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Sample records for temperature dependent lattice

  1. Temperature dependent lattice misfit in nickel-base superalloys - Simulation and experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neumeier, Steffen; Goeken, Mathias [Lehrstuhl fuer Allgemeine Werkstoffeigenschaften, Universitaet Erlangen-Nuernberg, Erlangen (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    Ni-base superalloys are widely used in high temperature applications like jet engines and land-based turbines, because of their excellent high temperature properties. They derive their excellent high temperature strength and creep resistance from the presence of a high volume fraction of Ni{sub 3}Al {gamma}{sup '} precipitates (L1{sub 2} structure), which are embedded coherently within the face centred cubic (A1) {gamma} matrix. The magnitude and sign of the lattice misfit between {gamma} and {gamma}{sup '} are important parameters affecting the microstructural evolution and high temperature strength of Ni-base superalloys. Therefore the knowledge of the lattice misfit at application temperature is of great importance. In this study the lattice misfit of several 1{sup st}, 2{sup nd} and 4{sup th} generation Ni-base superalloys in dependence of temperature has been measured by means of HRXRD and compared with lattice misfit simulations based on thermodynamic calculations. The influence of the thermal expansion coefficients and the change in the chemical composition of both {gamma} and {gamma}{sup '} due to the {gamma}{sup '} dissolution with increasing temperature has been taking into account. The experimentally measured {gamma} and {gamma}{sup '} lattice parameters could be reproduced by the simulation and the {gamma}/{gamma}{sup '} lattice misfit could be reasonably predicted.

  2. Temperature- and pressure-dependent lattice behaviour of RbFe(MoO4)(2)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Waskowska, A.; Gerward, Leif; Olsen, J. S.

    2010-01-01

    Trigonal RbFe(MoO4)(2) is a quasi-two-dimensional antiferromagnet on a triangular lattice below T-N = 3.8 K, The crystal exhibits also a structural phase transition at T-c = 190 K related to symmetry change from Pm1 to P. We present the temperature-and pressure-dependent characteristics of this m......Trigonal RbFe(MoO4)(2) is a quasi-two-dimensional antiferromagnet on a triangular lattice below T-N = 3.8 K, The crystal exhibits also a structural phase transition at T-c = 190 K related to symmetry change from Pm1 to P. We present the temperature-and pressure-dependent characteristics...... of this material in the context of ambiguous opinions on the symmetry and crystal properties below T-c. A single-crystal x-ray diffraction shows that the temperature-dependent evolution of the unit cell in the range 100-300 K is strongly anisotropic with markedly discontinuous changes at T-c. The transition...... is connected with a spontaneous strain developing in effect of the volume decrease. The structure releases the strain by rotation of corner-sharing rigid MoO4 and FeO6 polyhedra in the (a, b) basal plane. The temperature dependence of the IR vibrational wavenumbers exhibits weak changes near T-c, which...

  3. Simulation of phase separation with temperature-dependent viscosity using lattice Boltzmann method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Heping; Zang, Duyang; Li, Xiaoguang; Geng, Xingguo

    2017-12-27

    This paper presents an exploration of the phase separation behavior and pattern formation in a binary fluid with temperature-dependent viscosity via a coupled lattice Boltzmann method (LBM). By introducing a viscosity-temperature relation into the LBM, the coupling effects of the viscosity-temperature coefficient [Formula: see text] , initial viscosity [Formula: see text] and thermal diffusion coefficient [Formula: see text] , on the phase separation were successfully described. The calculated results indicated that an increase in initial viscosity and viscosity-temperature coefficient, or a decrease in the thermal diffusion coefficient, can lead to the orientation of isotropic growth fronts over a wide range of viscosity. The results showed that droplet-type phase structures and lamellar phase structures with domain orientation parallel or perpendicular to the walls can be obtained in equilibrium by controlling the initial viscosity, thermal diffusivity, and the viscosity-temperature coefficient. Furthermore, the dataset was rearranged for growth kinetics of domain growth and thermal diffusion fronts in a plot by the spherically averaged structure factor and the ratio of separated and continuous phases. The analysis revealed two different temporal regimes: spinodal decomposition and domain growth stages, which further quantified the coupled effects of temperature and viscosity on the evolution of temperature-dependent phase separation. These numerical results provide guidance for setting optimum temperature ranges to obtain expected phase separation structures for systems with temperature-dependent viscosity.

  4. Transport lattice models of heat transport in skin with spatially heterogeneous, temperature-dependent perfusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Gregory T

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Investigation of bioheat transfer problems requires the evaluation of temporal and spatial distributions of temperature. This class of problems has been traditionally addressed using the Pennes bioheat equation. Transport of heat by conduction, and by temperature-dependent, spatially heterogeneous blood perfusion is modeled here using a transport lattice approach. Methods We represent heat transport processes by using a lattice that represents the Pennes bioheat equation in perfused tissues, and diffusion in nonperfused regions. The three layer skin model has a nonperfused viable epidermis, and deeper regions of dermis and subcutaneous tissue with perfusion that is constant or temperature-dependent. Two cases are considered: (1 surface contact heating and (2 spatially distributed heating. The model is relevant to the prediction of the transient and steady state temperature rise for different methods of power deposition within the skin. Accumulated thermal damage is estimated by using an Arrhenius type rate equation at locations where viable tissue temperature exceeds 42°C. Prediction of spatial temperature distributions is also illustrated with a two-dimensional model of skin created from a histological image. Results The transport lattice approach was validated by comparison with an analytical solution for a slab with homogeneous thermal properties and spatially distributed uniform sink held at constant temperatures at the ends. For typical transcutaneous blood gas sensing conditions the estimated damage is small, even with prolonged skin contact to a 45°C surface. Spatial heterogeneity in skin thermal properties leads to a non-uniform temperature distribution during a 10 GHz electromagnetic field exposure. A realistic two-dimensional model of the skin shows that tissue heterogeneity does not lead to a significant local temperature increase when heated by a hot wire tip. Conclusions The heat transport system model of the

  5. Temperature dependence of first lattice corrections to the free-energy of kink compacton-bearing systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yemele, David [Departement de Physique, Faculte des Sciences, Universite de Dschang, BP 067 Dschang (Cameroon); Kofane, Timoleon C [Laboratoire de Mecanique, Faculte des Sciences, Universite de Yaounde I, BP 812 Yaounde (Cameroon)

    2005-03-16

    The free-energy of discrete nonlinear Klein-Gordon (NKG) systems with anharmonic interparticle interactions is derived by means of the transfer integral operator method, with the first lattice corrections and kink-kink interactions taken into account. Two particular substrate potentials are considered: the {phi}-four and the sine-Gordon (sG). We show that, in the general case where the system exhibits the kink soliton like excitations, the correction factors, due to the lattice discreteness, appearing in the free-energy and in the lattice corrected static kink soliton energy, depend on the temperature through a coupling of the interparticle anharmonicity strength to the temperature. Similarly, in the purely anharmonic NKG systems, characterized by the absence of the linear dispersion, where thermodynamic properties are sensitive to kink compactons, we find also that the correction factors are temperature dependent. In both cases, they decrease with increasing temperatures, although the correction factors verify different temperature laws.

  6. Temperature dependence of the flux line lattice transition into square symmetry in superconducting LuNi2B2C

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eskildsen, M.R.; Abrahamsen, A.B.; Kogan, V.G.

    2001-01-01

    We have investigated the temperature dependence of the H parallel to c flux line lattice structural phase transition from square to hexagonal symmetry, in the tetragonal superconductor LuNi2B2C (T-c = 16.6 K). At temperatures below 10 K the transition onset field, H-2(T), is only weakly temperature...... dependent. Above 10 K, H-2(T) rises sharply, bending away from the upper critical field. This contradicts theoretical predictions of H-2(T) merging with the upper critical field and suggests that just below the H-c2(T) curve the flux line lattice might be hexagonal....

  7. Temperature-dependent magnetism in artificial honeycomb lattice of connected elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summers, B.; Debeer-Schmitt, L.; Dahal, A.; Glavic, A.; Kampschroeder, P.; Gunasekera, J.; Singh, D. K.

    2018-01-01

    Artificial magnetic honeycomb lattices are expected to exhibit a broad and tunable range of novel magnetic phenomena that would be difficult to achieve in natural materials, such as long-range spin ice, entropy-driven magnetic charge-ordered states, and spin order due to the spin chirality. Eventually, the spin correlation is expected to develop into a unique spin-solid-state-density ground state, manifested by the distribution of the pairs of vortex states of opposite chirality. Here we report the creation of an artificial permalloy honeycomb lattice of ultrasmall connecting bonds, with a typical size of ≃12 nm. Detailed magnetic and neutron-scattering measurements on the newly fabricated honeycomb lattice demonstrate the evolution of magnetic correlation as a function of temperature. At low enough temperature, neutron-scattering measurements and micromagnetic simulation suggest the development of a loop state of vortex configuration in this system.

  8. Irradiation temperature dependence of production efficiency of lattice defects in some neutron-irradiated oxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okada, Moritami [Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University, Kumatori-cho, Sennan-gun, Osaka 5900494 (Japan)]. E-mail: okada@rri.kyoto-u.ac.jp; Atobe, Kozo [Faculty of Science, Naruto University of Education, Naruto, Tokushima 7728502 (Japan); Nakagawa, Masuo [Faculty of Education, Kagawa University, Takamatsu, Kagawa 7608522 (Japan)

    2004-11-01

    Temperature dependence of production efficiency of irradiation-induced defects in neutron-irradiated oxides has been investigated. Some oxide single crystals, MgO, {alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} (sapphire) and TiO{sub 2} (rutile), were irradiated at several controlled temperatures, 10, 20, 50, 100, 150 and 200 K, using the low-temperature irradiation facility of Kyoto University Reactor (KUR-LTL), and at ambient temperature ({approx}370 K) in the same facility. Irradiation temperature dependence of production efficiency of a 1 {mu}m band in TiO{sub 2} differs greatly from that of anion vacancy (F-type centers) in MgO and {alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. Results for MgO and {alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} show steep negative gradients from 10 to 370 K, whereas that for TiO{sub 2} includes a valley between 40 and 60 K and a hump at about 130 K, and then disappear at about 200 K. In MgO and {alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, this behavior can be explained by the recombination of Frenkel pairs, which is activated at higher temperature. In TiO{sub 2}, in addition to the recombination mechanism, a covalent bonding property is thought to be exerted strong influence, and it is suggested that a disappearance of the 1 {mu}m band at above 200 K is due to the recombination process of Frenkel pairs which is caused by the irradiation-induced crystallization.

  9. Temperature dependence of the NMR spin-lattice relaxation rate for spin-1/2 chains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coira, E.; Barmettler, P.; Giamarchi, T.; Kollath, C.

    2016-10-01

    We use recent developments in the framework of a time-dependent matrix product state method to compute the nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation rate 1 /T1 for spin-1/2 chains under magnetic field and for different Hamiltonians (XXX, XXZ, isotropically dimerized). We compute numerically the temperature dependence of the 1 /T1 . We consider both gapped and gapless phases, and also the proximity of quantum critical points. At temperatures much lower than the typical exchange energy scale, our results are in excellent agreement with analytical results, such as the ones derived from the Tomonaga-Luttinger liquid (TLL) theory and bosonization, which are valid in this regime. We also cover the regime for which the temperature T is comparable to the exchange coupling. In this case analytical theories are not appropriate, but this regime is relevant for various new compounds with exchange couplings in the range of tens of Kelvin. For the gapped phases, either the fully polarized phase for spin chains or the low-magnetic-field phase for the dimerized systems, we find an exponential decrease in Δ /(kBT ) of the relaxation time and can compute the gap Δ . Close to the quantum critical point our results are in good agreement with the scaling behavior based on the existence of free excitations.

  10. Temperature-dependent thermal conductivities of one-dimensional nonlinear Klein-Gordon lattices with a soft on-site potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Linlin; Li, Nianbei; Li, Baowen

    2014-12-01

    The temperature-dependent thermal conductivities of one-dimensional nonlinear Klein-Gordon lattices with soft on-site potential (soft-KG) are investigated systematically. Similarly to the previously studied hard-KG lattices, the existence of renormalized phonons is also confirmed in soft-KG lattices. In particular, the temperature dependence of the renormalized phonon frequency predicted by a classical field theory is verified by detailed numerical simulations. However, the thermal conductivities of soft-KG lattices exhibit the opposite trend in temperature dependence in comparison with those of hard-KG lattices. The interesting thing is that the temperature-dependent thermal conductivities of both soft- and hard-KG lattices can be interpreted in the same framework of effective phonon theory. According to the effective phonon theory, the exponents of the power-law dependence of the thermal conductivities as a function of temperature are only determined by the exponents of the soft or hard on-site potentials. These theoretical predictions are consistently verified very well by extensive numerical simulations.

  11. A survey of lattice results on finite temperature quantum ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A survey of lattice results on finite temperature quantum chromodynamics. E LAERMANN. Fakultät für Physik, Universität Bielefeld, D-33615 Bielefeld, Germany. Abstract. The talk summarizes some new results of lattice investigations of QCD at finite temper- ature. The topics discussed cover the flavor dependence of the ...

  12. Lattice dynamics and dielectric functions of multiferroic BiFeO{sub 3}/c-sapphire films determined by infrared reflectance spectra and temperature-dependent Raman scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duan, Zhihua; Yu, Qian [Key Laboratory of Polar Materials and Devices, Ministry of Education, Department of Electronic Engineering, East China Normal University, Shanghai 200241 (China); Wu, Jiada; Sun, Jian [Key Laboratory for Advanced Photonic Materials and Devices, Ministry of Education, Department of Optical Science and Engineering, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Hu, Zhigao, E-mail: zghu@ee.ecnu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Polar Materials and Devices, Ministry of Education, Department of Electronic Engineering, East China Normal University, Shanghai 200241 (China); Chu, Junhao [Key Laboratory of Polar Materials and Devices, Ministry of Education, Department of Electronic Engineering, East China Normal University, Shanghai 200241 (China)

    2012-12-15

    Multiferroic BiFeO{sub 3} (BFO) films have been grown on c-sapphire substrates by pulsed laser deposition under different laser energies (E{sub L}). The X-ray diffraction and Raman spectra indicate that the films are polycrystalline and exhibit the single rhombohedral (R) phase. The crystal distortion becomes weaker with decreasing the E{sub L}, which is described by the ratio of c/a. It was found that different E{sub L} values also lead to the variation of the Bi/Fe ratio. Temperature-dependent Raman spectra were carried out to study the phonon mode evolution behaviors. The three A{sub 1} transverse optical (TO) phonon modes located at 219, 172, and 142 cm{sup -1} shift towards a lower energy side with the temperature due to thermal expansion, thermal disorder and the anharmonic effects of lattice. The E(TO) and three A{sub 1}(TO) phonon frequencies slightly increase with increasing the E{sub L} of the growth condition, which results from the Bi vacancies, the changes of the length and intensity of Bi-O bonds and the local structure distortion in the FeO{sub 6} octahedra. The dielectric functions of the BFO films in the frequency range of 50-8000 cm{sup -1} have been extracted by fitting infrared reflectance spectra with the Lorentz multi-oscillator dispersion model. The variation trend of the dielectric functions with different E{sub L} can be observed and related to the packing density, surface roughness, and defect states. It was concluded that the E{sub L} corresponding to changing the c/a ratio has an obvious influence on the lattice vibrations and intraband transitions of the BFO films. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The c/a and Bi/Fe ratios of BiFeO{sub 3} films at different laser energy (E{sub L}). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The temperature-dependent evolution of phonon modes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The crystal distortion and Bi vacancies influence the lattice vibration. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The E{sub L} effect on the dielectric

  13. Frontiers of finite temperature lattice QCD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borsányi Szabolcs

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available I review a selection of recent finite temperature lattice results of the past years. First I discuss the extension of the equation of state towards high temperatures and finite densities, then I show recent results on the QCD topological susceptibility at high temperatures and highlight its relevance for dark matter search.

  14. Temperature dependent lattice instability in single crystals of ferromagnetic CdCr2Se4 diluted with In and Sb

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Waskowska, A.; Gerward, Leif; Olsen, J.S.

    2008-01-01

    to occur at the same temperature as the magnetic transition, T-c = 130 K, which also is the same T-c as for the parent crystal CdCr2Se4. The low temperature phase has been described in orthorhombic space group Fddd. For In admixture, a structural transition occurs in the paramagnetic state at about T......-a approximate to 200 K ( which is higher than T-c = 125 K), to a tetragonal structure with space group I4(1)/amd. This behaviour is attributed to macroscopic spontaneous strain due to chemical heterogeneities, and to spin frustrations due to mixed valencies of Cr. The paramagnetic Curie-Weiss temperature theta......In ferromagnetic CdCr2Se4 diluted with Me-x(3+) = In and Sb, deviations from cubic symmetry Fd (3) over barm appear in the paramagnetic phase just below room temperature, and they increase with decreasing temperature. For Sb admixture, the unit-cell anomalies indicate a structural phase transition...

  15. LATTICE QCD AT FINITE TEMPERATURE AND DENSITY.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BLUM,T.; CREUTZ,M.; PETRECZKY,P.

    2004-02-24

    With the operation of the RHIC heavy ion program, the theoretical understanding of QCD at finite temperature and density has become increasingly important. Though QCD at finite temperature has been extensively studied using lattice Monte-Carlo simulations over the past twenty years, most physical questions relevant for RHIC (and future) heavy ion experiments remain open. In lattice QCD at finite temperature and density there have been at least two major advances in recent years. First, for the first time calculations of real time quantities, like meson spectral functions have become available. Second, the lattice study of the QCD phase diagram and equation of state have been extended to finite baryon density by several groups. Both issues were extensively discussed in the course of the workshop. A real highlight was the study of the QCD phase diagram in (T, {mu})-plane by Z. Fodor and S. Katz and the determination of the critical end-point for the physical value of the pion mass. This was the first time such lattice calculations at, the physical pion mass have been performed. Results by Z Fodor and S. Katz were obtained using a multi-parameter re-weighting method. Other determinations of the critical end point were also presented, in particular using a Taylor expansion around {mu} = 0 (Bielefeld group, Ejiri et al.) and using analytic continuation from imaginary chemical potential (Ph. de Forcrand and O. Philipsen). The result based on Taylor expansion agrees within errors with the new prediction of Z. Fodor and S. Katz, while methods based on analytic continuation still predict a higher value for the critical baryon density. Most of the thermodynamics studies in full QCD (including those presented at this workshop) have been performed using quite coarse lattices, a = 0.2-0.3 fm. Therefore one may worry about cutoff effects in different thermodynamic quantities, like the transition temperature T{sub tr}. At the workshop U. Heller presented a study of the transition

  16. Spin-dependent potentials from lattice QCD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koma, Y. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany)]|[Mainz Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Kernphysik; Koma, M. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany)]|[Mainz Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Kernphysik]|[Osaka Univ. (JP). Research Center for Nuclear Physics (RCNP)

    2006-09-15

    The spin-dependent corrections to the static inter-quark potential are phenomenologically relevant to describing the fine and hyperfine spin splitting of the heavy quarkonium spectra. We investigate these corrections, which are represented as the field strength correlators on the quark-antiquark source, in SU(3) lattice gauge theory. We use the Polyakov loop correlation function as the quark-antiquark source, and by employing the multi-level algorithm, we obtain remarkably clean signals for these corrections up to intermediate distances of around 0.6 fm. Our observation suggests several new features of the corrections. (orig.)

  17. Positive dependence of thermal conductivity on temperature in GeTe/Bi2Te3 superlattices: the contribution of electronic and particle wave lattice thermal conductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, H.; Lan, F.; Liu, Y. J.; Zhou, L. J.; Wang, X. J.; He, Q.; Wang, K. Z.; Miao, X. S.

    2017-09-01

    Temperature-dependent thermal conductivity of phase-change material, GeTe/Bi2Te3 superlattices, has been investigated in the temperature range of 40-300 K. We have found that thermal conductivity increases with increasing temperature, which is contrary to the common results indicated by other works. In this paper, two possible mechanisms are suggested for this result. One is that the thermal conductivity is affected by the thermal boundary resistance at the interfaces between layers, and the other considers the factor of electronic thermal conductivity in the partially coherent regime which is based on the very wave-particle duality of phonons. Finally, the periodic thickness dependence of the thermal conductivity in GeTe/Bi2Te3 superlattices have been measured at room temperature, and the results indicate the main contribution of electron in the total thermal conductivity and the partially coherent regime of phonon. Thus we believe that the second explanation is more reasonable. The work here deepens the understanding of basic mechanisms of thermal transport in phase-change superlattices, and is instructive in modeling and simulation of phase change memories.

  18. Meson Correlators in Finite Temperature Lattice QCD

    CERN Document Server

    De Forcrand, Philippe; Hashimoto, T; Hioki, S; Matsufuru, H; Miyamura, O; Nakamura, A; Takaishi, T; Umeda, T; Stamatescu, I O; CERN. Geneva; Forcrand, Ph. de

    2001-01-01

    We analyze temporal and spatial meson correlators in quenched lattice QCD at T>0. Below T_c we observe little change in the meson properties as compared with T=0. Above T_c we observe new features: chiral symmetry restoration and signals of plasma formation, but also indication of persisting mesonic (metastable) states and different temporal and spatial masses in the mesonic channels. This suggests a complex picture of QGP in the region 1 - 1.5 T_c.

  19. Field dependence of hopping mobility: Lattice models against spatial disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oelerich, J. O.; Nenashev, A. V.; Dvurechenskii, A. V.; Gebhard, F.; Baranovskii, S. D.

    2017-11-01

    The theoretical description of the effect of the electric field F on the hopping mobility μ belongs to the not-yet-resolved problems related to charge transport in disordered materials. An often proposed solution is to simulate hopping transport via sites placed on regular grids and to fit the results by phenomenological equations. This approach currently dominates the theoretical research of hopping transport in organic disordered semiconductors. We show that the dependence μ (F ) in the case of regular grids can drastically differ from that in systems with spatial disorder. While μ increases with F on lattices, it can decrease in random systems with the same material parameters. Moreover, the material parameters responsible for the dependence μ (F ) on lattices differ from those responsible for μ (F ) in spatially disordered systems, which makes lattice models inappropriate for studying the field dependence of the hopping mobility.

  20. Revisiting 2D Lattice Based Spin Flip-Flop Ising Model: Magnetic Properties of a Thin Film and Its Temperature Dependence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Satya Pal

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a brief review of Ising's work done in 1925 for one dimensional spin chain with periodic boundary condition. Ising observed that no phase transition occurred at finite temperature in one dimension. He erroneously generalized his views in higher dimensions but that was not true. In 1941 Kramer and Wannier obtained…

  1. Effects of nanoscale size dependent parameters on lattice thermal ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Throughout the method of trial and error, using the MATHCAD. 12 program, the values of P,Nimp and γ were adjusted such that the best fit for calculated lattice thermal conductivity to the experimental curves were obtained as shown in figure 3. The diameter dependence of the fitting parameters Nimp,P and γ (L, T ) and γ ...

  2. Hot-phonon lifetime in AlGaN/GaN at a high lattice temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matulionis, A.; Liberis, J.; Ardaravicius, L.; Eastman, L. F.; Shealy, J. R.; Vertiatchikh, A.

    2004-04-01

    A microwave noise technique is applied to study hot phonons in a biased two-dimensional AlGaN/GaN channel. The longitudinal optical (LO)-phonon-conversion lifetime is estimated from the measured dependence of hot-electron temperature on supplied power. At a lattice temperature of 373 K, the mean value of the effective LO-phonon lifetime (350 fs) is close to the value obtained at room temperature.

  3. Anisotropic ordering in a two-temperature lattice gas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Szolnoki, Attila; Szabó, György; Mouritsen, Ole G.

    1997-01-01

    We consider a two-dimensional lattice gas model with repulsive nearest- and next-nearest-neighbor interactions that evolves in time according to anisotropic Kawasaki dynamics. The hopping of particles along the principal directions is governed by two heat baths at different temperatures T-x and T...

  4. Density dependence of the "symmetry energy" in the lattice gas model

    OpenAIRE

    Su, Q. M.; Ma, Y. G.(Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800, China); Tian, W. D.; Fang, D. Q.(Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800, China); Cai, X.Z.; Wang, K.

    2007-01-01

    Isoscaling behavior of the statistical emission fragments from the equilibrated sources with $Z$ = 30 and $N$ = 30, 33, 36 and 39, resepectively, is investigated in the framework of isospin dependent lattice gas model. The dependences of isoscaling parameters $\\alpha$ on source isospin asymmetry, temperature and freeze-out density are studied and the "symmetry energy" is deduced from isoscaling parameters. Results show that "symmetry energy" $C_{sym}$ is insensitive to the change of temperatu...

  5. History dependent quantum random walks as quantum lattice gas automata

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shakeel, Asif, E-mail: asif.shakeel@gmail.com, E-mail: dmeyer@math.ucsd.edu, E-mail: plove@haverford.edu; Love, Peter J., E-mail: asif.shakeel@gmail.com, E-mail: dmeyer@math.ucsd.edu, E-mail: plove@haverford.edu [Department of Physics, Haverford College, Haverford, Pennsylvania 19041 (United States); Meyer, David A., E-mail: asif.shakeel@gmail.com, E-mail: dmeyer@math.ucsd.edu, E-mail: plove@haverford.edu [Department of Mathematics, University of California/San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093-0112 (United States)

    2014-12-15

    Quantum Random Walks (QRW) were first defined as one-particle sectors of Quantum Lattice Gas Automata (QLGA). Recently, they have been generalized to include history dependence, either on previous coin (internal, i.e., spin or velocity) states or on previous position states. These models have the goal of studying the transition to classicality, or more generally, changes in the performance of quantum walks in algorithmic applications. We show that several history dependent QRW can be identified as one-particle sectors of QLGA. This provides a unifying conceptual framework for these models in which the extra degrees of freedom required to store the history information arise naturally as geometrical degrees of freedom on the lattice.

  6. A spin dependent hexagonal optical lattice with complex valued tunneling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinberg, Malte; Struck, Julian; Oelschlaeger, Christoph; Simonet, Juliette; Windpassinger, Patrick; Sengstock, Klaus

    2013-05-01

    The realization of ultracold quantum gases in hexagonal optical lattices allows for the investigation of unique topological properties especially in connection to Dirac cones. Here we report on prospects of engineering artificial gauge potentials for bosons in a tunable hexagonal optical lattice. An intrinsic spin-dependency offers a versatile method to lift the degeneracy of this bipartite lattice via the orientation of the quantization axis. It is thus possible to tailor gaps at the Dirac points in the dispersion relation. Moreover, complex tunneling parameters can be experimentally realized by applying an external periodic force which breaks time reversal symmetry. As the resulting Peierls phases range from 0 to 2 π it is possible to emulate artificial gauge potentials in such a system. With these tools at hand, we discuss the feasibility of the emulation of strong field physics with ultracold quantum gases in the honeycomb lattice as a step towards the realization of complex quantum systems, i.e. quantum Hall states and topological insulators.

  7. Texture dependent lattice strains and texture gradient in AI7020

    Science.gov (United States)

    Y Zhong, Z.; Brokmeier, H.-G.; Maawad, E.; Schell, N.

    2015-04-01

    Firstly, an Al7020 block was characterized by the texture gradient, which was remarkably strong. Texture sharpness in the center with about 30 mrd (multiple random distribution) shows typical plain strain texture components. On the surface and close to the surface the texture sharpness is much weaker showing also shear components. Strongest shear was not directly at the surface but 4 mm deeper. The texture analysis at HEMS Beamline (Petra III/DESY-Hamburg) was done with continuous scanning mode to include all grains to improve the grain statistics. Secondly, with an in situ synchrotron experiment the texture dependent lattice strain behavior was investigated using flat tensile samples oriented 0°, 45° and 90° to the rolling direction (RD). Texture induced anisotropy influenced on the lattice dependent yield strength and the lattice dependent stress-strain behavior, which will be discussed in detail. Due to the high energy synchrotron beam complete Debye-Scherrer rings were obtained so that the patterns, parallel and perpendicular to loading direction (LD), were obtained simultaneously.

  8. Lattice Monte Carlo calculations of finite temperature QCD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degrand, T.

    The status of the lattice description of the deconfinement transition and the properties of hadronic matter at high (and low) temperature T are discussed. An ultimate goal of these investigations is to learn whether or not QCD actually predicts the naive phase diagram. A more realistic goal, which is at present partially within grasp, is to compute the static properties of QCD matter at T 0 from first principles. These include the order of phase transitions, critical temperatures T/sub c/, critical exponents or latent heat, but not dynamical critical properties, such as the behavior of Green's functions near T/sub c/. No first- principles discussions of non-equilibrium properties of QCD, which would be required for a description of the experiments are known. In fact, experimentalists should think of the world studied by lattice or Monte Carlo methods as a little crystal in an oven whose temperature is kept constant in time. A short description is given of how to set up the finite-temperature field theory on a lattice to display the important parts of the calculation without going too much into details. Then recent progress in the understanding of the glue world - pure gauge theories is discussed and end by discussing the physically relevant case of fermions and gauge fields.

  9. Quantum phases in tunable state-dependent hexagonal optical lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lühmann, Dirk-Sören; Jürgensen, Ole; Weinberg, Malte; Simonet, Juliette; Soltan-Panahi, Parvis; Sengstock, Klaus

    2014-07-01

    We study the ground-state properties of ultracold bosonic atoms in a state-dependent graphenelike honeycomb optical lattice, where the degeneracy between the two triangular sublattices A and B can be lifted. We discuss the various geometries accessible with this lattice setup and present a scheme to control the energy offset with external magnetic fields. The competition of the on-site interaction with the offset energy leads to Mott phases characterized by population imbalances between the sublattices. For the definition of an optimal Hubbard model, we demonstrate a scheme that allows for the efficient computation of Wannier functions. Using a cluster mean-field method, we compute the phase diagrams and provide a universal representation for arbitrary energy offsets. We find good agreement with the experimental data for the superfluid to Mott insulator transition.

  10. Dependency Parsing with Lattice Structures for Resource-Poor Languages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudprasert, Sutee; Kawtrakul, Asanee; Boitet, Christian; Berment, Vincent

    In this paper, we present a new dependency parsing method for languages which have very small annotated corpus and for which methods of segmentation and morphological analysis producing a unique (automatically disambiguated) result are very unreliable. Our method works on a morphosyntactic lattice factorizing all possible segmentation and part-of-speech tagging results. The quality of the input to syntactic analysis is hence much better than that of an unreliable unique sequence of lemmatized and tagged words. We propose an adaptation of Eisner's algorithm for finding the k-best dependency trees in a morphosyntactic lattice structure encoding multiple results of morphosyntactic analysis. Moreover, we present how to use Dependency Insertion Grammar in order to adjust the scores and filter out invalid trees, the use of language model to rescore the parse trees and the k-best extension of our parsing model. The highest parsing accuracy reported in this paper is 74.32% which represents a 6.31% improvement compared to the model taking the input from the unreliable morphosyntactic analysis tools.

  11. Transverse momentum-dependent parton distribution functions in lattice QCD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Engelhardt, Michael G. [New Mexico State University; Musch, Bernhard U. [Tech. University Munich; Haegler, Philipp G. [Tech. University Munich; Negele, John W. [MIT; Schaefer, Andreas [Regensburg

    2013-08-01

    A fundamental structural property of the nucleon is the distribution of quark momenta, both parallel as well as perpendicular to its propagation. Experimentally, this information is accessible via selected processes such as semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering (SIDIS) and the Drell-Yan process (DY), which can be parametrized in terms of transversemomentum-dependent parton distributions (TMDs). On the other hand, these distribution functions can be extracted from nucleon matrix elements of a certain class of bilocal quark operators in which the quarks are connected by a staple-shaped Wilson line serving to incorporate initial state (DY) or final state (SIDIS) interactions. A scheme for evaluating such matrix elements within lattice QCD is developed. This requires casting the calculation in a particular Lorentz frame, which is facilitated by a parametrization of the matrix elements in terms of invariant amplitudes. Exploratory results are presented for the time-reversal odd Sivers and Boer-Mulders transverse momentum shifts.

  12. Temperature dependence of surface nanobubbles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berkelaar, R.P.; Seddon, James Richard Thorley; Zandvliet, Henricus J.W.; Lohse, Detlef

    2012-01-01

    The temperature dependence of nanobubbles was investigated experimentally using atomic force microscopy. By scanning the same area of the surface at temperatures from 51 °C to 25 °C it was possible to track geometrical changes of individual nanobubbles as the temperature was decreased.

  13. Temperature study of lattice constants and Raman scattering of SrLaGaO 4 single crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drozdowski, M.; Domagała, J.; Kozielski, M.; Szybowicz, M.; Pajaçzkowska, A.

    1995-12-01

    The lattice parameters of SrLaGaO 4 (SLG) single crystal were measured in the temperature range from 300 to 700 K using X-ray spectroscopy. The measurements revealed that (i) the thermal coefficient along a and c axes is different and (ii) thermal expansion coefficient in a direction depends on temperature, showing the transition temperature at about 460 K. To verify this result we have also studied the Raman intensity IR and full width at half maximum (FWHM) of the Raman band at 218 cm -1 ascribed to the librational lattice mode. The above temperature dependences display a characteristic discontinuity at about 460 K which coincides with the previous data obtained from X-ray measurements. The obtained results are discussed in terms of the nature of defects which might arise in the ABCO 4 lattice during the crystal growth process.

  14. The finite temperature phase transition in the lattice SU(2)-Higgs model

    CERN Document Server

    Farakos, K; Rummukainen, K; Shaposhnikov, Mikhail E

    1994-01-01

    We study the finite temperature transition of SU(2)-Higgs model with lattice Monte Carlo techniques. We use dimensional reduction to transform the original 4-dimensional SU(2)-gauge + fundamental Higgs theory to an effective 3-dimensional SU(2) + adjoint Higgs + fundamental Higgs model. The simulations were performed with Higgs masses of 35 and 80 GeV; in both cases we observe a stronger first order transition than the perturbation theory predicts, indicating that the dynamics of the transition strongly depend on non-perturbative effects.

  15. Dynamical control of matter-wave splitting using time-dependent optical lattices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Park, Sung Jong; Andersen, Henrik Kjær; Mai, Sune

    2012-01-01

    We report on measurements of splitting Bose-Einstein condensates (BEC) by using a time-dependent optical lattice potential. First, we demonstrate the division of a BEC into a set of equally populated components by means of time-dependent control of Landau-Zener tunneling in a vertical lattice...... potential. Next, we apply time-dependent optical Bragg mirrors to a BEC oscillating in a harmonic trap. We demonstrate high-order Bragg reflection of the condensate due to multiphoton Raman transitions, where the depth of the optical lattice potential allows for a choice of the order of the transition...

  16. Width and string tension of the flux tube in SU(2) lattice gauge theory at high temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chagdaa, S.; Galsandorj, E.; Laermann, E.; Purev, B.

    2018-02-01

    We study the profiles of the flux tube between a static quark and an antiquark in quenched SU(2) lattice gauge theory at temperatures around the deconfinement phase transition. The physical width of the flux tube and the string tension have been determined from the transverse profiles and the q\\bar{q} potential, respectively. Exploiting the computational power of a GPU accelerator in our flux tube investigation, we achieve much higher statistics through which we can increase the signal to noise ratio of our observables in the simulation. This has allowed the investigation of larger lattices as well as larger separations between the quarks than in our previous work. The improved accuracy gives us better results for the width and the string tension. The physical width of the flux tube increases with the temperature up to around T c while keeping its increasing dependence on the q\\bar{q} separation. The string tension results are compared for two different sizes of the lattice. As the lattice becomes larger and finer together with the improved precision, the temperature dependent string tension tends to have a smaller value than the previous one.

  17. Inelastic collisions and density-dependent excitation suppression in a 87Sr optical lattice clock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishof, M.; Martin, M. J.; Swallows, M. D.; Benko, C.; Lin, Y.; Quéméner, G.; Rey, A. M.; Ye, J.

    2011-11-01

    We observe two-body loss of 3P0 87Sr atoms trapped in a one-dimensional optical lattice. We measure loss rate coefficients for atomic samples between 1 and 6 μK that are prepared either in a single nuclear-spin sublevel or with equal populations in two sublevels. The measured temperature and nuclear-spin preparation dependence of rate coefficients agree well with calculations and reveal that rate coefficients for distinguishable atoms are only slightly enhanced over those of indistinguishable atoms. We further observe a suppression of excitation and losses during interrogation of the 1S0-3P0 transition as density increases and Rabi frequency decreases, which suggests the presence of strong interactions in our dynamically driven many-body system.

  18. Inelastic collisions and density-dependent excitation suppression in a {sup 87}Sr optical lattice clock

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bishof, M.; Martin, M. J.; Swallows, M. D.; Benko, C.; Lin, Y.; Quemener, G.; Rey, A. M.; Ye, J. [JILA, NIST and University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309-0440 (United States); Department of Physics, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309-0390 (United States)

    2011-11-15

    We observe two-body loss of {sup 3} P{sub 0} {sup 87}Sr atoms trapped in a one-dimensional optical lattice. We measure loss rate coefficients for atomic samples between 1 and 6 {mu}K that are prepared either in a single nuclear-spin sublevel or with equal populations in two sublevels. The measured temperature and nuclear-spin preparation dependence of rate coefficients agree well with calculations and reveal that rate coefficients for distinguishable atoms are only slightly enhanced over those of indistinguishable atoms. We further observe a suppression of excitation and losses during interrogation of the {sup 1} S{sub 0}-{sup 3} P{sub 0} transition as density increases and Rabi frequency decreases, which suggests the presence of strong interactions in our dynamically driven many-body system.

  19. Elastic properties and stress-temperature phase diagrams of high-temperature phases with low-temperature lattice instabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, John C.; Van der Ven, Anton

    2014-12-01

    The crystal structures of many technologically important high-temperature phases are predicted to have lattice instabilities at low temperature, making their thermodynamic and mechanical properties inaccessible to standard first principles approaches that rely on the (quasi) harmonic approximation. Here, we use the recently developed anharmonic potential cluster expansion within Monte Carlo simulations to predict the effect of temperature and anisotropic stress on the elastic properties of ZrH2, a material that undergoes diffusionless transitions among cubic, tetragonal, and orthorhombic phases. Our analysis shows that the mechanical properties of high-temperature phases with low-temperature vibrational instabilities are very sensitive to temperature and stress state. These findings have important implications for materials characterization and multi-scale simulations and suggest opportunities for enhanced strain engineering of high-temperature phases exhibiting soft-mode instabilities.

  20. Lattice Constant Dependence on Particle Size for Ceria prepared from a Citrate Sol-Gel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morris, V N [Analog Devices, Raheen Business Park, Raheen, Limerick (Ireland); Dimensional Solids Group, Chemistry Department, University College Cork, Cork (Ireland); Farrell, R A [Dimensional Solids Group, Chemistry Department, University College Cork, Cork (Ireland); Sexton, A M [Dimensional Solids Group, Chemistry Department, University College Cork, Cork (Ireland); Morris, M A [Dimensional Solids Group, Chemistry Department, University College Cork, Cork (Ireland); Centre for Research into Advanced Nanostructures and Nanodevices (CRANN), Trinity College, Dublin (Ireland)

    2006-02-22

    High surface area ceria nanoparticles have been prepared using a citrate solgel precipitation method. Changes to the particle size have been made by calcining the ceria powders at different temperatures, and X-ray methods used to determine their lattice parameters. The particle sizes have been assessed using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and the lattice parameter found to fall with decreasing particle size. The results are discussed in the light of the role played by surface tension effects.

  1. Isotropy dependence of spiral order in triangular lattice Hubbard model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Sahebsara

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Investigation of broken symmetry phases with long range order in strongly correlated electron systems is among subjects that have always been of interest to condensed matter scientists. In this paper we tried to study the existence of the 120 degrees magnetic spiral order, based on anisotropy in geometrically frustrated triangular lattices, using variational cluster approximation. We observed that by increasing the anisotropy in the system, the spiral order can be found for U≥7.5t and for t'<1.35; however, it is limited by decreasing t' since antiferromagnetism is dominant for t'<0.85t. Studying the Mott transition shows that a paramagnetic insulating phase, called quantum spin liquid, happens in the neighborhood of the spiral ordered phase

  2. Temperature dependent fluorescence in disordered Frenkel chains : Interplay of equilibration and local band-edge level structure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bednarz, M.; Malyshev, V.; Knoester, J.

    2003-01-01

    We model the optical dynamics in linear Frenkel exciton systems governed by scattering on static disorder and lattice vibrations and calculate the temperature dependent fluorescence spectrum and lifetime. The fluorescence Stokes shift shows a nonmonotonic behavior with temperature, which derives

  3. Finite-temperature superconducting correlations in the square lattice Hubbard model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khatami, Ehsan; Scalettar, Richard; Singh, Rajiv R. P.

    2014-03-01

    We utilize numerical linked-cluster expansions (NLCE) to study superconducting properties of the repulsive Fermi-Hubbard model on the square lattice. Within NLCE, temperature-dependent properties in the thermodynamic limit can be obtained from exact diagonalization of small clusters. We calculate the pairing correlation functions, structure factor, and correlation length for d-wave and extended s-wave symmetries at, and especially away from, half filling for a wide range of interaction strengths. A relatively strong tendency to d-wave pairing away from half filling is revealed after subtracting the uncorrelated contributions. We compare our findings to improved results from the determinantal quantum Monte Carlo simulations on large finite clusters with periodic boundary condition.

  4. Effects of nanoscale size dependent parameters on lattice thermal ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The obtained fitting value for mean Gruneisen parameter has a systematic dependence on all Si nanowire diameters changing from 0·791 for 115 nm diameter to 1·515 for the 22 nm nanowire diameter. The dependence also gave a suggested surface thickness of about 5–6 nm. The other two parameters were found to have ...

  5. Realization of ground-state artificial skyrmion lattices at room temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Dustin A; Maranville, Brian B; Balk, Andrew L; Kirby, Brian J; Fischer, Peter; Pierce, Daniel T; Unguris, John; Borchers, Julie A; Liu, Kai

    2015-10-08

    The topological nature of magnetic skyrmions leads to extraordinary properties that provide new insights into fundamental problems of magnetism and exciting potentials for novel magnetic technologies. Prerequisite are systems exhibiting skyrmion lattices at ambient conditions, which have been elusive so far. Here, we demonstrate the realization of artificial Bloch skyrmion lattices over extended areas in their ground state at room temperature by patterning asymmetric magnetic nanodots with controlled circularity on an underlayer with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA). Polarity is controlled by a tailored magnetic field sequence and demonstrated in magnetometry measurements. The vortex structure is imprinted from the dots into the interfacial region of the underlayer via suppression of the PMA by a critical ion-irradiation step. The imprinted skyrmion lattices are identified directly with polarized neutron reflectometry and confirmed by magnetoresistance measurements. Our results demonstrate an exciting platform to explore room-temperature ground-state skyrmion lattices.

  6. Breaking inversion symmetry in a state-dependent honeycomb lattice: artificial graphene with tunable band gap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinberg, M.; Staarmann, C.; Ölschläger, C.; Simonet, J.; Sengstock, K.

    2016-06-01

    Here, we present the application of a novel method for controlling the geometry of a state-dependent honeycomb lattice: the energy offset between the two sublattices of the honeycomb structure can be adjusted by rotating the atomic quantization axis. This enables us to continuously tune between a homogeneous graphene-like honeycomb lattice and a triangular lattice and to open an energy gap at the characteristic Dirac points. We probe the symmetry of the lattice with microwave spectroscopy techniques and investigate the behavior of atoms excited to the second energy band. We find a striking influence of the energy gap at the Dirac cones onto the lifetimes of bosonic atoms in the excited band.

  7. Finite-temperature treatment of ultracold atoms in a one-dimensional optical lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wild, B. G.; Blakie, P. B.; Hutchinson, D. A. W.

    2006-02-01

    We consider the effects of temperature upon the superfluid phase of ultracold, weakly interacting bosons in a one-dimensional optical lattice. We use a finite-temperature treatment of the Bose-Hubbard model based upon the Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov formalism, considering both a translationally invariant lattice and one with additional harmonic confinement. In both cases we observe an upward shift in the critical temperature for Bose condensation. For the case with additional harmonic confinement, this is in contrast with results for the uniform gas.

  8. Phase transitions and steady-state microstructures in a two-temperature lattice-gas model with mobile active impurities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Jonas Rosager; Sabra, Mads Christian; Mouritsen, Ole G.

    2000-01-01

    The nonequilibrium, steady-state phase transitions and the structure of the different phases of a two-dimensional system with two thermodynamic temperatures are studied via a simple lattice-gas model with mobile active impurities ("hot/cold spots'') whose activity is controlled by an external drive....... The properties of the model are calculated by Monte Carlo computer-simulation techniques. The two temperatures and the external drive on the system lead to a rich phase diagram including regions of microstructured phases in addition to macroscopically ordered (phase-separated) and disordered phases. Depending...

  9. The length-tension curve in muscle depends on lattice spacing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, C. D.; Salcedo, M. K.; Irving, T. C.; Regnier, M.; Daniel, T. L.

    2013-07-10

    Classic interpretations of the striated muscle length–tension curve focus on how force varies with overlap of thin (actin) and thick (myosin) filaments. New models of sarcomere geometry and experiments with skinned synchronous insect flight muscle suggest that changes in the radial distance between the actin and myosin filaments, the filament lattice spacing, are responsible for between 20% and 50% of the change in force seen between sarcomere lengths of 1.4 and 3.4 µm. Thus, lattice spacing is a significant force regulator, increasing the slope of muscle's force–length dependence.

  10. TEMPERATURE DEPENDENCE OF THE THERMAL ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Thermal conductivity values, in the temperature range 300 – 1200 K, have been measured in air and at atmospheric pressure for a Kenyan kaolinite refractory with 0% - 50% grog proportions. The experimental thermal conductivity values were then compared with those calculated using the Zumbrunnen et al [1] and the ...

  11. Gluon and ghost propagator studies in lattice QCD at finite temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aouane, Rafik

    2013-04-29

    Gluon and ghost propagators in quantum chromodynamics (QCD) computed in the infrared momentum region play an important role to understand quark and gluon confinement. They are the subject of intensive research thanks to non-perturbative methods based on Dyson-Schwinger (DS) and functional renormalization group (FRG) equations. Moreover, their temperature behavior might also help to explore the chiral and deconfinement phase transition or crossover within QCD at non-zero temperature. Our prime tool is the lattice discretized QCD (LQCD) providing a unique ab-initio non-perturbative approach to deal with the computation of various observables of the hadronic world. We investigate the temperature dependence of Landau gauge gluon and ghost propagators in pure gluodynamics and in full QCD. Regarding the gluon propagator, we compute its longitudinal D{sub L} as well its transversal D{sub T} components. The aim is to provide a data set in terms of fitting formulae which can be used as input for DS (or FRG) equations. We deal with full (N{sub f}=2) LQCD with the twisted mass fermion discretization. We employ gauge field configurations provided by the tmfT collaboration for temperatures in the crossover region and for three fixed pion mass values in the range [300,500] MeV. Finally, within SU(3) pure gauge theory (at T=0) we compute the Landau gauge gluon propagator according to different gauge fixing criteria. Our goal is to understand the influence of gauge copies with minimal (non-trivial) eigenvalues of the Faddeev-Popov operator.

  12. Density-dependent light-assisted tunneling in fermionic optical lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wenchao; Morong, William; Demarco, Brian

    2016-05-01

    Many recent theoretical proposals have discussed the possibility to realize density-dependent tunneling in optical lattices via external periodic driving. These methods enable the simulation of novel many-body quantum phases. Here we present experimental progress on realizing density-dependent tunneling for ultracold 40K atoms trapped in a cubic optical lattice via stimulated Raman transitions. After preparing a spin-polarized gas in the Mott insulator regime of the Hubbard model, a pair of Raman beams is applied to flip the spin of atoms. The Raman beams also introduce an effective density-dependent tunneling that can be tuned by the Raman frequency difference and Rabi rate. The Mott gap inferred from measurements of the fraction of atoms transferred between spin states as the Raman frequency difference is adjusted matches the prediction based on a tight-binding model. We also observe the interaction-dependent tunneling by measuring the fraction of doubly-occupied sites created by the Raman driving. This method allows the engineering of density-dependent tunneling and effective nearest-neighbor interactions in fermionic optical lattices. The authors acknowledge funding from the National Science Foundation (Grant No. PHY15-05468) and the Army Research Office (Grant No. W911NF-12-1-0462).

  13. Finite-temperature Properties of the Fermi-Hubbard Model on the Honeycomb Lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Baoming; Khatami, Ehsan; Paiva, Thereza; Rigol, Marcos

    2012-02-01

    We study thermodynamic properties of the Fermi-Hubbard model on the honeycomb lattice utilizing the numerical linked-cluster expansion, which is exact in the thermodynamic limit, and quantum Monte Carlo simulations. We obtain the equation of state, double occupancy, entropy and spin correlations for a wide range of temperatures, chemical potentials, and interaction strengths. Employing a local density approximation, we study properties of the system in the presence of a harmonic trapping potential and compare the efficiency of various adiabatic cooling schemes to those obtained for such model on the square lattice.

  14. Tricritical point of lattice QCD with Wilson quarks at finite temperature and density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Xiang-Qian

    2004-11-01

    First principle study of QCD at finite temperature T and chemical potential μ is essential for understanding a wide range of phenomena from heavy-ion collisions to cosmology and neutron stars. However, in the presence of finite density, the critical behavior lattice gauge theory without species doubling, is unknown. At strong coupling, we examine the phase structure on the (μ,T) plane, using Hamiltonian lattice QCD with Wilson fermions. A tricritical point is found, separating the first and second order chiral phase transitions. Such a tricritical point at finite T has not been found in previous work in the Hamiltonian formalism with Kogut-Susskind fermions or naive fermions.

  15. High Statistics Analysis using Anisotropic Clover Lattices: (IV) The Volume Dependence of the Light Hadron Masses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beane, S R; Detmold, W; Lin, H W; Luu, T C; Orginos, K; Parreno, A; Savage, M J; Torok, A; Walker-Loud, A

    2011-07-01

    The volume dependence of the octet baryon masses and relations among them are explored with Lattice QCD. Calculations are performed with nf = 2 + 1 clover fermion discretization in four lattice volumes, with spatial extent L ? 2.0, 2.5, 3.0 and 4.0 fm, with an anisotropic lattice spacing of b_s ? 0.123 fm in the spatial direction, and b_t = b_s/3.5 in the time direction, and at a pion mass of m_\\pi ? 390 MeV. The typical precision of the ground-state baryon mass determination is dependence of the masses, the Gell-Mann Okubo mass-relation, and of other mass combinations. A comparison with the predictions of heavy baryon chiral perturbation theory is performed in both the SU(2)L ? SU(2)R and SU(3)L ? SU(3)R expansions. Predictions of the three-flavor expansion for the hadron masses are found to describe the observed volume dependences reasonably well. Further, the ?N? axial coupling constant is extracted from the volume dependence of the nucleon mass in the two-flavor expansion, with only small modifications in the three-flavor expansion from the inclusion of kaons and eta's. At a given value of m?L, the finite-volume contributions to the nucleon mass are predicted to be significantly smaller at m_\\pi ? 140 MeV than at m_\\pi ? 390 MeV due to a coefficient that scales as ? m_\\pi^3. This is relevant for the design of future ensembles of lattice gauge-field configurations. Finally, the volume dependence of the pion and kaon masses are analyzed with two-flavor and three-flavor chiral perturbation theory.

  16. Correlation between temperature-dependent permittivity dispersion ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The results indicate that the poling temperature plays a crucial role in the domains' alignment process, as expected. The temperature-dependent permittivity frequency dispersion and depolarization behaviours may have same origin. The aligned domains' break up into random state/nanodomains at depoling temperature ...

  17. Imaging galectin-3 dependent endocytosis with lattice light-sheet microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baek, Jongho; Lou, Jieqiong; Coelho, Simao; Lim, Yean Jin; Seidlitz, Silvia; Nicovich, Philip R.; Wunder, Christian; Johannes, Ludger; Gaus, Katharina

    2017-04-01

    Lattice light-sheet (LLS) microscopy provides ultrathin light sheets of a two-dimensional optical lattice that allows us imaging three-dimensional (3D) objects for hundreds of time points at sub-second intervals and at or below the diffraction limit. Galectin-3 (Gal3), a carbohydrate-binding protein, triggers glycosphingolipid (GSL)-dependent biogenesis of morphologically distinct endocytic vesicles that are cargo specific and clathrin independent. In this study, we apply LLS microscopy to study the dynamics of Gal3 dependent endocytosis in live T cells. This will allow us to observe Gal3-mediated endocytosis at high temporal and excellent 3D spatial resolution, which may shed light on our understanding of the mechanism and physiological function of Gal3-induced endocytosis.

  18. The importance of temperature dependent energy gap in the understanding of high temperature thermoelectric properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Saurabh; Pandey, Sudhir K.

    2016-10-01

    In this work, we show the importance of temperature dependent energy band gap, E g (T), in understanding the high temperature thermoelectric (TE) properties of material by considering LaCoO3 (LCO) and ZnV2O4 (ZVO) compounds as a case study. For the fix value of band gap, E g , deviation in the values of α has been observed above 360 K and 400 K for LCO and ZVO compounds, respectively. These deviation can be overcomed by consideration of temperature dependent band gap. The change in used value of E g with respect to temperature is ∼4 times larger than that of In As. This large temperature dependence variation in E g can be attributed to decrement in the effective on-site Coulomb interaction due to lattice expansion. At 600 K, the value of ZT for n and p-doped, LCO is ∼0.35 which suggest that it can be used as a potential material for TE device. This work clearly suggest that one should consider the temperature dependent band gap in predicting the high temperature TE properties of insulating materials.

  19. Temperature-Dependent Diffusion Coefficients from ab initio Computations: Hydrogen in Nickel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    E Wimmer; W Wolf; J Sticht; P Saxe; C Geller; R Najafabadi; G Young

    2006-03-16

    The temperature-dependent mass diffusion coefficient is computed using transition state theory. Ab initio supercell phonon calculations of the entire system provide the attempt frequency, the activation enthalpy, and the activation entropy as a function of temperature. Effects due to thermal lattice expansion are included and found to be significant. Numerical results for the case of hydrogen in nickel demonstrate a strong temperature dependence of the migration enthalpy and entropy. Trapping in local minima along the diffusion path has a pronounced effect especially at low temperatures. The computed diffusion coefficients with and without trapping bracket the available experimental values over the entire temperature range between 0 and 1400 K.

  20. Temperature dependence of the MDT gas gain

    CERN Document Server

    Gaudio, G; Treichel, M

    1999-01-01

    This note describes the measurements taken in the Gamma Irradiation Facility (GIF) in the X5 test beam area at CERN to investigate the temperature dependence of the MDT drift gas (Ar/CO2 - 90:10). Spectra were taken with an Americium-241 source during the aging studies. We analysed the effects of temperature changes on the pulse height spectrum.

  1. Investigation Of Temperature Dependent Characteristics Of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The structure, magnetization and magnetostriction of Laves phase compound TbCo2 were investigated by temperature dependent high resolution neutron powder diffraction. The compound crystallizes in the cubic Laves phase C15 structure above its Curie temperature, TC and exhibits a rhombohedral distortion (space ...

  2. Finite temperature study of the axial U(1) symmetry on the lattice with overlap fermion formulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cossu, Guido; Aoki, Sinya; Fukaya, Hidenori; Hashimoto, Shoji; Kaneko, Takashi; Matsufuru, Hideo; Noaki, Jun-Ichi

    2013-06-01

    We examine the axial U(1) symmetry near and above the finite-temperature phase transition in two-flavor QCD using lattice QCD simulations. Although the axial U(1) symmetry is always violated by quantization, i.e., the chiral anomaly, the correlation functions may manifest effective restoration of the symmetry in the high-temperature phase. We explicitly study this possibility by calculating the meson correlators as well as the Dirac operator spectral density near the critical point. Our numerical simulations are performed on a 163×8 lattice with two flavors of dynamical quarks represented by the overlap fermion formalism. Chiral symmetry and its violation due to the axial anomaly is manifestly realized with this formulation, which is a prerequisite for the study of the effective restoration of the axial U(1) symmetry. In order to avoid discontinuity in the gauge configuration space, which occurs for the exactly chiral lattice fermions, the simulation is confined in a fixed topological sector. It induces a finite-volume effect, which is well described by a formula based on the Fourier transform from the θ vacua. We confirm this formula at finite temperature by calculating the topological susceptibility in the quenched theory. Our two-flavor simulations show degeneracy of the meson correlators and a gap in the Dirac operator spectral density, which implies that the axial U(1) symmetry is effectively restored in the chirally symmetric phase.

  3. Escherichia coli survival in waters: Temperature dependence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knowing the survival rates of water-borne Escherichia coli is important in evaluating microbial contamination and making appropriate management decisions. E. coli survival rates are dependent on temperature, a dependency that is routinely expressed using an analogue of the Q10 mo...

  4. Quantum electrodynamical time-dependent density functional theory for many-electron systems on a lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farzanehpour, Mehdi; Tokatly, Ilya; Nano-Bio Spectroscopy Group; ETSF Scientific Development Centre Team

    2015-03-01

    We present a rigorous formulation of the time-dependent density functional theory for interacting lattice electrons strongly coupled to cavity photons. We start with an example of one particle on a Hubbard dimer coupled to a single photonic mode, which is equivalent to the single mode spin-boson model or the quantum Rabi model. For this system we prove that the electron-photon wave function is a unique functional of the electronic density and the expectation value of the photonic coordinate, provided the initial state and the density satisfy a set of well defined conditions. Then we generalize the formalism to many interacting electrons on a lattice coupled to multiple photonic modes and prove the general mapping theorem. We also show that for a system evolving from the ground state of a lattice Hamiltonian any density with a continuous second time derivative is locally v-representable. Spanish Ministry of Economy and Competitiveness (Grant No. FIS2013-46159-C3-1-P), Grupos Consolidados UPV/EHU del Gobierno Vasco (Grant No. IT578-13), COST Actions CM1204 (XLIC) and MP1306 (EUSpec).

  5. Finite-temperature properties of strongly correlated fermions in the honeycomb lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Baoming; Paiva, Thereza; Khatami, Ehsan; Rigol, Marcos

    2014-05-01

    We study finite-temperature properties of the Hubbard model in the honeycomb lattice using numerical linked-cluster expansions and determinantal quantum Monte Carlo simulations. Specifically, we calculate experimentally relevant quantities, such as the entropy, the specific heat, uniform and staggered spin susceptibilities, nearest-neighbor spin correlations, and the double occupancy at and away from half filling. We show that in homogeneous systems adiabatic cooling is more efficient at finite doping than at half filling, and that this can be used in trapped geometries to create a Mott insulating phase with exponentially long antiferromagnetic correlations at relatively high entropies. Those entropies are found to be higher in the honeycomb lattice than in the square one suggesting that the experimental realization of an antiferromagnetic Mott insulator may be easier in the former geometry.

  6. Critical behavior of 3D Z(N) lattice gauge theories at zero temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borisenko, O., E-mail: oleg@bitp.kiev.ua [Bogolyubov Institute for Theoretical Physics, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, 03680 Kiev (Ukraine); Chelnokov, V., E-mail: chelnokov@bitp.kiev.ua [Bogolyubov Institute for Theoretical Physics, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, 03680 Kiev (Ukraine); Cortese, G., E-mail: cortese@unizar.es [Instituto de Física Teórica UAM/CSIC, Cantoblanco, E-28049 Madrid (Spain); Departamento de Física Teórica, Universidad de Zaragoza, E-50009 Zaragoza (Spain); Gravina, M., E-mail: gravina@cs.infn.it [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università della Calabria, and Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Gruppo Collegato di Cosenza, I-87036 Arcavacata di Rende, Cosenza (Italy); Papa, A., E-mail: papa@cs.infn.it [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università della Calabria, and Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Gruppo Collegato di Cosenza, I-87036 Arcavacata di Rende, Cosenza (Italy); Surzhikov, I., E-mail: i_van_go@inbox.ru [Bogolyubov Institute for Theoretical Physics, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, 03680 Kiev (Ukraine)

    2014-02-15

    Three-dimensional Z(N) lattice gauge theories at zero temperature are studied for various values of N. Using a modified phenomenological renormalization group, we explore the critical behavior of the generalized Z(N) model for N=2,3,4,5,6,8. Numerical computations are used to simulate vector models for N=2,3,4,5,6,8,13,20 for lattices with linear extension up to L=96. We locate the critical points of phase transitions and establish their scaling with N. The values of the critical indices indicate that the models with N>4 belong to the universality class of the three-dimensional XY model. However, the exponent α derived from the heat capacity is consistent with the Ising universality class. We discuss a possible resolution of this puzzle.

  7. Phase structure of 3D Z(N) lattice gauge theories at finite temperature: Large-N and continuum limits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borisenko, O., E-mail: oleg@bitp.kiev.ua [Bogolyubov Institute for Theoretical Physics, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, 03680 Kiev (Ukraine); Chelnokov, V., E-mail: chelnokov@bitp.kiev.ua [Bogolyubov Institute for Theoretical Physics, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, 03680 Kiev (Ukraine); Gravina, M., E-mail: gravina@fis.unical.it [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università della Calabria, and Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Gruppo Collegato di Cosenza, I-87036 Arcavacata di Rende, Cosenza (Italy); Papa, A., E-mail: papa@fis.unical.it [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università della Calabria, and Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Gruppo Collegato di Cosenza, I-87036 Arcavacata di Rende, Cosenza (Italy)

    2014-11-15

    We study numerically three-dimensional Z(N) lattice gauge theories at finite temperature, for N=5,6,8,12,13 and 20 on lattices with temporal extension N{sub t}=2,4,8. For each model, we locate phase transition points and determine critical indices. We propose also the scaling of critical points with N. The data obtained enable us to verify the scaling near the continuum limit for the Z(N) models at finite temperatures.

  8. Controlling the frequency-temperature sensitivity of a cryogenic sapphire maser frequency standard by manipulating Fe3+ spins in the sapphire lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benmessai, K.; Creedon, D. L.; Le Floch, J.-M.; Tobar, M. E.; Mrad, M.; Bourgeois, P.-Y.; Kersalé, Y.; Giordano, V.

    2012-02-01

    To create a stable signal from a cryogenic sapphire maser frequency standard, the frequency-temperature dependence of the supporting whispering gallery mode must be annulled. We report the ability to control this dependence by manipulating the paramagnetic susceptibility of Fe3+ ions in the sapphire lattice. We show that the maser signal depends on other whispering gallery modes tuned to the pump signal near 31 GHz, and the annulment point can be controlled to exist between 5 and 10 K, depending on the Fe3+ ion concentration and the frequency of the pump. This level of control has not been achieved previously and will allow improvements in the stability of such devices.

  9. Investigations of Low Temperature Time Dependent Cracking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van der Sluys, W A; Robitz, E S; Young, B A; Bloom, J

    2002-09-30

    The objective of this project was to investigate metallurgical and mechanical phenomena associated with time dependent cracking of cold bent carbon steel piping at temperatures between 327 C and 360 C. Boiler piping failures have demonstrated that understanding the fundamental metallurgical and mechanical parameters controlling these failures is insufficient to eliminate it from the field. The results of the project consisted of the development of a testing methodology to reproduce low temperature time dependent cracking in laboratory specimens. This methodology was used to evaluate the cracking resistance of candidate heats in order to identify the factors that enhance cracking sensitivity. The resultant data was integrated into current available life prediction tools.

  10. Comparison of High Temperature Crystal Lattice and Bulk Thermal Expansion Measurements of LGT Single Crystal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beaucage, Timothy R [University of Maine; Beenfeldt, Eric P [University of Maine; Speakman, Scott A [ORNL; Porter, Wallace D [ORNL; Payzant, E Andrew [ORNL; Pereira da Cunha, Mauricio [University of Maine

    2006-01-01

    Among the langasite family of crystals (LGX), the three most popular materials are langasite (LGS, La3Ga5SiO14), langatate (LGT, La3Ga5.5Ta0.5O14) and langanite (LGN, La3Ga5.5Nb0.5O14). The LGX crystals have received significant attention for acoustic wave (AW) device applications due to several properties, which include: (1) piezoelectric constants about two and a half times those of quartz, thus allowing the design of larger bandwidth filters; (2) existence of temperature compensated orientations; (3) high density, with potential for reduced vibration and acceleration sensitivity; and (4) possibility of operation at high temperatures, since the LGX crystals do not present phase changes up to their melting point above 1400degC. The LGX crystals' capability to operate at elevated temperatures calls for an investigation on the growth quality and the consistency of these materials' properties at high temperature. One of the fundamental crystal properties is the thermal expansion coefficients in the entire temperature range where the material is operational. This work focuses on the measurement of the LGT thermal expansion coefficients from room temperature (25degC) to 1200degC. Two methods of extracting the thermal expansion coefficients have been used and compared: (a) dual push-rod dilatometry, which provides the bulk expansion; and (b) x-ray powder diffraction, which provides the lattice expansion. Both methods were performed over the entire temperature range and considered multiple samples taken from <001> Czochralski grown LGT material. The thermal coefficients of expansion were extracted by approximating each expansion data set to a third order polynomial fit over three temperature ranges reported in this work: 25degC to 400degC, 400degC to 900degC, 900degC to 1200degC. An accuracy of fit better than 35ppm for the bulk expansion and better than 10ppm for the lattice expansion have been obtained with the aforementioned polynomial fitting. The

  11. Temperature dependence of optically induced cell deformations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritsch, Anatol; Kiessling, Tobias R.; Stange, Roland; Kaes, Josef A.

    2012-02-01

    The mechanical properties of any material change with temperature, hence this must be true for cellular material. In biology many functions are known to undergo modulations with temperature, like myosin motor activity, mechanical properties of actin filament solutions, CO2 uptake of cultured cells or sex determination of several species. As mechanical properties of living cells are considered to play an important role in many cell functions it is surprising that only little is known on how the rheology of single cells is affected by temperature. We report the systematic temperature dependence of single cell deformations in Optical Stretcher (OS) measurements. The temperature is changed on a scale of about 20 minutes up to hours and compared to defined temperature shocks in the range of milliseconds. Thereby, a strong temperature dependence of the mechanics of single suspended cells is revealed. We conclude that the observable differences arise rather from viscosity changes of the cytosol than from structural changes of the cytoskeleton. These findings have implications for the interpretation of many rheological measurements, especially for laser based approaches in biological studies.

  12. Temperature dependences of hydrous species in feldspars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, W. D.; Yang, Y.; Zhu, K. Y.; Xia, Q. K.

    2018-01-01

    Feldspars are abundant in the crust of the Earth. Multiple hydrogen species such as OH, H2O and NH4 + can occur in the structure of feldspars. Hydrogen species play a critical role in influencing some properties of the host feldspars and the crust, including mechanical strength, electrical property of the crust, and evolution of the crustal fluids. Knowledge of hydrous species in feldspars to date has been mostly derived from spectroscopic studies at ambient temperature. However, the speciation and sites of hydrous species at high temperatures may not be quenchable. Here, we investigated the temperature dependences of several typical hydrous components (e.g., type IIa OH, type IIb OH and type I H2O) in feldspars by measuring the in situ FTIR spectra at elevated temperatures up to 800 °C. We found that the hydrous species demonstrated different behaviors at elevated temperatures. With increasing temperature, type IIa OH redistributes on the various sites in the anorthoclase structure. Additionally, O-H vibration frequencies increase for types IIa and IIb OH, and they decrease for type I H2O with increasing temperature. In contrast to type I H2O which drastically dehydrates during the heating process, types IIa and IIb OH show negligible loss; however, the bulk integral absorption coefficients drastically decrease with increasing temperature. These results may have implications in understanding the properties of hydrous species and feldspars at non-ambient temperatures, not only under geologic conditions but also at cold planetary surface conditions.

  13. Temperature Dependent Models of Semiconductor Devices for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The paper presents an investigation of the temperature dependent model of a diode and bipolar transistor built-in to the NAP-2 program and comparison of these models with experimentally measured characteristics of the BA 100 diode and BC 109 transistor. The detail of the modelling technique has been discussed and ...

  14. Measurements of temperature dependence of 'localized susceptibility'

    CERN Document Server

    Shiozawa, H; Ishii, H; Takayama, Y; Obu, K; Muro, T; Saitoh, Y; Matsuda, T D; Sugawara, H; Sato, H

    2003-01-01

    The magnetic susceptibility of some rare-earth compounds is estimated by measuring magnetic circular dichroism (MCD) of rare-earth 3d-4f absorption spectra. The temperature dependence of the magnetic susceptibility obtained by the MCD measurement is remarkably different from the bulk susceptibility in most samples, which is attributed to the strong site selectivity of the core MCD measurement.

  15. Temperature and angular momentum dependence of the ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Temperature and angular momentum dependence of the quadrupole deformation is studied in the middle of the sd-shell for 28Si and 27Si isotopes using the spherical shell model approach. The shell model calculations have been performed using the standard universal sd-shell (USD) interaction and the canonical ...

  16. Temperature Dependent Wire Delay Estimation in Floorplanning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winther, Andreas Thor; Liu, Wei; Nannarelli, Alberto

    2011-01-01

    Due to large variations in temperature in VLSI circuits and the linear relationship between metal resistance and temperature, the delay through wires of the same length can be different. Traditional thermal aware floorplanning algorithms use wirelength to estimate delay and routability....... In this work, we show that using wirelength as the evaluation metric does not always produce a floorplan with the shortest delay. We propose a temperature dependent wire delay estimation method for thermal aware floorplanning algorithms, which takes into account the thermal effect on wire delay. The experiment...... results show that a shorter delay can be achieved using the proposed method. In addition, we also discuss the congestion and reliability issues as they are closely related to routing and temperature....

  17. A novel theoretical model for the temperature dependence of band gap energy in semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Peiji; Li, Weiguo; Zhang, Xianhe; Zhang, Xuyao; Deng, Yong; Kou, Haibo

    2017-10-01

    We report a novel theoretical model without any fitting parameters for the temperature dependence of band gap energy in semiconductors. This model relates the band gap energy at the elevated temperature to that at the arbitrary reference temperature. As examples, the band gap energies of Si, Ge, AlN, GaN, InP, InAs, ZnO, ZnS, ZnSe and GaAs at temperatures below 400 K are calculated and are in good agreement with the experimental results. Meanwhile, the band gap energies at high temperatures (T  >  400 K) are predicted, which are greater than the experimental results, and the reasonable analysis is carried out as well. Under low temperatures, the effect of lattice expansion on the band gap energy is very small, but it has much influence on the band gap energy at high temperatures. Therefore, it is necessary to consider the effect of lattice expansion at high temperatures, and the method considering the effect of lattice expansion has also been given. The model has distinct advantages compared with the widely quoted Varshni’s semi-empirical equation from the aspect of modeling, physical meaning and application. The study provides a convenient method to determine the band gap energy under different temperatures.

  18. Correlation Decay in Fermionic Lattice Systems with Power-Law Interactions at Nonzero Temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Santana, Senaida; Gogolin, Christian; Cirac, J Ignacio; Acín, Antonio

    2017-09-15

    We study correlations in fermionic lattice systems with long-range interactions in thermal equilibrium. We prove a bound on the correlation decay between anticommuting operators and generalize a long-range Lieb-Robinson-type bound. Our results show that in these systems of spatial dimension D with, not necessarily translation invariant, two-site interactions decaying algebraically with the distance with an exponent α≥2D, correlations between such operators decay at least algebraically to 0 with an exponent arbitrarily close to α at any nonzero temperature. Our bound is asymptotically tight, which we demonstrate by a high temperature expansion and by numerically analyzing density-density correlations in the one-dimensional quadratic (free, exactly solvable) Kitaev chain with long-range pairing.

  19. Temperature dependence of phonons in photosynthesis proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Mengyang; Myles, Dean; Blankenship, Robert; Markelz, Andrea

    Protein long range vibrations are essential to biological function. For many proteins, these vibrations steer functional conformational changes. For photoharvesting proteins, the structural vibrations play an additional critical role in energy transfer to the reaction center by both phonon assisted energy transfer and energy dissipation. The characterization of these vibrations to understand how they are optimized to balance photoharvesting and photoprotection is challenging. To date this characterization has mainly relied on fluorescence line narrowing measurements at cryogenic temperatures. However, protein dynamics has a strong temperature dependence, with an apparent turn on in anharmonicity between 180-220 K. If this transition affects intramolecular vibrations, the low temperature measurements will not represent the phonon spectrum at biological temperatures. Here we use the new technique of anisotropic terahertz microscopy (ATM) to measure the intramolecular vibrations of FMO complex. ATM is uniquely capable of isolating protein vibrations from isotropic background. We find resonances both red and blue shift with temperature above the dynamical transition. The results indicate that the characterization of vibrations must be performed at biologically relevant temperatures to properly understand the energy overlap with the excitation energy transfer. This work was supported by NSF:DBI 1556359, BioXFEL seed Grant funding from NSF:DBI 1231306, DOE: DE-SC0016317, and the Bruce Holm University at Buffalo Research Foundation Grant.

  20. Compendium of energy-dependent sensitivity profiles for the TRX-2 thermal lattice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomlinson, E.T.; Lucius, J.L.; Drischler, J.D.

    1978-03-01

    Energy-dependent sensitivity profiles for five responses calculated for the TRX-2 thermal lattice with the ORNL sensitivity code system FORSS are presented here both in graphical form and in SENPRO format. The responses are the multiplication factor, k/sub eff/; the ratio of epithermal-to-thermal captures in /sup 238/U, /sup 28/rho; the ratio of epithermal-to-thermal fissions in /sup 235/U, /sup 25/delta; the ratio of fissions in /sup 238/U to fissions in /sup 235/U, /sup 28/delta; and the ratio of captures in /sup 238/U to fissions in /sup 235/U, CR. A summary table of the total sensitivities is also presented.

  1. Lattice Discrete Particle Model (LDPM) for pressure-dependent inelasticity in granular rocks

    CERN Document Server

    Ashari, Shiva Esna; Cusatis, Gianluca

    2016-01-01

    This paper deals with the formulation, calibration, and validation of a Lattice Discrete Particle Model (LDPM) for the simulation of the pressure-dependent inelastic response of granular rocks. LDPM is formulated in the framework of discrete mechanics and it simulates the heterogeneous deformation of cemented granular systems by means of discrete compatibility/equilibrium equations defined at the grain scale. A numerical strategy is proposed to generate a realistic microstructure based on the actual grain size distribution of a sandstone and the capabilities of the method are illustrated with reference to the particular case of Bleurswiller sandstone, i.e. a granular rock that has been extensively studied at the laboratory scale. LDPM micromechanical parameters are calibrated based on evidences from triaxial experiments, such as hydrostatic compression, brittle failure at low confinement and plastic behavior at high confinement. Results show that LDPM allows exploring the effect of fine-scale heterogeneity on...

  2. Self-intermediate scattering function of strongly interacting three-dimensional lattice gases: time- and wave-vector-dependent tracer diffusion coefficient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skarpalezos, Loukas; Argyrakis, Panos; Vikhrenko, Vyacheslav S

    2014-05-01

    We investigate the self-intermediate scattering function (SISF) in a three-dimensional (3D) cubic lattice fluid (interacting lattice gas) with attractive nearest-neighbor interparticle interactions at a temperature slightly above the critical one by means of Monte Carlo simulations. A special representation of SISF as an exponent of the mean tracer diffusion coefficient multiplied by the geometrical factor and time is considered to highlight memory effects that are included in time and wave-vector dependence of the diffusion coefficient. An analytical expression for the diffusion coefficient is suggested to reproduce the simulation data. It is shown that the particles' mean-square displacement is equal to the time integral of the diffusion coefficient. We make a comparison with the previously considered 2D system on a square lattice. The main difference with the two-dimensional case is that the time dependence of particular characteristics of the tracer diffusion coefficient in the 3D case cannot be described by exponentially decreasing functions, but requires using stretched exponentials with rather small values of exponents, of the order of 0.2. The hydrodynamic values of the tracer diffusion coefficient (in the limit of large times and small wave vectors) defined through SIFS simulation results agree well with the results of its direct determination by the mean-square displacement of the particles in the entire range of concentrations and temperatures.

  3. Low-temperature embrittlement and fracture of metals with different crystal lattices – Dislocation mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.M. Chernov

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The state of a low-temperature embrittlement (cold brittleness and dislocation mechanisms for formation of the temperature of a ductile-brittle transition and brittle fracture of metals (mono- and polycrystals with various crystal lattices (BCC, FCC, HCP are considered. The conditions for their formation connected with a stress-deformed state and strength (low temperature yield strength as well as the fracture breaking stress and mobility of dislocations in the top of a crack of the fractured metal are determined. These conditions can be met for BCC and some HCP metals in the initial state (without irradiation and after a low-temperature damaging (neutron irradiation. These conditions are not met for FCC and many HCP metals. In the process of the damaging (neutron irradiation such conditions are not met also and the state of low-temperature embrittlement of metals is absent (suppressed due to arising various radiation dynamic processes, which increase the mobility of dislocations and worsen the strength characteristics.

  4. Temperature dependent terahertz properties of Ammonium Nitrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Abdur; Azad, Abul; Moore, David

    Terahertz spectroscopy has been demonstrated as an ideal nondestructive method for identifying hazardous materials such as explosives. Many common explosives exhibit distinct spectral signatures at terahertz range (0.1-6.0 THz) due to the excitations of their low frequency vibrational modes. Ammonium nitrate (AN), an easily accessible oxidizer often used in improvised explosive, exhibits strong temperature dependence. While the room temperature terahertz absorption spectrum of AN is featureless, it reveals distinct spectral features below 240 K due to the polymorphic phase transition. We employed terahertz time domain spectroscopy to measure the effective dielectric properties of AN embedded in polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) binder. The dielectric properties of pure AN were extracted using three different effective medium theories (EMT), simple effective medium approach, Maxwell-Garnett (MG) model, and Bruggeman (BR) model. In order to understand the effect of temperature on the dielectric properties, we varied the sample temperature from 5K to 300K. This study indicates presence of additional vibrational modes at low temperature. These results may greatly enhance the detectability of AN and facilitate more accurate theoretical modeling.

  5. Front propagation in a regular vortex lattice: Dependence on the vortex structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beauvier, E.; Bodea, S.; Pocheau, A.

    2017-11-01

    We investigate the dependence on the vortex structure of the propagation of fronts in stirred flows. For this, we consider a regular set of vortices whose structure is changed by varying both their boundary conditions and their aspect ratios. These configurations are investigated experimentally in autocatalytic solutions stirred by electroconvective flows and numerically from kinematic simulations based on the determination of the dominant Fourier mode of the vortex stream function in each of them. For free lateral boundary conditions, i.e., in an extended vortex lattice, it is found that both the flow structure and the front propagation negligibly depend on vortex aspect ratios. For rigid lateral boundary conditions, i.e., in a vortex chain, vortices involve a slight dependence on their aspect ratios which surprisingly yields a noticeable decrease of the enhancement of front velocity by flow advection. These different behaviors reveal a sensitivity of the mean front velocity on the flow subscales. It emphasizes the intrinsic multiscale nature of front propagation in stirred flows and the need to take into account not only the intensity of vortex flows but also their inner structure to determine front propagation at a large scale. Differences between experiments and simulations suggest the occurrence of secondary flows in vortex chains at large velocity and large aspect ratios.

  6. Frequency dependence of electron spin-lattice relaxation for semiquinones in alcohol solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elajaili, Hanan B; Biller, Joshua R; Eaton, Sandra S; Eaton, Gareth R

    2014-10-01

    The spin-lattice relaxation rates at 293 K for three anionic semiquinones (2,5-di-t-butyl-1,4-benzosemiquinone, 2,6-di-t-butyl-1,4-benzosemiquinone, and 2,3,5,6-tetramethoxy-1,4-benzosemiquinone) were studied at up to 8 frequencies between 250 MHz and 34 GHz in ethanol or methanol solution containing high concentrations of OH(-). The relaxation rates are about a factor of 2 faster at lower frequencies than at 9 or 34 GHz. However, in perdeuterated alcohols the relaxation rates exhibit little frequency dependence, which demonstrates that the dominant frequency-dependent contribution to relaxation is modulation of dipolar interactions with solvent nuclei. The relaxation rates were modeled as the sum of two frequency-independent contributions (spin rotation and a local mode) and two frequency-dependent contributions (modulation of dipolar interaction with solvent nuclei and a much smaller contribution from modulation of g anisotropy). The correlation time for modulation of the interaction with solvent nuclei is longer than the tumbling correlation time of the semiquinone and is consistent with hydrogen bonding of the alcohol to the oxygen atoms of the semiquinones. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Phase Transformation and Lattice Parameter Changes of Non-trivalent Rare Earth-Doped YSZ as a Function of Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Shengli; Huang, Xiao; He, Zhang; Buyers, Andrew

    2018-01-01

    To examine the effect of doping/co-doping on high-temperature phase compositions of YSZ, stand-alone YSZ and CeO2 and Nb2O5 co-doped YSZ samples were prepared using mechanical alloy and high-temperature sintering. XRD analysis was performed on these samples from room temperature to 1100 °C. The results show that the structure for the co-doped samples tends to be thermally stable when the test temperature is higher than a critical value. Monoclinic phase was dominant in Nb2O5 co-doped YSZ at temperatures lower than 600 °C, while for the YSZ and CeO2 co-doped YSZ, cubic/tetragonal phase was dominant in the whole test temperature range. The lattice parameters for all the samples increase with increasing test temperature generally. The lattice parameters for the two non-trivalent rare earth oxides co-doped YSZ show that the lattice parameter a for the cubic phase of the Ce4+ co-doped YSZ is consistently greater than that of 7YSZ which is related to the presence of larger radius of Ce4+ in the matrix. The lattice parameters a, b, c for the monoclinic phase of Ce4+ co-doped YSZ are much closer to each other than that of the Nb5+ co-doped YSZ, indicating the former has better tendency to form cubic/tetragonal phase, which is desired for vast engineering applications.

  8. QCD at finite temperature and density on the lattice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lombardo M.-P.

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available In the first lecture we briefly summarize the basics of field theory thermodynamics and critical phenomena. We then introduce the lattice gauge field theory approach to QCD at finite temperature and density, which is a non-perturbative scheme allowing first principle calculations using the QCD Lagrangian as a sole input. Some of the general concepts and idea introduced at the beginning are demonstrated by use of simple effective models of QCD. The second lecture is devoted to applications. We emphasize that current methods suffice to study the main phenomena at RHIC and LHC energies, and we discuss the ongoing theoretical efforts devoted to the solution of the sign problem which hampers the simulations of cold and dense matter. We conclude with short overview of the status of the field as of Summer 2008.

  9. SPECIFICATIONS FOR HIGH TEMPERATURE LATTICE TEST REACTOR BUILDING 318 PROJECT CAH-100

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vitro Engineering Company

    1964-07-15

    This is the specifications for the High Temperature Lattice Test Reactor Building 318 and it is divided into the following 21 divisions or chapters: (1) Excavating, Backfill & Grading; (2) Reinforced Concrete; (3) Masonry; (4) Structural Steel & Miscellaneous Metal Items, Contents - Division V; (5) Plumbing, Process & Service Piping; (6) Welding; (7) Insulated Metal Siding; (8) Roof Decks & Roofing; (9) Plaster Partitions & Ceiling; (10) Standard Doors, Windows & Hardware; (11) Shielding Doors; (12) Sprinkler System & Fire Extinguishers, Contents - Division XIII; (13) Heating, Ventilating & Air Conditioning; (14) Painting, Protective Coating & Floor Covering, Contents - Division XV; (15) Electrical; (16) Communications & Alarm Systems; (17) Special Equipment & Furnishings; (18) Overhead Bridge Crane; (19) Prefabricated Steel Building; (20) Paved Drive; and (21) Landscaping & Irrigation Sprinklers.

  10. Comparison of electromechanical properties and lattice distortions of different cuprate high temperature superconductors

    CERN Document Server

    Scheuerlein, C.; Grether, A; Rikel, M O; Hudspeth, J; Sugano, M; Ballarino, A; Bottura, L

    2016-01-01

    The electromechanical properties of different cuprate high-temperature superconductors, notably two ReBCO tapes, a reinforced and a nonreinforced Bi-2223 tape, and a Bi-2212 wire, have been studied. The axial tensile stress and strain, as well as the transverse compressive stress limits at which an irreversible critical current degradation occurs, are compared. The experimental setup has been integrated in a high-energy synchrotron beamline, and the self-field critical current and lattice parameter changes as a function of tensile stress and strain of a reinforced Bi-2223 tape have been measured simultaneously. Initially, the Bi-2223 filaments exhibit nearly linear elastic behavior up to the strain at which an irreversible degradation is observed. At 77 K, an axial Bi-2223 filament precompression of 0.09% in the composite tape and a Bi-2223 Poisson ratio ν = 0.21 have been determined.

  11. Improving the Volume Dependence of Two-Body Binding Energies Calculated with Lattice QCD

    CERN Document Server

    Davoudi, Zohreh

    2011-01-01

    Volume modifications to the binding of two-body systems in large cubic volumes of extent L depend upon the total momentum and exponentially upon the ratio of L to the size of the boosted system. Recent work by Bour et al determined the momentum dependence of the leading volume modifications to nonrelativistic systems with periodic boundary conditions imposed on the single-particle wavefunctions, enabling them to numerically determine the scattering of such bound states using a low-energy effective field theory and Luschers finite-volume method. The calculation of bound nuclear systems directly from QCD using Lattice QCD has begun, and it is important to reduce the systematic uncertainty introduced into such calculations by the finite spatial extent of the gauge-field configurations. We extend the work of Bour et al from nonrelativistic quantum mechanics to quantum field theory by generalizing the work of Luscher and of Gottlieb and Rummukainen to boosted two-body bound states. The volume modifications to bind...

  12. New Crystal-Growth Methods for Producing Lattice-Matched Substrates for High-Temperature Superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boatner, L.A.

    2008-06-24

    This effort addressed the technical problem of identifying and growing, on a commercial scale, suitable single-crystal substrates for the subsequent deposition of epitaxial thin films of high temperature semiconductors such as GaN/AlN. The lack of suitable lattice-matched substrate materials was one of the major problem areas in the development of semiconducting devices for use at elevated temperatures as well as practical opto-electronic devices based on Al- and GaN technology. Such lattice-matched substrates are necessary in order to reduce or eliminate high concentrations of defects and dislocations in GaN/AlN and related epitaxial thin films. This effort concentrated, in particular, on the growth of single crystals of ZnO for substrate applications and it built on previous ORNL experience in the chemical vapor transport growth of large single crystals of zinc oxide. This combined expertise in the substrate growth area was further complemented by the ability of G. Eres and his collaborators to deposit thin films of GaN on the subject substrates and the overall ORNL capability for characterizing the quality of such films. The research effort consisted of research on the growth of two candidate substrate materials in conjunction with concurrent research on the growth and characterization of GaN films, i.e. the effort combined bulk crystal growth capabilities in the area of substrate production at both ORNL and the industrial partner, Commercial Crystal Growth Laboratories (CCL), Naples, Florida, with the novel thin-film deposition techniques previously developed in the ORNL SSD.

  13. Temperature dependence of transport coefficients of 'simple liquid ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... (MD) simulations has been investigated. The study carried out at two densities, r* = 0.60 and r* = 0.95. Result shows erratic variations of the shear viscosity in the two lattices structures. KeyWords: Temperature effect, face centred, simple cubic, transport properties, simple liquid. [Global Jnl Pure & Appl. Sci. Vol.9(3) 2003: ...

  14. Direct method for calculating temperature-dependent transport properties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, Y.; Yuan, Z.; Wesselink, R.J.H.; Starikov, A.A.; van Schilfgaarde, M.; Kelly, Paul J.

    2015-01-01

    We show how temperature-induced disorder can be combined in a direct way with first-principles scattering theory to study diffusive transport in real materials. Excellent (good) agreement with experiment is found for the resistivity of Cu, Pd, Pt (and Fe) when lattice (and spin) disorder are

  15. Temperature dependent structural, vibrational and magnetic properties of K3Gd5(PO4)6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bevara, Samatha; Achary, S Nagabhusan; Mishra, Karuna Kara; Ravindran, T R; Sinha, Anil K; Sastry, P U; Tyagi, Avesh Kumar

    2017-02-22

    Herein we report the evolution of the crystal structure of K3Gd5(PO4)6 in the temperature range from 20 K to 1073 K, as observed from variable temperature X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopic studies. K3Gd5(PO4)6 has an open tunnel containing a three dimensional structure built by [Gd5(PO4)6]3- ions which in turn are formed of PO4 tetrahedra and GdOn (n = 8 and 9) polyhedra. The empty tunnels in the structure are occupied by K+ ions and maintain charge neutrality in the lattice. Evolution of unit cell parameters with temperature shows a systematic increase with temperature. The average axial thermal expansion coefficients between 20 K and 1073 K are: αa = 10.6 × 10-6 K-1, αb = 5.5 × 10-6 K-1 and αc = 16.4 × 10-6 K-1. The evolution of distortion indices of the various coordination polyhedra with temperature indicates a gradual decrease with increasing temperature, while those of Gd2O9 and K2O8 polyhedra show opposite trends. The overall anisotropy of the lattice thermal expansion is found to be controlled largely by the effect of temperature on GdOn polyhedra and their linkages. Temperature dependent Raman spectroscopic studies indicated that the intensities and wavenumbers of most of the Raman modes decrease continuously with increasing temperature. Anharmonic analyses of Raman modes indicated that the lattice, rigid translation and librational modes have larger contributions towards thermal expansion of K3Gd5(PO4)6 compared to high frequency internal modes. The temperature and field dependent magnetic measurements indicated no long range ordering down to 2 K and the observed effective magnetic moment per Gd3+ ion and the Weiss constant are 7.91 μB and 0.38 K, respectively.

  16. Escherichia coli survival in waters: temperature dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaustein, R A; Pachepsky, Y; Hill, R L; Shelton, D R; Whelan, G

    2013-02-01

    Knowing the survival rates of water-borne Escherichia coli is important in evaluating microbial contamination and making appropriate management decisions. E. coli survival rates are dependent on temperature, a dependency that is routinely expressed using an analogue of the Q₁₀ model. This suggestion was made 34 years ago based on 20 survival curves taken from published literature, but has not been revisited since then. The objective of this study was to re-evaluate the accuracy of the Q₁₀ equation, utilizing data accumulated since 1978. We assembled a database of 450 E. coli survival datasets from 70 peer-reviewed papers. We then focused on the 170 curves taken from experiments that were performed in the laboratory under dark conditions to exclude the effects of sunlight and other field factors that could cause additional variability in results. All datasets were tabulated dependencies "log concentration vs. time." There were three major patterns of inactivation: about half of the datasets had a section of fast log-linear inactivation followed by a section of slow log-linear inactivation; about a quarter of the datasets had a lag period followed by log-linear inactivation; and the remaining quarter were approximately linear throughout. First-order inactivation rate constants were calculated from the linear sections of all survival curves and the data grouped by water sources, including waters of agricultural origin, pristine water sources, groundwater and wells, lakes and reservoirs, rivers and streams, estuaries and seawater, and wastewater. Dependency of E. coli inactivation rates on temperature varied among the water sources. There was a significant difference in inactivation rate values at the reference temperature between rivers and agricultural waters, wastewaters and agricultural waters, rivers and lakes, and wastewater and lakes. At specific sites, the Q₁₀ equation was more accurate in rivers and coastal waters than in lakes making the value of

  17. Quantum electrodynamical time-dependent density-functional theory for many-electron systems on a lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farzanehpour, M.; Tokatly, I. V.

    2014-11-01

    We present a rigorous formulation of the time-dependent density-functional theory for interacting lattice electrons strongly coupled to cavity photons. We start with an example of one particle on a Hubbard dimer coupled to a single photonic mode, which is equivalent to the single mode spin-boson model or the quantum Rabi model. For this system we prove that the electron-photon wave function is a unique functional of the electronic density and the expectation value of the photonic coordinate, provided the initial state and the density satisfy a set of well defined conditions. Then we generalize the formalism to many interacting electrons on a lattice coupled to multiple photonic modes and prove the general mapping theorem. We also show that for a system evolving from the ground state of a lattice Hamiltonian any density with a continuous second time derivative is locally v representable.

  18. Lattice QCD calculations of transverse momentum-dependent parton distributions (TMDs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Engelhardt M.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available An ongoing program of evaluating TMD observables within Lattice QCD is reviewed, summarizing recent progress with respect to several challenges faced by such calculations. These lattice calculations are based on a definition of TMDs through hadronic matrix elements of quark bilocal operators containing staple-shaped gauge connections. A parametrization of the matrix elements in terms of invariant amplitudes serves to cast them in the Lorentz frame preferred for a lattice calculation. Data on the naively T-odd Sivers and Boer-Mulders effects as well as the transversity TMD are presented.

  19. THERMODYNAMICS OF TWO-FLAVOR LATTICE QCD WITH AN IMPROVED WILSON QUARK ACTION AT NON-ZERO TEMPERATURE AND DENSITY.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MAEZAWA,Y.; AOKI, S.; EJIRI, S.; HATSUDA, T.; ISHII, N.; KANAYA, K.; UKITA, N.

    2006-11-14

    The authors report the current status of the systematic studies of the QCD thermodynamics by lattice QCD simulations with two flavors of improved Wilson quarks. They evaluate the critical temperature of two flavor QCD in the chiral limit at zero chemical potential and show the preliminary result. Also they discuss fluctuations at none-zero temperature and density by calculating the quark number and isospin susceptibilities and their derivatives with respect to chemical potential.

  20. Lattice Thermal Conductivity of Ultra High Temperature Ceramics ZrB2 and HfB2 from Atomistic Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, John W.; Murray, Daw S.; Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.

    2011-01-01

    Atomistic Green-Kubo simulations are performed to evaluate the lattice thermal conductivity for single crystals of the ultra high temperature ceramics ZrB2 and HfB2 for a range of temperatures. Recently developed interatomic potentials are used for these simulations. Heat current correlation functions show rapid oscillations which can be identified with mixed metal-Boron optical phonon modes. Agreement with available experimental data is good.

  1. Graphene, a material for high temperature devices; intrinsic carrier density, carrier drift velocity, and lattice energy

    CERN Document Server

    Yin, Yan; Wang, Li; Jin, Kuijuan; Wang, Wenzhong

    2016-01-01

    Heat has always been a killing matter for traditional semiconductor machines. The underlining physical reason is that the intrinsic carrier density of a device made from a traditional semiconductor material increases very fast with a rising temperature. Once reaching a temperature, the density surpasses the chemical doping or gating effect, any p-n junction or transistor made from the semiconductor will fail to function. Here, we measure the intrinsic Fermi level (|E_F|=2.93k_B*T) or intrinsic carrier density (n_in=3.87*10^6 cm^-2 K^-2*T^2), carrier drift velocity, and G mode phonon energy of graphene devices and their temperature dependencies up to 2400 K. Our results show intrinsic carrier density of graphene is an order of magnitude less sensitive to temperature than those of Si or Ge, and reveal the great potentials of graphene as a material for high temperature devices. We also observe a linear decline of saturation drift velocity with increasing temperature, and identify the temperature coefficients of ...

  2. Temperature dependence of resonant x-ray magnetic scattering in holmium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helgesen, G.; Hill, J. P.; Thurston, T. R.; Gibbs, Doon; Kwo, J.; Hong, M.

    1994-08-01

    We report the results of resonant x-ray magnetic scattering experiments on bulk and thin-film single crystals of holmium. The scattering at the principal magnetic reflection has been characterized as a function of the temperature in the spiral phases near and below their respective Néel temperatures. The integrated intensity of the principal magnetic peak in both samples shows power-law behavior versus reduced temperature with nearly equal exponents. The exponents for the scattering at the resonant second and third harmonics in the bulk sample are not simple integer multiples of the first, and motivate the consideration of simple scaling corrections to mean-field theory. We also present and compare the results of high-resolution measurements of the temperature dependence of the magnetic wave vectors, c-axis lattice constants, and correlation lengths of the magnetic scattering of the two samples in their spiral phases. Although the qualitative behavior is similar, systematic differences are found, including uniformly larger magnetic wave vectors and the suppression of the 1/6 phase in the film. The spiral magnetic structure of the film forms a domain state at all temperatures in the ordered phase. The magnetic correlation lengths of both samples are greatest near the Néel temperature, where that of the film appears to exceed the translational correlation lengths of the lattice. As the temperature decreases, the magnetic correlation lengths also decrease. These results are discussed in terms of the strain present in the samples.

  3. The behavior of lattice defects produced in Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} irradiated by neutrons at high temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atobe, K.; Koizumi, T. [Naruto Univ. of Education, Tokushima (Japan); Okada, M. [Kyoto Univ., Research Reactor Inst., Kumatori, Osaka (Japan)

    2003-01-01

    Single crystals of {alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} were irradiated by the two reactors, KUR and JMTR, at three different temperatures. Lattice defects produced by irradiation were studied by esr (electron spin resonance). Three kinds of esr spectram, which are denoted as A, B and C spectram, are observed. The spectram A was observed at three different irradiation temperatures and was ascribed to oxygen vacancies. The spectram B showed no angular dependence for the rotation of external magnetic field to the crystal axis, and the defect density of this spectram decreased with an increase of annealing temperature. When the specimen was annealed at 400 degC after irradiation at 200 degC, the spectram C was observed and was presumed to be due to Al-colloids. (Y. Kazumata)

  4. Lattice model calculation of elastic and thermodynamic properties at high pressure and temperature. [for alkali halides in NaCl lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demarest, H. H., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    The elastic constants and the entire frequency spectrum were calculated up to high pressure for the alkali halides in the NaCl lattice, based on an assumed functional form of the inter-atomic potential. The quasiharmonic approximation is used to calculate the vibrational contribution to the pressure and the elastic constants at arbitrary temperature. By explicitly accounting for the effect of thermal and zero point motion, the adjustable parameters in the potential are determined to a high degree of accuracy from the elastic constants and their pressure derivatives measured at zero pressure. The calculated Gruneisen parameter, the elastic constants and their pressure derivatives are in good agreement with experimental results up to about 600 K. The model predicts that for some alkali halides the Grunesen parameter may decrease monotonically with pressure, while for others it may increase with pressure, after an initial decrease.

  5. Inducing spin-dependent tunneling to probe magnetic correlations in optical lattices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Kim-Georg; Andersen, Brian; Syljuåsen, Olav

    2012-01-01

    We suggest a simple experimental method for probing antiferromagnetic spin correlations of two-component Fermi gases in optical lattices. The method relies on a spin selective Raman transition to excite atoms of one spin species to their first excited vibrational mode where the tunneling is large...

  6. Temperature dependence of the in situ widths of a rotating condensate in one dimensional optical potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hassan, Ahmed S., E-mail: ahmedhassan117@yahoo.com; Soliman, Shemi S.M.

    2016-01-08

    In this paper, a conventional method of quantum statistical mechanics is used to study the temperature dependence of the in situ widths of a rotating condensate bosons in 1D optical potential. We trace the experimentally accessible parameters for which the temperature dependence of the in situ widths becomes perceivable. The calculated results showed that the temperature dependence of the in situ widths is completely different from that of a rotating condensate or trapped bosons in the optical lattice separately. The z-width shows distinct behavior from x- and y-widths due to the rotation effect. The obtained results provide useful qualitative theoretical results for future Bose Einstein condensation experiments in such traps. - Highlights: • The temperature dependence of the in situ widths of a rotating condensate boson in 1D optical potential is investigated. • We trace the experimentally accessible parameters for which the in situ widths become perceivable. • The above mentioned parameters exhibit a characteristic rotation rate and optical potential depth dependence. • Characteristic dependence of the effective widths on temperature is investigated. • Our results provide useful qualitatively and quantitative theoretical results for experiments in various traps.

  7. Temperature and frequency dependence of AC conductivity and modulus in Cr-Doped ZnO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junais, P. M.; Govindaraj, G.

    2017-05-01

    A nanocrystalline Cr-doped ZnO has been prepared by refluxing method. The samples were characterized using XRD and impedance spectroscopy. The XRD pattern shows the crystalline nature of the sample and well confirms the successful doping Cr into the host lattice. The conductivity of the sample measured in the temperature range 303-603K and in the frequency range 10Hz-1MHz. The temperature dependent dc conductivity and hopping frequency show Arrhenius behavior. AC conductivity data were analyzed using Jonscher's power law. Modulus data were analyzed using Bergman modified KWW function. Temperature dependent capacitance shows a sharp peak at 540K which may be due to ferroelectric nature of the material.

  8. Inclusion of temperature dependent shell corrections in Landau ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Landau theory used for studying hot rotating nuclei usually uses zero temperature Struti- nsky smoothed total energy for the temperature dependent shell corrections. This is replaced in this work by the temperature dependent Strutinsky smoothed free energy. Our results show that this re- placement has only ...

  9. Inclusion of temperature dependent shell corrections in Landau ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Landau theory used for studying hot rotating nuclei usually uses zero temperature Strutinsky smoothed total energy for the temperature dependent shell corrections. This is replaced in this work by the temperature dependent Strutinsky smoothed free energy. Our results show that this replacement has only marginal effect for ...

  10. Temperature dependence of ferromagnetic resonance measurements in nanostructured line arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raposo V.

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available We report the effect of temperature on the ferromagnetic resonance (FMR spectra of nanostructured line arrays. Different temperature dependences are observed for permalloy an nickel based samples. The qualitative features of the temperature dependence of the resonance field and linewidth can be described by the usual expression of slow relaxing linewidth mechanism and Bloch equation.

  11. Temperature dependence of the magnetization of canted spin structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Henrik; Lefmann, Kim; Brok, Erik

    2012-01-01

    for the temperature dependence of the magnetization of a simple canted spin structure in which relaxation can take place at finite temperatures between spin configurations with different canting angles. We show that the saturation magnetization may either decrease or increase with decreasing temperature, depending...

  12. Modeling temperature dependence of trace element concentrations in groundwater using temperature dependent distribution coefficient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, H.; Saito, T.; Hamamoto, S.; Komatsu, T.

    2015-12-01

    In our previous study, we have observed trace element concentrations in groundwater increased when groundwater temperature was increased with constant thermal loading using a 50-m long vertical heat exchanger installed at Saitama University, Japan. During the field experiment, 38 degree C fluid was circulated in the heat exchanger resulting 2.8 kW thermal loading over 295 days. Groundwater samples were collected regularly from 17-m and 40-m deep aquifers at four observation wells located 1, 2, 5, and 10 m, respectively, from the heat exchange well and were analyzed with ICP-MS. As a result, concentrations of some trace elements such as boron increased with temperature especially at the 17-m deep aquifer that is known as marine sediment. It has been also observed that the increased concentrations have decreased after the thermal loading was terminated indicating that this phenomenon may be reversible. Although the mechanism is not fully understood, changes in the liquid phase concentration should be associated with dissolution and/or desorption from the solid phase. We therefore attempt to model this phenomenon by introducing temperature dependence in equilibrium linear adsorption isotherms. We assumed that distribution coefficients decrease with temperature so that the liquid phase concentration of a given element becomes higher as the temperature increases under the condition that the total mass stays constant. A shape function was developed to model the temperature dependence of the distribution coefficient. By solving the mass balance equation between the liquid phase and the solid phase for a given element, a new term describing changes in the concentration was implemented in a source/sink term of a standard convection dispersion equation (CDE). The CDE was then solved under a constant ground water flow using FlexPDE. By calibrating parameters in the newly developed shape function, the changes in element concentrations observed were quite well predicted. The

  13. Lattice dynamics and substrate-dependent transport properties of (In, Yb)-doped CoSb3 skutterudite thin films

    KAUST Repository

    Sarath Kumar, S. R.

    2011-10-24

    Lattice dynamics, low-temperature electrical transport, and high-temperature thermoelectric properties of (In, Yb)-doped CoSb3thin films on different substrates are reported. Pulsed laser deposition under optimized conditions yielded single-phase polycrystalline skutterudite films. Raman spectroscopy studies suggested that In and Yb dopants occupy the cage sites in the skutterudite lattice. Low-temperature electrical transport studies revealed the n-type semiconducting nature of the films with extrinsic and intrinsic conduction mechanisms, in sharp contrast to the degenerate nature reported for identical bulk samples. Calculations yielded a direct bandgap close to 50 meV with no evidence of an indirect gap. The carrier concentration of the films was identical to that reported for the bulk and increased with temperature beyond 250 K. The higher resistivity exhibited is attributed to the enhanced grain boundary scattering in films with a high concentration of grains. The maximum power factor of ∼0.68 W m−1 K−1 obtained at 660 K for the film on glass is found to be nearly four times smaller compared to that reported for the bulk. The observed difference in the power factors of the films on different substrates is explained on the basis of the diffusion of oxygen from the substrates and the formation of highly conducting CoSb2 phase upon the oxidation of CoSb3.

  14. Composition dependence of glow peak temperature in KCl{sub 1-x}Br{sub x} doped with divalent cations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez-Salas, R [Departamento de Investigacion en FIsica, Universidad de Sonora, Apartado Postal 5-088 Hermosillo, Sonora, 83190 (Mexico); Aceves, R [Departamento de Investigacion en FIsica, Universidad de Sonora, Apartado Postal 5-088 Hermosillo, Sonora, 83190 (Mexico); RodrIguez-Mijangos, R [Departamento de Investigacion en FIsica, Universidad de Sonora, Apartado Postal 5-088 Hermosillo, Sonora, 83190 (Mexico); Riveros, H G [Instituto de FIsica, UNAM, Apartado Postal 20/364, Mexico, DF 01000, Mexico (Mexico); Duarte, C [Departamento de GeologIa, Universidad de Sonora, Rosales y Boulevard Luis E, Hermosillo, Sonora, 83000 (Mexico)

    2004-01-28

    Thermoluminescence measurements of {beta}-irradiated Eu{sup 2+} - and Ca{sup 2+} - doped KCl{sub 1-x}KBr{sub x} solid solutions excited at room temperature have been carried out to identify the effect of composition on the glow peaks. A typical glow peak has been distinguished for each composition. A linear dependence of its temperature on the composition x has been found. These results indicate that for divalent impurity-doped alkali halide solid solutions these glow peak temperatures are mostly dependent on the lattice constant of the host than on the size of the anion or impurity cation.

  15. Temperature Dependent Molecular Dynamic Simulation of Friction

    OpenAIRE

    Dias, R. A.; Rapini, M.; Costa, B. V.; Coura, P. Z.

    2006-01-01

    In this work we present a molecular dynamics simulation of a FFM experiment. The tip-sample interaction is studied by varying the normal force in the tip and the temperature of the surface. The friction force, cA, at zero load and the friction coefficient, $\\mu$, were obtained. Our results strongly support the idea that the effective contact area, A, decreases with increasing temperature and the friction coefficient presents a clear signature of the premelting process of the surface.

  16. The Nc dependencies of baryon masses: Analysis with Lattice QCD and Effective Theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calle Cordon, Alvaro C. [JLAB; DeGrand, Thomas A. [University of Colorado; Goity, Jose L. [JLAB

    2014-07-01

    Baryon masses at varying values of Nc and light quark masses are studied with Lattice QCD and the results are analyzed in a low energy effective theory based on a combined framework of the 1/Nc and Heavy Baryon Chiral Perturbation Theory expansions. Lattice QCD results for Nc=3, 5 and 7 obtained in quenched calculations, as well as results for unquenched calculations for Nc=3, are used for the analysis. The results are consistent with a previous analysis of Nc=3 LQCD results, and in addition permit the determination of sub-leading in 1/Nc effects in the spin-flavor singlet component of the baryon masses as well as in the hyperfine splittings.

  17. Localization of cold atoms in state-dependent optical lattices via a Rabi Pulse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horstmann, Birger; Dürr, Stephan; Roscilde, Tommaso

    2010-10-15

    We propose a novel realization of Anderson localization in nonequilibrium states of ultracold atoms in an optical lattice. A Rabi pulse transfers part of the population to a different internal state with infinite effective mass. These frozen atoms create a quantum superposition of different disorder potentials, localizing the mobile atoms. For weakly interacting mobile atoms, Anderson localization is obtained. The localization length increases with increasing disorder and decreasing interaction strength, contrary to the expectation for equilibrium localization.

  18. High temperature series expansions for the susceptibility of Ising model on the Kagome lattice with nearest neighber interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z Jalali mola

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available  The Ising model is one of the simplest models describing the interacting particles. In this work, we calculate the high temperature series expansions of zero field susceptibility of ising model with ferromagnetic, antiferromagnetic and one antiferromagnetic interactions on two dimensional kagome lattice. Using the Pade´ approximation, we calculate the susceptibility of critical exponent of ferromagnetic ising model γ ≈ 1.75, which is consistent with universality hypothesis. However, antiferromagnetic and one antiferromagnetic interaction ising model doesn’t show any transition at finite temperature because of the effect of magnetic frustration.

  19. Temperature-dependent dielectric function of nickel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zollner, Stefan; Nathan Nunley, T.; Trujillo, Dennis P.; Pineda, Laura G.; Abdallah, Lina S.

    2017-11-01

    Confirming historical results by Ornstein and Koefoed (1938), the authors found an anomaly in the optical constants at 1.96 eV for bulk nickel near the Curie temperature through careful high-precision spectroscopic ellipsometry measurements from 80 to 800 K. The anomaly is only seen in sweeps with increasing temperature if the sample carries a net magnetization. In decreasing temperature sweeps or for unmagnetized samples, the anomaly is absent. The sign of the anomaly in the optical conductivity at 1.96 eV is in contrast to the sign of the anomaly in the electrical DC conductivity. The anomaly is rather large and therefore explained with changes in the on-diagonal Drude-Lorentz portion of the dielectric tensor. No sign of anisotropy (polar magneto-optical Kerr effect) is found in the data.

  20. High-temperature atomic superfluidity in lattice Bose-Fermi mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illuminati, Fabrizio; Albus, Alexander

    2004-08-27

    We consider atomic Bose-Fermi mixtures in optical lattices and study the superfluidity of fermionic atoms due to s-wave pairing induced by boson-fermion interactions. We prove that the induced fermion-fermion coupling is always attractive if the boson-boson on-site interaction is repulsive, and predict the existence of an enhanced BEC-BCS crossover as the strength of the lattice potential is varied. We show that for direct on-site fermion-fermion repulsion, the induced attraction can give rise to superfluidity via s-wave pairing at striking variance with the case of pure systems of fermionic atoms with direct repulsive interactions.

  1. Temperature behaviour of the average size of nanoparticle lattices co-deposited with an amorphous matrix. Analysis of Ge + Al2O3 and Ni + Al2O3 thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mezzasalma, Stefano A.; Car, Tihomir; Nekić, Nikolina; Jerčinović, Marko; Buljan, Maja

    2017-11-01

    We theoretically interpret the thermal behaviour of the average radius versus substrate temperature of regular quantum dot/nanocluster arrays formed by sputtering semiconductor/metal atoms with oxide molecules. The analysis relies on a continuum theory for amorphous films with given surface quantities, perturbed by a nanoparticle lattice. An account of the basic thermodynamic contributions is given in terms of force-flux phenomenological coefficients of each phase (Ge, Ni, Al2O3). Average radii turn out to be expressible by a characteristic length scale and a dimensionless parameter, which mainly depend upon temperature through diffusion lengths, film pressures and finite-size corrections to interfacial tensions. The numerical agreement is good in both Ge (4 % ) and Ni (15.4 % ) lattices grown at temperatures ≤slant 800 K, despite the lower temperature behaviour of quantum dots seeming to suggest further driving forces taking part in such processes.

  2. Temperature dependence of fission product release rates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelly, J.L.; McGown, M.E.; Reynolds, A.B.

    1984-10-01

    Fission product fractional release rates, K, used in the Albrecht-Wild model and measured at Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe and Oak Ridge National Laboratory can be fitted well by a single straight line for each fission product over the entire temperature range of the data when in K is plotted as a function of 1/T. Past applications of the Albrecht-Wild model have used plots of ln K versus T, which required three fits over the temperature range. Thus it is suggested that fractional release rates be represented by the Arrhenius form, K = K /SUB o/ exp(-Q/RT).

  3. Parametric dependencies of JET electron temperature profiles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schunke, B. [Commission of the European Communities, Abingdon (United Kingdom). JET Joint Undertaking; Imre, K.; Riedel, K. [New York Univ., NY (United States)

    1994-07-01

    The JET Ohmic, L-Mode and H-Mode electron temperature profiles obtained from the LIDAR Thomson Scattering Diagnostic are parameterized in terms of the normalized flux parameter and a set of the engineering parameters like plasma current, toroidal field, line averages electron density... It is shown that the electron temperature profiles fit a log-additive model well. It is intended to use the same model to predict the profile shape for D-T discharges in JET and in ITER. 2 refs., 5 figs.

  4. Analysis of the temperature dependence of the thermal conductivity of insulating single crystal oxides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Langenberg

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The temperature dependence of the thermal conductivity of 27 different single crystal oxides is reported from ≈20 K to 350 K. These crystals have been selected among the most common substrates for growing epitaxial thin-film oxides, spanning over a range of lattice parameters from ≈3.7 Å to ≈12.5 Å. Different contributions to the phonon relaxation time are discussed on the basis of the Debye model. This work provides a database for the selection of appropriate substrates for thin-film growth according to their desired thermal properties, for applications in which heat management is important.

  5. The temperature dependence of the magnetoelastic characteristics ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Special cylindrical backing enables application of the uniform compressive stress to the wound ring sample. A resistive furnace heated the experimental set-up. Results presented in the paper indicate a significant influence of the temperature on the magnetoelastic characteristics of Fe70Ni8Si10B12 amorphous alloy.

  6. Deconfinement and universality in the 3DU(1) lattice gauge theory at finite temperature: study in the dual formulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borisenko, O.; Chelnokov, V. [Bogolyubov Institute for Theoretical Physics, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine,UA-03680 Kiev (Ukraine); Gravina, M.; Papa, A. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università della Calabria, and INFN - Gruppo collegato di Cosenza,I-87036 Arcavacata di Rende, Cosenza (Italy)

    2015-09-10

    We study analytically and numerically the three-dimensional U(1) lattice gauge theory at finite temperature in the dual formulation. For an appropriate disorder operator, we obtain the renormalization group equations describing the critical behavior of the model in the vicinity of the deconfinement phase transition. These equations are used to check the validity of the Svetitsky-Yaffe conjecture regarding the critical behavior of the lattice U(1) model. Furthermore, we perform numerical simulations of the model for N{sub t}=1,2,4,8 and compute, by a cluster algorithm, the dual correlation functions and the corresponding second moment correlation length. In this way we locate the position of the critical point and calculate critical indices.

  7. Impact of the thermal scattering law of H in H2O on the isothermal temperature reactivity coefficients for UOX and MOX fuel lattices in cold operating conditions

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Scotta, Juan Pablo; Noguere, Gilles; Bernard, David; Damian, Jose Ignacio Marquez; Santamarina, Alain

    2016-01-01

    The contribution of the thermal scattering law of hydrogen in light water to isothermal temperature reactivity coefficients for UOX and MOX lattices was studied in the frame of the MISTRAL critical...

  8. Thermal stability of an interface-stabilized skyrmion lattice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonntag, A; Hermenau, J; Krause, S; Wiesendanger, R

    2014-08-15

    The thermal stability of the magnetic nano-skyrmion lattice in the monolayer Fe/Ir(111) is investigated using temperature dependent spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscopy. Our experiments show that the skyrmion lattice disappears at a temperature of T_{c}=27.8  K, indicating a loss of long-range magnetic order. At second-layer iron islands the lattice is pinned and local order persists at temperatures above T_{c}. The findings are explained in terms of the complex magnetic interactions involved in the formation of the skyrmion lattice.

  9. Temperature and angular momentum dependence of the ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    a metallic superconductor, the linear dimension of the system is quite large and the transition from one phase to the ... This has been demonstrated in small metallic grains in which discontinuity is observed with large ... in the above studies critically depends on the inclusion of the quantal and statistical fluctuations [8,11].

  10. Change of MMP dependent on temperature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rudyk, Svetlana Nikolayevna; Søgaard, Erik Gydesen; Akwansa, Eugene

    2008-01-01

       The experiment was conducted with the purpose to investigate how Minimum Miscibility Pressure (MMP) changes at different temperatures. MMP was measured in a high pressure unit. An original oil saturated chalk core plug from the Danish oil field in North Sea was under investigation. The plug...... was divided into three samples. The pure carbon dioxide was injected into a chamber with the sample under pressure gradually increasing from 60 bars to 420 bars. CO2 was injected in a first sample at temperature 50oC , second at 60oC and third at 70oC. The amount of oil extracted was plotted against pressure....... The oil recovery/pressure correlation obtained showed that: -  oil recovery grows rather in steps, - MMP (the point B on the curve), above which the oil recovery increases insignificantly,  is equal for all the temperatures, - but the starting points (A on the graph) from which oil recovery starts growing...

  11. Symmetry restoration at high-temperature in two-color and two-flavor lattice gauge theories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jong-Wan [Department of Physics, College of Science, Swansea University,Singleton Park, SA2 8PP, Swansea, Wales (United Kingdom); Department of Physics, Pusan National University,Busan 46241 (Korea, Republic of); Extreme Physics Institute, Pusan National University,Busan 46241 (Korea, Republic of); Lucini, Biagio; Piai, Maurizio [Department of Physics, College of Science, Swansea University,Singleton Park, SA2 8PP, Swansea, Wales (United Kingdom)

    2017-04-07

    We consider the SU(2) gauge theory with N{sub f}=2 flavors of Dirac fundamental fermions. We study the high-temperature behavior of the spectra of mesons, discretizing the theory on anisotropic lattices, and measuring the two-point correlation functions in the temporal direction as well as screening masses in various channels. We identify the (pseudo-)critical temperature as the temperature at which the susceptibility associated with the Polyakov loop has a maximum. At high temperature both the spin-1 and spin-0 sectors of the light meson spectra exhibit enhanced symmetry properties, indicating the restoration of both the global SU(4) and the axial U(1){sub A} symmetries of the model.

  12. Study of frequency- and temperature-dependent electrical transport in heavy fermion systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baral, P. C.

    2017-05-01

    This paper focuses on the frequency- and temperature-dependent electrical transport properties of heavy fermion (HF) systems. For this, Kondo lattice model (KLM) with Coulomb correlation between f-f electrons at the same site is considered. The Hamiltonian is treated in mean-field approximation (MFA) for the Kondo hybridization and Heisenberg-type interaction to get mean-field Hamiltonian and it is written after the Fourier transformation. The Hartree-Fock-type approximation is considered for the Coulomb repulsion between f-f electrons, the perturbed part of the Hamiltonian. The two Green’s functions for the conduction and f-electrons are calculated to define the self-energy. Then the frequency- and temperature-dependent optical conductivity and resistivity are calculated by using the Kubo’s formula within the linear dynamical response approach. They are studied by varying the model parameters. The anomalies and results obtained are compared with experimental data.

  13. Temperature-dependent mechanical deformation of silicon at the nanoscale: Phase transformation versus defect propagation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiran, M. S. R. N., E-mail: kiran.mangalampalli@anu.edu.au; Tran, T. T.; Smillie, L. A.; Subianto, D.; Williams, J. S.; Bradby, J. E. [Department of Electronic Materials Engineering, Research School of Physics and Engineering, Australian National University, Australian Capital Territory, Canberra 2601 (Australia); Haberl, B. [Department of Electronic Materials Engineering, Research School of Physics and Engineering, Australian National University, Australian Capital Territory, Canberra 2601 (Australia); Chemical and Engineering Materials Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States)

    2015-05-28

    This study uses high-temperature nanoindentation coupled with in situ electrical measurements to investigate the temperature dependence (25–200 °C) of the phase transformation behavior of diamond cubic (dc) silicon at the nanoscale. Along with in situ indentation and electrical data, ex situ characterizations, such as Raman and cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy, have been used to reveal the indentation-induced deformation mechanisms. We find that phase transformation and defect propagation within the crystal lattice are not mutually exclusive deformation processes at elevated temperature. Both can occur at temperatures up to 150 °C but to different extents, depending on the temperature and loading conditions. For nanoindentation, we observe that phase transformation is dominant below 100 °C but that deformation by twinning along (111) planes dominates at 150 °C and 200 °C. This work, therefore, provides clear insight into the temperature dependent deformation mechanisms in dc-Si at the nanoscale and helps to clarify previous inconsistencies in the literature.

  14. Orientation-Dependent Oxygen Evolution on RuO 2 without Lattice Exchange

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoerzinger, Kelsey A.; Diaz-Morales, Oscar; Kolb, Manuel; Rao, Reshma R.; Frydendal, Rasmus; Qiao, Liang; Wang, Xiao Renshaw; Halck, Niels Bendtsen; Rossmeisl, Jan; Hansen, Heine A.; Vegge, Tejs; Stephens, Ifan E. L.; Koper, Marc T. M.; Shao-Horn, Yang

    2017-03-15

    RuO2 catalysts exhibit record activities towards the oxygen evolution reaction (OER), which is crucial to enable efficient and sustainable energy storage. Here we examine the RuO2 OER kinetics on rutile (110), (100), (101), and (111) orientations, finding (100) the most active. We assess the potential involvement of lattice oxygen in the OER mechanism with online 3 electrochemical mass spectrometry, which showed no evidence of oxygen exchange on these oriented facets in acidic or basic electrolytes. Similar results were obtained for polyoriented RuO2 films and particles, in contrast to previous work, suggesting lattice oxygen is not exchanged in catalyzing OER on crystalline RuO2 surfaces. This hypothesis is supported by the correlation of activity with the number of active Ru-sites calculated by DFT, where more active facets bind oxygen more weakly. This new understanding of the active sites provides a design strategy to enhance the OER activity of RuO2 nanoparticles by facet engineering.

  15. Size and shape dependence study of magnetization reversal in magnetic antidot lattice arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mallick, Sougata; Bedanta, Subhankar, E-mail: sbedanta@niser.ac.in

    2015-05-15

    Magnetic Antidot Lattice (MAL) arrays of Co have been prepared in micron range using ultraviolet (UV) lithography technique with different shapes and sizes. Magnetization reversal in such MAL systems has been studied by magneto-optic Kerr effect (MOKE) based microscopy by varying the angle between the easy axis and the external magnetic field. The domain images evidence that the magnetization reversal along easy axis is highly dominated by nucleation of domains which is subsequently accompanied by domain wall motion. We have observed that with increase in active magnetic area domain size increases but on the contrary coercivity decreases. The presence of periodic holes turns the MALs magnetically hard when compared to similar thickness of continuous thin film. The magnetization relaxation along easy axis for the Co MAL at constant dc field fits very well with the exponential law of Fatuzzo–Labrune indicating domain nucleated dominant process. - Highlights: • The periodic holes act as pinning center and make the domains to follow a zigzag path. • Domain size for different magnetic antidot lattice arrays (MALs) has been studied. • The relaxation behavior of MALs under constant magnetic field has been studied.

  16. Selecting Temperature for Protein Crystallization Screens Using the Temperature Dependence of the Second Virial Coefficient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jun; Yin, Da-Chuan; Guo, Yun-Zhu; Wang, Xi-Kai; Xie, Si-Xiao; Lu, Qin-Qin; Liu, Yong-Ming

    2011-01-01

    Protein crystals usually grow at a preferable temperature which is however not known for a new protein. This paper reports a new approach for determination of favorable crystallization temperature, which can be adopted to facilitate the crystallization screening process. By taking advantage of the correlation between the temperature dependence of the second virial coefficient (B22) and the solubility of protein, we measured the temperature dependence of B22 to predict the temperature dependence of the solubility. Using information about solubility versus temperature, a preferred crystallization temperature can be proposed. If B22 is a positive function of the temperature, a lower crystallization temperature is recommended; if B22 shows opposite behavior with respect to the temperature, a higher crystallization temperature is preferred. Otherwise, any temperature in the tested range can be used. PMID:21479212

  17. Temperature-Dependent van der Waals Forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsegian, V. A.; Ninham, B. W.

    1970-01-01

    Biological systems can experience a strong van der Waals interaction involving electromagnetic fluctuations at the low frequency limit. In lipid-water mixtures the free energy of this interaction is proportional to temperature, primarily involves an entropy change, and has qualitative features of a “hydrophobic bond.” Protein-protein attraction in dilute solution is due as much to low frequency proton fluctuation (Kirkwood-Shumaker forces) and permanent dipole forces as to high frequency (infrared and UV) van der Waals intreactions. These conclusions are described in terms of numerical calculations via the Lifshitz theory of van der Waals forces. PMID:5449916

  18. Temperature dependence of the surface plasmon resonance in small electron gas fragments, self consistent field approximation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fasolato, C.; Sacchetti, F.; Tozzi, P.; Petrillo, C.

    2017-07-01

    The temperature dependence of the surface plasmon resonance in small metal spheres is calculated using an electron gas model within the Random Phase Approximation. The calculation is mainly devoted to the study of spheres with diameters up to at least 10 nm, where quantum effects can still be relevant and a simple plasmon pole approximation for the dielectric function is no more appropriate. We find a possible blue shift of the plasmon resonance position when the temperature is increased while keeping the size of the sphere fixed. The blue shift is appreciable only when the temperature is a large fraction of the Fermi energy. These results provide a guide for pump and probe experiments with a high time resolution, tailored to study the excited electron system before thermalisation with the lattice takes place.

  19. A temperature dependent slip factor based thermal model for friction ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    This paper proposes a new slip factor based three-dimensional thermal model to predict the temperature distribution during friction stir welding of 304L stainless steel plates. The proposed model employs temperature and radius dependent heat source to study the thermal cycle, temperature distribution, power required, the ...

  20. A temperature dependent slip factor based thermal model for friction ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. This paper proposes a new slip factor based three-dimensional thermal model to predict the temperature distribution during friction stir welding of 304L stainless steel plates. The proposed model employs temperature and radius dependent heat source to study the thermal cycle, temperature distribution, power ...

  1. RECENT LATTICE RESULTS ON FINITE TEMPERATURE AND DENSITY QCD, PART 1.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    KARSCH,F.

    2007-07-09

    We discuss recent progress made studies of bulk thermodynamics of strongly interacting matter through lattice simulations of QCD with an almost physical light and strange quark mass spectrum. We present results on the QCD equation of state at vanishing and non-vanishing quark chemical potential and show first results on baryon number and strangeness fluctuations, which might be measured in event-by-event fluctuations in low energy runs at RHIC as well as at FAIR.

  2. Finite Temperature Lattice QCD - Baryons in the Quark-Gluon Plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Aarts, Gert; De Boni, Davide; Hands, Simon; Jäger, Benjamin; Praki, Chrisanthi; Skullerud, Jon-Ivar

    2016-01-01

    Baryonic correlation functions provide an ideal tool to study parity doubling and chiral symmetry using lattice simulations. We present a study using $2+1$ flavors of anisotropic Wilson clover fermions on the FASTSUM ensembles and find clear evidence that parity doubling emerges in the quark-gluon plasma. This result is confirmed on the level of spectral functions, which are obtained using a MEM reconstruction. We further highlight the importance of Gaussian smearing in this study.

  3. Orientation-Dependent Oxygen Evolution on RuO2 without Lattice Exchange

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stoerzinger, Kelsey A.; Diaz-Morales, Oscar; Kolb, Manuel

    2017-01-01

    RuO2 catalysts exhibit record activities toward the oxygen evolution reaction (OER), which is crucial to enable efficient and sustainable energy storage. Here we examine the RuO2 OER kinetics on rutile (110), (100), (101), and (111) orientations, finding (100) the most active. We assess the poten......RuO2 catalysts exhibit record activities toward the oxygen evolution reaction (OER), which is crucial to enable efficient and sustainable energy storage. Here we examine the RuO2 OER kinetics on rutile (110), (100), (101), and (111) orientations, finding (100) the most active. We assess...... the potential involvement of lattice oxygen in the OER mechanism with online electrochemical mass spectrometry, which showed no evidence of oxygen exchange on these oriented facets in acidic or basic electrolytes. Similar results were obtained for polyoriented RuO2 films and particles, in contrast to previous...

  4. Temperature Dependence in Homogeneous and Heterogeneous Nucleation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGraw R. L.; Winkler, P. M.; Wagner, P. E.

    2017-08-01

    Heterogeneous nucleation on stable (sub-2 nm) nuclei aids the formation of atmospheric cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) by circumventing or reducing vapor pressure barriers that would otherwise limit condensation and new particle growth. Aerosol and cloud formation depend largely on the interaction between a condensing liquid and the nucleating site. A new paper published this year reports the first direct experimental determination of contact angles as well as contact line curvature and other geometric properties of a spherical cap nucleus at nanometer scale using measurements from the Vienna Size Analyzing Nucleus Counter (SANC) (Winkler et al., 2016). For water nucleating heterogeneously on silver oxide nanoparticles we find contact angles around 15 degrees compared to around 90 degrees for the macroscopically measured equilibrium angle for water on bulk silver. The small microscopic contact angles can be attributed via the generalized Young equation to a negative line tension that becomes increasingly dominant with increasing curvature of the contact line. These results enable a consistent theoretical description of heterogeneous nucleation and provide firm insight to the wetting of nanosized objects.

  5. Temperature dependence of the HNO3 UV absorption cross sections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkholder, James B.; Talukdar, Ranajit K.; Ravishankara, A. R.; Solomon, Susan

    1993-01-01

    The temperature dependence of the HNO3 absorption cross sections between 240 and 360 K over the wavelength range 195 to 350 nm has been measured using a diode array spectrometer. Absorption cross sections were determined using both (1) absolute pressure measurements at 298 K and (2) a dual absorption cell arrangement in which the absorption spectrum at various temperatures is measured relative to the room temperature absorption spectrum. The HNO3 absorption spectrum showed a temperature dependence which is weak at short wavelengths but stronger at longer wavelengths which are important for photolysis in the lower stratosphere. The 298 K absorption cross sections were found to be larger than the values currently recommended for atmospheric modeling (DeMore et al., 1992). Our absorption cross section data are critically compared with the previous measurements of both room temperature and temperature-dependent absorption cross sections. Temperature-dependent absorption cross sections of HNO3 are recommended for use in atmospheric modeling. These temperature dependent HNO3 absorption cross sections were used in a two-dimensional dynamical-photochemical model to demonstrate the effects of the revised absorption cross sections on loss rate of HNO3 and the abundance of NO2 in the stratosphere.

  6. Temperature dependence of postmortem MR quantification for soft tissue discrimination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zech, Wolf-Dieter; Schwendener, Nicole; Jackowski, Christian [University of Bern, From the Institute of Forensic Medicine, Bern (Switzerland); Persson, Anders; Warntjes, Marcel J. [University of Linkoeping, The Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV), Linkoeping (Sweden)

    2015-08-15

    To investigate and correct the temperature dependence of postmortem MR quantification used for soft tissue characterization and differentiation in thoraco-abdominal organs. Thirty-five postmortem short axis cardiac 3-T MR examinations were quantified using a quantification sequence. Liver, spleen, left ventricular myocardium, pectoralis muscle and subcutaneous fat were analysed in cardiac short axis images to obtain mean T1, T2 and PD tissue values. The core body temperature was measured using a rectally inserted thermometer. The tissue-specific quantitative values were related to the body core temperature. Equations to correct for temperature differences were generated. In a 3D plot comprising the combined data of T1, T2 and PD, different organs/tissues could be well differentiated from each other. The quantitative values were influenced by the temperature. T1 in particular exhibited strong temperature dependence. The correction of quantitative values to a temperature of 37 C resulted in better tissue discrimination. Postmortem MR quantification is feasible for soft tissue discrimination and characterization of thoraco-abdominal organs. This provides a base for computer-aided diagnosis and detection of tissue lesions. The temperature dependence of the T1 values challenges postmortem MR quantification. Equations to correct for the temperature dependence are provided. (orig.)

  7. Spin-lattice relaxation of magnetic centers in molecular crystals at low temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Le Tuan Anh; Chibotaru, Liviu F.

    2018-01-01

    We study the spin-phonon relaxation rate of both Kramers and non-Kramers molecular magnets in strongly diluted samples at low temperature. Using the "rotational" contribution to the spin-phonon Hamiltonian, universal formulas for the relaxation rate are obtained. Intriguingly, these formulas are all entirely expressed via measurable or ab initio computable physical quantities. Moreover, they are also independent of the energy gaps to excited states involved in the relaxation process. These obtained expressions for direct and Raman processes offer an easy way to determine the lowest limit of the spin-phonon relaxation of any spin system based on magnetic properties of the ground doublet only. In addition, some intriguing properties of Raman process are also found. Particularly, Raman process in Kramers system is found dependent on the magnetic field's orientation but independent of its magnitude, meanwhile, the same process in non-Kramers system is significantly reduced out of resonance, i.e., for an applied external field. Interestingly, Raman process is demonstrated to vary as T9 for both systems. Application of the theory to a recently investigated cobalt(II) complex shows that it can provide a reasonably good description for the relaxation. Based on these findings, a strategy in developing efficient single-molecule magnets by enhancing the mechanical rigidity of the molecular unit is proposed.

  8. Poiseuille Flow of Fluid Whose Viscosity is Temperature Dependent ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We discuss a fluid flowing between two parallel plates. We assume a Poiseuille flow. Furthermore, we assume that the viscosity μ, depends on temperature T. We show that the velocity equation has two solutions. Graph features prominently in the presentation.

  9. Temperature dependent climate projection deficiencies in CMIP5 models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Jens H.; Boberg, Fredrik

    2012-01-01

    Monthly mean temperatures for 34 GCMs available from the CMIP5 project are compared with observations from CRU for 26 different land regions covering all major land areas in the world for the period 1961-2000 by means of quantile-quantile (q-q) diagrams. A warm period positive temperature dependent...... bias is identified for many of the models within many of the chosen climate regions. However, the exact temperature dependence varies considerably between the models. We analyse the role of this difference as a contributing factor for some models to project stronger regional warming than others...... that in general models with a positive temperature dependent bias tend to have a large projected temperature change, and these tendencies increase with increasing global warming level. We argue that this appears to be linked with the ability of models to capture complex feedbacks accurately. In particular land...

  10. Temperature dependence of photovoltaic cells, modules, and systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emery, K.; Burdick, J.; Caiyem, Y. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)] [and others

    1996-05-01

    Photovoltaic (PV) cells and modules are often rated in terms of a set of standard reporting conditions defined by a temperature, spectral irradiance, and total irradiance. Because PV devices operates over a wide range of temperatures and irradiances, the temperature and irradiance related behavior must be known. This paper surveys the temperature dependence of crystalline and thin-film, state-of-the-art, research-size cells, modules, and systems measured by a variety of methods. The various error sources and measurement methods that contribute to cause differences in the temperature coefficient for a given cell or module measured with various methods are discussed.

  11. Hysteresis and Temperature Dependency of Moisture Sorption – New Measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rode, Carsten; Hansen, Kurt Kielsgaard

    2011-01-01

    It is well known that sorption characteristics of building materials exhibit hysteresis in the way the equilibrium curves develop between adsorption and desorption, and that the sorption curves are also somewhat temperature dependent. However, these two facts are most often neglected in models...... measurements of hysteresis and temperature dependency of the moisture sorption characteristics of three different porous building materials: aerated concrete, cement paste and spruce. Scanning curves are measured for all three materials where periods with adsorption and desorption interrupt each other...

  12. Temperature dependence of unitary properties of an ATP-dependent potassium channel in cardiac myocytes.

    OpenAIRE

    McLarnon, J G; Hamman, B.N.; Tibbits, G.F.

    1993-01-01

    The temperature dependence of the properties of unitary currents in cultured rat ventricular myocytes has been studied. Currents flowing through an ATP-dependent K+ channel were recorded from inside-out patches with the bath temperature varied from 10 degrees to 30 degrees C. The channel conductance was 56 pS at room temperature (22 degrees C), and the amplitudes of unitary currents and the channel conductance exhibited a relatively weak (Q10 from 1.4 to 1.6) dependence on temperature. The te...

  13. Temperature-dependent thermal properties of spark plasma sintered alumina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saheb Nouari

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we report temperature-dependent thermal properties of alumina powder and bulk alumina consolidated by spark plasma sintering method. The properties were measured between room temperature and 250ºC using a thermal constants analyzer. Alumina powder had very low thermal properties due to the presence of large pores and absence of bonding between its particles. Fully dense alumina with a relative density of 99.6 % was obtained at a sintering temperature of 1400°C and a holding time of 10 min. Thermal properties were found to mainly dependent on density. Thermal conductivity, thermal diffusivity, and specific heat of the fully dense alumina were 34.44 W/mK, 7.62 mm2s-1, and 1.22 J/gK, respectively, at room temperature. Thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity decreased while specific heat increased with the increase in temperature from room temperature to 250ºC.

  14. Temperature dependent optical properties of PbS nanocrystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordin, M N; Li, Juerong; Clowes, S K; Curry, R J

    2012-07-11

    A comprehensive study of the optical properties of PbS nanocrystals (NCs) is reported that includes the temperature dependent absorption, photoluminescence (PL) and PL lifetime in the range of 3-300 K. The absorption and PL are found to display different temperature dependent behaviour though both redshift as temperature is reduced. This results in a temperature dependent Stokes shift which increases from ∼75 meV at 300 K with reducing temperature until saturating at ∼130 meV below ∼150 K prior to a small reduction to 125 meV upon cooling from 25 to 3 K. The PL lifetime is found to be single exponential at 3 K with a lifetime of τ(1) = 6.5 μs. Above 3 K biexponential behaviour is observed with the lifetime for each process displaying a different temperature dependence. The Stokes shift is modelled using a three-level rate equation model incorporating temperature dependent parameter values obtained via fitting phenomenological relationships to the observed absorption and PL behaviour. This results in a predicted energy difference between the two emitting states of ∼6 meV which is close to the excitonic exchange energy splitting predicted theoretically for these systems.

  15. Temperature-dependent piezoresistivity in an MWCNT/epoxy nanocomposite temperature sensor with ultrahigh performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alamusi; Li, Yuan; Hu, Ning; Wu, Liangke; Yuan, Weifeng; Peng, Xianghe; Gu, Bin; Chang, Christiana; Liu, Yaolu; Ning, Huiming; Li, Jinhua; Surina; Atobe, Satoshi; Fukunaga, Hisao

    2013-11-01

    A temperature sensor was fabricated from a polymer nanocomposite with multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) as nanofiller (i.e., MWCNT/epoxy). The electrical resistance and temperature coefficient of resistance (TCR) of the temperature sensor were characterized experimentally. The effects of temperature (within the range 333-373 K) and MWCNT content (within the range 1-5 wt%) were investigated thoroughly. It was found that the resistance increases with increasing temperature and decreasing MWCNT content. However, the resistance change ratio related to the TCR increases with increasing temperature and MWCNT content. The highest value of TCR (0.021 K-1), which was observed in the case of 5 wt% MWCNT, is much higher than those of traditional metals and MWCNT-based temperature sensors. Moreover, the corresponding numerical simulation—conducted to explain the above temperature-dependent piezoresistivity of the nanocomposite temperature sensor—indicated the key role of a temperature-dependent tunneling effect.

  16. Temperature dependence of electromechanical properties of PLZT x ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    the temperature dependence of electromechanical proper- ties of PLZT. It has been observed that the compositions of PLZT ceramics with Zr/Ti 57/43 show enhanced piezoelectric response at room temperature and can be used in low power transducer devices (Shukla et al 2004). Keeping the device application in view, ...

  17. Existence of a secondary flow for a temperature dependent viscous ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We model a viscous fluid flowing between parallel plates. The viscosity depends on temperature. We investigate the properties of the velocity and we show that the temperature and velocity fields have two solutions. The existence of two velocity solutions is new. This means that there exist secondary flows. Journal of the ...

  18. On the effect of temperature dependent thermal conductivity on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We consider the effect of temperature dependent thermal conductivity on temperature rise in biologic tissues during microwave heating. The method of asymptotic expansion is used for finding solution. An appropriate matching procedure was used in our method. Our result reveals the possibility of multiple solutions and it ...

  19. Pressure–temperature dependence of thermodynamic properties of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    properties of materials under high pressures and temperatures for microscopic under- standing as well as technological applications. In this paper, we report our theoretical study of both pressure and temperature dependences of the thermal properties of rutile within the Debye and Debye–Grüneisen models with and ...

  20. Time dependent temperature distribution in pulsed Ti:sapphire lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buoncristiani, A. Martin; Byvik, Charles E.; Farrukh, Usamah O.

    1988-01-01

    An expression is derived for the time dependent temperature distribution in a finite solid state laser rod for an end-pumped beam of arbitrary shape. The specific case of end pumping by circular (constant) or Gaussian beam is described. The temperature profile for a single pump pulse and for repetitive pulse operation is discussed. The particular case of the temperature distribution in a pulsed titanium:sapphire rod is considered.

  1. Numerical linked-cluster approach to quantum lattice models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigol, Marcos; Bryant, Tyler; Singh, Rajiv R P

    2006-11-03

    We present a novel algorithm that allows one to obtain temperature dependent properties of quantum lattice models in the thermodynamic limit from exact diagonalization of small clusters. Our numerical linked-cluster approach provides a systematic framework to assess finite-size effects and is valid for any quantum lattice model. Unlike high temperature expansions, which have a finite radius of convergence in inverse temperature, these calculations are accurate at all temperatures provided the range of correlations is finite. We illustrate the power of our approach studying spin models on kagomé, triangular, and square lattices.

  2. The temperature dependent amide I band of crystalline acetanilide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cruzeiro, Leonor [CCMAR, Universidade do Algarve, Campus de Gambelas, 8005-139 Faro (Portugal); Physics Department, FCT, Universidade do Algarve, Campus de Gambelas, 8005-139 Faro (Portugal); Freedman, Holly [CCMAR, Universidade do Algarve, Campus de Gambelas, 8005-139 Faro (Portugal)

    2013-10-01

    The temperature dependent anomalous peak in the amide I band of crystalline acetanilide is thought to be due to self-trapped states. On the contrary, according to the present model, the anomalous peak comes from the fraction of ACN molecules strongly hydrogen-bonded to a neighboring ACN molecule, and its intensity decreases because, on average, this fraction decreases as temperature increases. This model provides, for the first time, an integrated and theoretically consistent view of the temperature dependence of the full amide I band and a qualitative explanation of some of the features of nonlinear pump–probe experiments.

  3. BUCKLING OF A COLUMN WITH TEMPERATURE DEPENDENT MATERIAL PROPERTIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ömer SOYKASAP

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Buckling of a column with temperature dependent material properties is investigated. Euler-Bernoulli theory of thin beams is used to derive the element matrices by means of the minimum potential energy principle. Temperature dependency of material properties is taken into account in the formulation. The column is divided into finite elements with the axial degrees of freedom defined at the outer fiber of the column. Column elements have simpler derivations and compact element matrices than those of classical beam-bending element. Some illustrative examples are presented to show the convergence of numerical results obtained by the use of new elements. The results are compared with those of the classical beam-bending element and analytical solution. The new element converges to the analytical results as powerful as the classical beam-bending element. The temperature effects on the buckling loads of the column with temperature dependent material properties are also examined.

  4. Temperature dependent modulation of lobster neuromuscular properties by serotonin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Jonna L; Edwards, Claire R; Holt, Stephen R; Worden, Mary Kate

    2007-03-01

    In cold-blooded species the efficacy of neuromuscular function depends both on the thermal environmental of the animal's habitat and on the concentrations of modulatory hormones circulating within the animal's body. The goal of this study is to examine how temperature variation within an ecologically relevant range affects neuromuscular function and its modulation by the neurohormone serotonin (5-HT) in Homarus americanus, a lobster species that inhabits a broad thermal range in the wild. The synaptic strength of the excitatory and inhibitory motoneurons innervating the lobster dactyl opener muscle depends on temperature, with the strongest neurally evoked muscle movements being elicited at cold (temperatures. However, whereas neurally evoked contractions can be elicited over the entire temperature range from 2 to >20 degrees C, neurally evoked relaxations of resting muscle tension are effective only at colder temperatures at which the inhibitory junction potentials are hyperpolarizing in polarity. 5-HT has two effects on inhibitory synaptic signals: it potentiates their amplitude and also shifts the temperature at which they reverse polarity by approximately +7 degrees C. Thus 5-HT both potentiates neurally evoked relaxations of the muscle and increases the temperature range over which neurally evoked muscle relaxations can be elicited. Neurally evoked contractions are maximally potentiated by 5-HT at warm (18 degrees C) temperatures; however, 5-HT enhances excitatory junction potentials in a temperature-independent manner. Finally, 5-HT strongly increases resting muscle tension at the coldest extent of the temperature range tested (2 degrees C) but is ineffective at 22 degrees C. These data demonstrate that 5-HT elicits several temperature-dependent physiological changes in the passive and active responses of muscle to neural input. The overall effect of 5-HT is to increase the temperature range over which neurally evoked motor movements can be elicited in this

  5. Temperature-dependent enthalpy of oxygenation in Antarctic fish hemoglobins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fago, A.; Wells, R.M.G.; Weber, Roy E.

    1997-01-01

    The effect of temperature on the oxygen-binding properties of the hemoglobins of three cold-adapted Antarctic fish species, Dissostichus mawsoni, Pagothenia borchgrevinki and Trematomus, sp., has been investigated under different pH values and buffer conditions. A clear non linear van't Hoff plot...... oxygen binding. The degree of the temperature dependence of the heat of oxygenation observed in these hemoglobins seems to reflect the differences in their allosteric effects rather than a specific molecular adaptation to low temperatures. Moreover, this study indicates that the disagreement between...... (logP(50) vs 1/T) of D. mawsoni hemoglobin indicates that the enthalpy of oxygenation (slope of the plot) is temperature dependent and that at high temperatures oxygen-binding becomes less exothermic. Nearly linear relationships were found in the hemoglobins of the other two species. The data were...

  6. Theory of coherent time-dependent transport in one-dimensional multiband semiconductor super-lattices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rotvig, J.; Smith, H.; Jauho, Antti-Pekka

    1996-01-01

    We present an analytical study of one-dimensional semiconductor superlattices in external electric fields, which may be time dependent. A number of general results for the (quasi)energies and eigenstates are derived. An equation of motion for the density matrix is obtained for a two-band model...

  7. Temperature dependent Raman scattering in YCrO3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mall, A. K.; Mukherjee, S.; Sharma, Y.; Garg, A.; Gupta, R.

    2014-04-01

    High quality polycrystalline YCrO3 samples were synthesized using solid-state-reaction method. The samples were subsequently characterized using X-ray diffraction and magnetometry. Further, temperature dependent Raman spectroscopy over a spectral range from 100 to 800 cm-1 was used to examine the variation of phonons as a function of temperature from 90 to 300 K. In the low temperature ferroelectric phase of YCrO3, the observed phonon spectra showed softening of some Raman modes below the magnetic ordering temperature (TN ˜ 142K), suggesting a coupling between the spin and phonon degrees of freedom.

  8. Finite-temperature phase transition to a Kitaev spin liquid phase on a hyperoctagon lattice: A large-scale quantum Monte Carlo study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishchenko, Petr A.; Kato, Yasuyuki; Motome, Yukitoshi

    2017-09-01

    The quantum spin liquid is an enigmatic quantum state in insulating magnets, in which conventional long-range order is suppressed by strong quantum fluctuations. Recently, an unconventional phase transition was reported between the low-temperature quantum spin liquid and the high-temperature paramagnet in the Kitaev model on a three-dimensional hyperhoneycomb lattice. Here, we show that a similar "liquid-gas" transition takes place in another three-dimensional lattice, the hyperoctagon lattice. We investigate the critical phenomena by adopting the Green-function based Monte Carlo technique with the kernel polynomial method, which enables systematic analysis of up to 2048 sites. The critical temperature is lower than that in the hyperhoneycomb case, reflecting the smaller flux gap. We also discuss the transition on the basis of an effective model in the anisotropic limit.

  9. Monte Carlo analysis of experiments on the reactivity temperature coefficient for UO{sub 2} and MOX light water moderated lattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erradi, L.; Chetaine, A. [Faculte des Sciences, Groupe de Physique des Reacteurs, Rabat Maroc (Morocco); Chakir, E.; Kharchaf, A. [Faculte des sciences de Kenitra, Dept. de physique (Morocco); Elbardouni, T. [Faculte des Sciences de Tetouan, Dept. de Physique (Morocco); Elkhoukhi, T. [CNESTEN, Rabat (Morocco)

    2005-07-01

    In a previous work, we have analysed the main French experiments available on the reactivity temperature coefficient (RTC): CREOLE and MISTRAL experiments. In these experiments, the RTC has been measured in both UO{sub 2} and UO{sub 2}-PuO{sub 2} PWR type lattices. Our calculations, using APOLLO2 code with CEA93 library based on JEF2.2 evaluation, have shown that the calculation error in UO{sub 2} lattices is less than 1 pcm/C degrees which is considered as the target accuracy. On the other hand the calculation error in the MOX lattices is more significant in both low and high temperature ranges: an average error of -2 {+-} 0.5 pcm/C degrees is observed in low temperatures and an error of +3 {+-} 2 pcm/C degrees is obtained for temperatures higher than 250 C degrees. In the present work, we analysed additional experimental benchmarks on the RTC of UO{sub 2} and MOX light water moderated lattices. To analyze these benchmarks and with the aim of minimizing uncertainties related to modelling of the experimental set up, we chose the Monte Carlo method which has the advantage of taking into account in the most exact manner the geometry of the experimental configurations. This analysis shows for the UO{sub 2} lattices, a maximum experiment-calculation deviation of about 0,7 pcm/C degrees, which is below the target accuracy for this type of lattices. For the KAMINI experiment, which relates to the measurement of the RTC in a light water moderated lattice using U-233 as fuel our analysis shows that the ENDF/B6 library gives the best result, with an experiment-calculation deviation of the order of -0,16 pcm/C degrees. The analysis of the benchmarks using MOX fuel made it possible to highlight a discrepancy between experiment and calculation on the RTC of about -0.7 pcm/C degrees (for a range of temperatures going from 20 to 248 C degrees) and -1,2 pcm/C degrees (for a range of temperatures going from 20 to 80 C degrees). This result, in particular the tendency which has the

  10. Arrhenius temperature dependence of in vitro tissue plasminogen activator thrombolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaw, George J [Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, OH 45267-0769 (United States); Dhamija, Ashima [Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, OH 45267-0769 (United States); Bavani, Nazli [Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, OH 45267-0769 (United States); Wagner, Kenneth R [Department of Neurology, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, OH 45267-0769 (United States); Holland, Christy K [Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, OH 45267-0769 (United States)

    2007-06-07

    Stroke is a devastating disease and a leading cause of death and disability. Currently, the only FDA approved therapy for acute ischemic stroke is the intravenous administration of the thrombolytic medication, recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (tPA). However, this treatment has many contraindications and can have dangerous side effects such as intra-cerebral hemorrhage. These treatment limitations have led to much interest in potential adjunctive therapies, such as therapeutic hypothermia (T {<=} 35 deg. C) and ultrasound enhanced thrombolysis. Such interest may lead to combining these therapies with tPA to treat stroke, however little is known about the effects of temperature on the thrombolytic efficacy of tPA. In this work, we measure the temperature dependence of the fractional clot mass loss {delta}m(T) resulting from tPA exposure in an in vitro human clot model. We find that the temperature dependence is well described by an Arrhenius temperature dependence with an effective activation energy E{sub eff} of 42.0 {+-} 0.9 kJ mole{sup -1}. E{sub eff} approximates the activation energy of the plasminogen-to-plasmin reaction of 48.9 kJ mole{sup -1}. A model to explain this temperature dependence is proposed. These results will be useful in predicting the effects of temperature in future lytic therapies.

  11. Temperature dependence of the elastocaloric effect in natural rubber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, Zhongjian, E-mail: zhongjian.xie521@gmail.com; Sebald, Gael; Guyomar, Daniel

    2017-07-12

    The temperature dependence of the elastocaloric (eC) effect in natural rubber (NR) has been studied. This material exhibits a large eC effect over a broad temperature range from 0 °C to 49 °C. The maximum adiabatic temperature change (ΔT) occurred at 10 °C and the behavior could be predicted by the temperature dependence of the strain-induced crystallization (SIC) and the temperature-induced crystallization (TIC). The eC performance of NR was then compared with that of shape memory alloys (SMAs). This study contributes to the SIC research of NR and also broadens the application of elastomers. - Highlights: • A large elastocaloric effect over a broad temperature range was found in natural rubber (NR). • The caloric performance of NR was compared with that of shape memory alloys. • The temperature dependence of the elastocaloric effect in NR can be prediced by the theory of strain-induced crystallization.

  12. Substrate-dependent temperature sensitivity of soil organic matter decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myachina, Olga; Blagodatskaya, Evgenia

    2015-04-01

    Activity of extracellular enzymes responsible for decomposition of organics is substrate dependent. Quantity of the substrate is the main limiting factor for enzymatic or microbial heterotrophic activity in soils. Different mechanisms of enzymes response to temperature suggested for low and high substrate availability were never proved for real soil conditions. We compared the temperature responses of enzymes-catalyzed reactions in soils. Basing on Michaelis-Menten kinetics we determined the enzymes affinity to substrate (Km) and mineralization potential of heterotrophic microorganisms (Vmax) 1) for three hydrolytic enzymes: β-1,4-glucosidase, N-acetyl- β -D-glucosaminidase and phosphatase by the application of fluorogenically labeled substrates and 2) for mineralization of 14C-labeled glucose by substrate-dependent respiratory response. Here we show that the amount of available substrate is responsible for temperature sensitivity of hydrolysis of polymers in soil, whereas monomers oxidation to CO2 does not depend on substrate amount and is mainly temperature governed. We also found that substrate affinity of enzymes (which is usually decreases with the temperature) differently responded to warming for the process of depolymerisation versus monomers oxidation. We suggest the mechanism to temperature acclimation based on different temperature sensitivity of enzymes kinetics for hydrolysis of polymers and for monomers oxidation.

  13. A framework for elucidating the temperature dependence of fitness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amarasekare, Priyanga; Savage, Van

    2012-02-01

    Climate warming is predicted to cause large-scale extinctions, particularly of ectothermic species. A striking difference between tropical and temperate ectotherms is that tropical species experience a mean habitat temperature that is closer to the temperature at which fitness is maximized (T(opt)) and an upper temperature limit for survival (T(max)) that is closer to T(opt) than do temperate species. Thus, even a small increase in environmental temperature could put tropical ectotherms at high risk of extinction, whereas temperate ectotherms have a wider temperature cushion. Although this pattern is widely observed, the mechanisms that produce it are not well understood. Here we develop a mathematical framework to partition the temperature response of fitness into its components (fecundity, mortality, and development) and test model predictions with data for insects. We find that fitness declines at high temperatures because the temperature responses of fecundity and mortality act in opposite ways: fecundity decreases with temperature when temperatures exceed the optimal range, whereas mortality continues to increase. The proximity of T(opt) to T(max) depends on how the temperature response of development mediates the interaction between fecundity and mortality. When development is highly temperature sensitive, mortality exceeds reproduction only after fecundity has started to decline with temperature, which causes fitness to decline rapidly to zero when temperatures exceed T(opt). The model correctly predicts empirically observed fitness-temperature relationships in insects from different latitudes. It also suggests explanations for the widely reported phenological shifts in many ectotherms and the latitudinal differences in fitness responses.

  14. Temperature dependence of alkali-antimonide photocathodes: Evaluation at cryogenic temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamun, M. A.; Hernandez-Flores, M. R.; Morales, E.; Hernandez-Garcia, C.; Poelker, M.

    2017-10-01

    CsxKySb photocathodes were manufactured on a niobium substrate and evaluated over a range of temperatures from 300 to 77 K. Vacuum conditions were identified that minimize surface contamination due to gas adsorption when samples were cooled below room temperature. Measurements of the photocathode spectral response provided a means to evaluate the photocathode band gap dependence on the temperature and to predict the photocathode quantum efficiency at 4 K, a typical temperature at which superconducting radio frequency photoguns operate.

  15. Numerical study of active control of mixing in electro-osmotic flows by temperature difference using lattice Boltzmann methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alizadeh, A; Wang, J K; Pooyan, S; Mirbozorgi, S A; Wang, M

    2013-10-01

    In this paper, the effect of temperature difference between inlet flow and walls on the electro-osmotic flow through a two-dimensional microchannel is investigated. The main objective is to study the effect of temperature variations on the distribution of ions and consequently internal electric potential field, electric body force, and velocity fields in an electro-osmotic flow. We assume constant temperature and zeta potential on walls and use the mean temperature of each cross section to characterize the Boltzmann ion distribution across the channel. Based on these assumptions, the multiphysical transports are still able to be described by the classical Poisson-Boltzmann model. In this work, the Navier-Stokes equation for fluid flow, the Poisson-Boltzmann equation for ion distribution, and the energy equation for heat transfer are solved by a couple lattice Boltzmann method. The modeling results indicate that the temperature difference between walls and the inlet solution may lead to two symmetrical vortices at the entrance region of the microchannel which is appropriate for mixing enhancements. The advantage of this phenomenon for active control of mixing in electro-osmotic flow is the manageability of the vortex scale without extra efforts. For instance, the effective domain of this pattern could broaden by the following modulations: decreasing the external electric potential field, decreasing the electric double layer thickness, or increasing the temperature difference between inlet flow and walls. This work may provide a novel strategy for design or optimization of microsystems. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. On the Temperature Dependence of the UNIQUAC/UNIFAC Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skjold-Jørgensen, Steen; Rasmussen, Peter; Fredenslund, Aage

    1980-01-01

    Local composition models for the description of the properties of liquid mixtures do not in general give an accurate representation of excess Gibbs energy and excess enthalpy simultaneously. The introduction of temperature dependent interaction parameters leads to considerable improvements...... of the simultaneous correlation. The temperature dependent parameters have, however, little physical meaning and very odd results are frequently obtained when the interaction parameters obtained from excess enthalpy information alone are used for the prediction of vapor-liquid equilibria. The UNIQUAC/UNIFAC models...... are modified in this work by the introduction of a general temperature dependence of the coordination number. The modified UNIQUAC/UNIFAC models are especially suited for the representation of mixtures containing non-associating components. The modified models contain the same number of interaction parameters...

  17. Beyond-mean-field study of a binary bosonic mixture in a state-dependent honeycomb lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Lushuai; Krönke, Sven; Stockhofe, Jan; Simonet, Juliette; Sengstock, Klaus; Lühmann, Dirk-Sören; Schmelcher, Peter

    2015-04-01

    We investigate a binary mixture of bosonic atoms loaded into a state-dependent honeycomb lattice. For this system, the emergence of a so-called twisted-superfluid ground state was experimentally observed in Soltan-Panahi et al. [Nat. Phys. 8, 71 (2012), 10.1038/nphys2128]. Theoretically, the origin of this effect is not understood. We perform numerical simulations of an extended single-band Bose-Hubbard model adapted to the experimental parameters employing the multilayer multiconfiguration time-dependent Hartree method for Bosons. Our results confirm the overall applicability of mean-field theory in the relevant parameter range, within the extended single-band Bose-Hubbard model. Beyond this, we provide a detailed analysis of correlation effects correcting the mean-field result. These have the potential to induce asymmetries in single shot time-of-flight measurements, but we find no indication of the patterns characteristic of the twisted superfluid. We comment on the restrictions of our model and possible extensions.

  18. Apparatus for temperature-dependent cathodoluminescence characterization of materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bok, Jan; Schauer, Petr

    2014-07-01

    An apparatus for characterization of temperature-dependent cathodoluminescence (CL) of solid-state materials is presented. This device excites a specimen using an electron beam and the CL emission is collected from the specimen side opposite the e-beam irradiation. The design of the temperature-controlled specimen holder that enables cooling down to 100 K and heating up to 500 K is described. The desired specimen temperature is automatically stabilized using a PID controller, which is the proportional-integral-derivative control feedback loop. Moreover, the specimen holder provides in situ e-beam current measurement during the specimen excitation. The apparatus allows the measurement of the CL intensity, the CL spectrum, or the CL intensity decay depending on the specimen temperature, or on a variety of excitation conditions, such as excitation energy, electron current (dose), or excitation duration. The apparatus abilities are demonstrated by an example of the CL measurements of the YAG:Ce single-crystal scintillator.

  19. Honeybee flight metabolic rate: does it depend upon air temperature?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, William A; Heinrich, Bernd; Stevenson, Robert D

    2005-03-01

    Differing conclusions have been reached as to how or whether varying heat production has a thermoregulatory function in flying honeybees Apis mellifera. We investigated the effects of air temperature on flight metabolic rate, water loss, wingbeat frequency, body segment temperatures and behavior of honeybees flying in transparent containment outdoors. For periods of voluntary, uninterrupted, self-sustaining flight, metabolic rate was independent of air temperature between 19 and 37 degrees C. Thorax temperatures (T(th)) were very stable, with a slope of thorax temperature on air temperature of 0.18. Evaporative heat loss increased from 51 mW g(-1) at 25 degrees C to 158 mW g(-1) at 37 degrees C and appeared to account for head and abdomen temperature excess falling sharply over the same air temperature range. As air temperature increased from 19 to 37 degrees C, wingbeat frequency showed a slight but significant increase, and metabolic expenditure per wingbeat showed a corresponding slight but significant decrease. Bees spent an average of 52% of the measurement period in flight, with 19 of 78 bees sustaining uninterrupted voluntary flight for periods of >1 min. The fraction of time spent flying declined as air temperature increased. As the fraction of time spent flying decreased, the slope of metabolic rate on air temperature became more steeply negative, and was significant for bees flying less than 80% of the time. In a separate experiment, there was a significant inverse relationship of metabolic rate and air temperature for bees requiring frequent or constant agitation to remain airborne, but no dependence for bees that flew with little or no agitation; bees were less likely to require agitation during outdoor than indoor measurements. A recent hypothesis explaining differences between studies in the slope of flight metabolic rate on air temperature in terms of differences in metabolic capacity and thorax temperature is supported for honeybees in voluntary

  20. AlN Bandgap Temperature Dependence from its Optical Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-06-07

    AlN bandgap temperature dependence from its optical properties E. Silveira a,, J.A. Freitas b, S.B. Schujman c, L.J. Schowalter c a Depto. de Fisica ...literature could, in part, be lifted in terms of selection rules for the optical transitions [5]. Further experimental investigations corroborated with...CL, transmission/ absorption and OR measurements at different temperatures. 2. Experimental details The high-quality large bulk AlN single crystals

  1. Iron mapping using the temperature dependency of the magnetic susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birkl, Christoph; Langkammer, Christian; Krenn, Heinz; Goessler, Walter; Ernst, Christina; Haybaeck, Johannes; Stollberger, Rudolf; Fazekas, Franz; Ropele, Stefan

    2015-03-01

    The assessment of iron content in brain white matter (WM) is of high importance for studying neurodegenerative diseases. While R2 * mapping and quantitative susceptibility mapping is suitable for iron mapping in gray matter, iron mapping in WM still remains an unsolved problem. We propose a new approach for iron mapping, independent of diamagnetic contributions of myelin by assessing the temperature dependency of the paramagnetic susceptibility. We used unfixed human brain slices for relaxometry and calculated R2 ' as a measure for microscopic susceptibility variations at several temperatures (4°C-37°C) at 3 Tesla. The temperature coefficient of R2 ' (TcR2p) was calculated by linear regression and related to the iron concentration found by subsequent superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometry and by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. In line with SQUID measurements, R2 ' mapping showed a linear temperature dependency of the bulk susceptibility with the highest slope in gray matter. Even in WM, TcR2p yielded a high linear correlation with the absolute iron concentration. According to Curie's law, only paramagnetic matter exhibits a temperature dependency while the diamagnetism shows no effect. We have demonstrated that the temperature coefficient (TcR2p) can be used as a measure of the paramagnetic susceptibility despite of an unknown diamagnetic background. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Temperature dependence of the Brewer global UV measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fountoulakis, Ilias; Redondas, Alberto; Lakkala, Kaisa; Berjon, Alberto; Bais, Alkiviadis F.; Doppler, Lionel; Feister, Uwe; Heikkila, Anu; Karppinen, Tomi; Karhu, Juha M.; Koskela, Tapani; Garane, Katerina; Fragkos, Konstantinos; Savastiouk, Volodya

    2017-11-01

    Spectral measurements of global UV irradiance recorded by Brewer spectrophotometers can be significantly affected by instrument-specific optical and mechanical features. Thus, proper corrections are needed in order to reduce the associated uncertainties to within acceptable levels. The present study aims to contribute to the reduction of uncertainties originating from changes in the Brewer internal temperature, which affect the performance of the optical and electronic parts, and subsequently the response of the instrument. Until now, measurements of the irradiance from various types of lamps at different temperatures have been used to characterize the instruments' temperature dependence. The use of 50 W lamps was found to induce errors in the characterization due to changes in the transmissivity of the Teflon diffuser as it warms up by the heat of the lamp. In contrast, the use of 200 or 1000 W lamps is considered more appropriate because they are positioned at longer distances from the diffuser so that warming is negligible. Temperature gradients inside the instrument can cause mechanical stresses which can affect the instrument's optical characteristics. Therefore, during the temperature-dependence characterization procedure warming or cooling must be slow enough to minimize these effects. In this study, results of the temperature characterization of eight different Brewer spectrophotometers operating in Greece, Finland, Germany and Spain are presented. It was found that the instruments' response changes differently in different temperature regions due to different responses of the diffusers' transmittance. The temperature correction factors derived for the Brewer spectrophotometers operating at Thessaloniki, Greece, and Sodankylä, Finland, were evaluated and were found to remove the temperature dependence of the instruments' sensitivity.

  3. DETERMINATION OF TEMPERATURE DISTRIBUTION FOR ANNULAR FINS WITH TEMPERATURE DEPENDENT THERMAL CONDUCTIVITY BY HPM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davood Domairry Ganji

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, homotopy perturbation method has been used to evaluate the temperature distribution of annular fin with temperature-dependent thermal conductivity and to determine the temperature distribution within the fin. This method is useful and practical for solving the nonlinear heat transfer equation, which is associated with variable thermal conductivity condition. The homotopy perturbation method provides an approximate analytical solution in the form of an infinite power series. The annular fin heat transfer rate with temperature-dependent thermal conductivity has been obtained as a function of thermo-geometric fin parameter and the thermal conductivity parameter describing the variation of the thermal conductivity.

  4. A Model of Temperature-Dependent Young's Modulus for Ultrahigh Temperature Ceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiguo Li

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on the different sensitivities of material properties to temperature between ultrahigh temperature ceramics (UHTCs and traditional ceramics, the original empirical formula of temperature-dependent Young's modulus of ceramic materials is unable to describe the temperature dependence of Young's modulus of UHTCs which are used as thermal protection materials. In this paper, a characterization applied to Young's modulus of UHTC materials under high temperature which is revised from the original empirical formula is established. The applicable temperature range of the characterization extends to the higher temperature zone. This study will provide a basis for the characterization for strength and fracture toughness of UHTC materials and provide theoretical bases and technical reserves for the UHTC materials' design and application in the field of spacecraft.

  5. Similar temperature dependencies of glycolytic enzymes: an evolutionary adaptation to temperature dynamics?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cruz Luisa Ana B

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Temperature strongly affects microbial growth, and many microorganisms have to deal with temperature fluctuations in their natural environment. To understand regulation strategies that underlie microbial temperature responses and adaptation, we studied glycolytic pathway kinetics in Saccharomyces cerevisiae during temperature changes. Results Saccharomyces cerevisiae was grown under different temperature regimes and glucose availability conditions. These included glucose-excess batch cultures at different temperatures and glucose-limited chemostat cultures, subjected to fast linear temperature shifts and circadian sinoidal temperature cycles. An observed temperature-independent relation between intracellular levels of glycolytic metabolites and residual glucose concentration for all experimental conditions revealed that it is the substrate availability rather than temperature that determines intracellular metabolite profiles. This observation corresponded with predictions generated in silico with a kinetic model of yeast glycolysis, when the catalytic capacities of all glycolytic enzymes were set to share the same normalized temperature dependency. Conclusions From an evolutionary perspective, such similar temperature dependencies allow cells to adapt more rapidly to temperature changes, because they result in minimal perturbations of intracellular metabolite levels, thus circumventing the need for extensive modification of enzyme levels.

  6. Temperature dependencies of frequency characteristics of HTSC RLC curcuit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buniatyan, Vahe V.; Aroutiounian, V. M.; Shmavonyan, G. Sh.; Buniatyan, Vaz. V.

    2006-05-01

    Analytical expressions of temperature dependencies of magnitude-frequency and phase-frequency characteristics of a HTSC RLC parallel circuit are obtained, where the resistance and inductance are non-linearly depended on the optical signal modulated by the intensity. It is shown that the magnitude-frequency and phase-frequency characteristics of circuits can be controlled by choosing the parameters of the HTSC thin film and optical "pump".

  7. Ultra-capacitor electrical modeling using temperature dependent parameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lajnef, W.; Briat, O.; Azzopardi, S.; Woirgard, E.; Vinassa, J.M. [Bordeaux-1 Univ., Lab. IXL CNRS UMR 5818 - ENSEIRB, 33 - Talence (France)

    2004-07-01

    This paper deals with ultra-capacitor electrical modeling. For a proper characterization and identification, a dedicated test bench is designed. First, the ultra-capacitor electric behavior is presented and an electrical model is proposed. The model parameters are identified using a combination of constant currents and frequency response measurements. Then, the temperature dependence of the ultra-capacitor parameters is investigated. Therefore, constant currents and impedance spectroscopy tests are done at different ambient temperatures. Finally, the electrical model parameters are adjusted according to temperature. (authors)

  8. Analogy between temperature-dependent and concentration-dependent bacterial killing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Neef, C.; van Gils, Stephanus A.; Ijzerman, W.L.

    2002-01-01

    In this article an analogy between temperature-dependent and concentration-dependent bacterial killing is described. The validation process of autoclaves uses parameters such as reduction rate constant k, decimal reduction time D and resistance coefficient z from an imaginary microorganism to

  9. Temperature-Induced Lattice Relaxation of Perovskite Crystal Enhances Optoelectronic Properties and Solar Cell Performance

    KAUST Repository

    Banavoth, Murali

    2016-12-14

    Hybrid organic-inorganic perovskite crystals have recently become one of the most important classes of photoactive materials in the solar cell and optoelectronic communities. Albeit improvements have focused on state-of-the-art technology including various fabrication methods, device architectures, and surface passivation, progress is yet to be made in understanding the actual operational temperature on the electronic properties and the device performances. Therefore, the substantial effect of temperature on the optoelectronic properties, charge separation, charge recombination dynamics, and photoconversion efficiency are explored. The results clearly demonstrated a significant enhancement in the carrier mobility, photocurrent, charge carrier lifetime, and solar cell performance in the 60 ± 5 °C temperature range. In this temperature range, perovskite crystal exhibits a highly symmetrical relaxed cubic structure with well-aligned domains that are perpendicular to a principal axis, thereby remarkably improving the device operation. This finding provides a new key variable component and paves the way toward using perovskite crystals in highly efficient photovoltaic cells.

  10. Size-dependent cohesive energy, melting temperature, and Debye temperature of spherical metallic nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Y. D.; Liang, X. L.; Kong, X. Q.; Zhang, W. J.

    2017-06-01

    It is necessary to theoretically evaluate the thermodynamic properties of metallic nanoparticles due to the lack of experimental data. Considering the surface effects and crystal structures, a simple theoretical model is developed to study the size dependence of thermodynamic properties of spherical metallic nanoparticles. Based on the model, we have considered Co and Cu nanoparticles for the study of size dependence of cohesive energy, Au and Cu nanoparticles for size dependence of melting temperature, and Cu, Co and Au nanoparticles for size dependence of Debye temperature, respectively. The results show that the size effects on melting temperature, cohesive energy and Debye temperature of the spherical metallic nanoparticles are predominant in the sizes ranging from about 3 nm to 20 nm. The present theoretical predictions are in agreement with available corresponding experimental and computer simulation results for the spherical metallic nanoparticles. The model could be used to determine the thermodynamic properties of other metallic nanoparticles to some extent.

  11. Temperature dependence of exciton diffusion in conjugated polymers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mikhnenko, O.V.; Cordella, F.; Sieval, A.B.; Hummelen, J.C.; Blom, P.W.M.; Loi, M.A.

    2008-01-01

    The temperature dependence of the exciton dynamics in a conjugated polymer is studied using time-resolved spectroscopy. Photoluminescence decays were measured in heterostructured samples containing a sharp polymer-fullerene interface, which acts as an exciton quenching wall. Using a ID diffusion

  12. Temperature dependence of electromechanical properties of PLZT x ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The compositions of lead lanthanum zirconate titanate PLZT [Pb(Zr0.57Ti0.43)O3 + at% of La, where = 3, 5, 6, 10 and 12] have been synthesized using mixed oxide route. The temperature dependent electromechanical parameters have been determined using vector impedance spectroscopy (VIS). The charge constant ...

  13. Temperature-dependent gas transport and its correlation with kinetic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2017-05-20

    May 20, 2017 ... Temperature-dependent gas transport and its correlation with kinetic diameter in polymer nanocomposite membrane. N K ACHARYA. Applied Physics Department, Faculty of Technology and Engineering, The M S University of Baroda,. Vadodara 390 001, India sarnavee@gmail.com. MS received 18 May ...

  14. Temperature dependence studies on the electro-oxidation of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Cyclic voltammetry; electrochemical impedance spectroscopy; activation energy; fuel cell; alcohol. Abstract. Temperature dependence on the electro-oxidation of methanol, ethanol and 1-propanol in 0.5 M H2SO4 were investigated with Pt and PtRu electrodes. Tafel slope and apparent activation energy were evaluated ...

  15. Electronically induced nuclear transitions - temperature dependence and Rabi oscillations

    CERN Document Server

    Niez, J J

    2002-01-01

    This paper deals with a nucleus electromagnetically coupled with the bound states of its electronic surroundings. It describes the temperature dependence of its dynamics and the onset of potential Rabi oscillations by means of a Master Equation. The latter is generalized in order to account for possible strong resonances. Throughout the paper the approximation schemes are discussed and tested. (authors)

  16. Extraction of temperature dependent interfacial resistance of thermoelectric modules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Min

    2011-01-01

    This article discusses an approach for extracting the temperature dependency of the electrical interfacial resistance associated with thermoelectric devices. The method combines a traditional module-level test rig and a nonlinear numerical model of thermoelectricity to minimize measurement errors...... on the interfacial resistance. The extracted results represent useful data to investigating the characteristics of thermoelectric module resistance and comparing performance of various modules....

  17. Investigation of temperature dependence of development and aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacher, G. A.

    1969-01-01

    Temperature dependence of maturation and metabolic rates in insects, and the failure of vital processes during development were investigated. The paper presented advances the general hypothesis that aging in biological systems is a consequence of the production of entropy concomitant with metabolic activity.

  18. Temperature dependence effect of viscosity on ultrathin lubricant film melting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.V.Khomenko

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available We study the melting of an ultrathin lubricant film under friction between atomically flat surfaces at temperature dependencies of viscosity described by Vogel-Fulcher relationship and by power expression, which are observed experimentally. It is shown that the critical temperature exists in both cases the exceeding of which leads to the melting of lubricant and, as a result, the sliding mode of friction sets in. The values of characteristic parameters of lubricant are defined, which are needed for friction reduction. In the systems, where the Vogel-Fulcher dependence is fulfilled, it is possible to choose the parameters at which the melting of lubricant takes place even at zero temperature of friction surfaces. The deformational defect of the shear modulus is taken into account in describing the lubricant melting according to the mechanism of the first-order transition.

  19. Effects of Temperature on Time Dependent Rheological Characteristics of Koumiss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serdal Sabancı

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The rheological properties of koumiss were investigated at different temperatures (4, 10, and 20°C. Experimental shear stress–shear rate data were fitted to different rheological models. The consistency of koumiss was predicted by using the power-law model since it described the consistency of koumiss best with highest regression coefficient and lowest errors (root mean square error and chi-square. Koumiss exhibited shear thinning behavior (n<1. The flow activation energy for temperature dependency of consistency was 25.532 kJ/mol, and the frequency constant was 2.18×10-7Pa.sn. As the temperature increased the time dependent thixotropic characteristics of koumiss decreased.

  20. Temperature-dependent structure evolution in liquid gallium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiong, L. H.; Wang, X. D.; Yu, Q.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, F.; Sun, Y.; Cao, Q. P.; Xie, H. L.; Xiao, T. Q.; Zhang, D. X.; Wang, C. Z.; Ho, K. M.; Ren, Y.; Jiang, J. Z.

    2017-04-01

    Temperature-dependent atomistic structure evolution of liquid gallium (Ga) has been investigated by using in situ high energy X-ray diffraction experiment and ab initio molecular dynamics simulation. Both experimental and theoretical results reveal the existence of a liquid structural change around 1000 K in liquid Ga. Below and above this temperature the liquid exhibits differences in activation energy for selfdiffusion, temperature-dependent heat capacity, coordination numbers, density, viscosity, electric resistivity and thermoelectric power, which are reflected from structural changes of the bond-orientational order parameter Q6, fraction of covalent dimers, averaged string length and local atomic packing. This finding will trigger more studies on the liquid-to-liquid crossover in metallic melts.

  1. A Temperature-Dependent Battery Model for Wireless Sensor Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Leonardo M; Montez, Carlos; Moraes, Ricardo; Portugal, Paulo; Vasques, Francisco

    2017-02-22

    Energy consumption is a major issue in Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs), as nodes are powered by chemical batteries with an upper bounded lifetime. Estimating the lifetime of batteries is a difficult task, as it depends on several factors, such as operating temperatures and discharge rates. Analytical battery models can be used for estimating both the battery lifetime and the voltage behavior over time. Still, available models usually do not consider the impact of operating temperatures on the battery behavior. The target of this work is to extend the widely-used Kinetic Battery Model (KiBaM) to include the effect of temperature on the battery behavior. The proposed Temperature-Dependent KiBaM (T-KiBaM) is able to handle operating temperatures, providing better estimates for the battery lifetime and voltage behavior. The performed experimental validation shows that T-KiBaM achieves an average accuracy error smaller than 0.33%, when estimating the lifetime of Ni-MH batteries for different temperature conditions. In addition, T-KiBaM significantly improves the original KiBaM voltage model. The proposed model can be easily adapted to handle other battery technologies, enabling the consideration of different WSN deployments.

  2. A Temperature-Dependent Battery Model for Wireless Sensor Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Leonardo M.; Montez, Carlos; Moraes, Ricardo; Portugal, Paulo; Vasques, Francisco

    2017-01-01

    Energy consumption is a major issue in Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs), as nodes are powered by chemical batteries with an upper bounded lifetime. Estimating the lifetime of batteries is a difficult task, as it depends on several factors, such as operating temperatures and discharge rates. Analytical battery models can be used for estimating both the battery lifetime and the voltage behavior over time. Still, available models usually do not consider the impact of operating temperatures on the battery behavior. The target of this work is to extend the widely-used Kinetic Battery Model (KiBaM) to include the effect of temperature on the battery behavior. The proposed Temperature-Dependent KiBaM (T-KiBaM) is able to handle operating temperatures, providing better estimates for the battery lifetime and voltage behavior. The performed experimental validation shows that T-KiBaM achieves an average accuracy error smaller than 0.33%, when estimating the lifetime of Ni-MH batteries for different temperature conditions. In addition, T-KiBaM significantly improves the original KiBaM voltage model. The proposed model can be easily adapted to handle other battery technologies, enabling the consideration of different WSN deployments. PMID:28241444

  3. Can Holstein-Kondo lattice model be used as a candidate for the theory of high transition temperature superconductors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Nourafkan

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available   It is a common knowledge that the formation of electron pairs is a necessary ingredient of any theoretical work describing superconductivity. Thus, finding the mechanism of the formation of the electron pairs is of utmost importance. There are some experiments on high transition temperature superconductors which support the electron-phonon (e-ph interactions as the pairing mechanism (ARPES, and there are others which support the spin fluctuations as their pairing mechanism (tunneling spectroscopy. In this paper, we introduce the Holstein-Kondo lattice model (H-KLM which incorporates the e-ph as well as the Kondo exchange interaction. We have used the dynamical mean field theory (DMFT to describe heavy fermion semiconductors and have employed the exact-diagonalization technique to obtain our results. The phase diagram of these systems in the parameter space of the e-ph coupling, g, and the Kondo exchange coupling, J, show that the system can be found in the Kondo insulating phase, metallic phase or the bi-polaronic phase. It is shown that these systems develop both spin gap and a charge gap, which are different and possess energies in the range of 1-100 meV. In view of the fact that both spin excitation energies and phonon energies lie in this range, we expect our work on H-KLM opens a way to formalize the theory of the high transition temperature superconductors .

  4. Temperature dependence of contact resistance at metal/MWNT interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sang-Eui; Moon, Kyoung-Seok; Sohn, Yoonchul, E-mail: yoonchul.son@samsung.com [Materials Research Center, Samsung Advanced Institute of Technology, Samsung Electronics, Suwon 443-803 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-07-11

    Although contact resistance of carbon nanotube (CNT) is one of the most important factors for practical application of electronic devices, a study regarding temperature dependence on contact resistance of CNTs with metal electrodes has not been found. Here, we report an investigation of contact resistance at multiwalled nanotube (MWNT)/Ag interface as a function of temperature, using MWNT/polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) composite. Electrical resistance of MWNT/PDMS composite revealed negative temperature coefficient (NTC). Excluding the contact resistance with Ag electrode, the NTC effect became less pronounced, showing lower intrinsic resistivity with the activation energy of 0.019 eV. Activation energy of the contact resistance of MWNT/Ag interface was determined to be 0.04 eV, two times larger than that of MWNT-MWNT network. The increase in the thermal fluctuation assisted electron tunneling is attributed to conductivity enhancement at both MWNT/MWNT and MWNT/Ag interfaces with increasing temperature.

  5. Depth Dependent Relationships between Temperature and Ocean Heterotrophic Prokaryotic Production

    KAUST Repository

    Lønborg, Christian

    2016-06-07

    Marine prokaryotes play a key role in cycling of organic matter and nutrients in the ocean. Using a unique dataset (>14,500 samples), we applied a space-for-time substitution analysis to assess the temperature dependence of prokaryotic heterotrophic production (PHP) in epi- (0-200 m), meso- (201-1000 m) and bathypelagic waters (1001-4000 m) of the global ocean. Here, we show that the temperature dependence of PHP is fundamentally different between these major oceanic depth layers, with an estimated ecosystem-level activation energy (E) of 36 ± 7 kJ mol for the epipelagic, 72 ± 15 kJ mol for the mesopelagic and 274 ± 65 kJ mol for the bathypelagic realm. We suggest that the increasing temperature dependence with depth is related to the parallel vertical gradient in the proportion of recalcitrant organic compounds. These Ea predict an increased PHP of about 5, 12, and 55% in the epi-, meso-, and bathypelagic ocean, respectively, in response to a water temperature increase by 1°C. Hence, there is indication that a major thus far underestimated feedback mechanism exists between future bathypelagic ocean warming and heterotrophic prokaryotic activity.

  6. Competitive interactions modify the temperature dependence of damselfly growth rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson-Ortman, Viktor; Stoks, Robby; Johansson, Frank

    2014-05-01

    Individual growth rates and survival are major determinants of individual fitness, population size structure, and community dynamics. The relationships between growth rate, survival, and temperature may thus be important for predicting biological responses to climate change. Although it is well known that growth rates and survival are affected by competition and predation in addition to temperature, the combined effect of these factors on growth rates, survival, and size structure has rarely been investigated simultaneously in the same ecological system. To address this question, we conducted experiments on the larvae of two species of damselflies and determined the temperature dependence of growth rate, survival, and cohort size structure under three scenarios of increasing ecological complexity: no competition, intraspecific competition, and interspecific competition. In one species, the relationship between growth rate and temperature became steeper in the presence of competitors, whereas that of survival remained unchanged. In the other species, the relationship between growth rate and temperature was unaffected by competitive interactions, but survival was greatly reduced at high temperatures in the presence of interspecific competitors. The combined effect of competitive interactions and temperature on cohort size structure differed from the effects of these factors in isolation. Together, these findings suggest that it will be challenging to scale up information from single-species laboratory studies to the population and community level.

  7. Temperature Dependence of the Resonant Magnetoelectric Effect in Layered Heterostructures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dmitrii A. Burdin

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The dependence of the resonant direct magnetoelectric effect on temperature is studied experimentally in planar composite structures. Samples of rectangular shapes with dimensions of 5 mm × 20 mm employed ferromagnetic layers of either an amorphous (metallic glass alloy or nickel with a thickness of 20–200 μm and piezoelectric layers of single crystalline langatate material or lead zirconate titanate piezoelectric ceramics with a thickness of 500 μm. The temperature of the samples was varied in a range between 120 and 390 K by blowing a gaseous nitrogen stream around them. It is shown that the effective characteristics of the magnetoelectric effect—such as the mechanical resonance frequency fr, the quality factor Q and the magnitude of the magnetoelectric coefficient αE at the resonance frequency—are contingent on temperature. The interrelations between the temperature changes of the characteristics of the magnetoelectric effect and the temperature variations of the following material parameters—Young’s modulus Y, the acoustic quality factor of individual layers, the dielectric constant ε, the piezoelectric modulus d of the piezoelectric layer as well as the piezomagnetic coefficients λ(n of the ferromagnetic layer—are established. The effect of temperature on the characteristics of the nonlinear magnetoelectric effect is observed for the first time. The results can be useful for designing magnetoelectric heterostructures with specified temperature characteristics, in particular, for the development of thermally stabilized magnetoelectric devices.

  8. Shutter-Less Temperature-Dependent Correction for Uncooled Thermal Camera Under Fast Changing FPA Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, D.; Westfeld, P.; Maas, H.-G.

    2017-05-01

    Conventional temperature-dependant correction methods for uncooled cameras are not so valid for images under the condition of fast changing FPA temperature as usual, therefore, a shutter-less temperature-dependant correction method is proposed here to compensate for these errors and stabilize camera's response only related to the object surface temperature. Firstly, sequential images are divided into the following three categories according to the changing speed of FPA temperature: stable (0°C/min), relatively stable (0.5°C/min). Then all of the images are projected into the same level using a second order polynomial relation between FPA temperatures and gray values from stable images. Next, a third order polynomial relation between temporal differences of FPA temperatures and the above corrected images is implemented to eliminate the deviation caused by fast changing FPA temperature. Finally, radiometric calibration is applied to convert image gray values into object temperature values. Experiment results show that our method is more effective for fast changing FPA temperature data than FLIR GEV.

  9. Quantitative Temperature Dependence of Longitudinal Spin Seebeck Effect at High Temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ken-ichi Uchida

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available We report temperature-dependent measurements of longitudinal spin Seebeck effects (LSSEs in Pt/Y_{3}Fe_{5}O_{12} (YIG/Pt systems in a high temperature range from room temperature to above the Curie temperature of YIG. The experimental results show that the magnitude of the LSSE voltage in the Pt/YIG/Pt systems rapidly decreases with increasing the temperature and disappears above the Curie temperature. The critical exponent of the LSSE voltage in the Pt/YIG/Pt systems at the Curie temperature is estimated to be 3, which is much greater than that for the magnetization curve of YIG. This difference highlights the fact that the mechanism of the LSSE cannot be explained in terms of simple static magnetic properties in YIG.

  10. Vortex lattice mobility and effective pinning potentials in the peak ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    temperature the mobility of the vortex lattice (VL) is found to be dependent on the dynamical history. ... Introduction. The peak effect (PE) in the critical current density (Jc) in both low and high temperature ... An anomalous increase is observed above an onset field Bon or temperature Ton, until Jc reaches a maximum.

  11. Gas diffusion and temperature dependence of bubble nucleation during irradiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foreman, A. J. E.; Singh, Bachu Narain

    1986-01-01

    of the diatomic nucleation of helium bubbles, assuming helium to diffuse substitutionally, with radiation-enhanced diffusion at lower temperatures. The calculated temperature dependence of the bubble density shows excellent agreement with that observed in 600 MeV proton irradiations, including a reduction...... in activation energy below Tm/2. The coalescence of diatomic nuclei due to Brownian motion markedly improves the agreement and also provides a well-defined terminal density. Bubble nucleation by this mechanism is sufficiently fast to inhibit any appreciable initial loss of gas to grain boundaries during...

  12. Temperature and size dependent friction of gold nanoislands on graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, Ben D.; Lodge, Michael S.; Williams, Zachary; Ishigami, Masa

    2013-03-01

    Nanoscale motors and machines require the ability to tune frictional properties at the nanoscale. Yet a fundamental understanding of frictional processes of nanoislands still remains unknown. We have performed a quartz crystal microbalance study to investigate the role of temperature and island size on frictional energy dissipation for gold nanoislands on graphene. Significant frictional dissipation is observed even at room temperature, consistent with activated friction on the graphene surface. We will discuss these results and compare them to previously predicted models for thermally activated and size dependent friction. This work is funded by the Intelligence Community Postdoctoral Research Fellowship program

  13. Temperature dependence of relaxation times and temperature mapping in ultra-low-field MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vesanen, Panu T; Zevenhoven, Koos C J; Nieminen, Jaakko O; Dabek, Juhani; Parkkonen, Lauri T; Ilmoniemi, Risto J

    2013-10-01

    Ultra-low-field MRI is an emerging technology that allows MRI and NMR measurements in microtesla-range fields. In this work, the possibilities of relaxation-based temperature measurements with ultra-low-field MRI were investigated by measuring T1 and T2 relaxation times of agarose gel at 50 μT-52 mT and at temperatures 5-45°C. Measurements with a 3T scanner were made for comparison. The Bloembergen-Purcell-Pound relaxation theory was combined with a two-state model to explain the field-strength and temperature dependence of the data. The results show that the temperature dependencies of agarose gel T1 and T2 in the microtesla range differ drastically from those at 3T; the effect of temperature on T1 is reversed at approximately 5 mT. The obtained results were used to reconstruct temperature maps from ultra-low-field scans. These time-dependent temperature maps measured from an agarose gel phantom at 50 μT reproduced the temperature gradient with good contrast. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Exact low-temperature series expansion for the partition function of the zero-field Ising model on the infinite square lattice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siudem, Grzegorz; Fronczak, Agata; Fronczak, Piotr

    2016-10-10

    In this paper, we provide the exact expression for the coefficients in the low-temperature series expansion of the partition function of the two-dimensional Ising model on the infinite square lattice. This is equivalent to exact determination of the number of spin configurations at a given energy. With these coefficients, we show that the ferromagnetic-to-paramagnetic phase transition in the square lattice Ising model can be explained through equivalence between the model and the perfect gas of energy clusters model, in which the passage through the critical point is related to the complete change in the thermodynamic preferences on the size of clusters. The combinatorial approach reported in this article is very general and can be easily applied to other lattice models.

  15. Manganese oxide phases and morphologies: A study on calcination temperature and atmospheric dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Augustin, Matthias; Fenske, Daniela; Bardenhagen, Ingo; Westphal, Anne; Knipper, Martin; Plaggenborg, Thorsten; Kolny-Olesiak, Joanna; Parisi, Jürgen

    2015-01-01

    Manganese oxides are one of the most important groups of materials in energy storage science. In order to fully leverage their application potential, precise control of their properties such as particle size, surface area and Mn (x) (+) oxidation state is required. Here, Mn3O4 and Mn5O8 nanoparticles as well as mesoporous α-Mn2O3 particles were synthesized by calcination of Mn(II) glycolate nanoparticles obtained through an economical route based on a polyol synthesis. The preparation of the different manganese oxides via one route facilitates assigning actual structure-property relationships. The oxidation process related to the different MnO x species was observed by in situ X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements showing time- and temperature-dependent phase transformations occurring during oxidation of the Mn(II) glycolate precursor to α-Mn2O3 via Mn3O4 and Mn5O8 in O2 atmosphere. Detailed structural and morphological investigations using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and powder XRD revealed the dependence of the lattice constants and particle sizes of the MnO x species on the calcination temperature and the presence of an oxidizing or neutral atmosphere. Furthermore, to demonstrate the application potential of the synthesized MnO x species, we studied their catalytic activity for the oxygen reduction reaction in aprotic media. Linear sweep voltammetry revealed the best performance for the mesoporous α-Mn2O3 species.

  16. Manganese oxide phases and morphologies: A study on calcination temperature and atmospheric dependence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias Augustin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Manganese oxides are one of the most important groups of materials in energy storage science. In order to fully leverage their application potential, precise control of their properties such as particle size, surface area and Mnx+ oxidation state is required. Here, Mn3O4 and Mn5O8 nanoparticles as well as mesoporous α-Mn2O3 particles were synthesized by calcination of Mn(II glycolate nanoparticles obtained through an economical route based on a polyol synthesis. The preparation of the different manganese oxides via one route facilitates assigning actual structure–property relationships. The oxidation process related to the different MnOx species was observed by in situ X-ray diffraction (XRD measurements showing time- and temperature-dependent phase transformations occurring during oxidation of the Mn(II glycolate precursor to α-Mn2O3 via Mn3O4 and Mn5O8 in O2 atmosphere. Detailed structural and morphological investigations using transmission electron microscopy (TEM and powder XRD revealed the dependence of the lattice constants and particle sizes of the MnOx species on the calcination temperature and the presence of an oxidizing or neutral atmosphere. Furthermore, to demonstrate the application potential of the synthesized MnOx species, we studied their catalytic activity for the oxygen reduction reaction in aprotic media. Linear sweep voltammetry revealed the best performance for the mesoporous α-Mn2O3 species.

  17. Temperature dependent bacteriophages of a tropical bacterial pathogen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martha Rebecca Jane Clokie

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available There is an increasing awareness of the multiple ways that bacteriophages (phages influence bacterial evolution, population dynamics, physiology and pathogenicity. By studying a novel group of phages infecting a soil borne pathogen, we revealed a paradigm shifting observation that the phages switch their lifestyle according to temperature. We sampled soil from an endemic area of the serious tropical pathogen Burkholderia pseudomallei, and established that podoviruses infecting the pathogen are frequently present in soil, and many of them are naturally occurring variants of a common virus type. Experiments on one phage in the related model Burkholderia thailandensis demonstrated that temperature defines the outcome of phage-bacteria interactions. At higher temperatures (37°C, the phage predominantly goes through a lytic cycle, but at lower temperatures (25°C, the phage remains temperate. This is the first report of a naturally occurring phage that follows a lytic or temperate lifestyle according to temperature. These observations fundamentally alter the accepted views on the abundance, population biology and virulence of B. pseudomallei. Furthermore, when taken together with previous studies, our findings suggest that the phenomenon of temperature dependency in phages is widespread. Such phages are likely to have a profound effect on bacterial life, and on our ability to culture and correctly enumerate viable bacteria.

  18. Temperature-Dependent Conformations of Model Viscosity Index Improvers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramasamy, Uma Shantini; Cosimbescu, Lelia; Martini, Ashlie

    2015-05-01

    Lubricants are comprised of base oils and additives where additives are chemicals that are deliberately added to the oil to enhance properties and inhibit degradation of the base oils. Viscosity index (VI) improvers are an important class of additives that reduce the decline of fluid viscosity with temperature [1], enabling optimum lubricant performance over a wider range of operating temperatures. These additives are typically high molecular weight polymers, such as, but not limited to, polyisobutylenes, olefin copolymer, and polyalkylmethacrylates, that are added in concentrations of 2-5% (w/w). Appropriate polymers, when dissolved in base oil, expand from a coiled to an uncoiled state with increasing temperature [2]. The ability of VI additives to increase their molar volume and improve the temperature-viscosity dependence of lubricants suggests there is a strong relationship between molecular structure and additive functionality [3]. In this work, we aim to quantify the changes in polymer size with temperature for four polyisobutylene (PIB) based molecular structures at the nano-scale using molecular simulation tools. As expected, the results show that the polymers adopt more conformations at higher temperatures, and there is a clear indication that the expandability of a polymer is strongly influenced by molecular structure.

  19. Classical nucleation theory with a radius-dependent surface tension: a two-dimensional lattice-gas automata model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickey, Joseph; L'Heureux, Ivan

    2013-02-01

    The constant surface tension assumption of the Classical Nucleation Theory (CNT) is known to be flawed. In order to probe beyond this limitation, we consider a microscopic, two-dimensional Lattice-Gas Automata (LGA) model of nucleation in a supersaturated system, with model input parameters E(ss) (solid particle-to-solid particle bonding energy), E(sw) (solid particle-to-water bonding energy), η (next-to-nearest-neighbor bonding coefficient in solid phase), and C(in) (initial solute concentration). The LGA method has the advantages of easy implementation, low memory requirements, and fast computation speed. Analytical results for the system's concentration and the crystal radius as functions of time are derived and the former is fit to the simulation data in order to determine the equilibrium concentration. The "Mean First-Passage Time" technique is used to obtain the nucleation rate and critical nucleus size from the simulation data. The nucleation rate and supersaturation data are evaluated using a modification to the CNT that incorporates a two-dimensional radius-dependent surface tension term. The Tolman parameter, δ, which controls the radius dependence of the surface tension, decreases (increases) as a function of the magnitude of E(ss) (E(sw)), at fixed values of η and E(sw) (E(ss)). On the other hand, δ increases as η increases while E(ss) and E(sw) are held constant. The constant surface tension term of the CNT, Σ(0), increases (decreases) with increasing magnitudes of E(ss) (E(sw)) at fixed values of E(sw) (E(ss)) and increases as η is increased. Σ(0) increases linearly as a function of the change in energy during an attachment or detachment reaction, |ΔE|, however, with a slope less than that predicted for a crystal that is uniformly packed at maximum density. These results indicate an increase in the radius-dependent surface tension, Σ, with respect to increasing magnitude of the difference between E(ss) and E(sw).

  20. Temperature dependence of the fundamental band gap parameters ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Thin films of ternary ZnxCd1 xSe were deposited on GaAs (100) substrate using metal- organic-chemical-vapour-deposition (MOCVD) technique. Temperature dependence of the near- band-edge emission from these Cd-rich ZnxCd1 xSe (for x = 0.025, 0.045) films has been studied using photoluminescence ...

  1. Low-temperature expansions for an Ising model on a hexagonal-close-packed lattice with competing interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zimmerman, D.S.; Kallin, C.; Berlinsky, A.J.

    1988-05-01

    The limit of stability for the ferromagnetic phase of an hcp Ising model with in-plane antiferromagnetic interactions, J, and out-of-plane ferromagnetic interactions, D, is calculated with use of a low-temperature expansion. To the lowest order in x = exp(-2D/T) the limit of stability is given by y = 1-x, where y = exp(-4(1/2+J/D)/T). The calculation to order x/sup 2/ requires the summation of excitations which contribute to the free-energy terms proportional to arbitrary powers of x and y, but when summed, contribute to order x/sup 2/, along the line y = 1-x. The resulting limit of stability for the ferromagnetic phase coincides to order x/sup 2/, with the special line onto which Domany mapped a dynamical ferromagnetic Ising model on the honeycomb lattice. This strongly suggests that part of this special line exactly coincides with the ferromagnetic phase boundary.

  2. Density of biogas digestate depending on temperature and composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerber, Mandy; Schneider, Nico

    2015-09-01

    Density is one of the most important physical properties of biogas digestate to ensure an optimal dimensioning and a precise design of biogas plant components like stirring devices, pumps and heat exchangers. In this study the density of biogas digestates with different compositions was measured using pycnometers at ambient pressure in a temperature range from 293.15 to 313.15K. The biogas digestates were taken from semi-continuous experiments, in which the marine microalga Nannochloropsis salina, corn silage and a mixture of both were used as feedstocks. The results show an increase of density with increasing total solid content and a decrease with increasing temperature. Three equations to calculate the density of biogas digestate were set up depending on temperature as well as on the total solid content, organic composition and elemental composition, respectively. All correlations show a relative deviation below 1% compared to experimental data. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  3. The temperature-dependence of elementary reaction rates: beyond Arrhenius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Ian W M

    2008-04-01

    The rates of chemical reactions and the dependence of their rate constants on temperature are of central importance in chemistry. Advances in the temperature-range and accuracy of kinetic measurements, principally inspired by the need to provide data for models of combustion, atmospheric, and astrophysical chemistry, show up the inadequacy of the venerable Arrhenius equation--at least, over wide ranges of temperature. This critical review will address the question of how to reach an understanding of the factors that control the rates of 'non-Arrhenius' reactions. It makes use of a number of recent kinetic measurements and shows how developments in advanced forms of transition state theory provide satisfactory explanations of complex kinetic behaviour (72 references).

  4. Concentration dependence of the wings of a dipole-broadened magnetic resonance line in magnetically diluted lattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zobov, V. E., E-mail: rsa@iph.krasn.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Kirenskii Institute of Physics, Siberian Branch (Russian Federation); Kucherov, M. M. [Siberian Federal University, Institute of Space and Information Technologies (Russian Federation)

    2017-01-15

    The singularities of the time autocorrelation functions (ACFs) of magnetically diluted spin systems with dipole–dipole interaction (DDI), which determine the high-frequency asymptotics of autocorrelation functions and the wings of a magnetic resonance line, are studied. Using the self-consistent fluctuating local field approximation, nonlinear equations are derived for autocorrelation functions averaged over the independent random arrangement of spins (magnetic atoms) in a diamagnetic lattice with different spin concentrations. The equations take into account the specificity of the dipole–dipole interaction. First, due to its axial symmetry in a strong static magnetic field, the autocorrelation functions of longitudinal and transverse spin components are described by different equations. Second, the long-range type of the dipole–dipole interaction is taken into account by separating contributions into the local field from distant and near spins. The recurrent equations are obtained for the expansion coefficients of autocorrelation functions in power series in time. From them, the numerical value of the coordinate of the nearest singularity of the autocorrelation function is found on the imaginary time axis, which is equal to the radius of convergence of these expansions. It is shown that in the strong dilution case, the logarithmic concentration dependence of the coordinate of the singularity is observed, which is caused by the presence of a cluster of near spins whose fraction is small but contribution to the modulation frequency is large. As an example a silicon crystal with different {sup 29}Si concentrations in magnetic fields directed along three crystallographic axes is considered.

  5. Theory of the temperature dependent dielectric function of semiconductors: from bulk to surfaces. Application to GaAs and Si

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shkrebtii, Anatoli I.; Teatro, Timothy; Henderson, Laura [Faculty of Science, University of Ontario Institute of Technology, Simcoe Street North 2000, L1H 7K4 Oshawa (Canada); Ibrahim, Zahraa A. [Faculty of Science, University of Ontario Institute of Technology, Simcoe Street North 2000, L1H 7K4 Oshawa (Canada); Department of Physics, University of Toronto, M5S 1A7, Toronto (Canada); Richter, Wolfgang [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Roma Tor Vergata, 00133 Rome (Italy); Institut fuer Festkoerperphysik, Technische Universitaet Berlin, 10623 Berlin (Germany); Lee, Martin J.G. [Department of Physics, University of Toronto, M5S 1A7, Toronto (Canada)

    2010-08-15

    A novel, efficient method for calculating the temperature dependencies of the linear dielectric functions of semiconductor systems and its application are presented. The method follows an intuitive and natural path with ab-initio finite temperature molecular dynamics providing the thermally perturbed atomic configurations, which are used as structural inputs for calculating the dielectric function. The effect of lattice dynamics, including quantum zero point vibration, on the electronic bands and dielectric function of crystalline (c-) GaAs and Si as well as hydrogenated amorphous Si (a-Si:H) is discussed. Our theoretical results for bulk c-GaAs and c-Si in the range from 0 to 1000 K are in good overall agreement with highly accurate ellipsometric measurements. The implementation of the method resolves a serious discrepancy in energy and line shape between experiment and the latest optical models, all of which neglect lattice dynamics, and provides information on the indirect gap and indirect optical transitions in c-Si. For a-Si:H, the calculated temperature dependent optical response combined with the vibrational spectroscopy provides detailed insight into electronic, dynamical properties, and stability of this important prototypical amorphous semiconductor material. At semiconductor surfaces, dynamical effects are expected to be even more pronounced due to reduced atom coordination and reconstruction. This is demonstrated for C(111) 2 x 1, an intensively studied but controversial surface of the quantum diamond crystal. (Abstract Copyright [2010], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  6. Charmonium spectral functions from 2+1 flavour lattice QCD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borsányi, Szabolcs [University of Wuppertal, Department of Physics,Wuppertal D-42097 (Germany); Dürr, Stephan [University of Wuppertal, Department of Physics,Wuppertal D-42097 (Germany); Jülich Supercomputing Center,Jülich D-52425 (Germany); Fodor, Zoltán [University of Wuppertal, Department of Physics,Wuppertal D-42097 (Germany); Jülich Supercomputing Center,Jülich D-52425 (Germany); Eötvös University,Budapest, H-1117 (Hungary); Hoelbling, Christian [University of Wuppertal, Department of Physics,Wuppertal D-42097 (Germany); Katz, Sándor D. [Eötvös University,Budapest, H-1117 (Hungary); MTA-ELTE Lendület Lattice Gauge Theory Research Group,Budapest, H-1117 (Hungary); Krieg, Stefan [University of Wuppertal, Department of Physics,Wuppertal D-42097 (Germany); Jülich Supercomputing Center,Jülich D-52425 (Germany); Mages, Simon [University of Regensburg,Regensburg D-93053 (Germany); Nógrádi, Dániel; Pásztor, Attila [Eötvös University,Budapest, H-1117 (Hungary); MTA-ELTE Lendület Lattice Gauge Theory Research Group,Budapest, H-1117 (Hungary); Schäfer, Andreas [University of Regensburg,Regensburg D-93053 (Germany); Szabó, Kálmán K. [University of Wuppertal, Department of Physics,Wuppertal D-42097 (Germany); Jülich Supercomputing Center,Jülich D-52425 (Germany); Tóth, Bálint C. [University of Wuppertal, Department of Physics,Wuppertal D-42097 (Germany); Trombitás, Norbert [Eötvös University,Budapest, H-1117 (Hungary); MTA-ELTE Lendület Lattice Gauge Theory Research Group,Budapest, H-1117 (Hungary)

    2014-04-22

    Finite temperature charmonium spectral functions in the pseudoscalar and vector channels are studied in lattice QCD with 2+1 flavours of dynamical Wilson quarks, on fine isotropic lattices (with a lattice spacing of 0.057fm), with a non-physical pion mass of m{sub π}≈545 MeV. The highest temperature studied is approximately 1.4T{sub c}. Up to this temperature no significant variation of the spectral function is seen in the pseudoscalar channel. The vector channel shows some temperature dependence, which seems to be consistent with a temperature dependent low frequency peak related to heavy quark transport, plus a temperature independent term at ω>0. These results are in accord with previous calculations using the quenched approximation.

  7. Temperature dependent mistranslation in a hyperthermophile adapts proteins to lower temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Michael H.; Pan, Tao

    2016-01-01

    All organisms universally encode, synthesize and utilize proteins that function optimally within a subset of growth conditions. While healthy cells are thought to maintain high translational fidelity within their natural habitats, natural environments can easily fluctuate outside the optimal functional range of genetically encoded proteins. The hyperthermophilic archaeon Aeropyrum pernix (A. pernix) can grow throughout temperature variations ranging from 70 to 100°C, although the specific factors facilitating such adaptability are unknown. Here, we show that A. pernix undergoes constitutive leucine to methionine mistranslation at low growth temperatures. Low-temperature mistranslation is facilitated by the misacylation of tRNALeu with methionine by the methionyl-tRNA synthetase (MetRS). At low growth temperatures, the A. pernix MetRS undergoes a temperature dependent shift in tRNA charging fidelity, allowing the enzyme to conditionally charge tRNALeu with methionine. We demonstrate enhanced low-temperature activity for A. pernix citrate synthase that is synthesized during leucine to methionine mistranslation at low-temperature growth compared to its high-fidelity counterpart synthesized at high-temperature. Our results show that conditional leucine to methionine mistranslation can make protein adjustments capable of improving the low-temperature activity of hyperthermophilic proteins, likely by facilitating the increasing flexibility required for greater protein function at lower physiological temperatures. PMID:26657639

  8. Quantifying the Temperature Dependence of Glycine Betaine RNA Duplex Destabilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwinefus, Jeffrey J.; Menssen, Ryan J.; Kohler, James M.; Schmidt, Elliot C.; Thomas, Alexandra L.

    2013-01-01

    Glycine betaine stabilizes folded protein structure due to its unfavorable thermodynamic interactions with amide oxygen and aliphatic carbon surface area exposed during protein unfolding. However, glycine betaine can attenuate nucleic acid secondary structure stability, although its mechanism of destabilization is not currently understood. In this work we quantify glycine betaine interactions with the surface area exposed during thermal denaturation of nine RNA dodecamer duplexes with guanine-cytosine (GC) contents of 17–100%. Hyperchromicity values indicate increasing glycine betaine molality attenuates stacking. Glycine betaine destabilizes higher GC content RNA duplexes to a greater extent than low GC content duplexes due to greater accumulation at the surface area exposed during unfolding. The accumulation is very sensitive to temperature and displays characteristic entropy-enthalpy compensation. Since the entropic contribution to the m-value (used to quantify GB interaction with the RNA solvent accessible surface area exposed during denaturation) is more dependent on temperature than the enthalpic contribution, higher GC content duplexes with their larger transition temperatures are destabilized to a greater extent than low GC content duplexes. The concentration of glycine betaine at the RNA surface area exposed during unfolding relative to bulk was quantified using the solute partitioning model. Temperature correction predicts a glycine betaine concentration at 25 °C to be nearly independent of GC content, indicating that glycine betaine destabilizes all sequences equally at this temperature. PMID:24219229

  9. Complete FDTD analysis of microwave heating processes in frequency-dependent and temperature dependent media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torres, F.; Jecko, B. [Univ. de Limoges (France). Inst. de Recherche en Communications Optiques et Microondes

    1997-01-01

    It is well known that the temperature rise in a material modifies its physical properties and, particularly, its dielectric permittivity. The dissipated electromagnetic power involved in microwave heating processes depending on {var_epsilon}({omega}), the electrical characteristics of the heated media must vary with the temperature to achieve realistic simulations. In this paper, the authors present a fast and accurate algorithm allowing, through a combined electromagnetic and thermal procedure, to take into account the influence of the temperature on the electrical properties of materials. First, the temperature dependence of the complex permittivity ruled by a Debye relaxation equation is investigated, and a realistic model is proposed and validated. Then, a frequency-dependent finite-differences time-domain ((FD){sup 2}TD) method is used to assess the instantaneous electromagnetic power lost by dielectric hysteresis. Within the same iteration, a time-scaled form of the heat transfer equation allows one to calculate the temperature distribution in the heated medium and then to correct the dielectric properties of the material using the proposed model. These new characteristics will be taken into account by the EM solver at the next iteration. This combined algorithm allows a significant reduction of computation time. An application to a microwave oven is proposed.

  10. The Temperature Condition of the Plate with Temperature-Dependent Thermal Conductivity and Energy Release

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. S. Zarubin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The temperature state of a solid body, in addition to the conditions of its heat exchange with the environment, can greatly depend on the heat release (or heat absorption processes within the body volume. Among the possible causes of these processes should be noted such as a power release in the fuel elements of nuclear reactors, exothermic or endothermic chemical reactions in the solid body material, which respectively involve heat release or absorbtion, heat transfer of a part of the electric power in the current-carrying conductors (so-called Joule’s heat or the energy radiation penetrating into the body of a semitransparent material, etc. The volume power release characterizes an intensity of these processes.The extensive list of references to the theory of heat conductivity of solids offers solutions to problems to determine a stationary (steady over time and non-stationary temperature state of the solids (as a rule, of the canonical form, which act as the sources of volume power release. Thus, in general case, a possibility for changing power release according to the body volume and in solving the nonstationary problems also a possible dependence of this value on the time are taken into consideration.However, in real conditions the volume power release often also depends on the local temperature, and such dependence can be nonlinear. For example, with chemical reactions the intensity of heat release or absorption is in proportion to their rate, which, in turn, is sensitive to the temperature value, and a dependence on the temperature is exponential. A further factor that in such cases makes the analysis of the solid temperature state complicated, is dependence on the temperature and the thermal conductivity of this body material, especially when temperature distribution therein  is significantly non-uniform. Taking into account the influence of these factors requires the mathematical modeling methods, which allow us to build an adequate

  11. Temperature-dependent magnetic EXAFS investigation of Gd

    CERN Document Server

    Wende, H; Poulopoulos, P N; Rogalev, A; Goulon, J; Schlagel, D L; Lograsso, T A; Baberschke, K

    2001-01-01

    Magnetic EXAFS (MEXAFS) is the helicity-dependent counterpart of the well-established EXAFS technique. By means of MEXAFS it is possible not only to analyze the local magnetic structure but also to learn about magnetic fluctuations. Here we present the MEXAFS of a Gd single crystal at the L sub 3 sub , sub 2 -edges in the temperature range of 10-250 K. For the first time MEXAFS was probed over a large range in reduced temperature of 0.04<=T/T sub C<=0.85 with T sub C =293 K. We show that the vibrational damping described by means of a Debye temperature of theta sub D =160 K must be taken into account for the spin-dependent MEXAFS before analyzing magnetic fluctuations. For a detailed analysis of the MEXAFS and the EXAFS, the experimental data are compared to ab initio calculations. This enables us to separate the individual single- from the multiple-scattering contributions. The MEXAFS data have been recorded at the ID 12A beamline of the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF). To ensure that th...

  12. Temperature-dependent photoluminescence from CdS/Si nanoheterojunctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Yue Li; Li, Yong; Ji, Peng Fei; Zhou, Feng Qun; Sun, Xiao Jun; Yuan, Shu Qing; Wan, Ming Li [Pingdingshan University, Department of Physics, Solar New Energy Research Center, Pingdingshan (China); Ling, Hong [North China University of Water Resources and Electric Power, Department of Mathematics and Information Science, Zhengzhou (China)

    2016-12-15

    CdS/Si nanoheterojunctions have been fabricated by growing nanocrystal CdS (nc-CdS) on the silicon nanoporous pillar array (Si-NPA) through using a chemical bath deposition method. The nanoheterojunctions have been constructed by three layers: the upper layer being a nc-CdS thin films, the intermediate layer being the interface region including nc-CdS and nanocrystal silicon (nc-Si), and the bottom layer being nc-Si layer grown on sc-Si substrate. The room temperature and temperature-dependent photoluminescence (PL) have been measured and analyzed to provide some useful information of defect states. Utilizing the Gauss-Newton fitting method, five emission peaks from the temperature-dependent PL spectra can be determined. From the high energy to low energy, these five peaks are ascribed to the some luminescence centers which are formed by the oxygen-related deficiency centers in the silicon oxide layer of Si-NPA, the band gap emission of nc-CdS, the transition from the interstitial cadmium (I{sub Cd}) to the valence band, the recombination from I{sub Cd} to cadmium vacancies (V{sub Cd}), and from sulfur vacancies (V{sub s}) to the valence band, respectively. Understanding of the defect states in the CdS/Si nanoheterojunctions is very meaningful for the performance of devices based on CdS/Si nanoheterojunctions. (orig.)

  13. Holographic superconductor on Q-lattice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ling, Yi [Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences,Beijing, 100049 (China); State Key Laboratory of Theoretical Physics, Institute of Theoretical Physics,Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, 100190 (China); Liu, Peng; Niu, Chao [Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences,Beijing, 100049 (China); Wu, Jian-Pin [Department of Physics, School of Mathematics and Physics, Bohai University,Jinzhou, 121013 (China); State Key Laboratory of Theoretical Physics, Institute of Theoretical Physics,Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, 100190 (China); Xian, Zhuo-Yu [Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences,Beijing, 100049 (China)

    2015-02-10

    We construct the simplest gravitational dual model of a superconductor on Q-lattices. We analyze the condition for the existence of a critical temperature at which the charged scalar field will condense. In contrast to the holographic superconductor on ionic lattices, the presence of Q-lattices will suppress the condensate of the scalar field and lower the critical temperature. In particular, when the Q-lattice background is dual to a deep insulating phase, the condensation would never occur for some small charges. Furthermore, we numerically compute the optical conductivity in the superconducting regime. It turns out that the presence of Q-lattice does not remove the pole in the imaginary part of the conductivity, ensuring the appearance of a delta function in the real part. We also evaluate the gap which in general depends on the charge of the scalar field as well as the Q-lattice parameters. Nevertheless, when the charge of the scalar field is relatively large and approaches the probe limit, the gap becomes universal with ω{sub g}≃9T{sub c} which is consistent with the result for conventional holographic superconductors.

  14. Temperature Dependent Variations of Phonon Interactions in Nanocrystalline Cerium Oxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sugandha Dogra Pandey

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The temperature dependent anharmonic behavior of the phonon modes of nanocrystalline CeO2 was investigated in the temperature range of 80–440 K. The anharmonic constants have been derived from the shift in phonon modes fitted to account for the anharmonic contributions as well as the thermal expansion contribution using the high pressure parameters derived from our own high pressure experimental data reported previously. The total anharmonicity has also been estimated from the true anharmonicity as well as quasiharmonic component. In the line-width variation analysis, the cubic anharmonic term was found to dominate the quartic term. Finally, the phonon lifetime also reflected the trend so observed.

  15. Measurement system for temperature dependent noise characterization of magnetoresistive sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nording, F.; Weber, S.; Ludwig, F.; Schilling, M.

    2017-03-01

    Magnetoresistive (MR) sensors and sensor systems are used in a large variety of applications in the field of industrial automation, automotive business, aeronautic industries, and instrumentation. Different MR sensor technologies like anisotropic magnetoresistive, giant magnetoresistive, and tunnel magnetoresistive sensors show strongly varying properties in terms of magnetoresistive effect, response to magnetic fields, achievable element miniaturization, manufacturing effort, and signal-to-noise ratio. Very few data have been reported so far on the comparison of noise performance for different sensor models and technologies, especially including the temperature dependence of their characteristics. In this paper, a stand-alone measurement setup is presented that allows a comprehensive characterization of MR sensors including sensitivity and noise over a wide range of temperatures.

  16. Temperature dependence of topological susceptibility using gradient flow

    CERN Document Server

    Taniguchi, Yusuke; Kanaya, Kazuyuki; Kitazawa, Masakiyo; Suzuki, Hiroshi; Umeda, Takashi; Iwami, Ryo; Wakabayashi, Naoki

    2016-01-01

    We study temperature dependence of the topological susceptibility with the $N_{f}=2+1$ flavors Wilson fermion. We have two major interests in this paper. One is a comparison of gluonic and fermionic definitions of the topological susceptibility. Two definitions are related by the chiral Ward-Takahashi identity but their coincidence is highly non-trivial for the Wilson fermion. By applying the gradient flow both for the gauge and quark fields we find a good agreement of these two measurements. The other is a verification of a prediction of the dilute instanton gas approximation at low temperature region $T_{pc}< T<1.5T_{pc}$, for which we confirm the prediction that the topological susceptibility decays with power $\\chi_{t}\\propto(T/T_{pc})^{-8}$ for three flavors QCD.

  17. Temperature dependence of the dielectric constant of acrylic dielectric elastomer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheng, Junjie; Chen, Hualing; Li, Bo; Chang, Longfei [Xi' an Jiaotong University, State Key Laboratory for Strength and Vibration of Mechanical Structures, Xi' an (China); Xi' an Jiaotong University, School of Mechanical Engineering, Xi' an (China)

    2013-02-15

    The dielectric constant is an essential electrical parameter to the achievable voltage-induced deformation of the dielectric elastomer. This paper primarily focuses on the temperature dependence of the dielectric constant (within the range of 173 K to 373 K) for the most widely used acrylic dielectric elastomer (VHB 4910). First the dielectric constant was investigated experimentally with the broadband dielectric spectrometer (BDS). Results showed that the dielectric constant first increased with temperature up to a peak value and then dropped to a relative small value. Then by analyzing the fitted curves, the Cole-Cole dispersion equation was found better to characterize the rising process before the peak values than the Debye dispersion equation, while the decrease process afterward can be well described by the simple Debye model. Finally, a mathematical model of dielectric constant of VHB 4910 was obtained from the fitted results which can be used to further probe the electromechanical stability of the dielectric elastomers. (orig.)

  18. Temperature dependence of the dielectric constant of acrylic dielectric elastomer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Junjie; Chen, Hualing; Li, Bo; Chang, Longfei

    2013-02-01

    The dielectric constant is an essential electrical parameter to the achievable voltage-induced deformation of the dielectric elastomer. This paper primarily focuses on the temperature dependence of the dielectric constant (within the range of 173 K to 373 K) for the most widely used acrylic dielectric elastomer (VHB 4910). First the dielectric constant was investigated experimentally with the broadband dielectric spectrometer (BDS). Results showed that the dielectric constant first increased with temperature up to a peak value and then dropped to a relative small value. Then by analyzing the fitted curves, the Cole-Cole dispersion equation was found better to characterize the rising process before the peak values than the Debye dispersion equation, while the decrease process afterward can be well described by the simple Debye model. Finally, a mathematical model of dielectric constant of VHB 4910 was obtained from the fitted results which can be used to further probe the electromechanical stability of the dielectric elastomers.

  19. Temperature-dependent dispersion model of float zone crystalline silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franta, Daniel; Dubroka, Adam; Wang, Chennan; Giglia, Angelo; Vohánka, Jirí; Franta, Pavel; Ohlídal, Ivan

    2017-11-01

    In this paper, we present the temperature dependent dispersion model of float zone crystalline silicon. The theoretical background for valence electronic excitations is introduced in the theoretical part of this paper. This model is based on application of sum rules and parametrization of transition strength functions corresponding to the individual elementary phonon and electronic excitations. The parameters of the model are determined by fitting ellipsometric and spectrophotometric experimental data in the spectral range from far infrared (70 cm-1) to extreme ultraviolet (40 eV). The ellipsometric data were measured in the temperature range 5-700 K. The excitations of the valence electrons to the conduction band are divided into the indirect and direct electronic transitions. The indirect transitions are modeled by truncated Lorentzian terms, whereas the direct transitions are modeled using Gaussian broadened piecewise smooth functions representing 3D and 2D van Hove singularities modified by excitonic effects. Since the experimental data up to high energies (40 eV) are available, we are able to determine the value of the effective number of valence electrons. The Tauc-Lorentz dispersion model is used for modeling high energy electron excitations. Two slightly different values of the effective number of valence electrons are obtained for the Jellison-Modine (4.51) and Campi-Coriasso (4.37) parametrization. Our goal is to obtain the model of dielectric response of crystalline silicon which depends only on photon energy, temperature and small number of material parameters, e.g. the concentration of substituted carbon and interstitial oxygen. The model presented in this paper is accurate enough to replace tabulated values of c-Si optical constants used in the optical characterization of thin films diposited on silicon substrates. The spectral dependencies of the optical constants obtained in our work are compared to results obtained by other authors.

  20. Temperature-Dependent X-ray Diffraction Measurements of Infrared Superlattices Grown by MBE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles J. Reyner

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Strained-layer superlattices (SLSs are an active research topic in the molecular beam epitaxy (MBE and infrared focal plane array communities. These structures undergo a >500 K temperature change between deposition and operation. As a result, the lattice constants of the substrate and superlattice are expected to change by approximately 0.3%, and at approximately the same rate. However, we present the first temperature-dependent X-ray diffraction (XRD measurements of SLS material on GaSb and show that the superlattice does not contract in the same manner as the substrate. In both InAs/InAs0.65Sb0.35 and In0.8Ga0.2As/InAs0.65Sb0.35 SLS structures, the apparent out-of-plane strain states of the superlattices switch from tensile at deposition to compressive at operation. These changes have ramifications for material characterization, defect generation, carrier lifetime, and overall device performance of superlattices grown by MBE.

  1. Solvent and Temperature Dependence of Spin Echo Dephasing for Chromium(V) and Vanadyl Complexes in Glassy Solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eaton, Gareth R.; Eaton, Sandra S.

    1999-01-01

    The solvent and temperature dependence of the rate constant for spin echo dephasing, 1/Tm, for 0.2 to 1.2 mM glassy solutions of chromyl bis(1-hydroxy-cyclohexanecarboxylic acid), CrO(HCA)-2; aquo vanadyl ion, VO2+(aq), and vanadyl bis(trifluoroacetylacetonate), VO(tfac)2were examined. At low temperatures where 1/T1≪ 1/Tm, 1/Tmin 1:1 H2O:glycerol is dominated by solvent protons. At low temperature 1/Tmincreases in the order 1:1 H2O:glycerol or 9:1 CF3CH2OH:ethyleneglycol (no methyl groups) < 9:1i-PrOH:MeOH (hindered methyl groups) < 9:1n-PrOH:MeOH (less hindered methyl groups). This solvent dependence of 1/Tmis similar to that observed for nitroxyl radicals, which indicates that the effect of solvent methyl groups on spin-echo dephasing at low temperature is quite general. At higher temperatures the echo dephasing is dominated by spin-lattice relaxation and is concentration dependent. As the glass softens, echo dephasing is dominated by the onset of molecular tumbling.

  2. Titanium-silicon carbide composite lattice structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moongkhamklang, Pimsiree

    Sandwich panel structures with stiff, strong face sheets and lightweight cellular cores are widely used for weight sensitive, bending dominated loading applications. The flexural stiffness and strength of a sandwich panel is determined by the stiffness, strength, thickness, and separation of the face sheets, and by the compressive and shear stiffness and strength of the cellular core. Panel performance can be therefore optimized using cores with high specific stiffness and strength. The specific stiffness and strength of all cellular materials depends upon the specific elastic modulus and strength of the material used to make the structure. The stiffest and strongest cores for ambient temperature applications utilize carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) honeycombs and lattice structures. Few options exist for lightweight sandwich panels intended for high temperature uses. High temperature alloys such as Ti-6A1-4V can be applied to SiC monofilaments to create very high specific modulus and strength fibers. These are interesting candidates for the cores of elevated temperature sandwich structures such as the skins of hypersonic vehicles. This dissertation explores the potential of sandwich panel concepts that utilize millimeter scale titanium matrix composite (TMC) lattice structures. A method has been developed for fabricating millimeter cell size cellular lattice structures with the square or diamond collinear truss topologies from 240 mum diameter Ti-6A1-4V coated SiC monofilaments (TMC monofilaments). Lattices with relative densities in the range 10% to 20% were manufactured and tested in compression and shear. Given the very high compressive strength of the TMC monofilaments, the compressive strengths of both the square and diamond lattices were dominated by elastic buckling of the constituent struts. However, under shear loading, some of the constituent struts of the lattices are subjected to tensile stresses and failure is then set by tensile failure of the

  3. Brittle Creep of Tournemire Shale: Orientation, Temperature and Pressure Dependences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Zhi; Bonnelye, Audrey; Dick, Pierre; David, Christian; Chen, Mian; Schubnel, Alexandre

    2017-04-01

    Time and temperature dependent rock deformation has both scientific and socio-economic implications for natural hazards, the oil and gas industry and nuclear waste disposal. During the past decades, most studies on brittle creep have focused on igneous rocks and porous sedimentary rocks. To our knowledge, only few studies have been carried out on the brittle creep behavior of shale. Here, we conducted a series of creep experiments on shale specimens coming from the French Institute for Nuclear Safety (IRSN) underground research laboratory located in Tournemire, France. Conventional tri-axial experiments were carried under two different temperatures (26˚ C, 75˚ C) and confining pressures (10 MPa, 80 MPa), for three orientations (σ1 along, perpendicular and 45˚ to bedding). Following the methodology developed by Heap et al. [2008], differential stress was first increased to ˜ 60% of the short term peak strength (10-7/s, Bonnelye et al. 2016), and then in steps of 5 to 10 MPa every 24 hours until brittle failure was achieved. In these long-term experiments (approximately 10 days), stress and strains were recorded continuously, while ultrasonic acoustic velocities were recorded every 1˜15 minutes, enabling us to monitor the evolution of elastic wave speed anisotropy. Temporal evolution of anisotropy was illustrated by inverting acoustic velocities to Thomsen parameters. Finally, samples were investigated post-mortem using scanning electron microscopy. Our results seem to contradict our traditional understanding of loading rate dependent brittle failure. Indeed, the brittle creep failure stress of our Tournemire shale samples was systematically observed ˜50% higher than its short-term peak strength, with larger final axial strain accumulated. At higher temperatures, the creep failure strength of our samples was slightly reduced and deformation was characterized with faster 'steady-state' creep axial strain rates at each steps, and larger final axial strain

  4. Temperature dependence of thermal conductivity of biological tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, A; Mahajan, R L

    2003-08-01

    In this paper, we present our experimental results on the determination of the thermal conductivity of biological tissues using a transient technique based on the principles of the cylindrical hot-wire method. A novel, 1.45 mm diameter, 50 mm long hot-wire probe was deployed. Initial measurements were made on sponge, gelatin and Styrofoam insulation to test the accuracy of the probe. Subsequent experiments conducted on sheep collagen in the range of 25 degrees C thermal conductivity to be a linear function of temperature. Further, these changes in the thermal conductivity were found to be reversible. However, when the tissue was heated beyond 55 degrees C, irreversible changes in thermal conductivity were observed. Similar experiments were also conducted for determining the thermal conductivity of cow liver. In this case, the irreversible effects were found to set in much later at around 90 degrees C. Below this temperature, in the range of 25 degrees C thermal conductivity, as for sheep collagen, varied linearly with temperature. In the second part of our study, in vivo measurements were taken on the different organs of a living pig. Comparison with reported values for dead tissues shows the thermal conductivities of living organs to be higher, indicating thereby the dominant role played by blood perfusion in enhancing the net heat transfer in living tissues. The degree of enhancement is different in different organs and shows a direct dependence on the blood flow rate.

  5. Temperature dependence of ion irradiation induced amorphization of zirconolite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, K. L.; Blackford, M. G.; Lumpkin, G. R.; Zaluzec, N. J.

    1999-12-22

    Zirconolite is one of the major host phases for actinides in various wasteforms for immobilizing high level radioactive waste (HLW). Over time, zirconolite's crystalline matrix is damaged by {alpha}-particles and energetic recoil nuclei recoil resulting from {alpha}-decay events. The cumulative damage caused by these particles results in amorphization. Data from natural zirconolites suggest that radiation damage anneals over geologic time and is dependant on the thermal history of the material. Proposed HLW containment strategies rely on both a suitable wasteform and geologic isolation. Depending on the waste loading, depth of burial, and the repository-specific geothermal gradient, burial could result in a wasteform being exposed to temperatures of between 100--450 C. Consequently, it is important to assess the effect of temperature on radiation damage in synthetic zirconolite. Zirconolite containing wasteforms are likely to be hot pressed at or below 1,473 K (1,200 C) and/or sintered at or below 1,623 K (1,350 C). Zirconolite fabricated at temperatures below 1,523 K (1,250 C) contains many stacking faults. As there have been various attempts to link radiation resistance to structure, the authors decided it was also pertinent to assess the role of stacking faults in radiation resistance. In this study, they simulate {alpha}-decay damage in two zirconolite samples by irradiating them with 1.5 MeV Kr{sup +} ions using the High Voltage Electron Microscope-Tandem User Facility (HTUF) at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and measure the critical dose for amorphization (D{sub c}) at several temperatures between 20 and 773 K. One of the samples has a high degree of crystallographic perfection, the other contains many stacking faults on the unit cell scale. Previous authors proposed a model for estimating the activation energy of self annealing in zirconolite and for predicting the critical dose for amorphization at any temperature. The authors discuss their results

  6. Lattice mismatch modeling of aluminum alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Dongwon; Roy, Shibayan; Watkins, Thomas R.; Shyam, Amit

    2017-10-01

    We present a theoretical framework to accurately predict the lattice mismatch between the fcc matrix and precipitates in the multi-component aluminum alloys as a function of temperature and composition. We use a computational thermodynamic approach to model the lattice parameters of the multi-component fcc solid solution and θ'-Al2Cu precipitate phase. Better agreement between the predicted lattice parameters of fcc aluminum in five commercial alloys (206, 319, 356, A356, and A356 + 0.5Cu) and experimental data from the synchrotron X-ray diffraction (SXD) has been obtained when simulating supersaturated rather than equilibrium solid solutions. We use the thermal expansion coefficient of thermodynamically stable θ-Al2Cu to describe temperature-dependent lattice parameters of meta-stable θ' and to show good agreement with the SXD data. Both coherent and semi-coherent interface mismatches between the fcc aluminum matrix and θ' in Al-Cu alloys are presented as a function of temperature. Our calculation results show that the concentration of solute atoms, particularly Cu, in the matrix greatly affects the lattice mismatch

  7. Temperature dependence of Henry's law constant in an extended temperature range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Görgényi, Miklós; Dewulf, Jo; Van Langenhove, Herman

    2002-08-01

    The Henry's law constants H for chloroform, 1,1-dichloroethane, 1,2-dichloropropane, trichloroethene, chlorobenzene, benzene and toluene were determined by the EPICS-SPME technique (equilibrium partitioning in closed systems--solid phase microextraction) in the temperature range 275-343 K. The curvature observed in the ln H vs. 1/T plot was due to the temperature dependence of the change in enthalpy delta H0 during the transfer of 1 mol solute from the aqueous solution to the gas phase. The nonlinearity of the plot was explained by means of a thermodynamic model which involves the temperature dependence of delta H0 of the compounds and the thermal expansion of water in the three-parameter equation ln (H rho TT) = A2/T + BTB + C2, where rho T is the density of water at temperature T, TB = ln(T/298) + (298-T)/T, A2 = -delta H298(0)/R, delta H298(0) is the delta H0 value at 298 K, B = delta Cp0/R, and C2 is a constant. delta Cp0 is the molar heat capacity change in volatilization from the aqueous solution. A statistical comparison of the two models demonstrates the superiority of the three-parameter equation over the two-parameter one ln H vs. 1/T). The new, three-parameter equation allows a more accurate description of the temperature dependence of H, and of the solubility of volatile organic compounds in water at higher temperatures.

  8. Shear Viscosity from Lattice QCD

    CERN Document Server

    Mages, Simon W; Fodor, Zoltán; Schäfer, Andreas; Szabó, Kálmán

    2015-01-01

    Understanding of the transport properties of the the quark-gluon plasma is becoming increasingly important to describe current measurements at heavy ion collisions. This work reports on recent efforts to determine the shear viscosity h in the deconfined phase from lattice QCD. The main focus is on the integration of the Wilson flow in the analysis to get a better handle on the infrared behaviour of the spectral function which is relevant for transport. It is carried out at finite Wilson flow time, which eliminates the dependence on the lattice spacing. Eventually, a new continuum limit has to be carried out which sends the new regulator introduced by finite flow time to zero. Also the non-perturbative renormalization strategy applied for the energy momentum tensor is discussed. At the end some quenched results for temperatures up to 4 : 5 T c are presented

  9. Monitoring thermally induced structural deformation and framework decomposition of ZIF-8 through in situ temperature dependent measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ben; Mei, Yingjie; Xiao, Zhenyu; Kang, Zixi; Wang, Rongming; Sun, Daofeng

    2017-10-18

    ZIF-8 is an easily synthesized porous material which is widely applied in gas storage/separation, catalysis, and nanoarchitecture fabrication. Thermally induced atomic displacements and the resultant framework deformation/collapse significantly influence the application of ZIF-8, and therefore, in situ temperature dependent FTIR spectroscopy was utilized to study the framework changes during heating in the oxidative environment. The results suggest that ZIF-8 undergoes three transition stages, which are the lattice expansion stage below 200 °C, the "reversible" structural deformation stage from 200 to 350 °C, and the decomposition/collapse stage over 350 °C. Our research indicates that the Zn-N bond breaks at a temperature of 350 °C in the oxidant environment, leading to a drastic deformation of the ZIF-8 structure.

  10. Anisotropy and temperature dependence of structural, thermodynamic, and elastic properties of crystalline cellulose Iβ: a first-principles investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dri, Fernando L.; Shang, ShunLi; Hector, Louis G., Jr.; Saxe, Paul; Liu, Zi-Kui; Moon, Robert J.; Zavattieri, Pablo D.

    2014-12-01

    Anisotropy and temperature dependence of structural, thermodynamic and elastic properties of crystalline cellulose Iβ were computed with first-principles density functional theory (DFT) and a semi-empirical correction for van der Waals interactions. Specifically, we report the computed temperature variation (up to 500 K) of the monoclinic cellulose Iβ lattice parameters, constant pressure heat capacity, Cp, entropy, S, enthalpy, H, the linear thermal expansion components, ξi, and components of the isentropic and isothermal (single crystal) elastic stiffness matrices, CijS (T) and CijT (T) , respectively. Thermodynamic quantities from phonon calculations computed with DFT and the supercell method provided necessary inputs to compute the temperature dependence of cellulose Iβ properties via the quasi-harmonic approach. The notable exceptions were the thermal conductivity components, λi (the prediction of which has proven to be problematic for insulators using DFT) for which the reverse, non-equilibrium molecular dynamics approach with a force field was applied. The extent to which anisotropy of Young's modulus and Poisson's ratio is temperature-dependent was explored in terms of the variations of each with respect to crystallographic directions and preferred planes containing specific bonding characteristics (as revealed quantitatively from phonon force constants for each atomic pair, and qualitatively from charge density difference contours). Comparisons of the predicted quantities with available experimental data revealed reasonable agreement up to 500 K. Computed properties were interpreted in terms of the cellulose Iβ structure and bonding interactions.

  11. The Temperature Condition of the Plate with Temperature-Dependent Thermal Conductivity and Energy Release

    OpenAIRE

    V. S. Zarubin; A. V. Kotovich; G. N. Kuvyrkin

    2016-01-01

    The temperature state of a solid body, in addition to the conditions of its heat exchange with the environment, can greatly depend on the heat release (or heat absorption) processes within the body volume. Among the possible causes of these processes should be noted such as a power release in the fuel elements of nuclear reactors, exothermic or endothermic chemical reactions in the solid body material, which respectively involve heat release or absorbtion, heat transfer of a part of the elect...

  12. Temperature dependence of the deformation behavior of 316 stainless steel after low temperature neutron irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pawel-Robertson, J.E.; Rowcliffe, A.F.; Grossbeck, M.L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)] [and others

    1996-10-01

    The effects of low temperature neutron irradiation on the tensile behavior of 316 stainless steel have been investigated. A single heat of solution annealed 316 was irradiated to 7 and 18 dpa at 60, 200, 330, and 400{degrees}C. The tensile properties as a function of dose and as a function of temperature were examined. Large changes in yield strength, deformation mode, strain to necking, and strain hardening capacity were seen in this irradiation experiment. The magnitudes of the changes are dependent on both irradiation temperature and neutron dose. Irradiation can more than triple the yield strength over the unirradiated value and decrease the strain to necking (STN) to less than 0.5% under certain conditions. A maximum increase in yield strength and a minimum in the STN occur after irradiation at 330{degrees}C but the failure mode remains ductile.

  13. Temperature Dependence of the Viscosity of Isotropic Liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jadzyn, J.; Czechowski, G.; Lech, T.

    1999-04-01

    Temperature dependence of the shear viscosity measured for isotropic liquids belonging to the three homologous series: 4-(trans-4'-n-alkylcyclohexyl) isothiocyanatobenzenes (Cn H2n+1 CyHx Ph NCS; nCHBT, n=0-12), n-alkylcyanobiphenyls (CnH2n+1 Ph Ph CN; nCB, n=2-12) and 1,n-alkanediols (HO(CH2)nOH; 1,nAD, n=2-10) were analysed with the use of Arrhenius equation and its two modifications: Vogel--Fulcher and proposed in this paper. The extrapolation of the isothermal viscosity of 1,n-alkanediols (n=2-10) to n=1 leads to an interesting conclusion concerning the expected viscosity of methanediol, HOCH2OH, the compound strongly unstable in a pure state.

  14. Nonlinear temperature dependent failure analysis of finite width composite laminates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagarkar, A. P.; Herakovich, C. T.

    1979-01-01

    A quasi-three dimensional, nonlinear elastic finite element stress analysis of finite width composite laminates including curing stresses is presented. Cross-ply, angle-ply, and two quasi-isotropic graphite/epoxy laminates are studied. Curing stresses are calculated using temperature dependent elastic properties that are input as percent retention curves, and stresses due to mechanical loading in the form of an axial strain are calculated using tangent modulii obtained by Ramberg-Osgood parameters. It is shown that curing stresses and stresses due to tensile loading are significant as edge effects in all types of laminate studies. The tensor polynomial failure criterion is used to predict the initiation of failure. The mode of failure is predicted by examining individual stress contributions to the tensor polynomial.

  15. Buckling and reaction rate measurements in graphite moderated lattices fuelled with plutonium-uranium oxide clusters at temperatures up to 400 deg. C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carter, D.H.; Gibson, M.; King, D.C.; Marshall, J.; Puckett, B.J.; Richards, A.E.; Wass, T.; Wilson, D.J. [General Reactor Physics Division, Atomic Energy Establishment, Winfrith, Dorchester, Dorset (United Kingdom)

    1965-07-15

    The Report describes a series of experiments carried out in SCORPIO I and II on sub-critical graphite moderated lattices fuelled with 21-rod clusters of PuO{sub 2}/UO{sub 2} fuel. Three fuel batches with nominal plutonium: uranium ratios of 0.25%, 0.8% and 1.2% were investigated at temperatures between 20 deg. C and 400 deg. C. Because of the limited amounts of the three fuels, exponential measurements were made in 2-zone stacks, the outer regions of which were loaded with suitably matched 'reference fuel'. Fine structure distributions in the lattice cell were obtained with manganese and indium foils. Pu239/U235 fission ratios were determined both by fission chambers and by fission-product counting techniques. (author) 14 refs, 30 figs, 18 tabs

  16. Temperature dependence of the electronic structure of semiconductors and insulators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poncé, S., E-mail: samuel.pon@gmail.com; Gillet, Y.; Laflamme Janssen, J.; Gonze, X. [European Theoretical Spectroscopy Facility and Institute of Condensed Matter and Nanosciences, Université catholique de Louvain, Chemin des étoiles 8, bte L07.03.01, B-1348 Louvain-la-neuve (Belgium); Marini, A. [Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche (CNR), Via Salaria Km 29.3, CP 10, 00016 Monterotondo Stazione (Italy); Verstraete, M. [European Theoretical Spectroscopy Facility and Physique des matériaux et nanostructures, Université de Liège, Allée du 6 Août 17, B-4000 Liège (Belgium)

    2015-09-14

    The renormalization of electronic eigenenergies due to electron-phonon coupling (temperature dependence and zero-point motion effect) is sizable in many materials with light atoms. This effect, often neglected in ab initio calculations, can be computed using the perturbation-based Allen-Heine-Cardona theory in the adiabatic or non-adiabatic harmonic approximation. After a short description of the recent progresses in this field and a brief overview of the theory, we focus on the issue of phonon wavevector sampling convergence, until now poorly understood. Indeed, the renormalization is obtained numerically through a slowly converging q-point integration. For non-zero Born effective charges, we show that a divergence appears in the electron-phonon matrix elements at q → Γ, leading to a divergence of the adiabatic renormalization at band extrema. This problem is exacerbated by the slow convergence of Born effective charges with electronic wavevector sampling, which leaves residual Born effective charges in ab initio calculations on materials that are physically devoid of such charges. Here, we propose a solution that improves this convergence. However, for materials where Born effective charges are physically non-zero, the divergence of the renormalization indicates a breakdown of the adiabatic harmonic approximation, which we assess here by switching to the non-adiabatic harmonic approximation. Also, we study the convergence behavior of the renormalization and develop reliable extrapolation schemes to obtain the converged results. Finally, the adiabatic and non-adiabatic theories, with corrections for the slow Born effective charge convergence problem (and the associated divergence) are applied to the study of five semiconductors and insulators: α-AlN, β-AlN, BN, diamond, and silicon. For these five materials, we present the zero-point renormalization, temperature dependence, phonon-induced lifetime broadening, and the renormalized electronic band structure.

  17. Analogy between temperature-dependent and concentration-dependent bacterial killing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neef, C; van Gils, S A; IJzerman, W L

    2002-11-01

    In this article an analogy between temperature-dependent and concentration-dependent bacterial killing is described. The validation process of autoclaves uses parameters such as reduction rate constant k, decimal reduction time D and resistance coefficient z from an imaginary microorganism to describe the sterilization process. Total lethality of the process is calculated as the integral of the lethality (a function of the temperature) over time. In the case of concentration-dependent killing-i.e. using antibiotic drugs-the k-value is not necessarily a constant; it is the difference between growth and killing of the microorganism. Equations are derived for the decimal reduction time D and resistance coefficient z. Pharmacodynamic models of tobramycin, ciprofloxacin and ceftazidime are used to demonstrate that there is an optimal concentration for all three drugs: C(opt-tobra)=3.20 MICmg/l, C(opt-cipro)=3.45 MICmg/l and C(opt-cefta)=1.35 MICmg/l.

  18. Time dependent and temperature dependent properties of the forward voltage characteristic of InGaN high power LEDs

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    P. L. Fulmek; P. Haumer; F. P. Wenzl; W. Nemitz; J. Nicolics

    2017-01-01

    Estimating the junction temperature and its dynamic behavior in dependence of various operating conditions is an important issue, since these properties influence the optical characteristics as well...

  19. Lattice theory

    CERN Document Server

    Birkhoff, Garrett

    1940-01-01

    Since its original publication in 1940, this book has been revised and modernized several times, most notably in 1948 (second edition) and in 1967 (third edition). The material is organized into four main parts: general notions and concepts of lattice theory (Chapters I-V), universal algebra (Chapters VI-VII), applications of lattice theory to various areas of mathematics (Chapters VIII-XII), and mathematical structures that can be developed using lattices (Chapters XIII-XVII). At the end of the book there is a list of 166 unsolved problems in lattice theory, many of which still remain open. I

  20. Temperature-Dependent Henry's Law Constants of Atmospheric Amines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leng, Chunbo; Kish, J Duncan; Roberts, Jason E; Dwebi, Iman; Chon, Nara; Liu, Yong

    2015-08-20

    There has been growing interest in understanding atmospheric amines in the gas phase and their mass transfer to the aqueous phase because of their potential roles in cloud chemistry, secondary organic aerosol formation, and the fate of atmospheric organics. Temperature-dependent Henry's law constants (KH) of atmospheric amines, a key parameter in atmospheric chemical transport models to account for mass transfer, are mostly unavailable. In this work, we investigated gas-liquid equilibria of five prevalent atmospheric amines, namely 1-propylamine, di-n-propylamine, trimethylamine, allylamine, and 4-methylmorpholine using bubble column technique. We reported effective KH, intrinsic KH, and gas phase diffusion coefficients of these species over a range of temperatures relevant to the lower atmosphere for the first time. The measured KH at 298 K and enthalpy of solution for 1-propylamine, di-n-propylamine, trimethylamine, allylamine, and 4-methylmorpholine are 61.4 ± 4.9 mol L(-1) atm(-1) and -49.0 ± 4.8 kJ mol(-1); 14.5 ± 1.2 mol L(-1) atm(-1) and -72.5 ± 6.8 kJ mol(-1); 8.9 ± 0.7 mol L(-1) atm(-1) and -49.6 ± 4.7 kJ mol(-1); 103.5 ± 10.4 mol L(-1) atm(-1) and -42.7 ± 4.3 kJ mol(-1); and 952.2 ± 114.3 mol L(-1) atm(-1) and -82.7 ± 9.7 kJ mol(-1), respectively. In addition, we evaluated amines' characteristic times to achieve gas-liquid equilibrium for partitioning between gas and aqueous phases. Results show gas-liquid equilibrium can be rapidly established at natural cloud droplets surface, but the characteristic times may be extended substantially at lower temperatures and pHs. Moreover, our findings imply that atmospheric amines are more likely to exist in cloud droplets, and ambient temperature, water content, and pH of aerosols play important roles in their partitioning.

  1. Dependence of the brittle ductile transition on strain-rate-dependent critical homologous temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Paul M.

    2017-05-01

    Earthquakes mainly occur in crust or mantle that is below a critical temperature for the tectonic strain-rate, \\dot{e}_t, such that stress builds up to the breaking point before it can relax due to creep. Then long-range stress correlation gives rise to power law seismicity including large events. The limiting temperature depends on pressure, which is taken into account by finding a critical homologous temperature THc = T/TM above which earthquakes are rarely observed (where T, TM are temperature and average melting temperature of constituent minerals). We find that THc for ocean plates is ∼0.55. For California earthquakes, it is also close to 0.55. The uppermost mantle layer of oceanic plates of thickness ∼50 km is composed of harzburgite and depleted peridotite from which basalt has been removed to form ocean crust. Thus it has a higher melting temperature than the peridotite of the surrounding mantle, or the lower halves of plates. Thicknesses of seismicity in deep subduction zones, determined from 2-D polynomial fits to a relocated catalogue, are ∼50 km, which suggests that the earthquake channel is confined to this layer. We construct models to find homologous temperatures in slabs, and find that seismicity thicknesses are also, on average, confined to TH ≤ 0.55 ± 0.05. The associated rheology is compared with that obtained from flexure models of ocean lithosphere. The brittle-ductile transition occurs where viscosity drops from high values in the cold cores of slabs to values of 1022-1023 Pa s, that is, where creep strain-rates become comparable to tectonic rates. The cut-off for deep earthquakes is not sharp. However they appear unlikely to occur if homologous temperature is high TH > 0.55. Exceptions to the rule are anomalously deep earthquakes such as those beneath the Iceland and the Hawaiian hotspots, and the Newport Inglewood Fault. These are smaller events with short-range stress correlation, and can be explained if strain-rates are two to

  2. Honeybee flight metabolic rate: does it depend upon air temperature?

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Woods, William A; Heinrich, Bernd; Stevenson, Robert D

    2005-01-01

    .... We investigated the effects of air temperature on flight metabolic rate, water loss, wingbeat frequency, body segment temperatures and behavior of honeybees flying in transparent containment outdoors...

  3. Temperature-dependent absorption and gain of ytterbium-doped potassium double tungstates for chip-scale amplifiers and lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yong, Yean-Sheng; Aravazhi, Shanmugam; Vázquez-Córdova, Sergio A.; Herek, Jennifer L.; García-Blanco, Sonia M.; Pollnau, Markus

    2017-02-01

    Ytterbium-doped potassium rare-earth double tungstate thin films are excellent candidates for highly efficient waveguide lasers, as well as high-gain waveguide amplifiers, with a record-high optical gain per unit length of 935 dB/cm recently demonstrated. However, the spectroscopic properties of these highly ytterbium-doped thin films and, in particular, their temperature dependence are not well investigated. These characteristics are required for the understanding of the behavior of the fabricated optical devices and crucial for further device optimization. We experimentally determined the absorption cross-sections for a potassium ytterbium gadolinium double tungstate, KYb0.57Gd0.43(WO4)2, thin film grown lattice matched onto an undoped KY(WO4)2 substrate. At room temperature, the peak cross-section value at 981 nm and the overall absorption spectrum are very similar to those of Yb-doped bulk potassium double tungstate crystals, although Yb is now the dominating rare-earth content. The temperature-dependent study shows a significant decrease of the absorption cross-section values at 933 nm and 981 nm with increasing temperature. We verify theoretically that this is due to the temperature dependence of fractional populations in the individual Stark levels of the absorbing crystal-field multiplet, in combination with the linewidth broadening with increasing temperature. Further investigations suggest that the broadening of absorption linewidth at 981 nm originates in the intra-manifold relaxation between the two lowest Stark levels of the ground state. Finally, the implications of the spectroscopic findings on the operating characteristics of waveguide amplifiers are investigated. Amplifiers operating at 80 °C are expected to exhibit only 67% of the maximum theoretical gain at room temperature.

  4. Temperature dependence of microwave oscillations in magnetic tunnel junctions with a perpendicularly magnetized free layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Peng; Feng, Jiafeng, E-mail: hxwei@iphy.ac.cn, E-mail: jiafengfeng@iphy.ac.cn; Wei, Hongxiang, E-mail: hxwei@iphy.ac.cn, E-mail: jiafengfeng@iphy.ac.cn; Han, Xiufeng [Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Fang, Bin; Zhang, Baoshun; Zeng, Zhongming [Key Laboratory of Nanodevices and Applications, Suzhou Institute of Nano-tech and Nano-bionics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Ruoshui Road 398, Suzhou 215123 (China)

    2015-01-05

    We experimentally study the temperature dependence of the spin-transfer-torque-induced microwave oscillations in MgO-based magnetic tunnel junction nanopillars with a perpendicularly magnetized free layer. We demonstrate that the oscillation frequency increases rapidly with decreasing temperature, which is mainly ascribed to the temperature dependence of both the saturation magnetization and the perpendicular magnetic anisotropy. We also find that a strong temperature dependence of the output power while a nonmonotonic temperature dependence of spectral linewidth are maintained for a constant dc bias in measured temperature range. Possible mechanisms leading to the different dependences of oscillation frequency, output power, and linewidth are discussed.

  5. Quasiparticle interference in ZrSiS: Strongly band-selective scattering depending on impurity lattice site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Christopher J.; Wu, Yu-Mi; Hsing, Cheng-Rong; Tseng, Yi; Sankar, Raman; Wei, Ching-Ming; Chou, Fang-Cheng; Lin, Minn-Tsong

    2017-11-01

    Scanning tunneling microscopy visualizations of quasiparticle interference (QPI) enable powerful insights into the k -space properties of superconducting, topological, Rashba, and other exotic electronic phases, but their reliance on impurities acting as scattering centers is rarely scrutinized. Here, we investigate QPI at the vacuum-cleaved (001) surface of the Dirac semimetal ZrSiS. We find that interference patterns around impurities located on the Zr and S lattice sites appear very different, and can be ascribed to selective scattering of different subsets of the predominantly Zr 4 d -derived band structure, namely, the m =0 and ±1 components. We show that the selectivity of scattering channels requires an explanation beyond the different bands' orbital characteristics and their respective charge density distributions over Zr and S lattice sites. Importantly, this result shows that the usual assumption of generic scattering centers allowing observations of quasiparticle interference to shed light indiscriminately and isotropically upon the q space of scattering events does not hold, and that the scope and interpretation of QPI observations can therefore be be strongly contingent on the material defect chemistry. This finding promises to spur new investigations into the quasiparticle scattering process itself, to inform future interpretations of quasiparticle interference observations, and ultimately to aid the understanding and engineering of quantum electronic transport properties.

  6. Influence of the spin quantum number $s$ on the zero-temperature phase transition in the square lattice $J$-$J'$ model

    OpenAIRE

    Darradi, R.; Richter, J.; Farnell, D. J. J.

    2004-01-01

    We investigate the phase diagram of the Heisenberg antiferromagnet on the square lattice with two different nearest-neighbor bonds $J$ and $J'$ ($J$-$J'$ model) at zero temperature. The model exhibits a quantum phase transition at a critical value $J'_c > J$ between a semi-classically ordered N\\'eel and a magnetically disordered quantum paramagnetic phase of valence-bond type, which is driven by local singlet formation on $J'$ bonds. We study the influence of spin quantum number $s$ on this p...

  7. The Lattice Compatibility Theory: Arguments for Recorded I-III-O2 Ternary Oxide Ceramics Instability at Low Temperatures beside Ternary Telluride and Sulphide Ceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Boubaker

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Some recorded behaviours differences between chalcopyrite ternary oxide ceramics and telluride and sulphides are investigated in the framework of the recently proposed Lattice Compatibility Theory (LCT. Alterations have been evaluated in terms of Urbach tailing and atomic valence shell electrons orbital eigenvalues, which were calculated through several approximations. The aim of the study was mainly an attempt to explain the intriguing problem of difficulties of elaborating chalcopyrite ternary oxide ceramics (I-III-O2 at relatively low temperatures under conditions which allowed crystallization of ternary telluride and sulphides.

  8. Lattice dynamics approach to determine the dependence of the time-of-flight of transversal polarized acoustic waves on external stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarar, K. S.; Pluta, M.; Amjad, U.; Grill, W.

    2011-04-01

    Based on the lattice dynamics approach the dependence of the time-of-flight (TOF) on stress has been modeled for transversal polarized acoustic waves. The relevant dispersion relation is derived from the appropriate mass-spring model together with the dependencies on the restoring forces including the effect of externally applied stress. The lattice dynamics approach can also be interpreted as a discrete and strictly periodic lumped circuit. In that case the modeling represents a finite element approach. In both cases the properties relevant for wavelengths large with respect to the periodic structure can be derived from the respective limit relating also to low frequencies. The model representing a linear chain with stiffness to shear and additional stiffness introduced by extensional stress is presented and compared to existing models, which so far represent each only one of the effects treated here in combination. For a string this effect is well known from musical instruments. The counteracting effects are discussed and compared to experimental results.

  9. Depth dependent lattice disorder and strain in Mn-implanted and post-annealed InAs thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez-Arrabal, R., E-mail: raquel.gonzalez.arrabal@upm.e [Instituto de Fusion Nuclear, ETSII, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid (UPM) C/ Jose Gutierrez Abascal, 2, E-28006 Madrid (Spain); Redondo-Cubero, A. [Centro de Microanalisis de Materiales, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, E-28049 Madrid (Spain); ISOM and Departamento de Ingenieria Electronica, ETSI Telecomunicacion, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, E-28040 Madrid (Spain); Gonzalez, Y.; Gonzalez, L.; Martin-Gonzalez, M.S. [Instituto de Microelectronica de Madrid CSIC C/ Isaac Newton, 8. Tres Cantos, E-28760 Madrid (Spain)

    2011-04-15

    The lattice order degree and the strain in as-grown, Mn-implanted and post-implanted annealed InAs thin films were investigated with depth resolution by means of Rutherford backscattering spectrometry in channeling conditions (RBS/C). Three main crystallographic axes were analyzed for both In and As sublattices. The behaviour of the induced defects was evaluated in two regions with different native defects: the interface and the surface. The results show that Mn implantation and post-implantation annealing are anisotropic processes, affecting in a different way the In and As sublattices. The mechanisms influencing the enhancement and deterioration of the crystal quality during the implantation are discussed in relation to the as-grown defects and the segregation of the elements.

  10. Anomalous dependence of the heat capacity of supercooled water on pressure and temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.A. Stepanov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In some papers, dependences of the isobaric heat capacity of water versus pressure and temperature were obtained. It is shown that these dependences contradict both the dependence of heat capacity on temperature for supercooled water, and an important thermodynamic equation for the dependence of heat capacity on pressure. A possible explanation for this contradiction is proposed.

  11. Fracture strength of the particulate-reinforced ultra-high temperature ceramics based on a temperature dependent fracture toughness model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ruzhuan; Li, Weiguo; Ji, Baohua; Fang, Daining

    2017-10-01

    The particulate-reinforced ultra-high temperature ceramics (pUHTCs) have been particularly developed for fabricating the leading edge and nose cap of hypersonic vehicles. They have drawn intensive attention of scientific community for their superior fracture strength at high temperatures. However, there is no proper model for predicting the fracture strength of the ceramic composites and its dependency on temperature. In order to account for the effect of temperature on the fracture strength, we proposed a concept called energy storage capacity, by which we derived a new model for depicting the temperature dependent fracture toughness of the composites. This model gives a quantitative relationship between the fracture toughness and temperature. Based on this temperature dependent fracture toughness model and Griffith criterion, we developed a new fracture strength model for predicting the temperature dependent fracture strength of pUHTCs at different temperatures. The model takes into account the effects of temperature, flaw size and residual stress without any fitting parameters. The predictions of the fracture strength of pUHTCs in argon or air agreed well with the experimental measurements. Additionally, our model offers a mechanism of monitoring the strength of materials at different temperatures by testing the change of flaw size. This study provides a quantitative tool for design, evaluation and monitoring of the fracture properties of pUHTCs at high temperatures.

  12. Temperature and pressure dependent structural and thermo-physical properties of quaternary CoVTiAl alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousuf, Saleem; Gupta, Dinesh C.

    2017-09-01

    Investigation of band structure and thermo-physical response of new quaternary CoVTiAl Heusler alloy within the frame work of density functional theory has been analyzed. 100% spin polarization with ferromagnetic stable ground state at the optimized lattice parameter of 6.01 Å is predicted for the compound. Slater-Pauling rule for the total magnetic moment of 3 μB and an indirect semiconducting behavior is also seen for the compound. In order to perfectly analyze the thermo-physical response, the lattice thermal conductivity and thermodynamic properties have been calculated. Thermal effects on some macroscopic properties of CoVTiAl are predicted using the quasi-harmonic Debye model, in which the lattice vibrations are taken into account. The variations of the lattice constant, volume expansion coefficient, heat capacities, and Debye temperature with pressure and temperature in the ranges of 0 GPa to 15 GPa and 0 K to 800 K have been obtained.

  13. Temperature-dependent macromolecular X-ray crystallography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weik, Martin, E-mail: martin.weik@ibs.fr; Colletier, Jacques-Philippe [CEA, IBS, Laboratoire de Biophysique Moléculaire, F-38054 Grenoble (France); CNRS, UMR5075, F-38027 Grenoble (France); Université Joseph Fourier, F-38000 Grenoble (France)

    2010-04-01

    The dynamical behaviour of crystalline macromolecules and their surrounding solvent as a function of cryo-temperature is reviewed. X-ray crystallography provides structural details of biological macromolecules. Whereas routine data are collected close to 100 K in order to mitigate radiation damage, more exotic temperature-controlled experiments in a broader temperature range from 15 K to room temperature can provide both dynamical and structural insights. Here, the dynamical behaviour of crystalline macromolecules and their surrounding solvent as a function of cryo-temperature is reviewed. Experimental strategies of kinetic crystallography are discussed that have allowed the generation and trapping of macromolecular intermediate states by combining reaction initiation in the crystalline state with appropriate temperature profiles. A particular focus is on recruiting X-ray-induced changes for reaction initiation, thus unveiling useful aspects of radiation damage, which otherwise has to be minimized in macromolecular crystallography.

  14. Temperature dependence of the strain response of chemical composition gratings in optical fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guoyu; Guan, Bai-ou

    2008-11-01

    Chemical composition gratings, used as strain sensing elements at high temperature environments, show a temperature dependence of their strain response. Temperature dependence of the strain response of CCGs over a range of temperatures from 24°C to 900°C has been measured. It is found that the wavelength shift of CCGs is linear with applied tensile strain at a constant temperature, and the strain sensitivity is 0.0011nm/μɛ.

  15. Relative viscosity of emulsions in simple shear flow: Temperature, shear rate, and interfacial tension dependence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Se Bin; Lee, Joon Sang [Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Yonsei Unversity, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-08-15

    We simulate an emulsion system under simple shear rates to analyze its rheological characteristics using the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM). We calculate the relative viscosity of an emulsion under a simple shear flow along with changes in temperature, shear rate, and surfactant concentration. The relative viscosity of emulsions decreased with an increase in temperature. We observed the shear-thinning phenomena, which is responsible for the inverse proportion between the shear rate and viscosity. An increase in the interfacial tension caused a decrease in the relative viscosity of the decane-in-water emulsion because the increased deformation caused by the decreased interfacial tension significantly influenced the wall shear stress.

  16. Temperature dependence of a silicon power device switching parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habchi, R.; Salame, C.; Khoury, A.; Mialhe, P.

    2006-04-01

    This study presents measurements of device switching parameters performed on a commercial power metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor under high-temperature conditions. Measured switching times show that the device response to being turned off becomes faster at high temperatures. The inverse drain-source current rapidly increases above the 300°C limit. I-V curves indicate that the saturation current in the channel increases with temperature.

  17. Incommensurate lattice modulations in Potassium Vanadate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakoumakos, Bryan; Banerjee, Arnab; Mark, Lumsden; Cao, Huibo; Kim, Jong-Woo; Hoffman, Christina; Wang, Xiaoping

    Potassium Vanadate (K2V3O8) is an S = 1/2 2D square lattice antiferromagnet that shows spin reorientation indicating a strong coupling between the magnetism and its dielectric properties with a promise of rich physics that promises multiferroicity. These tangible physical properties are strongly tied through a spin-lattice coupling to the underlying lattice and superlattice behavior. It has a superlattice (SL) onsetting below Tc = 115 K with an approximate [3 x 3 x 2] modulation. Here we present our recent experiments at TOPAZ beamline at SNS which for the first time proves conclusively that the lattice modulations are incommensurate, with an in-plane Q of 0.315. We will also show our attempts to refine the data using JANA which requires a redefinition of the lattice, as well as the temperature and Q dependence of the superlattice modulation measured using neutrons at HFIR and synchrotron x-rays at APS. Our results are not only relevant for the ongoing search of multifunctional behavior in K2V3O8 but also generally for the superlattice modulations observed in a large family of fresnoites. Work performed at ORNL and ANL is supported by U.S. Dept. of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences and Office of User Facilities Division.

  18. Lattice gas with molecular dynamics collision operator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsa, M. Reza; Wagner, Alexander J.

    2017-07-01

    We introduce a lattice gas implementation that is based on coarse-graining a molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. Such a lattice gas is similar to standard lattice gases, but its collision operator is informed by an underlying MD simulation. This can be considered an optimal lattice gas implementation because it allows for the representation of any system that can be simulated with MD. We show here that equilibrium behavior of the popular lattice Boltzmann algorithm is consistent with this optimal lattice gas. This comparison allows us to make a more accurate identification of the expressions for temperature and pressure in lattice Boltzmann simulations, which turn out to be related not only to the physical temperature and pressure but also to the lattice discretization. We show that for any spatial discretization, we need to choose a particular temporal discretization to recover the lattice Boltzmann equilibrium.

  19. Temperature-dependent rate models of vascular cambium cell mortality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthew B. Dickinson; Edward A. Johnson

    2004-01-01

    We use two rate-process models to describe cell mortality at elevated temperatures as a means of understanding vascular cambium cell death during surface fires. In the models, cell death is caused by irreversible damage to cellular molecules that occurs at rates that increase exponentially with temperature. The models differ in whether cells show cumulative effects of...

  20. Thermal Aware Floorplanning Incorporating Temperature Dependent Wire Delay Estimation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winther, AndreasThor; Liu, Wei; Nannarelli, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Temperature has a negative impact on metal resistance and thus wire delay. In state-of-the-art VLSI circuits, large thermal gradients usually exist due to the uneven distribution of heat sources. The difference in wire temperature can lead to performance mismatch because wires of the same length ...

  1. Temperature dependence of poly(lactic acid) mechanical properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhou, Chengbo; Guo, Huilong; Li, Jingqing

    2016-01-01

    The mechanical properties of polymers are not only determined by their structures, but also related to the temperature field in which they are located. The yield behaviors, Young's modulus and structures of injection-molded poly(lactic acid) (PLA) samples after annealing at different temperatures...

  2. PRELIMINARY STUDIES 'ON TEMPERATURE DEPENDENCE 'Q,F ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ferromagnetic has characteristic temperature/magnetisation curves. At varying temperatures the magnetic susceptibility of a diamagnet is constant. (Fig.1), while it decreases for paramagnetic materials (Fig.2). The paramagnetic materials obey Curie law,. (eqn.1) in which the magnetic susceptibility varies inversely with.

  3. Substrate bias voltage and deposition temperature dependence on ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... on Si (100) substrate. Deposition at higher substrate temperature causes the film to react with Si forming silicides at the film/Si substrate interface. Ti film undergoes a microstructural transition from hexagonal plate-like to round-shaped grains as the substrate temperature was raised from 300 to 50 °C during film deposition ...

  4. Temperature-dependent phenotypic variation of Campylobacter jejuni lipooligosaccharides

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Semchenko, Evgeny A

    2010-11-30

    Abstract Background Campylobacter jejuni is a major bacterial cause of food-borne enteritis, and its lipooligosaccharide (LOS) plays an initiating role in the development of the autoimmune neuropathy, Guillain-Barré syndrome, by induction of anti-neural cross-reactive antibodies through ganglioside molecular mimicry. Results Herein we describe the existence and heterogeneity of multiple LOS forms in C. jejuni strains of human and chicken origin grown at 37°C and 42°C, respectively, as determined on sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide electrophoresis gels with carbohydrate-specific silver staining and blotting with anti-ganglioside ligands, and confirmed by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The C. jejuni NCTC 11168 original isolate (11168-O) was compared to its genome-sequenced variant (11168-GS), and both were found to have a lower-Mr LOS form, which was different in size and structure to the previously characterized higher-Mr form bearing GM1 mimicry. The lower-Mr form production was found to be dependent on the growth temperature as the production of this form increased from ~5%, observed at 37°C to ~35% at 42°C. The structure of the lower-Mr form contained a β-D-Gal-(1→3)-β-D-GalNAc disaccharide moiety which is consistent with the termini of the GM1, asialo-GM1, GD1, GT1 and GQ1 gangliosides, however, it did not display GM1 mimicry as assessed in blotting studies but was shown in NMR to resemble asialo-GM1. The production of multiple LOS forms and lack of GM1 mimicry was not a result of phase variation in the genes tested of NCTC 11168 and was also observed in most of the human and chicken isolates of C. jejuni tested. Conclusion The presence of differing amounts of LOS forms at 37 and 42°C, and the variety of forms observed in different strains, indicate that LOS form variation may play a role in an adaptive mechanism or a stress response of the bacterium during the colonization of different hosts.

  5. Temperature-dependent phenotypic variation of Campylobacter jejuni lipooligosaccharides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semchenko, Evgeny A; Day, Christopher J; Wilson, Jennifer C; Grice, I Darren; Moran, Anthony P; Korolik, Victoria

    2010-11-30

    Campylobacter jejuni is a major bacterial cause of food-borne enteritis, and its lipooligosaccharide (LOS) plays an initiating role in the development of the autoimmune neuropathy, Guillain-Barré syndrome, by induction of anti-neural cross-reactive antibodies through ganglioside molecular mimicry. Herein we describe the existence and heterogeneity of multiple LOS forms in C. jejuni strains of human and chicken origin grown at 37 °C and 42 °C, respectively, as determined on sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide electrophoresis gels with carbohydrate-specific silver staining and blotting with anti-ganglioside ligands, and confirmed by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The C. jejuni NCTC 11168 original isolate (11168-O) was compared to its genome-sequenced variant (11168-GS), and both were found to have a lower-M(r) LOS form, which was different in size and structure to the previously characterized higher-M(r) form bearing GM₁ mimicry. The lower-M(r) form production was found to be dependent on the growth temperature as the production of this form increased from ~5%, observed at 37 °C to ~35% at 42 °C. The structure of the lower-M(r) form contained a β-D-Gal-(1→3)-β-D-GalNAc disaccharide moiety which is consistent with the termini of the GM₁, asialo-GM₁, GD₁, GT₁ and GQ₁ gangliosides, however, it did not display GM₁ mimicry as assessed in blotting studies but was shown in NMR to resemble asialo-GM₁. The production of multiple LOS forms and lack of GM1 mimicry was not a result of phase variation in the genes tested of NCTC 11168 and was also observed in most of the human and chicken isolates of C. jejuni tested. The presence of differing amounts of LOS forms at 37 and 42 °C, and the variety of forms observed in different strains, indicate that LOS form variation may play a role in an adaptive mechanism or a stress response of the bacterium during the colonization of different hosts.

  6. Temperature-dependent phenotypic variation of Campylobacter jejuni lipooligosaccharides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moran Anthony P

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Campylobacter jejuni is a major bacterial cause of food-borne enteritis, and its lipooligosaccharide (LOS plays an initiating role in the development of the autoimmune neuropathy, Guillain-Barré syndrome, by induction of anti-neural cross-reactive antibodies through ganglioside molecular mimicry. Results Herein we describe the existence and heterogeneity of multiple LOS forms in C. jejuni strains of human and chicken origin grown at 37°C and 42°C, respectively, as determined on sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide electrophoresis gels with carbohydrate-specific silver staining and blotting with anti-ganglioside ligands, and confirmed by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR spectroscopy. The C. jejuni NCTC 11168 original isolate (11168-O was compared to its genome-sequenced variant (11168-GS, and both were found to have a lower-Mr LOS form, which was different in size and structure to the previously characterized higher-Mr form bearing GM1 mimicry. The lower-Mr form production was found to be dependent on the growth temperature as the production of this form increased from ~5%, observed at 37°C to ~35% at 42°C. The structure of the lower-Mr form contained a β-D-Gal-(1→3-β-D-GalNAc disaccharide moiety which is consistent with the termini of the GM1, asialo-GM1, GD1, GT1 and GQ1 gangliosides, however, it did not display GM1 mimicry as assessed in blotting studies but was shown in NMR to resemble asialo-GM1. The production of multiple LOS forms and lack of GM1 mimicry was not a result of phase variation in the genes tested of NCTC 11168 and was also observed in most of the human and chicken isolates of C. jejuni tested. Conclusion The presence of differing amounts of LOS forms at 37 and 42°C, and the variety of forms observed in different strains, indicate that LOS form variation may play a role in an adaptive mechanism or a stress response of the bacterium during the colonization of different hosts.

  7. Solenoidal ionization cooling lattices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. C. Fernow

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available We explore a practical approach for designing ionization cooling channels with periodic solenoidal focusing. We examine the lattice characteristics in terms of the properties of the coils and the cell geometry. The peak magnetic field in the coils is an important engineering constraint in lattice design. We examine the dependence of the peak field, momentum passband locations, and the beta function on the coil parameters. We make a systematic examination of all allowed lattice configurations taking into account the symmetry properties of the current densities and the beta function. We introduce a unique classification for comparing cooling lattice configurations. While solutions with a single coil per cell illustrate most of the effects that are important for cooling channel design, the introduction of additional coils allows more flexibility in selecting the lattice properties. We look at example solutions for the problem of the initial transverse cooling stage of a neutrino factory or muon collider and compare our results with the properties of some published cooling lattice designs. Scaling laws are used to compare solutions from different symmetry classes.

  8. Vortex lattice mobility and effective pinning potentials in the peak ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In that region of field and temperature the mobility of the vortex lattice (VL) is found to be dependent on the dynamical history. Recently we reported evidence that the VL reorganizes and accesses to robust VL configurations (VLCs) with different effective pinning potential wells arising in response to different system histories.

  9. Temperature Dependence of Dark Current in Quantum Well Infrared Detectors

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hickey, Thomas

    2002-01-01

    ...) /cu cm were gathered and analyzed for various temperatures. The device was cooled with a closed cycle refrigerator, and the data were acquired using the Agilent 4155B Semiconductor Parameter Analyzer...

  10. Temperature dependence of the magnetic properties of ferromagnetic amorphous alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaunt, P.

    1979-01-01

    The magnetic hysteresis properties of amorphous alloys have recently been discussed in terms of an exchange-enhanced applied field. This absolute-zero model is here extended to finite temperatures. The modified treatment predicts a remanent magnetization which is unaffected by thermal activation while the coercive force falls (finally to zero) as temperature increases. Comparison with experiment for TbFe/sub 2/ suggests that regions of volume approx. =7500 A/sup 3/ reverse coherently.

  11. Triplet Vortex Lattice Solutions of the Bogoliubov-de Gennes Equation in a Square Lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hori, Yoshiki; Goto, Akira; Ozaki, Masa-aki

    2006-09-01

    Various self-consistent triplet vortex lattice states are obtained for a two-dimensional extended Hubbard model with nearest-neighbor ferromagnetic exchange interaction in a uniform magnetic field. There are four types of triplet superconducting classes, axial, up-spin, planar, and bipolar state, with maximal magnetic translational symmetry for the magnetic flux φ = φ0/p2 in a square crystal lattice, where φ0 = hc/2e is the flux quantum and p is an integer. We diagonalize the mean-field Hamiltonian numerically with self-consistency conditions for each symmetry class, and obtain various meta-stable vortex lattice states. The temperature dependence of the free energy of these meta-stable states is compared.

  12. Quantitative Analysis of Temperature Dependence of Raman shift of monolayer WS2

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Huang, Xiaoting; Gao, Yang; Yang, Tianqi; Ren, Wencai; Cheng, Hui-Ming; Lai, Tianshu

    2016-01-01

    We report the temperature-dependent evolution of Raman spectra of monolayer WS2 directly CVD-grown on a gold foil and then transferred onto quartz substrates over a wide temperature range from 84 to 543 K...

  13. Temperature Dependence of Single-Event Burnout in N-Channel Power MOSFET’s

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-03-15

    AD-A277 921 P O Temperature Dependence of Single-Event Burnout in N-Channel Power MOSFETs 15 March 1994 Prepared by G. H. JOHNSON, R. D. SCHRIMPF...Makimunm 200 words) The temperature dependence of single-event burnout (SEB) in n-channel power metal-oxide- semiconductor field effect transistors...power MOSFET is tmned off (blocking a large The temperature dependence of single-event burn drain-source bias) [3]. Previous burnout modeling has beow

  14. Temperature Dependent Seed Germination of Dalbergia nigra Allem (Leguminosae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda G. A. Ferraz-Grande

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available The germination of endangered species Dalbergia nigra was studied and 30.5° C was found as optimum temperature, although the species presented a broad temperature range where germination occurs and light had no effect. The analysis of kinetics of seed germination confirmed the asynchronized germination below and above the optimum temperature. The light insensitive seed and germination also at high temperatures indicated that D. nigra could occur both in understories and gaps where the mean temperature was high.A germinação de sementes de Dalbergia nigra Allem, comumente conhecida como jacarandá-da-Bahia, caviúna, jacarandá, uma espécie em extinção, foi estudada e determinamos a temperatura ótima de 30,5° C. A espécie apresenta uma ampla faixa de temperatura onde a germinação ocorre e a luz branca não influenciou o processo. A análise da cinética da germinação de sementes confirma a germinação não sincronizada acima e abaixo da temperatura ótima de germinação. A semente insensível à luz e a germinação também em altas temperaturas indicam que D. nigra pode ocorrer tanto na sombra da vegetação bem como em clareiras.

  15. On the Temperature Dependence of the Shear Viscosity and Holography

    CERN Document Server

    Cremonini, Sera; Szepietowski, Phillip

    2012-01-01

    We examine the structure of the shear viscosity to entropy density ratio eta/s in holographic theories of gravity coupled to a scalar field, in the presence of higher derivative corrections. Thanks to a non-trivial scalar field profile, eta/s in this setup generically runs as a function of temperature. In particular, its temperature behavior is dictated by the shape of the scalar potential and of the scalar couplings to the higher derivative terms. We consider a number of dilatonic setups, but focus mostly on phenomenological models that are QCD-like. We determine the geometric conditions needed to identify local and global minima for eta/s as a function of temperature, which translate to restrictions on the signs and ranges of the higher derivative couplings. Finally, such restrictions lead to an holographic argument for the existence of a global minimum for eta/s in these models, at or above the deconfinement transition.

  16. Temperature-dependent permittivity of annealed and unannealed gold films

    CERN Document Server

    Shen, Po-Ting; Lin, Cheng-Wei; Liu, Hsiang-Lin; Chang, Chih-Wei; Chu, Shi-Wei

    2016-01-01

    Due to local field enhancement and subwavelength confinements, nano-plasmonics provide numerous novel applications. Simultaneously, as an efficient nanoscale heat generator from inherent absorption, thermo-plasmonics is emerging as an important branch. However, although significant temperature increase is involved in applications, detailed characterization of metal permittivity at different temperatures is lacking. In this work, we extract the permittivity of gold film from 300K to the annealing temperature of 570K. By comparing annealed and unannealed films, more than one-order difference in thermo-derivative of permittivity is revealed, resulting in unexpectedly large variation of plasmonic properties. Our result is valuable not only for characterizing extensively used unannealed nanoparticles, but also for designing future thermo-nano-plasmonic systems.

  17. A Study of the Temperature Dependence of Bienzyme Systems and Enzymatic Chains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. V. Kotov

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available It is known that most enzyme-facilitated reactions are highly temperature dependent processes. In general, the temperature coefficient, Q10, of a simple reaction reaches 2.0–3.0. Nevertheless, some enzyme-controlled processes have much lower Q10 (about 1.0, which implies that the process is almost temperature independent, even if individual reactions involved in the process are themselves highly temperature dependent. In this work, we investigate a possible mechanism for this apparent temperature compensation: simple mathematical models are used to study how varying types of enzyme reactions are affected by temperature. We show that some bienzyme-controlled processes may be almost temperature independent if the modules involved in the reaction have similar temperature dependencies, even if individually, these modules are strongly temperature dependent. Further, we show that in non-reversible enzyme chains the stationary concentrations of metabolites are dependent only on the relationship between the temperature dependencies of the first and last modules, whilst in reversible reactions, there is a dependence on every module. Our findings suggest a mechanism by which the metabolic processes taking place within living organisms may be regulated, despite strong variation in temperature.

  18. Temperature-Dependent Magnetoelectric Effect from First Principles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mostovoy, Maxim; Scaramucci, Andrea; Spaldin, Nicola A.; Delaney, Kris T.

    2010-01-01

    We show that nonrelativistic exchange interactions and spin fluctuations can give rise to a linear magnetoelectric effect in collinear antiferromagnets at elevated temperatures that can exceed relativistic magnetoelectric responses by more than 1 order of magnitude. We show how symmetry arguments,

  19. Temperature-Dependent Nickel Release from Nickel-Alloys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Menne, T.; Solgaard, Per Bent

    1979-01-01

    Ni release from Danish 1 krone coins and metal buttons from jeans was measured at 20.degree. C in distilled water and at 35.degree. C in distilled water and synthetic sweat. The temperature elevation increased the Ni release from the coins and 2 of the 9 metal buttons investigated. The sensitivity...

  20. Temperature dependence studies on the electro-oxidation of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    agreed that the electro-oxidation of methanol was improved by raising the temperature and ruthenium modification. Keywords. Cyclic voltammetry; electrochemical impedance spectroscopy; activation energy; fuel cell; alcohol. 1. Introduction. The use of hydrogen carrier like alcohol as alterna- tive fuels in the direct alcohol ...

  1. Temperature dependent small-angle neutron scattering of CTABr ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Small-angle neutron scattering studies have been carried out to check the structural integrity of citryltrimethylammonium bromide (CTABr) micelles in a magnetic fluid for different magnetic fluid concentrations at two different temperatures 303 and 333 K. It is found that the CTABr micelles grow with increasing magnetic fluid ...

  2. Temperature dependent small-angle neutron scattering of CTABr ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    K. It is found that the CTABr micelles grow with increasing magnetic fluid concentration and there is a decrease in the micellar size with increase in temperature. Keywords. Magnetic fluids; micellar solutions; small-angle neutron scattering. .... studies [16] where viscosity increases when the magnetic fluid concentration in the.

  3. Second law analysis of a reacting temperature dependent viscous ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this paper, entropy generation during the flow of a reacting viscous fluid through an inclined Channel with isothermal walls are investigated. The coupled energy and momentum equations were solved numerically. Previous results in literature (Adesanya et al 2006 [[17]) showed both velocity and temperature have two ...

  4. Temperature-dependent gas transport and its correlation with kinetic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Activation energies for permeation of polymer nanocomposite membrane have not been reported so far. A tradeoff relation between permeability and selectivity shows that as permeability increases, the selectivity decreases. Attempts have been made to see this trade-off relation at relatively higher temperature. It is found ...

  5. Temperature dependent scintillation properties of pure LaCl3

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bizarri, G.; Dorenbos, P.

    2009-01-01

    The scintillation yield, scintillation decay, and x-ray excited emission of pure LaCl3 was studied as a function of temperature between 80 and 600 K. Two broad band emissions centered around 325 nm and 400 nm were identified and correlated to emissions from two localized exciton states named STE1

  6. Temperature dependence of the dielectric properties of rubber wood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed Firoz Kabir; Wan M. Daud; Kaida B. Khalid; Haji A.A. Sidek

    2001-01-01

    The effect of temperature on the dielectric properties of rubber wood was investigated in three anisotropic directions—longitudinal, radial, and tangential, and at different measurement frequencies. Low frequency measurements were conducted with a dielectric spectrometer, and high frequencies used microwave applied with open-ended coaxial probe sensors. Dielectric...

  7. Temperature Dependence of the Stability of Ion Pair Interactions ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. An understanding of the determinants of the thermal stability of thermostable proteins is expected to enable design of enzymes that can be employed in industrial biocatalytic processes carried out at high temperatures. A major factor that has been proposed to stabilize thermostable proteins is the high occurrence.

  8. Temperature Dependence of the Stability of Ion Pair Interactions ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    An understanding of the determinants of the thermal stability of thermostable proteins is expected to enable design of enzymes that can be employed in industrial biocatalytic processes carried out at high temperatures. A major factor that has been proposed to stabilize thermostable proteins is the high occurrenceof salt ...

  9. The external field dependence of the BCS critical temperature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frank, Rupert L.; Hainzl, Christian; Seiringer, Robert

    2016-01-01

    We consider the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer free energy functional for particles interacting via a two-body potential on a microscopic scale and in the presence of weak external fields varying on a macroscopic scale. We study the influence of the external fields on the critical temperature. We show...

  10. Reduction of the Differential Light Shift by the Spatial Periodicity in an Optical Lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Xu-Guang; Xu, Xia; Chen, Xu-Zong; Zhou, Xiao-Ji

    2013-10-01

    We study the spatial periodicity effects on the differential light shift of noninteracting atoms in an optical lattice. Through the Rabi-spectrum approach, when the wavelength of the optical lattice is not magic, a reduction to the differential light shift is expected. The reduction results from the Bloch bands induced by the quantized motion in the periodic potential. Taking the microwave transition of rubidium atoms as an example, this reduction at some wavelengths can reach one order of magnitude, compared to the data without considering the spatial profile of the optical lattice. When the atomic temperature is considered, the differential light shift increases or decreases with temperature, depending on the wavelength of the lattice. Our results should be beneficial for microwave optical lattice clock and precision measurements.

  11. Molecular players involved in temperature-dependent sex determination and sex differentiation in Teleost fish

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms that underlie sex determination and differentiation are conserved and diversified. In fish species, temperature-dependent sex determination and differentiation seem to be ubiquitous and molecular players involved in these mechanisms may be conserved. Although how the ambient temperature transduces signals to the undifferentiated gonads remains to be elucidated, the genes downstream in the sex differentiation pathway are shared between sex-determining mechanisms. In this paper, we review recent advances on the molecular players that participate in the sex determination and differentiation in fish species, by putting emphasis on temperature-dependent sex determination and differentiation, which include temperature-dependent sex determination and genetic sex determination plus temperature effects. Application of temperature-dependent sex differentiation in farmed fish and the consequences of temperature-induced sex reversal are discussed. PMID:24735220

  12. ESR in 2D triangular chromium lattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hemmida, M; Nidda, H-A Krug von; Loidl, A, E-mail: mhemmida@yahoo.d [Experimental Physics V, Center for Electronic Correlations and Magnetism, University of Augsburg, 86135 Augsburg (Germany)

    2010-01-01

    The spin dynamics in some two-dimensional (2D) triangular Cr-antiferromagnetic frustrated lattices, i.e. HCrO{sub 2}, LiCrO{sub 2}, and NaCrO{sub 2} with ordered rock-salt structure as well as the delafossite compounds CuCrO{sub 2} and AgCrO{sub 2}, has been investigated by Electron Spin Resonance (ESR). On approaching the Neel temperature T{sub N} from above, the divergence of the temperature dependent linewidth is well described in terms of a Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless (BKT) like scenario due to magnetic vortex-antivortex pairing.

  13. Temperature dependence of planktonic metabolism in the ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regaudie-De-Gioux, A.; Duarte, C. M.

    2012-03-01

    Standard metabolic theory predicts that both respiration and photosynthesis should increase with increasing temperature, albeit at different rates. However, test of this prediction for ocean planktonic communities is limited, despite the broad consequences of this prediction in the present context of global ocean warming. We compiled a large data set on volumetric planktonic metabolism in the open ocean and tested the relationship between specific metabolic rates and water temperature. The relationships derived are consistent with predictions derived from metabolic theory of ecology, yielding activation energy for planktonic metabolism consistent with predictions from the metabolic theory. These relationships can be used to predict the effect of warming on ocean metabolism and, thus, the role of planktonic communities in the flow of carbon in the global ocean.

  14. Temperature dependence of electron impact ionization coefficient in bulk silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Mowfaq Jalil

    2017-09-01

    This work exhibits a modified procedure to compute the electron impact ionization coefficient of silicon for temperatures between 77 and 800K and electric fields ranging from 70 to 400 kV/cm. The ionization coefficients are computed from the electron momentum distribution function through solving the Boltzmann transport equation (BTE). The arrangement is acquired by joining Legendre polynomial extension with BTE. The resulting BTE is solved by differences-differential method using MATLAB®. Six (X) equivalent ellipsoidal and non-parabolic valleys of the conduction band of silicon are taken into account. Concerning the scattering mechanisms, the interval acoustic scattering, non-polar optical scattering and II scattering are taken into consideration. This investigation showed that the ionization coefficients decrease with increasing temperature. The overall results are in good agreement with previous experimental and theoretical reported data predominantly at high electric fields.

  15. Temperature dependent transport characteristics of graphene/n-Si diodes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Parui, S.; Ruiter, R.; Zomer, P. J.; Wojtaszek, M.; van Wees, B. J.; Banerjee, T.

    2014-01-01

    Realizing an optimal Schottky interface of graphene on Si is challenging, as the electrical transport strongly depends on the graphene quality and the fabrication processes. Such interfaces are of increasing research interest for integration in diverse electronic devices as they are thermally and

  16. Temperature and concentration dependences of the activity coefficients of electrolytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tikhonov, N. A.; Sidel'nikov, G. B.

    2017-10-01

    A model has been suggested that describes the interaction of hydrated ions in electrolytes and allows the calculation of the main physical effects. The model explains the character of the curves of the activity coefficients. Binary solutions of uni-univalent electrolytes at concentrations from zero to several moles per liter and at temperatures from zero to a few dozens of degrees were studied. The results of simulation were verified by comparing them with many literature data.

  17. Temperature Dependence of Light Transmittance in Polymer Dispersed Liquid Crystals

    OpenAIRE

    Bloisi, F.; Ruocchio, C.; Vicari, L

    1997-01-01

    Polymer Dispersed Liquid Crystals (PDLC) axe composite materials made of a dispersion of liquid crystal droplets in a polymeric matrix. When the liquid crystal is in the nematic phase, droplets appeax as optically anisotropic spheres and the material is opaque white. Sample transmittance is a function of the temperature. If the liquid crystal refractive index in the isotropic phase is equal to the one of the polymer, after the nematic-isotropic transition the material is transparent. We prese...

  18. Lattice parameters guide superconductivity in iron-arsenides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konzen, Lance M. N.; Sefat, Athena S.

    2017-03-01

    The discovery of superconducting materials has led to their use in technological marvels such as magnetic-field sensors in MRI machines, powerful research magnets, short transmission cables, and high-speed trains. Despite such applications, the uses of superconductors are not widespread because they function much below room-temperature, hence the costly cooling. Since the discovery of Cu- and Fe-based high-temperature superconductors (HTS), much intense effort has tried to explain and understand the superconducting phenomenon. While no exact explanations are given, several trends are reported in relation to the materials basis in magnetism and spin excitations. In fact, most HTS have antiferromagnetic undoped ‘parent’ materials that undergo a superconducting transition upon small chemical substitutions in them. As it is currently unclear which ‘dopants’ can favor superconductivity, this manuscript investigates crystal structure changes upon chemical substitutions, to find clues in lattice parameters for the superconducting occurrence. We review the chemical substitution effects on the crystal lattice of iron-arsenide-based crystals (2008 to present). We note that (a) HTS compounds have nearly tetragonal structures with a-lattice parameter close to 4 Å, and (b) superconductivity can depend strongly on the c-lattice parameter changes with chemical substitution. For example, a decrease in c-lattice parameter is required to induce ‘in-plane’ superconductivity. The review of lattice parameter trends in iron-arsenides presented here should guide synthesis of new materials and provoke theoretical input, giving clues for HTS.

  19. Characterization and Temperature Dependence of Arctic Micromonas polaris Viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maat, Douwe S; Biggs, Tristan; Evans, Claire; van Bleijswijk, Judith D L; van der Wel, Nicole N; Dutilh, Bas E; Brussaard, Corina P D

    2017-06-02

    Global climate change-induced warming of the Artic seas is predicted to shift the phytoplankton community towards dominance of smaller-sized species due to global warming. Yet, little is known about their viral mortality agents despite the ecological importance of viruses regulating phytoplankton host dynamics and diversity. Here we report the isolation and basic characterization of four prasinoviruses infectious to the common Arctic picophytoplankter Micromonas. We furthermore assessed how temperature influenced viral infectivity and production. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that the putative double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) Micromonas polaris viruses (MpoVs) are prasinoviruses (Phycodnaviridae) of approximately 120 nm in particle size. One MpoV showed intrinsic differences to the other three viruses, i.e., larger genome size (205 ± 2 vs. 191 ± 3 Kb), broader host range, and longer latent period (39 vs. 18 h). Temperature increase shortened the latent periods (up to 50%), increased the burst size (up to 40%), and affected viral infectivity. However, the variability in response to temperature was high for the different viruses and host strains assessed, likely affecting the Arctic picoeukaryote community structure both in the short term (seasonal cycles) and long term (global warming).

  20. Characterization and Temperature Dependence of Arctic Micromonas polaris Viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maat, Douwe S.; Biggs, Tristan; Evans, Claire; van Bleijswijk, Judith D. L.; van der Wel, Nicole N.; Dutilh, Bas E.; Brussaard, Corina P. D.

    2017-01-01

    Global climate change-induced warming of the Artic seas is predicted to shift the phytoplankton community towards dominance of smaller-sized species due to global warming. Yet, little is known about their viral mortality agents despite the ecological importance of viruses regulating phytoplankton host dynamics and diversity. Here we report the isolation and basic characterization of four prasinoviruses infectious to the common Arctic picophytoplankter Micromonas. We furthermore assessed how temperature influenced viral infectivity and production. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that the putative double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) Micromonas polaris viruses (MpoVs) are prasinoviruses (Phycodnaviridae) of approximately 120 nm in particle size. One MpoV showed intrinsic differences to the other three viruses, i.e., larger genome size (205 ± 2 vs. 191 ± 3 Kb), broader host range, and longer latent period (39 vs. 18 h). Temperature increase shortened the latent periods (up to 50%), increased the burst size (up to 40%), and affected viral infectivity. However, the variability in response to temperature was high for the different viruses and host strains assessed, likely affecting the Arctic picoeukaryote community structure both in the short term (seasonal cycles) and long term (global warming). PMID:28574420

  1. Temperature dependence of Henry's law constants of metolachlor and diazinon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feigenbrugel, Valérie; Le Calvé, Stéphane; Mirabel, Philippe

    2004-10-01

    A dynamic system based on the water/air equilibrium at the interface within the length of a microporous tube has been used to determine experimentally the Henry's law constants (HLC) of two pesticides: metolachlor and diazinon. The measurements were conducted over the temperature range 283-301 K. At 293 K, HLCs values are (42.6+/-2.8) x 10(3) (in units of M atm(-1)) for metolachlor and (3.0+/-0.3)x10(3) for diazinon. The obtained data were used to derive the following Arrhenius expressions: HLC=(3.0+/-0.4) x 10(-11) exp((10,200+/-1,000)/T) for metolachlor and (7.2+/-0.5) x 10(-15) exp((11,900+/-700)/T) for diazinon. At a cumulus cloud temperature of 283 K, the fractions of metolachlor and diazinon in the atmospheric aqueous phase are about 57% and 11% respectively. In order to evaluate the impact of a cloud on the atmospheric chemistry of both studied pesticides, we compare also their atmospheric lifetimes under clear sky (tau(gas)), and cloudy conditions (tau(multiphase)). The calculated multiphase lifetimes (in units of hours) are significantly lower than those in gas phase at a cumulus temperature of 283 K (in parentheses): metolachlor, 0.4 (2.9); diazinon, 1.9 (5.0).

  2. Efficiency and temperature dependence of water removal by membrane dryers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leckrone, K. J.; Hayes, J. M.

    1997-01-01

    The vapor pressure of water in equilibrium with sorption sites within a Nafion membrane is given by log P(WN) = -3580/T + 10.01, where P(WN) is expressed in Torr and T is the membrane temperature, in kelvin. The efficiency of dryers based on selective permeation of water through Nafion can thus be enhanced by cooling the membrane. Residual water in effluents exceeds equilibrium levels if insufficient time is allowed for water to diffuse to the membrane surface as gas passes through the dryer. For tubular configurations, this limitation can be avoided if L > or = Fc(10(3.8)/120 pi D), where L is the length of the tubular membrane, in centimeters, Fc is the gas flow rate, in mL/ min, and D is the diffusion coefficient for water in the carrier gas at the operating temperature of the dryer, in cm2/s. An efficient dryer that at room temperature dries gas to a dew point of -61 degrees C is described; the same dryer maintained at 0 degrees C yields a dew point of -80 degrees C and removes water as effectively as Mg(ClO4)2 or a dry ice/acetone slush. The use of Nafion membranes to construct devices capable of delivering gas streams with low but precisely controlled humidities is discussed.

  3. Graphene antidot lattice waveguides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Jesper Goor; Gunst, Tue; Markussen, Troels

    2012-01-01

    We introduce graphene antidot lattice waveguides: nanostructured graphene where a region of pristine graphene is sandwiched between regions of graphene antidot lattices. The band gaps in the surrounding antidot lattices enable localized states to emerge in the central waveguide region. We model...... the waveguides via a position-dependent mass term in the Dirac approximation of graphene and arrive at analytical results for the dispersion relation and spinor eigenstates of the localized waveguide modes. To include atomistic details we also use a tight-binding model, which is in excellent agreement...... with the analytical results. The waveguides resemble graphene nanoribbons, but without the particular properties of ribbons that emerge due to the details of the edge. We show that electrons can be guided through kinks without additional resistance and that transport through the waveguides is robust against...

  4. Lattice Thermal Conductivity of Ultra High Temperature Ceramics (UHTC) ZrB2 and HfB2 from Atomistic Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, John W.; Daw, Murray S.; Bauschlicher, Charles W.

    2012-01-01

    Ultra high temperature ceramics (UHTC) including ZrB2 and HfB2 have a number of properties that make them attractive for applications in extreme environments. One such property is their high thermal conductivity. Computational modeling of these materials will facilitate understanding of fundamental mechanisms, elucidate structure-property relationships, and ultimately accelerate the materials design cycle. Progress in computational modeling of UHTCs however has been limited in part due to the absence of suitable interatomic potentials. Recently, we developed Tersoff style parameterizations of such potentials for both ZrB2 and HfB2 appropriate for atomistic simulations. As an application, Green-Kubo molecular dynamics simulations were performed to evaluate the lattice thermal conductivity for single crystals of ZrB2 and HfB2. The atomic mass difference in these binary compounds leads to oscillations in the time correlation function of the heat current, in contrast to the more typical monotonic decay seen in monoatomic materials such as Silicon, for example. Results at room temperature and at elevated temperatures will be reported.

  5. Anomalous temperature dependence in valence band spectra: A resonant photoemission study of layered perovskite Sr{sub 2}CoO{sub 4}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pandey, Pankaj K.; Choudhary, R. J., E-mail: ram@csr.res.in; Phase, D. M. [UGC DAE Consortium for Scientific Research, University Campus, Indore 452001 (India)

    2014-05-05

    Valence band spectra (VBS) and its modification across Curie temperature (T{sub C}) of Sr{sub 2}CoO{sub 4} thin film are studied using resonant photoemission spectroscopy. It is found that VBS mainly consists of hybridized states of Co-3d t{sub 2g}e{sub g} and O-2p; however, Co-3d e{sub g} states show its prominence only in the ferromagnetic temperature regime. Below T{sub C}, spectral weight transfer takes place anomalously from high binding energy (B.E.) region to low B.E. region, signifying the enhanced intermediate or low spin state Co{sup 4+} ions. It is suggested that spin-lattice coupling and many-body effects in Sr{sub 2}CoO{sub 4} derived from the strong electron correlations lead to such temperature dependence of VBS.

  6. Temperature dependence of electron mobility in N-type organic molecular crystals: Theoretical study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Lili; Fan, Jianzhong; Jiang, Supu; Wang, Zhongjie; Wang, Chuan-Kui

    2017-11-01

    The temperature dependence of electron mobility in three Fx-TCNQ molecular crystals is studied. The electron mobility calculated based on Marcus charge transfer rate for all three molecules increases, as the temperature becomes high. Nevertheless, the electron mobility calculated based on quantum charge transfer rate shows opposite temperature dependence and indicates bandlike transport mechanism. Similar intrinsic transport properties are obtained for three systems. The different temperature dependence for Fx-TCNQ molecules detected should be induced by different transfer paths or external factors. Our investigation could help one better understand experimental results and provide intuitive view on the transfer mechanism in molecular crystals.

  7. Temperature dependent simulation of diamond depleted Schottky PIN diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hathwar, Raghuraj; Dutta, Maitreya; Koeck, Franz A. M.; Nemanich, Robert J.; Chowdhury, Srabanti; Goodnick, Stephen M.

    2016-06-01

    Diamond is considered as an ideal material for high field and high power devices due to its high breakdown field, high lightly doped carrier mobility, and high thermal conductivity. The modeling and simulation of diamond devices are therefore important to predict the performances of diamond based devices. In this context, we use Silvaco® Atlas, a drift-diffusion based commercial software, to model diamond based power devices. The models used in Atlas were modified to account for both variable range and nearest neighbor hopping transport in the impurity bands associated with high activation energies for boron doped and phosphorus doped diamond. The models were fit to experimentally reported resistivity data over a wide range of doping concentrations and temperatures. We compare to recent data on depleted diamond Schottky PIN diodes demonstrating low turn-on voltages and high reverse breakdown voltages, which could be useful for high power rectifying applications due to the low turn-on voltage enabling high forward current densities. Three dimensional simulations of the depleted Schottky PIN diamond devices were performed and the results are verified with experimental data at different operating temperatures

  8. Temperature dependent simulation of diamond depleted Schottky PIN diodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hathwar, Raghuraj; Dutta, Maitreya; Chowdhury, Srabanti; Goodnick, Stephen M. [Department of Electrical Engineering, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287-8806 (United States); Koeck, Franz A. M.; Nemanich, Robert J. [Department of Physics, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287-8806 (United States)

    2016-06-14

    Diamond is considered as an ideal material for high field and high power devices due to its high breakdown field, high lightly doped carrier mobility, and high thermal conductivity. The modeling and simulation of diamond devices are therefore important to predict the performances of diamond based devices. In this context, we use Silvaco{sup ®} Atlas, a drift-diffusion based commercial software, to model diamond based power devices. The models used in Atlas were modified to account for both variable range and nearest neighbor hopping transport in the impurity bands associated with high activation energies for boron doped and phosphorus doped diamond. The models were fit to experimentally reported resistivity data over a wide range of doping concentrations and temperatures. We compare to recent data on depleted diamond Schottky PIN diodes demonstrating low turn-on voltages and high reverse breakdown voltages, which could be useful for high power rectifying applications due to the low turn-on voltage enabling high forward current densities. Three dimensional simulations of the depleted Schottky PIN diamond devices were performed and the results are verified with experimental data at different operating temperatures.

  9. Temperature-dependent surface nanomechanical properties of a thermoplastic nanocomposite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Hui; Dobryden, Illia; Ihrner, Niklas; Johansson, Mats; Ma, Houyi; Pan, Jinshan; Claesson, Per M

    2017-05-15

    In polymer nanocomposites, particle-polymer interactions influence the properties of the matrix polymer next to the particle surface, providing different physicochemical properties than in the bulk matrix. This region is often referred to as the interphase, but detailed characterization of its properties remains a challenge. Here we employ two atomic force microscopy (AFM) force methods, differing by a factor of about 15 in probing rate, to directly measure the surface nanomechanical properties of the transition region between filler particle and matrix over a controlled temperature range. The nanocomposite consists of poly(ethyl methacrylate) (PEMA) and poly(isobutyl methacrylate) (PiBMA) with a high concentration of hydrophobized silica nanoparticles. Both AFM methods demonstrate that the interphase region around a 40-nm-sized particle located on the surface of the nanocomposite could extend to 55-70nm, and the interphase exhibits a gradient distribution in surface nanomechanical properties. However, the slower probing rate provides somewhat lower numerical values for the surface stiffness. The analysis of the local glass transition temperature (Tg) of the interphase and the polymer matrix provides evidence for reduced stiffness of the polymer matrix at high particle concentration, a feature that we attribute to selective adsorption. These findings provide new insight into understanding the microstructure and mechanical properties of nanocomposites, which is of importance for designing nanomaterials. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Temperature dependences in electron-stimulated desorption of neutral europium

    CERN Document Server

    Ageev, V N; Madey, T E

    2003-01-01

    The electron-stimulated desorption (ESD) yield for neutral europium (Eu) atoms from Eu layers adsorbed on oxygen-covered tungsten surfaces has been measured as a function of electron energy, europium coverage and degree of oxidation of tungsten, with an emphasis on effects of substrate temperature. The measurements have been carried out using a time-of-flight method and surface ionization detector. We expand on an earlier report, and compare ESD of multivalent Eu with ESD of monovalent alkali atoms, studied previously. The Eu atom ESD is a complicated function of Eu coverage, electron energy and substrate temperature. In the coverage range 0.05-0.35 monolayer (ML), overlapping resonant-like Eu atom yield peaks are observed at electron energies E sub e of 36 and 41 eV that might be associated with Eu or W shallow core level excitations. Additional resonant-like peaks are seen at E sub e of 54 and 84 eV that are associated with W 5p and 5s level excitations. The Eu atom yield peaks at 36 and 41 eV are seen only...

  11. Integrated optic current transducers incorporating photonic crystal fiber for reduced temperature dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Woo-Sung; Kim, Sung-Moon; Oh, Min-Cheol

    2015-08-24

    Optical current transducers (OCT) are indispensable for accurate monitoring of large electrical currents in an environment suffering from severe electromagnetic interference. Temperature dependence of OCTs caused by its components, such as wave plates and optical fibers, should be reduced to allow temperature-independent operation. A photonic crystal fiber with a structural optical birefringence was incorporated instead of a PM fiber, and a spun PM fiber was introduced to overcome the temperature-dependent linear birefringence of sensing fiber coil. Moreover, an integrated optic device that provides higher stability than fiber-optics was employed to control the polarization and detect the phase of the sensed optical signal. The proposed OCT exhibited much lower temperature dependence than that from a previous study. The OCT satisfied the 0.5 accuracy class (IIEC 60044-8) and had a temperature dependence less than ± 1% for a temperature range of 25 to 78 °C.

  12. Temperature dependence of direct current conductivity in Ag-ED20 nanocomposite films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novikov, G. F.; Rabenok, E. V.; Bogdanova, L. M.; Irzhak, V. I.

    2017-10-01

    The effect of silver nanoparticles (NPs) in the concentration range of ≤0.8 wt % have on direct current conductivity σdc of Ag-ED20 nanocomposite is studied by method of broadband dielectric spectroscopy (10-2-105 Hz) method of broadband dielectric spectroscopy. It is found that temperature dependence σdc consists of two sections: above the glass transition temperature ( T g), the dependence corresponds to the empirical Vogel-Fulcher-Tammann law (Vogel temperature T 0 does not depend on the NP concentration); below T g, the dependence is Arrhenius with activation energy E a ≈ 1.2 eV. In the region where T > T g, the σdc value grows along with NP concentration. It is concluded that the observed broken form of the temperature dependence is apparently due to a change in the conduction mechanism after the freezing of ion mobility at temperatures below T g.

  13. Temperature dependence of single-event burnout in n-channel power MOSFETs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Gregory H.; Schrimpf, Ronald D.; Galloway, Kenneth F.; Koga, Rocky

    1992-12-01

    The temperature dependence of single-event burnout (SEB) in n-channel power MOSFETs is investigated experimentally and analytically. Experimental data are presented which indicate that the SEB susceptibility of the power MOSFET decreases with increasing temperature. A previously reported analytical model that describes the SEB mechanism is updated to include temperature variations. This model is shown to agree with the experimental trends.

  14. Temperature and relative humidity dependence of radiochromic film dosimeter response to gamma electron radiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McLaughlin, W.L.; Puhl, J.M.; Miller, A.

    1995-01-01

    on some earlier studies, their response functions have been reported to be dependent on the temperature and relative humidity during irradiation. The present study investigates differences in response over practical ranges of temperature, relative humidity, dose, and for different recent batches of films...... humidity) and should be calibrated under environmental conditions (temperature) at which they will be used routinely....

  15. Temperature and Humidity Dependence of a Polymer-Based Gas Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, M. A.; Buehler, M. G.

    1997-01-01

    This paper quantifies the temperature and humidity dependence of a polymer-based gas sensor. The measurement and analysis of three polymers indicates that resistance changes in the polymer films, due to temperature and humidity, can be positive or negative. The temperature sensitivity ranged from +1600 to -320 ppm/nd the relative sensitivity ranged from +1100 to -260 ppm/%.

  16. Temperature dependence of electronic heat capacity in Holstein model of DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fialko, N.; Sobolev, E.; Lakhno, V.

    2016-04-01

    The dynamics of charge migration was modeled to calculate temperature dependencies of its thermodynamic equilibrium values such as energy and electronic heat capacity in homogeneous adenine fragments. The energy varies from nearly polaron one at T ∼ 0 to midpoint of the conductivity band at high temperatures. The peak on the graph of electronic heat capacity is observed at the polaron decay temperature.

  17. Hartmann flow with temperature-dependent physical properties. [magnetohydrodynamics of liquid metal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linn, G. T.; Walker, J. S.

    1978-01-01

    Attention is given to the steady, fully developed, one-dimensional flow of a liquid metal in which thermal conductivity, electrical conductivity, and viscosity are functions of temperature. It is found that the properties are decreasing functions of temperature and the first differences between temperature-dependent and constant properties are discussed.

  18. The temperature-dependent expression of the desaturase gene desA in Synechocystis PCC6803.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Los, D; Horvath, I; Vigh, L; Murata, N

    1993-02-22

    We examined the temperature-dependent regulation of the expression of the desA gene, which encodes delta 12 desaturase of Synechocystis PCC6803. The level of desA transcript increased 10-fold within 1 h upon a decrease in temperature from 36 degrees C to 22 degrees C. This suggests that the low-temperature-induced desaturation of membrane lipid fatty acids is regulated at the level of the expression of the desaturase genes. The accumulation of the desA transcript depended on the extent of temperature change over a certain threshold level, but not on the absolute temperature.

  19. Temperature dependence of a refractive index sensor based on a macrobending micro-plastic optical fiber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Ning; Teng, Chuanxin; Zhao, Xiaowei; Zheng, Jie

    2015-03-10

    We investigate the temperature dependence of a refractive index (RI) sensor based on a macrobending micro-plastic optical fiber (m-POF) both theoretically and experimentally. The performance of the RI sensor at different temperatures (10°C-70°C) is measured and simulated over an RI range from 1.33 to 1.45. It is found that the temperature dependent bending loss and RI measurement deviation monotonically change with temperature, and the RI deviation has a higher gradient with temperature variation for a higher measured RI. Because of the linear trend of temperature dependence of the sensor, it is feasible to correct for changes in ambient temperature.

  20. H/D isotopic and temperature effects in the polarized IR spectra of hydrogen-bond cyclic trimers in the crystal lattices of acetone oxime and 3,5-dimethylpyrazole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flakus, Henryk T; Hachuła, Barbara; Garbacz, Aleksandra

    2012-11-29

    Polarized IR spectra of hydrogen-bonded acetone oxime and 3,5-dimethylpyrazole crystals were measured at 293 and 77 K in the ν(X-H) and ν(X-D) band frequency ranges. These crystals contain molecular trimers in their lattices. The individual crystal spectral properties remain in a close relation with the electronic structure of the two different molecular systems. We show that a vibronic coupling mechanism involving the hydrogen-bond protons and the electrons on the π-electronic systems in the molecules determines the way in which the vibrational exciton coupling between the hydrogen bonds in the trimers occurs. A strong coupling in 3,5-dimethylpyrazole trimers prefers a "tail-to-head"-type Davydov coupling widespread via the π-electrons. A weak through-space exciton coupling in acetone oxime trimers involves three adjacent hydrogen bonds in each cycle. The relative contribution of each exciton coupling mechanism in the trimer spectra generation is temperature and the molecular electronic structure-dependent. This explains the observed difference in the temperature-induced evolution of the compared spectra. The mechanism of the H/D isotopic "self-organization" processes in the crystal hydrogen bonds was also analyzed. The two types of the hydrogen-bond trimers exhibit the same way, in which the H/D isotopic recognition mechanism occurs. In acetone oxime and 3,5-dimethylpyrazole trimers, identical hydrogen isotope atoms exist in these entire hydrogen-bond systems.

  1. Temperature dependence of amino acid side chain IR absorptions in the amide I' region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Benjamin A; Literati, Alex; Ball, Borden; Kubelka, Jan

    2014-05-01

    Amide I' IR spectra are widely used for studies of structural changes in peptides and proteins as a function of temperature. Temperature dependent absorptions of amino acid side-chains that overlap the amide I' may significantly complicate the structural analyses. While the side-chain IR spectra have been investigated previously, thus far their dependence on temperature has not been reported. Here we present the study of the changes in the IR spectra with temperature for side-chain groups of aspartate, glutamate, asparagine, glutamine, arginine, and tyrosine in the amide I' region (in D2O). Band fitting analysis was employed to extract the temperature dependence of the individual spectral parameters, such as peak frequency, integrated intensity, band width, and shape. As expected, the side-chain IR bands exhibit significant changes with temperature. The majority of the spectral parameters, particularly the frequency and intensity, show linear dependence on temperature, but the direction and magnitude vary depending on the particular side-chain group. The exception is arginine, which exhibits a distinctly nonlinear frequency shift with temperature for its asymmetric CN3H5(+) bending signal, although a linear fit can account for this change to within ~1/3 cm(-1). The applicability of the determined spectral parameters for estimations of temperature-dependent side-chain absorptions in peptides and proteins are discussed. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Torque and Drag Friction Model: Implemented Friction Factor Dependency of Temperature

    OpenAIRE

    Brekke, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Master's thesis in Petroleum engineering We investigated the friction factor dependency of temperature. “Friction factor” is a parameter in the calculations of torque and drag. Increased well reach is dependent on accurate torque and drag modeling. We proposed that the friction factor can be dependent on temperature other than linear approximations as studied by Kaarstad et al. [2009]. The results was implemented in the work of Aadnoy [2006] torque and drag 3D model. The local friction fac...

  3. Dynamical Defects in Rotating Magnetic Skyrmion Lattices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pöllath, S; Wild, J; Heinen, L; Meier, T N G; Kronseder, M; Tutsch, L; Bauer, A; Berger, H; Pfleiderer, C; Zweck, J; Rosch, A; Back, C H

    2017-05-19

    The chiral magnet Cu_{2}OSeO_{3} hosts a Skyrmion lattice that may be equivalently described as a superposition of plane waves or a lattice of particlelike topological objects. A thermal gradient may break up the Skyrmion lattice and induce rotating domains, raising the question of which of these scenarios better describes the violent dynamics at the domain boundaries. Here, we show that in an inhomogeneous temperature gradient caused by illumination in a Lorentz transmission electron microscope different parts of the Skyrmion lattice can be set into motion with different angular velocities. Tracking the time dependence, we show that the constant rearrangement of domain walls is governed by dynamic 5-7 defects arranging into lines. An analysis of the associated defect density is described by Frank's equation and agrees well with classical 2D Monte Carlo simulations. Fluctuations of boundaries show a surgelike rearrangement of Skyrmion clusters driven by defect rearrangement consistent with simulations treating Skyrmions as point particles. Our findings underline the particle character of the Skyrmion.

  4. Temperature-dependent VNIR spectroscopy of hydrated Na-carbonates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tosi, Federico; Carli, Cristian; De Angelis, Simone; Beck, Pierre; Brissaud, Olivier; Schmitt, Bernard; Capaccioni, Fabrizio; De Sanctis, Maria Cristina; Piccioni, Giuseppe

    2017-04-01

    The surfaces of the Galilean icy satellites Europa, Ganymede and Callisto, dominated by water ice, also show substantial amounts of non-water-ice compounds. These satellites will be the subject of close exploration by the ESA JUICE mission and the NASA Europa Multiple-Flyby Mission, which will focus on Ganymede and Europa, respectively. Among non-water-ice compounds thought to exist on the surfaces of the Jovian icy satellites, hydrated salt minerals have been proposed to exist as a by-product of endogenic processes. Safe detection of these minerals shall rely on laboratory spectroscopic analysis of these materials carried out under appropriate environmental conditions. Here we report on laboratory measurements, carried out in the framework of a Europlanet Transnational Access (TA) 2020 proposal approved in 2016, on two hydrated sodium carbonates, namely sodium carbonate monohydrate (Na2CO3·1H2O) and sodium carbonate decahydrate (Na2CO3·10H2O). Spectral profiles of these compounds were obtained in the visible and near-infrared (VNIR) spectral domain, taking advantage of the Cold Surfaces spectroscopy facility at the Institut de Planétologie et d'Astrophysique de Grenoble (IPAG), where such compounds can be measured under cryogenic conditions indicative of real planetary surfaces. Carbonates were first sieved so as to separate them in three different grain size ranges: 20-50 μm, 75-100 μm, and 125-150 μm. These grain sizes have been chosen to: (1) be indicative of typical regoliths known or expected to exist on the surface of the icy satellites, and (2) avoid overlapping between ranges, therefore minimizing particles contamination among the dimensional classes. Each grain size was then measured with the Spectro-Gonio-Radiometer facility in the overall 0.5-4.0 μm spectral range, with spectral sampling increasing with increasing wavelength. For each sample, the overall 93-279 K temperature ramp was acquired in 11 steps varying from 10 K to 25 K, imposed by time

  5. Enhancement of nonlinear optical and temperature dependent dielectric properties of Ce:BaTiO3 nano and submicron particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senthilkumar, P.; Dhanuskodi, S.; Thomas, Anitta Rose; Philip, Reji

    2017-08-01

    The solgel synthesized Ce: BaTiO3 (BT) particles are crystallized in tetragonal structure and the expansion of lattice along a-axis is ensured from the Rietveld refined XRD spectra. FTIR shows that the increase of force constant from 199.97 to 213.13 N m-1 is owing to an effective incorporation of heavier atomic mass of Ce in BT lattice. HRTEM reflects the discontinuous atomic planes in the form of Ti vacancies which is supported by EDS measurement. The modification of optical band structure of BT with Ce ions is validated through several absorption and defect emission bands. Energy dependent second harmonic generation is carried out to confirm the non saturated signal, thermal stability and maximum intensity 2483 counts attained for 2 mol% Ce at 200 mJ. Optical limiting characteristics of the samples is analysed at 532 nm using 5 ns laser pulses of energy 50, 100 and 150 µJ. The nonlinear absorption coefficient (β) is found to be enhanced upon Ce doping. Lower optical limiting thresholds of 2.8 and 3.3 J cm-2 are obtained in the case of 1 and 4 mol% Ce samples respectively. Dielectric properties in a broad temperature range (40-500 °C) and frequency (100 Hz-5 MHz) have been investigated in detail. The dielectric constant is increased from 1926 to 3750 on Ce doping and there are two semicircles in the Cole-Cole plot at 500 °C due to grain and grain boundaries and corresponding equivalent circuit model is proposed.

  6. Low temperature vibrational spectra, lattice dynamics, and phase transitions in some potassium hexahalometallates: K2[XY6] with X=Sn or Te and Y=Cl or Br

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chodos, Steven L.; Berg, Rolf W.

    1979-01-01

    This paper deals with the observation and identification of phonon frequencies resulting from the low temperature phase transitions in K2XY6 crystals. By means of a simple lattice dynamical model, the vibrational Raman and IR data available in the literature and obtained here have been analyzed. ...

  7. Experimental determination of monoethanolamine protonation constant and its temperature dependency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma’mun Sholeh

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbon dioxide as one of the major contributors to the global warming problem is produced in large quantities by many important industries and its emission seems to rise from year to year. Aminebased absorption is one of the methods to capture CO2 from its sources. As a reactive system, mass transfer and chemical reaction take place simultaneously. In a vapor-liquid equilibrium model for the CO2-amine-water system, some parameters such as mass transfer coefficients and chemical equilibrium constants need to be known. However, some parameters could be determined experimentally and the rests could be regressed from the model. The protonation constant (pKa, as one of the model parameters, could then be measured experimentally. The purpose of this study is to measure the pKa of monoethanolamine (MEA at a range of temperatures from 303 to 330K by a potentiometric titration method. The experimental data obtained were in a good agreement with the literature data. The pKa data from this work together with those from the literature were then correlated in an empirical correlation to be used for future research.

  8. Monitoring operating temperature and supply voltage in achieving high system dependability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khan, M.A.; Kerkhoff, Hans G.

    2013-01-01

    System dependability being a set of number of attributes, of which the important reliability, heavily depends on operating temperature and supply voltage. Any change beyond the designed specifications may change the system performance and could result in system reliability and hence dependability

  9. Modeling of Circuits with Strongly Temperature Dependent Thermal Conductivities for Cryogenic CMOS

    OpenAIRE

    Hamlet, J.; Eng, K.; Gurrieri, T.; Levy, J; Carroll, M

    2010-01-01

    When designing and studying circuits operating at cryogenic temperatures understanding local heating within the circuits is critical due to the temperature dependence of transistor and noise behavior. We have investigated local heating effects of a CMOS ring oscillator and current comparator at T=4.2K. In two cases, the temperature near the circuit was measured with an integrated thermometer. A lumped element equivalent electrical circuit SPICE model that accounts for the strongly temperature...

  10. Temperature dependency of mechanical properties for crystalline cellulose added to silicone elastomer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kameda, Takao; Sugino, Naoto; Takei, Satoshi; Hanabata, Makoto

    2017-08-01

    A chemical cross-linked transparent film was got by a silicon compound to crystalline cellulose. Temperature dependency for the elasticity modulus of a provided film was measured. The shear elastic modulus was obtained the value of 2 x 106 [Pa] at room temperature. The sample decreases in 190 [deg. C] for the elasticity modulus at the room temperature as 60%, but approximately 10% recover when temperature rises up to 200 [deg. C] or more.

  11. The effect of temperature dependent tissue parameters on acoustic radiation force induced displacements

    CERN Document Server

    Suomi, Visa; Konofagou, Elisa; Cleveland, Robin

    2016-01-01

    Multiple ultrasound elastography techniques rely on acoustic radiation force (ARF) in monitoring high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) therapy. However, ARF is dependent on tissue attenuation and sound speed, both of which are also known to change with temperature making the therapy monitoring more challenging. Furthermore, the viscoelastic properties of tissue are also temperature dependent, which affects the displacements induced by ARF. The aim of this study is to quantify the temperature dependent changes in the acoustic and viscoelastic properties of liver and investigate their effect on ARF induced displacements by using both experimental methods and simulations. Furthermore, the temperature dependent viscoelastic properties of liver are experimentally measured over a frequency range of 0.1-200 Hz at temperatures reaching 80 C, and both conventional and fractional Zener models are used to fit the data. The fractional Zener model was found to fit better with the experimental viscoelasticity data with ...

  12. Investigation on the effects of temperature dependency of material parameters on a thermoelastic loading problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Anil; Mukhopadhyay, Santwana

    2017-08-01

    The present work is concerned with the investigation of thermoelastic interactions inside a spherical shell with temperature-dependent material parameters. We employ the heat conduction model with a single delay term. The problem is studied by considering three different kinds of time-dependent temperature and stress distributions applied at the inner and outer surfaces of the shell. The problem is formulated by considering that the thermal properties vary as linear function of temperature that yield nonlinear governing equations. The problem is solved by applying Kirchhoff transformation along with integral transform technique. The numerical results of the field variables are shown in the different graphs to study the influence of temperature-dependent thermal parameters in various cases. It has been shown that the temperature-dependent effect is more prominent in case of stress distribution as compared to other fields and also the effect is significant in case of thermal shock applied at the two boundary surfaces of the spherical shell.

  13. Temperature dependence of photoluminescence from ordered GaInP{sub 2} epitaxial layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prutskij, T. [Instituto de Ciencias, BUAP, Apartado Postal 207, 72000 Puebla, Pue. (Mexico); Pelosi, C. [IMEM/CNR, Parco Area delle Scienze 37/A, 43010 Parma (Italy)

    2010-01-15

    The temperature behavior of the integrated intensity of photoluminescence (PL) emission from ordered GaInP{sub 2} epitaxial layer was measured at temperatures of 10 - 300 K. Within this temperature range the PL emission is dominated by band-to-band radiative recombination. The PL intensity temperature dependence has two regions: at low temperatures it quenches rapidly as the temperature increases, and above 100 K it reduces slowly. This temperature behavior is compared with that of disordered GaInP{sub 2} layer. The specter of the PL emission of the disordered layer has two peaks, which are identified as due to donor-accepter (D-A) and band-to-band recombination. The PL intensity quenching of these spectral bands is very different: With increasing temperature, the D-A peak intensity remains almost unchanged at low temperatures and then decreases at a higher rate. The intensity of the band-to-band recombination peak decays gradually, having a higher rate at low temperatures than at higher temperatures. Comparing these temperature dependencies of these PL peaks of ordered and disordered alloys and the temperature behavior of their full width at half maximum (FWHM), we conclude that the different morphology of these alloys causes their different temperature behavior. (copyright 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  14. Perspectives of optical lattices with state-dependent tunneling in approaching quantum magnetism in the presence of the external harmonic trapping potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sotnikov, Andrii, E-mail: a_sotnikov@kipt.kharkov.ua [Akhiezer Institute for Theoretical Physics, NSC KIPT, Akademichna St. 1, 61108 Kharkiv (Ukraine); Karazin Kharkiv National University, Svobody Sq. 4, 61022 Kharkiv (Ukraine)

    2016-03-11

    We study theoretically potential advantages of two-component mixtures in optical lattices with state-dependent tunneling for approaching long-range-order phases and detecting easy-axis antiferromagnetic correlations. While we do not find additional advantages of mixtures with large hopping imbalance for approaching quantum magnetism in a harmonic trap, it is shown that a nonzero difference in hopping amplitudes remains highly important for a proper symmetry breaking in the pseudospin space for the single-site-resolution imaging and can be advantageously used for a significant increase of the signal-to-noise ratio and thus detecting long-range easy-axis antiferromagnetic correlations in the corresponding experiments. - Highlights: • The most optimal ways to observe magnetic correlations in a quantum-gas microscope are presented. • Importance of a controlled symmetry breaking for antiferromagnetism is studied. • A quantitative theoretical analysis for the entropy in ultracold fermionic mixtures is performed. • No advantages from realizations with the strong hopping asymmetry are found.

  15. The effect of Fe addition on the transformation temperatures, lattice parameter and magnetization saturation of Ni{sub 52.5-X}Mn{sub 23}Ga{sub 24.5}Fe{sub X} ferromagnetic shape memory alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soto-Parra, D.E.; Alvarado-Hernandez, F.; Ayala, O.; Ochoa-Gamboa, R.A. [Centro de Investigacion en Materiales Avanzados S.C. Miguel de Cervantes 120, Complejo industrial Chihuahua, 31109 Chihuahua (Mexico); Flores-Zuniga, H. [Centro de Investigacion en Materiales Avanzados S.C. Miguel de Cervantes 120, Complejo industrial Chihuahua, 31109 Chihuahua (Mexico)], E-mail: horacio.flores@cimav.edu.mx; Rios-Jara, D. [Instituto Potosino de Investigacion Cientifica y Tecnologica, Camino a la Presa San Jose 2055, Col. Lomas 4a seccion, 78216 San Luis Potosi, S.L.P. (Mexico)

    2008-09-22

    The effect of Fe addition on martensitic transformation temperatures, Curie temperature (T{sub C}), lattice parameters and magnetization saturation was studied in Ni{sub 52.5-X}Mn{sub 23}Ga{sub 24.5}Fe{sub X} alloys fabricated by arc-melting furnace. The characterizations were performed by DSC, X-ray diffraction and magnetometry. Fe replacing Ni sites leads to an increment on lattice parameter and on the magnetization saturation of the austenitic phase at room temperature. Also, T{sub C} increases from 370 K up to 400 K and remains constant for X {>=} 3.1 at.% Fe. In contrast, martensitic transformation temperatures decrease with Fe substituting Ni.

  16. Temperature dependent electronic structure and magnetism of metallic systems with localized moments. Application on gadolinium; Temperaturabhaengige elektronische Struktur und Magnetismus von metallischen Systemen mit lokalisierten Momenten. Anwendung auf Gadolinium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, C.A.M. dos

    2005-06-24

    This thesis focuses on the theoretical investigation of the temperature dependent electronic and magnetic properties of metallic 4f-systems with localized magnetic moments. The presented theory is based on the Kondo-lattice model, which describes the interaction between a system of 4f-localized magnetic moments and the itinerant conduction band electrons. This interaction is responsible for a remarkable temperature dependence of the electronic structure mainly induced by the subsystem of 4f-localized moments. The many-body problem provoked by the Kondo-lattice model is solved by using a moment conserving Green function technique, which takes care of several special limiting cases. This method reproduces the T=0-exact solvable limiting case of the ferromagnetically saturated semiconductor. The temperature dependent magnetic properties of the 4f-localized subsystem are evaluated by means of a modified Rudermann-Kittel-Kasuya-Yosida (RKKY) type procedure, which together with the solution of the electronic part allows for a self-consistent calculation of all the electronic and magnetic properties of the model. Results of model calculations allow to deduce the conditions for ferromagnetism in dependence of the electron density n, exchange coupling J and temperature T. The self-consistently calculated Curie temperature T{sub C} is presented and discussed in dependence of relevant parameters (J, n, and W) of the model. The second part of the thesis is concerned with the investigation of the temperature dependence of the electronic and magnetic properties of the rare-earth metal Gadolinium (Gd). The original Kondo-lattice model is extended to a multi-band Kondo-lattice model and combined with an ab-initio band structure calculation to take into account for the multi-bands in real systems. The single-particle energies of the model are taken from an augmented spherical wave (ASW) band structure calculation. The proposed method avoids the double counting of relevant

  17. The dependence of surface temperature on IGBTs load and ambient temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Čaja

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Currently, older power electronics and electrotechnics are improvement and at the same time developing new and more efficient devices. These devices produce in their activities a significant part of the heat which, if not effectively drained, causing damage to these elements. In this case, it is important to develop new and more efficient cooling system. The most widespread of modern methods of cooling is the cooling by heat pipe. This contribution is aimed at cooling the insulated-gate bipolar transistor (IGBT elements by loop heat pipe (LHP. IGBTs are very prone to damage due to high temperatures, and therefore is the important that the surface temperature was below 100°C. It was therefore created a model that examined what impact of surface temperature on the IGBT element and heat removal at different load and constant ambient temperature.

  18. Temperature-dependent gate-swing hysteresis of pentacene thin film transistors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yow-Jon Lin

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The temperature-dependent hysteresis-type transfer characteristics of pentacene-based organic thin film transistors (OTFTs were researched. The temperature-dependent transfer characteristics exhibit hopping conduction behavior. The fitting data for the temperature-dependent off-to-on and on-to-off transfer characteristics of OTFTs demonstrate that the hopping distance (ah and the barrier height for hopping (qϕt control the carrier flow, resulting in the hysteresis-type transfer characteristics of OTFTs. The hopping model gives an explanation of the gate-swing hysteresis and the roles played by qϕt and ah.

  19. Lattice QCD on fine lattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaefer, Stefan [DESY (Germany). Neumann Inst. for Computing

    2016-11-01

    These configurations are currently in use in many on-going projects carried out by researchers throughout Europe. In particular this data will serve as an essential input into the computation of the coupling constant of QCD, where some of the simulations are still on-going. But also projects computing the masses of hadrons and investigating their structure are underway as well as activities in the physics of heavy quarks. As this initial project of gauge field generation has been successful, it is worthwhile to extend the currently available ensembles with further points in parameter space. These will allow to further study and control systematic effects like the ones introduced by the finite volume, the non-physical quark masses and the finite lattice spacing. In particular certain compromises have still been made in the region where pion masses and lattice spacing are both small. This is because physical pion masses require larger lattices to keep the effects of the finite volume under control. At light pion masses, a precise control of the continuum extrapolation is therefore difficult, but certainly a main goal of future simulations. To reach this goal, algorithmic developments as well as faster hardware will be needed.

  20. The Temperature Dependence of the Debye-Waller Factor of Magnesium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sledziewska-Blocka, D.; Lebech, Bente

    1976-01-01

    The temperature dependence of the average Debye-Waller factor for magnesium was measured by means of neutron diffraction spectrometry. The experimental results obtained in the temperature range from 5 to 256 K are compared with theoretical calculations, using the harmonic and quasi-harmonic appro......The temperature dependence of the average Debye-Waller factor for magnesium was measured by means of neutron diffraction spectrometry. The experimental results obtained in the temperature range from 5 to 256 K are compared with theoretical calculations, using the harmonic and quasi...

  1. Tunneling magnetoresistance dependence on the temperature in a ferromagnetic Zener diode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Comesana, E; Aldegunde, M; GarcIa-Loureiro, A, E-mail: enrique.comesana@usc.e [Departamento de Electronica e Computacion, Universidade de Santiago de Compostela, 15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain)

    2009-11-15

    In the present work we focus on the study of the temperature dependence of the tunnelling current in a ferromagnetic Zener diode. We predict the tunneling magnetoresistance dependence on the temperature. Large doping concentrations lead to magnetic semiconductors with Curie temperature T{sub C} near or over room temperature and this will facilitate the introduction of new devices that make use of the ferromagnetism effects. According to our calculations the tunneling magnetoresistance has the form TMR {proportional_to} (T{sup n}{sub C}-T{sup n}).

  2. Temperature-dependent vibrational spectroscopic study and DFT calculations of the sorbic acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saraiva, G. D.; Nogueira, C. E. S.; Freire, P. T. C.; de Sousa, F. F.; da Silva, J. H.; Teixeira, A. M. R.; Mendes Filho, J.

    2015-02-01

    This work reports a temperature-dependent vibrational spectroscopic study of the sorbic acid (C6H8O2), as well as the mode assignment at ambient conditions, based on the density functional theory. Temperature-dependent vibrational properties have been performed in polycrystalline sorbic acid through both Raman and infrared spectroscopy in the 20-300 K and 80-300 K temperature ranges, respectively. These studies present the occurrence of some modifications in the Raman spectra that could be interpreted as a low temperature phase transition undergone by sorbic acid from the monoclinic phase to an unknown phase with conformational change of the molecules in the unit cell.

  3. Temperature dependence of photoluminescence from submonolayer deposited InGaAs/GaAs quantum dots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, Zhangcheng; Leosson, K.; Birkedal, Dan

    2002-01-01

    The temperature dependence of photoluminescence (PL) from self-assembled InGaAs quantum dots (QD's) grown by submonolayer deposition mode (non-SK mode), is investigated. It is found that the PL spectra are dominated by the ground-state transitions at low temperatures, but increasingly by the exci......The temperature dependence of photoluminescence (PL) from self-assembled InGaAs quantum dots (QD's) grown by submonolayer deposition mode (non-SK mode), is investigated. It is found that the PL spectra are dominated by the ground-state transitions at low temperatures, but increasingly...

  4. Temperature dependence of magnetically dead layers in ferromagnetic thin-films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Tokaç

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Polarized neutron reflectometry has been used to study interface magnetism and magnetic dead layers in model amorphous CoFeB:Ta alloy thin-film multilayers with Curie temperatures tuned to be below room-temperature. This allows temperature dependent variations in the effective magnetic thickness of the film to be determined at temperatures that are a significant fraction of the Curie temperature, which cannot be achieved in the material systems used for spintronic devices. In addition to variation in the effective magnetic thickness due to compositional grading at the interface with the tantalum capping layer, the key finding is that at the interface between ferromagnetic film and GaAs(001 substrate local interfacial alloying creates an additional magnetic dead-layer. The thickness of this magnetic dead-layer is temperature dependent, which may have significant implications for elevated-temperature operation of hybrid ferromagnetic metal-semiconductor spintronic devices.

  5. Temperature dependence of magnetically dead layers in ferromagnetic thin-films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokaç, M.; Kinane, C. J.; Atkinson, D.; Hindmarch, A. T.

    2017-11-01

    Polarized neutron reflectometry has been used to study interface magnetism and magnetic dead layers in model amorphous CoFeB:Ta alloy thin-film multilayers with Curie temperatures tuned to be below room-temperature. This allows temperature dependent variations in the effective magnetic thickness of the film to be determined at temperatures that are a significant fraction of the Curie temperature, which cannot be achieved in the material systems used for spintronic devices. In addition to variation in the effective magnetic thickness due to compositional grading at the interface with the tantalum capping layer, the key finding is that at the interface between ferromagnetic film and GaAs(001) substrate local interfacial alloying creates an additional magnetic dead-layer. The thickness of this magnetic dead-layer is temperature dependent, which may have significant implications for elevated-temperature operation of hybrid ferromagnetic metal-semiconductor spintronic devices.

  6. Impact of the thermal scattering law of H in H2O on the isothermal temperature reactivity coefficients for UOX and MOX fuel lattices in cold operating conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scotta Juan Pablo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The contribution of the thermal scattering law of hydrogen in light water to isothermal temperature reactivity coefficients for UOX and MOX lattices was studied in the frame of the MISTRAL critical experiments carried out in the zero power reactor EOLE of CEA Cadarache (France. The interpretation of the core residual reactivity measured between 6 °C to 80 °C (by step of 5 °C was performed with the Monte-Carlo code TRIPOLI4®. The nuclear data from the JEFF-3.1.1 library were used in the calculations. Three different thermal scattering laws of hydrogen in light water were tested in order to evaluate their impact on the MISTRAL calculations. The thermal scattering laws of interest were firstly those recommended in JEFF-3.1.1 and ENDF/B-VII.1 and also that recently produced at the atomic center of Bariloche (CAB, Argentina with molecular dynamic simulations. The present work indicates that the calculation-to-experimpental bias is −0.4 ± 0.3 pcm/°C in the UOX core and −1.0 ± 0.3 pcm/°C in the MOX cores, when the JEFF-3.1.1 library is used. An improvement is observed over the whole temperature range with the CAB model. The calculation-to-experimpental bias vanishes for the UOX core (−0.02 pcm/°C and becomes close to −0.7 pcm/°C for the MOX cores. The magnitude of these bias have to be connected to the typical value of the temperature reactivity coefficient that ranges from −5 pcm/°C at Begining Of Cycle (BOC up to −50 pcm/°C at End Of Cycle (EOC, in PWR conditions.

  7. Sex reversal triggers the rapid transition from genetic to temperature-dependent sex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holleley, Clare E; O'Meally, Denis; Sarre, Stephen D; Marshall Graves, Jennifer A; Ezaz, Tariq; Matsubara, Kazumi; Azad, Bhumika; Zhang, Xiuwen; Georges, Arthur

    2015-07-02

    Sex determination in animals is amazingly plastic. Vertebrates display contrasting strategies ranging from complete genetic control of sex (genotypic sex determination) to environmentally determined sex (for example, temperature-dependent sex determination). Phylogenetic analyses suggest frequent evolutionary transitions between genotypic and temperature-dependent sex determination in environmentally sensitive lineages, including reptiles. These transitions are thought to involve a genotypic system becoming sensitive to temperature, with sex determined by gene-environment interactions. Most mechanistic models of transitions invoke a role for sex reversal. Sex reversal has not yet been demonstrated in nature for any amniote, although it occurs in fish and rarely in amphibians. Here we make the first report of reptile sex reversal in the wild, in the Australian bearded dragon (Pogona vitticeps), and use sex-reversed animals to experimentally induce a rapid transition from genotypic to temperature-dependent sex determination. Controlled mating of normal males to sex-reversed females produces viable and fertile offspring whose phenotypic sex is determined solely by temperature (temperature-dependent sex determination). The W sex chromosome is eliminated from this lineage in the first generation. The instantaneous creation of a lineage of ZZ temperature-sensitive animals reveals a novel, climate-induced pathway for the rapid transition between genetic and temperature-dependent sex determination, and adds to concern about adaptation to rapid global climate change.

  8. Temperature-dependent innate defense against the common cold virus limits viral replication at warm temperature in mouse airway cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foxman, Ellen F; Storer, James A; Fitzgerald, Megan E; Wasik, Bethany R; Hou, Lin; Zhao, Hongyu; Turner, Paul E; Pyle, Anna Marie; Iwasaki, Akiko

    2015-01-20

    Most isolates of human rhinovirus, the common cold virus, replicate more robustly at the cool temperatures found in the nasal cavity (33-35 °C) than at core body temperature (37 °C). To gain insight into the mechanism of temperature-dependent growth, we compared the transcriptional response of primary mouse airway epithelial cells infected with rhinovirus at 33 °C vs. 37 °C. Mouse airway cells infected with mouse-adapted rhinovirus 1B exhibited a striking enrichment in expression of antiviral defense response genes at 37 °C relative to 33 °C, which correlated with significantly higher expression levels of type I and type III IFN genes and IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs) at 37 °C. Temperature-dependent IFN induction in response to rhinovirus was dependent on the MAVS protein, a key signaling adaptor of the RIG-I-like receptors (RLRs). Stimulation of primary airway cells with the synthetic RLR ligand poly I:C led to greater IFN induction at 37 °C relative to 33 °C at early time points poststimulation and to a sustained increase in the induction of ISGs at 37 °C relative to 33 °C. Recombinant type I IFN also stimulated more robust induction of ISGs at 37 °C than at 33 °C. Genetic deficiency of MAVS or the type I IFN receptor in infected airway cells permitted higher levels of viral replication, particularly at 37 °C, and partially rescued the temperature-dependent growth phenotype. These findings demonstrate that in mouse airway cells, rhinovirus replicates preferentially at nasal cavity temperature due, in part, to a less efficient antiviral defense response of infected cells at cool temperature.

  9. Temperature-dependent dynamic mechanical properties of magnetorheological elastomers under magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ju, Benxiang, E-mail: jubenxiang@qq.com [National Instrument Functional Materials Engineering Technology Research Center, Chongqing 400707 (China); Tang, Rui; Zhang, Dengyou; Yang, Bailian [National Instrument Functional Materials Engineering Technology Research Center, Chongqing 400707 (China); Yu, Miao; Liao, Changrong [College of Optoelectronic Engineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China)

    2015-01-15

    Both anisotropic and isotropic magnetorheological elastomer (MRE) samples were fabricated by using as-prepared polyurethane (PU) matrix and carbonyl iron particles. Temperature-dependent dynamic mechanical properties of MRE were investigated and analyzed. Due to the unique structural features of as-prepared matrix, temperature has a greater impact on the properties of as-prepared MRE, especially isotropic MRE. With increasing of temperature and magnetic field, MR effect of isotropic MRE can reach up to as high as 4176.5% at temperature of 80 °C, and the mechanism of the temperature-dependent in presence of magnetic field was discussed. These results indicated that MRE is a kind of temperature-dependent material, and can be cycled between MRE and MR plastomer (MRP) by varying temperature. - Highlights: • Both anisotropic and isotropic MRE were fabricated by using as-prepared matrix. • Temperature-dependent properties of MRE under magnetic field were investigated. • As-prepared MRE can transform MRE to MRP by adjusting temperature.

  10. Shaken Lattice Interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weidner, Carrie; Yu, Hoon; Anderson, Dana

    2015-05-01

    This work introduces a method to perform interferometry using atoms trapped in an optical lattice. Starting at t = 0 with atoms in the ground state of a lattice potential V(x) =V0cos [ 2 kx + ϕ(t) ] , we show that it is possible to transform from one atomic wavefunction to another by a prescribed shaking of the lattice, i.e., by an appropriately tailored time-dependent phase shift ϕ(t) . In particular, the standard interferometer sequence of beam splitting, propagation, reflection, reverse propagation, and recombination can be achieved via a set of phase modulation operations {ϕj(t) } . Each ϕj(t) is determined using a learning algorithm, and the split-step method calculates the wavefunction dynamics. We have numerically demonstrated an interferometer in which the shaken wavefunctions match the target states to better than 1 % . We carried out learning using a genetic algorithm and optimal control techniques. The atoms remain trapped in the lattice throughout the full interferometer sequence. Thus, the approach may be suitable for use in an dynamic environment. In addition to the general principles, we discuss aspects of the experimental implementation. Supported by the Office of Naval Research (ONR) and Northrop Grumman.

  11. Temperature-dependent structural and functional features of a hyperthermostable enzyme using elastic neutron scattering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koutsopoulos, S; van der Oost, J; Norde, W

    2005-01-01

    The dynamic behavior of an endoglucanase from the hyperthermophilic microorganism Pyrococcus furiosus was investigated using elastic neutron scattering. The temperature dependence of the atomic motions was correlated with conformational. and functional characteristics of the enzyme. The onset of

  12. Temperature dependence of magnetic anisotropies in ultrathin Fe film on vicinal Si(111)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yong-Sheng; He, Wei; Ye, Jun; Hu, Bo; Tang, Jin; Zhang, Xiang-Qun [State Key Laboratory of Magnetism and Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Cheng, Zhao-Hua, E-mail: zhcheng@aphy.iphy.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Magnetism and Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); School of Physical Sciences, University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China)

    2017-05-01

    The temperature dependence of magnetic anisotropy of ultrathin Fe film with different thickness epitaxially grown on vicinal Si(111) substrate has been quantitatively investigated using the anisotropic magnetoresistance(AMR) measurements. Due to the effect of the vicinal substrate, the magnetic anisotropy is the superposition of a four-fold, a two-fold and a weakly six-fold contribution. It is found that the temperature dependence of the first-order magnetocrystalline anisotropies coefficient follows power laws of the reduced magnetization m(T)(=M(T)/M(0)) being consistent with the Callen and Callen's theory. However the temperature dependence of uniaxial magnetic anisotropy (UMA) shows novel behavior that decreases roughly as a function of temperature with different power law for samples with different thickness. We also found that the six-fold magnetocrystalline anisotropy is almost invariable over a wide temperature range. Possible mechanisms leading to the different exponents are discussed.

  13. Temperature dependence and mechanism of the reaction between O(3P) and chlorine dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colussi, A. J.; Sander, S. P.; Fiedl, R. R.

    1992-01-01

    Second-order rate constants for the decay of O(3P) in excess chlorine dioxide, k(II), were measured as a function of total pressure (20-600 Torr argon) and temperature (248-312 K), using flash photolysis-atomic resonance fluorescence. Results indicate that k(II) is pressure dependent with a value, K(b), that is nonzero at zero pressure, and both the third-order rate constant and k(b) have negative temperature dependences.

  14. Quark mass density- and temperature- dependent model for bulk strange quark matter

    OpenAIRE

    al, Yun Zhang et.

    2002-01-01

    It is shown that the quark mass density-dependent model can not be used to explain the process of the quark deconfinement phase transition because the quark confinement is permanent in this model. A quark mass density- and temperature-dependent model in which the quark confinement is impermanent has been suggested. We argue that the vacuum energy density B is a function of temperature. The dynamical and thermodynamical properties of bulk strange quark matter for quark mass density- and temper...

  15. Temperature-dependent magnetic properties of individual glass spherules, Apollo 11, 12, and 14 lunar samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorpe, A. N.; Sullivan, S.; Alexander, C. C.; Senftle, F. E.; Dwornik, E. J.

    1972-01-01

    Magnetic susceptibility of 11 glass spherules from the Apollo 14 lunar fines have been measured from room temperature to 4 K. Data taken at room temperature, 77 K, and 4.2 K, show that the soft saturation magnetization was temperature independent. In the temperature range 300 to 77 K the temperature-dependent component of the magnetic susceptibility obeys the Curie law. Susceptibility measurements on these same specimens and in addition 14 similar spherules from the Apollo 11 and 12 mission show a Curie-Weiss relation at temperatures less than 77 K with a Weiss temperature of 3-7 degrees in contrast to 2-3 degrees found for tektites and synthetic glasses of tektite composition. A proposed model and a theoretical expression closely predict the variation of the susceptibility of the glass spherules with temperature.

  16. Multiscale Modeling of Ultra High Temperature Ceramics (UHTC) ZrB2 and HfB2: Application to Lattice Thermal Conductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, John W.; Daw, Murray S.; Squire, Thomas H.; Bauschlicher, Charles W.

    2012-01-01

    We are developing a multiscale framework in computational modeling for the ultra high temperature ceramics (UHTC) ZrB2 and HfB2. These materials are characterized by high melting point, good strength, and reasonable oxidation resistance. They are candidate materials for a number of applications in extreme environments including sharp leading edges of hypersonic aircraft. In particular, we used a combination of ab initio methods, atomistic simulations and continuum computations to obtain insights into fundamental properties of these materials. Ab initio methods were used to compute basic structural, mechanical and thermal properties. From these results, a database was constructed to fit a Tersoff style interatomic potential suitable for atomistic simulations. These potentials were used to evaluate the lattice thermal conductivity of single crystals and the thermal resistance of simple grain boundaries. Finite element method (FEM) computations using atomistic results as inputs were performed with meshes constructed on SEM images thereby modeling the realistic microstructure. These continuum computations showed the reduction in thermal conductivity due to the grain boundary network.

  17. Temperature Dependence of Faraday Effect-Induced Bias Error in a Fiber Optic Gyroscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xuyou; Liu, Pan; Guang, Xingxing; Xu, Zhenlong; Guan, Lianwu; Li, Guangchun

    2017-09-07

    Improving the performance of interferometric fiber optic gyroscope (IFOG) in harsh environments, such as magnetic field and temperature field variation, is necessary for its practical applications. This paper presents an investigation of Faraday effect-induced bias error of IFOG under varying temperature. Jones matrix method is utilized to formulize the temperature dependence of Faraday effect-induced bias error. Theoretical results show that the Faraday effect-induced bias error changes with the temperature in the non-skeleton polarization maintaining (PM) fiber coil. This phenomenon is caused by the temperature dependence of linear birefringence and Verdet constant of PM fiber. Particularly, Faraday effect-induced bias errors of two polarizations always have opposite signs that can be compensated optically regardless of the changes of the temperature. Two experiments with a 1000 m non-skeleton PM fiber coil are performed, and the experimental results support these theoretical predictions. This study is promising for improving the bias stability of IFOG.

  18. Temperature dependence of 1H NMR chemical shifts and its influence on estimated metabolite concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wermter, Felizitas C; Mitschke, Nico; Bock, Christian; Dreher, Wolfgang

    2017-07-06

    Temperature dependent chemical shifts of important brain metabolites measured by localised 1H MRS were investigated to test how the use of incorrect prior knowledge on chemical shifts impairs the quantification of metabolite concentrations. Phantom measurements on solutions containing 11 metabolites were performed on a 7 T scanner between 1 and 43 °C. The temperature dependence of the chemical shift differences was fitted by a linear model. Spectra were simulated for different temperatures and analysed by the AQSES program (jMRUI 5.2) using model functions with chemical shift values for 37 °C. Large differences in the temperature dependence of the chemical shift differences were determined with a maximum slope of about ±7.5 × 10-4 ppm/K. For 32-40 °C, only minor quantification errors resulted from using incorrect chemical shifts, with the exception of Cr and PCr. For 1-10 °C considerable quantification errors occurred if the temperature dependence of the chemical shifts was neglected. If 1H MRS measurements are not performed at 37 °C, for which the published chemical shift values have been determined, the temperature dependence of chemical shifts should be considered to avoid systematic quantification errors, particularly for measurements on animal models at lower temperatures.

  19. Temperature Dependence of Rheology and Polymer Diffusion in Silica/Polystyrene Nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tung, Wei-Shao; Clarke, Nigel; Composto, Russell; Meth, Jeffrey; Winey, Karen

    2015-03-01

    Time-temperature superposition using the WLF equation is well-established for both the zero shear viscosity and the polymer diffusion coefficient in homopolymer melts. This talk will present the temperature-dependence of polymer dynamics in polymer nanocomposites comprised of polystyrene and phenyl-capped silica nanoparticles (0 - 50 vol%). The WLF equation fits the temperature dependence of the tracer polymer diffusion coefficient and the fitting parameter (B/fo) decreases smoothly with nanoparticle concentration suggesting an increase in the thermal expansion coefficient for the free volume. The WLF equation also fits the temperature dependence of the zero shear viscosity from oscillatory shear experiments, although the fitting parameter (B/fo) increases substantially with nanoparticle concentration. This discrepancy between the diffusion and rheology will be discussed with respect to the reptation model, which predicts that the temperature dependence of polymer diffusion depends predominately on the temperature dependence of local viscosity, and the elastic response in nanocomposites. National Science Foundation DMR-12-10379.

  20. Temperature dependence of the electrical conductivity of amorphous V sub x Si sub 1 minus x

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boghosian, H.H.; Howson, M.A. (Department of Physics, The University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT, United Kingdom (GB))

    1990-04-15

    We present results for the temperature dependence of electrical conductivity for amorphous V{sub {ital x}}Si{sub 1{minus}{ital x}} alloys. The alloys investigated span the composition range from {ital x}=0.5 to 0.1. For the alloys with more than 20 at. % V, the temperature dependence could be successfully fitted with use of the theories of quantum interference effects, and values for the spin-orbit and inelastic scattering rates are extracted from the fits. As the concentration of V is decreased, there is evidence for a metal-insulator transition seen at around 15 to 13 at. % V. The temperature dependence of the conductivity is surprisingly similar for all the alloys on the metallic side of the transition, showing a clear {ital T}{sup 1/2} dependence at the lowest temperatures while the insulating V{sub 0.1}Si{sub 0.9} alloy shows evidence for variable-range-hopping conduction. The V{sub 0.13}Si{sub 0.87} alloy, which is right at the transition, exhibits an unusual temperature dependence. The sample is metallic and seems to follow a {ital T}{sup 1/3} dependence at low temperatures.

  1. A simple equation for describing the temperature dependent growth of free-floating macrophytes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heide, van Tj.; Roijackers, R.M.M.; Nes, van E.H.; Peeters, E.T.H.M.

    2006-01-01

    Temperature is one of the most important factors determining growth rates of free-floating macrophytes in the field. To analyse and predict temperature dependent growth rates of these pleustophytes, modelling may play an important role. Several equations have been published for describing

  2. Theory of Temperature Dependence of the Magnetization in Rare-Earth-Transition-Metal Alloys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Szpunar, B.; Lindgård, Per-Anker

    1977-01-01

    It is shown that the temperature dependence of the magnetic moments and Curie and ferrimagnetic compensation temperatures for Gdl-xTx (T = Co, Ni, and Fe) and Y1-xCox can be accounted for by a simple model assuming a RKKY interaction between the rare-earth moments and the transition-metal pseudo-...

  3. Indications for a changing electricity demand pattern : The temperature dependence of electricity demand in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hekkenberg, M.; Benders, R. M. J.; Moll, H. C.; Uiterkamp, A. J. M. Schoot

    This study assesses the electricity demand pattern in the relatively temperate climate of the Netherlands (latitude 52 degrees 30'N). Daily electricity demand and average temperature during the period from 1970 until 2007 are investigated for possible trends in the temperature dependence of

  4. Molecular modeling of temperature dependence of solubility parameters for amorphous polymers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, X.; Yuan, C.; Wong, C.K.Y.; Zhang, G.

    2011-01-01

    A molecular modeling strategy is proposed to describe the temperature (T) dependence of solubility parameter (?) for the amorphous polymers which exhibit glass-rubber transition behavior. The commercial forcefield “COMPASS” is used to support the atomistic simulations of the polymer. The temperature

  5. THE TEMPERATURE DEPENDENCE OF THE EMISSION OF PERCHLORO- ETHYLENE FROM DRY CLEANED FABRICS

    Science.gov (United States)

    A study was conducted to evaluate the emission of perchloroethylene (tetrachloroethylene) from freshly dry cleaned fabrics using small environmental test chambers. The temperature dependence of the release of perchloroethylene was evaluated over a temperature range of 20 to 45°C....

  6. Temperature dependence of single-event burnout in n-channel power MOSFET's

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, G. H.; Schrimpf, R. D.; Galloway, K. F.; Koga, R.

    1994-03-01

    The temperature dependence of single-event burnout (SEB) in n-channel power metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistors (MOSFET's) is investigated experimentally and analytically. Experimental data are presented which indicate that the SEB susceptibility of the power MOSFET decreases with increasing temperature. A previously reported analytical model that describes the SEB mechanism is updated to include temperature variations. This model is shown to agree with the experimental trends.

  7. Temperature dependence of fracture toughness in HT9 steel neutron-irradiated up to 145 dpa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baek, Jong-Hyuk [KAERI; Byun, Thak Sang [ORNL; Maloy, S [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Toloczko, M [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)

    2014-01-01

    The temperature dependence of fracture toughness in HT9 steel irradiated to high doses was investigated using miniature three-point bend (TPB) fracture specimens. These specimens were from the ACO-3 fuel duct wall of the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF), in which irradiation doses were in the range of 3.2 144.8 dpa and irradiation temperatures in the range of 380.4 502.6 oC. A miniature specimen reuse technique has been established for this investigation: the specimens used were the tested halves of miniature Charpy impact specimens (~13 3 4 mm) with diamond-saw cut in the middle. The fatigue precracking for specimens and fracture resistance (J-R) tests were carried out in a MTS servo-hydraulic testing machine with a vacuum furnace following the standard procedure described in the ASTM Standard E 1820-09. For each of five irradiated and one archive conditions, 7 to 9 J-R tests were performed at selected temperatures ranging from 22 C to 600 C. The fracture toughness of the irradiated HT9 steel was strongly dependent on irradiation temperatures rather than irradiation dose. When the irradiation temperature was below about 430 C, the fracture toughness of irradiated HT9 increased with test temperature, reached an upper shelf of 180 200 MPa m at 350 450 C and then decreased with test temperature. When the irradiation temperature 430 C, the fracture toughness was nearly unchanged until about 450 C and decreased with test temperature in higher temperature range. Similar test temperature dependence was observed for the archive material although the highest toughness values are lower after irradiation. Ductile stable crack growth occurred except for a few cases where both the irradiation temperature and test temperature are relatively low.

  8. Temperature dependence of spin-orbit torques in Cu-Au alloys

    KAUST Repository

    Wen, Yan

    2017-03-07

    We investigated current driven spin-orbit torques in Cu40Au60/Ni80Fe20/Ti layered structures with in-plane magnetization. We have demonstrated a reliable and convenient method to separate dampinglike torque and fieldlike torque by using the second harmonic technique. It is found that the dampinglike torque and fieldlike torque depend on temperature very differently. Dampinglike torque increases with temperature, while fieldlike torque decreases with temperature, which are different from results obtained previously in other material systems. We observed a nearly linear dependence between the spin Hall angle and longitudinal resistivity, suggesting that skew scattering may be the dominant mechanism of spin-orbit torques.

  9. Molecular modeling of temperature dependence of solubility parameters for amorphous polymers

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, X.; Yuan, C.; Wong, C.K.Y.; Zhang, G

    2011-01-01

    A molecular modeling strategy is proposed to describe the temperature (T) dependence of solubility parameter (δ) for the amorphous polymers which exhibit glass-rubber transition behavior. The commercial forcefield “COMPASS” is used to support the atomistic simulations of the polymer. The temperature dependence behavior of δ for the polymer is modeled by running molecular dynamics (MD) simulation at temperatures ranging from 250 up to 650 K. Comparing the MD predicted δ value at 298 K and the ...

  10. Temperature Dependent Fracture Model and its Application to Ultra Heavy Thick Steel Plate Used for Shipbuilding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Yun Chan; Lee, Youngseog; An, Gyu Baek; Park, Joon Sik; Lee, Jong Bong; Kim, Sung Il

    In this study, experimental and numerical studies were performed to examine the effects of thickness of steel plate on the arrest fracture toughness. The ESSO tests were performed with the steel plates having temperature gradient along the crack propagation direction. A temperature dependent crack initiation criterion was proposed as well. A series of three-dimensional FEA was then carried out to simulate the ESSO test while the thickness of the steel plate varies. Results reveal that a temperature dependent brittle criterion proposed in this study can describe the fracture behavior properly.

  11. Equation of states and melting temperatures of diamond cubic and zincblende semiconductors: pressure dependence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hung, V V; Hanh, P T M [Hanoi National Pedagogic University, Km8 Hanoi-Sontay Highway, Hanoi (Viet Nam); Masuda-Jindo, K [Department of Material Science and Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Nagasuta, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-8503 (Japan); Hai, N T [Hanoi University of Technology, 01 Dai Co Viet Road, Hanoi (Viet Nam)], E-mail: kmjindo@issp.u-tokyo.ac.jp

    2008-02-15

    The pressure dependence of the melting temperatures of tetrahedrally coordinated semiconductors are studied using the equation of states derived from the statistical moment method, in comparison with those of the normal metals. Using the general expressions of the limiting temperatures T{sub m}, we calculate the 'melting' temperatures of the semiconductor crystals and normal metals as a function of the hydrostatic pressure. The physical origins for the inverse pressure dependence of T{sub m} observed for tetrahedrally coordinated semiconductors are also discussed.

  12. Temperature dependence of universal conductance fluctuation due to development of weak localization in graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terasawa, D.; Fukuda, A.; Fujimoto, A.; Ohno, Y.; Matsumoto, K.

    2017-11-01

    The temperature effect of quantum interference on resistivity is examined in monolayer graphene, with experimental results showing that the amplitude of the conductance fluctuation increases as temperature decreases. We find that this behavior can be attributed to the decrease in the inelastic scattering (dephasing) rate, which enhances the weak localization (WL) correction to resistivity. Following a previous report that explained the relationship between the universal conductance fluctuation (UCF) and WL regarding the gate voltage dependence (Terasawa et al., 2017) [19], we propose that the temperature dependence of the UCF in monolayer graphene can be interpreted by the WL theory.

  13. Fast and slow thermal processes in harmonic scalar lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzkin, V. A.; Krivtsov, A. M.

    2017-12-01

    An approach for analytical description of thermal processes in harmonic lattices is presented. We cover longitudinal and transverse vibrations of chains and out-of-plane vibrations of two-dimensional lattices with interactions of an arbitrary number of neighbors. The motion of each particle is governed by a single scalar equation and therefore the notion ‘scalar lattice’ is used. The evolution of initial temperature field in an infinite lattice is investigated. An exact equation describing the evolution is derived. Continualization of this equation with respect to spatial coordinates is carried out. The resulting continuum equation is solved analytically. The solution shows that the kinetic temperature is represented as the sum of two terms, one describing short time behavior, the other large time behavior. At short times, the temperature performs high-frequency oscillations caused by redistribution of energy among kinetic and potential forms (fast process). Characteristic time of this process is of the order of ten periods of atomic vibrations. At large times, changes of the temperature are caused by ballistic heat transfer (slow process). The temperature field is represented as a superposition of waves having the shape of initial temperature distribution and propagating with group velocities dependent on the wave vector. Expressions describing fast and slow processes are invariant with respect to substitution t by -t . However, examples considered in the paper demonstrate that these processes are irreversible. Numerical simulations show that presented theory describes the evolution of temperature field at short and large time scales with high accuracy.

  14. Using extrathermodynamic relationships to model the temperature dependence of Henry's law constants of 209 PCB congeners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bamford, Holly A; Poster, Dianne L; Huie, Robert E; Baker, Joel E

    2002-10-15

    Our previous measurements of the temperature dependencies of Henry's law constants of 26 polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) showed a well-defined linear relationship between the enthalpy and the entropy of phase change. Within a homologue group, the Henry's law constants converged to a common value at a specific isoequilibrium temperature. We use this relationship to model the temperature dependencies of the Henry's law constants of the remaining PCB congeners. By using experimentally measured Henry's law constants at 11 degrees C for 61 PCB congeners described in this paper combined with the isoequilibrium temperatures from our previous measurements of Henry's law constants of 26 PCB congeners, we have derived an empirical relationship between the enthalpies and the entropies of phase change for these additional PCB congeners. A systematic variation in the enthalpies and entropies of phase change was found to be partially dependent on the chlorine number and substitution patterns on the biphenyl rings, allowing further estimation of the temperature dependence of Henry's law constants for the remaining 122 PCB congeners. The enthalpies of phase change for all 209 PCB congeners ranged between 10 and 169 kJ mol(-1), where the enthalpies of phase change decreased as the number of ortho chlorine substitutions on the biphenyl rings increased within homologue groups. These data are used to predict the temperature dependence of Henry's law constants for all 209 PCB congeners.

  15. Temperature dependence of the ClONO{sub 2} UV absorption spectrum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burkholder, J.B.; Talukdar, R.K.; Ravishankara, A.R. [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States)

    1994-04-01

    The temperature dependence of the ClONO{sub 2} absorption spectrum has been measured between 220 and 298 K and between 195 and 430 nm using a diode array spectrometer. The absorption cross sections were determined using both: (1) absolute pressure measurements at 296 K and (2) measurements at various temperatures relative to 296 K using a dual absorption cell arrangement. The temperature dependence of the ClONO{sub 2} absorption spectrum shows very broad structure. The amplitude of the temperature dependence relative to that at 296 K is weak at short wavelengths, < 2% at 215 nm and 220 K, but significant at the wavelengths important in the stratosphere, {approximately} 30% at 325 nm and 220 K. The authors ClONO{sub 2} absorption cross section data are in good general agreement with the previous measurements of Molina and Molina.

  16. Temperature dependence of the ClONO2 UV absorption spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkholder, James B.; Talukdar, Ranajit K.; Ravishankara, A. R.

    1994-01-01

    The temperature dependence of the ClONO2 absorption spectrum has been measured between 220 and 298 K and between 195 and 430 nm using a diode array spectrometer. The absorption cross sections were determined using both: (1) absolute pressure measurements at 296 K and (2) measurements at various temperatures relative to 296 K using a dual absorption cell arrangement. The temperature dependence of the ClONO2 absorption spectrum shows very broad structure. The amplitude of the temperature dependence relative to that at 296 K is weak at short wavelengths, less than 2% at 215 nm and 220 K, but significant at the wavelengths important in the stratosphere, about 30% at 325 nm and 220 K. Our ClONO2 absorption cross section data are in good general agreement with the previous measurements of Molina and Molina (1979).

  17. Viscosity analysis of the temperature dependence of the solution conformation of ovalbumin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monkos, K

    2000-05-31

    The viscosity of ovalbumin aqueous solutions was studied as a function of temperature and of protein concentration. Viscosity-temperature dependence was discussed on the basis of the modified Arrhenius formula at temperatures ranging from 5 to 55 degrees C. The activation energy of viscous flow for hydrated and unhydrated ovalbumin was calculated. Viscosity-concentration dependence, in turn, was discussed on the basis of Mooney equation. It has been shown that the shape parameter S decreases with increasing temperature, and self-crowding factor K does not depend on temperature. At low concentration limit the numerical values of the intrinsic viscosity and of Huggins coefficient were calculated. A master curve relating the specific viscosity etasp to the reduced concentration c[eta], over the whole range of temperature, was obtained and the three ranges of concentrations: diluted, semi-diluted and concentrated, are discussed. It has been proved that the Mark-Houvink-Kuhn-Sakurada (MHKS) exponent for ovalbumin does not depend on temperature.

  18. Improved Regression Analysis of Temperature-Dependent Strain-Gage Balance Calibration Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulbrich, N.

    2015-01-01

    An improved approach is discussed that may be used to directly include first and second order temperature effects in the load prediction algorithm of a wind tunnel strain-gage balance. The improved approach was designed for the Iterative Method that fits strain-gage outputs as a function of calibration loads and uses a load iteration scheme during the wind tunnel test to predict loads from measured gage outputs. The improved approach assumes that the strain-gage balance is at a constant uniform temperature when it is calibrated and used. First, the method introduces a new independent variable for the regression analysis of the balance calibration data. The new variable is designed as the difference between the uniform temperature of the balance and a global reference temperature. This reference temperature should be the primary calibration temperature of the balance so that, if needed, a tare load iteration can be performed. Then, two temperature{dependent terms are included in the regression models of the gage outputs. They are the temperature difference itself and the square of the temperature difference. Simulated temperature{dependent data obtained from Triumph Aerospace's 2013 calibration of NASA's ARC-30K five component semi{span balance is used to illustrate the application of the improved approach.

  19. 2D lattice formation by YAG:Nd laser on the surface of Ge single crystal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Medvid, A. [Riga Technical University, Laboratory of Semiconductor Physics, LV-1048, 14 Azenes Str. (Latvia)]. E-mail: medvids@latnet.lv; Fukuda, Y. [Research Institute of Electronics, Shizuoka University, 3-5-1 Johoku, Hamamatsu 432-8011 (Japan); Michko, A. [Riga Technical University, Laboratory of Semiconductor Physics, LV-1048, 14 Azenes Str. (Latvia); Onufrievs, P. [Riga Technical University, Laboratory of Semiconductor Physics, LV-1048, 14 Azenes Str. (Latvia); Anma, Y. [Research Institute of Electronics, Shizuoka University, 3-5-1 Johoku, Hamamatsu 432-8011 (Japan)

    2005-05-15

    Experimentally observed self-organization of a 2D lattice on the surface of Ge single crystal after irradiation by pulsed YAG:Nd laser is reported. The 2D lattice consists of nano-size elevations arranged in a pattern of C{sub 6i} point group symmetry and is characterized by translational symmetry with the period of 1 {mu}m. Calculations of time depended distribution of temperature in the bulk of the Ge sample are presented to explain the phenomenon. The calculations show that overheating of the crystal lattice occurs at laser radiation intensities exceeding 30 MW/cm{sup 2}. According to synergetic ideas, the presence of the non-equilibrium liquid phase of Ge and huge gradient of temperature ({approx}3 x 10{sup 8} K/m) can lead to self-organization of the 2D lattice similar to Bernar's cells.

  20. What Can We Learn from a Detailed Study of the Temperature Dependence of σ, the Width of the Pair Distribution Function?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridges, F.; Downward, L.; Jiang, Y.; O'Brien, T.

    2007-02-01

    In many systems there is a significant coupling between the local structure and other properties of the system such as magnetism, electrical and thermal transport, metal/insulator transitions etc. In such materials, a detailed temperature-dependent study of the width of the Pair Distribution Function (PDF), σ, can separate different contributions and provide a connection between the observed macroscopic observations and the underlying atomic interactions that produce them. The usual model for simple systems is that the T-dependence of σ2 is described by an Einstein or Correlated Debye model, with one characteristic temperature for the system; in such models σ2(T) increases smoothly with T and has a slowly increasing slope. However that is not always the case: in structures with large unit cells containing several types of atoms, some atoms in the crystal can have a low Einstein temperature while others have a very high correlated Debye temperature as observed in a number of thermoelectric systems (skutterudites and clathrates). In others systems such as the negative thermal expansion material ZrW2O8, the same atom cam be involved in both low and high temperature Einstein modes. Vibrations of atoms (or molecular unit) described by a low Einstein temperature often control/determine the lattice properties. In other systems there are deviations from the T-dependence expected for either the Einstein or correlated Debye models — such as a small increase in σ2 at low temperatures for the Ru-Ru pair in PrRu4Sb12 which has a metal/insulator transition near 60K, or a very sharp step in σ2(T) observed in the bilayer colossal magnetoresistance system La2-2xSr1+2xMn2O7 at the ferromagnetic transition. We discuss broadening of the PDF in more complex systems, show some simulations and then present several recent examples.

  1. Temperature dependences of the contact resistivity in ohmic contacts to n{sup +}-InN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sachenko, A. V.; Belyaev, A. E. [National Academy of Sciences, Lashkaryov Institute of Semiconductor Physics (Ukraine); Boltovets, N. S. [“Orion” Research Institute (Ukraine); Brunkov, P. N.; Jmerik, V. N.; Ivanov, S. V. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ioffe Physical-Technical Institute (Russian Federation); Kapitanchuk, L. M. [National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Paton Electric Welding Institute (Ukraine); Konakova, R. V., E-mail: konakova@isp.kiev.ua; Klad’ko, V. P.; Romanets, P. N.; Saja, P. O.; Safryuk, N. V.; Sheremet, V. N. [National Academy of Sciences, Lashkaryov Institute of Semiconductor Physics (Ukraine)

    2015-04-15

    The temperature dependences of the contact resistivity (ρ{sub c}) of ohmic contacts based on the Au-Ti-Pd-InN system are measured at an InN doping level of 2 × 10{sup 18} cm{sup −3} in the temperature range of 4.2–300 K. At temperatures T > 150 K, linearly increasing dependences ρ{sub c}(T) are obtained. The dependences are explained within the mechanism of thermionic current flow through metal shunts associated with dislocations. Good agreement between theoretical and experimental dependences is achieved assuming that the flowing current is limited by the total resistance of the metal shunts, and the density of conductive dislocations is ∼5 × 10{sup 9} cm{sup −2}. Using the X-ray diffraction method, the density of screw and edge dislocations in the structure under study is measured: their total density exceeds 10{sup 10} cm{sup −2}.

  2. Influence of excitation power density on temperature dependencies of NaYF4: Yb, Er nanoparticles luminescence spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ustalkov, Sergey O.; Kozlova, Ekaterina A.; Savenko, Olga A.; Mohammed, Ammar H. M.; Kochubey, Vyacheslav I.; Skaptsov, Alexander A.

    2017-03-01

    Upconversion nanoparticles are good candidates for nanothermometry. The wavelength of the excitation and luminescence lie in optical window. The influence of the excitation power density on the luminescence temperature dependences is studded. Ratio of luminescence intensities linearly depends on temperature.

  3. Temperature-dependent subsurface growth during atomic layer deposition on polypropylene and cellulose fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jur, Jesse S; Spagnola, Joseph C; Lee, Kyoungmi; Gong, Bo; Peng, Qing; Parsons, Gregory N

    2010-06-01

    Nucleation and subsequent growth of aluminum oxide by atomic layer deposition (ALD) on polypropylene fiber substrates is strongly dependent on processing temperature and polymer backbone structure. Deposition on cellulose cotton, which contains ample hydroxyl sites for ALD nucleation and growth on the polymer backbone, readily produces a uniform and conformal coating. However, similar ALD processing on polypropylene, which contains no readily available active sites for growth initiation, results in a graded and intermixed polymer/inorganic interface layer. The structure of the polymer/inorganic layer depends strongly on the process temperature, where lower temperature (60 degrees C) produced a more abrupt transition. Cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy images of polypropylene fibers coated at higher temperature (90 degrees C) show that non-coalesced particles form in the near-surface region of the polymer, and the particles grow in size and coalesce into a film as the number of ALD cycles increases. Quartz crystal microbalance analysis on polypropylene films confirms enhanced mass uptake at higher processing temperatures, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy data also confirm heterogeneous mixing between the aluminum oxide and the polypropylene during deposition at higher temperatures. The strong temperature dependence of film nucleation and subsurface growth is ascribed to a relatively large increase in bulk species diffusivity that occurs upon the temperature-driven free volume expansion of the polypropylene. These results provide helpful insight into mechanisms for controlled organic/inorganic thin film and fiber materials integration.

  4. Elevated temperature dependent transport properties of phosphorus and arsenic doped zinc oxide thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, B.; Nakarmi, M. L.; Oder, T. N.; McMaster, M.; Velpukonda, N.; Smith, A.

    2013-12-01

    Elevated temperature dependent Hall effect measurements were performed in a wide temperature range from 80 to 800 K to study transport properties of zinc oxide (ZnO) thin films heavily doped with phosphorus (P) and arsenic (As), and grown on sapphire substrates by RF magnetron sputtering. Double thermal activation processes in both P- and As-doped ZnO thin films with small activation energy of ˜0.04 eV and large activation energy of ˜0.8 eV were observed from variable temperature Hall effect measurements. The samples exhibited n-type conductivities throughout the temperature range. Based on photoluminescence measurements at 11 K and theoretical results, the large activation energy observed in the temperature dependent Hall effect measurement has been assigned to a deep donor level, which could be related to oxygen vacancy (VO) in the doped ZnO thin films.

  5. Temperature Dependence of Sound Velocity in High-Strength Fiber-Reinforced Plastics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomura, Ryuji; Yoneyama, Keiichi; Ogasawara, Futoshi; Ueno, Masashi; Okuda, Yuichi; Yamanaka, Atsuhiko

    2003-08-01

    Longitudinal sound velocity in unidirectional hybrid composites or high-strength fiber-reinforced plastics (FRPs) was measured along the fiber axis over a wide temperature range (from 77 K to 420 K). We investigated two kinds of high-strength crystalline polymer fibers, polyethylene (Dyneema) and polybenzobisoxazole (Zylon), which are known to have negative thermal expansion coefficients and high thermal conductivities along the fiber axis. Both FRPs had very high sound velocities of about 9000 m/s at low temperatures and their temperature dependences were very strong. Sound velocity monotonically decreased with increasing temperature. The temperature dependence of sound velocity was much stronger in Dyneema-FRP than in Zylon-FRP.

  6. Temperature dependence of stress in CVD diamond films studied by Raman spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dychalska Anna

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Evolution of residual stress and its components with increasing temperature in chemical vapor deposited (CVD diamond films has a crucial impact on their high temperature applications. In this work we investigated temperature dependence of stress in CVD diamond film deposited on Si(100 substrate in the temperature range of 30 °C to 480 °C by Raman mapping measurement. Raman shift of the characteristic diamond band peaked at 1332 cm-1 was studied to evaluate the residual stress distribution at the diamond surface. A new approach was applied to calculate thermal stress evolution with increasing tempera­ture by using two commonly known equations. Comparison of the residts obtained from the two methods was presented. The intrinsic stress component was calculated from the difference between average values of residual and thermal stress and then its temperature dependence was discussed.

  7. Temperature dependence of the photoluminescence of MnS/ZnS core—shell quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Dai-Feng; Ding, Xing; Dai, Ru-Cheng; Zhao, Zhi; Wang, Zhong-Ping; Zhang, Zeng-Ming

    2014-12-01

    The temperature dependence of the photoluminescence (PL) from MnS/ZnS core—shell quantum dots is investigated in a temperature range of 8 K-300 K. The orange emission from the 4T1 → 6A1 transition of Mn2+ ions and the blue emission related to the trapped surface state are observed in the MnS/ZnS core—shell quantum dots. As the temperature increases, the orange emission is shifted toward a shorter wavelength while the blue emission is shifted towards the longer wavelength. Both the orange and blue emissions reduce their intensities with the increase of temperature but the blue emission is quenched faster. The temperature-dependent luminescence intensities of the two emissions are well explained by the thermal quenching theory.

  8. Temperature Dependent Electrical and Micromechanical Properties of Lanthanum Titanate with Additions of Yttria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldsby, Jon C.

    2003-01-01

    Lanthanum titanate (La2Ti2O7) a layered distorted perovskite (1) with space group Pna2(sub 1) has been shown to have potential as a high temperature piezoelectric (2). However this highly refractory oxide compound must be consolidated at relatively high temperatures approximately 1400 C. Commercial La2Ti207 powders were mechanically alloyed with additions of Y2O3 to lower the consolidation temperature by 300 C and to provide post processing mechanical stability. Temperature dependent electrical, elastic and anelastic behavior were selected as nondestructive means of evaluating the effects of yttria on the properties of this ferroceramic material.

  9. Reversing the temperature dependence of the sensitized Er3+ luminescence intensity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenz, F.; Hryciw, A.; DeCorby, R.; Meldrum, A.

    2009-08-01

    The temperature-induced quenching of the Er3+ luminescence is a significant problem in silicon-based materials systems ultimately designed for room-temperature applications. Here, we show that amorphous silicon-rich oxide, moderately annealed in order to avoid growth of Si nanocrystals, exhibits a reversed temperature dependence in which the integrated Er3+ luminescence increases in intensity upon heating from 77 up to 300 K. This behavior is attributed to a unique spectrum of interacting defects that efficiently sensitize the Er3+ levels, even in the absence of nanocrystals. The effect could have ramifications in fiber-optic emitters or amplifiers to be operated at noncryogenic temperatures.

  10. Simulation study of temperature-dependent diffusion behaviors of Ag/Ag(001) at low substrate temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cai, Danyun; Mo, Yunjie [State Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Materials and Technologies, School of Electronics and Information Technology, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, 510275 (China); Feng, Xiaofang [State Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Materials and Technologies, School of Physics, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, 510275 (China); He, Yingyou [State Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Materials and Technologies, School of Electronics and Information Technology, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, 510275 (China); Jiang, Shaoji, E-mail: stsjsj@mail.sysu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Materials and Technologies, School of Physics, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, 510275 (China)

    2017-06-01

    Highlights: • The model of combinations of nearest-neighbor atoms of adatom was built to calculate the diffusion barrier of every configuration for Ag/Ag(001). • The complete potential energy curve of a specific diffusion path on the surface was worked out with the help of elementary diffusion behaviors. • The non-monotonic relation between the surface roughness and the substrate temperature (decreasing from 300 K to 100 K) was demonstrated. • A theoretical explanation of diffusion mechanism for the non-monotonic variation of roughness at low substrate temperature was presented. - Abstract: In this study, a model based on the First Principles calculations and Kinetic Monte Carlo simulation were established to study the growth characteristic of Ag thin film at low substrate temperature. On the basis of the interaction between the adatom and nearest-neighbor atoms, some simplifications and assumptions were made to categorize the diffusion behaviors of Ag adatoms on Ag(001). Then the barriers of all possible diffusion behaviors were calculated using the Climbing Image Nudged Elastic Band method (CI-NEB). Based on the Arrhenius formula, the morphology variation, which is attributed to the surface diffusion behaviors during the growth, was simulated with a temperature-dependent KMC model. With this model, a non-monotonic relation between the surface roughness and the substrate temperature (decreasing from 300 K to 100 K) were discovered. The analysis of the temperature dependence on diffusion behaviors presents a theoretical explanation of diffusion mechanism for the non-monotonic variation of roughness at low substrate temperature.

  11. Proposal of new 235U nuclear data to improve keff biases on 235U enrichment and temperature for low enriched uranium fueled lattices moderated by light water

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, H; 奥村 啓介; 柴田 恵一

    2005-01-01

    The under prediction of keff depending on 235U enrichment in low enriched uranium fueled systems was studied in this report. Benchmark testing was carried out with several evaluated nuclear data files, including the new uranium evaluations from preliminary ENDF/B-VII and CENDL-3.1. Another problem reviewed here was keff underestimation vs. temperature increase, which was observed in the slightly enriched system with recent JENDL and ENDF/B uranium evaluations. Through the substitute analysis ...

  12. Bottomonium suppression using a lattice QCD vetted potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krouppa, Brandon; Rothkopf, Alexander; Strickland, Michael

    2018-01-01

    We estimate bottomonium yields in relativistic heavy-ion collisions using a lattice QCD vetted, complex-valued, heavy-quark potential embedded in a realistic, hydrodynamically evolving medium background. We find that the lattice-vetted functional form and temperature dependence of the proper heavy-quark potential dramatically reduces the dependence of the yields on parameters other than the temperature evolution, strengthening the picture of bottomonium as QGP thermometer. Our results also show improved agreement between computed yields and experimental data produced in RHIC 200 GeV /nucleon collisions. For LHC 2.76 TeV /nucleon collisions, the excited states, whose suppression has been used as a vital sign for quark-gluon-plasma production in a heavy-ion collision, are reproduced better than previous perturbatively-motivated potential models; however, at the highest LHC energies our estimates for bottomonium suppression begin to underestimate the data. Possible paths to remedy this situation are discussed.

  13. Temperature dependent electron paramagnetic resonance study on magnetoelectric YCrO3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mall, Ashish Kumar; Dixit, Ambesh; Garg, Ashish; Gupta, Rajeev

    2017-12-01

    We report temperature dependent electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) studies on polycrystalline YCrO3 samples at X-band (9.46 GHz) in the temperature range of 120 K–298 K. The EPR spectra exhibit a single broad line across the whole temperature range, attributed to Cr3+ ions. The variation of EPR spectra parameters (line width, integrated intensity, and g-factor) as a function of temperature was analyzed to understand the nature of spin-dynamics in the paramagnetic region of YCrO3. A peak in the g-factor suggests the presence of a new phase within the paramagnetic state at an intermediate point of temperature T IP ~ 230 K, attributed to the onset of short range canted antiferromagnetic correlations in the material much above 140 K, Néel temperature (T N) of YCrO3. The EPR intensity increases with a decrease in temperature up to T N due to the renormalization of the magnetic moments arising from the appearance of canted antiferromagnetic correlations. Further, temperature dependent dielectric measurements also exhibit an anomaly at ~230 K suggesting the presence of magnetodielectric coupling in YCrO3, with a possibility towards a relatively high temperature magnetodielectric system.

  14. Temperature dependence of a microstructured SiC coherent thermal source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hervé, Armande; Drévillon, Jérémie; Ezzahri, Younès; Joulain, Karl; De Sousa Meneses, Domingos; Hugonin, Jean-Paul

    2016-09-01

    By ruling a grating on a polar material that supports surface phonon-polaritons such as silicon carbide (SiC), it is possible to create directional and monochromatic thermal sources. So far, most of the studies have considered only materials with room temperature properties as the ones tabulated in Palik's handbooks. Recently, measurements have provided experimental data of the SiC dielectric function at different temperatures. Here we study, numerically, the effect of the temperature dependence of the dielectric function on the thermal emission of SiC gratings (1D grating, in a first approach), heated at different temperatures. When materials are heated, the position of the grating emissivity peak shifts towards higher wavelength values. A second consequence of the temperature dependence of optical properties is that room temperature designed gratings are not optimal for higher temperatures. However, by modifying the grating parameters, it is possible to find an emission peak, with a maximum of emissivity near 1, for each temperature. We tried first to catch some patterns in the emissivity variation. Then, we obtained a grating, which leads to an optimum emissivity for all available temperature data for SiC.

  15. Temperature and humidity dependence of secondary organic aerosol yield from the ozonolysis of β-pinene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. von Hessberg

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The temperature dependence of secondary organic aerosol (SOA formation from ozonolysis of β-pinene was studied in a flow reactor at 263 K–303 K and 1007 hPa under dry and humid conditions (0% and 26%–68% relative humidity, respectively. The observed SOA yields reached maximum values of 0.18–0.39 at high particle mass concentrations (Mo. Under dry conditions, the measurement data showed an overall increase in SOA yield with inverse temperature, but significant oscillatory deviations from the predicted linear increase with inverse temperature (up to 50% at high Mo was observed. Under humid conditions the SOA yield exhibited a linear decrease with inverse temperature. For the atmospherically relevant concentration level of Mo=10 μg m−3 and temperature range 263 K–293 K, the results from humid experiments in this study indicate that the SOA yield of β-pinene ozonolysis may be well represented by an average value of 0.15 with an uncertainty estimate of ±0.05. When fitting the measurement data with a two-product model, both the partitioning coefficients (Kom,i and the stoichiometric yields (αi of the low-volatile and semi-volatile model species were found to vary with temperature. The results indicate that not only the reaction product vapour pressures but also the relative contributions of different gas-phase or multiphase reaction channels are strongly dependent on temperature and the presence of water vapour. In fact, the oscillatory positive temperature dependence observed under dry conditions and the negative temperature dependence observed under humid conditions indicate that the SOA yield is governed much more by the temperature and humidity dependence of the involved chemical reactions than by vapour pressure temperature dependencies. We suggest that the elucidation and modelling of SOA formation need to take into account the

  16. A space and time scale-dependent nonlinear geostatistical approach for downscaling daily precipitation and temperature

    KAUST Repository

    Jha, Sanjeev Kumar

    2015-07-21

    A geostatistical framework is proposed to downscale daily precipitation and temperature. The methodology is based on multiple-point geostatistics (MPS), where a multivariate training image is used to represent the spatial relationship between daily precipitation and daily temperature over several years. Here, the training image consists of daily rainfall and temperature outputs from the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model at 50 km and 10 km resolution for a twenty year period ranging from 1985 to 2004. The data are used to predict downscaled climate variables for the year 2005. The result, for each downscaled pixel, is daily time series of precipitation and temperature that are spatially dependent. Comparison of predicted precipitation and temperature against a reference dataset indicates that both the seasonal average climate response together with the temporal variability are well reproduced. The explicit inclusion of time dependence is explored by considering the climate properties of the previous day as an additional variable. Comparison of simulations with and without inclusion of time dependence shows that the temporal dependence only slightly improves the daily prediction because the temporal variability is already well represented in the conditioning data. Overall, the study shows that the multiple-point geostatistics approach is an efficient tool to be used for statistical downscaling to obtain local scale estimates of precipitation and temperature from General Circulation Models. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  17. Homogeneous broadening effect on temperature dependence of green upconversion luminescence in erbium doped fibers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Egatz-Gómez, A. [Facultad de Óptica y Optometría, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Arcos de Jalón 118, Madrid 28037 (Spain); Department of Biomedical Engineering, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX 77843 (United States); Calderón, Oscar G., E-mail: oscargc@fis.ucm.es [Facultad de Óptica y Optometría, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Arcos de Jalón 118, Madrid 28037 (Spain); Melle, Sonia; Carreño, F.; Antón, M.A. [Facultad de Óptica y Optometría, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Arcos de Jalón 118, Madrid 28037 (Spain); Gort, Elske M. [Facultad de Óptica y Optometría, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Arcos de Jalón 118, Madrid 28037 (Spain); Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Groningen, 9700 RB Groningen (Netherlands)

    2013-07-15

    We study the green upconversion luminescence of Er{sup 3+} ions in an aluminosilicate optical fiber upon near infrared excitation at 787 nm. The dependence of the upconversion luminescence on temperature has been determined. As temperature drops from room to cryogenic temperatures, the upconversion green emission reaches a maximum around 40 K, and then decreases. A nearly quadratic dependence of the upconversion luminescence with excitation power is found, which is consistent with a sequential stepwise two-photon absorption process. These results have been explained with a semiclassical model that considers the inhomogeneous broadening of the optical transitions due to glass imperfections, and the dependence of the homogeneous linewidth broadening on temperature. -- Highlights: ► We study green upconversion luminescence of Er{sup 3+} ions in a fiber excited at 787 nm. ► Upconversion luminescence variation from room to cryogenic temperature is analyzed. ► Upconversion emission consists in a sequential two-photon absorption process. ► A semiclassical model considering inhomogeneous broadening explains the results. ► Homogeneous broadening is responsible for the upconversion temperature dependence.

  18. Temperature dependence of the superconducting proximity effect quantified by scanning tunneling spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Stępniak

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Here, we present the first systematic study on the temperature dependence of the extension of the superconducting proximity effect in a 1–2 atomic layer thin metallic film, surrounding a superconducting Pb island. Scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy (STM/STS measurements reveal the spatial variation of the local density of state on the film from 0.38 up to 1.8 K. In this temperature range the superconductivity of the island is almost unaffected and shows a constant gap of a 1.20 ± 0.03 meV. Using a superconducting Nb-tip a constant value of the proximity length of 17 ± 3 nm at 0.38 and 1.8 K is found. In contrast, experiments with a normal conductive W-tip indicate an apparent decrease of the proximity length with increasing temperature. This result is ascribed to the thermal broadening of the occupation of states of the tip, and it does not reflect an intrinsic temperature dependence of the proximity length. Our tunneling spectroscopy experiments shed fresh light on the fundamental issue of the temperature dependence of the proximity effect for atomic monolayers, where the intrinsic temperature dependence of the proximity effect is comparably weak.

  19. Molecular modeling of temperature dependence of solubility parameters for amorphous polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xianping; Yuan, Cadmus; Wong, Cell K Y; Zhang, Guoqi

    2012-06-01

    A molecular modeling strategy is proposed to describe the temperature (T) dependence of solubility parameter (δ) for the amorphous polymers which exhibit glass-rubber transition behavior. The commercial forcefield "COMPASS" is used to support the atomistic simulations of the polymer. The temperature dependence behavior of δ for the polymer is modeled by running molecular dynamics (MD) simulation at temperatures ranging from 250 up to 650 K. Comparing the MD predicted δ value at 298 K and the glass transition temperature (T(g)) of the polymer determined from δ-T curve with the experimental value confirm the accuracy of our method. The MD modeled relationship between δ and T agrees well with the previous theoretical works. We also observe the specific volume (v), cohesive energy (U(coh)), cohesive energy density (E(CED)) and δ shows a similar temperature dependence characteristics and a drastic change around the T(g). Meanwhile, the applications of δ and its temperature dependence property are addressed and discussed.

  20. A theoretical analysis for temperature dependences of laser-induced damage threshold

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikami, K.; Motokoshi, S.; Somekawa, T.; Jitsuno, T.; Fujita, M.; Tanaka, K. A.

    2013-11-01

    The temperature dependence of the laser-induced damage threshold on optical coatings was studied in detail for laser pulses from 123 K to 473 K at different temperature using Nd:YAG laser (wavelength 1064 nm and pulse width 4 ns) and Ti:Sapphire laser (wavelength 800 nm and pulse width 100 fs, 2 ps, and 200 ps). The six kinds of optical monolayer coatings were prepared by electron beam evaporation and the coating materials were SiO2, Al2O3, HfO2, ZrO2, Ta2O5, and MgF2. For pulses longer than a few picoseconds, the laser-induced damage threshold of single-layer coatings increased with decreasing temperature. This temperature dependence was reversed for pulses shorter than a few picoseconds. We describe the physics models to explain the observed scaling. The electron avalanche is essential to explain the differences in the temperature dependence. In other words, the balance between linear process such as electron avalanche etc. and nonlinear process such as multiphoton ionization etc. will be able to decide the tendency of the temperature dependence. The proposed model also gives one of possibility for an extremely high LIDT optics.

  1. Congruence amalgamation of lattices

    CERN Document Server

    Grätzer, G; Wehrung, F; Gr\\"{a}tzer, George; Lakser, Harry; Wehrung, Friedrich

    2000-01-01

    J. Tuma proved an interesting "congruence amalgamation" result. We are generalizing and providing an alternate proof for it. We then provide applications of this result: --A.P. Huhn proved that every distributive algebraic lattice $D$ with at most $\\aleph\\_1$ compact elements can be represented as the congruence lattice of a lattice $L$. We show that $L$ can be constructed as a locally finite relatively complemented lattice with zero. --We find a large class of lattices, the $\\omega$-congruence-finite lattices, that contains all locally finite countable lattices, in which every lattice has a relatively complemented congruence-preserving extension.

  2. Temperature-Dependent Ellipsometry Measurements of Partial Coulomb Energy in Superconducting Cuprates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levallois, J.; Tran, M. K.; Pouliot, D.; Presura, C. N.; Greene, L. H.; Eckstein, J. N.; Uccelli, J.; Giannini, E.; Gu, G. D.; Leggett, A. J.; van der Marel, D.

    2016-07-01

    We performed an experimental study of the temperature and doping dependence of the energy-loss function of the bilayer and trilayer bismuth cuprates family. The primary aim is to obtain information on the energy stored in the Coulomb interaction between the conduction electrons, on the temperature dependence thereof, and on the change of Coulomb interaction when Cooper pairs are formed. We performed temperature-dependent ellipsometry measurements on several Bi2 Sr2 CaCu2 O8 -x single crystals: underdoped with Tc=60 , 70, and 83 K; optimally doped with Tc=91 K ; overdoped with Tc=84 , 81, 70, and 58 K; as well as optimally doped Bi2 Sr2 Ca2 Cu3 O10 +x with Tc=110 K . Our first observation is that, as the temperature drops through Tc, the loss function in the range up to 2 eV displays a change of temperature dependence as compared to the temperature dependence in the normal state. This effect at—or close to—Tc depends strongly on doping, with a sign change for weak overdoping. The size of the observed change in Coulomb energy, using an extrapolation with reasonable assumptions about its q dependence, is about the same size as the condensation energy that has been measured in these compounds. Our results therefore lend support to the notion that the Coulomb energy is an important factor for stabilizing the superconducting phase. Because of the restriction to small momentum, our observations do not exclude a possible significant contribution to the condensation energy of the Coulomb energy associated with the region of q around (π ,π ).

  3. Temperature-Dependent Ellipsometry Measurements of Partial Coulomb Energy in Superconducting Cuprates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Levallois

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available We performed an experimental study of the temperature and doping dependence of the energy-loss function of the bilayer and trilayer bismuth cuprates family. The primary aim is to obtain information on the energy stored in the Coulomb interaction between the conduction electrons, on the temperature dependence thereof, and on the change of Coulomb interaction when Cooper pairs are formed. We performed temperature-dependent ellipsometry measurements on several Bi_{2}Sr_{2}CaCu_{2}O_{8-x} single crystals: underdoped with T_{c}=60, 70, and 83 K; optimally doped with T_{c}=91  K; overdoped with T_{c}=84, 81, 70, and 58 K; as well as optimally doped Bi_{2}Sr_{2}Ca_{2}Cu_{3}O_{10+x} with T_{c}=110  K. Our first observation is that, as the temperature drops through T_{c}, the loss function in the range up to 2 eV displays a change of temperature dependence as compared to the temperature dependence in the normal state. This effect at—or close to—T_{c} depends strongly on doping, with a sign change for weak overdoping. The size of the observed change in Coulomb energy, using an extrapolation with reasonable assumptions about its q dependence, is about the same size as the condensation energy that has been measured in these compounds. Our results therefore lend support to the notion that the Coulomb energy is an important factor for stabilizing the superconducting phase. Because of the restriction to small momentum, our observations do not exclude a possible significant contribution to the condensation energy of the Coulomb energy associated with the region of q around (π,π.

  4. Modeling and Compensating Temperature-Dependent Non-Uniformity Noise in IR Microbolometer Cameras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Alejandro; Pezoa, Jorge E.; Figueroa, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    Images rendered by uncooled microbolometer-based infrared (IR) cameras are severely degraded by the spatial non-uniformity (NU) noise. The NU noise imposes a fixed-pattern over the true images, and the intensity of the pattern changes with time due to the temperature instability of such cameras. In this paper, we present a novel model and a compensation algorithm for the spatial NU noise and its temperature-dependent variations. The model separates the NU noise into two components: a constant term, which corresponds to a set of NU parameters determining the spatial structure of the noise, and a dynamic term, which scales linearly with the fluctuations of the temperature surrounding the array of microbolometers. We use a black-body radiator and samples of the temperature surrounding the IR array to offline characterize both the constant and the temperature-dependent NU noise parameters. Next, the temperature-dependent variations are estimated online using both a spatially uniform Hammerstein-Wiener estimator and a pixelwise least mean squares (LMS) estimator. We compensate for the NU noise in IR images from two long-wave IR cameras. Results show an excellent NU correction performance and a root mean square error of less than 0.25 ∘C, when the array’s temperature varies by approximately 15 ∘C. PMID:27447637

  5. Temperature-dependent electronic decay profiles in CZT: probe of bulk and surface properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessick, Royal; Maupin, Hugh; Tepper, Gary C.; Szeles, Csaba

    2003-01-01

    The electronic performance of CZT-based gamma radiation spectrometers is governed by a synergism of bulk and surface properties. Compensation is used to increase the bulk resistivity of Cd1-xZnxTe (x~0.1), but the same electronic states that are introduced to increase the material resistivity can also trap charge and reduce the carrier lifetime. Electrical and mechanical surface defects introduced during or subsequent to crystal harvesting are also known to interfere with device performance. Using a contactless, pulsed laser microwave cavity perturbation technique, electronic decay profiles were studied in high pressure Bridgman CZT as a function of temperature. The electronic decay profile was found to depend very strongly on temperature and was modeled using a function consisting of two exponential terms with temperature-dependent amplitudes and time constants. The model was used to relate the observed temperature dependent decay kinetics in CZT to specific trap energies. It was found that, at low temperatures, the electronic decay process is dominated by a deep trap with an energy of approximately 0.69 +/- 0.1 eV from the band edge. As the temperature is increased, the charge trapping becomes dominated by a second trap with an energy of approximately 0.60 +/- 0.1 eV from the band edge. Surface damage introduces additional charge traps that significantly alter the decay kinetics particularly at low temperatures.

  6. Comparing the temperature dependence of photosynthetic electron transfer in Chloroflexus aurantiacus and Rhodobactor sphaeroides reaction centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Zhi; Lin, Su; Xin, Yueyong; Wang, Haiyu; Blankenship, Robert E; Woodbury, Neal W

    2011-09-29

    The process of electron transfer from the special pair, P, to the primary electron donor, H(A), in quinone-depleted reaction centers (RCs) of Chloroflexus (Cf.) aurantiacus has been investigated over the temperature range from 10 to 295 K using time-resolved pump-probe spectroscopic techniques. The kinetics of the electron transfer reaction, P* → P(+)H(A)(-), was found to be nonexponential, and the degree of nonexponentiality increased strongly as temperature decreased. The temperature-dependent behavior of electron transfer in Cf. aurantiacus RCs was compared with that of the purple bacterium Rhodobacter (Rb.) sphaeroides . Distinct transitions were found in the temperature-dependent kinetics of both Cf. aurantiacus and Rb. sphaeroides RCs, at around 220 and 160 K, respectively. Structural differences between these two RCs, which may be associated with those differences, are discussed. It is suggested that weaker protein-cofactor hydrogen bonding, stronger electrostatic interactions at the protein surface, and larger solvent interactions likely contribute to the higher transition temperature in Cf. aurantiacus RCs temperature-dependent kinetics compared with that of Rb. sphaeroides RCs. The reaction-diffusion model provides an accurate description for the room-temperature electron transfer kinetics in Cf. aurantiacus RCs with no free parameters, using coupling and reorganization energy values previously determined for Rb. sphaeroides , along with an experimental measure of protein conformational diffusion dynamics and an experimental literature value of the free energy gap between P* and P(+)H(A)(-). © 2011 American Chemical Society

  7. Modeling and Compensating Temperature-Dependent Non-Uniformity Noise in IR Microbolometer Cameras

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Wolf

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Images rendered by uncooled microbolometer-based infrared (IR cameras are severely degraded by the spatial non-uniformity (NU noise. The NU noise imposes a fixed-pattern over the true images, and the intensity of the pattern changes with time due to the temperature instability of such cameras. In this paper, we present a novel model and a compensation algorithm for the spatial NU noise and its temperature-dependent variations. The model separates the NU noise into two components: a constant term, which corresponds to a set of NU parameters determining the spatial structure of the noise, and a dynamic term, which scales linearly with the fluctuations of the temperature surrounding the array of microbolometers. We use a black-body radiator and samples of the temperature surrounding the IR array to offline characterize both the constant and the temperature-dependent NU noise parameters. Next, the temperature-dependent variations are estimated online using both a spatially uniform Hammerstein-Wiener estimator and a pixelwise least mean squares (LMS estimator. We compensate for the NU noise in IR images from two long-wave IR cameras. Results show an excellent NU correction performance and a root mean square error of less than 0.25 ∘ C, when the array’s temperature varies by approximately 15 ∘ C.

  8. Temperature-dependent photoluminescence and Raman investigation of Cu-incorporated ZnO nanorods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, J.L. [Institute of Micro/Nano Devices and Solar Cells, School of Physics and Information Engineering, Fuzhou University, Fuzhou (China); Jiangsu Collaborative Innovation Center of Photovolatic Science and Engineering, Changzhou University, Changzhou 213164, Jiangsu (China); Key Laboratory of Semiconductor Materials Science, Institute of Semiconductors, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 912, Beijing 100083 (China); Lai, Y.F., E-mail: laiyunfeng@gmail.com [Institute of Micro/Nano Devices and Solar Cells, School of Physics and Information Engineering, Fuzhou University, Fuzhou (China); Cheng, S.Y.; Zheng, Q. [Institute of Micro/Nano Devices and Solar Cells, School of Physics and Information Engineering, Fuzhou University, Fuzhou (China); Chen, Y.H. [Key Laboratory of Semiconductor Materials Science, Institute of Semiconductors, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 912, Beijing 100083 (China)

    2015-05-15

    Temperature-dependent Raman and photoluminescence (PL) investigation of Cu-incorporated ZnO nanorods prepared by hydrothermal method have been investigated. A strong broad violet–blue emission has been observed in the PL spectra of Cu-incorporated ZnO nanorods, which decreases dramatically with increasing temperature. By Gaussian fitting, this peak can be resolved into two peaks centered at around 393 and 405 nm, respectively, under a temperature of 8 K. The origins of these two peaks are discussed. Temperature-dependent energies of neutral donor bound exciton (D{sup 0}X) are analyzed, and the Einstein temperature is deduced to be around 343±44 K, which do not show significant change compared with that without Cu incorporation. An activation energy of about 14±1 meV is determined from the quenching of D{sup 0}X as a function of temperature in the Cu-incorporated ZnO nanorods, which is much smaller than that deduced in the undoped ZnO nanorods (about 22±2 meV). The small activation energy can be attributed to the additional nonradiative centers introduced by Cu incorporation. The high concentration of defects and impurities in the Cu-incorporated ZnO nanorods are also confirmed by the larger value of the line width of the Raman spectra and its temperature-dependent relationship. - Highlights: • A strong violet–blue emission is observed in the PL spectra of ZnO:Cu nanorods. • This emission can be resolved into two peaks by Gaussian fitting. • Activation energy of the nonradiative centers and Einstein temperature is deduced. • The small activation energy indicates the additional nonradiative centers. • The temperature-dependent Raman spectra indicates more defects in the doping sample.

  9. Does N2 fixation amplify the temperature dependence of ecosystem metabolism?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welter, Jill R; Benstead, Jonathan P; Cross, Wyatt F; Hood, James M; Huryn, Alexander D; Johnson, Philip W; Williamson, Tanner J

    2015-03-01

    Variation in resource supply can cause variation in temperature dependences of metabolic processes (e.g., photosynthesis and respiration). Understanding such divergence is particularly important when using metabolic theory to predict ecosystem responses to climate warming. Few studies, however, have assessed the effect of temperature-resource interactions on metabolic processes, particularly in cases where the supply of limiting resources exhibits temperature dependence. We investigated the responses of biomass accrual, gross primary production (GPP), community respiration (CR), and N2 fixation to warming during biofilm development in a streamside channel experiment. Areal rates of GPP, CR, biomass accrual, and N2 fixation scaled positively with temperature, showing a 32- to 71-fold range across the temperature gradient (approximately 7 degrees-24 degrees C). Areal N2-fixation rates exhibited apparent activation energies (1.5-2.0 eV; 1 eV = approximately 1.6 x 10(-19) J) approximating the activation energy of the nitrogenase reaction. In contrast, mean apparent activation energies for areal rates of GPP (2.1-2.2 eV) and CR (1.6-1.9 eV) were 6.5- and 2.7-fold higher than estimates based on metabolic theory predictions (i.e., 0.32 and 0.65 eV, respectively) and did not significantly differ from the apparent activation energy observed for N2 fixation. Mass-specific activation energies for N2 fixation (1.4-1.6 eV), GPP (0.3-0.5 eV), and CR (no observed temperature relationship) were near or lower than theoretical predictions. We attribute the divergence of areal activation energies from those predicted by metabolic theory to increases in N2 fixation with temperature, leading to amplified temperature dependences of biomass accrual and areal rates of GPP and R. Such interactions between temperature dependences must be incorporated into metabolic models to improve predictions of ecosystem responses to climate change.

  10. Anomalous temperature dependent magneto-conductance in organic light-emitting diodes with multiple emissive states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Chen-xiao; Jia, Wei-yao; Huang, Ke-Xun; Zhang, Qiao-ming; Yang, Xiao-hui; Xiong, Zu-hong, E-mail: zhxiong@swu.edu.cn [School of Physical Science and Technology, MOE Key Laboratory on Luminescence and Real-Time Analysis, Southwest University, Chongqing 400715 (China)

    2015-07-13

    The temperature dependence of the magneto-conductance (MC) in organic electron donor-acceptor hybrid and layer heterojunction diodes was studied. The MC value increased with temperature in layer heterojunction and in 10 wt. % hybrid devices. An anomalous decrease of the MC with temperature was observed in 25 wt. %–50 wt. % hybrid devices. Further increasing donor concentration to 75 wt. %, the MC again increased with temperature. The endothermic exciplex-exciton energy transfer and the change in electroplex/exciton ratio caused by change in charge transport with temperature may account for these phenomena. Comparative studies of the temperature evolutions of the IV curves and the electroluminescence and photoluminescence spectra back our hypothesis.

  11. High-Curie-Temperature Ferromagnetism in (Sc,Fe)F3 Fluorides and its Dependence on Chemical Valence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Lei; Chen, Jun; Fan, Longlong; Ren, Yang; Huang, Qingzhen; Sanson, Andrea; Jiang, Zheng; Zhou, Mei; Rong, Yangchun; Wang, Yong; Deng, Jinxia; Xing, Xianran

    2015-08-19

    A magnetic metal-fluoride system is shown for the first time to have a high Curie temperature (≈545 K). The magnetism correlates intimately with the Fe(2+)/Fe(3+) ratio. As the ratio increases, the weak magnetism displayed by unordered magnetic moments intensifies, and these magnetic moments align in parallel. Simultaneously, a magneto-volume effect is also shown to increase the lattice volume. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Determination of the built-in voltage of BHJ solar cells by temperature dependent photocurrent measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mingebach, Markus; Deibel, Carsten [Experimental Physics VI, Physical Institute, Julius-Maximilians-University of Wuerzburg (Germany); Dyakonov, Vladimir [Experimental Physics VI, Physical Institute, Julius-Maximilians-University of Wuerzburg (Germany); Bavarian Center of Applied Energy Research (ZAE Bayern e.V.), Wuerzburg (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    Despite all progresses in the performance of organic BHJ solar cells (up to 8% power conversion efficiency) some very important properties such as the voltage dependent photocurrent or the built-in potential are not fully understood yet. We investigate poly(3-hexyl thiophene) (P3HT): [6,6]-phenyl-C{sub 61} butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) solar cells by means of temperature dependent pulsed photocurrent measurements and impedance spectroscopy. We find a point of optimal symmetry (POS) that represents the case of quasi flat bands (QFB) in the bulk of the cell, which is lower than the built-in voltage. This difference is due to band bending at the contacts, which is reduced at lower temperatures. Therefore we can identify the built-in voltage by measuring the POS (confirmed by temperature dependent current voltage measurements). This leads to the conclusion that the potential determined by Mott-Schottky analysis is not the built-in potential.

  13. Manipulating the temperature dependence of the thermal conductivity of graphene phononic crystal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Shiqian; An, Meng; Yang, Nuo; Li, Baowen

    2016-07-01

    By using non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations, modulating the temperature dependence of thermal conductivity of graphene phononic crystals (GPnCs) is investigated. It is found that the temperature dependence of thermal conductivity of GPnCs follows ∼T (-α) behavior. The power exponents (α) can be efficiently tuned by changing the characteristic size of GPnCs. The phonon participation ratio spectra and dispersion relation reveal that the long-range phonon modes are more affected in GPnCs with larger holes (L 0). Our results suggest that constructing GPnCs is an effective method to manipulate the temperature dependence of thermal conductivity of graphene, which would be beneficial for developing GPnC-based thermal management and signal processing devices.

  14. Temperature dependence of Young's modulus of titanium dioxide (TIO2) nanotubes: Molecular mechanics modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukyanov, S. I.; Bandura, A. V.; Evarestov, R. A.

    2015-12-01

    Temperature dependence of the Young's modulus of cylindrical single-wall nanotubes with zigzag and armchair chiralities and consolidated-wall nanotubes has been studied by the molecular mechanics method with the use of the atom-atom potential. The nanotubes have been obtained by rolling up of crystal layers (111) of TiO2 with fluorite structure. Calculations have been performed for isothermal conditions on the basis of calculating the Helmholtz free energy of the system. The dependence of the Helmholtz free energy of nanotubes on the period has been calculated in the quasi-harmonic approximation as a result of calculation of phonon frequencies. It has been shown that the temperature dependence of the stiffness of nanotubes is determined by their chirality, and some nanotubes exibit anomalous behavior of both the Young's modulus and the period of unit cell with variation in temperature.

  15. Temperature dependence of the magnetization of disc shaped NiO nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klausen, Stine Nyborg; Lindgard, P.A.; Lefmann, Kim

    2002-01-01

    We present neutron diffraction data of NiO nanoparticles measuring the total magnetization and the sublattice magnetization at various temperatures. Electron microscopy shows that the particles are disc shaped with average diameter of about 12 nm and a thickness of about 2 nm. The Neel temperature...... as a temperature dependent contribution of a structural peak in contrast to bulk NiO. The two magnetic signals vanish at the same temperature. The data are interpreted on the basis of an extended mean field model on disc shaped NiO particles. This model includes the finite size dependence of the effective field...... (approximate to460 K) is less than for bulk NiO (523 K). The magnetic domain size, as estimated from the width of the neutron diffraction peaks corresponding to the antiferromagnetic reflection is smaller than the particle size estimated from the structural peaks. A ferromagnetic contribution is present...

  16. Thermal dissociation of molten KHSO4: Temperature dependence of Raman spectra and thermodynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Christian B.; Kalampounias, Angelos G.; Fehrmann, Rasmus

    2008-01-01

    intensities with the stoichiometric coefficients, the equilibrium constant, and the thermodynamics of the reaction equilibrium is derived. The method is used-along with the temperature-dependent features of the Raman spectra-to show that the studied equilibrium 2HSO(4)(-) (1) S2O72-(1) + H2O(g) is the only......Raman spectroscopy is used to study the thermal dissociation of molten KHSO4 at temperatures of 240-450 degrees C under static equilibrium conditions. Raman spectra obtained at 10 different temperatures for the molten phase and for the vapors thereof exhibit vibrational wavenumbers and relative...... band intensities inferring the occurrence of the temperature-dependent dissociation equilibrium 2HSO(4)(-) (1) S2O72-(1) + H2O(g). The Raman data are adequate for determining the partial pressures of H2O in the gas phase above the molten mixtures. A formalism for correlating relative Raman band...

  17. Competitive adsorption equilibrium model with continuous temperature dependent parameters for naringenin enantiomers on Chiralpak AD column.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jin; Jiang, Xiaoxiao; Guo, Jinghua; Chen, Yongtao; Yu, Weifang

    2015-11-27

    Determination of competitive adsorption equilibrium model with continuous temperature dependent parameters is important for the design and optimization of a chromatographic separation process operated under non-isothermal conditions. In this study, linear pulse experiments were first carried to determine the parameters of transport-dispersive model and their temperature dependences in the range of 283–313 K. Overloaded band profiles of naringenin enantiomers on a Chiralpak AD column were acquired under various temperatures. Three of them were first separately fitted using Langmuir, linear-Langmuir and bi-Langmuir isotherm models substituted into the transport-dispersive column model. The comparison showed that bi-Langmuir model captures more details of the experimental results. This model was then extended with three extra parameters accounting for adsorption heat effects and used to simultaneously fit the band profiles at three temperatures.

  18. A Temperature-Dependent Thermal Model of IGBT Modules Suitable for Circuit-Level Simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Rui; Wang, Huai; Ma, Ke

    2014-01-01

    Thermal impedance of IGBT modules may vary with operating conditions due to that the thermal conductivity and heat capacity of materials are temperature dependent. This paper proposes a Cauer thermal model for a 1700 V/1000 A IGBT module with temperature-dependent thermal resistances and thermal...... relevant reliability aspect performance. A test bench is built up with an ultra-fast infrared (IR) camera to validate the proposed thermal impedance model....... capacitances. The temperature effect is investigated by Finite Element Method (FEM) simulation based on the geometry and material information of the IGBT module. The developed model is ready for circuit-level simulation to achieve an improved accuracy of the estimation on IGBT junction temperature and its...

  19. Robots and lattice automata

    CERN Document Server

    Adamatzky, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    The book gives a comprehensive overview of the state-of-the-art research and engineering in theory and application of Lattice Automata in design and control of autonomous Robots. Automata and robots share the same notional meaning. Automata (originated from the latinization of the Greek word “αυτόματον”) as self-operating autonomous machines invented from ancient years can be easily considered the first steps of robotic-like efforts. Automata are mathematical models of Robots and also they are integral parts of robotic control systems. A Lattice Automaton is a regular array or a collective of finite state machines, or automata. The Automata update their states by the same rules depending on states of their immediate neighbours. In the context of this book, Lattice Automata are used in developing modular reconfigurable robotic systems, path planning and map exploration for robots, as robot controllers, synchronisation of robot collectives, robot vision, parallel robotic actuators. All chapters are...

  20. Lattices for the lattice Boltzmann method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chikatamarla, Shyam S; Karlin, Iliya V

    2009-04-01

    A recently introduced theory of higher-order lattice Boltzmann models [Chikatamarla and Karlin, Phys. Rev. Lett. 97, 190601 (2006)] is elaborated in detail. A general theory of the construction of lattice Boltzmann models as an approximation to the Boltzmann equation is presented. New lattices are found in all three dimensions and are classified according to their accuracy (degree of approximation of the Boltzmann equation). The numerical stability of these lattices is argued based on the entropy principle. The efficiency and accuracy of many new lattices are demonstrated via simulations in all three dimensions.

  1. Inverse temperature dependence of reverse gate leakage current in AlGaN/GaN HEMT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaushik, J. K.; Balakrishnan, V. R.; Panwar, B. S.; Muralidharan, R.

    2013-01-01

    The experimentally observed inverse temperature dependence of the reverse gate leakage current in AlGaN/GaN HEMT is explained using a virtual gate trap-assisted tunneling model. The virtual gate is formed due to the capture of electrons by surface states in the vicinity of actual gate. The increase and decrease in the length of the virtual gate with temperature due to trap kinetics are used to explain this unusual effect. The simulation results have been validated experimentally.

  2. Temperature dependency of the hysteresis behaviour of PZT actuators using Preisach model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mangeot, Charles; Zsurzsan, Tiberiu-Gabriel

    2016-01-01

    The Preisach model is a powerful tool for modelling the hysteresis phenomenon on multilayer piezo actuators under large signal excitation. In this paper, measurements at different temperatures are presented, showing the effect on the density of the Preisach matrix. An energy-based approach...... is presented, aiming at defining a temperature-dependent phenomenological model of hysteresis for a better understanding of the non-linear effects in piezo actuators....

  3. Temperature-dependent respiration-growth relations in ancestral maize cultivars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce N. Smith; Jillian L. Walker; Rebekka L. Stone; Angela R. Jones; Lee D. Hansen

    2001-01-01

    Shoots from 4- to 6-day old seedlings of seven ancestral or old cultivars of Zea mays L. were placed in a calorimeter. Dark metabolic heat rate (q) and CO2 production rate (RCO2) were measured at nine temperatures (5, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30, 35, 40, and 45 °C). Temperature dependencies of q and RCO2 were used to model response of both growth and substrate carbon conversion...

  4. Microbial interactions with the cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa and their dependence on temperature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dziallas, Claudia; Grossart, Hans-Peter

    2012-01-01

    cultures changed in a temperature-dependent manner, its quality greatly varied under the same environmental conditions, but with different associated bacterial communities. Furthermore, temperature affected quantity and quality of cell-bound microcystins, whereby interactions between M. aeruginosa......’ methanogens contributed to the associated microbial community. This implies so far uncharacterized interactions between Microcystis aeruginosa and its associated prokaryotic community, which has unknown ecological consequences in a climatically changing world....

  5. Inferring the temperature dependence of population parameters: the effects of experimental design and inference algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palamara, Gian Marco; Childs, Dylan Z; Clements, Christopher F; Petchey, Owen L; Plebani, Marco; Smith, Matthew J

    2014-12-01

    Understanding and quantifying the temperature dependence of population parameters, such as intrinsic growth rate and carrying capacity, is critical for predicting the ecological responses to environmental change. Many studies provide empirical estimates of such temperature dependencies, but a thorough investigation of the methods used to infer them has not been performed yet. We created artificial population time series using a stochastic logistic model parameterized with the Arrhenius equation, so that activation energy drives the temperature dependence of population parameters. We simulated different experimental designs and used different inference methods, varying the likelihood functions and other aspects of the parameter estimation methods. Finally, we applied the best performing inference methods to real data for the species Paramecium caudatum. The relative error of the estimates of activation energy varied between 5% and 30%. The fraction of habitat sampled played the most important role in determining the relative error; sampling at least 1% of the habitat kept it below 50%. We found that methods that simultaneously use all time series data (direct methods) and methods that estimate population parameters separately for each temperature (indirect methods) are complementary. Indirect methods provide a clearer insight into the shape of the functional form describing the temperature dependence of population parameters; direct methods enable a more accurate estimation of the parameters of such functional forms. Using both methods, we found that growth rate and carrying capacity of Paramecium caudatum scale with temperature according to different activation energies. Our study shows how careful choice of experimental design and inference methods can increase the accuracy of the inferred relationships between temperature and population parameters. The comparison of estimation methods provided here can increase the accuracy of model predictions, with important

  6. Temperature and humidity dependence of bulk resistivity of bakelite for resistive plate chambers in CMS

    CERN Document Server

    Ahn, S H; Bahk, S Y; Gapienko, V A; Hong, B; Hong, S J; Jung, S Y; Kim, J Y; Kim, Y J; Kim, Y U; Koo, D G; Lee, K S; Lee, S J; Lee, Y L; Lim, I T; Nam, S K; Pac, M Y; Park, S K; Ra, Y S; Rhee, J T; Seo, S W; Sim, K S

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents data obtained in a systematic study on the bulk resistivity of Korean bakelike as a function of temperature in the range 20-30 degrees C and relative humidity in the range 35-65%. Strong dependence of resistivity on both temperature and humidity was observed. Measurements were carried out in the framework of R&D work on resistive plate chambers which will be used in the CMS detector. (4 refs).

  7. Temperature dependent properties of InSb and InAs nanowire field-effect transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, Henrik A.; Caroff, Philippe; Thelander, Claes; Lind, Erik; Karlström, Olov; Wernersson, Lars-Erik

    2010-04-01

    We present temperature dependent electrical measurements on InSb and InAs nanowire field-effect transistors (FETs). The FETs are fabricated from InAs/InSb heterostructure nanowires, where one complete transistor is defined within each of the two segments. Both the InSb and the InAs FETs are n-type with good current saturation and low voltage operation. The off-current for the InSb FET shows a strong temperature dependence, which we attribute to a barrier lowering due to an increased band-to-band tunneling in the drain part of the channel.

  8. Temperature dependence of magnetism near defects in SrB sub 6

    CERN Document Server

    Jarlborg, T

    2003-01-01

    The temperature (T) dependence of magnetic moments in SrB sub 6 is studied through spin-polarized band calculations for a supercell of Sr sub 2 sub 7 B sub 1 sub 5 sub 6 containing a B sub 6 vacancy. The magnetic moment decays rather quickly with T despite the fact that only electronic Fermi-Dirac effects are included. This result and the T dependence of moments near an La impurity can hardly explain the reports of a very high Curie temperature in hexaborides, but suggest that the magnetism is caused by some other type of impurity. (letter to the editor)

  9. Thermally Activated Contact Strengthening Explains Nonmonotonic Temperature and Velocity Dependence of Atomic Friction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mykhaylo Evstigneev

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available While the well-established Prandtl-Tomlinson (PT model of atomic friction predicts that the friction force decreases with temperature and grows with velocity, several recent experiments reported that a nonmonotonic temperature dependence and a decreasing velocity dependence may also occur. We propose a minimal extension of the PT model, incorporating the possibility of thermally activated contact strengthening and providing one common framework to quantitatively explain all those “anomalous” experimental findings, as well as the previously known “normal” (PT-like behavior.

  10. Temperature dependence of nanosecond laser pulse thresholds of melanosome and microsphere microcavitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Morgan S.; Kennedy, Paul K.; Noojin, Gary D.; Thomas, Robert J.; Rockwell, Benjamin A.

    2016-01-01

    Melanosome microcavitation is the threshold-level retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) damage mechanism for nanosecond (ns) pulse exposures in the visible and near-infrared (NIR). Thresholds for microcavitation of isolated bovine RPE melanosomes were determined as a function of temperature (20 to 85°C) using single ns laser pulses at 532 and 1064 nm. Melanosomes were irradiated using a 1064-nm Q-switched Nd:YAG (doubled for 532-nm irradiation). For comparison to melanosome data, a similar temperature (20 to 65°C) dependence study was also performed for 532 nm, ns pulse exposures of black polystyrene microbeads. Results indicated a decrease in the microcavitation average radiant exposure threshold with increasing sample temperature for both 532- and 1064-nm single pulse exposures of melanosomes and microbeads. Threshold data and extrapolated nucleation temperatures were used to estimate melanosome absorption coefficients in the visible and NIR, and microbead absorption coefficients in the visible, indicating that melanin is a better absorber of visible light than black polystyrene. The NIR melanosome absorption coefficients ranged from 3713 cm-1 at 800 nm to 222 cm-1 at 1319 nm. These data represent the first temperature-dependent melanosome microcavitation study in the NIR and provide additional information for understanding melanosome microcavitation threshold dependence on wavelength and ambient temperature.

  11. Surprising behaviors in the temperature dependent kinetics of diatomic interhalogens with anions and cations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuman, Nicholas S.; Martinez, Oscar; Ard, Shaun G.; Wiens, Justin P.; Keyes, Nicholas R.; Guo, Hua; Viggiano, Albert A.

    2017-06-01

    Rate constants and product branching fractions of reactions between diatomic interhalogens (ICl, ClF) and a series of anions (Br-, I-) and cations (Ar+, N2+) are measured using a selected ion flow tube apparatus and reported over the temperature range 200-500 K. The efficiency of both anion reactions with ICl is 2%-3% at 300 K to yield Cl-, increasing with temperature in a manner consistent with the small endothermicities of the reactions. The anion reactions with ClF are 10%-20% efficient at 300 K to yield Cl- and also show a positive temperature dependence despite being highly exothermic. The stationary points along the anion + ClF reaction coordinates were calculated using density functional theory, showing no endothermic barriers inhibiting reaction. The observed temperature dependence can be rationalized by a decreasing dipole attraction with increasing rotational energy, but confirmation requires trajectory calculations of the systems. All four cation reactions are fairly efficient at 300 K with small positive temperature dependences, despite large exothermicities to charge transfer. Three of the four reactions proceed exclusively by dissociative charge transfer to yield Cl+. The N2+ + ClF reaction proceeds by both non-dissociative and dissociative charge transfer, with the non-dissociative channel surprisingly increasing with increasing temperature. The origins of these behaviors are not clear and are discussed within the framework of charge-transfer reactions.

  12. Impurity-directed transport within a finite disordered lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnetta, Bradley J.; Ordonez, Gonzalo; Garmon, Savannah

    2018-02-01

    We consider a finite, disordered 1D quantum lattice with a side-attached impurity. We study theoretically the transport of a single electron from the impurity into the lattice, at zero temperature. The transport is dominated by Anderson localization and, in general, the electron motion has a random character due to the lattice disorder. However, we show that by adjusting the impurity energy the electron can attain quasi-periodic motions, oscillating between the impurity and a small region of the lattice. This region corresponds to the spatial extent of a localized state with an energy matched by that of the impurity. By precisely tuning the impurity energy, the electron can be set to oscillate between the impurity and a region far from the impurity, even distances larger than the Anderson localization length. The electron oscillations result from the interference of hybridized states, which have some resemblance to Pendry's necklace states (Pendry, 1987) [21]. The dependence of the electron motion on the impurity energy gives a potential mechanism for selectively routing an electron towards different regions of a 1D disordered lattice.

  13. Spin-charge-lattice coupling through resonant multimagnon excitations in multiferroic BiFeO3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, M. O.; Kumar, A.; Denev, S. A.; Chu, Y. H.; Seidel, J.; Martin, L. W.; Yang, S.-Y.; Rai, R. C.; Xue, X. S.; Ihlefeld, J. F.; Podraza, N. J.; Saiz, E.; Lee, S.; Klug, J.; Cheong, S. W.; Bedzyk, M. J.; Auciello, O.; Schlom, D. G.; Orenstein, J.; Ramesh, R.; Musfeldt, J. L.; Litvinchuk, A. P.; Gopalan, V.

    2009-04-01

    Spin-charge-lattice coupling mediated by multimagnon processes is demonstrated in multiferroic BiFeO3. Experimental evidence of two- and three-magnon excitations as well as multimagnon coupling at electronic energy scales and high temperatures are reported. Temperature dependent Raman experiments show up to five resonant enhancements of the two-magnon excitation below the Néel temperature. These are shown to be collective interactions between on-site Fe d-d electronic resonance, phonons, and multimagnons.

  14. A Temperature-Dependent Phenology Model for Liriomyza huidobrensis (Diptera: Agromyzidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sporleder, Marc; Carhuapoma, Pablo; Kroschel, Jürgen

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Liriomyza huidobrensis (Blanchard) is an economically important and highly polyphagous worldwide pest. To establish a temperature-dependent phenology model, essential for understanding the development and growth of the pest population under a variety of climates and as part of a pest risk analysis, L. huidobrensis life-table data were collected under laboratory conditions at seven constant temperatures on its host faba bean (Vicia faba L.). Several nonlinear equations were fitted to each life stage to model the temperature-dependent population growth and species life history and finally compile an overall temperature-dependent pest phenology model using the Insect Life Cycle Modeling (ILCYM) software. Liriomyza huidobrensis completed development from egg to adult in all temperatures evaluated, except at 32 °C, which was lethal to pupae. Eggs did not develop at 35 °C. Mean development time of all immature stages decreased with increasing temperature. Nonlinear models predicted optimal temperature for immature survival between 20–25 °C (32–38% mortality of all immature stages). Life-table parameters simulated at constant temperatures indicated that L. huidobrensis develops within the range of 12–28 °C. Simulated life-table for predicting the population dynamics of L. huidobrensis under two contrasting environments showed that lowland temperatures at the coast of Peru (250 m.a.s.l.) presented better conditions for a potential population increase than highland (3,400 m.a.s.l.) conditions. The presented model linked with Geographic Information Systems will allow pest risk assessments in different environmental regions to support the regulation of pest movement to prevent pest entry into not-yet invaded regions as well as to implement effective management strategies. PMID:28334271

  15. Intensity and temperature-dependent photoluminescence of tris (8-hydroxyquinoline) aluminum films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ajward, A. M.; Wang, X.; Wagner, H. P. [Department of Physics, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, Ohio 45221 (United States)

    2013-12-04

    We investigate the recombination of excitons in tris (8-hydroxyquinoline) aluminum films by intensity and temperature dependent time-resolved photoluminescence (PL). At low temperature (15 K) and elevated excitation intensity the radiative emission is quenched by singlet-singlet annihilation processes. With rising temperature the PL quenching is strongly reduced resulting in a PL efficiency maximum at ∼170 K. The reduced exciton annihilation is attributed to thermally activated occupation of non-quenchable trapped exciton states. Above 170 K the PL efficiency decreases due to thermal de-trapping of radiative states and subsequent migration to non-radiative centers.

  16. Physico-chemical characterization of the temperature dependent hydration kinetics of Gleditsia sinensis gum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jian, Hong-Lei; Lin, Xue-Jiao; Zhang, Wei-Ming; Sun, Da-Feng; Jiang, Jian-Xin

    2013-11-01

    The physico-chemical properties and hydration kinetics of Gleditsia sinensis gum were investigated to evaluate its temperature dependence. The increase of temperature resulted in improved solubility of G. sinensis gum, and the dissolved galactomannan showed decreased degree of galactose substitution (DSGal) and increased molecular weight (p0.96), and the hydration index t0.8 at different temperatures varied in the range of 51-302 min. It was found that galactomannan with low DSGal and high molecular weight exhibited slow hydration rate and poor solubility. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. A Temperature-Dependent Thermal Model of IGBT Modules Suitable for Circuit-Level Simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Rui; Wang, Huai; Pedersen, Kristian Bonderup

    2016-01-01

    A basic challenge in the IGBT transient simulation study is to obtain the realistic junction temperature, which demands not only accurate electrical simulations but also precise thermal impedance. This paper proposed a transient thermal model for IGBT junction temperature simulations during short...... circuits or overloads. The updated Cauer thermal model with varying thermal parameters is obtained by means of FEM thermal simulations with temperature-dependent physical parameters. The proposed method is applied to a case study of a 1700 V/1000 A IGBT module. Furthermore, a testing setup is built up...

  18. Temperature dependence of large positive magnetoresistance in hybrid ferromagnetic/semiconductor devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overend, N.; Nogaret, A.; Gallagher, B. L.; Main, P. C.; Henini, M.; Marrows, C. H.; Howson, M. A.; Beaumont, S. P.

    1998-04-01

    We investigate a new type of magnetoresistance (MR) in which the resistivity of a near-surface two-dimensional electron gas is controlled by the magnetization of a submicron ferromagnetic grating defined on the surface of the device. We observe an increase in resistance of up to ˜1500% at a temperature of 4 K and ˜1% at 300 K. The magnitude and temperature dependence of the MR are well accounted for by a semiclassical theory. Optimization of device parameters is expected to increase considerably the magnitude of the room temperature MR.

  19. Dependence of the depth distribution of implanted silver ions on the temperature of irradiated glass

    CERN Document Server

    Stepanov, A L

    2001-01-01

    The peculiarities of the glass ion implantation by the silver ions in dependence on the substrate temperature within the interval of 20-100 deg C are studied. Modeling the profiles of the implanted ions distribution in depth with an account of the thermostimulated increase in the admixture diffusion mobility is carried out. It is shown, that increase in the substrate temperature leads to the diffusion wash-out of the introduced admixture ions distribution. The analysis of the modeling results indicates the necessity of strict control of the substrate temperature by the dielectrics implantation for obtaining the conditions for the metal nanoparticles synthesis

  20. Temperature-Dependent Electrical and Micromechanical Properties of Lanthanum Titanate with Additions of Yttria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldsby, Jon C.

    2010-01-01

    Temperature-dependent elastic properties were determined by establishing continuous flexural vibrations in the material at its lowest resonance frequency of 31tHz. The imaginary part of the complex impedance plotted as a function of frequency and temperature reveals a thermally activated peak, which decreases in magnitude as the temperature increases. Additions of yttria do not degrade the electromechanical in particularly the elastic and anelastic properties of lanthanum titanate. Y2O3/La2Ti2O7 exhibits extremely low internal friction and hence may be more mechanical fatigue-resistant at low strains.

  1. Lattice sites, charge states and spin–lattice relaxation of Fe ions in {sup 57}Mn{sup +} implanted GaN and AlN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masenda, H., E-mail: hilary.masenda@wits.ac.za [School of Physics, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg 2050 (South Africa); Naidoo, D. [School of Physics, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg 2050 (South Africa); Bharuth-Ram, K. [Physics Department, Durban University of Technology, Durban 4000 (South Africa); iThemba LABS, PO Box 725, Somerset West 7129 (South Africa); Gunnlaugsson, H.P. [PH Department, ISOLDE/CERN, 1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); KU Leuven, Instituut voor Kern-en Stralingsfysica, 3001 Leuven (Belgium); Johnston, K. [PH Department, ISOLDE/CERN, 1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Mantovan, R. [Laboratorio MDM, IMM-CNR, Via Olivetti 2, 20864 Agrate Brianza (MB) (Italy); Mølholt, T.E. [PH Department, ISOLDE/CERN, 1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Ncube, M. [School of Physics, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg 2050 (South Africa); Shayestehaminzadeh, S. [Materials Chemistry, RWTH Aachen University, Kopernikusstr. 10, 5274 Aachen (Germany); Gíslason, H.P. [Science Institute, University of Iceland, Dunhaga 3, 107 Reykjavík (Iceland); Langouche, G. [KU Leuven, Instituut voor Kern-en Stralingsfysica, 3001 Leuven (Belgium); Ólafsson, S. [Science Institute, University of Iceland, Dunhaga 3, 107 Reykjavík (Iceland); Weyer, G. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University, Ny Munkegade 120, 8000 Aarhus (Denmark)

    2016-03-01

    The lattice sites, valence states, resulting magnetic behaviour and spin–lattice relaxation of Fe ions in GaN and AlN were investigated by emission Mössbauer spectroscopy following the implantation of radioactive {sup 57}Mn{sup +} ions at ISOLDE/CERN. Angle dependent measurements performed at room temperature on the 14.4 keV γ-rays from the {sup 57}Fe Mössbauer state (populated from the {sup 57}Mn β{sup −} decay) reveal that the majority of the Fe ions are in the 2+ valence state nearly substituting the Ga and Al cations, and/or associated with vacancy type defects. Emission Mössbauer spectroscopy experiments conducted over a temperature range of 100–800 K show the presence of magnetically split sextets in the “wings” of the spectra for both materials. The temperature dependence of the sextets relates these spectral features to paramagnetic Fe{sup 3+} with rather slow spin–lattice relaxation rates which follow a T{sup 2} temperature dependence characteristic of a two-phonon Raman process. - Highlights: • The majority of the Fe ions are in the 2+ state, located on near substitutional sites associated with vacancy type defects. • A significant fraction of the Fe ions are in the paramagnetic Fe{sup 3+} state. • Spin–lattice relaxation of Fe{sup 3+} in both GaN and AlN follows a two-phonon Raman process.

  2. Modelling temperature-dependent heat production over decades in High Arctic coal waste rock piles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hollesen, Jørgen; Elberling, Bo; Jansson, P.E.

    2011-01-01

    Subsurface heat production from oxidation of pyrite is an important process that may increase subsurface temperatures within coal waste rock piles and increase the release of acid mine drainage, AMD. Waste rock piles in the Arctic are especially vulnerable to changes in subsurface temperatures...... as the release of AMD normally is limited by permafrost. Here we show that temperatures within a 20 year old heat-producing waste rock pile in Svalbard (78°N) can be modelled by the one-dimensional heat and water flow model (CoupModel) with a new temperature-dependent heat-production module that includes both...... biological and chemical oxidation processes and heat source depletion over time. Inputs to the model are meteorological measurements, physical properties of the waste rock material and measured subsurface heat-production rates. Measured mean annual subsurface temperatures within the waste rock pile are up...

  3. Temperature dependence of vegetative growth and dark respiration: a mathematical model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gent, M P; Enoch, H Z

    1983-03-01

    A mathematical model of the processes involved in carbon metabolism is described that predicts the influence of temperature on the growth of plants. The model assumes that the rate of production of dry matter depends both on the temperature and the level of nonstructural carbohydrate. The level of nonstructural carbohydrate is determined by the rates of photosynthesis, growth, and maintenance respiration. The model describes the rate of growth and dark respiration, and the levels of carbohydrate seen in vegetative growth of carnation and tomato. The model suggests that the growth of plants at low temperatures is limited by a shortage of respiratory energy, whereas at high temperatures growth is limited by the shortage of carbohydrate. Thermoperiodism, wherein a warm day and cool night results in faster growth than does constant temperature, is explained by the model as an increase in the level of nonstructural carbohydrate which promotes the rate of growth relative to the rate of maintenance respiration.

  4. Temperature-dependent regulation of reproduction in the diving beetle Dytiscus sharpi (Coleoptera: Dytiscidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoda, Toshio; Tajima, Fumitada; Taniguchi, Hiroshi; Saeki, Motoyuki; Numakura, Kazuki; Hasegawa, Masami; Kamimura, Shinji

    2007-11-01

    The effects of temperature on the mating behavior, gonad development, germ cell maturation, and egg spawning of the predaceous diving beetle Dytiscus sharpi (Coleoptera; Dytiscidae), were investigated. By field observations, we found that mating behavior started in October and occurred more frequently from November to December. Under our laboratory breeding conditions, we observed almost the same seasonal variation in mating behavior. We found that temperatures lower than 20 degrees C were required to trigger mating behavior. We also found the same temperature threshold triggered gonadogenesis as well as spermatogenesis. Furthermore, for females, exposure to lower temperatures (<8 degrees C) during the winter was required for egg maturation and spawning in spring; that is, there was a second threshold for successful female reproduction. We conclude that the termination of summer reproductive diapause of D. sharpi is regulated in a temperature-dependent manner, thus effecting the adaptation of D. sharpi to southern warm habitats.

  5. Temperature dependence of the non-local spin Seebeck effect in YIG/Pt nanostructures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathrin Ganzhorn

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available We study the transport of thermally excited non-equilibrium magnons through the ferrimagnetic insulator YIG using two electrically isolated Pt strips as injector and detector. The diffusing magnons induce a non-local inverse spin Hall voltage in the detector corresponding to the so-called non-local spin Seebeck effect (SSE. We measure the non-local SSE as a function of temperature and strip separation. In experiments at room temperature we observe a sign change of the non-local SSE voltage at a characteristic strip separation d0, in agreement with previous investigations. At lower temperatures however, we find a strong temperature dependence of d0. This suggests that both the angular momentum transfer across the YIG/Pt interface as well as the transport mechanism of the magnons in YIG as a function of temperature must be taken into account to describe the non-local SSE.

  6. Temperature dependent diode and photovoltaic characteristics of graphene-GaN heterojunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalita, Golap; Dzulsyahmi Shaarin, Muhammad; Paudel, Balaram; Mahyavanshi, Rakesh; Tanemura, Masaki

    2017-07-01

    Understanding the charge carrier transport characteristics at the graphene-GaN interface is of significant importance for the fabrication of efficient photoresponsive devices. Here, we report on the temperature dependent diode and photovoltaic characteristics of a graphene/n-GaN heterostructure based Schottky junction. The graphene/n-GaN heterojunction showed rectifying diode characteristics and photovoltaic action with photoresponsivity in the ultra-violet wavelength. The current-voltage characteristics of the graphene/n-GaN heterojunction device were investigated under dark and light illumination with changes in temperature. Under dark conditions, an increase in the forward bias current as well as saturation current was observed, and a decrease in the device ideality factor was obtained with an increase in temperature. Under illumination of light, a decrease in the open circuit voltage (Voc) and an increase in the short circuit current density (Jsc) was obtained with an increase in temperature. The increase in saturation current and carrier recombination with the increase in temperature leads to a reduction in Voc, while the photo-generated carrier increases in the heterojunction interface at higher temperatures contributing to the increase in Jsc. The observed temperature dependent device characteristics of the graphene/n-GaN heterojunction can be significant to understand the junction behavior and photovoltaic action.

  7. Temperature dependence of optical properties in Nd/Cr:YAG materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Honda, Yoshiyuki, E-mail: honda-y@ile.osaka-u.ac.jp [Institute of Laser Engineering, Osaka University, 2-6 Yamada-oka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Motokoshi, Shinji [Institute for Laser Technology, 1-8-4 Utsubo-honmachi, Nishi-ku, Osaka 550-0004 (Japan); Jitsuno, Takahisa; Miyanaga, Noriaki; Fujioka, Kana [Institute of Laser Engineering, Osaka University, 2-6 Yamada-oka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Nakatsuka, Masahiro [Institute for Laser Technology, 1-8-4 Utsubo-honmachi, Nishi-ku, Osaka 550-0004 (Japan); Yoshida, Minoru [Kinki University, 3-4-1 Kowakae, Higashi-osaka, Osaka 577-8052 (Japan)

    2014-04-15

    The energy transfer from Cr{sup 3+} to Nd{sup 3+} for Nd/Cr:YAG (Nd: 1.0%, Cr: 2.0%) materials was investigated by measuring the temperature dependences of fluorescence characteristics. The fluorescence intensity of Nd{sup 3+} increased with temperature owing to enhancement of the absorption coefficient of Cr{sup 3+}. The energy transfer efficiency was constant from 77 to 450 K. The energy transfer time decreased with increasing temperature. -- Highlights: • We investigate the energy transfer from Cr{sup 3+} to Nd{sup 3+} in Nd/Cr:YAG materials by measuring the temperature dependence of fluorescence characteristics. • The fluorescence intensity of Nd{sup 3+} increased with temperature owing to enhancement of the absorption coefficient of Cr{sup 3+}. • The energy transfer efficiency was constant from 77 to 450 K. • The energy transfer time decreased with increasing temperature. • Nd/Cr:YAG ceramics pumped by a flash lamp would not only provide high conversion efficiency, but can also be expected to function as an effective laser operating at high temperature.

  8. Fabrication and temperature-dependent field-emission properties of bundlelike VO2 nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Haihong; Luo, Min; Yu, Ke; Gao, Yanfeng; Huang, Rong; Zhang, Zhengli; Zeng, Min; Cao, Chuanxiang; Zhu, Ziqiang

    2011-06-01

    Bundlelike VO(2)(B) nanostructures were synthesized via a hydrothermal method, and VO(2)(M(1)/R) nanobundles were obtained after a heat-treatment process. Structural characterization shows that these nanobundles are self-assembled by VO(2) nanowires, and VO(2)(M(1)/R) nanobundles have better crystallinity. Temperature-dependent field-emission (FE) measurement indicates that FE properties of these two phases of nanobundles can both be improved by increasing the ambient temperature. Moreover, for the VO(2)(M(1)/R) nanobundles, their FE properties are also strongly dependent on the temperature-induced metal-insulator transitions process. Compared with poor FE properties found in the insulating phase, FE properties were significantly improved by increasing the temperature, and about a three-orders-of-magnitude increasing of the emission current density has been observed at a fixed field of 6 V/μm. Work function measurement and density-functional theory calculations indicated that the decrease of work function with temperature is the main reason that caused the improvement of FE properties. These characteristics make VO(2)(M(1)/R) a candidate material for application of new type of temperature-controlled field emitters, whose emission density can be adjusted by ambient temperature. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  9. Temperature-Dependent Development Modeling of the Phorid Fly Megaselia halterata (Wood) (Diptera: Phoridae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barzegar, S; Zamani, A A; Abbasi, S; Vafaei Shooshtari, R; Shirvani Farsani, N

    2016-10-01

    The effect of temperature on the development of Megaselia halterata (Wood) (Diptera: Phoridae) on A15 variety of button mushroom in the stages of casing and spawn-running was investigated at eight constant temperatures (10, 12.5, 15, 18, 20, 22.5, 25, and 27°C) and developmental rates were modeled as a function of temperature. At 25 and 27°C, an average of 22.2 ± 0.14 and 20.0 ± 0.10 days was needed for M. halterata to complete its development from oviposition to adult eclosion in the stages of casing and spawn-running, respectively. The developmental times of males or females at various constant temperatures were significantly different. Among the linear models, the Ikemoto and Takai linear model in the absence of 12.5 and 25°C showed the best statistical goodness-of-fit and based on this model, the lower developmental threshold and the thermal constant were estimated as 10.4°C and 526.3 degree-days, respectively. Twelve nonlinear temperature-dependent models were examined to find the best model to describe the relationship between temperature and development rate of M. halterata. The Logan 10 nonlinear model provided the best estimation for T opt and T max and is strongly recommended for the description of temperature-dependent development of M. halterata.

  10. The temperature dependence of luminescence from a long-lasting phosphor exposed to ionizing radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Kowatari, M; Satoh, Y; Iinuma, K; Uchida, S I

    2002-01-01

    The temperature dependence of luminescence from a long-lasting phosphor (LLP), SrAl sub 2 O sub 4 : Eu sup 2 sup + ,Dy sup 3 sup + , exposed to ionizing radiation has been measured to understand the LLP luminescence mechanism. Evaluation of the decay constants of the LLP exposed to alpha-, beta- or gamma-rays at temperatures from 200 to 390 K showed that the decay constant is divided into four components ranging from 10 sup - sup 4 to 10 sup - sup 1 s sup - sup 1 with activation energies of 0.02-0.35 eV. Total luminous intensity from the LLP with changing irradiation temperature has its maximum value around the room temperature. Irradiation at elevated temperature (390 K) has the total luminescence pattern with monotonous decrease as temperature rises. As a result of evaluating the temperature dependence of luminescence, the luminescence mechanism is considered as follows: (1.) holes generated by irradiation are stored at Dy sup 3 sup + sites (hole traps) and then released to recombine with electrons trapped ...

  11. The effect of temperature dependent tissue parameters on acoustic radiation force induced displacements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suomi, Visa; Han, Yang; Konofagou, Elisa; Cleveland, Robin O.

    2016-10-01

    Multiple ultrasound elastography techniques rely on acoustic radiation force (ARF) in monitoring high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) therapy. However, ARF is dependent on tissue attenuation and sound speed, both of which are also known to change with temperature making the therapy monitoring more challenging. Furthermore, the viscoelastic properties of tissue are also temperature dependent, which affects the displacements induced by ARF. The aim of this study is to quantify the temperature dependent changes in the acoustic and viscoelastic properties of liver and investigate their effect on ARF induced displacements by using both experimental methods and simulations. Furthermore, the temperature dependent viscoelastic properties of liver are experimentally measured over a frequency range of 0.1-200 Hz at temperatures reaching 80 °C, and both conventional and fractional Zener models are used to fit the data. The fractional Zener model was found to fit better with the experimental viscoelasticity data with respect to the conventional model with up to two orders of magnitude lower sum of squared errors (SSE). The characteristics of experimental displacement data were also seen in the simulations due to the changes in attenuation coefficient and lesion development. At low temperatures before thermal ablation, attenuation was found to affect the displacement amplitude. At higher temperature, the decrease in displacement amplitude occurs approximately at 60-70 °C due to the combined effect of viscoelasticity changes and lesion growth overpowering the effect of attenuation. The results suggest that it is necessary to monitor displacement continuously during HIFU therapy in order to ascertain when ablation occurs.

  12. Unraveling the Transcriptional Basis of Temperature-Dependent Pinoxaden Resistance in Brachypodium hybridum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matzrafi, Maor; Shaar-Moshe, Lidor; Rubin, Baruch; Peleg, Zvi

    2017-01-01

    Climate change endangers food security and our ability to feed the ever-increasing human population. Weeds are the most important biotic stress, reducing crop-plant productivity worldwide. Chemical control, the main approach for weed management, can be strongly affected by temperature. Previously, we have shown that temperature-dependent non-target site (NTS) resistance of Brachypodium hybridum is due to enhanced detoxification of acetyl-CoA carboxylase inhibitors. Here, we explored the transcriptional basis of this phenomenon. Plants were characterized for the transcriptional response to herbicide application, high-temperature and their combination, in an attempt to uncover the genetic basis of temperature-dependent pinoxaden resistance. Even though most of the variance among treatments was due to pinoxaden application (61%), plants were able to survive pinoxaden application only when grown under high-temperatures. Biological pathways and expression patterns of members of specific gene families, previously shown to be involved in NTS metabolic resistance to different herbicides, were examined. Cytochrome P450, glucosyl transferase and glutathione-S-transferase genes were found to be up-regulated in response to pinoxaden application under both control and high-temperature conditions. However, biological pathways related to oxidation and glucose conjugation were found to be significantly enriched only under the combination of pinoxaden application and high-temperature. Analysis of reactive oxygen species (ROS) was conducted at several time points after treatment using a probe detecting H2O2/peroxides. Comparison of ROS accumulation among treatments revealed a significant reduction in ROS quantities 24 h after pinoxaden application only under high-temperature conditions. These results may indicate significant activity of enzymatic ROS scavengers that can be correlated with the activation of herbicide-resistance mechanisms. This study shows that up-regulation of genes

  13. Unraveling the Transcriptional Basis of Temperature-Dependent Pinoxaden Resistance in Brachypodium hybridum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matzrafi, Maor; Shaar-Moshe, Lidor; Rubin, Baruch; Peleg, Zvi

    2017-01-01

    Climate change endangers food security and our ability to feed the ever-increasing human population. Weeds are the most important biotic stress, reducing crop-plant productivity worldwide. Chemical control, the main approach for weed management, can be strongly affected by temperature. Previously, we have shown that temperature-dependent non-target site (NTS) resistance of Brachypodium hybridum is due to enhanced detoxification of acetyl-CoA carboxylase inhibitors. Here, we explored the transcriptional basis of this phenomenon. Plants were characterized for the transcriptional response to herbicide application, high-temperature and their combination, in an attempt to uncover the genetic basis of temperature-dependent pinoxaden resistance. Even though most of the variance among treatments was due to pinoxaden application (61%), plants were able to survive pinoxaden application only when grown under high-temperatures. Biological pathways and expression patterns of members of specific gene families, previously shown to be involved in NTS metabolic resistance to different herbicides, were examined. Cytochrome P450, glucosyl transferase and glutathione-S-transferase genes were found to be up-regulated in response to pinoxaden application under both control and high-temperature conditions. However, biological pathways related to oxidation and glucose conjugation were found to be significantly enriched only under the combination of pinoxaden application and high-temperature. Analysis of reactive oxygen species (ROS) was conducted at several time points after treatment using a probe detecting H2O2/peroxides. Comparison of ROS accumulation among treatments revealed a significant reduction in ROS quantities 24 h after pinoxaden application only under high-temperature conditions. These results may indicate significant activity of enzymatic ROS scavengers that can be correlated with the activation of herbicide-resistance mechanisms. This study shows that up-regulation of genes

  14. Temperature-dependent photoluminescence of cadmium-free Cu-Zn-In-S quantum dot thin films as temperature probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lan; Kang, Xiaojiao; Huang, Lijian; Pan, Daocheng

    2015-12-21

    We reported temperature-dependent photoluminescence (PL) studies on Cu-Zn-In-S quantum dot (QD) thin films. In this paper, cadmium-free and luminescent Cu-Zn-In-S quantum dot thin films were in situ formed by thermal decomposition of molecular-based precursors in the open air, without need of the complicated quantum dot synthesis. Molecular-based precursor solutions were prepared by dissolving Cu2O, ZnO, and In(OH)3 in the ethanol solution of butylamine and carbon disulfide. The effects of sintering temperature, sintering time, and the concentration of capping agents on the photoluminescence properties of Cu-Zn-In-S QD thin films have been systematically investigated. It was found that alkali metal ions play an important role in enhancing the PL quantum yield of quantum dot thin films. The as-prepared QD thin films show composition-tunable emission in the range of 535 nm to 677 nm, and the absolute PL quantum yields can reach as high as 22.1%. All of the as-deposited QD thin films show a single-exponential decay to temperature, indicating that these cadmium-free QD thin films have high potential as temperature probes.

  15. The role of electron transport in determining the temperature dependence of the photosynthetic rate in spinach leaves grown at contrasting temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamori, Wataru; Noguchi, Ko; Kashino, Yasuhiro; Terashima, Ichiro

    2008-04-01

    The temperature response of the uncoupled whole-chain electron transport rate (ETR) in thylakoid membranes differs depending on the growth temperature. However, the steps that limit whole-chain ETR are still unclear and the question of whether the temperature dependence of whole-chain ETR reflects that of the photosynthetic rate remains unresolved. Here, we determined the whole-chain, PSI and PSII ETR in thylakoid membranes isolated from spinach leaves grown at 30 degrees C [high temperature (HT)] and 15 degrees C [low temperature (LT)]. We measured temperature dependencies of the light-saturated photosynthetic rate at 360 microl l(-1) CO2 (A360) in HT and LT leaves. Both of the temperature dependences of whole-chain ETR and of A360 were different depending on the growth temperature. Whole-chain ETR was less than the rates of PSI ETR and PSII ETR in the broad temperature range, indicating that the process was limited by diffusion processes between the PSI and PSII. However, at high temperatures, whole-chain ETR appeared to be limited by not only the diffusion processes but also PSII ETR. The C3 photosynthesis model was used to evaluate the limitations of A360 by whole-chain ETR (Pr) and ribulose bisphosphate carboxylation (Pc). In HT leaves, A360 was co-limited by Pc and Pr at low temperatures, whereas at high temperatures, A360 was limited by Pc. On the other hand, in LT leaves, A360 was solely limited by Pc over the entire temperature range. The optimum temperature for A360 was determined by Pc in both HT and LT leaves. Thus, this study showed that, at low temperatures, the limiting step of A360 was different depending on the growth temperature, but was limited by Pc at high temperatures regardless of the growth temperatures.

  16. Lattice dynamics of lithium oxide

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Li2O finds several important technological applications, as it is used in solid-state batteries, can be used as a blanket breeding material in nuclear fusion reactors, etc. Li2O exhibits a fast ion phase, characterized by a thermally induced dynamic disorder in the anionic sub-lattice of Li+, at elevated temperatures around 1200 ...

  17. Temperature Dependence and Magnetic Properties of Injection Molding Tool Materials Used in Induction Heating

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guerrier, Patrick; Nielsen, Kaspar Kirstein; Hattel, Jesper Henri

    2015-01-01

    To analyze the heating phase of an induction heated injection molding tool precisely, the temperature-dependent magnetic properties, B–H curves, and the hysteresis loss are necessary for the molding tool materials. Hence, injection molding tool steels, core materials among other materials have...

  18. Role of heat advection in a channeled lava flow with power law, temperature-dependent rheology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filippucci, Marilena; Tallarico, Andrea; Dragoni, Michele

    2013-06-01

    The cooling of a lava flow, both in the transient and the steady state, is investigated considering that lava rheology is pseudoplastic and dependent on temperature. Lava exits from the vent with constant velocity and flows down a slope under the effect of gravity force inside a channel of rectangular cross section. We consider that cooling of lava is caused by thermal radiation into the atmosphere and thermal conduction at the channel walls and at the ground. The heat equation is solved numerically in a 3-D computational domain, and the solution is tested to evaluate the numerical errors. We study the steady state and the initial transient period of lava cooling. Results indicate that the advective heat transport significantly modifies the cooling rate of lava, slowing down the cooling process. Since the lava velocity depends on temperature, the cooling rate depends on the effusion temperature. Velocity profiles are modified during cooling showing two marginal static zones where the crust can form and remain stable. The fraction of crust coverage is calculated under the assumption that the solid lava is a plastic body with temperature-dependent yield strength. We numerically confirm that heat advection cannot be neglected in the mechanism of formation of lava tubes.

  19. Observed and simulated temperature dependence of the liquid water path of low clouds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Del Genio, A.D.; Wolf, A.B. [NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies, New York, NY (United States)

    1996-04-01

    Data being acquired at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Southern great Plains (SGP) Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) site can be used to examine the factors determining the temperature dependence of cloud optical thickness. We focus on cloud liquid water and physical thickness variations which can be derived from existing ARM measurements.

  20. Temperature dependence of UV radiation effects in Arctic and temperate isolates of three red macrophytes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Poll, W.H.; Eggert, A.; Buma, A.G.J.; Breeman, Arno

    The temperature dependence of UV effects was studied for Arctic and temperate isolates of the red macrophytes Palmaria palmata, Coccotylus truncatus and Phycodrys rubens. The effects of daily repeated artificial ultraviolet B and A radiation (UVBR: 280-320 nm, UVAR: 320-400 nm) treatments were

  1. Thermal rectification in restructured graphene with locally modulated temperature dependence of thermal conductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, Anuj; Hori, Takuma; Shiga, Takuma; Shiomi, Junichiro

    2017-10-01

    We study thermal rectification (TR) in a selectively restructured graphene by performing deviational phonon Monte Carlo (MC) simulations with frequency-dependent phonon transport properties obtained from first principles. The restructuring is achieved by introducing vacancy defects in a portion of graphene. The defects significantly change phonon transport properties, resulting in a modulation of temperature dependence of thermal conductivity. With this modulated temperature dependence, we predict TR ratio through a Fourier's-law-based iterative scheme (FIS), where heat flow through the system is analyzed by solving the Fourier's law of heat conduction with spatially varying temperature-dependent thermal conductivity. To identify structure parameters for maximal TR ratio, we investigate the influence of defect size, volume percentage of defects, and system (consisting of defective and nondefective regions) length through FIS analysis. As a result, we find that the TR ratio is mainly a function of length of defective and nondefective regions and volume percentage of defect, and it is mostly independent of defect size. A longer (of the order of 10 μm) nondefective side, coupled to a shorter (of the order of 100 nm) defective side, can lead to large TR ratios. Finally, MC simulation for the restructured graphene (full system) is performed to verify the predictions from FIS analysis. The full system calculations give similar trends but with enhanced TR ratios up to 70% for the temperature range of 200-500 K.

  2. The Heated Laminar Vertical Jet in a Liquid with Power-law Temperature Dependence of Density

    OpenAIRE

    Sharifulin, V. A.

    2009-01-01

    The analytical solution of heated laminar vertical jet in a liquid with power-law temperature dependence of density was obtained in the skin-layer approximation for certain values of Prandtl number. Cases of point and linear sources were considered.

  3. Temperature-dependent infrared and calorimetric studies on arsenicals adsorption from solution to hematite nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    To address the lack of systematic and surface sensitive studies on the adsorption energetics of arsenic compounds on metal (oxyhydr)oxides, we conducted temperature-dependent ATR-FTIR studies for the adsorption of arsenate, monomethylarsonic acid, and dimethylarsinic acid on hematite nanoparticles a...

  4. Temperature Dependence of the Polariton Linewidth in a GaAs Quantum Well Microcavity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borri, P.; Jensen, Jacob Riis; Langbein, W.

    2000-01-01

    The temperature dependent linewidths of the polariton resonances in a GaAs/AlGaAs single quantum well microcavity are measured. Due to the dominant homogeneous broadening of the investigated resonances, a direct linewidth analysis of the reflectivity spectra allows us to investigate the role of s...

  5. PRELIMINARY s'T'u_D|Es" on TEMPERATURE DEPENDENCE 'QF ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bartington MS2B sensor operating at low frequency. The temperature dependence of magnetic.susceptibility experiment was carried out on representative samples using the. Bartington MS2X/T system (Fig.2). The samples' were frozen in the refrigerator to nearly 0°C and then quickly transferred to the water (MS2W) sensor.

  6. Dissecting the frog inner ear with Gaussian noise .2. Temperature dependence of inner ear function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    vanDijk, P; Wit, HP; Segenhout, JM

    1997-01-01

    The temperature dependence of the response of single primary auditory nerve fibers (n = 31) was investigated in the European edible frog, Rana esculenta (seven ears). Nerve fiber responses were analyzed with Wiener kernel analysis and polynomial correlation. The responses were described with a

  7. Temperature dependent behaviour of lead sulfide quantum dot solar cells and films

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Speirs, Mark J.; Dirin, Dmitry N.; Abdu-Aguye, Mustapha; Balazs, Daniel M.; Kovalenko, Maksym V.; Loi, Maria Antonietta

    2016-01-01

    Despite increasing greatly in power conversion efficiency in recent times, lead sulfide quantum dot (PbS QD) solar cells still suffer from a low open circuit voltage (V-OC) and fill factor (FF). In this work, we explore the temperature dependent behavior of similar to 9% efficient solar cells. In

  8. Demonstrating the Temperature Dependence of Density via Construction of a Galilean Thermometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priest, Marie A.; Padgett, Lea W.; Padgett, Clifford W.

    2011-01-01

    A method for the construction of a Galilean thermometer out of common chemistry glassware is described. Students in a first-semester physical chemistry (thermodynamics) class can construct the Galilean thermometer as an investigation of the thermal expansivity of liquids and the temperature dependence of density. This is an excellent first…

  9. The temperature dependence of Cr3+ : YAG zero-phonon lines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marceddu, Marco; Manca, Marianna; Ricci, Pier Carlo; Anedda, Alberto

    2012-01-01

    This paper deals with the photoluminescence temperature dependence of the zero-phonon lines of Cr3+ ions in an yttrium aluminium garnet (YAG) matrix. Experimental data were analysed in the framework of electron-phonon coupling in the quadratic approximation and it was found that Cr3+ ions in the YAG

  10. Temperature dependence of CIE-x,y color coordinates in YAG:Ce single crystal phosphor

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rejman, M.; Babin, Vladimir; Kučerková, Romana; Nikl, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 187, Jul (2017), s. 20-25 ISSN 0022-2313 R&D Projects: GA TA ČR TA04010135 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : YAG:Ce * single-crystal * simulation * energy level lifetime * white LED * CIE * temperature dependence Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 2.686, year: 2016

  11. Challenges in Modelling of Lightning-Induced Delamination; Effect of Temperature-Dependent Interfacial Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naghipour, P.; Pineda, E. J.; Arnold, S.

    2014-01-01

    Lightning is a major cause of damage in laminated composite aerospace structures during flight. Due to the dielectric nature of Carbon fiber reinforced polymers (CFRPs), the high energy induced by lightning strike transforms into extreme, localized surface temperature accompanied with a high-pressure shockwave resulting in extensive damage. It is crucial to develop a numerical tool capable of predicting the damage induced from a lightning strike to supplement extremely expensive lightning experiments. Delamination is one of the most significant failure modes resulting from a lightning strike. It can be extended well beyond the visible damage zone, and requires sophisticated techniques and equipment to detect. A popular technique used to model delamination is the cohesive zone approach. Since the loading induced from a lightning strike event is assumed to consist of extreme localized heating, the cohesive zone formulation should additionally account for temperature effects. However, the sensitivity to this dependency remains unknown. Therefore, the major focus point of this work is to investigate the importance of this dependency via defining various temperature dependency profiles for the cohesive zone properties, and analyzing the corresponding delamination area. Thus, a detailed numerical model consisting of multidirectional composite plies with temperature-dependent cohesive elements in between is subjected to lightning (excessive amount of heat and pressure) and delamination/damage expansion is studied under specified conditions.

  12. Transient energy growth modulation by temperature dependent transport properties in a stratified plane Poiseuille flow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rinaldi, E.; Boersma, B.J.; Pecnik, R.

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the effect of temperature dependent thermal conductivity ? and isobaric specific heat c_P on the transient amplification of perturbations in a thermally stratified laminar plane Poiseuille flow. It is shown that for decreasing thermal conductivity the maximum transient energy growth

  13. Habitat related variation in UV tolerance of tropical marine red macrophytes is not temperature dependent

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Poll, W.H.; Bischof, K.; Buma, A.G.J.; Breeman, Arno

    Because tropical marine macrophytes experience high ultraviolet-B radiation (UVBR: 280-320 nm) it is assumed that they have high UV tolerance. This was investigated by examining the relative UV sensitivity of five Caribbean red macrophytes. Furthermore, the possibility of temperature dependence of

  14. A Simple Method to Calculate the Temperature Dependence of the Gibbs Energy and Chemical Equilibrium Constants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, Francisco M.

    2014-01-01

    The temperature dependence of the Gibbs energy and important quantities such as Henry's law constants, activity coefficients, and chemical equilibrium constants is usually calculated by using the Gibbs-Helmholtz equation. Although, this is a well-known approach and traditionally covered as part of any physical chemistry course, the required…

  15. Path dependent models to predict property changes in graphite irradiated at changing irradiation temperatures

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Kok, S

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available .co.za ] Path dependent models to predict property changes in graphite irradiated at changing irradiation temperatures S KOK CSIR Advanced Mathematical Modelling, Modelling and Digital Science, PO Box 395, Pretoria, 0001, South Africa E-mail: skok...

  16. Model analysis of temperature dependence of abnormal resistivity of a multiwalled carbon nanotube interconnection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Chen Yeh

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Yi-Chen Yeh1, Lun-Wei Chang2, Hsin-Yuan Miao3, Szu-Po Chen1, Jhu-Tzang Lue11Department of Physics and 2Institute of Electronics Engineering, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu, Taiwan; 3Department of Electrical Engineering, Tunghai University, Taichung, TaiwanAbstract: A homemade microwave plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition method was used to grow a multiwalled carbon nanotube between two nickel catalyst electrodes. To investigate the transport properties and electron scattering mechanism of this interconnection (of approximately fixed length and fixed diameter, we carried out a model analysis of temperature dependence of resistivity. To explain the abnormal behavior of the negative temperature coefficient of resistivity in our experimental results, we then employed theories, such as hopping conductivity theory and variable range hopping conductivity theory, to describe resistivity in the high- and low-temperature ranges, respectively. Further, the grain boundary scattering model is also provided to fit the entire measured curve of temperature dependence of resistivity.Keywords: multiwalled carbon nanotube, resistivity, hopping conductivity, temperature dependence

  17. Temperature dependence of the calibration factor of radon and radium determination in water samples by SSNTD

    CERN Document Server

    Hunyadi, I; Hakl, J; Baradacs, E; Dezso, Z

    1999-01-01

    The sensitivity of a sup 2 sup 2 sup 6 Ra determination method of water samples by SSNTD was measured as a function of storage temperature during exposure. The method is based on an etched track type radon monitor, which is closed into a gas permeable foil and is immersed in the water sample. The sample is sealed in a glass vessel and stored for an exposure time of 10-30 days. The sensitivity increased more than a factor of two when the storage temperature was raised from 2 deg. C to 30 deg. C. Temperature dependence of the partition coefficient of radon between water and air provides explanation for this dependence. For practical radio- analytical application the temperature dependence of the calibration factor is given by fitting the sensitivity data obtained by measuring sup 2 sup 2 sup 6 Ra standard solutions (in the activity concentration range of 0.1-48.5 kBq m sup - sup 3) at different storage temperatures.

  18. Phonons in quantum solids with defects. [lattice vacancies and interstitials in solid helium and metallic hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobi, N.; Zmuidzinas, J. S.

    1974-01-01

    A formalism was developed for temperature-dependent, self-consistent phonons in quantum solids with defects. Lattice vacancies and interstitials in solid helium and metallic hydrogen, as well as electronic excitations in solid helium, were treated as defects that modify properties of these systems. The information to be gained from the modified phonon spectrum is discussed.

  19. Temperature-dependent remineralization of organic matter - small impacts on the carbon cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laufkötter, Charlotte; John, Jasmin; Stock, Charles; Dunne, John

    2017-04-01

    The temperature dependence of remineralization of organic matter is regularly mentioned as important but unconstrained factor, with the potential to cause considerable uncertainty in projections of marine export production, carbon sequestration and oceanic carbon uptake. We have recently presented evidence for a temperature dependence of the particulate organic matter (POC) flux to depth, based on a compilation of observations. Here, we explore the impacts of the new temperature dependence on net primary production, POC flux and oceanic carbon uptake in the ecosystem model COBALT coupled to GFDL's ESM2M Coupled Climate-Carbon Earth System Model. We have implemented two remineralization schemes: COBALT-R1 includes a temperature dependence using parameter values according to our data analysis. COBALT-R1 shows very high remineralization in warm surface waters. The data used to constrain it, however, comes from colder water below 150m. Colonization of sinking material occurs throughout the euphotic zone, potentially reducing remineralization in the immediate vicinity of the ocean surface relative to R1 rates [Mislan et al., 2014]. We thus considered a second model version (COBALT-R2) that decreases remineralization towards the surface but ramped up remineralization rates to R1 values below 150m. After 1300 years of spin-up, the effects of the temperature dependence are most visible in the intermediate part of the water column (150 - 1500m), with stronger remineralization in the warmer upper water but weaker remineralization below, such that the carbon flux at 2000m is barely affected. Also, both COBALT-R1 and COBALT-R2 simulate lower POC flux in the low latitudes and higher POC flux in high latitudes compared to the original model version. In terms of future changes, COBALT-R1 projects an increase in NPP while COBALT-R2 projects a moderate decrease. However, the percentaged decrease in POC flux at 100m is identical in both model versions and the original COBALT

  20. Temperature dependence of the optical properties of violet, blue and green InGaN/GaN single quantum well light-emitting diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yi; Zhu, Youhua; Wang, Meiyu; Deng, Honghai; Huang, Jing; Yin, HaiHong; Sun, Ling

    2017-12-01

    Temperature dependence of the optical properties of InGaN/GaN single quantum well light-emitting diodes (LEDs) with different indium (In) contents is investigated by using the effective mass theory taking into account the band-gap shrinkage and lattice thermal expansion. The peak intensity of the spontaneous emission spectrum is decreased by 30.6%, 30.4%, and 30.3% for the violet, blue, and green LEDs in the temperature range 300 K–400 K, while the reductions of internal quantum efficiency (η) with temperature are ~0.13, ~0.11, and ~0.1 respectively at the injection current density of 100 A cm‑2. Moreover, two different slopes for all the η–T curves are observed: a lower absolute value of the slopes at T  =  300–350 K a larger absolute value of the slopes at T  =  350–400 K. The numerical results also indicate that the efficiency droop effect with increasing the temperature becomes more serious, especially for the InGaN/GaN LED structures with the lower In-content.