WorldWideScience

Sample records for temperature effects

  1. Temperature effects in photodynamic processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hovhannisyan, Vladimir A.; Avetisyan, Hasmik A.; Mathevosyan, Margarita B.; Elbakyan, Egishe G.

    2005-04-01

    Photodynamic activity of several dyes on Drosophila melanogaster at different temperatures (15-35°C) inside of test-tubes was investigated. Both phototoxic sensitizers (chlorin e6, methylene blue, etc. -group A) and non active compounds (hemoglobin, brilliant green, pyronine, etc.-group B) were used. Dyes of 10-5-10-3 M concentration were added to the food for drosophila 24 hours before irradiation. Solar radiation, narrow-band halogen lamps, LEDs and laser were used as a photo-stimulator. Irradiation parameters: I dyes in the control test-tubes at all doses of irradiation and temperatures applied percentage of survived insects was approximately 100%. In the darkness with the use of all dyes observations also indicated no damage to the insects. At the temperatures up to 25°C when using dyes of group B insects were not affected at all, while with the dyes of group A findings showed dose-dependent insect mortality. At high temperatures (30-35°C) when using group B dyes flies were losing their mobility and in the case of group A dyes the drosophila"s survival value sharply dropped. Combination of dyes from A group with some dyes from B group leads to the partial disappearance of photodynamic effect. This, probably, is concerned with the toxic photoproduct suppression by the inactive dye. Experimental model of drosophila allows to investigate photosensitization impact within wide temperature range, to find out the processes, when using combination of dyes, as well as to study photodynamic effect on reproductive functions of insects.

  2. Quantifying Temperature Effects on Fall Chinook Salmon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jager, Yetta [ORNL

    2011-11-01

    The motivation for this study was to recommend relationships for use in a model of San Joaquin fall Chinook salmon. This report reviews literature pertaining to relationships between water temperature and fall Chinook salmon. The report is organized into three sections that deal with temperature effects on development and timing of freshwater life stages, temperature effects on incubation survival for eggs and alevin, and temperature effects on juvenile survival. Recommendations are made for modeling temperature influences for all three life stages.

  3. Temperature effects and compensation-control methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Dunzhu; Chen, Shuling; Wang, Shourong; Li, Hongsheng

    2009-01-01

    In the analysis of the effects of temperature on the performance of microgyroscopes, it is found that the resonant frequency of the microgyroscope decreases linearly as the temperature increases, and the quality factor changes drastically at low temperatures. Moreover, the zero bias changes greatly with temperature variations. To reduce the temperature effects on the microgyroscope, temperature compensation-control methods are proposed. In the first place, a BP (Back Propagation) neural network and polynomial fitting are utilized for building the temperature model of the microgyroscope. Considering the simplicity and real-time requirements, piecewise polynomial fitting is applied in the temperature compensation system. Then, an integral-separated PID (Proportion Integration Differentiation) control algorithm is adopted in the temperature control system, which can stabilize the temperature inside the microgyrocope in pursuing its optimal performance. Experimental results reveal that the combination of microgyroscope temperature compensation and control methods is both realizable and effective in a miniaturized microgyroscope prototype.

  4. ELEVATED TEMPERATURE EFFECTS ON THE ELECTRICAL ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effects of elevated temperatures on the electrical properties of Bi metal probe to Si thin films had been investigated for electric field values 10-100V/m. Measurements of current (I) – voltage (V) characteristics were obtained at temperatures 300,320,340,360,380 and 400K respectively. The results indicated linear I–V ...

  5. Nanoscale temperature sensing using the Seebeck effect

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, F. L.; Flipse, J.; van Wees, B. J.

    2012-01-01

    We experimentally study the effect of Joule heating on the electron temperature in metallic nanoscale devices and compare the results with a diffusive 3D finite element model. The temperature is probed using four thermocouples located at different distances from the heater. A good quantitative

  6. Variable effects of temperature on insect herbivory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan P. Lemoine

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Rising temperatures can influence the top-down control of plant biomass by increasing herbivore metabolic demands. Unfortunately, we know relatively little about the effects of temperature on herbivory rates for most insect herbivores in a given community. Evolutionary history, adaptation to local environments, and dietary factors may lead to variable thermal response curves across different species. Here we characterized the effect of temperature on herbivory rates for 21 herbivore-plant pairs, encompassing 14 herbivore and 12 plant species. We show that overall consumption rates increase with temperature between 20 and 30 °C but do not increase further with increasing temperature. However, there is substantial variation in thermal responses among individual herbivore-plant pairs at the highest temperatures. Over one third of the herbivore-plant pairs showed declining consumption rates at high temperatures, while an approximately equal number showed increasing consumption rates. Such variation existed even within herbivore species, as some species exhibited idiosyncratic thermal response curves on different host plants. Thus, rising temperatures, particularly with respect to climate change, may have highly variable effects on plant-herbivore interactions and, ultimately, top-down control of plant biomass.

  7. Effects of skin surface temperature on photoplethysmograph.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, In Cheol; Yoon, Hyungro; Kang, Hyunjeong; Yeom, Hojun

    2014-01-01

    Photoplethysmograph (PPG) has been widely used to investigate various cardiovascular conditions. Previous studies demonstrated effects of temperature of the measurement environment; however, an integrated evaluation has not been established in environments with gradual air temperature variation. The purpose of this study is to investigate variations and relationships of blood pressure (BP), PPG and cardiovascular parameters such as heart rate (HR), stroke volume (SV), cardiac output (CO) and total peripheral resistance (TPR), by changing skin surface temperature (SST). Local mild cooling and heating was conducted on 16 healthy subjects. The results showed that local SST changes affected Finometer blood pressures (Finger BP), PPG components and TPR, but not the oscillometric blood pressure (Central BP), HR, SV and CO, and indicated that temperature must be maintained and monitored to reliably evaluate cardiovascular conditions in temperature-varying environments.

  8. Effects of Skin Surface Temperature on Photoplethysmograph

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    In Choel Jeong

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Photoplethysmograph (PPG has been widely used to investigate various cardiovascular conditions. Previous studies demonstrated effects of temperature of the measurement environment; however, an integrated evaluation has not been established in environments with gradual air temperature variation. The purpose of this study is to investigate variations and relationships of blood pressure (BP, PPG and cardiovascular parameters such as heart rate (HR, stroke volume (SV, cardiac output (CO and total peripheral resistance (TPR, by changing skin surface temperature (SST. Local mild cooling and heating was conducted on 16 healthy subjects. The results showed that local SST changes affected Finometer blood pressures (Finger BP, PPG components and TPR, but not the oscillometric blood pressure (Central BP, HR, SV and CO, and indicated that temperature must be maintained and monitored to reliably evaluate cardiovascular conditions in temperature-varying environments.

  9. Effects of radiant temperature on thermal comfort

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atmaca, Ibrahim; Kaynakli, Omer; Yigit, Abdulvahap [Uludag University, Bursa (Turkey). Faculty of Engineering and Architecture, Department of Mechanical Engineering

    2007-09-15

    The aim of this paper is to investigate the local differences between body segments caused by high radiant temperature, and to analyze the interior surface temperatures for different wall and ceiling constructions with their effect on thermal comfort. For the segment-wise thermal interactions between human body and its surrounding, simulations have been conducted by appropriately modifying Gagge 2-node model to multi-segment case to demonstrate the local differences. Simulation results are found to be in good agreement with experimental and simulation results reported in the literature. To calculate the interior surface temperatures of the wall and ceiling, the sol-air temperature approach is used for convenience. It is shown in the paper that the body segments close the relatively hot surfaces are more affected than others and interior surface temperatures of un-insulated walls and ceilings exposed to a strong solar radiation reach high levels, all of which cause thermal discomfort for the occupants in buildings. (author)

  10. Effects of Temperature on Hybrid Lens Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Askins, Steve; Victoria, Marta; Herrero, Rebeca; Domínguez, César; Antón, Ignacio; Sala, Gabriel

    2011-12-01

    In hybrid Silicone-on-glass Fresnel lenses, an optical silicone is molded onto a glass substrate and forms the Fresnel structure. These lenses offer a cost effective solution as a primary optical element in point-focus concentrator photovoltaic modules, as well as performance advantages. However, these lenses have a high performance variation with temperature due both to the change in index of refraction of silicone as well as to deformations in the facets caused by coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) mismatch. In this study we perform measurements of the light flux at the focal plane of a family of SOG lenses, varying temperature and lens-to-receiver distances. The effect of varying silicone cure temperature and the depth of the silicone between the lens and the glass substrate on temperature dependence was investigated. A preliminary computer model of this behavior is presented.

  11. Temperature effect on plasmons in bilayer graphene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patel, Digish K., E-mail: jdiggish@gmail.com; Sharma, A. C. [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, The M.S. University of Baroda, Vadodara-390002, Gujarat (India); Ashraf, S. S. Z. [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Aligarh Muslim University, Aligarh-202002, Uttar Pradesh (India); Ambavale, S. K. [Vishwakarma Government Engineering College Chandkheda, Ahmedabad-382424, Gujarat (India)

    2015-06-24

    We have theoretically investigated the plasmon dispersion and damping rate of doped bilayer graphene (BLG) at finite temperatures within the random phase approximation. Our computed results on plasmon dispersion show that plasmon frequency enhances with increasing temperatures in contrast to single layer graphene where it is suppressed. This can be attributed to the fact that the dynamic response of the electron gas or screening in bilayer graphene is different from that of single layer graphene. Further the temperature effect on damping rate is also discussed.

  12. Effect of irrigation fluid temperature on body temperature during ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... of dogs were hypothermic (<37oC). The addition of warmed irrigation fluids to a temperature management protocol in dogs undergoing elbow arthroscopy during general anaesthesia did not lead to decreased temperature losses. Keywords: Arthroscopy, Hypothermia, Irrigation fluid temperature, Thermoregulation.

  13. Effective Tolman temperature induced by trace anomaly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eune, Myungseok [Sangmyung University, Department of Civil Engineering, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of); Gim, Yongwan [Sogang University, Department of Physics, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Sogang University, Research Institute for Basic Science, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Wontae [Sogang University, Department of Physics, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-04-15

    Despite the finiteness of stress tensor for a scalar field on the four-dimensional Schwarzschild black hole in the Israel-Hartle-Hawking vacuum, the Tolman temperature in thermal equilibrium is certainly divergent on the horizon due to the infinite blue-shift of the Hawking temperature. The origin of this conflict is due to the fact that the conventional Tolman temperature was based on the assumption of a traceless stress tensor, which is, however, incompatible with the presence of the trace anomaly responsible for the Hawking radiation. Here, we present an effective Tolman temperature which is compatible with the presence of the trace anomaly by using the modified Stefan-Boltzmann law. Eventually, the effective Tolman temperature turns out to be finite everywhere outside the horizon, and so an infinite blue-shift of the Hawking temperature at the event horizon does not appear any more. In particular, it is vanishing on the horizon, so that the equivalence principle is exactly recovered at the horizon. (orig.)

  14. Effective Tolman temperature induced by trace anomaly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eune, Myungseok; Gim, Yongwan; Kim, Wontae

    2017-04-01

    Despite the finiteness of stress tensor for a scalar field on the four-dimensional Schwarzschild black hole in the Israel-Hartle-Hawking vacuum, the Tolman temperature in thermal equilibrium is certainly divergent on the horizon due to the infinite blue-shift of the Hawking temperature. The origin of this conflict is due to the fact that the conventional Tolman temperature was based on the assumption of a traceless stress tensor, which is, however, incompatible with the presence of the trace anomaly responsible for the Hawking radiation. Here, we present an effective Tolman temperature which is compatible with the presence of the trace anomaly by using the modified Stefan-Boltzmann law. Eventually, the effective Tolman temperature turns out to be finite everywhere outside the horizon, and so an infinite blue-shift of the Hawking temperature at the event horizon does not appear any more. In particular, it is vanishing on the horizon, so that the equivalence principle is exactly recovered at the horizon.

  15. Effects of temperature changes on groundwater ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griebler, Christian; Kellermann, Claudia; Schreglmann, Kathrin; Lueders, Tillmann; Brielmann, Heike; Schmidt, Susanne; Kuntz, David; Walker-Hertkorn, Simone

    2014-05-01

    The use of groundwater as a carrier of thermal energy is becoming more and more important as a sustainable source of heating and cooling. At the same time, the present understanding of the effects of aquifer thermal usage on geochemical and biological aquifer ecosystem functions is extremely limited. Recently we started to assess the effects of temperature changes in groundwater on the ecological integrity of aquifers. In a field study, we have monitored hydrogeochemical, microbial, and faunal parameters in groundwater of an oligotrophic aquifer in the vicinity of an active thermal discharge facility. The observed seasonal variability of abiotic and biotic parameters between wells was considerable. Yet, due to the energy-limited conditions no significant temperature impacts on bacterial or faunal abundances and on bacterial productivity were observed. In contrast, the diversity of aquifer bacterial communities and invertebrate fauna was either positively or negatively affected by temperature, respectively. In follow-up laboratory experiments temperature effects were systematically evaluated with respect to energy limitation (e.g. establishment of unlimited growth conditions), geochemistry (e.g. dynamics of DOC and nutrients), microbiology (e.g. survival of pathogens), and fauna (temperature preference and tolerance). First, with increased nutrient and organic carbon concentrations even small temperature changes revealed microbiological dynamics. Second, considerable amounts of adsorbed DOC were mobilized from sediments of different origin with an increase in temperatures. No evidence was obtained for growth of pathogenic bacteria and extended survival of viruses at elevated temperatures. Invertebrates clearly preferred natural thermal conditions (10-12°C), where their highest frequency of appearance was measured in a temperature gradient. Short-term incubations (48h) of invertebrates in temperature dose-response tests resulted in LT50 (lethal temperature) values

  16. Effect of programmed circadian temperature fluctuations on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effect of programmed circadian temperature fluctuations on population dynamics of. Biomphalaria pfeifferi (Krauss). K.N. de Kock and J.A. van Eeden. Snail Research Unit, Medical Research Council, Potchefstroom University for Christian Higher Education,. Potchefstroom. Until now all life-table studies on freshwater snails.

  17. Effects of chilling temperatures on photosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Environmental stress is an inescapable reality for most plants growing in natural settings. Conditions of sub or supra-optimal temperatures, water deficit, water logging, salinity, and pollution can have dramatic effects on plant growth and development, and in agricultural settings, yield. In cotton...

  18. The Effect of Temperature on Umami Taste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Barry G; Alvarado, Cynthia; Andrew, Kendra; Nachtigal, Danielle

    2016-07-01

    The effect of temperature on umami taste has not been previously studied in humans. Reported here are 3 experiments in which umami taste was measured for monopotassium glutamate (MPG) and monosodium glutamate (MSG) at solution temperatures between 10 and 37 °C. Experiment 1 showed that for subjects sensitive to MPG on the tongue tip, 1) cooling reduced umami intensity whether sampled with the tongue tip or in the whole mouth, but 2) had no effect on the rate of umami adaptation on the tongue tip. Experiment 2 showed that temperature had similar effects on the umami taste of MSG and MPG on the tongue tip but not in the whole mouth, and that contrary to umami taste, cooling to 10 °C increased rather than decreased the salty taste of both stimuli. Experiment 3 was designed to investigate the contribution of the hT1R1-hT1R3 glutamate receptor to the cooling effect on umami taste by using the T1R3 inhibitor lactisole. However, lactisole failed to block the umami taste of MPG at any temperature, which supports prior evidence that lactisole does not block umami taste for all ligands of the hT1R1-hT1R3 receptor. We conclude that temperature can affect sensitivity to the umami and salty tastes of glutamates, but in opposite directions, and that the magnitude of these effects can vary across stimuli and modes of tasting (i.e., whole mouth vs. tongue tip exposures). © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Finite-temperature effects on the Gaussian effective potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hajj, G.A.; Stevenson, P.M.

    1988-01-15

    We derive the finite-temperature Gaussian effective potential (FTGEP) from first principles, resolving some confusions arising in earlier treatments. The advantages of the FTGEP approach over the conventional loop expansion, even for high temperatures, are illustrated in a quantum-mechanical example. Results are presented for phi/sup 6/ theory in two and three dimensions and for the ''autonomous'' version of lambdaphi/sup 4/ theory in four dimensions.

  20. Managing Temperature Effects in Nanoscale Adaptive Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Wolpert, David

    2012-01-01

    This book discusses new techniques for detecting, controlling, and exploiting the impacts of temperature variations on nanoscale circuits and systems.  It provides a holistic discussion of temperature management, including physical phenomena (reversal of the MOSFET temperature dependence) that have recently become problematic, along with circuit techniques for detecting, controlling, and adapting to these phenomena. A detailed discussion is also included of the general aspects of thermal-aware system design and management of temperature-induced faults. A new sensor system is described that can determine the temperature dependence as well as the operating temperature to improve system reliability.  A new method is presented to control a circuit’s temperature dependence by individually tuning pull-up and pull-down networks to their temperature-insensitive operating points. This method extends the range of supply voltages that can be made temperature-insensitive, achieving insensitivity at nominal voltage fo...

  1. Combined scale effects for effective brazing at low temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bartout D.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In modern joining technology, the focus is on effective brazing and soldering of temperature sensitive materials. Here, as well as in diffusion welding processes the needed thermal energy is externally realized in the joint zone. This produces a heating of the whole joining parts, since in laminar joining the thermal energy is transported in interior by thermal conduction. An excess of critical temperatures or tolerable impact periods in wide parts of materials and respectively components is often not avoidable. This leads to thermal damages. In this point of view nanotechnology shows promising possibilities as scale effects and their resulting thermophysical effects such as melting temperature reduction and high diffusion rates can be used for providing a self-propagating high-temperature synthesis at room temperature. After ignition by an external energy source a self-propagating exothermic reaction is started. By producing a multilayer system with alternately arranged nanoscaled layers of e.g. Al and Ni the resulting thin foil can be used as heat source for melting the braze or solder material within the joining zone without any external preheating. Due to the high process velocities up to 30 m/s and the local heat input significant thermal influences on the joined parts are not detectable.

  2. Modeling the effect of temperature on ozone-related mortality

    OpenAIRE

    Wilson, Ander; Rappold, Ana G.; Neas, Lucas M.; Reich, Brian J

    2014-01-01

    Climate change is expected to alter the distribution of ambient ozone levels and temperatures which, in turn, may impact public health. Much research has focused on the effect of short-term ozone exposures on mortality and morbidity while controlling for temperature as a confounder, but less is known about the joint effects of ozone and temperature. The extent of the health effects of changing ozone levels and temperatures will depend on whether these effects are additive or synergistic. In t...

  3. Temperature Effects in the ATIC BGO Calorimeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isbert, J.; Wefel, J. P.; Atic Team

    The Advanced Thin Ionization Calorimeter ATIC Balloon Experiment contains a segmented calorimeter composed of 320 individual BGO crystals 18 radiation lengths deep to determine the particle energy Like all inorganic scintillation crystals the light output of BGO depends not only on the energy deposited by particles but also on the temperature of the crystal ATIC had successful flights in 2000 2001 and 2002 2003 from McMurdo Antarctica The temperature of balloon instruments varies during their flights at altitude due to sun angle variations and differences in albedo from the ground and is monitored and recorded In order to determine the temperature sensitivity of the ATIC calorimeter the instrument was temperature cycled in the thermal vacuum chamber at the CSBF in Palestine TX The temperature dependence derived from the pulse height response to cosmic ray muons at various temperatures is discussed and compared to values in the literature

  4. Solar Eclipse Effect on Shelter Air Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segal, M.; Turner, R. W.; Prusa, J.; Bitzer, R. J.; Finley, S. V.

    1996-01-01

    Decreases in shelter temperature during eclipse events were quantified on the basis of observations, numerical model simulations, and complementary conceptual evaluations. Observations for the annular eclipse on 10 May 1994 over the United States are presented, and these provide insights into the temporal and spatial changes in the shelter temperature. The observations indicated near-surface temperature drops of as much as 6 C. Numerical model simulations for this eclipse event, which provide a complementary evaluation of the spatial and temporal patterns of the temperature drops, predict similar decreases. Interrelationships between the temperature drop, degree of solar irradiance reduction, and timing of the peak eclipse are also evaluated for late spring, summer, and winter sun conditions. These simulations suggest that for total eclipses the drops in shelter temperature in midlatitudes can be as high as 7 C for a spring morning eclipse.

  5. EFFECT OF THE SUN UPON ANTENNA TEMPERATURE

    Science.gov (United States)

    temperature distributions over the sun at several frequencies are presented. The method by which antenna temperature is evaluated, using the Philco...calculate the variation of carrier-to-noise ratio as an antenna scans toward the sun while receiving signals from a deep-space probe and from a random-orbit satellite.

  6. Effect of processor temperature on film dosimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Shiv P; Das, Indra J

    2012-01-01

    Optical density (OD) of a radiographic film plays an important role in radiation dosimetry, which depends on various parameters, including beam energy, depth, field size, film batch, dose, dose rate, air film interface, postexposure processing time, and temperature of the processor. Most of these parameters have been studied for Kodak XV and extended dose range (EDR) films used in radiation oncology. There is very limited information on processor temperature, which is investigated in this study. Multiple XV and EDR films were exposed in the reference condition (d(max.), 10 × 10 cm(2), 100 cm) to a given dose. An automatic film processor (X-Omat 5000) was used for processing films. The temperature of the processor was adjusted manually with increasing temperature. At each temperature, a set of films was processed to evaluate OD at a given dose. For both films, OD is a linear function of processor temperature in the range of 29.4-40.6°C (85-105°F) for various dose ranges. The changes in processor temperature are directly related to the dose by a quadratic function. A simple linear equation is provided for the changes in OD vs. processor temperature, which could be used for correcting dose in radiation dosimetry when film is used. Copyright © 2012 American Association of Medical Dosimetrists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Investigating the effect of surface water - groundwater interactions on stream temperature using Distributed temperature sensing and instream temperature model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karthikeyan, Matheswaran; Blemmer, Morten; Mortensen, Julie Flor

    2011-01-01

    Surface water–groundwater interactions at the stream interface influences, and at times controls the stream temperature, a critical water property driving biogeochemical processes. This study investigates the effects of these interactions on temperature of Stream Elverdamsåen in Denmark using the...

  8. Finite temperature effects in primordial inflation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelmini, G. B.; Nanopoulos, D. V.; Olive, K. A.

    1983-11-01

    We present a detailed study of a recently proposed model for primordial inflation based on an N=1 locally supersymmetric potential. For a large class of parameters with which all cosmological constraints are satisfied, the temperature corrections can be neglected during the inflation period. At higher temperatures, the minimum is not at the origin, but very close to it. Address after July 1, 1983: Theory Group, Fermilab, PO Box 500, Batavia, IL 60510, USA.

  9. Effects of open-air temperature on air temperature inside biological safety cabinet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umemura, Masayuki; Shigeno, Katsuro; Yamamura, Keiko; Osada, Takashi; Soda, Midori; Yamada, Kiyofumi; Ando, Yuichi; Wakiya, Yoshifumi

    2011-02-14

    In Japan, biological safety cabinets (BSCs) are normally used by medical staff while handling antineoplastic agents. We have also set up a class II B2 BSC at the Division of Chemotherapy for Outpatients. The air temperature inside this BSC, however, decreases in winter. We assumed that this decrease is caused by the intake of open-air. Therefore, we investigated the effects of low open-air temperature on the BSC temperature and the time of admixtures of antineoplastic agents. The studies were conducted from January 1 to March 31, 2008. The outdoor air temperature was measured in the shade near the intake nozzle of the BSC and was compared with the BSC temperature. The correlation between the outdoor air temperature and the BSC temperature, the dissolution time of cyclophosphamide (CPA) and gemcitabine (GEM), and accurate weight measurement of epirubicin (EPI) solution were investigated for low and normal BSC temperatures. The BSC temperature was correlated with the open-air temperature for open-air temperatures of 5-20°C (p < 0.0001). The dissolution of CPA and GEM at these temperatures was significantly delayed as compared to that at 25°C (p < 0.01 and p < 0.0001, respectively). The weight measurement of EPI solution using a syringe method lacks accuracy because of its high coefficient of viscosity at low temperatures (p < 0.01). These results suggest that the BSC temperature decreases below room temperature in winter when air is drawn from outdoors. We showed that the BSC temperature affects the dissolution rate of antineoplastic agents. Further, we suggested that the BSC temperature drop might delay the affair of the admixtures of antineoplastic agents and increase the waiting time of outpatients for chemotherapy.

  10. Temperature extremes: Effect on plant growth and development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerry L. Hatfield

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Temperature is a primary factor affecting the rate of plant development. Warmer temperatures expected with climate change and the potential for more extreme temperature events will impact plant productivity. Pollination is one of the most sensitive phenological stages to temperature extremes across all species and during this developmental stage temperature extremes would greatly affect production. Few adaptation strategies are available to cope with temperature extremes at this developmental stage other than to select for plants which shed pollen during the cooler periods of the day or are indeterminate so flowering occurs over a longer period of the growing season. In controlled environment studies, warm temperatures increased the rate of phenological development; however, there was no effect on leaf area or vegetative biomass compared to normal temperatures. The major impact of warmer temperatures was during the reproductive stage of development and in all cases grain yield in maize was significantly reduced by as much as 80−90% from a normal temperature regime. Temperature effects are increased by water deficits and excess soil water demonstrating that understanding the interaction of temperature and water will be needed to develop more effective adaptation strategies to offset the impacts of greater temperature extreme events associated with a changing climate.

  11. Temperature Effects on Brain Tissue in Compression

    CERN Document Server

    Rashid, Badar; Gilchrist, Michael; 10.1016/j.jmbbm.2012.04.005

    2013-01-01

    Extensive research has been carried out for at least 50 years to understand the mechanical properties of brain tissue in order to understand the mechanisms of traumatic brain injury (TBI). The observed large variability in experimental results may be due to the inhomogeneous nature of brain tissue and to the broad range of test conditions. However, test temperature is also considered as one of the factors influencing the properties of brain tissue. In this research, the mechanical properties of porcine brain have been investigated at 22C (room temperature) and at 37C (body temperature) while maintaining a constant preservation temperature of approximately 4-5C. Unconfined compression tests were performed at dynamic strain rates of 30 and 50/s using a custom made test apparatus. There was no significant difference (p = 0.8559 - 0.9290) between the average engineering stresses of the brain tissue at the two different temperature conditions. The results of this study should help to understand the behavior of bra...

  12. Effect of temperature on electromechanical instability of dielectric elastomers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Junjie; Chen, Hualing; Li, Bo; Wang, Yongquan; Qiang, Junhua

    2012-04-01

    The electromechanical behavior of dielectric elastomer is strongly affected by the temperature. Very few models accounting for the effects of temperature exist in the literature. A recent experiment showed that the variation of dielectric constant of the most widely used dielectric elastomer (VHB 4910, 3M) according to temperature is relatively significant. In this paper, we develop a thermodynamic model to study the influence of temperature on the instability in dielectric elastomer by involving deformation and temperature-dependent dielectric constant. The results indicate that the increase of temperature could improve the actuation stress and the electromechanical instability of the elastomer.

  13. Effects of Elevated Temperature on Compressive Strength Of Concrete

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study presents the results of investigation of the effects of elevated temperatures on the compressive strength of Grade 40 concrete. A total of thirty cube specimens were cast, cured in water at ambient temperature in the laboratory and subjected to various temperature regimes before testing. A concrete mix of 1:1:3 ...

  14. Effects of temperature on chirp rates of tree crickets (Orthoptera ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1991-10-02

    Oct 2, 1991 ... Surprisingly little is known about the effects of temperature on rates within poikilothenn nervous systems (Walker. 1975). Since poikilothenn metabolic rates generally increase with temperature, pulse rates and chirp rates of the calling songs of crickets generally increase with temperature. Since songs that ...

  15. Review: Sublethal effects of temperature on freshwater organisms ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Review: Sublethal effects of temperature on freshwater organisms, with special reference to aquatic insects. HF Dallas, V Ross-Gillespie. Abstract. Water temperature is a key variable affecting aquatic organisms. Understanding their response to elevated water temperatures is important for estimating upper thermal limits, ...

  16. Effect of microstructure on the high temperature strength of nitride ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The effect of these parameters on room temperature and high temperature strength of the composite up to 1300°C in ambient condition were studied. The high temperature flexural strength of the composite of all compositions increased at 1200 and 1300°C because of oxidation of Si3N4 phase and blunting crack front.

  17. Quantitative Temperature Dependence of Longitudinal Spin Seebeck Effect at High Temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ken-ichi Uchida

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available We report temperature-dependent measurements of longitudinal spin Seebeck effects (LSSEs in Pt/Y_{3}Fe_{5}O_{12} (YIG/Pt systems in a high temperature range from room temperature to above the Curie temperature of YIG. The experimental results show that the magnitude of the LSSE voltage in the Pt/YIG/Pt systems rapidly decreases with increasing the temperature and disappears above the Curie temperature. The critical exponent of the LSSE voltage in the Pt/YIG/Pt systems at the Curie temperature is estimated to be 3, which is much greater than that for the magnetization curve of YIG. This difference highlights the fact that the mechanism of the LSSE cannot be explained in terms of simple static magnetic properties in YIG.

  18. Effect of temperature on platelet adherence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braune, S; Fröhlich, G M; Lendlein, A; Jung, F

    2016-01-01

    Thrombogenicity is one of the main parameters tested in vitro to evaluate the hemocompatibility of artificial surfaces. While the influence of the temperature on platelet aggregation has been addressed by several studies, the temperature influence on the adherence of platelets to body foreign surfaces as an important aspect of biomedical device handling has not yet been explored. Therefore, we analyzed the influence of two typically applied incubation-temperatures (22°C and 37°C) on the adhesion of platelets to biomaterials. Thrombogenicity of three different polymers - medical grade poly(dimethyl siloxane) (PDMS), polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) and polyethylene terephthalate (PET) - were studied in an in vitro static test. Platelet adhesion was studied with stringently characterized blood from apparently healthy subjects. Collection of whole blood and preparation of platelet rich plasma (PRP) was carried out at room temperature (22°C). PRP was incubated with the polymers either at 22°C or 37°C. Surface adherent platelets were fixed, fluorescently labelled and assessed by an image-based approach. Differences in the density of adherent platelets after incubation at 22°C and 37°C occurred on PDMS and PET. Similar levels of adherent platelets were observed on the very thrombogenic PTFE. The covered surface areas per single platelet were analyzed to measure the state of platelet activation and revealed no differences between the two incubation temperatures for any of the analyzed polymers. Irrespective of the observed differences between the low and medium thrombogenic PDMS and PET and the higher variability at 22°C, the thrombogenicity of the three investigated polymers was evaluated being comparable at both incubation temperatures.

  19. Temperature effect on surface roughening of thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Z.-J.; Shen, Y. G.

    2005-12-01

    The effect of the deposition temperature on the surface roughness and the growth exponent of thin films in the early growth time regime has been studied using a linear continuum model. Surface diffusion and three commonly observed roughening mechanisms, namely, shot noise, the Ehrlich-Schwobel (ES) effect, and the stress-induced instability, are step-by-step incorporated into the model to analyze the temperature effect in different cases. It has been revealed that when the thermal activated surface diffusion is operative, the surface roughness of the films without the stress effect will decrease with deposition temperature. In addition, a rougher film surface caused by the ES effect can also be observed at low temperatures. If stress exists due to a lattice mismatch at the film/substrate interface, however, high deposition temperatures may result in an unstable growth with the roughness increasing with temperature. Our analyses have also found that the growth exponent is strongly temperature dependent, and the film growth may fall into three or four temperature regions depending on whether the stress effect is present or not: (1) low-temperature region with a fixed growth exponent of 0.5 or slightly larger than 0.5 due to the ES effect; (2) a middle crossover temperature region with the growth exponent decreasing with temperature from 0.5 (or slightly larger than 0.5) to 0.25; (3) high-temperature region characterizing by noisy Mullins diffusion equation with a constant growth exponent of 0.25; and (4) if stress exists during film growth, at the high-temperature region where the stress-induced morphology instability begins to operate the growth exponent will be larger than 0.25 and increase with temperature.

  20. Distance and temperature effects on pika forage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jim F. Fowler; Barbara Smith; Steve Overby

    2014-01-01

    The American pika, Ochotona princeps, has been referred to as a 'canary in the coal mine' when it comes to climate change. This small rabbit relative inhabits cool alpine and subalpine mountain areas and has been shown to be sensitive to higher temperatures from both physiological experiments (Smith 1974) and from past climate transitions in the late...

  1. Enhanced battery model including temperature effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rosca, B.; Wilkins, S.

    2013-01-01

    Within electric and hybrid vehicles, batteries are used to provide/buffer the energy required for driving. However, battery performance varies throughout the temperature range specific to automotive applications, and as such, models that describe this behaviour are required. This paper presents a

  2. Temperature Effects in Varactors and Multipliers

    Science.gov (United States)

    East, J.; Mehdi, Imran

    2001-01-01

    Varactor diode multipliers are a critical part of many THz measurement systems. The power and efficiencies of these devices limit the available power for THz sources. Varactor operation is determined by the physics of the varactor device and a careful doping profile design is needed to optimize the performance. Higher doped devices are limited by junction breakdown and lower doped structures are limited by current saturation. Higher doped structures typically have higher efficiencies and lower doped structures typically have higher powers at the same operating frequency and impedance level. However, the device material properties are also a function of the operating temperature. Recent experimental evidence has shown that the power output of a multiplier can be improved by cooling the device. We have used a particle Monte Carlo simulation to investigate the temperature dependent velocity vs. electric field in GaAs. This information was then included in a nonlinear device circuit simulator to predict multiplier performance for various temperatures and device designs. This paper will describe the results of this analysis of temperature dependent multiplier operation.

  3. Effect of temperature on quantum dots

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    MAHDI AHMADI BORJI

    2017-07-12

    Jul 12, 2017 ... applications. Quantum dot semiconductor lasers, due to the discrete density of states, low threshold current and temperature dependence, high optical gain and quan- tum efficiency and high modulation speed, ... elastic properties of neighbour materials, lattice mis- match, and geometry of the quantum dot ...

  4. EFFECT OF TEMPERATURE AND HOST GENOTYPE ON ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Disease development in plants involves various inter-related processes each of which may be. influenced by environmental factors as well as host and pathogen genotypes Temperature in the range of 20~25°C was reported to be optimum for urediniospore germination of groundnut rust. (Subrahmanyam and McDonald ...

  5. High Pressure and Temperature Effects in Polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucknall, David; Arrighi, Valeria; Johnston, Kim; Condie, Iain

    Elastomers are widely exploited as the basis for seals in gas and fluid pipelines. The underlying behaviour of these elastomer at the high pressure, elevated temperatures they experience in operation is poorly understood. Consequently, the duty cycle of these materials is often deliberately limited to a few hours, and in order to prevent failure, production is stopped in order to change the seals in critical joints. The result is significant time lost due to bringing down production to change the seals as well as knock on financial costs. In order to address the fundamental nature of the elastomers at their intended operating conditions, we are studying the gas permeation behaviour of hydrogenated natural butyl rubber (HNBR) and fluorinated elastomers (FKM) at a high pressure and elevated temperature. We have developed a pressure system that permits gas permeation studies at gas pressures of up to 5000 psi and operating temperatures up to 150° C. In this paper, we will discuss the nature of the permeation behaviour at these extreme operating conditions, and how this relates to the changes in the polymer structure. We will also discuss the use of graphene-polymer thin layer coatings to modify the gas permeation behaviour of the elastomers.

  6. Dissociative electron attachment to HBr: A temperature effect

    OpenAIRE

    Fedor, Juraj; Cingel, M.; Skalný, J. D.; Scheier, P.; Märk, T.D.; Čížek, M.; Kolorenč, P.; Horáček, J

    2007-01-01

    The effects of rovibrational temperature on dissociative electron attachment to hydrogen bromide has been investigated from the experimental and theoretical point of view. Theoretical calculations based on the nonlocal resonance model predict a strong temperature effect on the Br⁻ fragment ion yield due to population of higher vibrational and rotational states. A crossed beam experimental setup consisting of a temperature controlled effusive molecular beam and a trochoidal electron monochroma...

  7. Effect of Temperature and Relative Humidity on the Growth of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effects of temperature and relative humidity on the growth of Helminthosporium fulvum were investigated. Various temperature regimes of 10oC, 15oC, 20oC, 25oC, 30oC, 35oC and 40¢ªC were used to determine the temperature effect on the growth of H. fulvum. Maximum growth of H. fulvum was obtained at 25¢ªC ...

  8. Effect of Temperature and Relative Humidity on the Growth of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ABSTRACT: The effects of temperature and relative humidity on the growth of Helminthosporium fulvum were investigated. Various temperature regimes of 10oC, 15oC, 20oC, 25oC, 30oC, 35oC and 40˚C were used to determine the temperature effect on the growth of H. fulvum. Maximum growth of H. fulvum was obtained ...

  9. The Effect of Temperature on Moisture Transport in Concrete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yao; Xi, Yunping

    2017-08-09

    Most concrete structures and buildings are under temperature and moisture variations simultaneously. Thus, the moisture transport in concrete is driven by the moisture gradient as well as the temperature gradient. This paper presents an experimental approach for determining the effect of different temperature gradients on moisture distribution profiles in concrete. The effect of elevated temperatures under isothermal conditions on the moisture transport was also evaluated, and found not to be significant. The non-isothermal tests show that the temperature gradient accelerates the moisture transport in concrete. The part of increased moisture transfer due to the temperature gradient can be quantified by a coupling parameter DHT, which can be determined by the present test data. The test results indicated that DHT is not a constant but increases linearly with the temperature variation. A material model was developed for DHT based on the experimental results obtained in this study.

  10. Temperature and species richness effects in phytoplankton communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schabhüttl, Stefanie; Hingsamer, Peter; Weigelhofer, Gabriele; Hein, Thomas; Weigert, Achim; Striebel, Maren

    2013-02-01

    Phytoplankton play an important role as primary producers and thus can affect higher trophic levels. Phytoplankton growth and diversity may, besides other factors, be controlled by seasonal temperature changes and increasing water temperatures. In this study, we investigated the combined effects of temperature and diversity on phytoplankton growth. In a controlled laboratory experiment, monocultures of 15 freshwater phytoplankton taxa (green algae, cyanobacteria, and diatoms) as well as 25 mixed communities of different species richness (2-12 species) and taxa composition were exposed to constant temperatures of 12, 18, and 24 °C. Additionally, they were exposed to short-term daily temperature peaks of +4 °C. Increased species richness had a positive effect on phytoplankton growth rates and phosphorous content at all temperature levels, with maximum values occurring at 18 °C. Overyielding was observed at almost all temperature levels and could mostly be explained by complementary traits. Higher temperatures resulted in higher fractions of cyanobacteria in communities. This negative effect of temperature on phytoplankton diversity following a shift in community composition was most obvious in communities adapted to cooler temperatures, pointing to the assumption that relative temperature changes may be more important than absolute ones.

  11. Temperature hysteretic effect and its influence on colossal ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    in magnetic fields up to 40 kOe have revealed anomalous temperature hysteretic effects both in 0 Oe and 20 kOe magnetic fields. The sharp ... This bulk sample also shows temperature hysteretic effects in resistivity [2,3]. No attempts has been made to study ... resistance ratio Rcool/Rwarm. Figure 2 shows the variation of.

  12. Effect of Temperature and Hose Genotype on Components of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effect of Temperature and Hose Genotype on Components of Resistance to Groundnut Rust. P Subrahmanyam, PV Subba Rao, PM Reddy, D McDonald. Abstract. The effects of temperature on incubation period, infection frequency, lesion diameter, leaf area damage, pustule rupture, and sporulation were quantified for six ...

  13. and interaction effects of extrusion temperature and usage level

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ali

    2012-10-30

    Oct 30, 2012 ... interaction effects between dietary levels of EFFSB and extrusion temperatures on performance criteria, pancreas weight, CPK, LDH, ... of the effective heat treatments is extrusion system inclu- ding high temperature ... EFFSB were analyzed for dry matter (DM), ether extract (EE), crude protein (CP), crude ...

  14. Glutaraldehyde crosslinking of collagen: effects of time, temperature, concentration and presoaking as measured by shrinkage temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruijgrok, J M; de Wijn, J R; Boon, M E

    1994-01-01

    Experiments were carried out to study the effect on the degree of crosslinking of: (a) short term (1 or 5 min) high (50 degrees C) temperature glutaraldehyde (GA) fixation of native collagen membrane, (b) a combination of GA presoaking at low temperature [0 degree C or room temperature (rt)] followed by short time (collagen fleece in a multilayer diffusion model. As a measure for the degree of crosslinking the shrinkage temperature (Ts) was determined. Short time (1 or 5 min) high temperature (50 degrees C) fixation using 0.1% GA solution caused the shrinkage temperature to increase to 80% and 93% respectively, of the maximum attainable Ts employing GA crosslinking (ca 91 degrees C). Fixation with 0.01% GA for 5 min at 50 degrees C appeared equally as effective as 1 min with 0.1% GA. Although an elevated fixation temperature (from rt to 45 degrees C) was found to produce a substantial increase in Ts of the collagen sheets, a homogeneous distribution of cross links was not obtained by this method. Presoaking the samples at rt (1 h) or at 0 degree C (3 h) with subsequent short time heating to 45 degrees C caused an almost equal rise in shrinkage temperature in Ts throughout the collagen samples.

  15. Effect of temperature and temperature shock on the stability of continuous cellulosic-hydrogen fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadow, Samir I; Jiang, Hongyu; Watanabe, Ryoya; Li, Yu-You

    2013-08-01

    Three continuous stirred tank reactors (CSTR) were operated under mesophilic (37 ± 1°C), thermophilic (55 ± 1°C) and hyper-thermophilic (80 ± 1°C) temperatures for 164 days to investigate the effect of temperature and temperature shock on the cellulosic-dark hydrogen fermentation by mixed microflora. During steady state condition, the sudden decreases in the fermentation temperature occurred twice in each condition for 24h. The results show that the 55 ± 1 and 80 ± 1°C presented stable hydrogen yields of 12.28 and 9.72 mmol/g cellulose, respectively. However, the 37 ± 1°C presented low hydrogen yield of 3.56 mmol/g cellulose and methane yield of 5.4 mmol/g cellulose. The reactor performance under 55 ± 1 or 80 ± 1°C appeared to be more resilient to the sudden decreases in the fermentation temperature than 37 ± 1°C. The experimental analysis results indicated that the changing in soluble by-products could explain the effect of temperature and temperature shock, and the thermophilic temperature is expected having a better economic performance for cellulosic-hydrogen fermentation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Effects of mine strata thermal behavior and mine initial temperatures on mobile refuge alternative temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yantek, D S; Yan, L; Bissert, P T; Klein, M D

    2017-04-01

    Federal regulations require the installation of refuge alternatives (RAs) in underground coal mines. Mobile RAs have a limited ability to dissipate heat, and heat buildup can lead to a life-threatening condition as the RA internal air temperature and relative humidity increase. The U.S. National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) performed heat testing on a 10-person tent-type training RA and contracted ThermoAnalytics Inc. to develop a validated thermal simulation model of the tested RA. The model was used to examine the effects of the constant mine strata temperature assumption, initial mine air temperature, initial mine strata surface temperature (MSST), initial mine strata temperature at depth (MSTD) and mine strata thermal behavior on RA internal air temperature using 117 W (400 Btu/h) of sensible heat input per simulated miner. For the studied RA, when the mine strata temperature was treated as a constant, the final predicted RA internal air temperature was 7.1°C (12.8°F) lower than it was when the mine strata thermal behavior was included in the model. A 5.6°C (10.0°F) increase in the initial MSST resulted in a 3.9°C (7.1°F) increase in the final RA internal air temperature, whereas a 5.6°C (10°F) increase in the initial MSTD yielded a 1.4°C (2.5°F) increase in the final RA internal air temperature. The results indicate that mine strata temperature increases and mine strata initial temperatures must be accounted for in the physical testing or thermal simulations of RAs.

  17. Temperature, humidity and time. Combined effects on radiochromic film dosimeters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abdel-Fattah, A.A.; Miller, A.

    1996-01-01

    The effects of both relative humidity and temperature during irradiation on the dose response of FWT-60-00 and Riso B3 radiochromic film dosimeters have been investigated in the relative humidity (RH) range 11-94% and temperature range 20-60 degrees C for irradiation by Co-60 photons and 10-Me......V electrons. The results show that humidity and temperature cannot be treated as independent variables, rather there appears to be interdependence between absorbed dose, temperature, and humidity. Dose rate does not seem to play a significant role. The dependence of temperature during irradiation is +0.......25 +/- 0.1% per degrees C for the FWT-60-00 dosimeters and +0.5 +/- 0.1% per degrees C For Riso B3 dosimeters at temperatures between 20 and 50 degrees C and at relative humidities between 20 and 53%. At extreme conditions both with respect to temperature and to humidity, the dosimeters show much stronger...

  18. Effect of temperature on the mechanical properties of polymer mortars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Marciano Laredo dos Reis

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the results of an experimental program to investigate the effect of temperature on the performance of epoxy and unsaturated polyester polymer mortars (PM. PM is a composite material in which polymeric materials are used to bond the aggregates in a fashion similar to that used in the preparation of Portland cement concrete. For this purpose, prismatic and cylindrical specimens were prepared for flexural and compressive tests, respectively, at different temperatures. Measurements of the temperature-dependent elastic modulus and the compressive and flexural strength were conducted using a thermostatic chamber attached to a universal test machine for a range of temperatures varying from room temperature to 90 ºC. The flexural and compressive strength decreases as temperature increases, especially after matrix HDT. Epoxy polymer mortars are more sensitive to temperature variation than unsaturated polyester ones.

  19. Effects of temperature and growing seasons on crop water ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The crop water requirement (CWR) depends on several factors including temperature and growing seasons. This study investigated the effects of temperature and growing seasons on CWR in Saudi Arabia. Increase in temperature by 1°C increased the CWR by 1.9 - 2.9%, 1.9 – 3.0% and 2.2 – 3.8% for dates, alfalfa and ...

  20. Effect of temperature increments in septic tank efficiency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chi-Tec, M.; Caballero-Arzapalo, N.; Giacoman Vallejo, G.; Mendez-Novelo, R.; Quintal-Franco, C.

    2009-07-01

    Septic tanks are the main sewage disposal system used in Yucatan, Mexico. Septic tank content is stabilized under anaerobic conditions and is considered the temperature has a significant effect on the efficiency. This work was developed in order asses the feasibility to improve communal septic tanks efficiency by increasing content temperature. Temperatures inside the tank were increased using a hybrid heater system (solar and electricity). (Author)

  1. The effect of pavement-watering on subsurface pavement temperatures

    OpenAIRE

    Hendel, Martin; Royon, Laurent

    2015-01-01

    International audience; Pavement-watering is currently viewed as a potential climate change adaptation and urban heat island mitigation technique. The effects of pavement-watering on pavement temperature measured 5 cm deep are presented and discussed. Subsurface temperature measurements could not be used to improve or optimize pavement-watering methods as was seen in previous work on surface temperatures or subsurface pavement heat flux measurements.

  2. Experimental and computational investigation of temperature effects on soot mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bi Xiaojie

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Effects of initial ambient temperatures on combustion and soot emission characteristics of diesel fuel were investigated through experiment conducted in optical constant volume chamber and simulation using phenomenological soot model. There are four difference initial ambient temperatures adopted in our research: 1000 K, 900 K, 800 K and 700 K. In order to obtain a better prediction of soot behavior, phenomenological soot model was revised to take into account the soot oxidation feedback on soot number density and good agreement was observed in the comparison of soot measurement and prediction. Results indicated that ignition delay prolonged with the decrease of initial ambient temperature. The heat release rate demonstrated the transition from mixing controlled combustion at high ambient temperature to premixed combustion mode at low ambient temperature. At lower ambient temperature, soot formation and oxidation mechanism were both suppressed. But finally soot mass concentration reduced with decreasing initial ambient temperature. Although the drop in ambient temperature did not cool the mean in-cylinder temperature during the combustion, it did shrink the total area of local high equivalence ratio, in which soot usually generated fast. At 700 K initial ambient temperature, soot emissions were almost negligible, which indicates that sootless combustion might be achieved at super low initial temperature operation conditions.

  3. Microstructural Evolution and Mechanical Behavior of High Temperature Solders: Effects of High Temperature Aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasnine, M.; Tolla, B.; Vahora, N.

    2017-12-01

    This paper explores the effects of aging on the mechanical behavior, microstructure evolution and IMC formation on different surface finishes of two high temperature solders, Sn-5 wt.% Ag and Sn-5 wt.% Sb. High temperature aging showed significant degradation of Sn-5 wt.% Ag solder hardness (34%) while aging has little effect on Sn-5 wt.% Sb solder. Sn-5 wt.% Ag experienced rapid grain growth as well as the coarsening of particles during aging. Sn-5 wt.% Sb showed a stable microstructure due to solid solution strengthening and the stable nature of SnSb precipitates. The increase of intermetallic compound (IMC) thickness during aging follows a parabolic relationship with time. Regression analysis (time exponent, n) indicated that IMC growth kinetics is controlled by a diffusion mechanism. The results have important implications in the selection of high temperature solders used in high temperature applications.

  4. Temperature compensation in viscoelastic damper using magnetorheological effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Yi; Tu, Jianwei; Yu, Yang; Xu, Jiayun; Tan, Dongmei

    2017-06-01

    The viscoelastic damper is an effective passive vibration control device, however, its viscoelastic material experiences considerable thermal softening when subjected to higher temperatures, limiting its development and application. In an effort to cope this problem, this paper proposes the development of a new-type viscoelastic damper using the magnetorheological (MR) effect to compensate for the thermal softening effect of viscoelastic material. The new damper is manufactured and the performance is tested, verifying that its MR effect can effectively make up for the performance deficiency of traditional viscoelastic dampers in high temperature. The mechanical model of the new damper is devised and its parameters are identified through the performance test data. The compensation strategy is presented and the thermal compensation controller based on pulse width modulation technology is developed. The compensation experimental results show that this new-type viscoelastic damper will not be influenced by environmental temperature, it can maintain the optimal energy dissipation performance in various temperature conditions.

  5. Effects of Temperature and Growing Seasons on Crop Water ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PROF HORSFALL

    ABSTRACT: Water savings can be improved through reducing agricultural water consumption. The crop water requirement (CWR) depends on several factors including temperature and growing seasons. This study investigated the effects of temperature and growing seasons on CWR in Saudi Arabia. Increase in ...

  6. Effect of temperature on moromi fermentation of soy sauce with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    It was learned that as the aging of moromi took place, the pH level was decreased from pH 7 to 4.88. Also, the soy sauce had lower concentration of ethanol when higher temperature was used in moromi fermentation but the difference of temperature did not show significantly effect on total nitrogen content in soy sauce.

  7. Effect of Calcination and Reduction Temperatures on the Reduction ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of calcination and reduction temperatures on the reducibility, dispersion and Fischer-Tropsch activity of 10 wt% cobalt supported on titania catalyst modified by 0.1 wt% boron has been studied. The percentage reduction and percentage dispersion were found to decrease with increasing calcination temperature.

  8. Effects of Decortication Temperature on the Functional Properties of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The results obtained showed that the effects of decortication on the functional properties of cowpea flour were significantly different (p 0.05). Flour sample at decortication temperature of 40oC showed the least boiling and gelation temperature, and also the ...

  9. Effects of temperature on the germination, sporulation, and in - vivo ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effects of temperature on the germination, sporulation, and in - vivo infection of Sphaerotheca fuliginea (powdery mildew) on water melon ( Citrullus lanathus . L) ... Significant difference (P<0.05) was observed among the temperature levels on mycelium length with highest length observed at 20°C, but least was at 40°C.

  10. Effect of Temperature on the Oviposition Capacity of Engorged Adult ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effects of temperature on the oviposition capacity of engorged adult females of Rhipicephalus sanguineus and Haemaphysalis leachi leachi and on the hatching pattern of their eggs were investigated under laboratory conditions. The temperatures of maintenance were 150C, 200C, 250C, 300C and 370C at 85% relative ...

  11. Temperature effects on quantum interference in molecular junctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markussen, Troels; Thygesen, Kristian Sommer

    2014-01-01

    A number of experiments have demonstrated that destructive quantum interference (QI) effects in molecular junctions lead to very low conductances even at room temperature. On the other hand, another recent experiment showed increasing conductance with temperature which was attributed to decoherence...

  12. Temperature effects on surface activity and application in oxidation ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Correspondingly, the CMC of CTAB-SDS decreases almost by half. The increase of surface activity of CTAB-SDS can be attributed to the relatively weak electrostatic interaction at high temperature, which is supported by the increase of solubility of CTAB-SDS with rise in temperature. Catalytic effect on oxidation of toluene ...

  13. Effect of temperature on accumulation of chlorophylls and leaf ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effects of temperature on leaf colour, accumulation of chlorophylls and leaf ultrastructures of an albino tea cultivar 'Xiaxueya' were investigated. The study showed that the shoot albino phenomenon of 'Xiaoxueya' was controlled by temperature. The development of chloroplast from etioplast and the accumulation of ...

  14. On the effect of temperature dependent thermal conductivity on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We consider the effect of temperature dependent thermal conductivity on temperature rise in biologic tissues during microwave heating. The method of asymptotic expansion is used for finding solution. An appropriate matching procedure was used in our method. Our result reveals the possibility of multiple solutions and it ...

  15. Effect of temperature on shelf life, chemical and microbial properties ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cream cheese samples were analyzed to find out the effect of recommended storage temperature (4±1°C) and ambient room temperature (21±1°C) on pH, titratable acidity (% lactic acid), moisture content and microbial growth. Percent reduction in moisture content and increase in titratable acidity of cheeses were found to ...

  16. Effect of heat treatment temperature on microstructure and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Effect of heat treatment temperature on microstructure and electrochemical properties of hollow carbon spheres prepared in high-pressure argon. Boyang Liu Yun ... 40 cycles. However, the discharge capacity of the HCSs decreases and the cycling performance is improved with the increase of heat treatment temperature.

  17. Effect of Calcination and Reduction Temperatures on the Reduction ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of calcination and reduction temperatures on the reducibility, dispersion and Fischer-Tropsch activity of 10 wt% cobalt supported on titania catalyst modified by 0.1 wt% boron has been studied. The percentage reduction and ... The reduction temperature did not affect the product selectivity. South African Journal of ...

  18. Effect of drying temperatures on the proximate composition and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A study was conducted to dry chicken eggs in order to determine the effect of drying temperatures on the proximate composition and sensory attributes of dried eggs. The albumen, yolk and whole egg were dried separately at temperatures of 50, 55 and 60oC. The drying time for the samples ranged from 7hrs20mins to ...

  19. Effects of reaction temperature on size and optical properties of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Effects of reaction temperature on size and optical properties of CdSe nanocrystals. Shutang Chen ... The diameter of the CdSe nanocrystals is tuned from 4–11.0 nm by varying the reaction temperatures. The growth ... Department of Chemistry, School of Science, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing 100081, P.R. China ...

  20. Determination of chilling temperature effects on nutrient elements ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PRECIOUS

    2009-12-01

    Dec 1, 2009 ... Full Length Research Paper. Determination of chilling temperature effects on ... Results indicated that the distribution of some inorganic elements among organs (roots, stem and leaves) of cole ... Key words: Common cole (Brassica oleracea cv. Acephala), inorganic element, chilling temperature, X-ray,.

  1. Effects of preparation temperature on the conductivity of polypyrrole ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    An attempt has been made to investigate the effect of temperature on the conductivity of polypyrrole conducting polymer films prepared by an electrochemical method in an aqueous medium using camphor sulfonate as the dopant. The polymer was grown from aqueous solutions employing a range of temperatures (1-60°C).

  2. Effect of temperature on shelf life, chemical and microbial properties ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    use

    2011-11-23

    Nov 23, 2011 ... Cream cheese samples were analyzed to find out the effect of recommended storage temperature. (4±1°C) and ambient room temperature (21±1°C) on pH, titratable acidity (% lactic acid), moisture content and microbial growth. Percent reduction in moisture content and increase in titratable acidity of.

  3. Effect of temperature on perchloroethylene dechlorination by a methanogenic consortium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, J.; Skeen, R.S.; Hooker, B.S.

    1995-04-01

    The effect of temperature on the kinetics of growth, substrate metabolism, and perchloroethylene (PCE) dechlorination by a methanogenic consortium is reported. In all cases, a simple kinetic model accurately reflected experimental data. Values for the substrate and methane yield coefficients, and the maximum specific growth rate are fairly consistent at each temperature. Also, the substrate and methane yield coefficients show little temperature sensitivity. In contrast, both the maximum specific growth rate and the PCE dechlorination yield coefficient (Y{sub PCE}) are temperature dependent.

  4. Modeling the Temperature Effect of Orientations in Residential Buildings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabahat Arif

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Indoor thermal comfort in a building has been an important issue for the environmental sustainability. It is an accepted fact that their designs and planning consume a lot of energy in the modern architecture of 20th and 21st centuries. An appropriate orientation of a building can provide thermally comfortable indoor temperatures which otherwise can consume extra energy to condition these spaces through all the seasons. This experimental study investigates the potential effect of this solar passive design strategy on indoor temperatures and a simple model is presented for predicting indoor temperatures based upon the ambient temperatures.

  5. NOTE: Effects of temperature variation on MOSFET dosimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Tsang; Butson, Martin J.; Yu, Peter K. N.

    2004-07-01

    This note investigates temperature effects on dosimetry using a metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFET) for radiotherapy x-ray treatment. This was performed by analysing the dose response and threshold voltage outputs for MOSFET dosimeters as a function of ambient temperature. Results have shown that the clinical semiconductor dosimetry system (CSDS) MOSFET provides stable dose measurements with temperatures varying from 15 °C up to 40 °C. Thus standard irradiations performed at room temperature can be directly compared to in vivo dose assessments performed at near body temperature without a temperature correction function. The MOSFET dosimeter threshold voltage varies with temperature and this level is dependent on the dose history of the MOSFET dosimeter. However, the variation can be accounted for in the measurement method. For accurate dosimetry, the detector should be placed for approximately 60 s on a patient to allow thermal equilibrium before measurements are taken with the final reading performed whilst still attached to the patient or conversely left for approximately 120 s after removal from the patient if initial readout was measured at room temperature to allow temperature equilibrium to be established.

  6. Temperature Dependence of the Resonant Magnetoelectric Effect in Layered Heterostructures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dmitrii A. Burdin

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The dependence of the resonant direct magnetoelectric effect on temperature is studied experimentally in planar composite structures. Samples of rectangular shapes with dimensions of 5 mm × 20 mm employed ferromagnetic layers of either an amorphous (metallic glass alloy or nickel with a thickness of 20–200 μm and piezoelectric layers of single crystalline langatate material or lead zirconate titanate piezoelectric ceramics with a thickness of 500 μm. The temperature of the samples was varied in a range between 120 and 390 K by blowing a gaseous nitrogen stream around them. It is shown that the effective characteristics of the magnetoelectric effect—such as the mechanical resonance frequency fr, the quality factor Q and the magnitude of the magnetoelectric coefficient αE at the resonance frequency—are contingent on temperature. The interrelations between the temperature changes of the characteristics of the magnetoelectric effect and the temperature variations of the following material parameters—Young’s modulus Y, the acoustic quality factor of individual layers, the dielectric constant ε, the piezoelectric modulus d of the piezoelectric layer as well as the piezomagnetic coefficients λ(n of the ferromagnetic layer—are established. The effect of temperature on the characteristics of the nonlinear magnetoelectric effect is observed for the first time. The results can be useful for designing magnetoelectric heterostructures with specified temperature characteristics, in particular, for the development of thermally stabilized magnetoelectric devices.

  7. Effects of Aging Temperature on Moisture Absorption of Perforated GFRP

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Eslami, Shiva; Taheri-Behrooz, Fathollah; Taheri, Farid

    2012-01-01

      This paper examines the effects of aging on the flexural stiffness and bending loading capacity of a perforated glass fiber-reinforced epoxy composite subjected to combined moisture and elevated temperature...

  8. Effects of storage temperature and extension media on motility of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ADEYEYE

    2016-07-26

    Jul 26, 2016 ... Keywords: Egg-yolk citrate, Goat-milk citrate, Motility, Semen ... milk, skin and other products), has been adjudged ... detrimental effect on sperm cells (Purdy, 2006). ... motility at two different storage temperature in an.

  9. effect of elevated temperature on the compressive strength of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    HOD

    -chemical industries [7]. Although there are several studies on the use of mill scale in cement manufacturing and soil stabilization [8,. 9], the option of mill scale in concrete as partial replacement of cement under the effect of temperature.

  10. Effect of seasonal changing temperature on the growth of phytoplankton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ming; Fan, Meng; Yuan, Xing; Zhu, Huaiping

    An non-autonomous nutrient-phytoplankton interacting model incorporating the effect of time-varying temperature is established. The impacts of temperature on metabolism of phytoplankton such as nutrient uptake, death rate, and nutrient releasing from particulate nutrient are investigated. The ecological reproductive index is formulated to present a threshold criteria and to characterize the dynamics of phytoplankton. The positive invariance, dissipativity, and the existence and stability of boundary and positive periodic solution are established. The analyses rely on the comparison principle, the coincidence degree theory and Lyapunov direct method. The effect of seasonal temperature and daily temperature on phytoplankton biomass are simulated numerically. Numerical simulation shows that the phytoplankton biomass is very robust to the variation of water temperature. The dynamics of the model and model predictions agree with the experimental data. Our model and analysis provide a possible explanation of triggering mechanism of phytoplankton blooms.

  11. Effect of temperature on sandstone permeability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenbrand, Esther; Kjøller, Claus

    with the Kozeny equation and the Klinkenberg procedure. Both methods overestimated the measured brine permeability; this suggests that additional factors, possibly related to clay morphology, contributed to a lower brine permeability. Thermal expansion would have a negligible effect on permeability as estimated...... interaction forces. Quantitative analysis of images, in which mineralogy was mapped based on backscatter electron intensity in combination with energy dispersive X-ray analysis by using the QEMSCAN® system, was used to compare a tested sample to an untested Berea sandstone sample. During the experiment...

  12. Effects of temperature on the structure of neutron stars at high temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Liang-gui; Lu, Jun-Li; Wang, Li

    2018-01-01

    In Newtonian physics, higher temperature leads to higher thermal pressure, which provides stronger support against the gravitational contraction of stars. However, in the temperature range of tens of MeV involved in the evolution of a proto-neutron star or a higher massive neutron star, the effects of temperature are richer. We showed that, for a high temperature neutron star (HTNS) constructed with a realistic equation of state (EOS), the HTNS may expand or contract during cooling, the central density may increase or decrease, the quasi-normal mode oscillation frequencies may increase or decrease, and in particular, (i) independent of the EOS, for a HTNS of a given mass, there exists a maximum temperature T_{max} that it could ever attend at birth (with the value of T_{max} different for different EOS), and (ii) for the Hempel EOS and the Shen EOS, there is a range of mass that the HTNS may gravitationally collapse after a period of radiative cooling; however, for the Lattimer-Swesty EOS and Banik EOS, no delayed collapse is possible. Our study, which describes the cooling of HTNSs with simple quasi-stationary TOV sequences, provides an understanding of the effects of the thermal energy/pressure at high temperature, and a demonstration that different EOSs can lead to qualitatively different evolution paths.

  13. Temperature dependence of the elastocaloric effect in natural rubber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, Zhongjian, E-mail: zhongjian.xie521@gmail.com; Sebald, Gael; Guyomar, Daniel

    2017-07-12

    The temperature dependence of the elastocaloric (eC) effect in natural rubber (NR) has been studied. This material exhibits a large eC effect over a broad temperature range from 0 °C to 49 °C. The maximum adiabatic temperature change (ΔT) occurred at 10 °C and the behavior could be predicted by the temperature dependence of the strain-induced crystallization (SIC) and the temperature-induced crystallization (TIC). The eC performance of NR was then compared with that of shape memory alloys (SMAs). This study contributes to the SIC research of NR and also broadens the application of elastomers. - Highlights: • A large elastocaloric effect over a broad temperature range was found in natural rubber (NR). • The caloric performance of NR was compared with that of shape memory alloys. • The temperature dependence of the elastocaloric effect in NR can be prediced by the theory of strain-induced crystallization.

  14. Effect of temperature on task performance in officeenvironment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seppanen, Olli; Fisk, William J.; Lei, Q.H.

    2006-07-01

    Indoor temperature is one of the fundamental characteristics of the indoor environment. It can be controlled with a degree of accuracy dependent on the building and its HVAC system. The indoor temperature affects several human responses, including thermal comfort, perceived air quality, sick building syndrome symptoms and performance at work. In this study, we focused on the effects of temperature on performance at office work. We included those studies that had used objective indicators of performance that are likely to be relevant in office type work, such as text processing, simple calculations (addition, multiplication), length of telephone customer service time, and total handling time per customer for call-center workers. We excluded data from studies of industrial work performance. We calculated from all studies the percentage of performance change per degree increase in temperature, and statistically analyzed measured work performance with temperature. The results show that performance increases with temperature up to 21-22 C, and decreases with temperature above 23-24 C. The highest productivity is at temperature of around 22 C. For example, at the temperature of 30 C, the performance is only 91.1% of the maximum i.e. the reduction in performance is 8.9%

  15. Moisture Absorption Model of Composites Considering Water Temperature Effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HUI Li

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The influence of water temperature on composite moisture absorption parameters was investigated in temperature-controlled water bath. Experiments of carbon fiber/bismaleimide resin composites immersed in water of 60℃, 70℃and 80℃ were developed respectively. According to the moisture content-time curves obtained from the experimental results, the diffusion coefficient and the balanced moisture content of the composites immersed in different water temperature could be calculated. What's more, the effect of water temperature on the diffusion coefficient and the balanced moisture content were discussed too. According to the Arrhenius equation and the law of Fick, a moisture absorption model was proposed to simulate the hygroscopic behaviour of the composite laminates immersed in different water temperature which can predict the absorption rate of water of the composites immersed in distilled water of 95℃ at any time precisely and can calculate how long it will take to reach the specific absorption rate.

  16. Temperature Effects on Hybrid Composite Plates Under Impact Loads

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Metin SAYER

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available In this work, impact responses of carbon-glass fiber/epoxy (hybrid composites were investigated under various temperatures and increasing impact energies. The increasing impact energies were applied to the specimens at various temperatures as -20, 0, 20 and 40 oC until perforation took place of specimens. Those specimens are composed by two types of fiber orientation with eight laminates hybrid composites. An Energy profiling diagram, used for showing the relationship between impact and absorbed energy, has been used to obtain penetration and perforation thresholds of hybrid composites. Beside those, temperature effects on impact characteristics such as maximum contact force (Fmax, total deflection (d and maximum contact duration (t were also presented in figures. Finally, glass and carbon fibers exhibited more brittle characteristics at -20 oC according to other temperatures. So, perforation threshold of each hybrid composites at -20 oC was found higher than other temperatures. Keywords : Hybrid composite

  17. Effect of warming temperatures on US wheat yields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tack, Jesse; Barkley, Andrew; Nalley, Lawton Lanier

    2015-06-02

    Climate change is expected to increase future temperatures, potentially resulting in reduced crop production in many key production regions. Research quantifying the complex relationship between weather variables and wheat yields is rapidly growing, and recent advances have used a variety of model specifications that differ in how temperature data are included in the statistical yield equation. A unique data set that combines Kansas wheat variety field trial outcomes for 1985-2013 with location-specific weather data is used to analyze the effect of weather on wheat yield using regression analysis. Our results indicate that the effect of temperature exposure varies across the September-May growing season. The largest drivers of yield loss are freezing temperatures in the Fall and extreme heat events in the Spring. We also find that the overall effect of warming on yields is negative, even after accounting for the benefits of reduced exposure to freezing temperatures. Our analysis indicates that there exists a tradeoff between average (mean) yield and ability to resist extreme heat across varieties. More-recently released varieties are less able to resist heat than older lines. Our results also indicate that warming effects would be partially offset by increased rainfall in the Spring. Finally, we find that the method used to construct measures of temperature exposure matters for both the predictive performance of the regression model and the forecasted warming impacts on yields.

  18. Effect of pressure applied during casting on temperatures beneath casts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deignan, Brian J; Iaquinto, Joseph M; Eskildsen, Scott M; Woodcock, Cassandra A; Owen, John R; Wayne, Jennifer S; Kuester, Victoria G

    2011-01-01

    Burns and pressure sores are common injuries during cast application. Various factors such as water temperature, padding, and cast material layers may play a role in these injuries; however, the effect of cast molding on temperatures and pressures has not been investigated. This raises the following questions, does the application of molding during cast application: (1) alter skin level temperatures in a variety of cast materials? and (2) risk inducing either thermal injury or pressure necrosis? An upper extremity model was created to measure pressure and temperature underneath casting materials. Cast padding, water bath temperature, and cast thickness were standardized. A 3-point mold was simulated using 3 casting materials-Fiberglass only, Plaster Only splint, and Plaster splint overwrapped with Fiberglass-while pressure and temperature were recorded. : Pressure application led to a statistically significant (PFiberglass combination reached an average peak temperature of 47.9°C, which was maintained for up to 6 minutes. Neither Fiberglass nor Plaster Only reached peak temperatures of this magnitude (average of 42.7 and 43.6°C, respectively). Peak (369 mm Hg) and highest residual (21 mm Hg) pressures were below harmful levels. Pressure application during casting is a risk factor for burn injuries. Care should be taken when molding a plaster splint overwrapped in fiberglass by waiting until the plaster has fully cooled. Combined with other known risk factors, the pressure from molding a cast could increase the likelihood of causing cutaneous burns.

  19. Load forecasting method considering temperature effect for distribution network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng Xiao Fang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available To improve the accuracy of load forecasting, the temperature factor was introduced into the load forecasting in this paper. This paper analyzed the characteristics of power load variation, and researched the rule of the load with the temperature change. Based on the linear regression analysis, the mathematical model of load forecasting was presented with considering the temperature effect, and the steps of load forecasting were given. Used MATLAB, the temperature regression coefficient was calculated. Using the load forecasting model, the full-day load forecasting and time-sharing load forecasting were carried out. By comparing and analyzing the forecast error, the results showed that the error of time-sharing load forecasting method was small in this paper. The forecasting method is an effective method to improve the accuracy of load forecasting.

  20. Effects of pressure and temperature on gate valve unwedging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Damerell, P.S.; Harrison, D.H.; Hayes, P.W.; Simons, J.W.; Walker, T.A.

    1996-12-01

    The stem thrust required to unwedge a gate valve is influenced by the pressure and temperature when the valve is closed and by the changes in these conditions between closure and opening. {open_quotes}Pressure locking{close_quotes} and {open_quotes}thermal binding{close_quotes} refer to situations where pressure and temperature effects cause the unwedging load to be much higher than normal. A model of these phenomena has been developed. Wedging (closure) is modeled as developing an {open_quotes}interference{close_quotes} between the disk and its seat rings in the valve. The effects of pressure and temperature are analyzed to determine the change in this disk-to-seat {open_quotes}interference{close_quotes}. Flexibilities, of the disk, body, stem and yoke strongly influence the unwedging thrust. Calculations and limited comparisons to data have been performed for a range of valve designs and scenarios. Pressure changes can increase the unwedging load when there is either a uniform pressure decrease, or a situation where the bonnet pressure exceeds the pressures in the adjacent piping. Temperature changes can increase the unwedging load when: (1) valve closure at elevated system temperature produces a delayed stem expansion, (2) a temperature increase after closure produces a bonnet pressure increase, or (3) a temperature change after closure produces an increase in the disk-to-seat {open_quotes}interference{close_quotes} or disk-to-seat friction.

  1. Effective temperature dynamics of shear bands in metallic glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daub, Eric G.; Klaumünzer, David; Löffler, Jörg F.

    2014-12-01

    We study the plastic deformation of bulk metallic glasses with shear transformation zone (STZ) theory, a physical model for plasticity in amorphous systems, and compare it with experimental data. In STZ theory, plastic deformation occurs when localized regions rearrange due to applied stress and the density of these regions is determined by a dynamically evolving effective disorder temperature. We compare the predictions of STZ theory to experiments that explore the low-temperature deformation of Zr-based bulk metallic glasses via shear bands at various thermal temperatures and strain rates. By following the evolution of effective temperature with time, strain rate, and temperature through a series of approximate and numerical solutions to the STZ equations, we successfully model a suite of experimentally observed phenomena, including shear-band aging as apparent from slide-hold-slide tests, a temperature-dependent steady-state flow stress, and a strain-rate- and temperature-dependent transition from stick-slip (serrated flow) to steady-sliding (nonserrated flow). We find that STZ theory quantitatively matches the observed experimental data and provides a framework for relating the experimentally measured energy scales to different types of atomic rearrangements.

  2. Estimation of abnormal temperature effects on elderly mortality in South Korea using the temperature deviation index

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Giehae; Bae, Hyun-Joo; Lim, Youn-Hee

    2017-07-01

    Recent studies have revealed that the effect of temperature on mortality has changed over time. One of the major contributors to the changes is adaptation. We aimed to understand the relationship between elderly mortality and temperature anomaly using the temperature deviation index (TDI), which considers exposure history. Summertime (May to September) mortality data from 1996 to 2014 and meteorological data from 1971 to 2014 were obtained for 16 regions covering South Korea. The TDI was defined as the target day's temperature abnormality compared to previous 25 years' apparent temperature (AT). The relationship between the TDI and elderly mortality for each region was examined by generalized linear modeling with Poisson distribution. Pooled estimates were computed to yield a national effect estimate. Stratified analyses were performed using the percentiles of AT and TDI. Most regions showed positive linear associations, and the associations ranged from 0.4 to 4.3% increase per unit increase of the TDI. In the pooled analyses, a unit increase of the TDI was associated with a 1.4% increase (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.93-1.87) in elderly mortality. In the stratified analysis, the relationship between the TDI and elderly mortality was significant at or above the 75th percentile of AT (1.32% increase; 95% CI 0.47-2.22). We suggest a positive association between the TDI and elderly mortality in South Korea. The association observed particularly in the highest percentile of AT in the stratified analysis suggests independent effects of temperature anomaly in addition to those of absolute AT.

  3. Experimental study of temperature effects on air gun signatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langhammer, J.; Landroe, M.

    1992-01-01

    The effect of varying the water temperature between 5[sup o]C and 46[sup o]C upon seismic air gun signatures has been studied experimentally. The experiments were carried out in a 850 litres water tank. Increasing the water temperature from 5[sup o]C to 29[sup o]C leads to 10% increase in the primary to bubble ratio, given that the signatures are filtered with a 0-128 Hz high cut filter. The bubble time period increases with 1 ms, or 4 % within the same temperature range. 7 refs., 28 figs., 3 tabs.

  4. Nuclear Quantum Vibrational Effects in Shock Hugoniot Temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldman, N; Reed, E; Fried, L E

    2009-07-23

    We present a straightforward method for the inclusion of quantum nuclear vibrational effects in molecular dynamics calculations of shock Hugoniot temperatures. Using a Grueneisen equation of state and a quasiharmonic approximation to the vibrational energies, we derive a simple, post-processing method for calculation of the quantum corrected Hugoniot temperatures. We have used our novel technique on ab initio simulations of shock compressed water. Our results indicate significantly closer agreement with all available experimental temperature data. Our formalism and technique can be easily applied to a number of different shock compressed molecular liquids or solids.

  5. Effect of increasing growth temperature on yeast fermentation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of increasing growth temperature on yeast fermentation was studied at approximately 5 oC intervals over a range of 18 – 37 oC, using one strain each of ale, lager and wine yeast. The ale and wine yeasts grew at all the temperatures tested, but lager yeast failed to grow at 37 oC. All these strains gave lower ...

  6. Main and interaction effects of extrusion temperature and usage ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The extrusion temperatures did not have significant effect on feed intake (FI), body weight gain (WG) and feed conversion ratio (FCR) of chickens during each and whole period, but the inclusion rate of EFFSB had significant (P<0.05) effect on FI and WG. The FI and WG of chickens fed diet contained 15% EFFSB was ...

  7. Effect of oxidation and annealing temperature on optical and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science; Volume 37; Issue 3. Effect of oxidation and ... Keywords. SnO2 thin films; optical properties; optical bandgap; Urbach energy; surface roughness; XRD. ... The effect of oxidation temperature on the optical and structural properties of SnO2 films were investigated. Higher ...

  8. Effect of Pyrolysis Temperature on Cadmium and Lead ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Consumption of tobacco as cigarette or otherwise has been demonstrated to contribute to air pollution via smoke generation resulting in adverse health effect. Therefore, this study investigates the effect of pyrolysis temperature on the concentration, distribution of cadmium and lead between ash residue and smoke in some ...

  9. Effects of repetition and temperature on Contingent Electrical Stimulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Castrillon, Eduardo E.; Zhou, Xinwen; Svensson, Peter

    ) activity associated with bruxism. Repetition of the electrical stimulus and skin surface temperature (ST) may affect the perception of CES and possibly also the inhibitory EMG effects.Objectives: To determine the effects of stimulus repetition and skin ST on the perception of CES.  Methods: Healthy...

  10. Light quality and temperature effects on antirrhinum growth and development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khattak, Abdul Mateen; Pearson, Simon

    2005-02-01

    An experiment was carried out to examine the effects of light quality on the growth and development of antirrhinum under three different temperatures 19 degrees C, 24 degrees C and 27 degrees C in glasshouses. Five different colour filters (i.e. 'Red absorbing', 'Blue absorbing', 'Blue and Red absorbing' and two 'partially Blue absorbing' materials) were tested, with one clear polythene as a control. Plant height, internode length and leaf area were significantly affected by the spectral filters as well as the temperature. Analysis of color filter's effect on presumed photoreceptors to exist indicated that antirrhinum plant height was regulated by the action of a blue acting photoreceptor (BAP) and not the phytochrome. There was no evidence for an effect of phytochrome or BAP on time to flowering, however, increasing temperature levels effectively decreased the time to flowering. To predict the effects of different spectral qualities and temperature, simple models were created from data on plant height, internode length and time to flowering. These models were then applied to simulate the potential benefits of spectral filters and temperature in manipulation of growth control and flowering in antirrhinum.

  11. Risky Adaptation: The Effect of Temperature Extremes on HIV Prevalence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, R.

    2016-12-01

    Previous work has linked rainfall shock to an increase in HIV prevalence in Sub-Saharan Africa. In this paper we take advantage of repeated waves of the Demographic and Health Survey (DHS) and a new high resolution climate dataset for the African continent to test the non-linear relationship between temperature and HIV. We find a strong and significant relationship between recent high temperatures and increases in HIV prevalence in a region. We then test the effect of temperature on risk factors that may contribute to this increase. High temperatures are linked to an increase in sexual violence, number of partners and a decrease in condom usage - all of which may contribute to the uptake in HIV rate. This paper contributes to the literature on adaptation from two standpoints. First, we suggest that some behavioral changes that are classed as adaptations, in the sense that they allow for consumption smoothing in the face of extreme temperatures, may carry unexpected risks to the individuals involved. Second, we find preliminary evidence that the relationship between temperature and these risky behaviors is diminished in regions prone to higher temperatures, suggesting some adaptation is possible in the long run.

  12. Effect of temperature to the properties of sago starch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustafa Kamal, M.; Baini, R.; Mohamaddan, S.; Selaman, O. S.; Zauzi, N. Ahmad; Rahman, M. R.; Rahman, N. Abdul; Chong, K. H.; Atan, M. F.; Samat, N. A. S. Abdul; Taib, S. N. L.; Othman, A. K.

    2017-06-01

    Recently, the importance of sago starch has increased, as it has become one of the main economically important agricultural crops to the most Southeast Asia countries. In the present work, an analysis on drying process of sago starch (Metroxylon sagu Rottb.) underwent various temperature has been made by using four empirical equations. The main goal of this analysis is to suggest the most accurate equation, in order to model and simulate the mechanical drying of sago starch. The experimental investigations were carried out in a gravity convection lab oven; and ±50g of sago starch (sample heights of 1 cm) was dried through four different temperatures, which were 50, 60, 70 and 80ºC. The effect of drying temperature on the drying kinetics, as well as various qualities attributes of sago starch, such as microstructure, colour and functional properties were investigated. The results suggested that drying temperature has significant effect on sago starch drying kinetic; therefore, drying temperature would be the basis to select drying condition. Meanwhile, it was found that the various drying temperature ranging from 50 to 80ºC affected the product quality especially in term of colour.

  13. The effect of aging temperature on natural zeolite modification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purbaningtias, Tri Esti; Wiyantoko, Bayu; Kurniawati, Puji; Prasetyoko, Didik; Suprapto

    2017-12-01

    This study investigated the effect of aging temperature on the development of natural zeolite. Natural zeolite was modified by surfactant treatment using cetyltrimethylammonium bromide as the cationic surfactant for mesopore template. Characterization materials used XRD, FTIR and nitrogen physisorption. XRD diffractograms showed variations aging temperature caused the crystallinity and mesopores structure of natural zeolite (MZ). All FTIR spectra showed the presence of silanol and siloxane in the sample MZ and modified of natural zeolite (MMZ). It is proved that all the samples MZ and MMZ on any variation is economical silica-based material. Meanwhile, physisorption nitrogen profiles gave information that the addition of aging temperatures increased the surface area of the modified material but at a temperature of 100°C, the surface area of MMZ becomes smaller due to the water loss system.

  14. Effects of temperature and relative humidity on DNA methylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bind, Marie-Abele; Zanobetti, Antonella; Gasparrini, Antonio; Peters, Annette; Coull, Brent; Baccarelli, Andrea; Tarantini, Letizia; Koutrakis, Petros; Vokonas, Pantel; Schwartz, Joel

    2014-07-01

    Previous studies have found relationships between DNA methylation and various environmental contaminant exposures. Associations with weather have not been examined. Because temperature and humidity are related to mortality even on non-extreme days, we hypothesized that temperature and relative humidity may affect methylation. We repeatedly measured methylation on long interspersed nuclear elements (LINE-1), Alu, and 9 candidate genes in blood samples from 777 elderly men participating in the Normative Aging Study (1999-2009). We assessed whether ambient temperature and relative humidity are related to methylation on LINE-1 and Alu, as well as on genes controlling coagulation, inflammation, cortisol, DNA repair, and metabolic pathway. We examined intermediate-term associations of temperature, relative humidity, and their interaction with methylation, using distributed lag models. Temperature or relative humidity levels were associated with methylation on tissue factor (F3), intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1), toll-like receptor 2 (TRL-2), carnitine O-acetyltransferase (CRAT), interferon gamma (IFN-γ), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), and glucocorticoid receptor, LINE-1, and Alu. For instance, a 5°C increase in 3-week average temperature in ICAM-1 methylation was associated with a 9% increase (95% confidence interval: 3% to 15%), whereas a 10% increase in 3-week average relative humidity was associated with a 5% decrease (-8% to -1%). The relative humidity association with ICAM-1 methylation was stronger on hot days than mild days. DNA methylation in blood cells may reflect biological effects of temperature and relative humidity. Temperature and relative humidity may also interact to produce stronger effects.

  15. Effect of temperature on a miniaturized microbial fuel cell (MFC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Hao; Jiang, Chenming; Chae, Junseok

    2017-12-01

    A microbial fuel cell (MFC) is a bioinspired energy converter which directly converts biomass into electricity through the catalytic activity of a specific species of bacteria. The effect of temperature on a miniaturized microbial fuel cell with Geobacter sulfurreducens dominated mixed inoculum is investigated in this paper for the first time. The miniaturized MFC warrants investigation due to its small thermal mass, and a customized setup is built for the temperature effect characterization. The experiment demonstrates that the optimal temperature for the miniaturized MFC is 322-326 K (49-53 °C). When the temperature is increased from 294 to 322 K, a remarkable current density improvement of 282% is observed, from 2.2 to 6.2 Am-2. Furthermore, we perform in depth analysis on the effect of temperature on the miniaturized MFC, and found that the activation energy for the current limiting mechanism of the MFC is approximately between 0.132 and 0.146 eV, and the result suggest that the electron transfer between cytochrome c is the limiting process for the miniaturized MFC.

  16. Effects of rapid changes in temperature on two estuarine crustaceans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burton, D.T.; Capizzi, T.P.; Margrey, S.L.; Wakefield, W.W.

    1981-01-01

    Weight specific oxygen consumption (Q/sub O/sub 2// patterns of the amphipod, Gammarus sp. (acclimated to 5/sup 0/, 15/sup 0/ and 25/sup 0/ C) and of juvenile blue crabs, Callinectes sapidus (15/sup 0/ and 25/sup 0/ C) were used to evaluate the potential effect of exposure to rapid temperature changes simulating once-through power plant pumped entrainment. Amphipods at all acclimation temperatures and blue crabs at 15/sup 0/ C responded to the temperature changes by increasing Q/sub O/sub 2// above pre-exposure levels after the thermal increase and then returning to pre-exposure levels. The response was judged to be a normal physiological compensation response, not a thermal stress response, as suggested by some investigators. Significant differences were found among seasonal Q/sub O/sub 2// patterns in both species; Q/sub O/sub 2// increased with increasing acclimation temperature. However, no seasonal stress effects were found as a result of exposure to the temperature changes. This implies that the effects of ..delta..T's up to 10(/sup 0/C) from power plants of this design should have no significant impact on these organisms.

  17. The effect of cool water ingestion on gastrointestinal pill temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, David M; Carter, James M; Richmond, Victoria L; Blacker, Sam D; Rayson, Mark P

    2008-03-01

    Telemetric gastrointestinal (GI) temperature pills are now commonly used to measure core body temperature and could minimize the risk of heat illness while maximizing operational effectiveness in workers subject to high levels of thermal strain. To quantify the effect of repeated cool water ingestion on the accuracy of GI pill temperature. Ten operational firefighters ingested a pill to measure GI temperature (T1int) before overnight sleep. Two hours following breakfast and 11.5 h after ingesting T1int, the firefighters ingested a second pill (T2int) before performing 8.5 h of intermittent activity (repetitive cycles of 30 min of seated rest followed by 30 min of general firefighter duties). During the first 2 min of each 30-min rest period, the firefighters consumed 250 mL of chilled water (5-8 degrees C). Water ingestion had a highly variable effect both within and between subjects in transiently (32 +/- 10 min) reducing the temperature of T2int in comparison with T1int. In general, this transient reduction in T2int became progressively smaller as time following ingestion increased. In some firefighters, the difference between T1int and T2int became negligible (+/- 0.1 degrees C) after 3 h, whereas in two others, large differences (peaking at 2.0 degrees C and 6.3 degrees C) were still observed when water was consumed 8 h after pill ingestion. These results show that a GI pill ingested immediately prior to physical activity cannot be used to measure core body temperature accurately in all individuals during the following 8 h when cool fluids are regularly ingested. This makes GI temperature measurement unsuitable for workers who respond to emergency deployments when regular fluid consumption is recommended operational practice.

  18. Effect of High Temperature on Properties of Glass Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Wei Chien

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the concrete is mixed with glass fibers which are 0.5%, 1.0% and 1.5% of cement weight and 0.6 cm long. The effect of fiber addition level on the compressive strength, bending strength and residual compressive strength and thermal conductivity after heating of concrete is discussed. The test results show that an appropriate addition of glass fiber to the concrete at room temperature is favorable for the compressive strength. A low addition of relatively short glass fiber has insignificant effect on the bending strength. However, the adverse effect on the bending strength will increase if the addition level is too high. The addition of glass fiber can improve the loss of concrete strength under the effect of high temperature not exceeding 500°C, and a relatively high compressive strength remains under the effect of high temperature not exceeding 800°C. The high temperature can reduce the thermal conductivity of glass concrete, and the higher the addition level of glass fiber is, the lower is the thermal conductivity. Keywords: Glass fiber, concrete, heating, thermal conductivity

  19. Effects of emitted electron temperature on the plasma sheath

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheehan, J. P., E-mail: sheehanj@umich.edu [Department of Aerospace Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Kaganovich, I. D.; Wang, H.; Raitses, Y. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States); Sydorenko, D. [Physics Department, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2E9 (Canada); Hershkowitz, N. [Department of Engineering Physics, University of Wisconsin–Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States)

    2014-06-15

    It has long been known that electron emission from a surface significantly affects the sheath surrounding that surface. Typical fluid theory of a planar sheath with emitted electrons assumes that the plasma electrons follow the Boltzmann relation and the emitted electrons are emitted with zero energy and predicts a potential drop of 1.03T{sub e}/e across the sheath in the floating condition. By considering the modified velocity distribution function caused by plasma electrons lost to the wall and the half-Maxwellian distribution of the emitted electrons, it is shown that ratio of plasma electron temperature to emitted electron temperature significantly affects the sheath potential when the plasma electron temperature is within an order of magnitude of the emitted electron temperature. When the plasma electron temperature equals the emitted electron temperature the emissive sheath potential goes to zero. One dimensional particle-in-cell simulations corroborate the predictions made by this theory. The effects of the addition of a monoenergetic electron beam to the Maxwellian plasma electrons were explored, showing that the emissive sheath potential is close to the beam energy only when the emitted electron flux is less than the beam flux.

  20. Effects of shock topology on temperature field in compressible turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Ni, Qionglin

    2015-01-01

    Effects of two types of shock topology, namely, small-scale shocklet and large-scale shock wave, on the statistics of temperature in compressible turbulence were investigated by simulations. The shocklet and shock wave are caused by the solenoidal and compressive modes of driven forces, respectively. Hereafter, the related two flows are called as SFT and CFT, respectively. It shows that in SFT the temperature spectrum follows the k^-5/3 power law, and the temperature field has "ramp-cliff" structures. By contrast, in CFT the temperature spectrum obeys the k^-2 power law, and the temperature field is dominated by large-scale rarefaction and compression. The power-law exponents for the p.d.f. of large negative dilatation are -2.5 in SFT and -3.5 in CFT, close to theoretical values. For the isentropic assumption of thermodynamic variables, the derivation in SFT grows with the turbulent Mach number (Mt), and for same Mt, the variables in CFT are more anisentropic. The angle statistics shows that the temperature g...

  1. Effects of elevated ambient temperature on embryo implantation in rats

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Yomi

    2012-03-22

    Mar 22, 2012 ... Effects of elevated ambient temperature on embryo implantation in rats. Huda Yahia Hamid1,2, Md Zuki Abu Bakar Zakaria2*, Nurhusien Yimer3, Goh Yong Meng2, Abd. Wahid Haron4 and Noordin Mohamed Mustapha5. 1Department of Anatomy, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Khartoum, ...

  2. Surface and temperature effects in isovector giant resonances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lipparini, E.; Stringari, S.

    Using the liquid droplet model (LDM) we investigate three different sum rules for the isovector dipole and monopole excitations. Analytical formulae are derived for the excitation energies of these resonances and the predictions are compared with experiments. The role of the surface and the effects of temperature are explicitly discussed.

  3. "Deflategate": Time, Temperature, and Moisture Effects on Football Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumenthal, Jack; Beljak, Lauren; Macatangay, Dahlia-Marie; Helmuth-Malone, Lilly; McWilliams, Catharina; Raptis, Sofia

    2016-01-01

    In a recent paper in "The Physics Teacher (TPT)", DiLisi and Rarick used the National Football League "Deflategate" controversy to introduce to physics students the physics of a bouncing ball. In this paper, we measure and analyze the environmental effects of time, ambient temperature, and moisture on the internal pressure of…

  4. Temperature-Dependent Magnetoelectric Effect from First Principles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mostovoy, Maxim; Scaramucci, Andrea; Spaldin, Nicola A.; Delaney, Kris T.

    2010-01-01

    We show that nonrelativistic exchange interactions and spin fluctuations can give rise to a linear magnetoelectric effect in collinear antiferromagnets at elevated temperatures that can exceed relativistic magnetoelectric responses by more than 1 order of magnitude. We show how symmetry arguments,

  5. Effect of Brewing Time and Temperature on the release of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Michael Horsfall

    The result shows that the rate of release of manganese and oxalate in brewed tea increase with increase in brewing temperature and time. @JASEM ... of the stomach and bowel. They are also effective in reducing nausea ... belong to a group of molecules called organic acids, and are routinely made by plants, animals, and.

  6. Effect of cold temperature storage on the quality attributes of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of cold temperature storage on the quality attributes of pawpaw and guava leathers was evaluated. Pawpaw leather was significantly higher than guava leather in calorific content, water activity, pH and total mould count throughout the duration of storage. However Guava leather was higher in texture. Sensory ...

  7. Effects of selected washing treatments and drying temperatures on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effects of selected washing treatments and drying temperatures on biochemical and microbiological quality of dagaa (Rastrineobola argentea). ... Results indicated that TBARS values increased significantly (p<0.05) from 1.39 mgMA/kg in fresh fish to 10.55 mgMA/kg in the market samples. The TVBN values increased ...

  8. Effect of roasting temperature on the quality and acceptability of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effect of roasting temperature on the quality and acceptability of dakuwa- A Nigerian cereal/groundnut snack. ... Results of proximate composition and mineral content showed significant (p<0.05) variations in moisture (3.2-5.9%), protein (16.5-19.1%) and iron (0.00-0.03mg/100g) contents. The total microbial count, colour ...

  9. Effects of temperature and relative humidity on the egg laying ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effects of temperature and relative humidity on the egg laying pattern of Rhipicephalus sanguineus (Koch, 1844) infesting sheep in semi-arid region of Nigeria. ... The pre-oviposition days under belljar conditions (11.1±9.15) was significantly shorter (p<0.05) than ambient conditions (14.5±14.9 days), each having post ...

  10. Effects of temperature and salinity on resting metabolism in two ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effects of temperature and salinity on resting metabolism in two South African rock pool fish: the resident gobiid Caffrogobius caffer and the transient sparid Diplodus sargus ... A significant positive relationship (P =0.03) between salinity and oxygen consumption was determined for D. sargus capensis, but not for C. caffer.

  11. Effects of storage temperature on the quantity and integrity of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effects of storage temperature on the quantity and integrity of genomic DNA extracted from mice tissues: A comparison of recovery methods. ... and NucleoSpin® Blood and Tissue kit found to be appropriate for yielding high quantity of gDNA, with the Chelex®100 method yielding a greater quantity (P < 0.045) than the kit.

  12. Rainfall and temperature effects on flowering and pollen productions ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Rainfall and temperature effects on flowering and pollen productions in cocoa. ... and pollen productions in cocoa. SS Omolaja, P Aikpokpodion, S Oyedeji, DE Vwioko ... The number of flowers produced on the ventral surface (V) of the clones was significantly higher (p < 0.05) than that from the dorsal region. More pods per ...

  13. Possible effects of regulating hydroponic water temperature on plant ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Yomi

    2010-12-29

    Dec 29, 2010 ... production of antioxidants in cells exposed to heat stress. EFFECTS OF REGULATING HYDROPONIC WATER. TEMPERATURE ON NUTRIENT UPTAKE AND. ACCUMULATION IN PLANT TISSUES. Plant nutrients have a great potential for increasing yield and are capable of promoting plant growth ( ...

  14. The effect of temperature on the rate of development and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    factors influencing the ··natural rhythm" of cercaria1 emergence before any study of long term temperature effects was undertaken. Such basic information should reveal the factors under- lying the marked diurnal periodicity of cercariae reported by Rowan (1958) from Puerto. Rico and noted locally in the field during rodent ...

  15. Effect of Temperature on Antibiotic Properties of Garlic (Allium ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DOCTOR

    aqueous extracts of garlic and ginger to observe the effect of temperature on their antibiotic properties .... The agar well assay method was used to explore the .... action. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 66:1950. Durairaj S, Srinivasan S, Lakshmanaperumalsamy P (2009). In vitro. Antibacterial Activity and Stability of Garlic Extract at ...

  16. Effects of preparation temperature on the conductivity of polypyrrole ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    2002-04-02

    Apr 2, 2002 ... Abstract. An attempt has been made to investigate the effect of temperature on the conductivity of polypyrrole conducting polymer films prepared by an electrochemical method in an aqueous medium using camphor sulfonate as the dopant. The polymer was grown from aqueous solutions employing a ...

  17. Temperature effects on polymer-carbon composite sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, J. R.; Homer, M. L.; Manatt, K.; Kisor, A.; Lara, L.; Jewell, A. D.; Shevade, A.; Ryan, M. A.

    2003-01-01

    At JPL we have investigated the effects of temperature on polymer-carbon black composite sensors. While the electrical properties of polymer composites have been studied, with mechanisms of conductivity described by connectivity and tunneling, it is not fully understood how these properties affect sensor characteristics and responses.

  18. Effect of temperature on polarization reversal of strontium-doped ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The effect of temperature on polarization reversal of strontium-doped lead zirconate titanate ceramics was studied. The piezoelectric properties viz. dielectric constant and piezoelectric coupling coefficient, were used for polarization reversal characteristic. These properties and apparent coercive field weremeasured during ...

  19. Effect of temperature on polarization reversal of strontium-doped ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2009-08-11

    Aug 11, 2009 ... Abstract. The effect of temperature on polarization reversal of strontium-doped lead zirconate titanate ceramics was studied. The piezoelectric properties viz. dielectric constant and piezoelectric coupling coefficient, were used for polarization reversal characteristic. These properties and apparent coercive ...

  20. Modulating effects of ascorbic acid on rectal temperature of pigs ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The experiment was carried out with the aim of investigating the effect of ascorbic acid (AA) administration on fluctuations in rectal temperature (RT) of pigs transported by road during the harmattan season. Sixteen pigs administered orally with AA at the dose of 250 mg/kg served as experimental animals, and 13 others ...

  1. Effects of sintering temperature on the density and porosity

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-03-01

    Mar 1, 2013 ... perative. Hence the aim of this paper is to critically investi- gate the effects of sintering temperature on the density and porosity of salt bead preforms used in the liquid infiltration of aluminium for open cell foam manufac- turing. 2. Sintering Mechanism. Sintering occurs by atomic diffusion processes that.

  2. The Effect of Intertia, Visocus Damping, Temperature and Normal ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    29

    The Effect of Intertia, Visocus Damping, Temperature and Normal. Stress on Chaotic Behavior of the Rate and State Friction Model. Mr.Nitish Sinha. Research Scholar, Department of Mechanical Engineering. Visvesvaraya National Institute of Technology, Nagpur-10, India. E-mail: nitishme08@gmail.com. Dr. Arun K. Singh.

  3. Effect of stress-induced grain growth during room temperature ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    Effect of stress-induced grain growth during room temperature tensile deformation on ductility in nanocrystalline metals. WEICHANG XU, PINQIANG DAI* and XIAOLEI WU. †. College of Materials Science and Engineering, Fuzhou University, Fuzhou 350108, China. †. State Key Laboratory of Nonlinear Mechanics, Institute ...

  4. Determination of chilling temperature effects on nutrient elements ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PRECIOUS

    2009-12-01

    Dec 1, 2009 ... Baydas E (2006). Trace element changes during hibernation of. Drosophila melanogaster by WDXRF analyses at chilling temperature. J. Quant. Spec. Rad. Tran. 102: 492-498. Dumlupinar R, Demir F, Bostan H (2007). Determination of Chilling. Temprature Effects on Inorganic Element Composition and.

  5. Effects of sintering temperature on the density and porosity

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-03-01

    Mar 1, 2013 ... Abstract. Effects of sintering temperature on the density and porosity of sodium chloride preforms for alu- minium foam manufacturing have been investigated. Cold pressed salt preforms were sintered at. 730Й, 760Й and 790Й and different times ranging between 6- 18 hours in a carbolite furnace at.

  6. Effects of Sintering Temperature on the Density And Porosity of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effects of sintering temperature on the density and porosity of sodium chloride preforms for alu- minium foam manufacturing have been investigated. Cold pressed salt preforms were sintered at 30, 760 and 790 and di erent times ranging between 6- 18 hours in a carbolite furnace at a heating rate of 5/minute. The Results of ...

  7. The Effects of Solar Irradience and Ambient Temperature on Solar ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Optimizing this conversion, especially in the face of the high cost of solar panels, is thus desirable. Towards this end, it is necessary to know the maximum output periods of solar modules and the conditions for maximum panel output. This paper is the result of a study of the effects of solar irradiance and ambient temperature ...

  8. Effect of microstructure on the high temperature strength of nitride ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Effect of microstructure on the high temperature strength of nitride bonded silicon carbide composite. J RAKSHIT and P K DAS*. Central Glass and Ceramic Research Institute, Kolkata 700 032, India. MS received 15 March 2002; revised 3 August 2002. Abstract. Four compositions of nitride bonded SiC were fabricated with ...

  9. Effect of preparation temperature and ions doping on size ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Binary and quaternary amorphous nano powders are prepared by wet reduction method. Cobalt boride nano catalyst is synthesized at 10 and 60 ºC. Effect of preparation temperature on size and morphology was studied. Co-M-Zr-B (M: Cr, Mo and W) as quaternary catalysts are also prepared in order to studying ions ...

  10. rainfall and temperature effects on flowering and pollen productions ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Production of non-functional pollen by plant reduces effectiveness of pollination. A study was carried out at. Cocoa Research Institute of Nigeria, Ibadan to determine the influence of rainfall and temperature on flowering intensity of selected clones of Upper Amazon cocoa (Theobroma cacao), as well as its pollen fertility.

  11. Rainfall and temperature effects on flowering and pollen productions ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Production of non-functional pollen by plant reduces effectiveness of pollination. A study was carried out at Cocoa Research Institute of Nigeria, Ibadan to determine the influence of rainfall and temperature on flowering intensity of selected clones of Upper Amazon cocoa (Theobroma cacao), as well as its pollen fertility.

  12. and interaction effects of extrusion temperature and usage level

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ali

    2012-10-30

    Oct 30, 2012 ... interaction effects between dietary levels of EFFSB and extrusion temperatures on performance criteria, pancreas weight, CPK, LDH, AST ... supplement in the poultry diets (Arnold et al., 1971;. Simovic et al., 1972; ... isonitrogenous starter, grower and finisher mash diets formulated according to AVIAGEN ...

  13. Effects of Hot Water Treatment and Temperature on Seedling ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An experiment was conducted at the Faculty of Agriculture, University of Maiduguri, to study the effect of hot water treatment and temperature on the morphological characteristics of Arabic gum. The experiment was laid out in a Randomized Complete Block Design in a factorial arrangement. The treatments included a ...

  14. Effect of temperature and salinity on germination of Achillea ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Achillea fragrantissima and Moringa peregrina are dominant plants in the mountainous desert of Saudi Arabia. The two species suffer from intensive anthropogenic pressures as they have important medicinal uses. This paper aimed to evaluate the effect of temperature and salinity on germination of A. fragrantissima and M.

  15. Effect of substrate temperature on electrical and magnetic properties ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Pramana – Journal of Physics; Volume 58; Issue 5-6. Effect of substrate temperature on electrical and magnetic properties of epitaxial La 1 − Pb MnO3 films. Ajay Singh D K Aswal Shashwati Sen K Shah L C Gupta S K Gupta V C Sahni. Colossal Magnetoresistance & Other Materials Volume 58 Issue ...

  16. Effect of Calcination and Reduction Temperatures on the Reduction ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2003-12-05

    Dec 5, 2003 ... The effect of calcination and reduction temperatures on the reducibility, dispersion and Fischer-Tropsch activity of 10 wt% cobalt supported on titania catalyst modified by 0.1 wt% boron has been studied. The percentage reduction and percentage dispersion were found to decrease with increasing ...

  17. Effect of elevated temperature on the compressive strength of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Concrete materials in structures are usually exposed to high temperatures during fire. The relative properties of concrete after such an exposure are of great importance in terms of the serviceability of buildings. The effect of partial replacement of cement with pulverized steel mill scale (PSMS) on the compressive strength of ...

  18. Effects of Different Hatcher Temperatures on Hatching Traits of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    selcuk

    Abstract. This study deals with the effects of different hatcher temperatures on hatching traits in modern commercial broiler eggs during the last five days of incubation. The hatching eggs were obtained from a 52- wk old (Ross 308) flock. All eggs were distributed randomly into one incubator and incubated for 17 d using.

  19. Statistical analysis of the effects of relative humidity and temperature ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Meteorological data from the Department of Satellite Application Facility on Climate Monitoring (CMSAF), DWD Germany have been used to study and investigate the effect of relative humidity and temperature on refractivity in twenty six locations grouped into for climatic regions aloft Nigeria (Coastal, Guinea savannah, ...

  20. Theoretical analysis of effect of temperature on threshold ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    TECS

    determined through eigen value equation, which has to be solved through iterative methods. In order to explore the full potential of GaN material for applications in heterostructure based blue–ultraviolet laser diodes, we investigated the effect of temperature on optical confinement by analysing the near field intensity.

  1. Effect of temperature on wet agglomeration of crystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Maghsoodi

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s:This study dealt with the wet agglomeration process in which a small quantity of binder liquid was added into a suspension of crystals, directly in the stirring vessel where the crystallization took place. The purpose of this investigation was evaluation of the effect of temperature on the agglomeration process in order to gain insight into the mechanism of the formation of the agglomerates. Materials and Methods: Carbamazepine was used as a model drug and water/ethanol and isopropyl acetate were used as crystallization system and binder liquid, respectively. The agglomeration of crystals was carried out at various temperatures and the agglomerates were characterized in terms of size, morphology, density and mechanical strength. Results: Evaluation of the agglomerates along the course of agglomeration shows that the properties of the particles change gradually but substantially. Higher temperature of the system during agglomeration process favors the formation of more regular agglomerates with mechanically stronger and denser structure; this can be explained by the promotion effect of temperature on the agglomeration process. Conclusion: With optimized wet agglomeration temperature, spherical, dense, and strong agglomerates can be obtained.

  2. Effect of Intracanal Cryotherapy on Reducing Root Surface Temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vera, Jorge; Ochoa-Rivera, Jorge; Vazquez-Carcaño, Marino; Romero, Monica; Arias, Ana; Sleiman, Philippe

    2015-11-01

    The positive effect of cryotherapy has been widely described in medicine. The aim of the present study was to validate a new methodology to reduce and maintain external root surface temperature for at least 4 minutes. Twenty extracted single-rooted teeth were instrumented to size 35/.06 and subjected to 2 different irrigation interventions with a repeated-measures design using 5% sodium hypochlorite first (control) and 2.5°C cold saline solution later (experimental). In both, 20 mL of the irrigant solution was delivered for a total time of 5 minutes with a microcannula attached to the EndoVac system (Kerr Endo, Orange County, CA) inserted to the working length. The initial and lowest temperatures were recorded in the apical 4 mm with a digital thermometer for both irrigants. Data were analyzed with the repeated measure analysis of variance (Greenhouse-Geisser correction) and Bonferroni post hoc tests. Differences in maintaining a -10°C temperature reduction over 4 minutes were assessed with the Fisher exact test. Although significant differences were found between the initial and lowest temperatures in both the control and experimental irrigation procedures (P surface temperature more than 10°C and maintained it for 4 minutes, which may be enough to produce a local anti-inflammatory effect in the periradicular tissues. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Effect of temperature on the viscosities of mixed micellar solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, C. Durga; Kumar, D. Sudheer; Sarma, G. V. S.; Ramesh, K. V.

    2017-07-01

    The effect of addition of Triton X-100 (TX-100) on the viscosities of Sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS) micellar solution containingNaCl and Cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) micellar solution containingKBr at various temperatures are presented. The viscosity of SDS micellar solution is found to increase on addition of TX-100 at all temperatures (25 to 45 °C). However the increase in viscosity is large up to certain % of TX-100, after that the increase in viscosity is found to be small. Where as in CTAB micelles, at lower temperatures, the viscosity of micellar solution decreased up to certain composition of TX-100 and with further addition of TX-100 the viscosity got increaed. At higher temperatures viscosity of CTAB micellar solution increased on addition of TX-100. Depending on the nature of surfactant system and temperature, the viscosity of micellar solution may increase or decrease on addition of TX-100. The thermodynamic parameters for the viscous flow of micellar solutions in the presence of TX-100 are also determined. The effect of TX-100 on the viscosity and the activation enthalpy for viscous flow of anionic micelles is tremendously large as compared to cationic micelles. This is due to transition of micellar shape from rod to elongated rod or to sphere in the presence of added TX-100.

  4. Effects of Temperature on Wrist Flexor Muscles Endurance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afsun Nodehi-Moghadam

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: It is widely recognized that neuromuscular function is temperature sensitive. Changes in muscle temperature may affect muscle force development. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of temperature on wrist flexor muscles endurance. Methods: Fifteen healthy subjects (mean age 21.13±1.30 years participated in the present study. The wrist flexor muscles endurance was measured before and after applying ice and hot packs over the forearm for 15 minutes. Paired t tests were used to compare differences between pre and post intervention endurance. Results: The results showed a significant increase in wrist flexor muscles endurance after heating. (P=0.04. We also found that, cooling the forearm muscles leaded to significant decrease of wrist flexor muscles endurance (P=0.01. Conclusion: These results suggest that hand function is temperature sensitive. Therefore, further studies are needed to evaluate the effects of cold on muscular function in people working in workplaces with extreme temperature.

  5. Casimir effect for the Higgs field at finite temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, A. F.; Khanna, Faqir C.

    2017-08-01

    In early 1970, it was postulated that there exists a zero spin quantum field, called Higgs field, that is present in all universe. The potential energy of the Higgs field is transferred to particles. Hence they acquire mass. These ideas were essential in fulfilling the basic need for a particle, called Higgs, with mass. These particles are called Higgs particles with spin zero with its mass to be ˜125 GeV. This raises the question as to its physical effects. If these particles are present, will they exhibit a Casimir effect and also obey the Stefan-Boltzmann Law? Assuming the dynamics of this field, will these effects change with temperature. The present calculation uses thermo field dynamics formalism to calculate temperature effects.

  6. Effective temperature and spontaneous collective motion of active matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shenshen; Wolynes, Peter

    2012-02-01

    Spontaneous directed motion, a hallmark of cell biology, is unusual in classical statistical physics. Here we study, using both numerical and analytical methods, organized motion in models of the cytoskeleton in which constituents are driven by energy-consuming motors. Although systems driven by small-step motors are described by an effective temperature and are thus quiescent, at higher order in step size, both homogeneous and inhomogeneous, flowing and oscillating behavior emerges. Motors that respond with a negative susceptibility to imposed forces lead to an apparent negative temperature system in which beautiful structures form resembling the asters seen in cell division.

  7. Pressure and temperature effects in homopolymer blends and diblock copolymers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frielinghaus, H.; Schwahn, D.; Mortensen, K.

    1997-01-01

    contribution of the Flory-Huggins parameter at larger pressure fields. This gives rise to a shift of the phase boundaries to higher temperatures and to a strong reduction of the Ginzburg parameter. Diblock copolymers show a different behavior. Neither the entropic term of the Flory-Huggins parameter nor......Thermal composition fluctuations in homopolymer mer blends and diblock copolymers were studied with SANS in varying pressure and temperature fields. For homopolymers we find a quite consistent behavior: The dominating effect of compressibility or packing leads to a reduction of the entropic...

  8. Effects of temperature changes on maize production in Mozambique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, L.; Michaelsen, J.; Funk, C.; Husak, G.

    2011-01-01

    We examined intraseasonal changes in maize phenology and heat stress exposure over the 1979-2008 period, using Mozambique meteorological station data and maize growth requirements in a growing degree-day model. Identifying historical effects of warming on maize growth is particularly important in Mozambique because national food security is highly dependent on domestic food production, most of which is grown in already warm to hot environments. Warming temperatures speed plant development, shortening the length of growth periods necessary for optimum plant and grain size. This faster phenological development also alters the timing of maximum plant water demand. In hot growing environments, temperature increases during maize pollination threaten to make midseason crop failure the norm. In addition to creating a harsher thermal environment, we find that early season temperature increases have caused the maize reproductive period to start earlier, increasing the risk of heat and water stress. Declines in time to maize maturation suggest that, independent of effects to water availability, yield potential is becoming increasingly limited by warming itself. Regional variations in effects are a function of the timing and magnitude of temperature increases and growing season characteristics. Continuation of current climatic trends could induce substantial yield losses in some locations. Farmers could avoid some losses through simple changes to planting dates and maize varietal types.

  9. Effects of elevated CO2 and temperature on seed quality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hampton, John G; Boelt, Birte; Rolston, M P

    2013-01-01

    Successful crop production depends initially on the availability of high-quality seed. By 2050 global climate change will have influenced crop yields, but will these changes affect seed quality? The present review examines the effects of elevated carbon dioxide (CO2) and temperature during seed...... species. Seed mass increases may result in a decrease of seed nitrogen (N) concentration in non-legumes. Increasing temperature may decrease seed mass because of an accelerated growth rate and reduced seed filling duration, but lower seed mass does not necessarily reduce seed germination or vigour. Like...... seed mass, reported seed germination responses to elevated CO2 have been variable. The reported changes in seed C/N ratio can decrease seed protein content which may eventually lead to reduced viability. Conversely, increased ethylene production may stimulate germination in some species. High-temperature...

  10. Effect of diathermy on muscle temperature, electromyography, and mechanomyography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Sarah M; Trowbridge, Cynthia A; Fincher, A Louise; Cramer, Joel T

    2008-08-01

    This study examined the effects of pulsed shortwave diathermy on intramuscular temperature, surface electromyography (EMG), and mechanomyography (MMG) of the vastus lateralis. Thirty-five men were assigned to diathermy (n = 13), sham-diathermy (n = 12), or control (n = 10) groups. Each subject performed isometric maximal voluntary contractions (MVCs) and incremental ramp contractions (10%-90% MVC) before and after treatment. Torque, intramuscular temperature, EMG, and MMG were recorded. Temperature for the diathermy group increased (P diathermy group. During ramp contractions, MMG amplitude and IMF increased at all percentages of MVC (10%-90%) for the diathermy group only (P Diathermy treatments may decrease musculotendinous stiffness, but not absolute strength or motor control strategies that influence force production.

  11. Temperature and Humidity Effects on Hospital Morbidity in Darwin, Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldie, James; Sherwood, Steven C; Green, Donna; Alexander, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    Many studies have explored the relationship between temperature and health in the context of a changing climate, but few have considered the effects of humidity, particularly in tropical locations, on human health and well-being. To investigate this potential relationship, this study assessed the main and interacting effects of daily temperature and humidity on hospital admission rates for selected heat-relevant diagnoses in Darwin, Australia. Univariate and bivariate Poisson generalized linear models were used to find statistically significant predictors and the admission rates within bins of predictors were compared to explore nonlinear effects. The analysis indicated that nighttime humidity was the most statistically significant predictor (P humidity (P humidity effect appeared to be strongly nonlinear: Hot days appeared to have higher admission rates when they were preceded by high nighttime humidity. From this analysis, we suggest that heat-health policies in tropical regions similar to Darwin need to accommodate the effects of temperature and humidity at different times of day. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Effect of drying temperature on lycopene content of processed tomatoes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Czako

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Recently it has been increasing interest worldwide in the production of dehydrated tomato products, which are used in food industry and in pharmacy. An important indicator of the quality of products, beside the microbiological stability is health safety and lycopene content. The aim of this work was to evaluate the effect of drying temperature on changes of the content of lycopene in selected varieties of tomato. Drying was performed at 45 °C, 70 °C and 90 °C. Varieties of Darina F1, Denár, Kecskeméty, Orange, Paulína F1, Šejk F1 were used. Tomatoes were processed into dried slices with the dry matter content of 80-85%. Content of lycopene was determined spectrophotometrically. The content of lycopene in fresh tomatoes ranged from 63.378 mg 100 g-1 of dry matter (Orange to 302.37 mg 100 g-1 of dry matter (Šejk F1. After drying at all temperatures, content of lycopene decreased on average of 64.48 to 68.3%. The most significant changes were found at temperature of 90 °C. Based on the results the most appropriate temperature for drying among the monitored temperatures was at 70 °C, in this case the content of lycopene in the product ranged from 12.839 mg 100 g-1 dry matter (Orange to 115.9 mg 100 g-1 of dry matter.

  13. Temperature effects on bond between concrete and reinforcing steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lublóy Éva

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Bond behaviour between concrete and reinforcing bars was observed under elevated temperatures. Five different concrete compositions were used. Hundred five pull-out specimens (Ø120 mm, 100 mm were prepared. After removing the specimens from the formwork, they were stored in water for seven days then kept at laboratory conditions until testing. The specimens were 28 days old by testing. After heating up the specimens, they were kept for two hours at these maximum temperatures (20 °C, 150 °C, 300 °C, 400 °C, 500 °C, 800 °C. Specimens were then cooled down in laboratory conditions. Finally the specimens were tested at room temperature. In order to check the compressive strength standard cubes were cast, cured, and heat treated, then tested to compressive strength. The results showed reduction in residual compressive strength and considerable changes in steel-concrete bond under high temperatures. Based on test results, a proposal is presented for the modification of MC2010 bond-ship formula in order to consider temperature effect.

  14. Physical effects on visible temperature measurements of shocked foams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benage, J.; Falk, K.; Fryer, C.; Greef, C.; Williams, J.; Schmidt, D.; McCoy, C.; Boehly, T.

    2013-10-01

    We have conducted a series of experiments measuring the temperature of shock compressed foams at pressures from ~ 50 to >300 GPA. These experiments were carried out at the OMEGA laser facility and utilized the streaked optical pyrometer (SOP) to measure the optical emission from the shocked foam targets and infer the temperature. A comparison of our results to both standard equation of state (EOS) tables and to quantum molecular dynamics (QMD) simulations result in temperatures that are below these theoretical predictions, especially at the higher pressures. This indicates either an error in these models or a limitation with this type of measurement technique. In order to estimate whether the emission from the shock front is consistent with the bulk temperature of the shocked material, a series of high-resolution hydrodynamic simulations were performed. We find these simulations predict emission more consistent with the measurements at high pressures, similar to previous results for shocked Silicon. The effect of specific physics issues at the shock front, including temperature relaxation, electron thermal conduction, and radiation transport are evaluated to determine the magnitude of their affect on the emission. Both experimental and simulations results will be presented. Work performed under the auspices of the NNSA/DOE.

  15. Effects of the high temperatures of cows in nursing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erasmo G. Hurtado Sosa

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available To determine the physiologic answer to the high temperatures in the cow’s milkmaids in different moments of the postparto in the municipality of Fomento, 15 cows were evaluated during a period of 61 days in a warm and humid climate. The answer indicators to the heat were: Rectal temperature, cutaneous temperature, temperature of the milk, breathing frequency and heart frequency, the statistic analysis was carried out with the help of the statistical programs STATGRAPHICS Bonus 5.1 for Windows ® 2000 and the processor of data Excel, Office 2007, they were carried out correlation tests and regression, to analyze the effects from the animal answer to the heat for the suitable groups, it was carried out a variance analysis with a factorial design, in series of time. The most sensitive indicators of animal answer were the TR and the FR, the group postpartum smaller than 30 the most sensitive to the high temperatures, prevailing a situation of danger for the livestock and differences under the conditions of comfort for the cows among the morning (ITH 59.63 and the afternoon (ITH 90.72, being more favorable for the cluster the Indicator of morning comfort.

  16. Surfactant and temperature effects on paraben transport through silicone membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waters, Laura J; Dennis, Laura; Bibi, Aisha; Mitchell, John C

    2013-08-01

    This study investigates the effects of two surfactants (one anionic and one non-ionic) and controlled modifications in temperature (298-323K) on the permeation of two structurally similar compounds through a silicone membrane using a Franz diffusion cell system. In all cases the presence of an anionic surfactant, namely sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS), reduced the permeation of both compounds (methylparaben and ethylparaben) over a period of 24h. The degree of permeation reduction was proportional to the concentration of surfactant with a maximum effect observed, with an average reduction of approximately 50%, at the highest surfactant concentration of 20mM. Differences were seen around the critical micelle concentration (CMC) of SDS implying the effect was partially connected with the favoured formation of micelles. In contrast, the presence of non-ionic surfactant (Brij 35) had no effect on the permeation of methylparaben or ethylparaben at any of the concentrations investigated, both above and below the CMC of the surfactant. From these findings the authors conclude that the specific effects of SDS are a consequence of ionic surfactant-silicone interactions retarding the movement of paraben through the membrane through indirect modifications to the surface of the membrane. As expected, an increase in experimental temperature appeared to enhance the permeation of both model compounds, a finding that is in agreement with previously reported data. Interestingly, in the majority of cases this effect was optimum at the second highest temperature studied (45°C) which suggests that permeation is a temperature-dependent phenomenon. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Defluoridation of drinking water with pottery: effect of firing temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauge, S; Osterberg, R; Bjorvatn, K; Selvig, K A

    1994-12-01

    Excessive fluoride (F) in drinking water should be removed, but simple, inexpensive methods of fluoride removal are not readily available. This study examines the F(-)-binding capacity of clay and clayware, especially the effect of the firing temperature on the F(-)-binding process. A series of pots were made from ordinary potter's clay and fired at 500-1000 degrees C. Likewise, small clay bricks were fired and then crushed and sieved. NaF solutions containing 10 mg/l F- (10 ppm F-) were prepared. Suitable aliquots of the solutions were poured into clay pots or exposed to powdered clayware. Samples were taken at storage periods of 30 min to 20 days and analyzed for F- by ion-selective electrodes. The rate and capacity of F(-)-binding in the clayware varied with the firing temperature. Clay fired at approximately 600 degrees C was most effective. Temperatures over 700 degrees C caused a decline in F(-)-binding, and pottery fired at 900 degrees C and above seemed unable to remove F- from water. Pots fired at 500 degrees C or less cracked in water. The findings indicate that clayware, fired at an optimal temperature, may be of practical value for partial defluoridation of drinking water.

  18. Temperature Effect on Micelle Formation: Molecular Thermodynamic Model Revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoshnood, Atefeh; Lukanov, Boris; Firoozabadi, Abbas

    2016-03-08

    Temperature affects the aggregation of macromolecules such as surfactants, polymers, and proteins in aqueous solutions. The effect on the critical micelle concentration (CMC) is often nonmonotonic. In this work, the effect of temperature on the micellization of ionic and nonionic surfactants in aqueous solutions is studied using a molecular thermodynamic model. Previous studies based on this technique have predicted monotonic behavior for ionic surfactants. Our investigation shows that the choice of tail transfer energy to describe the hydrophobic effect between the surfactant tails and the polar solvent molecules plays a key role in the predicted CMC. We modify the tail transfer energy by taking into account the effect of the surfactant head on the neighboring methylene group. The modification improves the description of the CMC and the predicted micellar size for aqueous solutions of sodium n-alkyl sulfate, dodecyl trimethylammonium bromide (DTAB), and n-alkyl polyoxyethylene. The new tail transfer energy describes the nonmonotonic behavior of CMC versus temperature. In the DTAB-water system, we redefine the head size by including the methylene group, next to the nitrogen, in the head. The change in the head size along with our modified tail transfer energy improves the CMC and aggregation size prediction significantly. Tail transfer is a dominant energy contribution in micellar and microemulsion systems. It also promotes the adsorption of surfactants at fluid-fluid interfaces and affects the formation of adsorbed layer at fluid-solid interfaces. Our proposed modifications have direct applications in the thermodynamic modeling of the effect of temperature on molecular aggregation, both in the bulk and at the interfaces.

  19. Effects of Temperature on the Histotripsy Intrinsic Threshold for Cavitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlaisavljevich, Eli; Xu, Zhen; Maxwell, Adam; Mancia, Lauren; Zhang, Xi; Lin, Kuang-Wei; Duryea, Alexander; Sukovich, Jonathan; Hall, Tim; Johnsen, Eric; Cain, Charles

    2016-05-10

    Histotripsy is an ultrasound ablation method that depends on the initiation of a dense cavitation bubble cloud to fractionate soft tissue. Previous work has demonstrated that a cavitation cloud can be formed by a single acoustic pulse with one high amplitude negative cycle, when the negative pressure amplitude exceeds a threshold intrinsic to the medium. The intrinsic thresholds in soft tissues and tissue phantoms that are water-based are similar to the intrinsic threshold of water over an experimentally verified frequency range of 0.3-3 MHz. Previous work studying the histotripsy intrinsic threshold has been limited to experiments performed at room temperature (~20°C). In this study, we investigate the effects of temperature on the histotripsy intrinsic threshold in water, which is essential to accurately predict the intrinsic thresholds expected over the full range of in vivo therapeutic temperatures. Based on previous work studying the histotripsy intrinsic threshold and classical nucleation theory, we hypothesize that the intrinsic threshold will decrease with increasing temperature. To test this hypothesis, the intrinsic threshold in water was investigated both experimentally and theoretically. The probability of generating cavitation bubbles was measured by applying a single pulse with one high amplitude negative cycle at 1 MHz to distilled, degassed water at temperatures ranging from 10°C-90°C. Cavitation was detected and characterized by passive cavitation detection and high-speed photography, from which the probability of cavitation was measured vs. pressure amplitude. The results indicate that the intrinsic threshold (the negative pressure at which the cavitation probability=0.5) significantly decreases with increasing temperature, showing a nearly linear decreasing trend from 29.8±0.4 MPa at 10˚C to 14.9±1.4 MPa at 90˚C. Overall, the results of this study support our hypothesis that the intrinsic threshold is highly dependent upon the temperature

  20. Effect of temperature on the oxidation of soybean biodiesel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pereira, G. G.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes to examine the effect of temperature on the oxidation behavior of biodiesel. Soybean biodiesel was oxidized at different temperatures (room temperature, 60, and 110 °C, and the increase in primary and secondary oxidation products was determined based on the peroxide and anisidine values, respectively, during the induction period (IP. The results indicated that the evolution of hydroperoxides followed zero-order reaction kinetics during the IP at all temperatures, and their rate of formation was exponentially affected by temperature. It was also deduced that temperature influenced the ratio between primary and secondary oxidation products formation, which decreased as the temperature increased. Additionally, it was possible to predict the oxidation behavior of the soybean biodiesel at room temperature by an exponential model fitted to the IP values at different temperatures (70, 80, 90, 100, and 110 °C using the Rancimat apparatus.El propósito de este trabajo es evaluar el efecto de la temperatura en el comportamiento oxidativo del biodiesel. Biodiesel derivado de aceite de soja fue oxidado a diferentes temperaturas (temperatura ambiente, 60 y 110 °C y se evaluaron el contenido de compuestos primarios y secundarios de oxidación mediante el índice de peróxidos y de anisidina, respectivamente, a lo largo del periodo de inducción. Los resultados indicaron que el contenido de hidroperóxidos evolucionó siguiendo una cinética de orden cero a lo largo del periodo de inducción a todas las temperaturas y que su velocidad de formación cambió exponencialmente con la temperatura. También se dedujo que la temperatura influyó en la relación entre la formación de los productos de oxidación primarios y secundarios, disminuyendo a medida que aumentaba la temperatura. Además, fue posible predecir el comportamiento oxidativo del biodiesel de soja a temperatura ambiente ajustando a un modelo exponencial los valores de periodo

  1. Global non-linear effect of temperature on economic production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Marshall; Hsiang, Solomon M; Miguel, Edward

    2015-11-12

    Growing evidence demonstrates that climatic conditions can have a profound impact on the functioning of modern human societies, but effects on economic activity appear inconsistent. Fundamental productive elements of modern economies, such as workers and crops, exhibit highly non-linear responses to local temperature even in wealthy countries. In contrast, aggregate macroeconomic productivity of entire wealthy countries is reported not to respond to temperature, while poor countries respond only linearly. Resolving this conflict between micro and macro observations is critical to understanding the role of wealth in coupled human-natural systems and to anticipating the global impact of climate change. Here we unify these seemingly contradictory results by accounting for non-linearity at the macro scale. We show that overall economic productivity is non-linear in temperature for all countries, with productivity peaking at an annual average temperature of 13 °C and declining strongly at higher temperatures. The relationship is globally generalizable, unchanged since 1960, and apparent for agricultural and non-agricultural activity in both rich and poor countries. These results provide the first evidence that economic activity in all regions is coupled to the global climate and establish a new empirical foundation for modelling economic loss in response to climate change, with important implications. If future adaptation mimics past adaptation, unmitigated warming is expected to reshape the global economy by reducing average global incomes roughly 23% by 2100 and widening global income inequality, relative to scenarios without climate change. In contrast to prior estimates, expected global losses are approximately linear in global mean temperature, with median losses many times larger than leading models indicate.

  2. Rovibrational and temperature effects in theoretical studies of NMR parameters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faber, Rasmus; Kaminsky, Jakub; Sauer, Stephan P. A.

    2016-01-01

    The demand for high precision calculations of NMR shieldings (or their related values, chemical shifts δ) and spin-spin coupling constants facilitating and supporting detailed interpretations of NMR spectra increases hand in hand with the development of computational techniques and hardware...... resources. Highly sophisticated calculations including even relativistic effects are nowadays possible for these properties. However, NMR parameters depend not only on molecular structure and environment but also on molecular flexibility and temperature and the apparent success of theoretical predictions...

  3. Effects of elevated CO2 and temperature on seed quality

    OpenAIRE

    HAMPTON, J. G.; BOELT, B.; ROLSTON, M. P.; CHASTAIN, T. G.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Successful crop production depends initially on the availability of high-quality seed. By 2050 global climate change will have influenced crop yields, but will these changes affect seed quality? The present review examines the effects of elevated carbon dioxide (CO2) and temperature during seed production on three seed quality components: seed mass, germination and seed vigour. In response to elevated CO2, seed mass has been reported to both increase and decrease in C3 plants, but not...

  4. Effects of culture concentration and inoculation temperature on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effects of culture concentration and inoculation temperature on physicochemical, microbial and organoleptic properties of yoghurt. ... The result also showed a significant (P<0.001) difference in titratable acidity of the yoghurts (ranging from 1.31% to 2.52%), pH (4.49 to 5.38) and total solids (12.4% to 17.1%). Total protein ...

  5. Temperature hysteretic effect and its influence on colossal ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Electrical resistance () measurements of a bulk La0.33Nd0.33Ca0.33MnO3 perovskite in magnetic fields up to 40 kOe have revealed anomalous temperature hysteretic effects both in 0 Oe and 20 kOe magnetic fields. The sharp peak observed in the vs. plot indicates the occurrence of metal-to-insulator (M–I) transition ...

  6. The effect of oral temperature on the temperature perception of liquids and semisolids in the mouth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Engelen, L.; Wijk, de R.A.; Prinz, J.F.; Bilt, van der A.; Janssen, A.M.; Bosman, F.

    2002-01-01

    This work examined the influence of oral temperature on oral perception of temperature in liquids and semisolids. A panel of 20 adults assessed the temperature of water, custard dessert and mayonnaise. Oral temperatures were manipulated by 5-s mouth rinses of 10, 35 and 55°C performed prior to

  7. [Effect of Light Color Temperature on Human Concentration and Creativity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weitbrecht, W U; Bärwolff, H; Lischke, A; Jünger, S

    2015-06-01

    Light has different biological effects depending on the color temperature and intensity. This may be the reason for its differing effects. We investigated the influence of color temperature (3000 K, 4500 K, 6000 K) under constant high intensity (1000 Lux) on concentration and creativity of 50 students and employees of the Cologne University of Applied Sciences, Campus Gummersbach (age: 30.9 +/- 10.8y.). As test method we used d2-bq-test, creativity test (mean of the number of ideas on 5 themes), word test and logic test. In addition, test subjects were asked to evaluate their impression of light by means of a questionnaire. To exclude the circadian influence and learning effects on the result, we performed tests at the same time of the day using a random order of color temperature. We found that creativity was better under warm light (3000 K) than under colder light (4500 K, 6000 K). Concentration was best under cold light (6000 K). Under the same light intensity conditions, subjects judged blue light (6000 K) to be brighter than red light (3000 K). © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  8. Effective kinetic theory for high temperature gauge theories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Peter B.; Moore, Guy D.; Yaffe, Laurence G.

    2003-01-01

    Quasiparticle dynamics in relativistic plasmas associated with hot, weakly-coupled gauge theories (such as QCD at asymptotically high temperature T) can be described by an effective kinetic theory, valid on sufficiently large time and distance scales. The appropriate Boltzmann equations depend on effective scattering rates for various types of collisions that can occur in the plasma. The resulting effective kinetic theory may be used to evaluate observables which are dominantly sensitive to the dynamics of typical ultrarelativistic excitations. This includes transport coefficients (viscosities and diffusion constants) and energy loss rates. In this paper, we show how to formulate effective Boltzmann equations which will be adequate to compute such observables to leading order in the running coupling g(T) of high-temperature gauge theories [and all orders in 1/log g(T)-1]. As previously proposed in the literature, a leading-order treatment requires including both 2leftrightarrow2 particle scattering processes as well as effective ``1leftrightarrow2'' collinear splitting processes in the Boltzmann equations. The latter account for nearly collinear bremsstrahlung and pair production/annihilation processes which take place in the presence of fluctuations in the background gauge field. Our effective kinetic theory is applicable not only to near-equilibrium systems (relevant for the calculation of transport coefficients), but also to highly non-equilibrium situations, provided some simple conditions on distribution functions are satisfied.

  9. QBO effects manifesting in ozone, temperature, and wind profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Sitnov

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available On the basis of ozonesonde records up to 1998 the responses on the equatorial quasi-biennial oscillation (QBO, manifesting in ozone, temperature, and wind (QBO effects were isolated in the region from the ground to altitudes as high as 35km at 22 stations located in Europe (7, North America (7, Japan (4, Hawaii (1, Australia (2, and Antarctic (1. The vertical structures of the QBO effects of ozone are represented as an alternation of layers of well-developed quasi-biennial signals, whose phases gradually change with height and thin transitional layers of ill-developed signals, whose phases change abruptly with height. The amplitudes of the effects depend on height and reach the maxima of 3–6nbar in the lower stratosphere. At the majority of sites the effects are found to be approximately in phase between 20 and 23km. Two types of the vertical structures of the temperature QBO effects are found. At most of the sites located equatorward of about 50° the stratospheric temperature anomalies are characterized by downward propagation, whereas at sites situated poleward of about 50° they look as column-like structures. Near the tropopause the effects frequently reveal dipole-like structure, when the stratospheric and tropospheric anomalies are of opposite signs. The amplitudes of the effects are in the range of 0.5–1°C. The vertical structures of the QBO effects of horizontal wind components reveal a diversity of patterns. The amplitudes of the QBO effects of the meridional and zonal winds are comparable and lie in the range of 0.5–2m s–1. As a rule, the maxima of the effects are noticed slightly below the tropopause, as well as in the middle stratosphere. In general, a statistical assurance of the obtained QBO effects is rather poor. However, a considerable part of them reveal similarity, which can be hardly explained by chance. Furthermore, the results agree with possible physical mechanisms of off-equatorial influence of the QBO, as well

  10. Effects of Elevated Temperature on Concrete with Recycled Coarse Aggregates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salau, M. A.; Oseafiana, O. J.; Oyegoke, T. O.

    2015-11-01

    This paper discusses the effects of heating temperatures of 200°C, 400°C and 600°C each for 2 hours at a heating rate of 2.5°C/min on concrete with the content of Natural Coarse Aggregates (NCA) partially replaced with Recycled Coarse Aggregates (RCA), obtained from demolished building in the ratio of 0%, 15% and 30%.There was an initial drop in strength from 100°C to 200°C which is suspected to be due to the relatively weak interfacial bond between the RCA and the hardened paste within the concrete matrix;a gradual increase in strength continued from 200°C to 450°C and steady drop occurred again as it approached 600°C.With replacement proportion of 0%, 15% and 30% of NCA and exposure to peak temperature of 600°C, a relative concrete strength of 23.6MPa, 25.3MPa and 22.2MPa respectively can be achieved for 28 days curing age. Furthermore, RAC with 15% NCA replacement when exposed to optimum temperature of 450°C yielded high compressive strength comparable to that of control specimen (normal concrete). In addition, for all concrete samples only slight surface hairline cracks were noticed as the temperature approached 400°C. Thus, the RAC demonstrated behavior just like normal concrete and may be considered fit for structural use.

  11. Effect of drink temperature on core temperature and endurance cycling performance in warm, humid conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burdon, Catriona; O'Connor, Helen; Gifford, Janelle; Shirreffs, Susan; Chapman, Phillip; Johnson, Nathan

    2010-09-01

    The aims of this study were to determine the effect of cold (4 °C) and thermoneutral (37 °C) beverages on thermoregulation and performance in the heat and to explore sensory factors associated with ingesting a cold stimulus. Seven males (age 32.8 ± 6.1 years, [V(.)]O(2peak) 59.4 ± 6.6 ml x kg(-1) x min(-1)) completed cold, thermoneutral, and thermoneutral + ice trials in randomized order. Participants cycled for 90 min at 65%[V(.)]O(2peak) followed by a 15-min performance test at 28 °C and 70% relative humidity. They ingested 2.3 ml x kg(-1) of a 7.4% carbohydrate-electrolyte solution every 10 min during the 90-min steady-state exercise including 30 ml ice puree every 5 min in the ice trial. Absolute changes in skin temperature (0.22 ± 1.1 °C vs. 1.14 ± 0.9 °C; P = 0.02), mean body temperature (1.2 ± 0.3 vs. 1.6 ± 0.3 °C; P = 0.03), and heat storage were lower across the 90-min exercise bout for the cold compared with the thermoneutral trial. Significant improvements (4.9 ± 2.4%, P cold but no significant differences were detected with ice. Consumption of cold beverages during prolonged exercise in the heat improves body temperature measures and performance. Consumption of ice did not reveal a sensory response, but requires further study. Beverages consumed by athletes exercising in the heat should perhaps be cold for performance and safety reasons.

  12. Effects of Temperature and Humidity on Major League Baseballs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerstman, Victoria; Raue, Brian

    2003-11-01

    In a study inspired by the famous humidor of the Colorado Rockies of Major League Baseball, we have measured the effects of temperature and humidity on the elasticity of official Major League baseballs. The elasticity, e, also referred to as the coefficient of restitution (COR), of the baseballs was determined by dropping the balls from a fixed height onto a concrete floor and determining the speed of the ball after the initial impact. Corrections for air drag were made to the measured COR. Measurements were done for baseballs stored under a wide variety of conditions that included storage in the freezer compartment of a household refrigerator, storage in an 80^rcC oven with varying humidity conditions, and storage in a crude humidor. The balls were tested over a period of several hours after removal to nominal conditions. Our results show a linear increase of the COR with increasing temperature, as well as a nearly linear decrease in the COR as water mass is increased. Using the results of our measurements, we have determined the effects of temperature and humidity on batted-ball speeds and flight distances at the Rockies' home field.

  13. Rheology of Indian Honey: Effect of Temperature and Gamma Radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudhanshu Saxena

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Honey brands commonly available in Indian market were characterized for their rheological and thermal properties. Viscosity of all the honey samples belonging to different commercial brands was found to decrease with increase in temperature (5–40°C and their sensitivity towards temperature varied significantly as explained by calculating activation energy based on Arrhenius model and ranged from 54.0 to 89.0 kJ/mol. However, shear rate was not found to alter the viscosity of honey indicating their Newtonian character and the shear stress varied linearly with shear rate for all honey samples. Honey is known to contain pathogenic microbial spores and in our earlier study gamma radiation was found to be effective in achieving microbial decontamination of honey. The effect of gamma radiation (5–15 kGy on rheological properties of honey was assessed, and it was found to remain unchanged upon radiation treatment. The glass transition temperatures (Tg of these honey analyzed by differential scanning calorimetry varied from −44.1 to −54.1°C and remained unchanged upon gamma radiation treatment. The results provide information about some key physical properties of commercial Indian honey. Radiation treatment which is useful for ensuring microbial safety of honey does not alter these properties.

  14. Urinary catecholamines in iron deficiency anemia: effects of environmental temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, S.M.; Beard, J.L.

    1986-03-05

    Iron deficiency (ID) is associated with increased levels of norepinephrine (NE) in plasma and urine. They investigated the effect of 5-7 days exposure to three different environmental temperatures (10/sup 0/C, 24/sup 0/C, 30/sup 0/C) on urinary catecholamine levels to test the hypothesis that increased thermogenic activity is causal to this increased excretion in iron deficiency. Catecholamines were analyzed from acidified urine by HPLC-EC. The mean Hb in ID animals was 3.1 +/- .5 versus controls of 12.8 +/- 9. These data demonstrate that contrary to previous reports NE excretion is not normalized at a thermoneutral temperature and suggests a basic abnormality in peripheral SNS activity and NE metabolism in iron deficiency that is independent of environmental drive from thermogenesis.

  15. Pressure and temperature effects in homopolymer blends and diblock copolymers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frielinghaus, H.; Schwahn, D.; Mortensen, K.

    1997-01-01

    fluctuations. Phase boundaries, the Flory-Huggins interaction parameter and the Ginzburg number were obtained. The packing of the molecules changes with pressure. Therefore, the degree of thermal fluctuation as a function of packing and temperature was studied. While in polymer blends packing leads, in some......Thermal composition fluctuations in a homogeneous binary polymer blend and in a diblock copolymer were measured by small-angle neutron scattering as a function of temperature and pressure. The experimental data were analyzed with theoretical expressions, including the important effect of thermal...... of the 'mean-field' approximation and the three-dimensional Ising model. The phase boundaries in blends increase with pressure, while the phase boundary of the studied block copolymer shows an unusual shape: with increasing pressure it first decreases and then increases. Its origin is an increase...

  16. Quantum correlations at infinite temperature: The dynamical Nagaoka effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanász-Nagy, Márton; Lovas, Izabella; Grusdt, Fabian; Greif, Daniel; Greiner, Markus; Demler, Eugene A.

    2017-07-01

    Do quantum correlations play a role in high-temperature dynamics of many-body systems? A common expectation is that thermal fluctuations lead to fast decoherence and make dynamics classical. In this paper we provide a striking example that a single particle created in a featureless, infinite temperature spin bath not only exhibits nonclassical dynamics but it also induces strong long-lived correlations between the surrounding spins. We study the nonequilibrium dynamics of a hole created in a Mott insulator in the atomic limit, which corresponds to a degenerate spin system. In the absence of interactions, the spin correlations arise purely from quantum interference. Furthermore, these correlations are both antiferromagnetic and ferromagnetic, in striking contrast to the equilibrium Nagaoka effect. These results are relevant for a number of condensed matter spin systems and should be observable using state of the art bosonic or fermionic quantum gas microscopes.

  17. Effect of sintering temperature on structural and electrical properties ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    TECS

    energies decreased from 1⋅25–0⋅82 eV with increase in sintering temperature. Keywords. Ce0⋅9Gd0⋅1O1⋅95; IT–SOFC; XRD; SEM. 1. Introduction. Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) are of two types based on their operating temperatures: high temperature SOFCs and low temperature or intermediate temperature SOFCs ( ...

  18. The Effects of the Heat and Moisture Exchanger on Humidity, Airway Temperature, and Core Body Temperature

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Delventhal, Mary

    1999-01-01

    Findings from several studies have demonstrated that the use of a heat and moisture exchanger increases airway humidity, which in turn increases mean airway temperature and prevents decreases in core body temperature...

  19. Interplay between geometry and temperature in the Casimir effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, Alexej

    2010-06-23

    In this thesis, we investigate the interplay between geometry and temperature in the Casimir effect for the inclined-plates, sphere-plate and cylinder-plate configurations. We use the worldline approach, which combines the string-inspired quantum field theoretical formalism with Monte Carlo techniques. The approach allows the precise computation of Casimir energies in arbitrary geometries. We analyze the dependence of the Casimir energy, force and torque on the separation parameter and temperature T, and find Casimir phenomena which are dominated by long-range fluctuations. We demonstrate that for open geometries, thermal energy densities are typically distributed on scales of thermal wavelengths. As an important consequence, approximation methods for thermal corrections based on local energy-density estimates, such as the proximity-force approximation, are found to become unreliable even at small surface-separations. Whereas the hightemperature behavior is always found to be linear in T, richer power-law behaviors at small temperatures emerge. In particular, thermal forces can develop a non-monotonic behavior. Many novel numerical as well as analytical results are presented. (orig.)

  20. Effects of flux concentrations and sintering temperature on dental porcelain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghose, Polash; Gafur, Md. Abdul; Das, Sujan Kumar; Ranjan Chakraborty, Shyamal; Mohsin, Md.; Deb, Arun Kumar; Rakibul Qadir, Md.

    2014-02-01

    In this study, samples of dental porcelain bodies have been made by using the materials collected from selected deposits employing different mixing proportions of clay, quartz and feldspar. Dental porcelain ceramics have been successfully fabricated by using the sintering technique together with some Na2CO3 additive. The dental porcelain powder has been pressed into pellets at first and subsequently sintered at 700, 800, 900, 1000 and 1100 °C for 2 h. The physical and mechanical properties of the prepared samples have been investigated. The sintering behavior of the fired samples has been evaluated by bulk density, linear shrinkage, water absorption and apparent porosity measurements. This study includes the evaluation of the Vickers's microhardness by microhardness tester. Phase analysis and microstructural study have been performed by XRD and optical microscope respectively. Optical properties have been investigated using UV-visible spectroscopy. Influence of firing conditions on leucite formation, densification and microstructural development of the sintered samples has been investigated. It has been found that the choice of sintering temperature is one of the key factors in controlling leucite crystallization in dental porcelain ceramics. It has also been found that the flux concentration of material and the effect of temperature on preparation of dental porcelain contribute to the firing shrinkage and hardness, which has been found to increase with the increase of treatment temperature.

  1. Temperature effects on MIPs in the BGO calorimeters of DAMPE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuan-Peng; Wen, Si-Cheng; Jiang, Wei; Yue, Chuan; Zhang, Zhi-Yong; Wei, Yi-Feng; Zhang, YunLong; Zang, Jing-Jing; Wu, Jian

    2017-10-01

    In this paper, we present a study of temperature effects on BGO calorimeters using proton MIPs collected in the first year of operation of DAMPE. By directly comparing MIP calibration constants used by the DAMPE data production pipe line, we find an experimental relation between the temperature and signal amplitudes of each BGO bar: a general deviation of ‑1.162%/°C, and ‑0.47%/°C to ‑1.60%/°C statistically for each detector element. During 2016, DAMPE’s temperature changed by ∼8°C due to solar elevation angle, and the corresponding energy scale bias is about 9%. By frequent MIP calibration operation, this kind of bias is eliminated to an acceptable value. This work was supported by National Key Program for Research and Development (No. 2016YFA0400200) and by NSFC (11303105, 11673021). The DAMPE mission was funded by the strategic priority science and technology projects in space science of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (No. XDA04040000 and No. XDA04040400)

  2. Light quality and temperature effects on antirrhinum growth and development

    OpenAIRE

    Khattak, Abdul Mateen; Pearson, Simon

    2005-01-01

    An experiment was carried out to examine the effects of light quality on the growth and development of antirrhinum under three different temperatures 19 °C, 24 °C and 27 °C in glasshouses. Five different colour filters (i.e. ‘Red absorbing’, ‘Blue absorbing’, ‘Blue and Red absorbing’ and two ‘partially Blue absorbing’ materials) were tested, with one clear polythene as a control. Plant height, internode length and leaf area were significantly affected by the spectral filters as well as the te...

  3. The Effect of Temperature on the Production of Nitrobenzene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agustriyanto, R.; Sapei, L.; Rosaline, G.; Setiawan, R.

    2017-02-01

    Nitrobenzene is a compound derived from benzene and quite fundamental in the petrochemical industry. One of which is in the manufacture of aniline. Aniline has an important role as dyes, synthetic rubber materials, rocket fuels and pharmaceuticals. Nitrobenzene can be synthesized by the nitration reaction of benzene. The purpose of the research is to design synthesis process of nitrobenzene by using Aspen Hysys simulator. The effect of changes in operating condition on nitrobenzene will be investigated. The benefits of the research are to obtain the optimum operating temperature for nitrobenzene production so that the use of utility can be minimized.

  4. The Effects of High Temperature on Gessoes with Different Admixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budu, Ana-Maria; Sandu, Ion; Cristache, Raluca Anamaria

    2014-11-01

    This paper presents the effects of temperature on gessoes that have different substances added, usually used in painting or restoration to enhance the flexibility of the ground layer or to create a suitable gesso for the specific painting technique. Five samples of gesso were made and applied on Balsa wood (a dry, stable wood that is used in restoration for completing the missing elements of the panel). After the thermal treatment, the samples were analyzed optical, by microscopy and colorimetry. The results showed small differences in colour, but no cracks of the gessoes

  5. Ultrasonic flowmeters: temperature gradients and transducer geometry effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willatzen, M

    2003-03-01

    Ultrasonic flowmeter performance is addressed for the case of cylindrically shaped flowmeters employing two reciprocal ultrasonic transducers A and B so as to measure time-of-flight differences between signals transmitted from transducer A towards B followed by an equivalent signal transmitted from transducer B towards A. In the case where a liquid flows through the flowmeter's measuring section ("spoolpiece"), the arrival times of the two signals differ by an amount related to the flow passing between the two transducers. Firstly, a detailed study of flow measurement errors with mean flow in the laminar flow regime is carried out as a function of the mode index and the transducer diameter/cylinder diameter ratio in the case where no temperature gradients are present in the flowmeter sensor. It is shown that all modes except the fundamental mode overestimate the mean flow by a factor of 33.33% while excitation of the fundamental mode solely give error-free measurements. The immediate consequences are that the flowmeter error decreases as the transducer diameter/cylinder diameter ratio approaches 1 from 0 reflecting the fact that the excitation level of the fundamental mode increases from almost 0 to 1 as this ratio approaches 1 from 0. Secondly, the effect on flowmeter performance due to flow-induced temperature gradients is examined. It is shown that the presence of temperature gradients leads to flowmeter errors at the higher-flow values even in the case where the fundamental mode is the only mode excited. It is also deduced that flowmeter errors in general depend on the distance between transducers A and B whether temperature gradients exist or not. This conclusion is not reflected in the usual definition of flowmeter errors given by the so-called mode-dependent deviation of measurement introduced in earlier works. Copyright 2002 Elsevier Science B.V.

  6. Investigat ing the effect of surface water – groundwater interactions on stream temperature using D istributed Temperature Sensing and instream temperature model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matheswaran, K.; Blemmer, M.; Mortensen, J.

    2011-01-01

    Surface water–groundwater interactions at the stream interface influences, and at times controls the stream temperature, a critical water property driving biogeochemical processes. This study investigates the effects of these interactions on temperature of Stream Elverdamsåen in Denmark using the...

  7. Hydrogen-incorporation stabilization of metallic VO2(R) phase to room temperature, displaying promising low-temperature thermoelectric effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Changzheng; Feng, Feng; Feng, Jun; Dai, Jun; Peng, Lele; Zhao, Jiyin; Yang, Jinlong; Si, Cheng; Wu, Ziyu; Xie, Yi

    2011-09-07

    Regulation of electron-electron correlation has been found to be a new effective way to selectively control carrier concentration, which is a crucial step toward improving thermoelectric properties. The pure electronic behavior successfully stabilized the nonambient metallic VO(2)(R) to room temperature, giving excellent thermoelectric performance among the simple oxides with wider working temperature ranges.

  8. Effect of wound healing period and temperature, irradiation and post irradiation storage temperature on the keeping quality of potatoes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Langerak, D.I.; Wolters, T.C.; Jong, de W.J.H.J.; Hollman, P.C.; Cramwinckel, A.B.; Oortwijn, H.; Vroomen, L.H.M.

    1988-01-01

    The effect of irradiation doses, wound healing temperature, post harvest irradiation time (wound healing period) and storage temperature on a number of quality parameters such as loss of weight, sprout inhibition and rot incidence, chemical parameters such as sugar and vitamin e content, sensory

  9. Modeling Tree Shade Effect on Urban Ground Surface Temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Napoli, Marco; Massetti, Luciano; Brandani, Giada; Petralli, Martina; Orlandini, Simone

    2016-01-01

    There is growing interest in the role that urban forests can play as urban microclimate modifiers. Tree shade and evapotranspiration affect energy fluxes and mitigate microclimate conditions, with beneficial effects on human health and outdoor comfort. The aim of this study was to investigate surface temperature () variability under the shade of different tree species and to test the capability in predicting of a proposed heat transfer model. Surface temperature data on asphalt and grass under different shading conditions were collected in the Cascine park, Florence, Italy, and were used to test the performance of a one-dimensional heat transfer model integrated with a routine for estimating the effect of plant canopies on surface heat transfer. Shading effects of 10 tree species commonly used in Italian urban settings were determined by considering the infrared radiation and the tree canopy leaf area index (LAI). The results indicate that, on asphalt, was negatively related to the LAI of trees ( reduction ranging from 13.8 to 22.8°C). On grass, this relationship was weaker probably because of the combined effect of shade and grass evapotranspiration on ( reduction ranged from 6.9 to 9.4°C). A sensitivity analysis confirmed that other factors linked to soil water content play an important role in reduction of grassed areas. Our findings suggest that the energy balance model can be effectively used to estimate of the urban pavement under different shading conditions and can be applied to the analysis of microclimate conditions of urban green spaces. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  10. High temperature experimental characterization of microscale thermoelectric effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favaloro, Tela

    temperature vacuum thermostats are designed and fabricated with optical imaging capability and interchangeable measurement stages for various electrical and thermoelectric characterizations. We demonstrate the simultaneous measurement of in-plane electrical conductivity and Seebeck coefficient of thin-film or bulk thermoelectric materials. Furthermore, we utilize high-speed circuitry to implement the transient Harman technique and directly determine the cross-plane figure of merit of thin film thermoelectric materials at high temperatures. Transient measurements on thin film devices are subject to complications from the growth substrate, non-ideal contacts and other detrimental thermal and electrical effects. A strategy is presented for optimizing device geometry to mitigate the impact of these parasitics. This design enabled us to determine the cross-plane thermoelectric material properties in a single high temperature measurement of a 25mum InGaAs thin film with embedded ErAs (0.2%) nanoparticles using the bipolar transient Harman technique in conjunction with thermoreflectance thermal imaging. This approach eliminates discrepancies and potential device degradation from the multiple measurements necessary to obtain individual material parameters. Finite element method simulations are used to analyze non-uniform current and temperature distributions over the device area and determine the three dimensional current path for accurate extraction of material properties from the thermal images. Results match with independent measurements of thermoelectric material properties for the same material composition, validating this approach. We apply high magnification thermoreflectance imaging to create temperature maps of vanadium dioxide nanobeams and examine electro-thermal energy conversion along the nanobeam length. The metal to insulator transition of strongly correlated materials is subject to strong lattice coupling which brings about the unique one-dimensional alignment of

  11. QBO effects manifesting in ozone, temperature, and wind profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Sitnov

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available On the basis of ozonesonde records up to 1998 the responses on the equatorial quasi-biennial oscillation (QBO, manifesting in ozone, temperature, and wind (QBO effects were isolated in the region from the ground to altitudes as high as 35km at 22 stations located in Europe (7, North America (7, Japan (4, Hawaii (1, Australia (2, and Antarctic (1.

    The vertical structures of the QBO effects of ozone are represented as an alternation of layers of well-developed quasi-biennial signals, whose phases gradually change with height and thin transitional layers of ill-developed signals, whose phases change abruptly with height. The amplitudes of the effects depend on height and reach the maxima of 3–6nbar in the lower stratosphere. At the majority of sites the effects are found to be approximately in phase between 20 and 23km.

    Two types of the vertical structures of the temperature QBO effects are found. At most of the sites located equatorward of about 50° the stratospheric temperature anomalies are characterized by downward propagation, whereas at sites situated poleward of about 50° they look as column-like structures. Near the tropopause the effects frequently reveal dipole-like structure, when the stratospheric and tropospheric anomalies are of opposite signs. The amplitudes of the effects are in the range of 0.5–1°C.

    The vertical structures of the QBO effects of horizontal wind components reveal a diversity of patterns. The amplitudes of the QBO effects of the meridional and zonal winds are comparable and lie in the range of 0.5–2m s–1. As a rule, the maxima of the effects are noticed slightly below the tropopause, as well as in the middle stratosphere.

    In general, a statistical assurance of the obtained QBO effects is rather poor. However, a considerable part of them reveal similarity

  12. Magnetocaloric effect at cryogenic temperature in gadolinium oxide nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul, Rima, E-mail: rima.paul@saha.ac.in [Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF Bidhannagar, Kolkata 700064 (India); Paramanik, Tapas; Das, Kalipada [Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF Bidhannagar, Kolkata 700064 (India); Sen, Pintu [Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre, 1/AF Bidhannagar, Kolkata 700064 (India); Satpati, B.; Das, I. [Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF Bidhannagar, Kolkata 700064 (India)

    2016-11-01

    We have synthesized fascinating nano-structure of Gadolinium oxide (Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}) using controlled template-assisted electrochemical deposition technique which showed interesting anisotropic magnetic behavior. The nanotubes of Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} with average diameter 200 nm, length 10 µm and wall thickness 20 nm are constituted of nanoclusters with average diameter 7.5 nm. The tubes are aligned and are almost uniform throughout their length. Detailed magnetic measurements of aligned Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanotubes have been performed for both parallel and perpendicular magnetic field orientations with respect to the axis of the Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanotube array. Significant differences in magnetization values have been observed between the parallel and perpendicular orientations. Experimental results indicate the superparamagnetic nature of the nanomaterial. Large magnetocaloric effect, associated with the sharp change in magnetization of the Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanotubes, has been observed in the cryogenic temperature regime that shows anisotropic behavior. - Highlights: • Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanotubes of diameter ~200 nm synthesized through electrochemical technique. • The nanotubes are superparamagnetic in nature. • At cryogenic temperature, the nanotubes exhibit large magnetocaloric anisotropic effect.

  13. Temperature extremes: Effect on plant growth and development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temperature is a primary factor affecting the rate of plant development. Warmer temperatures expected with climate change and the potential for more extreme temperature events will further impact plant productivity. Pollination is one of the most sensitive phenological stages to temperature extremes...

  14. Effects of Temperature Integration on Growth and Development of Roses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dieleman, J.A.; Meinen, E.; Dueck, T.A.

    2005-01-01

    Dutch horticulture aims at a reduction of the energy use in greenhouses by 65% in 2010 compared to 1980. When temperature integration is applied, temperatures may be reduced, as long as they are compensated by higher temperatures within a pre-set time span. Applying temperature integration without

  15. The effect of ambient temperature and solar panel's surface ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The absorbance layer employed in the production of the solar panel is assumed to be responsible for the high temperatures retained on the solar panel's surface when compared with the ambient temperatures. The results show that the lower the temperature difference between solar panel's surface temperature and ...

  16. Foot temperature in healthy individuals: effects of ambient temperature and age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nardin, Rachel A; Fogerson, Patricia M; Nie, Rui; Rutkove, Seward B

    2010-01-01

    Patient complaints of excessively warm or cold feet are common in medical practice. Such symptoms can be caused by underlying vascular or neurologic disease, and measurement of foot temperature during daily activity and sleep could provide a deeper understanding of their actual thermal basis. We used a Thermochron iButton to assess surface foot temperature variation and its relationship to ambient temperature during the day with activity and at night during sleep in 39 healthy individuals aged 18 to 65 years in a temperate region of the United States. We simultaneously used actigraphy to record leg movement. We identified a mean +/- SD awake temperature of 30.6 degrees +/- 2.6 degrees C and asleep temperature of 34.0 degrees +/- 1.8 degrees C, with values reaching as low as 15.9 degrees C in the winter and as high as 37.5 degrees C in the summer. Foot temperature was found to be independent of foot movement or sex; however, there was, as expected, a strong association between foot temperature and ambient temperature (r = .59, P sleep. These results provide data on the normal variation of foot temperature in individuals living in a temperate climate and demonstrate the potential use of Thermochron iButton technology in clinical contexts, including the evaluation of patients with excessively warm or cold feet.

  17. Total Dose Effects on Bipolar Integrated Circuits at Low Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, A. H.; Swimm, R. T.; Thorbourn, D. O.

    2012-01-01

    Total dose damage in bipolar integrated circuits is investigated at low temperature, along with the temperature dependence of the electrical parameters of internal transistors. Bandgap narrowing causes the gain of npn transistors to decrease far more at low temperature compared to pnp transistors, due to the large difference in emitter doping concentration. When irradiations are done at temperatures of -140 deg C, no damage occurs until devices are warmed to temperatures above -50 deg C. After warm-up, subsequent cooling shows that damage is then present at low temperature. This can be explained by the very strong temperature dependence of dispersive transport in the continuous-time-random-walk model for hole transport. For linear integrated circuits, low temperature operation is affected by the strong temperature dependence of npn transistors along with the higher sensitivity of lateral and substrate pnp transistors to radiation damage.

  18. Gaia FGK benchmark stars: Effective temperatures and surface gravities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heiter, U.; Jofré, P.; Gustafsson, B.; Korn, A. J.; Soubiran, C.; Thévenin, F.

    2015-10-01

    Context. In the era of large Galactic stellar surveys, carefully calibrating and validating the data sets has become an important and integral part of the data analysis. Moreover, new generations of stellar atmosphere models and spectral line formation computations need to be subjected to benchmark tests to assess any progress in predicting stellar properties. Aims: We focus on cool stars and aim at establishing a sample of 34 Gaia FGK benchmark stars with a range of different metallicities. The goal was to determine the effective temperature and the surface gravity independently of spectroscopy and atmospheric models as far as possible. Most of the selected stars have been subjected to frequent spectroscopic investigations in the past, and almost all of them have previously been used as reference, calibration, or test objects. Methods: Fundamental determinations of Teff and log g were obtained in a systematic way from a compilation of angular diameter measurements and bolometric fluxes and from a homogeneous mass determination based on stellar evolution models. The derived parameters were compared to recent spectroscopic and photometric determinations and to gravity estimates based on seismic data. Results: Most of the adopted diameter measurements have formal uncertainties around 1%, which translate into uncertainties in effective temperature of 0.5%. The measurements of bolometric flux seem to be accurate to 5% or better, which contributes about 1% or less to the uncertainties in effective temperature. The comparisons of parameter determinations with the literature in general show good agreements with a few exceptions, most notably for the coolest stars and for metal-poor stars. Conclusions: The sample consists of 29 FGK-type stars and 5 M giants. Among the FGK stars, 21 have reliable parameters suitable for testing, validation, or calibration purposes. For four stars, future adjustments of the fundamental Teff are required, and for five stars the log g

  19. Effect of evaporator temperature on vapor compression refrigeration system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah A.A.A. Al-Rashed

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a comparable evaluation of R600a (isobutane, R290 (propane, R134a, R22, for R410A, and R32 an optimized finned-tube evaporator, and analyzes the evaporator effect on the system coefficient of performance (COP. Results concerning the response of a refrigeration system simulation software to an increase in the amount of oil flowing with the refrigerant are presented. It is shown that there is optima of the apparent overheat value, for which either the exchanged heat or the refrigeration coefficient of performance (COP is maximized: consequently, it is not possible to optimize both the refrigeration COP and the evaporator effect. The obtained evaporator optimization results were incorporated in a conventional analysis of the vapor compression system. For a theoretical cycle analysis without accounting for evaporator effects, the COP spread for the studied refrigerants was as high as 11.7%. For cycle simulations including evaporator effects, the COP of R290 was better than that of R22 by up to 3.5%, while the remaining refrigerants performed approximately within a 2% COP band of the R22 baseline for the two condensing temperatures considered.

  20. Historical effects of temperature and precipitation on California crop yields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lobell, D.B. [Energy and Environment Directorate, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Cahill, K.N. [Interdisciplinary Graduate Program in Environment and Resources, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Field, C.B. [Department of Global Ecology, Carnegie Institution, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States)

    2007-03-15

    For the 1980-2003 period, we analyzed the relationship between crop yield and three climatic variables (minimum temperature, maximum temperature, and precipitation) for 12 major Californian crops: wine grapes, lettuce, almonds, strawberries, table grapes, hay, oranges, cotton, tomatoes, walnuts, avocados, and pistachios. The months and climatic variables of greatest importance to each crop were used to develop regressions relating yield to climatic conditions. For most crops, fairly simple equations using only 2-3 variables explained more than two-thirds of observed yield variance. The types of variables and months identified suggest that relatively poorly understood processes such as crop infection, pollination, and dormancy may be important mechanisms by which climate influences crop yield. Recent climatic trends have had mixed effects on crop yields, with orange and walnut yields aided, avocado yields hurt, and most crops little affected by recent climatic trends. Yield-climate relationships can provide a foundation for forecasting crop production within a year and for projecting the impact of future climate changes.

  1. Electrochemistry of active chromium. Part III. Effects of temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. P. POPIC

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available It was shown that the temperature in the range 20 – 65 ºC has considerable effects on the electrochemical anodic dissolution of chromium in the active potential range as well as on the electrochemical hydrogen evolution reactions on bare and oxide covered chromium surfaces. Also, the chemical dissolution of chromium is strongly affected. The apparent energy of activation for anodic dissolution is 63.1 kJ mol-1, for hydrogen evolution on a bare Cr surface 19.5 kJ mol-1, for the same reaction on an oxide covered surface 44.0 kJ mol-1 and for the chemical (“anomalous” dissolution 66.9 kJ mol-1. The temperature dependences of the total corrosion rate, and the electrochemical corrosion rate alone, are presented in polynomial forms with the appropriate constants obtained by the best fit of the experimental data. For the hydrogen evolution reaction on both bare and oxide covered chromium, the Volmer-Heyrovsky reaction mechanism with the second step as rate determining was proposed.

  2. The Effect of Acclimation to Sublethal Temperature on Subsequent Susceptibility of Sitophilus zeamais Mostchulsky (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) to High Temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lü, Jianhua; Zhang, Huina

    2016-01-01

    Heat treatment is a popular alternative to synthetic pesticides in disinfesting food-processing facilities and empty grain storages. Sitophilus zeamais Mostchulsky is one of the most cosmopolitan and destructive insects found in empty grain storage facilities and processing facilities. The effect of acclimation in S. zeamais adults to sublethal high temperature on their subsequent susceptibility to high temperatures was investigated. S. zeamais adults were acclimated to 36°C for 0 (as a control), 1, 3, and 5 h, and then were exposed at 43, 47, 51, and 55°C for different time intervals respectively. Acclimation to sublethal high temperature significantly reduced subsequent susceptibility of S. zeamais adults to lethal high temperatures of 43, 47, 51, and 55°C, although the mortality of S. zeamais adults significantly increased with increasing exposure time at lethal high temperatures. The mortality of S. zeamais adults with 1, 3, and 5 h of acclimation to 36°C was significantly lower than that of S. zeamais adults without acclimation when exposed to the same lethal high temperatures. The present results suggest that the whole facility should be heated to target lethal high temperature as soon as possible, avoiding decreasing the control effectiveness of heat treatment due to the acclimation in stored product insects to sublethal temperature.

  3. The effect of body temperature on the hunting response of the middle finger skin temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daanen, H A; Van de Linde, F J; Romet, T T; Ducharme, M B

    1997-01-01

    The relationship between body temperature and the hunting response (intermittent supply of warm blood to cold exposed extremities) was quantified for nine subjects by immersing one hand in 8 degree C water while their body was either warm, cool or comfortable. Core and skin temperatures were manipulated by exposing the subjects to different ambient temperatures (30, 22, or 15 degrees C), by adjusting their clothing insulation (moderate, light, or none), and by drinking beverages at different temperatures (43, 37 and 0 degrees C). The middle finger temperature (Tfi) response was recorded, together with ear canal (Tear), rectal (Tre), and mean skin temperature (Tsk). The induced mean Tear changes were -0.34 (0.08) and +0.29 (0.03) degrees C following consumption of the cold and hot beverage, respectively. Tsk ranged from 26.7 to 34.5 degrees C during the tests. In the warm environment after a hot drink, the initial finger temperature (T(fi,base)) was 35.3 (0.4) degrees C, the minimum finger temperature during immersion (T(fi,min)) was 11.3 (0.5) degrees C, and 2.6 (0.4) hunting waves occurred in the 30-min immersion period. In the neutral condition (thermoneutral room and beverage) T(fi,base) was 32.1 (1.0) degrees C, T(fi,min) was 9.6 (0.3) degrees C, and 1.6 (0.2) waves occurred. In the cold environment after a cold drink, these values were 19.3 (0.9) degrees C, 8.7 (0.2) degrees C, and 0.8 (0.2) waves, respectively. A colder body induced a decrease in the magnitude and frequency of the hunting response. The total heat transferred from the hand to the water, as estimated by the area under the middle finger temperature curve, was also dependent upon the induced increase or decrease in Tear and Tsk. We conclude that the characteristics of the hunting temperature response curve of the finger are in part determined by core temperature and Tsk. Both T(fi,min) and the maximal finger temperature during immersion were higher when the core temperature was elevated; Tsk

  4. Effect of Temperature and Catalyst Concentration on Polyglycerol during Synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Ardila-Suárez

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Morphology, molecular weight, polydispersity, functionality, and thermal properties are important characteristics when using polyglycerol as a building block in the development of materials for industrial applications such as hydrogels, surfactants, asphalts additives, cosmetics, pharmaceutical, biomedical, and drug delivery systems. In this study several experimental techniques are used to understand the effect of process variables during synthesis in the catalyzed etherification of glycerol, a coproduct of biodiesel industry. Biobased polyglycerol is a high-valued product, which is useful as building block material because of its remarkable features, for instance, multiple hydrophilic groups, excellent biocompatibility, and highly flexible aliphatic polyether backbone. A connection between polyglycerol characteristics and process variables during synthesis allows the control of glycerol polymerization through reaction conditions. We show that temperature and catalyst concentration can be tuned with the aim of tailoring fundamental polyglycerol parameters including molecular weight, polydispersity, morphology, and functionality.

  5. Satellite ozone comparisons - Effects of pressure and temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivero, John J.; Barnes, Robert A.

    1991-01-01

    The effects of errors in determining temperature, pressure, and density in the background atmosphere on the measurements of ozone by two different satellite sensors, the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment II (SAGE II) spectrometer aboard the ERB satellite and the solar backscattered UV (SBUV) spectrometer aboard Nimbus 7, were determined. The manner in which the differences in these background atmosphere measurements propagate is demonstrated by making direct comparisons of stratospheric ozone profiles by the SBUV and the SAGE II spectrometers. It is shown that, in regions with strong vertical ozone gradients (particularly at 70 mbar in the tropics), modest differences in vertical positioning could result in differences of 5 to 10 percent in ozone concentrations.

  6. Effects of temperature and copper pollution on soil community--extreme temperature events can lead to community extinction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menezes-Oliveira, Vanessa B; Scott-Fordsmand, Janeck J; Soares, Amadeu M V M; Amorim, Monica J B

    2013-12-01

    Global warming affects ecosystems and species' diversity. The physiology of individual species is highly influenced by changes in temperature. The effects on species communities are less studied; they are virtually unknown when combining effects of pollution and temperature. To assess the effects of temperature and pollution in the soil community, a 2-factorial soil mesocosms multispecies experiment was performed. Three exposure periods (28 d, 61 d, and 84 d) and 4 temperatures (19 °C, 23 °C, 26 °C, and 29 °C) were tested, resembling the mean annual values for southern Europe countries and extreme events. The soil used was from a field site, clean, or spiked with Cu (100 mg Cu/kg). Results showed clear differences between 29 °C treatment and all other temperature treatments, with a decrease in overall abundance of organisms, further potentiated by the increase in exposure time. Folsomia candida was the most abundant species and Enchytraeus crypticus was the most sensitive to Cu toxicity. Differences in species optimum temperatures were adequately covered: 19 °C for Hypoaspis aculeifer or 26 °C for E. crypticus. The temperature effects were more pronounced the longer the exposure time. Feeding activity decreased with higher temperature and exposure time, following the decrease in invertebrate abundance, whereas for the same conditions the organic matter turnover increased. Hence, negative impacts on ecosystem services because of temperature increase can be expected by changes on soil function and as consequence of biodiversity loss. © 2013 SETAC.

  7. Effect of temperature on structure and corrosion resistance for ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Moreover, cracks were observed by SEM in coating surface and interface at the plating temperature of 90 ∘ C. Coating corrosion resistance is highly dependent on temperature according to polarization curves. The optimum temperature isfound to be 80 ∘ C and the possible reasons of corrosion resistance for NiWP coating ...

  8. 2239 EFFECT OF INLET-AIR TEMPERATURE ON PHYSICO ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mimi

    took higher time to get wet at lower temperature than at higher temperature of reconstituting water. This is in agreement with the findings that the wettability of skim milk powder is poor at water temperature below the melting point of fat because the surface of the particles is always covered by fat, forming a water repellent ...

  9. Effect of air drying temperature on rehydration ability, colour ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The rehydration ratio, non-enzymatic browning and colour loss increased with increase in air-drying temperature, while the water holding capacity decreased with increase in air-drying temperature. The vitamin C content of red peppers decreased linearly from 133.1 to 48.79 mg/100 g as the air-drying temperature ...

  10. Effect of ambient temperature and attachment method on surface temperature measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Psikuta, Agnes; Niedermann, Reto; Rossi, René M

    2014-07-01

    Accurate measurement of skin surface temperature is essential in both thermo-physiological and clinical applications. However, a literature review of the last two decades of physiological or clinical research revealed an inconsistency or a lack of information on how temperature sensors were attached to the skin surface. The purpose of this study was to systematically compare and quantify the performance of different commercially available temperature sensors and their typical attachment methods, and, secondly, to provide a time-efficient and reliable method for testing any sensor-tape combination. In conclusion, both the sensor type and the attachment method influenced the results of temperature measurements (both its absolute and relative dimensions). The sensor shape and the contact of its sensing area to the surface, as well as the conductance of the tape were the most important parameters to minimise the influence of environmental conditions on surface temperature measurement. These results suggest that temperature sensors and attachment methods for human subject and manikin trials should be selected carefully, with a systematic evaluation of the sensor-tape system under conditions of use, and emphasise the need to report these parameters in publications.

  11. The effect of low temperature cryocoolers on the development of low temperature superconducting magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green, Michael A.

    2000-08-05

    The commercial development of reliable 4 K cryocoolers improves the future prospects for magnets made from low temperature superconductors (LTS). The hope of the developers of high temperature superconductors (HTS) has been to replace liquid helium cooled LTS magnets with HTS magnets that operate at or near liquid nitrogen temperature. There has been limited success in this endeavor, but continued problems with HTS conductors have greatly slowed progress toward this goal. The development of cryocoolers that reliably operate below 4 K will allow magnets made from LTS conductor to remain very competitive for many years to come. A key enabling technology for the use of low temperature cryocoolers on LTS magnets has been the development of HTS leads. This report describes the characteristics of LTS magnets that can be successfully melded to low-temperature cryocoolers. This report will also show when it is not appropriate to consider the use of low-temperature cryocoolers to cool magnets made with LTS conductor. A couple of specific examples of LTS magnets where cryocoolers can be used are given.

  12. Temperature effects and genotype-temperature interactions on sex determination in the European sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saillant, Eric; Fostier, Alexis; Haffray, Pierrick; Menu, Bruno; Thimonier, Jacques; Chatain, Béatrice

    2002-04-01

    The effect of temperature on sex-ratios in 27 families of sea bass reared in the same tank from the fertilization stage onward was investigated. An excess of males (68%) was found in the groups that were reared at high temperature (mean +/- standard deviation: 20+/-1 degrees C) until they reached the mean size of 8.1 cm (Standard Length, 149 days post-fertilization [p.f.]). Masculinization was higher (89% of males) in the groups maintained at low temperature (13 degrees C), from fertilization to a mean length of 6.5 cm (346 days p.f.). Shifts from high to low temperature at 8.1cm and from low to high temperature at 6.5 cm had no consequence on the sex-ratio. The percentage of males showing intratesticular oocytes was higher at low temperature (63%) than at high temperature (36%), suggesting that these males may be sensitive fish that have been masculinized by environmental factors. Fish sampled in the groups reared at high (2,200 fish) and low (500 fish) temperature were genotyped on three microsatellite loci. This allowed them to be assigned to the breeders used in the crossing design, thus permitting an analysis of parental influence on sex-ratios. In groups reared at high temperature, both parents had a significant additive effect on the percentage of females, and the interaction between sire and dam was not significant. Genotype temperature interactions were also detected and their existence suggests the interesting possibility of selecting nonsensitive genotypes in breeding programs. Copyright 2002 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  13. Evaluation of the paleoclimatic effect in the exploration of subsurface temperatures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuchs, Sven; Balling, N.; Förster, Andrea

    at any borehole location in the basin where standard well log data and sufficient temperature information is available. This includes temperature logs as well as a series of corrected bottom-hole temperatures or temperatures from drill-stem tests. References: Balling, N., 2013. The Lithosphere beneath......Temperature-depth models developed in geothermal exploration are usually constrained by values of observed surface heat flow and the thermal conductivity of rocks. In several areas, in particular in the northern hemisphere, regional geothermal studies have shown that the subsurface temperatures...... and temperature gradients may be overprinted by the long term paleoclimatic effect of glacial and interglacial periods. This effect generally yields, for depths

  14. Effect of storage temperature on the motility of west African dwarf ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Semen stored under refrigerator has significantly higher value (P<0.01, P<0.05) when compared to semen stored under room temperature. This implies that refrigerator temperature preserved ram sperms motility better than room temperature under the same storage diluent. Keywords: Effect, Storage temperature, Motility, ...

  15. Effect of temperature on continuous dry fermentation of swine manure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Liangwei; Chen, Chuang; Zheng, Dan; Yang, Hongnan; Liu, Yi; Chen, Ziai

    2016-07-15

    Laboratory-scale experiments were performed on the dry digestion of solid swine manure in a semi-continuous mode using 4.5 L down plug-flow anaerobic reactors with an organic loading rate of 3.46 kg volatile solids (VS) m(-3) d(-1) to evaluate the effects of temperature (15, 25 and 35 °C). At 15 °C, biogas production was the poorest due to organic overload and acidification, with a methane yield of 0.036 L CH4 g(-1) VS added and a volumetric methane production rate of 0.125 L CH4 L(-1) d(-1). The methane yield and volumetric methane production rate at 25 °C (0.226 L CH4 g(-1) VS added and 0.783 L CH4 L(-1) d(-1), respectively) were 6.24 times higher than those at 15 °C. However, the methane yield (0.237 L CH4 g(-1) VS added) and the volumetric methane production rate (0.821 L CH4 L(-1) d(-1)) at 35 °C were only 4.86% higher than those at 25 °C, which indicated similar results were obtained at 25 °C and 35 °C. The lower biogas production at 35 °C in dry digestion compared with that in wet digestion could be attributed to ammonia inhibition. For a single pig farm, digestion of solid manure is accomplished in small-scale domestic or small-farm bioreactors, for which operating temperatures of 35 °C are sometimes difficult to achieve. Considering biogas production, ammonia inhibition and net energy recovery, an optimum temperature for dry digestion of solid swine manure is 25 °C. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Glycemic index: effect of food storage under low temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Cassab Carreira

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available This study was carried out to evaluate the influence of food storage under low temperature (-20ºC and the resistant starch formation, both on the glycemic index (GI. The GI of only cooked and cooked and stored foods under -20ºC for 30 days was evaluated in short-term tests with humans. Significant increase on the RS content was evidenced for all the stored foods. The food storage resulted in a significant decrease on the GI of beans and chick-peas; the GI of pasta remained the same and the GI of corn meal increased. Thus, the RS formation showed reduced influence on the glycemic index. The storage of starchy foods under low temperature can collaborate to the RS intake but its effect on the GI will depend on the characteristics of the carbohydrates of each food.O estudo foi realizado para avaliar a influência do armazenamento de alimentos sob baixa temperatura e a formação de amido resistente sobre o índice glicêmico (IG. O IG de alimentos cozidos ou cozidos e armazenados a -20ºC por 30 dias foi avaliado em ensaios de curta duração com humanos. Aumento significativo no conteúdo de AR foi evidenciado para todos os alimentos armazenados. O armazenamento dos alimentos resultou em significativa redução no IG do feijão e do grão de bico. O IG do macarrão foi o mesmo e da polenta sofreu aumento. Desta forma, a evidenciada formação de AR mostrou reduzida influência no IG. O armazenamento de alimentos fonte de amido sob baixa temperatura pode colaborar com a ingestão de AR, mas o efeito sobre o IG vai depender das características dos carboidratos de cada alimento.

  17. Effective temperature of ionizing stars of extragalactic H II regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dors, O. L.; Hägele, G. F.; Cardaci, M. V.; Krabbe, A. C.

    2017-04-01

    The effective temperature (Teff) of the radiation field of the ionizing star(s) of a large sample of extragalactic H II regions was estimated using the R = log([O II] (λλ3726 + 29)/[O III] λ5007) index. We used a grid of photoionization models to calibrate the Teff-R relation finding that it has a strong dependence with the ionizing parameter, while it shows a weak direct dependence with the metallicity (variations in Z imply variations in U) of both the stellar atmosphere of the ionizing star and the gas phase of the H II region. Since the R index varies slightly with the Teff for values larger than 40 kK, the R index can be used to derive the Teff in the 30-40 kK range. A large fraction of the ionization parameter variation is due to differences in the temperature of the ionizing stars and then the use of the (relatively) low Teff dependent S2 = [S II] (λλ6717 + 31)/Hα emission-line ratio to derive the ionization parameter is preferable over others in the literature. We propose linear metallicity dependent relationships between S2 and U. Teff and metallicity estimations for a sample of 865 H II regions, whose emission-line intensities were compiled from the literature, do not show any Teff-Z correlation. On the other hand, it seems to be hints of the presence of an anticorrelation between Teff-U. We found that the majority of the studied H II regions (˜87 per cent) present Teff values in the range between 37 and 40 kK, with an average value of 38.5(±1) kK. We also studied the variation of Teff as a function of the galactocentric distance for 14 spiral galaxies. Our results are in agreement with the idea of the existence of positive Teff gradients along the disc of spiral galaxies.

  18. Effect of Fermentation Temperature on the Volatile Composition of Kimchi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Sang Pil; Lee, Eun Joo; Kim, Young Ho; Ahn, Dong Uk

    2016-10-17

    This study was conducted to evaluate the effect of fermentation temperature on the volatile composition in Kimchi. Kimchi was fermented at 2 temperature conditions (4 and 20 °C). Volatile compounds of Kimchi samples were analyzed during the fermentation periods using the dynamic headspace gas chromatography-mass spectrometry method. The optimum ripening time for the Kimchi fermented at 4 °C was 35 d, and that of 20 °C was 2 d. The pH at the optimum ripening time was 4.97 and 4.41, and the titratable acidity was 0.59% and 0.76% for the Kimchi fermented at 4 and 20 °C, respectively. Forty different types of volatile compounds, including alcohol, aldehyde, ester, and sulfur compounds, were identified. The Kimchi fermented at 20 °C produced greater amounts of volatile compounds than that at 4 °C. The amounts of most volatiles increased as the fermentation time increased, but those of aldehydes decreased rapidly during both 4 and 20 °C fermentation. Organic acids, ester, and nitriles were detected only in Kimchi fermented at 20 °C. The amounts of dimethyl disulfide, methyl-2-propenyl disulfide, and di-2-propenyl disulfide produced from the Kimchi fermented at 20 °C were more than 2-times of those at 4 °C. Therefore, it is concluded that the strong pungent odor of Kimchi fermented at 20° C is probably due to the high amount of organic acids (low pH) and sulfur compounds (dimethyl disulfide, methyl-2-propenyl disulfide, and di-2-propenyl disulfide) between the 2 Kimchi. © 2016 Institute of Food Technologists®.

  19. Global Cooling: Effect of Urban Albedo on Global Temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akbari, Hashem; Menon, Surabi; Rosenfeld, Arthur

    2007-05-22

    In many urban areas, pavements and roofs constitute over 60% of urban surfaces (roof 20-25%, pavements about 40%). The roof and the pavement albedo can be increased by about 0.25 and 0.10, respectively, resulting in a net albedo increase for urban areas of about 0.1. Many studies have demonstrated building cooling-energy savings in excess of 20% upon raising roof reflectivity from an existing 10-20% to about 60%. We estimate U.S. potential savings in excess of $1 billion (B) per year in net annual energy bills. Increasing albedo of urban surfaces can reduce the summertime urban temperature and improve the urban air quality. Increasing the urban albedo has the added benefit of reflecting more of the incoming global solar radiation and countering the effect of global warming. We estimate that increasing albedo of urban areas by 0.1 results in an increase of 3 x 10{sup -4} in Earth albedo. Using a simple global model, the change in air temperature in lowest 1.8 km of the atmosphere is estimated at 0.01K. Modelers predict a warming of about 3K in the next 60 years (0.05K/year). Change of 0.1 in urban albedo will result in 0.01K global cooling, a delay of {approx}0.2 years in global warming. This 0.2 years delay in global warming is equivalent to 10 Gt reduction in CO2 emissions.

  20. Measurements of effective noise temperature in fused silica fiber violin modes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bilenko, I.A.; Lourie, S.L

    2002-11-25

    The results of measurements of the effective noise temperature in fused silica fiber violin modes are presented. In these measurements the fibers were stressed and value of the effective noise temperature was obtained by direct observation of oscillations in the fundamental violin modes of several samples. Measured values indicate that effective noise temperature does not exceed the room temperature significantly. This result is important for the design of the advanced gravitational wave antennae.

  1. Temperature is the evil twin: effects of increased temperature and ocean acidification on reproduction in a reef fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, G M; Kroon, F J; Metcalfe, S; Mundayi, P L

    2015-04-01

    Reproduction in many organisms can be disrupted by changes to the physical environment, such as those predicted to occur during climate change. Marine organisms face the dual climate change threats of increasing temperature and ocean acidification, yet no studies have examined the potential interactive effects of these stressors on reproduction in marine fishes. We used a long-term experiment to test the interactive effects of increased temperature and CO2 on the reproductive performance of the anemonefish, Amphiprion melanopus. Adult breeding pairs were kept for 10 months at three temperatures (28.5°C [+0.0°C], 30.0°C [-1.5°C] and 31.5°C [+3.0°C]) cross-factored with three CO2 levels (a current-day control [417 µatm] and moderate [644 µatm] and high [1134 µatm]) treatments consistent with the range of CO2 projections for the year 2100. We recorded each egg clutch produced during the breeding season, the number of eggs laid per clutch, average egg size, fertilization success, survival to hatching, hatchling length, and yolk provisioning. Adult body condition, hepatosomatic index, gonadosomatic index, and plasma 17β-estradiol concentrations were measured at the end of the breeding season to determine the effect of prolonged exposure to increased temperature and elevated. CO2 on adults, and to examine potential physiological mechanisms for changes in reproduction. Temperature had by far the stronger influence on reproduction, with clear declines in reproduction occurring in the +1.5°C treatment and ceasing altogether in the +3.0°C treatment. In contrast, CO2 had a minimal effect on the majority of reproductive traits measured, but caused a decline in offspring quality in combination with elevated temperature. We detected no significant effect of temperature or Co2 on adult body condition or hepatosomatic index. Elevated temperature had a significant negative effect on plasma 17β-estradiol concentrations, suggesting that declines in reproduction with

  2. Temperature effect on IG-11 graphite wear performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo Xiaowei [Institute of Nuclear Energy and New Energy Technology, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)]. E-mail: xwluo@mail.tsnghua.edu.cn; Yu Suyuan [Institute of Nuclear Energy and New Energy Technology, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Sheng Xuanyu [Institute of Nuclear Energy and New Energy Technology, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); He Shuyan [Institute of Nuclear Energy and New Energy Technology, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2005-10-01

    IG-11 graphite, used in the 10 MW high temperature gas-cooled test reactor (HTR-10), was tested under different temperatures on an SRV standard wear performance tester. The experiment temperatures were room temperature, 100, 200, 300 and 400 deg C. According to the reactor structure, the experiments were designed to test graphite-graphite and graphite-stainless steel wear. The wear debris was collected, and the worn surfaces and debris were observed under scanning electronic microscope (SEM). It was found that there were different wear mechanisms at different temperatures. The main wear mechanism at room temperature was abrasive wear; at 200 deg C, it was fatigue wear; at 400 deg C, adhesive wear was observed. This difference was mainly due to the change of stress distribution at the contact area. The distribution of wear debris was also analyzed by EDX particle analysis software.

  3. EFFECT OF AIR TEMPERATURE ON LEAF PHOTOSYNTHESIS IN ELDER

    OpenAIRE

    Monica Popescu

    2012-01-01

    Temperature with solar radiation intensity is the main external factor affecting photosynthesis process. Measurements were collected in the 2011 growing season. Photosynthesis and respiration measurements were made at Sambucus nigra leaves with a CO2 analyzer. The aim was to develop a model of photosynthesis in relation to temperature (which is in close relationship with air humidity). Photosynthesis of Sambucus nigra leaves is sensitive to temperature with an optimum around 25-28oC and rates...

  4. EFFECT OF AIR TEMPERATURE ON LEAF PHOTOSYNTHESIS IN ELDER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica Popescu

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Temperature with solar radiation intensity is the main external factor affecting photosynthesis process. Measurements were collected in the 2011 growing season. Photosynthesis and respiration measurements were made at Sambucus nigra leaves with a CO2 analyzer. The aim was to develop a model of photosynthesis in relation to temperature (which is in close relationship with air humidity. Photosynthesis of Sambucus nigra leaves is sensitive to temperature with an optimum around 25-28oC and rates declining by 18% with air temperature around 33-35oC.

  5. Temperature Effects on the Magnetization and Magnetoimpedance in Ferromagnetic Glass-Covered microwires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uddin, A.; Evstigneeva, S. A.; Dzhumazoda, A.; Salem, M. M.; Nematov, M. G.; Adam, A. M.; Panina, LV; Morchenko, A. T.

    2017-11-01

    The effect of temperature on static and dynamic magnetization in Co-based amorphous microwires was investigated with the aim of potential applications in miniature temperature sensors. The wires of two compositions with different magnetostriction and Curie temperature in glass-cover and after removing the glass layer demonstrated very different temperature behaviour of the magnetization loops and magnetoimpedance. The mechanisms of the temperature effects are related to the residual stress distribution due to fast solidification, the difference in thermal expansion coefficient of metal and glass and the proximity to the Curie temperature. The interplay of these factors may result in a very strong temperature dependence of magnetoimpedance in a moderate temperature range (room temperature ‑373K). Such elements may be incorporated in various composite materials for a local temperature monitoring.

  6. Effect of irrigation fluid temperature on core body temperature and inflammatory response during arthroscopic shoulder surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Xiaoyun; Ye, Luyou; Liu, Zhongtang; Wen, Hong; Hu, Yuezheng; Xu, Xinxian

    2015-08-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the influence of irrigation fluid on the patients' physiological response to arthroscopic shoulder surgery. Patients who were scheduled for arthroscopic shoulder surgery were prospectively included in this study. They were randomly assigned to receive warm arthroscopic irrigation fluid (Group W, n = 33) or room temperature irrigation fluid (Group RT, n = 33) intraoperatively. Core body temperature was measured at regular intervals. The proinflammatory cytokines TNF-α, IL-1, IL-6, and IL-10 were measured in drainage fluid and serum. The changes of core body temperatures in Group RT were similar with those in Group W within 15 min after induction of anesthesia, but the decreases in Group RT were significantly greater after then. The lowest temperature was 35.1 ± 0.4 °C in Group RT and 35.9 ± 0.3 °C in Group W, the difference was statistically different (P irrigation fluid compared with warm irrigation fluid. And local inflammatory response is significantly reduced by using warm irrigation fluid. It seems that warm irrigation fluid is more recommendable for arthroscopic shoulder surgery.

  7. Effect of Climate Change on Water Temperature and ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    There is increasing evidence that our planet is warming and this warming is also resulting in rising sea levels. Estuaries which are located at the interface between land and ocean are impacted by these changes. We used CE-QUAL-W2 water quality model to predict changes in water temperature as a function of increasing air temperatures and rising sea level for the Yaquina Estuary, Oregon (USA). Annual average air temperature in the Yaquina watershed is expected to increase about 0.3 deg C per decade by 2040-2069. An air temperature increase of 3 deg C in the Yaquina watershed is likely to result in estuarine water temperature increasing by 0.7 to 1.6 deg C. Largest water temperature increases are expected in the upper portion of the estuary, while sea level rise may ameliorate some of the warming in the lower portion of the estuary. Smallest changes in water temperature are predicted to occur in the summer, and maximum changes during the winter and spring. Increases in air temperature may result in an increase in the number of days per year that the 7-day maximum average temperature exceeds 18 deg C (criterion for protection of rearing and migration of salmonids and trout) as well as other water quality concerns. In the upstream portion of the estuary, a 4 deg C increase in air temperature is predicted to cause an increase of 40 days not meeting the temperature criterion, while in the lower estuary the increase will depend upon rate of sea level rise (rang

  8. Effects of Carbonization Temperature and Component Ratio on Electromagnetic Interference Shielding Effectiveness of Woodceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yubo Tao

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Woodceramics were fabricated in a vacuum through carbonization of wood powder impregnated with phenol formaldehyde (PF resin. The effects of carbonization temperature and mass ratio of wood/resin on electromagnetic interference (EMI shielding effectiveness (SE and morphology of woodceramics were explored. The PF resin made wood cell walls have the characteristics of glassy carbon. Wood axial tracheid and ray cells were filled with more glassy carbon by increasing addition of PF resin. Moreover, the increase of carbonization temperature was beneficial to improving SE. Woodceramics (mass ratio 1:1 obtained at 1000 °C presented a medium SE level between 30 MHz and 1.5 GHz.

  9. Effects of copper, hypoxia and acute temperature shifts on mitochondrial oxidation in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) acclimated to warm temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sappal, Ravinder [Department of Pathology and Microbiology, Atlantic Veterinary College, University of Prince Edward Island, Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island C1A 4P3 (Canada); Department of Biomedical Sciences, Atlantic Veterinary College, University of Prince Edward Island, Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island C1A 4P3 (Canada); Fast, Mark [Department of Pathology and Microbiology, Atlantic Veterinary College, University of Prince Edward Island, Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island C1A 4P3 (Canada); Stevens, Don [Department of Biomedical Sciences, Atlantic Veterinary College, University of Prince Edward Island, Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island C1A 4P3 (Canada); Kibenge, Fred [Department of Pathology and Microbiology, Atlantic Veterinary College, University of Prince Edward Island, Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island C1A 4P3 (Canada); Siah, Ahmed [British Columbia Centre for Aquatic Health Sciences, 871A Island Highway, Campbell River, British Columbia V9W 2C2 (Canada); Kamunde, Collins, E-mail: ckamunde@upei.ca [Department of Biomedical Sciences, Atlantic Veterinary College, University of Prince Edward Island, Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island C1A 4P3 (Canada)

    2015-12-15

    Highlights: • Warm acclimation reduced the electron transport system (ETS) efficiency. • Warm acclimation altered the effects of acute temperature shift, hypoxia and Cu on ETS. • Warm acclimation increased thermal sensitivity of state 3 and reduced that of state 4. • Cu stimulated while hypoxia inhibited ETS respiratory activity. • Interactions of Cu and hypoxia on the ETS and plasma metabolites were antagonistic. - Abstract: Temperature fluctuations, hypoxia and metals pollution frequently occur simultaneously or sequentially in aquatic systems and their interactions may confound interpretation of their biological impacts. With a focus on energy homeostasis, the present study examined how warm acclimation influences the responses and interactions of acute temperature shift, hypoxia and copper (Cu) exposure in fish. Rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) were acclimated to cold (11 °C; control) and warm (20 °C) temperature for 3 weeks followed by exposure to environmentally realistic levels of Cu and hypoxia for 24 h. Subsequently, mitochondrial electron transport system (ETS) respiratory activity supported by complexes I–IV (CI–IV), plasma metabolites and condition indices were measured. Warm acclimation reduced fish condition, induced aerobic metabolism and altered the responses of fish to acute temperature shift, hypoxia and Cu. Whereas warm acclimation decelerated the ETS and increased the sensitivity of maximal oxidation rates of the proximal (CI and II) complexes to acute temperature shift, it reduced the thermal sensitivity of state 4 (proton leak). Effects of Cu with and without hypoxia were variable depending on the acclimation status and functional index. Notably, Cu stimulated respiratory activity in the proximal ETS segments, while hypoxia was mostly inhibitory and minimized the stimulatory effect of Cu. The effects of Cu and hypoxia were modified by temperature and showed reciprocal antagonistic interaction on the ETS and plasma

  10. The Effect of Temperature on the Gasification Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marek Baláš

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Gasification is a technology that uses fuel to produce power and heat. This technology is also suitable for biomass conversion. Biomass is a renewable energy source that is being developed to diversify the energy mix, so that the Czech Republic can reduce its dependence on fossil fuels and on raw materials for energy imported from abroad. During gasification, biomass is converted into a gas that can then be burned in a gas burner, with all the advantages of gas combustion. Alternatively, it can be used in internal combustion engines. The main task during gasification is to achieve maximum purity and maximum calorific value of the gas. The main factors are the type of gasifier, the gasification medium, biomass quality and, last but not least, the gasification mode itself. This paper describes experiments that investigate the effect of temperature and pressure on gas composition and low calorific value. The experiments were performed in an atmospheric gasifier in the laboratories of the Energy Institute atthe Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Brno University of Technology.

  11. Effect of temperature on structure and corrosion resistance for ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    corrosion resistance becomes lower. Probably, there is. Figure 6. Relationship between temperature and the natural cor- rosion potential of NiWP coating in the 3.5% NaCl solution. With the increase in the bath temperature, natural corrosion potential showed parabola change, increased first and then decreased, natural.

  12. Magnetocaloric effect in temperature-sensitive magnetic fluids

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The magnetocaloric properties of three different temperature-sensitive magnetic fluids were studied. The pyromagnetic coefficient for all the materials were obtained and it was found that this property depends on physical and magnetic properties like size, magnetization and Curie temperature. A theoretical model was ...

  13. TEMPERATURE EFFECTS ON CHLOROPHYLL FLUORESCENCE INDUCTION IN TOMATO

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    JANSSEN, LHJ; VANHASSELT, PR

    Chlorophyll fluorescence induction of tomato leaf discs was measured at a low actinic light intensity of 10 mu mol.m(-2).s(-1) and at decreasing temperatures from 30 degrees to 0 degrees C. F-o remained constant within the temperature range assessed. In contrast, the peak of fluorescence induction,

  14. Effect of different storage temperatures on bacterial spoilage of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study determined the bacterial organisms associated with Oreochromis niloticus spoilage at two storage temperatures (6 and 20°C) and also assessed the ability of the individual bacterial isolates to cause spoilage at the two storage temperatures. Bacteriological analysis revealed the association of five bacteria ...

  15. Laboratory Study of the Effect of Temperature Changes on Mixing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This work is an investigation of the eect of temperature changes on the mixing and performance of ponds. The parameters tested for were: biochemical oxygen demand, dissolved oxygen, coliform, suspended solid, temperature and pH. Three metallic tanks were fed simultaneously by a plastic container under gravity.

  16. Nuclear Weapons Effects: Dust and Air Temperature Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    The report presents a computer program for calculating the dust and air temperature environment resulting from nuclear weapons detonations. The...cessation of blast winds. Air temperature is treated as a dust-related phenomenon. The ground, heated by thermal radiation prior to arrival of the air

  17. Effects of reaction temperature on size and optical properties of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    Abstract. We report experimental results on the reaction temperature dependence of luminescence proper- ties in size-controlled CdSe nanocrystals. Such reaction temperature dependent property is also size- dependent. The diameter of the CdSe nanocrystals is tuned from 4–11⋅0 nm by varying the reaction tempera-.

  18. TEMPERATURE EFFECTS ON THE KINETICS OF PHOTOINITIATED POLYMERIZATION OF DIMETHACRYLATES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BROER, DJ; MOL, GN; CHALLA, G

    1991-01-01

    The photoinitiated polymerization of three bisphenol-A-based dimethacrylates is studied. The polymerization rate of the dimethacrylate increases with temperature up to 160-degrees-C. Above this temperature depropagation starts to dominate the polymerization and the rate approaches zero above

  19. Effective closure temperature in leaky and/or saturating thermochronometers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guralnik, Benny; Jain, Mayank; Herman, Frédéric

    2013-01-01

    The classical equation of closure temperature (TC) in thermochronometry (Dodson, 1973), assumed (i) no storage limitation for the accumulating radiogenic product, (ii) a negligible product concentration at the initial temperature of cooling T0, and (iii) a negligible product loss at the final (pr...

  20. Effect of Temperature on the Tensile Strength and Thermoelectric ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The tensile strength and thermoelectric e.m.f. values of 6063 aluminum alloy quenched at different temperatures from 2500C to 6000C were investigated. The result empirically confirmed that a perfect correlation exists between the tensile strength and thermoelectric e.m.f. values with concurrent minimum temperature ...

  1. Temperature distribution effects on micro-CFPCR performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Pin-Chuan; Nikitopoulos, Dimitris E; Soper, Steven A; Murphy, Michael C

    2008-04-01

    Continuous flow polymerase chain reactors (CFPCRs) are BioMEMS devices that offer unique capabilities for the ultra-fast amplification of target DNA fragments using repeated thermal cycling, typically over the following temperature ranges: 90 degrees C-95 degrees C for denaturation, 50 degrees C-70 degrees C for renaturation, and 70 degrees C-75 degrees C for extension. In CFPCR, DNA cocktail is pumped through the constant temperature zones and reaches thermal equilibrium with the channel walls quickly due to its low thermal capacitance. In previous work, a polycarbonate CFPCR was designed with microchannels 150 microm deep, 50 microm wide, and 1.78 m long-including preheating and post-heating zones, fabricated with LIGA, and demonstrated. The high thermal resistance of the polycarbonate led to a high temperature gradient in the micro-device at steady-state and was partly responsible for the low amplification yield. Several steps were taken to ensure that there were three discrete, uniform temperature zones on the polycarbonate CFPCR device including: reducing the thickness of the CFPCR substrate to decrease thermal capacitance, using copper plates as heating elements to ensure a uniform temperature input, and making grooves between temperature zones to increase the resistance to lateral heat conduction between zones. Finite element analyses (FEA) were used to evaluate the macro temperature distribution in the CFPCR device and the micro temperature distribution along a single microchannel. At steady-state, the simulated CFPCR device had three discrete temperature zones, each with a uniform temperature distribution with a variation of +/-0.3 degrees C. An infrared (IR) camera was used to measure the steady-state temperature distribution in the prototype CFPCR and validated the simulation results. The temperature distributions along a microchannel at flow velocities from 0 mm/s to 6 mm/s were used to estimate the resulting temperatures of the DNA reagents in a single

  2. Temperature effects on the electrical properties of multiphase polymer composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Vivo, Biagio; Guadagno, Liberata; Lamberti, Patrizia; Raimondo, Marialuigia; Spinelli, Giovanni; Tucci, Vincenzo; Vertuccio, Luigi; Vittoria, Vittoria

    2014-05-01

    A study concerning the temperature dependence of some electrical properties of multiphase nanocomposite systems based on epoxy matrix, loaded with a 1% of multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) and different amounts of Hydrotalcite clay (HT), is presented. An extensive electrical characterization in DC was carried out highlighting that, consistently with the fluctuation-induced tunneling model, the electrical resistivity of the composites are characterized by a negative temperature coefficient (NTC) since it decreases monotonically with increasing temperature in the range 30-110°C. Furthermore, current-voltage (I-V) and temperature-voltage (T-V) characteristics with a perfect linear behavior are detected. The influence of different clay content on the electrical performance of the composites is also investigated. The interesting results open a new routes for such composites due their possible applications in the field of temperature sensor.

  3. The effect of water deficit on body temperature during rugby.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, I; Mitchell, D; Seider, R; Kahn, A; Phillips, F

    1981-07-04

    Sweat losses, water deficits and changes in rectal temperature were measured in 13 first-league players during a rugby match. Changes in plasma volume, serum electrolyte and blood glucose levels were also determined. Rectal temperatures were markedly elevated after the match. Both temperatures reached levels which are known to be associated with an impairment of physical, mental and psychological function, and could have caused a deterioration in performance during the second half of the match. Body temperatures were high enough to have predisposed to aggressive behaviour. Increases in rectal temperature were related to water deficit. The small volumes of fluid ingested by the players just before and during the match suggest that they are unaware of the importance of preventing dehydration. Recommendations are made to reduce the risk of hyperthermia. Glucose and electrolyte supplementation is not required just before and during rugby.

  4. The Effect of Heating Temperature on the Prooxidant and Hydroperoxide Decomposition Activity of Myoglobin

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    BERISHA, Adrian; ENDO, Yasushi; FUJIMOTO, Kenshiro

    2000-01-01

    Solutions of myoglobin from the heart of a horse were heated at various temperatures to assess the effect of heating temperature on the prooxidant and hydroperoxide decomposition activity of myoglobin...

  5. Temperature effects on geotechnical and hydraulic properties of bentonite hydrated with inorganic salt solutions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rashid, H. M. A.; Kawamoto, K.; Saito, T.

    2015-01-01

    © 2015, International Journal of GEOMATE. This study investigated the combined effect of temperature and single-species salt solutions on geotechnical properties (swell index and liquid limit) and hydraulic conductivity of bentonite applying different cation types, concentrations, and temperatures...

  6. Room temperature ferrimagnetism and low temperature disorder effects in zinc ferrite thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raghavan, Lisha; Pookat, Geetha [Department of Physics, Cochin University of Science and Technology, Cochin 682022, Kerala (India); Thomas, Hysen [Department of Physics, Christian College, Chengannur, Kerala 689122 (India); Ojha, Sunil; Avasthi, D.K. [Inter University Accelerator Centre, Aruna Asaf Ali Marg, New Delhi 110067 (India); Anantharaman, M.R., E-mail: mraiyer@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Cochin University of Science and Technology, Cochin 682022, Kerala (India)

    2015-07-01

    Zinc ferrite is a normal spinel and antiferromagnetic in nature with a Neel temperature of 10 K in the micron regime. It exhibits interesting features like superparamagnetism, spin glass and ferrimagnetism in the nano-regime. These anomalies make zinc ferrite striking among various other spinels. Further, in the thin film form, the magnetic properties are dependent on preparative techniques, annealing and deposition parameters. In the present work, zinc ferrite thin films were prepared by RF sputtering. The films were annealed at 400° C and 600° C. The thickness and composition of films were estimated by employing Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS). The structural and microstructural studies conducted using Glancing X Ray Diffractometer (GXRD) and Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM) indicates the formation of a spinel phase and grain growth was observed with annealing. Magnetic measurements were carried out using a Superconducting Quantum Interferometer Device–Vibrating Sample Magnetometry (SQUID VSM). The films were found to be ferrimagnetic at room temperature and Field Cooling–Zero Field Cooling (FC–ZFC) studies indicate the presence of disorders. - Highlights: • Zinc ferrite thin films were prepared by RF sputtering. • The films were annealed at 400 °C and 600 °C. • Grain growth was observed with annealing. • The highest magnetization of 18 emu/cc was obtained for zinc ferrite film of thickness 120 nm. • The films were ferrimagnetic at room temperature.

  7. Effects of temperature on the quality of black garlic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xinyan; Li, Ningyang; Lu, Xiaoming; Liu, Pengli; Qiao, Xuguang

    2016-05-01

    Black garlic is a type of garlic product that is generally produced by heating raw garlic at high temperature with controlled humidity for more than 30 days. Black garlic has appeared on the market for many years. It is crucial to investigate the characteristics of quality formation of black garlic during processing at various temperatures. In this study, fresh garlic was processed to black garlic at temperatures of 60, 70, 80 and 90 °C. Moisture, amino acid nitrogen and allicin contents decreased gradually during thermal processing of various temperatures. Reducing sugar, 5-hydroxymethylfurfural, total phenols, total acids contents and browning increased. The changing rate of quality indicators and flavour of black garlic varied at different temperatures. Browning intensity reached about 74 when black garlic aged. The sensory score was significantly higher in black garlic aged at 70 °C (39.95 ± 0.31) compared with that at other temperatures, suggesting that 70 °C might facilitate formation of good quality and flavour of black garlic during processing. Temperature had a remarkable impact on the quality and flavour of black garlic. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry.

  8. Effect of body fat and gender on body temperature distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neves, Eduardo Borba; Salamunes, Ana Carla Chierighini; de Oliveira, Rafael Melo; Stadnik, Adriana Maria Wan

    2017-12-01

    It is well known that body composition can influence peripheral heat loss and skin temperature. That the distribution of body fat is affected by gender is well known; however, there is little information on how body composition and gender influences the measure of skin temperature. This study evaluated skin temperature distribution according to body fat percentage (BF%) and gender. A sample of 94 apparently healthy volunteers (47 women and 47 men) was assessed with Dual-Energy X-Ray Absorptiometry (DXA) and infrared thermography (mean, maximum and minimum temperatures - TMean, TMax and TMin). The sample was divided into groups, according to health risk classification, based on BF%, as proposed by the American College of Sports Medicine: Average (n = 58), Elevated (n = 16) or High (n = 20). Women had lower TMean in most regions of interest (ROI). In both genders, group High had lower temperature values than Average and Elevated in the trunk, upper and lower limbs. In men, palms and posterior hands had a tendency (p temperature along with increased BF%. TMean, TMax and TMin of trunk, upper and lower limbs were negatively correlated with BF% and the fat percentage of each segment (upper limbs, lower limbs and trunk). The highest correlations found in women were between posterior trunk and BF% (rho = -0.564, p skin temperature than men, which was related with higher BF%. Facial temperature seems not to be influenced by body fat. With the future collection of data on the relationship between BF% and skin temperature while taking into account factors such as body morphology, gender, and ethnicity, we conclude that measurement of BF may be reliably estimated with the use of thermal imaging technology. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Negative effects of low developmental temperatures on aphid predation by Orius majusculus (Heteroptera Anthocoridae)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helgadottir, Frida; Toft, Soren; Sigsgaard, Lene

    2017-01-01

    results rejected the positive acclimation hypothesis. At all test temperatures predation capacity was highest for females that had developed at 20 °C and lowest for those that had developed at 12 °C. Thus, development at low temperatures had a detrimental effect on predatory performance (negative...... apple aphids (Dysaphis plantaginea) of females from each of these treatments was tested at the same temperatures (12, 16 and 20 °C). Additionally, we tested the effects of low temperature treatment only during the last nymphal instar, to examine if shorter treatments would have the same effects. Our...... acclimation effect) at both high and low temperatures, and the effect was larger the longer the treatment. Mortality of the nymphs was also increased at lower temperatures. Thus, no enhanced biocontrol efficiency or production benefits were gained from low temperature treatment of O. majusculus, neither...

  10. Effect of Temperature Variation on Modal Frequency of Reinforced Concrete Slab and Beam in Cold Regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanbing Liu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Changes of modal frequencies induced by temperature variation can be more obvious than those caused by structural damage, which will lead to the false damage identification results. Therefore, quantifying the temperature effect on modal frequencies is a critical step to eliminate its interference in damage detection. Due to the nonuniform and time-dependent characteristics of temperature distribution, it is insufficient to obtain the reliable relationships between temperatures and modal frequencies using temperatures in air or at surface. In this paper, correlations between measured temperatures (air temperature, surface temperature, mean temperature, etc. and modal frequencies for the slab and beam are comparatively analyzed. And the quantitative models are constructed considering nonuniform temperature distribution. Firstly, the reinforced concrete slab and beam were constructed and placed outside the laboratory to be monitored. Secondly, the correlation coefficients between modal frequencies and three kinds of temperatures are calculated, respectively. Thirdly, simple linear regression models between mean temperature and modal frequencies are established for the slab and beam. Finally, five temperature variables are selected to construct the multiple linear regression models. Prediction results reveal that the proposed multiple linear regression models possess favorable accuracy to quantify the temperature effect on modal frequencies considering nonuniform temperature distribution.

  11. Surface Tension Gradients Induced by Temperature: The Thermal Marangoni Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gugliotti, Marcos; Baptisto, Mauricio S.; Politi, Mario J.

    2004-01-01

    Surface tensions gradients were generated in a thin liquid film because of the local increase in temperature, for demonstration purposes. This is performed using a simple experiment and allows different alternatives for heat generation to be used.

  12. Effect of temperature on the development, reproduction and mortality ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lam.) in East and West Africa. Knowledge on the influence of temperature on development, reproduction and mortality of this pest is important in understanding its potential population growth and geographical distribution.

  13. Effect of outgassing temperature on the performance of porous materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figini-Albisetti, Alessandro; Velasco, Leticia F.; Parra, José B.; Ania, Conchi O.

    2010-06-01

    This work illustrates the consequences of an inadequate outgassing temperature of porous materials of different nature (zeolites and activated carbons) on their performance on gas storage and wastewater remediation. Outgassing at low temperature in thermally stable materials leads to an incomplete cleaning of the porous surface; as a result, the gas storage ability based on adsorption isotherms is underestimated. In contrast, outgassing at elevated temperature in temperature-sensitive materials provokes irreversible changes in their composition and structure, which also affects strongly their stability and performance. Two examples illustrating wrong interpretation data on CO 2 capture on zeolites and wastewater treatment using activated carbons are addressed. The results show how the performance of a given material can be significantly modified or misunderstood after the outgassing pretreatment.

  14. Enzyme inactivation kinetics: Coupled effects of temperature and moisture content

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Perdana, J.A.; Fox, M.B.; Schutyser, M.A.I.; Boom, R.M.

    2012-01-01

    Enzymes are often dried for stability reasons and to facilitate handling. However, they are often susceptible to inactivation during drying. It is generally known that temperature and moisturecontent influence the enzymeinactivation kinetics. However, the coupledeffect of both variables on

  15. Temperature effects on vaccine induced immunity to viruses in fish

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lorenzen, Niels; Lorenzen, Ellen; Rasmussen, Jesper Skou

    a problem in terms of inducing a protective immune response by vaccination in aquaculture, since it is often desirable to vaccinate fish during autumn, winter, or spring. In experimental vaccination trials with rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) using a DNA-vaccine encoding the viral glycoprotein of viral...... haemorrhagic septicaemia virus (VHSV), non-specific as well as specific immune mechanisms seemed to be delayed at low temperature. At five weeks post vaccination fish kept at 5C had no detectable response of neutralising antibodies while two thirds of the fish kept at 15C had sero-converted. While protective...... immunity was still established at both temperatures, specificity analysis suggested that protection at the lower temperature was mainly due to non-specific innate antiviral mechanisms, which appeared to last longer at low temperature. This was presumably related to a prolonged persistence of the vaccine...

  16. Effect of temperature on moisture sorption phenomena in agricultural products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiří Štencl

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper demonstrates importance of temperature influence on dehydration processes using drying model equations in introductory part and further presents results of water sorption tests of parsley leaves. Measurements were carried out under laboratory conditions in the temperature range of 10–40 °C and relative air humidity from 30 to 100%. Moisture sorption isotherms were tested using a gravimetric dynamic method with continuous recording of changes in sample weight. Five mathematical models available in the literature (Chung-Pfost, GAB, Halsey, Henderson, and Oswin were statistical evaluated. The Henderson equation was found to be a good model both for moisture adsorption and desorption. Part of the sorption isotherms measured in parsley leaves show the type II BET classification shape. An increase in temperature causes an increase in water activity for the same moisture content and, if water activity is kept constant, an increase in temperature causes a decrease in the amount of absorbed water.

  17. Highly Effective Thermal Regenerator for Low Temperature Cryocoolers Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Future missions to investigate the structure and evolution of the universe require highly efficient, low-temperature cryocoolers for low-noise detector systems. We...

  18. EFFECT OF SULPHATE ON LOW-TEMPERATURE ANAEROBIC DIGESTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Padhraig eMadden

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The effect of sulphate addition on the stability of, and microbial community behaviour in, low-temperature anaerobic expanded granular sludge bed-based bioreactors was investigated at 15°C. Efficient bioreactor performance was observed, with chemical oxygen demand removal efficiencies of >90%, and a mean SO42- removal rate of 98.3%. In situ methanogensis appeared unaffected at a COD:SO42- influent ratio of 8:1, and subsequently of 3:1, and was impacted marginally only when the COD: SO42- ratio was 1:2. . Specific methanogenic activity assays indicated a complex set of interactions between sulphate-reducing bacteria (SRB, methanogens and homoacetogenic bacteria. SO42- addition resulted in predominantly acetoclastic, rather than hydrogenotrophic, methanogenesis until >600 days of SO42--influenced bioreactor operation. Temporal microbial community development was monitored by denaturation gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE of 16S rRNA genes. Fluorescence in situ hybridisations (FISH, qPCR and microsensor analysis were combined to investigate the distribution of microbial groups, and particularly SRB and methanogens, along the structure of granular biofilms. qPCR data indicated that sulphidogenic genes were present in methanogenic and sulfidogenic biofilms, indicating the potential for sulphate reduction even in bioreactors not exposed to SO42-. Although the architecture of methanogenic and sulphidogenic granules was similar, indicating the presence of SRB even in methanogenic systems, FISH with rRNA targets found that the SRB were more abundant in the sulphidogenic biofilms. Methanosaeta species were the predominant, keystone members of the archaeal community, with the complete absence of the Methanosarcina species in the experimental bioreactor by trial conclusion. Microsensor data suggested the ordered distribution of sulphate reduction and sulphide accumulation, even in methanogenic granules.

  19. Body Temperature Effects on Lung Injury in Ventilated Preterm Lambs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, Molly K.; Hillman, Noah H.; Kallapur, Suhas G.; Polglase, Graeme R.; Jobe, Alan H.; Pillow, J. Jane

    2010-01-01

    Aims: Mechanical ventilation causes lung injury in premature infants. Hypothermia may protect against and hyperthermia may augment lung injury. We tested the effects of hypo- and hyperthermia on ventilation induced acute lung injury in preterm lambs. Methods: Twin sheep fetuses at 128 d GA (term 150 d) were surgically delivered and randomized to unventilated control (UVC), normothermia (38-39 °C) without lung injury (NTNI), or to 1 of 3 injurious ventilation groups: hypothermic (33-34 °C, LT), normothermic (38-39 °C, NT) or hyperthermic (40-41 °C, HT). NT, LT and HT groups had 15 min of injurious ventilation (PEEP 0 cmH2O, VT escalation to 15 mL/kg) following delivery and prior to surfactant. The animals were then gently ventilated (PEEP 5 cmH2O, VT 7.5 mL/kg) for 2 h 45 min. NTNI lambs received surfactant at birth prior to gentle ventilation. The lambs were then euthanized, and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid and lung tissue were used to evaluate lung injury, inflammatory cell counts, inflammatory markers and cytokine mRNA. Results: Target temperatures were achieved by 15 min of age and maintained for 3 h. All ventilated groups had increased BAL protein, lung inflammation and increased cytokine mRNA. HT animals developed acidosis, premature death, pneumothoraces, impaired lung function and increased inflammatory mRNA expression. LT animals remained clinically stable without pneumothoraces or death, had improved ventilatory efficiency and trended toward lower inflammatory mRNA expression than NT animals. Conclusion: Hyperthermia exacerbated ventilator induced lung injury, while hypothermia may protect against lung injury in the preterm lamb. PMID:20299144

  20. EFFECT OF TEMPERATURE ON THE PROCESS OF BEER PRIMARY FERMENTATION

    OpenAIRE

    Miriam Solgajová; Helena Frančáková; Štefan Dráb; Žigmund Tóth

    2013-01-01

    Beer is a very popular and widespread drink worldwide. Beer may be defined as a foamy alcoholic drink aerated by carbon dioxide that is formed during fermentation. Sensorial and analytical character of beer is mainly formed during process of primary fermentation. Our work has monitored the influence of temperature of fermentation substrate on the process of primary fermentation during beer production. Obtained values of temperature and apparent extract out of four brews of 10% light hopped wo...

  1. The Effect of Seasons Temperature and Nitrogen Release on Cow ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The cow dung and pig dung were treated in anaerobic sequencing batch reactor or digester whose capacity was 0.971 m3 and operated at 28.2°C and 35.3oC respectively as their maximum ambient temperature and 27.0 oC ... The highest volume of Biogas was produced at 21.05 oC and 24.7 oC (mesophilic temperature).

  2. Effect of extraction temperature on the yield and physicochemical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The oil was extracted using solvent extraction method at two different temperatures; the physicochemical properties and the oil yield were determined. The physical properties of the extracted oil at two temperatures 55oC and 65oC are as follows: specific gravity 0.93 and 0.9; refractive index 1.39 and 1.40; viscosity 6.93 and ...

  3. Temperature effects on parasite prevalence in a natural hybrid complex

    OpenAIRE

    Schoebel, Corine N.; Tellenbach, Christoph; Spaak, Piet; Wolinska, Justyna

    2010-01-01

    Both host susceptibility and parasite infectivity commonly have a genetic basis, and can therefore be shaped by coevolution. However, these traits are often sensitive to environmental variation, resulting in genotype-by-environment interactions. We tested the influence of temperature on host–parasite genetic specificity in the Daphnia longispina hybrid complex, exposed to the protozoan parasite Caullerya mesnili. Infection rates were higher at low temperature. Furthermore, significant differe...

  4. Temperature and Solar Radiation Effects on Photovoltaic Panel Power

    OpenAIRE

    Karafil, Akif; Ozbay, Harun; Kesler, Metin

    2016-01-01

    Solar energy is converted to electrical energy directly by semi-conductors materials used in Photovoltaic (PV) panels. Although, there has been great advancements in semi-conductor material technology in recent years panel efficiency is very lower. There are many factors affecting the panel efficiency such as tilt angle, shading, dust, solar radiation level, temperature and wiring losses. Among these factors, solar radiation level and temperature are more prominent. The solar radiation level ...

  5. Effects of Gloves, Temperature and Their Interaction on Finger, Hand, and Arm Blood Flow and Skin Temperature: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallbech, M. Susan

    1996-01-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the effects of cold only, commercially available gloves only, and the combination of gloves and cold on the blood flow and surface (skin) temperature of the medial and proximal phalanxes of digit 3, the metacarpal region of the hand, and the forearm.

  6. Effect of temperature on the graphitization process of a semianthracite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez, D.; Montes-Moran, M.A.; Garcia, A.B. [Instituto Nacional del Carbon, CSIC, Apdo. 73, 33080 Oviedo (Spain); Young, R.J. [Manchester Materials Science Centre, UMIST/University of Manchester, Grosvenor St., M1 7HS Manchester (United Kingdom)

    2002-12-01

    In this work, a Spanish semianthracite was graphitized at temperatures {>=}2400 C. The aim of this research was to study the influence of the temperature on the evolution of the structural order of the graphitic materials obtained. Crystalline parameters such as interlayer spacing, d{sub 002}, and domain sizes L{sub c} and L{sub a} were calculated from X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements. The intensity ratio of the D and G Raman bands was used to assess the degree of orientation of these materials. Analysis of the XRD and Raman data of the graphitized samples allowed one to conclude that their structural order tend to increase with the temperature of treatment. Interlayer distances d{sub 002} remained almost unchanged in the whole range of temperatures studied. It seems that after a given value of this parameter is reached, improvement of samples' crystallinity is only related to crystallite-size growth. According to the Raman I{sub D}/I{sub D}+I{sub G} ratio, an increase of the bidimensional structural order with the graphitization temperature is observed. The degree of graphitization achieved at the highest temperature employed can be improved by increasing the time of treatment.

  7. The effect of drying temperature on the composition of biomass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Houghton, T.P.; Stevens, D.N.; Wright, C.T.; Radtke, C.W.

    2008-05-01

    The compositional quality of different lignocellulosic feedstocks influences their performance and potential demand at a biorefinery. Many analytical protocols for determining the composition or performance characteristics of biomass involve a drying step, where the drying temperature can vary depending on the specific protocol. To get reliable data, it is important to determine the correct drying temperature to vaporize the water without negatively impacting the compositional quality of the biomass. A comparison of drying temperature between 45 degrees C and 100 degrees C was performed using wheat straw and corn stover. Near-infrared (NIR) spectra were taken of the dried samples and compared using principal component analysis (PCA). Carbohydrates were analyzed using quantitative saccharification to determine sugar degradation. Analysis of variance was used to determine if there was a significant difference between drying at different temperatures. PCA showed an obvious separation in samples dried at different temperatures due to sample water content. However, quantitative saccharification data shows, within a 95% confidence interval, that there is no significant difference in sugar content for drying temperatures up to 100 degrees C for wheat straw and corn stover.

  8. Temperature effects on copepod egg hatching: does acclimatization matter?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Benni Winding; Drillet, Guillaume; Kozmér, A.

    2010-01-01

    This report investigates female sizes, egg sizes and egg hatching rates in relation to temperature for the near-shore calanoid copepod Acartia tonsa cultured at 6, 9, 14 and 24°C for several generations to achieve acclimatization. Inverse size relationships of eggs and females were revealed...... with increasing temperature. Eggs produced at 6°C were 85 ± 4 µm in diameter, but decreased to 80 ± 3 µm at 24°C. Female cephalothorax length was 840 ± 52 and 692 ± 39 µm at 9 and 24°C, respectively. Parallel hatching experiments were performed between non-acclimatized and acclimatized cultures across a range...... of temperatures reflecting natural conditions in Danish waters. A greater fraction of eggs enter quiescence as temperature declines. Eggs were able to hatch at temperatures as low as 1.5°C. Final egg hatching success increased with temperature. Acclimatization of the copepods resulted in a lower maximum hatching...

  9. Finite-temperature effective boundary theory of the quantized thermal Hall effect

    OpenAIRE

    Nakai, Ryota; Ryu, Shinsei; Nomura, Kentaro

    2015-01-01

    A finite-temperature effective free energy of the boundary of a quantized thermal Hall system is derived microscopically from the bulk two-dimensional Dirac fermion coupled with a gravitational field. In two spatial dimensions, the thermal Hall conductivity of fully gapped insulators and superconductors is quantized and given by the bulk Chern number, in analogy to the quantized electric Hall conductivity in quantum Hall systems. From the perspective of effective action functionals, two disti...

  10. Effects of bonding temperature on microstructure, fracture behavior and joint strength of Ag nanoporous bonding for high temperature die attach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Min-Su, E-mail: mskim927@gmail.com [Joining and Welding Research Institute, Osaka University, 11-1 Mihogaoka, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan); Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Nishikawa, Hiroshi [Joining and Welding Research Institute, Osaka University, 11-1 Mihogaoka, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan)

    2015-10-01

    Ag nanoparticle sintering has received much attention as an alternative joining method to lead-based soldering for high temperature electronic applications. However, there are still certain issues with this method, such as difficulties of in controlling the joining layer thickness and the occurrence of unexpected voids resulting from solvent evaporation. In this study, the effect of bonding temperature (200–400 °C) and environment (air and N{sub 2}) on the joint strength of Ag nanoporous bonding (NPB) on electroless nickel/immersion gold finished Cu disks was investigated. A nanoporous Ag sheet fabricated using dealloying method from an Al–Ag precursor was adopted as the insert material. The NPB was conducted at various temperatures (200–400 °C) for 30 min at a pressure of 20 MPa in both air and N{sub 2} environments. The joint strength of NPB was closely related with the microstructure of the Ag layer and the fracture mode of the joint, and increased with increasing bonding temperature through the formation of strong interface and a coarsened Ag layer. The effect of the bonding environment was not significant, except in the case of bonding temperature of 400 °C.

  11. Effect of Temperature on Tolbutamide Binding to Glycated Serum Albumin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Szkudlarek

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Glycation process occurs in protein and becomes more pronounced in diabetes when an increased amount of reducing sugar is present in bloodstream. Glycation of protein may cause conformational changes resulting in the alterations of its binding properties even though they occur at a distance from the binding sites. The changes in protein properties could be related to several pathological consequences such as diabetic and nondiabetic cardiovascular diseases, cataract, renal dysfunction and Alzheimer’s disease. The experiment was designed to test the impact of glycation process on sulfonylurea drug tolbutamide-albumin binding under physiological (T = 309 K and inflammatory (T = 311 K and T = 313 K states using fluorescence and UV-VIS spectroscopies. It was found in fluorescence analysis experiments that the modification of serum albumin in tryptophanyl and tyrosyl residues environment may affect the tolbutamide (TB binding to albumin in subdomain IIA and/or IIIA (Sudlow’s site I and/or II, and also in subdomains IB and IIB. We estimated the binding of tolbutamide to albumin described by a mixed nature of interaction (specific and nonspecific. The association constants Ka (L∙mol−1 for tolbutamide at its high affinity sites on non-glycated albumin were in the range of 1.98–7.88 × 104 L∙mol−1 (λex = 275 nm, 1.20–1.64 × 104 L∙mol−1 (λex = 295 nm and decreased to 1.24–0.42 × 104 L∙mol−1 at λex = 275 nm (T = 309 K and T = 311 K and increased to 2.79 × 104 L∙mol−1 at λex = 275 nm (T = 313 K and to 4.43–6.61 × 104 L∙mol−1 at λex = 295 nm due to the glycation process. Temperature dependence suggests the important role of van der Waals forces and hydrogen bonding in hydrophobic interactions between tolbutamide and both glycated and non-glycated albumin. We concluded that the changes in the environment of TB binding of albumin in subdomain IIA and/or IIIA as well as in subdomains IB and IIB influence on

  12. Effect of Temperature on Topological States of Circular DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Yang-Tao; Li, Xiu-Yan; Liu, Yan-Hui; Chen, Hu

    2017-07-01

    The different topological states of circular double-stranded DNA can be defined by their linking number. The equilibrium distribution of linking number can be obtained by circularizing a linear DNA into a circle by ligase. Based on the recent experimental results that the DNA bending rigidity and twist rigidity strongly depend on temperature, the reduced bending rigidity can be approximated by g=(3.19× {10}-19-T\\cdot 4.14× {10}-22) {erg}\\cdot {cm} over the temperature interval (5 ∼ 53) °C, and the temperature dependence of twist rigidity can be fitted by C(T)=(4588.89{exp} (-T/117.04)-251.33) nm. The temperature dependence of the linking number distribution of circular DNAs can be predicted by using Monte Carlo simulation. The variance of linking number distribution on temperature is in accordance with the previous experimental results. Compared with the temperature dependence of bending rigidity, the temperature dependence of twist rigidity causes a noticeable fluctuation in linking number distribution and mainly contribute towards the variance change of linking number distribution of circular DNA. The variance of the writhe number and twist number in the equation = + depends on the length of circular DNA. When the length of circular DNA is less than 230 nm, the variance of twist number is dominant over the variance of writhe number ( ), whereas for the condition that the length of the circular DNA is larger than 370 nm. Supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant Nos. 11047022, 11204045, and 11464004, Guizhou Provincial Tracking Key Program of Social Development (SY20123089, SZ20113069), the General Financial Grant from the China Postdoctoral Science Foundation (2014M562341), the Research Foundation for Young University Teachers from Guizhou University (201311), and College Innovation Talent Team of Guizhou Province (2014)32

  13. Effect of operating microscope light on brain temperature during craniotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gayatri, Parthasarathi; Menon, Girish G; Suneel, Puthuvassery R

    2013-07-01

    Operating microscopes used during neurosurgery are fitted with xenon light. Burn injuries have been reported because of xenon microscope lighting as the intensity of xenon light is 300 W. We designed this study to find out if the light of operating microscope causes an increase in temperature of the brain tissue, which is exposed underneath. Twenty-one adult patients scheduled for elective craniotomies were enrolled. Distal esophageal temperature (T Eso), brain temperature under the microscope light (T Brain), and brain temperature under dura mater (T Dura) were measured continuously at 15-minute intervals during microscope use. The irrigation fluid temperature, room temperature, intensity of the microscope light, and the distance of the microscope from the brain surface were kept constant. The average age of the patients was 44±15 years (18 males and 3 females). The mean duration of microscope use was 140±39 minutes. There were no significant changes in T Brain and T Dura and T Eso over time. T Dura was significantly lower than T Brain both at time 0 and 60 minutes but not at 90 minutes. T Brain was significantly lower than T Eso both at time 0 and 60 minutes but not at 90 minutes. The T Dura remained significantly lower than T Eso at 0, 60, and 90 minutes. Our study shows that there is no significant rise in brain temperature under xenon microscope light up to 120 minutes duration, at intensity of 60% to 70%, from a distance of 20 to 25 cm from the brain surface.

  14. Effects of Temperature and CSSX Organics on Saltstone Processing Properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harbour, J

    2006-02-06

    This task was performed to determine whether the two variables, ''mix temperature'' and ''quantity of organics'' introduced into the decontaminated salt solution by the caustic side solvent extraction (CSSX) process, need to be included in the upcoming Saltstone Variability Study. Because the amount and types of organics introduced through the CSSX process do not significantly impact the fresh properties of Saltstone, the ''quantity of organics'' variable will not be included in the Saltstone Variability Study. The Saltstone Variability Study should include the variable of ''mix temperature'' in the experimental design. Examples are presented in this report that clearly demonstrate a pronounced dependence of the fresh grout properties on ''mix temperature''. One example, using mixes made with the Deliquification, Dissolution and Adjustment (DDA) simulant, shows that the properties of gel time and bleed water are highly mix temperature dependent. The gel time increased from 15 minutes at 10 C to 90 minutes at 35 C with most of the change occurring between 20 and 30 C. That is, gel time is highly sensitive to mix temperature, especially in the temperature range over which processing is most likely. The volume percent bleed water for these mixes increased from {approx}1 % at 10 C to 13 % at 35 C. The gel times and volume percent bleed water are correlated such that the longer the gel time, the greater the amount of bleed water. In another example, and in contrast to the DDA results, gel times decreased with increasing temperatures for mixes made using the Modular CSSX Unit (MCU) simulants. In this case the gel time decreased from 150 minutes at 10 C to 20 minutes at 38 C. The rheological properties of these mixes were shown to be dependent on temperature over the range of 10 to 40 C. The plastic viscosity increased from 35 cP at 40 C to values between 60 to 70 cP at 10

  15. The effect of temperature cycling on the DC conductivity of polyethylene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khalil, M.S.; Henriksen, Mogens; Henk, Peter O

    1992-01-01

    The effect of temperature cycling between 40°C and 80°C during combined temperature and electric field conditioning on the DC conductivity of LDPE (low-density polyethylene) has been studied and compared with DC conductivity results using a constant temperature of 80°C and an identical sample under...

  16. The effect of temperature on some rheological properties of wheat flour doughs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bloksma, A.H.; Nieman, W.

    1975-01-01

    Doughs from three flours were sheared between a cone and plate at constant rates in the range 6 times 10‐4‐2 times 10‐2 s‐1. At temperatures between 25 and 40d̀C, the apparent viscosity decreased with increasing temperature and with increasing rate of shear. The effects of the temperature and of the

  17. Molecular dynamics simulation of temperature effects on CF3+ etching of Si surface

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ning, J. P.; Lu, X. D.; Zhao, C. L.; Qin, Y. M.; He, P. N.; Bogaerts, A.; Gou, F. J.

    2010-01-01

    Molecular dynamics method was employed to investigate the effects of the reaction layer formed near the surface region on CF3+ etching of Si at different temperatures. The simulation results show that the coverages of F and C are sensitive to the surface temperature. With increasing temperature, the

  18. The effect of temperature on the ammoniation of wheat straw by urea

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    x moisture level, temperature x treatment period and moisture level x treatment period interactions were also significant (P:::;:; 0,01). Treatment for one and two weeks. Table 1 The effect of temperature and moisture level on the % OMD of wheat straw ammoniated by urea, determined in vitro. Temperature. Moisture level.

  19. Effect of temperature on anaerobic treatment of black water in UASB-septic tank systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luostarinen, S.; Sanders, W.T.M.; Kujawa-Roeleveld, K.; Zeeman, G.

    2007-01-01

    The effect of northern European seasonal temperature changes and low temperature on the performance of upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB)-septic tanks treating black water was studied. Three UASB-septic tanks were monitored with different operational parameters and at different temperatures. The

  20. Combustion Temperature Effect of Diesel Engine Convert to Compressed Natural Gas Engine

    OpenAIRE

    Semin; Abdul R. Ismail; Rosli A. Bakar

    2009-01-01

    Effect of combustion temperature in the engine cylinder of diesel engine convert to Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) engine was presents in this study. The objective of this study was to investigate the engine cylinder combustion temperature effect of diesel engine convert to CNG engine on variation engine speed. Problem statement: The hypothesis was that the lower performance of CNG engine was caused by the effect of lower in engine cylinder temperature. Are the CNG engine is lower cylinder temp...

  1. Effects of eutrophication and temperature on submersed rooted plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raun, Ane-Marie Løvendahl

    , especially at high temperatures. Results also showed that growth of Z. marina plants at higher temperatures will be reduced at gradually lower oxygen concentrations. The tropical seagrasses were surprisingly tolerant to oxygen depletion in the water column and none of them showed reduced growth within the 72......Aquatic macrophytes have during the last decades faced a massive decline of coverage and repeated die‐off events have been detected for freshwater (Sand‐Jensen et al., 2000) and marine plants (Waycott et al., 2009). Increased nutrient loading has been suggested to play a central role, because high...... and degradation of dying alga blooms accelerate the microbial activity and thereby intensify oxygen consumption in sediment and water column. This oxygen consumption may accelerate further by increasing temperature caused by warmer climate. This thesis examines how low sediment and water column oxygen levels...

  2. Temperature dependence effect of viscosity on ultrathin lubricant film melting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.V.Khomenko

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available We study the melting of an ultrathin lubricant film under friction between atomically flat surfaces at temperature dependencies of viscosity described by Vogel-Fulcher relationship and by power expression, which are observed experimentally. It is shown that the critical temperature exists in both cases the exceeding of which leads to the melting of lubricant and, as a result, the sliding mode of friction sets in. The values of characteristic parameters of lubricant are defined, which are needed for friction reduction. In the systems, where the Vogel-Fulcher dependence is fulfilled, it is possible to choose the parameters at which the melting of lubricant takes place even at zero temperature of friction surfaces. The deformational defect of the shear modulus is taken into account in describing the lubricant melting according to the mechanism of the first-order transition.

  3. Effects of Temperature on Time Dependent Rheological Characteristics of Koumiss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serdal Sabancı

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The rheological properties of koumiss were investigated at different temperatures (4, 10, and 20°C. Experimental shear stress–shear rate data were fitted to different rheological models. The consistency of koumiss was predicted by using the power-law model since it described the consistency of koumiss best with highest regression coefficient and lowest errors (root mean square error and chi-square. Koumiss exhibited shear thinning behavior (n<1. The flow activation energy for temperature dependency of consistency was 25.532 kJ/mol, and the frequency constant was 2.18×10-7Pa.sn. As the temperature increased the time dependent thixotropic characteristics of koumiss decreased.

  4. Effects of temperature on Cochliomyia macellaria (Diptera:Calliphoridae) development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrd, J H; Butler, J F

    1996-11-01

    Growth curves were studied for the egg, larva, and pupa of the secondary screwworm, Cochliomyia macellaria (F), under mean cyclic temperatures of 15.6, 21.1, 26.7, 32.2, and a constant 25.0 degrees C. Development from egg to adult under all regimes ranged from 170 to 588 h. A constant temperature regime of 25 degrees C produced a range of pupation times from 92 to 142 h, with adult emergence ranging from 196 to 261 h. The maximal preferential temperature of 39 degrees C was determined for maggots by using a gradient system. The minimal variation in the range of larval lengths and development time makes this species suitable for establishing relatively narrow confidence intervals when constructing a postmortem interval estimate for use in legal investigations.

  5. The effects of fluctuating temperature regimes on the embryonic development of lake whitefish (Coregonus clupeaformis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Michael Y-T; Manzon, Richard G; Somers, Christopher M; Boreham, Douglas R; Wilson, Joanna Y

    2017-12-01

    Fluctuating incubation temperatures may have significant effects on fish embryogenesis; yet most laboratory-based studies use constant temperatures. For species that experience large, natural seasonal temperature changes during embryogenesis, such as lake whitefish (Coregonus clupeaformis), seasonal temperature regimes are likely optimal for development. Anthropogenic activities can increase average and/or variability of natural incubation temperatures over large (e.g. through climate change) or smaller (e.g. thermal effluent discharge) geographic scales. To investigate this, we incubated lake whitefish embryos under constant (2, 5, or 8°C) and fluctuating temperature regimes. Fluctuating temperature regimes had a base temperature of 2°C with: 1) seasonal temperature changes that modeled natural declines/inclines; 2) tri-weekly +3°C, 1h temperature spikes; or 3) both seasonal temperature changes and temperature spikes. We compared mortality to hatch, morphometrics, and heart rate at three developmental stages. Mortality rate was similar for embryos incubated at constant 2°C, constant 5°C, or with seasonal temperatures, but was significantly greater at constant 8°C. Embryos incubated constantly at >2°C had reduced body growth and yolk consumption compared to embryos incubated with seasonal temperature changes. When measured at the common base temperature of 2°C, embryos incubated at constant 2°C had lower heart rates than embryos incubated with both seasonal temperature changes and temperature spikes. Our study suggests that incubating lake whitefish embryos with constant temperatures may significantly alter development, growth, and heart rate compared to incubating with seasonal temperature changes, emphasizing the need to include seasonal temperature changes in laboratory-based studies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Effects of Cryogenic Temperatures on Spacecraft Internal Dielectric Discharges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Dale c.; Schneider, Todd A.; Vaughn, Jason A.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Most calculations of internal dielectric charging on spacecraft use tabulated values of material surface and bulk conductivities, dielectric constants, and dielectric breakdown strengths. Many of these properties are functions of temperature, and the temperature dependences are not well known. At cryogenic temperatures, where it is well known that material conductivities decrease dramatically, it is an open question as to the timescales over which buried charge will dissipate and prevent the eventual potentially disastrous discharges of dielectrics. In this paper, measurements of dielectric charging and discharging for cable insulation materials at cryogenic temperatures (approx. 90 K) are presented using a broad spectrum electron source at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center. The measurements were performed for the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST), which will orbit at the Earth-Sun L2 point, and parts of which will be perennially at temperatures as low as 40 K. Results of these measurements seem to show that Radiation Induced Conductivity (RIC) under cryogenic conditions at L2 will not be sufficient to allow charges to bleed off of some typical cable insulation materials even over the projected JWST lifetime of a dozen years or more. After the charging and discharging measurements are presented, comparisons are made between the material conductivities that can be inferred from the measured discharges and conductivities calculated from widely used formulae. Furthermore, the measurement-inferred conductivities are compared with extrapolations of recent measurements of materials RIC and dark conductivities performed with the charge-storage method at Utah State University. Implications of the present measurements are also given for other spacecraft that may operate at cryogenic temperatures, such as probes of the outer planets or the permanently dark cratered areas on the moon. The present results will also be of interest to those who must design or

  7. An effect of temperature distribution on terahertz phase dynamics in intrinsic Josephson junctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asai, Hidehiro, E-mail: hd-asai@aist.go.jp; Kawabata, Shiro

    2013-11-15

    Highlights: •We calculate the temperature distribution in intrinsic Josephson junctions (IJJs). •We investigate the effect of temperature distribution on THz radiation from IJJs. •The Joule heating in the IJJs makes inhomogeneous temperature distribution. •The inhomogeneous temperature distribution strongly excites THz emission. -- Abstract: In this study, we numerically calculate the temperature distribution and the THz phase dynamics in the mesa-structured intrinsic Josephson junctions (IJJs) using the thermal diffusion equation and the Sine–Gordon equation. We observe that the temperature distribution has a broad peak around the center region of the IJJ mesa. Under a high external current, a “hot spot” where the temperature is locally higher than the superconducting critical temperature appears around this region. The transverse Josephson plasma wave is strongly excited by the inhomogeneous temperature distribution in the mesa. This gives rise to intense THz emission.

  8. barrel temperature emperature emperature effects on the ffects

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    eobe

    PVC, PP, and HDPE are 6.10N/mm2, 21.67N/mm2, and 12.94N/mm2 at barrel temperature of 2700C, 2700C, 2100C;. Maximum proof stress. Maximum proof stress was 3.44N/mm2, 20.63N/mm2, and 13.65N/mm2 at barrel temperature of 2400C, 2500C and. 1600C; Maximum percentage elongation. Maximum percentage ...

  9. Effect of the graphene oxide reduction temperature on supercapacitor performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Eunmi; Kim, Jaekwang; Cui, Yinhua; Choi, Kyuho; Gao, Yuan; Han, Seunghee; Pyo, Sung Gyu; Yoon, Songhun

    2017-07-01

    In this study, we investigated the influence of the reduction temperature on graphene oxide. After performing the thermal reduction at specific temperatures (200, 600, and 1000 °C), the morphological and crystallographic changes were investigated by several analysis methods. The reduced graphene oxides were used as supercapacitor electrodes and analyzed with various electrochemical techniques. The capacitance exhibited an increase up to 600 °C before decreasing abruptly at 1000 °C. This behavior was ascribed to the limited ionic accessibility into the compact graphene layer.[Figure not available: see fulltext.

  10. Temperature effect upon blood consumption in Triatoma infestans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Catalá

    1992-12-01

    Full Text Available Different blood consumption speed was observed in Triatoma infestans - nymphs and adults - exposed to 12 degrees C and 28 degrees C. Exposure to optimal temperature (28 degrees C allows the insects to consume blood at a rate of 9% per day. Significative relationship between blood amount present in the promesenteron and consumed blood was found at 28 degrees. Consumption of blood was drastically reduced at the lowest temperature. Accordingly, lack of ovaric development, oviposition and mating behaviour was observed in insects kept at 12 degrees C. Relationship between laboratory and field observations are discussed.

  11. Liquid-phase diffusion bonding: Temperature effects and solute redistribution in high temperature lead-free composite solders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, Iver [Ames Lab. and Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States); Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States); Choquette, Stephanie [Ames Lab. and Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States); Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2015-05-17

    Liquid-phase diffusion bonding (LPDB) is being studied as the primary phenomena occurring in the development of a high temperature lead-free composite solder paste composed of gas-atomized Cu-10Ni, wt.% (Cu-11Ni, at.%) powder blended with Sn-0.7Cu-0.05Ni-0.01Ge (Sn-1.3Cu-0.1Ni-0.02Ge, at.%) Nihon-Superior SN100C solder powder. Powder compacts were used as a model system. LPDB promotes enhanced interdiffusion of the low-melting alloy matrix with the solid Cu-10Ni reinforcement powder above the matrix liquidus temperature. The initial study involved the effective intermetallic compound (IMC) compositions and microstructures that occur at varying reflow temperatures and times between 250-300°C and 30-60s, respectively. Certain reflow temperatures encourage adequate interdiffusion to form a continuous highly-conductive network throughout the composite solder joints. The diffusion of nickel, in particular, has a disperse pattern that foreshadows the possibility of a highly-conductive low-melting solder that can be successfully utilized at high temperatures.

  12. Experimental investigation of temperature effect on yield of a pool of oil possessing viscoelastic properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ametov, I.M.; Baidikov, Yu.N.; Berezhnoi, N.I.; Bereryuk, I.M.; Ruzin, L.M.

    1982-02-01

    The effect of temperature on petroleum yield of a pool of viscoelastic oil when displaced by water from a viable porous medium model is considered. Based on experiments, a nonmonotonous character of the dependence of the oil yield on temperature is established. A decrease of oil yield following a rise in temperature is noted. This is explained by an anomaly of viscoelastic properties within that temperature interval.

  13. Temperature Dependence Characterization of Layered Materials via the Magneto-Optical Kerr Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Haoxiang; Stevens, Christopher; Paul, Jagannath; Karaiskaj, Denis; Miller, Casey

    The Curie temperature of PyCu alloy films can be controlled by Cu content. The additional thickness in layered materials changes the Cure temperature and hence the magnetic coupling between permalloy and Cu layers. The decoupling is investigated by the Magneto-Optical Kerr Effect (MOKE) as a function of temperature around the Curie temperature. The measurements reveal the coupling dynamics between permalloy and Co in novel magnetic heterostructures. This research at USF is supported by the National Science Foundation.

  14. The effect of air velocity on heat stress at increased air temperature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerg, Bjarne Schmidt; Wang, Xiaoshuai; Zhang, Guoqiang

    to the temperature difference between the surfaces of animals and the surrounding air, and this temperature difference declines when the air temperature approaches the animal body temperature. Consequently it can it by expected that the effect of air velocity decreases at increased air temperature. The literature...... on different categories of farm animals to determine how the effect of air velocity depends on the air temperature. A new expression to calculate the chilling effect of increased air velocity was suggested. In addition to the parameters air velocity and air temperature this new expression included three......Increased air velocity is a frequently used method to reduce heat stress of farm animals housed in warm conditions. The main reason why the method works is that higher air velocity increases the convective heat release from the animals. Convective heat release from the animals is strongly related...

  15. Effects of agitation speed, temperature, carbon and nitrogen sources ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Lactococcus lactis is a Gram-positive bacterium widely used in the production of buttermilk and cheese. Recently, the bacterium becomes famous as the genetically modified organism can be used alive for the treatment of disease. In this study, different cultural conditions based on agitation speed and temperature on the ...

  16. Effect of home-refrigerator storage temperature on tomato quality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Farneti, B.; Zhang, W.; Witkowska, I.M.; Woltering, E.J.

    2010-01-01

    Postharvest storage, handling and distribution of fruit at low temperatures is the most common and manageable approach to control ripening and subsequent deterioration and to maximize product shelf-life. However, tomatoes, as many other subtropical fruits, are susceptible to develop symptoms of

  17. The effects of incubation period and temperature on the Hydrogen ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A total of 171 water samples from 3 sources were analyzed for the presence of faecal contamination by standard MPN, P/A, EC-M and H2S techniques at different temperatures and incubation times. Analysis of water samples by H2S technique showed that the incubation period of H2S bottles is highly dependent on ...

  18. Effects of Temperature on the Physicochemical Properties of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The results further indicate that the quality of both unblended and blended traditionally processed vegetable oils deteriorate significantly at elevated temperatures (p < 0.05). However, the blends showed relatively better quality and stability than the unblended ones whereby the formulations of palm oil (PO) and sesame oil ...

  19. Effects of low temperature and drought on the physiological and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Water deficiency and low temperature are two important ecological factors which affect the distribution and cultivation of oil palm. To find out how oil palm adapts to the environmental conditions, the dynamics of a series of important physiological components derived from the leaves of potted oil palm seedlings under ...

  20. Effect of electric field (at different temperatures) on germination of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Chickpea (Cicer arietinum) seeds were exposed to electric field from zero to 1300 V for 15 min at three different temperatures (13, 16 and 19°C). It was found that the exposure of chickpea seeds to the electric field caused a change in water uptake capacity (and its coefficient) as compared to control. A new theoretical model ...

  1. Effect of nonthermal ion distribution and dust temperature on ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Dust-acoustic solitary waves in unmagnetized dusty plasma whose constituents are iner- tial charged dust grains, Boltzmannian electrons and nonthermal ions have been investigated by taking into account finite dust temperature. The pseudopotential has been used to study solitary solution. The existence of solitary waves ...

  2. Effect of fermentation and drying temperature on the characteristics ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AJB SERVER

    2006-08-17

    Aug 17, 2006 ... available fresh, frozen, freeze-dried, or in a low- temperature stabilized liquid form. A commercial .... **Liquid smoke. Sodium ascorbate. Dextrose. Tetrasodium pyrophosphate. Table salt. Sodium nitrite. Vegetable oil. BHA. Monosodium glutamate. Potassium sorbate. Refined wheat flour. * Spice mix.

  3. Effects of drying temperature on viability of macaw palm ( Acrocomia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In response to a growing interest in improving seedling production of oilseed species (like macaw palm), a fruit drying protocol for facilitating seed extraction was proposed. This enabled the production of macaw palm seedlings, but the temperature most suitable for seed extraction without losing its physiological quality is ...

  4. Modelling the effect of temperature on seed germination in some ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The prediction of germination percentage (GP) and germination speed (GS) of the seeds for some cucurbits (watermelon, melon, cucumber, summer squash, pumpkin and winter squash) was investigated by mathematical model based on temperature. The model, D = [a - (b x T) + (c x T2)] of Uzun et al. (2001), was adapted ...

  5. Temperature effects on peel spotting in "Sucrier banana" fruit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trakulnaleumsai, C.; Ketsa, S.; Doorn, van W.G.

    2006-01-01

    Banana fruit of the cultivar `Sucrier¿ (Musa acuminata, AA Group) develops peel spotting at a relatively early stage of development (when the peel is about as slightly more yellow than green). Holding ripening bananas at 15 and 18 °C instead of room temperature (26¿27 °C) only temporarily reduced

  6. The effect of temperature on one-dimensional nanometallic photonic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2017-04-07

    Apr 7, 2017 ... hibit the propagation of electromagnetic waves within a certain frequency range, so that the light can be totally .... as previously mentioned, the loss factor increases by increasing the temperature. This leads to a ... We saw that the height of defect modes is decreased by increasing the period number.

  7. effect of ambient temperature on farrowing rate in pigs

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    tion, but invariably result in early embryo death. Lllberg. & Burfening(1967) reported that ewes subjected to high air temperature at about the time of mating will have a reduced reproducrive rate because of an increased embryonic death rate. Salisbury & Flerchinger (1961) reported early foetal mortailty in cattle inseminated.

  8. Effects of temperature and salinity on the seeds germination of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The present study consists of the elimination of tegumentary inhibition affecting seeds of Retama raetam by the chemical scarification. This pretreatment was carried out using pure sulfuric acid (98 %) and the seeds' germinative behavior was studied in the laboratory under controlled conditions of temperature and salinity.

  9. [Effect of the temperature of the dialysis bath in diabetics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galli, Cintia N; López, Mirta; Beresan, Hugo; Elbert, Alicia

    2004-01-01

    During the dialysis procedure, arterial hypotension is one of the most common problems and it has been object of many studies. In hemodialysis, changes are produced in body volume through ultrafiltration that generate an increase in the production of thermic energy, which is removed during the treatment. The hypovolemia resulting from the removal of volume activates the sympathetic system, avoiding in this way heat loss and increasing body temperature that promotes vascular vasodilatation and interferes with the compensatory constrictive response to volume fall with consequent arterial hypotension. Patients with autonomic neuropathy would be the most affected by volume depletion and they are usually the ones that show the highest frecuency of hypotension episodes, typical of patients with diabetes. It has been proved before that the use of a cold bath does not decrease the efficiency of the dialysis treatment and improves the cardiovascular stability as well, mostly in patients proned to it, such as diabetics, elderly, and patients with cardiac failure. In this study, it was observed that patients showed low basal temperatures before dialysis treatment and that the use of bath temperature of 35.5 degrees C increased the temperature post dialysis less than with the standard bath at 37 degrees C. The bath at 35.5 degrees C decreased the episodes of arterial hypotension, with an improvement in patient's welfare, and lower requirement of attention and treatment costs.

  10. The Effect of Seasons Temperature and Nitrogen Release on Cow ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BSN

    digestive performance could be inhibited or even reduced as a result (Werner, et al.,. 1987). This is because temperature affects the enzymatic activities of the microorganisms (anaerobic) responsible for the conversion of organic materials into biogas (Philip et al., 2001). There are usually two reasons why the mesophilic.

  11. Mathematical Modelling of Effect of Ambient Temperature and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Temperature distributions on the soil surface strongly depend on the state of the processes of mass and energy exchanges (radiation and convection, evaporation and water condensation, supply of water through precipitation and gaseous exchange). It was assumed that soil medium is homogeneous and parameters ...

  12. Effect of oxidation and annealing temperature on optical and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    which means that initial oxidation temperature played an important role on surface uniformity of SnO2 thin films. Keywords. SnO2 thin films; optical properties; optical bandgap; Urbach energy; surface roughness; XRD. 1. Introduction. Tin oxide belongs to a class of materials that have suitable electrical conductivity and high ...

  13. Barrel Temperature Effects on the Mechanical Properties of Injection ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An existing mould was used for the production of tension and deflection test specimen. Then a plunger type of injection machine was used to mould test specimens at various barrel temperatures ranging from 1600C to 2800C, keeping all other process variables constant. The tensile and deflection test carried out on the ...

  14. Effect of fluxing additive on sintering temperature, microstructure and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The persistence of various phase(s) at higher temperatures in the flux-added materials indicated that the phase transitions occurred relatively slowly. A decrease in dielectric constant of Li2O-added BaTiO3 in comparison to pure BaTiO3 may be due to the diminished dielectric polarizability of Li+ in comparison to Ba2+.

  15. Effects of chlorine and temperature on yeasts isolatedfrom a soft ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Yeasts isolated from sugar and filling valves in a bottling process were exposed to different chlorine concentrations and various high temperatures. It was found that growth of yeasts decreased with increase in chlorine concentration. The maximum chlorine concentration that inhibited both types of yeasts was 60mg/l while ...

  16. Modelling the effect of temperature on seed germination in some ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2010-03-01

    Mar 1, 2010 ... temperature and water potential on seed germination. J. Exp. Bot. 44: 407-414. Finch-Savage WE, Pheleps K, Peach L, Steckel JRA (2000). Use of the threshold germination model under variable field condition. Seed. Biology: Advance and Applications, CABI publication, Oxon and New. York, pp. 489-497.

  17. Effect of fluxing additive on sintering temperature, microstructure and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    doping have been described and discussed. Additionally, in situ Raman spectroscopy has been used for the first time to investigate and compare the phase transition temperatures of pure and Li2CO3-added BaTiO3. 2. Experimental. Batches (50g) of GPR grade TiO2 and BaCO3 (Aldrich. Chemicals Company Inc.) powder ...

  18. Effects of Different Hatcher Temperatures on Hatching Traits of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    selcuk

    bulb and wet-bulb temperatures on time of hatch and chick weight at hatch. Poult. Sci. 69, 887-897. Tazawa, H., Moriya, K., Tamura, A., Komoro, T. & Akiyama, R., 2001. Ontogenetic study of thermoregulation in birds. J. Therm. Biol. 26, 281-286.

  19. Effect of varying temperature on growth, morphology and soluble ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-05-16

    May 16, 2008 ... temperature severely affects cell morphology (cell size, cell types, formation of filaments/minicells and staining behavior of cells). ..... 185(2): 693-697. Hancock IC (1994). Analysis of cell wall constituents of Gram – positive bacteria. In: Chemical Methods in Prokaryotic systematics. Good fellow M, O'Donnel ...

  20. effect of ambient temperature on farrowing rate in pigs

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    tion, but invariably result in early embryo death. Lllberg. & Burfening(1967) reported that ewes subjected to high air temperature at about the time of mating will have a reduced reproducrive rate because of an increased embryonic death rate. Salisbury & Flerchinger .... of oestrus and accepting the boar. The farrowing rate.

  1. Effect of temperature, light intensity and growth regulators on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ansellia africana (Orchidaceae) is an important endangered medicinal plant species of South Africa which has been heavily exploited in recent years. Experiments were conducted in growth rooms at different temperatures (16, 26, 36°C) and in a nursery at different light intensities induced by shade cloth densities (200, 400, ...

  2. Possible effects of regulating hydroponic water temperature on plant ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This may include accumulation of different metabolites such as phenolic compounds, reactive oxygen species (ROS), nutrient uptake, chlorophyll pigment formation, the photosynthesis process and finally the growth and development of the plant. The optimum temperature of the growth medium can contribute to improving ...

  3. Neutron scattering effects on fusion ion temperature measurements.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ziegler, Lee (Bechtel/Nevada, Las Vegas, NV); Starner, Jason R.; Cooper, Gary Wayne; Ruiz, Carlos L.; Franklin, James Kenneth (Ktech Corporation, Albuquerque, NM); Casey, Daniel T.

    2006-06-01

    To support the nuclear fusion program at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), a consistent and verifiable method to determine fusion ion temperatures needs to be developed. Since the fusion temperature directly affects the width in the spread of neutron energies produced, a measurement of the neutron energy width can yield the fusion temperature. Traditionally, the spread in neutron energies is measured by using time-of-flight to convert a spread in neutron energies at the source to a spread in time at detector. One potential obstacle to using this technique at the Z facility at SNL is the need to shield the neutron detectors from the intense bremsstrahlung produced. The shielding consists of eight inches of lead and the concern is that neutrons will scatter in the lead, artificially broaden the neutron pulse width and lead to an erroneous measurement. To address this issue, experiments were performed at the University of Rochester's Laboratory for Laser Energetics, which demonstrated that a reliable ion temperature measurement can be achieved behind eight inches of lead shielding. To further expand upon this finding, Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended (MCNPX) was used to simulate the experimental geometric conditions and perform the neutron transport. MCNPX was able to confidently estimate results observed at the University of Rochester.

  4. Effect of Brewing Time and Temperature on the release of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study evaluates the oxalate content and manganese released in three plant material (Moringa oleifera leaves, Phyllanthus amarus leaves, Neem leaves) used as tea and compared with the conventional Lipton tea. The manganese and oxalate test was determined by varying brewing temperature at 29oC, 50oC, 100oC ...

  5. Effects of storage period and temperature on seed germination of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Freshly processed seeds, sun-dried to moisture content of between 10-12% and stored at three temperature regimes of 28OC + 2OC, 5OC + 2OC and -17OC + 2OC were taken out at monthly intervals and sown. Data collected were subjected to Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) P< = 0.01 while mean separation was carried ...

  6. Effect of Calcination and Reduction Temperatures on the Reduction ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2003-12-05

    Dec 5, 2003 ... The reduction temperature did not affect the product selectivity. KEYWORDS. Fischer-Tropsch synthesis, carbon monoxide hydrogenation, syngas conversion, cobalt; titania, fixed-bed reactor. 1. Introduction. Supported cobalt catalysts have been widely employed for. Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) synthesis of ...

  7. Effects of storage temperature and extension media on motility of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The survivability of caprine spermatozoa was compared in semen extenders prepared from the conventional egg-yolk citrate and goat-milk citrate. Motility was comparable in both sets of extenders during the first 24 hours post-extension when extended ejaculates were stored at either room temperature (28 OC) or ...

  8. Effects of temperature, light, desiccation and cold storage on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... on the seeds desiccated to 5.4 ± 0.1% moisture content. These results suggest an intermediate seed storage behaviour. For germplasm long-term conservation purpose, a cryopreservation investigation was proposed. Key words: Seed, desiccation tolerance, low temperature tolerance, germination, Sophora tonkinensis.

  9. Effect of low-temperature plasma treatment on tailorability and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    treatment [1]. Low-temperature plasma (LTP) treatment can be an alternative to traditional wet processes in textile preparation and finishing [2–4]. Nowadays commercial production of plasma-treated wool .... defined as the percentage change in dimensions of the relaxed fabric from wet to dry. HE-1 and HE-2 are the hygral ...

  10. Effects of agitation speed, temperature, carbon and nitrogen sources ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2010-08-16

    Aug 16, 2010 ... and temperature on the growth of recombinant L. lactis NZ9000 harboring domain 1 of aerolysin gene ... reaction. membrane after binding to glycosylphosphati-dylinositol- anchored receptors (Abrami et al., 2000). The toxin is activated either by soluble ... rates of the fish fed with recombinant L. lactis was.

  11. High temperature effects on flavones accumulation and antioxidant ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Scutellaria baicalensis is a traditional Chinese medicinal plant that has long been grown in Hubei Province. However, increasing average annual temperatures in the region have made plants unsuitable for medicinal use. Two flavones, baicalin and baicalein, are the major active ingredients of S. baicalensis.

  12. Magnetocaloric effect in temperature-sensitive magnetic fluids

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    The pyromagnetic coefficient for all the materials were obtained and it was found that this property depends on physical and magnetic ... Magnetic fluid; pyromagnetic coefficient; Curie temperature. 1. Introduction. A magnetic fluid .... fluid, the distribution of particle size generally follows the log-normal distribution function ...

  13. Effect of individual finger skin temperature on vibrotactile perception threshold

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Harazin

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: In healthy people, the vibrotactile perception threshold (VPT at fingertips depends on a given measurement method and on individual characteristics such as age, gender and finger skin temperature. The aim of the study was to compare the VPT values in 2 groups of healthy subjects with different finger skin temperature. Materials and Methods: The study group comprised 56 males and 76 females, who formed pairs matched with respect to age, gender and body mass index (BMI but differing in terms of finger skin temperature at pre-launch testing. The finger skin temperature of less than 29°C indicated the subjects with "cold hands" and that of more than 29°C, the subjects with "warm hands". The measuring system made use of P8 pallesthesiometer (EMSON-MAT, Poland and the measurement procedure was in compliance with the ISO 13091-1:2001 standard. VPT measurements were performed for the index, middle and ring fingers of both hands at the frequencies of 4 Hz, 25 Hz, 31.5 Hz, 63 Hz, 125 Hz and 250 Hz. Results: The findings of the study revealed that the mean VPTs among the subjects with "cold hands" were significantly higher than the corresponding values among the subjects with "warm hands". Conclusions: The type of individual peripheral thermoregulation should be considered when assessing the VPT and determining its reference values.

  14. Effects of Temperature Levels and Concrete Cover Thickness on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    With the knowledge of the temperature of the fire, thickness of concrete cover, residual strength of concrete and tensile strength of embedded reinforcement after fire exposure, we can predict the residual carrying capacity of the beams after fire. The experimental procedure involves some specimens of reinforcing steel bars ...

  15. Effects of incubation temperature on growth and performance of the veiled chameleon (Chamaeleo calyptratus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Robin M

    2008-10-01

    I evaluated the effect of incubation temperature on phenotypes of the veiled chameleon, Chamaeleo calyptratus. I chose this species for study because its large clutch size (30-40 eggs or more) allows replication within clutches both within and among experimental treatments. The major research objectives were (1) to assess the effect of constant low, moderate, and high temperatures on embryonic development, (2) to determine whether the best incubation temperature for embryonic development also produced the "best" hatchlings, and (3) to determine how a change in incubation temperature during mid-development would affect phenotype. To meet these objectives, I established five experimental temperature regimes and determined egg survival and incubation length and measured body size and shape, selected body temperatures, and locomotory performance of lizards at regular intervals from hatching to 90 d, or just before sexual maturity. Incubation temperature affected the length of incubation, egg survival, and body mass, but did not affect sprint speed or selected body temperature although selected body temperature affected growth in mass independently of treatment and clutch. Incubation at moderate temperatures provided the best conditions for both embryonic and post-hatching development. The highest incubation temperatures were disruptive to development; eggs had high mortality, developmental rate was low, and hatchlings grew slowly. Changes in temperature during incubation increased the among-clutch variance in incubation length relative to that of constant temperature treatments. Copyright 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  16. The effect of temperature on the viability of Demodex folliculorum and Demodex brevis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ya E; Guo, Na; Wu, Li Ping

    2009-11-01

    Demodex folliculorum and Demodex brevis are obligatory parasites of the pilosebaceous unit in humans and are cosmopolitan in terms of their distribution. This study was conducted to explore the effect of temperature on the viability of D. folliculorum and D. brevis. Both types of parasites were collected with the cellophane tape method, then randomly grouped and placed into separate moist cabinets. They were divided into 15 groups and exposed to experimental temperatures ranging from -15 degrees C to 60 degrees C. Curve diagrams and scatter plots on the relationship between temperature and the corresponding survival time were drawn and analyzed. It is demonstrated that temperature has a tremendous influence on the viability of D. folliculorum and D. brevis. Survival time and temperature are inversely correlated in the temperature range of 5-37 degrees C. Both D. folliculorum and D. brevis can survive better at low temperatures than at high temperatures. The most suitable maintenance temperature is 5 degrees C, and the optimal temperature for D. folliculorum and D. brevis to develop in vitro is 16-20 degrees C. Temperatures below 0 degrees C and above 37 degrees C are harmful to the mites. The lethal temperature is 54 degrees C, and the effective temperature that kills Demodex mites is 58 degrees C.

  17. Effects of cold and hot temperature on dehydration: a mechanism of cardiovascular burden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Youn-Hee; Park, Min-Seon; Kim, Yoonhee; Kim, Ho; Hong, Yun-Chul

    2015-08-01

    The association between temperature (cold or heat) and cardiovascular mortality has been well documented. However, few studies have investigated the underlying mechanism of the cold or heat effect. The main goal of this study was to examine the effect of temperature on dehydration markers and to explain the pathophysiological disturbances caused by changes of temperature. We investigated the relationship between outdoor temperature and dehydration markers (blood urea nitrogen (BUN)/creatinine ratio, urine specific gravity, plasma tonicity and haematocrit) in 43,549 adults from Seoul, South Korea, during 1995-2008. We used piece-wise linear regression to find the flexion point of apparent temperature and estimate the effects below or above the apparent temperature. Levels of dehydration markers decreased linearly with an increase in the apparent temperature until a point between 22 and 27 °C, which was regarded as the flexion point of apparent temperature, and then increased with apparent temperature. Because the associations between temperature and cardiovascular mortality are known to be U-shaped, our findings suggest that temperature-related changes in hydration status underlie the increased cardiovascular mortality and morbidity during high- or low-temperature conditions.

  18. Effect of temperature on pyrolysis product of empty fruit bunches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rahman, Aizuddin Abdul; Sulaiman, Fauziah; Abdullah, Nurhayati [School of Physics, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 11800 Minden, Penang (Malaysia)

    2015-04-24

    Pyrolysis of empty fruit bunches (EFB) was performed in a fixed bed reactor equipped with liquid collecting system. Pyrolysis process was conducted by varying the terminal pyrolysis temperature from 300 to 500°C under heating rate of 10°C/min for at least 2 hours. Char yield was obtained highest at 300°C around 55.88 wt%, and started to decrease as temperature increase. The maximum yield of pyrolysis liquid was obtained around 54.75 wt% as pyrolysis temperature reach 450°C. For gas yield percentage, the yield gained as temperature was increased from 300 to 500°C, within the range between 8.44 to 19.32 wt%. The char obtained at 400°C has great potential as an alternative solid fuel, due to its high heating value of 23.37 MJ/kg, low in volatile matter and ash content which are approximately around 40.32 and 11.12 wt%, respectively. The collected pyrolysis liquid within this temperature range found to have high water content of around 16.15 to 18.20 wt%. The high aqueous fraction seemed to cause the pyrolysis liquid to have low HHV which only ranging from 10.81 to 12.94 MJ/kg. These trends of results showed that necessary enhancement should be employ either on the raw biomass or pyrolysis products in order to approach at least the minimum quality of common hydrocarbon solid or liquid fuel. For energy production, both produced bio-char and pyrolysis liquid are considered as sustainable sources of bio-energy since they contained low amounts of nitrogen and sulphur, which are considered as environmental friendly solid and liquid fuel.

  19. The effect of temperature on the sensitivity of Daphnia magna to cyanobacteria is genus dependent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hochmuth, Jennifer D; De Schamphelaere, Karel A C

    2014-10-01

    In the present study, the authors investigated the effects of 6 different genera of cyanobacteria on multiple endpoints of Daphnia magna in a 21-d life table experiment conducted at 3 different temperatures (15 °C, 19 °C, and 23 °C). The specific aims were to test if the effect of temperature on Daphnia's sensitivity to cyanobacteria differed among different cyanobacteria and if the rank order from most to least harmful cyanobacteria to Daphnia reproduction changed or remained the same across the studied temperature range. Overall, the authors observed a decrease in harmful effects on reproduction with increasing temperature for Microcystis, Nodularia, and Aphanizomenon, and an increase in harmful effects with increasing temperature for Anabaena and Oscillatoria. No effect of temperature was observed on Daphnia sensitivity to Cylindrospermopsis. Harmful effects of Microcystis and Nodularia on reproduction appear to be mirrored by a decrease in length. On the other hand, harmful effects of Anabaena, Aphanizomenon, and Oscillatoria on reproduction were correlated with a decrease in intrinsic rate of natural increase, which was matched by a later onset of reproduction in exposures to Oscillatoria. In addition, the results suggest that the cyanobacteria rank order of harmfulness may change with temperature. Higher temperatures may increase the sensitivity of D. magna to the presence of some cyanobacteria (Anabaena and Oscillatoria) in their diet, whereas the harmful effects of others (Microcystis, Nodularia, and Aphanizomenon) may be reduced by higher temperatures. © 2014 SETAC.

  20. Temperature Dependence of Faraday Effect-Induced Bias Error in a Fiber Optic Gyroscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xuyou; Liu, Pan; Guang, Xingxing; Xu, Zhenlong; Guan, Lianwu; Li, Guangchun

    2017-09-07

    Improving the performance of interferometric fiber optic gyroscope (IFOG) in harsh environments, such as magnetic field and temperature field variation, is necessary for its practical applications. This paper presents an investigation of Faraday effect-induced bias error of IFOG under varying temperature. Jones matrix method is utilized to formulize the temperature dependence of Faraday effect-induced bias error. Theoretical results show that the Faraday effect-induced bias error changes with the temperature in the non-skeleton polarization maintaining (PM) fiber coil. This phenomenon is caused by the temperature dependence of linear birefringence and Verdet constant of PM fiber. Particularly, Faraday effect-induced bias errors of two polarizations always have opposite signs that can be compensated optically regardless of the changes of the temperature. Two experiments with a 1000 m non-skeleton PM fiber coil are performed, and the experimental results support these theoretical predictions. This study is promising for improving the bias stability of IFOG.

  1. Sensitivity of blackbody effective emissivity to wavelength and temperature: By genetic algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ejigu, E. K.; Liedberg, H. G.

    2013-09-01

    A variable-temperature blackbody (VTBB) is used to calibrate an infrared radiation thermometer (pyrometer). The effective emissivity (ɛeff) of a VTBB is dependent on temperature and wavelength other than the geometry of the VTBB. In the calibration process the effective emissivity is often assumed to be constant within the wavelength and temperature range. There are practical situations where the sensitivity of the effective emissivity needs to be known and correction has to be applied. We present a method using a genetic algorithm to investigate the sensitivity of the effective emissivity to wavelength and temperature variation. Two matlab® programs are generated: the first to model the radiance temperature calculation and the second to connect the model to the genetic algorithm optimization toolbox. The effective emissivity parameter is taken as a chromosome and optimized at each wavelength and temperature point. The difference between the contact temperature (reading from a platinum resistance thermometer or liquid in glass thermometer) and radiance temperature (calculated from the ɛeff values) is used as an objective function where merit values are calculated and best fit ɛeff values selected. The best fit ɛeff values obtained as a solution show how sensitive they are to temperature and wavelength parameter variation. Uncertainty components that arise from wavelength and temperature variation are determined based on the sensitivity analysis. Numerical examples are considered for illustration.

  2. Sensitivity of blackbody effective emissivity to wavelength and temperature: By genetic algorithm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ejigu, E. K.; Liedberg, H. G. [National Metrology Institute of South Africa (NMISA), Private Bag X34, Lynnwood Ridge, Pretoria, 0040 (South Africa)

    2013-09-11

    A variable-temperature blackbody (VTBB) is used to calibrate an infrared radiation thermometer (pyrometer). The effective emissivity (ε{sub eff}) of a VTBB is dependent on temperature and wavelength other than the geometry of the VTBB. In the calibration process the effective emissivity is often assumed to be constant within the wavelength and temperature range. There are practical situations where the sensitivity of the effective emissivity needs to be known and correction has to be applied. We present a method using a genetic algorithm to investigate the sensitivity of the effective emissivity to wavelength and temperature variation. Two matlab® programs are generated: the first to model the radiance temperature calculation and the second to connect the model to the genetic algorithm optimization toolbox. The effective emissivity parameter is taken as a chromosome and optimized at each wavelength and temperature point. The difference between the contact temperature (reading from a platinum resistance thermometer or liquid in glass thermometer) and radiance temperature (calculated from the ε{sub eff} values) is used as an objective function where merit values are calculated and best fit ε{sub eff} values selected. The best fit ε{sub eff} values obtained as a solution show how sensitive they are to temperature and wavelength parameter variation. Uncertainty components that arise from wavelength and temperature variation are determined based on the sensitivity analysis. Numerical examples are considered for illustration.

  3. Temperature Effect on the Nanostructure of SDS Micelles in Water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammouda, Boualem

    2013-01-01

    Sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) surfactants form micelles when dissolved in water. These are formed of a hydrocarbon core and hydrophilic ionic surface. The small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) technique was used with deuterated water (D2O) in order to characterize the micelle structure. Micelles were found to be slightly compressed (oblate ellipsoids) and their sizes shrink with increasing temperature. Fits of SANS data to the Mean Spherical Approximation (MSA) model yielded a calculated micelle volume fraction which was lower than the SDS surfactant (sample mixing) volume fraction; this suggests that part of the SDS molecules do not participate in micelle formation and remain homogeneously mixed in the solvent. A set of material balance equations allowed the estimation of the SDS fraction in the micelles. This fraction was found to be high (close to one) except for samples around 1 % SDS fraction. The micelle aggregation number was found to decrease with increasing temperature and/or decreasing SDS fraction.

  4. The effect of low temperature on Antarctic endolithic green algae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, M. A.; Morris, G. J.; Friedmann, E. I.

    1988-01-01

    Laboratory experiments show that undercooling to about -5 degrees C occurs in colonized Beacon sandstones of the Ross Desert, Antarctica. High-frequency temperature oscillations between 5 degrees C and -5 degrees C or -10 degrees C (which occur in nature on the rock surface) did not damage Hemichloris antarctica. In a cryomicroscope, H. antarctica appeared to be undamaged after slow or rapid cooling to -50 degrees C. 14CO2 incorporation after freezing to -20 degrees C was unaffected in H. antarctica or in Trebouxia sp. but slightly depressed in Stichococcus sp. (isolated from a less extreme Antarctic habitat). These results suggest that the freezing regime in the Antarctic desert is not injurious to endolithic algae. It is likely that the freezing-point depression inside the rock makes available liquid water for metabolic activity at subzero temperatures. Freezing may occur more frequently on the rock surface and contribute to the abiotic nature of the surface.

  5. Compositional effects on the low temperature pumpability of engine oils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mac Alpine, G.A.; May, C.J.

    1987-01-01

    An in-depth study of the additive and basestock component factors affecting low temperature viscometrics and oil pumpability of multigrade engine oils has been made. Basestock pour points or residual wax contents alone do not predict low shear viscometric properties of the finished oils under slow cool conditions. Rather, the composition of the wax itself is a key factor with both normal and non-normal paraffins contributing to viscometric increases at low temperatures. It is shown that viscosity index improver and pour depressant selection can prove to be critical in the prevention of oil gelation leading to pumpability failure. The results of these lab viscometric studies have been confirmed in all weather chassis dynamometer tests on five 4-cylinder overhead cam engines.

  6. The Effect of Temperature Curing on Geopolymer Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Triwulan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This study presents curing temperature influences to behaviors of geopolymer concrete. The concrete was fly ash based, with the ratio of fly ash to alkaline activator was 65%:35%. Ratio coarse aggregate to fine aggregate was 60%:40%, ratios Na2SiO3/NaOH were 1.5:2 and 2.5. A polycarboxilate superplasticizer with ratio was 2% to fly ash weight. Form of the test specimens were cylinder with diameter of 10 cm and 20 cm high. Steam curing conducted were at 40°C, 60°C and 80°C for 24 hours. The control specimens were treated at normal moist curing. Tests conducted were compressive strength, tensile strength, porosity and elasticity modulus. The results indicated that at the elevated temperature the compressive strength increases as well as tensile strength but decreases the closed porosity of specimens. The elasticity modulus had a similar tendency.

  7. The surface temperature effect on the dissociative sticking of N2 on Fe(111)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Niels Engholm; Hansen, Flemming Yssing; Billing, Gert Due

    1995-01-01

    We present the first realistic calculation of the surface temperature effect on the dissociative sticking probability of molecular nitrogen on Fe(111). Extensive quantum dynamical calculations show that, depending on the impact point in the unit cell, the sticking probabilities can increase as well...... as decrease as a function of the surface temperature. The magnitude of the temperature effect on randomly chosen impact points is comparable with the experimental observation. Since only a small fraction of the impacts give a significant contribution to the sticking and the alternating temperature effect...

  8. Effects of different hatcher temperatures on hatching traits of broiler ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hatching time, hatchability, age of mortality and the incidence of embryo malpositions were recorded as percentage of fertile eggs. The highest mean embryonic heat production or eggshell surface temperature occurred in the hatching cabinets operated at 39.9 °C and lowest at 36.1 °C. Eggs incubated at 37.2 °C and 38.3 ...

  9. Temperature Effect on Hydrogen Evolution Reaction at Au Electrode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Zhi-qiang; Liao, Ling-wen; Zheng, Yong-li; Kang, Jing; Chen, Yan-xia

    2012-08-01

    The temperature dependence of hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) at a quasi-single crystalline gold electrode in both 0.1 mol/L HClO4 and 0.1 mol/L KOH solutions was investigated by cyclic voltammetry. HER current displays a clear increase with reaction overpotential (η) and temperature from 278-333 K. In 0.1 mol/L HClO4 the Tafel slopes are found to increases slightly with temperature from 118 mV/dec to 146 mV/dec, while in 0.1 mol/L KOH it is ca. 153±15 mV/dec without clear temperature-dependent trend. The apparent activation energy (Ea) for HER at equilibrium potential is ca. 48 and 34 kJ/mol in 0.1 mol/L HClO4 and 0.1 mol/L KOH, respectively. In acid solution, Ea decreases with increase in η, from Ea=37 kJ/mol (η=0.2 V) to 30 kJ/mol (η=0.35 V). In contrast, in 0.1 mol/L KOH, Ea does not show obvious change with η. The pre-exponential factor (A) in 0.1 mol/L HClO4 is ca. 1 order higher than that in 0.1 mol/L KOH. Toward more negative potential, in 0.1 mol/L HClO4 A changes little with potential, while in 0.1 mol/L KOH it displays a monotonic increase with η. The change trends of the potential-dependent kinetic parameters for HER at Au electrode in 0.1 mol/L HClO4 and that in 0.1 mol/L KOH are discussed.

  10. Effects of temperature on the compressive properties of extruded ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Recycled plastics, over the years, are believed to be inferior to virgin plastics. In this work, compression test was carried out on virgin and recycled uPVC plastics at different temperatures, from 25°C to 130°C at intervals of 15°C, to determine and to compare their compressive properties. The specimens were heat treated in ...

  11. Effects of rf power on electron density and temperature, neutral temperature, and Te fluctuations in an inductively coupled plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camparo, James; Fathi, Gilda

    2009-05-01

    Atomic clocks that fly on global-navigation satellites such as global positioning system (GPS) and Galileo employ light from low-temperature, inductively coupled plasmas (ICPs) for atomic signal generation and detection (i.e., alkali/noble-gas rf-discharge lamps). In this application, the performance of the atomic clock and the capabilities of the navigation system depend sensitively on the stability of the ICP's optical emission. In order to better understand the mechanisms that might lead to instability in these rf-discharge lamps, and hence the satellite atomic clocks, we studied the optical emission from a Rb/Xe ICP as a function of the rf power driving the plasma. Surprisingly, we found that the electron density in the plasma was essentially independent of increases in rf power above its nominal value (i.e., "rf-power gain") and that the electron temperature was only a slowly varying function of rf-power gain. The primary effect of rf power was to increase the temperature of the neutrals in the plasma, which was manifested by an increase in Rb vapor density. Interestingly, we also found evidence for electron temperature fluctuations (i.e., fluctuations in the plasma's high-energy electron content). The variance of these fluctuations scaled inversely with the plasma's mean electron temperature and was consistent with a simple model that assumed that the total electron density in the discharge was independent of rf power. Taken as a whole, our results indicate that the electrons in alkali/noble-gas ICPs are little affected by slight changes in rf power and that the primary effect of such changes is to heat the plasma's neutral species.

  12. Temperature effects in deep-water hydrate foam

    CERN Document Server

    Egorov, Alexander V; Rozhkov, Aleksey N

    2016-01-01

    This study focuses on heat and mass exchange processes in hydrate foam during its formation from methane bubbles in gas hydrate stability zone (GHSZ) of the Lake Baikal and following delivery of it in open container to the lake surface. The foam was formed as a result of methane bubble collection with a trap/container. The trap was inverted glass beaker of diameter of 70 mm and 360 mm long. Open bottom end of the beaker used as enter for bubbles ascended from the lakebed. At a depth of 1400 m all bubbles which fed to the trap were transformed here into solid hydrate foam. The sensitive thermometer was mounted in the middle of the trap and recorded the temperature inside trap. The fate of the bubbles in the trap was recorded by video-camera. During ascend within GHSZ with velocity of about 0.375 m/s we observed the continuous decrease of the temperature in the foam up to a level of negative magnitude in a depth interval of 1400 - 750 meters. Above 750 m temperature decrease was changed by small growth. However...

  13. Effects of Temperature and Species on TNT (Trinitrotoluene) Injury to Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-09-01

    line. Perennial ryegrass grown without TNT The nutrient solution for all flasks was a was significantly affected by temperature modified version of that...Plants strength. The solutions had an initial pH of grown at the lowest temperature produced 6.0. The nutrients were added to distilled wa- only a...toxic effects of trinitrotoluene (TNT) to plants grown hydroponically . The first -/study tested the effect of temperature and TNT concentration on plant

  14. Effect of temperature on the electro-oxidation of ethanol on platinum

    OpenAIRE

    Ana Paula M. Camargo; Bruno A. F. Previdello; Hamilton Varela; Ernesto R. Gonzalez

    2010-01-01

    We present in this work an experimental investigation of the effect of temperature (from 25 to 180 ºC) in the electro-oxidation of ethanol on platinum in two different phosphoric acid concentrations. We observed that the onset potential for ethanol electro-oxidation shifts to lower values and the reaction rates increase as temperature is increased for both electrolytes. The results were rationalized in terms of the effect of temperature on the adsorption of reaction intermediates, poisons, an...

  15. Effect of changes in season and temperature on mortality associated with air pollution in Seoul, Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Ae Kyung; Hong, Yun Chul; Kim, Ho

    2011-04-01

    Global warming has increased concern about the synergistic or interactive effects of temperature and air pollution on human health. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of changes in season and temperature on mortality associated with air pollution in Seoul, Korea, from June 1999 to December 2007. We used Poisson regression models with natural cubic splines. The effect of modifications was explored with two models: a time-varying coefficient model and a temperature-stratified model. In the summer season with high temperatures, we observed a considerable increase in the association between mortality and air pollution. The elevated risk was pronounced particularly in the effect of SO₂, and the increase of RR on non-accidental mortality was 0.83% (95% CI 0.42 to 1.25) at high temperatures (≥ 26.2°C) whereas the overall estimate was 0.21% (95% CI 0.07 to 0.36) per 0.5 ppb increment of SO₂. Those aged 65 y and over generally showed a higher risk of mortality. At extremely high temperature, the age group 85 y and older was especially vulnerable to air pollution. In a two-pollutant model, the significant effect of SO₂ at high temperatures (≥ 26.2°C) was not confounded by adjusting for other pollutants and the effect of CO at temperatures of 19.1-26.2°C remained largely unchanged by adjusting for other pollutants. The dominant adverse effect of SO₂ at high temperatures might be explained by an increase in concentration of sulfates by enhanced photochemical reaction, whereas at milder temperatures without vigorous photochemical activity the effect of CO may predominate in increasing mortality. Season and temperature strongly modified the adverse effect of air pollution, which implicates that an increase in the number of hot summer days by global warming may alter the health effects of air pollution.

  16. Effect of Periodic Surface Air Temperature Variations on Subsurface Thermal Structure with Vertical Fluid flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    D, R. V.; Ravi, M.; Srivastava, K.

    2016-12-01

    The influence of climate change on near subsurface temperatures is an important research topic for global change impact assessment at the regional scale. The varying temperature of the air over the surface in long term will disturb subsurface thermal structure. Groundwater flow is another important process which perturbs the thermal distribution into the subsurface. To investigate the effect of periodic air temperature on nonisothermal subsurface, one dimensional transient heat conduction-advection equation is solved numerically using finite element method. Thermal response of subsurface for periodic variations in surface air temperature (SAT) with robin type boundary condition on the surface with vertical ground water flow are calculated and the amplitude attenuation of propagation of surface temperature information in the subsurface for different scenarios of advection and convective coefficient are discussed briefly. The results show the coupled response of trigonometric variation in air temperature with surface temperatures along with ground water velocity has significant implications for the effects of climate change.

  17. Ageing and temperature effect on the fatigue performance of bituminous mixtures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. López-Montero

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The ageing of asphalt mixes, together with their exposure to low temperatures, causes a progressive increase of cracking. In this paper, the effect of ageing and temperature on the fatigue of asphalt concretes made with two types of binders, conventional (50/70 and polymer modified bitumen (PMB, is studied. For this purpose, specimens previously subjected to an accelerated laboratory ageing process were tested by a strain sweep test at different temperatures (-5ºC, 5ºC and 20°C. Results were compared with the obtained from the unaged specimens showing the relative importance of ageing, temperature and type of bitumen on the parameters that determine the fatigue life of the mixture. The mixtures behaviour becomes more brittle with ageing and the decrease of temperature. However, ageing hardly has an effect on fatigue at lower temperatures. In general, mixtures made with polymer modified bitumen have a better fatigue performance to ageing and temperature.

  18. Temperature Effect on Capacitive Humidity Sensors and its Compensation Using Artificial Neural Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarikul ISLAM

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper represents the study of the effect of temperature on different capacitive humidity sensors used in practice. Capacitance of the humidity sensor, which is a function of concentration of water vapor, also depends on ambient temperature. This variation of ambient temperature causes error in the performance of sensor outputs and its compensation is essential. In this paper, we have used an artificial neural network to compensate the effect of ambient temperature error. The proposed artificial neural network technique is based on inverse model of the sensor. The technique is applicable for compensation of linear or nonlinear temperature effect of humidity sensor. It can also compensate the nonlinearity of the capacitive humidity response which is an issue for all most all types of humidity sensor. Our simulation studies show the sensor output and artificial neural network model output matches closely. Even though sensor characteristics change with temperature, the proposed model performs well irrespective of any change in temperature. It can be extended for the temperature compensation of other sensors. The maximum error for nonlinearity using the ANN technique are 0.2 % and temperature error of 0.08 % for temperature range between 10 0C to 60 0C of Sensor 3 and 0.01 % for temperature range between 25 0C to 85 0C of Sensor 4 respectively.

  19. [Effects of temperature and density on the mortality and reproduction of cotton aphid Aphis gossypii].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Gui-Zhen; Lü, Zhao-Zhi; Xia, De-Ping; Sun, Ping; Ma, Ji-Hong; Xu, Yang-Cheng

    2013-05-01

    A laboratory cotton leaf disc experiment was conducted to study the effects of different temperature (32, 34, 36, 38, and 40 degrees C) and density (5, 25, 50, and 75 individuals per dish) on the mortality and reproduction of Aphis gossypii. With the increase of temperature, density, and culture duration, the cumulative mortality of A. gossypii presented an increasing trend. The parameters estimated by complementary log-log (CLL) model showed that the beta value decreased with the increase of density, indicating that the effects of temperature weakened with increasing density. The gamma value, a parameter for the time effect of temperature, changed with culture duration, indicating that the morality of A. gossypii was co-affected by the temperature and culture duration. The two-way ANOVA analysis of variance showed that temperature and density had significant effects on the fecundity of A. gossypii, and there existed interactive effect. At 32-36 degrees C, the reproduction rate of A. gossypii decreased with the increase of density, but at 40 degrees C, no significant difference was observed in the reproduction rate under different densities, suggesting that the density effect was weakened with increasing temperature, i. e., the contribution of temperature and density to the survival and reproduction of individual varied with the ranges of the temperature and density. This study could provide reference for the monitoring and forecasting of A. gossypii population and for the improvement of pests control.

  20. [Effects of urban river width on the temperature and humidity of nearby green belts in summer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Peng; Zhu, Chun-Yang; Li, Shu-Hua

    2012-03-01

    As an important part of urban ecosystem, urban river plays a vital role in improving urban ecological environment. By the methods of small scale quantitative measurement, this paper analyzed the effects of seven urban rivers with different widths along the Third to Fifth Ring in Beijing on the air temperature and relative humidity of nearby green belts. The results showed that urban river width was the main factor affecting the temperature and humidity of nearby green belts. When the river had a width of 8 m, it had no effects in decreasing temperature but definite effects in increasing humidity; when the river width was 14-33 m, obvious effects were observed in decreasing temperature and increasing humidity; when the river had a width larger than 40 m, the effects in decreasing temperature and increasing humidity were significant and tended to be stable. There existed significant differences in the temperature and humidity between the green belts near the seven rivers and the corresponding controls. The critical width of urban river for the obvious effects in decreasing temperature and increasing humidity was 44 m. The regression equation of the temperature (x) and humidity (y) for the seven green belts nearby the urban rivers in summer was y = 173.191-3.247x, with the relative humidity increased by 1.0% when the air temperature decreased by about 0.3 degrees C.

  1. Effect of programmed diurnal temperature cycles on plasma thyroxine level, body temperature, and feed intake of holstein dairy cows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, I. M.; Johnson, H. D.; Hahn, G. L.

    1983-03-01

    Holstein cows exposed to simulated summer diurnal ambient temperature cycles of Phoenix, Arizona and Atlanta, Georgia and diurnal modifications of these climates displayed daily cycles fluctuations in plasma thyroxine (T4) and rectal temperatures (Tre). There were daily diurnal changes in T4 and Tre under all simulated climate conditions. Maximal values generally occurred in the evening hours and minimum values in the morning. Although the diurnal rhythm was influenced by the various simulated climates (diurnal modifications) a diurnal rhythm was very evident even under constant conditions at thermoneutral (Tnc) and at cyclic thermoneutral conditions (TN). The major significance of the study is that the initiation of night cooling of the animals at a time when their Tre was highest was most beneficial to maintenance of a TN plasma T4 level. There was a highly significant negative relationship of average T4 and average Tre. There was also a significant negative relationship of feed consumption and average temperature-humidity index (THI). These data suggest that night cooling may be a most effective method to alleviate thermoregulatory limitations of a hot climate on optimal animal performance. Decreasing the night time air temperature (Ta) or THI or increasing the diurnal range allows the cows to more easily dissipate excess body heat accumulated during the day and minimize the thermal inhibition on feed intake, and alterations in plasma T4 and Tre.

  2. Effect of temperature, salinity, light and time of dehiscence on seed ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cultivar differences. Grass Forage Sci. 53: 270-278. Perumal SA, Varghese B, Govender P, Ramdhani S, Berjak P (2014). Effects of elevated temperature on germination and effects of elevated temperatures on germination and subsequent seedling vigour in recalcitrant Trichilia emetica seeds. South Afr. J. Bot. 90: 153-162.

  3. Negative effects of low developmental temperatures on aphid predation by Orius majusculus (Heteroptera: Anthocoridae)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helgadóttir, Friða; Toft, Søren; Sigsgaard, Lene

    2017-01-01

    apple aphids (Dysaphis plantaginea) of females from each of these treatments was tested at the same temperatures (12, 16 and 20 °C). Additionally, we tested the effects of low temperature treatment only during the last nymphal instar, to examine if shorter treatments would have the same effects. Our...

  4. The Effect of Temperature on the Enzyme-Catalyzed Reaction: Insights from Thermodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aledo, Juan Carlos; Jimenez-Riveres, Susana; Tena, Manuel

    2010-01-01

    When teaching the effect of temperature on biochemical reactions, the problem is usually oversimplified by confining the thermal effect to the catalytic constant, which is identified with the rate constant of the elementary limiting step. Therefore, only positive values for activation energies and values greater than 1 for temperature coefficients…

  5. Effect of low temperature during the night in young sweet pepper plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gorbe Sanchez, Elisa; Heuvelink, E.; Jalink, H.; Stanghellini, C.

    2015-01-01

    The optimization of heating in greenhouses should be an energy saving target in the cultivation of sweet pepper plants; from both an environmental and economical point of view. It is important to understand the effect of low temperatures on this crop. While the effect of low temperature has been

  6. The oasis effect and summer temperature rise in arid regions - case study in Tarim Basin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Xingming; Li, Weihong; Deng, Haijun

    2016-10-14

    This study revealed the influence of the oasis effect on summer temperatures based on MODIS Land Surface Temperature (LST) and meteorological data. The results showed that the oasis effect occurs primarily in the summer. For a single oasis, the maximum oasis cold island intensity based on LST (OCI LST ) was 3.82 °C and the minimum value was 2.32 °C. In terms of the annual change in OCI LST , the mean value of all oases ranged from 2.47 °C to 3.56 °C from 2001 to 2013. Net radiation (R n ) can be used as a key predictor of OCI LST and OCI temperature (OCI based on air temperature). On this basis, we reconstructed a long time series (1961-2014) of OCI temperature and T base (air temperature without the disturbance of oasis effect). Our results indicated that the reason for the increase in the observed temperatures was the significant decrease in the OCI temperature over the past 50 years. In arid regions, the data recorded in weather stations not only underestimated the mean temperature of the entire study area but also overestimated the increasing trend of the temperature. These discrepancies are due to the limitations in the spatial distribution of weather stations and the disturbance caused by the oasis effect.

  7. The Effects of Nutrient Imbalances and Temperature on the Biomass Stoichiometry of Freshwater Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Katherine N; Godwin, Casey M; Cotner, James B

    2017-01-01

    Two contemporary effects of humans on aquatic ecosystems are increasing temperatures and increasing nutrient concentrations from fertilizers. The response of organisms to these perturbations has important implications for ecosystem processes. We examined the effects of phosphorus (P) supply and temperature on organismal carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus (C, N, and P) content, cell size and allocation into internal P pools in three strains of recently isolated bacteria ( Agrobacterium sp., Flavobacterium sp., and Arthrobacter sp.). We manipulated resource C:P in chemostats and also manipulated temperatures from 10 to 30°C. Dilution rates were maintained for all the strains at ~25% of their temperature-specific maximum growth rate to simulate low growth rates in natural systems. Under these conditions, there were large effects of resource stoichiometry and temperature on biomass stoichiometry, element quotas, and cell size. Each strain was smaller when C-limited and larger when P-limited. Temperature had weak effects on morphology, little effect on C quotas, no effect on N quotas and biomass C:N, but had strong effects on P quotas, biomass N:P and C:P, and RNA. RNA content per cell increased with increasing temperature at most C:P supply ratios, but was more strongly affected by resource stoichiometry than temperature. Because we used a uniform relative growth rate across temperatures, these findings mean that there are important nutrient and temperature affects on biomass composition and stoichiometry that are independent of growth rate. Changes in biomass stoichiometry with temperature were greatest at low P availability, suggesting tighter coupling between temperature and biomass stoichiometry in oligotrophic ecosystems than in eutrophic systems. Because the C:P stoichiometry of biomass affects how bacteria assimilate and remineralize C, increased P availability could disrupt a negative feedback between biomass stoichiometry and C availability.

  8. Effect of isobars at finite temperature in pion condensation in 16O

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.K. Tripathi

    1983-01-01

    Full Text Available The role of Δ (1232 at finite temperature is considered in pion condensation in 16O. Taking into account the effect of the Δ's the free energy of the spin-isospin phase, where the spins of all the protons are oriented one way and those of neutrons in the opposite direction, is compared with the free energy of the normal phase. For higher temperatures (T> 15MeV the critical density of the phase transition increases with temperature. Smaller temperatures are found to contribute to the development of the condensate. The Δ's get increasingly more important with higher density and temperature.

  9. High temperature study of flexible silicon-on-insulator fin field-effect transistors

    KAUST Repository

    Diab, Amer El Hajj

    2014-09-29

    We report high temperature electrical transport characteristics of a flexible version of the semiconductor industry\\'s most advanced architecture: fin field-effect transistor on silicon-on-insulator with sub-20 nm fins and high-κ/metal gate stacks. Characterization from room to high temperature (150 °C) was completed to determine temperature dependence of drain current (Ids), gate leakage current (Igs), transconductance (gm), and extracted low-field mobility (μ0). Mobility degradation with temperature is mainly caused by phonon scattering. The other device characteristics show insignificant difference at high temperature which proves the suitability of inorganic flexible electronics with advanced device architecture.

  10. EFFECTS OF PAVEMENT SURFACE TEMPERATURE ON THE MODIFICATION OF URBAN THERMAL ENVIRONMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SARAT, Adebayo-Aminu

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Urban centres continue to experience escalating average summer temperature over the last fifty years. Temperature in the urban core cites have been rising due to rapid growth of urbanization in the latter half of the twentieth century (Akbari et al., 1989. Outdoor experiments were conducted to investigate the effects of different movement of materials on the urban thermal environment. Meteorological conditions such as air temperature, pavement surface temperature, Relative humidity and wind velocity were recorded to determine temperature differences among Asphalt/concrete, interlocking bricks and grass surfaces.

  11. The Effect of Elevated Temperature on Concrete Materials and Structures - a Literature Review.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naus, Dan J [ORNL

    2006-03-01

    The objective of this limited study was to provide an overview of the effects of elevated temperature on the behavior of concrete materials and structures. In meeting this objective the effects of elevated temperatures on the properties of ordinary Portland cement concrete constituent materials and concretes are summarized. The effects of elevated temperature on high-strength concrete materials are noted and their performance compared to normal strength concretes. A review of concrete materials for elevated-temperature service is presented. Nuclear power plant and general civil engineering design codes are described. Design considerations and analytical techniques for evaluating the response of reinforced concrete structures to elevated-temperature conditions are presented. Pertinent studies in which reinforced concrete structural elements were subjected to elevated temperatures are described.

  12. Temperature effect on the behaviour of engineered clay barriers; Effet de la temperature sur le comportement des barrieres de confinement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, A.M

    2005-11-15

    The present work deals with the thermo-hydro-mechanical behaviour of compacted swelling clay used for engineered barriers in high-level radioactive repositories. The MX80 bentonite was chosen for this work. Firstly, an experimental work on the thermal conductivity of the compacted bentonite was performed. The results evidenced the effects of dry density, water content, volumetric fraction of soil components, microstructure, and mineralogy. This experimental work gave rise to the proposition of a theoretical model for estimate the thermal conductivity of compacted bentonites. Secondly, after a calibration of suction generated by saturated saline solution in function of temperature, water retention curves were determined at different temperatures. The experimental results showed a decrease of the water retention capacity of soil after heating. A simple model based on the interfacial tension air-water was formulated to simulate this effect. Thirdly, a new isotropic cell enabling a simultaneous control of suction, temperature and mechanical stress was developed. With this new cell, an experimental work on the thermo-mechanical behaviour of the unsaturated compacted bentonite was performed. Finally, a constitutive model was developed for simulate the thermo-hydro-mechanical behaviours obtained experimentally. (author)

  13. EFFECT OF TEMPERATURE ON THE PROCESS OF BEER PRIMARY FERMENTATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miriam Solgajová

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Beer is a very popular and widespread drink worldwide. Beer may be defined as a foamy alcoholic drink aerated by carbon dioxide that is formed during fermentation. Sensorial and analytical character of beer is mainly formed during process of primary fermentation. Our work has monitored the influence of temperature of fermentation substrate on the process of primary fermentation during beer production. Obtained values of temperature and apparent extract out of four brews of 10% light hopped wort has been recorded, during the process of primary fermentation carried out in mini brewery of SPU. We have compared our results with theoretical values of primary fermentation process commonly achieved in conditions of industrial breweries. It was found out that our results differ in some ways, moreover they exceed theoretically given values which was caused due to different construction of mini brewery fermentation tank in comparison with industrial brewery technologies. Beer produced in mini brewery of SPU showed in sensorial tests very good quality without any strange odour and any strange taste.

  14. High temperature and drought stress effects on survival of Pinus ponderosa seedlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolb, P F; Robberecht, R

    1996-08-01

    We studied the effects of high temperature and drought on the survival, growth and water relations of seedlings of Pinus ponderosa (Dougl.) Lawson, one of few coniferous tree species that can successfully colonize drought-prone sites with high soil surface temperatures. Temperature profiles were measured with 0.07-mm thermocouples in a sparse ponderosa pine forest in northern Idaho. The soil surface and the adjacent 5 mm of air reached maximum temperatures exceeding 75 degrees C, well above the lethal temperature threshold for most plants. Air temperatures 50 mm above the soil surface (seedling needle height) rarely exceeded 45 degrees C. Pinus ponderosa seedlings that survived maintained basal stem temperatures as much as 15 degrees C lower than the surrounding air. The apparent threshold temperature at the seedling stem surface resulting in death was approximately 63 degrees C for less than 1 min. No correlation between seedling mortality and needle temperature was found, although some needles reached temperatures as high as 60 degrees C for periods of cooling the stem below the lethal threshold temperature. Heat exchange calculations showed that rapid water flow through seedling stems can absorb sufficient energy to reduce stem temperature by 30 degrees C during peak sunlight hours.

  15. Effect of Indoor Temperature on Physical Performance in Older Adults during Days with Normal Temperature and Heat Waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindemann, Ulrich; Stotz, Anja; Beyer, Nina; Oksa, Juha; Skelton, Dawn A; Becker, Clemens; Rapp, Kilian; Klenk, Jochen

    2017-02-14

    Indoor temperature is relevant with regard to mortality and heat-related self-perceived health problems. The aim of this study was to describe the association between indoor temperature and physical performance in older adults. Eighty-one older adults (84% women, mean age 80.9 years, standard deviation 6.53) were visited every four weeks from May to October 2015 and additionally during two heat waves in July and August 2015. Indoor temperature, habitual gait speed, chair-rise performance and balance were assessed. Baseline assessment of gait speed was used to create two subgroups (lower versus higher gait speed) based on frailty criteria. The strongest effect of increasing temperature on habitual gait speed was observed in the subgroup of adults with higher gait speed (-0.087 m/s per increase of 10 °C; 95% confidence interval (CI): -0.136; -0.038). The strongest effects on timed chair-rise and balance performance were observed in the subgroup of adults with lower gait speed (2.03 s per increase of 10 °C (95% CI: 0.79; 3.28) and -3.92 s per increase of 10 °C (95% CI: -7.31; -0.52), respectively). Comparing results of physical performance in absentia of a heat wave and during a heat wave, habitual gait speed was negatively affected by heat in the total group and subgroup of adults with higher gait speed, chair-rise performance was negatively affected in all groups and balance was not affected. The study provides arguments for exercise interventions in general for older adults, because a better physical fitness might alleviate impediments of physical capacity and might provide resources for adequate adaptation in older adults during heat stress.

  16. Analyzing the effect of tool edge radius on cutting temperature in micro-milling process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Y. C.; Yang, K.; Zheng, K. N.; Bai, Q. S.; Chen, W. Q.; Sun, G. Y.

    2010-10-01

    Cutting heat is one of the important physical subjects in the cutting process. Cutting heat together with cutting temperature produced by the cutting process will directly have effects on the tool wear and the life as well as on the workpiece processing precision and surface quality. The feature size of the workpiece is usually several microns. Thus, the tiny changes of cutting temperature will affect the workpiece on the surface quality and accuracy. Therefore, cutting heat and temperature generated in micro-milling will have significantly different effect than the one in the traditional tools cutting. In this paper, a two-dimensional coupled thermal-mechanical finite element model is adopted to determine thermal fields and cutting temperature during the Micro-milling process, by using software Deform-2D. The effect of tool edge radius on effective stress, effective strain, velocity field and cutting temperature distribution in micro-milling of aluminum alloy Al2024-T6 were investigated and analyzed. Also, the transient cutting temperature distribution was simulated dynamically. The simulation results show that the cutting temperature in Micro-milling is lower than those occurring in conventional milling processes due to the small loads and low cutting velocity. With increase of tool edge radius, the maximum temperature region gradually occurs on the contact region between finished surfaced and flank face of micro-cutter, instead of the rake face or the corner of micro-cutter. And this phenomenon shows an obvious size effect.

  17. Analysis of effective radiant temperatures in a Pacific Northwest forest using Thermal Infrared Multispectral Scanner data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sader, S. A.

    1986-01-01

    Analysis of Thermal Infrared Multispectral Scanner data collected over H. J. Andrews experimental forest in western Oregon indicated that aspect and slope gradient had a greater effect on the thermal emission of younger reforested clearcuts than of older stands. Older forest stands (older than 25 years) with greater amounts of green biomass and closed canopies, had lower effective radiant temperatures than younger, less dense stands. Aspect and slope had little effect on the effective radiant temperature of these older stands. Canopy temperature recorded at approximately 1:30 pm local time July 29, 1983 were nearly equal to maximum daily air temperature recorded at eight reference stands. The investigation provided some insights into the utility of the thermal sensor for detecting surface temperature differences related to forest composition and green biomass amounts in mountain terrain.

  18. Measurement of cryogenic moderator temperature effects in a small heterogeneous thermal reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoovler, G.S.; Ball, R.M.; Lewis, R.H.

    1994-12-31

    Past papers have described a critical experiment (CX) built at Sandia National Laboratories to investigate the neutronic behavior of the particle-bed reactor (PBK). Among the experiments previously reported were tests to measure the reactivity effect of uniform temperature variations between 20 and 80{degree}C. This paper describes additional experiments designed to examine the effects of cryogenic moderator temperatures on core reactivity and neutron spectrum. The general importance of temperature effects to the design of the PBR have been previously discussed. A unique feature of the PBR is that the moderator may be at cryogenic temperatures during reactor startup. Because temperature effects in small, heterogeneous thermal reactors can be significant and because we found no integral measurements with cryogenic moderators in such systems, an experiment with a cryogenic moderator was designed and performed in the CX as an extension to the isothermal measurements previously reported.

  19. Soil surface temperatures reveal moderation of the urban heat island effect by trees and shrubs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edmondson, Jill L; Stott, Iain; Davies, Zoe G

    2016-01-01

    Urban areas are major contributors to air pollution and climate change, causing impacts on human health that are amplified by the microclimatological effects of buildings and grey infrastructure through the urban heat island (UHI) effect. Urban greenspaces may be important in reducing surface...... months increased by 0.6 °C over the 5 km from the city outskirts to the centre. Trees and shrubs in non-domestic greenspace reduced mean maximum daily soil surface temperatures in the summer by 5.7 °C compared to herbaceous vegetation, but tended to maintain slightly higher temperatures in winter. Trees...... in domestic gardens, which tend to be smaller, were less effective at reducing summer soil surface temperatures. Our findings reveal that the UHI effects soil temperatures at a city-wide scale, and that in their moderating urban soil surface temperature extremes, trees and shrubs may help to reduce...

  20. Behavioural effects of temperature on ectothermic animals: unifying thermal physiology and behavioural plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abram, Paul K; Boivin, Guy; Moiroux, Joffrey; Brodeur, Jacques

    2017-11-01

    Temperature imposes significant constraints on ectothermic animals, and these organisms have evolved numerous adaptations to respond to these constraints. While the impacts of temperature on the physiology of ectotherms have been extensively studied, there are currently no frameworks available that outline the multiple and often simultaneous pathways by which temperature can affect behaviour. Drawing from the literature on insects, we propose a unified framework that should apply to all ectothermic animals, generalizing temperature's behavioural effects into: (1) kinetic effects, resulting from temperature's bottom-up constraining influence on metabolism and neurophysiology over a range of timescales (from short to long term), and (2) integrated effects, where the top-down integration of thermal information intentionally initiates or modifies a behaviour (behavioural thermoregulation, thermal orientation, thermosensory behavioural adjustments). We discuss the difficulty in distinguishing adaptive behavioural changes from constraints when observing animals' behavioural responses to temperature. We then propose two complementary approaches to distinguish adaptations from constraints, and categorize behaviours according to our framework: (i) 'kinetic null modelling' of temperature's effects on behaviour; and (ii) behavioural ecology experiments using temperature-insensitive mutants. Our framework should help to guide future research on the complex relationship between temperature and behaviour in ectothermic animals. © 2016 Cambridge Philosophical Society.

  1. [EFFECT OF TEMPERATURE ON THE VIABILITY OF PLANKTON CELLS AND MODEL LEGIONELLA PNEUMOPHILA BIOFILMS IN WATER].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tartakovsky, I S; Karpoval, T I; Gruzdeva, O A; Marinenko, O V; Dronina, Yu E

    2015-01-01

    Study the effect of water temperature from 40 to 70 degrees C on viability of plankton forms and model Legionella pneumophila under experimental conditions. Monospecies legionella biofilms, obtained in plates for enzyme immunoassay during 96 hours at 28 degrees C, and water suspension of BCYE agar cultivated cells of L. pneumophila at a concentration of 10(3) - 10(5) CFU per liter were used in the study for evaluation of bactericidal effect of temperature on various legionella forms. Analysis of effects of various temperature regimens on plankton forms and model legionella biofilms has shown that at a temperature range from 50 to 60 degrees C a significant reduction of quantity of viable legionella cells occurs. Model legionella biofilms have partially conserved viability at a temperature of 60 degrees C and only exposition to a temperature of 70 degrees C resulted in death of legionella biofilms and plankton forms of bacteria. A dependence of viability conservation of legionella from the initial concentration of the causative agent in water and duration of exposition at varying temperature was shown. Short-term heating at a temperature of at least 70 degrees C has the most pronounced bactericidal effect on plankton forms and model L. pneumophila biofilms under experimental conditions. Such temperature regimen could be used as one of the prophylaxis approaches during maintenance of especially dangerous water system and, fist of all, systems of hot water supply.

  2. Effect of mold temperature on the mechanical durability of titanium casting clasp model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iiyama, Kenichi; Doi, Hisashi; Hanawa, Takao

    2009-09-01

    Titanium is widely used in dental applications. This study investigated the effects of casting conditions on the mechanical characteristics of cast titanium, with a special focus on mold temperature. As such, the mechanical characteristics of specimens prepared at various mold temperatures of 23, 200, 400, 600 and 800 degrees C were compared. On tensile strength, a significant decrease was observed at mold temperatures above 400 degrees C as well as an increase in the scattering of the measured values at higher mold temperatures. On the durability of cast titanium which was assessed by simulating the actual clasp movement during cyclic flexural test, it was found to decrease as the mold temperature increased. When compared with Type 4 dental gold alloy, titanium which was cast at room temperature exhibited equivalent or better durability. Based on the results of this study, it is recommended to perform casting at lower mold temperatures in order to produce highly fatigue-proof cast titanium clasps.

  3. Climate change, global warming and coral reefs: modelling the effects of temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crabbe, M James C

    2008-10-01

    Climate change and global warming have severe consequences for the survival of scleractinian (reef-building) corals and their associated ecosystems. This review summarizes recent literature on the influence of temperature on coral growth, coral bleaching, and modelling the effects of high temperature on corals. Satellite-based sea surface temperature (SST) and coral bleaching information available on the internet is an important tool in monitoring and modelling coral responses to temperature. Within the narrow temperature range for coral growth, corals can respond to rate of temperature change as well as to temperature per se. We need to continue to develop models of how non-steady-state processes such as global warming and climate change will affect coral reefs.

  4. Temperature effects on gene expression and morphological development of European eel, Anguilla anguilla larvae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Politis, Sebastian Nikitas; Mazurais, David; Servili, Arianna

    2017-01-01

    to first-feeding, and the linked expression of targeted genes [heat shock proteins (hsp), growth hormone (gh) and insulin-like growth factors (igf)] associated to larval performance of European eel, Anguilla anguilla. Temperature effects on larval morphology and gene expression were investigated throughout......Temperature is important for optimization of rearing conditions in aquaculture, especially during the critical early life history stages of fish. Here, we experimentally investigated the impact of temperature (16, 18, 20, 22 and 24°C) on thermally induced phenotypic variability, from larval hatch...... affected by temperature. In real time, increasing temperature from 16 to 22°C accelerated larval development, while larval gene expression patterns (hsp70, hsp90, gh and igf-1) were delayed at cold temperatures (16°C) or accelerated at warm temperatures (20-22°C). All targeted genes (hsp70, hsp90, gh, igf...

  5. Temperature effects on solute diffusion and adsorption in differently compacted kaolin clay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mon, Ei Ei; Hamamoto, Shoichiro; Kawamoto, Ken

    2016-01-01

    diffusion process in soils has been poorly understood and rarely documented. In this study, solute diffusion experiments as well as equilibrium adsorption experiments using pure kaolin clay were conducted under different temperature conditions. The experiments of K+ adsorption on kaolin clay showed more......Effects of soil temperature on the solute diffusion process in soils are important since subsurface temperature variation affects solute transport such as a fertilizer movement, leaching of salt, and pollutant movement to groundwater aquifers. However, the temperature dependency on the solute...... enhanced adsorption of K+ at elevated temperature likely because surface charge characteristics were affected at different temperature conditions for the kaolin clay. The temperature dependent solute diffusion showed that the solute diffusion coefficient at 40 °C was around two times higher than that at 6...

  6. The effects of cold rolling temperature on corrosion resistance of pure iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jinlong, Lv; Hongyun, Luo

    2014-10-01

    The effects of cold rolling temperature on grain size and grain orientation of pure iron were investigated. Comparing with sample rolled at room temperature, the grain refinement was facilitated in sample obtained by cryogenic cold rolling at liquid-nitrogen temperature. However, the grain orientation changed little for two samples. It was shown that cathodic hydrogen evolution reaction could govern the corrosion reaction for pure iron in sulfuric acid solution. The grain refinement obtained by rolling improved the corrosion resistance of iron in sulfuric acid solution, borate buffer solution and borate buffer solution with chloride ion. However, comparing with iron rolled at room temperature, the corrosion resistance of iron obtained by cryogenic temperature rolling was lower. Comparing with iron rolled at room temperature, higher dislocation density in iron rolled at cryogenic temperature reduced its corrosion resistance.

  7. Study on effect of temperature and humidity on the CO2 concentration measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, YuLiang; Ni, Xiang; Wu, YuanXi; Zhang, Wei

    2017-08-01

    In the application of non dispersive infrared (NDIR) carbon dioxide (CO2) concentration measurement, we need avoid the interference factors (such as temperature, pressure, gas, fluctuation of the light source and dust pollution etc.). In the past experiments only single factor, such as temperature, is often emphasized to the influence on the measurement results, without considering the effect of multiple factors. In order to study the change of gas concentration with measurement parameters, we constructs a CO2 detecting device with a BM530 gas detecting module, TMD10 temperature and humidity sensor. The experimental results show that: there is a correlation between the two interference factors: temperature and humidity. With the decreasing temperature, gas concentration measurement value decreases too. In developing process of instruments, we can make correction of the concentration- temperature instead of that of the measurement results under different temperature and humidity conditions.

  8. Increased Temperatures Have Dramatic Effects on Growth and Grain Yield of Three Maize Hybrids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerry L. Hatfield

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Rising temperatures under climate change are projected to have negative impacts on crop growth and production. These conclusions are not based on direct observations but on projected model results. A study conducted comparing normal seasonal temperatures (1980–2010 for Ames, IA, to a normal + 4°C environment with the same water vapor deficit evaluated the impacts of temperature on maize ( L. development and production. The rate of phenological development increased at higher temperatures; however, the relationship of leaf collar and leaf tip appearance to growing degree days was the same between temperature regimes. There was no effect on total leaf area or vegetative dry matter production, but grain yields decreased from 84 to 100% because of exposure to high nighttime temperatures and disruption of the pollination process as evidenced by the large reduction in kernels per ear. Projected increases in temperature will negatively affect grain production and threaten food security.

  9. Effects of Temperature and Corrosion Potential on SCC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andresen, Peter L.; Seeman, Russell A.

    This study reinforces the expectation that a consistent benefit of low corrosion potential is achievable at intermediate temperatures associated with BWR start up. Such low corrosion potentials can probably only be achieved using NobleChem™ and injection of H2 or other reductants such as hydrazine or carbohydrazide because very low residual levels of O2 can elevate the corrosion potential. The high growth rates that occur during start up merit mitigation, although this study did not find growth rates that were orders of magnitude higher than at 288 °C. However, this study did not attempt to simulate all aspects of start up, especially the sources of dynamic strain such as differential thermal expansion, which can be estimated by are not known.

  10. Effect of Temperature towards RNA Concentration: Quantitative Investigation with Spectrophotometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feby Fariska Savira

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Ribonucleic acid (RNA is a thermodynamically unstable molecule. The way RNA samples are preserved is critical to maintain maximum yield and quality, therefore it is useful for molecular analysis such as real time- PCR. There are many contradictions and variations regarding the temperature for RNA storage. The aim of this study is to find the ideal temperature to store RNA among -80o C, -20o C and 4oC by determining changes in RNA concentration over two weeks of storage time. The liver of eight rats was divided into three groups, weighing from 25-26 μg. Samples were homogenized, isolated and stored in -80oC, -20oC and 4oC freezers. Absorbance was measured with spectrophotometry at 260 and 280 nm to determine the concentration of RNA. There was no significant difference in the concentration of RNA samples stored in all temperatures after two weeks, both experimentally and statistically (Kruskal-Wallis, -80oC p=0.949; -20oC p=0.885; 4oC p=0.935. In conclusion, RNA can be stored in -80oC, -20oC and 4oC for two weeks without quantity reduction. Longer duration of study and RNA quality analysis is recommended to check for RNA degradation. Keywords: RNA, temperature, concentration, storage, spectrophotometry Efek Suhu terhadap Konsentrasi RNA: Investigasi Kuantitatif dengan Spektrofotometer Abstrak Ribonucleic acid (RNA adalah molekul yang tidak stabil secara termodinamik. Cara penyimpanan RNA sangat kritis untuk menjaga kuantitas dan kualitasnya agar dapat digunakan untuk analisis molekuler seperti real time-PCR. Tujuan penelitian ini adalah mengetahui suhu ideal penyimpanan RNA di antara -80oC, -20oC dan 4oC dengan melihat perubahan pada konsentrasi RNA selama dua minggu masa penyimpanan. Delapan hati tikus dibagi menjadi tiga kelompok dengan berat sampel 25-26 μg. Sampel hati dihomogenisasi dan diisolasi, lalu disimpan pada suhu -80oC, -20oC and 4oC. Absorbansi diukur dengan spektrofotometri pada gelombang cahaya 260 dan 280 nm untuk mendapatkan

  11. Preheating temperature effect on tritium retention in VPS-W

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sato, M.; Uchimura, H.; Toda, K.; Oya, Y.; Okuno, K. [Graduate School of Science, Shizuoka University, Suruga-Ku, Shizuoka (Japan); Tokunaga, T.; Watanabe, H.; Yoshida, N. [Research Institute for Applied Mechanics, Kyushu University, Kasuga-city, Fukuoka (Japan); Hatano, Y. [Hydrogen Isotope Research Center, University of Toyama, Toyama-city, Toyama (Japan); Kasada, R.; Kimura, A. [Institute of Advance Energy, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto (Japan); Nagasaka, T. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki-city, Gifu (Japan)

    2015-03-15

    The W coating by Vacuum Plasma Spraying (VPS) technology is thought to be reasonable for most plasma facing components in future fusion reactors. In this paper the deuterium retention behavior for the Vacuum Plasma Spraying (VPS) tungsten (W) coating has been studied to demonstrate the tritium retention as a function of heating temperature. It has been found that two major deuterium desorption stages were observed at the temperature regions of 400 - 700 K (Stage 1) and 900 - 1100 K (Stage 2), considering that Stage 1 has been linked to the desorption of deuterium trapped by near surface and intrinsic defects, and Stage 2 has been related to the desorption of deuterium bound to impurities as C-D bonds. By heating the sample above 673 K, the major peak of C-1s shifted from C-O bond to C-C bond, where the retention of deuterium as Stage 2 has increased. Therefore it indicates that the hydrogen isotope retention was controlled by the amount of C-C bond in VPS, most of which was contaminated during the VPS coating process. The comparison of several samples (VPS-W with shading, VPS-W without shading and Polycrystalline W (PCW)) shows that the carbon impurity has a large affinity with deuterium and makes stable trapping states compared to that with intrinsic defects and grain boundaries. However, most of them was reduced by heating at 1173 K. Therefore, heating treatment is quite important to get rid of carbon impurities and refrain higher tritium retention in VPS. (authors)

  12. High autumn temperature delays spring bud burst in boreal trees, counterbalancing the effect of climatic warming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heide, O. M. [Agricultural Univesity of Norway, Department of Biology and Nature Conservation, As (Norway)

    2003-09-01

    The effect of temperature during short-day dormancy induction on the duration and stability of bud dormancy was examined in three boreal tree species (2 birches and 1 alder) grown in a controlled environment. The phenology of the latitudinal range of birch populations, and the relationship between spring bud burst and autumn and spring temperatures were also studied. Results showed that during short-day dormancy induction in the autumn high temperatures delayed bud burst in the following spring in both controlled and natural environments. It is suggested that this response to higher autumn temperatures may be a manifestation of a general synergism between high temperature and short-day photoperiodic processes, and may be an adaptive mechanism common to boreal trees. It is further conjectured that this mechanism may be important in counterbalancing the potentially adverse effects of higher winter temperatures on dormancy stability of boreal trees during climate warming. 23 refs., 2 tabs., 4 figs.

  13. Effects of Environmental Temperature on the Dynamics of Ichthyophoniasis in Juvenile Pacific Herring (Clupea pallasii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jake L. Gregg

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of temperature and infection by Ichthyophonus were examined in juvenile Pacific herring (Clupea pallasii maintained under simulated overwinter fasting conditions. In addition to defining parameters for a herring bioenergetics model (discussed in Vollenweider et al. this issue, these experiments provided new insights into factors influencing the infectivity and virulence of the parasite Ichthyophonus. In groups of fish with established disease, temperature variation had little effect on disease outcome. Ichthyophonus mortality outpaced that resulting from starvation alone. In newly infected fish, temperature variation significantly changed the mortality patterns related to disease. Both elevated and lowered temperatures suppressed disease-related mortality relative to ambient treatments. When parasite exposure dose decreased, an inverse relationship between infection prevalence and temperature was detected. These findings suggest interplay between temperature optima for parasite growth and host immune function and have implications for our understanding of how Ichthyophonus infections are established in wild fish populations.

  14. The Varying Effects of Uniaxial Compressive Stress on the Bainitic Transformation under Different Austenitization Temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingxing Zhou

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In this study, thermal simulation experiments under different austenitization temperatures and different stress states were conducted. High-temperature laser scanning confocal microscopy (LSCM, thermal dilatometry, and scanning electron microscope (SEM were used to quantitatively investigate the effects of the uniaxial compressive stress on bainitic transformation at 330 °C following different austenitization temperatures. The transformation plasticity was also analyzed. It was found that the promotion degree of stress on bainitic transformation increases with the austenitization temperature due to larger prior austenite grain size as well as stronger promoting effect of mechanical driving force on selected variant growth at higher austenitization temperatures. The grain size and the yield strength of prior austenite are other important factors which influence the promotion degree of stress on bainitic transformation, besides the mechanical driving force provided by the stress. Moreover, the transformation plasticity increases with the austenitization temperature.

  15. Effects of environmental temperature on the dynamics of ichthyophoniasis in Juvenile Pacific Herring (Clupea pallasii)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregg, J.L.; Vollenweider, Johanna J.; Grady, C.A.; Heintz, R.A.; Hershberger, P.K.

    2011-01-01

    The effects of temperature and infection by Ichthyophonus were examined in juvenile Pacific herring (Clupea pallasii) maintained under simulated overwinter fasting conditions. In addition to defining parameters for a herring bioenergetics model (discussed in Vollenweider et al. this issue), these experiments provided new insights into factors influencing the infectivity and virulence of the parasite Ichthyophonus. In groups of fish with established disease, temperature variation had little effect on disease outcome. Ichthyophonus mortality outpaced that resulting from starvation alone. In newly infected fish, temperature variation significantly changed the mortality patterns related to disease. Both elevated and lowered temperatures suppressed disease-related mortality relative to ambient treatments. When parasite exposure dose decreased, an inverse relationship between infection prevalence and temperature was detected. These findings suggest interplay between temperature optima for parasite growth and host immune function and have implications for our understanding of how Ichthyophonus infections are established in wild fish populations.

  16. The effect of various sintering temperature on used refractory towards its physical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudibyo; Wulandari, Y. R.; Amin, M.; Azhar

    2018-01-01

    The used magnesia refractory from the kiln of cement industry was successfully recycled to new refractory using Kaolin as an adhesive. In this work, the temperatures of sintering were varied from 1000°C to 1500°C. The result shows that the increment temperature effects in sintering process will enhance refractory physical properties such as bulk density, cold crushing strength or pressure strength and thermal conductivity. Meanwhile, the porosity was decreased as the increase of the sintering temperature.

  17. Low-temperature optical processing of semiconductor devices using photon effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sopori, B.L.; Cudzinovic, M.; Symko, M. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)] [and others

    1995-08-01

    In an RTA process the primary purpose of the optical energy incident on the semiconductor sample is to increase its temperature rapidly. The activation of reactions involved in processes such as the formation of junctions, metal contacts, deposition of oxides or nitrides, takes place purely by the temperature effects. We describe the observation of a number of new photonic effects that take place within the bulk and at the interfaces of a semiconductor when a semiconductor device is illuminated with a spectrally broad-band light. Such effects include changes in the diffusion properties of impurities in the semiconductor, increased diffusivity of impurities across interfaces, and generation of electric fields that can alter physical and chemical properties of the interface. These phenomena lead to certain unique effects in an RTA process that do not occur during conventional furnace annealing under the same temperature conditions. Of particular interest are observations of low-temperature alloying of Si-Al interfaces, enhanced activation of phosphorus in Si during drive-in, low-temperature oxidation of Si, and gettering of impurities at low-temperatures under optical illumination. These optically induced effects, in general, diminish with an increase in the temperature, thus allowing thermally activated reaction rates to dominate at higher temperatures.

  18. Soil surface temperatures reveal moderation of the urban heat island effect by trees and shrubs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmondson, J L; Stott, I; Davies, Z G; Gaston, K J; Leake, J R

    2016-09-19

    Urban areas are major contributors to air pollution and climate change, causing impacts on human health that are amplified by the microclimatological effects of buildings and grey infrastructure through the urban heat island (UHI) effect. Urban greenspaces may be important in reducing surface temperature extremes, but their effects have not been investigated at a city-wide scale. Across a mid-sized UK city we buried temperature loggers at the surface of greenspace soils at 100 sites, stratified by proximity to city centre, vegetation cover and land-use. Mean daily soil surface temperature over 11 months increased by 0.6 °C over the 5 km from the city outskirts to the centre. Trees and shrubs in non-domestic greenspace reduced mean maximum daily soil surface temperatures in the summer by 5.7 °C compared to herbaceous vegetation, but tended to maintain slightly higher temperatures in winter. Trees in domestic gardens, which tend to be smaller, were less effective at reducing summer soil surface temperatures. Our findings reveal that the UHI effects soil temperatures at a city-wide scale, and that in their moderating urban soil surface temperature extremes, trees and shrubs may help to reduce the adverse impacts of urbanization on microclimate, soil processes and human health.

  19. Effect of climate change on soil temperature in Swedish boreal forests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jungqvist, Gunnar; Oni, Stephen K; Teutschbein, Claudia; Futter, Martyn N

    2014-01-01

    Complex non-linear relationships exist between air and soil temperature responses to climate change. Despite its influence on hydrological and biogeochemical processes, soil temperature has received less attention in climate impact studies. Here we present and apply an empirical soil temperature model to four forest sites along a climatic gradient of Sweden. Future air and soil temperature were projected using an ensemble of regional climate models. Annual average air and soil temperatures were projected to increase, but complex dynamics were projected on a seasonal scale. Future changes in winter soil temperature were strongly dependent on projected snow cover. At the northernmost site, winter soil temperatures changed very little due to insulating effects of snow cover but southern sites with little or no snow cover showed the largest projected winter soil warming. Projected soil warming was greatest in the spring (up to 4°C) in the north, suggesting earlier snowmelt, extension of growing season length and possible northward shifts in the boreal biome. This showed that the projected effects of climate change on soil temperature in snow dominated regions are complex and general assumptions of future soil temperature responses to climate change based on air temperature alone are inadequate and should be avoided in boreal regions.

  20. Effect of climate change on soil temperature in Swedish boreal forests.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gunnar Jungqvist

    Full Text Available Complex non-linear relationships exist between air and soil temperature responses to climate change. Despite its influence on hydrological and biogeochemical processes, soil temperature has received less attention in climate impact studies. Here we present and apply an empirical soil temperature model to four forest sites along a climatic gradient of Sweden. Future air and soil temperature were projected using an ensemble of regional climate models. Annual average air and soil temperatures were projected to increase, but complex dynamics were projected on a seasonal scale. Future changes in winter soil temperature were strongly dependent on projected snow cover. At the northernmost site, winter soil temperatures changed very little due to insulating effects of snow cover but southern sites with little or no snow cover showed the largest projected winter soil warming. Projected soil warming was greatest in the spring (up to 4°C in the north, suggesting earlier snowmelt, extension of growing season length and possible northward shifts in the boreal biome. This showed that the projected effects of climate change on soil temperature in snow dominated regions are complex and general assumptions of future soil temperature responses to climate change based on air temperature alone are inadequate and should be avoided in boreal regions.

  1. Pressure effect on the low-temperature remanences of multidomain magnetite: Change in the Verwey transition temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, M.; Yamamoto, Y.; Nishioka, T.; Kodama, K.; Mochizuki, N.; Tsunakawa, H.

    2011-12-01

    The Verwey transition of magnetite is the basic issues for the rock magnetism, since main magnetic mineral of terrestrial rocks is magnetite and its associates. One of the most important issues concerning the Verwey transition is the change in transition temperature (Tv) due to pressure, which is thought to improve our understanding of its electric and magnetic nature in relation to the phase diagram. Recently, the opposite pressure effects of the transition temperature were reported applying the different experimental method. Measuring the electrical resistivity of single crystalline samples, Môri et al. [2002] reported that Tv becomes lower with increasing pressure by 9 GPa. In contrast, Pasternak et al. [2003] reported from Mössbauer experiment that transition temperature becomes higher with increasing pressure by 30 GPa. Thus the change in transition temperature with pressure has been controversial, and nature of the Verwey transition is still unclear. The magnetic property measurements using low temperature cycle are a powerful tool for identifying the state of magnetic minerals. Carporzen and Gilder [2010] conducted the thermal demagnetization experiment of low-temperature remanences of magnetite, and observed an increase in Tv with increasing pretreated pressure. From this result, they suggested that the Verwey transition of magnetite have the potential of a geobarometer. Modern techniques of high-pressure experiments enable us to measure sample magnetizations under pressure [Gilder et al., 2002; Kodama and Nishioka, 2005; Sadykov et al., 2008]. In the present study, systematic experiments of low-temperature remanences have been conducted for powder samples of stoichiometric magnetite under pressure up to 0.7 GPa using the high-pressure cell specially designed for MPMS, which was made of CuBe and ZrO2 [Kodama and Nishioka, 2005]. Natural magnetite of large single crystals were crushed by hand and sieved in an ultrasonic bath to be ~50 μm in size. For

  2. Combined Effects of Temperature and Salinity on Larval ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Daisy Ouya

    Decapoda,. Grapsidae). Scient. Mar. 54: 55–60. Anger, K., Harms, J., Montú, M. & De Bakker, C. (1990) Effects of salinity on the larval development of a semiterrestrial tropical crab,. Sesarma angustipes (Decapoda: Grapsidae). Mar. Ecol. Prog.

  3. Potential effects of diurnal temperature oscillations on potato late blight with special reference to climate change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakya, S K; Goss, E M; Dufault, N S; van Bruggen, A H C

    2015-02-01

    Global climate change will have effects on diurnal temperature oscillations as well as on average temperatures. Studies on potato late blight (Phytophthora infestans) development have not considered daily temperature oscillations. We hypothesize that growth and development rates of P. infestans would be less influenced by change in average temperature as the magnitude of fluctuations in daily temperatures increases. We investigated the effects of seven constant (10, 12, 15, 17, 20, 23, and 27°C) and diurnally oscillating (±5 and ±10°C) temperatures around the same means on number of lesions, incubation period, latent period, radial lesion growth rate, and sporulation intensity on detached potato leaves inoculated with two P. infestans isolates from clonal lineages US-8 and US-23. A four-parameter thermodynamic model was used to describe relationships between temperature and disease development measurements. Incubation and latency progression accelerated with increasing oscillations at low mean temperatures but slowed down with increasing oscillations at high mean temperatures (P effects of global climate change on disease development.

  4. Coupled effects of the temperature and the relative humidity on gecko adhesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Zhilong; Yang, Yazheng; Chen, Shaohua

    2017-08-01

    To explain the inconsistent results of experiments on temperature-dependent gecko adhesion, a theoretical peeling model is established wherein a nano-thin film is adopted to simulate a gecko spatula. The model considers not only the respective effects of temperature and environmental humidity on the peel-off force but also the coupled effect of both factors. Increasing temperature is found to lead to a decreasing peel-off force if the environmental humidity is uncontrolled. However, if the environmental humidity is constant, the peel-off force is insensitive to the temperature and remains almost constant. The synthetic theoretical analysis demonstrates that the seemingly contradictory results of temperature-dependent gecko adhesion experiments are actually consistent under their respective experimental conditions. This inconsistency is mainly due to the environmental humidity, which varies with the changing temperature if it is not artificially controlled. The results cannot only reasonably explain the different experimental results for the effect of temperature on gecko adhesion but can also facilitate the design of temperature-controlled or humidity-controlled adhesion sensors by tuning the environmental humidity or temperature.

  5. Effects of ca treatments and temperature on broccoli colour development

    OpenAIRE

    Schouten, R.E.; Zhang, X.; Tijskens, L.M.M.; Kooten, van, G.C.

    2010-01-01

    Broccoli combines high contents of vitamins, fibres and glucosinolates with a low calorie count and is sometimes referred to as the ‘crown jewel of nutrition’. Colour is one of the most important quality attributes of broccoli, and yellowing due to senescence of broccoli florets is the main external quality problem in the broccoli supply chain. Controlled Atmosphere (CA) is a very effective method to maintain broccoli quality but the effects of CA on colour retention have not been studied ext...

  6. Magnetoconductivity in Weyl semimetals: Effect of chemical potential and temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Xiao; Law, K. T.; Lee, P. A.

    2017-10-01

    We present detailed analyses of magnetoconductivities in a Weyl semimetal within the Born and self-consistent Born approximations. In the presence of charged impurities, linear magnetoresistance can occur when the charge carriers are mainly from the zeroth (n =0 ) Landau level. Interestingly, the linear magnetoresistance is very robust against changes of temperature as long as the charge carriers come mainly from the zeroth Landau level. We denote this parameter regime as the high-field regime. On the other hand, the linear magnetoresistance disappears once the charge carriers from the higher Landau levels can provide notable contributions. Our analysis indicates that the deviation from linear magnetoresistance is mainly due to the deviation of the longitudinal conductivity from 1 /B behavior. We found two important features of the self-energy approximation: (i) A dramatic jump of σx x, when the n =1 Landau level begins to contribute charge carriers, which is the beginning point of the middle-field regime, when decreasing the external magnetic field from high field; (ii) in the low-field regime, σx x exhibits B-5 /3 behavior, causing the magnetoresistance ρx x to exhibit B1 /3 behavior. A detailed and careful numerical calculation indicates that the self-energy approximation (including both the Born and the self-consistent Born approximations) does not explain the recent experimental observation of linear magnetoresistance in Weyl semimetals.

  7. Effects of temperature and snowfall on mortality in Pennsylvania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorjanc, M L; Flanders, W D; VanDerslice, J; Hersh, J; Malilay, J

    1999-06-15

    The relation between exposure to severe cold weather and mortality is examined in a retrospective study of deaths occurring during the month of January from 1991 to 1996 in Pennsylvania. Using division-days as units of observation (n = 1,560) aggregated from death certificates and geographic divisions, the authors estimated mortality rates for total deaths and deaths due to ischemic heart disease, cerebrovascular diseases, and respiratory diseases by analyses based on generalized estimating equations. Total mortality increased on days of "extreme" climatic conditions, that is, when snowfall was greater than 3 cm and when temperatures were below -7 degrees C (rate ratio (RR) = 1.27, 95 percent confidence interval (CI) 1.12-1.44). On days of extreme conditions, mortality due to ischemic heart diseases tripled among males aged 35-49 years (RR = 3.54, 95 percent CI 2.35-5.35), increased for men aged 50-64 years (RR = 1.77, 95 percent CI 1.32-2.38), and rose for males aged 65 years and older (RR = 1.58, 95 percent CI 1.37-1.82), when compared with milder conditions. Among females, mortality for those aged 65 years and older increased for respiratory causes (RR = 1.68, 95 percent CI 1.28-2.21) and cerebrovascular causes (RR = 1.47, 95 percent CI 1.13-1.91). Cold and snow exposure may be hazardous among men as young as 35 years.

  8. Parametric analysis and temperature effect of deployable hinged shells using shape memory polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Ran; Yang, Qing-Sheng; He, Xiao-Qiao; Liew, Kim-Meow

    2016-11-01

    Shape memory polymers (SMPs) are a class of intelligent materials, which are defined by their capacity to store a temporary shape and recover an original shape. In this work, the shape memory effect of SMP deployable hinged shell is simulated by using compiled user defined material subroutine (UMAT) subroutine of ABAQUS. Variations of bending moment and strain energy of the hinged shells with different temperatures and structural parameters in the loading process are given. The effects of the parameters and temperature on the nonlinear deformation process are emphasized. The entire thermodynamic cycle of SMP deployable hinged shell includes loading at high temperature, load carrying with cooling, unloading at low temperature and recovering the original shape with heating. The results show that the complicated thermo-mechanical deformation and shape memory effect of SMP deployable hinge are influenced by the structural parameters and temperature. The design ability of SMP smart hinged structures in practical application is prospected.

  9. Effect of surfactants and temperature on the hyperfiltration performance of poly(ether/urea) membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leban, M. I.; Wydeven, T. J.

    1984-01-01

    The individual and combined effects of pasteurization temperature (347 K) and surfactants (anionic, cationic, and neutral) on a poly(ether/urea) thin-film hyperfiltration membrane were studied. Performance of this positively charged membrane was measured in terms of sodium chloride rejection and water flux. The observed effect was mostly on water flux and minimal on salt rejection. Pasteurization temperature caused an irreversible flux decline (flux decline slope of 0.09). The gradual flux reduction caused by neutral and cationic surfactants was reversible, whereas the flux reduction caused by anionic surfactant was irreversible and of similar magnitude to flux reduction caused by pasteurization temperature. The effects of anionic surfactant and pasteurization temperature were additive. Because of flux decline at elevated temperatures the poly(ether/urea) membrane is not very attractive for long-term spaceflight use.

  10. Effect of aerosols loading and retention on surface temperature in the DJF months

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emetere, M. E.; Onyechekwa, L.; Tunji-Olayeni, P.

    2017-05-01

    The effect of aerosols loading most often results in aerosols retention in the atmosphere. Aside the health hazards of aerosol retention, its effect on climate change are visible. In this research, it was proposed that the effect of aerosol retention also affects the fluctuation of the surface temperature. The location of study is Enugu, Nigeria (6.4584° N, 7.5464° E). Twenty-nine years GISS Surface Temperature Analysis (GISTEMP) data set and sixteen years MISR aerosol optical data set were used. The fluctuations in the sixteen years aerosol optical depth (AOD) tallied with the surface temperature. The curve-fitting tool of Matlab was used to generate a polynomial for the surface temperature and used to project a five years prediction of the surface temperature.

  11. Soil surface temperatures reveal moderation of the urban heat island effect by trees and shrubs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edmondson, Jill L; Stott, Iain; Davies, Zoe G

    2016-01-01

    Urban areas are major contributors to air pollution and climate change, causing impacts on human health that are amplified by the microclimatological effects of buildings and grey infrastructure through the urban heat island (UHI) effect. Urban greenspaces may be important in reducing surface...... the adverse impacts of urbanization on microclimate, soil processes and human health....... temperature extremes, but their effects have not been investigated at a city-wide scale. Across a midsized UK city we buried temperature loggers at the surface of greenspace soils at 100 sites, stratified by proximity to city centre, vegetation cover and land-use. Mean daily soil surface temperature over 11...

  12. The effect of temperature on metal accumulation in Typha latifolia and Scirpus acutus

    OpenAIRE

    Brunham, Wade Greene

    2009-01-01

    Wetland plants have a capacity for metal sequestration and have been used to remediate such environmental contaminants. My research objective was to identify the effect of temperature on metal (Cd, Zn, Pb and Cu) accumulation in Typha latifolia and Scirpus acutus. These common wetland plant species were grown at 13, 16, and 18oC to determine the effect of temperature on metal accumulation. Cd109 was used as a radiotracer to study the effect of temperature on uptake kinetics. S. acutus accumul...

  13. Incubation temperature effects on hatchling performance in the loggerhead sea turtle (Caretta caretta.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leah R Fisher

    Full Text Available Incubation temperature has significant developmental effects on oviparous animals, including affecting sexual differentiation for several species. Incubation temperature also affects traits that can influence survival, a theory that is verified in this study for the Northwest Atlantic loggerhead sea turtle (Caretta caretta. We conducted controlled laboratory incubations and experiments to test for an effect of incubation temperature on performance of loggerhead hatchlings. Sixty-eight hatchlings were tested in 2011, and 31 in 2012, produced from eggs incubated at 11 different constant temperatures ranging from 27°C to 33°C. Following their emergence from the eggs, we tested righting response, crawling speed, and conducted a 24-hour long swim test. The results support previous studies on sea turtle hatchlings, with an effect of incubation temperature seen on survivorship, righting response time, crawling speed, change in crawl speed, and overall swim activity, and with hatchlings incubated at 27°C showing decreased locomotor abilities. No hatchlings survived to be tested in both years when incubated at 32°C and above. Differences in survivorship of hatchlings incubated at high temperatures are important in light of projected higher sand temperatures due to climate change, and could indicate increased mortality from incubation temperature effects.

  14. Temperature sensitivity analysis of polarity controlled electrostatically doped tunnel field-effect transistor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nigam, Kaushal; Pandey, Sunil; Kondekar, P. N.; Sharma, Dheeraj

    2016-09-01

    The conventional tunnel field-effect transistors (TFETs) have shown potential to scale down in sub-22 nm regime due to its lower sub-threshold slope and robustness against short-channel effects (SCEs), however, sensitivity towards temperature variation is a major concern. Therefore, for the first time, we investigate temperature sensitivity analysis of a polarity controlled electrostatically doped tunnel field-effect transistor (ED-TFET). Different performance metrics and analog/RF figure-of-merits were considered and compared for both devices, and simulations were performed using Silvaco ATLAS device tool. We found that the variation in ON-state current in ED-TFET is almost temperature independent due to electrostatically doped mechanism, while, it increases in conventional TFET at higher temperature. Above room temperature, the variation in ION, IOFF, and SS sensitivity in ED-TFET are only 0.11%/K, 2.21%/K, and 0.63%/K, while, in conventional TFET the variations are 0.43%/K, 2.99%/K, and 0.71%/K, respectively. However, below room temperature, the variation in ED-TFET ION is 0.195%/K compared to 0.27%/K of conventional TFET. Moreover, it is analysed that the incomplete ionization effect in conventional TFET severely affects the drive current and the threshold voltage, while, ED-TFET remains unaffected. Hence, the proposed ED-TFET is less sensitive towards temperature variation and can be used for cryogenics as well as for high temperature applications.

  15. The effect of temperature on the speciation of U(VI) in sulfate solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rao, Linfeng; Tian, Guoxin

    2008-09-15

    Sulfate, one of the inorganic constituents that could be present in the nuclear waste repository, forms complexes with U(VI) and affects its migration in the environment. Results show that the complexation of U(VI) with sulfate is enhanced by the increase in temperature. The effect of temperature on the complexation and speciation of U(VI) in sulfate solutions is discussed.

  16. The effects of temperature and relative humidity on the growth of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effects of temperature and relative humidity on the growth of three isolated fungi from rice ( Oryza sativa L.) seedlings in Dadin Kowa Irrigation Scheme, Dadin Kowa, Gombe. ... There were significant differences (P≤0.05) in the growth of these fungi at different temperature and relative humidity regimes. Keywords: ...

  17. Effect of temperature and displacement rate on behaviour of as-cast ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The aim of this work is to study the mechanism of fracture behaviour of aluminum alloys around solidus temperature. Tensile tests were performed on notched specimens of as-cast AA5182 and Al–3.3%Cu alloys using a Gleeble 3500® thermomechanical simulator. The effect of temperature and strain rate on the ...

  18. Effect of pouring temperature on the properties of Al-8%Si alloy sand ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was conducted to produce sand castings and determine the effect of pouring temperature on the properties of sand cast products from Al-8%Si alloy. Molten alloy was poured into prepared sand moulds at pouring temperatures of 650, 700, 750, 800 and 850°C. The density of each casting was determined based ...

  19. Effects of urban tree canopy loss on land surface temperature magnitude and timing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arthur Elmes; John Rogan; Christopher Williams; Samuel Ratick; David Nowak; Deborah Martin

    2017-01-01

    Urban Tree Canopy (UTC) plays an important role in moderating the Surface Urban Heat Island (SUHI) effect, which poses threats to human health due to substantially increased temperatures relative to rural areas. UTC coverage is associated with reduced urban temperatures, and therefore benefits both human health and reducing energy use in cities. Measurement of this...

  20. Effects of storage temperature and humidity on shelf life and quality ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effects of storage temperature and humidity on shelf life and quality of African pear (Dacryodes edulis) fruits. ... Nigerian Food Journal ... However, the quality losses as well as microbiological growths were drastically reduced when the fruits were stored at the lowest storage temperature (50C) and under three relative ...

  1. Effect of cellulose fiber reinforcement on the temperature dependent mechanical performance of nylon 6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehdi Tajvidi; Mokhtar Feizmand; Robert H. Falk; Colin Felton

    2009-01-01

    In order to quantify the effect of temperature on the mechanical properties of pure nylon 6 and its composite with cellulose fibers (containing 25 wt% cellulose fibers), the materials were sampled and tested at three representative temperatures of 256, 296, and 336 K. Flexural and tensile tests were performed and the reductions in mechanical properties were evaluated....

  2. A micro-environmental study of the effect of temperature on the sex ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1988-01-15

    Jan 15, 1988 ... A micro-environmental study of the effect of temperature on the sex ratios of the loggerhead turtle, Caretta ... Sex determination in C. caretta is, under natural conditions, dependent on incubation temperature. In general, below 27°C .... ture a complete reversal of the sex ratio took place from all males to all ...

  3. Effect of pH and temperature on the binding of bilirubin to human ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Effect of pH and temperature on the binding of bilirubin to human erythrocyte membranes was studied by incubating the membranes at different pH and temperatures and determining the bound bilirubin. At all pH values, the amount of membrane-bound bilirubin increased with the increase in bilirubin-to-albumin molar ratios ...

  4. Effect of pH and temperature on the binding of bilirubin to human ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Effect of pH and temperature on the binding of bilirubin to human erythrocyte membranes was studied by incubating the mem- branes at different pH and temperatures and determining the bound bilirubin. At all pH values, the amount of membrane-bound bilirubin increased with the increase in bilirubin-to-albumin molar ...

  5. Effect of temperature on wheat streak mosaic disease development in winter wheat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temperature is one of the key factors that influence viral disease development in plants. In this study, temperature effect on Wheat streak mosaic virus (WSMV) replication and in planta movement was determined using a green fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagged virus in two winter wheat cultivars. Virus-...

  6. [Further promotion effect of variable temperature drying on effective components in roots of Salvia miltiorrhiza f. alba].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Bing-Qian; Lv, Hai-Hua; Yang, Fan; Liu, Wei; Geng, Yan-Ling; Wang, Xiao; Wang, Tao; Qu, Zhen-Yu

    2017-05-01

    To study the effects of different variable temperature drying modes on active components of roots of Salvia miltiorrhiza f. alba, and provide basis for its industrialized drying process. In order to ensure the content of active components, variable temperature drying modes were designed: low temperature at 30 ℃ and high temperature at 60 ℃, low temperature at 30 ℃ and high temperature at 70 ℃, low temperature at 30 ℃ and high temperature at 80 ℃, low temperature at 40 ℃ and high temperature at 60 ℃, low temperature at 40 ℃ and high temperature at 70 ℃, low temperature at 40 ℃ and high temperature at 80 ℃ and air dry oven was used for variable temperature drying process. Then HPLC method was used to determine the changes of active components in roots of S. miltiorrhiza f. alba under different temperature modes; and SPSS 17.0 was used to analyze the data. The results showed that the samples, which were first dried at 40 ℃ for six hours and then dried at 80 ℃ for three hours, had the highest contents in dihydrotanshinone, cryptotanshinone, tanshinone Ⅰ and tanshinone ⅡA as compared with other kinds of drying methods, and the contents were 0.35, 2.76, 0.78, 4.47 mg•g⁻¹, respectively. Additionally, as compared with samples dried in the shade, the contents of dihydrotanshinone, cryptotanshinone and tanshinone Ⅰ were increased 2.9% (P>0.05), 45.3% (PVariable temperature drying can significantly affect the contents of active components in roots of S. miltiorrhiza f. alba. As compared with the traditional process of shade-drying process, low temperature drying can significantly increase the content of water-soluble active components and also with significant promotion effect on the liposoluble components such as tanshinone ⅡA, cryptotanshinone and tanshinone Ⅰ. The variable temperature drying mode, can effectively shorten the process of drying and provide theoretical basis for industrial processing of roots of S. miltiorrhiza f

  7. Effect of kaolin treatment temperature on mortar chloride permeability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puertas, F.

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available The present paper discusses the results of chloride resistance tests conducted on ordinary Portland cement (OPC mortars containing a Colombian kaolin pre-treated at temperatures of from 600 to 800 ºC. The resulting metakaolin (MK was added to OPC mortar mixes in proportions of 10 and 20% by cement weight. The mortars were compared for physical and chemical properties, including capillary absorption, chloride permeability and pore microstructure as assessed by mercury porosimetry. The best performance was recorded for the samples containing 20% of the material treated at 800 ºC.En el presente trabajo se incluyen los resultados de la resistencia a la penetración de cloruros de morteros de Cemento Portland Ordinario (OPC adicionados con un caolín colombiano sometido a tratamiento térmico en un rango de temperaturas entre 600 y 800 °C. Los productos del tratamiento térmico, metacaolín (MK, son incorporados en mezclas de morteros de OPC en proporciones del 10 y 20% en relación al peso del cemento. Se comparan sus características físico-químicas, entre las cuales se incluye la microestructura de poros evaluada por la técnica de porosimetría de mercurio, con la absorción capilar y la permeabilidad a cloruros. Se concluye que las muestras adicionadas con un 20% del material tratado térmicamente a 800 °C presentan el mejor desempeño en sus propiedades finales.

  8. Pseudogaps and Impurity Effects in High Temperature Superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, Paul J.

    2003-02-25

    In science the questions found are almost as important as the answers. High temperature (high T{sub c}) superconductivity is a phenomenon that has made researchers question accepted notions of solids in many aspects. Many ideas need revision such as BCS superconductivity and the quasiparticle notion. Clearly, these are large issues and this body of work seeks only to add some insight into these things. This work contains angle resolved photoemission data from BSCCO (Bi{sub 2} Sr{sub 2} Ca Cu{sub 2} O{sub 8+{delta}}), a high T{sub c} material chosen for convenience with respect to the experimental technique. In particular, the studies included O doped BSCCO, single plane BSCCO, and Zn doped BSCCO. O doping, a common tool for altering the carrier concentration, helped to establish the origin of T{sub c} as being limited by either phase fluctuations or the superconductor pairing strength. While reestablishing the agreement of the data with d-wave pairing, the data also demonstrated the relevant energy scales of interest across the doping regime. In studying single plane BSCCO as a function of carrier concentration, d-wave pairing again was reinforced and the limiting factors of T{sub c} in the single layered compound proved to be quite similar to that of the bilayer compound. The results for Zn doped BSCCO are presented in a more phenomenological flavor. Significant changes occurred in the spectra such as the suppression of the superconducting dip and the spectral peak along {Lambda}Y. While a unique microscopic theory does not readily present itself, these are dramatic changes to key portions of BSCCO spectra. Also, an anomalous change of spectral weight appeared in this material.

  9. Effect of solution saturation state and temperature on diopside dissolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carroll Susan A

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Steady-state dissolution rates of diopside are measured as a function of solution saturation state using a titanium flow-through reactor at pH 7.5 and temperature ranging from 125 to 175°C. Diopside dissolved stoichiometrically under all experimental conditions and rates were not dependent on sample history. At each temperature, rates continuously decreased by two orders of magnitude as equilibrium was approached and did not exhibit a dissolution plateau of constant rates at high degrees of undersaturation. The variation of diopside dissolution rates with solution saturation can be described equally well with a ion exchange model based on transition state theory or pit nucleation model based on crystal growth/dissolution theory from 125 to 175°C. At 175°C, both models over predict dissolution rates by two orders of magnitude indicating that a secondary phase precipitated in the experiments. The ion exchange model assumes the formation of a Si-rich, Mg-deficient precursor complex. Lack of dependence of rates on steady-state aqueous calcium concentration supports the formation of such a complex, which is formed by exchange of protons for magnesium ions at the surface. Fit to the experimental data yields Rate (moldiopsidecm−2s−1=k×10−Ea/2.303RT(aH+2aMg2+n MathType@MTEF@5@5@+=feaafiart1ev1aaatCvAUfKttLearuWrP9MDH5MBPbIqV92AaeXatLxBI9gBaebbnrfifHhDYfgasaacH8akY=wiFfYdH8Gipec8Eeeu0xXdbba9frFj0=OqFfea0dXdd9vqai=hGuQ8kuc9pgc9s8qqaq=dirpe0xb9q8qiLsFr0=vr0=vr0dc8meaabaqaciaacaGaaeqabaqabeGadaaakeaaieaacqWFsbGucqWFHbqycqWF0baDcqWFLbqzcqqGGaaicqGGOaakcqWFTbqBcqWFVbWBcqWFSbaBcqWFGaaicqWFKbazcqWFPbqAcqWFVbWBcqWFWbaCcqWFZbWCcqWFPbqAcqWFKbazcqWFLbqzcqWFGaaicqWFJbWycqWFTbqBdaahaaWcbeqaaiabgkHiTiabikdaYaaakiab=bcaGiab=nhaZnaaCaaaleqabaGaeyOeI0IaeGymaedaaOGaeiykaKIaeyypa0Jaem4AaSMaey41aqRaeeymaeJaeeimaaZaaWbaaSqabeaacqGHsislcqWGfbqrdaWgaaadbaGaemyyaegabeaaliabc+caViabikdaYiabc6caUiabioda

  10. Sensory and Physiological Effects on Humans of Combined Exposures to Air Temperatures and Volatile Organic Compounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mølhave, Lars; Liu, Zunyong; Jørgensen, Anne Hempel

    1993-01-01

    Ten healthy humans were exposed to combinations of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and air temperature (0 mg/m3 and 10 mg/m3 of a mixture of 22 volatile organic compounds and 18, 22 and 26° C). Previously demonstrated effects of VOCs and thermal exposures were replicated. For the first time nasal...... cross-sectional areas and nasal volumes, as measured by acoustic rhinometry, were shown to decrease with decreasing temperature and increasing VOC exposure. Temperature and pollutant exposures affected air quality, the need for more ventilation, skin humidity on the forehead, sweating, acute sensory...... indoor air concentrations of VOCs should depend on room air temperature....

  11. Effects of Temperature and Forming Speed on Plastic Bending of Adhesively Bonded Sheet Metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takiguchi, Michihiro; Yoshida, Tetsuya; Yoshida, Fusahito

    This paper deals with the temperature and rate-dependent elasto-viscoplasticity behaviour of a highly ductile acrylic adhesive and its effect on plastic bending of adhesively bonded sheet metals. Tensile lap shear tests of aluminium single-lap joints were performed at various temperature of 10-40°C at several tensile speeds. Based on the experimental results, a new constitutive model of temperature and rate-dependent elasto-viscoplasticity of the adhesive is presented. From V-bending experiments and the corresponding numerical simulation, it was found that the gull-wing bend is suppressed by high-speed forming at a lower temperature.

  12. Effect of Temperature on Expression of Resistance to Meloidogyne spp. In Common Bean (Phaseolus vulgaris)

    OpenAIRE

    Omwega, C. O.; Thomason, I. J.; ROBERTS, P. A.

    1990-01-01

    The effect of soil temperature on the expression of resistance in several common bean lines carrying resistance to root-knot nematodes (Meloidogyne spp.) was studied under controlled temperatures in temperature tank and growth chamber conditions. Resistance to M. javanica and M. incognita race 1 in bean lines A315, A328, A445, G1805, and G2618 was stable at 24-30 C. However, there was a significant increase in reproduction of M. javanica on A315, A328, and A445 when temperature was increased ...

  13. Effect of drying temperatures on physical characteristics of sorghum flour modified with lactic acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manuhara, G. J.; Amanto, B. S.; Astuti, T. A.

    2017-04-01

    Different drying temperatures produce different starch structure, while the remains of lactic acid in sorghum grain might continue starch modification during drying. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of drying temperatures (40, 50, 60° C) on physical characteristics of sorghum flour modified with lactic acid. Higher drying temperatures produced sorghum flour, with higher viscosity and swelling power, but lower whiteness and solubility. Modified sorghum flour showed higher value than the unmodified flour at all characteristics. Infrared spectroscopy showed that modification shifted absorption peak from 1,334 cm-1 to 1,373 cm-1, but there was no difference between samples dried at different temperatures.

  14. Effect of austenitizing temperature on the microstructure and mechanical properties of Nb–Ti microalloyed steel

    OpenAIRE

    Fu Guiqin; Jin Duo; Zhu Miaoyong

    2015-01-01

    The effect of austenitizing temperature on the microstructure and mechanical properties of Nb–Ti microalloyed steel was investigated. Steels were subjected to different austenitizing treatments (temperatures ranging from 850 °C to 1250 °C for 5-120 min) and rolled after being austenitized at different temperatures (i.e. 1020 °C, 1070 °C and 1150 °C). The results showed that austenite grain coarsening temperature was around 1000 °C. The mean grain size of the rolled steels initially ...

  15. A general model for effects of temperature on ectotherm ontogenetic growth and development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Wenyun; Moses, Melanie E; West, Geoffrey B; Hou, Chen; Brown, James H

    2012-05-07

    The temperature size rule (TSR) is the tendency for ectotherms to develop faster but mature at smaller body sizes at higher temperatures. It can be explained by a simple model in which the rate of growth or biomass accumulation and the rate of development have different temperature dependence. The model accounts for both TSR and the less frequently observed reverse-TSR, predicts the fraction of energy allocated to maintenance and synthesis over the course of development, and also predicts that less total energy is expended when developing at warmer temperatures for TSR and vice versa for reverse-TSR. It has important implications for effects of climate change on ectothermic animals.

  16. Low-Temperature Seebeck Coefficients for Polaron-Driven Thermoelectric Effect in Organic Polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira Neto, Pedro Henrique; da Silva Filho, Demétrio A; Roncaratti, Luiz F; Acioli, Paulo H; E Silva, Geraldo Magela

    2016-07-14

    We report the results of electronic structure coupled to molecular dynamics simulations on organic polymers subject to a temperature gradient at low-temperature regimes. The temperature gradient is introduced using a Langevin-type dynamics corrected for quantum effects, which are very important in these systems. Under this condition we were able to determine that in these no-impurity systems the Seebeck coefficient is in the range of 1-3 μV/K. These results are in good agreement with reported experimental results under the same low-temperature conditions.

  17. Effect of temperature on polarization switching in long-wavelength VCSELs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quirce, Ana; Valle, Angel; Pesquera, Luis; Panajotov, Krassimir; Thienpont, Hugo

    2015-03-01

    We have measured the effect of the temperature on the polarization-resolved characteristics of a 1550-nm singletransverse mode vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL). Two double polarization switchings (PS) are observed. For low temperatures a PS from longer to shorter wavelengths (Type II PS) followed by the opposite PS (Type I) is observed. For higher temperatures Type I followed by Type II PS are measured. A simple expression relating the spin flip rate to the dichroism, differential gain, threshold current and PS current is derived. With this expression the dependence of the spin-flip rate on the temperature is obtained.

  18. Effect of electric field (at different temperatures) on germination of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    patience

    2014-01-01

    Jan 1, 2014 ... Key words: Cicer arietinum L. seeds, electric-field, water-uptake model, ferroelectric effect. INTRODUCTION. Exposure of seeds to the magnetic field has been reported as safe and affordable treatment for enhanced germination and growth of plants by many workers. (Aladjadjiyan, 2002; Fischer et al., 2004 ...

  19. Effects of geometry and temperature on mode I interlaminar fracture ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A fracture mechanics approach has been adopted by mode I test and the effects of specimen geometry have been investigated. Increase in interlaminar fracture energy value, c, was observed as the crack propagated through the composite, i.e. a rising 'R-curve' for both blend and nanocomposites. Deep fracture studies ...

  20. Effect of varying temperature on growth, morphology and soluble ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-05-16

    May 16, 2008 ... soluble protein content of PY79 (wild type) and div mutant strains (IA197, IA292, IA314, IA315) was ... Also protein content decreases at sporulation stages. Hence div-mutations are multifaceted mutations which cause effects on cell morphology, sporulation and ..... Exposure of cells to increased tem-.

  1. Ameliorative effects of ascorbic acid on rectal temperature ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This experiment was performed with the aim of investigating the effects of ascorbic acid (AA) on stress due to road transportation of rabbits. Nine rabbits administered AA served as the treated animals, while seven others given sterile water were used as the controls. All the rabbits were transported by road for 2 h under ...

  2. Effect of Chronic Hypercapnia on Body Temperature Regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-08-01

    colon. The anesthesia was usually effective after approximately 5 min, at which time the animals were taken out of the exposure chamber and...exposure to 15% C02, guinea pigs in particular hyperventilate strongly accompanied by a high degree of panting, which must result in an in- creased

  3. Ameliorative effects of ascorbic acid on rectal temperature ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-08-29

    Aug 29, 2011 ... This experiment was performed with the aim of investigating the effects of ascorbic acid (AA) on stress due to road transportation of rabbits. Nine rabbits administered AA served as the treated animals, while seven others given sterile water were used as the controls. All the rabbits were transported by road ...

  4. Effects of temperature and water stresses on germination of some ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Insaf

    2013-04-24

    Apr 24, 2013 ... species. Acta Oecol. 23:23-30. Singh F, Diwakar B (1995). Chickpea botany and production practices. Skill Development Series N°16. ICRISAT. Smita KJ, Nayyar H (2005). Carbendazim alleviates effects of water stress on chickpea seedlings. Biol. Plant. 49:289-291. Tejera NA, Soussi M, Lluch C (2006).

  5. The effect of elevated temperature on the toxicity of the laboratory cultured dinoflagellate Ostreopsis lenticularis (Dinophyceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashton, Mayra; Tosteson, Thomas; Tosteson, Carmen

    2003-06-01

    Ostreopsis lenticularis Fukuyo 1981, is the major benthic dinoflagellate vector implicated in ciguatera fish poisoning in finfish on the southwest coast of Puerto Rico. Clonal laboratory cultures of O. lenticularis (clone 301) exposed to elevated temperatures (30-31 degrees C) for 33 and 54 days showed significant increases in the quantity of extractable toxin they produced as compared to their toxicities versus cells grown at temperatures of 25-26 degrees C. O lenticularis samples collected directly from the field following exposure to elevated temperatures for comparable periods of time also showed significant increases in extractable toxin. The increased toxicity of both field sampled and laboratory grown O. lenticularis exposed to elevated temperatures may result from the effects of elevated temperatures on their metabolism and/or the bacterial symbionts found associated with these microalgae. The number of bacteria associated with cultured O. lenticularis exposed to elevated temperatures was significantly reduced. Increased toxin recovery from O. lenticularis exposed to elevated temperatures may have resulted from the direct effect of temperature on toxin production and/or the reduction of Ostreopsis associated bacterial flora that consume toxin in the process of their growth. This reduction in the quantity of associated bacterial flora in temperature treated cultures may result in increased toxin recovery from O. lenticularis due to a reduction in the consumption of toxin by these symbiont bacteria.

  6. The effects of massage on intra muscular temperature in the vastus lateralis in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drust, B; Atkinson, G; Gregson, W; French, D; Binningsley, D

    2003-08-01

    The aim of the current investigation was to evaluate the effect of different durations of massage, and ultrasound treatment, on the temperature of the vastus lateralis muscle in males. Deep effleurage massage of the vastus lateralis was performed on seven healthy males (mean +/- SD; age; 28 +/- 4 years, height 1.84 +/- 0.05 m, body mass 85.7 +/- 12 kg) for 5, 10 and 15 min periods. A 5-min period of ultrasound at 45 KHz was also completed by all subjects. Intra muscular temperature (at 1.5, 2.5 and 3.5 cm) and thigh skin temperature were assessed pre and post treatment. Heart rate was monitored continuously throughout all conditions. Pre treatment intra muscular temperature increased as depth of measurement increased (p = 0.00002). Changes in muscle temperature at 1.5 and 2.5 cm were significantly greater following massage than ultrasound (p 0.05). Massage also significantly increased both heart rate and thigh skin temperature compared to ultrasound (p < 0.005). Increases in intra muscular temperature, heart rate and thigh skin temperature were the same irrespective of massage duration. These data suggest that massage and ultrasound have only limited effects on deep muscle temperature. As a result such approaches may not be suitable as a preparation strategy for exercise.

  7. Effect of different water temperatures on growth of aquatic plants Salvinia natans and Ceratophyllum demersum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khadija Kadhem Hreeb

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the effect of some different water temperatures on growth of aquatic plants (Salvinia natans and Ceratophyllum demersum. Methods: The aquatic plants were brought from Shatt Al-Arab River in 2016. Equal weights of aquatic plants were aquacultured in aquaria, and were exposed to three different temperatures ( 12, 22 and 32 °C. Results: The results showed that the two plants did not show significant differences with respect to their effects on pH and electrical conductivity values. Time and temperature did not affect the values of pH and electrical conductivity. The values of dissolved oxygen was significantly influenced with variation of time and temperature, while the two plants did not have significant differences on dissolved oxygen values, nitrate ion concentration and was not significantly influenced with variation of plant species or temperature or time. Plant species and temperature significantly affected phosphate ion concentration, while the time did not significantly influence the concentration of phosphate ion. Chlorophyll a content and biomass were significantly influenced with the variation of plant species, and temperature . Conclusions: Aquatic plants has a species specific respond to temperatures change in their environment. Water plant, Ceratophyllum demersum is more tolerant to temperatures change than Salvinia natans.

  8. Temperature effects on the immature development time of Culex eduardoi Casal and Garcia (Diptera: Culicidae)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loetti, V.; Schweigmann, N.J.; Burroni, N.E., E-mail: nburroni@ege.fcen.uba.a [Universidad de Buenos Aires (Argentina). Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales. Grupo de Estudio de Mosquitos

    2011-01-15

    The effect of constant temperatures on the development time from first instar to adult emergence was studied in Culex eduardoi Casal and Garcia reared at 7, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30 or 33 deg C. Data were adjusted to the linear degree-day model and the nonlinear Briere model. According to the linear model, the development time was inversely related to the rearing temperatures between 7 deg C and 25 deg C. Maximum mortality (100%) was recorded at temperatures > 30 deg C. According to the linear model, the development threshold temperature and thermal constant were 5.7 deg C and 188.8 degree days, respectively. The lower and upper threshold temperatures and the optimum temperature for the nonlinear model were -2.3, 30.0 and 28.1 deg C, respectively. (author)

  9. The effects of different salt, biostimulant and temperature levels on seed germination of some vegetable species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ertan Yildirim

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This research was conducted to determine the effects of two biostimulants (humic acid and biozyme or three different salt (NaCl concentrations at the temperature 10, 15, 20 and 25°C on parsley, leek, celery, tomato, onion, lettuce, basil, radish and garden cress seed germination. Two applications of both biostimulants increased seed germination of parsley, celery and leek at all temperature treatments. Germination rate decreased depending on high salt concentrations. At different salt and temperature levels garden cress was characterised by the highest germination percentage compared to other vegetable species.Interactions between NaCl concentrations and temperatures, as welI as biostimulants and temperatures were significant at p=0.001 in for all vegetable species except onion in NaCl concentrations and temperatures compared to that of the control.

  10. Cooling Effect of Water Injection on a High-Temperature Supersonic Jet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Li

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The high temperature and high pressure supersonic jet is one of the key problems in the design of solid rocket motors. To reduce the jet temperature and noise, cooling water is typically injected into the exhaust plume. Numerical simulations for the gas-liquid multiphase flow field with mixture multiphase model were developed and a series of experiments were carried out. By introducing the energy source terms caused by the vaporization of liquid water into the energy equation, a coupling solution was developed to calculate the multiphase flow field. The temperature data predictions agreed well with the experimental results. When water was injected into the plume, the high temperature core region area was reduced, and the temperature on the head face was much lower than that without water. The relationship between the reduction of temperature on the bottom plate and the momentum ratio is developed, which can be used to predict the cooling effect of water injection in many cases.

  11. Tensile Adhesion Strength of Biomass Ash Deposits: Effect of the Temperature Gradient and Ash Chemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laxminarayan, Yashasvi; Nair, Akhilesh Balachandran; Jensen, Peter Arendt

    2018-01-01

    Replacing coal with biomass in power plants is a viable option for reducing net CO2 emissions and combating climate change. However, biomass combustion in boilers may exacerbate problems related to ash deposition and corrosion, demanding effective deposit removal. The tensile adhesion strength...... the deposits. After sintering, the deposits were removed using an electrically controlled arm and the corresponding tensile adhesion strength was measured.The influence of the flue gas temperature (500–700 °C), steel surface temperature (500–650 °C), and deposit composition were investigated. The results...... revealed that increasing the flue gas temperature as well as the steel surface temperature led to a sharp increase in the tensile adhesion strength of the model deposits. The sharp increase was typically observed near the melting temperature (or deformation temperature) of the investigated model deposits...

  12. Effect of salinity on the upper lethal temperature tolerance of early-juvenile red drum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Dusty; Bumguardner, Britt; Cason, Paul

    2015-10-01

    Previous work investigating the temperature tolerance of juvenile red drum ranging 18-50mm TL found evidence for positive size dependence (smaller fish less tolerant to higher temperatures) suggesting smaller size classes (<18mm TL) potentially may succumb to extreme summer water temperatures. Here, we explored the upper lethal temperature tolerance (ULT) in smaller-sized red drum which ranged from 10 to 20mm TL across multiple salinities to further understand the thermal limitations of this propagated game fish. In order to investigate the combined effect of temperature and salinity on ULT, temperature trials were conducted under three levels of salinity which commonly occur along the coast of Texas (25, 35, and 45ppt). The rate of temperature increase (+0.25°C/h) was designed to mimic a natural temperature increase of a summer day in Texas. We determined that the lethal temperature at 50% (LT50) did not differ between the three salinities examined statistically; median lethal temperature for individuals exposed to 25ppt ranged from 36.4 to 37.7°C, 35ppt ranged from 36.4 to 37.7°C, and 45ppt ranged from 36.1 to 37.4°C. Further, LT50 data obtained here for early-juvenile red drum did not differ from data of a similar experiment examining 25mm TL sized fish. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  13. Effect of temperature on the orthodontic clinical applications of niti closed-coil springs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinar-Escalona, Eduardo; Llamas-Carreras, José M.; Barrera-Mora, José M.; Abalos-Lasbrucci, Camilo

    2013-01-01

    NiTi spring coils were used to obtain large deformation under a constant force. The device consists on a NiTi coil spring, superelastic at body temperature, in order to have a stress plateau during the austenitic retransformation during the unloading. The temperature variations induced changes in the spring force. Objectives: The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of the temperature variations in the spring forces and corrosion behaviour simulating the ingestion hot/cold drinks and food. Study Design: The springs were subjected to a tensile force using universal testing machine MTS-Adamel (100 N load cell). All tests were performed in artificial saliva maintained at different temperatures. The corrosion tests were performed according to the ISO-standard 10993-15:2000. Results: The increase in temperature of 18oC induced an increase in the spring force of 30%. However, when the temperature returns to 37oC the distraction force recovers near the initial level. After cooling down the spring to 15oC, the force decreased by 46%. This investigation show as the temperature increase, the corrosion potential shifts towards negative values and the corrosion density is rising. Conclusions: The changes of the temperatures do not modify the superelastic behaviour of the NiTi closed-coil springs. The corrosion potential of NiTi in artificial saliva is decreasing by the rise of the temperatures. Key words:Superelasticity, NiTi, springs, orthodontic, coils, recovery, temperature. PMID:23722142

  14. Simulating the effect of climate change on stream temperature in the Trout Lake Watershed, Wisconsin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Selbig, William R., E-mail: wrselbig@usgs.gov

    2015-07-15

    The potential for increases in stream temperature across many spatial and temporal scales as a result of climate change can pose a difficult challenge for environmental managers, especially when addressing thermal requirements for sensitive aquatic species. This study evaluates simulated changes to the thermal regime of three northern Wisconsin streams in response to a projected changing climate using a modeling framework and considers implications of thermal stresses to the fish community. The Stream Network Temperature Model (SNTEMP) was used in combination with a coupled groundwater and surface water flow model to assess forecasts in climate from six global circulation models and three emission scenarios. Model results suggest that annual average stream temperature will steadily increase approximately 1.1 to 3.2 °C (varying by stream) by the year 2100 with differences in magnitude between emission scenarios. Daily mean stream temperature during the months of July and August, a period when cold-water fish communities are most sensitive, showed excursions from optimal temperatures with increased frequency compared to current conditions. Projections of daily mean stream temperature, in some cases, were no longer in the range necessary to sustain a cold water fishery. - Highlights: • A stream temperature model was calibrated for three streams in northern Wisconsin. • The effect of climate change on stream temperature was simulated in each stream. • Annual average stream temperature was projected to rise from 1 to 3 °C by 2100. • Forecasts of stream temperature exceeded optimal ranges for brook trout.

  15. Off-design performance of a chemical looping combustion (CLC) combined cycle: effects of ambient temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Jinling; Wang, Bo; Zhang, Shijie; Xiao, Yunhan

    2010-02-01

    The present work investigates the influence of ambient temperature on the steady-state off-design thermodynamic performance of a chemical looping combustion (CLC) combined cycle. A sensitivity analysis of the CLC reactor system was conducted, which shows that the parameters that influence the temperatures of the CLC reactors most are the flow rate and temperature of air entering the air reactor. For the ambient temperature variation, three off-design control strategies have been assumed and compared: 1) without any Inlet Guide Vane (IGV) control, 2) IGV control to maintain air reactor temperature and 3) IGV control to maintain constant fuel reactor temperature, aside from fuel flow rate adjusting. Results indicate that, compared with the conventional combined cycle, due to the requirement of pressure balance at outlet of the two CLC reactors, CLC combined cycle shows completely different off-design thermodynamic characteristics regardless of the control strategy adopted. For the first control strategy, temperatures of the two CLC reactors both rise obviously as ambient temperature increases. IGV control adopted by the second and the third strategy has the effect to maintain one of the two reactors' temperatures at design condition when ambient temperature is above design point. Compare with the second strategy, the third would induce more severe decrease of efficiency and output power of the CLC combined cycle.

  16. The effects of anesthetic technique and ambient temperature on thermoregulation in lower extremity surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozer, Ayse B; Tosun, Fadime; Demirel, Ismail; Unlu, Serap; Bayar, Mustafa K; Erhan, Omer L

    2013-08-01

    The purpose of our study was to determine the effects of anesthetic technique and ambient temperature on thermoregulation for patients undergoing lower extremity surgery. Our study included 90 male patients aged 18-60 years in American Society of Anesthesiologists Physical Status groups I or II who were scheduled for lower extremity surgery. Patients were randomly divided into three groups according to anesthetic technique: general anesthesia (GA), epidural anesthesia (EA), and femoral-sciatic block (FS). These groups were divided into subgroups according to room temperature: the temperature for group I was 20-22 °C and that for group II was 23-25 °C. Therefore, we labeled the groups as follows: GA I, GA II, EA I, EA II, FS I, and FS II. Probes for measuring tympanic membrane and peripheral temperature were placed in and on the patients, and mean skin temperature (MST) and mean body temperature (MBT) were assessed. Postoperative shivering scores were recorded. During anesthesia, tympanic temperature and MBT decreased whereas MST increased for all patients. There was no significant difference between tympanic temperatures in either the room temperature or anesthetic method groups. MST was lower in group GA I than in group GA II after 5, 10, 15, 20, 60 and 90 min whereas MBT was significantly lower at the basal level (p thermoregulation among anesthetic techniques. Room temperature affected thermoregulation in Group GA.

  17. Effective temperatures and the breakdown of the Stokes-Einstein relation for particle suspensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza, Carlos I; Santamaría-Holek, I; Pérez-Madrid, A

    2015-09-14

    The short- and long-time breakdown of the classical Stokes-Einstein relation for colloidal suspensions at arbitrary volume fractions is explained here by examining the role that confinement and attractive interactions play in the intra- and inter-cage dynamics executed by the colloidal particles. We show that the measured short-time diffusion coefficient is larger than the one predicted by the classical Stokes-Einstein relation due to a non-equilibrated energy transfer between kinetic and configuration degrees of freedom. This transfer can be incorporated in an effective kinetic temperature that is higher than the temperature of the heat bath. We propose a Generalized Stokes-Einstein relation (GSER) in which the effective temperature replaces the temperature of the heat bath. This relation then allows to obtain the diffusion coefficient once the viscosity and the effective temperature are known. On the other hand, the temporary cluster formation induced by confinement and attractive interactions of hydrodynamic nature makes the long-time diffusion coefficient to be smaller than the corresponding one obtained from the classical Stokes-Einstein relation. Then, the use of the GSER allows to obtain an effective temperature that is smaller than the temperature of the heat bath. Additionally, we provide a simple expression based on a differential effective medium theory that allows to calculate the diffusion coefficient at short and long times. Comparison of our results with experiments and simulations for suspensions of hard and porous spheres shows an excellent agreement in all cases.

  18. Ambient temperature and added heat wave effects on hospitalizations in California from 1999 to 2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherbakov, Toki; Malig, Brian; Guirguis, Kristen; Gershunov, Alexander; Basu, Rupa

    2018-01-01

    Investigators have examined how heat waves or incremental changes in temperature affect health outcomes, but few have examined both simultaneously. We utilized distributed lag nonlinear models (DLNM) to explore temperature associations and evaluate possible added heat wave effects on hospitalizations in 16 climate zones throughout California from May through October 1999-2009. We define heat waves as a period when daily mean temperatures were above the zone- and month-specific 95th percentile for at least two consecutive days. DLNMs were used to estimate climate zone-specific non-linear temperature and heat wave effects, which were then combined using random effects meta-analysis to produce an overall estimate for each. With higher temperatures, admissions for acute renal failure, appendicitis, dehydration, ischemic stroke, mental health, non-infectious enteritis, and primary diabetes were significantly increased, with added effects from heat waves observed for acute renal failure and dehydration. Higher temperatures also predicted statistically significant decreases in hypertension admissions, respiratory admissions, and respiratory diseases with secondary diagnoses of diabetes, though heat waves independently predicted an added increase in risk for both respiratory types. Our findings provide evidence that both heat wave and temperature exposures can exert effects independently. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Effects of artificial dawn on sleep inertia, skin temperature, and the awakening cortisol response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van De Werken, Maan; Giménez, Marina C; De Vries, Bonnie; Beersma, Domien G M; Van Someren, Eus J W; Gordijn, Marijke C M

    2010-09-01

    The effect of artificial dawn during the last 30 min of sleep on subsequent dissipation of sleep inertia was investigated, including possible involvement of cortisol and thermoregulatory processes. Sixteen healthy subjects who reported difficulty with waking up participated in random order in a control and an artificial dawn night. Sleep inertia severity was measured by subjective ratings of sleepiness and activation, and by performance on an addition and a reaction time task measured at 1, 15, 30, 45, 60, and 90 min after waking up at habitual wake up time at workdays. At all intervals, saliva samples were collected for cortisol analysis. Sleep electroencephalogram was recorded during the 30 min prior to waking up; core body temperature and skin temperatures were recorded continuously until 90 min after waking up. Subjective sleepiness was significantly decreased and subjective activation increased after waking up in the artificial dawn condition as compared with control, in which lights were turned on at waking up. These effects can be explained by effects of artificial dawn on skin temperature and amount of wakefulness during the 30 min prior to the alarm. Artificial dawn accelerated the decline in skin temperature and in the distal-to-proximal skin temperature gradient after getting up. No significant effects of artificial dawn on performance, core body temperature, and cortisol were found. These results suggest that the physiology underlying the positive effects of artificial dawn on the dissipation of sleep inertia involves light sleep and an accelerated skin temperature decline after awakening.

  20. Effects of temperature on graphene oxide deposition and transport in saturated porous media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Mei; Gao, Bin; Tang, Deshan; Sun, Huimin; Yin, Xianqiang; Yu, Congrong

    2017-06-05

    Laboratory batch sorption and sand column experiments were conducted to examine the effects of temperature (6 and 24°C) on the retention and transport of GO in water-saturated porous media with different combination of solution ionic strength (IS, 1 and 10mM), sand type (natural and acid-cleaned), and grain size (coarse and fine). Although results from batch sorption experiment showed that temperature affected the sorption of GO onto the sand grains at the low IS, the interactions between GO and the sand were relatively weak, which did make the temperature effect prominent. When the IS was 1mM, experimental temperature showed little effect on GO retention and transport regardless of the medium properties. GO was highly mobile in the sand columns with mass recovery rates ranged from 77.3% to 92.4%. When the IS increased to 10mM, temperature showed notable effects on GO retention and transport in saturated porous media. For all the combinations of sand type and grain size, the higher the temperature was, the less mobile GO particles were. The effects of temperature on GO retention and transport in saturated porous media were further verified though simulations from an advection-dispersion-reaction model. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Effect of Temperature Set-Back on Heat Pump Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-04-01

    systems because their efficiency, or -coefficient of performance, changes as the outdoor tfmper- ature changes . And as-the efficiency cnanges, the...capacity also changes . Another condition which effects COP (total work out/total energy in) is defrost. A heavy buildup of frost on the outdoor coil...DoE cliimatic regions? Ex. Night set-back in residences and night and weekend set-back in small commercial buildings. - Is there a minimum elapsed

  2. Relationship between Spokesperson’s Gender and Advertising Color Temperature in a Framework of Advertising Effectiveness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pilelienė Lina

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Advertising spokesperson is one of the undeniably important factors affecting advertising effectiveness. However, advertising spokesperson has to have some particular features to be effective. Various previous researches resulted in determination of different features of advertising spokesperson and their effectiveness; i.e. type of a spokesperson (celebrity vs. a regular person; gender and race of a spokesperson; etc. were found to have an impact on the spokesperson’s effectiveness. However, the research on the impact of shooting color temperature on its effectiveness is still scarce. Moreover, an assumption can be made that color temperature might cause a different effect depending on advertising spokesperson’s gender. The aim of this paper is to fill this gap by analyzing the relationship between spokesperson’s gender and advertising color temperature in a framework of advertising effectiveness. Neuromarketing research methods were applied to meet the aim and to determine the guidelines for its usage in advertising.

  3. Alignment and temperature effects in liquid-crystal-based active polarimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gladish, James C; Duncan, Donald D

    2014-06-20

    It is well known that in liquid crystal (LC)-based active polarimetry, alignment and temperature effects impact polarimeter performance. Practically speaking, when constructing a polarimetric measurement system from LC variable retarders (LCVRs), unavoidable alignment and temperature uncertainties will occur, leading to systematic error that propagates to the Mueller matrix. Typical calibration methods use only a single metric to assess polarimeter performance (the condition number) and often ignore the relationship between systematic error and specific Mueller matrix elements. Here we explore alignment and temperature effects in a Stokes generator and polarimeter, each consisting of two LCVRs, through a series of simulations to calibrate the polarimeter and measure the Mueller matrix of air. We achieve this by modifying an existing LCVR model to incorporate alignment and temperature effects. This new approach offers insight into employing LCVRs individually and associating particular Mueller matrix element error with specific LCVR effects.

  4. Effective thermal conductivity method for predicting spent nuclear fuel cladding temperatures in a dry fill gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bahney, Robert

    1997-12-19

    This paper summarizes the development of a reliable methodology for the prediction of peak spent nuclear fuel cladding temperature within the waste disposal package. The effective thermal conductivity method replaces other older methodologies.

  5. The effect of temperature on photosynthetic induction under fluctuating light in Chrysanthemum morifolium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Öztürk, Isik; Ottosen, Carl-Otto; Ritz, Christian

    2013-01-01

    The temporal course of photosynthetic induction was investigated on Chrysanthemum morifolium under dynamic light and temperature conditions to evaluate the effect of climatic variables on photosynthetic induction. The Plant material was grown under uniform, controlled conditions and analyzed...

  6. Effects of temperature and maternal and grandmaternal age on wing shape in parthenogenetic Drosophila mercatorum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaersgaard, Anders; Faurby, Soren; Andersen, Ditte Holm

    2007-01-01

    The effects a stressful developmental temperature and maternal and grandmaternal age was investigated on plasticity of wing shape, using the Procrustes method, in two parthenogenetic strains of Drosophila mercatorum. Shape was significantly modified by both factors. Maternal and grandmaternal age...

  7. Anaerobic slurry co-digestion of poultry manure and straw: effect of organic loading and temperature

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Azadeh Babaee; Jalal Shayegan; Anis Roshani

    2013-01-01

      In order to obtain basic design criteria for anaerobic digestion of a mixture of poultry manure and wheat straw, the effects of different temperatures and organic loading rates on the biogas yield...

  8. The effects of sodium oxybate on core body and skin temperature regulation in narcolepsy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Heide, A. van der; Donjacour, C.E; Pijl, H; Reijntjes, R.H; Overeem, S; Lammers, G.J; Someren, E.J.W. van; Fronczek, R

    2015-01-01

    .... The aim of the present study is to investigate the effects of sodium oxybate, a widely used drug to treat narcolepsy, on the 24-h profiles of temperature and sleep-wakefulness in patients with narcolepsy and controls...

  9. Radiation and temperature effects on electronic components investigated under the CSTI high capacity power project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarze, Gene E.; Niedra, Janis M.; Frasca, Albert J.; Wieserman, William R.

    1993-01-01

    The effects of nuclear radiation and high temperature environments must be fully known and understood for the electronic components and materials used in both the Power Conditioning and Control subsystem and the reactor Instrumentation and Control subsystem of future high capacity nuclear space power systems. This knowledge is required by the designer of these subsystems in order to develop highly reliable, long-life power systems for future NASA missions. A review and summary of the experimental results obtained for the electronic components and materials investigated under the power management element of the Civilian Space Technology Initiative (CSTI) high capacity power project are presented: (1) neutron, gamma ray, and temperature effects on power semiconductor switches, (2) temperature and frequency effects on soft magnetic materials; and (3) temperature effects on rare earth permanent magnets.

  10. Effect of temperature oscillation on chemical reaction rates in the atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberstein, I. J.

    1974-01-01

    The effect of temperature fluctuations on atmospheric ozone chemistry is examined by considering the Chapman photochemical theory of ozone transport to calculate globally averaged ozone production rates from mean reaction rates, activation energies, and recombination processes.

  11. Investigation on the effects of temperature dependency of material parameters on a thermoelastic loading problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Anil; Mukhopadhyay, Santwana

    2017-08-01

    The present work is concerned with the investigation of thermoelastic interactions inside a spherical shell with temperature-dependent material parameters. We employ the heat conduction model with a single delay term. The problem is studied by considering three different kinds of time-dependent temperature and stress distributions applied at the inner and outer surfaces of the shell. The problem is formulated by considering that the thermal properties vary as linear function of temperature that yield nonlinear governing equations. The problem is solved by applying Kirchhoff transformation along with integral transform technique. The numerical results of the field variables are shown in the different graphs to study the influence of temperature-dependent thermal parameters in various cases. It has been shown that the temperature-dependent effect is more prominent in case of stress distribution as compared to other fields and also the effect is significant in case of thermal shock applied at the two boundary surfaces of the spherical shell.

  12. Temperature Effects on the Wind Direction Measurement of 2D Solid Thermal Wind Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bei; Zhu, Yan-Qing; Yi, Zhenxiang; Qin, Ming; Huang, Qing-An

    2015-01-01

    For a two-dimensional solid silicon thermal wind sensor with symmetrical structure, the wind speed and direction information can be derived from the output voltages in two orthogonal directions, i.e., the north-south and east-west. However, the output voltages in these two directions will vary linearly with the ambient temperature. Therefore, in this paper, a temperature model to study the temperature effect on the wind direction measurement has been developed. A theoretical analysis has been presented first, and then Finite Element Method (FEM) simulations have been performed. It is found that due to symmetrical structure of the thermal wind sensor, the temperature effects on the output signals in the north-south and east-west directions are highly similar. As a result, the wind direction measurement of the thermal wind sensor is approximately independent of the ambient temperature. The experimental results fit the theoretical analysis and simulation results very well. PMID:26633398

  13. Effect of temperature on skeletal muscle energy turnover during dynamic knee-extensor exercise in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ferguson, R.A.; Krustrup, Peter; Kjær, Michael

    2006-01-01

    . Total ATP production (aerobic + anaerobic) was the same between each temperature condition [505.0 mmol/kg (SD 107.2) vs. 527.1 mmol/kg (SD 117.6); C and HT, respectively]. In conclusion, within the range of temperatures studied, passively increasing muscle temperature before exercise has no effect......The present study examined the effect of elevated temperature on muscle energy turnover during dynamic exercise. Nine male subjects performed 10 min of dynamic knee-extensor exercise at an intensity of 43 W (SD 10) and a frequency of 60 contractions per minute. Exercise was performed under normal...... (C) and elevated muscle temperature (HT) through passive heating. Thigh oxygen uptake (V(O2)) was determined from measurements of thigh blood flow and femoral arterial-venous differences for oxygen content. Anaerobic energy turnover was estimated from measurements of lactate release as well as muscle...

  14. Effect of carbon dioxide and temperature on passive film parametersof superduplex stainless steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emandro Vieira da Costa

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Superduplex stainless steel has been frequently employed in new sites of Brazilian Pre-Salt. In these environments, chloride concentration, temperature and carbon dioxide are normally present in higher levels than those at sea water at room temperature. In these conditions, it is expected that the passive films of stainless steel also show modifications. To better understand such modifications, samples of superduplex stainless steel UNS S32750 were submitted to electrochemical impedance measurements in brine media, at two temperatures and under presence/absence of carbon dioxide. The electrochemical impedance results were initially tested using the Kramers-Kronig transform and subsequently fitted by equivalent circuit employing constant phase elements - CPE. Moreover, to quantify the effect of each factor (temperature, chloride, carbon dioxide and microstructure on the equivalent circuit, their parameters were tested applying statistical analysis. Significant effect of carbon dioxide and temperature was found on related parameters of passive film for heat-treated samples.

  15. Effect of Reinforcement on Early-Age Concrete Temperature Stress: Preliminary Experimental Investigation and Analytical Simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianda Xin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available For concrete under short-term loading, effect of reinforcement on concrete crack resistance capability is usually negligible; however, recent research results show that extension of this viewpoint to concrete under long-term loading (temperature variation may be unsuitable. In order to investigate this phenomenon, this paper presents the experimental and analytical results of early-age reinforced concrete temperature stress development under uniaxial restraint. The experiments were carried out on a temperature stress testing machine (TSTM. Experimental results show that the coupling of reinforcement and concrete creep behavior influenced the concrete temperature stress development, and nearly 16% of concrete stress was reduced in the current research. Moreover, the cracking time of reinforced concrete was also delayed. Finally, based on the principle of superposition, analytical simulations of effect of reinforcement on concrete temperature stress have been performed.

  16. Effects of outside air temperature on the preparation of antineoplastic drug solutions in biological safety cabinets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umemura, Masayuki; Itoh, Akio; Ando, Yuichi; Yamada, Kiyofumi; Wakiya, Yoshifumi; Nabeshima, Toshitaka

    2015-08-01

    In Japan, biological safety cabinets are commonly used by medical staff to prepare antineoplastic agents. At the Division of Chemotherapy for Outpatients, Nagoya University Hospital, a class II B2 biological safety cabinet is used. The temperature inside this biological safety cabinet decreases in winter. In this study, we investigated the effect of low outside air temperature on the biological safety cabinet temperature, time required to admix antineoplastic agents, and accuracy of epirubicin weight measurement. Studies were conducted from 1 January to 31 March 2008 (winter). The outside air temperature near the biological safety cabinet intake nozzle was compared with the biological safety cabinet temperature. The correlation between the outside air temperature and the biological safety cabinet temperature, time for cyclophosphamide and gemcitabine solubilization, and accuracy of epirubicin weight measurement were investigated at low and high biological safety cabinet temperatures. The biological safety cabinet temperature correlated with the outside air temperature of 5-20℃ (p < 0.0001). Compared to cyclophosphamide and gemcitabine solubilization in the biological safety cabinet at 25℃, solubilization at 10℃ was significantly delayed (p < 0.01 and p < 0.0001, respectively). Measurement of epirubicin weight by using a syringe lacked accuracy because of epirubicin's high viscosity at low temperatures (p < 0.01). These results suggest that the biological safety cabinet temperature decreases when cool winter air is drawn into the biological safety cabinet, affecting the solubilization of antineoplastic agents. We suggest that a decrease in biological safety cabinet temperature may increase the time required to admix antineoplastic agents, thereby increasing the time for which outpatients must wait for chemotherapy. © The Author(s) 2014.

  17. Electric field and temperature effects in irradiated MOSFETs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silveira, M. A. G., E-mail: marcilei@fei.edu.br; Santos, R. B. B.; Leite, F. G.; Araújo, N. E.; Cirne, K. H.; Melo, M. A. A.; Rallo, A. [Centro Universitário da FEI, São Bernardo do Campo, S.P. (Brazil); Aguiar, Vitor A. P.; Aguirre, F.; Macchione, E. L. A.; Added, N.; Medina, N. H. [Instituto de Física da USP, São Paulo, S.P. (Brazil)

    2016-07-07

    Electronic devices exposed to ionizing radiation exhibit degradation on their electrical characteristics, which may compromise the functionality of the device. Understanding the physical phenomena responsible for radiation damage, which may be specific to a particular technology, it is of extreme importance to develop methods for testing and recovering the devices. The aim of this work is to check the influence of thermal annealing processes and electric field applied during irradiation of Metal Oxide Semiconductor Field Effect Transistors (MOSFET) in total ionizing dose experiments analyzing the changes in the electrical parameters in these devices.

  18. Hall effect in CNT doped YBCO high temperature superconductor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Dadras

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available In order to study Hall effect in pure and CNT doped YBCO polycrystalline samples, we have measured longitudinal and transverse voltages at the different magnetic field (0-9T in the vortex state. We found a sign reversal for pure sample near 3T and double sign reversal of the Hall coefficient for CNT doped sample near 3 and 5T. It can be deduced that CNT doping caused strong flux pinning and Hall double sign reversal in this compound.

  19. Time course of temperature effects on cardiovascular mortality in Brisbane, Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Weiwei; Hu, Wenbiao; Mengersen, Kerrie; Guo, Yuming; Pan, Xiaochuan; Connell, Des; Tong, Shilu

    2011-07-01

    To quantify the lagged effects of mean temperature on deaths from cardiovascular diseases in Brisbane, Australia. Polynomial distributed lag models were used to assess the percentage increase in mortality up to 30 days associated with an increase (or decrease) of 1°C above (or below) the threshold temperature. Brisbane, Australia. 22 805 cardiovascular deaths registered between 1996 and 2004. Deaths from cardiovascular diseases. The results show a longer lagged effect in cold days and a shorter lagged effect in hot days. For the hot effect, a statistically significant association was observed only for lag 0-1 days. The percentage increase in mortality was found to be 3.7% (95% CI 0.4% to 7.1%) for people aged ≥65 years and 3.5% (95% CI 0.4% to 6.7%) for all ages associated with an increase of 1°C above the threshold temperature of 24°C. For the cold effect, a significant effect of temperature was found for 10-15 lag days. The percentage estimates for older people and all ages were 3.1% (95% CI 0.7% to 5.7%) and 2.8% (95% CI 0.5% to 5.1%), respectively, with a decrease of 1°C below the threshold temperature of 24°C. The lagged effects lasted longer for cold temperatures but were apparently shorter for hot temperatures. There was no substantial difference in the lag effect of temperature on mortality between all ages and those aged ≥65 years in Brisbane, Australia.

  20. Effect of heat transfer correlations on the fuel temperature prediction of SCWRs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Espinosa-Martínez Erick-Gilberto

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we present a numerical analysis of the effect of different heat transfer correlations on the prediction of the cladding wall temperature in a supercritical water reactor at nominal operating conditions. The neutronics process with temperature feedback effects, the heat transfer in the fuel rod, and the thermal-hydraulics in the core were simulated with a three-pass core design.