologies, Inc. (GA), General Electric Co. (GE), and Combustion Engineering, Inc. (C-E).

  1. Comparative evaluation of pebble-bed and prismatic fueled high-temperature gas-cooled reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kasten, P.R.; Bartine, D.E.

    1981-01-01

    A comparative evaluation has been performed of the HTGR and the Federal Republic of Germany's Pebble Bed Reactor (PBR) for potential commercial applications in the US. The evaluation considered two reactor sizes (1000 and 3000 MW(t)) and three process applications (steam cycle, direct cycle, and process heat, with outlet coolant temperatures of 750, 850, and 950/sup 0/C, respectively). The primary criterion for the comparison was the levelized (15-year) cost of producing electricity or process heat. Emphasis was placed on the cost impact of differences between the prismatic-type HTGR core, which requires periodic refuelings during reactor shutdowns, and the pebble bed PBR core, which is refueled continuously during reactor operations. Detailed studies of key technical issues using reference HTGR and PBR designs revealed that two cost components contributing to the levelized power costs are higher for the PBR: capital costs and operation and maintenance costs. A third cost component, associated with nonavailability penalties, tended to be higher for the PBR except for the process heat application, for which there is a large uncertainty in the HTGR nonavailability penalty at the 950/sup 0/C outlet coolant temperature. A fourth cost component, fuel cycle costs, is lower for the PBR, but not sufficiently lower to offset the capital cost component. Thus the HTGR appears to be slightly superior to the PBR in economic performance. Because of the advanced development of the HTGR concept, large HTGRs could also be commercialized in the US with lower R and D costs and shorter lead times than could large PBRs. It is recommended that the US gas-cooled thermal reactor program continue giving primary support to the HTGR, while also maintaining its cooperative PBR program with FRG.

  2. Sensitivity studies of modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactor postulated accidents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ball, Syd [Nuclear Science and Technology Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6010 (United States)]. E-mail: sjb@ornl.gov

    2006-03-15

    The results of various accident scenario simulations for the two major modular high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) variants (prismatic and pebble bed cores) are presented. Sensitivity studies can help to quantify the uncertainty ranges of the predicted outcomes for variations in some of the more crucial system parameters, as well as for occurrences of equipment and/or operator failures or errors. In addition, sensitivity studies can guide further efforts in improving the design and determining where more (or less) R and D is appropriate. Both of the modular HTGR designs studied - the 400-MW(t) pebble bed modular reactor (PBMR, pebble) and the 600-MW(t) gas-turbine modular helium reactor (GT-MHR, prismatic) - show excellent accident prevention and mitigation capabilities because of their inherent passive safety features. The large thermal margins between operating and 'potential damage' temperatures, along with the typically very slow accident response times (approximate days to reach peak temperatures), tend to reduce concerns about uncertainties in the simulation models, the initiating events, and the equipment and operator responses.

  3. A temperature swing adsorptive reactor for the enhancement of catalytic dehydrogenation reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, M.; Jang, E.J. [LG Engineering Co., Ltd. (Korea, Republic of); Moon, J.K. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-02-01

    Based on temperature swing concept arising from forced periodic variations in feed conditions, a theoretical study of a novel catalytic reactor system is carried out, in which adsorption and reaction occur simultaneously. In order to evaluate the performance of a temperature swing adsorptive reaction(TSAR) process for various operating conditions, the rigorous dynamic model of the reactor is developed and dynamic simulation is performed. In the application of the concept suggested in this paper, the dehydrogenation process of methyl-cyclohexane(MCH) to produce toluene is employed and the conversion and energy consumption is calculated. The results are compared with the case of isothermal equilibrium reaction. For the whole range of investigation, it is examined TSAR process is superior to an isothermal equilibrium reactor in the sense of a conversion and energy saving. In the consideration of the results of this study, TSAR process can provide a means for the effective utilization of a waste heat source for reaction heat and for feed gas preheat; periodic catalyst regeneration; the generation of optimal temperature for the improvement of a conversion; and reaction enhancement for theoretically limited reactions.

  4. Kinetic study on the effect of temperature on biogas production using a lab scale batch reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deepanraj, B; Sivasubramanian, V; Jayaraj, S

    2015-11-01

    In the present study, biogas production from food waste through anaerobic digestion was carried out in a 2l laboratory-scale batch reactor operating at different temperatures with a hydraulic retention time of 30 days. The reactors were operated with a solid concentration of 7.5% of total solids and pH 7. The food wastes used in this experiment were subjected to characterization studies before and after digestion. Modified Gompertz model and Logistic model were used for kinetic study of biogas production. The kinetic parameters, biogas yield potential of the substrate (B), the maximum biogas production rate (Rb) and the duration of lag phase (λ), coefficient of determination (R(2)) and root mean square error (RMSE) were estimated in each case. The effect of temperature on biogas production was evaluated experimentally and compared with the results of kinetic study. The results demonstrated that the reactor with operating temperature of 50°C achieved maximum cumulative biogas production of 7556ml with better biodegradation efficiency. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Low-temperature anaerobic digestion of swine manure in a plug-flow reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massé, Daniel I; Gilbert, Yan; Saady, N M C; Liu, Charle

    2013-01-01

    A low-temperature (25 degrees C) anaerobic eight-compartment (PF01 to PF08) cascade reactor simulating a plug-flow reactor (PFR) treating pig manure was monitored for a year. The bioreactor was fed at an average loading rate of 2.4 +/- 0.2 g of total chemical oxygen demand (TCOD) per litre of reactor per day for a theoretical hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 67 +/- 7 d. An average of 79% of TCOD was removed from pig manure (converted into biogas and in sediments), whereas specific methane yields ranging from 397 to 482 NL CH4 kg(-1) VS (148.6 to 171.4 NL CH4 kg(-1) TCOD) were obtained. After 150 d, fluctuating performances of the process were observed, associated with solids accumulation in the upstream compartments, preventing the complete anaerobic digestion of swine manure in the compartments PF01 to PF04. Low-temperature anaerobic PFR represents an interesting alternative for the treatment of pig manure and recovery of green energy. Further investigations regarding a modified design, with better accumulating solids management, are needed to optimize the performance of this low-temperature PFR treating pig manure.

  6. Performance Estimation of Supercritical Co2 Micro Modular Reactor (MMR) for Varying Cooling Air Temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahn, Yoonhan; Kim, Seong Gu; Cho, Seong Kuk; Lee, Jeong Ik [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    A Small Modular Reactor (SMR) receives interests for the various application such as electricity co-generation, small-scale power generation, seawater desalination, district heating and propulsion. As a part of SMR development, supercritical CO2 Micro Modular Reactor (MMR) of 36.2MWth in power is under development by the KAIST research team. To enhance the mobility, the entire system including the power conversion system is designed for the full modularization. Based on the preliminary design, the thermal efficiency is 31.5% when CO2 is sufficiently cooled to the design temperature. A supercritical CO2 MMR is designed to supply electricity to the remote regions. The ambient temperature of the area can influence the compressor inlet temperature as the reactor is cooled with the atmospheric air. To estimate the S-CO2 cycle performance for various environmental conditions, A quasi-static analysis code is developed. For the off design performance of S-CO2 turbomachineries, the experimental result of Sandia National Lab (SNL) is utilized.

  7. Partial oxidation of methane in a temperature-controlled dielectric barrier discharge reactor

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Xuming

    2015-01-01

    We studied the relative importance of the reduced field intensity and the background reaction temperature in the partial oxidation of methane in a temperature-controlled dielectric barrier discharge reactor. We obtained important mechanistic insight from studying high-temperature and low-pressure conditions with similar reduced field intensities. In the tested range of background temperatures (297 < T < 773 K), we found that the conversion of methane and oxygen depended on both the electron-induced chemistry and the thermo-chemistry, whereas the chemical pathways to the products were overall controlled by the thermo-chemistry at a given temperature. We also found that the thermo-chemistry enhanced the plasma-assisted partial oxidation process. Our findings expand our understanding of the plasma-assisted partial oxidation process and may be helpful in the design of cost-effective plasma reformers. © 2014 The Combustion Institute.

  8. The application of an innovative continuous multiple tube reactor as a strategy to control the specific organic loading rate for biohydrogen production by dark fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Simone D; Fuess, Lucas T; Penteado, Eduardo D; Lucas, Shaiane D M; Gotardo, Jackeline T; Zaiat, Marcelo

    2015-12-01

    Biohydrogen production in fixed-bed reactors often leads to unstable and decreasing patterns because the excessive accumulation of biomass in the bed negatively affects the specific organic loading rate (SOLR) applied to the reactor. In this context, an innovative reactor configuration, i.e., the continuous multiple tube reactor (CMTR), was assessed in an attempt to better control the SOLR for biohydrogen production. The CMTR provides a continuous discharge of biomass, preventing the accumulation of solids in the long-term. Sucrose was used as the carbon source and mesophilic temperature conditions (25°C) were applied in three continuous assays. The reactor showed better performance when support material was placed in the outlet chamber to enhance biomass retention within the reactor. Although the SOLR could not be effectively controlled, reaching values usually higher than 10gsucroseg(-1)VSSd(-1), the volumetric hydrogen production and molar hydrogen production rates peaked, respectively, at 1470mLH2L(-1)d(-1) and 45mmolH2d(-1), indicating that the CMTR was a suitable configuration for biohydrogen production. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Uncertainty quantification of calculated temperatures for advanced gas reactor fuel irradiation experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pham, Binh Thi-Cam [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Hawkes, Grant Lynn [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Einerson, Jeffrey James [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-08-01

    This paper presents the quantification of uncertainty of the calculated temperature data for the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) fuel irradiation experiments conducted in the Advanced Test Reactor at Idaho National Laboratory in support of the Advanced Reactor Technology Research and Development program. Recognizing uncertainties inherent in physics and thermal simulations of the AGR tests, the results of the numerical simulations are used in combination with statistical analysis methods to improve qualification of measured data. The temperature simulation data for AGR tests are also used for validation of the fission product transport and fuel performance simulation models. These crucial roles of the calculated fuel temperatures in ensuring achievement of the AGR experimental program objectives require accurate determination of the model temperature uncertainties. To quantify the uncertainty of AGR calculated temperatures, this study identifies and analyzes ABAQUS model parameters of potential importance to the AGR predicted fuel temperatures. The selection of input parameters for uncertainty quantification of the AGR calculated temperatures is based on the ranking of their influences on variation of temperature predictions. Thus, selected input parameters include those with high sensitivity and those with large uncertainty. Propagation of model parameter uncertainty and sensitivity is then used to quantify the overall uncertainty of AGR calculated temperatures. Expert judgment is used as the basis to specify the uncertainty range for selected input parameters. The input uncertainties are dynamic accounting for the effect of unplanned events and changes in thermal properties of capsule components over extended exposure to high temperature and fast neutron irradiation. The sensitivity analysis performed in this work went beyond the traditional local sensitivity. Using experimental design, analysis of pairwise interactions of model parameters was performed to establish

  10. Effect of Thermal Degradation on High Temperature Ultrasonic Transducer Performance in Small Modular Reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilgunde, Prathamesh N.; Bond, Leonard J.

    Prototype ultrasonic NDT transducers for use in immersion in coolants for small modular reactors have shown low signal to noise ratio. The reasons for the limitations in performance at high temperature are under investigation, and include changes in component properties. This current work seeks to quantify the issue of thermal expansion and degradation of the piezoelectric material in a transducer using a finite element method. The computational model represents an experimental set up for an ultrasonic transducer in a pulse-echo mode immersed in a liquid sodium coolant. Effect on transmitted and received ultrasonic signal due to elevated temperature (∼200oC) has been analysed.

  11. Design Strategies for Optically-Accessible, High-Temperature, High-Pressure Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. F. Rice; R. R. Steeper; C. A. LaJeunesse; R. G. Hanush; J. D. Aiken

    2000-02-01

    The authors have developed two optical cell designs for high-pressure and high-temperature fluid research: one for flow systems, and the other for larger batch systems. The flow system design uses spring washers to balance the unequal thermal expansions of the reactor and the window materials. A typical design calculation is presented showing the relationship between system pressure, operating temperature, and torque applied to the window-retaining nut. The second design employs a different strategy more appropriate for larger windows. This design uses two seals: one for the window that benefits from system pressure, and a second one that relies on knife-edge, metal-to-metal contact.

  12. Design strategies for optically-accessible, high-temperature, high-pressure reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. F. Rice; R. R. Steeper; C. A. LaJeunesse; R. G. Hanush; J. D. Aiken

    2000-02-01

    The authors have developed two optical cell designs for high-pressure and high-temperature fluid research: one for flow systems, and the other for larger batch systems. The flow system design uses spring washers to balance the unequal thermal expansions of the reactor and the window materials. A typical design calculation is presented showing the relationship between system pressure, operating temperature, and torque applied to the window-retaining nut. The second design employs a different strategy more appropriate for larger windows. This design uses two seals: one for the window that benefits from system pressure, and a second one that relies on knife-edge, metal-to-metal contact.

  13. Catalytic-Dielectric Barrier Discharge Plasma Reactor For Methane and Carbon Dioxide Conversion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Istadi Istadi

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available A catalytic - DBD plasma reactor was designed and developed for co-generation of synthesis gas and C2+ hydrocarbons from methane. A hybrid Artificial Neural Network - Genetic Algorithm (ANN-GA was developed to model, simulate and optimize the reactor. Effects of CH4/CO2 feed ratio, total feed flow rate, discharge voltage and reactor wall temperature on the performance of catalytic DBD plasma reactor was explored. The Pareto optimal solutions and corresponding optimal operating parameters ranges based on multi-objectives can be suggested for catalytic DBD plasma reactor owing to two cases, i.e. simultaneous maximization of CH4 conversion and C2+ selectivity, and H2 selectivity and H2/CO ratio. It can be concluded that the hybrid catalytic DBD plasma reactor is potential for co-generation of synthesis gas and higher hydrocarbons from methane and carbon dioxide and showed better than the conventional fixed bed reactor with respect to CH4 conversion, C2+ yield and H2 selectivity for CO2 OCM process. © 2007 BCREC UNDIP. All rights reserved.[Presented at Symposium and Congress of MKICS 2007, 18-19 April 2007, Semarang, Indonesia][How to Cite: I. Istadi, N.A.S. Amin. (2007. Catalytic-Dielectric Barrier Discharge Plasma Reactor For Methane and Carbon Dioxide Conversion. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering and Catalysis, 2 (2-3: 37-44.  doi:10.9767/bcrec.2.2-3.8.37-44][How to Link/DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.9767/bcrec.2.2-3.8.37-44 || or local: http://ejournal.undip.ac.id/index.php/bcrec/article/view/8][Cited by: Scopus 1 |

  14. Radionuclides in primary coolant of a fluoride salt-cooled high-temperature reactor during normal operation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zhang, Guo-Qing; Wang, Shuai; Zhang, Hai-Qing; Zhu, Xing-Wang; Peng, Chao; Cai, Jun; He, Zhao-Zhong; Chen, Kun

    2017-01-01

    The release of fission products from coated particle fuel to primary coolant, as well as the activation of coolant and impurities, were analysed for a fluoride salt-cooled high-temperature reactor (FHR...

  15. Elevated-Temperature Ferritic and Martensitic Steels and Their Application to Future Nuclear Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klueh, RL

    2005-01-31

    In the 1970s, high-chromium (9-12% Cr) ferritic/martensitic steels became candidates for elevated-temperature applications in the core of fast reactors. Steels developed for conventional power plants, such as Sandvik HT9, a nominally Fe-12Cr-1Mo-0.5W-0.5Ni-0.25V-0.2C steel (composition in wt %), were considered in the United States, Europe, and Japan. Now, a new generation of fission reactors is in the planning stage, and ferritic, bainitic, and martensitic steels are again candidates for in-core and out-of-core applications. Since the 1970s, advances have been made in developing steels with 2-12% Cr for conventional power plants that are significant improvements over steels originally considered. This paper will review the development of the new steels to illustrate the advantages they offer for the new reactor concepts. Elevated-temperature mechanical properties will be emphasized. Effects of alloying additions on long-time thermal exposure with and without stress (creep) will be examined. Information on neutron radiation effects will be discussed as it applies to ferritic and martensitic steels.

  16. CFD Model Development and validation for High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor Cavity Cooling System (RCCS) Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hassan, Yassin [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States); Corradini, Michael; Tokuhiro, Akira; Wei, Thomas Y.C.

    2014-07-14

    The Reactor Cavity Cooling Systems (RCCS) is a passive safety system that will be incorporated in the VTHR design. The system was designed to remove the heat from the reactor cavity and maintain the temperature of structures and concrete walls under desired limits during normal operation (steady-state) and accident scenarios. A small scale (1:23) water-cooled experimental facility was scaled, designed, and constructed in order to study the complex thermohydraulic phenomena taking place in the RCCS during steady-state and transient conditions. The facility represents a portion of the reactor vessel with nine stainless steel coolant risers and utilizes water as coolant. The facility was equipped with instrumentation to measure temperatures and flow rates and a general verification was completed during the shakedown. A model of the experimental facility was prepared using RELAP5-3D and simulations were performed to validate the scaling procedure. The experimental data produced during the steady-state run were compared with the simulation results obtained using RELAP5-3D. The overall behavior of the facility met the expectations. The facility capabilities were confirmed to be very promising in performing additional experimental tests, including flow visualization, and produce data for code validation.

  17. Neutronic analysis stochastic distribution of fuel particles in Very High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Wei

    The Very High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (VHTR) is a promising candidate for Generation IV designs due to its inherent safety, efficiency, and its proliferation-resistant and waste minimizing fuel cycle. A number of these advantages stem from its unique fuel design, consisting of a stochastic mixture of tiny (0.78mm diameter) microspheres with multiple coatings. However, the microsphere fuel regions represent point absorbers for resonance energy neutrons, resulting in the "double heterogeneity" for particle fuel. Special care must be taken to analyze this fuel in order to predict the spatial and spectral dependence of the neutron population in a steady-state reactor configuration. The challenges are considerable and resist brute force computation: there are over 1010 microspheres in a typical reactor configuration, with no hope of identifying individual microspheres in this stochastic mixture. Moreover, when individual microspheres "deplete" (e.g., burn the fissile isotope U-235 or transmute the fertile isotope U-238 (eventually) to Pu-239), the stochastic time-dependent nature of the depletion compounds the difficulty posed by the stochastic spatial mixture of the fuel, resulting in a prohibitive computational challenge. The goal of this research is to develop a methodology to analyze particle fuel randomly distributed in the reactor, accounting for the kernel absorptions as well as the stochastic depletion of the fuel mixture. This Ph.D. dissertation will address these challenges by developing a methodology for analyzing particle fuel that will be accurate enough to properly model stochastic particle fuel in both static and time-dependent configurations and yet be efficient enough to be used for routine analyses. This effort includes creation of a new physical model, development of a simulation algorithm, and application to real reactor configurations.

  18. Evaluation of wrapper tubes temperature of neutron fast reactors by Transcoeur-2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valentin, B.; Brun, P. [CEA Centre d`Etudes de Cadarache, 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France). Dept. d`Etudes des Combustibles; Chaigne, G. [Societe Franco-Americaine de Constructions Atomiques (FRAMATOME), 92 - Paris-La-Defense (France)

    1995-12-31

    This paper deals with the thermal loading estimation of wrapper tubes by TRANSCOEUR-2 code. This estimation needs the knowledge of two temperature fields: the first is the peripheral sub-channels temperature of each sub-assembly computed by the design field computed by the thermohydraulic code TRIO-Vf with boundary conditions coming from CADET. The modeling of each code is presented as the first application of TRANSCOEUR-2 is performed on the European Fast Reactor (EFR) Core Design 6/92 (CD 6/91) in the nominal power conditions. The results show a temperature variation between the bottom and the top of the sub-assemblies fuel columns of 110 Celsius grades in the center of the core and 95 celsius grades at its periphery. The wrapper tubes temperatures are higher in the center than in the external side of the core. (authors). 2 refs., 8 figs.

  19. Off-design temperature effects on nuclear fuel pins for an advanced space-power-reactor concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowles, K. J.

    1974-01-01

    An exploratory out-of-reactor investigation was made of the effects of short-time temperature excursions above the nominal operating temperature of 990 C on the compatibility of advanced nuclear space-power reactor fuel pin materials. This information is required for formulating a reliable reactor safety analysis and designing an emergency core cooling system. Simulated uranium mononitride (UN) fuel pins, clad with tungsten-lined T-111 (Ta-8W-2Hf) showed no compatibility problems after heating for 8 hours at 2400 C. At 2520 C and above, reactions occurred in 1 hour or less. Under these conditions free uranium formed, redistributed, and attacked the cladding.

  20. Fluoride-Salt-Cooled High-Temperature Reactor (FHR) for Power and Process Heat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forsberg, Charles [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Hu, Lin-wen [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Peterson, Per [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Sridharan, Kumar [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    2015-01-21

    In 2011 the U.S. Department of Energy through its Nuclear Energy University Program (NEUP) awarded a 3- year integrated research project (IRP) to the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and its partners at the University of California at Berkeley (UCB) and the University of Wisconsin at Madison (UW). The IRP included Westinghouse Electric Company and an advisory panel chaired by Regis Matzie that provided advice as the project progressed. The first sentence of the proposal stated the goals: The objective of this Integrated Research Project (IRP) is to develop a path forward to a commercially viable salt-cooled solid-fuel high-temperature reactor with superior economic, safety, waste, nonproliferation, and physical security characteristics compared to light-water reactors. This report summarizes major results of this research.

  1. High temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) graphite pebble fuel: Review of technologies for reprocessing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mcwilliams, A. J. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2015-09-08

    This report reviews literature on reprocessing high temperature gas-cooled reactor graphite fuel components. A basic review of the various fuel components used in the pebble bed type reactors is provided along with a survey of synthesis methods for the fabrication of the fuel components. Several disposal options are considered for the graphite pebble fuel elements including the storage of intact pebbles, volume reduction by separating the graphite from fuel kernels, and complete processing of the pebbles for waste storage. Existing methods for graphite removal are presented and generally consist of mechanical separation techniques such as crushing and grinding chemical techniques through the use of acid digestion and oxidation. Potential methods for reprocessing the graphite pebbles include improvements to existing methods and novel technologies that have not previously been investigated for nuclear graphite waste applications. The best overall method will be dependent on the desired final waste form and needs to factor in the technical efficiency, political concerns, cost, and implementation.

  2. A preliminary neutronic evaluation of high temperature engineering test reactor using the SCALE6 code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanure, L. P. A. R.; Sousa, R. V.; Costa, D. F.; Cardoso, F.; Veloso, M. A. F.; Pereira, C.

    2014-02-01

    Neutronic parameters of some fourth generation nuclear reactors have been investigated at the Departamento de Engenharia Nuclear/UFMG. Previous studies show the possibility to increase the transmutation capabilities of these fourth generation systems to achieve significant reduction concerning transuranic elements in spent fuel. To validate the studies, a benchmark on core physics analysis, related to initial testing of the High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor and provided by International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) was simulated using the Standardized Computer Analysis for Licensing Evaluation (SCALE). The CSAS6/KENO-VI control sequence and the 44-group ENDF/B-V 0 cross-section neutron library were used to evaluate the keff (effective multiplication factor) and the result presents good agreement with experimental value.

  3. Transient analysis of nuclear graphite oxidation for high temperature gas cooled reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Wei, E-mail: wxu12@mails.tsinghua.edu.cn; Shi, Lei; Zheng, Yanhua

    2016-09-15

    Graphite is widely used as moderator, reflector and structural materials in the high temperature gas-cooled reactor pebble-bed modular (HTR-PM). In normal operating conditions or water/air ingress accident, the nuclear graphite in the reactor may be oxidized by air or steam. Oxidation behavior of nuclear graphite IG-110 which is used as the structural materials and reflector of HTR-PM is mainly researched in this paper. To investigate the penetration depth of oxygen in IG-110, this paper developed the one dimensional spherical oxidation model. In the oxidation model, the equations considered graphite porosity variation with the graphite weight loss. The effect of weight loss on the effective diffusion coefficient and the oxidation rate was also considered in this model. Based on this theoretical model, this paper obtained the relative concentration and local weight loss ratio profile in graphite. In addition, the local effective diffusion coefficient and oxidation rate in the graphite were also investigated.

  4. Core and Refueling Design Studies for the Advanced High Temperature Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holcomb, David Eugene [ORNL; Ilas, Dan [ORNL; Varma, Venugopal Koikal [ORNL; Cisneros, Anselmo T [ORNL; Kelly, Ryan P [ORNL; Gehin, Jess C [ORNL

    2011-09-01

    The Advanced High Temperature Reactor (AHTR) is a design concept for a central generating station type [3400 MW(t)] fluoride-salt-cooled high-temperature reactor (FHR). The overall goal of the AHTR development program is to demonstrate the technical feasibility of FHRs as low-cost, large-size power producers while maintaining full passive safety. This report presents the current status of ongoing design studies of the core, in-vessel structures, and refueling options for the AHTR. The AHTR design remains at the notional level of maturity as important material, structural, neutronic, and hydraulic issues remain to be addressed. The present design space exploration, however, indicates that reasonable options exist for the AHTR core, primary heat transport path, and fuel cycle provided that materials and systems technologies develop as anticipated. An illustration of the current AHTR core, reactor vessel, and nearby structures is shown in Fig. ES1. The AHTR core design concept is based upon 252 hexagonal, plate fuel assemblies configured to form a roughly cylindrical core. The core has a fueled height of 5.5 m with 25 cm of reflector above and below the core. The fuel assembly hexagons are {approx}45 cm across the flats. Each fuel assembly contains 18 plates that are 23.9 cm wide and 2.55 cm thick. The reactor vessel has an exterior diameter of 10.48 m and a height of 17.7 m. A row of replaceable graphite reflector prismatic blocks surrounds the core radially. A more complete reactor configuration description is provided in Section 2 of this report. The AHTR core design space exploration was performed under a set of constraints. Only low enrichment (<20%) uranium fuel was considered. The coated particle fuel and matrix materials were derived from those being developed and demonstrated under the Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE) advanced gas reactor program. The coated particle volumetric packing fraction was restricted to at most 40%. The pressure

  5. Effect of inlet temperature on the performance of a catalytic reactor. [air pollution control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, D. N.

    1978-01-01

    A 12 cm diameter by 15 cm long catalytic reactor was tested with No. 2 diesel fuel in a combustion test rig at inlet temperatures of 700, 800, 900, and 1000 K. Other test conditions included pressures of 3 and 6 x 10 to the 5th power Pa, reference velocities of 10, 15, and 20 m/s, and adiabatic combustion temperatures in the range 1100 to 1400 K. The combustion efficiency was calculated from measurements of carbon monoxide and unburned hydrocarbon emissions. Nitrogen oxide emissions and reactor pressure drop were also measured. At a reference velocity of 10 m/s, the CO and unburned hydrocarbons emissions, and, therefore, the combustion efficiency, were independent of inlet temperature. At an inlet temperature of 1000 K, they were independent of reference velocity. Nitrogen oxides emissions resulted from conversion of the small amount (135 ppm) of fuel-bound nitrogen in the fuel. Up to 90 percent conversion was observed with no apparent effect of any of the test variables. For typical gas turbine operating conditions, all three pollutants were below levels which would permit the most stringent proposed automotive emissions standards to be met.

  6. Gas-cooled reactor programs: high-temperature gas-cooled reactor technology development program. Annual progress report for period ending December 31, 1981

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1982-06-01

    Information is presented concerning HTGR chemistry; fueled graphite development; irradiation services for General Atomic Company; prestressed concrete pressure vessel development; HTGR structural materials; graphite development; high-temperature reactor physics studies; shielding studies; component flow test loop studies; core support performance test; and application and project assessments.

  7. Development of standardized air-blown coal gasifier/gas turbine concepts for future electric power systems. Volume 2, Appendix A: Fixed bed gasifier and sulfur sorbent regeneration subsystem computer model development: Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blough, E.; Russell, W.; Leach, J.W.

    1990-08-01

    Computer models have been developed for evaluating conceptual designs of integrated coal gasification combined cycle power plants. An overall system model was developed for performing thermodynamic cycle analyses, and detailed models were developed for predicting performance characteristics of fixed bed coal gasifiers and hot gas clean up subsystem components. The overall system model performs mass and energy balances and does chemical equilibrium analyses to determine the effects of changes in operating conditions, or to evaluate proposed design changes. An existing plug flow model for fixed bed gasifiers known as the Wen II model was revised and updated. Also, a spread sheet model of zinc ferrite sulfur sorbent regeneration subsystem was developed. Parametric analyses were performed to determine how performance depends on variables in the system design. The work was done to support CRS Sirrine Incorporated in their study of standardized air blown coal gasifier gas turbine concepts.

  8. Effect of temperature and pressure on characteristics and reactivity of biomass-derived chars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recari, J; Berrueco, C; Abelló, S; Montané, D; Farriol, X

    2014-10-01

    This study evaluates the influence of pyrolysis temperature (350-450°C) and pressure (0.1-2.0MPa) on product yields and char properties. Spruce chars were produced under slow pyrolysis conditions in a fixed bed reactor. Special attention was devoted to the study of the oxidation reactivity of the produced chars, and its relationship with the evaluated char properties. The obtained results showed that the effect of the pyrolysis condition on char production and in particular on the mechanism of secondary char formation strongly influenced the char reactivity. Additionally it has been observed that the interval of temperature between 350 and 450°C may be key in the mechanism of tar repolymerization. The information provided in this study is of great interest for the determination of optimal operation conditions and the design of new gasification concepts or the development of bioenergy carriers via pyrolysis technologies. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. A Project Management and Systems Engineering Structure for a Generation IV Very High Temperature Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ed Gorski; Dennis Harrell; Finis Southworth

    2004-09-01

    The Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) will be an advanced, very high temperature (approximately 1000o C. coolant outlet temperature), gas cooled nuclear reactor and is the nearest term of six Generation IV reactor technologies for nuclear assisted hydrogen production. In 2001, the Generation IV International Forum (GIF), a ten nation international forum working together with the Department of Energy’s (DOE) Nuclear Energy Research Advisory Committee (NERAC), agreed to proceed with the development of a technology roadmap and identified the next generation of nuclear reactor systems for producing new sources of power. Since a new reactor has not been licensed in the United States since the 1970s, the risks are too large for a single utility to assume in the development of an unprecedented Generation IV reactor. The government must sponsor and invest in the research to resolve major first of a kind (FOAK) issues through a full-scale demonstration prior to industry implementation. DOE’s primary mission for the VHTR is to demonstrate nuclear reactor assisted cogeneration of electricity and hydrogen while meeting the Generation IV goals for safety, sustainability, proliferation resistance and physical security and economics. The successful deployment of the VHTR as a demonstration project will aid in restarting the now atrophied U.S. nuclear power industry infrastructure. It is envisioned that VHTR project participants will include DOE Laboratories, industry partners such as designers, constructors, manufacturers, utilities, and Generation IV international countries. To effectively mange R&D, engineering, procurement, construction, and operation for this multi-organizational and technologically complex project, systems engineering will be used extensively to ensure delivery of the final product. Although the VHTR is an unprecedented FOAK system, the R&D, when assessed using the Office of Science and Technology Gate Model, falls primarily in the 3rd - Exploratory

  10. Development of gas cooled reactors and experimental setup of high temperature helium loop for in-pile operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miletić, Marija, E-mail: marija_miletic@live.com [Czech Technical University in Prague, Prague (Czech Republic); Fukač, Rostislav, E-mail: fuk@cvrez.cz [Research Centre Rez Ltd., Rez (Czech Republic); Pioro, Igor, E-mail: Igor.Pioro@uoit.ca [University of Ontario Institute of Technology, Oshawa (Canada); Dragunov, Alexey, E-mail: Alexey.Dragunov@uoit.ca [University of Ontario Institute of Technology, Oshawa (Canada)

    2014-09-15

    Highlights: • Gas as a coolant in Gen-IV reactors, history and development. • Main physical parameters comparison of gas coolants: carbon dioxide, helium, hydrogen with water. • Forced convection in turbulent pipe flow. • Gas cooled fast reactor concept comparisons to very high temperature reactor concept. • High temperature helium loop: concept, development, mechanism, design and constraints. - Abstract: Rapidly increasing energy and electricity demands, global concerns over the climate changes and strong dependence on foreign fossil fuel supplies are powerfully influencing greater use of nuclear power. In order to establish the viability of next-generation reactor concepts to meet tomorrow's needs for clean and reliable energy production the fundamental research and development issues need to be addressed for the Generation-IV nuclear-energy systems. Generation-IV reactor concepts are being developed to use more advanced materials, coolants and higher burn-ups fuels, while keeping a nuclear reactor safe and reliable. One of the six Generation-IV concepts is a very high temperature reactor (VHTR). The VHTR concept uses a graphite-moderated core with a once-through uranium fuel cycle, using high temperature helium as the coolant. Because helium is naturally inert and single-phase, the helium-cooled reactor can operate at much higher temperatures, leading to higher efficiency. Current VHTR concepts will use fuels such as uranium dioxide, uranium carbide, or uranium oxycarbide. Since some of these fuels are new in nuclear industry and due to their unknown properties and behavior within VHTR conditions it is very important to address these issues by investigate their characteristics within conditions close to those in VHTRs. This research can be performed in a research reactor with in-pile helium loop designed and constructed in Research Center Rez Ltd. One of the topics analyzed in this article are also physical characteristic and benefits of gas

  11. EUROPAIRS: The European project on coupling of High Temperature Reactors with industrial processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Angulo, C., E-mail: carmen.angulo@gdfsuez.com [Tractebel Engineering S.A. (GDF SUEZ), Avenue Ariane 7, 1200 Brussels (Belgium); Bogusch, E. [AREVA NP GmbH, Paul-Gossen-Strasse 100, 91052 Erlangen (Germany); Bredimas, A. [LGI Consulting, 37 rue de la Grange aux Belles, 75010 Paris (France); Delannay, N. [Tractebel Engineering S.A. (GDF SUEZ), Avenue Ariane 7, 1200 Brussels (Belgium); Viala, C. [AREVA NP SAS, 10 rue Juliette Recamier, 69456 Lyon Cedex 06 (France); Ruer, J.; Muguerra, Ph.; Sibaud, E. [SAIPEM S.A., 1/7 Avenue San Fernando, 78884 Saint Quentin en Yvelines Cedex (France); Chauvet, V. [LGI Consulting, 37 rue de la Grange aux Belles, 75010 Paris (France); Hittner, D. [AREVA NP Inc., 3315 Old Forest Road, Lynchburg, VA 24501 (United States); Fuetterer, M.A. [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, 1755ZG Petten (Netherlands); Groot, S. de [Nuclear Research and Consultancy Group, 1755ZG Petten (Netherlands); Lensa, W. von; Verfondern, K. [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, Leo-Brandt-Strasse,52425 Juelich (Germany); Moron, R. [Solvay SA, rue du Prince Albert 33, 1050 Brussels (Belgium); Baudrand, O. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire (IRSN), BP 17, 92262 Fontenay-aux-Roses cedex (France); Griffay, G. [Arcelor Mittal Maizieres Research SA, rue Luigi Cherubini 1A5, 39200 Saint Denis (France); Baaten, A. [USG/Baaten Energy Consulting, Burgermeester-Ceulen-Straat 78, 6212CT Maastricht (Netherlands); Segurado-Gimenez, J. [Tractebel Engineering S.A. (GDF SUEZ), Avenue Ariane 7, 1200 Brussels (Belgium)

    2012-10-15

    Developers of High Temperature Reactors (HTR) worldwide acknowledge that the main asset for market breakthrough is its unique ability to address growing needs for industrial cogeneration of heat and power (CHP) owing to its high operating temperature and flexibility, adapted power level, modularity and robust safety features. A strong alliance between nuclear and process heat user industries is a necessity for developing such a nuclear system for the conventional process heat market, just as the electro-nuclear development required a close partnership with utilities. Initiating such an alliance is one of the objectives of the EUROPAIRS project ( (www.europairs.eu)) presently on-going in the frame of the Euratom 7th Framework Programme (FP7). Although small and of short duration (21 months), EUROPAIRS is of strategic importance: it generates the boundary conditions for rapid demonstration of collocating HTR with industrial processes as proposed by the European High Temperature Reactor Technology Network (HTR-TN). This paper presents the main goals, the organization and the working approach of EUROPAIRS. It also presents the status of the viability assessment studies for coupling HTR with industrial end-user systems as one of the main pillars of the project. The main goal of the viability assessment is to identify developments required to remove the last technological and licensing barriers for a viable coupling scheme. The study is expected to result in guidelines for directing the choice of an industrial scale prototype.

  12. Preliminary Core Analysis of High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor Using DeCART Code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Chang Joon; Lee, Hyun Chul; Noh, Jae Man [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    The 2-dimensional core analysis for the High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR) has been performed. The HTTR is a graphite-moderated and helium gas cooled reactor with an outlet temperature of 950 .deg. C and thermal output of 30 MW. In this study, the DECART code is used with a 190-group KARMA library. The calculation results are compared with those of the McCARD with the ENDF-B/VII.0 library. From the analysis results, it is known that the DeCART code generally overestimates k{sub inf} with a moderator temperature variation. In addition, it can be seen that the DeCART code predicts less negative MTC than the McCARD code. However, the DeCART code gives a slightly more negative FTC value. From the depletion results, the error of the DeCART decreases over the burnup until 600 FPD. The DeCART code gives very similar trend within the error of 190 pcm, which is very small error when compared with other result.

  13. THR-TH: a high-temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactor core thermal hydraulics code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vondy, D.R.

    1984-07-01

    The ORNL version of PEBBLE, the (RZ) pebble bed thermal hydraulics code, has been extended for application to a prismatic gas cooled reactor core. The supplemental treatment is of one-dimensional coolant flow in up to a three-dimensional core description. Power density data from a neutronics and exposure calculation are used as the basic information for the thermal hydraulics calculation of heat removal. Two-dimensional neutronics results may be expanded for a three-dimensional hydraulics calculation. The geometric description for the hydraulics problem is the same as used by the neutronics code. A two-dimensional thermal cell model is used to predict temperatures in the fuel channel. The capability is available in the local BOLD VENTURE computation system for reactor core analysis with capability to account for the effect of temperature feedback by nuclear cross section correlation. Some enhancements have also been added to the original code to add pebble bed modeling flexibility and to generate useful auxiliary results. For example, an estimate is made of the distribution of fuel temperatures based on average and extreme conditions regularly calculated at a number of locations.

  14. Predictive functional control of temperature in a pharmaceutical hybrid nonlinear batch reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Štampar Simon

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available These days, in times of recession, we are forced by competitiveness and the optimization of production to lower the costs of the temperature control in pharmaceutical batch reactors and increase the quantity and quality of the produced pharmaceutical product (active pharmaceutical substances. Therefore, a control algorithm is needed which provides us rapid and precise temperature control. This paper deals with the development of a control algorithm, where two predictive functional controllers are connected in a cascade for heating and cooling the content of the hybrid batch reactor. The algorithm has to be designed to cope with the constraints and the mixed discrete and continuous nature of the process of heating and cooling. The main goal of the control law is to achieve rapid and exact tracking of the reference temperature, good disturbance rejection and, in particular, a small number of heating and cooling medium switchings. The simulation results of the proposed algorithm give us much better performance compared to a conventional cascade PI algorithm.

  15. NEET Enhanced Micro Pocket Fission Detector for High Temperature Reactors - FY15 Status Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unruh, Troy [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); McGregor, Douglas [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Ugorowski, Phil [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Reichenberger, Michael [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Ito, Takashi [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-09-01

    A new project, that is a collaboration between the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), the Kansas State University (KSU), and the French Atomic Energy Agency, Commissariat à l'Énergie Atomique et aux Energies Alternatives, (CEA), has been initiated by the Nuclear Energy Enabling Technologies (NEET) Advanced Sensors and Instrumentation (ASI) program for developing and testing High Temperature Micro-Pocket Fission Detectors (HT MPFD), which are compact fission chambers capable of simultaneously measuring thermal neutron flux, fast neutron flux and temperature within a single package for temperatures up to 800 °C. The MPFD technology utilizes a small, multi-purpose, robust, in-core parallel plate fission chamber and thermocouple. As discussed within this report, the small size, variable sensitivity, and increased accuracy of the MPFD technology represent a revolutionary improvement over current methods used to support irradiations in US Material Test Reactors (MTRs). Previous research conducted through NEET ASI1-3 has shown that the MPFD technology could be made robust and was successfully tested in a reactor core. This new project will further the MPFD technology for higher temperature regimes and other reactor applications by developing a HT MPFD suitable for temperatures up to 800 °C. This report summarizes the research progress for year one of this three year project. Highlights from research accomplishments include: A joint collaboration was initiated between INL, KSU, and CEA. Note that CEA is participating at their own expense because of interest in this unique new sensor. An updated HT MPFD design was developed. New high temperature-compatible materials for HT MPFD construction were procured. Construction methods to support the new design were evaluated at INL. Laboratory evaluations of HT MPFD were initiated. Electrical contact and fissile material plating has been performed at KSU. Updated detector electronics are undergoing evaluations at KSU. A

  16. Assessment of Water Ingress Accidents in a Modular High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Z.; Dong, Y; Scherer, W

    2005-01-01

    Severe water ingress accidents in the 200-MW HTR-module were assessed to determine the safety margins of modular pebble-bed high-temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTR-module). The 200-MW HTR-module was designed by Siemens under the criteria that no active safety protection systems were necessary because of its inherent safe nature. For simulating the behavior of the HTR-module during severe water ingress accidents, a water, steam, and helium multiphase cavity model was developed and implemente...

  17. KEY DESIGN REQUIREMENTS FOR THE HIGH TEMPERATURE GAS-COOLED REACTOR NUCLEAR HEAT SUPPLY SYSTEM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    L.E. Demick

    2010-09-01

    Key requirements that affect the design of the high temperature gas-cooled reactor nuclear heat supply system (HTGR-NHSS) as the NGNP Project progresses through the design, licensing, construction and testing of the first of a kind HTGR based plant are summarized. These requirements derive from pre-conceptual design development completed to-date by HTGR Suppliers, collaboration with potential end users of the HTGR technology to identify energy needs, evaluation of integration of the HTGR technology with industrial processes and recommendations of the NGNP Project Senior Advisory Group.

  18. Hydrogen/Oxygen Reactions at High Pressures and Intermediate Temperatures: Flow Reactor Experiments and Kinetic Modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hashemi, Hamid; Christensen, Jakob Munkholt; Glarborg, Peter

    of the mixture was varied from oxidizing to reducing conditions. Moreover, a series of experiments in an oxygen atmosphere instead of a nitrogen atmosphere has been done. A reaction mechanism based on a recent work by Burke et al. has been developed. In addition to modeling of the present experiments......, ignition occurs at the temperature of 775–800 K. In general, the present model provides a good agreement with the measurements in the flow reactor and with recent data on laminar burning velocity and ignition delay time....

  19. Heat exchanger design considerations for high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDonald, C.F.; Vrable, D.L.; Van Hagan, T.H.; King, J.H.; Spring, A.H.

    1980-02-01

    Various aspects of the high-temperature heat exchanger conceptual designs for the gas turbine (HTGR-GT) and process heat (HTGR-PH) plants are discussed. Topics include technology background, heat exchanger types, surface geometry, thermal sizing, performance, material selection, mechanical design, fabrication, and the systems-related impact of installation and integration of the units in the prestressed concrete reactor vessel. The impact of future technology developments, such as the utilization of nonmetallic materials and advanced heat exchanger surface geometries and methods of construction, is also discussed.

  20. Cyclic purging for low-temperature solid fusion reactor blanket operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Was, G.S.; Lidsky, L.M.

    1979-05-01

    A purging process was developed that will permit operation of fusion reactor blankets employing solid LiAlO/sub 2/ as the breeder material at fuel temperatures of <600/sup 0/C. The low fuel temperature would greatly reduce the problems of fuel sintering, densification, and volume expansion that occur at fuel temperatures in excess of 900/sup 0/C without degrading the plant thermal efficiency. The process consists of heating the blanket to a specified temperature for a given time at regular intervals to release tritium held up in the breeding material. As an example, a detailed purging cycle was developed for the breeder rod shim rod blanket that uses LiAlO/sub 2/ in the form of micronsize particles compacted into millimeter-size pellets and is designed for low-temperature operation. Tritium inventory, doubling time, purging time, purging temperature, purging frequency, and particle size are the parameters used to evaluate the process. Calculations indicate that breeder particle sizes ranging from 20 to 50 ..mu..m and purging temperatures ranging from 600 to 700/sup 0/C can result in purge times of <1 h with three or more weeks between purges, and a doubling time of 7 yr for a blanket inventory limit of 5 kg and a breeding ratio of <1.02.

  1. New steady-state microbial community compositions and process performances in biogas reactors induced by temperature disturbances

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luo, Gang; De Francisci, Davide; Kougias, Panagiotis

    2015-01-01

    Background The microbial community in a biogas reactor greatly influences the process performance. However, only the effects of deterministic factors (such as temperature and hydraulic retention time (HRT)) on the microbial community and performance have been investigated in biogas reactors. Little...... is known about the manner in which stochastic factors (for example, stochastic birth, death, colonization, and extinction) and disturbance affect the stable-state microbial community and reactor performances. Results In the present study, three replicate biogas reactors treating cattle manure were run...... to examine the role of stochastic factors and disturbance in shaping microbial communities. In the triplicate biogas reactors with the same inoculum and operational conditions, similar process performances and microbial community profiles were observed under steady-state conditions. This indicated...

  2. Design and Fabrication Technique of the Key Components for Very High Temperature Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ho Jin; Song, Ki Nam; Kim, Yong Wan

    2006-12-15

    The gas outlet temperature of Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) may be beyond the capability of conventional metallic materials. The requirement of the gas outlet temperature of 950 .deg. C will result in operating temperatures for metallic core components that will approach very high temperature on some cases. The materials that are capable of withstanding this temperature should be prepared, or nonmetallic materials will be required for limited components. The Ni-base alloys such as Alloy 617, Hastelloy X, XR, Incoloy 800H, and Haynes 230 are being investigated to apply them on components operated in high temperature. Currently available national and international codes and procedures are needed reviewed to design the components for HTGR/VHTR. Seven codes and procedures, including five ASME Codes and Code cases, one French code (RCC-MR), and on British Procedure (R5) were reviewed. The scope of the code and code cases needs to be expanded to include the materials with allowable temperatures of 950 .deg. C and higher. The selection of compact heat exchangers technology depends on the operating conditions such as pressure, flow rates, temperature, but also on other parameters such as fouling, corrosion, compactness, weight, maintenance and reliability. Welding, brazing, and diffusion bonding are considered proper joining processes for the heat exchanger operating in the high temperature and high pressure conditions without leakage. Because VHTRs require high temperature operations, various controlled materials, thick vessels, dissimilar metal joints, and precise controls of microstructure in weldment, the more advanced joining processes are needed than PWRs. The improved solid joining techniques are considered for the IHX fabrication. The weldability for Alloy 617 and Haynes 230 using GTAW and SMAW processes was investigated by CEA.

  3. THATCH: A computer code for modelling thermal networks of high- temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kroeger, P.G.; Kennett, R.J.; Colman, J.; Ginsberg, T. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States))

    1991-10-01

    This report documents the THATCH code, which can be used to model general thermal and flow networks of solids and coolant channels in two-dimensional r-z geometries. The main application of THATCH is to model reactor thermo-hydraulic transients in High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors (HTGRs). The available modules simulate pressurized or depressurized core heatup transients, heat transfer to general exterior sinks or to specific passive Reactor Cavity Cooling Systems, which can be air or water-cooled. Graphite oxidation during air or water ingress can be modelled, including the effects of added combustion products to the gas flow and the additional chemical energy release. A point kinetics model is available for analyzing reactivity excursions; for instance due to water ingress, and also for hypothetical no-scram scenarios. For most HTGR transients, which generally range over hours, a user-selected nodalization of the core in r-z geometry is used. However, a separate model of heat transfer in the symmetry element of each fuel element is also available for very rapid transients. This model can be applied coupled to the traditional coarser r-z nodalization. This report described the mathematical models used in the code and the method of solution. It describes the code and its various sub-elements. Details of the input data and file usage, with file formats, is given for the code, as well as for several preprocessing and postprocessing options. The THATCH model of the currently applicable 350 MW{sub th} reactor is described. Input data for four sample cases are given with output available in fiche form. Installation requirements and code limitations, as well as the most common error indications are listed. 31 refs., 23 figs., 32 tabs.

  4. Degradation of phenol in an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor at ambient temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ke, Shui-zhou; Shi, Zhou; Zhang, Tong; Fang, Herbert H P

    2004-01-01

    A synthetic wastewater containing phenol as sole substrate was treated in a 2.8 L upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor at ambient temperature. The operation conditions and phenol removal efficiency were discussed, microbial population in the UASB sludge was identified based on DNA cloning, and pathway of anaerobic phenol degradation was proposed. Phenol in wastewater was degraded in an UASB reactor at loading rate up to 18 gCOD/(L x d), with a 1:1 recycle ratio, at 26 +/- 1 degrees C, pH 7.0-7.5. An UASB reactor was able to remove 99% of phenol up to 1226 mg/L in wastewater with 24 h of hydraulic retention time (HRT). For HRT below 24 h, phenol degradation efficiency decreased with HRT, from 95.4% at 16 h to 93.8% at 12 h. It further deteriorated to 88.5% when HRT reached 8 h. When the concentration of influent phenol of the reactor was 1260 mg/L (corresponding COD 3000 mg/L), with the HRT decreasing (from 40 h to 4 h, corresponding COD loading increasing), the biomass yields tended to increase from 0.265 to 3.08 g/(L x d). While at 12 h of HRT, the biomass yield was lower. When HRT was 12 h, the methane yield was 0.308 L/(gCOD removed), which was the highest. Throughout the study, phenol was the sole organic substrate. The effluent contained only residual phenol without any detectable intermediates, such as benzoate, 4-hydrobenzoate or volatile fatty acids (VFAs). Based on DNA cloning analysis, the sludge was composed of five groups of microorganisms. Desulfotomaculum and Clostridium were likely responsible for the conversion of phenol to benzoate, which was further degraded by Syntrophus to acetate and H2/CO2. Methanogens lastly converted acetate and H2/CO2 to methane. The role of epsilon-Proteobacteria was, however, unsure.

  5. NEET Enhanced Micro-Pocket Fission Detector for High Temperature Reactors - FY16 Status Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unruh, Troy [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Reichenberger, Michael [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Stevenson, Sarah [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Tsai, Kevin [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); McGregor, Douglas [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-09-01

    A collaboration between the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), the Kansas State University (KSU), and the French Atomic Energy Agency, Commissariat à l'Énergie Atomique et aux Energies Alternatives, (CEA), has been initiated by the Nuclear Energy Enabling Technologies (NEET) Advanced Sensors and Instrumentation (ASI) program for developing and testing High Temperature Micro-Pocket Fission Detectors (HT MPFD), which are compact fission chambers capable of simultaneously measuring thermal neutron flux, fast neutron flux and temperature within a single package for temperatures up to 800 °C. The MPFD technology utilizes a small, multi-purpose, robust, in-core fission chambers and thermocouple. As discussed within this report, the small size, variable sensitivity, and increased accuracy of the MPFD technology represent a revolutionary improvement over current methods used to support irradiations in US Material Test Reactors (MTRs). Previous research conducted through NEET ASI1-3 has shown that the MPFD technology could be made robust and was successfully tested in a reactor core. This new project will further the MPFD technology for higher temperature regimes and other reactor applications by developing a HT MPFD suitable for temperatures up to 800 °C. This report summarizes the research progress for year two of this three year project. Highlights from research accomplishments include: • Continuation of a joint collaboration between INL, KSU, and CEA. Note that CEA is participating at their own expense because of interest in this unique new sensor. • An updated parallel wire HT MPFD design was developed. • Program support for HT MPFD deployments was given to Accident Tolerant Fuels (ATF) and Advanced Gas-cooled Reactor (AGR) irradiation test programs. • Quality approved materials for HT MPFD construction were procured by irradiation test programs for upcoming deployments. • KSU improved and performed electrical contact and fissile material plating.

  6. Assessment of Candidate Molten Salt Coolants for the Advanced High Temperature Reactor (AHTR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, D.F.

    2006-03-24

    The Advanced High-Temperature Reactor (AHTR) is a novel reactor design that utilizes the graphite-matrix high-temperature fuel of helium-cooled reactors, but provides cooling with a high-temperature fluoride salt. For applications at temperatures greater than 900 C the AHTR is also referred to as a Liquid-Salt-Cooled Very High-Temperature Reactor (LS-VHTR). This report provides an assessment of candidate salts proposed as the primary coolant for the AHTR based upon a review of physical properties, nuclear properties, and chemical factors. The physical properties most relevant for coolant service were reviewed. Key chemical factors that influence material compatibility were also analyzed for the purpose of screening salt candidates. Some simple screening factors related to the nuclear properties of salts were also developed. The moderating ratio and neutron-absorption cross-section were compiled for each salt. The short-lived activation products, long-lived transmutation activity, and reactivity coefficients associated with various salt candidates were estimated using a computational model. Table A presents a summary of the properties of the candidate coolant salts. Certain factors in this table, such as melting point, vapor pressure, and nuclear properties, can be viewed as stand-alone parameters for screening candidates. Heat-transfer properties are considered as a group in Sect. 3 in order to evaluate the combined effects of various factors. In the course of this review, it became apparent that the state of the properties database was strong in some areas and weak in others. A qualitative map of the state of the database and predictive capabilities is given in Table B. It is apparent that the property of thermal conductivity has the greatest uncertainty and is the most difficult to measure. The database, with respect to heat capacity, can be improved with modern instruments and modest effort. In general, ''lighter'' (low-Z) salts tend to

  7. Depletion Analysis of Modular High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor Loaded with LEU/Thorium Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sonat Sen; Gilles Youinou

    2013-02-01

    Thorium based fuel has been considered as an option to uranium-based fuel, based on considerations of resource utilization (Thorium is more widely available when compared to Uranium). The fertile isotope of Thorium (Th-232) can be converted to fissile isotope U-233 by neutron capture during the operation of a suitable nuclear reactor such as High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR). However, the fertile Thorium needs a fissile supporter to start and maintain the conversion process such as U-235 or Pu-239. This report presents the results of a study that analyzed the thorium utilization in a prismatic HTGR, namely Modular High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (MHTGR) that was designed by General Atomics (GA). The collected for the modeling of this design come from Chapter 4 of MHTGR Preliminary Safety Information Document that GA sent to Department of Energy (DOE) on 1995. Both full core and unit cell models were used to perform this analysis using SCALE 6.1 and Serpent 1.1.18. Because of the long mean free paths (and migration lengths) of neutrons in HTRs, using a unit cell to represent a whole core can be non-trivial. The sizes of these cells were set to match the spectral index between unit cell and full core domains. It was found that for the purposes of this study an adjusted unit cell model is adequate. Discharge isotopics and one-group cross-sections were delivered to the transmutation analysis team. This report provides documentation for these calculations

  8. Sustainability of thorium-uranium in pebble-bed fluoride salt-cooled high temperature reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhu Guifeng

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Sustainability of thorium fuel in a Pebble-Bed Fluoride salt-cooled High temperature Reactor (PB-FHR is investigated to find the feasible region of high discharge burnup and negative Flibe (2LiF-BeF2 salt Temperature Reactivity Coefficient (TRC. Dispersion fuel or pellet fuel with SiC cladding and SiC matrix is used to replace the tristructural-isotropic (TRISO coated particle system for increasing fuel loading and decreasing excessive moderation. To analyze the neutronic characteristics, an equilibrium calculation method of thorium fuel self-sustainability is developed. We have compared two refueling schemes (mixing flow pattern and directional flow pattern and two kinds of reflector materials (SiC and graphite. This method found that the feasible region of breeding and negative Flibe TRC is between 20 vol% and 62 vol% fuel loading in the fuel. A discharge burnup could be achieved up to about 200 MWd/kgHM. The case with directional flow pattern and SiC reflector showed superior burnup characteristics but the worst radial power peak factor, while the case with mixing flow pattern and SiC reflector, which was the best tradeoff between discharge burnup and radial power peak factor, could provide burnup of 140 MWd/kgHM and about 1.4 radial power peak factor with 50 vol% dispersion fuel. In addition, Flibe salt displays good neutron properties as a coolant of quasi-fast reactors due to the strong 9Be(n,2n reaction and low neutron absorption of 6Li (even at 1000 ppm in fast spectrum. Preliminary thermal hydraulic calculation shows good safety margin. The greatest challenge of this reactor may be the decades irradiation time of the pebble fuel.

  9. DESIGN CHARACTERISTICS OF THE IDAHO NATIONAL LABORATORY HIGH-TEMPERATURE GAS-COOLED TEST REACTOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sterbentz, James; Bayless, Paul; Strydom, Gerhard; Kumar, Akansha; Gougar, Hans

    2016-11-01

    Uncertainty and sensitivity analysis is an indispensable element of any substantial attempt in reactor simulation validation. The quantification of uncertainties in nuclear engineering has grown more important and the IAEA Coordinated Research Program (CRP) on High-Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor (HTGR) initiated in 2012 aims to investigate the various uncertainty quantification methodologies for this type of reactors. The first phase of the CRP is dedicated to the estimation of cell and lattice model uncertainties due to the neutron cross sections co-variances. Phase II is oriented towards the investigation of propagated uncertainties from the lattice to the coupled neutronics/thermal hydraulics core calculations. Nominal results for the prismatic single block (Ex.I-2a) and super cell models (Ex.I-2c) have been obtained using the SCALE 6.1.3 two-dimensional lattice code NEWT coupled to the TRITON sequence for cross section generation. In this work, the TRITON/NEWT-flux-weighted cross sections obtained for Ex.I-2a and various models of Ex.I-2c is utilized to perform a sensitivity analysis of the MHTGR-350 core power densities and eigenvalues. The core solutions are obtained with the INL coupled code PHISICS/RELAP5-3D, utilizing a fixed-temperature feedback for Ex. II-1a.. It is observed that the core power density does not vary significantly in shape, but the magnitude of these variations increases as the moderator-to-fuel ratio increases in the super cell lattice models.

  10. Effects of irradiation at lower temperature on the microstructure of Cr-Mo-V-alloyed reactor pressure vessel steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grosse, M.; Boehmert, J.; Gilles, R. [Hahn-Meitner-Institut Berlin GmbH (Germany)

    1998-10-01

    The microstructural damage process due to neutron irradiation [1] proceeds in two stages: - formation of displacement cascades - evolution of the microstructure by defect reactions. Continuing our systematic investigation about the microstructural changes of Russian reactor pressure vessel steel due to neutron irradiation the microstructure of two laboratory heats of the VVER 440-type reactor pressure vessel steel after irradiation at 60 C was studied by small angle neutron scattering (SANS). 60 C-irradiation differently changes the irradiation-induced microstructure in comparison with irradiation at reactor operation temperature and can, thus, provide new insights into the mechanisms of the irradiation damage. (orig.)

  11. Analysis of Possible Application of High-Temperature Nuclear Reactors to Contemporary Large-Output Steam Power Plants on Ships

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kowalczyk T.

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper is aimed at analysis of possible application of helium to cooling high-temperature nuclear reactor to be used for generating steam in contemporary ship steam-turbine power plants of a large output with taking into account in particular variable operational parameters. In the first part of the paper types of contemporary ship power plants are presented. Features of today applied PWR reactors and proposed HTR reactors are discussed. Next, issues of load variability of the ship nuclear power plants, features of the proposed thermal cycles and results of their thermodynamic calculations in variable operational conditions, are presented.

  12. Materials for the very high temperature reactor (VHTR): a versatile nuclear power station for combined cycle electricity and heat production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffelner, W

    2005-07-01

    The International Generation IV Initiative provides a research platform for the development of advanced nuclear plants which are able to produce electricity and heat in a combined cycle. Very high-temperature gas-cooled reactors are considered as near-term deployable plants meeting these requirements. They build on high-temperature gas-cooled reactors which are already in operation. The main parts of such an advanced plant are: reactor pressure vessel, core and close-to-core components, gas turbine, intermediate heat exchanger, and hydrogen production unit. The paper discusses the VHTR concept, materials, fuel and hydrogen production based on discussions on research and development projects addressed within the generation IV community. It is shown that material limitations might restrict the outlet temperature of near-term deployable VHTRs to about 950 {sup o}C. The impact of the high temperatures on fuel development is also discussed. Current status of combined cycle hydrogen production is elaborated on. (author)

  13. Pore Scale Thermal Hydraulics Investigations of Molten Salt Cooled Pebble Bed High Temperature Reactor with BCC and FCC Configurations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shixiong Song

    2014-01-01

    CFD results and empirical correlations’ predictions of pressure drop and local Nusselt numbers. Local pebble surface temperature distributions in several default conditions are investigated. Thermal removal capacities of molten salt are confirmed in the case of nominal condition; the pebble surface temperature under the condition of local power distortion shows the tolerance of pebble in extreme neutron dose exposure. The numerical experiments of local pebble insufficient cooling indicate that in the molten salt cooled pebble bed reactor, the pebble surface temperature is not very sensitive to loss of partial coolant. The methods and results of this paper would be useful for optimum designs and safety analysis of molten salt cooled pebble bed reactors.

  14. Coupling of Modular High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor with Supercritical Rankine Cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shutang Zhu

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents investigations on the possible combination of modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (MHTGR technology with the supercritical (SC steam turbine technology and the prospective deployments of the MHTGR SC power plant. Energy conversion efficiency of steam turbine cycle can be improved by increasing the main steam pressure and temperature. Investigations on SC water reactor (SCWR reveal that the development of SCWR power plants still needs further research and development. The MHTGR SC plant coupling the existing technologies of current MHTGR module design with operation experiences of SC FPP will achieve high cycle efficiency in addition to its inherent safety. The standard once-reheat SC steam turbine cycle and the once-reheat steam cycle with life-steam have been studied and corresponding parameters were computed. Efficiencies of thermodynamic processes of MHTGR SC plants were analyzed, while comparisons were made between an MHTGR SC plant and a designed advanced passive PWR - AP1000. It was shown that the net plant efficiency of an MHTGR SC plant can reach 45% or above, 30% higher than that of AP1000 (35% net efficiency. Furthermore, an MHTGR SC plant has higher environmental competitiveness without emission of greenhouse gases and other pollutants.

  15. Sodium effects on mechanical performance and consideration in high temperature structural design for advanced reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Natesan, K., E-mail: natesan@anl.go [Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Li Meimei; Chopra, O.K.; Majumdar, S. [Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)

    2009-07-15

    Sodium environmental effects are key limiting factors in the high temperature structural design of advanced sodium-cooled reactors. A guideline is needed to incorporate environmental effects in the ASME design rules to improve the performance reliability over long operating times. This paper summarizes the influence of sodium exposure on mechanical performance of selected austenitic stainless and ferritic/martensitic steels. Focus is on Type 316SS and mod.9Cr-1Mo. The sodium effects were evaluated by comparing the mechanical properties data in air and sodium. Carburization and decarburization were found to be the key factors that determine the tensile and creep properties of the steels. A beneficial effect of sodium exposure on fatigue life was observed under fully reversed cyclic loading in both austenitic stainless steels and ferritic/martensitic steels. However, when hold time was applied during cyclic loading, the fatigue life was significantly reduced. Based on the mechanical performance of the steels in sodium, consideration of sodium effects in high temperature structural design of advanced fast reactors is discussed.

  16. Investigation on the Core Bypass Flow in a Very High Temperature Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hassan, Yassin

    2013-10-22

    Uncertainties associated with the core bypass flow are some of the key issues that directly influence the coolant mass flow distribution and magnitude, and thus the operational core temperature profiles, in the very high-temperature reactor (VHTR). Designers will attempt to configure the core geometry so the core cooling flow rate magnitude and distribution conform to the design values. The objective of this project is to study the bypass flow both experimentally and computationally. Researchers will develop experimental data using state-of-the-art particle image velocimetry in a small test facility. The team will attempt to obtain full field temperature distribution using racks of thermocouples. The experimental data are intended to benchmark computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes by providing detailed information. These experimental data are urgently needed for validation of the CFD codes. The following are the project tasks: • Construct a small-scale bench-top experiment to resemble the bypass flow between the graphite blocks, varying parameters to address their impact on bypass flow. Wall roughness of the graphite block walls, spacing between the blocks, and temperature of the blocks are some of the parameters to be tested. • Perform CFD to evaluate pre- and post-test calculations and turbulence models, including sensitivity studies to achieve high accuracy. • Develop the state-of-the art large eddy simulation (LES) using appropriate subgrid modeling. • Develop models to be used in systems thermal hydraulics codes to account and estimate the bypass flows. These computer programs include, among others, RELAP3D, MELCOR, GAMMA, and GAS-NET. Actual core bypass flow rate may vary considerably from the design value. Although the uncertainty of the bypass flow rate is not known, some sources have stated that the bypass flow rates in the Fort St. Vrain reactor were between 8 and 25 percent of the total reactor mass flow rate. If bypass flow rates are on the

  17. Cooling performance of a water-cooling panel system for modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takada, Shoji; Suzuki, Kunihiko; Inagaki, Yoshiyuki; Sudo, Yukio [Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Ibaraki-ken (Japan)

    1995-12-31

    Experiments on a water cooling panel system were performed to investigate its heat removal performance and the temperature distribution of components for a modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (MHTGR). The analytical code THANPACST2 was applied to analyze the experimental results to verify the validity of the analytical method and the model.

  18. High Temperature and Pressure Alkaline Electrochemical Reactor for Conversion of Power to Chemicals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chatzichristodoulou, Christodoulos

    2016-01-01

    Moving away from fossil fuels requires harvesting more and more intermittent renewable energy resources and establishing a sustainable system for the production of chemicals. This brings forward the need for efficient large scale energy storage technologies 1-3 and technologies for the conversion...... of renewable electricity to chemicals. Electrochemical reactors can play a crucial role in this endeavor, since they can efficiently and reversibly transform electricity to high-value chemicals, and thus serve as energy storage and recovery devices for balancing the grid, while offering a means...... for the sustainable production of chemicals 4-6. A novel type of alkaline electrochemical cell that can operate at elevated temperature and pressure has been developed that relies on corrosion resistant high temperature diaphragms, based on mesoporous ceramic membranes where aqueous KOH is immobilized by capillary...

  19. High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor Projected Markets and Preliminary Economics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larry Demick

    2011-08-01

    This paper summarizes the potential market for process heat produced by a high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR), the environmental benefits reduced CO2 emissions will have on these markets, and the typical economics of projects using these applications. It gives examples of HTGR technological applications to industrial processes in the typical co-generation supply of process heat and electricity, the conversion of coal to transportation fuels and chemical process feedstock, and the production of ammonia as a feedstock for the production of ammonia derivatives, including fertilizer. It also demonstrates how uncertainties in capital costs and financial factors affect the economics of HTGR technology by analyzing the use of HTGR technology in the application of HTGR and high temperature steam electrolysis processes to produce hydrogen.

  20. Gamma spectroscopy for analysis of high temperature reactor fuel element KueFA tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seeger, O.; Laurie, M.; Bottomley, P.D.W.; Rondinella, V.V. [European Commission - Joint Research Centre, Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany). Institute for Transuranium Elements (JRC-ITU); Allelein, H.J. [RWTH Aachen Univ. (Germany). Lehrstuhl fuer Reaktorsicherheit und -technik

    2013-07-01

    The High Temperature Reactor (HTR) is characterized by an advanced design with passive safety features. Fuel elements are constituted by a graphite matrix containing sub-mm-sized fuel particles with TRISO (TRi-ISOtropic) coating designed to provide high fission product retention. During a loss of coolant accident scenario in a HTR the maximum temperature is foreseen to be in the range of 1600-1650 C, remaining well below the melting point of the fuel. An experimental assessment of the fuel behaviour under accident conditions is necessary to investigate the quality of fission product retention of TRISO coated particles in a given fuel element and to validate relevant computer codes. The device used to perform these studies is the cold finger apparatus KueFA (KuehlFinger-Apparatur). (orig.)

  1. The use of a very high temperature nuclear reactor in the manufacture of synthetic fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farbman, G. H.; Brecher, L. E.

    1976-01-01

    The three parts of a program directed toward creating a cost-effective nuclear hydrogen production system are described. The discussion covers the development of a very high temperature nuclear reactor (VHTR) as a nuclear heat and power source capable of producing the high temperature needed for hydrogen production and other processes; the development of a hydrogen generation process based on water decomposition, which can utilize the outputs of the VHTR and be integrated with many different ultimate hydrogen consuming processes; and the evaluation of the process applications of the nuclear hydrogen systems to assess the merits and potential payoffs. It is shown that the use of VHTR for the manufacture of synthetic fuels appears to have a very high probability of making a positive contribution to meeting the nation's energy needs in the future.

  2. Porous nuclear fuel element for high-temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youchison, Dennis L [Albuquerque, NM; Williams, Brian E [Pacoima, CA; Benander, Robert E [Pacoima, CA

    2011-03-01

    Porous nuclear fuel elements for use in advanced high temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactors (HTGR's), and to processes for fabricating them. Advanced uranium bi-carbide, uranium tri-carbide and uranium carbonitride nuclear fuels can be used. These fuels have high melting temperatures, high thermal conductivity, and high resistance to erosion by hot hydrogen gas. Tri-carbide fuels, such as (U,Zr,Nb)C, can be fabricated using chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) to simultaneously deposit each of the three separate carbides, e.g., UC, ZrC, and NbC in a single CVI step. By using CVI, the nuclear fuel may be deposited inside of a highly porous skeletal structure made of, for example, reticulated vitreous carbon foam.

  3. Porous nuclear fuel element with internal skeleton for high-temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youchison, Dennis L.; Williams, Brian E.; Benander, Robert E.

    2013-09-03

    Porous nuclear fuel elements for use in advanced high temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactors (HTGR's), and to processes for fabricating them. Advanced uranium bi-carbide, uranium tri-carbide and uranium carbonitride nuclear fuels can be used. These fuels have high melting temperatures, high thermal conductivity, and high resistance to erosion by hot hydrogen gas. Tri-carbide fuels, such as (U,Zr,Nb)C, can be fabricated using chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) to simultaneously deposit each of the three separate carbides, e.g., UC, ZrC, and NbC in a single CVI step. By using CVI, the nuclear fuel may be deposited inside of a highly porous skeletal structure made of, for example, reticulated vitreous carbon foam.

  4. Thiophene hydrodesulfurization over CoMo/Al2O3-CuY catalysts: Temperature effect study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yamina Boukoberine

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available CoMo/γ-Al2O3-CuY catalysts are prepared by physically mixing CoMo/γ-Al2O3 catalyst with Cu-exchanged Y zeolite. The CuY zeolite is prepared by the solid state ion exchange technique. The thiophene hydrodesulfurization is performed in a fixed bed reactor at high temperature and atmospheric pressure. The results show that the presence of CuY zeolite particles in CoMo/Al2O3 catalyst can have a noticeable effect on both the conversion and product selectivities. An increasing zeolite loading in catalyst results in a decrease of the thiophene HDS activity. This decrease is probably caused by the formation of heavy compounds and the deactivation of the zeolite at high temperatures.

  5. TEMPERATURE MONITORING OPTIONS AVAILABLE AT THE IDAHO NATIONAL LABORATORY ADVANCED TEST REACTOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J.E. Daw; J.L. Rempe; D.L. Knudson; T. Unruh; B.M. Chase; K.L Davis

    2012-03-01

    As part of the Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility (ATR NSUF) program, the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has developed in-house capabilities to fabricate, test, and qualify new and enhanced sensors for irradiation testing. To meet recent customer requests, an array of temperature monitoring options is now available to ATR users. The method selected is determined by test requirements and budget. Melt wires are the simplest and least expensive option for monitoring temperature. INL has recently verified the melting temperature of a collection of materials with melt temperatures ranging from 100 to 1000 C with a differential scanning calorimeter installed at INL’s High Temperature Test Laboratory (HTTL). INL encapsulates these melt wires in quartz or metal tubes. In the case of quartz tubes, multiple wires can be encapsulated in a single 1.6 mm diameter tube. The second option available to ATR users is a silicon carbide temperature monitor. The benefit of this option is that a single small monitor (typically 1 mm x 1 mm x 10 mm or 1 mm diameter x 10 mm length) can be used to detect peak irradiation temperatures ranging from 200 to 800 C. Equipment has been installed at INL’s HTTL to complete post-irradiation resistivity measurements on SiC monitors, a technique that has been found to yield the most accurate temperatures from these monitors. For instrumented tests, thermocouples may be used. In addition to Type-K and Type-N thermocouples, a High Temperature Irradiation Resistant ThermoCouple (HTIR-TC) was developed at the HTTL that contains commercially-available doped molybdenum paired with a niobium alloy thermoelements. Long duration high temperature tests, in furnaces and in the ATR and other MTRs, demonstrate that the HTIR-TC is accurate up to 1800 C and insensitive to thermal neutron interactions. Thus, degradation observed at temperatures above 1100 C with Type K and N thermocouples and decalibration due to transmutation with tungsten

  6. Vortex Diode Analysis and Testing for Fluoride Salt-Cooled High-Temperature Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoder Jr, Graydon L [ORNL; Elkassabgi, Yousri M. [Texas A& M University, Kingsville; De Leon, Gerardo I. [Texas A& M University, Kingsville; Fetterly, Caitlin N. [Texas A& M University, Kingsville; Ramos, Jorge A. [Texas A& M University, Kingsville; Cunningham, Richard Burns [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)

    2012-02-01

    Fluidic diodes are presently being considered for use in several fluoride salt-cooled high-temperature reactor designs. A fluidic diode is a passive device that acts as a leaky check valve. These devices are installed in emergency heat removal systems that are designed to passively remove reactor decay heat using natural circulation. The direct reactor auxiliary cooling system (DRACS) uses DRACS salt-to-salt heat exchangers (DHXs) that operate in a path parallel to the core flow. Because of this geometry, under normal operating conditions some flow bypasses the core and flows through the DHX. A flow diode, operating in reverse direction, is-used to minimize this flow when the primary coolant pumps are in operation, while allowing forward flow through the DHX under natural circulation conditions. The DRACSs reject the core decay heat to the environment under loss-of-flow accident conditions and as such are a reactor safety feature. Fluidic diodes have not previously been used in an operating reactor system, and therefore their characteristics must be quantified to ensure successful operation. This report parametrically examines multiple design parameters of a vortex-type fluidic diode to determine the size of diode needed to reject a particular amount of decay heat. Additional calculations were performed to size a scaled diode that could be tested in the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Liquid Salt Flow Loop. These parametric studies have shown that a 152.4 mm diode could be used as a test article in that facility. A design for this diode is developed, and changes to the loop that will be necessary to test the diode are discussed. Initial testing of a scaled flow diode has been carried out in a water loop. The 150 mm diode design discussed above was modified to improve performance, and the final design tested was a 171.45 mm diameter vortex diode. The results of this testing indicate that diodicities of about 20 can be obtained for diodes of this size. Experimental

  7. Experimental study and modeling of a high-temperature solar chemical reactor for hydrogen production from methane cracking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abanades, Stephane; Flamant, Gilles [Processes, Materials, and Solar Energy Laboratory, CNRS (PROMES-CNRS, UPR 8521), 7 Rue du Four Solaire, 66120 Odeillo Font-Romeu (France)

    2007-07-15

    A high-temperature fluid-wall solar reactor was developed for the production of hydrogen from methane cracking. This laboratory-scale reactor features a graphite tubular cavity directly heated by concentrated solar energy, in which the reactive flowing gas dissociates to form hydrogen and carbon black. The solar reactor characterization was achieved with: (a) a thorough experimental study on the reactor performance versus operating conditions and (b) solar reactor modeling. The results showed that the conversion of CH{sub 4} and yield of H{sub 2} can exceed 97% and 90%, respectively, and these depend strongly on temperature and on fluid-wall heat transfer and reaction surface area. In addition to the experimental study, a 2D computational model coupling transport phenomena was developed to predict the mapping of reactor temperature and of species concentration, and the reaction extent at the outlet. The model was validated and kinetics of methane decomposition were identified from simulations and comparison to experimental results. (author)

  8. Operation and Control Simulation of a Modular High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor Nuclear Power Plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Haipeng; Huang, Xiaojin; Zhang, Liangju

    2008-08-01

    Issues in the operation and control of the multi-modular nuclear power plant are complicated. The high temperature gas cooled reactor pebble-bed module (HTR-PM) plant with two-module will be built as a demonstration plant in China. To investigate the operation and control characteristics of the plant, a simplified dynamic model is developed and mathematically formulated based upon the fundamental conversation of mass, energy and momentum. The model is implemented in a personal computer to simulate the power increase process of the HTR-PM operation. The open loop operation with no controller is first simulated and the results show that the essential parameter steam temperature varies drastically with time, which is not allowable in the normal operation. According to the preliminary control strategy of the HTR-PM, a simple steam temperature controller is proposed. The controller is of Proportional-type with a time lag. The closed loop operation with a steam temperature controller is then implemented and the simulation results show that the steam temperature and also other parameters are all well controlled in the allowable range.

  9. Experimental assessment of accident scenarios for the high temperature reactor fuel system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seeger, O.; Laurie, M.; Bottomley, P.D.W.; Rondinella, V.V. [European Commission, Joint Research Center, Karlsruhe (Germany). Inst. for Transuranium Elements; Avincola, V. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Karlsruhe (Germany). Inst. fuer Angewandte Materialien (IAM-AWP); Allelein, H.J. [RWTH Aachen Univ. (Germany). Lehrstuhl fuer Reaktorsicherheit und -technik

    2013-11-15

    The High Temperature Reactor (HTR) is characterized by an advanced design with passive safety features. Fuel elements are constituted by a graphite matrix containing sub-mm-sized fuel particles with TRi-ISOtropic (TRISO) coating, designed to provide high fission product retention. During a loss of coolant accident scenario in a HTR the maximum temperature is foreseen to be in the range of 1,600 to 1,650 C, remaining well below the melting point of the fuel. Two key aspects associated with the safety of HTR fuel are assessed in this paper: fission product retention at temperatures up to 1,800 C is analyzed with the Cold Finger Apparatus (KueFA) while the behaviour of HTR-relevant fuel materials in an oxidizing environment is studied with the Corrosion Apparatus KORA. The KueFA is used to observe the combined effects of Depressurization and LOss of Forced Circulation (DLOFC) accident scenarios on HTR fuel. Originally designed at the Forschungszentrum Juelich (FZJ), an adapted KueFA operates on irradiated fuel in hot cell at JRC-ITU. A fuel pebble is heated in helium atmosphere for several hundred hours, mimicking accident temperatures up to 1,800 C and realistic temperature transients. Nongaseous volatile fission products released from the fuel condense on a water cooled stainless steel plate dubbed 'Cold Finger'. Exchanging plates frequently during the experiment and analyzing plate deposits by means of High Purity Germanium (HPGe) gamma spectroscopy allows a reconstruction of the fission product release as a function of time and temperature. To achieve a good quantification of the release, a careful calibration of the setup is necessary and a collimator needs to be used in some cases. The analysis of condensation plates from recent KueFA tests shows that fission product release quantification is possible at high and low activity levels. Another relevant HTR accident scenario is air ingress into the reactor vessel as a consequence of a DLOFC incident. In

  10. A Burst Mode, Ultrahigh Temperature UF4 Vapor Core Reactor Rankine Cycle Space Power System Concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugan, E. T.; Kahook, S. D.; Diaz, N. J.

    1996-01-01

    Static and dynamic neutronic analyses have been performed on an innovative burst mode (100's of MW output for a few thousand seconds) Ulvahigh Temperature Vapor Core Reactor (UTVR) space nuclear power system. The NVTR employs multiple, neutronically-coupled fissioning cores and operates on a direct, closed Rankine cycle using a disk Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) generater for energy conversion. The UTVR includes two types of fissioning core regions: (1) the central Ultrahigh Temperature Vapor Core (UTVC) which contains a vapor mixture of highly enriched UF4 fuel and a metal fluoride working fluid and (2) the UF4 boiler column cores located in the BeO moderator/reflector region. The gaseous nature of the fuel the fact that the fuel is circulating, the multiple coupled fissioning cores, and the use of a two phase fissioning fuel lead to unique static and dynamic neutronic characteristics. Static neutronic analysis was conducted using two-dimensional S sub n, transport theory calculations and three-dimensional Monte Carlo transport theory calculations. Circulating-fuel, coupled-core point reactor kinetics equations were used for analyzing the dynamic behavior of the UTVR. In addition to including reactivity feedback phenomena associated with the individual fissioning cores, the effects of core-to-core neutronic and mass flow coupling between the UTVC and the surrounding boiler cores were also included in the dynamic model The dynamic analysis of the UTVR reveals the existence of some very effectlve inherent reactivity feedback effects that are capable of quickly stabilizing this system, within a few seconds, even when large positive reactivity insertions are imposed. If the UTVC vapor fuel density feedback is suppressed, the UTVR is still inherently stable because of the boiler core liquid-fuel volume feedback; in contrast, suppression of the vapor fuel density feedback in 'conventional" gas core cavity reactors causes them to become inherently unstable. Due to the

  11. Reactor operation

    CERN Document Server

    Shaw, J

    2013-01-01

    Reactor Operation covers the theoretical aspects and design information of nuclear reactors. This book is composed of nine chapters that also consider their control, calibration, and experimentation.The opening chapters present the general problems of reactor operation and the principles of reactor control and operation. The succeeding chapters deal with the instrumentation, start-up, pre-commissioning, and physical experiments of nuclear reactors. The remaining chapters are devoted to the control rod calibrations and temperature coefficient measurements in the reactor. These chapters also exp