WorldWideScience

Sample records for temperature dependent analysis

  1. Nonlinear temperature dependent failure analysis of finite width composite laminates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagarkar, A. P.; Herakovich, C. T.

    1979-01-01

    A quasi-three dimensional, nonlinear elastic finite element stress analysis of finite width composite laminates including curing stresses is presented. Cross-ply, angle-ply, and two quasi-isotropic graphite/epoxy laminates are studied. Curing stresses are calculated using temperature dependent elastic properties that are input as percent retention curves, and stresses due to mechanical loading in the form of an axial strain are calculated using tangent modulii obtained by Ramberg-Osgood parameters. It is shown that curing stresses and stresses due to tensile loading are significant as edge effects in all types of laminate studies. The tensor polynomial failure criterion is used to predict the initiation of failure. The mode of failure is predicted by examining individual stress contributions to the tensor polynomial.

  2. Second law analysis of a reacting temperature dependent viscous ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this paper, entropy generation during the flow of a reacting viscous fluid through an inclined Channel with isothermal walls are investigated. The coupled energy and momentum equations were solved numerically. Previous results in literature (Adesanya et al 2006 [[17]) showed both velocity and temperature have two ...

  3. Complete FDTD analysis of microwave heating processes in frequency-dependent and temperature dependent media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torres, F.; Jecko, B. [Univ. de Limoges (France). Inst. de Recherche en Communications Optiques et Microondes

    1997-01-01

    It is well known that the temperature rise in a material modifies its physical properties and, particularly, its dielectric permittivity. The dissipated electromagnetic power involved in microwave heating processes depending on {var_epsilon}({omega}), the electrical characteristics of the heated media must vary with the temperature to achieve realistic simulations. In this paper, the authors present a fast and accurate algorithm allowing, through a combined electromagnetic and thermal procedure, to take into account the influence of the temperature on the electrical properties of materials. First, the temperature dependence of the complex permittivity ruled by a Debye relaxation equation is investigated, and a realistic model is proposed and validated. Then, a frequency-dependent finite-differences time-domain ((FD){sup 2}TD) method is used to assess the instantaneous electromagnetic power lost by dielectric hysteresis. Within the same iteration, a time-scaled form of the heat transfer equation allows one to calculate the temperature distribution in the heated medium and then to correct the dielectric properties of the material using the proposed model. These new characteristics will be taken into account by the EM solver at the next iteration. This combined algorithm allows a significant reduction of computation time. An application to a microwave oven is proposed.

  4. Improved Regression Analysis of Temperature-Dependent Strain-Gage Balance Calibration Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulbrich, N.

    2015-01-01

    An improved approach is discussed that may be used to directly include first and second order temperature effects in the load prediction algorithm of a wind tunnel strain-gage balance. The improved approach was designed for the Iterative Method that fits strain-gage outputs as a function of calibration loads and uses a load iteration scheme during the wind tunnel test to predict loads from measured gage outputs. The improved approach assumes that the strain-gage balance is at a constant uniform temperature when it is calibrated and used. First, the method introduces a new independent variable for the regression analysis of the balance calibration data. The new variable is designed as the difference between the uniform temperature of the balance and a global reference temperature. This reference temperature should be the primary calibration temperature of the balance so that, if needed, a tare load iteration can be performed. Then, two temperature{dependent terms are included in the regression models of the gage outputs. They are the temperature difference itself and the square of the temperature difference. Simulated temperature{dependent data obtained from Triumph Aerospace's 2013 calibration of NASA's ARC-30K five component semi{span balance is used to illustrate the application of the improved approach.

  5. EXACT SOLUTION FOR TEMPERATURE-DEPENDENT BUCKLING ANALYSIS OF FG-CNT-REINFORCED MINDLIN PLATES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Mohammad Mousavi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This research deals with the buckling analysis of nanocomposite polymeric temperature-dependent plates reinforced by single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs. For the carbon-nanotube reinforced composite (CNTRC plate, uniform distribution (UD and three types of functionally graded (FG distribution patterns of SWCNT reinforcements are assumed. The material properties of FG-CNTRC plate are graded in the thickness direction and estimated based on the rule of mixture. The CNTRC is located in a elastic medium which is simulated with temperature-dependent Pasternak medium. Based on orthotropic Mindlin plate theory, the governing equations are derived using Hamilton’s principle and solved by Navier method. The influences of the volume fractions of carbon nanotubes, elastic medium, temperature and distribution type of CNTs are considered on the buckling of the plate. Results indicate that CNT distribution close to top and bottom are more efficient than those distributed nearby the mid-plane for increasing the stiffness of plates.

  6. How to apply the dependence structure analysis to extreme temperature and precipitation for disaster risk assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Jieling; Li, Ning; Zhang, Zhengtao; Chen, Xi

    2017-06-01

    IPCC reports that a changing climate can affect the frequency and the intensity of extreme events. However, the extremes appear in the tail of the probability distribution. In order to know the relationship between extreme events in the tail of temperature and precipitation, an important but previously unobserved dependence structure is analyzed in this paper. Here, we examine the dependence structure by building a bivariate joint of Gumbel copula model for temperature and precipitation using monthly average temperature (T) and monthly precipitation (P) data from Beijing station in China covering a period of 1951-2015 and find the dependence structure can be divided into two sections, they are the middle part and the upper tail. We show that T and P have a strong positive correlation in the high tail section (T > 25.85 °C and P > 171.1 mm) (=0.66, p < 0.01) while they do not demonstrate the same relation in the other section, which suggests that the identification of a strong influence of T on extreme P needs help from the dependence structure analysis. We also find that in the high tail section, every 1 °C increase in T is associated with 73.45 mm increase in P. Our results suggested that extreme precipitation fluctuations by changes in temperature will allow the data dependence structure to be included in extreme affect for the disaster risk assessment under future climate change scenarios. Copula bivariate jointed probability distribution is useful to the dependence structure analysis.

  7. Model analysis of temperature dependence of abnormal resistivity of a multiwalled carbon nanotube interconnection

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    Yi-Chen Yeh

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Yi-Chen Yeh1, Lun-Wei Chang2, Hsin-Yuan Miao3, Szu-Po Chen1, Jhu-Tzang Lue11Department of Physics and 2Institute of Electronics Engineering, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu, Taiwan; 3Department of Electrical Engineering, Tunghai University, Taichung, TaiwanAbstract: A homemade microwave plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition method was used to grow a multiwalled carbon nanotube between two nickel catalyst electrodes. To investigate the transport properties and electron scattering mechanism of this interconnection (of approximately fixed length and fixed diameter, we carried out a model analysis of temperature dependence of resistivity. To explain the abnormal behavior of the negative temperature coefficient of resistivity in our experimental results, we then employed theories, such as hopping conductivity theory and variable range hopping conductivity theory, to describe resistivity in the high- and low-temperature ranges, respectively. Further, the grain boundary scattering model is also provided to fit the entire measured curve of temperature dependence of resistivity.Keywords: multiwalled carbon nanotube, resistivity, hopping conductivity, temperature dependence

  8. Analysis of convective longitudinal fin with temperature-dependent thermal conductivity and internal heat generation

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    M.G. Sobamowo

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available In this study, analysis of heat transfer in a longitudinal rectangular fin with temperature-dependent thermal conductivity and internal heat generation was carried out using finite difference method. The developed systems of non-linear equations that resulted from the discretization using finite difference scheme were solved with the aid of MATLAB using fsolve. The numerical solution was validated with the exact solution for the linear problem. The developed heat transfer models were used to investigate the effects of thermo-geometric parameters, coefficient of heat transfer and thermal conductivity (non-linear parameters on the temperature distribution, heat transfer and thermal performance of the longitudinal rectangular fin. From the results, it shows that the fin temperature distribution, the total heat transfer, and the fin efficiency are significantly affected by the thermo-geometric parameters of the fin. Also, for the solution to be thermally stable, the fin thermo-geometric parameter must not exceed a specific value. However, it was established that the increase in temperature-dependent properties and internal heat generation values increases the thermal stability range of the thermo-geometric parameter. The results obtained in this analysis serve as basis for comparison of any other method of analysis of the problem.

  9. Temperature-Dependent Modeling and Crosstalk Analysis in Mixed Carbon Nanotube Bundle Interconnects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, Mayank Kumar; Garg, Harsh; Kaushik, B. K.

    2017-08-01

    The temperature-dependent circuit modeling and performance analysis in terms of crosstalk in capacitively coupled mixed carbon nanotube bundle (MCB) interconnects, at the far end of the victim line, have been analyzed with four different structures of MCBs (MCB-1, MCB-2, MCB-3 and MCB-4) constituted under case 1 and case 2 at the 22-nm technology node. The impact of tunneling and intershell coupling between adjacent shells on temperature-dependent equivalent circuit parameters of a multi-walled carbon nanotube bundle are also critically analyzed and employed for different MCB structures under case 1. A similar analysis is performed for copper interconnects and comparisons are made between results obtained through these analyses over temperatures ranging from 300 K to 500 K. The simulation program with integrated circuit emphasis simulation results reveals that, compared with all MCB structures under case 1 and case 2, with rise in temperature from 300 K to 500 K, crosstalk-induced noise voltage levels at the far end of the victim line are found to be significantly large in copper. It is also observed that due to the dominance of larger temperature-dependent resistance and ground capacitance in case 1, the MCB-2 is of lower crosstalk-induced noise voltage levels than other structures of MCBs. On the other hand, the MCB-1 has smaller time duration of victim output. Results further reveal that, compared with case 2 of MCB, with rise in temperatures, the victim line gets less prone to crosstalk-induced noise in MCB interconnects constituted under case 1, due to tunneling effects and intershell coupling between adjacent shells. Based on these comparative results, a promising MCB structure (MCB-2) has been proposed among other structures under the consideration of tunneling effects and intershell coupling (case 1).

  10. Quantitative Analysis of Temperature Dependence of Raman shift of monolayer WS2

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Huang, Xiaoting; Gao, Yang; Yang, Tianqi; Ren, Wencai; Cheng, Hui-Ming; Lai, Tianshu

    2016-01-01

    We report the temperature-dependent evolution of Raman spectra of monolayer WS2 directly CVD-grown on a gold foil and then transferred onto quartz substrates over a wide temperature range from 84 to 543 K...

  11. Viscosity analysis of the temperature dependence of the solution conformation of ovalbumin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monkos, K

    2000-05-31

    The viscosity of ovalbumin aqueous solutions was studied as a function of temperature and of protein concentration. Viscosity-temperature dependence was discussed on the basis of the modified Arrhenius formula at temperatures ranging from 5 to 55 degrees C. The activation energy of viscous flow for hydrated and unhydrated ovalbumin was calculated. Viscosity-concentration dependence, in turn, was discussed on the basis of Mooney equation. It has been shown that the shape parameter S decreases with increasing temperature, and self-crowding factor K does not depend on temperature. At low concentration limit the numerical values of the intrinsic viscosity and of Huggins coefficient were calculated. A master curve relating the specific viscosity etasp to the reduced concentration c[eta], over the whole range of temperature, was obtained and the three ranges of concentrations: diluted, semi-diluted and concentrated, are discussed. It has been proved that the Mark-Houvink-Kuhn-Sakurada (MHKS) exponent for ovalbumin does not depend on temperature.

  12. Analysis of Radiative Radial Fin with Temperature-Dependent Thermal Conductivity Using Nonlinear Differential Transformation Methods

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    Mohsen Torabi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Radiative radial fin with temperature-dependent thermal conductivity is analyzed. The calculations are carried out by using differential transformation method (DTM, which is a seminumerical-analytical solution technique that can be applied to various types of differential equations, as well as the Boubaker polynomials expansion scheme (BPES. By using DTM, the nonlinear constrained governing equations are reduced to recurrence relations and related boundary conditions are transformed into a set of algebraic equations. The principle of differential transformation is briefly introduced and then applied to the aforementioned equations. Solutions are subsequently obtained by a process of inverse transformation. The current results are then compared with previously obtained results using variational iteration method (VIM, Adomian decomposition method (ADM, homotopy analysis method (HAM, and numerical solution (NS in order to verify the accuracy of the proposed method. The findings reveal that both BPES and DTM can achieve suitable results in predicting the solution of such problems. After these verifications, we analyze fin efficiency and the effects of some physically applicable parameters in this problem such as radiation-conduction fin parameter, radiation sink temperature, heat generation, and thermal conductivity parameters.

  13. A theoretical analysis for temperature dependences of laser-induced damage threshold

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikami, K.; Motokoshi, S.; Somekawa, T.; Jitsuno, T.; Fujita, M.; Tanaka, K. A.

    2013-11-01

    The temperature dependence of the laser-induced damage threshold on optical coatings was studied in detail for laser pulses from 123 K to 473 K at different temperature using Nd:YAG laser (wavelength 1064 nm and pulse width 4 ns) and Ti:Sapphire laser (wavelength 800 nm and pulse width 100 fs, 2 ps, and 200 ps). The six kinds of optical monolayer coatings were prepared by electron beam evaporation and the coating materials were SiO2, Al2O3, HfO2, ZrO2, Ta2O5, and MgF2. For pulses longer than a few picoseconds, the laser-induced damage threshold of single-layer coatings increased with decreasing temperature. This temperature dependence was reversed for pulses shorter than a few picoseconds. We describe the physics models to explain the observed scaling. The electron avalanche is essential to explain the differences in the temperature dependence. In other words, the balance between linear process such as electron avalanche etc. and nonlinear process such as multiphoton ionization etc. will be able to decide the tendency of the temperature dependence. The proposed model also gives one of possibility for an extremely high LIDT optics.

  14. Data-driven analysis of the temperature and momentum dependence of the charm quark diffusion coefficient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yingru; Nahrgang, Marlene; Bernhard, Jonah; Cao, Shanshan; Bass, Steffen

    2017-09-01

    Heavy quarks (charm and bottom) have been considered as valuable probes of the QGP medium created in heavy-ion collisions. The interaction strength between heavy quarks and the medium, commonly characterized by their diffusion coefficients, is not directly measurable, but can be estimated by comparison between theoretical model calculations and experimental data on observables such as elliptic flow and nuclear modification factor. In this work, we conduct a data-driven model-to-data analysis to systematically and quantitatively study the evolution of heavy quarks in the QGP medium. We start by proposing a generalized ansatz for the heavy quark diffusion coefficient, then subsequently calibrate our model calculation to the experimental data utilizing a modern Bayesian analysis. We then are able to extract the functional form (with quantified uncertainties) of the transport coefficients. Our model can simultaneously describe the experimental data of D-meson RAA and v2 for different collision systems at both RHIC and LHC, utilizing our extracted diffusion coefficients. It is found that the heavy quark spatial diffusion coefficient has a non-trivial temperature dependence at low momentum and converges to the pQCD calculation in the intermediate/high momentum region. DE-FG02-05ER41367 (DOE).

  15. Combined analysis of the temperature dependences of the fluorescence spectra and images of single molecules in polymer films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anikushina, Tatiana; Naumov, Andrei; Kador, Lothar

    2017-10-01

    In this poster talk we discuss a possibility to realize the combined analysis of the temperature dependences of the zero-phonon line widths and fluorescence images of single molecules in thin polymer films. Such analysis is aimed to obtain the local characteristics of low-temperature vibrational dynamics (individual parameters of quasi-localised low-frequency vibrational modes) in relation to the sample structure.

  16. Temperature-dependent gain compensation of CsI(Tl) detectors using pulse shape analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Joel; Isaak, Johann; Loeher, Bastian; Savran, Deniz; Wamers, Felix [ExtreMe Matter Institute EMMI and Research Division, GSI Helmholtzzentrum, Darmstadt (Germany); Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies FIAS, Frankfurt (Germany); Vencelj, Matjaz [Jozef Stefan Institute, Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    2014-07-01

    The scintillation properties of CsI(Tl) crystals and the gain of photo-sensors such as avalanche photodiodes (APDs) and photo-multipliers (PMs) are temperature dependent. Therefore, for accurate measurements in γ-ray spectroscopy using CsI(Tl) detectors temperature variations have to be precisely monitored. Since the decay time constants in the scintillation process of CsI(Tl) crystals also depend on the temperature, these changes can be compensated by analyzing the pulse shape of detector signals. The method uses the correlation between the gain and the pulse-shape to correct the effect of the temperature. The results of the implementation of this method using CsI(Tl) crystals read out by PMs are presented. It shows to improve that the energy resolution of the detectors in a temperature changing environment ranging from -10 {sup circle} C to 40 {sup circle} C is improved. The suitability of the method using CsI(Tl) read out by APDs was investigated in the same temperature range. First results are also presented.

  17. Study of the temperature dependent nitrogen retention in tungsten surfaces by XPS-analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plank, Ulrike [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Boltzmannstr. 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Fakultaet fuer Physik der Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen, Schellingstrasse 4, D-80799 Muenchen (Germany); Meisl, Gerd; Hoeschen, Till [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Boltzmannstr. 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    To reduce the power load on the divertor of fusion experiments, nitrogen (N) is puffed into the plasma. As a side effect, nitrogen gets implanted into the tungsten (W) walls of the reactor and forms nitride layers. Their formation and, therefore, the N accumulation in W showed an unexpected temperature dependence in previous experiments. To study the nitrogen retention, we implanted N ions with an energy of 300 eV into W and observed the evolution of the surface composition by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). We find that the N content does not change when the sample is annealed up to 800 K after implantation at lower temperatures. In contrast, the N concentration decreases with increasing implantation temperature. At 800 K implantation temperature, the N saturation level is about 5 times lower compared to 300 K implantation. A possible explanation for this difference is an enhanced diffusion during ion bombardment due to changes in the structure or in the chemical state of the tungsten nitride system. Ongoing tungsten nitride erosion experiments shall help to clarify whether the strong temperature dependence is the result of enhanced diffusion or of phase changes.

  18. Exoproteome Analysis of the Seaweed Pathogen Nautella italica R11 Reveals Temperature-Dependent Regulation of RTX-Like Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa Gardiner

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Climate fluctuations have been linked to an increased prevalence of disease in seaweeds, including the red alga Delisea pulchra, which is susceptible to a bleaching disease caused by the bacterium Nautella italica R11 under elevated seawater temperatures. To further investigate the role of temperature in the induction of disease by N. italica R11, we assessed the effect of temperature on the expression of the extracellular proteome (exoproteome in this bacterium. Label-free quantitative mass spectrometry was used to identify 207 proteins secreted into supernatant fraction, which is equivalent to 5% of the protein coding genes in the N. italica R11 genome. Comparative analysis demonstrated that expression of over 30% of the N. italica R11 exoproteome is affected by temperature. The temperature-dependent proteins include traits that could facilitate the ATP-dependent transport of amino acid and carbohydrate, as well as several uncharacterized proteins. Further, potential virulence determinants, including two RTX-like proteins, exhibited significantly higher expression in the exoproteome at the disease inducing temperature of 24°C relative to non-inducing temperature (16°C. This is the first study to demonstrate that temperature has an influence exoproteome expression in a macroalgal pathogen. The results have revealed several temperature regulated candidate virulence factors that may have a role in macroalgal colonization and invasion at elevated sea-surface temperatures, including novel RTX-like proteins.

  19. Temperature-dependent deliquescence relative humidities and water activities using humidity controlled thermogravimetric analysis with application to malonic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyer, Keith D; Schroeder, Jason R; Kissinger, Jared A

    2014-04-03

    We utilize a new experimental technique, humidity-controlled thermogravimetric analysis (HTGA), to determine temperature-dependent deliquescence relative humidities (DRH) and to determine the equilibrium concentration of a solution at a given temperature and relative humidity. To that end, we have investigated the malonic acid/water system determining the DRH and concentration/RH relationship in the temperature range 303-278 K. Excellent agreement is found with literature values for the DRH of malonic acid as a function of temperature and for the concentration/RH relationship at several temperatures. Thus, we extend the DRH and concentration/RH relationship to a broader temperature range and are using the HTGA experiments to investigate other organic acids.

  20. Analysis of the temperature dependence of the thermal conductivity of insulating single crystal oxides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Langenberg

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The temperature dependence of the thermal conductivity of 27 different single crystal oxides is reported from ≈20 K to 350 K. These crystals have been selected among the most common substrates for growing epitaxial thin-film oxides, spanning over a range of lattice parameters from ≈3.7 Å to ≈12.5 Å. Different contributions to the phonon relaxation time are discussed on the basis of the Debye model. This work provides a database for the selection of appropriate substrates for thin-film growth according to their desired thermal properties, for applications in which heat management is important.

  1. Temperature dependence of surface nanobubbles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berkelaar, R.P.; Seddon, James Richard Thorley; Zandvliet, Henricus J.W.; Lohse, Detlef

    2012-01-01

    The temperature dependence of nanobubbles was investigated experimentally using atomic force microscopy. By scanning the same area of the surface at temperatures from 51 °C to 25 °C it was possible to track geometrical changes of individual nanobubbles as the temperature was decreased.

  2. Analysis of a temperature- and rainfall-dependent model for malaria transmission dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okuneye, Kamaldeen; Gumel, Abba B

    2017-05-01

    A new non-autonomous model is designed and used to assess the impact of variability in temperature and rainfall on the transmission dynamics of malaria in a population. In addition to adding age-structure in the host population and the dynamics of immature malaria mosquitoes, a notable feature of the new model is that recovered individuals do not revert to wholly-susceptible class (that is, recovered individuals enjoy reduced susceptibility to new malaria infection). In the absence of disease-induced mortality, the disease-free solution of the model is shown to be globally-asymptotically stable when the associated reproduction ratio is less than unity. The model has at least one positive periodic solution when the reproduction ratio exceeds unity (and the disease persists in the community in this case). Detailed uncertainty and sensitivity analysis, using mean monthly temperature and rainfall data from KwaZulu-Natal province of South Africa, shows that the top three parameters of the model that have the most influence on the disease transmission dynamics are the mosquito carrying capacity, transmission probability per contact for susceptible mosquitoes and human recovery rate. Numerical simulations of the model show that, for the KwaZulu-Natal province, malaria burden increases with increasing mean monthly temperature and rainfall in the ranges ([17-25]°C and [32-110] mm), respectively (and decreases with decreasing mean monthly temperature and rainfall values). In particular, transmission is maximized for mean monthly temperature and rainfall in the ranges [21-25]°C and [95-125] mm. This occurs for a six-month period in KwaZulu-Natal (hence, this study suggests that anti-malaria control efforts should be intensified during this period). It is shown, for the fixed mean monthly temperature of KwaZulu-Natal, that malaria burden decreases whenever the amount of rainfall exceeds a certain threshold value. It is further shown (through sensitivity analysis and

  3. Proteomic analysis of temperature-dependent changes in stored UHT milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, John W; Gupta, Rajesh; Deeth, Hilton C; Alewood, Paul F

    2011-03-09

    Molecular changes in milk proteins during storage of UHT-treated milk have been investigated using two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) coupled to MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry. UHT-treated samples were stored at three different temperatures, 4 °C, 28 °C, and 40 °C, for two months. Three main changes could be observed on 2-DE gels following storage. They were (1) the appearance of diffuse staining regions above the position of the monomeric caseins caused by nondisulfide cross-linking of α and β-caseins; (2) the appearance of additional acidic forms of proteins, predominantly of α(S1)-casein, caused by deamidation; and (3) the appearance of "stacked spots" caused by lactosylation of whey proteins. The extent of the changes increased with increased storage temperature. Mass spectrometric analysis of in-gel tryptic digests showed that the cross-linked proteins were dominated by α(S1)-casein, but a heterogeneous population of cross-linked forms with α(S2)-casein and β-casein was also observed. Tandem MS analysis was used to confirm deamidation of N(129) in α(S1)-casein. MS analysis of the stacked spots revealed lactosylation of 9/15 lysines in β-lactoglobulin and 8/12 lysines in α-lactalbumin. More extensive analysis will be required to confirm the nature of the cross-links and additional deamidation sites in α(S1)-casein as the highly phosphorylated nature of the caseins makes them challenging prospects for MS analysis.

  4. Temperature dependent analysis of three classes of fluorescence spectra from p-6P nanofiber films

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balzer, F.; Pogantsch, Alexander; Rubahn, Horst-Günter

    2009-01-01

    devices, given that the spectra are reproducible for varying surface temperatures. A detailed investigation as a function of surface temperature variation from 300 to 30 K reveals three classes of spectra: (a) spectra with well resolved excitonic peaks, which shift 35meV to the blue with decreasing...... temperature, (b) similar spectra with an additional intermediate broadening around 150 K, and (c) excitonic spectra similar to (b), but with a green defect emission band. Quantitative fitting of type (a) spectra results in an  exciton–phonon coupling factor of 80 ± 10meV and an average phonon temperature of Θ...

  5. Haar Wavelet Collocation Method for Thermal Analysis of Porous Fin with Temperature-dependent Thermal Conductivity and Internal Heat Generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George OGUNTALA

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the thermal performance analysis of porous fin with temperature-dependent thermal conductivity and internal heat generation is carried out using Haar wavelet collocation method. The effects of various parameters on the thermal characteristics of the porous fin are investigated. It is found that as the porosity increases, the rate of heat transfer from the fin increases and the thermal performance of the porous fin increases. The numerical solutions by the Haar wavelet collocation method are in good agreement with the standard numerical solutions.

  6. Heat transfer analysis of a fin with temperature-dependent thermal conductivity and heat transfer coefficient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadi Mirgolbabaee

    2015-02-01

    Results are presented for the dimensionless temperature distribution and fin efficiency for different values of the problem parameters which for the purpose of comparison, obtained equation were calculated with mentioned methods. It was found the proposed solution is very accurate, efficient, and convenient for the discussed problem, furthermore convergence problems for solving nonlinear equations by using AGM appear small so the results demonstrate that the AGM could be applied through other methods in nonlinear problems with high nonlinearity.

  7. Analysis of temperature-dependent changes in the metabolism of Yersinia pestis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navid, Ali; Almaas, Eivind

    2008-03-01

    The gram-negative bacterium Yersinia pestis is the aetiological agent of bubonic plague, a zoonotic infection that occurs through the bite of a flea. It has long been known that Y. pestis has different metabolic needs upon transition from the flea gut environment (26 C) to that of a mammalian host (37 C). To study this and other outstanding questions about metabolic function of Y. pestis, we used the available genomic, biochemical and physiological data to develop a constraint-based flux balance model of metabolism in the avirulent 91001 strain (biovar Mediaevalis) of this organism. Utilizing two sets of whole-genome DNA microarray expression data, we examined the system level changes that occur when Y. pestis acclimatizes to temperature shifts. Our results point to fundamental changes in its oxidative metabolism of sugars and use of amino acids, in particular that of arginine. This behavior is indicative of an inefficient metabolism that could be caused by adaptation to life in a nutrient rich environment.

  8. Proteomic analysis of temperature dependent extracellular proteins from Aspergillus fumigatus grown under solid-state culture condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adav, Sunil S; Ravindran, Anita; Sze, Siu Kwan

    2013-06-07

    Fungal species of the genus Aspergillus are filamentous ubiquitous saprophytes that play a major role in lignocellulosic biomass recycling and also are considered as cell factories for the production of organic acids, pharmaceuticals, and industrially important enzymes. Analysis of extracellular secreted biomass degrading enzymes using complex lignocellulosic biomass as a substrate by solid-state fermentation could be a more practical approach to evaluate application of the enzymes for lignocellulosic biorefinery. This study isolated a fungal strain from compost, identified as Aspergillus fumigatus, and further analyzed it for lignocellulolytic enzymes at different temperatures using label free quantitative proteomics. The profile of secretome composition discovered cellulases, hemicellulases, lignin degrading proteins, peptidases and proteases, and transport and hypothetical proteins; while protein abundances and further their hierarchical clustering analysis revealed temperature dependent expression of these enzymes during solid-state fermentation of sawdust. The enzyme activities and protein abundances as determined by exponentially modified protein abundance index (emPAI) indicated the maximum activities at the range of 40-50 °C, demonstrating the thermophilic nature of the isolate A. fumigatus LF9. Characterization of the thermostability of secretome suggested the potential of the isolated fungal strain in the production of thermophilic biomass degrading enzymes for industrial application.

  9. Phase transition analysis of V-shaped liquid crystal: Combined temperature-dependent FTIR and density functional theory approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Swapnil; Singh, Harshita; Karthick, T; Tandon, Poonam; Prasad, Veena

    2018-01-05

    Temperature-dependent Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) combined with density functional theory (DFT) is employed to study the mechanism of phase transitions of V-shaped bent-core liquid crystal. Since it has a large number of flexible bonds, one-dimensional potential energy scan (PES) was performed on the flexible bonds and predicted the most stable conformer I. A detailed analysis of vibrational normal modes of conformer I have been done on the basis of potential energy distribution. The good agreement between the calculated spectrum of conformer I and observed FTIR spectrum at room temperature validates our theoretical structure model. Furthermore, the prominent changes observed in the stretching vibrational bands of CH3/CH2, CO, ring CC, ring CO, ring CH in-plane bending, and ring CH out-of-plane bending at Iso→nematic phase transition (at 155°C) have been illustrated. However, the minor changes in the spectral features observed for the other phase transitions might be due to the shape or bulkiness of molecules. Combined FTIR and PES study beautifully explained the dynamics of the molecules, molecular realignment, H-bonding, and conformational changes at the phase transitions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Phase transition analysis of V-shaped liquid crystal: Combined temperature-dependent FTIR and density functional theory approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Swapnil; Singh, Harshita; Karthick, T.; Tandon, Poonam; Prasad, Veena

    2018-01-01

    Temperature-dependent Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) combined with density functional theory (DFT) is employed to study the mechanism of phase transitions of V-shaped bent-core liquid crystal. Since it has a large number of flexible bonds, one-dimensional potential energy scan (PES) was performed on the flexible bonds and predicted the most stable conformer I. A detailed analysis of vibrational normal modes of conformer I have been done on the basis of potential energy distribution. The good agreement between the calculated spectrum of conformer I and observed FTIR spectrum at room temperature validates our theoretical structure model. Furthermore, the prominent changes observed in the stretching vibrational bands of CH3/CH2, Cdbnd O, ring CC, ring CO, ring CH in-plane bending, and ring CH out-of-plane bending at Iso → nematic phase transition (at 155 °C) have been illustrated. However, the minor changes in the spectral features observed for the other phase transitions might be due to the shape or bulkiness of molecules. Combined FTIR and PES study beautifully explained the dynamics of the molecules, molecular realignment, H-bonding, and conformational changes at the phase transitions.

  11. Analysis of Convective Straight and Radial Fins with Temperature-Dependent Thermal Conductivity Using Variational Iteration Method with Comparison with Respect to Finite Element Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Safa Bozkurt Coşkun

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to enhance heat transfer between primary surface and the environment, radiating extended surfaces are commonly utilized. Especially in the case of large temperature differences, variable thermal conductivity has a strong effect on performance of such a surface. In this paper, variational iteration method is used to analyze convective straight and radial fins with temperature-dependent thermal conductivity. In order to show the efficiency of variational iteration method (VIM, the results obtained from VIM analysis are compared with previously obtained results using Adomian decomposition method (ADM and the results from finite element analysis. VIM produces analytical expressions for the solution of nonlinear differential equations. However, these expressions obtained from VIM must be tested with respect to the results obtained from a reliable numerical method or analytical solution. This work assures that VIM is a promising method for the analysis of convective straight and radial fin problems.

  12. Theoretical Analysis on the Kinetic Isotope Effects of Bimolecular Nucleophilic Substitution (SN2 Reactions and Their Temperature Dependence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wan-Chen Tsai

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Factors affecting the kinetic isotope effects (KIEs of the gas-phase SN2 reactions and their temperature dependence have been analyzed using the ion-molecule collision theory and the transition state theory (TST. The quantum-mechanical tunneling effects were also considered using the canonical variational theory with small curvature tunneling (CVT/SCT. We have benchmarked a few ab initio and density functional theory (DFT methods for their performance in predicting the deuterium KIEs against eleven experimental values. The results showed that the MP2/aug-cc-pVDZ method gave the most accurate prediction overall. The slight inverse deuterium KIEs usually observed for the gas-phase SN2 reactions at room temperature were due to the balance of the normal rotational contribution and the significant inverse vibrational contribution. Since the vibrational contribution is a sensitive function of temperature while the rotation contribution is temperature independent, the KIEs are thus also temperature dependent. For SN2 reactions with appreciable barrier heights, the tunneling effects were predicted to contribute significantly both to the rate constants and to the carbon-13, and carbon-14 KIEs, which suggested important carbon atom tunneling at and below room temperature.

  13. Temperature-dependent Hammond behavior in a protein-folding reaction: analysis of transition-state movement and ground-state effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taskent, Humeyra; Cho, Jae-Hyun; Raleigh, Daniel P

    2008-05-02

    Characterization of the transition-state ensemble and the nature of the free-energy barrier for protein folding are areas of intense activity and some controversy. A key issue that has emerged in recent years is the width of the free-energy barrier and the susceptibility of the transition state to movement. Here we report denaturant-induced and temperature-dependent folding studies of a small mixed alpha-beta protein, the N-terminal domain of L9 (NTL9). The folding of NTL9 was determined using fluorescence-detected stopped-flow fluorescence measurements conducted at seven different temperatures between 11 and 40 degrees C. Plots of the log of the observed first-order rate constant versus denaturant concentration, "chevron plots," displayed the characteristic V shape expected for two-state folding. There was no hint of deviation from linearity even at the lowest denaturant concentrations. The relative position of the transition state, as judged by the Tanford beta parameter, beta(T), shifts towards the native state as the temperature is increased. Analysis of the temperature dependence of the kinetic and equilibrium m values indicates that the effect is due to significant movement of the transition state and also includes a contribution from temperature-dependent ground-state effects. Analysis of the Leffler plots, plots of Delta G versus Delta G degrees, and their cross-interaction parameters confirms the transition-state movement. Since the protein is destabilized at high temperature, the shift represents a temperature-dependent Hammond effect. This provides independent confirmation of a recent theoretical prediction. The magnitude of the temperature-denaturant cross-interaction parameter is larger for NTL9 than has been reported for the few other cases studied. The implications for temperature-dependent studies of protein folding are discussed.

  14. Analysis for fin efficiency with temperature-dependent thermal conductivity of fractional order energy balance equation using HPST Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Patra

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Radiating extended surfaces are usually utilized to enhance the heat transfer between primary surface and the environment. In this paper, temperature distribution, fin efficiency, efficacy of convective straight fins with constant and temperature-dependent thermal conductivity are solved by implementing homotopy perturbation sumudu transform method (HPSTM. The proposed method is very useful and practical for solving the fractional order nonlinear diffusion equation, which is associated with variable thermal conductivity condition. A dimensionless analytical expression has been developed for fin effectiveness. The fin efficiency and the fin effectiveness have been attained as a function of thermo-geometric fin parameter. It can be noticed that the thermal conductivity parameter has a strong influence over the fin efficiency. The analytical solutions acquired by the present method illustrate the approach is easy to implement and computationally very interesting. The obtained results are compared with previously found classical order results using variational iteration method (VIM, Adomian decomposition method, and the results from Galerkin method in order to show the competence of this present method. HPSTM is a simple and effective method for rapid assessment of physical systems although the fractional order energy balance equations comprise with strong nonlinear terms. The subsequent correlation equations can benefit thermal design engineers for designing of innovative straight fins with both constant and temperature-dependent thermal conductivity.

  15. TEMPERATURE DEPENDENCE OF THE THERMAL ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Thermal conductivity values, in the temperature range 300 – 1200 K, have been measured in air and at atmospheric pressure for a Kenyan kaolinite refractory with 0% - 50% grog proportions. The experimental thermal conductivity values were then compared with those calculated using the Zumbrunnen et al [1] and the ...

  16. Temperature- and pressure-dependent infrared spectroscopy of 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium trifluoromethanesulfonate: A dipolar coupling theory analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burba, Christopher M; Chang, Hai-Chou

    2018-03-15

    Continued growth and development of ionic liquids requires a thorough understanding of how cation and anion molecular structure defines the liquid structure of the materials as well as the various properties that make them technologically useful. Infrared spectroscopy is frequently used to assess molecular-level interactions among the cations and anions of ionic liquids because the intramolecular vibrational modes of the ions are sensitive to the local potential energy environments in which they reside. Thus, different interaction modes among the ions may lead to different spectroscopic signatures in the vibrational spectra. Charge organization present in ionic liquids, such as 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium trifluoromethanesulfonate ([C 4 mim]CF 3 SO 3 ), is frequently modeled in terms of a quasicrystalline structure. Highly structured quasilattices enable the dynamic coupling of vibrationally-induced dipole moments to produce optical dispersion and transverse optical-longitudinal optical (TO-LO) splitting of vibrational modes of the ionic liquid. According to dipolar coupling theory, the degree of TO-LO splitting is predicted to have a linear dependence on the number density of the ionic liquid. Both temperature and pressure will affect the number density of the ionic liquid and, therefore, the amount of TO-LO splitting for this mode. Therefore, we test these relationships through temperature- and pressure-dependent FT-IR spectroscopic studies of [C 4 mim]CF 3 SO 3 , focusing on the totally symmetric SO stretching mode for the anion, ν s (SO 3 ). Increased temperature decreases the amount of TO-LO splitting for ν s (SO 3 ), whereas elevated pressure is found to increase the amount of band splitting. In both cases, the experimental observations follow the general predictions of dipolar coupling theory, thereby supporting the quasilattice model for this ionic liquid. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Correlation between temperature-dependent permittivity dispersion ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The results indicate that the poling temperature plays a crucial role in the domains' alignment process, as expected. The temperature-dependent permittivity frequency dispersion and depolarization behaviours may have same origin. The aligned domains' break up into random state/nanodomains at depoling temperature ...

  18. Temperature-dependent vibration analysis of a FG viscoelastic cylindrical microshell under various thermal distribution via modified length scale parameter: a numerical solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safarpour, Hamed; Mohammadi, Kianoosh; Ghadiri, Majid

    2017-04-01

    In this article, the vibrational analysis of temperature-dependent cylindrical functionally graded (FG) microshells surrounded by viscoelastic a foundation is investigated by means of the modified couple stress theory (MCST). MCST is applied to this model to be productive in design and analysis of micro actuators and micro sensors. The modeled cylindrical FG microshell, its equations of motion and boundary conditions are derived by Hamilton's principle and the first-order shear deformation theory (FSDT). For the first time, in the present study, functionally graded length scale parameter which changes along the thickness has been considered in the temperature-dependent cylindrical FG microshell. The accuracy of the present model is verified with previous studies and also with those obtained by analytical Navier method. The novelty of the current study is consideration of viscoelastic foundation, various thermal loadings and size effect as well as satisfying various boundary conditions implemented on the temperature-dependent cylindrical FG microshell using MCST. Generalized differential quadrature method (GDQM) is applied to discretize the equations of motion. Then, some factors are investigated such as the influence of length to radius ratio, damping, Winkler and Pasternak foundations, different temperature changes, circumferential wave numbers, and boundary conditions on natural frequency of the cylindrical FG microshell. The results have many applications such as modeling of microrobots and biomedical microsystems.

  19. Spotlight on the Underdogs—An Analysis of Underrepresented Alternaria Mycotoxins Formed Depending on Varying Substrate, Time and Temperature Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwickel, Theresa; Kahl, Sandra M.; Klaffke, Horst; Rychlik, Michael; Müller, Marina E. H.

    2016-01-01

    Alternaria (A.) is a genus of widespread fungi capable of producing numerous, possibly health-endangering Alternaria toxins (ATs), which are usually not the focus of attention. The formation of ATs depends on the species and complex interactions of various environmental factors and is not fully understood. In this study the influence of temperature (7 °C, 25 °C), substrate (rice, wheat kernels) and incubation time (4, 7, and 14 days) on the production of thirteen ATs and three sulfoconjugated ATs by three different Alternaria isolates from the species groups A. tenuissima and A. infectoria was determined. High-performance liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry was used for quantification. Under nearly all conditions, tenuazonic acid was the most extensively produced toxin. At 25 °C and with increasing incubation time all toxins were formed in high amounts by the two A. tenuissima strains on both substrates with comparable mycotoxin profiles. However, for some of the toxins, stagnation or a decrease in production was observed from day 7 to 14. As opposed to the A. tenuissima strains, the A. infectoria strain only produced low amounts of ATs, but high concentrations of stemphyltoxin III. The results provide an essential insight into the quantitative in vitro AT formation under different environmental conditions, potentially transferable to different field and storage conditions. PMID:27869760

  20. Spotlight on the Underdogs-An Analysis of Underrepresented Alternaria Mycotoxins Formed Depending on Varying Substrate, Time and Temperature Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwickel, Theresa; Kahl, Sandra M; Klaffke, Horst; Rychlik, Michael; Müller, Marina E H

    2016-11-19

    Alternaria (A.) is a genus of widespread fungi capable of producing numerous, possibly health-endangering Alternaria toxins (ATs), which are usually not the focus of attention. The formation of ATs depends on the species and complex interactions of various environmental factors and is not fully understood. In this study the influence of temperature (7 °C, 25 °C), substrate (rice, wheat kernels) and incubation time (4, 7, and 14 days) on the production of thirteen ATs and three sulfoconjugated ATs by three different Alternaria isolates from the species groups A. tenuissima and A. infectoria was determined. High-performance liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry was used for quantification. Under nearly all conditions, tenuazonic acid was the most extensively produced toxin. At 25 °C and with increasing incubation time all toxins were formed in high amounts by the two A. tenuissima strains on both substrates with comparable mycotoxin profiles. However, for some of the toxins, stagnation or a decrease in production was observed from day 7 to 14. As opposed to the A. tenuissima strains, the A. infectoria strain only produced low amounts of ATs, but high concentrations of stemphyltoxin III. The results provide an essential insight into the quantitative in vitro AT formation under different environmental conditions, potentially transferable to different field and storage conditions.

  1. Spotlight on the Underdogs—An Analysis of Underrepresented Alternaria Mycotoxins Formed Depending on Varying Substrate, Time and Temperature Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theresa Zwickel

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Alternaria (A. is a genus of widespread fungi capable of producing numerous, possibly health-endangering Alternaria toxins (ATs, which are usually not the focus of attention. The formation of ATs depends on the species and complex interactions of various environmental factors and is not fully understood. In this study the influence of temperature (7 °C, 25 °C, substrate (rice, wheat kernels and incubation time (4, 7, and 14 days on the production of thirteen ATs and three sulfoconjugated ATs by three different Alternaria isolates from the species groups A. tenuissima and A. infectoria was determined. High-performance liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry was used for quantification. Under nearly all conditions, tenuazonic acid was the most extensively produced toxin. At 25 °C and with increasing incubation time all toxins were formed in high amounts by the two A. tenuissima strains on both substrates with comparable mycotoxin profiles. However, for some of the toxins, stagnation or a decrease in production was observed from day 7 to 14. As opposed to the A. tenuissima strains, the A. infectoria strain only produced low amounts of ATs, but high concentrations of stemphyltoxin III. The results provide an essential insight into the quantitative in vitro AT formation under different environmental conditions, potentially transferable to different field and storage conditions.

  2. Temperature dependence of the MDT gas gain

    CERN Document Server

    Gaudio, G; Treichel, M

    1999-01-01

    This note describes the measurements taken in the Gamma Irradiation Facility (GIF) in the X5 test beam area at CERN to investigate the temperature dependence of the MDT drift gas (Ar/CO2 - 90:10). Spectra were taken with an Americium-241 source during the aging studies. We analysed the effects of temperature changes on the pulse height spectrum.

  3. Investigation Of Temperature Dependent Characteristics Of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The structure, magnetization and magnetostriction of Laves phase compound TbCo2 were investigated by temperature dependent high resolution neutron powder diffraction. The compound crystallizes in the cubic Laves phase C15 structure above its Curie temperature, TC and exhibits a rhombohedral distortion (space ...

  4. Escherichia coli survival in waters: Temperature dependence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knowing the survival rates of water-borne Escherichia coli is important in evaluating microbial contamination and making appropriate management decisions. E. coli survival rates are dependent on temperature, a dependency that is routinely expressed using an analogue of the Q10 mo...

  5. Temperature-dependent analysis of conduction mechanism of leakage current in thermally grown oxide on 4H-SiC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sometani, Mitsuru; Takei, Manabu [Advanced Power Electronics Research Center, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 1-1-1 Umezono, Tsukuba, 305-8568 Ibaraki (Japan); Fuji Electric Co. Ltd., 1 Fuji-machi, Hino, 191-8502 Tokyo (Japan); Okamoto, Dai; Harada, Shinsuke; Ishimori, Hitoshi; Takasu, Shinji; Hatakeyama, Tetsuo; Yonezawa, Yoshiyuki; Fukuda, Kenji; Okumura, Hajime [Advanced Power Electronics Research Center, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 1-1-1 Umezono, Tsukuba, 305-8568 Ibaraki (Japan)

    2015-01-14

    The conduction mechanism of the leakage current of a thermally grown oxide on 4H silicon carbide (4H-SiC) was investigated. The dominant carriers of the leakage current were found to be electrons by the carrier-separation current-voltage method. The current-voltage and capacitance-voltage characteristics, which were measured over a wide temperature range, revealed that the leakage current in SiO{sub 2}/4H-SiC on the Si-face can be explained as the sum of the Fowler-Nordheim (FN) tunneling and Poole-Frenkel (PF) emission leakage currents. A rigorous FN analysis provided the true barrier height for the SiO{sub 2}/4H-SiC interface. On the basis of Arrhenius plots of the PF current separated from the total leakage current, the existence of carbon-related defects and/or oxygen vacancy defects was suggested in thermally grown SiO{sub 2} films on the Si-face of 4H-SiC.

  6. ANALYSIS OF DEPENDENCE OF THE FLOW TEMPERATURE OF THE PLASTICIZED POLYMER ON THE CHEMICAL STRUCTURE AND CONCENTRATION OF THE POLYMER AND THE PLASTICIZER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Askadskiy Andrey Aleksandrovich

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Polymeric materials are widely used in construction. The properties of polymeric construction materials vary to a substantial extent; their durability, thermal stability, frost resistance, waterproof and dielectric properties are particularly pronounced. Their properties serve as the drivers of the high market demand for these products. These materials are applied as finishing materials, molded sanitary engineering products and effective thermal insulation and water proofing materials. The authors analyze the influence of the chemical structure and structural features of polymers on their properties. The authors consider flow and vitrification temperatures of polymers. These temperatures determine the parameters of polymeric products, including those important for the construction process. The analysis of influence of concentration of the plasticizer on the vitrification temperature is based on the two basic theories. In accordance with the first one, reduction of the vitrification temperature is proportionate to the molar fraction of the injected plasticizer. According to the second concept, reduction of the vitrification temperature is proportionate to the volume fraction of the injected solvent. Dependencies of the flow temperature on the molecular weight and the molar fraction of the plasticizer are derived for PVC. As an example, two plasticizers were considered, including dibutyl sebacate and dioctylftalatalate. The basic parameters of all mixtures were calculated through the employment of "Cascade" software programme (A.N. Nesmeyanov Institute of Organoelemental Connections, Russian Academy of Sciences.

  7. Correlation between Temperature-dependent Fatigue Resistance and Differential Scanning Calorimetry Analysis for 2 Contemporary Rotary Instruments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arias, Ana; Macorra, José C; Govindjee, Sanjay; Peters, Ove A

    2018-02-02

    The aim of this study was to assess differences in cyclic fatigue (CF) life of contemporary heat-treated nickel-titanium rotary instruments at room and body temperatures and to document corresponding phase transformations. Forty Hyflex EDM (H-EDM) files (Coltene, Cuyahoga Falls, OH [#25/.08, manufactured by electrical discharge machining]) and 40 TRUShape (TS) files (Dentsply Tulsa Dental Specialties, Tulsa, OK [#25/.06v, manufactured by grinding and shape setting]) were divided into 2 groups (n = 20) for CF resistance tests in a water bath either at room (22°C ± 0.5°C) or body temperature (37°C ± 0.5°C). Instruments were rotated in a simulated canal (angle = 60°, radius = 3 mm, and center of the curvature 5 mm from the tip) until fracture occurred. The motor was controlled by an electric circuit that was interrupted after instrument fracture. The mean half-life and beta and eta Weibull parameters were determined and compared. Two instruments of each brand were subjected to differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). While TS instruments lasted significantly longer at room temperature (mean life = 234.7 seconds; 95% confidence interval [CI], 209-263.6) than at body temperature (mean life = 83.2 seconds; 95% CI, 76-91.1), temperature did not affect H-EDM behavior (room temperature mean life = 725.4 seconds; 95% CI, 658.8-798.8 and body temperature mean life = 717.9 seconds; 95% CI, 636.8-809.3). H-EDM instruments significantly outlasted TS instruments at both temperatures. At body temperature, TS was predominantly austenitic, whereas H-EDM was martensitic or in R-phase. TS was in a mixed austenitic/martensitic phase at 22°C, whereas H-EDM was in the same state as at 37°C. H-EDM had a longer fatigue life than TS, which showed a marked decrease in fatigue life at body temperature; neither the life span nor the state of the microstructure in the DSC differed for H-EDM between room or body temperature. Copyright © 2017 American Association of

  8. Investigations of Low Temperature Time Dependent Cracking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van der Sluys, W A; Robitz, E S; Young, B A; Bloom, J

    2002-09-30

    The objective of this project was to investigate metallurgical and mechanical phenomena associated with time dependent cracking of cold bent carbon steel piping at temperatures between 327 C and 360 C. Boiler piping failures have demonstrated that understanding the fundamental metallurgical and mechanical parameters controlling these failures is insufficient to eliminate it from the field. The results of the project consisted of the development of a testing methodology to reproduce low temperature time dependent cracking in laboratory specimens. This methodology was used to evaluate the cracking resistance of candidate heats in order to identify the factors that enhance cracking sensitivity. The resultant data was integrated into current available life prediction tools.

  9. Temperature dependence of optically induced cell deformations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritsch, Anatol; Kiessling, Tobias R.; Stange, Roland; Kaes, Josef A.

    2012-02-01

    The mechanical properties of any material change with temperature, hence this must be true for cellular material. In biology many functions are known to undergo modulations with temperature, like myosin motor activity, mechanical properties of actin filament solutions, CO2 uptake of cultured cells or sex determination of several species. As mechanical properties of living cells are considered to play an important role in many cell functions it is surprising that only little is known on how the rheology of single cells is affected by temperature. We report the systematic temperature dependence of single cell deformations in Optical Stretcher (OS) measurements. The temperature is changed on a scale of about 20 minutes up to hours and compared to defined temperature shocks in the range of milliseconds. Thereby, a strong temperature dependence of the mechanics of single suspended cells is revealed. We conclude that the observable differences arise rather from viscosity changes of the cytosol than from structural changes of the cytoskeleton. These findings have implications for the interpretation of many rheological measurements, especially for laser based approaches in biological studies.

  10. Temperature dependences of hydrous species in feldspars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, W. D.; Yang, Y.; Zhu, K. Y.; Xia, Q. K.

    2018-01-01

    Feldspars are abundant in the crust of the Earth. Multiple hydrogen species such as OH, H2O and NH4 + can occur in the structure of feldspars. Hydrogen species play a critical role in influencing some properties of the host feldspars and the crust, including mechanical strength, electrical property of the crust, and evolution of the crustal fluids. Knowledge of hydrous species in feldspars to date has been mostly derived from spectroscopic studies at ambient temperature. However, the speciation and sites of hydrous species at high temperatures may not be quenchable. Here, we investigated the temperature dependences of several typical hydrous components (e.g., type IIa OH, type IIb OH and type I H2O) in feldspars by measuring the in situ FTIR spectra at elevated temperatures up to 800 °C. We found that the hydrous species demonstrated different behaviors at elevated temperatures. With increasing temperature, type IIa OH redistributes on the various sites in the anorthoclase structure. Additionally, O-H vibration frequencies increase for types IIa and IIb OH, and they decrease for type I H2O with increasing temperature. In contrast to type I H2O which drastically dehydrates during the heating process, types IIa and IIb OH show negligible loss; however, the bulk integral absorption coefficients drastically decrease with increasing temperature. These results may have implications in understanding the properties of hydrous species and feldspars at non-ambient temperatures, not only under geologic conditions but also at cold planetary surface conditions.

  11. Temperature Dependent Models of Semiconductor Devices for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The paper presents an investigation of the temperature dependent model of a diode and bipolar transistor built-in to the NAP-2 program and comparison of these models with experimentally measured characteristics of the BA 100 diode and BC 109 transistor. The detail of the modelling technique has been discussed and ...

  12. Measurements of temperature dependence of 'localized susceptibility'

    CERN Document Server

    Shiozawa, H; Ishii, H; Takayama, Y; Obu, K; Muro, T; Saitoh, Y; Matsuda, T D; Sugawara, H; Sato, H

    2003-01-01

    The magnetic susceptibility of some rare-earth compounds is estimated by measuring magnetic circular dichroism (MCD) of rare-earth 3d-4f absorption spectra. The temperature dependence of the magnetic susceptibility obtained by the MCD measurement is remarkably different from the bulk susceptibility in most samples, which is attributed to the strong site selectivity of the core MCD measurement.

  13. Temperature and angular momentum dependence of the ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Temperature and angular momentum dependence of the quadrupole deformation is studied in the middle of the sd-shell for 28Si and 27Si isotopes using the spherical shell model approach. The shell model calculations have been performed using the standard universal sd-shell (USD) interaction and the canonical ...

  14. Temperature Dependent Wire Delay Estimation in Floorplanning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winther, Andreas Thor; Liu, Wei; Nannarelli, Alberto

    2011-01-01

    Due to large variations in temperature in VLSI circuits and the linear relationship between metal resistance and temperature, the delay through wires of the same length can be different. Traditional thermal aware floorplanning algorithms use wirelength to estimate delay and routability....... In this work, we show that using wirelength as the evaluation metric does not always produce a floorplan with the shortest delay. We propose a temperature dependent wire delay estimation method for thermal aware floorplanning algorithms, which takes into account the thermal effect on wire delay. The experiment...... results show that a shorter delay can be achieved using the proposed method. In addition, we also discuss the congestion and reliability issues as they are closely related to routing and temperature....

  15. Elevated temperature deformation analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, J. M.

    The paper demonstrates a novel nondestructive test and data analysis technique for quantitative measurement of circumferentially varying flexural moduli of 2D involute carbon-carbon tag rings containing localized wrinkles and dry plies at room and rocket nozzle operating temperatures. Room temperature computed tomography (CT) deformation tests were performed on 11 carbon-carbon rings selected from the cylinders and cones fabricated under the NDE data application program and two plexiglass rings fabricated under this program. This testing and analysis technique is found to have primary application in validation of analytical models for carbon-carbon performance modeling. Both effects of defects assumptions, the effects of high temperature environments, and failure-related models can be validated effectively. The testing and analysis process can be interwoven in a manner that increases the engineering understanding of the material behavior and permits rapid resolution of analysis questions. Specific recommendations for the development and implementation of this technique are provided.

  16. Temperature dependence of phonons in photosynthesis proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Mengyang; Myles, Dean; Blankenship, Robert; Markelz, Andrea

    Protein long range vibrations are essential to biological function. For many proteins, these vibrations steer functional conformational changes. For photoharvesting proteins, the structural vibrations play an additional critical role in energy transfer to the reaction center by both phonon assisted energy transfer and energy dissipation. The characterization of these vibrations to understand how they are optimized to balance photoharvesting and photoprotection is challenging. To date this characterization has mainly relied on fluorescence line narrowing measurements at cryogenic temperatures. However, protein dynamics has a strong temperature dependence, with an apparent turn on in anharmonicity between 180-220 K. If this transition affects intramolecular vibrations, the low temperature measurements will not represent the phonon spectrum at biological temperatures. Here we use the new technique of anisotropic terahertz microscopy (ATM) to measure the intramolecular vibrations of FMO complex. ATM is uniquely capable of isolating protein vibrations from isotropic background. We find resonances both red and blue shift with temperature above the dynamical transition. The results indicate that the characterization of vibrations must be performed at biologically relevant temperatures to properly understand the energy overlap with the excitation energy transfer. This work was supported by NSF:DBI 1556359, BioXFEL seed Grant funding from NSF:DBI 1231306, DOE: DE-SC0016317, and the Bruce Holm University at Buffalo Research Foundation Grant.

  17. Temperature dependent terahertz properties of Ammonium Nitrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Abdur; Azad, Abul; Moore, David

    Terahertz spectroscopy has been demonstrated as an ideal nondestructive method for identifying hazardous materials such as explosives. Many common explosives exhibit distinct spectral signatures at terahertz range (0.1-6.0 THz) due to the excitations of their low frequency vibrational modes. Ammonium nitrate (AN), an easily accessible oxidizer often used in improvised explosive, exhibits strong temperature dependence. While the room temperature terahertz absorption spectrum of AN is featureless, it reveals distinct spectral features below 240 K due to the polymorphic phase transition. We employed terahertz time domain spectroscopy to measure the effective dielectric properties of AN embedded in polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) binder. The dielectric properties of pure AN were extracted using three different effective medium theories (EMT), simple effective medium approach, Maxwell-Garnett (MG) model, and Bruggeman (BR) model. In order to understand the effect of temperature on the dielectric properties, we varied the sample temperature from 5K to 300K. This study indicates presence of additional vibrational modes at low temperature. These results may greatly enhance the detectability of AN and facilitate more accurate theoretical modeling.

  18. Mechanism of oxide thickness and temperature dependent current conduction in n+-polySi/SiO2/p-Si structures — a new analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samanta, Piyas

    2017-10-01

    The conduction mechanism of gate leakage current through thermally grown silicon dioxide (SiO2) films on (100) p-type silicon has been investigated in detail under negative bias on the degenerately doped n-type polysilicon (n+-polySi) gate. The analysis utilizes the measured gate current density J G at high oxide fields E ox in 5.4 to 12 nm thick SiO2 films between 25 and 300 °C. The leakage current measured up to 300 °C was due to Fowler–Nordheim (FN) tunneling of electrons from the accumulated n +-polySi gate in conjunction with Poole Frenkel (PF) emission of trapped-electrons from the electron traps located at energy levels ranging from 0.6 to 1.12 eV (depending on the oxide thickness) below the SiO2 conduction band (CB). It was observed that PF emission current I PF dominates FN electron tunneling current I FN at oxide electric fields E ox between 6 and 10 MV/cm and throughout the temperature range studied here. Understanding of the mechanism of leakage current conduction through SiO2 films plays a crucial role in simulation of time-dependent dielectric breakdown (TDDB) of metaloxide–semiconductor (MOS) devices and to precisely predict the normal operating field or applied gate voltage for lifetime projection of the MOS integrated circuits.

  19. Escherichia coli survival in waters: temperature dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaustein, R A; Pachepsky, Y; Hill, R L; Shelton, D R; Whelan, G

    2013-02-01

    Knowing the survival rates of water-borne Escherichia coli is important in evaluating microbial contamination and making appropriate management decisions. E. coli survival rates are dependent on temperature, a dependency that is routinely expressed using an analogue of the Q₁₀ model. This suggestion was made 34 years ago based on 20 survival curves taken from published literature, but has not been revisited since then. The objective of this study was to re-evaluate the accuracy of the Q₁₀ equation, utilizing data accumulated since 1978. We assembled a database of 450 E. coli survival datasets from 70 peer-reviewed papers. We then focused on the 170 curves taken from experiments that were performed in the laboratory under dark conditions to exclude the effects of sunlight and other field factors that could cause additional variability in results. All datasets were tabulated dependencies "log concentration vs. time." There were three major patterns of inactivation: about half of the datasets had a section of fast log-linear inactivation followed by a section of slow log-linear inactivation; about a quarter of the datasets had a lag period followed by log-linear inactivation; and the remaining quarter were approximately linear throughout. First-order inactivation rate constants were calculated from the linear sections of all survival curves and the data grouped by water sources, including waters of agricultural origin, pristine water sources, groundwater and wells, lakes and reservoirs, rivers and streams, estuaries and seawater, and wastewater. Dependency of E. coli inactivation rates on temperature varied among the water sources. There was a significant difference in inactivation rate values at the reference temperature between rivers and agricultural waters, wastewaters and agricultural waters, rivers and lakes, and wastewater and lakes. At specific sites, the Q₁₀ equation was more accurate in rivers and coastal waters than in lakes making the value of

  20. Data-driven analysis for the temperature and momentum dependence of the heavy-quark diffusion coefficient in relativistic heavy-ion collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yingru; Bernhard, Jonah E.; Bass, Steffen A.; Nahrgang, Marlene; Cao, Shanshan

    2018-01-01

    By applying a Bayesian model-to-data analysis, we estimate the temperature and momentum dependence of the heavy quark diffusion coefficient in an improved Langevin framework. The posterior range of the diffusion coefficient is obtained by performing a Markov chain Monte Carlo random walk and calibrating on the experimental data of D -meson RAA and v2 in three different collision systems at the Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collidaer (RHIC) and the Large Hadron Collider (LHC): Au-Au collisions at 200 GeV and Pb-Pb collisions at 2.76 and 5.02 TeV. The spatial diffusion coefficient is found to be consistent with lattice QCD calculations and comparable with other models' estimation. We demonstrate the capability of our improved Langevin model to simultaneously describe the RAA and v2 at both RHIC and the LHC energies, as well as the higher order flow coefficient such as D meson v3. We show that by applying a Bayesian analysis, we are able to quantitatively and systematically study the heavy flavor dynamics in heavy-ion collisions.

  1. Temperature-dependent photoluminescence analysis of 1-MeV electron irradiation-induced nonradiative recombination centers in GaAs/Ge space solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiancheng, Yi; Pengfei, Xiao; Yong, Zheng; Juan, Tang; Rong, Wang

    2016-03-01

    The effects of irradiation of 1-MeV electrons on p+-n GaAs/Ge solar cells have been investigated by temperature-dependent photoluminescence (PL) measurements in the temperature range of 10-290 K. The temperature dependence of the PL peak energy agrees well with the Varnish relation, and the thermal quenching of the total integrated PL intensity is well explained by the thermal quenching theory. Meanwhile, the thermal quenching of temperature-dependent PL confirmed that there are two nonradiative recombination centers in the solar cells, and the thermal activation energies of these centers are determined by Arrhenius plots of the total integrated PL intensity. Furthermore, the nonradiative recombination center, as a primary defect, is identified as the H3 hole trap located at Ev + 0.71 eV at room temperature and the H2 hole trap located at Ev + 0.41 eV in the temperature range of 100-200 K, by comparing the thermal activation and ionization energies of the defects.

  2. Improving Loop Dependence Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Nicklas Bo; Karlsson, Sven

    2017-01-01

    Programmers can no longer depend on new processors to have significantly improved single-thread performance. Instead, gains have to come from other sources such as the compiler and its optimization passes. Advanced passes make use of information on the dependencies related to loops. We improve th...

  3. Multi-boiling Heat Transfer Analysis of a Convective Straight Fin with Temperature-Dependent Thermal Properties and Internal Heat Generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gbeminiyi Sobamowo

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available In this study, by using the finite volume method, the heat transfer in a convective straight fin with temperature-dependent thermal properties and an internal heat generation under multi-boiling heat transfer modes are analyzed. In this regard, the local heat transfer coefficient is considered to vary within a power-law function of temperature. In the present study, the coexistence of all the boiling modes is taken into consideration. The developed heat transfer models and the corresponding numerical solutions are used to investigate the effects of various thermo-geometric parameters on the thermal performance of the longitudinal rectangular fin. The results shows that the fin temperature distribution, the total heat transfer, and the fin efficiency are significantly affected by the thermo-geometric parameters of the fin and the internal heat generation within the fin. The obtained results can provide a platform for improvements in the design of the fin in the heat transfer equipment.

  4. Analysis of carrier transport and band tail states in p-type tin monoxide thin-film transistors by temperature dependent characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jiawei; Kong, Xi; Yang, Jia; Li, Yunpeng; Wilson, Joshua; Liu, Jie; Xin, Qian; Wang, Qingpu; Song, Aimin

    2016-06-01

    Tin monoxide (SnO) has drawn much attention in recent years due to its high hole mobility, transparency, and potential for mass production. However, due to its metastable nature, the deposited film often contains multi-phases such as metallic tin and tin dioxide, which may degrade its electrical properties. Here, we presented the temperature dependent characteristics of p-type SnO thin-film transistors. The hole transport mechanism is dominated by band conduction at high temperatures and variable-range hopping at low temperatures. The maximum activation energy was found to be 308 meV, which denotes a bandgap of around 0.6 eV. The density of states was found to be 1.12 × 1021 cm-3 eV-1 at VG = -80 V, and 6.75 × 1020 cm-3 eV-1 at VG = 0 V, respectively.

  5. GISS Surface Temperature Analysis

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The GISTEMP dataset is a global 2x2 gridded temperature anomaly dataset. Temperature data is updated around the middle of every month using current data files from...

  6. Depth Dependent Relationships between Temperature and Ocean Heterotrophic Prokaryotic Production

    KAUST Repository

    Lønborg, Christian

    2016-06-07

    Marine prokaryotes play a key role in cycling of organic matter and nutrients in the ocean. Using a unique dataset (>14,500 samples), we applied a space-for-time substitution analysis to assess the temperature dependence of prokaryotic heterotrophic production (PHP) in epi- (0-200 m), meso- (201-1000 m) and bathypelagic waters (1001-4000 m) of the global ocean. Here, we show that the temperature dependence of PHP is fundamentally different between these major oceanic depth layers, with an estimated ecosystem-level activation energy (E) of 36 ± 7 kJ mol for the epipelagic, 72 ± 15 kJ mol for the mesopelagic and 274 ± 65 kJ mol for the bathypelagic realm. We suggest that the increasing temperature dependence with depth is related to the parallel vertical gradient in the proportion of recalcitrant organic compounds. These Ea predict an increased PHP of about 5, 12, and 55% in the epi-, meso-, and bathypelagic ocean, respectively, in response to a water temperature increase by 1°C. Hence, there is indication that a major thus far underestimated feedback mechanism exists between future bathypelagic ocean warming and heterotrophic prokaryotic activity.

  7. Temperature dependent impedance spectroscopy and Thermally Stimulated Depolarization Current (TSDC) analysis of disperse red 1-co-poly(methyl methacrylate) copolymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Yee Song; Cuervo-Reyes, Eduardo; Nüesch, Frank A.; Opris, Dorina M.

    2016-04-01

    The dielectric relaxation processes of polymethyl methacrylates that have been functionalized with Disperse Red 1 (DR1) in the side chain (DR1-co-MMA) were studied with temperature dependent impedance spectroscopy and thermally stimulated depolarization current (TSDC) techniques. Copolymers with dipole contents which varied between 10 mol% and 70 mol% were prepared. All samples showed dipole relaxations above the structural-glass transition temperature (Tg). The β-relaxation of the methyl methacrylate (MMA) repeating unit was most visible in DR1(10%)-co-MMA and rapidly vanishes with higher dipole contents. DSC data reveal an increase of the Tg by 20 °C to 125°C with the inclusion of the dipole into the polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) as side chain. The impedance data of samples with several DR1 concentrations, taken at several temperatures above Tg, have been fitted with the Havriliak-Negami (HN) function. In all cases, the fits reveal a dielectric response that corresponds to power-law dipolar relaxations. TSDC measurements show that the copolymer can be poled, and that the induced polarization can be frozen by lowering the temperature well below the glass transition. Relaxation strengths ΔƐ estimated by integrating the depolarization current are similar to those obtained from the impedance data, confirming the efficient freezing of the dipoles in the structural glass state.

  8. The Temperature Condition of the Plate with Temperature-Dependent Thermal Conductivity and Energy Release

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. S. Zarubin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The temperature state of a solid body, in addition to the conditions of its heat exchange with the environment, can greatly depend on the heat release (or heat absorption processes within the body volume. Among the possible causes of these processes should be noted such as a power release in the fuel elements of nuclear reactors, exothermic or endothermic chemical reactions in the solid body material, which respectively involve heat release or absorbtion, heat transfer of a part of the electric power in the current-carrying conductors (so-called Joule’s heat or the energy radiation penetrating into the body of a semitransparent material, etc. The volume power release characterizes an intensity of these processes.The extensive list of references to the theory of heat conductivity of solids offers solutions to problems to determine a stationary (steady over time and non-stationary temperature state of the solids (as a rule, of the canonical form, which act as the sources of volume power release. Thus, in general case, a possibility for changing power release according to the body volume and in solving the nonstationary problems also a possible dependence of this value on the time are taken into consideration.However, in real conditions the volume power release often also depends on the local temperature, and such dependence can be nonlinear. For example, with chemical reactions the intensity of heat release or absorption is in proportion to their rate, which, in turn, is sensitive to the temperature value, and a dependence on the temperature is exponential. A further factor that in such cases makes the analysis of the solid temperature state complicated, is dependence on the temperature and the thermal conductivity of this body material, especially when temperature distribution therein  is significantly non-uniform. Taking into account the influence of these factors requires the mathematical modeling methods, which allow us to build an adequate

  9. Inclusion of temperature dependent shell corrections in Landau ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Landau theory used for studying hot rotating nuclei usually uses zero temperature Struti- nsky smoothed total energy for the temperature dependent shell corrections. This is replaced in this work by the temperature dependent Strutinsky smoothed free energy. Our results show that this re- placement has only ...

  10. Inclusion of temperature dependent shell corrections in Landau ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Landau theory used for studying hot rotating nuclei usually uses zero temperature Strutinsky smoothed total energy for the temperature dependent shell corrections. This is replaced in this work by the temperature dependent Strutinsky smoothed free energy. Our results show that this replacement has only marginal effect for ...

  11. Temperature dependence of ferromagnetic resonance measurements in nanostructured line arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raposo V.

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available We report the effect of temperature on the ferromagnetic resonance (FMR spectra of nanostructured line arrays. Different temperature dependences are observed for permalloy an nickel based samples. The qualitative features of the temperature dependence of the resonance field and linewidth can be described by the usual expression of slow relaxing linewidth mechanism and Bloch equation.

  12. Temperature dependence of the magnetization of canted spin structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Henrik; Lefmann, Kim; Brok, Erik

    2012-01-01

    for the temperature dependence of the magnetization of a simple canted spin structure in which relaxation can take place at finite temperatures between spin configurations with different canting angles. We show that the saturation magnetization may either decrease or increase with decreasing temperature, depending...

  13. Modeling temperature dependence of trace element concentrations in groundwater using temperature dependent distribution coefficient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, H.; Saito, T.; Hamamoto, S.; Komatsu, T.

    2015-12-01

    In our previous study, we have observed trace element concentrations in groundwater increased when groundwater temperature was increased with constant thermal loading using a 50-m long vertical heat exchanger installed at Saitama University, Japan. During the field experiment, 38 degree C fluid was circulated in the heat exchanger resulting 2.8 kW thermal loading over 295 days. Groundwater samples were collected regularly from 17-m and 40-m deep aquifers at four observation wells located 1, 2, 5, and 10 m, respectively, from the heat exchange well and were analyzed with ICP-MS. As a result, concentrations of some trace elements such as boron increased with temperature especially at the 17-m deep aquifer that is known as marine sediment. It has been also observed that the increased concentrations have decreased after the thermal loading was terminated indicating that this phenomenon may be reversible. Although the mechanism is not fully understood, changes in the liquid phase concentration should be associated with dissolution and/or desorption from the solid phase. We therefore attempt to model this phenomenon by introducing temperature dependence in equilibrium linear adsorption isotherms. We assumed that distribution coefficients decrease with temperature so that the liquid phase concentration of a given element becomes higher as the temperature increases under the condition that the total mass stays constant. A shape function was developed to model the temperature dependence of the distribution coefficient. By solving the mass balance equation between the liquid phase and the solid phase for a given element, a new term describing changes in the concentration was implemented in a source/sink term of a standard convection dispersion equation (CDE). The CDE was then solved under a constant ground water flow using FlexPDE. By calibrating parameters in the newly developed shape function, the changes in element concentrations observed were quite well predicted. The

  14. Use of temperature dependent Raman spectra to improve accuracy for analysis of complex oil-based samples: lube base oils and adulterated olive oils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Mooeung; Lee, Sanguk; Chang, Kyeol; Chung, Hoeil; Jung, Young Mee

    2012-10-20

    A simple and effective strategy to improve accuracy for Raman spectroscopic analysis of complex mixture samples by probing a measurement temperature yielding enhanced spectral selectivity has been demonstrated. For the evaluation, the determination of Kinematic Viscosity at 40 °C (KV@40) of lube base oil (LBO) samples was initially attempted. Partial least squares (PLS) was used to determine the KV@40 using Raman spectra of the samples collected at 8 different temperatures from 20 to 90 °C with 10 °C increments. Interestingly, the distinct temperature-induced spectral variation among the samples occurred at 50 °C, thereby resulting in the improved accuracy for determination of KV@40. Two-dimensional (2D) correlation analysis was also performed to find an additional supportive rationale for the improved accuracy. The strategy was further evaluated for the identification of soybean oil-adulterated olive oils using linear discriminant analysis (LDA). Similarly, the discrimination accuracy was improved around 80-90 °C due to the enhanced spectral selectivity between olive and soybean oils. In overall, these two results successfully demonstrate analytical effectiveness of the strategy. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Temperature Dependent Molecular Dynamic Simulation of Friction

    OpenAIRE

    Dias, R. A.; Rapini, M.; Costa, B. V.; Coura, P. Z.

    2006-01-01

    In this work we present a molecular dynamics simulation of a FFM experiment. The tip-sample interaction is studied by varying the normal force in the tip and the temperature of the surface. The friction force, cA, at zero load and the friction coefficient, $\\mu$, were obtained. Our results strongly support the idea that the effective contact area, A, decreases with increasing temperature and the friction coefficient presents a clear signature of the premelting process of the surface.

  16. Multispectrum Analysis of 12CH4 in the v4 Band: I. Air-Broadened Half Widths, Pressure-Induced Shifts, Temperature Dependences and Line Mixing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, MaryAnn H.; Benner, D. Chris; Predoi-Cross, Adriana; Venkataraman, Malathy Devi

    2009-01-01

    Lorentz air-broadened half widths, pressure-induced shifts and their temperature dependences have been measured for over 430 transitions (allowed and forbidden) in the v4 band of (CH4)-12 over the temperature range 210 to 314 K. A multispectrum non linear least squares fitting technique was used to simultaneously fit a large number of high-resolution (0.006 to 0.01/cm) absorption spectra of pure methane and mixtures of methane diluted with dry air. Line mixing was detected for pairs of A-, E-, and F-species transitions in the P- and R-branch manifolds and quantified using the off-diagonal relaxation matrix elements formalism. The measured parameters are compared to air- and N2-broadened values reported in the literature for the v4 and other bands. The dependence of the various spectral line parameters upon the tetrahedral symmetry species and rotational quantum numbers of the transitions is discussed. All data used in the present work were recorded using the McMath-Pierce Fourier transform spectrometer located at the National Solar Observatory on Kitt Peak.

  17. Surface Temperature Data Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, James; Ruedy, Reto

    2012-01-01

    Small global mean temperature changes may have significant to disastrous consequences for the Earth's climate if they persist for an extended period. Obtaining global means from local weather reports is hampered by the uneven spatial distribution of the reliably reporting weather stations. Methods had to be developed that minimize as far as possible the impact of that situation. This software is a method of combining temperature data of individual stations to obtain a global mean trend, overcoming/estimating the uncertainty introduced by the spatial and temporal gaps in the available data. Useful estimates were obtained by the introduction of a special grid, subdividing the Earth's surface into 8,000 equal-area boxes, using the existing data to create virtual stations at the center of each of these boxes, and combining temperature anomalies (after assessing the radius of high correlation) rather than temperatures.

  18. Temperature-dependent dielectric function of nickel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zollner, Stefan; Nathan Nunley, T.; Trujillo, Dennis P.; Pineda, Laura G.; Abdallah, Lina S.

    2017-11-01

    Confirming historical results by Ornstein and Koefoed (1938), the authors found an anomaly in the optical constants at 1.96 eV for bulk nickel near the Curie temperature through careful high-precision spectroscopic ellipsometry measurements from 80 to 800 K. The anomaly is only seen in sweeps with increasing temperature if the sample carries a net magnetization. In decreasing temperature sweeps or for unmagnetized samples, the anomaly is absent. The sign of the anomaly in the optical conductivity at 1.96 eV is in contrast to the sign of the anomaly in the electrical DC conductivity. The anomaly is rather large and therefore explained with changes in the on-diagonal Drude-Lorentz portion of the dielectric tensor. No sign of anisotropy (polar magneto-optical Kerr effect) is found in the data.

  19. Temperature dependence of fission product release rates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelly, J.L.; McGown, M.E.; Reynolds, A.B.

    1984-10-01

    Fission product fractional release rates, K, used in the Albrecht-Wild model and measured at Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe and Oak Ridge National Laboratory can be fitted well by a single straight line for each fission product over the entire temperature range of the data when in K is plotted as a function of 1/T. Past applications of the Albrecht-Wild model have used plots of ln K versus T, which required three fits over the temperature range. Thus it is suggested that fractional release rates be represented by the Arrhenius form, K = K /SUB o/ exp(-Q/RT).

  20. Parametric dependencies of JET electron temperature profiles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schunke, B. [Commission of the European Communities, Abingdon (United Kingdom). JET Joint Undertaking; Imre, K.; Riedel, K. [New York Univ., NY (United States)

    1994-07-01

    The JET Ohmic, L-Mode and H-Mode electron temperature profiles obtained from the LIDAR Thomson Scattering Diagnostic are parameterized in terms of the normalized flux parameter and a set of the engineering parameters like plasma current, toroidal field, line averages electron density... It is shown that the electron temperature profiles fit a log-additive model well. It is intended to use the same model to predict the profile shape for D-T discharges in JET and in ITER. 2 refs., 5 figs.

  1. The temperature dependence of the magnetoelastic characteristics ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Special cylindrical backing enables application of the uniform compressive stress to the wound ring sample. A resistive furnace heated the experimental set-up. Results presented in the paper indicate a significant influence of the temperature on the magnetoelastic characteristics of Fe70Ni8Si10B12 amorphous alloy.

  2. Temperature and angular momentum dependence of the ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    a metallic superconductor, the linear dimension of the system is quite large and the transition from one phase to the ... This has been demonstrated in small metallic grains in which discontinuity is observed with large ... in the above studies critically depends on the inclusion of the quantal and statistical fluctuations [8,11].

  3. Change of MMP dependent on temperature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rudyk, Svetlana Nikolayevna; Søgaard, Erik Gydesen; Akwansa, Eugene

    2008-01-01

       The experiment was conducted with the purpose to investigate how Minimum Miscibility Pressure (MMP) changes at different temperatures. MMP was measured in a high pressure unit. An original oil saturated chalk core plug from the Danish oil field in North Sea was under investigation. The plug...... was divided into three samples. The pure carbon dioxide was injected into a chamber with the sample under pressure gradually increasing from 60 bars to 420 bars. CO2 was injected in a first sample at temperature 50oC , second at 60oC and third at 70oC. The amount of oil extracted was plotted against pressure....... The oil recovery/pressure correlation obtained showed that: -  oil recovery grows rather in steps, - MMP (the point B on the curve), above which the oil recovery increases insignificantly,  is equal for all the temperatures, - but the starting points (A on the graph) from which oil recovery starts growing...

  4. Mechanistic analysis of temperature-dependent current conduction through thin tunnel oxide in n+-polySi/SiO2/n+-Si structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samanta, Piyas

    2017-09-01

    We present a detailed investigation on temperature-dependent current conduction through thin tunnel oxides grown on degenerately doped n-type silicon (n+-Si) under positive bias ( VG ) on heavily doped n-type polycrystalline silicon (n+-polySi) gate in metal-oxide-semiconductor devices. The leakage current measured between 298 and 573 K and at oxide fields ranging from 6 to 10 MV/cm is primarily attributed to Poole-Frenkel (PF) emission of trapped electrons from the neutral electron traps located in the silicon dioxide (SiO2) band gap in addition to Fowler-Nordheim (FN) tunneling of electrons from n+-Si acting as the drain node in FLOating gate Tunnel OXide Electrically Erasable Programmable Read-Only Memory devices. Process-induced neutral electron traps are located at 0.18 eV and 0.9 eV below the SiO2 conduction band. Throughout the temperature range studied here, PF emission current IPF dominates FN electron tunneling current IFN at oxide electric fields Eox between 6 and 10 MV/cm. A physics based new analytical formula has been developed for FN tunneling of electrons from the accumulation layer of degenerate semiconductors at a wide range of temperatures incorporating the image force barrier rounding effect. FN tunneling has been formulated in the framework of Wentzel-Kramers-Brilloiun taking into account the correction factor due to abrupt variation of the energy barrier at the cathode/oxide interface. The effect of interfacial and near-interfacial trapped-oxide charges on FN tunneling has also been investigated in detail at positive VG . The mechanism of leakage current conduction through SiO2 films plays a crucial role in simulation of time-dependent dielectric breakdown of the memory devices and to precisely predict the normal operating field or applied floating gate (FG) voltage for lifetime projection of the devices. In addition, we present theoretical results showing the effect of drain doping concentration on the FG leakage current.

  5. Temperature Dependent Variations of Phonon Interactions in Nanocrystalline Cerium Oxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sugandha Dogra Pandey

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The temperature dependent anharmonic behavior of the phonon modes of nanocrystalline CeO2 was investigated in the temperature range of 80–440 K. The anharmonic constants have been derived from the shift in phonon modes fitted to account for the anharmonic contributions as well as the thermal expansion contribution using the high pressure parameters derived from our own high pressure experimental data reported previously. The total anharmonicity has also been estimated from the true anharmonicity as well as quasiharmonic component. In the line-width variation analysis, the cubic anharmonic term was found to dominate the quartic term. Finally, the phonon lifetime also reflected the trend so observed.

  6. Selecting Temperature for Protein Crystallization Screens Using the Temperature Dependence of the Second Virial Coefficient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jun; Yin, Da-Chuan; Guo, Yun-Zhu; Wang, Xi-Kai; Xie, Si-Xiao; Lu, Qin-Qin; Liu, Yong-Ming

    2011-01-01

    Protein crystals usually grow at a preferable temperature which is however not known for a new protein. This paper reports a new approach for determination of favorable crystallization temperature, which can be adopted to facilitate the crystallization screening process. By taking advantage of the correlation between the temperature dependence of the second virial coefficient (B22) and the solubility of protein, we measured the temperature dependence of B22 to predict the temperature dependence of the solubility. Using information about solubility versus temperature, a preferred crystallization temperature can be proposed. If B22 is a positive function of the temperature, a lower crystallization temperature is recommended; if B22 shows opposite behavior with respect to the temperature, a higher crystallization temperature is preferred. Otherwise, any temperature in the tested range can be used. PMID:21479212

  7. Temperature-Dependent van der Waals Forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsegian, V. A.; Ninham, B. W.

    1970-01-01

    Biological systems can experience a strong van der Waals interaction involving electromagnetic fluctuations at the low frequency limit. In lipid-water mixtures the free energy of this interaction is proportional to temperature, primarily involves an entropy change, and has qualitative features of a “hydrophobic bond.” Protein-protein attraction in dilute solution is due as much to low frequency proton fluctuation (Kirkwood-Shumaker forces) and permanent dipole forces as to high frequency (infrared and UV) van der Waals intreactions. These conclusions are described in terms of numerical calculations via the Lifshitz theory of van der Waals forces. PMID:5449916

  8. Temperature-dependent magnetic EXAFS investigation of Gd

    CERN Document Server

    Wende, H; Poulopoulos, P N; Rogalev, A; Goulon, J; Schlagel, D L; Lograsso, T A; Baberschke, K

    2001-01-01

    Magnetic EXAFS (MEXAFS) is the helicity-dependent counterpart of the well-established EXAFS technique. By means of MEXAFS it is possible not only to analyze the local magnetic structure but also to learn about magnetic fluctuations. Here we present the MEXAFS of a Gd single crystal at the L sub 3 sub , sub 2 -edges in the temperature range of 10-250 K. For the first time MEXAFS was probed over a large range in reduced temperature of 0.04<=T/T sub C<=0.85 with T sub C =293 K. We show that the vibrational damping described by means of a Debye temperature of theta sub D =160 K must be taken into account for the spin-dependent MEXAFS before analyzing magnetic fluctuations. For a detailed analysis of the MEXAFS and the EXAFS, the experimental data are compared to ab initio calculations. This enables us to separate the individual single- from the multiple-scattering contributions. The MEXAFS data have been recorded at the ID 12A beamline of the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF). To ensure that th...

  9. A temperature dependent slip factor based thermal model for friction ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    This paper proposes a new slip factor based three-dimensional thermal model to predict the temperature distribution during friction stir welding of 304L stainless steel plates. The proposed model employs temperature and radius dependent heat source to study the thermal cycle, temperature distribution, power required, the ...

  10. A temperature dependent slip factor based thermal model for friction ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. This paper proposes a new slip factor based three-dimensional thermal model to predict the temperature distribution during friction stir welding of 304L stainless steel plates. The proposed model employs temperature and radius dependent heat source to study the thermal cycle, temperature distribution, power ...

  11. Temperature Dependence in Homogeneous and Heterogeneous Nucleation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGraw R. L.; Winkler, P. M.; Wagner, P. E.

    2017-08-01

    Heterogeneous nucleation on stable (sub-2 nm) nuclei aids the formation of atmospheric cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) by circumventing or reducing vapor pressure barriers that would otherwise limit condensation and new particle growth. Aerosol and cloud formation depend largely on the interaction between a condensing liquid and the nucleating site. A new paper published this year reports the first direct experimental determination of contact angles as well as contact line curvature and other geometric properties of a spherical cap nucleus at nanometer scale using measurements from the Vienna Size Analyzing Nucleus Counter (SANC) (Winkler et al., 2016). For water nucleating heterogeneously on silver oxide nanoparticles we find contact angles around 15 degrees compared to around 90 degrees for the macroscopically measured equilibrium angle for water on bulk silver. The small microscopic contact angles can be attributed via the generalized Young equation to a negative line tension that becomes increasingly dominant with increasing curvature of the contact line. These results enable a consistent theoretical description of heterogeneous nucleation and provide firm insight to the wetting of nanosized objects.

  12. Temperature and Humidity Dependence of a Polymer-Based Gas Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, M. A.; Buehler, M. G.

    1997-01-01

    This paper quantifies the temperature and humidity dependence of a polymer-based gas sensor. The measurement and analysis of three polymers indicates that resistance changes in the polymer films, due to temperature and humidity, can be positive or negative. The temperature sensitivity ranged from +1600 to -320 ppm/nd the relative sensitivity ranged from +1100 to -260 ppm/%.

  13. Photocatalytic TMO-NMs adsorbent: Temperature-Time dependent Safranine degradation, sorption study validated under optimized effective equilibrium models parameter with standardized statistical analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahab, Rizwan; Khan, Farheen; Kaushik, Nagendra Kumar; Musarrat, Javed; Al-Khedhairy, Abdulaziz A.

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, chemically synthesized copper oxide nanoparticles (CuO-NPs), were employed for two processes: one is photocatalytic degradation and second one adsorption for the sorption of safranine (SA) dye in an aqueous medium at pH = 12.01. The optimized analytes amount (nano-adsorbent = 0.10 g, conc. range of SA dye 56.13 ppm to 154.37 ppm, pH = 12.01, temperature 303 K) reached to equilibrium point in 80 min, which acquired for chemical adsorption-degradation reactions. The degredated SA dye data’s recorded by UV-visible spectroscopy for the occurrence of TMO-NMs of CuO-NPs at anticipated period of interval. The feasible performance of CuO-NPs was admirable, shows good adsorption capacity qm = 53.676 mg g−1 and most convenient to best fitted results establish by linear regression equation, corresponded for selected kinetic model (pseudo second order (R2 = 0.9981), equilibrium isotherm models (Freundlich, Langmuir, Dubnin-Radushkevich (D-R), Temkin, H-J and Halsey), and thermodynamic parameters (∆H° = 75461.909 J mol−1, ∆S° = 253.761 J mol−1, ∆G° = −1427.93 J mol−1, Ea = 185.142 J mol−1) with error analysis. The statistical study revealed that CuO-NPs was an effective adsorbent certified photocatalytic efficiency (η = 84.88%) for degradation of SA dye, exhibited more feasibility and good affinity toward adsorbate, the sorption capacity increases with increased temperature at equilibrium point. PMID:28195174

  14. Photocatalytic TMO-NMs adsorbent: Temperature-Time dependent Safranine degradation, sorption study validated under optimized effective equilibrium models parameter with standardized statistical analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahab, Rizwan; Khan, Farheen; Kaushik, Nagendra Kumar; Musarrat, Javed; Al-Khedhairy, Abdulaziz A.

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, chemically synthesized copper oxide nanoparticles (CuO-NPs), were employed for two processes: one is photocatalytic degradation and second one adsorption for the sorption of safranine (SA) dye in an aqueous medium at pH = 12.01. The optimized analytes amount (nano-adsorbent = 0.10 g, conc. range of SA dye 56.13 ppm to 154.37 ppm, pH = 12.01, temperature 303 K) reached to equilibrium point in 80 min, which acquired for chemical adsorption-degradation reactions. The degredated SA dye data’s recorded by UV-visible spectroscopy for the occurrence of TMO-NMs of CuO-NPs at anticipated period of interval. The feasible performance of CuO-NPs was admirable, shows good adsorption capacity qm = 53.676 mg g-1 and most convenient to best fitted results establish by linear regression equation, corresponded for selected kinetic model (pseudo second order (R2 = 0.9981), equilibrium isotherm models (Freundlich, Langmuir, Dubnin-Radushkevich (D-R), Temkin, H-J and Halsey), and thermodynamic parameters (∆H° = 75461.909 J mol-1, ∆S° = 253.761 J mol-1, ∆G° = -1427.93 J mol-1, Ea = 185.142 J mol-1) with error analysis. The statistical study revealed that CuO-NPs was an effective adsorbent certified photocatalytic efficiency (η = 84.88%) for degradation of SA dye, exhibited more feasibility and good affinity toward adsorbate, the sorption capacity increases with increased temperature at equilibrium point.

  15. Temperature dependence of the HNO3 UV absorption cross sections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkholder, James B.; Talukdar, Ranajit K.; Ravishankara, A. R.; Solomon, Susan

    1993-01-01

    The temperature dependence of the HNO3 absorption cross sections between 240 and 360 K over the wavelength range 195 to 350 nm has been measured using a diode array spectrometer. Absorption cross sections were determined using both (1) absolute pressure measurements at 298 K and (2) a dual absorption cell arrangement in which the absorption spectrum at various temperatures is measured relative to the room temperature absorption spectrum. The HNO3 absorption spectrum showed a temperature dependence which is weak at short wavelengths but stronger at longer wavelengths which are important for photolysis in the lower stratosphere. The 298 K absorption cross sections were found to be larger than the values currently recommended for atmospheric modeling (DeMore et al., 1992). Our absorption cross section data are critically compared with the previous measurements of both room temperature and temperature-dependent absorption cross sections. Temperature-dependent absorption cross sections of HNO3 are recommended for use in atmospheric modeling. These temperature dependent HNO3 absorption cross sections were used in a two-dimensional dynamical-photochemical model to demonstrate the effects of the revised absorption cross sections on loss rate of HNO3 and the abundance of NO2 in the stratosphere.

  16. Temperature dependence of postmortem MR quantification for soft tissue discrimination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zech, Wolf-Dieter; Schwendener, Nicole; Jackowski, Christian [University of Bern, From the Institute of Forensic Medicine, Bern (Switzerland); Persson, Anders; Warntjes, Marcel J. [University of Linkoeping, The Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV), Linkoeping (Sweden)

    2015-08-15

    To investigate and correct the temperature dependence of postmortem MR quantification used for soft tissue characterization and differentiation in thoraco-abdominal organs. Thirty-five postmortem short axis cardiac 3-T MR examinations were quantified using a quantification sequence. Liver, spleen, left ventricular myocardium, pectoralis muscle and subcutaneous fat were analysed in cardiac short axis images to obtain mean T1, T2 and PD tissue values. The core body temperature was measured using a rectally inserted thermometer. The tissue-specific quantitative values were related to the body core temperature. Equations to correct for temperature differences were generated. In a 3D plot comprising the combined data of T1, T2 and PD, different organs/tissues could be well differentiated from each other. The quantitative values were influenced by the temperature. T1 in particular exhibited strong temperature dependence. The correction of quantitative values to a temperature of 37 C resulted in better tissue discrimination. Postmortem MR quantification is feasible for soft tissue discrimination and characterization of thoraco-abdominal organs. This provides a base for computer-aided diagnosis and detection of tissue lesions. The temperature dependence of the T1 values challenges postmortem MR quantification. Equations to correct for the temperature dependence are provided. (orig.)

  17. Poiseuille Flow of Fluid Whose Viscosity is Temperature Dependent ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We discuss a fluid flowing between two parallel plates. We assume a Poiseuille flow. Furthermore, we assume that the viscosity μ, depends on temperature T. We show that the velocity equation has two solutions. Graph features prominently in the presentation.

  18. Temperature dependent climate projection deficiencies in CMIP5 models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Jens H.; Boberg, Fredrik

    2012-01-01

    Monthly mean temperatures for 34 GCMs available from the CMIP5 project are compared with observations from CRU for 26 different land regions covering all major land areas in the world for the period 1961-2000 by means of quantile-quantile (q-q) diagrams. A warm period positive temperature dependent...... bias is identified for many of the models within many of the chosen climate regions. However, the exact temperature dependence varies considerably between the models. We analyse the role of this difference as a contributing factor for some models to project stronger regional warming than others...... that in general models with a positive temperature dependent bias tend to have a large projected temperature change, and these tendencies increase with increasing global warming level. We argue that this appears to be linked with the ability of models to capture complex feedbacks accurately. In particular land...

  19. Temperature dependence of photovoltaic cells, modules, and systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emery, K.; Burdick, J.; Caiyem, Y. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)] [and others

    1996-05-01

    Photovoltaic (PV) cells and modules are often rated in terms of a set of standard reporting conditions defined by a temperature, spectral irradiance, and total irradiance. Because PV devices operates over a wide range of temperatures and irradiances, the temperature and irradiance related behavior must be known. This paper surveys the temperature dependence of crystalline and thin-film, state-of-the-art, research-size cells, modules, and systems measured by a variety of methods. The various error sources and measurement methods that contribute to cause differences in the temperature coefficient for a given cell or module measured with various methods are discussed.

  20. Hysteresis and Temperature Dependency of Moisture Sorption – New Measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rode, Carsten; Hansen, Kurt Kielsgaard

    2011-01-01

    It is well known that sorption characteristics of building materials exhibit hysteresis in the way the equilibrium curves develop between adsorption and desorption, and that the sorption curves are also somewhat temperature dependent. However, these two facts are most often neglected in models...... measurements of hysteresis and temperature dependency of the moisture sorption characteristics of three different porous building materials: aerated concrete, cement paste and spruce. Scanning curves are measured for all three materials where periods with adsorption and desorption interrupt each other...

  1. Temperature dependence of unitary properties of an ATP-dependent potassium channel in cardiac myocytes.

    OpenAIRE

    McLarnon, J G; Hamman, B.N.; Tibbits, G.F.

    1993-01-01

    The temperature dependence of the properties of unitary currents in cultured rat ventricular myocytes has been studied. Currents flowing through an ATP-dependent K+ channel were recorded from inside-out patches with the bath temperature varied from 10 degrees to 30 degrees C. The channel conductance was 56 pS at room temperature (22 degrees C), and the amplitudes of unitary currents and the channel conductance exhibited a relatively weak (Q10 from 1.4 to 1.6) dependence on temperature. The te...

  2. Temperature-dependent thermal properties of spark plasma sintered alumina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saheb Nouari

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we report temperature-dependent thermal properties of alumina powder and bulk alumina consolidated by spark plasma sintering method. The properties were measured between room temperature and 250ºC using a thermal constants analyzer. Alumina powder had very low thermal properties due to the presence of large pores and absence of bonding between its particles. Fully dense alumina with a relative density of 99.6 % was obtained at a sintering temperature of 1400°C and a holding time of 10 min. Thermal properties were found to mainly dependent on density. Thermal conductivity, thermal diffusivity, and specific heat of the fully dense alumina were 34.44 W/mK, 7.62 mm2s-1, and 1.22 J/gK, respectively, at room temperature. Thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity decreased while specific heat increased with the increase in temperature from room temperature to 250ºC.

  3. Temperature dependent optical properties of PbS nanocrystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordin, M N; Li, Juerong; Clowes, S K; Curry, R J

    2012-07-11

    A comprehensive study of the optical properties of PbS nanocrystals (NCs) is reported that includes the temperature dependent absorption, photoluminescence (PL) and PL lifetime in the range of 3-300 K. The absorption and PL are found to display different temperature dependent behaviour though both redshift as temperature is reduced. This results in a temperature dependent Stokes shift which increases from ∼75 meV at 300 K with reducing temperature until saturating at ∼130 meV below ∼150 K prior to a small reduction to 125 meV upon cooling from 25 to 3 K. The PL lifetime is found to be single exponential at 3 K with a lifetime of τ(1) = 6.5 μs. Above 3 K biexponential behaviour is observed with the lifetime for each process displaying a different temperature dependence. The Stokes shift is modelled using a three-level rate equation model incorporating temperature dependent parameter values obtained via fitting phenomenological relationships to the observed absorption and PL behaviour. This results in a predicted energy difference between the two emitting states of ∼6 meV which is close to the excitonic exchange energy splitting predicted theoretically for these systems.

  4. Temperature-dependent piezoresistivity in an MWCNT/epoxy nanocomposite temperature sensor with ultrahigh performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alamusi; Li, Yuan; Hu, Ning; Wu, Liangke; Yuan, Weifeng; Peng, Xianghe; Gu, Bin; Chang, Christiana; Liu, Yaolu; Ning, Huiming; Li, Jinhua; Surina; Atobe, Satoshi; Fukunaga, Hisao

    2013-11-01

    A temperature sensor was fabricated from a polymer nanocomposite with multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) as nanofiller (i.e., MWCNT/epoxy). The electrical resistance and temperature coefficient of resistance (TCR) of the temperature sensor were characterized experimentally. The effects of temperature (within the range 333-373 K) and MWCNT content (within the range 1-5 wt%) were investigated thoroughly. It was found that the resistance increases with increasing temperature and decreasing MWCNT content. However, the resistance change ratio related to the TCR increases with increasing temperature and MWCNT content. The highest value of TCR (0.021 K-1), which was observed in the case of 5 wt% MWCNT, is much higher than those of traditional metals and MWCNT-based temperature sensors. Moreover, the corresponding numerical simulation—conducted to explain the above temperature-dependent piezoresistivity of the nanocomposite temperature sensor—indicated the key role of a temperature-dependent tunneling effect.

  5. Temperature dependence of electromechanical properties of PLZT x ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    the temperature dependence of electromechanical proper- ties of PLZT. It has been observed that the compositions of PLZT ceramics with Zr/Ti 57/43 show enhanced piezoelectric response at room temperature and can be used in low power transducer devices (Shukla et al 2004). Keeping the device application in view, ...

  6. Existence of a secondary flow for a temperature dependent viscous ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We model a viscous fluid flowing between parallel plates. The viscosity depends on temperature. We investigate the properties of the velocity and we show that the temperature and velocity fields have two solutions. The existence of two velocity solutions is new. This means that there exist secondary flows. Journal of the ...

  7. On the effect of temperature dependent thermal conductivity on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We consider the effect of temperature dependent thermal conductivity on temperature rise in biologic tissues during microwave heating. The method of asymptotic expansion is used for finding solution. An appropriate matching procedure was used in our method. Our result reveals the possibility of multiple solutions and it ...

  8. Pressure–temperature dependence of thermodynamic properties of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    properties of materials under high pressures and temperatures for microscopic under- standing as well as technological applications. In this paper, we report our theoretical study of both pressure and temperature dependences of the thermal properties of rutile within the Debye and Debye–Grüneisen models with and ...

  9. Time dependent temperature distribution in pulsed Ti:sapphire lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buoncristiani, A. Martin; Byvik, Charles E.; Farrukh, Usamah O.

    1988-01-01

    An expression is derived for the time dependent temperature distribution in a finite solid state laser rod for an end-pumped beam of arbitrary shape. The specific case of end pumping by circular (constant) or Gaussian beam is described. The temperature profile for a single pump pulse and for repetitive pulse operation is discussed. The particular case of the temperature distribution in a pulsed titanium:sapphire rod is considered.

  10. Temperature-dependent Henry's law constants of 4-alkyl-branched chain fatty acids and 3-methylindole in an oil-air matrix and analysis of volatiles in lamb fat using selected ion flow tube mass spectrometry (SIFT-MS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castada, Hardy Z; Polentz, Victoria; Barringer, Sheryl; Wick, Macdonald

    2017-10-07

    4-Alkyl-branched chain fatty acids and 3-methylindole are characteristic flavor compounds associated with sheep meat. Determining their partitioning behavior between the gas and condensed phase and ultimately developing a correlation between the compound's headspace concentration and sensory descriptive grouping are important for high throughput characterization and grading classification. The headspace concentrations of 3-methylindole, 4-methyloctanoic acid, 4-ethyloctanoic acid, and 4-methylnonanoic acid above corn oil-based standard solutions, and lamb fat samples were measured using selected ion flow tube-mass spectrometry (SIFT-MS). The standard solutions were equilibrated at 80, 100, 110 and 125(o) C while the fat samples were equilibrated at 125(o) C. Statistical evaluation, linear and polynomial regression analyses were performed to establish the compound-specific and temperature-dependent Henry's law constants, enthalpy (∆H) and entropy (∆S) of phase changes. The Henry's law constants (kH(cp) ) were calculated from the regression analysis with a high degree of confidence (p 0.99). The kH(cp) increased with increase in equilibrium temperature. The empirical calculation of the ∆H and ∆S at different temperatures confirmed the temperature-dependence of the Henry's law constants. The headspace concentrations of the lamb-flavor compounds were determined above actual lamb fat samples and the corresponding condensed phase concentrations were successfully derived. The temperature-dependent Henry's law constants, ∆H, and ∆S of phase changes for 3-methylindole, 4-methyloctanoic acid, 4-ethyloctanoic acid, and 4-methylnonanoic acid in an air-oil matrix were empirically derived. The effectiveness of SIFT-MS for the direct, real-time, and rapid determination of key flavor compounds in lamb fat samples was established. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  11. The temperature dependent amide I band of crystalline acetanilide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cruzeiro, Leonor [CCMAR, Universidade do Algarve, Campus de Gambelas, 8005-139 Faro (Portugal); Physics Department, FCT, Universidade do Algarve, Campus de Gambelas, 8005-139 Faro (Portugal); Freedman, Holly [CCMAR, Universidade do Algarve, Campus de Gambelas, 8005-139 Faro (Portugal)

    2013-10-01

    The temperature dependent anomalous peak in the amide I band of crystalline acetanilide is thought to be due to self-trapped states. On the contrary, according to the present model, the anomalous peak comes from the fraction of ACN molecules strongly hydrogen-bonded to a neighboring ACN molecule, and its intensity decreases because, on average, this fraction decreases as temperature increases. This model provides, for the first time, an integrated and theoretically consistent view of the temperature dependence of the full amide I band and a qualitative explanation of some of the features of nonlinear pump–probe experiments.

  12. BUCKLING OF A COLUMN WITH TEMPERATURE DEPENDENT MATERIAL PROPERTIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ömer SOYKASAP

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Buckling of a column with temperature dependent material properties is investigated. Euler-Bernoulli theory of thin beams is used to derive the element matrices by means of the minimum potential energy principle. Temperature dependency of material properties is taken into account in the formulation. The column is divided into finite elements with the axial degrees of freedom defined at the outer fiber of the column. Column elements have simpler derivations and compact element matrices than those of classical beam-bending element. Some illustrative examples are presented to show the convergence of numerical results obtained by the use of new elements. The results are compared with those of the classical beam-bending element and analytical solution. The new element converges to the analytical results as powerful as the classical beam-bending element. The temperature effects on the buckling loads of the column with temperature dependent material properties are also examined.

  13. Temperature dependent modulation of lobster neuromuscular properties by serotonin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Jonna L; Edwards, Claire R; Holt, Stephen R; Worden, Mary Kate

    2007-03-01

    In cold-blooded species the efficacy of neuromuscular function depends both on the thermal environmental of the animal's habitat and on the concentrations of modulatory hormones circulating within the animal's body. The goal of this study is to examine how temperature variation within an ecologically relevant range affects neuromuscular function and its modulation by the neurohormone serotonin (5-HT) in Homarus americanus, a lobster species that inhabits a broad thermal range in the wild. The synaptic strength of the excitatory and inhibitory motoneurons innervating the lobster dactyl opener muscle depends on temperature, with the strongest neurally evoked muscle movements being elicited at cold (temperatures. However, whereas neurally evoked contractions can be elicited over the entire temperature range from 2 to >20 degrees C, neurally evoked relaxations of resting muscle tension are effective only at colder temperatures at which the inhibitory junction potentials are hyperpolarizing in polarity. 5-HT has two effects on inhibitory synaptic signals: it potentiates their amplitude and also shifts the temperature at which they reverse polarity by approximately +7 degrees C. Thus 5-HT both potentiates neurally evoked relaxations of the muscle and increases the temperature range over which neurally evoked muscle relaxations can be elicited. Neurally evoked contractions are maximally potentiated by 5-HT at warm (18 degrees C) temperatures; however, 5-HT enhances excitatory junction potentials in a temperature-independent manner. Finally, 5-HT strongly increases resting muscle tension at the coldest extent of the temperature range tested (2 degrees C) but is ineffective at 22 degrees C. These data demonstrate that 5-HT elicits several temperature-dependent physiological changes in the passive and active responses of muscle to neural input. The overall effect of 5-HT is to increase the temperature range over which neurally evoked motor movements can be elicited in this

  14. Temperature-dependent enthalpy of oxygenation in Antarctic fish hemoglobins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fago, A.; Wells, R.M.G.; Weber, Roy E.

    1997-01-01

    The effect of temperature on the oxygen-binding properties of the hemoglobins of three cold-adapted Antarctic fish species, Dissostichus mawsoni, Pagothenia borchgrevinki and Trematomus, sp., has been investigated under different pH values and buffer conditions. A clear non linear van't Hoff plot...... oxygen binding. The degree of the temperature dependence of the heat of oxygenation observed in these hemoglobins seems to reflect the differences in their allosteric effects rather than a specific molecular adaptation to low temperatures. Moreover, this study indicates that the disagreement between...... (logP(50) vs 1/T) of D. mawsoni hemoglobin indicates that the enthalpy of oxygenation (slope of the plot) is temperature dependent and that at high temperatures oxygen-binding becomes less exothermic. Nearly linear relationships were found in the hemoglobins of the other two species. The data were...

  15. Temperature dependent Raman scattering in YCrO3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mall, A. K.; Mukherjee, S.; Sharma, Y.; Garg, A.; Gupta, R.

    2014-04-01

    High quality polycrystalline YCrO3 samples were synthesized using solid-state-reaction method. The samples were subsequently characterized using X-ray diffraction and magnetometry. Further, temperature dependent Raman spectroscopy over a spectral range from 100 to 800 cm-1 was used to examine the variation of phonons as a function of temperature from 90 to 300 K. In the low temperature ferroelectric phase of YCrO3, the observed phonon spectra showed softening of some Raman modes below the magnetic ordering temperature (TN ˜ 142K), suggesting a coupling between the spin and phonon degrees of freedom.

  16. Arrhenius temperature dependence of in vitro tissue plasminogen activator thrombolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaw, George J [Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, OH 45267-0769 (United States); Dhamija, Ashima [Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, OH 45267-0769 (United States); Bavani, Nazli [Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, OH 45267-0769 (United States); Wagner, Kenneth R [Department of Neurology, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, OH 45267-0769 (United States); Holland, Christy K [Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, OH 45267-0769 (United States)

    2007-06-07

    Stroke is a devastating disease and a leading cause of death and disability. Currently, the only FDA approved therapy for acute ischemic stroke is the intravenous administration of the thrombolytic medication, recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (tPA). However, this treatment has many contraindications and can have dangerous side effects such as intra-cerebral hemorrhage. These treatment limitations have led to much interest in potential adjunctive therapies, such as therapeutic hypothermia (T {<=} 35 deg. C) and ultrasound enhanced thrombolysis. Such interest may lead to combining these therapies with tPA to treat stroke, however little is known about the effects of temperature on the thrombolytic efficacy of tPA. In this work, we measure the temperature dependence of the fractional clot mass loss {delta}m(T) resulting from tPA exposure in an in vitro human clot model. We find that the temperature dependence is well described by an Arrhenius temperature dependence with an effective activation energy E{sub eff} of 42.0 {+-} 0.9 kJ mole{sup -1}. E{sub eff} approximates the activation energy of the plasminogen-to-plasmin reaction of 48.9 kJ mole{sup -1}. A model to explain this temperature dependence is proposed. These results will be useful in predicting the effects of temperature in future lytic therapies.

  17. Temperature dependence of the elastocaloric effect in natural rubber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, Zhongjian, E-mail: zhongjian.xie521@gmail.com; Sebald, Gael; Guyomar, Daniel

    2017-07-12

    The temperature dependence of the elastocaloric (eC) effect in natural rubber (NR) has been studied. This material exhibits a large eC effect over a broad temperature range from 0 °C to 49 °C. The maximum adiabatic temperature change (ΔT) occurred at 10 °C and the behavior could be predicted by the temperature dependence of the strain-induced crystallization (SIC) and the temperature-induced crystallization (TIC). The eC performance of NR was then compared with that of shape memory alloys (SMAs). This study contributes to the SIC research of NR and also broadens the application of elastomers. - Highlights: • A large elastocaloric effect over a broad temperature range was found in natural rubber (NR). • The caloric performance of NR was compared with that of shape memory alloys. • The temperature dependence of the elastocaloric effect in NR can be prediced by the theory of strain-induced crystallization.

  18. Substrate-dependent temperature sensitivity of soil organic matter decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myachina, Olga; Blagodatskaya, Evgenia

    2015-04-01

    Activity of extracellular enzymes responsible for decomposition of organics is substrate dependent. Quantity of the substrate is the main limiting factor for enzymatic or microbial heterotrophic activity in soils. Different mechanisms of enzymes response to temperature suggested for low and high substrate availability were never proved for real soil conditions. We compared the temperature responses of enzymes-catalyzed reactions in soils. Basing on Michaelis-Menten kinetics we determined the enzymes affinity to substrate (Km) and mineralization potential of heterotrophic microorganisms (Vmax) 1) for three hydrolytic enzymes: β-1,4-glucosidase, N-acetyl- β -D-glucosaminidase and phosphatase by the application of fluorogenically labeled substrates and 2) for mineralization of 14C-labeled glucose by substrate-dependent respiratory response. Here we show that the amount of available substrate is responsible for temperature sensitivity of hydrolysis of polymers in soil, whereas monomers oxidation to CO2 does not depend on substrate amount and is mainly temperature governed. We also found that substrate affinity of enzymes (which is usually decreases with the temperature) differently responded to warming for the process of depolymerisation versus monomers oxidation. We suggest the mechanism to temperature acclimation based on different temperature sensitivity of enzymes kinetics for hydrolysis of polymers and for monomers oxidation.

  19. A framework for elucidating the temperature dependence of fitness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amarasekare, Priyanga; Savage, Van

    2012-02-01

    Climate warming is predicted to cause large-scale extinctions, particularly of ectothermic species. A striking difference between tropical and temperate ectotherms is that tropical species experience a mean habitat temperature that is closer to the temperature at which fitness is maximized (T(opt)) and an upper temperature limit for survival (T(max)) that is closer to T(opt) than do temperate species. Thus, even a small increase in environmental temperature could put tropical ectotherms at high risk of extinction, whereas temperate ectotherms have a wider temperature cushion. Although this pattern is widely observed, the mechanisms that produce it are not well understood. Here we develop a mathematical framework to partition the temperature response of fitness into its components (fecundity, mortality, and development) and test model predictions with data for insects. We find that fitness declines at high temperatures because the temperature responses of fecundity and mortality act in opposite ways: fecundity decreases with temperature when temperatures exceed the optimal range, whereas mortality continues to increase. The proximity of T(opt) to T(max) depends on how the temperature response of development mediates the interaction between fecundity and mortality. When development is highly temperature sensitive, mortality exceeds reproduction only after fecundity has started to decline with temperature, which causes fitness to decline rapidly to zero when temperatures exceed T(opt). The model correctly predicts empirically observed fitness-temperature relationships in insects from different latitudes. It also suggests explanations for the widely reported phenological shifts in many ectotherms and the latitudinal differences in fitness responses.

  20. Low temperature aluminum soldering analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peterkort, W.G.

    1976-09-01

    The investigation of low temperature aluminum soldering included the collection of spread factor and dihedral angle data for several solder alloys and a study of flux effects on aluminum. Selected solders were subjected to environmental tests and evaluated on the basis of tensile strength, joint resistance, visual appearance, and metallurgical analysis. A production line method for determining adequate flux removal was developed.

  1. Temperature-dependency analysis and correction methods of in-situ power-loss estimation for crystalline silicon modules undergoing potential-induced degradation stress testing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spataru, Sergiu; Hacke, Peter; Sera, Dezso

    2015-01-01

    duration and cost, avoids stress transients while ramping to and from the stress temperature, eliminates flash testing except at the initial and final data points, and enables significantly faster and more detailed acquisition of statistical data for future application of various statistical reliability...

  2. Temperature-dependent analysis of thermal motion, disorder and structures of tris(ethylenediamine)zinc(II)sulfate and tris(ethylenediamine)copper(II) sulfate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smeets, S.; Parois, P.J.A.; Bürgi, H.-B.; Lutz, M.

    2011-01-01

    The crystal structures of the title compounds have been determined in the temperature range 140–290 K for the zinc complex, and 190–270 K for the copper complex. The two structures are isostructural in the trigonal space group P 331c with the sulfate anion severely disordered on a site with 32 (D3)

  3. Temperature dependence of alkali-antimonide photocathodes: Evaluation at cryogenic temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamun, M. A.; Hernandez-Flores, M. R.; Morales, E.; Hernandez-Garcia, C.; Poelker, M.

    2017-10-01

    CsxKySb photocathodes were manufactured on a niobium substrate and evaluated over a range of temperatures from 300 to 77 K. Vacuum conditions were identified that minimize surface contamination due to gas adsorption when samples were cooled below room temperature. Measurements of the photocathode spectral response provided a means to evaluate the photocathode band gap dependence on the temperature and to predict the photocathode quantum efficiency at 4 K, a typical temperature at which superconducting radio frequency photoguns operate.

  4. On the Temperature Dependence of the UNIQUAC/UNIFAC Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skjold-Jørgensen, Steen; Rasmussen, Peter; Fredenslund, Aage

    1980-01-01

    Local composition models for the description of the properties of liquid mixtures do not in general give an accurate representation of excess Gibbs energy and excess enthalpy simultaneously. The introduction of temperature dependent interaction parameters leads to considerable improvements...... of the simultaneous correlation. The temperature dependent parameters have, however, little physical meaning and very odd results are frequently obtained when the interaction parameters obtained from excess enthalpy information alone are used for the prediction of vapor-liquid equilibria. The UNIQUAC/UNIFAC models...... are modified in this work by the introduction of a general temperature dependence of the coordination number. The modified UNIQUAC/UNIFAC models are especially suited for the representation of mixtures containing non-associating components. The modified models contain the same number of interaction parameters...

  5. Apparatus for temperature-dependent cathodoluminescence characterization of materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bok, Jan; Schauer, Petr

    2014-07-01

    An apparatus for characterization of temperature-dependent cathodoluminescence (CL) of solid-state materials is presented. This device excites a specimen using an electron beam and the CL emission is collected from the specimen side opposite the e-beam irradiation. The design of the temperature-controlled specimen holder that enables cooling down to 100 K and heating up to 500 K is described. The desired specimen temperature is automatically stabilized using a PID controller, which is the proportional-integral-derivative control feedback loop. Moreover, the specimen holder provides in situ e-beam current measurement during the specimen excitation. The apparatus allows the measurement of the CL intensity, the CL spectrum, or the CL intensity decay depending on the specimen temperature, or on a variety of excitation conditions, such as excitation energy, electron current (dose), or excitation duration. The apparatus abilities are demonstrated by an example of the CL measurements of the YAG:Ce single-crystal scintillator.

  6. Honeybee flight metabolic rate: does it depend upon air temperature?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, William A; Heinrich, Bernd; Stevenson, Robert D

    2005-03-01

    Differing conclusions have been reached as to how or whether varying heat production has a thermoregulatory function in flying honeybees Apis mellifera. We investigated the effects of air temperature on flight metabolic rate, water loss, wingbeat frequency, body segment temperatures and behavior of honeybees flying in transparent containment outdoors. For periods of voluntary, uninterrupted, self-sustaining flight, metabolic rate was independent of air temperature between 19 and 37 degrees C. Thorax temperatures (T(th)) were very stable, with a slope of thorax temperature on air temperature of 0.18. Evaporative heat loss increased from 51 mW g(-1) at 25 degrees C to 158 mW g(-1) at 37 degrees C and appeared to account for head and abdomen temperature excess falling sharply over the same air temperature range. As air temperature increased from 19 to 37 degrees C, wingbeat frequency showed a slight but significant increase, and metabolic expenditure per wingbeat showed a corresponding slight but significant decrease. Bees spent an average of 52% of the measurement period in flight, with 19 of 78 bees sustaining uninterrupted voluntary flight for periods of >1 min. The fraction of time spent flying declined as air temperature increased. As the fraction of time spent flying decreased, the slope of metabolic rate on air temperature became more steeply negative, and was significant for bees flying less than 80% of the time. In a separate experiment, there was a significant inverse relationship of metabolic rate and air temperature for bees requiring frequent or constant agitation to remain airborne, but no dependence for bees that flew with little or no agitation; bees were less likely to require agitation during outdoor than indoor measurements. A recent hypothesis explaining differences between studies in the slope of flight metabolic rate on air temperature in terms of differences in metabolic capacity and thorax temperature is supported for honeybees in voluntary

  7. Temperature analysis in CFRP drilling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumura, Takashi; Tamura, Shoichi

    2016-10-01

    The cutting temperature in drilling of carbon fiber reinforced plastics (CFRPs) is simulated numerically in finite difference analysis. The cutting force is predicted to estimate heat generation on the shear plane and the rake face by an energy approach. In the force model, three dimensional chip flow is interpreted as a piling up of the orthogonal cuttings in the planes containing the cutting velocities and the chip flow velocities, in which the chip flow direction is determined to minimize the cutting energy. Then, the cutting force is predicted in the determined chip flow model. The cutting temperature distribution is simulated with the thermal conductions, the thermal convections and the heat generations in the discrete elements of the tool, the chip and the workpiece. The heat generations on the shear plane and the rake face are given by stress distributions based on the cutting force predicted. The cutting temperature is analyzed on assumption that all mechanical works contribute the heat generation. The temperature of CFRP is compared with that of carbon steel in the numerical simulation. The maximum temperature of CFRP is much lower than carbon steel. The position at the maximum temperature is near the tool tip due to a low thermal conductivity of CFRP.

  8. AlN Bandgap Temperature Dependence from its Optical Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-06-07

    AlN bandgap temperature dependence from its optical properties E. Silveira a,, J.A. Freitas b, S.B. Schujman c, L.J. Schowalter c a Depto. de Fisica ...literature could, in part, be lifted in terms of selection rules for the optical transitions [5]. Further experimental investigations corroborated with...CL, transmission/ absorption and OR measurements at different temperatures. 2. Experimental details The high-quality large bulk AlN single crystals

  9. A temperature analysis in magnetic hyperthermia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astefanoaei, Iordana; Stancu, Alexandru

    2017-12-01

    In the Magnetic Hyperthermia - the control of the temperature field within the malignant tissues is an important task which receives a considerable attention in the all experimental and theoretical researches. A temperature analysis focus the main parameters which influences strongly this therapy. The spatial distribution of the particles influences significantly the temperature field developed within a malignant tissue, when an external time - dependent magnetic field is applied. This paper analyses the temperature field induced by the particulate systems (magnetite and maghemite) with an exponential spatial distribution within a concentric tissues configuration (malignant and healthy tissues). The temperature field developed by these magnetic systems was computed using an analytical model which predicts the temperature at every point. This model was developed in order to compute the isothermal surfaces in the range of the therapeutic temperature range: 42÷46°C. The parameters involved in the burning process of the malignant tissues are optimized to get the uniform hyperthermic temperatures within malignant tissues for a corresponding clinically particle dosage.

  10. Temperature dependence of amino acid side chain IR absorptions in the amide I' region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Benjamin A; Literati, Alex; Ball, Borden; Kubelka, Jan

    2014-05-01

    Amide I' IR spectra are widely used for studies of structural changes in peptides and proteins as a function of temperature. Temperature dependent absorptions of amino acid side-chains that overlap the amide I' may significantly complicate the structural analyses. While the side-chain IR spectra have been investigated previously, thus far their dependence on temperature has not been reported. Here we present the study of the changes in the IR spectra with temperature for side-chain groups of aspartate, glutamate, asparagine, glutamine, arginine, and tyrosine in the amide I' region (in D2O). Band fitting analysis was employed to extract the temperature dependence of the individual spectral parameters, such as peak frequency, integrated intensity, band width, and shape. As expected, the side-chain IR bands exhibit significant changes with temperature. The majority of the spectral parameters, particularly the frequency and intensity, show linear dependence on temperature, but the direction and magnitude vary depending on the particular side-chain group. The exception is arginine, which exhibits a distinctly nonlinear frequency shift with temperature for its asymmetric CN3H5(+) bending signal, although a linear fit can account for this change to within ~1/3 cm(-1). The applicability of the determined spectral parameters for estimations of temperature-dependent side-chain absorptions in peptides and proteins are discussed. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Iron mapping using the temperature dependency of the magnetic susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birkl, Christoph; Langkammer, Christian; Krenn, Heinz; Goessler, Walter; Ernst, Christina; Haybaeck, Johannes; Stollberger, Rudolf; Fazekas, Franz; Ropele, Stefan

    2015-03-01

    The assessment of iron content in brain white matter (WM) is of high importance for studying neurodegenerative diseases. While R2 * mapping and quantitative susceptibility mapping is suitable for iron mapping in gray matter, iron mapping in WM still remains an unsolved problem. We propose a new approach for iron mapping, independent of diamagnetic contributions of myelin by assessing the temperature dependency of the paramagnetic susceptibility. We used unfixed human brain slices for relaxometry and calculated R2 ' as a measure for microscopic susceptibility variations at several temperatures (4°C-37°C) at 3 Tesla. The temperature coefficient of R2 ' (TcR2p) was calculated by linear regression and related to the iron concentration found by subsequent superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometry and by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. In line with SQUID measurements, R2 ' mapping showed a linear temperature dependency of the bulk susceptibility with the highest slope in gray matter. Even in WM, TcR2p yielded a high linear correlation with the absolute iron concentration. According to Curie's law, only paramagnetic matter exhibits a temperature dependency while the diamagnetism shows no effect. We have demonstrated that the temperature coefficient (TcR2p) can be used as a measure of the paramagnetic susceptibility despite of an unknown diamagnetic background. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Temperature dependence of the Brewer global UV measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fountoulakis, Ilias; Redondas, Alberto; Lakkala, Kaisa; Berjon, Alberto; Bais, Alkiviadis F.; Doppler, Lionel; Feister, Uwe; Heikkila, Anu; Karppinen, Tomi; Karhu, Juha M.; Koskela, Tapani; Garane, Katerina; Fragkos, Konstantinos; Savastiouk, Volodya

    2017-11-01

    Spectral measurements of global UV irradiance recorded by Brewer spectrophotometers can be significantly affected by instrument-specific optical and mechanical features. Thus, proper corrections are needed in order to reduce the associated uncertainties to within acceptable levels. The present study aims to contribute to the reduction of uncertainties originating from changes in the Brewer internal temperature, which affect the performance of the optical and electronic parts, and subsequently the response of the instrument. Until now, measurements of the irradiance from various types of lamps at different temperatures have been used to characterize the instruments' temperature dependence. The use of 50 W lamps was found to induce errors in the characterization due to changes in the transmissivity of the Teflon diffuser as it warms up by the heat of the lamp. In contrast, the use of 200 or 1000 W lamps is considered more appropriate because they are positioned at longer distances from the diffuser so that warming is negligible. Temperature gradients inside the instrument can cause mechanical stresses which can affect the instrument's optical characteristics. Therefore, during the temperature-dependence characterization procedure warming or cooling must be slow enough to minimize these effects. In this study, results of the temperature characterization of eight different Brewer spectrophotometers operating in Greece, Finland, Germany and Spain are presented. It was found that the instruments' response changes differently in different temperature regions due to different responses of the diffusers' transmittance. The temperature correction factors derived for the Brewer spectrophotometers operating at Thessaloniki, Greece, and Sodankylä, Finland, were evaluated and were found to remove the temperature dependence of the instruments' sensitivity.

  13. DETERMINATION OF TEMPERATURE DISTRIBUTION FOR ANNULAR FINS WITH TEMPERATURE DEPENDENT THERMAL CONDUCTIVITY BY HPM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davood Domairry Ganji

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, homotopy perturbation method has been used to evaluate the temperature distribution of annular fin with temperature-dependent thermal conductivity and to determine the temperature distribution within the fin. This method is useful and practical for solving the nonlinear heat transfer equation, which is associated with variable thermal conductivity condition. The homotopy perturbation method provides an approximate analytical solution in the form of an infinite power series. The annular fin heat transfer rate with temperature-dependent thermal conductivity has been obtained as a function of thermo-geometric fin parameter and the thermal conductivity parameter describing the variation of the thermal conductivity.

  14. A Model of Temperature-Dependent Young's Modulus for Ultrahigh Temperature Ceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiguo Li

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on the different sensitivities of material properties to temperature between ultrahigh temperature ceramics (UHTCs and traditional ceramics, the original empirical formula of temperature-dependent Young's modulus of ceramic materials is unable to describe the temperature dependence of Young's modulus of UHTCs which are used as thermal protection materials. In this paper, a characterization applied to Young's modulus of UHTC materials under high temperature which is revised from the original empirical formula is established. The applicable temperature range of the characterization extends to the higher temperature zone. This study will provide a basis for the characterization for strength and fracture toughness of UHTC materials and provide theoretical bases and technical reserves for the UHTC materials' design and application in the field of spacecraft.

  15. Similar temperature dependencies of glycolytic enzymes: an evolutionary adaptation to temperature dynamics?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cruz Luisa Ana B

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Temperature strongly affects microbial growth, and many microorganisms have to deal with temperature fluctuations in their natural environment. To understand regulation strategies that underlie microbial temperature responses and adaptation, we studied glycolytic pathway kinetics in Saccharomyces cerevisiae during temperature changes. Results Saccharomyces cerevisiae was grown under different temperature regimes and glucose availability conditions. These included glucose-excess batch cultures at different temperatures and glucose-limited chemostat cultures, subjected to fast linear temperature shifts and circadian sinoidal temperature cycles. An observed temperature-independent relation between intracellular levels of glycolytic metabolites and residual glucose concentration for all experimental conditions revealed that it is the substrate availability rather than temperature that determines intracellular metabolite profiles. This observation corresponded with predictions generated in silico with a kinetic model of yeast glycolysis, when the catalytic capacities of all glycolytic enzymes were set to share the same normalized temperature dependency. Conclusions From an evolutionary perspective, such similar temperature dependencies allow cells to adapt more rapidly to temperature changes, because they result in minimal perturbations of intracellular metabolite levels, thus circumventing the need for extensive modification of enzyme levels.

  16. Temperature dependencies of frequency characteristics of HTSC RLC curcuit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buniatyan, Vahe V.; Aroutiounian, V. M.; Shmavonyan, G. Sh.; Buniatyan, Vaz. V.

    2006-05-01

    Analytical expressions of temperature dependencies of magnitude-frequency and phase-frequency characteristics of a HTSC RLC parallel circuit are obtained, where the resistance and inductance are non-linearly depended on the optical signal modulated by the intensity. It is shown that the magnitude-frequency and phase-frequency characteristics of circuits can be controlled by choosing the parameters of the HTSC thin film and optical "pump".

  17. Ultra-capacitor electrical modeling using temperature dependent parameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lajnef, W.; Briat, O.; Azzopardi, S.; Woirgard, E.; Vinassa, J.M. [Bordeaux-1 Univ., Lab. IXL CNRS UMR 5818 - ENSEIRB, 33 - Talence (France)

    2004-07-01

    This paper deals with ultra-capacitor electrical modeling. For a proper characterization and identification, a dedicated test bench is designed. First, the ultra-capacitor electric behavior is presented and an electrical model is proposed. The model parameters are identified using a combination of constant currents and frequency response measurements. Then, the temperature dependence of the ultra-capacitor parameters is investigated. Therefore, constant currents and impedance spectroscopy tests are done at different ambient temperatures. Finally, the electrical model parameters are adjusted according to temperature. (authors)

  18. Analogy between temperature-dependent and concentration-dependent bacterial killing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Neef, C.; van Gils, Stephanus A.; Ijzerman, W.L.

    2002-01-01

    In this article an analogy between temperature-dependent and concentration-dependent bacterial killing is described. The validation process of autoclaves uses parameters such as reduction rate constant k, decimal reduction time D and resistance coefficient z from an imaginary microorganism to

  19. Size-dependent cohesive energy, melting temperature, and Debye temperature of spherical metallic nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Y. D.; Liang, X. L.; Kong, X. Q.; Zhang, W. J.

    2017-06-01

    It is necessary to theoretically evaluate the thermodynamic properties of metallic nanoparticles due to the lack of experimental data. Considering the surface effects and crystal structures, a simple theoretical model is developed to study the size dependence of thermodynamic properties of spherical metallic nanoparticles. Based on the model, we have considered Co and Cu nanoparticles for the study of size dependence of cohesive energy, Au and Cu nanoparticles for size dependence of melting temperature, and Cu, Co and Au nanoparticles for size dependence of Debye temperature, respectively. The results show that the size effects on melting temperature, cohesive energy and Debye temperature of the spherical metallic nanoparticles are predominant in the sizes ranging from about 3 nm to 20 nm. The present theoretical predictions are in agreement with available corresponding experimental and computer simulation results for the spherical metallic nanoparticles. The model could be used to determine the thermodynamic properties of other metallic nanoparticles to some extent.

  20. Temperature dependence of exciton diffusion in conjugated polymers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mikhnenko, O.V.; Cordella, F.; Sieval, A.B.; Hummelen, J.C.; Blom, P.W.M.; Loi, M.A.

    2008-01-01

    The temperature dependence of the exciton dynamics in a conjugated polymer is studied using time-resolved spectroscopy. Photoluminescence decays were measured in heterostructured samples containing a sharp polymer-fullerene interface, which acts as an exciton quenching wall. Using a ID diffusion

  1. Temperature dependence of electromechanical properties of PLZT x ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The compositions of lead lanthanum zirconate titanate PLZT [Pb(Zr0.57Ti0.43)O3 + at% of La, where = 3, 5, 6, 10 and 12] have been synthesized using mixed oxide route. The temperature dependent electromechanical parameters have been determined using vector impedance spectroscopy (VIS). The charge constant ...

  2. Temperature-dependent gas transport and its correlation with kinetic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2017-05-20

    May 20, 2017 ... Temperature-dependent gas transport and its correlation with kinetic diameter in polymer nanocomposite membrane. N K ACHARYA. Applied Physics Department, Faculty of Technology and Engineering, The M S University of Baroda,. Vadodara 390 001, India sarnavee@gmail.com. MS received 18 May ...

  3. Temperature dependence studies on the electro-oxidation of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Cyclic voltammetry; electrochemical impedance spectroscopy; activation energy; fuel cell; alcohol. Abstract. Temperature dependence on the electro-oxidation of methanol, ethanol and 1-propanol in 0.5 M H2SO4 were investigated with Pt and PtRu electrodes. Tafel slope and apparent activation energy were evaluated ...

  4. Electronically induced nuclear transitions - temperature dependence and Rabi oscillations

    CERN Document Server

    Niez, J J

    2002-01-01

    This paper deals with a nucleus electromagnetically coupled with the bound states of its electronic surroundings. It describes the temperature dependence of its dynamics and the onset of potential Rabi oscillations by means of a Master Equation. The latter is generalized in order to account for possible strong resonances. Throughout the paper the approximation schemes are discussed and tested. (authors)

  5. Extraction of temperature dependent interfacial resistance of thermoelectric modules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Min

    2011-01-01

    This article discusses an approach for extracting the temperature dependency of the electrical interfacial resistance associated with thermoelectric devices. The method combines a traditional module-level test rig and a nonlinear numerical model of thermoelectricity to minimize measurement errors...... on the interfacial resistance. The extracted results represent useful data to investigating the characteristics of thermoelectric module resistance and comparing performance of various modules....

  6. Investigation of temperature dependence of development and aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacher, G. A.

    1969-01-01

    Temperature dependence of maturation and metabolic rates in insects, and the failure of vital processes during development were investigated. The paper presented advances the general hypothesis that aging in biological systems is a consequence of the production of entropy concomitant with metabolic activity.

  7. Temperature dependence effect of viscosity on ultrathin lubricant film melting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.V.Khomenko

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available We study the melting of an ultrathin lubricant film under friction between atomically flat surfaces at temperature dependencies of viscosity described by Vogel-Fulcher relationship and by power expression, which are observed experimentally. It is shown that the critical temperature exists in both cases the exceeding of which leads to the melting of lubricant and, as a result, the sliding mode of friction sets in. The values of characteristic parameters of lubricant are defined, which are needed for friction reduction. In the systems, where the Vogel-Fulcher dependence is fulfilled, it is possible to choose the parameters at which the melting of lubricant takes place even at zero temperature of friction surfaces. The deformational defect of the shear modulus is taken into account in describing the lubricant melting according to the mechanism of the first-order transition.

  8. Effects of Temperature on Time Dependent Rheological Characteristics of Koumiss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serdal Sabancı

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The rheological properties of koumiss were investigated at different temperatures (4, 10, and 20°C. Experimental shear stress–shear rate data were fitted to different rheological models. The consistency of koumiss was predicted by using the power-law model since it described the consistency of koumiss best with highest regression coefficient and lowest errors (root mean square error and chi-square. Koumiss exhibited shear thinning behavior (n<1. The flow activation energy for temperature dependency of consistency was 25.532 kJ/mol, and the frequency constant was 2.18×10-7Pa.sn. As the temperature increased the time dependent thixotropic characteristics of koumiss decreased.

  9. Temperature-dependent structure evolution in liquid gallium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiong, L. H.; Wang, X. D.; Yu, Q.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, F.; Sun, Y.; Cao, Q. P.; Xie, H. L.; Xiao, T. Q.; Zhang, D. X.; Wang, C. Z.; Ho, K. M.; Ren, Y.; Jiang, J. Z.

    2017-04-01

    Temperature-dependent atomistic structure evolution of liquid gallium (Ga) has been investigated by using in situ high energy X-ray diffraction experiment and ab initio molecular dynamics simulation. Both experimental and theoretical results reveal the existence of a liquid structural change around 1000 K in liquid Ga. Below and above this temperature the liquid exhibits differences in activation energy for selfdiffusion, temperature-dependent heat capacity, coordination numbers, density, viscosity, electric resistivity and thermoelectric power, which are reflected from structural changes of the bond-orientational order parameter Q6, fraction of covalent dimers, averaged string length and local atomic packing. This finding will trigger more studies on the liquid-to-liquid crossover in metallic melts.

  10. A Temperature-Dependent Battery Model for Wireless Sensor Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Leonardo M; Montez, Carlos; Moraes, Ricardo; Portugal, Paulo; Vasques, Francisco

    2017-02-22

    Energy consumption is a major issue in Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs), as nodes are powered by chemical batteries with an upper bounded lifetime. Estimating the lifetime of batteries is a difficult task, as it depends on several factors, such as operating temperatures and discharge rates. Analytical battery models can be used for estimating both the battery lifetime and the voltage behavior over time. Still, available models usually do not consider the impact of operating temperatures on the battery behavior. The target of this work is to extend the widely-used Kinetic Battery Model (KiBaM) to include the effect of temperature on the battery behavior. The proposed Temperature-Dependent KiBaM (T-KiBaM) is able to handle operating temperatures, providing better estimates for the battery lifetime and voltage behavior. The performed experimental validation shows that T-KiBaM achieves an average accuracy error smaller than 0.33%, when estimating the lifetime of Ni-MH batteries for different temperature conditions. In addition, T-KiBaM significantly improves the original KiBaM voltage model. The proposed model can be easily adapted to handle other battery technologies, enabling the consideration of different WSN deployments.

  11. A Temperature-Dependent Battery Model for Wireless Sensor Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Leonardo M.; Montez, Carlos; Moraes, Ricardo; Portugal, Paulo; Vasques, Francisco

    2017-01-01

    Energy consumption is a major issue in Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs), as nodes are powered by chemical batteries with an upper bounded lifetime. Estimating the lifetime of batteries is a difficult task, as it depends on several factors, such as operating temperatures and discharge rates. Analytical battery models can be used for estimating both the battery lifetime and the voltage behavior over time. Still, available models usually do not consider the impact of operating temperatures on the battery behavior. The target of this work is to extend the widely-used Kinetic Battery Model (KiBaM) to include the effect of temperature on the battery behavior. The proposed Temperature-Dependent KiBaM (T-KiBaM) is able to handle operating temperatures, providing better estimates for the battery lifetime and voltage behavior. The performed experimental validation shows that T-KiBaM achieves an average accuracy error smaller than 0.33%, when estimating the lifetime of Ni-MH batteries for different temperature conditions. In addition, T-KiBaM significantly improves the original KiBaM voltage model. The proposed model can be easily adapted to handle other battery technologies, enabling the consideration of different WSN deployments. PMID:28241444

  12. Temperature dependence of contact resistance at metal/MWNT interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sang-Eui; Moon, Kyoung-Seok; Sohn, Yoonchul, E-mail: yoonchul.son@samsung.com [Materials Research Center, Samsung Advanced Institute of Technology, Samsung Electronics, Suwon 443-803 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-07-11

    Although contact resistance of carbon nanotube (CNT) is one of the most important factors for practical application of electronic devices, a study regarding temperature dependence on contact resistance of CNTs with metal electrodes has not been found. Here, we report an investigation of contact resistance at multiwalled nanotube (MWNT)/Ag interface as a function of temperature, using MWNT/polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) composite. Electrical resistance of MWNT/PDMS composite revealed negative temperature coefficient (NTC). Excluding the contact resistance with Ag electrode, the NTC effect became less pronounced, showing lower intrinsic resistivity with the activation energy of 0.019 eV. Activation energy of the contact resistance of MWNT/Ag interface was determined to be 0.04 eV, two times larger than that of MWNT-MWNT network. The increase in the thermal fluctuation assisted electron tunneling is attributed to conductivity enhancement at both MWNT/MWNT and MWNT/Ag interfaces with increasing temperature.

  13. Competitive interactions modify the temperature dependence of damselfly growth rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson-Ortman, Viktor; Stoks, Robby; Johansson, Frank

    2014-05-01

    Individual growth rates and survival are major determinants of individual fitness, population size structure, and community dynamics. The relationships between growth rate, survival, and temperature may thus be important for predicting biological responses to climate change. Although it is well known that growth rates and survival are affected by competition and predation in addition to temperature, the combined effect of these factors on growth rates, survival, and size structure has rarely been investigated simultaneously in the same ecological system. To address this question, we conducted experiments on the larvae of two species of damselflies and determined the temperature dependence of growth rate, survival, and cohort size structure under three scenarios of increasing ecological complexity: no competition, intraspecific competition, and interspecific competition. In one species, the relationship between growth rate and temperature became steeper in the presence of competitors, whereas that of survival remained unchanged. In the other species, the relationship between growth rate and temperature was unaffected by competitive interactions, but survival was greatly reduced at high temperatures in the presence of interspecific competitors. The combined effect of competitive interactions and temperature on cohort size structure differed from the effects of these factors in isolation. Together, these findings suggest that it will be challenging to scale up information from single-species laboratory studies to the population and community level.

  14. Temperature Dependence of the Resonant Magnetoelectric Effect in Layered Heterostructures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dmitrii A. Burdin

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The dependence of the resonant direct magnetoelectric effect on temperature is studied experimentally in planar composite structures. Samples of rectangular shapes with dimensions of 5 mm × 20 mm employed ferromagnetic layers of either an amorphous (metallic glass alloy or nickel with a thickness of 20–200 μm and piezoelectric layers of single crystalline langatate material or lead zirconate titanate piezoelectric ceramics with a thickness of 500 μm. The temperature of the samples was varied in a range between 120 and 390 K by blowing a gaseous nitrogen stream around them. It is shown that the effective characteristics of the magnetoelectric effect—such as the mechanical resonance frequency fr, the quality factor Q and the magnitude of the magnetoelectric coefficient αE at the resonance frequency—are contingent on temperature. The interrelations between the temperature changes of the characteristics of the magnetoelectric effect and the temperature variations of the following material parameters—Young’s modulus Y, the acoustic quality factor of individual layers, the dielectric constant ε, the piezoelectric modulus d of the piezoelectric layer as well as the piezomagnetic coefficients λ(n of the ferromagnetic layer—are established. The effect of temperature on the characteristics of the nonlinear magnetoelectric effect is observed for the first time. The results can be useful for designing magnetoelectric heterostructures with specified temperature characteristics, in particular, for the development of thermally stabilized magnetoelectric devices.

  15. The importance of temperature dependent energy gap in the understanding of high temperature thermoelectric properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Saurabh; Pandey, Sudhir K.

    2016-10-01

    In this work, we show the importance of temperature dependent energy band gap, E g (T), in understanding the high temperature thermoelectric (TE) properties of material by considering LaCoO3 (LCO) and ZnV2O4 (ZVO) compounds as a case study. For the fix value of band gap, E g , deviation in the values of α has been observed above 360 K and 400 K for LCO and ZVO compounds, respectively. These deviation can be overcomed by consideration of temperature dependent band gap. The change in used value of E g with respect to temperature is ∼4 times larger than that of In As. This large temperature dependence variation in E g can be attributed to decrement in the effective on-site Coulomb interaction due to lattice expansion. At 600 K, the value of ZT for n and p-doped, LCO is ∼0.35 which suggest that it can be used as a potential material for TE device. This work clearly suggest that one should consider the temperature dependent band gap in predicting the high temperature TE properties of insulating materials.

  16. Shutter-Less Temperature-Dependent Correction for Uncooled Thermal Camera Under Fast Changing FPA Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, D.; Westfeld, P.; Maas, H.-G.

    2017-05-01

    Conventional temperature-dependant correction methods for uncooled cameras are not so valid for images under the condition of fast changing FPA temperature as usual, therefore, a shutter-less temperature-dependant correction method is proposed here to compensate for these errors and stabilize camera's response only related to the object surface temperature. Firstly, sequential images are divided into the following three categories according to the changing speed of FPA temperature: stable (0°C/min), relatively stable (0.5°C/min). Then all of the images are projected into the same level using a second order polynomial relation between FPA temperatures and gray values from stable images. Next, a third order polynomial relation between temporal differences of FPA temperatures and the above corrected images is implemented to eliminate the deviation caused by fast changing FPA temperature. Finally, radiometric calibration is applied to convert image gray values into object temperature values. Experiment results show that our method is more effective for fast changing FPA temperature data than FLIR GEV.

  17. Quantitative Temperature Dependence of Longitudinal Spin Seebeck Effect at High Temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ken-ichi Uchida

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available We report temperature-dependent measurements of longitudinal spin Seebeck effects (LSSEs in Pt/Y_{3}Fe_{5}O_{12} (YIG/Pt systems in a high temperature range from room temperature to above the Curie temperature of YIG. The experimental results show that the magnitude of the LSSE voltage in the Pt/YIG/Pt systems rapidly decreases with increasing the temperature and disappears above the Curie temperature. The critical exponent of the LSSE voltage in the Pt/YIG/Pt systems at the Curie temperature is estimated to be 3, which is much greater than that for the magnetization curve of YIG. This difference highlights the fact that the mechanism of the LSSE cannot be explained in terms of simple static magnetic properties in YIG.

  18. Gas diffusion and temperature dependence of bubble nucleation during irradiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foreman, A. J. E.; Singh, Bachu Narain

    1986-01-01

    of the diatomic nucleation of helium bubbles, assuming helium to diffuse substitutionally, with radiation-enhanced diffusion at lower temperatures. The calculated temperature dependence of the bubble density shows excellent agreement with that observed in 600 MeV proton irradiations, including a reduction...... in activation energy below Tm/2. The coalescence of diatomic nuclei due to Brownian motion markedly improves the agreement and also provides a well-defined terminal density. Bubble nucleation by this mechanism is sufficiently fast to inhibit any appreciable initial loss of gas to grain boundaries during...

  19. Temperature and size dependent friction of gold nanoislands on graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, Ben D.; Lodge, Michael S.; Williams, Zachary; Ishigami, Masa

    2013-03-01

    Nanoscale motors and machines require the ability to tune frictional properties at the nanoscale. Yet a fundamental understanding of frictional processes of nanoislands still remains unknown. We have performed a quartz crystal microbalance study to investigate the role of temperature and island size on frictional energy dissipation for gold nanoislands on graphene. Significant frictional dissipation is observed even at room temperature, consistent with activated friction on the graphene surface. We will discuss these results and compare them to previously predicted models for thermally activated and size dependent friction. This work is funded by the Intelligence Community Postdoctoral Research Fellowship program

  20. Temperature dependence of relaxation times and temperature mapping in ultra-low-field MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vesanen, Panu T; Zevenhoven, Koos C J; Nieminen, Jaakko O; Dabek, Juhani; Parkkonen, Lauri T; Ilmoniemi, Risto J

    2013-10-01

    Ultra-low-field MRI is an emerging technology that allows MRI and NMR measurements in microtesla-range fields. In this work, the possibilities of relaxation-based temperature measurements with ultra-low-field MRI were investigated by measuring T1 and T2 relaxation times of agarose gel at 50 μT-52 mT and at temperatures 5-45°C. Measurements with a 3T scanner were made for comparison. The Bloembergen-Purcell-Pound relaxation theory was combined with a two-state model to explain the field-strength and temperature dependence of the data. The results show that the temperature dependencies of agarose gel T1 and T2 in the microtesla range differ drastically from those at 3T; the effect of temperature on T1 is reversed at approximately 5 mT. The obtained results were used to reconstruct temperature maps from ultra-low-field scans. These time-dependent temperature maps measured from an agarose gel phantom at 50 μT reproduced the temperature gradient with good contrast. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Temperature dependent bacteriophages of a tropical bacterial pathogen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martha Rebecca Jane Clokie

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available There is an increasing awareness of the multiple ways that bacteriophages (phages influence bacterial evolution, population dynamics, physiology and pathogenicity. By studying a novel group of phages infecting a soil borne pathogen, we revealed a paradigm shifting observation that the phages switch their lifestyle according to temperature. We sampled soil from an endemic area of the serious tropical pathogen Burkholderia pseudomallei, and established that podoviruses infecting the pathogen are frequently present in soil, and many of them are naturally occurring variants of a common virus type. Experiments on one phage in the related model Burkholderia thailandensis demonstrated that temperature defines the outcome of phage-bacteria interactions. At higher temperatures (37°C, the phage predominantly goes through a lytic cycle, but at lower temperatures (25°C, the phage remains temperate. This is the first report of a naturally occurring phage that follows a lytic or temperate lifestyle according to temperature. These observations fundamentally alter the accepted views on the abundance, population biology and virulence of B. pseudomallei. Furthermore, when taken together with previous studies, our findings suggest that the phenomenon of temperature dependency in phages is widespread. Such phages are likely to have a profound effect on bacterial life, and on our ability to culture and correctly enumerate viable bacteria.

  2. Temperature-Dependent Conformations of Model Viscosity Index Improvers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramasamy, Uma Shantini; Cosimbescu, Lelia; Martini, Ashlie

    2015-05-01

    Lubricants are comprised of base oils and additives where additives are chemicals that are deliberately added to the oil to enhance properties and inhibit degradation of the base oils. Viscosity index (VI) improvers are an important class of additives that reduce the decline of fluid viscosity with temperature [1], enabling optimum lubricant performance over a wider range of operating temperatures. These additives are typically high molecular weight polymers, such as, but not limited to, polyisobutylenes, olefin copolymer, and polyalkylmethacrylates, that are added in concentrations of 2-5% (w/w). Appropriate polymers, when dissolved in base oil, expand from a coiled to an uncoiled state with increasing temperature [2]. The ability of VI additives to increase their molar volume and improve the temperature-viscosity dependence of lubricants suggests there is a strong relationship between molecular structure and additive functionality [3]. In this work, we aim to quantify the changes in polymer size with temperature for four polyisobutylene (PIB) based molecular structures at the nano-scale using molecular simulation tools. As expected, the results show that the polymers adopt more conformations at higher temperatures, and there is a clear indication that the expandability of a polymer is strongly influenced by molecular structure.

  3. Temperature dependence of the fundamental band gap parameters ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Thin films of ternary ZnxCd1 xSe were deposited on GaAs (100) substrate using metal- organic-chemical-vapour-deposition (MOCVD) technique. Temperature dependence of the near- band-edge emission from these Cd-rich ZnxCd1 xSe (for x = 0.025, 0.045) films has been studied using photoluminescence ...

  4. Density of biogas digestate depending on temperature and composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerber, Mandy; Schneider, Nico

    2015-09-01

    Density is one of the most important physical properties of biogas digestate to ensure an optimal dimensioning and a precise design of biogas plant components like stirring devices, pumps and heat exchangers. In this study the density of biogas digestates with different compositions was measured using pycnometers at ambient pressure in a temperature range from 293.15 to 313.15K. The biogas digestates were taken from semi-continuous experiments, in which the marine microalga Nannochloropsis salina, corn silage and a mixture of both were used as feedstocks. The results show an increase of density with increasing total solid content and a decrease with increasing temperature. Three equations to calculate the density of biogas digestate were set up depending on temperature as well as on the total solid content, organic composition and elemental composition, respectively. All correlations show a relative deviation below 1% compared to experimental data. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  5. The temperature-dependence of elementary reaction rates: beyond Arrhenius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Ian W M

    2008-04-01

    The rates of chemical reactions and the dependence of their rate constants on temperature are of central importance in chemistry. Advances in the temperature-range and accuracy of kinetic measurements, principally inspired by the need to provide data for models of combustion, atmospheric, and astrophysical chemistry, show up the inadequacy of the venerable Arrhenius equation--at least, over wide ranges of temperature. This critical review will address the question of how to reach an understanding of the factors that control the rates of 'non-Arrhenius' reactions. It makes use of a number of recent kinetic measurements and shows how developments in advanced forms of transition state theory provide satisfactory explanations of complex kinetic behaviour (72 references).

  6. Temperature dependent mistranslation in a hyperthermophile adapts proteins to lower temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Michael H.; Pan, Tao

    2016-01-01

    All organisms universally encode, synthesize and utilize proteins that function optimally within a subset of growth conditions. While healthy cells are thought to maintain high translational fidelity within their natural habitats, natural environments can easily fluctuate outside the optimal functional range of genetically encoded proteins. The hyperthermophilic archaeon Aeropyrum pernix (A. pernix) can grow throughout temperature variations ranging from 70 to 100°C, although the specific factors facilitating such adaptability are unknown. Here, we show that A. pernix undergoes constitutive leucine to methionine mistranslation at low growth temperatures. Low-temperature mistranslation is facilitated by the misacylation of tRNALeu with methionine by the methionyl-tRNA synthetase (MetRS). At low growth temperatures, the A. pernix MetRS undergoes a temperature dependent shift in tRNA charging fidelity, allowing the enzyme to conditionally charge tRNALeu with methionine. We demonstrate enhanced low-temperature activity for A. pernix citrate synthase that is synthesized during leucine to methionine mistranslation at low-temperature growth compared to its high-fidelity counterpart synthesized at high-temperature. Our results show that conditional leucine to methionine mistranslation can make protein adjustments capable of improving the low-temperature activity of hyperthermophilic proteins, likely by facilitating the increasing flexibility required for greater protein function at lower physiological temperatures. PMID:26657639

  7. Quantifying the Temperature Dependence of Glycine Betaine RNA Duplex Destabilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwinefus, Jeffrey J.; Menssen, Ryan J.; Kohler, James M.; Schmidt, Elliot C.; Thomas, Alexandra L.

    2013-01-01

    Glycine betaine stabilizes folded protein structure due to its unfavorable thermodynamic interactions with amide oxygen and aliphatic carbon surface area exposed during protein unfolding. However, glycine betaine can attenuate nucleic acid secondary structure stability, although its mechanism of destabilization is not currently understood. In this work we quantify glycine betaine interactions with the surface area exposed during thermal denaturation of nine RNA dodecamer duplexes with guanine-cytosine (GC) contents of 17–100%. Hyperchromicity values indicate increasing glycine betaine molality attenuates stacking. Glycine betaine destabilizes higher GC content RNA duplexes to a greater extent than low GC content duplexes due to greater accumulation at the surface area exposed during unfolding. The accumulation is very sensitive to temperature and displays characteristic entropy-enthalpy compensation. Since the entropic contribution to the m-value (used to quantify GB interaction with the RNA solvent accessible surface area exposed during denaturation) is more dependent on temperature than the enthalpic contribution, higher GC content duplexes with their larger transition temperatures are destabilized to a greater extent than low GC content duplexes. The concentration of glycine betaine at the RNA surface area exposed during unfolding relative to bulk was quantified using the solute partitioning model. Temperature correction predicts a glycine betaine concentration at 25 °C to be nearly independent of GC content, indicating that glycine betaine destabilizes all sequences equally at this temperature. PMID:24219229

  8. Simulation of phase separation with temperature-dependent viscosity using lattice Boltzmann method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Heping; Zang, Duyang; Li, Xiaoguang; Geng, Xingguo

    2017-12-27

    This paper presents an exploration of the phase separation behavior and pattern formation in a binary fluid with temperature-dependent viscosity via a coupled lattice Boltzmann method (LBM). By introducing a viscosity-temperature relation into the LBM, the coupling effects of the viscosity-temperature coefficient [Formula: see text] , initial viscosity [Formula: see text] and thermal diffusion coefficient [Formula: see text] , on the phase separation were successfully described. The calculated results indicated that an increase in initial viscosity and viscosity-temperature coefficient, or a decrease in the thermal diffusion coefficient, can lead to the orientation of isotropic growth fronts over a wide range of viscosity. The results showed that droplet-type phase structures and lamellar phase structures with domain orientation parallel or perpendicular to the walls can be obtained in equilibrium by controlling the initial viscosity, thermal diffusivity, and the viscosity-temperature coefficient. Furthermore, the dataset was rearranged for growth kinetics of domain growth and thermal diffusion fronts in a plot by the spherically averaged structure factor and the ratio of separated and continuous phases. The analysis revealed two different temporal regimes: spinodal decomposition and domain growth stages, which further quantified the coupled effects of temperature and viscosity on the evolution of temperature-dependent phase separation. These numerical results provide guidance for setting optimum temperature ranges to obtain expected phase separation structures for systems with temperature-dependent viscosity.

  9. Temperature-dependent photoluminescence from CdS/Si nanoheterojunctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Yue Li; Li, Yong; Ji, Peng Fei; Zhou, Feng Qun; Sun, Xiao Jun; Yuan, Shu Qing; Wan, Ming Li [Pingdingshan University, Department of Physics, Solar New Energy Research Center, Pingdingshan (China); Ling, Hong [North China University of Water Resources and Electric Power, Department of Mathematics and Information Science, Zhengzhou (China)

    2016-12-15

    CdS/Si nanoheterojunctions have been fabricated by growing nanocrystal CdS (nc-CdS) on the silicon nanoporous pillar array (Si-NPA) through using a chemical bath deposition method. The nanoheterojunctions have been constructed by three layers: the upper layer being a nc-CdS thin films, the intermediate layer being the interface region including nc-CdS and nanocrystal silicon (nc-Si), and the bottom layer being nc-Si layer grown on sc-Si substrate. The room temperature and temperature-dependent photoluminescence (PL) have been measured and analyzed to provide some useful information of defect states. Utilizing the Gauss-Newton fitting method, five emission peaks from the temperature-dependent PL spectra can be determined. From the high energy to low energy, these five peaks are ascribed to the some luminescence centers which are formed by the oxygen-related deficiency centers in the silicon oxide layer of Si-NPA, the band gap emission of nc-CdS, the transition from the interstitial cadmium (I{sub Cd}) to the valence band, the recombination from I{sub Cd} to cadmium vacancies (V{sub Cd}), and from sulfur vacancies (V{sub s}) to the valence band, respectively. Understanding of the defect states in the CdS/Si nanoheterojunctions is very meaningful for the performance of devices based on CdS/Si nanoheterojunctions. (orig.)

  10. Measurement system for temperature dependent noise characterization of magnetoresistive sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nording, F.; Weber, S.; Ludwig, F.; Schilling, M.

    2017-03-01

    Magnetoresistive (MR) sensors and sensor systems are used in a large variety of applications in the field of industrial automation, automotive business, aeronautic industries, and instrumentation. Different MR sensor technologies like anisotropic magnetoresistive, giant magnetoresistive, and tunnel magnetoresistive sensors show strongly varying properties in terms of magnetoresistive effect, response to magnetic fields, achievable element miniaturization, manufacturing effort, and signal-to-noise ratio. Very few data have been reported so far on the comparison of noise performance for different sensor models and technologies, especially including the temperature dependence of their characteristics. In this paper, a stand-alone measurement setup is presented that allows a comprehensive characterization of MR sensors including sensitivity and noise over a wide range of temperatures.

  11. Temperature dependence of topological susceptibility using gradient flow

    CERN Document Server

    Taniguchi, Yusuke; Kanaya, Kazuyuki; Kitazawa, Masakiyo; Suzuki, Hiroshi; Umeda, Takashi; Iwami, Ryo; Wakabayashi, Naoki

    2016-01-01

    We study temperature dependence of the topological susceptibility with the $N_{f}=2+1$ flavors Wilson fermion. We have two major interests in this paper. One is a comparison of gluonic and fermionic definitions of the topological susceptibility. Two definitions are related by the chiral Ward-Takahashi identity but their coincidence is highly non-trivial for the Wilson fermion. By applying the gradient flow both for the gauge and quark fields we find a good agreement of these two measurements. The other is a verification of a prediction of the dilute instanton gas approximation at low temperature region $T_{pc}< T<1.5T_{pc}$, for which we confirm the prediction that the topological susceptibility decays with power $\\chi_{t}\\propto(T/T_{pc})^{-8}$ for three flavors QCD.

  12. Temperature dependence of the dielectric constant of acrylic dielectric elastomer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheng, Junjie; Chen, Hualing; Li, Bo; Chang, Longfei [Xi' an Jiaotong University, State Key Laboratory for Strength and Vibration of Mechanical Structures, Xi' an (China); Xi' an Jiaotong University, School of Mechanical Engineering, Xi' an (China)

    2013-02-15

    The dielectric constant is an essential electrical parameter to the achievable voltage-induced deformation of the dielectric elastomer. This paper primarily focuses on the temperature dependence of the dielectric constant (within the range of 173 K to 373 K) for the most widely used acrylic dielectric elastomer (VHB 4910). First the dielectric constant was investigated experimentally with the broadband dielectric spectrometer (BDS). Results showed that the dielectric constant first increased with temperature up to a peak value and then dropped to a relative small value. Then by analyzing the fitted curves, the Cole-Cole dispersion equation was found better to characterize the rising process before the peak values than the Debye dispersion equation, while the decrease process afterward can be well described by the simple Debye model. Finally, a mathematical model of dielectric constant of VHB 4910 was obtained from the fitted results which can be used to further probe the electromechanical stability of the dielectric elastomers. (orig.)

  13. Temperature dependence of the dielectric constant of acrylic dielectric elastomer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Junjie; Chen, Hualing; Li, Bo; Chang, Longfei

    2013-02-01

    The dielectric constant is an essential electrical parameter to the achievable voltage-induced deformation of the dielectric elastomer. This paper primarily focuses on the temperature dependence of the dielectric constant (within the range of 173 K to 373 K) for the most widely used acrylic dielectric elastomer (VHB 4910). First the dielectric constant was investigated experimentally with the broadband dielectric spectrometer (BDS). Results showed that the dielectric constant first increased with temperature up to a peak value and then dropped to a relative small value. Then by analyzing the fitted curves, the Cole-Cole dispersion equation was found better to characterize the rising process before the peak values than the Debye dispersion equation, while the decrease process afterward can be well described by the simple Debye model. Finally, a mathematical model of dielectric constant of VHB 4910 was obtained from the fitted results which can be used to further probe the electromechanical stability of the dielectric elastomers.

  14. Temperature-dependent dispersion model of float zone crystalline silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franta, Daniel; Dubroka, Adam; Wang, Chennan; Giglia, Angelo; Vohánka, Jirí; Franta, Pavel; Ohlídal, Ivan

    2017-11-01

    In this paper, we present the temperature dependent dispersion model of float zone crystalline silicon. The theoretical background for valence electronic excitations is introduced in the theoretical part of this paper. This model is based on application of sum rules and parametrization of transition strength functions corresponding to the individual elementary phonon and electronic excitations. The parameters of the model are determined by fitting ellipsometric and spectrophotometric experimental data in the spectral range from far infrared (70 cm-1) to extreme ultraviolet (40 eV). The ellipsometric data were measured in the temperature range 5-700 K. The excitations of the valence electrons to the conduction band are divided into the indirect and direct electronic transitions. The indirect transitions are modeled by truncated Lorentzian terms, whereas the direct transitions are modeled using Gaussian broadened piecewise smooth functions representing 3D and 2D van Hove singularities modified by excitonic effects. Since the experimental data up to high energies (40 eV) are available, we are able to determine the value of the effective number of valence electrons. The Tauc-Lorentz dispersion model is used for modeling high energy electron excitations. Two slightly different values of the effective number of valence electrons are obtained for the Jellison-Modine (4.51) and Campi-Coriasso (4.37) parametrization. Our goal is to obtain the model of dielectric response of crystalline silicon which depends only on photon energy, temperature and small number of material parameters, e.g. the concentration of substituted carbon and interstitial oxygen. The model presented in this paper is accurate enough to replace tabulated values of c-Si optical constants used in the optical characterization of thin films diposited on silicon substrates. The spectral dependencies of the optical constants obtained in our work are compared to results obtained by other authors.

  15. Temperature-dependent subsurface growth during atomic layer deposition on polypropylene and cellulose fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jur, Jesse S; Spagnola, Joseph C; Lee, Kyoungmi; Gong, Bo; Peng, Qing; Parsons, Gregory N

    2010-06-01

    Nucleation and subsequent growth of aluminum oxide by atomic layer deposition (ALD) on polypropylene fiber substrates is strongly dependent on processing temperature and polymer backbone structure. Deposition on cellulose cotton, which contains ample hydroxyl sites for ALD nucleation and growth on the polymer backbone, readily produces a uniform and conformal coating. However, similar ALD processing on polypropylene, which contains no readily available active sites for growth initiation, results in a graded and intermixed polymer/inorganic interface layer. The structure of the polymer/inorganic layer depends strongly on the process temperature, where lower temperature (60 degrees C) produced a more abrupt transition. Cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy images of polypropylene fibers coated at higher temperature (90 degrees C) show that non-coalesced particles form in the near-surface region of the polymer, and the particles grow in size and coalesce into a film as the number of ALD cycles increases. Quartz crystal microbalance analysis on polypropylene films confirms enhanced mass uptake at higher processing temperatures, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy data also confirm heterogeneous mixing between the aluminum oxide and the polypropylene during deposition at higher temperatures. The strong temperature dependence of film nucleation and subsurface growth is ascribed to a relatively large increase in bulk species diffusivity that occurs upon the temperature-driven free volume expansion of the polypropylene. These results provide helpful insight into mechanisms for controlled organic/inorganic thin film and fiber materials integration.

  16. Temperature Dependent Seed Germination of Dalbergia nigra Allem (Leguminosae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda G. A. Ferraz-Grande

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available The germination of endangered species Dalbergia nigra was studied and 30.5° C was found as optimum temperature, although the species presented a broad temperature range where germination occurs and light had no effect. The analysis of kinetics of seed germination confirmed the asynchronized germination below and above the optimum temperature. The light insensitive seed and germination also at high temperatures indicated that D. nigra could occur both in understories and gaps where the mean temperature was high.A germinação de sementes de Dalbergia nigra Allem, comumente conhecida como jacarandá-da-Bahia, caviúna, jacarandá, uma espécie em extinção, foi estudada e determinamos a temperatura ótima de 30,5° C. A espécie apresenta uma ampla faixa de temperatura onde a germinação ocorre e a luz branca não influenciou o processo. A análise da cinética da germinação de sementes confirma a germinação não sincronizada acima e abaixo da temperatura ótima de germinação. A semente insensível à luz e a germinação também em altas temperaturas indicam que D. nigra pode ocorrer tanto na sombra da vegetação bem como em clareiras.

  17. Temperature Dependence of the Polariton Linewidth in a GaAs Quantum Well Microcavity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borri, P.; Jensen, Jacob Riis; Langbein, W.

    2000-01-01

    The temperature dependent linewidths of the polariton resonances in a GaAs/AlGaAs single quantum well microcavity are measured. Due to the dominant homogeneous broadening of the investigated resonances, a direct linewidth analysis of the reflectivity spectra allows us to investigate the role of s...

  18. Dissecting the frog inner ear with Gaussian noise .2. Temperature dependence of inner ear function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    vanDijk, P; Wit, HP; Segenhout, JM

    1997-01-01

    The temperature dependence of the response of single primary auditory nerve fibers (n = 31) was investigated in the European edible frog, Rana esculenta (seven ears). Nerve fiber responses were analyzed with Wiener kernel analysis and polynomial correlation. The responses were described with a

  19. Analysis of Critical Infrastructure Dependencies and Interdependencies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petit, Frederic [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Verner, Duane [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Brannegan, David [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Buehring, William [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Dickinson, David [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Guziel, Karen [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Haffenden, Rebecca [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Phillips, Julia [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Peerenboom, James [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2015-06-01

    The report begins by defining dependencies and interdependencies and exploring basic concepts of dependencies in order to facilitate a common understanding and consistent analytical approaches. Key concepts covered include; Characteristics of dependencies: upstream dependencies, internal dependencies, and downstream dependencies; Classes of dependencies: physical, cyber, geographic, and logical; and Dimensions of dependencies: operating environment, coupling and response behavior, type of failure, infrastructure characteristics, and state of operations From there, the report proposes a multi-phase roadmap to support dependency and interdependency assessment activities nationwide, identifying a range of data inputs, analysis activities, and potential products for each phase, as well as key steps needed to progress from one phase to the next. The report concludes by outlining a comprehensive, iterative, and scalable framework for analyzing dependencies and interdependencies that stakeholders can integrate into existing risk and resilience assessment efforts.

  20. Brittle Creep of Tournemire Shale: Orientation, Temperature and Pressure Dependences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Zhi; Bonnelye, Audrey; Dick, Pierre; David, Christian; Chen, Mian; Schubnel, Alexandre

    2017-04-01

    Time and temperature dependent rock deformation has both scientific and socio-economic implications for natural hazards, the oil and gas industry and nuclear waste disposal. During the past decades, most studies on brittle creep have focused on igneous rocks and porous sedimentary rocks. To our knowledge, only few studies have been carried out on the brittle creep behavior of shale. Here, we conducted a series of creep experiments on shale specimens coming from the French Institute for Nuclear Safety (IRSN) underground research laboratory located in Tournemire, France. Conventional tri-axial experiments were carried under two different temperatures (26˚ C, 75˚ C) and confining pressures (10 MPa, 80 MPa), for three orientations (σ1 along, perpendicular and 45˚ to bedding). Following the methodology developed by Heap et al. [2008], differential stress was first increased to ˜ 60% of the short term peak strength (10-7/s, Bonnelye et al. 2016), and then in steps of 5 to 10 MPa every 24 hours until brittle failure was achieved. In these long-term experiments (approximately 10 days), stress and strains were recorded continuously, while ultrasonic acoustic velocities were recorded every 1˜15 minutes, enabling us to monitor the evolution of elastic wave speed anisotropy. Temporal evolution of anisotropy was illustrated by inverting acoustic velocities to Thomsen parameters. Finally, samples were investigated post-mortem using scanning electron microscopy. Our results seem to contradict our traditional understanding of loading rate dependent brittle failure. Indeed, the brittle creep failure stress of our Tournemire shale samples was systematically observed ˜50% higher than its short-term peak strength, with larger final axial strain accumulated. At higher temperatures, the creep failure strength of our samples was slightly reduced and deformation was characterized with faster 'steady-state' creep axial strain rates at each steps, and larger final axial strain

  1. Temperature dependence of thermal conductivity of biological tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, A; Mahajan, R L

    2003-08-01

    In this paper, we present our experimental results on the determination of the thermal conductivity of biological tissues using a transient technique based on the principles of the cylindrical hot-wire method. A novel, 1.45 mm diameter, 50 mm long hot-wire probe was deployed. Initial measurements were made on sponge, gelatin and Styrofoam insulation to test the accuracy of the probe. Subsequent experiments conducted on sheep collagen in the range of 25 degrees C thermal conductivity to be a linear function of temperature. Further, these changes in the thermal conductivity were found to be reversible. However, when the tissue was heated beyond 55 degrees C, irreversible changes in thermal conductivity were observed. Similar experiments were also conducted for determining the thermal conductivity of cow liver. In this case, the irreversible effects were found to set in much later at around 90 degrees C. Below this temperature, in the range of 25 degrees C thermal conductivity, as for sheep collagen, varied linearly with temperature. In the second part of our study, in vivo measurements were taken on the different organs of a living pig. Comparison with reported values for dead tissues shows the thermal conductivities of living organs to be higher, indicating thereby the dominant role played by blood perfusion in enhancing the net heat transfer in living tissues. The degree of enhancement is different in different organs and shows a direct dependence on the blood flow rate.

  2. Temperature dependence of ion irradiation induced amorphization of zirconolite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, K. L.; Blackford, M. G.; Lumpkin, G. R.; Zaluzec, N. J.

    1999-12-22

    Zirconolite is one of the major host phases for actinides in various wasteforms for immobilizing high level radioactive waste (HLW). Over time, zirconolite's crystalline matrix is damaged by {alpha}-particles and energetic recoil nuclei recoil resulting from {alpha}-decay events. The cumulative damage caused by these particles results in amorphization. Data from natural zirconolites suggest that radiation damage anneals over geologic time and is dependant on the thermal history of the material. Proposed HLW containment strategies rely on both a suitable wasteform and geologic isolation. Depending on the waste loading, depth of burial, and the repository-specific geothermal gradient, burial could result in a wasteform being exposed to temperatures of between 100--450 C. Consequently, it is important to assess the effect of temperature on radiation damage in synthetic zirconolite. Zirconolite containing wasteforms are likely to be hot pressed at or below 1,473 K (1,200 C) and/or sintered at or below 1,623 K (1,350 C). Zirconolite fabricated at temperatures below 1,523 K (1,250 C) contains many stacking faults. As there have been various attempts to link radiation resistance to structure, the authors decided it was also pertinent to assess the role of stacking faults in radiation resistance. In this study, they simulate {alpha}-decay damage in two zirconolite samples by irradiating them with 1.5 MeV Kr{sup +} ions using the High Voltage Electron Microscope-Tandem User Facility (HTUF) at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and measure the critical dose for amorphization (D{sub c}) at several temperatures between 20 and 773 K. One of the samples has a high degree of crystallographic perfection, the other contains many stacking faults on the unit cell scale. Previous authors proposed a model for estimating the activation energy of self annealing in zirconolite and for predicting the critical dose for amorphization at any temperature. The authors discuss their results

  3. Determination of the built-in voltage of BHJ solar cells by temperature dependent photocurrent measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mingebach, Markus; Deibel, Carsten [Experimental Physics VI, Physical Institute, Julius-Maximilians-University of Wuerzburg (Germany); Dyakonov, Vladimir [Experimental Physics VI, Physical Institute, Julius-Maximilians-University of Wuerzburg (Germany); Bavarian Center of Applied Energy Research (ZAE Bayern e.V.), Wuerzburg (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    Despite all progresses in the performance of organic BHJ solar cells (up to 8% power conversion efficiency) some very important properties such as the voltage dependent photocurrent or the built-in potential are not fully understood yet. We investigate poly(3-hexyl thiophene) (P3HT): [6,6]-phenyl-C{sub 61} butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) solar cells by means of temperature dependent pulsed photocurrent measurements and impedance spectroscopy. We find a point of optimal symmetry (POS) that represents the case of quasi flat bands (QFB) in the bulk of the cell, which is lower than the built-in voltage. This difference is due to band bending at the contacts, which is reduced at lower temperatures. Therefore we can identify the built-in voltage by measuring the POS (confirmed by temperature dependent current voltage measurements). This leads to the conclusion that the potential determined by Mott-Schottky analysis is not the built-in potential.

  4. Events leading to the opening and closing of the exocytotic fusion pore have markedly different temperature dependencies. Kinetic analysis of single fusion events in patch-clamped mouse mast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberhauser, A F; Monck, J R; Fernandez, J M

    1992-03-01

    The earliest event in exocytosis is the formation of a fusion pore, an aqueous channel that connects the lumen of a secretory granule with the extracellular space. We can observe the formation of individual fusion pores and their subsequent dilation or closure by measuring the changes in the admittance of patch-clamped mast cells during GTP gamma S-stimulated exocytotic fusion. To investigate the molecular structure of the fusion pore, we have studied the temperature dependency of the rate constants for fusion pore formation and closure. An Arrhenius plot of the rate of fusion pore formation shows a simple linear relationship with an apparent activation energy of 23 kcal/mol. In contrast, the Arrhenius plot of the rate of closure of the fusion pore is discontinuous, with the break at approximately 13 degrees C. Above the break point, the rate of closure has a weak temperature dependence (7 kcal/mol), whereas below 13 degrees C the rate of closure is temperature independent. This type of temperature dependency is characteristic of events that depend on diffusion in a lipid phase that undergoes a fluid-solid phase transition. We propose that the formation of the fusion pore is regulated by the conformational change of a molecular structure with a high activation energy, whereas the closure of the fusion pore is regulated by lipids that become phase separated at 13 degrees C.

  5. Temperature dependence of Henry's law constant in an extended temperature range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Görgényi, Miklós; Dewulf, Jo; Van Langenhove, Herman

    2002-08-01

    The Henry's law constants H for chloroform, 1,1-dichloroethane, 1,2-dichloropropane, trichloroethene, chlorobenzene, benzene and toluene were determined by the EPICS-SPME technique (equilibrium partitioning in closed systems--solid phase microextraction) in the temperature range 275-343 K. The curvature observed in the ln H vs. 1/T plot was due to the temperature dependence of the change in enthalpy delta H0 during the transfer of 1 mol solute from the aqueous solution to the gas phase. The nonlinearity of the plot was explained by means of a thermodynamic model which involves the temperature dependence of delta H0 of the compounds and the thermal expansion of water in the three-parameter equation ln (H rho TT) = A2/T + BTB + C2, where rho T is the density of water at temperature T, TB = ln(T/298) + (298-T)/T, A2 = -delta H298(0)/R, delta H298(0) is the delta H0 value at 298 K, B = delta Cp0/R, and C2 is a constant. delta Cp0 is the molar heat capacity change in volatilization from the aqueous solution. A statistical comparison of the two models demonstrates the superiority of the three-parameter equation over the two-parameter one ln H vs. 1/T). The new, three-parameter equation allows a more accurate description of the temperature dependence of H, and of the solubility of volatile organic compounds in water at higher temperatures.

  6. Dependence of the depth distribution of implanted silver ions on the temperature of irradiated glass

    CERN Document Server

    Stepanov, A L

    2001-01-01

    The peculiarities of the glass ion implantation by the silver ions in dependence on the substrate temperature within the interval of 20-100 deg C are studied. Modeling the profiles of the implanted ions distribution in depth with an account of the thermostimulated increase in the admixture diffusion mobility is carried out. It is shown, that increase in the substrate temperature leads to the diffusion wash-out of the introduced admixture ions distribution. The analysis of the modeling results indicates the necessity of strict control of the substrate temperature by the dielectrics implantation for obtaining the conditions for the metal nanoparticles synthesis

  7. Extracting Credible Dependencies for Averaged One-Dependence Estimator Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LiMin Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Of the numerous proposals to improve the accuracy of naive Bayes (NB by weakening the conditional independence assumption, averaged one-dependence estimator (AODE demonstrates remarkable zero-one loss performance. However, indiscriminate superparent attributes will bring both considerable computational cost and negative effect on classification accuracy. In this paper, to extract the most credible dependencies we present a new type of seminaive Bayesian operation, which selects superparent attributes by building maximum weighted spanning tree and removes highly correlated children attributes by functional dependency and canonical cover analysis. Our extensive experimental comparison on UCI data sets shows that this operation efficiently identifies possible superparent attributes at training time and eliminates redundant children attributes at classification time.

  8. The Temperature Condition of the Plate with Temperature-Dependent Thermal Conductivity and Energy Release

    OpenAIRE

    V. S. Zarubin; A. V. Kotovich; G. N. Kuvyrkin

    2016-01-01

    The temperature state of a solid body, in addition to the conditions of its heat exchange with the environment, can greatly depend on the heat release (or heat absorption) processes within the body volume. Among the possible causes of these processes should be noted such as a power release in the fuel elements of nuclear reactors, exothermic or endothermic chemical reactions in the solid body material, which respectively involve heat release or absorbtion, heat transfer of a part of the elect...

  9. Temperature dependence of the deformation behavior of 316 stainless steel after low temperature neutron irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pawel-Robertson, J.E.; Rowcliffe, A.F.; Grossbeck, M.L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)] [and others

    1996-10-01

    The effects of low temperature neutron irradiation on the tensile behavior of 316 stainless steel have been investigated. A single heat of solution annealed 316 was irradiated to 7 and 18 dpa at 60, 200, 330, and 400{degrees}C. The tensile properties as a function of dose and as a function of temperature were examined. Large changes in yield strength, deformation mode, strain to necking, and strain hardening capacity were seen in this irradiation experiment. The magnitudes of the changes are dependent on both irradiation temperature and neutron dose. Irradiation can more than triple the yield strength over the unirradiated value and decrease the strain to necking (STN) to less than 0.5% under certain conditions. A maximum increase in yield strength and a minimum in the STN occur after irradiation at 330{degrees}C but the failure mode remains ductile.

  10. Temperature Dependence of the Viscosity of Isotropic Liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jadzyn, J.; Czechowski, G.; Lech, T.

    1999-04-01

    Temperature dependence of the shear viscosity measured for isotropic liquids belonging to the three homologous series: 4-(trans-4'-n-alkylcyclohexyl) isothiocyanatobenzenes (Cn H2n+1 CyHx Ph NCS; nCHBT, n=0-12), n-alkylcyanobiphenyls (CnH2n+1 Ph Ph CN; nCB, n=2-12) and 1,n-alkanediols (HO(CH2)nOH; 1,nAD, n=2-10) were analysed with the use of Arrhenius equation and its two modifications: Vogel--Fulcher and proposed in this paper. The extrapolation of the isothermal viscosity of 1,n-alkanediols (n=2-10) to n=1 leads to an interesting conclusion concerning the expected viscosity of methanediol, HOCH2OH, the compound strongly unstable in a pure state.

  11. Temperature dependence of the electronic structure of semiconductors and insulators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poncé, S., E-mail: samuel.pon@gmail.com; Gillet, Y.; Laflamme Janssen, J.; Gonze, X. [European Theoretical Spectroscopy Facility and Institute of Condensed Matter and Nanosciences, Université catholique de Louvain, Chemin des étoiles 8, bte L07.03.01, B-1348 Louvain-la-neuve (Belgium); Marini, A. [Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche (CNR), Via Salaria Km 29.3, CP 10, 00016 Monterotondo Stazione (Italy); Verstraete, M. [European Theoretical Spectroscopy Facility and Physique des matériaux et nanostructures, Université de Liège, Allée du 6 Août 17, B-4000 Liège (Belgium)

    2015-09-14

    The renormalization of electronic eigenenergies due to electron-phonon coupling (temperature dependence and zero-point motion effect) is sizable in many materials with light atoms. This effect, often neglected in ab initio calculations, can be computed using the perturbation-based Allen-Heine-Cardona theory in the adiabatic or non-adiabatic harmonic approximation. After a short description of the recent progresses in this field and a brief overview of the theory, we focus on the issue of phonon wavevector sampling convergence, until now poorly understood. Indeed, the renormalization is obtained numerically through a slowly converging q-point integration. For non-zero Born effective charges, we show that a divergence appears in the electron-phonon matrix elements at q → Γ, leading to a divergence of the adiabatic renormalization at band extrema. This problem is exacerbated by the slow convergence of Born effective charges with electronic wavevector sampling, which leaves residual Born effective charges in ab initio calculations on materials that are physically devoid of such charges. Here, we propose a solution that improves this convergence. However, for materials where Born effective charges are physically non-zero, the divergence of the renormalization indicates a breakdown of the adiabatic harmonic approximation, which we assess here by switching to the non-adiabatic harmonic approximation. Also, we study the convergence behavior of the renormalization and develop reliable extrapolation schemes to obtain the converged results. Finally, the adiabatic and non-adiabatic theories, with corrections for the slow Born effective charge convergence problem (and the associated divergence) are applied to the study of five semiconductors and insulators: α-AlN, β-AlN, BN, diamond, and silicon. For these five materials, we present the zero-point renormalization, temperature dependence, phonon-induced lifetime broadening, and the renormalized electronic band structure.

  12. Analogy between temperature-dependent and concentration-dependent bacterial killing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neef, C; van Gils, S A; IJzerman, W L

    2002-11-01

    In this article an analogy between temperature-dependent and concentration-dependent bacterial killing is described. The validation process of autoclaves uses parameters such as reduction rate constant k, decimal reduction time D and resistance coefficient z from an imaginary microorganism to describe the sterilization process. Total lethality of the process is calculated as the integral of the lethality (a function of the temperature) over time. In the case of concentration-dependent killing-i.e. using antibiotic drugs-the k-value is not necessarily a constant; it is the difference between growth and killing of the microorganism. Equations are derived for the decimal reduction time D and resistance coefficient z. Pharmacodynamic models of tobramycin, ciprofloxacin and ceftazidime are used to demonstrate that there is an optimal concentration for all three drugs: C(opt-tobra)=3.20 MICmg/l, C(opt-cipro)=3.45 MICmg/l and C(opt-cefta)=1.35 MICmg/l.

  13. Characterization and Temperature Dependence of Arctic Micromonas polaris Viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maat, Douwe S; Biggs, Tristan; Evans, Claire; van Bleijswijk, Judith D L; van der Wel, Nicole N; Dutilh, Bas E; Brussaard, Corina P D

    2017-06-02

    Global climate change-induced warming of the Artic seas is predicted to shift the phytoplankton community towards dominance of smaller-sized species due to global warming. Yet, little is known about their viral mortality agents despite the ecological importance of viruses regulating phytoplankton host dynamics and diversity. Here we report the isolation and basic characterization of four prasinoviruses infectious to the common Arctic picophytoplankter Micromonas. We furthermore assessed how temperature influenced viral infectivity and production. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that the putative double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) Micromonas polaris viruses (MpoVs) are prasinoviruses (Phycodnaviridae) of approximately 120 nm in particle size. One MpoV showed intrinsic differences to the other three viruses, i.e., larger genome size (205 ± 2 vs. 191 ± 3 Kb), broader host range, and longer latent period (39 vs. 18 h). Temperature increase shortened the latent periods (up to 50%), increased the burst size (up to 40%), and affected viral infectivity. However, the variability in response to temperature was high for the different viruses and host strains assessed, likely affecting the Arctic picoeukaryote community structure both in the short term (seasonal cycles) and long term (global warming).

  14. Characterization and Temperature Dependence of Arctic Micromonas polaris Viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maat, Douwe S.; Biggs, Tristan; Evans, Claire; van Bleijswijk, Judith D. L.; van der Wel, Nicole N.; Dutilh, Bas E.; Brussaard, Corina P. D.

    2017-01-01

    Global climate change-induced warming of the Artic seas is predicted to shift the phytoplankton community towards dominance of smaller-sized species due to global warming. Yet, little is known about their viral mortality agents despite the ecological importance of viruses regulating phytoplankton host dynamics and diversity. Here we report the isolation and basic characterization of four prasinoviruses infectious to the common Arctic picophytoplankter Micromonas. We furthermore assessed how temperature influenced viral infectivity and production. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that the putative double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) Micromonas polaris viruses (MpoVs) are prasinoviruses (Phycodnaviridae) of approximately 120 nm in particle size. One MpoV showed intrinsic differences to the other three viruses, i.e., larger genome size (205 ± 2 vs. 191 ± 3 Kb), broader host range, and longer latent period (39 vs. 18 h). Temperature increase shortened the latent periods (up to 50%), increased the burst size (up to 40%), and affected viral infectivity. However, the variability in response to temperature was high for the different viruses and host strains assessed, likely affecting the Arctic picoeukaryote community structure both in the short term (seasonal cycles) and long term (global warming). PMID:28574420

  15. Thermal rectification in restructured graphene with locally modulated temperature dependence of thermal conductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, Anuj; Hori, Takuma; Shiga, Takuma; Shiomi, Junichiro

    2017-10-01

    We study thermal rectification (TR) in a selectively restructured graphene by performing deviational phonon Monte Carlo (MC) simulations with frequency-dependent phonon transport properties obtained from first principles. The restructuring is achieved by introducing vacancy defects in a portion of graphene. The defects significantly change phonon transport properties, resulting in a modulation of temperature dependence of thermal conductivity. With this modulated temperature dependence, we predict TR ratio through a Fourier's-law-based iterative scheme (FIS), where heat flow through the system is analyzed by solving the Fourier's law of heat conduction with spatially varying temperature-dependent thermal conductivity. To identify structure parameters for maximal TR ratio, we investigate the influence of defect size, volume percentage of defects, and system (consisting of defective and nondefective regions) length through FIS analysis. As a result, we find that the TR ratio is mainly a function of length of defective and nondefective regions and volume percentage of defect, and it is mostly independent of defect size. A longer (of the order of 10 μm) nondefective side, coupled to a shorter (of the order of 100 nm) defective side, can lead to large TR ratios. Finally, MC simulation for the restructured graphene (full system) is performed to verify the predictions from FIS analysis. The full system calculations give similar trends but with enhanced TR ratios up to 70% for the temperature range of 200-500 K.

  16. Time dependent and temperature dependent properties of the forward voltage characteristic of InGaN high power LEDs

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    P. L. Fulmek; P. Haumer; F. P. Wenzl; W. Nemitz; J. Nicolics

    2017-01-01

    Estimating the junction temperature and its dynamic behavior in dependence of various operating conditions is an important issue, since these properties influence the optical characteristics as well...

  17. Simulation study of temperature-dependent diffusion behaviors of Ag/Ag(001) at low substrate temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cai, Danyun; Mo, Yunjie [State Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Materials and Technologies, School of Electronics and Information Technology, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, 510275 (China); Feng, Xiaofang [State Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Materials and Technologies, School of Physics, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, 510275 (China); He, Yingyou [State Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Materials and Technologies, School of Electronics and Information Technology, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, 510275 (China); Jiang, Shaoji, E-mail: stsjsj@mail.sysu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Materials and Technologies, School of Physics, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, 510275 (China)

    2017-06-01

    Highlights: • The model of combinations of nearest-neighbor atoms of adatom was built to calculate the diffusion barrier of every configuration for Ag/Ag(001). • The complete potential energy curve of a specific diffusion path on the surface was worked out with the help of elementary diffusion behaviors. • The non-monotonic relation between the surface roughness and the substrate temperature (decreasing from 300 K to 100 K) was demonstrated. • A theoretical explanation of diffusion mechanism for the non-monotonic variation of roughness at low substrate temperature was presented. - Abstract: In this study, a model based on the First Principles calculations and Kinetic Monte Carlo simulation were established to study the growth characteristic of Ag thin film at low substrate temperature. On the basis of the interaction between the adatom and nearest-neighbor atoms, some simplifications and assumptions were made to categorize the diffusion behaviors of Ag adatoms on Ag(001). Then the barriers of all possible diffusion behaviors were calculated using the Climbing Image Nudged Elastic Band method (CI-NEB). Based on the Arrhenius formula, the morphology variation, which is attributed to the surface diffusion behaviors during the growth, was simulated with a temperature-dependent KMC model. With this model, a non-monotonic relation between the surface roughness and the substrate temperature (decreasing from 300 K to 100 K) were discovered. The analysis of the temperature dependence on diffusion behaviors presents a theoretical explanation of diffusion mechanism for the non-monotonic variation of roughness at low substrate temperature.

  18. Temperature-Dependent Henry's Law Constants of Atmospheric Amines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leng, Chunbo; Kish, J Duncan; Roberts, Jason E; Dwebi, Iman; Chon, Nara; Liu, Yong

    2015-08-20

    There has been growing interest in understanding atmospheric amines in the gas phase and their mass transfer to the aqueous phase because of their potential roles in cloud chemistry, secondary organic aerosol formation, and the fate of atmospheric organics. Temperature-dependent Henry's law constants (KH) of atmospheric amines, a key parameter in atmospheric chemical transport models to account for mass transfer, are mostly unavailable. In this work, we investigated gas-liquid equilibria of five prevalent atmospheric amines, namely 1-propylamine, di-n-propylamine, trimethylamine, allylamine, and 4-methylmorpholine using bubble column technique. We reported effective KH, intrinsic KH, and gas phase diffusion coefficients of these species over a range of temperatures relevant to the lower atmosphere for the first time. The measured KH at 298 K and enthalpy of solution for 1-propylamine, di-n-propylamine, trimethylamine, allylamine, and 4-methylmorpholine are 61.4 ± 4.9 mol L(-1) atm(-1) and -49.0 ± 4.8 kJ mol(-1); 14.5 ± 1.2 mol L(-1) atm(-1) and -72.5 ± 6.8 kJ mol(-1); 8.9 ± 0.7 mol L(-1) atm(-1) and -49.6 ± 4.7 kJ mol(-1); 103.5 ± 10.4 mol L(-1) atm(-1) and -42.7 ± 4.3 kJ mol(-1); and 952.2 ± 114.3 mol L(-1) atm(-1) and -82.7 ± 9.7 kJ mol(-1), respectively. In addition, we evaluated amines' characteristic times to achieve gas-liquid equilibrium for partitioning between gas and aqueous phases. Results show gas-liquid equilibrium can be rapidly established at natural cloud droplets surface, but the characteristic times may be extended substantially at lower temperatures and pHs. Moreover, our findings imply that atmospheric amines are more likely to exist in cloud droplets, and ambient temperature, water content, and pH of aerosols play important roles in their partitioning.

  19. Dependence of the brittle ductile transition on strain-rate-dependent critical homologous temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Paul M.

    2017-05-01

    Earthquakes mainly occur in crust or mantle that is below a critical temperature for the tectonic strain-rate, \\dot{e}_t, such that stress builds up to the breaking point before it can relax due to creep. Then long-range stress correlation gives rise to power law seismicity including large events. The limiting temperature depends on pressure, which is taken into account by finding a critical homologous temperature THc = T/TM above which earthquakes are rarely observed (where T, TM are temperature and average melting temperature of constituent minerals). We find that THc for ocean plates is ∼0.55. For California earthquakes, it is also close to 0.55. The uppermost mantle layer of oceanic plates of thickness ∼50 km is composed of harzburgite and depleted peridotite from which basalt has been removed to form ocean crust. Thus it has a higher melting temperature than the peridotite of the surrounding mantle, or the lower halves of plates. Thicknesses of seismicity in deep subduction zones, determined from 2-D polynomial fits to a relocated catalogue, are ∼50 km, which suggests that the earthquake channel is confined to this layer. We construct models to find homologous temperatures in slabs, and find that seismicity thicknesses are also, on average, confined to TH ≤ 0.55 ± 0.05. The associated rheology is compared with that obtained from flexure models of ocean lithosphere. The brittle-ductile transition occurs where viscosity drops from high values in the cold cores of slabs to values of 1022-1023 Pa s, that is, where creep strain-rates become comparable to tectonic rates. The cut-off for deep earthquakes is not sharp. However they appear unlikely to occur if homologous temperature is high TH > 0.55. Exceptions to the rule are anomalously deep earthquakes such as those beneath the Iceland and the Hawaiian hotspots, and the Newport Inglewood Fault. These are smaller events with short-range stress correlation, and can be explained if strain-rates are two to

  20. Honeybee flight metabolic rate: does it depend upon air temperature?

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Woods, William A; Heinrich, Bernd; Stevenson, Robert D

    2005-01-01

    .... We investigated the effects of air temperature on flight metabolic rate, water loss, wingbeat frequency, body segment temperatures and behavior of honeybees flying in transparent containment outdoors...

  1. A Temperature-Dependent Phenology Model for Liriomyza huidobrensis (Diptera: Agromyzidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sporleder, Marc; Carhuapoma, Pablo; Kroschel, Jürgen

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Liriomyza huidobrensis (Blanchard) is an economically important and highly polyphagous worldwide pest. To establish a temperature-dependent phenology model, essential for understanding the development and growth of the pest population under a variety of climates and as part of a pest risk analysis, L. huidobrensis life-table data were collected under laboratory conditions at seven constant temperatures on its host faba bean (Vicia faba L.). Several nonlinear equations were fitted to each life stage to model the temperature-dependent population growth and species life history and finally compile an overall temperature-dependent pest phenology model using the Insect Life Cycle Modeling (ILCYM) software. Liriomyza huidobrensis completed development from egg to adult in all temperatures evaluated, except at 32 °C, which was lethal to pupae. Eggs did not develop at 35 °C. Mean development time of all immature stages decreased with increasing temperature. Nonlinear models predicted optimal temperature for immature survival between 20–25 °C (32–38% mortality of all immature stages). Life-table parameters simulated at constant temperatures indicated that L. huidobrensis develops within the range of 12–28 °C. Simulated life-table for predicting the population dynamics of L. huidobrensis under two contrasting environments showed that lowland temperatures at the coast of Peru (250 m.a.s.l.) presented better conditions for a potential population increase than highland (3,400 m.a.s.l.) conditions. The presented model linked with Geographic Information Systems will allow pest risk assessments in different environmental regions to support the regulation of pest movement to prevent pest entry into not-yet invaded regions as well as to implement effective management strategies. PMID:28334271

  2. Events leading to the opening and closing of the exocytotic fusion pore have markedly different temperature dependencies. Kinetic analysis of single fusion events in patch-clamped mouse mast cells

    OpenAIRE

    Oberhauser, A.F.; Monck, J.R.; Fernandez, J.M.

    1992-01-01

    The earliest event in exocytosis is the formation of a fusion pore, an aqueous channel that connects the lumen of a secretory granule with the extracellular space. We can observe the formation of individual fusion pores and their subsequent dilation or closure by measuring the changes in the admittance of patch-clamped mast cells during GTP gamma S-stimulated exocytotic fusion. To investigate the molecular structure of the fusion pore, we have studied the temperature dependency of the rate co...

  3. A novel theoretical model for the temperature dependence of band gap energy in semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Peiji; Li, Weiguo; Zhang, Xianhe; Zhang, Xuyao; Deng, Yong; Kou, Haibo

    2017-10-01

    We report a novel theoretical model without any fitting parameters for the temperature dependence of band gap energy in semiconductors. This model relates the band gap energy at the elevated temperature to that at the arbitrary reference temperature. As examples, the band gap energies of Si, Ge, AlN, GaN, InP, InAs, ZnO, ZnS, ZnSe and GaAs at temperatures below 400 K are calculated and are in good agreement with the experimental results. Meanwhile, the band gap energies at high temperatures (T  >  400 K) are predicted, which are greater than the experimental results, and the reasonable analysis is carried out as well. Under low temperatures, the effect of lattice expansion on the band gap energy is very small, but it has much influence on the band gap energy at high temperatures. Therefore, it is necessary to consider the effect of lattice expansion at high temperatures, and the method considering the effect of lattice expansion has also been given. The model has distinct advantages compared with the widely quoted Varshni’s semi-empirical equation from the aspect of modeling, physical meaning and application. The study provides a convenient method to determine the band gap energy under different temperatures.

  4. Temperature dependence of microwave oscillations in magnetic tunnel junctions with a perpendicularly magnetized free layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Peng; Feng, Jiafeng, E-mail: hxwei@iphy.ac.cn, E-mail: jiafengfeng@iphy.ac.cn; Wei, Hongxiang, E-mail: hxwei@iphy.ac.cn, E-mail: jiafengfeng@iphy.ac.cn; Han, Xiufeng [Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Fang, Bin; Zhang, Baoshun; Zeng, Zhongming [Key Laboratory of Nanodevices and Applications, Suzhou Institute of Nano-tech and Nano-bionics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Ruoshui Road 398, Suzhou 215123 (China)

    2015-01-05

    We experimentally study the temperature dependence of the spin-transfer-torque-induced microwave oscillations in MgO-based magnetic tunnel junction nanopillars with a perpendicularly magnetized free layer. We demonstrate that the oscillation frequency increases rapidly with decreasing temperature, which is mainly ascribed to the temperature dependence of both the saturation magnetization and the perpendicular magnetic anisotropy. We also find that a strong temperature dependence of the output power while a nonmonotonic temperature dependence of spectral linewidth are maintained for a constant dc bias in measured temperature range. Possible mechanisms leading to the different dependences of oscillation frequency, output power, and linewidth are discussed.

  5. A finite element technique for non-deterministic thermal deformation analyses including temperature dependent material properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Case, W. R., Jr.; Walston, W. H., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    A technique utilizing the finite element displacement method is developed for the static analysis of structures subjected to non-deterministic thermal loading in which the material properties, assumed isotropic, are temperature dependent. Matrix equations are developed for the first two statistical moments of the displacements using a third order series expansion for the displacements in terms of the random temperatures. Sample problems are included to demonstrate the range of applicability of the third order series solutions. These solutions are compared with results from Monte Carlo analyses and also, for some problems, with solutions obtained by numerically integrating equations for the statistical properties of the displacements. In general, it is shown that the effect of temperature dependent material properties can have a significant effect on the covariances of the displacements.

  6. Temperature-dependent surface nanomechanical properties of a thermoplastic nanocomposite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Hui; Dobryden, Illia; Ihrner, Niklas; Johansson, Mats; Ma, Houyi; Pan, Jinshan; Claesson, Per M

    2017-05-15

    In polymer nanocomposites, particle-polymer interactions influence the properties of the matrix polymer next to the particle surface, providing different physicochemical properties than in the bulk matrix. This region is often referred to as the interphase, but detailed characterization of its properties remains a challenge. Here we employ two atomic force microscopy (AFM) force methods, differing by a factor of about 15 in probing rate, to directly measure the surface nanomechanical properties of the transition region between filler particle and matrix over a controlled temperature range. The nanocomposite consists of poly(ethyl methacrylate) (PEMA) and poly(isobutyl methacrylate) (PiBMA) with a high concentration of hydrophobized silica nanoparticles. Both AFM methods demonstrate that the interphase region around a 40-nm-sized particle located on the surface of the nanocomposite could extend to 55-70nm, and the interphase exhibits a gradient distribution in surface nanomechanical properties. However, the slower probing rate provides somewhat lower numerical values for the surface stiffness. The analysis of the local glass transition temperature (Tg) of the interphase and the polymer matrix provides evidence for reduced stiffness of the polymer matrix at high particle concentration, a feature that we attribute to selective adsorption. These findings provide new insight into understanding the microstructure and mechanical properties of nanocomposites, which is of importance for designing nanomaterials. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Temperature dependent dynamics of DegP-trimer: A molecular dynamics study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nivedita Rai

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available DegP is a heat shock protein from high temperature requirement protease A family, which reacts to the environmental stress conditions in an ATP independent way. The objective of the present analysis emerged from the temperature dependent functional diversity of DegP between chaperonic and protease activities at temperatures below and above 28 °C, respectively. DegP is a multimeric protein and the minimal functional unit, DegP-trimer, is of great importance in understanding the DegP pathway. The structural aspects of DegP-trimer with respect to temperature variation have been studied using molecular dynamics simulations (for 100 ns and principal component analysis to highlight the temperature dependent dynamics facilitating its functional diversity. The DegP-trimer revealed a pronounced dynamics at both 280 and 320 K, when compared to the dynamics observed at 300 K. The LA loop is identified as the highly flexible region during dynamics and at extreme temperatures, the residues 46–80 of LA loop express a flip towards right (at 280 and left ( at 320 K with respect to the fixed β-sheet connecting the LA loop of protease for which Phe46 acts as one of the key residues. Such dynamics of LA loop facilitates inter-monomeric interaction with the PDZ1 domain of the neighbouring monomer and explains its active participation when DegP exists as trimer. Hence, the LA loop mediated dynamics of DegP-trimer is expected to provide further insight into the temperature dependent dynamics of DegP towards the understanding of its assembly and functional diversity in the presence of substrate.

  8. Temperature dependence of electromechanical impedance based bond-line integrity monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilgunde, Prathamesh; Bond, Leonard J.

    2017-04-01

    Electromechanical impedance (EMI) is an important technique for bond-line integrity monitoring of adhesively bonded joints in automotive and aerospace structures. In the current work, numerical analysis of temperature sensitivity of the EMI technique is performed. The objective is to detect stiffness reduction of the adhesive in the presence of temperature and external mechanical load. Increase in the operating temperature can degrade the bonded piezoelectric material causing misinterpretation of the EMI data. EMI Signal features are numerically investigated to decouple the effect of load and temperature on the piezoelectric material in the mechanically loaded bonded joint. The computational results indicate higher dependence of EM resonance spectrum towards piezoelectric material matrix as compared to the tensile load applied on the bonded sample as the stiffness of adhesive is numerically varied.

  9. Adomian Decomposition Method for a Nonlinear Heat Equation with Temperature Dependent Thermal Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashfaque H. Bokhari

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The solutions of nonlinear heat equation with temperature dependent diffusivity are investigated using the modified Adomian decomposition method. Analysis of the method and examples are given to show that the Adomian series solution gives an excellent approximation to the exact solution. This accuracy can be increased by increasing the number of terms in the series expansion. The Adomian solutions are presented in some situations of interest.

  10. Anomalous dependence of the heat capacity of supercooled water on pressure and temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.A. Stepanov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In some papers, dependences of the isobaric heat capacity of water versus pressure and temperature were obtained. It is shown that these dependences contradict both the dependence of heat capacity on temperature for supercooled water, and an important thermodynamic equation for the dependence of heat capacity on pressure. A possible explanation for this contradiction is proposed.

  11. Unraveling the Transcriptional Basis of Temperature-Dependent Pinoxaden Resistance in Brachypodium hybridum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matzrafi, Maor; Shaar-Moshe, Lidor; Rubin, Baruch; Peleg, Zvi

    2017-01-01

    Climate change endangers food security and our ability to feed the ever-increasing human population. Weeds are the most important biotic stress, reducing crop-plant productivity worldwide. Chemical control, the main approach for weed management, can be strongly affected by temperature. Previously, we have shown that temperature-dependent non-target site (NTS) resistance of Brachypodium hybridum is due to enhanced detoxification of acetyl-CoA carboxylase inhibitors. Here, we explored the transcriptional basis of this phenomenon. Plants were characterized for the transcriptional response to herbicide application, high-temperature and their combination, in an attempt to uncover the genetic basis of temperature-dependent pinoxaden resistance. Even though most of the variance among treatments was due to pinoxaden application (61%), plants were able to survive pinoxaden application only when grown under high-temperatures. Biological pathways and expression patterns of members of specific gene families, previously shown to be involved in NTS metabolic resistance to different herbicides, were examined. Cytochrome P450, glucosyl transferase and glutathione-S-transferase genes were found to be up-regulated in response to pinoxaden application under both control and high-temperature conditions. However, biological pathways related to oxidation and glucose conjugation were found to be significantly enriched only under the combination of pinoxaden application and high-temperature. Analysis of reactive oxygen species (ROS) was conducted at several time points after treatment using a probe detecting H2O2/peroxides. Comparison of ROS accumulation among treatments revealed a significant reduction in ROS quantities 24 h after pinoxaden application only under high-temperature conditions. These results may indicate significant activity of enzymatic ROS scavengers that can be correlated with the activation of herbicide-resistance mechanisms. This study shows that up-regulation of genes

  12. Unraveling the Transcriptional Basis of Temperature-Dependent Pinoxaden Resistance in Brachypodium hybridum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matzrafi, Maor; Shaar-Moshe, Lidor; Rubin, Baruch; Peleg, Zvi

    2017-01-01

    Climate change endangers food security and our ability to feed the ever-increasing human population. Weeds are the most important biotic stress, reducing crop-plant productivity worldwide. Chemical control, the main approach for weed management, can be strongly affected by temperature. Previously, we have shown that temperature-dependent non-target site (NTS) resistance of Brachypodium hybridum is due to enhanced detoxification of acetyl-CoA carboxylase inhibitors. Here, we explored the transcriptional basis of this phenomenon. Plants were characterized for the transcriptional response to herbicide application, high-temperature and their combination, in an attempt to uncover the genetic basis of temperature-dependent pinoxaden resistance. Even though most of the variance among treatments was due to pinoxaden application (61%), plants were able to survive pinoxaden application only when grown under high-temperatures. Biological pathways and expression patterns of members of specific gene families, previously shown to be involved in NTS metabolic resistance to different herbicides, were examined. Cytochrome P450, glucosyl transferase and glutathione-S-transferase genes were found to be up-regulated in response to pinoxaden application under both control and high-temperature conditions. However, biological pathways related to oxidation and glucose conjugation were found to be significantly enriched only under the combination of pinoxaden application and high-temperature. Analysis of reactive oxygen species (ROS) was conducted at several time points after treatment using a probe detecting H2O2/peroxides. Comparison of ROS accumulation among treatments revealed a significant reduction in ROS quantities 24 h after pinoxaden application only under high-temperature conditions. These results may indicate significant activity of enzymatic ROS scavengers that can be correlated with the activation of herbicide-resistance mechanisms. This study shows that up-regulation of genes

  13. Incorporating spatial dependence in regional frequency analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhuo; Yan, Jun; Zhang, Xuebin

    2014-12-01

    The efficiency of regional frequency analysis (RFA) is undermined by intersite dependence, which is usually ignored in parameter estimation. We propose a spatial index flood model where marginal generalized extreme value distributions are joined by an extreme-value copula characterized by a max-stable process for the spatial dependence. The parameters are estimated with a pairwise likelihood constructed from bivariate marginal generalized extreme value distributions. The estimators of model parameters and return levels can be more efficient than those from the traditional index flood model when the max-stable process fits the intersite dependence well. Through simulation, we compared the pairwise likelihood method with an L-moment method and an independence likelihood method under various spatial dependence models and dependence levels. The pairwise likelihood method was found to be the most efficient in mean squared error if the dependence model was correctly specified. When the dependence model was misspecified within the max-stable models, the pairwise likelihood method was still competitive relative to the other two methods. When the dependence model was not a max-stable model, the pairwise likelihood method led to serious bias in estimating the shape parameter and return levels, especially when the dependence was strong. In an illustration with annual maximum precipitation data from Switzerland, the pairwise likelihood method yielded remarkable reduction in the standard errors of return level estimates in comparison to the L-moment method.

  14. Temperature-dependent remineralization of organic matter - small impacts on the carbon cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laufkötter, Charlotte; John, Jasmin; Stock, Charles; Dunne, John

    2017-04-01

    The temperature dependence of remineralization of organic matter is regularly mentioned as important but unconstrained factor, with the potential to cause considerable uncertainty in projections of marine export production, carbon sequestration and oceanic carbon uptake. We have recently presented evidence for a temperature dependence of the particulate organic matter (POC) flux to depth, based on a compilation of observations. Here, we explore the impacts of the new temperature dependence on net primary production, POC flux and oceanic carbon uptake in the ecosystem model COBALT coupled to GFDL's ESM2M Coupled Climate-Carbon Earth System Model. We have implemented two remineralization schemes: COBALT-R1 includes a temperature dependence using parameter values according to our data analysis. COBALT-R1 shows very high remineralization in warm surface waters. The data used to constrain it, however, comes from colder water below 150m. Colonization of sinking material occurs throughout the euphotic zone, potentially reducing remineralization in the immediate vicinity of the ocean surface relative to R1 rates [Mislan et al., 2014]. We thus considered a second model version (COBALT-R2) that decreases remineralization towards the surface but ramped up remineralization rates to R1 values below 150m. After 1300 years of spin-up, the effects of the temperature dependence are most visible in the intermediate part of the water column (150 - 1500m), with stronger remineralization in the warmer upper water but weaker remineralization below, such that the carbon flux at 2000m is barely affected. Also, both COBALT-R1 and COBALT-R2 simulate lower POC flux in the low latitudes and higher POC flux in high latitudes compared to the original model version. In terms of future changes, COBALT-R1 projects an increase in NPP while COBALT-R2 projects a moderate decrease. However, the percentaged decrease in POC flux at 100m is identical in both model versions and the original COBALT

  15. Correlation between temperature dependent dielectric and DC resistivity of Cr substituted barium hexaferrite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sunil; Supriya, Sweety; Kar, Manoranjan

    2017-12-01

    The chromium substituted barium hexaferrite (BaFe12O19) crystallize to the hexagonal symmetry (P63/mmc space group), which has been studied by employing the XRD technique. The XRD analysis is supported by the Raman spectra and, microstructural analysis has been carried out by the FESEM (field emission scanning electron microscope) technique. Average particle size is found to be around 85 nm. Two peaks are observed in the temperature versus dielectric constant plots and, these two transition temperatures are identified as T d and T m. The temperature T d is due to dipole relaxation, whereas T m is assigned as dielectric phase transition. Both T d and T m increase with the increase in frequency. However, the former one (i.e. T d) increases more rapidly compare to that of later one (i.e. T m). Both the temperature (T d and T m) are also well identified in the temperature dependent DC resistivity. All the samples exhibit the negative temperature coefficient of resistance (NTCR) behavior, which reveals the semiconducting behavior of the material. The Mott VRH model could explain the DC electrical conductivity. Both dielectric constant and DC resistivity is well correlated with each other to explain the transport properties in Cr3+ substituted barium hexaferrite.

  16. Temperature-dependent VNIR spectroscopy of hydrated Na-carbonates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tosi, Federico; Carli, Cristian; De Angelis, Simone; Beck, Pierre; Brissaud, Olivier; Schmitt, Bernard; Capaccioni, Fabrizio; De Sanctis, Maria Cristina; Piccioni, Giuseppe

    2017-04-01

    The surfaces of the Galilean icy satellites Europa, Ganymede and Callisto, dominated by water ice, also show substantial amounts of non-water-ice compounds. These satellites will be the subject of close exploration by the ESA JUICE mission and the NASA Europa Multiple-Flyby Mission, which will focus on Ganymede and Europa, respectively. Among non-water-ice compounds thought to exist on the surfaces of the Jovian icy satellites, hydrated salt minerals have been proposed to exist as a by-product of endogenic processes. Safe detection of these minerals shall rely on laboratory spectroscopic analysis of these materials carried out under appropriate environmental conditions. Here we report on laboratory measurements, carried out in the framework of a Europlanet Transnational Access (TA) 2020 proposal approved in 2016, on two hydrated sodium carbonates, namely sodium carbonate monohydrate (Na2CO3·1H2O) and sodium carbonate decahydrate (Na2CO3·10H2O). Spectral profiles of these compounds were obtained in the visible and near-infrared (VNIR) spectral domain, taking advantage of the Cold Surfaces spectroscopy facility at the Institut de Planétologie et d'Astrophysique de Grenoble (IPAG), where such compounds can be measured under cryogenic conditions indicative of real planetary surfaces. Carbonates were first sieved so as to separate them in three different grain size ranges: 20-50 μm, 75-100 μm, and 125-150 μm. These grain sizes have been chosen to: (1) be indicative of typical regoliths known or expected to exist on the surface of the icy satellites, and (2) avoid overlapping between ranges, therefore minimizing particles contamination among the dimensional classes. Each grain size was then measured with the Spectro-Gonio-Radiometer facility in the overall 0.5-4.0 μm spectral range, with spectral sampling increasing with increasing wavelength. For each sample, the overall 93-279 K temperature ramp was acquired in 11 steps varying from 10 K to 25 K, imposed by time

  17. Fracture strength of the particulate-reinforced ultra-high temperature ceramics based on a temperature dependent fracture toughness model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ruzhuan; Li, Weiguo; Ji, Baohua; Fang, Daining

    2017-10-01

    The particulate-reinforced ultra-high temperature ceramics (pUHTCs) have been particularly developed for fabricating the leading edge and nose cap of hypersonic vehicles. They have drawn intensive attention of scientific community for their superior fracture strength at high temperatures. However, there is no proper model for predicting the fracture strength of the ceramic composites and its dependency on temperature. In order to account for the effect of temperature on the fracture strength, we proposed a concept called energy storage capacity, by which we derived a new model for depicting the temperature dependent fracture toughness of the composites. This model gives a quantitative relationship between the fracture toughness and temperature. Based on this temperature dependent fracture toughness model and Griffith criterion, we developed a new fracture strength model for predicting the temperature dependent fracture strength of pUHTCs at different temperatures. The model takes into account the effects of temperature, flaw size and residual stress without any fitting parameters. The predictions of the fracture strength of pUHTCs in argon or air agreed well with the experimental measurements. Additionally, our model offers a mechanism of monitoring the strength of materials at different temperatures by testing the change of flaw size. This study provides a quantitative tool for design, evaluation and monitoring of the fracture properties of pUHTCs at high temperatures.

  18. The temperature dependence of the BK channel activity - kinetics, thermodynamics, and long-range correlations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wawrzkiewicz-Jałowiecka, Agata; Dworakowska, Beata; Grzywna, Zbigniew J

    2017-10-01

    Large-conductance, voltage dependent, Ca2+-activated potassium channels (BK) are transmembrane proteins that regulate many biological processes by controlling potassium flow across cell membranes. Here, we investigate to what extent temperature (in the range of 17-37°C with ΔT=5°C step) is a regulating parameter of kinetic properties of the channel gating and memory effect in the series of dwell-time series of subsequent channel's states, at membrane depolarization and hyperpolarization. The obtained results indicate that temperature affects strongly the BK channels' gating, but, counterintuitively, it exerts no effect on the long-range correlations, as measured by the Hurst coefficient. Quantitative differences between dependencies of appropriate channel's characteristics on temperature are evident for different regimes of voltage. Examining the characteristics of BK channel activity as a function of temperature allows to estimate the net activation energy (Eact) and changes of thermodynamic parameters (ΔH, ΔS, ΔG) by channel opening. Larger Eact corresponds to the channel activity at membrane hyperpolarization. The analysis of entropy and enthalpy changes of closed to open channel's transition suggest the entropy-driven nature of the increase of open state probability during voltage activation and supports the hypothesis about the voltage-dependent geometry of the channel vestibule. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Temperature-dependent macromolecular X-ray crystallography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weik, Martin, E-mail: martin.weik@ibs.fr; Colletier, Jacques-Philippe [CEA, IBS, Laboratoire de Biophysique Moléculaire, F-38054 Grenoble (France); CNRS, UMR5075, F-38027 Grenoble (France); Université Joseph Fourier, F-38000 Grenoble (France)

    2010-04-01

    The dynamical behaviour of crystalline macromolecules and their surrounding solvent as a function of cryo-temperature is reviewed. X-ray crystallography provides structural details of biological macromolecules. Whereas routine data are collected close to 100 K in order to mitigate radiation damage, more exotic temperature-controlled experiments in a broader temperature range from 15 K to room temperature can provide both dynamical and structural insights. Here, the dynamical behaviour of crystalline macromolecules and their surrounding solvent as a function of cryo-temperature is reviewed. Experimental strategies of kinetic crystallography are discussed that have allowed the generation and trapping of macromolecular intermediate states by combining reaction initiation in the crystalline state with appropriate temperature profiles. A particular focus is on recruiting X-ray-induced changes for reaction initiation, thus unveiling useful aspects of radiation damage, which otherwise has to be minimized in macromolecular crystallography.

  20. Temperature dependence of the strain response of chemical composition gratings in optical fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guoyu; Guan, Bai-ou

    2008-11-01

    Chemical composition gratings, used as strain sensing elements at high temperature environments, show a temperature dependence of their strain response. Temperature dependence of the strain response of CCGs over a range of temperatures from 24°C to 900°C has been measured. It is found that the wavelength shift of CCGs is linear with applied tensile strain at a constant temperature, and the strain sensitivity is 0.0011nm/μɛ.

  1. Temperature dependence of a silicon power device switching parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habchi, R.; Salame, C.; Khoury, A.; Mialhe, P.

    2006-04-01

    This study presents measurements of device switching parameters performed on a commercial power metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor under high-temperature conditions. Measured switching times show that the device response to being turned off becomes faster at high temperatures. The inverse drain-source current rapidly increases above the 300°C limit. I-V curves indicate that the saturation current in the channel increases with temperature.

  2. COMPENSATION OF OUTPUT SIGNAL TEMPERATURE DEPENDENCE IN HOMODYNE DEMODULATION TECHNIQUE FOR PHASE FIBER-OPTIC SENSORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. V. Mekhrengin

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Modified phase-generated carrier homodyne demodulation technique for fiber-optic sensors is presented. Nowadays phase-generated carrier homodyne demodulation technique is one of the most widespread. One of its drawbacks is the temperature dependence of the output signal because of the modulator scale factor temperature dependence. In order to compensate this dependence an automatic adjustment of the phase modulation depth is necessary. To achieve the result, additional harmonics analysis is used with the help of the Bessel functions. For this purpose the known demodulation scheme is added with the branch, where interferometric signal is multiplied by the third harmonic of the modulation signal. The deviation of optimal ratio of odd harmonics is used as a feedback signal for adjusting the modulation depth. Unwanted emissions arise in the feedback signal, when the third harmonic possesses a value close to zero. To eliminate unwanted emission in the feedback signal, the principle scheme is added with one more branch, where interferometric signal is multiplied by the forth harmonic of the modulation signal. The deviation of optimal ratio of even harmonics is used as a feedback signal alternately with the deviation of optimal ratio of odd harmonics. A mathematical model of the algorithm is designed using the MATLAB package. Results of modeling have confirmed that suggested method gives the possibility for an automatic adjustment of the phase modulation depth and makes it possible to compensate temperature dependence for the modulator scale factor and output signal magnitude.

  3. Analysis of temperature trends in Northern Serbia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tosic, Ivana; Gavrilov, Milivoj; Unkašević, Miroslava; Marković, Slobodan; Petrović, Predrag

    2017-04-01

    An analysis of air temperature trends in Northern Serbia for the annual and seasonal time series is performed for two periods: 1949-2013 and 1979-2013. Three data sets of surface air temperatures: monthly mean temperatures, monthly maximum temperatures, and monthly minimum temperatures are analyzed at 9 stations that have altitudes varying between 75 m and 102 m. Monthly mean temperatures are obtained as the average of the daily mean temperatures, while monthly maximum (minimum) temperatures are the maximum (minimum) values of daily temperatures in corresponding month. Positive trends were found in 29 out of 30 time series, and the negative trend was found only in winter during the period 1979-2013. Applying the Mann-Kendall test, significant positive trends were found in 15 series; 7 in the period 1949-2013 and 8 in the period 1979-2013; and no significant trend was found in 15 series. Significant positive trends are dominated during the year, spring, and summer, where it was found in 14 out of 18 cases. Significant positive trends were found 7, 5, and 3 times in mean, maximum and minimum temperatures, respectively. It was found that the positive temperature trends are dominant in Northern Serbia.

  4. The analysis of dependent count data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Engel, J.

    1987-01-01

    In the literature, methods have been presented for the analysis of count data classified by fixed and crossed factors under the assumptions that this data can be modeled by independent binomial or Poisson distributions. In general, the mean value of these distributions depends on the levels

  5. Temperature-dependent rate models of vascular cambium cell mortality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthew B. Dickinson; Edward A. Johnson

    2004-01-01

    We use two rate-process models to describe cell mortality at elevated temperatures as a means of understanding vascular cambium cell death during surface fires. In the models, cell death is caused by irreversible damage to cellular molecules that occurs at rates that increase exponentially with temperature. The models differ in whether cells show cumulative effects of...

  6. Thermal Aware Floorplanning Incorporating Temperature Dependent Wire Delay Estimation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winther, AndreasThor; Liu, Wei; Nannarelli, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Temperature has a negative impact on metal resistance and thus wire delay. In state-of-the-art VLSI circuits, large thermal gradients usually exist due to the uneven distribution of heat sources. The difference in wire temperature can lead to performance mismatch because wires of the same length ...

  7. Temperature dependence of poly(lactic acid) mechanical properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhou, Chengbo; Guo, Huilong; Li, Jingqing

    2016-01-01

    The mechanical properties of polymers are not only determined by their structures, but also related to the temperature field in which they are located. The yield behaviors, Young's modulus and structures of injection-molded poly(lactic acid) (PLA) samples after annealing at different temperatures...

  8. PRELIMINARY STUDIES 'ON TEMPERATURE DEPENDENCE 'Q,F ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ferromagnetic has characteristic temperature/magnetisation curves. At varying temperatures the magnetic susceptibility of a diamagnet is constant. (Fig.1), while it decreases for paramagnetic materials (Fig.2). The paramagnetic materials obey Curie law,. (eqn.1) in which the magnetic susceptibility varies inversely with.

  9. Substrate bias voltage and deposition temperature dependence on ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... on Si (100) substrate. Deposition at higher substrate temperature causes the film to react with Si forming silicides at the film/Si substrate interface. Ti film undergoes a microstructural transition from hexagonal plate-like to round-shaped grains as the substrate temperature was raised from 300 to 50 °C during film deposition ...

  10. Temperature-dependent phenotypic variation of Campylobacter jejuni lipooligosaccharides

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Semchenko, Evgeny A

    2010-11-30

    Abstract Background Campylobacter jejuni is a major bacterial cause of food-borne enteritis, and its lipooligosaccharide (LOS) plays an initiating role in the development of the autoimmune neuropathy, Guillain-Barré syndrome, by induction of anti-neural cross-reactive antibodies through ganglioside molecular mimicry. Results Herein we describe the existence and heterogeneity of multiple LOS forms in C. jejuni strains of human and chicken origin grown at 37°C and 42°C, respectively, as determined on sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide electrophoresis gels with carbohydrate-specific silver staining and blotting with anti-ganglioside ligands, and confirmed by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The C. jejuni NCTC 11168 original isolate (11168-O) was compared to its genome-sequenced variant (11168-GS), and both were found to have a lower-Mr LOS form, which was different in size and structure to the previously characterized higher-Mr form bearing GM1 mimicry. The lower-Mr form production was found to be dependent on the growth temperature as the production of this form increased from ~5%, observed at 37°C to ~35% at 42°C. The structure of the lower-Mr form contained a β-D-Gal-(1→3)-β-D-GalNAc disaccharide moiety which is consistent with the termini of the GM1, asialo-GM1, GD1, GT1 and GQ1 gangliosides, however, it did not display GM1 mimicry as assessed in blotting studies but was shown in NMR to resemble asialo-GM1. The production of multiple LOS forms and lack of GM1 mimicry was not a result of phase variation in the genes tested of NCTC 11168 and was also observed in most of the human and chicken isolates of C. jejuni tested. Conclusion The presence of differing amounts of LOS forms at 37 and 42°C, and the variety of forms observed in different strains, indicate that LOS form variation may play a role in an adaptive mechanism or a stress response of the bacterium during the colonization of different hosts.

  11. Temperature-dependent phenotypic variation of Campylobacter jejuni lipooligosaccharides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semchenko, Evgeny A; Day, Christopher J; Wilson, Jennifer C; Grice, I Darren; Moran, Anthony P; Korolik, Victoria

    2010-11-30

    Campylobacter jejuni is a major bacterial cause of food-borne enteritis, and its lipooligosaccharide (LOS) plays an initiating role in the development of the autoimmune neuropathy, Guillain-Barré syndrome, by induction of anti-neural cross-reactive antibodies through ganglioside molecular mimicry. Herein we describe the existence and heterogeneity of multiple LOS forms in C. jejuni strains of human and chicken origin grown at 37 °C and 42 °C, respectively, as determined on sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide electrophoresis gels with carbohydrate-specific silver staining and blotting with anti-ganglioside ligands, and confirmed by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The C. jejuni NCTC 11168 original isolate (11168-O) was compared to its genome-sequenced variant (11168-GS), and both were found to have a lower-M(r) LOS form, which was different in size and structure to the previously characterized higher-M(r) form bearing GM₁ mimicry. The lower-M(r) form production was found to be dependent on the growth temperature as the production of this form increased from ~5%, observed at 37 °C to ~35% at 42 °C. The structure of the lower-M(r) form contained a β-D-Gal-(1→3)-β-D-GalNAc disaccharide moiety which is consistent with the termini of the GM₁, asialo-GM₁, GD₁, GT₁ and GQ₁ gangliosides, however, it did not display GM₁ mimicry as assessed in blotting studies but was shown in NMR to resemble asialo-GM₁. The production of multiple LOS forms and lack of GM1 mimicry was not a result of phase variation in the genes tested of NCTC 11168 and was also observed in most of the human and chicken isolates of C. jejuni tested. The presence of differing amounts of LOS forms at 37 and 42 °C, and the variety of forms observed in different strains, indicate that LOS form variation may play a role in an adaptive mechanism or a stress response of the bacterium during the colonization of different hosts.

  12. Temperature-dependent phenotypic variation of Campylobacter jejuni lipooligosaccharides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moran Anthony P

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Campylobacter jejuni is a major bacterial cause of food-borne enteritis, and its lipooligosaccharide (LOS plays an initiating role in the development of the autoimmune neuropathy, Guillain-Barré syndrome, by induction of anti-neural cross-reactive antibodies through ganglioside molecular mimicry. Results Herein we describe the existence and heterogeneity of multiple LOS forms in C. jejuni strains of human and chicken origin grown at 37°C and 42°C, respectively, as determined on sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide electrophoresis gels with carbohydrate-specific silver staining and blotting with anti-ganglioside ligands, and confirmed by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR spectroscopy. The C. jejuni NCTC 11168 original isolate (11168-O was compared to its genome-sequenced variant (11168-GS, and both were found to have a lower-Mr LOS form, which was different in size and structure to the previously characterized higher-Mr form bearing GM1 mimicry. The lower-Mr form production was found to be dependent on the growth temperature as the production of this form increased from ~5%, observed at 37°C to ~35% at 42°C. The structure of the lower-Mr form contained a β-D-Gal-(1→3-β-D-GalNAc disaccharide moiety which is consistent with the termini of the GM1, asialo-GM1, GD1, GT1 and GQ1 gangliosides, however, it did not display GM1 mimicry as assessed in blotting studies but was shown in NMR to resemble asialo-GM1. The production of multiple LOS forms and lack of GM1 mimicry was not a result of phase variation in the genes tested of NCTC 11168 and was also observed in most of the human and chicken isolates of C. jejuni tested. Conclusion The presence of differing amounts of LOS forms at 37 and 42°C, and the variety of forms observed in different strains, indicate that LOS form variation may play a role in an adaptive mechanism or a stress response of the bacterium during the colonization of different hosts.

  13. Temperature dependence of the kinetic isotope effect in β-pinene ozonolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gensch, Iulia; Laumer, Werner; Stein, Olaf; Kammer, Beatrix; Hohaus, Thorsten; Saathoff, Harald; Wegener, Robert; Wahner, Andreas; Kiendler-Scharr, Astrid

    2011-10-01

    The temperature dependence of the kinetic isotope effect (KIE) of β-pinene ozonolysis was investigated experimentally at 258, 273 and 303 K in the AIDA atmospheric simulation chamber. Compound specific carbon isotopic analysis of gas phase samples was performed off-line with a Thermo Desorption-Gas Chromatography-Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry (TD-GC-IRMS) system. From the temporal behavior of the δ13C of β-pinene a KIE of 1.00358 ± 0.00013 was derived at 303 K, in agreement with literature data. Furthermore, KIE values of 1.00380 ± 0.00014 at 273 K and 1.00539 ± 0.00012 at 258 K were determined, showing an increasing KIE with decreasing temperature. A parameterization of the observed KIE temperature dependence was deduced and used in a sensitivity study carried out with the global chemistry transport model MOZART-3. Two scenarios were compared, the first neglecting, the second implementing the KIE temperature dependence in the simulations. β-Pinene stable carbon isotope ratio and concentration were computed, with emphasis on boreal zones. For early spring it is shown that when neglecting the temperature dependence of KIE, the calculated average age of β-pinene in the atmosphere can be up to two times over- or underestimated. The evolution of the isotopic composition of the major β-pinene oxidation product, nopinone, was examined using Master Chemical Mechanism (MCM) simulations. The tested hypothesis that formation of nopinone and its associated KIE are the determining factors for the observed δ13C values of nopinone is supported at high β-pinene conversion levels.

  14. Simulation of thermal ablation by high-intensity focused ultrasound with temperature-dependent properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, C W; Sun, M K; Chen, B T; Shieh, J; Chen, C S; Chen, W S

    2015-11-01

    An integrated computational framework was developed in this study for modeling high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) thermal ablation. The temperature field was obtained by solving the bioheat transfer equation (BHTE) through the finite element method; while, the thermal lesion was considered as a denatured material experiencing phase transformation and modeled with the latent heat. An equivalent attenuation coefficient, which considers the temperature-dependent properties of the target material and the ultrasound diffraction due to bubbles, was proposed in the nonlinear thermal transient analysis. Finally, a modified thermal dose formulation was proposed to predict the lesion size, shape and location. In-vitro thermal ablation experiments on transparent tissue phantoms at different energy levels were carried out to validate this computational framework. The temperature histories and lesion areas from the proposed model show good correlation with those from the in-vitro experiments. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Thermal stresses in a spherical pressure vessel having temperature-dependent, transversely isotropic, elastic properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tauchert, T. R.

    1976-01-01

    Rayleigh-Ritz and modified Rayleigh-Ritz procedures are used to construct approximate solutions for the response of a thick-walled sphere to uniform pressure loads and an arbitrary radial temperature distribution. The thermoelastic properties of the sphere are assumed to be transversely isotropic and nonhomogeneous; variations in the elastic stiffness and thermal expansion coefficients are taken to be an arbitrary function of the radial coordinate and temperature. Numerical examples are presented which illustrate the effect of the temperature-dependence upon the thermal stress field. A comparison of the approximate solutions with a finite element analysis indicates that Ritz methods offer a simple, efficient, and relatively accurate approach to the problem.

  16. A Low Temperature Analysis of the Boundary Driven Kawasaki Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maes, Christian; O'Kelly de Galway, Winny

    2013-12-01

    Low temperature analysis of nonequilibrium systems requires finding the states with the longest lifetime and that are most accessible from other states. We determine these dominant states for a one-dimensional diffusive lattice gas subject to exclusion and with nearest neighbor interaction. They do not correspond to lowest energy configurations even though the particle current tends to zero as the temperature reaches zero. That is because the dynamical activity that sets the effective time scale, also goes to zero with temperature. The result is a non-trivial asymptotic phase diagram, which crucially depends on the interaction coupling and the relative chemical potentials of the reservoirs.

  17. Kernel parameter dependence in spatial factor analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Allan Aasbjerg

    2010-01-01

    Principal component analysis (PCA) [1] is often used for general feature generation and linear orthogonalization or compression by dimensionality reduction of correlated multivariate data, see Jolliffe [2] for a comprehensive description of PCA and related techniques. Schölkopf et al. [3] introduce...... feature space via the kernel function and then performing a linear analysis in that space. In this paper we shall apply a kernel version of maximum autocorrelation factor (MAF) [7, 8] analysis to irregularly sampled stream sediment geochemistry data from South Greenland and illustrate the dependence...

  18. [Health Technology Dependency: A Concept Analysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Miao-Yi; Chen, Ting-Yu; Kao, Chi-Wen

    2016-02-01

    Health technology dependence is a widely recognized concept that refers to the utilization of technology, including drugs, equipment, instruments, and related devices, to compensate for a physical disability or to prevent the progression of a disability. Although technology may significantly prolong the life of a patient, technology may also increase the psychological pressure of these patients and the burdens of their caregivers. There is a current dearth of related research and discussions related to the concept of "health technology dependency". Therefore, the present paper uses the strategies of concept analysis described by Walker & Avant (2010) to analyze this concept. The characteristic definition of health technology dependence addresses individuals who: (1) currently live with health technology, (2) may perceive physical or psychological burdens due to health technology, and (3) feel physical and psychological well-being when coping positively with their health technology dependency and, further, regard health technology as a part of their body. Further, the present paper uses case examples to help analyze the general concept. It is hoped that nurses may better understand the concept of "health technology dependency", consider the concerns of health-technology-dependent patients and their families, and develop relevant interventions to promote the well-being of these patients and their families.

  19. Temperature Dependence of Dark Current in Quantum Well Infrared Detectors

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hickey, Thomas

    2002-01-01

    ...) /cu cm were gathered and analyzed for various temperatures. The device was cooled with a closed cycle refrigerator, and the data were acquired using the Agilent 4155B Semiconductor Parameter Analyzer...

  20. Temperature dependence of the magnetic properties of ferromagnetic amorphous alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaunt, P.

    1979-01-01

    The magnetic hysteresis properties of amorphous alloys have recently been discussed in terms of an exchange-enhanced applied field. This absolute-zero model is here extended to finite temperatures. The modified treatment predicts a remanent magnetization which is unaffected by thermal activation while the coercive force falls (finally to zero) as temperature increases. Comparison with experiment for TbFe/sub 2/ suggests that regions of volume approx. =7500 A/sup 3/ reverse coherently.

  1. Temperature dependence of optical anisotropy of holographic polymer-dispersed liquid crystal transmission gratings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drevensek-Olenik, I; Fally, M; Ellabban, M A

    2006-08-01

    We measured the angular dependence of the 0th, +/-1 st, and +/-2 nd optical diffraction orders from a 50 microm thick transmission grating recorded in a UV-curable holographic polymer-dispersed liquid crystal (HPDLC) made from commercially available constituents. The analysis was performed for two orthogonal polarizations of the probe beams. The emphasis was laid on the temperature dependence of the grating anisotropy. Above the nematic-isotropic phase transition, the grating is optically isotropic. At lower temperatures the grating strength for the optical polarization perpendicular to the grating vector decreases with decreasing temperature, while for orthogonal polarization it increases with decreasing temperature. As a consequence, a regime of diffraction with strongly overmodulated gratings is observed. Our investigations indicate that the anisotropy of the refractive-index modulation scales with the optical anisotropy of the liquid crystal medium forming the phase-separated domains. We further demonstrate that light scattering effects, which are profound only in the nematic phase, must not be neglected and can be taken into account via a Lorentzian line-shape broadening of the probing wave vector directions in the framework of the diffraction theory for anisotropic optical phase gratings.

  2. Temperature Dependence of Single-Event Burnout in N-Channel Power MOSFET’s

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-03-15

    AD-A277 921 P O Temperature Dependence of Single-Event Burnout in N-Channel Power MOSFETs 15 March 1994 Prepared by G. H. JOHNSON, R. D. SCHRIMPF...Makimunm 200 words) The temperature dependence of single-event burnout (SEB) in n-channel power metal-oxide- semiconductor field effect transistors...power MOSFET is tmned off (blocking a large The temperature dependence of single-event burn drain-source bias) [3]. Previous burnout modeling has beow

  3. On the Temperature Dependence of the Shear Viscosity and Holography

    CERN Document Server

    Cremonini, Sera; Szepietowski, Phillip

    2012-01-01

    We examine the structure of the shear viscosity to entropy density ratio eta/s in holographic theories of gravity coupled to a scalar field, in the presence of higher derivative corrections. Thanks to a non-trivial scalar field profile, eta/s in this setup generically runs as a function of temperature. In particular, its temperature behavior is dictated by the shape of the scalar potential and of the scalar couplings to the higher derivative terms. We consider a number of dilatonic setups, but focus mostly on phenomenological models that are QCD-like. We determine the geometric conditions needed to identify local and global minima for eta/s as a function of temperature, which translate to restrictions on the signs and ranges of the higher derivative couplings. Finally, such restrictions lead to an holographic argument for the existence of a global minimum for eta/s in these models, at or above the deconfinement transition.

  4. Temperature-dependent permittivity of annealed and unannealed gold films

    CERN Document Server

    Shen, Po-Ting; Lin, Cheng-Wei; Liu, Hsiang-Lin; Chang, Chih-Wei; Chu, Shi-Wei

    2016-01-01

    Due to local field enhancement and subwavelength confinements, nano-plasmonics provide numerous novel applications. Simultaneously, as an efficient nanoscale heat generator from inherent absorption, thermo-plasmonics is emerging as an important branch. However, although significant temperature increase is involved in applications, detailed characterization of metal permittivity at different temperatures is lacking. In this work, we extract the permittivity of gold film from 300K to the annealing temperature of 570K. By comparing annealed and unannealed films, more than one-order difference in thermo-derivative of permittivity is revealed, resulting in unexpectedly large variation of plasmonic properties. Our result is valuable not only for characterizing extensively used unannealed nanoparticles, but also for designing future thermo-nano-plasmonic systems.

  5. A Study of the Temperature Dependence of Bienzyme Systems and Enzymatic Chains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. V. Kotov

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available It is known that most enzyme-facilitated reactions are highly temperature dependent processes. In general, the temperature coefficient, Q10, of a simple reaction reaches 2.0–3.0. Nevertheless, some enzyme-controlled processes have much lower Q10 (about 1.0, which implies that the process is almost temperature independent, even if individual reactions involved in the process are themselves highly temperature dependent. In this work, we investigate a possible mechanism for this apparent temperature compensation: simple mathematical models are used to study how varying types of enzyme reactions are affected by temperature. We show that some bienzyme-controlled processes may be almost temperature independent if the modules involved in the reaction have similar temperature dependencies, even if individually, these modules are strongly temperature dependent. Further, we show that in non-reversible enzyme chains the stationary concentrations of metabolites are dependent only on the relationship between the temperature dependencies of the first and last modules, whilst in reversible reactions, there is a dependence on every module. Our findings suggest a mechanism by which the metabolic processes taking place within living organisms may be regulated, despite strong variation in temperature.

  6. Innovative Instrumentation and Analysis of the Temperature Measurement for High Temperature Gasification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seong W. Lee

    2005-10-01

    The objectives of this project during this semi-annual reporting period are to test the effects of coating layer of the thermal couple on the temperature measurement and to screen out the significant factors affecting the temperature reading under different operational conditions. The systematic tests of the gasifier simulator on the high velocity oxygen fuel (HVOF) spray coated thermal couples were completed in this reporting period. The comparison tests of coated and uncoated thermal couples were conducted under various operational conditions. The temperature changes were recorded and the temperature differences were calculated to describe the thermal spray coating effect on the thermal couples. To record the temperature data accurately, the computerized data acquisition system (DAS) was adopted to the temperature reading. The DAS could record the data with the accuracy of 0.1 C and the recording parameters are configurable. In these experiments, DAS was set as reading one data for every one (1) minute. The operational conditions are the combination of three parameters: air flow rate, water/ammonia flow rate and the amount of fine dust particles. The results from the temperature readings show the temperature of uncoated thermal couple is uniformly higher than that of coated thermal couple for each operational condition. Analysis of Variances (ANOVA) was computed based on the results from systematic tests to screen out the significant factors and/or interactions. The temperature difference was used as dependent variable and three operational parameters (i.e. air flow rate, water/ammonia flow rate and amount of fine dust particle) were used as independent factors. The ANOVA results show that the operational parameters are not the statistically significant factors affecting the temperature readings which indicate that the coated thermal couple could be applied to temperature measurement in gasifier. The actual temperature reading with the coated thermal couple in

  7. Insight into Temperature Dependence of GTPase Activity in Human Guanylate Binding Protein-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Safikur; Deep, Shashank; Sau, Apurba Kumar

    2012-01-01

    Interferon-γ induced human guanylate binding protein-1(hGBP1) belongs to a family of dynamin related large GTPases. Unlike all other GTPases, hGBP1 hydrolyzes GTP to a mixture of GDP and GMP with GMP being the major product at 37°C but GDP became significant when the hydrolysis reaction was carried out at 15°C. The hydrolysis reaction in hGBP1 is believed to involve with a number of catalytic steps. To investigate the effect of temperature in the product formation and on the different catalytic complexes of hGBP1, we carried out temperature dependent GTPase assays, mutational analysis, chemical and thermal denaturation studies. The Arrhenius plot for both GDP and GMP interestingly showed nonlinear behaviour, suggesting that the product formation from the GTP-bound enzyme complex is associated with at least more than one step. The negative activation energy for GDP formation and GTPase assay with external GDP together indicate that GDP formation occurs through the reversible dissociation of GDP-bound enzyme dimer to monomer, which further reversibly dissociates to give the product. Denaturation studies of different catalytic complexes show that unlike other complexes the free energy of GDP-bound hGBP1 decreases significantly at lower temperature. GDP formation is found to be dependent on the free energy of the GDP-bound enzyme complex. The decrease in the free energy of this complex at low temperature compared to at high is the reason for higher GDP formation at low temperature. Thermal denaturation studies also suggest that the difference in the free energy of the GTP-bound enzyme dimer compared to its monomer plays a crucial role in the product formation; higher stability favours GMP but lower favours GDP. Thus, this study provides the first thermodynamic insight into the effect of temperature in the product formation of hGBP1. PMID:22859948

  8. Insight into temperature dependence of GTPase activity in human guanylate binding protein-1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anjana Rani

    Full Text Available Interferon-γ induced human guanylate binding protein-1(hGBP1 belongs to a family of dynamin related large GTPases. Unlike all other GTPases, hGBP1 hydrolyzes GTP to a mixture of GDP and GMP with GMP being the major product at 37°C but GDP became significant when the hydrolysis reaction was carried out at 15°C. The hydrolysis reaction in hGBP1 is believed to involve with a number of catalytic steps. To investigate the effect of temperature in the product formation and on the different catalytic complexes of hGBP1, we carried out temperature dependent GTPase assays, mutational analysis, chemical and thermal denaturation studies. The Arrhenius plot for both GDP and GMP interestingly showed nonlinear behaviour, suggesting that the product formation from the GTP-bound enzyme complex is associated with at least more than one step. The negative activation energy for GDP formation and GTPase assay with external GDP together indicate that GDP formation occurs through the reversible dissociation of GDP-bound enzyme dimer to monomer, which further reversibly dissociates to give the product. Denaturation studies of different catalytic complexes show that unlike other complexes the free energy of GDP-bound hGBP1 decreases significantly at lower temperature. GDP formation is found to be dependent on the free energy of the GDP-bound enzyme complex. The decrease in the free energy of this complex at low temperature compared to at high is the reason for higher GDP formation at low temperature. Thermal denaturation studies also suggest that the difference in the free energy of the GTP-bound enzyme dimer compared to its monomer plays a crucial role in the product formation; higher stability favours GMP but lower favours GDP. Thus, this study provides the first thermodynamic insight into the effect of temperature in the product formation of hGBP1.

  9. Temperature-Dependent Magnetoelectric Effect from First Principles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mostovoy, Maxim; Scaramucci, Andrea; Spaldin, Nicola A.; Delaney, Kris T.

    2010-01-01

    We show that nonrelativistic exchange interactions and spin fluctuations can give rise to a linear magnetoelectric effect in collinear antiferromagnets at elevated temperatures that can exceed relativistic magnetoelectric responses by more than 1 order of magnitude. We show how symmetry arguments,

  10. Temperature-Dependent Nickel Release from Nickel-Alloys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Menne, T.; Solgaard, Per Bent

    1979-01-01

    Ni release from Danish 1 krone coins and metal buttons from jeans was measured at 20.degree. C in distilled water and at 35.degree. C in distilled water and synthetic sweat. The temperature elevation increased the Ni release from the coins and 2 of the 9 metal buttons investigated. The sensitivity...

  11. Temperature dependence studies on the electro-oxidation of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    agreed that the electro-oxidation of methanol was improved by raising the temperature and ruthenium modification. Keywords. Cyclic voltammetry; electrochemical impedance spectroscopy; activation energy; fuel cell; alcohol. 1. Introduction. The use of hydrogen carrier like alcohol as alterna- tive fuels in the direct alcohol ...

  12. Temperature dependent small-angle neutron scattering of CTABr ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Small-angle neutron scattering studies have been carried out to check the structural integrity of citryltrimethylammonium bromide (CTABr) micelles in a magnetic fluid for different magnetic fluid concentrations at two different temperatures 303 and 333 K. It is found that the CTABr micelles grow with increasing magnetic fluid ...

  13. Temperature dependence of transport coefficients of 'simple liquid ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... (MD) simulations has been investigated. The study carried out at two densities, r* = 0.60 and r* = 0.95. Result shows erratic variations of the shear viscosity in the two lattices structures. KeyWords: Temperature effect, face centred, simple cubic, transport properties, simple liquid. [Global Jnl Pure & Appl. Sci. Vol.9(3) 2003: ...

  14. Temperature dependent small-angle neutron scattering of CTABr ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    K. It is found that the CTABr micelles grow with increasing magnetic fluid concentration and there is a decrease in the micellar size with increase in temperature. Keywords. Magnetic fluids; micellar solutions; small-angle neutron scattering. .... studies [16] where viscosity increases when the magnetic fluid concentration in the.

  15. Temperature-dependent gas transport and its correlation with kinetic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Activation energies for permeation of polymer nanocomposite membrane have not been reported so far. A tradeoff relation between permeability and selectivity shows that as permeability increases, the selectivity decreases. Attempts have been made to see this trade-off relation at relatively higher temperature. It is found ...

  16. Direct method for calculating temperature-dependent transport properties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, Y.; Yuan, Z.; Wesselink, R.J.H.; Starikov, A.A.; van Schilfgaarde, M.; Kelly, Paul J.

    2015-01-01

    We show how temperature-induced disorder can be combined in a direct way with first-principles scattering theory to study diffusive transport in real materials. Excellent (good) agreement with experiment is found for the resistivity of Cu, Pd, Pt (and Fe) when lattice (and spin) disorder are

  17. Temperature dependent scintillation properties of pure LaCl3

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bizarri, G.; Dorenbos, P.

    2009-01-01

    The scintillation yield, scintillation decay, and x-ray excited emission of pure LaCl3 was studied as a function of temperature between 80 and 600 K. Two broad band emissions centered around 325 nm and 400 nm were identified and correlated to emissions from two localized exciton states named STE1

  18. Temperature dependence of the dielectric properties of rubber wood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed Firoz Kabir; Wan M. Daud; Kaida B. Khalid; Haji A.A. Sidek

    2001-01-01

    The effect of temperature on the dielectric properties of rubber wood was investigated in three anisotropic directions—longitudinal, radial, and tangential, and at different measurement frequencies. Low frequency measurements were conducted with a dielectric spectrometer, and high frequencies used microwave applied with open-ended coaxial probe sensors. Dielectric...

  19. Temperature Dependence of the Stability of Ion Pair Interactions ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. An understanding of the determinants of the thermal stability of thermostable proteins is expected to enable design of enzymes that can be employed in industrial biocatalytic processes carried out at high temperatures. A major factor that has been proposed to stabilize thermostable proteins is the high occurrence.

  20. Temperature Dependence of the Stability of Ion Pair Interactions ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    An understanding of the determinants of the thermal stability of thermostable proteins is expected to enable design of enzymes that can be employed in industrial biocatalytic processes carried out at high temperatures. A major factor that has been proposed to stabilize thermostable proteins is the high occurrenceof salt ...

  1. The external field dependence of the BCS critical temperature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frank, Rupert L.; Hainzl, Christian; Seiringer, Robert

    2016-01-01

    We consider the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer free energy functional for particles interacting via a two-body potential on a microscopic scale and in the presence of weak external fields varying on a macroscopic scale. We study the influence of the external fields on the critical temperature. We show...

  2. Molecular players involved in temperature-dependent sex determination and sex differentiation in Teleost fish

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms that underlie sex determination and differentiation are conserved and diversified. In fish species, temperature-dependent sex determination and differentiation seem to be ubiquitous and molecular players involved in these mechanisms may be conserved. Although how the ambient temperature transduces signals to the undifferentiated gonads remains to be elucidated, the genes downstream in the sex differentiation pathway are shared between sex-determining mechanisms. In this paper, we review recent advances on the molecular players that participate in the sex determination and differentiation in fish species, by putting emphasis on temperature-dependent sex determination and differentiation, which include temperature-dependent sex determination and genetic sex determination plus temperature effects. Application of temperature-dependent sex differentiation in farmed fish and the consequences of temperature-induced sex reversal are discussed. PMID:24735220

  3. Temperature dependence of planktonic metabolism in the ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regaudie-De-Gioux, A.; Duarte, C. M.

    2012-03-01

    Standard metabolic theory predicts that both respiration and photosynthesis should increase with increasing temperature, albeit at different rates. However, test of this prediction for ocean planktonic communities is limited, despite the broad consequences of this prediction in the present context of global ocean warming. We compiled a large data set on volumetric planktonic metabolism in the open ocean and tested the relationship between specific metabolic rates and water temperature. The relationships derived are consistent with predictions derived from metabolic theory of ecology, yielding activation energy for planktonic metabolism consistent with predictions from the metabolic theory. These relationships can be used to predict the effect of warming on ocean metabolism and, thus, the role of planktonic communities in the flow of carbon in the global ocean.

  4. Temperature dependence of electron impact ionization coefficient in bulk silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Mowfaq Jalil

    2017-09-01

    This work exhibits a modified procedure to compute the electron impact ionization coefficient of silicon for temperatures between 77 and 800K and electric fields ranging from 70 to 400 kV/cm. The ionization coefficients are computed from the electron momentum distribution function through solving the Boltzmann transport equation (BTE). The arrangement is acquired by joining Legendre polynomial extension with BTE. The resulting BTE is solved by differences-differential method using MATLAB®. Six (X) equivalent ellipsoidal and non-parabolic valleys of the conduction band of silicon are taken into account. Concerning the scattering mechanisms, the interval acoustic scattering, non-polar optical scattering and II scattering are taken into consideration. This investigation showed that the ionization coefficients decrease with increasing temperature. The overall results are in good agreement with previous experimental and theoretical reported data predominantly at high electric fields.

  5. Temperature dependent transport characteristics of graphene/n-Si diodes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Parui, S.; Ruiter, R.; Zomer, P. J.; Wojtaszek, M.; van Wees, B. J.; Banerjee, T.

    2014-01-01

    Realizing an optimal Schottky interface of graphene on Si is challenging, as the electrical transport strongly depends on the graphene quality and the fabrication processes. Such interfaces are of increasing research interest for integration in diverse electronic devices as they are thermally and

  6. Temperature-dependent Mollow triplet spectra from a single quantum dot: Rabi frequency renormalization and sideband linewidth insensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Yu-Jia; He, Yu; He, Yu-Ming; Lu, Chao-Yang; Pan, Jian-Wei; Schneider, Christian; Kamp, Martin; Höfling, Sven; McCutcheon, Dara P S; Nazir, Ahsan

    2014-08-29

    We investigate temperature-dependent resonance fluorescence spectra obtained from a single self-assembled quantum dot. A decrease of the Mollow triplet sideband splitting is observed with increasing temperature, an effect we attribute to a phonon-induced renormalization of the driven dot Rabi frequency. We also present first evidence for a nonperturbative regime of phonon coupling, in which the expected linear increase in sideband linewidth as a function of temperature is canceled by the corresponding reduction in Rabi frequency. These results indicate that dephasing in semiconductor quantum dots may be less sensitive to changes in temperature than expected from a standard weak-coupling analysis of phonon effects.

  7. Temperature and concentration dependences of the activity coefficients of electrolytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tikhonov, N. A.; Sidel'nikov, G. B.

    2017-10-01

    A model has been suggested that describes the interaction of hydrated ions in electrolytes and allows the calculation of the main physical effects. The model explains the character of the curves of the activity coefficients. Binary solutions of uni-univalent electrolytes at concentrations from zero to several moles per liter and at temperatures from zero to a few dozens of degrees were studied. The results of simulation were verified by comparing them with many literature data.

  8. Temperature Dependence of Light Transmittance in Polymer Dispersed Liquid Crystals

    OpenAIRE

    Bloisi, F.; Ruocchio, C.; Vicari, L

    1997-01-01

    Polymer Dispersed Liquid Crystals (PDLC) axe composite materials made of a dispersion of liquid crystal droplets in a polymeric matrix. When the liquid crystal is in the nematic phase, droplets appeax as optically anisotropic spheres and the material is opaque white. Sample transmittance is a function of the temperature. If the liquid crystal refractive index in the isotropic phase is equal to the one of the polymer, after the nematic-isotropic transition the material is transparent. We prese...

  9. Emergence of coherent localized structures in shear deformations of temperature dependent fluids

    KAUST Repository

    Katsaounis, Theodoros

    2016-11-25

    Shear localization occurs in various instances of material instability in solid mechanics and is typically associated with Hadamard-instability for an underlying model. While Hadamard instability indicates the catastrophic growth of oscillations around a mean state, it does not by itself explain the formation of coherent structures typically observed in localization. The latter is a nonlinear effect and its analysis is the main objective of this article. We consider a model that captures the main mechanisms observed in high strain-rate deformation of metals, and describes shear motions of temperature dependent non-Newtonian fluids. For a special dependence of the viscosity on the temperature, we carry out a linearized stability analysis around a base state of uniform shearing solutions, and quantitatively assess the effects of the various mechanisms affecting the problem: thermal softening, momentum diffusion and thermal diffusion. Then, we turn to the nonlinear model, and construct localized states - in the form of similarity solutions - that emerge as coherent structures in the localization process. This justifies a scenario for localization that is proposed on the basis of asymptotic analysis in \\\\cite{KT}.

  10. Emergence of Coherent Localized Structures in Shear Deformations of Temperature Dependent Fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsaounis, Theodoros; Olivier, Julien; Tzavaras, Athanasios E.

    2017-04-01

    Shear localization occurs in various instances of material instability in solid mechanics and is typically associated with Hadamard-instability for an underlying model. While Hadamard instability indicates the catastrophic growth of oscillations around a mean state, it does not by itself explain the formation of coherent structures typically observed in localization. The latter is a nonlinear effect and its analysis is the main objective of this article. We consider a model that captures the main mechanisms observed in high strain-rate deformation of metals, and describes shear motions of temperature dependent non-Newtonian fluids. For a special dependence of the viscosity on the temperature, we carry out a linearized stability analysis around a base state of uniform shearing solutions, and quantitatively assess the effects of the various mechanisms affecting the problem: thermal softening, momentum diffusion and thermal diffusion. Then, we turn to the nonlinear model, and construct localized states—in the form of similarity solutions—that emerge as coherent structures in the localization process. This justifies a scenario for localization that is proposed on the basis of asymptotic analysis in Katsaounis and Tzavaras (SIAM J Appl Math 69:1618-1643, 2009).

  11. Temperature dependence of Henry's law constants of metolachlor and diazinon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feigenbrugel, Valérie; Le Calvé, Stéphane; Mirabel, Philippe

    2004-10-01

    A dynamic system based on the water/air equilibrium at the interface within the length of a microporous tube has been used to determine experimentally the Henry's law constants (HLC) of two pesticides: metolachlor and diazinon. The measurements were conducted over the temperature range 283-301 K. At 293 K, HLCs values are (42.6+/-2.8) x 10(3) (in units of M atm(-1)) for metolachlor and (3.0+/-0.3)x10(3) for diazinon. The obtained data were used to derive the following Arrhenius expressions: HLC=(3.0+/-0.4) x 10(-11) exp((10,200+/-1,000)/T) for metolachlor and (7.2+/-0.5) x 10(-15) exp((11,900+/-700)/T) for diazinon. At a cumulus cloud temperature of 283 K, the fractions of metolachlor and diazinon in the atmospheric aqueous phase are about 57% and 11% respectively. In order to evaluate the impact of a cloud on the atmospheric chemistry of both studied pesticides, we compare also their atmospheric lifetimes under clear sky (tau(gas)), and cloudy conditions (tau(multiphase)). The calculated multiphase lifetimes (in units of hours) are significantly lower than those in gas phase at a cumulus temperature of 283 K (in parentheses): metolachlor, 0.4 (2.9); diazinon, 1.9 (5.0).

  12. Efficiency and temperature dependence of water removal by membrane dryers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leckrone, K. J.; Hayes, J. M.

    1997-01-01

    The vapor pressure of water in equilibrium with sorption sites within a Nafion membrane is given by log P(WN) = -3580/T + 10.01, where P(WN) is expressed in Torr and T is the membrane temperature, in kelvin. The efficiency of dryers based on selective permeation of water through Nafion can thus be enhanced by cooling the membrane. Residual water in effluents exceeds equilibrium levels if insufficient time is allowed for water to diffuse to the membrane surface as gas passes through the dryer. For tubular configurations, this limitation can be avoided if L > or = Fc(10(3.8)/120 pi D), where L is the length of the tubular membrane, in centimeters, Fc is the gas flow rate, in mL/ min, and D is the diffusion coefficient for water in the carrier gas at the operating temperature of the dryer, in cm2/s. An efficient dryer that at room temperature dries gas to a dew point of -61 degrees C is described; the same dryer maintained at 0 degrees C yields a dew point of -80 degrees C and removes water as effectively as Mg(ClO4)2 or a dry ice/acetone slush. The use of Nafion membranes to construct devices capable of delivering gas streams with low but precisely controlled humidities is discussed.

  13. Febrile temperature facilitates hERG/IKr degradation through an altered K(+) dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yan; Wang, Tingzhong; Guo, Jun; Yang, Tonghua; Li, Wentao; Koichopolos, Jennifer; Lamothe, Shawn M; Kang, Yudi; Ma, Aiqun; Zhang, Shetuan

    2016-10-01

    Dysfunction of the rapidly activating delayed rectifier K(+) channel (IKr) encoded by the human ether-à-go-go-related gene (hERG) is the primary cause of acquired long QT syndrome (LQTS). Fever has been reported to trigger LQTS in various conditions. We aim to clarify the effect and underlying mechanisms of febrile temperature on hERG expressed in HEK cells, IKr in neonatal rat ventricular myocytes, and the QT interval in rabbits. Western blot analysis was used to determine the expression of hERG channel protein in stably transfected HEK 293 cells. Immunocytochemistry was used to visualize the localization of hERG channels. The whole-cell patch clamp technique was used to record hERG K(+) current (IhERG) in hERG expressing HEK 293 cells, as well as IKr, transient outward K(+) current (Ito), and L-type Ca(2+) current (ICa) in neonatal rat ventricular myocytes. Electrocardiographic recordings were performed in an in vivo rabbit model. Compared with culture at 37°C, culture at 40°C reduced the mature hERG expression and IhERG in an extracellular K(+) concentration-dependent manner. Point mutations that remove the K(+) dependence of hERG-S624T and F627Y-also abolished the febrile temperature-induced hERG reduction. In neonatal rat ventricular myocytes, febrile temperature prolonged the action potential duration and selectively reduced IKr in a manner similar to low K(+) culture. In an in vivo rabbit model, fever and hypokalemia synergistically prolonged the QT interval. Febrile temperature facilitates the development of LQTS by expediting hERG degradation through altered K(+) dependence. Copyright © 2016 Heart Rhythm Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Temperature and state dependence of dynamic phrenic oscillations in the decerebrate juvenile rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchenko, Vitaliy; Rogers, Robert F

    2007-12-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine characteristics of fast oscillations in the juvenile rat phrenic nerve (Ph) and to establish their temperature and state dependence. Two different age-matched decerebrate, baro- and chemodenervated rat preparations, in vivo and in situ arterially perfused models, were used to examine three systemic properties: 1) generation and dynamics of fast oscillations in Ph activity (both preparations), 2) responses to anoxia (both preparations), and 3) the effects of temperature on fast oscillations (in situ only). Both juvenile preparations generated power and coherence in two major bands analogous to adult medium- and high-frequency oscillations (HFO) at frequencies that increased with temperature but were lower than in adults. At < 28 degrees C, however, Ph oscillations were confined primarily to one low-frequency band (20-45 Hz). During sustained anoxia, both preparations produced stereotypical state changes from eupnea to hyperpnea to transition bursting (a behavior present only in vivo during incomplete ischemia) to gasping. Thus the juvenile rat produces a sequential pattern of responses to anoxia that are intermediate forms between those produced by neonates and those produced by adults. Time-frequency analysis determined that fast oscillations demonstrated dynamics over the course of the inspiratory burst and a state dependence similar to that of adults in vivo in which hyperpnea (and transition) bursts are associated with increases in HFO, while gasping contains no HFO. Our results confirm that both the fast oscillations in Ph activity and the coherence between Ph pairs produced by the juvenile rat are profoundly state- and temperature-dependent.

  15. Temperature Dependence of the Molar Heat Capacity for Ferromagnets Within the Mean Field Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández Rodríguez, J.; Blanco, J. A.

    2005-01-01

    We describe, using the Mean Field Theory, a detailed analysis of the magnetic contribution to the molar heat capacity Cmag for ferromagnetic systems. This calculation is designed to be used as a teaching homework problem for physics undergraduates. The description emphasises that Cmag at the transition temperature TC is characterised by the existence of a simple jump discontinuity anomaly, but when the temperature is lowered down to 0 K the shape of Cmag depends strongly on the magnitude of the spin S. In fact, the appearance of a shoulder in Cmag for S > 3/2 is expected. The origin of this shoulder could be understood as a Schottky-like anomaly in the ordered state. These physical results are in good agreement with those from real systems, and give the student a valuable insight into the behaviour of the thermodynamical response of a ferromagneticmaterial.

  16. Temperature dependence of electron mobility in N-type organic molecular crystals: Theoretical study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Lili; Fan, Jianzhong; Jiang, Supu; Wang, Zhongjie; Wang, Chuan-Kui

    2017-11-01

    The temperature dependence of electron mobility in three Fx-TCNQ molecular crystals is studied. The electron mobility calculated based on Marcus charge transfer rate for all three molecules increases, as the temperature becomes high. Nevertheless, the electron mobility calculated based on quantum charge transfer rate shows opposite temperature dependence and indicates bandlike transport mechanism. Similar intrinsic transport properties are obtained for three systems. The different temperature dependence for Fx-TCNQ molecules detected should be induced by different transfer paths or external factors. Our investigation could help one better understand experimental results and provide intuitive view on the transfer mechanism in molecular crystals.

  17. Temperature dependent simulation of diamond depleted Schottky PIN diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hathwar, Raghuraj; Dutta, Maitreya; Koeck, Franz A. M.; Nemanich, Robert J.; Chowdhury, Srabanti; Goodnick, Stephen M.

    2016-06-01

    Diamond is considered as an ideal material for high field and high power devices due to its high breakdown field, high lightly doped carrier mobility, and high thermal conductivity. The modeling and simulation of diamond devices are therefore important to predict the performances of diamond based devices. In this context, we use Silvaco® Atlas, a drift-diffusion based commercial software, to model diamond based power devices. The models used in Atlas were modified to account for both variable range and nearest neighbor hopping transport in the impurity bands associated with high activation energies for boron doped and phosphorus doped diamond. The models were fit to experimentally reported resistivity data over a wide range of doping concentrations and temperatures. We compare to recent data on depleted diamond Schottky PIN diodes demonstrating low turn-on voltages and high reverse breakdown voltages, which could be useful for high power rectifying applications due to the low turn-on voltage enabling high forward current densities. Three dimensional simulations of the depleted Schottky PIN diamond devices were performed and the results are verified with experimental data at different operating temperatures

  18. Temperature dependent simulation of diamond depleted Schottky PIN diodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hathwar, Raghuraj; Dutta, Maitreya; Chowdhury, Srabanti; Goodnick, Stephen M. [Department of Electrical Engineering, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287-8806 (United States); Koeck, Franz A. M.; Nemanich, Robert J. [Department of Physics, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287-8806 (United States)

    2016-06-14

    Diamond is considered as an ideal material for high field and high power devices due to its high breakdown field, high lightly doped carrier mobility, and high thermal conductivity. The modeling and simulation of diamond devices are therefore important to predict the performances of diamond based devices. In this context, we use Silvaco{sup ®} Atlas, a drift-diffusion based commercial software, to model diamond based power devices. The models used in Atlas were modified to account for both variable range and nearest neighbor hopping transport in the impurity bands associated with high activation energies for boron doped and phosphorus doped diamond. The models were fit to experimentally reported resistivity data over a wide range of doping concentrations and temperatures. We compare to recent data on depleted diamond Schottky PIN diodes demonstrating low turn-on voltages and high reverse breakdown voltages, which could be useful for high power rectifying applications due to the low turn-on voltage enabling high forward current densities. Three dimensional simulations of the depleted Schottky PIN diamond devices were performed and the results are verified with experimental data at different operating temperatures.

  19. Temperature dependences in electron-stimulated desorption of neutral europium

    CERN Document Server

    Ageev, V N; Madey, T E

    2003-01-01

    The electron-stimulated desorption (ESD) yield for neutral europium (Eu) atoms from Eu layers adsorbed on oxygen-covered tungsten surfaces has been measured as a function of electron energy, europium coverage and degree of oxidation of tungsten, with an emphasis on effects of substrate temperature. The measurements have been carried out using a time-of-flight method and surface ionization detector. We expand on an earlier report, and compare ESD of multivalent Eu with ESD of monovalent alkali atoms, studied previously. The Eu atom ESD is a complicated function of Eu coverage, electron energy and substrate temperature. In the coverage range 0.05-0.35 monolayer (ML), overlapping resonant-like Eu atom yield peaks are observed at electron energies E sub e of 36 and 41 eV that might be associated with Eu or W shallow core level excitations. Additional resonant-like peaks are seen at E sub e of 54 and 84 eV that are associated with W 5p and 5s level excitations. The Eu atom yield peaks at 36 and 41 eV are seen only...

  20. Integrated optic current transducers incorporating photonic crystal fiber for reduced temperature dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Woo-Sung; Kim, Sung-Moon; Oh, Min-Cheol

    2015-08-24

    Optical current transducers (OCT) are indispensable for accurate monitoring of large electrical currents in an environment suffering from severe electromagnetic interference. Temperature dependence of OCTs caused by its components, such as wave plates and optical fibers, should be reduced to allow temperature-independent operation. A photonic crystal fiber with a structural optical birefringence was incorporated instead of a PM fiber, and a spun PM fiber was introduced to overcome the temperature-dependent linear birefringence of sensing fiber coil. Moreover, an integrated optic device that provides higher stability than fiber-optics was employed to control the polarization and detect the phase of the sensed optical signal. The proposed OCT exhibited much lower temperature dependence than that from a previous study. The OCT satisfied the 0.5 accuracy class (IIEC 60044-8) and had a temperature dependence less than ± 1% for a temperature range of 25 to 78 °C.

  1. Temperature dependence of direct current conductivity in Ag-ED20 nanocomposite films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novikov, G. F.; Rabenok, E. V.; Bogdanova, L. M.; Irzhak, V. I.

    2017-10-01

    The effect of silver nanoparticles (NPs) in the concentration range of ≤0.8 wt % have on direct current conductivity σdc of Ag-ED20 nanocomposite is studied by method of broadband dielectric spectroscopy (10-2-105 Hz) method of broadband dielectric spectroscopy. It is found that temperature dependence σdc consists of two sections: above the glass transition temperature ( T g), the dependence corresponds to the empirical Vogel-Fulcher-Tammann law (Vogel temperature T 0 does not depend on the NP concentration); below T g, the dependence is Arrhenius with activation energy E a ≈ 1.2 eV. In the region where T > T g, the σdc value grows along with NP concentration. It is concluded that the observed broken form of the temperature dependence is apparently due to a change in the conduction mechanism after the freezing of ion mobility at temperatures below T g.

  2. Temperature dependence of single-event burnout in n-channel power MOSFETs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Gregory H.; Schrimpf, Ronald D.; Galloway, Kenneth F.; Koga, Rocky

    1992-12-01

    The temperature dependence of single-event burnout (SEB) in n-channel power MOSFETs is investigated experimentally and analytically. Experimental data are presented which indicate that the SEB susceptibility of the power MOSFET decreases with increasing temperature. A previously reported analytical model that describes the SEB mechanism is updated to include temperature variations. This model is shown to agree with the experimental trends.

  3. Temperature and relative humidity dependence of radiochromic film dosimeter response to gamma electron radiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McLaughlin, W.L.; Puhl, J.M.; Miller, A.

    1995-01-01

    on some earlier studies, their response functions have been reported to be dependent on the temperature and relative humidity during irradiation. The present study investigates differences in response over practical ranges of temperature, relative humidity, dose, and for different recent batches of films...... humidity) and should be calibrated under environmental conditions (temperature) at which they will be used routinely....

  4. Temperature dependence of electronic heat capacity in Holstein model of DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fialko, N.; Sobolev, E.; Lakhno, V.

    2016-04-01

    The dynamics of charge migration was modeled to calculate temperature dependencies of its thermodynamic equilibrium values such as energy and electronic heat capacity in homogeneous adenine fragments. The energy varies from nearly polaron one at T ∼ 0 to midpoint of the conductivity band at high temperatures. The peak on the graph of electronic heat capacity is observed at the polaron decay temperature.

  5. Hartmann flow with temperature-dependent physical properties. [magnetohydrodynamics of liquid metal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linn, G. T.; Walker, J. S.

    1978-01-01

    Attention is given to the steady, fully developed, one-dimensional flow of a liquid metal in which thermal conductivity, electrical conductivity, and viscosity are functions of temperature. It is found that the properties are decreasing functions of temperature and the first differences between temperature-dependent and constant properties are discussed.

  6. The temperature-dependent expression of the desaturase gene desA in Synechocystis PCC6803.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Los, D; Horvath, I; Vigh, L; Murata, N

    1993-02-22

    We examined the temperature-dependent regulation of the expression of the desA gene, which encodes delta 12 desaturase of Synechocystis PCC6803. The level of desA transcript increased 10-fold within 1 h upon a decrease in temperature from 36 degrees C to 22 degrees C. This suggests that the low-temperature-induced desaturation of membrane lipid fatty acids is regulated at the level of the expression of the desaturase genes. The accumulation of the desA transcript depended on the extent of temperature change over a certain threshold level, but not on the absolute temperature.

  7. Temperature-Dependent Diffusion Coefficients from ab initio Computations: Hydrogen in Nickel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    E Wimmer; W Wolf; J Sticht; P Saxe; C Geller; R Najafabadi; G Young

    2006-03-16

    The temperature-dependent mass diffusion coefficient is computed using transition state theory. Ab initio supercell phonon calculations of the entire system provide the attempt frequency, the activation enthalpy, and the activation entropy as a function of temperature. Effects due to thermal lattice expansion are included and found to be significant. Numerical results for the case of hydrogen in nickel demonstrate a strong temperature dependence of the migration enthalpy and entropy. Trapping in local minima along the diffusion path has a pronounced effect especially at low temperatures. The computed diffusion coefficients with and without trapping bracket the available experimental values over the entire temperature range between 0 and 1400 K.

  8. Temperature dependence of a refractive index sensor based on a macrobending micro-plastic optical fiber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Ning; Teng, Chuanxin; Zhao, Xiaowei; Zheng, Jie

    2015-03-10

    We investigate the temperature dependence of a refractive index (RI) sensor based on a macrobending micro-plastic optical fiber (m-POF) both theoretically and experimentally. The performance of the RI sensor at different temperatures (10°C-70°C) is measured and simulated over an RI range from 1.33 to 1.45. It is found that the temperature dependent bending loss and RI measurement deviation monotonically change with temperature, and the RI deviation has a higher gradient with temperature variation for a higher measured RI. Because of the linear trend of temperature dependence of the sensor, it is feasible to correct for changes in ambient temperature.

  9. Torque and Drag Friction Model: Implemented Friction Factor Dependency of Temperature

    OpenAIRE

    Brekke, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Master's thesis in Petroleum engineering We investigated the friction factor dependency of temperature. “Friction factor” is a parameter in the calculations of torque and drag. Increased well reach is dependent on accurate torque and drag modeling. We proposed that the friction factor can be dependent on temperature other than linear approximations as studied by Kaarstad et al. [2009]. The results was implemented in the work of Aadnoy [2006] torque and drag 3D model. The local friction fac...

  10. Experimental determination of monoethanolamine protonation constant and its temperature dependency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma’mun Sholeh

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbon dioxide as one of the major contributors to the global warming problem is produced in large quantities by many important industries and its emission seems to rise from year to year. Aminebased absorption is one of the methods to capture CO2 from its sources. As a reactive system, mass transfer and chemical reaction take place simultaneously. In a vapor-liquid equilibrium model for the CO2-amine-water system, some parameters such as mass transfer coefficients and chemical equilibrium constants need to be known. However, some parameters could be determined experimentally and the rests could be regressed from the model. The protonation constant (pKa, as one of the model parameters, could then be measured experimentally. The purpose of this study is to measure the pKa of monoethanolamine (MEA at a range of temperatures from 303 to 330K by a potentiometric titration method. The experimental data obtained were in a good agreement with the literature data. The pKa data from this work together with those from the literature were then correlated in an empirical correlation to be used for future research.

  11. Monitoring operating temperature and supply voltage in achieving high system dependability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khan, M.A.; Kerkhoff, Hans G.

    2013-01-01

    System dependability being a set of number of attributes, of which the important reliability, heavily depends on operating temperature and supply voltage. Any change beyond the designed specifications may change the system performance and could result in system reliability and hence dependability

  12. Modeling of Circuits with Strongly Temperature Dependent Thermal Conductivities for Cryogenic CMOS

    OpenAIRE

    Hamlet, J.; Eng, K.; Gurrieri, T.; Levy, J; Carroll, M

    2010-01-01

    When designing and studying circuits operating at cryogenic temperatures understanding local heating within the circuits is critical due to the temperature dependence of transistor and noise behavior. We have investigated local heating effects of a CMOS ring oscillator and current comparator at T=4.2K. In two cases, the temperature near the circuit was measured with an integrated thermometer. A lumped element equivalent electrical circuit SPICE model that accounts for the strongly temperature...

  13. Temperature dependency of mechanical properties for crystalline cellulose added to silicone elastomer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kameda, Takao; Sugino, Naoto; Takei, Satoshi; Hanabata, Makoto

    2017-08-01

    A chemical cross-linked transparent film was got by a silicon compound to crystalline cellulose. Temperature dependency for the elasticity modulus of a provided film was measured. The shear elastic modulus was obtained the value of 2 x 106 [Pa] at room temperature. The sample decreases in 190 [deg. C] for the elasticity modulus at the room temperature as 60%, but approximately 10% recover when temperature rises up to 200 [deg. C] or more.

  14. Temperature dependent photoreflectance study of Cu2SnS3 thin films produced by pulsed laser deposition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raadik, T.; Grossberg, M.; Krustok, J.

    2017-01-01

    The energy band structure of Cu2SnS3 (CTS) thin films fabricated by pulsed laser deposition was studied by photoreflectance spectroscopy (PR). The temperature-dependent PR spectra were measured in the range of T = 10–150 K. According to the Raman scattering analysis, the monoclinic crystal struct...

  15. A practice-driven systematic review of dependency analysis solutions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Callo Arias, Trosky B.; Spek, Pieter van der; Avgeriou, Paris

    2011-01-01

    When following architecture-driven strategies to develop large software-intensive systems, the analysis of the dependencies is not an easy task. In this paper, we report a systematic literature review on dependency analysis solutions. Dependency analysis concerns making dependencies due to

  16. The effect of temperature dependent tissue parameters on acoustic radiation force induced displacements

    CERN Document Server

    Suomi, Visa; Konofagou, Elisa; Cleveland, Robin

    2016-01-01

    Multiple ultrasound elastography techniques rely on acoustic radiation force (ARF) in monitoring high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) therapy. However, ARF is dependent on tissue attenuation and sound speed, both of which are also known to change with temperature making the therapy monitoring more challenging. Furthermore, the viscoelastic properties of tissue are also temperature dependent, which affects the displacements induced by ARF. The aim of this study is to quantify the temperature dependent changes in the acoustic and viscoelastic properties of liver and investigate their effect on ARF induced displacements by using both experimental methods and simulations. Furthermore, the temperature dependent viscoelastic properties of liver are experimentally measured over a frequency range of 0.1-200 Hz at temperatures reaching 80 C, and both conventional and fractional Zener models are used to fit the data. The fractional Zener model was found to fit better with the experimental viscoelasticity data with ...

  17. Investigation on the effects of temperature dependency of material parameters on a thermoelastic loading problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Anil; Mukhopadhyay, Santwana

    2017-08-01

    The present work is concerned with the investigation of thermoelastic interactions inside a spherical shell with temperature-dependent material parameters. We employ the heat conduction model with a single delay term. The problem is studied by considering three different kinds of time-dependent temperature and stress distributions applied at the inner and outer surfaces of the shell. The problem is formulated by considering that the thermal properties vary as linear function of temperature that yield nonlinear governing equations. The problem is solved by applying Kirchhoff transformation along with integral transform technique. The numerical results of the field variables are shown in the different graphs to study the influence of temperature-dependent thermal parameters in various cases. It has been shown that the temperature-dependent effect is more prominent in case of stress distribution as compared to other fields and also the effect is significant in case of thermal shock applied at the two boundary surfaces of the spherical shell.

  18. Temperature-Dependent Biological and Demographic Parameters of Coleomegilla maculata (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales-Ramos, Juan A; Rojas, M Guadalupe

    2017-01-01

    Knowledge of the most suitable environmental conditions for an organism growth and development is a prerequisite for developing mass rearing technology. The temperature requirements for development and the optimal range of temperatures for growth and reproduction of Coleomegilla maculata De Geer were studied. The development time of individual C. maculata larvae was determined at 18, 21, 24, 27, 30, 33, and 36 °C. Development times were converted to development rates and fitted to a nonlinear temperature-dependent model and to the linear day-degree model. Life and fertility table analysis was used to determine the optimal temperature for population growth within a range of favorable temperatures including 24, 25, 26, 27, and 28 °C. Nonlinear estimates of thermal maximum (TM) for the postembryonic development of C. maculata was 35.09 ± 10.35 °C. Estimation of TM based on pupal development was much lower at 27.23 ± 1.52 °C. Linear and nonlinear estimates of low temperature development threshold were 13.13 ± and 4.77 ± 3.03 °C for the whole postembryonic development and 10.95 and 9.18 ± 1.36 °C for the pupal stage alone, respectively. The most favorable temperature for population growth was 25 °C, where C. maculata showed significantly higher intrinsic rate of increase (rm = 0.066) and significantly lower doubling time (10.57 d) than the other favorable temperatures tested. A negative value of rm was obtained at 28 °C, indicating population decline occurring at this temperature making it unfavorable for C. maculata. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Entomological Society of America 2017. This work is written by US Government employees and is in the public domain in the US.

  19. Temperature dependence of photoluminescence from ordered GaInP{sub 2} epitaxial layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prutskij, T. [Instituto de Ciencias, BUAP, Apartado Postal 207, 72000 Puebla, Pue. (Mexico); Pelosi, C. [IMEM/CNR, Parco Area delle Scienze 37/A, 43010 Parma (Italy)

    2010-01-15

    The temperature behavior of the integrated intensity of photoluminescence (PL) emission from ordered GaInP{sub 2} epitaxial layer was measured at temperatures of 10 - 300 K. Within this temperature range the PL emission is dominated by band-to-band radiative recombination. The PL intensity temperature dependence has two regions: at low temperatures it quenches rapidly as the temperature increases, and above 100 K it reduces slowly. This temperature behavior is compared with that of disordered GaInP{sub 2} layer. The specter of the PL emission of the disordered layer has two peaks, which are identified as due to donor-accepter (D-A) and band-to-band recombination. The PL intensity quenching of these spectral bands is very different: With increasing temperature, the D-A peak intensity remains almost unchanged at low temperatures and then decreases at a higher rate. The intensity of the band-to-band recombination peak decays gradually, having a higher rate at low temperatures than at higher temperatures. Comparing these temperature dependencies of these PL peaks of ordered and disordered alloys and the temperature behavior of their full width at half maximum (FWHM), we conclude that the different morphology of these alloys causes their different temperature behavior. (copyright 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  20. BINARY: an optical freezing array for assessing temperature and time dependence of heterogeneous ice nucleation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Budke

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available A new optical freezing array for the study of heterogeneous ice nucleation in microliter-sized droplets is introduced, tested and applied to the study of immersion freezing in aqueous Snomax® suspensions. In the Bielefeld Ice Nucleation ARraY (BINARY ice nucleation can be studied simultaneously in 36 droplets at temperatures down to −40 °C (233 K and at cooling rates between 0.1 and 10 K min−1. The droplets are separated from each other in individual compartments, thus preventing a Wegener–Bergeron–Findeisen type water vapor transfer between droplets as well as avoiding the seeding of neighboring droplets by formation and surface growth of frost halos. Analysis of freezing and melting occurs via an automated real-time image analysis of the optical brightness of each individual droplet. As an application ice nucleation in water droplets containing Snomax® at concentrations from 1 ng mL−1 to 1 mg mL−1 was investigated. Using different cooling rates, a small time dependence of ice nucleation induced by two different classes of ice nucleators (INs contained in Snomax® was detected and the corresponding heterogeneous ice nucleation rate coefficient was quantified. The observed time dependence is smaller than those of other types of INs reported in the literature, suggesting that the BINARY setup is suitable for quantifying time dependence for most other INs of atmospheric interest, making it a useful tool for future investigations.

  1. Dependence of Pyrolysis Rate of Coal on Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slyusarskiy Konstantin V.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Pyrolysis process of coal has been researched to define kinetic constants which can be used for design and optimization of different processes of fuel transformation. The article considers anthracite powders and bituminous coal of Krasnogorsky mine with the use of non-isothermal thermogravimetric analysis with mass spectrometry. Spectroscanning microscopy and laser diffraction for definition of sizes and forms of particles distribution has been done. Other parameters – carbon content, ash and volatiles, density and moisture have been defined by standard methods. Energy of activation and pre-exponent with the use of models of Freedman, Starink and distributed activation energy model (DAEM, and also relative deviation of design data from experimental ones have been designed. The results of the analysis have shown the important influence of volatiles content and coal transformation degree on maximum reaction rate. Energy activation values received with the help of DAEM model are higher than with Freedman and Starink models. Process of pyrolysis of bituminous coal has a big rate in comparison with anthracite, and is better described by the above-mentioned models.

  2. Resistivity–thermopower correlation derived temperature-dependent transport behaviour of MnxZn1−xFe2O4 nanoparticles

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Joseph, Jaison; Tangsali, R.B; Gurav, S.M

    .... Deviations in the characteristic resistivity and thermopower values in response to ambient sample temperature variations were experimentally observed and used for correlation-derived temperature-dependent transport behaviour analysis. Samples with a concentration x = 0.8 and 1.0 showed high thermopower values at reasonably low temperatures with moderate specific resistance.

  3. The dependence of surface temperature on IGBTs load and ambient temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Čaja

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Currently, older power electronics and electrotechnics are improvement and at the same time developing new and more efficient devices. These devices produce in their activities a significant part of the heat which, if not effectively drained, causing damage to these elements. In this case, it is important to develop new and more efficient cooling system. The most widespread of modern methods of cooling is the cooling by heat pipe. This contribution is aimed at cooling the insulated-gate bipolar transistor (IGBT elements by loop heat pipe (LHP. IGBTs are very prone to damage due to high temperatures, and therefore is the important that the surface temperature was below 100°C. It was therefore created a model that examined what impact of surface temperature on the IGBT element and heat removal at different load and constant ambient temperature.

  4. Temperature-dependent gate-swing hysteresis of pentacene thin film transistors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yow-Jon Lin

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The temperature-dependent hysteresis-type transfer characteristics of pentacene-based organic thin film transistors (OTFTs were researched. The temperature-dependent transfer characteristics exhibit hopping conduction behavior. The fitting data for the temperature-dependent off-to-on and on-to-off transfer characteristics of OTFTs demonstrate that the hopping distance (ah and the barrier height for hopping (qϕt control the carrier flow, resulting in the hysteresis-type transfer characteristics of OTFTs. The hopping model gives an explanation of the gate-swing hysteresis and the roles played by qϕt and ah.

  5. The Temperature Dependence of the Debye-Waller Factor of Magnesium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sledziewska-Blocka, D.; Lebech, Bente

    1976-01-01

    The temperature dependence of the average Debye-Waller factor for magnesium was measured by means of neutron diffraction spectrometry. The experimental results obtained in the temperature range from 5 to 256 K are compared with theoretical calculations, using the harmonic and quasi-harmonic appro......The temperature dependence of the average Debye-Waller factor for magnesium was measured by means of neutron diffraction spectrometry. The experimental results obtained in the temperature range from 5 to 256 K are compared with theoretical calculations, using the harmonic and quasi...

  6. Tunneling magnetoresistance dependence on the temperature in a ferromagnetic Zener diode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Comesana, E; Aldegunde, M; GarcIa-Loureiro, A, E-mail: enrique.comesana@usc.e [Departamento de Electronica e Computacion, Universidade de Santiago de Compostela, 15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain)

    2009-11-15

    In the present work we focus on the study of the temperature dependence of the tunnelling current in a ferromagnetic Zener diode. We predict the tunneling magnetoresistance dependence on the temperature. Large doping concentrations lead to magnetic semiconductors with Curie temperature T{sub C} near or over room temperature and this will facilitate the introduction of new devices that make use of the ferromagnetism effects. According to our calculations the tunneling magnetoresistance has the form TMR {proportional_to} (T{sup n}{sub C}-T{sup n}).

  7. Temperature-dependent vibrational spectroscopic study and DFT calculations of the sorbic acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saraiva, G. D.; Nogueira, C. E. S.; Freire, P. T. C.; de Sousa, F. F.; da Silva, J. H.; Teixeira, A. M. R.; Mendes Filho, J.

    2015-02-01

    This work reports a temperature-dependent vibrational spectroscopic study of the sorbic acid (C6H8O2), as well as the mode assignment at ambient conditions, based on the density functional theory. Temperature-dependent vibrational properties have been performed in polycrystalline sorbic acid through both Raman and infrared spectroscopy in the 20-300 K and 80-300 K temperature ranges, respectively. These studies present the occurrence of some modifications in the Raman spectra that could be interpreted as a low temperature phase transition undergone by sorbic acid from the monoclinic phase to an unknown phase with conformational change of the molecules in the unit cell.

  8. Temperature dependence of photoluminescence from submonolayer deposited InGaAs/GaAs quantum dots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, Zhangcheng; Leosson, K.; Birkedal, Dan

    2002-01-01

    The temperature dependence of photoluminescence (PL) from self-assembled InGaAs quantum dots (QD's) grown by submonolayer deposition mode (non-SK mode), is investigated. It is found that the PL spectra are dominated by the ground-state transitions at low temperatures, but increasingly by the exci......The temperature dependence of photoluminescence (PL) from self-assembled InGaAs quantum dots (QD's) grown by submonolayer deposition mode (non-SK mode), is investigated. It is found that the PL spectra are dominated by the ground-state transitions at low temperatures, but increasingly...

  9. To the description of the temperature and pressure dependences of the thermal conductivity of sandstone and ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emirov, S. N.; Beybalaev, V. D.; Gadzhiev, G. G.; Ramazanova, A. E.; Amirova, A. A.; Aliverdiev, A. A.

    2017-11-01

    Here we present the results of an experimental study of the temperature and pressure dependences of the heat conductivity of composite compounds. The thermal conductivity of sandstone was measured by the absolute stationary method for pressures up to 400 MPa in the temperature range 273-523 K. From these experimental data we have proposed the equation describing the dependence of the thermal conductivity from the pressure and temperature. We have found that under the action of hydrostatic pressure the intensive growth of the heat-conductivity of gas-saturated sandstone is mainly up to 100 MPa, and then seamlessly switches to saturation. A comparative analysis is carried out with the experimental dependences of the thermal conductivity of ceramics (lanthanum sulfide LaS1.48).

  10. Temperature Dependence in Heterogeneous Nucleation with Application to the Direct Determination of Cluster Energy on Nearly Molecular Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGraw, Robert L; Winkler, Paul M; Wagner, Paul E

    2017-12-04

    A re-examination of measurements of heterogeneous nucleation of water vapor on silver nanoparticles is presented here using a model-free framework that derives the energy of critical cluster formation directly from measurements of nucleation probability. Temperature dependence is correlated with cluster stabilization by the nanoparticle seed and previously found cases of unusual increasing nucleation onset saturation ratio with increasing temperature are explained. A necessary condition for the unusual positive temperature dependence is identified, namely that the critical cluster be more stable, on a per molecule basis, than the bulk liquid to exhibit the effect. Temperature dependence is next examined in the classical Fletcher model, modified here to make the energy of cluster formation explicit in the model.  The contact angle used in the Fletcher model is identified as the microscopic contact angle, which can be directly obtained from heterogeneous nucleation experimental data by a recently developed analysis method. Here an equivalent condition, increasing contact angle with temperature, is found necessary for occurrence of unusual temperature dependence. Our findings have immediate applications to atmospheric particle formation and nanoparticle detection in condensation particle counters (CPCs).

  11. Temperature dependence of magnetically dead layers in ferromagnetic thin-films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Tokaç

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Polarized neutron reflectometry has been used to study interface magnetism and magnetic dead layers in model amorphous CoFeB:Ta alloy thin-film multilayers with Curie temperatures tuned to be below room-temperature. This allows temperature dependent variations in the effective magnetic thickness of the film to be determined at temperatures that are a significant fraction of the Curie temperature, which cannot be achieved in the material systems used for spintronic devices. In addition to variation in the effective magnetic thickness due to compositional grading at the interface with the tantalum capping layer, the key finding is that at the interface between ferromagnetic film and GaAs(001 substrate local interfacial alloying creates an additional magnetic dead-layer. The thickness of this magnetic dead-layer is temperature dependent, which may have significant implications for elevated-temperature operation of hybrid ferromagnetic metal-semiconductor spintronic devices.

  12. Temperature dependence of magnetically dead layers in ferromagnetic thin-films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokaç, M.; Kinane, C. J.; Atkinson, D.; Hindmarch, A. T.

    2017-11-01

    Polarized neutron reflectometry has been used to study interface magnetism and magnetic dead layers in model amorphous CoFeB:Ta alloy thin-film multilayers with Curie temperatures tuned to be below room-temperature. This allows temperature dependent variations in the effective magnetic thickness of the film to be determined at temperatures that are a significant fraction of the Curie temperature, which cannot be achieved in the material systems used for spintronic devices. In addition to variation in the effective magnetic thickness due to compositional grading at the interface with the tantalum capping layer, the key finding is that at the interface between ferromagnetic film and GaAs(001) substrate local interfacial alloying creates an additional magnetic dead-layer. The thickness of this magnetic dead-layer is temperature dependent, which may have significant implications for elevated-temperature operation of hybrid ferromagnetic metal-semiconductor spintronic devices.

  13. Temperature dependence of band gaps in semiconductors: electron-phonon interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kremer, Reinhard K.; Cardona, M.; Lauck, R. [MPI for Solid State Research, Stuttgart (Germany); Bhosale, J.; Ramdas, A.K. [Physics Dept., Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN (United States); Burger, A. [Fisk University, Dept. of Life and Physical Sciences, Nashville, TN (United States); Munoz, A. [MALTA Consolider Team, Dept. de Fisica Fundamental II, Universidad de La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Instituto de Materiales y Nanotecnologia, Universidad de La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Romero, A.H. [CINVESTAV, Dept. de Materiales, Unidad Queretaro, Mexico (Mexico); MPI fuer Mikrostrukturphysik, Halle an der Saale (Germany)

    2013-07-01

    We investigate the temperature dependence of the energy gap of several semiconductors with chalcopyrite structure and re-examine literature data and analyze own high-resolution reflectivity spectra in view of our new ab initio calculations of their phonon properties. This analysis leads us to distinguish between materials with d-electrons in the valence band (e.g. CuGaS{sub 2}, AgGaS{sub 2}) and those without d-electrons (e.g. ZnSnAs{sub 2}). The former exhibit a rather peculiar non-monotonic temperature dependence of the energy gap which, so far, has resisted cogent theoretical description. We demonstrate it can well be fitted by including two Bose-Einstein oscillators with weights of opposite sign leading to an increase at low-T and a decrease at higher T's. We find that the energy of the former correlates well with characteristic peaks in the phonon density of states associated with low-energy vibrations of the d-electron constituents.

  14. Sex reversal triggers the rapid transition from genetic to temperature-dependent sex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holleley, Clare E; O'Meally, Denis; Sarre, Stephen D; Marshall Graves, Jennifer A; Ezaz, Tariq; Matsubara, Kazumi; Azad, Bhumika; Zhang, Xiuwen; Georges, Arthur

    2015-07-02

    Sex determination in animals is amazingly plastic. Vertebrates display contrasting strategies ranging from complete genetic control of sex (genotypic sex determination) to environmentally determined sex (for example, temperature-dependent sex determination). Phylogenetic analyses suggest frequent evolutionary transitions between genotypic and temperature-dependent sex determination in environmentally sensitive lineages, including reptiles. These transitions are thought to involve a genotypic system becoming sensitive to temperature, with sex determined by gene-environment interactions. Most mechanistic models of transitions invoke a role for sex reversal. Sex reversal has not yet been demonstrated in nature for any amniote, although it occurs in fish and rarely in amphibians. Here we make the first report of reptile sex reversal in the wild, in the Australian bearded dragon (Pogona vitticeps), and use sex-reversed animals to experimentally induce a rapid transition from genotypic to temperature-dependent sex determination. Controlled mating of normal males to sex-reversed females produces viable and fertile offspring whose phenotypic sex is determined solely by temperature (temperature-dependent sex determination). The W sex chromosome is eliminated from this lineage in the first generation. The instantaneous creation of a lineage of ZZ temperature-sensitive animals reveals a novel, climate-induced pathway for the rapid transition between genetic and temperature-dependent sex determination, and adds to concern about adaptation to rapid global climate change.

  15. Metabolic efficiency in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae in relation to temperature dependent growth and biomass yield.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakhartsev, Maksim; Yang, Xuelian; Reuss, Matthias; Pörtner, Hans Otto

    2015-08-01

    Canonized view on temperature effects on growth rate of microorganisms is based on assumption of protein denaturation, which is not confirmed experimentally so far. We develop an alternative concept, which is based on view that limits of thermal tolerance are based on imbalance of cellular energy allocation. Therefore, we investigated growth suppression of yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae in the supraoptimal temperature range (30-40°C), i.e. above optimal temperature (Topt). The maximal specific growth rate (μmax) of biomass, its concentration and yield on glucose (Yx/glc) were measured across the whole thermal window (5-40°C) of the yeast in batch anaerobic growth on glucose. Specific rate of glucose consumption, specific rate of glucose consumption for maintenance (mglc), true biomass yield on glucose (Yx/glc(true)), fractional conservation of substrate carbon in product and ATP yield on glucose (Yatp/glc) were estimated from the experimental data. There was a negative linear relationship between ATP, ADP and AMP concentrations and specific growth rate at any growth conditions, whilst the energy charge was always high (~0.83). There were two temperature regions where mglc differed 12-fold, which points to the existence of a 'low' (within 5-31°C) and a 'high' (within 33-40°C) metabolic mode regarding maintenance requirements. The rise from the low to high mode occurred at 31-32°C in step-wise manner and it was accompanied with onset of suppression of μmax. High mglc at supraoptimal temperatures indicates a significant reduction of scope for growth, due to high maintenance cost. Analysis of temperature dependencies of product formation efficiency and Yatp/glc revealed that the efficiency of energy metabolism approaches its lower limit at 26-31°C. This limit is reflected in the predetermined combination of Yx/glc(true), elemental biomass composition and degree of reduction of the growth substrate. Approaching the limit implies a reduction of the safety margin

  16. A humidity shock leads to rapid, temperature dependent changes in coffee leaf physiology and gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thioune, El-Hadji; McCarthy, James; Gallagher, Thomas; Osborne, Bruce

    2017-03-01

    Climate change is expected to increase the frequency of above-normal atmospheric water deficits contemporaneous with periods of high temperatures. Here we explore alterations in physiology and gene expression in leaves of Coffea canephora Pierre ex A. Froehner caused by a sharp drop in relative humidity (RH) at three different temperatures. Both stomatal conductance (gs) and CO2 assimilation (A) measurements showed that gs and A values fell quickly at all temperatures after the transfer to low RH.  However, leaf relative water content measurements indicated that leaves nonetheless experienced substantial water losses, implying that stomatal closure and/or resupply of water was not fast enough to stop excessive evaporative losses.  At 27 and 35 °C, upper leaves showed significant decreases in Fv/Fm compared with lower leaves, suggesting a stronger impact on photosystem II for upper leaves, while at 42 °C, both upper and lower leaves were equally affected. Quantitative gene expression analysis of transcription factors associated with conventional dehydration stress, and genes involved with abscisic acid signalling, such as CcNCED3, indicated temperature-dependent, transcriptional changes during the Humidity Shock ('HuS') treatments.  No expression was seen at 27 °C for the heat-shock gene CcHSP90-7, but it was strongly induced during the 42 °C 'HuS' treatment. Consistent with a proposal that important cellular damage occurred during the 42 °C 'HuS' treatment, two genes implicated in senescence were induced by this treatment. Overall, the data show that C. canephora plants subjected to a sharp drop in RH exhibit major, temperature-dependent alterations in leaf physiology and important changes in the expression of genes associated with abiotic stress and senescence. The results presented suggest that more detailed studies on the combined effects of low RH and high temperature are warranted. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights

  17. Temperature-dependent innate defense against the common cold virus limits viral replication at warm temperature in mouse airway cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foxman, Ellen F; Storer, James A; Fitzgerald, Megan E; Wasik, Bethany R; Hou, Lin; Zhao, Hongyu; Turner, Paul E; Pyle, Anna Marie; Iwasaki, Akiko

    2015-01-20

    Most isolates of human rhinovirus, the common cold virus, replicate more robustly at the cool temperatures found in the nasal cavity (33-35 °C) than at core body temperature (37 °C). To gain insight into the mechanism of temperature-dependent growth, we compared the transcriptional response of primary mouse airway epithelial cells infected with rhinovirus at 33 °C vs. 37 °C. Mouse airway cells infected with mouse-adapted rhinovirus 1B exhibited a striking enrichment in expression of antiviral defense response genes at 37 °C relative to 33 °C, which correlated with significantly higher expression levels of type I and type III IFN genes and IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs) at 37 °C. Temperature-dependent IFN induction in response to rhinovirus was dependent on the MAVS protein, a key signaling adaptor of the RIG-I-like receptors (RLRs). Stimulation of primary airway cells with the synthetic RLR ligand poly I:C led to greater IFN induction at 37 °C relative to 33 °C at early time points poststimulation and to a sustained increase in the induction of ISGs at 37 °C relative to 33 °C. Recombinant type I IFN also stimulated more robust induction of ISGs at 37 °C than at 33 °C. Genetic deficiency of MAVS or the type I IFN receptor in infected airway cells permitted higher levels of viral replication, particularly at 37 °C, and partially rescued the temperature-dependent growth phenotype. These findings demonstrate that in mouse airway cells, rhinovirus replicates preferentially at nasal cavity temperature due, in part, to a less efficient antiviral defense response of infected cells at cool temperature.

  18. Temperature-dependent dynamic mechanical properties of magnetorheological elastomers under magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ju, Benxiang, E-mail: jubenxiang@qq.com [National Instrument Functional Materials Engineering Technology Research Center, Chongqing 400707 (China); Tang, Rui; Zhang, Dengyou; Yang, Bailian [National Instrument Functional Materials Engineering Technology Research Center, Chongqing 400707 (China); Yu, Miao; Liao, Changrong [College of Optoelectronic Engineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China)

    2015-01-15

    Both anisotropic and isotropic magnetorheological elastomer (MRE) samples were fabricated by using as-prepared polyurethane (PU) matrix and carbonyl iron particles. Temperature-dependent dynamic mechanical properties of MRE were investigated and analyzed. Due to the unique structural features of as-prepared matrix, temperature has a greater impact on the properties of as-prepared MRE, especially isotropic MRE. With increasing of temperature and magnetic field, MR effect of isotropic MRE can reach up to as high as 4176.5% at temperature of 80 °C, and the mechanism of the temperature-dependent in presence of magnetic field was discussed. These results indicated that MRE is a kind of temperature-dependent material, and can be cycled between MRE and MR plastomer (MRP) by varying temperature. - Highlights: • Both anisotropic and isotropic MRE were fabricated by using as-prepared matrix. • Temperature-dependent properties of MRE under magnetic field were investigated. • As-prepared MRE can transform MRE to MRP by adjusting temperature.

  19. Temperature-dependent structural and functional features of a hyperthermostable enzyme using elastic neutron scattering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koutsopoulos, S; van der Oost, J; Norde, W

    2005-01-01

    The dynamic behavior of an endoglucanase from the hyperthermophilic microorganism Pyrococcus furiosus was investigated using elastic neutron scattering. The temperature dependence of the atomic motions was correlated with conformational. and functional characteristics of the enzyme. The onset of

  20. Temperature dependence of magnetic anisotropies in ultrathin Fe film on vicinal Si(111)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yong-Sheng; He, Wei; Ye, Jun; Hu, Bo; Tang, Jin; Zhang, Xiang-Qun [State Key Laboratory of Magnetism and Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Cheng, Zhao-Hua, E-mail: zhcheng@aphy.iphy.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Magnetism and Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); School of Physical Sciences, University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China)

    2017-05-01

    The temperature dependence of magnetic anisotropy of ultrathin Fe film with different thickness epitaxially grown on vicinal Si(111) substrate has been quantitatively investigated using the anisotropic magnetoresistance(AMR) measurements. Due to the effect of the vicinal substrate, the magnetic anisotropy is the superposition of a four-fold, a two-fold and a weakly six-fold contribution. It is found that the temperature dependence of the first-order magnetocrystalline anisotropies coefficient follows power laws of the reduced magnetization m(T)(=M(T)/M(0)) being consistent with the Callen and Callen's theory. However the temperature dependence of uniaxial magnetic anisotropy (UMA) shows novel behavior that decreases roughly as a function of temperature with different power law for samples with different thickness. We also found that the six-fold magnetocrystalline anisotropy is almost invariable over a wide temperature range. Possible mechanisms leading to the different exponents are discussed.

  1. Temperature Dependence of Thin Film Spiral Inductors on Alumina Over a Temperature Range of 25 to 475 C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponchak, George E.; Jordan, Jennifer L.; Scardelletti, Maximilian C.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we present an analysis of inductors on an Alumina substrate over the temperature range of 25 to 475 C. Five sets of inductors, each set consisting of a 1.5, 2.5, 3.5, and a 4.5 turn inductor with different line width and spacing, were measured on a high temperature probe station from 10 MHz to 30 GHz. From these measured characteristics, it is shown that the inductance is nearly independent of temperature for low frequencies compared to the self resonant frequency, the parasitic capacitances are independent of temperature, and the resistance varies nearly linearly with temperature. These characteristics result in the self resonant frequency decreasing by only a few percent as the temperature is increased from 25 to 475 C, but the maximum quality factor decreases by a factor of 2 to 3. These observations based on measured data are confirmed through 2D simulations using Sonnet software.

  2. Temperature dependence and mechanism of the reaction between O(3P) and chlorine dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colussi, A. J.; Sander, S. P.; Fiedl, R. R.

    1992-01-01

    Second-order rate constants for the decay of O(3P) in excess chlorine dioxide, k(II), were measured as a function of total pressure (20-600 Torr argon) and temperature (248-312 K), using flash photolysis-atomic resonance fluorescence. Results indicate that k(II) is pressure dependent with a value, K(b), that is nonzero at zero pressure, and both the third-order rate constant and k(b) have negative temperature dependences.

  3. Quark mass density- and temperature- dependent model for bulk strange quark matter

    OpenAIRE

    al, Yun Zhang et.

    2002-01-01

    It is shown that the quark mass density-dependent model can not be used to explain the process of the quark deconfinement phase transition because the quark confinement is permanent in this model. A quark mass density- and temperature-dependent model in which the quark confinement is impermanent has been suggested. We argue that the vacuum energy density B is a function of temperature. The dynamical and thermodynamical properties of bulk strange quark matter for quark mass density- and temper...

  4. Temperature-dependent magnetic properties of individual glass spherules, Apollo 11, 12, and 14 lunar samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorpe, A. N.; Sullivan, S.; Alexander, C. C.; Senftle, F. E.; Dwornik, E. J.

    1972-01-01

    Magnetic susceptibility of 11 glass spherules from the Apollo 14 lunar fines have been measured from room temperature to 4 K. Data taken at room temperature, 77 K, and 4.2 K, show that the soft saturation magnetization was temperature independent. In the temperature range 300 to 77 K the temperature-dependent component of the magnetic susceptibility obeys the Curie law. Susceptibility measurements on these same specimens and in addition 14 similar spherules from the Apollo 11 and 12 mission show a Curie-Weiss relation at temperatures less than 77 K with a Weiss temperature of 3-7 degrees in contrast to 2-3 degrees found for tektites and synthetic glasses of tektite composition. A proposed model and a theoretical expression closely predict the variation of the susceptibility of the glass spherules with temperature.

  5. Temperature Dependence of Faraday Effect-Induced Bias Error in a Fiber Optic Gyroscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xuyou; Liu, Pan; Guang, Xingxing; Xu, Zhenlong; Guan, Lianwu; Li, Guangchun

    2017-09-07

    Improving the performance of interferometric fiber optic gyroscope (IFOG) in harsh environments, such as magnetic field and temperature field variation, is necessary for its practical applications. This paper presents an investigation of Faraday effect-induced bias error of IFOG under varying temperature. Jones matrix method is utilized to formulize the temperature dependence of Faraday effect-induced bias error. Theoretical results show that the Faraday effect-induced bias error changes with the temperature in the non-skeleton polarization maintaining (PM) fiber coil. This phenomenon is caused by the temperature dependence of linear birefringence and Verdet constant of PM fiber. Particularly, Faraday effect-induced bias errors of two polarizations always have opposite signs that can be compensated optically regardless of the changes of the temperature. Two experiments with a 1000 m non-skeleton PM fiber coil are performed, and the experimental results support these theoretical predictions. This study is promising for improving the bias stability of IFOG.

  6. Temperature dependence of 1H NMR chemical shifts and its influence on estimated metabolite concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wermter, Felizitas C; Mitschke, Nico; Bock, Christian; Dreher, Wolfgang

    2017-07-06

    Temperature dependent chemical shifts of important brain metabolites measured by localised 1H MRS were investigated to test how the use of incorrect prior knowledge on chemical shifts impairs the quantification of metabolite concentrations. Phantom measurements on solutions containing 11 metabolites were performed on a 7 T scanner between 1 and 43 °C. The temperature dependence of the chemical shift differences was fitted by a linear model. Spectra were simulated for different temperatures and analysed by the AQSES program (jMRUI 5.2) using model functions with chemical shift values for 37 °C. Large differences in the temperature dependence of the chemical shift differences were determined with a maximum slope of about ±7.5 × 10-4 ppm/K. For 32-40 °C, only minor quantification errors resulted from using incorrect chemical shifts, with the exception of Cr and PCr. For 1-10 °C considerable quantification errors occurred if the temperature dependence of the chemical shifts was neglected. If 1H MRS measurements are not performed at 37 °C, for which the published chemical shift values have been determined, the temperature dependence of chemical shifts should be considered to avoid systematic quantification errors, particularly for measurements on animal models at lower temperatures.

  7. Temperature Dependence of Rheology and Polymer Diffusion in Silica/Polystyrene Nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tung, Wei-Shao; Clarke, Nigel; Composto, Russell; Meth, Jeffrey; Winey, Karen

    2015-03-01

    Time-temperature superposition using the WLF equation is well-established for both the zero shear viscosity and the polymer diffusion coefficient in homopolymer melts. This talk will present the temperature-dependence of polymer dynamics in polymer nanocomposites comprised of polystyrene and phenyl-capped silica nanoparticles (0 - 50 vol%). The WLF equation fits the temperature dependence of the tracer polymer diffusion coefficient and the fitting parameter (B/fo) decreases smoothly with nanoparticle concentration suggesting an increase in the thermal expansion coefficient for the free volume. The WLF equation also fits the temperature dependence of the zero shear viscosity from oscillatory shear experiments, although the fitting parameter (B/fo) increases substantially with nanoparticle concentration. This discrepancy between the diffusion and rheology will be discussed with respect to the reptation model, which predicts that the temperature dependence of polymer diffusion depends predominately on the temperature dependence of local viscosity, and the elastic response in nanocomposites. National Science Foundation DMR-12-10379.

  8. Temperature dependence of the electrical conductivity of amorphous V sub x Si sub 1 minus x

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boghosian, H.H.; Howson, M.A. (Department of Physics, The University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT, United Kingdom (GB))

    1990-04-15

    We present results for the temperature dependence of electrical conductivity for amorphous V{sub {ital x}}Si{sub 1{minus}{ital x}} alloys. The alloys investigated span the composition range from {ital x}=0.5 to 0.1. For the alloys with more than 20 at. % V, the temperature dependence could be successfully fitted with use of the theories of quantum interference effects, and values for the spin-orbit and inelastic scattering rates are extracted from the fits. As the concentration of V is decreased, there is evidence for a metal-insulator transition seen at around 15 to 13 at. % V. The temperature dependence of the conductivity is surprisingly similar for all the alloys on the metallic side of the transition, showing a clear {ital T}{sup 1/2} dependence at the lowest temperatures while the insulating V{sub 0.1}Si{sub 0.9} alloy shows evidence for variable-range-hopping conduction. The V{sub 0.13}Si{sub 0.87} alloy, which is right at the transition, exhibits an unusual temperature dependence. The sample is metallic and seems to follow a {ital T}{sup 1/3} dependence at low temperatures.

  9. A simple equation for describing the temperature dependent growth of free-floating macrophytes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heide, van Tj.; Roijackers, R.M.M.; Nes, van E.H.; Peeters, E.T.H.M.

    2006-01-01

    Temperature is one of the most important factors determining growth rates of free-floating macrophytes in the field. To analyse and predict temperature dependent growth rates of these pleustophytes, modelling may play an important role. Several equations have been published for describing

  10. Theory of Temperature Dependence of the Magnetization in Rare-Earth-Transition-Metal Alloys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Szpunar, B.; Lindgård, Per-Anker

    1977-01-01

    It is shown that the temperature dependence of the magnetic moments and Curie and ferrimagnetic compensation temperatures for Gdl-xTx (T = Co, Ni, and Fe) and Y1-xCox can be accounted for by a simple model assuming a RKKY interaction between the rare-earth moments and the transition-metal pseudo-...

  11. Indications for a changing electricity demand pattern : The temperature dependence of electricity demand in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hekkenberg, M.; Benders, R. M. J.; Moll, H. C.; Uiterkamp, A. J. M. Schoot

    This study assesses the electricity demand pattern in the relatively temperate climate of the Netherlands (latitude 52 degrees 30'N). Daily electricity demand and average temperature during the period from 1970 until 2007 are investigated for possible trends in the temperature dependence of

  12. Molecular modeling of temperature dependence of solubility parameters for amorphous polymers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, X.; Yuan, C.; Wong, C.K.Y.; Zhang, G.

    2011-01-01

    A molecular modeling strategy is proposed to describe the temperature (T) dependence of solubility parameter (?) for the amorphous polymers which exhibit glass-rubber transition behavior. The commercial forcefield “COMPASS” is used to support the atomistic simulations of the polymer. The temperature

  13. THE TEMPERATURE DEPENDENCE OF THE EMISSION OF PERCHLORO- ETHYLENE FROM DRY CLEANED FABRICS

    Science.gov (United States)

    A study was conducted to evaluate the emission of perchloroethylene (tetrachloroethylene) from freshly dry cleaned fabrics using small environmental test chambers. The temperature dependence of the release of perchloroethylene was evaluated over a temperature range of 20 to 45°C....

  14. Temperature dependence of single-event burnout in n-channel power MOSFET's

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, G. H.; Schrimpf, R. D.; Galloway, K. F.; Koga, R.

    1994-03-01

    The temperature dependence of single-event burnout (SEB) in n-channel power metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistors (MOSFET's) is investigated experimentally and analytically. Experimental data are presented which indicate that the SEB susceptibility of the power MOSFET decreases with increasing temperature. A previously reported analytical model that describes the SEB mechanism is updated to include temperature variations. This model is shown to agree with the experimental trends.

  15. The temperature dependence of the symmetry factor for a model Fe3+(aq)/Fe2+(aq) redox half reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drechsel-Grau, Christof; Sprik, Michiel

    2015-09-01

    The symmetry factor for the activation of an elementary electrode reaction is, in principle, potential dependent and temperature dependent. The variation with temperature is usually rationalised by an Arrhenius-type separation in an enthalpic and entropic contribution. This empirical scheme is investigated for a model aqueous ferrous-ferric oxidation half reaction, using Marcus theory based molecular dynamics simulations. These calculations are extended with umbrella integration and classical transition path sampling methods to verify the validity of the Marcus theory for our model reaction. We show that, in the framework of the Marcus theory, the empirical Arrhenius-type analysis of the symmetry factor is justified provided the activation entropy is evaluated from the temperature dependence of the activation free energy with the potential kept constant. Under these conditions the temperature derivative of the symmetry factor is directly equal to the potential derivative of the activation entropy. Both quantities in turn are proportional to the equilibrium reaction entropy which is the expected behaviour for asymmetric electron transfer of which the half reaction studied here is an example. The numerical simulation results are in good agreement with these theoretical relations confirming that the Marcus theory can be used to analyse the temperature dependence of electron transfer rates.

  16. Friction and wear studies on the temperature dependence of brake-pad materials containing brass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eddoumy Fatima

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Brake pad materials for automobile applications are basically polymer matrix composites. Various reinforcing constituents used in brake pads are organic, metallic and ceramic fillers which play among others an important role on the mechanical and thermal properties, and the wear resistance at high temperature. Friction and wear depend on various parameters such as the micro-chemical structure of the pad and of the metallic counter-face, the rotation speed, the pressure, and the contact surface temperature (M.G. Jacko 1983. This latter parameter can be locally as high as 600 up to 1.500 ∘C depending on the brake type (M.G. Jacko 1983; Blau 2001. Thermal models have been developed to study interface effects at contacting surfaces (Majcherczak, Dufrenoy et al. 2007. Frictional energy can be dissipated through different mechanisms such as oxidation, rise in temperature, formation of wear particles, entropy changes associated to viscoelastic and viscoplastic deformation, and noise generation (Eddoumy, Addiego et al. 2011. Studies of friction brake show that more than 95% of the dissipated energy is transformed into heat (Kasem, Thevenet et al.; Majcherczak, Dufrenoy et al. 2007. Thermal analysis is therefore a primordial step in the study of brake systems since it provides thermo-mechanical properties (Majcherczak, Dufrenoy et al. 2007. The influence of the addition of metallic fibers on the performance of organic friction composites has been investigated using friction tests (Qu, Zhang et al. 2004. Benefits or limitations of the different fibers have been reported, however the issues of thermo-mechanical properties or effect of temperature on friction and wear behavior were not yet investigated (Bijwe, Kumar et al. 2008. No effort was done to correlate the thermo-mechanical and thermal properties with the friction and wear behavior. An important prerequisite is to get a good understanding on how brake materials behave. However, a link

  17. Experimental Measurement, Analysis and Modelling of Dependency ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We propose a direct method of measurement of the total emissivity of opaque samples on a range of temperature around the ambient one. The method rests on the modulation of the temperature of the sample and the infra-red signal processing resulting from the surface of the sample we model the total emissivity obtained ...

  18. Temperature dependence of fracture toughness in HT9 steel neutron-irradiated up to 145 dpa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baek, Jong-Hyuk [KAERI; Byun, Thak Sang [ORNL; Maloy, S [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Toloczko, M [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)

    2014-01-01

    The temperature dependence of fracture toughness in HT9 steel irradiated to high doses was investigated using miniature three-point bend (TPB) fracture specimens. These specimens were from the ACO-3 fuel duct wall of the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF), in which irradiation doses were in the range of 3.2 144.8 dpa and irradiation temperatures in the range of 380.4 502.6 oC. A miniature specimen reuse technique has been established for this investigation: the specimens used were the tested halves of miniature Charpy impact specimens (~13 3 4 mm) with diamond-saw cut in the middle. The fatigue precracking for specimens and fracture resistance (J-R) tests were carried out in a MTS servo-hydraulic testing machine with a vacuum furnace following the standard procedure described in the ASTM Standard E 1820-09. For each of five irradiated and one archive conditions, 7 to 9 J-R tests were performed at selected temperatures ranging from 22 C to 600 C. The fracture toughness of the irradiated HT9 steel was strongly dependent on irradiation temperatures rather than irradiation dose. When the irradiation temperature was below about 430 C, the fracture toughness of irradiated HT9 increased with test temperature, reached an upper shelf of 180 200 MPa m at 350 450 C and then decreased with test temperature. When the irradiation temperature 430 C, the fracture toughness was nearly unchanged until about 450 C and decreased with test temperature in higher temperature range. Similar test temperature dependence was observed for the archive material although the highest toughness values are lower after irradiation. Ductile stable crack growth occurred except for a few cases where both the irradiation temperature and test temperature are relatively low.

  19. Temperature dependence of spin-orbit torques in Cu-Au alloys

    KAUST Repository

    Wen, Yan

    2017-03-07

    We investigated current driven spin-orbit torques in Cu40Au60/Ni80Fe20/Ti layered structures with in-plane magnetization. We have demonstrated a reliable and convenient method to separate dampinglike torque and fieldlike torque by using the second harmonic technique. It is found that the dampinglike torque and fieldlike torque depend on temperature very differently. Dampinglike torque increases with temperature, while fieldlike torque decreases with temperature, which are different from results obtained previously in other material systems. We observed a nearly linear dependence between the spin Hall angle and longitudinal resistivity, suggesting that skew scattering may be the dominant mechanism of spin-orbit torques.

  20. Molecular modeling of temperature dependence of solubility parameters for amorphous polymers

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, X.; Yuan, C.; Wong, C.K.Y.; Zhang, G

    2011-01-01

    A molecular modeling strategy is proposed to describe the temperature (T) dependence of solubility parameter (δ) for the amorphous polymers which exhibit glass-rubber transition behavior. The commercial forcefield “COMPASS” is used to support the atomistic simulations of the polymer. The temperature dependence behavior of δ for the polymer is modeled by running molecular dynamics (MD) simulation at temperatures ranging from 250 up to 650 K. Comparing the MD predicted δ value at 298 K and the ...

  1. Temperature Dependent Fracture Model and its Application to Ultra Heavy Thick Steel Plate Used for Shipbuilding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Yun Chan; Lee, Youngseog; An, Gyu Baek; Park, Joon Sik; Lee, Jong Bong; Kim, Sung Il

    In this study, experimental and numerical studies were performed to examine the effects of thickness of steel plate on the arrest fracture toughness. The ESSO tests were performed with the steel plates having temperature gradient along the crack propagation direction. A temperature dependent crack initiation criterion was proposed as well. A series of three-dimensional FEA was then carried out to simulate the ESSO test while the thickness of the steel plate varies. Results reveal that a temperature dependent brittle criterion proposed in this study can describe the fracture behavior properly.

  2. Equation of states and melting temperatures of diamond cubic and zincblende semiconductors: pressure dependence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hung, V V; Hanh, P T M [Hanoi National Pedagogic University, Km8 Hanoi-Sontay Highway, Hanoi (Viet Nam); Masuda-Jindo, K [Department of Material Science and Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Nagasuta, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-8503 (Japan); Hai, N T [Hanoi University of Technology, 01 Dai Co Viet Road, Hanoi (Viet Nam)], E-mail: kmjindo@issp.u-tokyo.ac.jp

    2008-02-15

    The pressure dependence of the melting temperatures of tetrahedrally coordinated semiconductors are studied using the equation of states derived from the statistical moment method, in comparison with those of the normal metals. Using the general expressions of the limiting temperatures T{sub m}, we calculate the 'melting' temperatures of the semiconductor crystals and normal metals as a function of the hydrostatic pressure. The physical origins for the inverse pressure dependence of T{sub m} observed for tetrahedrally coordinated semiconductors are also discussed.

  3. Temperature dependence of universal conductance fluctuation due to development of weak localization in graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terasawa, D.; Fukuda, A.; Fujimoto, A.; Ohno, Y.; Matsumoto, K.

    2017-11-01

    The temperature effect of quantum interference on resistivity is examined in monolayer graphene, with experimental results showing that the amplitude of the conductance fluctuation increases as temperature decreases. We find that this behavior can be attributed to the decrease in the inelastic scattering (dephasing) rate, which enhances the weak localization (WL) correction to resistivity. Following a previous report that explained the relationship between the universal conductance fluctuation (UCF) and WL regarding the gate voltage dependence (Terasawa et al., 2017) [19], we propose that the temperature dependence of the UCF in monolayer graphene can be interpreted by the WL theory.

  4. Using extrathermodynamic relationships to model the temperature dependence of Henry's law constants of 209 PCB congeners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bamford, Holly A; Poster, Dianne L; Huie, Robert E; Baker, Joel E

    2002-10-15

    Our previous measurements of the temperature dependencies of Henry's law constants of 26 polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) showed a well-defined linear relationship between the enthalpy and the entropy of phase change. Within a homologue group, the Henry's law constants converged to a common value at a specific isoequilibrium temperature. We use this relationship to model the temperature dependencies of the Henry's law constants of the remaining PCB congeners. By using experimentally measured Henry's law constants at 11 degrees C for 61 PCB congeners described in this paper combined with the isoequilibrium temperatures from our previous measurements of Henry's law constants of 26 PCB congeners, we have derived an empirical relationship between the enthalpies and the entropies of phase change for these additional PCB congeners. A systematic variation in the enthalpies and entropies of phase change was found to be partially dependent on the chlorine number and substitution patterns on the biphenyl rings, allowing further estimation of the temperature dependence of Henry's law constants for the remaining 122 PCB congeners. The enthalpies of phase change for all 209 PCB congeners ranged between 10 and 169 kJ mol(-1), where the enthalpies of phase change decreased as the number of ortho chlorine substitutions on the biphenyl rings increased within homologue groups. These data are used to predict the temperature dependence of Henry's law constants for all 209 PCB congeners.

  5. Temperature dependence of the ClONO{sub 2} UV absorption spectrum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burkholder, J.B.; Talukdar, R.K.; Ravishankara, A.R. [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States)

    1994-04-01

    The temperature dependence of the ClONO{sub 2} absorption spectrum has been measured between 220 and 298 K and between 195 and 430 nm using a diode array spectrometer. The absorption cross sections were determined using both: (1) absolute pressure measurements at 296 K and (2) measurements at various temperatures relative to 296 K using a dual absorption cell arrangement. The temperature dependence of the ClONO{sub 2} absorption spectrum shows very broad structure. The amplitude of the temperature dependence relative to that at 296 K is weak at short wavelengths, < 2% at 215 nm and 220 K, but significant at the wavelengths important in the stratosphere, {approximately} 30% at 325 nm and 220 K. The authors ClONO{sub 2} absorption cross section data are in good general agreement with the previous measurements of Molina and Molina.

  6. Temperature dependence of the ClONO2 UV absorption spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkholder, James B.; Talukdar, Ranajit K.; Ravishankara, A. R.

    1994-01-01

    The temperature dependence of the ClONO2 absorption spectrum has been measured between 220 and 298 K and between 195 and 430 nm using a diode array spectrometer. The absorption cross sections were determined using both: (1) absolute pressure measurements at 296 K and (2) measurements at various temperatures relative to 296 K using a dual absorption cell arrangement. The temperature dependence of the ClONO2 absorption spectrum shows very broad structure. The amplitude of the temperature dependence relative to that at 296 K is weak at short wavelengths, less than 2% at 215 nm and 220 K, but significant at the wavelengths important in the stratosphere, about 30% at 325 nm and 220 K. Our ClONO2 absorption cross section data are in good general agreement with the previous measurements of Molina and Molina (1979).

  7. Temperature dependence of the in situ widths of a rotating condensate in one dimensional optical potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hassan, Ahmed S., E-mail: ahmedhassan117@yahoo.com; Soliman, Shemi S.M.

    2016-01-08

    In this paper, a conventional method of quantum statistical mechanics is used to study the temperature dependence of the in situ widths of a rotating condensate bosons in 1D optical potential. We trace the experimentally accessible parameters for which the temperature dependence of the in situ widths becomes perceivable. The calculated results showed that the temperature dependence of the in situ widths is completely different from that of a rotating condensate or trapped bosons in the optical lattice separately. The z-width shows distinct behavior from x- and y-widths due to the rotation effect. The obtained results provide useful qualitative theoretical results for future Bose Einstein condensation experiments in such traps. - Highlights: • The temperature dependence of the in situ widths of a rotating condensate boson in 1D optical potential is investigated. • We trace the experimentally accessible parameters for which the in situ widths become perceivable. • The above mentioned parameters exhibit a characteristic rotation rate and optical potential depth dependence. • Characteristic dependence of the effective widths on temperature is investigated. • Our results provide useful qualitatively and quantitative theoretical results for experiments in various traps.

  8. Time-dependent analysis of attacks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arnold, Florian; Hermanns, H.; Pulungan, Reza; Stoelinga, Mariëlle Ida Antoinette

    The success of a security attack crucially depends on time: the more time available to the attacker, the higher the probability of a successful attack; when given enough time, any system can be compromised. Insight in time-dependent behaviors of attacks and the evolution of the attacker’s success as

  9. Mössbauer spectroscopic analysis and temperature dependent electrical study of Mg{sub 0.9}Mn{sub 0.1}Gd{sub y}Fe{sub 2−y}O{sub 4} nanoferrites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Gagan, E-mail: bhargava_phy_hpu@yahoo.co.in [Department of Physics, Himachal Pradesh University, Shimla 171005 (India); Shah, Jyoti; Kotnala, R.K. [CSIR-National Physical Laboratory, Dr. K. S. Krishnan Road, New Delhi 110012 (India); Singh, Virender Pratap [Department of Physics, Himachal Pradesh University, Shimla 171005 (India); Dhiman, Meenakshi [Department of Physics, IEC University, Atal Nagar, Kallujhanda, Baddi (India); Shirsath, Sagar E. [Spin Device Technology Center, Faculty of Engineering, Shinshu University, Nagano (Japan); Shahbuddin, M. [Department of Physics, King Saud University, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia); Batoo, Khalid M. [King Abdullah Institute for Nanotechnology, King Saud University, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia); Singh, M. [Department of Physics, Himachal Pradesh University, Shimla 171005 (India)

    2015-09-15

    Mg–Gd–Mn nanoferrites with formulae Mg{sub 0.9}Mn{sub 0.1}Gd{sub y}Fe{sub 2−y}O{sub 4}, where y=0.05, 0.1, 0.2 and 0.3, have been synthesized by solution combustion technique. The dc resistivity was observed to decrease with the increase in temperature. Dielectric constant (ε′) and loss tangent (tan δ) have been found to be increasing with an increase in temperature while with an increase in frequency both have been found to be decreasing. The ac electrical conductivity (σ{sub ac}) has been studied as a function of temperature at different frequencies and has been observed to be increasing with the increase in temperature. The Mössbauer spectroscopy has been carried out so as to authenticate our previously reported results on the super-exchange interactions. - Graphical abstract: SEM image for Mg{sub 0.9}Mn{sub 0.1}Gd{sub 0.3}Fe{sub 1.7}O{sub 4} nanoferrite. - Highlights: • Mg–Gd–Mn nanoferrites are synthesized by solution combustion technique. • High value of dc resistivity (10{sup 8} Ω-cm) is obtained. • Very low values of dielectric loss tangent at high frequencies were obtained. • Gd{sup 3+} substitution resulted in weakening of A–B exchange interactions.

  10. Temperature dependences of the contact resistivity in ohmic contacts to n{sup +}-InN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sachenko, A. V.; Belyaev, A. E. [National Academy of Sciences, Lashkaryov Institute of Semiconductor Physics (Ukraine); Boltovets, N. S. [“Orion” Research Institute (Ukraine); Brunkov, P. N.; Jmerik, V. N.; Ivanov, S. V. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ioffe Physical-Technical Institute (Russian Federation); Kapitanchuk, L. M. [National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Paton Electric Welding Institute (Ukraine); Konakova, R. V., E-mail: konakova@isp.kiev.ua; Klad’ko, V. P.; Romanets, P. N.; Saja, P. O.; Safryuk, N. V.; Sheremet, V. N. [National Academy of Sciences, Lashkaryov Institute of Semiconductor Physics (Ukraine)

    2015-04-15

    The temperature dependences of the contact resistivity (ρ{sub c}) of ohmic contacts based on the Au-Ti-Pd-InN system are measured at an InN doping level of 2 × 10{sup 18} cm{sup −3} in the temperature range of 4.2–300 K. At temperatures T > 150 K, linearly increasing dependences ρ{sub c}(T) are obtained. The dependences are explained within the mechanism of thermionic current flow through metal shunts associated with dislocations. Good agreement between theoretical and experimental dependences is achieved assuming that the flowing current is limited by the total resistance of the metal shunts, and the density of conductive dislocations is ∼5 × 10{sup 9} cm{sup −2}. Using the X-ray diffraction method, the density of screw and edge dislocations in the structure under study is measured: their total density exceeds 10{sup 10} cm{sup −2}.

  11. Influence of excitation power density on temperature dependencies of NaYF4: Yb, Er nanoparticles luminescence spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ustalkov, Sergey O.; Kozlova, Ekaterina A.; Savenko, Olga A.; Mohammed, Ammar H. M.; Kochubey, Vyacheslav I.; Skaptsov, Alexander A.

    2017-03-01

    Upconversion nanoparticles are good candidates for nanothermometry. The wavelength of the excitation and luminescence lie in optical window. The influence of the excitation power density on the luminescence temperature dependences is studded. Ratio of luminescence intensities linearly depends on temperature.

  12. Elevated temperature dependent transport properties of phosphorus and arsenic doped zinc oxide thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, B.; Nakarmi, M. L.; Oder, T. N.; McMaster, M.; Velpukonda, N.; Smith, A.

    2013-12-01

    Elevated temperature dependent Hall effect measurements were performed in a wide temperature range from 80 to 800 K to study transport properties of zinc oxide (ZnO) thin films heavily doped with phosphorus (P) and arsenic (As), and grown on sapphire substrates by RF magnetron sputtering. Double thermal activation processes in both P- and As-doped ZnO thin films with small activation energy of ˜0.04 eV and large activation energy of ˜0.8 eV were observed from variable temperature Hall effect measurements. The samples exhibited n-type conductivities throughout the temperature range. Based on photoluminescence measurements at 11 K and theoretical results, the large activation energy observed in the temperature dependent Hall effect measurement has been assigned to a deep donor level, which could be related to oxygen vacancy (VO) in the doped ZnO thin films.

  13. Temperature Dependence of Sound Velocity in High-Strength Fiber-Reinforced Plastics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomura, Ryuji; Yoneyama, Keiichi; Ogasawara, Futoshi; Ueno, Masashi; Okuda, Yuichi; Yamanaka, Atsuhiko

    2003-08-01

    Longitudinal sound velocity in unidirectional hybrid composites or high-strength fiber-reinforced plastics (FRPs) was measured along the fiber axis over a wide temperature range (from 77 K to 420 K). We investigated two kinds of high-strength crystalline polymer fibers, polyethylene (Dyneema) and polybenzobisoxazole (Zylon), which are known to have negative thermal expansion coefficients and high thermal conductivities along the fiber axis. Both FRPs had very high sound velocities of about 9000 m/s at low temperatures and their temperature dependences were very strong. Sound velocity monotonically decreased with increasing temperature. The temperature dependence of sound velocity was much stronger in Dyneema-FRP than in Zylon-FRP.

  14. Temperature dependence of stress in CVD diamond films studied by Raman spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dychalska Anna

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Evolution of residual stress and its components with increasing temperature in chemical vapor deposited (CVD diamond films has a crucial impact on their high temperature applications. In this work we investigated temperature dependence of stress in CVD diamond film deposited on Si(100 substrate in the temperature range of 30 °C to 480 °C by Raman mapping measurement. Raman shift of the characteristic diamond band peaked at 1332 cm-1 was studied to evaluate the residual stress distribution at the diamond surface. A new approach was applied to calculate thermal stress evolution with increasing tempera­ture by using two commonly known equations. Comparison of the residts obtained from the two methods was presented. The intrinsic stress component was calculated from the difference between average values of residual and thermal stress and then its temperature dependence was discussed.

  15. Temperature dependence of the photoluminescence of MnS/ZnS core—shell quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Dai-Feng; Ding, Xing; Dai, Ru-Cheng; Zhao, Zhi; Wang, Zhong-Ping; Zhang, Zeng-Ming

    2014-12-01

    The temperature dependence of the photoluminescence (PL) from MnS/ZnS core—shell quantum dots is investigated in a temperature range of 8 K-300 K. The orange emission from the 4T1 → 6A1 transition of Mn2+ ions and the blue emission related to the trapped surface state are observed in the MnS/ZnS core—shell quantum dots. As the temperature increases, the orange emission is shifted toward a shorter wavelength while the blue emission is shifted towards the longer wavelength. Both the orange and blue emissions reduce their intensities with the increase of temperature but the blue emission is quenched faster. The temperature-dependent luminescence intensities of the two emissions are well explained by the thermal quenching theory.

  16. Temperature Dependent Electrical and Micromechanical Properties of Lanthanum Titanate with Additions of Yttria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldsby, Jon C.

    2003-01-01

    Lanthanum titanate (La2Ti2O7) a layered distorted perovskite (1) with space group Pna2(sub 1) has been shown to have potential as a high temperature piezoelectric (2). However this highly refractory oxide compound must be consolidated at relatively high temperatures approximately 1400 C. Commercial La2Ti207 powders were mechanically alloyed with additions of Y2O3 to lower the consolidation temperature by 300 C and to provide post processing mechanical stability. Temperature dependent electrical, elastic and anelastic behavior were selected as nondestructive means of evaluating the effects of yttria on the properties of this ferroceramic material.

  17. Reversing the temperature dependence of the sensitized Er3+ luminescence intensity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenz, F.; Hryciw, A.; DeCorby, R.; Meldrum, A.

    2009-08-01

    The temperature-induced quenching of the Er3+ luminescence is a significant problem in silicon-based materials systems ultimately designed for room-temperature applications. Here, we show that amorphous silicon-rich oxide, moderately annealed in order to avoid growth of Si nanocrystals, exhibits a reversed temperature dependence in which the integrated Er3+ luminescence increases in intensity upon heating from 77 up to 300 K. This behavior is attributed to a unique spectrum of interacting defects that efficiently sensitize the Er3+ levels, even in the absence of nanocrystals. The effect could have ramifications in fiber-optic emitters or amplifiers to be operated at noncryogenic temperatures.

  18. Study of temperature-dependent charge conduction in silicon-nanocrystal/SiO{sub 2} multilayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mavilla, Narasimha Rao; Chavan, Vinayak [National Centre for Photovoltaic Research and Education (NCPRE), Powai, Mumbai 400 076 (India); Department of Electrical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Powai, Mumbai 400 076 (India); Solanki, Chetan Singh [National Centre for Photovoltaic Research and Education (NCPRE), Powai, Mumbai 400 076 (India); Department of Energy Science and Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Powai, Mumbai 400 076 (India); Vasi, Juzer [National Centre for Photovoltaic Research and Education (NCPRE), Powai, Mumbai 400 076 (India); Department of Electrical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Powai, Mumbai 400 076 (India)

    2016-08-01

    Silicon-nanocrystals (Si-NCs) realized by SiO{sub x} {sub <} {sub 2}/SiO{sub 2} multilayer (ML) approach have shown promise for realizing tightly-controlled dimensions, thus efficiently exploiting the size-dependent quantum effects for device applications. Unfortunately, the confining insulating barriers (SiO{sub 2} sublayers), instrumental for realizing quantum size effects in Si-NC MLs, can also hinder the charge conduction which is crucial for device applications including Si-NC based tandem solar cells and multi-exciton solar cells. Owing to this, a comprehensive study of conduction mechanisms has been carried out using a thorough analysis of temperature-dependent dark I-V measurements of SiO{sub 2} thin film and Si-NC multilayer samples fabricated by Inductively Coupled Plasma CVD (ICPCVD). As the ML samples consisted of interleaved SiO{sub 2} sublayers, current in SiO{sub 2} thin film has initially been studied to understand the conduction properties of bulk ICPCVD SiO{sub 2}. For 21 nm thick SiO{sub 2} film, conduction is observed to be dominated by Fowler–Nordheim (FN) tunneling for higher electric fields (> 8 MV/cm; independent of temperature), while for lower electric fields (5–8 MV/cm) at higher temperatures, the trap-related Generalized Poole–Frenkel (GPF) is dominant. This signified the role of traps in modifying the conduction in bulk ICPCVD SiO{sub 2} films. We then present the conduction in ML samples. For multilayer samples with SiO{sub 2} sublayer thickness of 1.5 nm and 2.5 nm, Direct Tunneling (DT) is observed to be dominant, while for SiO{sub 2} sublayer thickness of 3.5 nm, Space Charge Limited Conduction (SCLC) with exponential trap distribution is found to be the dominant conduction mechanism. This signifies the role of traps in modifying the conduction in Si-NC multilayer samples and SiO{sub 2} sublayer thickness dependence. - Highlights: • Electrical conduction in SiO{sub 2} film & Si-nanocrystal layers (Si-NCs) is reported. • Si

  19. Direct temperature mass spectrometric study on the depth-dependent compositional gradients of aged triterpenoid varnishes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theodorakopoulos, Charis; Boon, Jaap J.; Zafiropulos, Vassilis

    2009-07-01

    The depth profiles of aged dammar and mastic films, which were uncovered by optimized KrF excimer laser ablation (248 nm, 25 ns), were examined by direct temperature-resolved mass spectrometry (DTMS). The results establish the generation of depth-dependent compositional gradients in triterpenoid resins as a consequence of aging, for the first time on the molecular level. Electron ionization DTMS total ion currents show that the required temperature to volatilize the polar compounds and the relative amount of pyrolysis products of the high molecular weight condensed fraction is reduced when the upper layer of varying thickness of the films had been removed by the laser. The relative abundance of characteristic ion fragments of known oxidized triterpenoid compounds gradually decreased with depth. In contrast, the ion fragments of original resin molecules became more abundant with depth. The mass spectra of the bulk of the films resembled that of the control samples, which were not subjected to aging. Multivariant factor discriminant analysis quantified the oxidative gradients and showed that a depth of 15 [mu]m from the surface of the aged films is the threshold between highly and much less deteriorated material.

  20. Temperature Depended Role of Shigella flexneri Invasion Plasmid on the Interaction with Acanthamoeba castellanii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Saeed

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Shigella flexneri is a Gram-negative bacterium causing the diarrhoeal disease shigellosis in humans. The virulence genes required for invasion are clustered on a large 220 kb plasmid encoding type three secretion system (TTSS apparatus and virulence factors such as adhesions and invasion plasmid antigens (Ipa. The bacterium is transmitted by contaminated food, water, or from person to person. Acanthamoebae are free-living amoebae (FLA which are found in diverse environments and isolated from various water sources. Different bacteria interact differently with FLA since Francisella tularensis, Vibrio cholerae, Shigella sonnei, and S. dysenteriae are able to grow inside A. castellanii. In contrast, Pseudomonas aeruginosa induces both necrosis and apoptosis to kill A. castellanii. The aim of this study is to examine the role of invasion plasmid of S. flexneri on the interaction with A. castellanii at two different temperatures. A. castellanii in the absence or presence of wild type, IpaB mutant, or plasmid-cured strain S. flexneri was cultured at 30∘C and 37∘C and the interaction was analysed by viable count of both bacteria and amoebae, electron microscopy, flow cytometry, and statistical analysis. The outcome of the interaction was depended on the temperature since the growth of A. castellanii was inhibited at 30∘C, and A. castellanii was killed by invasion plasmid mediated necrosis at 37∘C.

  1. Temperature dependence of the current-voltage characteristics of Sn/PANI/p-Si/Al heterojunctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaya, M [Graduate School of Natural and Applied Sciences, Department of Physics, Erciyes University, 38039 Kayseri (Turkey); Cetin, H [Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Department of Physics, Bozok University, 66100 Yozgat (Turkey); Boyarbay, B [Graduate School of Natural and Applied Sciences, Department of Physics, Erciyes University, 38039 Kayseri (Turkey); Goek, A [Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Department of Chemistry, Sueleyman Demirel University, 32260 Isparta (Turkey); Ayyildiz, E [Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Department of Physics, Erciyes University, 38039 Kayseri (Turkey)

    2007-10-10

    Sn/PANI/p-Si/Al heterojunctions were fabricated by electropolymerization of aniline on chemically cleaned p-Si substrates. Current-voltage characteristics of Sn/PANI/p-Si/Al heterojunctions measured in the temperature range 140-280 K are presented and analyzed. Although these devices were clearly rectifying, their I-V characteristics were non-ideal, which can be judged from the nonlinearity in the semi-logarithmic plots. The high values of the ideality factor n depending on the sample temperature may be ascribed to a decrease of the exponentially increasing rate in current due to space-charge injection into the PANI thin film at higher forward bias voltages. Careful analysis of the forward bias I-V characteristics on a log-log scale indicates that the space-charge-limited current (SCLC) conduction controlled by an exponential trap distribution above the valence band edge dominates the current transport in the PANI/p-Si diodes at high voltages. Furthermore, the PANI was characterized by using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) spectra.

  2. Temperature dependent electron paramagnetic resonance study on magnetoelectric YCrO3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mall, Ashish Kumar; Dixit, Ambesh; Garg, Ashish; Gupta, Rajeev

    2017-12-01

    We report temperature dependent electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) studies on polycrystalline YCrO3 samples at X-band (9.46 GHz) in the temperature range of 120 K–298 K. The EPR spectra exhibit a single broad line across the whole temperature range, attributed to Cr3+ ions. The variation of EPR spectra parameters (line width, integrated intensity, and g-factor) as a function of temperature was analyzed to understand the nature of spin-dynamics in the paramagnetic region of YCrO3. A peak in the g-factor suggests the presence of a new phase within the paramagnetic state at an intermediate point of temperature T IP ~ 230 K, attributed to the onset of short range canted antiferromagnetic correlations in the material much above 140 K, Néel temperature (T N) of YCrO3. The EPR intensity increases with a decrease in temperature up to T N due to the renormalization of the magnetic moments arising from the appearance of canted antiferromagnetic correlations. Further, temperature dependent dielectric measurements also exhibit an anomaly at ~230 K suggesting the presence of magnetodielectric coupling in YCrO3, with a possibility towards a relatively high temperature magnetodielectric system.

  3. Temperature dependence of a microstructured SiC coherent thermal source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hervé, Armande; Drévillon, Jérémie; Ezzahri, Younès; Joulain, Karl; De Sousa Meneses, Domingos; Hugonin, Jean-Paul

    2016-09-01

    By ruling a grating on a polar material that supports surface phonon-polaritons such as silicon carbide (SiC), it is possible to create directional and monochromatic thermal sources. So far, most of the studies have considered only materials with room temperature properties as the ones tabulated in Palik's handbooks. Recently, measurements have provided experimental data of the SiC dielectric function at different temperatures. Here we study, numerically, the effect of the temperature dependence of the dielectric function on the thermal emission of SiC gratings (1D grating, in a first approach), heated at different temperatures. When materials are heated, the position of the grating emissivity peak shifts towards higher wavelength values. A second consequence of the temperature dependence of optical properties is that room temperature designed gratings are not optimal for higher temperatures. However, by modifying the grating parameters, it is possible to find an emission peak, with a maximum of emissivity near 1, for each temperature. We tried first to catch some patterns in the emissivity variation. Then, we obtained a grating, which leads to an optimum emissivity for all available temperature data for SiC.

  4. ddRADseq reveals determinants for temperature-dependent sex reversal in Nile tilapia on LG23.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wessels, Stephan; Krause, Ina; Floren, Claudia; Schütz, Ekkehard; Beck, Jule; Knorr, Christoph

    2017-07-14

    In Nile tilapia sex determination is governed by a male heterogametic system XX/XY either on LG1 or LG23. The latter carries a Y-specific duplicate of the amh gene, which is a testis-determining factor. Allelic variants in the amh gene demonstrated to be major triggers for autosomal and temperature-dependent sex reversal. Further, QTL on LG23 and LG20 show a temperature-responsiveness with influence on the phenotypic sex relative to the sex chromosomes. Here we present a ddRADseq based approach to identify genomic regions that show unusual large differentiation in terms of fixation index (F ST ) between temperature-treated pseudomales and non-masculinized females using a comparative genome-scan. Genome-wide associations were identified for the temperature-dependent sex using a genetically all-female population devoid of amh-ΔY. Twenty-two thousand three hundred ninety-two SNPs were interrogated for the comparison of temperature-treated pseudomales and females, which revealed the largest differentiation on LG23. Outlier F ST -values (0.35-0.44) were determined for six SNPs in the genomic interval (9,190,077-11,065,693) harbouring the amh gene (9,602,693-9,605,808), exceeding the genome-wide low F ST of 0.013. Association analysis with a set of 9104 selected SNPs confirmed that the same genomic region on LG23 exerts a significant effect on the temperature-dependent sex. This study highlights the role of LG23 in sex determination, harbouring major determinants for temperature-dependent sex reversal in Nile tilapia. Furthermore F ST outlier detection proves a powerful tool for detection of sex-determining regions in fish genomes.

  5. Temperature and humidity dependence of secondary organic aerosol yield from the ozonolysis of β-pinene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. von Hessberg

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The temperature dependence of secondary organic aerosol (SOA formation from ozonolysis of β-pinene was studied in a flow reactor at 263 K–303 K and 1007 hPa under dry and humid conditions (0% and 26%–68% relative humidity, respectively. The observed SOA yields reached maximum values of 0.18–0.39 at high particle mass concentrations (Mo. Under dry conditions, the measurement data showed an overall increase in SOA yield with inverse temperature, but significant oscillatory deviations from the predicted linear increase with inverse temperature (up to 50% at high Mo was observed. Under humid conditions the SOA yield exhibited a linear decrease with inverse temperature. For the atmospherically relevant concentration level of Mo=10 μg m−3 and temperature range 263 K–293 K, the results from humid experiments in this study indicate that the SOA yield of β-pinene ozonolysis may be well represented by an average value of 0.15 with an uncertainty estimate of ±0.05. When fitting the measurement data with a two-product model, both the partitioning coefficients (Kom,i and the stoichiometric yields (αi of the low-volatile and semi-volatile model species were found to vary with temperature. The results indicate that not only the reaction product vapour pressures but also the relative contributions of different gas-phase or multiphase reaction channels are strongly dependent on temperature and the presence of water vapour. In fact, the oscillatory positive temperature dependence observed under dry conditions and the negative temperature dependence observed under humid conditions indicate that the SOA yield is governed much more by the temperature and humidity dependence of the involved chemical reactions than by vapour pressure temperature dependencies. We suggest that the elucidation and modelling of SOA formation need to take into account the

  6. A space and time scale-dependent nonlinear geostatistical approach for downscaling daily precipitation and temperature

    KAUST Repository

    Jha, Sanjeev Kumar

    2015-07-21

    A geostatistical framework is proposed to downscale daily precipitation and temperature. The methodology is based on multiple-point geostatistics (MPS), where a multivariate training image is used to represent the spatial relationship between daily precipitation and daily temperature over several years. Here, the training image consists of daily rainfall and temperature outputs from the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model at 50 km and 10 km resolution for a twenty year period ranging from 1985 to 2004. The data are used to predict downscaled climate variables for the year 2005. The result, for each downscaled pixel, is daily time series of precipitation and temperature that are spatially dependent. Comparison of predicted precipitation and temperature against a reference dataset indicates that both the seasonal average climate response together with the temporal variability are well reproduced. The explicit inclusion of time dependence is explored by considering the climate properties of the previous day as an additional variable. Comparison of simulations with and without inclusion of time dependence shows that the temporal dependence only slightly improves the daily prediction because the temporal variability is already well represented in the conditioning data. Overall, the study shows that the multiple-point geostatistics approach is an efficient tool to be used for statistical downscaling to obtain local scale estimates of precipitation and temperature from General Circulation Models. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  7. Homogeneous broadening effect on temperature dependence of green upconversion luminescence in erbium doped fibers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Egatz-Gómez, A. [Facultad de Óptica y Optometría, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Arcos de Jalón 118, Madrid 28037 (Spain); Department of Biomedical Engineering, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX 77843 (United States); Calderón, Oscar G., E-mail: oscargc@fis.ucm.es [Facultad de Óptica y Optometría, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Arcos de Jalón 118, Madrid 28037 (Spain); Melle, Sonia; Carreño, F.; Antón, M.A. [Facultad de Óptica y Optometría, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Arcos de Jalón 118, Madrid 28037 (Spain); Gort, Elske M. [Facultad de Óptica y Optometría, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Arcos de Jalón 118, Madrid 28037 (Spain); Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Groningen, 9700 RB Groningen (Netherlands)

    2013-07-15

    We study the green upconversion luminescence of Er{sup 3+} ions in an aluminosilicate optical fiber upon near infrared excitation at 787 nm. The dependence of the upconversion luminescence on temperature has been determined. As temperature drops from room to cryogenic temperatures, the upconversion green emission reaches a maximum around 40 K, and then decreases. A nearly quadratic dependence of the upconversion luminescence with excitation power is found, which is consistent with a sequential stepwise two-photon absorption process. These results have been explained with a semiclassical model that considers the inhomogeneous broadening of the optical transitions due to glass imperfections, and the dependence of the homogeneous linewidth broadening on temperature. -- Highlights: ► We study green upconversion luminescence of Er{sup 3+} ions in a fiber excited at 787 nm. ► Upconversion luminescence variation from room to cryogenic temperature is analyzed. ► Upconversion emission consists in a sequential two-photon absorption process. ► A semiclassical model considering inhomogeneous broadening explains the results. ► Homogeneous broadening is responsible for the upconversion temperature dependence.

  8. Temperature dependence of the superconducting proximity effect quantified by scanning tunneling spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Stępniak

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Here, we present the first systematic study on the temperature dependence of the extension of the superconducting proximity effect in a 1–2 atomic layer thin metallic film, surrounding a superconducting Pb island. Scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy (STM/STS measurements reveal the spatial variation of the local density of state on the film from 0.38 up to 1.8 K. In this temperature range the superconductivity of the island is almost unaffected and shows a constant gap of a 1.20 ± 0.03 meV. Using a superconducting Nb-tip a constant value of the proximity length of 17 ± 3 nm at 0.38 and 1.8 K is found. In contrast, experiments with a normal conductive W-tip indicate an apparent decrease of the proximity length with increasing temperature. This result is ascribed to the thermal broadening of the occupation of states of the tip, and it does not reflect an intrinsic temperature dependence of the proximity length. Our tunneling spectroscopy experiments shed fresh light on the fundamental issue of the temperature dependence of the proximity effect for atomic monolayers, where the intrinsic temperature dependence of the proximity effect is comparably weak.

  9. Molecular modeling of temperature dependence of solubility parameters for amorphous polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xianping; Yuan, Cadmus; Wong, Cell K Y; Zhang, Guoqi

    2012-06-01

    A molecular modeling strategy is proposed to describe the temperature (T) dependence of solubility parameter (δ) for the amorphous polymers which exhibit glass-rubber transition behavior. The commercial forcefield "COMPASS" is used to support the atomistic simulations of the polymer. The temperature dependence behavior of δ for the polymer is modeled by running molecular dynamics (MD) simulation at temperatures ranging from 250 up to 650 K. Comparing the MD predicted δ value at 298 K and the glass transition temperature (T(g)) of the polymer determined from δ-T curve with the experimental value confirm the accuracy of our method. The MD modeled relationship between δ and T agrees well with the previous theoretical works. We also observe the specific volume (v), cohesive energy (U(coh)), cohesive energy density (E(CED)) and δ shows a similar temperature dependence characteristics and a drastic change around the T(g). Meanwhile, the applications of δ and its temperature dependence property are addressed and discussed.

  10. Temperature-Dependent Ellipsometry Measurements of Partial Coulomb Energy in Superconducting Cuprates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levallois, J.; Tran, M. K.; Pouliot, D.; Presura, C. N.; Greene, L. H.; Eckstein, J. N.; Uccelli, J.; Giannini, E.; Gu, G. D.; Leggett, A. J.; van der Marel, D.

    2016-07-01

    We performed an experimental study of the temperature and doping dependence of the energy-loss function of the bilayer and trilayer bismuth cuprates family. The primary aim is to obtain information on the energy stored in the Coulomb interaction between the conduction electrons, on the temperature dependence thereof, and on the change of Coulomb interaction when Cooper pairs are formed. We performed temperature-dependent ellipsometry measurements on several Bi2 Sr2 CaCu2 O8 -x single crystals: underdoped with Tc=60 , 70, and 83 K; optimally doped with Tc=91 K ; overdoped with Tc=84 , 81, 70, and 58 K; as well as optimally doped Bi2 Sr2 Ca2 Cu3 O10 +x with Tc=110 K . Our first observation is that, as the temperature drops through Tc, the loss function in the range up to 2 eV displays a change of temperature dependence as compared to the temperature dependence in the normal state. This effect at—or close to—Tc depends strongly on doping, with a sign change for weak overdoping. The size of the observed change in Coulomb energy, using an extrapolation with reasonable assumptions about its q dependence, is about the same size as the condensation energy that has been measured in these compounds. Our results therefore lend support to the notion that the Coulomb energy is an important factor for stabilizing the superconducting phase. Because of the restriction to small momentum, our observations do not exclude a possible significant contribution to the condensation energy of the Coulomb energy associated with the region of q around (π ,π ).

  11. Temperature-Dependent Ellipsometry Measurements of Partial Coulomb Energy in Superconducting Cuprates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Levallois

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available We performed an experimental study of the temperature and doping dependence of the energy-loss function of the bilayer and trilayer bismuth cuprates family. The primary aim is to obtain information on the energy stored in the Coulomb interaction between the conduction electrons, on the temperature dependence thereof, and on the change of Coulomb interaction when Cooper pairs are formed. We performed temperature-dependent ellipsometry measurements on several Bi_{2}Sr_{2}CaCu_{2}O_{8-x} single crystals: underdoped with T_{c}=60, 70, and 83 K; optimally doped with T_{c}=91  K; overdoped with T_{c}=84, 81, 70, and 58 K; as well as optimally doped Bi_{2}Sr_{2}Ca_{2}Cu_{3}O_{10+x} with T_{c}=110  K. Our first observation is that, as the temperature drops through T_{c}, the loss function in the range up to 2 eV displays a change of temperature dependence as compared to the temperature dependence in the normal state. This effect at—or close to—T_{c} depends strongly on doping, with a sign change for weak overdoping. The size of the observed change in Coulomb energy, using an extrapolation with reasonable assumptions about its q dependence, is about the same size as the condensation energy that has been measured in these compounds. Our results therefore lend support to the notion that the Coulomb energy is an important factor for stabilizing the superconducting phase. Because of the restriction to small momentum, our observations do not exclude a possible significant contribution to the condensation energy of the Coulomb energy associated with the region of q around (π,π.

  12. Modeling and Compensating Temperature-Dependent Non-Uniformity Noise in IR Microbolometer Cameras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Alejandro; Pezoa, Jorge E.; Figueroa, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    Images rendered by uncooled microbolometer-based infrared (IR) cameras are severely degraded by the spatial non-uniformity (NU) noise. The NU noise imposes a fixed-pattern over the true images, and the intensity of the pattern changes with time due to the temperature instability of such cameras. In this paper, we present a novel model and a compensation algorithm for the spatial NU noise and its temperature-dependent variations. The model separates the NU noise into two components: a constant term, which corresponds to a set of NU parameters determining the spatial structure of the noise, and a dynamic term, which scales linearly with the fluctuations of the temperature surrounding the array of microbolometers. We use a black-body radiator and samples of the temperature surrounding the IR array to offline characterize both the constant and the temperature-dependent NU noise parameters. Next, the temperature-dependent variations are estimated online using both a spatially uniform Hammerstein-Wiener estimator and a pixelwise least mean squares (LMS) estimator. We compensate for the NU noise in IR images from two long-wave IR cameras. Results show an excellent NU correction performance and a root mean square error of less than 0.25 ∘C, when the array’s temperature varies by approximately 15 ∘C. PMID:27447637

  13. Temperature-dependent electronic decay profiles in CZT: probe of bulk and surface properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessick, Royal; Maupin, Hugh; Tepper, Gary C.; Szeles, Csaba

    2003-01-01

    The electronic performance of CZT-based gamma radiation spectrometers is governed by a synergism of bulk and surface properties. Compensation is used to increase the bulk resistivity of Cd1-xZnxTe (x~0.1), but the same electronic states that are introduced to increase the material resistivity can also trap charge and reduce the carrier lifetime. Electrical and mechanical surface defects introduced during or subsequent to crystal harvesting are also known to interfere with device performance. Using a contactless, pulsed laser microwave cavity perturbation technique, electronic decay profiles were studied in high pressure Bridgman CZT as a function of temperature. The electronic decay profile was found to depend very strongly on temperature and was modeled using a function consisting of two exponential terms with temperature-dependent amplitudes and time constants. The model was used to relate the observed temperature dependent decay kinetics in CZT to specific trap energies. It was found that, at low temperatures, the electronic decay process is dominated by a deep trap with an energy of approximately 0.69 +/- 0.1 eV from the band edge. As the temperature is increased, the charge trapping becomes dominated by a second trap with an energy of approximately 0.60 +/- 0.1 eV from the band edge. Surface damage introduces additional charge traps that significantly alter the decay kinetics particularly at low temperatures.

  14. Comparing the temperature dependence of photosynthetic electron transfer in Chloroflexus aurantiacus and Rhodobactor sphaeroides reaction centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Zhi; Lin, Su; Xin, Yueyong; Wang, Haiyu; Blankenship, Robert E; Woodbury, Neal W

    2011-09-29

    The process of electron transfer from the special pair, P, to the primary electron donor, H(A), in quinone-depleted reaction centers (RCs) of Chloroflexus (Cf.) aurantiacus has been investigated over the temperature range from 10 to 295 K using time-resolved pump-probe spectroscopic techniques. The kinetics of the electron transfer reaction, P* → P(+)H(A)(-), was found to be nonexponential, and the degree of nonexponentiality increased strongly as temperature decreased. The temperature-dependent behavior of electron transfer in Cf. aurantiacus RCs was compared with that of the purple bacterium Rhodobacter (Rb.) sphaeroides . Distinct transitions were found in the temperature-dependent kinetics of both Cf. aurantiacus and Rb. sphaeroides RCs, at around 220 and 160 K, respectively. Structural differences between these two RCs, which may be associated with those differences, are discussed. It is suggested that weaker protein-cofactor hydrogen bonding, stronger electrostatic interactions at the protein surface, and larger solvent interactions likely contribute to the higher transition temperature in Cf. aurantiacus RCs temperature-dependent kinetics compared with that of Rb. sphaeroides RCs. The reaction-diffusion model provides an accurate description for the room-temperature electron transfer kinetics in Cf. aurantiacus RCs with no free parameters, using coupling and reorganization energy values previously determined for Rb. sphaeroides , along with an experimental measure of protein conformational diffusion dynamics and an experimental literature value of the free energy gap between P* and P(+)H(A)(-). © 2011 American Chemical Society

  15. Modeling and Compensating Temperature-Dependent Non-Uniformity Noise in IR Microbolometer Cameras

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Wolf

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Images rendered by uncooled microbolometer-based infrared (IR cameras are severely degraded by the spatial non-uniformity (NU noise. The NU noise imposes a fixed-pattern over the true images, and the intensity of the pattern changes with time due to the temperature instability of such cameras. In this paper, we present a novel model and a compensation algorithm for the spatial NU noise and its temperature-dependent variations. The model separates the NU noise into two components: a constant term, which corresponds to a set of NU parameters determining the spatial structure of the noise, and a dynamic term, which scales linearly with the fluctuations of the temperature surrounding the array of microbolometers. We use a black-body radiator and samples of the temperature surrounding the IR array to offline characterize both the constant and the temperature-dependent NU noise parameters. Next, the temperature-dependent variations are estimated online using both a spatially uniform Hammerstein-Wiener estimator and a pixelwise least mean squares (LMS estimator. We compensate for the NU noise in IR images from two long-wave IR cameras. Results show an excellent NU correction performance and a root mean square error of less than 0.25 ∘ C, when the array’s temperature varies by approximately 15 ∘ C.

  16. Temperature-dependent photoluminescence and Raman investigation of Cu-incorporated ZnO nanorods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, J.L. [Institute of Micro/Nano Devices and Solar Cells, School of Physics and Information Engineering, Fuzhou University, Fuzhou (China); Jiangsu Collaborative Innovation Center of Photovolatic Science and Engineering, Changzhou University, Changzhou 213164, Jiangsu (China); Key Laboratory of Semiconductor Materials Science, Institute of Semiconductors, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 912, Beijing 100083 (China); Lai, Y.F., E-mail: laiyunfeng@gmail.com [Institute of Micro/Nano Devices and Solar Cells, School of Physics and Information Engineering, Fuzhou University, Fuzhou (China); Cheng, S.Y.; Zheng, Q. [Institute of Micro/Nano Devices and Solar Cells, School of Physics and Information Engineering, Fuzhou University, Fuzhou (China); Chen, Y.H. [Key Laboratory of Semiconductor Materials Science, Institute of Semiconductors, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 912, Beijing 100083 (China)

    2015-05-15

    Temperature-dependent Raman and photoluminescence (PL) investigation of Cu-incorporated ZnO nanorods prepared by hydrothermal method have been investigated. A strong broad violet–blue emission has been observed in the PL spectra of Cu-incorporated ZnO nanorods, which decreases dramatically with increasing temperature. By Gaussian fitting, this peak can be resolved into two peaks centered at around 393 and 405 nm, respectively, under a temperature of 8 K. The origins of these two peaks are discussed. Temperature-dependent energies of neutral donor bound exciton (D{sup 0}X) are analyzed, and the Einstein temperature is deduced to be around 343±44 K, which do not show significant change compared with that without Cu incorporation. An activation energy of about 14±1 meV is determined from the quenching of D{sup 0}X as a function of temperature in the Cu-incorporated ZnO nanorods, which is much smaller than that deduced in the undoped ZnO nanorods (about 22±2 meV). The small activation energy can be attributed to the additional nonradiative centers introduced by Cu incorporation. The high concentration of defects and impurities in the Cu-incorporated ZnO nanorods are also confirmed by the larger value of the line width of the Raman spectra and its temperature-dependent relationship. - Highlights: • A strong violet–blue emission is observed in the PL spectra of ZnO:Cu nanorods. • This emission can be resolved into two peaks by Gaussian fitting. • Activation energy of the nonradiative centers and Einstein temperature is deduced. • The small activation energy indicates the additional nonradiative centers. • The temperature-dependent Raman spectra indicates more defects in the doping sample.

  17. Does N2 fixation amplify the temperature dependence of ecosystem metabolism?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welter, Jill R; Benstead, Jonathan P; Cross, Wyatt F; Hood, James M; Huryn, Alexander D; Johnson, Philip W; Williamson, Tanner J

    2015-03-01

    Variation in resource supply can cause variation in temperature dependences of metabolic processes (e.g., photosynthesis and respiration). Understanding such divergence is particularly important when using metabolic theory to predict ecosystem responses to climate warming. Few studies, however, have assessed the effect of temperature-resource interactions on metabolic processes, particularly in cases where the supply of limiting resources exhibits temperature dependence. We investigated the responses of biomass accrual, gross primary production (GPP), community respiration (CR), and N2 fixation to warming during biofilm development in a streamside channel experiment. Areal rates of GPP, CR, biomass accrual, and N2 fixation scaled positively with temperature, showing a 32- to 71-fold range across the temperature gradient (approximately 7 degrees-24 degrees C). Areal N2-fixation rates exhibited apparent activation energies (1.5-2.0 eV; 1 eV = approximately 1.6 x 10(-19) J) approximating the activation energy of the nitrogenase reaction. In contrast, mean apparent activation energies for areal rates of GPP (2.1-2.2 eV) and CR (1.6-1.9 eV) were 6.5- and 2.7-fold higher than estimates based on metabolic theory predictions (i.e., 0.32 and 0.65 eV, respectively) and did not significantly differ from the apparent activation energy observed for N2 fixation. Mass-specific activation energies for N2 fixation (1.4-1.6 eV), GPP (0.3-0.5 eV), and CR (no observed temperature relationship) were near or lower than theoretical predictions. We attribute the divergence of areal activation energies from those predicted by metabolic theory to increases in N2 fixation with temperature, leading to amplified temperature dependences of biomass accrual and areal rates of GPP and R. Such interactions between temperature dependences must be incorporated into metabolic models to improve predictions of ecosystem responses to climate change.

  18. Anomalous temperature dependent magneto-conductance in organic light-emitting diodes with multiple emissive states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Chen-xiao; Jia, Wei-yao; Huang, Ke-Xun; Zhang, Qiao-ming; Yang, Xiao-hui; Xiong, Zu-hong, E-mail: zhxiong@swu.edu.cn [School of Physical Science and Technology, MOE Key Laboratory on Luminescence and Real-Time Analysis, Southwest University, Chongqing 400715 (China)

    2015-07-13

    The temperature dependence of the magneto-conductance (MC) in organic electron donor-acceptor hybrid and layer heterojunction diodes was studied. The MC value increased with temperature in layer heterojunction and in 10 wt. % hybrid devices. An anomalous decrease of the MC with temperature was observed in 25 wt. %–50 wt. % hybrid devices. Further increasing donor concentration to 75 wt. %, the MC again increased with temperature. The endothermic exciplex-exciton energy transfer and the change in electroplex/exciton ratio caused by change in charge transport with temperature may account for these phenomena. Comparative studies of the temperature evolutions of the IV curves and the electroluminescence and photoluminescence spectra back our hypothesis.

  19. Manipulating the temperature dependence of the thermal conductivity of graphene phononic crystal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Shiqian; An, Meng; Yang, Nuo; Li, Baowen

    2016-07-01

    By using non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations, modulating the temperature dependence of thermal conductivity of graphene phononic crystals (GPnCs) is investigated. It is found that the temperature dependence of thermal conductivity of GPnCs follows ∼T (-α) behavior. The power exponents (α) can be efficiently tuned by changing the characteristic size of GPnCs. The phonon participation ratio spectra and dispersion relation reveal that the long-range phonon modes are more affected in GPnCs with larger holes (L 0). Our results suggest that constructing GPnCs is an effective method to manipulate the temperature dependence of thermal conductivity of graphene, which would be beneficial for developing GPnC-based thermal management and signal processing devices.

  20. Temperature dependence of Young's modulus of titanium dioxide (TIO2) nanotubes: Molecular mechanics modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukyanov, S. I.; Bandura, A. V.; Evarestov, R. A.

    2015-12-01

    Temperature dependence of the Young's modulus of cylindrical single-wall nanotubes with zigzag and armchair chiralities and consolidated-wall nanotubes has been studied by the molecular mechanics method with the use of the atom-atom potential. The nanotubes have been obtained by rolling up of crystal layers (111) of TiO2 with fluorite structure. Calculations have been performed for isothermal conditions on the basis of calculating the Helmholtz free energy of the system. The dependence of the Helmholtz free energy of nanotubes on the period has been calculated in the quasi-harmonic approximation as a result of calculation of phonon frequencies. It has been shown that the temperature dependence of the stiffness of nanotubes is determined by their chirality, and some nanotubes exibit anomalous behavior of both the Young's modulus and the period of unit cell with variation in temperature.

  1. Temperature dependence of the magnetization of disc shaped NiO nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klausen, Stine Nyborg; Lindgard, P.A.; Lefmann, Kim

    2002-01-01

    We present neutron diffraction data of NiO nanoparticles measuring the total magnetization and the sublattice magnetization at various temperatures. Electron microscopy shows that the particles are disc shaped with average diameter of about 12 nm and a thickness of about 2 nm. The Neel temperature...... as a temperature dependent contribution of a structural peak in contrast to bulk NiO. The two magnetic signals vanish at the same temperature. The data are interpreted on the basis of an extended mean field model on disc shaped NiO particles. This model includes the finite size dependence of the effective field...... (approximate to460 K) is less than for bulk NiO (523 K). The magnetic domain size, as estimated from the width of the neutron diffraction peaks corresponding to the antiferromagnetic reflection is smaller than the particle size estimated from the structural peaks. A ferromagnetic contribution is present...

  2. Thermal dissociation of molten KHSO4: Temperature dependence of Raman spectra and thermodynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Christian B.; Kalampounias, Angelos G.; Fehrmann, Rasmus

    2008-01-01

    intensities with the stoichiometric coefficients, the equilibrium constant, and the thermodynamics of the reaction equilibrium is derived. The method is used-along with the temperature-dependent features of the Raman spectra-to show that the studied equilibrium 2HSO(4)(-) (1) S2O72-(1) + H2O(g) is the only......Raman spectroscopy is used to study the thermal dissociation of molten KHSO4 at temperatures of 240-450 degrees C under static equilibrium conditions. Raman spectra obtained at 10 different temperatures for the molten phase and for the vapors thereof exhibit vibrational wavenumbers and relative...... band intensities inferring the occurrence of the temperature-dependent dissociation equilibrium 2HSO(4)(-) (1) S2O72-(1) + H2O(g). The Raman data are adequate for determining the partial pressures of H2O in the gas phase above the molten mixtures. A formalism for correlating relative Raman band...

  3. Competitive adsorption equilibrium model with continuous temperature dependent parameters for naringenin enantiomers on Chiralpak AD column.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jin; Jiang, Xiaoxiao; Guo, Jinghua; Chen, Yongtao; Yu, Weifang

    2015-11-27

    Determination of competitive adsorption equilibrium model with continuous temperature dependent parameters is important for the design and optimization of a chromatographic separation process operated under non-isothermal conditions. In this study, linear pulse experiments were first carried to determine the parameters of transport-dispersive model and their temperature dependences in the range of 283–313 K. Overloaded band profiles of naringenin enantiomers on a Chiralpak AD column were acquired under various temperatures. Three of them were first separately fitted using Langmuir, linear-Langmuir and bi-Langmuir isotherm models substituted into the transport-dispersive column model. The comparison showed that bi-Langmuir model captures more details of the experimental results. This model was then extended with three extra parameters accounting for adsorption heat effects and used to simultaneously fit the band profiles at three temperatures.

  4. A Temperature-Dependent Thermal Model of IGBT Modules Suitable for Circuit-Level Simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Rui; Wang, Huai; Ma, Ke

    2014-01-01

    Thermal impedance of IGBT modules may vary with operating conditions due to that the thermal conductivity and heat capacity of materials are temperature dependent. This paper proposes a Cauer thermal model for a 1700 V/1000 A IGBT module with temperature-dependent thermal resistances and thermal...... relevant reliability aspect performance. A test bench is built up with an ultra-fast infrared (IR) camera to validate the proposed thermal impedance model....... capacitances. The temperature effect is investigated by Finite Element Method (FEM) simulation based on the geometry and material information of the IGBT module. The developed model is ready for circuit-level simulation to achieve an improved accuracy of the estimation on IGBT junction temperature and its...

  5. Inverse temperature dependence of reverse gate leakage current in AlGaN/GaN HEMT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaushik, J. K.; Balakrishnan, V. R.; Panwar, B. S.; Muralidharan, R.

    2013-01-01

    The experimentally observed inverse temperature dependence of the reverse gate leakage current in AlGaN/GaN HEMT is explained using a virtual gate trap-assisted tunneling model. The virtual gate is formed due to the capture of electrons by surface states in the vicinity of actual gate. The increase and decrease in the length of the virtual gate with temperature due to trap kinetics are used to explain this unusual effect. The simulation results have been validated experimentally.

  6. Temperature dependency of the hysteresis behaviour of PZT actuators using Preisach model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mangeot, Charles; Zsurzsan, Tiberiu-Gabriel

    2016-01-01

    The Preisach model is a powerful tool for modelling the hysteresis phenomenon on multilayer piezo actuators under large signal excitation. In this paper, measurements at different temperatures are presented, showing the effect on the density of the Preisach matrix. An energy-based approach...... is presented, aiming at defining a temperature-dependent phenomenological model of hysteresis for a better understanding of the non-linear effects in piezo actuators....

  7. Temperature-dependent respiration-growth relations in ancestral maize cultivars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce N. Smith; Jillian L. Walker; Rebekka L. Stone; Angela R. Jones; Lee D. Hansen

    2001-01-01

    Shoots from 4- to 6-day old seedlings of seven ancestral or old cultivars of Zea mays L. were placed in a calorimeter. Dark metabolic heat rate (q) and CO2 production rate (RCO2) were measured at nine temperatures (5, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30, 35, 40, and 45 °C). Temperature dependencies of q and RCO2 were used to model response of both growth and substrate carbon conversion...

  8. Microbial interactions with the cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa and their dependence on temperature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dziallas, Claudia; Grossart, Hans-Peter

    2012-01-01

    cultures changed in a temperature-dependent manner, its quality greatly varied under the same environmental conditions, but with different associated bacterial communities. Furthermore, temperature affected quantity and quality of cell-bound microcystins, whereby interactions between M. aeruginosa......’ methanogens contributed to the associated microbial community. This implies so far uncharacterized interactions between Microcystis aeruginosa and its associated prokaryotic community, which has unknown ecological consequences in a climatically changing world....

  9. Inferring the temperature dependence of population parameters: the effects of experimental design and inference algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palamara, Gian Marco; Childs, Dylan Z; Clements, Christopher F; Petchey, Owen L; Plebani, Marco; Smith, Matthew J

    2014-12-01

    Understanding and quantifying the temperature dependence of population parameters, such as intrinsic growth rate and carrying capacity, is critical for predicting the ecological responses to environmental change. Many studies provide empirical estimates of such temperature dependencies, but a thorough investigation of the methods used to infer them has not been performed yet. We created artificial population time series using a stochastic logistic model parameterized with the Arrhenius equation, so that activation energy drives the temperature dependence of population parameters. We simulated different experimental designs and used different inference methods, varying the likelihood functions and other aspects of the parameter estimation methods. Finally, we applied the best performing inference methods to real data for the species Paramecium caudatum. The relative error of the estimates of activation energy varied between 5% and 30%. The fraction of habitat sampled played the most important role in determining the relative error; sampling at least 1% of the habitat kept it below 50%. We found that methods that simultaneously use all time series data (direct methods) and methods that estimate population parameters separately for each temperature (indirect methods) are complementary. Indirect methods provide a clearer insight into the shape of the functional form describing the temperature dependence of population parameters; direct methods enable a more accurate estimation of the parameters of such functional forms. Using both methods, we found that growth rate and carrying capacity of Paramecium caudatum scale with temperature according to different activation energies. Our study shows how careful choice of experimental design and inference methods can increase the accuracy of the inferred relationships between temperature and population parameters. The comparison of estimation methods provided here can increase the accuracy of model predictions, with important

  10. Temperature and humidity dependence of bulk resistivity of bakelite for resistive plate chambers in CMS

    CERN Document Server

    Ahn, S H; Bahk, S Y; Gapienko, V A; Hong, B; Hong, S J; Jung, S Y; Kim, J Y; Kim, Y J; Kim, Y U; Koo, D G; Lee, K S; Lee, S J; Lee, Y L; Lim, I T; Nam, S K; Pac, M Y; Park, S K; Ra, Y S; Rhee, J T; Seo, S W; Sim, K S

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents data obtained in a systematic study on the bulk resistivity of Korean bakelike as a function of temperature in the range 20-30 degrees C and relative humidity in the range 35-65%. Strong dependence of resistivity on both temperature and humidity was observed. Measurements were carried out in the framework of R&D work on resistive plate chambers which will be used in the CMS detector. (4 refs).

  11. Dependency in Hydrological Extreme Value Analysis.

    OpenAIRE

    Boniphace, Edwin

    2012-01-01

    Contents Dedication i Acknowledgments iii Contents v List of Figures vii 1 Introduction 1 1.1 Extreme value theory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 1.2 Sum plots . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 1.3 Quantile-quantile plots . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 1.4 Impact of dependence in data on qq-plots . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 1.5 Scope of this thesis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 ...

  12. Temperature dependent properties of InSb and InAs nanowire field-effect transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, Henrik A.; Caroff, Philippe; Thelander, Claes; Lind, Erik; Karlström, Olov; Wernersson, Lars-Erik

    2010-04-01

    We present temperature dependent electrical measurements on InSb and InAs nanowire field-effect transistors (FETs). The FETs are fabricated from InAs/InSb heterostructure nanowires, where one complete transistor is defined within each of the two segments. Both the InSb and the InAs FETs are n-type with good current saturation and low voltage operation. The off-current for the InSb FET shows a strong temperature dependence, which we attribute to a barrier lowering due to an increased band-to-band tunneling in the drain part of the channel.

  13. Temperature dependence of magnetism near defects in SrB sub 6

    CERN Document Server

    Jarlborg, T

    2003-01-01

    The temperature (T) dependence of magnetic moments in SrB sub 6 is studied through spin-polarized band calculations for a supercell of Sr sub 2 sub 7 B sub 1 sub 5 sub 6 containing a B sub 6 vacancy. The magnetic moment decays rather quickly with T despite the fact that only electronic Fermi-Dirac effects are included. This result and the T dependence of moments near an La impurity can hardly explain the reports of a very high Curie temperature in hexaborides, but suggest that the magnetism is caused by some other type of impurity. (letter to the editor)

  14. Thermally Activated Contact Strengthening Explains Nonmonotonic Temperature and Velocity Dependence of Atomic Friction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mykhaylo Evstigneev

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available While the well-established Prandtl-Tomlinson (PT model of atomic friction predicts that the friction force decreases with temperature and grows with velocity, several recent experiments reported that a nonmonotonic temperature dependence and a decreasing velocity dependence may also occur. We propose a minimal extension of the PT model, incorporating the possibility of thermally activated contact strengthening and providing one common framework to quantitatively explain all those “anomalous” experimental findings, as well as the previously known “normal” (PT-like behavior.

  15. Temperature dependence of nanosecond laser pulse thresholds of melanosome and microsphere microcavitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Morgan S.; Kennedy, Paul K.; Noojin, Gary D.; Thomas, Robert J.; Rockwell, Benjamin A.

    2016-01-01

    Melanosome microcavitation is the threshold-level retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) damage mechanism for nanosecond (ns) pulse exposures in the visible and near-infrared (NIR). Thresholds for microcavitation of isolated bovine RPE melanosomes were determined as a function of temperature (20 to 85°C) using single ns laser pulses at 532 and 1064 nm. Melanosomes were irradiated using a 1064-nm Q-switched Nd:YAG (doubled for 532-nm irradiation). For comparison to melanosome data, a similar temperature (20 to 65°C) dependence study was also performed for 532 nm, ns pulse exposures of black polystyrene microbeads. Results indicated a decrease in the microcavitation average radiant exposure threshold with increasing sample temperature for both 532- and 1064-nm single pulse exposures of melanosomes and microbeads. Threshold data and extrapolated nucleation temperatures were used to estimate melanosome absorption coefficients in the visible and NIR, and microbead absorption coefficients in the visible, indicating that melanin is a better absorber of visible light than black polystyrene. The NIR melanosome absorption coefficients ranged from 3713 cm-1 at 800 nm to 222 cm-1 at 1319 nm. These data represent the first temperature-dependent melanosome microcavitation study in the NIR and provide additional information for understanding melanosome microcavitation threshold dependence on wavelength and ambient temperature.

  16. Surprising behaviors in the temperature dependent kinetics of diatomic interhalogens with anions and cations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuman, Nicholas S.; Martinez, Oscar; Ard, Shaun G.; Wiens, Justin P.; Keyes, Nicholas R.; Guo, Hua; Viggiano, Albert A.

    2017-06-01

    Rate constants and product branching fractions of reactions between diatomic interhalogens (ICl, ClF) and a series of anions (Br-, I-) and cations (Ar+, N2+) are measured using a selected ion flow tube apparatus and reported over the temperature range 200-500 K. The efficiency of both anion reactions with ICl is 2%-3% at 300 K to yield Cl-, increasing with temperature in a manner consistent with the small endothermicities of the reactions. The anion reactions with ClF are 10%-20% efficient at 300 K to yield Cl- and also show a positive temperature dependence despite being highly exothermic. The stationary points along the anion + ClF reaction coordinates were calculated using density functional theory, showing no endothermic barriers inhibiting reaction. The observed temperature dependence can be rationalized by a decreasing dipole attraction with increasing rotational energy, but confirmation requires trajectory calculations of the systems. All four cation reactions are fairly efficient at 300 K with small positive temperature dependences, despite large exothermicities to charge transfer. Three of the four reactions proceed exclusively by dissociative charge transfer to yield Cl+. The N2+ + ClF reaction proceeds by both non-dissociative and dissociative charge transfer, with the non-dissociative channel surprisingly increasing with increasing temperature. The origins of these behaviors are not clear and are discussed within the framework of charge-transfer reactions.

  17. Temperature-dependent mechanical deformation of silicon at the nanoscale: Phase transformation versus defect propagation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiran, M. S. R. N., E-mail: kiran.mangalampalli@anu.edu.au; Tran, T. T.; Smillie, L. A.; Subianto, D.; Williams, J. S.; Bradby, J. E. [Department of Electronic Materials Engineering, Research School of Physics and Engineering, Australian National University, Australian Capital Territory, Canberra 2601 (Australia); Haberl, B. [Department of Electronic Materials Engineering, Research School of Physics and Engineering, Australian National University, Australian Capital Territory, Canberra 2601 (Australia); Chemical and Engineering Materials Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States)

    2015-05-28

    This study uses high-temperature nanoindentation coupled with in situ electrical measurements to investigate the temperature dependence (25–200 °C) of the phase transformation behavior of diamond cubic (dc) silicon at the nanoscale. Along with in situ indentation and electrical data, ex situ characterizations, such as Raman and cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy, have been used to reveal the indentation-induced deformation mechanisms. We find that phase transformation and defect propagation within the crystal lattice are not mutually exclusive deformation processes at elevated temperature. Both can occur at temperatures up to 150 °C but to different extents, depending on the temperature and loading conditions. For nanoindentation, we observe that phase transformation is dominant below 100 °C but that deformation by twinning along (111) planes dominates at 150 °C and 200 °C. This work, therefore, provides clear insight into the temperature dependent deformation mechanisms in dc-Si at the nanoscale and helps to clarify previous inconsistencies in the literature.

  18. Quantitative time-course metabolomics in human red blood cells reveal the temperature dependence of human metabolic networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yurkovich, James T; Zielinski, Daniel C; Yang, Laurence; Paglia, Giuseppe; Rolfsson, Ottar; Sigurjónsson, Ólafur E; Broddrick, Jared T; Bordbar, Aarash; Wichuk, Kristine; Brynjólfsson, Sigurður; Palsson, Sirus; Gudmundsson, Sveinn; Palsson, Bernhard O

    2017-12-01

    The temperature dependence of biological processes has been studied at the levels of individual biochemical reactions and organism physiology (e.g. basal metabolic rates) but has not been examined at the metabolic network level. Here, we used a systems biology approach to characterize the temperature dependence of the human red blood cell (RBC) metabolic network between 4 and 37 °C through absolutely quantified exo- and endometabolomics data. We used an Arrhenius-type model (Q10) to describe how the rate of a biochemical process changes with every 10 °C change in temperature. Multivariate statistical analysis of the metabolomics data revealed that the same metabolic network-level trends previously reported for RBCs at 4 °C were conserved but accelerated with increasing temperature. We calculated a median Q10 coefficient of 2.89 ± 1.03, within the expected range of 2-3 for biological processes, for 48 individual metabolite concentrations. We then integrated these metabolomics measurements into a cell-scale metabolic model to study pathway usage, calculating a median Q10 coefficient of 2.73 ± 0.75 for 35 reaction fluxes. The relative fluxes through glycolysis and nucleotide metabolism pathways were consistent across the studied temperature range despite the non-uniform distributions of Q10 coefficients of individual metabolites and reaction fluxes. Together, these results indicate that the rate of change of network-level responses to temperature differences in RBC metabolism is consistent between 4 and 37 °C. More broadly, we provide a baseline characterization of a biochemical network given no transcriptional or translational regulation that can be used to explore the temperature dependence of metabolism. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  19. Intensity and temperature-dependent photoluminescence of tris (8-hydroxyquinoline) aluminum films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ajward, A. M.; Wang, X.; Wagner, H. P. [Department of Physics, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, Ohio 45221 (United States)

    2013-12-04

    We investigate the recombination of excitons in tris (8-hydroxyquinoline) aluminum films by intensity and temperature dependent time-resolved photoluminescence (PL). At low temperature (15 K) and elevated excitation intensity the radiative emission is quenched by singlet-singlet annihilation processes. With rising temperature the PL quenching is strongly reduced resulting in a PL efficiency maximum at ∼170 K. The reduced exciton annihilation is attributed to thermally activated occupation of non-quenchable trapped exciton states. Above 170 K the PL efficiency decreases due to thermal de-trapping of radiative states and subsequent migration to non-radiative centers.

  20. Physico-chemical characterization of the temperature dependent hydration kinetics of Gleditsia sinensis gum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jian, Hong-Lei; Lin, Xue-Jiao; Zhang, Wei-Ming; Sun, Da-Feng; Jiang, Jian-Xin

    2013-11-01

    The physico-chemical properties and hydration kinetics of Gleditsia sinensis gum were investigated to evaluate its temperature dependence. The increase of temperature resulted in improved solubility of G. sinensis gum, and the dissolved galactomannan showed decreased degree of galactose substitution (DSGal) and increased molecular weight (p0.96), and the hydration index t0.8 at different temperatures varied in the range of 51-302 min. It was found that galactomannan with low DSGal and high molecular weight exhibited slow hydration rate and poor solubility. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. A Temperature-Dependent Thermal Model of IGBT Modules Suitable for Circuit-Level Simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Rui; Wang, Huai; Pedersen, Kristian Bonderup

    2016-01-01

    A basic challenge in the IGBT transient simulation study is to obtain the realistic junction temperature, which demands not only accurate electrical simulations but also precise thermal impedance. This paper proposed a transient thermal model for IGBT junction temperature simulations during short...... circuits or overloads. The updated Cauer thermal model with varying thermal parameters is obtained by means of FEM thermal simulations with temperature-dependent physical parameters. The proposed method is applied to a case study of a 1700 V/1000 A IGBT module. Furthermore, a testing setup is built up...

  2. Temperature dependence of large positive magnetoresistance in hybrid ferromagnetic/semiconductor devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overend, N.; Nogaret, A.; Gallagher, B. L.; Main, P. C.; Henini, M.; Marrows, C. H.; Howson, M. A.; Beaumont, S. P.

    1998-04-01

    We investigate a new type of magnetoresistance (MR) in which the resistivity of a near-surface two-dimensional electron gas is controlled by the magnetization of a submicron ferromagnetic grating defined on the surface of the device. We observe an increase in resistance of up to ˜1500% at a temperature of 4 K and ˜1% at 300 K. The magnitude and temperature dependence of the MR are well accounted for by a semiclassical theory. Optimization of device parameters is expected to increase considerably the magnitude of the room temperature MR.

  3. Temperature-Dependent Electrical and Micromechanical Properties of Lanthanum Titanate with Additions of Yttria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldsby, Jon C.

    2010-01-01

    Temperature-dependent elastic properties were determined by establishing continuous flexural vibrations in the material at its lowest resonance frequency of 31tHz. The imaginary part of the complex impedance plotted as a function of frequency and temperature reveals a thermally activated peak, which decreases in magnitude as the temperature increases. Additions of yttria do not degrade the electromechanical in particularly the elastic and anelastic properties of lanthanum titanate. Y2O3/La2Ti2O7 exhibits extremely low internal friction and hence may be more mechanical fatigue-resistant at low strains.

  4. Modelling temperature-dependent heat production over decades in High Arctic coal waste rock piles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hollesen, Jørgen; Elberling, Bo; Jansson, P.E.

    2011-01-01

    Subsurface heat production from oxidation of pyrite is an important process that may increase subsurface temperatures within coal waste rock piles and increase the release of acid mine drainage, AMD. Waste rock piles in the Arctic are especially vulnerable to changes in subsurface temperatures...... as the release of AMD normally is limited by permafrost. Here we show that temperatures within a 20 year old heat-producing waste rock pile in Svalbard (78°N) can be modelled by the one-dimensional heat and water flow model (CoupModel) with a new temperature-dependent heat-production module that includes both...... biological and chemical oxidation processes and heat source depletion over time. Inputs to the model are meteorological measurements, physical properties of the waste rock material and measured subsurface heat-production rates. Measured mean annual subsurface temperatures within the waste rock pile are up...

  5. Temperature dependence of vegetative growth and dark respiration: a mathematical model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gent, M P; Enoch, H Z

    1983-03-01

    A mathematical model of the processes involved in carbon metabolism is described that predicts the influence of temperature on the growth of plants. The model assumes that the rate of production of dry matter depends both on the temperature and the level of nonstructural carbohydrate. The level of nonstructural carbohydrate is determined by the rates of photosynthesis, growth, and maintenance respiration. The model describes the rate of growth and dark respiration, and the levels of carbohydrate seen in vegetative growth of carnation and tomato. The model suggests that the growth of plants at low temperatures is limited by a shortage of respiratory energy, whereas at high temperatures growth is limited by the shortage of carbohydrate. Thermoperiodism, wherein a warm day and cool night results in faster growth than does constant temperature, is explained by the model as an increase in the level of nonstructural carbohydrate which promotes the rate of growth relative to the rate of maintenance respiration.

  6. Temperature-dependent regulation of reproduction in the diving beetle Dytiscus sharpi (Coleoptera: Dytiscidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoda, Toshio; Tajima, Fumitada; Taniguchi, Hiroshi; Saeki, Motoyuki; Numakura, Kazuki; Hasegawa, Masami; Kamimura, Shinji

    2007-11-01

    The effects of temperature on the mating behavior, gonad development, germ cell maturation, and egg spawning of the predaceous diving beetle Dytiscus sharpi (Coleoptera; Dytiscidae), were investigated. By field observations, we found that mating behavior started in October and occurred more frequently from November to December. Under our laboratory breeding conditions, we observed almost the same seasonal variation in mating behavior. We found that temperatures lower than 20 degrees C were required to trigger mating behavior. We also found the same temperature threshold triggered gonadogenesis as well as spermatogenesis. Furthermore, for females, exposure to lower temperatures (<8 degrees C) during the winter was required for egg maturation and spawning in spring; that is, there was a second threshold for successful female reproduction. We conclude that the termination of summer reproductive diapause of D. sharpi is regulated in a temperature-dependent manner, thus effecting the adaptation of D. sharpi to southern warm habitats.

  7. Temperature dependence of the non-local spin Seebeck effect in YIG/Pt nanostructures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathrin Ganzhorn

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available We study the transport of thermally excited non-equilibrium magnons through the ferrimagnetic insulator YIG using two electrically isolated Pt strips as injector and detector. The diffusing magnons induce a non-local inverse spin Hall voltage in the detector corresponding to the so-called non-local spin Seebeck effect (SSE. We measure the non-local SSE as a function of temperature and strip separation. In experiments at room temperature we observe a sign change of the non-local SSE voltage at a characteristic strip separation d0, in agreement with previous investigations. At lower temperatures however, we find a strong temperature dependence of d0. This suggests that both the angular momentum transfer across the YIG/Pt interface as well as the transport mechanism of the magnons in YIG as a function of temperature must be taken into account to describe the non-local SSE.

  8. Temperature dependent diode and photovoltaic characteristics of graphene-GaN heterojunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalita, Golap; Dzulsyahmi Shaarin, Muhammad; Paudel, Balaram; Mahyavanshi, Rakesh; Tanemura, Masaki

    2017-07-01

    Understanding the charge carrier transport characteristics at the graphene-GaN interface is of significant importance for the fabrication of efficient photoresponsive devices. Here, we report on the temperature dependent diode and photovoltaic characteristics of a graphene/n-GaN heterostructure based Schottky junction. The graphene/n-GaN heterojunction showed rectifying diode characteristics and photovoltaic action with photoresponsivity in the ultra-violet wavelength. The current-voltage characteristics of the graphene/n-GaN heterojunction device were investigated under dark and light illumination with changes in temperature. Under dark conditions, an increase in the forward bias current as well as saturation current was observed, and a decrease in the device ideality factor was obtained with an increase in temperature. Under illumination of light, a decrease in the open circuit voltage (Voc) and an increase in the short circuit current density (Jsc) was obtained with an increase in temperature. The increase in saturation current and carrier recombination with the increase in temperature leads to a reduction in Voc, while the photo-generated carrier increases in the heterojunction interface at higher temperatures contributing to the increase in Jsc. The observed temperature dependent device characteristics of the graphene/n-GaN heterojunction can be significant to understand the junction behavior and photovoltaic action.

  9. Temperature dependence of optical properties in Nd/Cr:YAG materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Honda, Yoshiyuki, E-mail: honda-y@ile.osaka-u.ac.jp [Institute of Laser Engineering, Osaka University, 2-6 Yamada-oka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Motokoshi, Shinji [Institute for Laser Technology, 1-8-4 Utsubo-honmachi, Nishi-ku, Osaka 550-0004 (Japan); Jitsuno, Takahisa; Miyanaga, Noriaki; Fujioka, Kana [Institute of Laser Engineering, Osaka University, 2-6 Yamada-oka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Nakatsuka, Masahiro [Institute for Laser Technology, 1-8-4 Utsubo-honmachi, Nishi-ku, Osaka 550-0004 (Japan); Yoshida, Minoru [Kinki University, 3-4-1 Kowakae, Higashi-osaka, Osaka 577-8052 (Japan)

    2014-04-15

    The energy transfer from Cr{sup 3+} to Nd{sup 3+} for Nd/Cr:YAG (Nd: 1.0%, Cr: 2.0%) materials was investigated by measuring the temperature dependences of fluorescence characteristics. The fluorescence intensity of Nd{sup 3+} increased with temperature owing to enhancement of the absorption coefficient of Cr{sup 3+}. The energy transfer efficiency was constant from 77 to 450 K. The energy transfer time decreased with increasing temperature. -- Highlights: • We investigate the energy transfer from Cr{sup 3+} to Nd{sup 3+} in Nd/Cr:YAG materials by measuring the temperature dependence of fluorescence characteristics. • The fluorescence intensity of Nd{sup 3+} increased with temperature owing to enhancement of the absorption coefficient of Cr{sup 3+}. • The energy transfer efficiency was constant from 77 to 450 K. • The energy transfer time decreased with increasing temperature. • Nd/Cr:YAG ceramics pumped by a flash lamp would not only provide high conversion efficiency, but can also be expected to function as an effective laser operating at high temperature.

  10. Fabrication and temperature-dependent field-emission properties of bundlelike VO2 nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Haihong; Luo, Min; Yu, Ke; Gao, Yanfeng; Huang, Rong; Zhang, Zhengli; Zeng, Min; Cao, Chuanxiang; Zhu, Ziqiang

    2011-06-01

    Bundlelike VO(2)(B) nanostructures were synthesized via a hydrothermal method, and VO(2)(M(1)/R) nanobundles were obtained after a heat-treatment process. Structural characterization shows that these nanobundles are self-assembled by VO(2) nanowires, and VO(2)(M(1)/R) nanobundles have better crystallinity. Temperature-dependent field-emission (FE) measurement indicates that FE properties of these two phases of nanobundles can both be improved by increasing the ambient temperature. Moreover, for the VO(2)(M(1)/R) nanobundles, their FE properties are also strongly dependent on the temperature-induced metal-insulator transitions process. Compared with poor FE properties found in the insulating phase, FE properties were significantly improved by increasing the temperature, and about a three-orders-of-magnitude increasing of the emission current density has been observed at a fixed field of 6 V/μm. Work function measurement and density-functional theory calculations indicated that the decrease of work function with temperature is the main reason that caused the improvement of FE properties. These characteristics make VO(2)(M(1)/R) a candidate material for application of new type of temperature-controlled field emitters, whose emission density can be adjusted by ambient temperature. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  11. Temperature-Dependent Development Modeling of the Phorid Fly Megaselia halterata (Wood) (Diptera: Phoridae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barzegar, S; Zamani, A A; Abbasi, S; Vafaei Shooshtari, R; Shirvani Farsani, N

    2016-10-01

    The effect of temperature on the development of Megaselia halterata (Wood) (Diptera: Phoridae) on A15 variety of button mushroom in the stages of casing and spawn-running was investigated at eight constant temperatures (10, 12.5, 15, 18, 20, 22.5, 25, and 27°C) and developmental rates were modeled as a function of temperature. At 25 and 27°C, an average of 22.2 ± 0.14 and 20.0 ± 0.10 days was needed for M. halterata to complete its development from oviposition to adult eclosion in the stages of casing and spawn-running, respectively. The developmental times of males or females at various constant temperatures were significantly different. Among the linear models, the Ikemoto and Takai linear model in the absence of 12.5 and 25°C showed the best statistical goodness-of-fit and based on this model, the lower developmental threshold and the thermal constant were estimated as 10.4°C and 526.3 degree-days, respectively. Twelve nonlinear temperature-dependent models were examined to find the best model to describe the relationship between temperature and development rate of M. halterata. The Logan 10 nonlinear model provided the best estimation for T opt and T max and is strongly recommended for the description of temperature-dependent development of M. halterata.

  12. The temperature dependence of luminescence from a long-lasting phosphor exposed to ionizing radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Kowatari, M; Satoh, Y; Iinuma, K; Uchida, S I

    2002-01-01

    The temperature dependence of luminescence from a long-lasting phosphor (LLP), SrAl sub 2 O sub 4 : Eu sup 2 sup + ,Dy sup 3 sup + , exposed to ionizing radiation has been measured to understand the LLP luminescence mechanism. Evaluation of the decay constants of the LLP exposed to alpha-, beta- or gamma-rays at temperatures from 200 to 390 K showed that the decay constant is divided into four components ranging from 10 sup - sup 4 to 10 sup - sup 1 s sup - sup 1 with activation energies of 0.02-0.35 eV. Total luminous intensity from the LLP with changing irradiation temperature has its maximum value around the room temperature. Irradiation at elevated temperature (390 K) has the total luminescence pattern with monotonous decrease as temperature rises. As a result of evaluating the temperature dependence of luminescence, the luminescence mechanism is considered as follows: (1.) holes generated by irradiation are stored at Dy sup 3 sup + sites (hole traps) and then released to recombine with electrons trapped ...

  13. Temperature-dependence on the structural, optical, andparamagnetic properties of ZnO nanostructures

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mhlongo, GH

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Violet-blue emitting ZnO nanostructures were synthesized by a microwave-assisted hydrothermal method followed by post-synthesis annealing at different temperatures. Scanning electron microscope analysis revealed a morphological transformation upon...

  14. Comprehensive study of internal quantum efficiency of high-brightness GaN-based light-emitting diodes by temperature-dependent electroluminescence method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yaqi; Pan, Mengshu; Li, Ting

    2014-02-01

    We report on the development of a temperature-dependent electroluminescence experimental setup for characterizing the internal quantum efficiency (IQE) of high-brightness GaN-based light-emitting diodes (LEDs). A systematic IQE study of commercial LED chips from major LED manufacturers (including Cree, Nichia, Osram, and Sanan) is presented. The chips show distinctive temperature- and current-dependence in the IQE behavior. Analysis to correlate the onset of droop with the onset of high injection is also presented.

  15. Temperature dependence of nickel oxide effect on the optoelectronic properties of porous silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riahi, R., E-mail: riahirim01@gmail.com [Laboratory of Semiconductors, Nanostructures and Advanced Technology (LSNTA), Research and Technology Center of Energy, Tourist Road Soliman, BP 95, 2050 Hammam-Lif (Tunisia); Faculty of Sciences Tunis–El Manar University (Tunisia); Derbali, L. [Laboratory of Semiconductors, Nanostructures and Advanced Technology (LSNTA), Research and Technology Center of Energy, Tourist Road Soliman, BP 95, 2050 Hammam-Lif (Tunisia); Ouertani, B. [Laboratory of Semiconductors, Nanostructures and Advanced Technology (LSNTA), Research and Technology Center of Energy, Tourist Road Soliman, BP 95, 2050 Hammam-Lif (Tunisia); Higher Institute of Environment Science and Technology of Borj-Cedria (Tunisia); Ezzaouia, H. [Laboratory of Semiconductors, Nanostructures and Advanced Technology (LSNTA), Research and Technology Center of Energy, Tourist Road Soliman, BP 95, 2050 Hammam-Lif (Tunisia)

    2017-05-15

    Highlights: • The treatment of porous silicon (PS) with nickel oxide (NiO) decreases the reflectivity significantly. • FTIR analysis showed a substitution of Si−H bonds to Si−O−Si and Si−O−Ni after the thermal annealing. • Annealing the treated NiO/PS at 400 °C leads to a noticeable improvement of the photoluminescence (PL) intensity. • A blueshift was obtained in the PL spectra due to the decrease of silicon nanocrystallites size after exceeding 400 °C. - Abstract: This paper investigates the effect of Nickel oxide (NiO) on the structural and optical properties of porous silicon (PS). Our investigations showed an obvious improvement of porous silicon optoelectronique properties after coating the PS with NiO thin film as a passivating process. The as-prepared NiO/PS thin film was subjected to a thermal annealing to study the effect of temperature on the efficiency of this treatment. The deposition of NiO onto the porous silicon layer was performed using the spray pyrolysis method. The surface modification of the as-prepared NiO/PS samples was investigated after annealing at various temperatures, using an infrared furnace, ranging between 300 °C and 600 °C. The X-ray Diffraction results showed that obtained films show cubic structure with preferred (200) plane orientation. We found an obvious dependence of the PS nanocrystallites size (nc-Si) to the annealing temperature. Photoluminescence (PL) is directly related to the electronic structure and transitions. The characteristic change of the band gap with decrease in size of the nanostructures can be pointed out by the observed blue shift in the photoluminescence spectra. Nickel oxide treatment of Porous silicon led to a significant increase of photoluminescence with a resulting blue-shift at higher annealing temperature. The surface morphology was examined by scanning electron microscope (SEM), and FTIR spectroscopy was used to study the chemical composition of the films. Moreover, the total

  16. The effect of temperature dependent tissue parameters on acoustic radiation force induced displacements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suomi, Visa; Han, Yang; Konofagou, Elisa; Cleveland, Robin O.

    2016-10-01

    Multiple ultrasound elastography techniques rely on acoustic radiation force (ARF) in monitoring high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) therapy. However, ARF is dependent on tissue attenuation and sound speed, both of which are also known to change with temperature making the therapy monitoring more challenging. Furthermore, the viscoelastic properties of tissue are also temperature dependent, which affects the displacements induced by ARF. The aim of this study is to quantify the temperature dependent changes in the acoustic and viscoelastic properties of liver and investigate their effect on ARF induced displacements by using both experimental methods and simulations. Furthermore, the temperature dependent viscoelastic properties of liver are experimentally measured over a frequency range of 0.1-200 Hz at temperatures reaching 80 °C, and both conventional and fractional Zener models are used to fit the data. The fractional Zener model was found to fit better with the experimental viscoelasticity data with respect to the conventional model with up to two orders of magnitude lower sum of squared errors (SSE). The characteristics of experimental displacement data were also seen in the simulations due to the changes in attenuation coefficient and lesion development. At low temperatures before thermal ablation, attenuation was found to affect the displacement amplitude. At higher temperature, the decrease in displacement amplitude occurs approximately at 60-70 °C due to the combined effect of viscoelasticity changes and lesion growth overpowering the effect of attenuation. The results suggest that it is necessary to monitor displacement continuously during HIFU therapy in order to ascertain when ablation occurs.

  17. Temperature dependent structural, vibrational and magnetic properties of K3Gd5(PO4)6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bevara, Samatha; Achary, S Nagabhusan; Mishra, Karuna Kara; Ravindran, T R; Sinha, Anil K; Sastry, P U; Tyagi, Avesh Kumar

    2017-02-22

    Herein we report the evolution of the crystal structure of K3Gd5(PO4)6 in the temperature range from 20 K to 1073 K, as observed from variable temperature X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopic studies. K3Gd5(PO4)6 has an open tunnel containing a three dimensional structure built by [Gd5(PO4)6]3- ions which in turn are formed of PO4 tetrahedra and GdOn (n = 8 and 9) polyhedra. The empty tunnels in the structure are occupied by K+ ions and maintain charge neutrality in the lattice. Evolution of unit cell parameters with temperature shows a systematic increase with temperature. The average axial thermal expansion coefficients between 20 K and 1073 K are: αa = 10.6 × 10-6 K-1, αb = 5.5 × 10-6 K-1 and αc = 16.4 × 10-6 K-1. The evolution of distortion indices of the various coordination polyhedra with temperature indicates a gradual decrease with increasing temperature, while those of Gd2O9 and K2O8 polyhedra show opposite trends. The overall anisotropy of the lattice thermal expansion is found to be controlled largely by the effect of temperature on GdOn polyhedra and their linkages. Temperature dependent Raman spectroscopic studies indicated that the intensities and wavenumbers of most of the Raman modes decrease continuously with increasing temperature. Anharmonic analyses of Raman modes indicated that the lattice, rigid translation and librational modes have larger contributions towards thermal expansion of K3Gd5(PO4)6 compared to high frequency internal modes. The temperature and field dependent magnetic measurements indicated no long range ordering down to 2 K and the observed effective magnetic moment per Gd3+ ion and the Weiss constant are 7.91 μB and 0.38 K, respectively.

  18. Temperature dependence of the magnetic structure of TbCu2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sima, V.; Smetana, Z.; Lebech, Bente

    1986-01-01

    The orthorhombic compound TbCu2 was studied by neutron powder diffraction. The temperature development of the magnetic structure is interpreted by means of Fourier analysis of the diffraction data below TN = 55 K.......The orthorhombic compound TbCu2 was studied by neutron powder diffraction. The temperature development of the magnetic structure is interpreted by means of Fourier analysis of the diffraction data below TN = 55 K....

  19. Temperature Dependence of Near-Infrared CO_2 Line Shapes Measured by Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghysels, Mélanie; Fleisher, Adam J.; Liu, Qingnan; Hodges, Joseph T.

    2017-06-01

    We present high signal-to-noise ratio, mode-by-mode cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS) line shape measurements of air-broadened transitions in the 30013 → 0001 band of ^{12}C^{16}O_2 located near λ = 1.6 μm. Absorption spectra were acquired from (230-290) K with a variable-temperature spectrometer developed in the framework of the NASA Orbiting Carbon Observatory-2 Mission to improve our understanding of carbon dioxide and oxygen line shape parameters. This system comprises a monolithic, thermally stabilized two-mirror, optical resonator exhibiting a mode stability of 200 kHz and a minimum detectable absorption coefficient of 10^{-11} cm^{-1}. Observed spectra were modeled the using the recently recommended Hartmann-Tran line profile (HTP) (and several of its limiting cases) which includes the effects of Dicke narrowing, speed dependent broadening, correlation between velocity- and phase-changing collisions and first-order line mixing effects. At fixed temperature, line shape parameters were determined by constrained multispectrum fitting of spectra acquired over the pressure range (30 - 300) Torr. For each transition considered, analysis of the temperature dependence of the fitted line shape parameters yielded the pressure-broadening temperature exponent and speed dependence parameter, where the latter quantity was found to be in good agreement with theoretical values consistent with the HTP model. Tennyson, et al., Pure Appl. Chem. 86, (2014) 1931

  20. Target temperature dependence of contact angle of water for silica glasses irradiated by argon ions without mass-separation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okabe, Yoshio; Tanisawa, Kazuhiko; Ito, Katsutaka; Kawajiri, Kyoji [Saitama Inst. of Tech., Okabe (Japan); Nakao, Aiko; Iwaki, Masaya; Ogiso, Hisato; Nakano, Shizuka

    1995-06-01

    Target temperature dependence of the contact angle of pure water for silica glasses during argon ion irradiation is studied in order to reduce or suppress the adsorption of hydrocarbons on silica glasses accompanying to ion beam irradiation. Argon ions were irradiated with a straight type ion implanter SIT-100 with ion acceleration voltage of 80 kV and a quantity of electricity for ion irradiation of 0.1 to 20 mC/cm{sup 2}. The target temperature during ion irradiation is controlled by the temperature control of the circulating water through the target holder. Temperature of the circulating water is 3 to 57degC. The contact angle of silica glass irradiated with Ar ions is high as 70 - 80deg in case of 1 mC/cm{sup 2} irradiation at a temperature of about 40degC and low as 30 to 40deg at 3 to 31degC. Results of the quantitative analysis of the surface compositions by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy show that the carbon concentration at the glass surface is similar to that of the unirradiated glass in case of low target temperature. Consequently, the target temperature during the irradiation is found to be one of factors to reduce the hydrocarbon adsorption. (T.H.).

  1. Temperature-dependent photoluminescence of cadmium-free Cu-Zn-In-S quantum dot thin films as temperature probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lan; Kang, Xiaojiao; Huang, Lijian; Pan, Daocheng

    2015-12-21

    We reported temperature-dependent photoluminescence (PL) studies on Cu-Zn-In-S quantum dot (QD) thin films. In this paper, cadmium-free and luminescent Cu-Zn-In-S quantum dot thin films were in situ formed by thermal decomposition of molecular-based precursors in the open air, without need of the complicated quantum dot synthesis. Molecular-based precursor solutions were prepared by dissolving Cu2O, ZnO, and In(OH)3 in the ethanol solution of butylamine and carbon disulfide. The effects of sintering temperature, sintering time, and the concentration of capping agents on the photoluminescence properties of Cu-Zn-In-S QD thin films have been systematically investigated. It was found that alkali metal ions play an important role in enhancing the PL quantum yield of quantum dot thin films. The as-prepared QD thin films show composition-tunable emission in the range of 535 nm to 677 nm, and the absolute PL quantum yields can reach as high as 22.1%. All of the as-deposited QD thin films show a single-exponential decay to temperature, indicating that these cadmium-free QD thin films have high potential as temperature probes.

  2. [Atomic force microscopy monitoring of temperature dependence of cytochrome BM3 oligomeric state].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bukharina, N S; Ivanov, Iu D; Pleshakova, T O; Frantsuzov, P A; Ivanova, N D; Krokhin, N V; Petushkova, N A; Archakov, A I

    2015-01-01

    The change in temperature is one of the factors affecting the activity of enzymes. In this work thermal denaturation and aggregation of cytochrome P450 BM3 were studied by atomic force microscopy. To determine specific temperature transitions the fluorescence analysis was used. In the low melting temperature range, 10-33 degrees C, a decrease in the fluorescence intensity of aromatic residues was observed with an increase in the fluorescence intensity of flavin groups. Protein melting in this range indicated three narrow S-shaped cooperative transitions at temperatures 16, 22 and 29 degrees C. Atomic force microscopy analysis in this temperature range showed that the shape of BM3 molecules remained globular in the form of compact objects (heights h < 7 nm, lateral dimensions d < 50 nm), but protein oligomeric state changed. The first two transitions were accompanied by a decrease in the degree of oligomerization and the third one was accompanied by its increase.

  3. The role of electron transport in determining the temperature dependence of the photosynthetic rate in spinach leaves grown at contrasting temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamori, Wataru; Noguchi, Ko; Kashino, Yasuhiro; Terashima, Ichiro

    2008-04-01

    The temperature response of the uncoupled whole-chain electron transport rate (ETR) in thylakoid membranes differs depending on the growth temperature. However, the steps that limit whole-chain ETR are still unclear and the question of whether the temperature dependence of whole-chain ETR reflects that of the photosynthetic rate remains unresolved. Here, we determined the whole-chain, PSI and PSII ETR in thylakoid membranes isolated from spinach leaves grown at 30 degrees C [high temperature (HT)] and 15 degrees C [low temperature (LT)]. We measured temperature dependencies of the light-saturated photosynthetic rate at 360 microl l(-1) CO2 (A360) in HT and LT leaves. Both of the temperature dependences of whole-chain ETR and of A360 were different depending on the growth temperature. Whole-chain ETR was less than the rates of PSI ETR and PSII ETR in the broad temperature range, indicating that the process was limited by diffusion processes between the PSI and PSII. However, at high temperatures, whole-chain ETR appeared to be limited by not only the diffusion processes but also PSII ETR. The C3 photosynthesis model was used to evaluate the limitations of A360 by whole-chain ETR (Pr) and ribulose bisphosphate carboxylation (Pc). In HT leaves, A360 was co-limited by Pc and Pr at low temperatures, whereas at high temperatures, A360 was limited by Pc. On the other hand, in LT leaves, A360 was solely limited by Pc over the entire temperature range. The optimum temperature for A360 was determined by Pc in both HT and LT leaves. Thus, this study showed that, at low temperatures, the limiting step of A360 was different depending on the growth temperature, but was limited by Pc at high temperatures regardless of the growth temperatures.

  4. Temperature Dependence and Magnetic Properties of Injection Molding Tool Materials Used in Induction Heating

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guerrier, Patrick; Nielsen, Kaspar Kirstein; Hattel, Jesper Henri

    2015-01-01

    To analyze the heating phase of an induction heated injection molding tool precisely, the temperature-dependent magnetic properties, B–H curves, and the hysteresis loss are necessary for the molding tool materials. Hence, injection molding tool steels, core materials among other materials have...

  5. Role of heat advection in a channeled lava flow with power law, temperature-dependent rheology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filippucci, Marilena; Tallarico, Andrea; Dragoni, Michele

    2013-06-01

    The cooling of a lava flow, both in the transient and the steady state, is investigated considering that lava rheology is pseudoplastic and dependent on temperature. Lava exits from the vent with constant velocity and flows down a slope under the effect of gravity force inside a channel of rectangular cross section. We consider that cooling of lava is caused by thermal radiation into the atmosphere and thermal conduction at the channel walls and at the ground. The heat equation is solved numerically in a 3-D computational domain, and the solution is tested to evaluate the numerical errors. We study the steady state and the initial transient period of lava cooling. Results indicate that the advective heat transport significantly modifies the cooling rate of lava, slowing down the cooling process. Since the lava velocity depends on temperature, the cooling rate depends on the effusion temperature. Velocity profiles are modified during cooling showing two marginal static zones where the crust can form and remain stable. The fraction of crust coverage is calculated under the assumption that the solid lava is a plastic body with temperature-dependent yield strength. We numerically confirm that heat advection cannot be neglected in the mechanism of formation of lava tubes.

  6. Observed and simulated temperature dependence of the liquid water path of low clouds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Del Genio, A.D.; Wolf, A.B. [NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies, New York, NY (United States)

    1996-04-01

    Data being acquired at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Southern great Plains (SGP) Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) site can be used to examine the factors determining the temperature dependence of cloud optical thickness. We focus on cloud liquid water and physical thickness variations which can be derived from existing ARM measurements.

  7. Temperature dependence of UV radiation effects in Arctic and temperate isolates of three red macrophytes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Poll, W.H.; Eggert, A.; Buma, A.G.J.; Breeman, Arno

    The temperature dependence of UV effects was studied for Arctic and temperate isolates of the red macrophytes Palmaria palmata, Coccotylus truncatus and Phycodrys rubens. The effects of daily repeated artificial ultraviolet B and A radiation (UVBR: 280-320 nm, UVAR: 320-400 nm) treatments were

  8. The Heated Laminar Vertical Jet in a Liquid with Power-law Temperature Dependence of Density

    OpenAIRE

    Sharifulin, V. A.

    2009-01-01

    The analytical solution of heated laminar vertical jet in a liquid with power-law temperature dependence of density was obtained in the skin-layer approximation for certain values of Prandtl number. Cases of point and linear sources were considered.

  9. Temperature-dependent infrared and calorimetric studies on arsenicals adsorption from solution to hematite nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    To address the lack of systematic and surface sensitive studies on the adsorption energetics of arsenic compounds on metal (oxyhydr)oxides, we conducted temperature-dependent ATR-FTIR studies for the adsorption of arsenate, monomethylarsonic acid, and dimethylarsinic acid on hematite nanoparticles a...

  10. PRELIMINARY s'T'u_D|Es" on TEMPERATURE DEPENDENCE 'QF ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bartington MS2B sensor operating at low frequency. The temperature dependence of magnetic.susceptibility experiment was carried out on representative samples using the. Bartington MS2X/T system (Fig.2). The samples' were frozen in the refrigerator to nearly 0°C and then quickly transferred to the water (MS2W) sensor.

  11. Temperature dependent behaviour of lead sulfide quantum dot solar cells and films

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Speirs, Mark J.; Dirin, Dmitry N.; Abdu-Aguye, Mustapha; Balazs, Daniel M.; Kovalenko, Maksym V.; Loi, Maria Antonietta

    2016-01-01

    Despite increasing greatly in power conversion efficiency in recent times, lead sulfide quantum dot (PbS QD) solar cells still suffer from a low open circuit voltage (V-OC) and fill factor (FF). In this work, we explore the temperature dependent behavior of similar to 9% efficient solar cells. In

  12. Demonstrating the Temperature Dependence of Density via Construction of a Galilean Thermometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priest, Marie A.; Padgett, Lea W.; Padgett, Clifford W.

    2011-01-01

    A method for the construction of a Galilean thermometer out of common chemistry glassware is described. Students in a first-semester physical chemistry (thermodynamics) class can construct the Galilean thermometer as an investigation of the thermal expansivity of liquids and the temperature dependence of density. This is an excellent first…

  13. The temperature dependence of Cr3+ : YAG zero-phonon lines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marceddu, Marco; Manca, Marianna; Ricci, Pier Carlo; Anedda, Alberto

    2012-01-01

    This paper deals with the photoluminescence temperature dependence of the zero-phonon lines of Cr3+ ions in an yttrium aluminium garnet (YAG) matrix. Experimental data were analysed in the framework of electron-phonon coupling in the quadratic approximation and it was found that Cr3+ ions in the YAG

  14. Temperature- and pressure-dependent lattice behaviour of RbFe(MoO4)(2)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Waskowska, A.; Gerward, Leif; Olsen, J. S.

    2010-01-01

    Trigonal RbFe(MoO4)(2) is a quasi-two-dimensional antiferromagnet on a triangular lattice below T-N = 3.8 K, The crystal exhibits also a structural phase transition at T-c = 190 K related to symmetry change from Pm1 to P. We present the temperature-and pressure-dependent characteristics of this m......Trigonal RbFe(MoO4)(2) is a quasi-two-dimensional antiferromagnet on a triangular lattice below T-N = 3.8 K, The crystal exhibits also a structural phase transition at T-c = 190 K related to symmetry change from Pm1 to P. We present the temperature-and pressure-dependent characteristics...... of this material in the context of ambiguous opinions on the symmetry and crystal properties below T-c. A single-crystal x-ray diffraction shows that the temperature-dependent evolution of the unit cell in the range 100-300 K is strongly anisotropic with markedly discontinuous changes at T-c. The transition...... is connected with a spontaneous strain developing in effect of the volume decrease. The structure releases the strain by rotation of corner-sharing rigid MoO4 and FeO6 polyhedra in the (a, b) basal plane. The temperature dependence of the IR vibrational wavenumbers exhibits weak changes near T-c, which...

  15. Temperature dependence of CIE-x,y color coordinates in YAG:Ce single crystal phosphor

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rejman, M.; Babin, Vladimir; Kučerková, Romana; Nikl, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 187, Jul (2017), s. 20-25 ISSN 0022-2313 R&D Projects: GA TA ČR TA04010135 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : YAG:Ce * single-crystal * simulation * energy level lifetime * white LED * CIE * temperature dependence Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 2.686, year: 2016

  16. Challenges in Modelling of Lightning-Induced Delamination; Effect of Temperature-Dependent Interfacial Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naghipour, P.; Pineda, E. J.; Arnold, S.

    2014-01-01

    Lightning is a major cause of damage in laminated composite aerospace structures during flight. Due to the dielectric nature of Carbon fiber reinforced polymers (CFRPs), the high energy induced by lightning strike transforms into extreme, localized surface temperature accompanied with a high-pressure shockwave resulting in extensive damage. It is crucial to develop a numerical tool capable of predicting the damage induced from a lightning strike to supplement extremely expensive lightning experiments. Delamination is one of the most significant failure modes resulting from a lightning strike. It can be extended well beyond the visible damage zone, and requires sophisticated techniques and equipment to detect. A popular technique used to model delamination is the cohesive zone approach. Since the loading induced from a lightning strike event is assumed to consist of extreme localized heating, the cohesive zone formulation should additionally account for temperature effects. However, the sensitivity to this dependency remains unknown. Therefore, the major focus point of this work is to investigate the importance of this dependency via defining various temperature dependency profiles for the cohesive zone properties, and analyzing the corresponding delamination area. Thus, a detailed numerical model consisting of multidirectional composite plies with temperature-dependent cohesive elements in between is subjected to lightning (excessive amount of heat and pressure) and delamination/damage expansion is studied under specified conditions.

  17. Transient energy growth modulation by temperature dependent transport properties in a stratified plane Poiseuille flow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rinaldi, E.; Boersma, B.J.; Pecnik, R.

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the effect of temperature dependent thermal conductivity ? and isobaric specific heat c_P on the transient amplification of perturbations in a thermally stratified laminar plane Poiseuille flow. It is shown that for decreasing thermal conductivity the maximum transient energy growth

  18. Habitat related variation in UV tolerance of tropical marine red macrophytes is not temperature dependent

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Poll, W.H.; Bischof, K.; Buma, A.G.J.; Breeman, Arno

    Because tropical marine macrophytes experience high ultraviolet-B radiation (UVBR: 280-320 nm) it is assumed that they have high UV tolerance. This was investigated by examining the relative UV sensitivity of five Caribbean red macrophytes. Furthermore, the possibility of temperature dependence of

  19. A Simple Method to Calculate the Temperature Dependence of the Gibbs Energy and Chemical Equilibrium Constants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, Francisco M.

    2014-01-01

    The temperature dependence of the Gibbs energy and important quantities such as Henry's law constants, activity coefficients, and chemical equilibrium constants is usually calculated by using the Gibbs-Helmholtz equation. Although, this is a well-known approach and traditionally covered as part of any physical chemistry course, the required…

  20. Path dependent models to predict property changes in graphite irradiated at changing irradiation temperatures

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Kok, S

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available .co.za ] Path dependent models to predict property changes in graphite irradiated at changing irradiation temperatures S KOK CSIR Advanced Mathematical Modelling, Modelling and Digital Science, PO Box 395, Pretoria, 0001, South Africa E-mail: skok...

  1. Temperature dependence of the calibration factor of radon and radium determination in water samples by SSNTD

    CERN Document Server

    Hunyadi, I; Hakl, J; Baradacs, E; Dezso, Z

    1999-01-01

    The sensitivity of a sup 2 sup 2 sup 6 Ra determination method of water samples by SSNTD was measured as a function of storage temperature during exposure. The method is based on an etched track type radon monitor, which is closed into a gas permeable foil and is immersed in the water sample. The sample is sealed in a glass vessel and stored for an exposure time of 10-30 days. The sensitivity increased more than a factor of two when the storage temperature was raised from 2 deg. C to 30 deg. C. Temperature dependence of the partition coefficient of radon between water and air provides explanation for this dependence. For practical radio- analytical application the temperature dependence of the calibration factor is given by fitting the sensitivity data obtained by measuring sup 2 sup 2 sup 6 Ra standard solutions (in the activity concentration range of 0.1-48.5 kBq m sup - sup 3) at different storage temperatures.

  2. Temperature Dependent Local Atomic Structure of LuFe2O4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, S.; Zhang, H.; Ghose, S.; Cheong, S.-W.; Emge, T.; Chen, Y.-S.; Tyson, T.

    The LuFe2O4 system has be studied intensively as a novel material with charge ordered driven ferroelectricity. However, the existence and origin of electric polarization and it coupling to the magnetic structure are open questions still to be addressed. Distinctly differing experiments yield different results. In this work, structural measurements on multiple length scales have been conducted over a broad range of temperatures. We have studied the correlation between the structural distortion and the electronic/magnetic properties in single-crystalline LuFe2O4 by using X-ray diffraction (XRD), temperature and orientation dependent Raman spectroscopy, temperature dependent X-ray pair distribution function (PDF) measurements and DFT modeling. The nature of the observed local atomic and electronic structural changes will be discussed and compared with previous work. This work is supported by DOE Grant DE-FG02-07ER46402.

  3. Temperature dependent thermoelectric properties of chemically derived gallium zinc oxide thin films

    KAUST Repository

    Barasheed, Abeer Z.

    2013-01-01

    In this study, the temperature dependent thermoelectric properties of sol-gel prepared ZnO and 3% Ga-doped ZnO (GZO) thin films have been explored. The power factor of GZO films, as compared to ZnO, is improved by nearly 17% at high temperature. A stabilization anneal, prior to thermoelectric measurements, in a strongly reducing Ar/H2 (95/5) atmosphere at 500°C was found to effectively stabilize the chemically derived films, practically eliminating hysteresis during thermoelectric measurements. Subtle changes in the thermoelectric properties of stabilized films have been correlated to oxygen vacancies and excitonic levels that are known to exist in ZnO-based thin films. The role of Ga dopants and defects, formed upon annealing, in driving the observed complex temperature dependence of the thermoelectric properties is discussed. © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2013.

  4. Probing Temperature-Dependent Recombination Kinetics in Polymer:Fullerene Solar Cells by Electric Noise Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Landi

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The influence of solvent additives on the temperature behavior of both charge carrier transport and recombination kinetics in bulk heterojunction solar cells has been investigated by electric noise spectroscopy. The observed differences in charge carrier lifetime and mobility are attributed to a different film ordering and donor-acceptor phase segregation in the blend. The measured temperature dependence indicates that bimolecular recombination is the dominant loss mechanism in the active layer, affecting the device performance. Blend devices prepared with a high-boiling-point solvent additive show a decreased recombination rate at the donor-acceptor interface as compared to the ones prepared with the reference solvent. A clear correlation between the device performance and the morphological properties is discussed in terms of the temperature dependence of the mobility-lifetime product.

  5. Viscosity of magnetite–toluene nanofluids: Dependence on temperature and nanoparticle concentration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Rahul [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Iowa State University, Ames, IA (United States); Sanchez, Oswaldo [Department of Mathematical Sciences, Morningside College, Sioux City, IA (United States); Ghosh, Suvojit [Department of Engineering Physics, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON (Canada); Kadimcherla, Naveen [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Iowa State University, Ames, IA (United States); Sen, Swarnendu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Jadavpur University, Kolkata, West Bengal (India); Balasubramanian, Ganesh, E-mail: bganesh@iastate.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Iowa State University, Ames, IA (United States)

    2015-10-23

    Highlights: • Viscosity of magnetite in toluene nanofluid increases monotonically with particle concentration. • Clusters formed at higher particle concentration are monodisperse. • With increasing temperature, viscosity decreases due less fraction of immobile fluid molecules. - Abstract: We examine the dependence of the viscosity of nanofluids, comprised of magnetite nanoparticles dispersed in toluene, on particle concentration and temperature. The nanofluid viscosity increases monotonically with particle concentration. We show that although the nanoparticles aggregate to form clusters with increasing concentration, the cluster size is fairly monodisperse and hence the viscosity can be expressed as a function of only the particle concentration. The viscosity of the nanofluid is found to decrease with temperature, similarly to the characteristics of the carrier liquid. We describe these dependencies through an empirical correlation, since the observations are useful to employ such nanofluids in engineering applications.

  6. Thickness- and temperature-dependent magnetodynamic properties of yttrium iron garnet thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haidar, M., E-mail: mohammad.haidar@Physics.gu.se; Ranjbar, M.; Balinsky, M.; Dumas, R. K. [Department of Physics, University of Gothenburg, 41296 Gothenburg (Sweden); Khartsev, S. [Department of Integrated Devices and Circuits, School of ICT, Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), 16440 Kista (Sweden); Åkerman, J. [Department of Physics, University of Gothenburg, 41296 Gothenburg (Sweden); Materials Physics, School of ICT, Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), 16440 Kista (Sweden)

    2015-05-07

    The magnetodynamical properties of nanometer-thick yttrium iron garnet films are studied using ferromagnetic resonance as a function of temperature. The films were grown on gadolinium gallium garnet substrates by pulsed laser deposition. First, we found that the damping coefficient increases as the temperature increases for different film thicknesses. Second, we found two different dependencies of the damping on film thickness: at room temperature, the damping coefficient increases as the film thickness decreases, while at T = 8 K, we find the damping to depend only weakly on the thickness. We attribute this behavior to an enhancement of the relaxation of the magnetization by impurities or defects at the surfaces.

  7. Formation of temperature dependable holographic memory using holographic polymer-dispersed liquid crystal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogiwara, Akifumi; Watanabe, Minoru; Moriwaki, Retsu

    2013-04-01

    Grating devices using photosensitive organic materials play an important role in the development of optical and optoelectronic systems. High diffraction efficiency and polarization dependence achieved in a holographic polymer-dispersed liquid crystal (HPDLC) grating are expected to provide polarization controllable optical devices, such as the holographic memory for optically reconfigurable gate arrays (ORGAs). However, the optical property is affected by the thermal modulation around the transition temperature (T(ni)) that the liquid crystal (LC) changes from nematic to isotropic phases. The temperature dependence of the diffraction efficiency in HPDLC grating is discussed with two types of LC composites comprised of isotropic and LC diacrylate monomers. The holographic memory formed by the LC and LC diacrylate monomer performs precise reconstruction of the context information for ORGAs at high temperatures more than 150°C.

  8. Temperature dependence of anisotropic diffraction in holographic polymer-dispersed liquid crystal memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogiwara, Akifumi; Watanabe, Minoru; Moriwaki, Retsu

    2013-09-10

    Grating devices using photosensitive organic materials play an important role in the development of optical and optoelectronic systems. High diffraction efficiency and polarization dependence achieved in a holographic polymer-dispersed liquid crystal (HPDLC) grating are expected to provide polarization-controllable optical devices, such as a holographic memory for optically reconfigurable gate arrays (ORGAs). However, the optical property is affected by the thermal modulation around the transition temperature (T(ni)) where the liquid crystal (LC) changes from nematic to isotropic phases. The temperature dependence of the diffraction efficiency in HPDLC grating is investigated using four types of LC composites comprised of LCs and monomers having different physical properties such as T(ni) and anisotropic refractive indices. The holographic memory formed by the LC with low anisotropic refractive index and LC diacrylate monomer implements optical reconfiguration for ORGAs at a high temperature beyond T(ni) of LC.

  9. Temperature-Dependent Polarization in Field-Effect Transport and Photovoltaic Measurements of Methylammonium Lead Iodide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labram, John G; Fabini, Douglas H; Perry, Erin E; Lehner, Anna J; Wang, Hengbin; Glaudell, Anne M; Wu, Guang; Evans, Hayden; Buck, David; Cotta, Robert; Echegoyen, Luis; Wudl, Fred; Seshadri, Ram; Chabinyc, Michael L

    2015-09-17

    While recent improvements in the reported peak power conversion efficiency (PCE) of hybrid organic-inorganic perovskite solar cells have been truly astonishing, there are many fundamental questions about the electronic behavior of these materials. Here we have studied a set of electronic devices employing methylammonium lead iodide ((MA)PbI3) as the active material and conducted a series of temperature-dependent measurements. Field-effect transistor, capacitor, and photovoltaic cell measurements all reveal behavior consistent with substantial and strongly temperature-dependent polarization susceptibility in (MA)PbI3 at temporal and spatial scales that significantly impact functional behavior. The relative PCE of (MA)PbI3 photovoltaic cells is observed to reduce drastically with decreasing temperature, suggesting that such polarization effects could be a prerequisite for high-performance device operation.

  10. Temperature and frequency dependence of AC conductivity and modulus in Cr-Doped ZnO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junais, P. M.; Govindaraj, G.

    2017-05-01

    A nanocrystalline Cr-doped ZnO has been prepared by refluxing method. The samples were characterized using XRD and impedance spectroscopy. The XRD pattern shows the crystalline nature of the sample and well confirms the successful doping Cr into the host lattice. The conductivity of the sample measured in the temperature range 303-603K and in the frequency range 10Hz-1MHz. The temperature dependent dc conductivity and hopping frequency show Arrhenius behavior. AC conductivity data were analyzed using Jonscher's power law. Modulus data were analyzed using Bergman modified KWW function. Temperature dependent capacitance shows a sharp peak at 540K which may be due to ferroelectric nature of the material.

  11. Diffractometric measurement of the temperature dependence of piezoelectric tensor in GMO monocrystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breczko, Teodor; Lempaszek, Andrzej

    2007-04-01

    Functional materials, of which an example is ferroelectric, ferroelastic monocrystal of molybdate (III) gadolinium (VI), are often used in the micro-motor operators (micro-servo motors) working in changeable environment conditions. Most frequently this change refers to temperature. That is why the important practical problem is the precise measurement of the value of piezoelectric tensor elements in dependence on the temperature of a particular monocrystal. In the presented article for this kind of measurements, the use of X-ray diffractometer has been shown. The advantage of the method presented is that, apart from precise dependence measurement between the temperature of a monocrystal and the value of piezoelectric tensor elements, it enables synchronous measurement of the value of thermal expansion tensor elements for a monocrystal.

  12. Context Dependent Analysis of BioAmbients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pilegaard, Henrik; Nielson, Flemming; Nielson, Hanne Riis

    2006-01-01

    BioAmbients is a derivative of mobile ambients that has shown promise of describing interesting features of the behaviour of biological systems. The technical contribution of this paper is to extend the Flow Logic approach to static analysis with a couple of new techniques in order to give precise...... information about the behaviour of systems written in BioAmbients. Applying the development to a simple model of a cell releasing nutrients from food compunds we illustrate how the proposed analysis does indeed improve on previous efforts....

  13. Stimulus-Dependent Effects of Temperature on Bitter Taste in Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Barry G; Andrew, Kendra

    2017-02-01

    This study investigated the effects of temperature on bitter taste in humans. The experiments were conducted within the context of current understanding of the neurobiology of bitter taste and recent evidence of stimulus-dependent effects of temperature on sweet taste. In the first experiment, the bitterness of caffeine and quinine sampled with the tongue tip was assessed at 4 different temperatures (10°, 21°, 30°, and 37 °C) following pre-exposure to the same solution or to water for 0, 3, or 10 s. The results showed that initial bitterness (0-s pre-exposure) followed an inverted U-shaped function of temperature for both stimuli, but the differences across temperature were statistically significant only for quinine. Conversely, temperature significantly affected adaptation to the bitterness of quinine but not caffeine. A second experiment used the same procedure to test 2 additional stimuli, naringin and denatonium benzoate. Temperature significantly affected the initial bitterness of both stimuli but had no effect on adaptation to either stimulus. These results confirm that like sweet taste, temperature affects bitter taste sensitivity and adaptation in stimulus-dependent ways. However, the thermal effect on quinine adaptation, which increased with warming, was opposite to what had been found previously for adaptation to sweetness. The implications of these results are discussed in relation to findings from prior studies of temperature and bitter taste in humans and the possible neurobiological mechanisms of gustatory thermal sensitivity. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Generalized Magneto-thermo-microstretch Response of a Half-space with Temperature-dependent Properties During Thermal Shock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qi-lin Xiong

    Full Text Available Abstract The generalized magneto-thermoelastic problem of an infinite homogeneous isotropic microstretch half-space with temperature-dependent material properties placed in a transverse magnetic field is investigated in the context of different generalized thermoelastic theories. The upper surface of the half-space is subjected to a zonal time-dependent heat shock. By solving finite element governing equations, the solution to the problem is obtained, from which the transient magneto-thermoelastic responses, including temperature, stresses, displacements, microstretch, microrotation, induced magnetic field and induced electric field are presented graphically. Comparisons are made in the results obtained under different generalized thermoelastic theories to show some unique features of generalized thermoelasticity, and comparisons are made in the results obtained under three forms of temperature dependent material properties (absolute temperature dependent, reference temperature dependent and temperature-independent to show the effects of absolute temperature and reference temperature. Weibull or Log-normal.

  15. Measurement of Wavelength and Temperature-Dependent Optical Properties of Thermochromic Pigments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jianying; Yu, Xiong Bill

    2017-01-01

    Thermochromic material is a substance that is capable of changing reversibly the color as the temperature rises. Therefore, the optical spectrum of thermochromic material is responsive to the environmental temperature. In this study, the temperature-dependent optical constants of thermochromic pigments over the wavelength of 350-1800 nm were investigated. Three kinds of thermochromic pigments featured with black, blue, and red colors at room temperature were suspended in water and the light reflection and transmission of the suspensions at different temperatures were measured by a multifunctional spectrophotometer. It was found that below the transition temperature of thermochromic material, the refractive index was 2.1-2.5, 2.2-2.6, and 2.0-2.4 over the wavelength range of 350-1800 nm for black, blue, and red thermochromic pigment, respectively, while above the transition temperature it reached 2.3-2.7, 2.4-2.9, and 2.4-2.7, respectively. It was also observed that the relationship between refractive index of thermochromic pigment and wavelength follows the cubic polynomial function. Furthermore, the extinction coefficient is in the range of 1 × 10-5-1.2 × 10-4 for all thermochromic pigments and remains approximately stable at different temperatures. The determination of optical constants of thermochromic pigments provides essential parameters in the modeling of light scattering and absorption by pigment particles to further fine-tune the optical properties of thermochromic coating.

  16. The dependence of thermoluminescence sensitivity upon the temperature of irradiation in meteorites and in terrestrial apatites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durrani, S.A.; Al-Khalifa, I.J.M. (Birmingham Univ. (UK). School of Physics and Space Research)

    1990-01-01

    Measurements are reported on the TL sensitivity (i.e. TL glow output per unit {gamma} ray test dose) of meteoritic specimens as well as terrestrial fluor- and chlor-apatites, as a function of irradiation temperature (T{sub irr}). The irradiation temperatures ranged from liquid nitrogen to room temperature (77 - 293 K). A kilocurie {sup 60}Co {gamma} ray source was used to deliver test doses of 400 Gy (40 krad) and 40 (4 krad) to the various samples. A strong dependence of the TL sensitivity upon the temperature of irradiation was noted in the case of Kirin meteorite: its TL sensitivity (for the 493 K readout peak) decreased by a factor of {similar to} 2 when T{sub irr} rose from liquid nitrogen (77 K) to dry ice in acetone (197 K) temperature, in the case of both 400 Gy and 40 Gy {gamma} ray doses. In the case of the Antarctic meteorite specimen (ALHA 77182.13), there was a smaller effect, viz. a fall of {similar to} 14% in the TL output corresponding to dry ice and higher irradiating temperatures as compared to the 77 K irradiation. For chlorapatite, the TL sensitivity decreased monotonically with increasing temperature for both the 563 K and the 448 K glow peaks. For the fluorapatite, the effect of reduced response was observed only between -17{sup 0}C (256 K) and room temperature (293 K). Both the theoretical and the practical implications of these observations are discussed. (author).

  17. Dependence of C-Band Backscatter on Ground Temperature, Air Temperature and Snow Depth in Arctic Permafrost Regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helena Bergstedt

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Microwave remote sensing has found numerous applications in areas affected by permafrost and seasonally frozen ground. In this study, we focused on data obtained by the Advanced Scatterometer (ASCAT, C-band during winter periods when the ground is assumed to be frozen. This paper discusses the relationships of ASCAT backscatter with snow depth, air and ground temperature through correlations and the analysis of covariance (ANCOVA to quantify influences on backscatter values during situations of frozen ground. We studied sites in Alaska, Northern Canada, Scandinavia and Siberia. Air temperature and snow depth data were obtained from 19 World Meteorological Organization (WMO and 4 Snow Telemetry (SNOTEL stations. Ground temperature data were obtained from 36 boreholes through the Global Terrestrial Network for Permafrost Database (GTN-P and additional records from central Yamal. Results suggest distinct differences between sites with and without underlying continuous permafrost. Sites characterized by high freezing indices (>4000 degree-days have consistently stronger median correlations of ASCAT backscatter with ground temperature for all measurement depths. We show that the dynamics in winter-time backscatter cannot be solely explained through snow processes, but are also highly correlated with ground temperature up to a considerable depth (60 cm. These findings have important implications for both freeze/thaw and snow water equivalent retrieval algorithms based on C-band radar measurements.

  18. The Dependence of Constitutive Properties on Temperature and Effective Normal Stress in Seismogenic Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Aitaro; Yoshida, Shingo; Ohnaka, Mitiyasu; Mochizuki, Hiromine

    We have evaluated how the parameters prescribing the slip-dependent constitutive law are affected by temperature and effective normal stress, by conducting the triaxial fracture experiments on Tsukuba-granite samples in seismogenic environments, which correspond to a depth range to 15 km. The normalized critical slip displacement Dc almost remains constant below 300oC (insensitive to both temperature and effective normal stress σneff) Dc increases with increasing temperature above 300 °C, and the rate of Dc increase with temperature tends to be largest at higher σneff. The breakdown stress drop Δτb for the granite at constant σneff is roughly 80 MPa below 300 °C, and does not depend on σneff. Above 300 °C, Δτb decreases gradually with increasing temperature, and the rate of Δτb reduction with temperature increases at higher σneff. The peak shear strength τp increases nearly linearly with increasing σneff below 300 °C. However, τp becomes lower above 300 °C, deviating from the linear relation extrapolated from below 300 °C. This is consistent with the onset of crystal plastic deformation mechanisms of Tsukuba granite.

  19. On the temperature dependence of H-U{sub iso} in the riding hydrogen model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lübben, Jens; Volkmann, Christian [Institut für Anorganische Chemie, Georg-August-Universität, Tammannstrasse 4, D-37077 Göttingen (Germany); Grabowsky, Simon [School of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Stirling Highway 35, WA-6009 Crawley (Australia); Edwards, Alison [Bragg Institute, Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Locked Bag 2001, Kirrawee DC, NSW 2232 (Australia); Morgenroth, Wolfgang [Institut für Geowissenschaften, Abteilung Kristallographie, Goethe-Universität, Altenhöferallee 1, 60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Fabbiani, Francesca P. A. [GZG, Abteilung Kristallographie, Georg-August Universität, Goldschmidtstrasse 1, 37077 Göttingen (Germany); Sheldrick, George M. [Institut für Anorganische Chemie, Georg-August-Universität, Tammannstrasse 4, D-37077 Göttingen (Germany); Dittrich, Birger, E-mail: birger.dittrich@chemie.uni-hamburg.de [Institut für Anorganische und Angewandte Chemie, Martin-Luther-King-Platz 6, 20146 Hamburg (Germany); Institut für Anorganische Chemie, Georg-August-Universität, Tammannstrasse 4, D-37077 Göttingen (Germany)

    2014-07-01

    The temperature dependence of hydrogen U{sub iso} and parent U{sub eq} in the riding hydrogen model is investigated by neutron diffraction, aspherical-atom refinements and QM/MM and MO/MO cluster calculations. Fixed values of 1.2 or 1.5 appear to be underestimated, especially at temperatures below 100 K. The temperature dependence of H-U{sub iso} in N-acetyl-l-4-hydroxyproline monohydrate is investigated. Imposing a constant temperature-independent multiplier of 1.2 or 1.5 for the riding hydrogen model is found to be inaccurate, and severely underestimates H-U{sub iso} below 100 K. Neutron diffraction data at temperatures of 9, 150, 200 and 250 K provide benchmark results for this study. X-ray diffraction data to high resolution, collected at temperatures of 9, 30, 50, 75, 100, 150, 200 and 250 K (synchrotron and home source), reproduce neutron results only when evaluated by aspherical-atom refinement models, since these take into account bonding and lone-pair electron density; both invariom and Hirshfeld-atom refinement models enable a more precise determination of the magnitude of H-atom displacements than independent-atom model refinements. Experimental efforts are complemented by computing displacement parameters following the TLS+ONIOM approach. A satisfactory agreement between all approaches is found.

  20. Temperature dependence of the interfacial magnetic anisotropy in W/CoFeB/MgO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyoung-Min Lee

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The interfacial perpendicular magnetic anisotropy in W/CoFeB (1.2 ∼ 3 nm/MgO thin film structures is strongly dependent on temperature, and is significantly reduced at high temperature. The interfacial magnetic anisotropy is generally proportional to the third power of magnetization, but an additional factor due to thermal expansion is required to explain the temperature dependence of the magnetic anisotropy of ultrathin CoFeB films. The reduction of the magnetic anisotropy is more prominent for the thinner films; as the temperature increases from 300 K to 400 K, the anisotropy is reduced ∼50% for the 1.2-nm-thick CoFeB, whereas the anisotropy is reduced ∼30% for the 1.7-nm-thick CoFeB. Such a substantial reduction of magnetic anisotropy at high temperature is problematic for data retention when incorporating W/CoFeB/MgO thin film structures into magneto-resistive random access memory devices. Alternative magnetic materials and structures are required to maintain large magnetic anisotropy at elevated temperatures.

  1. Temperature dependence of the heterogeneous uptake of acrylic acid on Arizona test dust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qifan; Wang, Yidan; Wu, Lingyan; Jing, Bo; Tong, Shengrui; Wang, Weigang; Ge, Maofa

    2017-03-01

    In this study, the temperature dependence of the heterogeneous uptake of acrylic acid on Arizona test dust (ATD) has been investigated within a temperature range of 255-315K using a Knudsen cell reactor. Combined with diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS) experiment, it was found that acrylic acid could adsorb on ATD via surface OH groups and convert to carboxylate on the particle surface. The kinetics study suggests that the initial true uptake coefficient (γt) of acrylic acid on ATD decreases from (4.02±0.12)×10(-5) to (1.73±0.05)×10(-5) with a temperature increase from 255 to 315K. According to the temperature dependence of uptake coefficients, the enthalpy (ΔHobs) and entropy (ΔSobs) of uptake processes were determined to be -(9.60±0.38) KJ/mol and -(121.55±1.33) J·K/mol, respectively. The activation energy for desorption (Edes) was calculated to be (14.57±0.60) KJ/mol. These results indicated that the heterogeneous uptake of acrylic acid on ATD surface was sensitive to temperature. The heterogeneous uptake on ATD could affect the concentration of acrylic acid in the atmosphere, especially at low temperature. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  2. The temperature dependence of intermediate range oxygen-oxygen correlations in liquid water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlesinger, Daniel; Wikfeldt, K Thor; Skinner, Lawrie B; Benmore, Chris J; Nilsson, Anders; Pettersson, Lars G M

    2016-08-28

    We analyze the recent temperature dependent oxygen-oxygen pair-distribution functions from experimental high-precision x-ray diffraction data of bulk water by Skinner et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 141, 214507 (2014)] with particular focus on the intermediate range where small, but significant, correlations are found out to 17 Å. The second peak in the pair-distribution function at 4.5 Å is connected to tetrahedral coordination and was shown by Skinner et al. to change behavior with temperature below the temperature of minimum isothermal compressibility. Here we show that this is associated also with a peak growing at 11 Å which strongly indicates a collective character of fluctuations leading to the enhanced compressibility at lower temperatures. We note that the peak at ∼13.2 Å exhibits a temperature dependence similar to that of the density with a maximum close to 277 K or 4 °C. We analyze simulations of the TIP4P/2005 water model in the same manner and find excellent agreement between simulations and experiment albeit with a temperature shift of ∼20 K.

  3. Temperature-dependent elastic properties of brain tissues measured with the shear wave elastography method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yan-Lin; Li, Guo-Yang; He, Ping; Mao, Ze-Qi; Cao, Yanping

    2017-01-01

    Determining the mechanical properties of brain tissues is essential in such cases as the surgery planning and surgical training using virtual reality based simulators, trauma research and the diagnosis of some diseases that alter the elastic properties of brain tissues. Here, we suggest a protocol to measure the temperature-dependent elastic properties of brain tissues in physiological saline using the shear wave elastography method. Experiments have been conducted on six porcine brains. Our results show that the shear moduli of brain tissues decrease approximately linearly with a slope of -0.041±0.006kPa/°C when the temperature T increases from room temperature (~23°C) to body temperature (~37°C). A case study has been further conducted which shows that the shear moduli are insensitive to the temperature variation when T is in the range of 37 to 43°C and will increase when T is higher than 43°C. With the present experimental setup, temperature-dependent elastic properties of brain tissues can be measured in a simulated physiological environment and a non-destructive manner. Thus the method suggested here offers a unique tool for the mechanical characterization of brain tissues with potential applications in brain biomechanics research. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Temperature dependence of the interfacial magnetic anisotropy in W/CoFeB/MgO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kyoung-Min; Choi, Jun Woo; Sok, Junghyun; Min, Byoung-Chul

    2017-06-01

    The interfacial perpendicular magnetic anisotropy in W/CoFeB (1.2 ˜ 3 nm)/MgO thin film structures is strongly dependent on temperature, and is significantly reduced at high temperature. The interfacial magnetic anisotropy is generally proportional to the third power of magnetization, but an additional factor due to thermal expansion is required to explain the temperature dependence of the magnetic anisotropy of ultrathin CoFeB films. The reduction of the magnetic anisotropy is more prominent for the thinner films; as the temperature increases from 300 K to 400 K, the anisotropy is reduced ˜50% for the 1.2-nm-thick CoFeB, whereas the anisotropy is reduced ˜30% for the 1.7-nm-thick CoFeB. Such a substantial reduction of magnetic anisotropy at high temperature is problematic for data retention when incorporating W/CoFeB/MgO thin film structures into magneto-resistive random access memory devices. Alternative magnetic materials and structures are required to maintain large magnetic anisotropy at elevated temperatures.

  5. Computational modeling of 915 MHz microwave ablation: Comparative assessment of temperature-dependent tissue dielectric models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshazer, Garron; Hagmann, Mark; Merck, Derek; Sebek, Jan; Moore, Kent B; Prakash, Punit

    2017-09-01

    The objective of this study is to develop a computational model for simulating 915 MHz microwave ablation (MWA), and verify the simulation predictions of transient temperature profiles against experimental measurements. Due to the limited experimental data characterizing temperature-dependent changes of tissue dielectric properties at 915 MHz, we comparatively assess two temperature-dependent approaches of modeling of dielectric properties: model A- piecewise linear temperature dependencies based on existing, but limited, experimental data, and model B- similar to model A, but augmented with linear decrease in electrical conductivity above 95 °C, as guided by our experimental measurements. The finite element method was used to simulate MWA procedures in liver with a clinical 915 MHz ablation applicator. A coupled electromagnetic-thermal solver incorporating temperature-dependent tissue biophysical properties of liver was implemented. Predictions of the transient temperature profiles and ablation zone dimensions for both model A and model B were compared against experimental measurements in ex vivo bovine liver tissue. Broadband dielectric properties of tissue within different regions of the ablation zone were measured and reported at 915 MHz and 2.45 GHz. Model B yielded peak tissue temperatures in closer agreement with experimental measurements, attributed to the inclusion of decrease in electrical conductivity at elevated temperature. The simulated transverse diameters of the ablation zone predicted by both models were greater than experimental measurements, which may be in part due to the lack of a tissue shrinkage model. At both considered power levels, predictions of transverse ablation zone diameters were in closer agreement with measurements for model B (max. discrepancy of 5 mm at 60 W, and 3 mm at 30 W), compared to model A (max. discrepancy of 9 mm at 60 W, and 6 mm at 30 W). Ablation zone lengths with both models were within 2 mm at 30 W, but

  6. Role of temperature-dependent viscosity and surface plates in spherical shell models of mantle convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Shijie; Zuber, Maria T.; Moresi, Louis; Gurnis, Michael

    2000-05-01

    Layered viscosity, temperature-dependent viscosity, and surface plates have an important effect on the scale and morphology of structure in spherical models of mantle convection. We find that long-wavelength structures can be produced either by a layered viscosity with a weak upper mantle or temperature-dependent viscosity even in the absence of surface plates, corroborating earlier studies. However, combining the layered viscosity structure with a temperature-dependent viscosity results in structure with significantly shorter wavelengths. Our models show that the scale of convection is mainly controlled by the surface plates, supporting the previous two-dimensional studies. Our models with surface plates, layered and temperature-dependent viscosity, and internal heating explain mantle structures inferred from seismic tomography. The models show that hot upwellings initiate at the core-mantle boundary (CMB) with linear structures, and as they depart from CMB, the linear upwellings quickly change into quasi-cylindrical plumes that dynamically interact with the ambient mantle and surface plates while ascending through the mantle. A linear up welling structure is generated again at shallow depths (maintained throughout the mantle. The tendency for linear upwelling and downwelling structures to break into plume-like structures is stronger at higher Rayleigh numbers. Our models also show that downwellings to first-order control surface plate motions and the locations and horizontal motion of upwellings. Upwellings tend to form at stagnation points predicted solely from the buoyancy forces of downwellings. Temperature-dependent viscosity greatly enhances the ascending velocity of developed upwelling plumes, and this may reduce the influence of global mantle flow on the motion of plumes. Our results can explain the anticorrelation between hotspot distribution and fast seismic wave speed anomalies in the lower mantle and may also have significant implications to the

  7. Maritime Load Dependent Lead Times - An Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pahl, Julia

    2017-01-01

    steps and increased container lead times. Proposed solutions to fight congestion range from extend-ing port capacities to process optimization of parts of the maritime supply chain. The potential that lies in information sharing and integrated planning using IT has received some attention, but mainly...... on the operational level concerning timely information sharing. Collaborative planning approaches for the maritime supply chain are scarce. The production industry already implemented planning and in-formation concepts. Problems related to the maritime supply chain have great similarities with those encountered...... in production. Inspired by supply chain planning systems, we analyze the current state of (collaborative) planning in the maritime transport chain with focus on containers. Regarding the problem of congestion, we particularly emphasize on load dependent lead times (LDLT) which are well studied in production....

  8. Results of scalp cooling during anthracycline containing chemotherapy depend on scalp skin temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komen, M M C; Smorenburg, C H; Nortier, J W R; van der Ploeg, T; van den Hurk, C J G; van der Hoeven, J J M

    2016-12-01

    The success of scalp cooling in preventing or reducing chemotherapy induced alopecia (CIA) is highly variable between patients undergoing similar chemotherapy regimens. A decrease of the scalp skin temperature seems to be an important factor, but data on the optimum temperature reached by scalp cooling to prevent CIA are lacking. This study investigated the relation between scalp skin temperature and its efficacy to prevent CIA. In this explorative study, scalp skin temperature was measured during scalp cooling in 62 breast cancer patients undergoing up to six cycles of anthracycline containing chemotherapy. Scalp skin temperature was measured by using two thermocouples at both temporal sides of the head. The primary end-point was the need for a wig or other head covering. Maximal cooling was reached after 45 min and was continued for 90 min after chemotherapy infusion. The scalp skin temperature after 45 min cooling varied from 10 °C to 31 °C, resulting in a mean scalp skin temperature of 19 °C (SEM: 0,4). Intrapersonal scalp skin temperatures during cooling were consistent for each chemotherapy cycle (ANOVA: P = 0,855). Thirteen out of 62 patients (21%) did not require a wig or other head covering. They appeared to have a significantly lower mean scalp skin temperature (18 °C; SEM: 0,7) compared to patients with alopecia (20 °C; SEM: 0,5) (P = 0,01). The efficacy of scalp cooling during chemotherapy is temperature dependent. A precise cut-off point could not be detected, but the best results seem to be obtained when the scalp temperature decreases below 18 °C. TRIALREGISTER. 3082. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Expanded modeling of temperature-dependent dielectric properties for microwave thermal ablation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Zhen; Brace, Christopher L

    2011-08-21

    Microwaves are a promising source for thermal tumor ablation due to their ability to rapidly heat dispersive biological tissues, often to temperatures in excess of 100 °C. At these high temperatures, tissue dielectric properties change rapidly and, thus, so do the characteristics of energy delivery. Precise knowledge of how tissue dielectric properties change during microwave heating promises to facilitate more accurate simulation of device performance and helps optimize device geometry and energy delivery parameters. In this study, we measured the dielectric properties of liver tissue during high-temperature microwave heating. The resulting data were compiled into either a sigmoidal function of temperature or an integration of the time-temperature curve for both relative permittivity and effective conductivity. Coupled electromagnetic-thermal simulations of heating produced by a single monopole antenna using the new models were then compared to simulations with existing linear and static models, and experimental temperatures in liver tissue. The new sigmoidal temperature-dependent model more accurately predicted experimental temperatures when compared to temperature-time integrated or existing models. The mean percent differences between simulated and experimental temperatures over all times were 4.2% for sigmoidal, 10.1% for temperature-time integration, 27.0% for linear and 32.8% for static models at the antenna input power of 50 W. Correcting for tissue contraction improved agreement for powers up to 75 W. The sigmoidal model also predicted substantial changes in heating pattern due to dehydration. We can conclude from these studies that a sigmoidal model of tissue dielectric properties improves prediction of experimental results. More work is needed to refine and generalize this model.

  10. Temperature dependent electrical characteristics of an organic-inorganic heterojunction obtained from a novel organometal Mn complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ocak, Y.S., E-mail: yusufselim@gmail.co [Department of Science, Faculty of Education, University of Dicle, Diyarbakir (Turkey); Ebeoglu, M.A. [Department of Electrical and Electronics Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of Dumlupinar, Kutahya (Turkey); Topal, G. [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Education, University of Dicle, Diyarbakir (Turkey); Kilicoglu, T., E-mail: tahsin@dicle.edu.t [Department of Physics, Faculty of Art and Science, University of Dicle, Diyarbakir (Turkey); Department of Physics, Faculty of Art and Science, University of Batman, Batman (Turkey)

    2010-05-01

    This study includes synthesizing a Mn hexaamide (MnHA) organometal compound (C{sub 27}H{sub 21}N{sub 9}O{sub 6}MnCl{sub 2}).(1/2H{sub 2}O), fabrication of MnHA/n-Si organic-inorganic heterojunction and analysis of conduction mechanism of the device over the room temperature. After synthesizing the molecule, the structure of the compound was determined using spectroscopic methods. The Sn/MnHA/n-Si structure was constructed by forming a thin MnHA layer on n-Si inorganic semiconductor and evaporating Sn metal on organic complex. The structure has shown good rectifying behavior and obeys the thermionic emission theory. The current-voltage (I-V) characteristics of the diode have been measured at temperatures ranging from 300 to 380 K at 10 K intervals to determine the temperature dependent electrical characteristics of the device.

  11. High Momentum Particle Identification Detector The Study of Cesium Iodide Quantum Efficiency Dependency on Substrate Material, Temperature and Quartz Window

    CERN Document Server

    Wisna, Gde Bimananda M

    2014-01-01

    The Cesium Iodide (CsI) is used as a material for detecting Cherenkov radiation produced by high momentum particle in High Momentum Particle Identification Detector (HMPID) at ALICE Experiment at CERN. This work provides investigation and analysis of The Quantum Efficiency (QE) result of CsI which is deposited on five samples substrates such as copper passivated red, copper passivated yellow, aluminium, copper coated with nickel and copper coated with nickel then coated with gold. The measurement of five samples is held under temperature $60^{0}$ C and $25^{0}$ C (room temperature) and also with optical quartz window which can be adjusted to limit the wavelength range which reach the CsI. The result shows there are dependency of substrate, temperature due to enhancement effect and also quartz windows usage on QE of CsI. The results of five samples is then compared and analyzed.

  12. Improved AIOMFAC model parameterisation of the temperature dependence of activity coefficients for aqueous organic mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganbavale, G.; Zuend, A.; Marcolli, C.; Peter, T.

    2015-01-01

    This study presents a new, improved parameterisation of the temperature dependence of activity coefficients in the AIOMFAC (Aerosol Inorganic-Organic Mixtures Functional groups Activity Coefficients) model applicable for aqueous as well as water-free organic solutions. For electrolyte-free organic and organic-water mixtures the AIOMFAC model uses a group-contribution approach based on UNIFAC (UNIversal quasi-chemical Functional-group Activity Coefficients). This group-contribution approach explicitly accounts for interactions among organic functional groups and between organic functional groups and water. The previous AIOMFAC version uses a simple parameterisation of the temperature dependence of activity coefficients, aimed to be applicable in the temperature range from ~ 275 to ~ 400 K. With the goal to improve the description of a wide variety of organic compounds found in atmospheric aerosols, we extend the AIOMFAC parameterisation for the functional groups carboxyl, hydroxyl, ketone, aldehyde, ether, ester, alkyl, aromatic carbon-alcohol, and aromatic hydrocarbon to atmospherically relevant low temperatures. To this end we introduce a new parameterisation for the temperature dependence. The improved temperature dependence parameterisation is derived from classical thermodynamic theory by describing effects from changes in molar enthalpy and heat capacity of a multi-component system. Thermodynamic equilibrium data of aqueous organic and water-free organic mixtures from the literature are carefully assessed and complemented with new measurements to establish a comprehensive database, covering a wide temperature range (~ 190 to ~ 440 K) for many of the functional group combinations considered. Different experimental data types and their processing for the estimation of AIOMFAC model parameters are discussed. The new AIOMFAC parameterisation for the temperature dependence of activity coefficients from low to high temperatures shows an overall improvement of 28% in

  13. Time dependent and temperature dependent properties of the forward voltage characteristic of InGaN high power LEDs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulmek, P. L.; Haumer, P.; Wenzl, F. P.; Nemitz, W.; Nicolics, J.

    2017-03-01

    Estimating the junction temperature and its dynamic behavior in dependence of various operating conditions is an important issue, since these properties influence the optical characteristics as well as the aging processes of a light-emitting diode (LED). Particularly for high-power LEDs and pulsed operation, the dynamic behavior and the resulting thermal cycles are of interest. The forward voltage method relies on the existence of a time-independent unique triple of forward-voltage, forward-current, and junction temperature. These three figures should as well uniquely define the optical output power and spectrum, as well as the loss power of the LED, which is responsible for an increase of the junction temperature. From transient FEM-simulations one may expect an increase of the temperature of the active semiconductor layer of some 1/10 K within the first 10 μs. Most of the well-established techniques for junction temperature measurement via forward voltage method evaluate the measurement data several dozens of microseconds after switching on or switching off and estimate the junction temperature by extrapolation towards the time of switching. In contrast, the authors developed a measurement procedure with the focus on the first microseconds after switching. Besides a fast data acquisition system, a precise control of the switching process is required, i.e. a precisely defined current pulse amplitude with fast rise-time and negligible transient by-effects. We start with a short description of the measurement setup and the newly developed control algorithm for the generation of short current pulses. The thermal characterization of the LED chip during the measurement procedures is accomplished by an IR thermography system and transient finite element simulations. The same experimental setup is used to investigate the optical properties of the LED in an Ulbricht-sphere. Our experiments are performed on InGaN LED chips mounted on an Al based insulated metal substrate

  14. Time dependent and temperature dependent properties of the forward voltage characteristic of InGaN high power LEDs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. L. Fulmek

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Estimating the junction temperature and its dynamic behavior in dependence of various operating conditions is an important issue, since these properties influence the optical characteristics as well as the aging processes of a light-emitting diode (LED. Particularly for high-power LEDs and pulsed operation, the dynamic behavior and the resulting thermal cycles are of interest. The forward voltage method relies on the existence of a time-independent unique triple of forward-voltage, forward-current, and junction temperature. These three figures should as well uniquely define the optical output power and spectrum, as well as the loss power of the LED, which is responsible for an increase of the junction temperature. From transient FEM-simulations one may expect an increase of the temperature of the active semiconductor layer of some 1/10 K within the first 10 μs. Most of the well-established techniques for junction temperature measurement via forward voltage method evaluate the measurement data several dozens of microseconds after switching on or switching off and estimate the junction temperature by extrapolation towards the time of switching. In contrast, the authors developed a measurement procedure with the focus on the first microseconds after switching. Besides a fast data acquisition system, a precise control of the switching process is required, i.e. a precisely defined current pulse amplitude with fast rise-time and negligible transient by-effects. We start with a short description of the measurement setup and the newly developed control algorithm for the generation of short current pulses. The thermal characterization of the LED chip during the measurement procedures is accomplished by an IR thermography system and transient finite element simulations. The same experimental setup is used to investigate the optical properties of the LED in an Ulbricht-sphere. Our experiments are performed on InGaN LED chips mounted on an Al based

  15. Temperature-dependent thermal properties of ex vivo liver undergoing thermal ablation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guntur, Sitaramanjaneya Reddy; Lee, Kang Il; Paeng, Dong-Guk; Coleman, Andrew John; Choi, Min Joo

    2013-10-01

    Thermotherapy uses a heat source that raises temperatures in the target tissue, and the temperature rise depends on the thermal properties of the tissue. Little is known about the temperature-dependent thermal properties of tissue, which prevents us from accurately predicting the temperature distribution of the target tissue undergoing thermotherapy. The present study reports the key thermal parameters (specific heat capacity, thermal conductivity and heat diffusivity) measured in ex vivo porcine liver while being heated from 20 ° C to 90 ° C and then naturally cooled down to 20 ° C. The study indicates that as the tissue was heated, all the thermal parameters resulted in plots with asymmetric quasi-parabolic curves with temperature, being convex downward with their minima at the turning temperature of 35-40 ° C. The largest change was observed for thermal conductivity, which decreased by 9.6% from its initial value (at 20 ° C) at the turning temperature (35 ° C) and rose by 45% at 90 ° C from its minimum (at 35 ° C). The minima were 3.567 mJ/(m(3) ∙ K) for specific heat capacity, 0.520 W/(m.K) for thermal conductivity and 0.141 mm(2)/s for thermal diffusivity. The minimum at the turning temperature was unique, and it is suggested that it be taken as a characteristic value of the thermal parameter of the tissue. On the other hand, the thermal parameters were insensitive to temperature and remained almost unchanged when the tissue cooled down, indicating that their variations with temperature were irreversible. The rate of the irreversible rise at 35 ° C was 18% in specific heat capacity, 40% in thermal conductivity and 38.3% in thermal diffusivity. The study indicates that the key thermal parameters of ex vivo porcine liver vary largely with temperature when heated, as described by asymmetric quasi-parabolic curves of the thermal parameters with temperature, and therefore, substantial influence on the temperature distribution of the tissue undergoing

  16. Design of shell-and-tube heat exchangers when the fouling depends on local temperature and velocity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butterworth, D. [HTFS, Hyprotech, Didcot (United Kingdom)

    2002-07-01

    Shell-and-tube heat exchangers are normally designed on the basis of a uniform and constant fouling resistance that is specified in advance by the exchanger user. The design process is then one of determining the best exchanger that will achieve the thermal duty within the specified pressure drop constraints. It has been shown in previous papers [Designing shell-and-tube heat exchangers with velocity-dependant fouling, 34th US national Heat Transfer Conference, 20-22 August 2000, Pittsburg, PA; Designing shell-and-tube heat exchangers with velocity-dependant fouling, 2nd Int. Conf. on Petroleum and Gas Phase Behavior and Fouling, 27-31 August 2000, Copenhagen] that this approach can be extended to the design of exchangers where the design fouling resistance depends on velocity. The current paper briefly reviews the main findings of the previous papers and goes on to treat the case where the fouling depends also on the local temperatures. The Ebert-Panchal [Analysis of Exxon crude-oil, slip-stream coking data, Engineering Foundation Conference on Fouling Mitigation of Heat Exchangers, 18-23 June 1995, California] form of fouling rate equation is used to evaluate this fouling dependence. When allowing for temperature effects, it becomes difficult to divorce the design from the way the exchanger will be operated up to the point when the design fouling is achieved. However, rational ways of separating the design from the operation are proposed. (author)

  17. Universal scaling of the temperature dependence of the strength of crystals governed by the Peierls mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, S.; Suzuki, T.

    2010-07-01

    The temperature dependences of the critical resolved shear stress (CRSS) governed by the Peierls mechanism in pure NaCl type crystals, those in pure bcc transition metals, those by dissociated dislocations in covalent crystals of the diamond and the zinc blende structures and those by perfect dislocations at low temperatures in zinc blende crystals have been demonstrated to be roughly scalable with respect to the non-dimensional normalization of the CRSS by the shear modulus G and the temperature by Gb3/kB, where b is the strength of the Burgers vector and kB the Boltzmann constant. Furthermore, CRSS vs. T relations have been shown to be scaled universally by normalizing respectively the CRSS by the estimated Peierls stress τp and the temperature by the kink-pair energy parameter of (τp/G)1/2(bd)3/2G/kB, where d is the period of the Peierls potential.

  18. Temperature Dependence of Soil Respiration Modulated by Thresholds in Soil Water Availability Across European Shrubland Ecosystems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lellei-Kovács, Eszter; Botta-Dukát, Zoltán; de Dato, Giovanbattista

    2016-01-01

    Soil respiration (SR) is a major component of the global carbon cycle and plays a fundamental role in ecosystem feedback to climate change. Empirical modelling is an essential tool for predicting ecosystem responses to environmental change, and also provides important data for calibrating...... the performance of SR models by including the interaction between soil moisture and soil temperature. We found that the best fit for the temperature functions depended on the site-specific climatic conditions. Including soil moisture, we identified thresholds in the three different response functions...... that improved the model fit in all cases. The direct soil moisture effect on SR, however, was weak at the annual time scale. We conclude that the exponential soil temperature function may only be a good predictor for SR in a narrow temperature range, and that extrapolating predictions for future climate based...

  19. Temperature dependent recombination dynamics in InP/ZnS colloidal nanocrystals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shirazi, Roza; Kopylov, Oleksii; Kovács, András

    2012-01-01

    In this letter, we investigate exciton recombination in InP/ZnS core-shell colloidal nanocrystals over a wide temperature range. Over the entire range between room temperature and liquid helium temperature, multi-exponential exciton decay curves are observed and well explained by the presence...... of bright and dark exciton states, as well as defect states. Two different types of defect are present: one located at the core-shell interface and the other on the surface of the nanocrystal. Based on the temperature dependent contributions of all four states to the total photoluminescence signal, we...... estimate that the four states are distributed within a 20 meV energy band in nanocrystals that emit at 1.82 eV....

  20. Temperature Dependence of NMR Parameters Calculated from Path Integral Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dračínský, Martin; Bouř, Petr; Hodgkinson, Paul

    2016-03-08

    The influence of temperature on NMR chemical shifts and quadrupolar couplings in model molecular organic solids is explored using path integral molecular dynamics (PIMD) and density functional theory (DFT) calculations of shielding and electric field gradient (EFG) tensors. An approach based on convoluting calculated shielding or EFG tensor components with probability distributions of selected bond distances and valence angles obtained from DFT-PIMD simulations at several temperatures is used to calculate the temperature effects. The probability distributions obtained from the quantum PIMD simulations, which includes nuclear quantum effects, are significantly broader and less temperature dependent than those obtained with conventional DFT molecular dynamics or with 1D scans through the potential energy surface. Predicted NMR observables for the model systems were in excellent agreement with experimental data.

  1. Unusual temperature dependence of the dissociative electron attachment cross section of 2-thiouracil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kopyra, Janina [Faculty of Science, Siedlce University, 3 Maja 54, 08-110 Siedlce (Poland); Abdoul-Carime, Hassan [Université de Lyon, F-69003 Lyon (France); Université Lyon 1, Villeurbanne (France); CNRS/IN2P3, UMR5822, Institut de Physique Nucléaire de Lyon, Lyon (France)

    2016-01-21

    At low energies (<3 eV), molecular dissociation is controlled by dissociative electron attachment for which the initial step, i.e., the formation of the transient negative ion, can be initiated by shape resonance or vibrational Feshbach resonance (VFR) mediated by the formation of a dipole bound anion. The temperature dependence for shape-resonances is well established; however, no experimental information is available yet on the second mechanism. Here, we show that the dissociation cross section for VFRs mediated by the formation of a dipole bound anion decreases as a function of a temperature. The change remains, however, relatively small in the temperature range of 370-440 K but it might be more pronounced at the extended temperature range.

  2. Unusually strong temperature dependence of P2X3 receptor traffic to the plasma membrane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evgeny ePryazhnikov

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available ATP-gated P2X3 receptors are expressed by nociceptive neurons and participate in transduction of pain. Responsiveness of P2X3 receptors is strongly enhanced at high temperatures, suggesting a role for these receptors in temperature detection. Since sustained responsiveness depends on receptor trafficking to the plasma membrane, we employed total-internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF microscopy to highlight perimembrane pool of DsRed-tagged P2X3 receptors and studied the effects of temperature on perimembrane turnover of P2X3-DsRed. Patch clamp recordings confirmed membrane expression of functional, rapidly desensitizing P2X3-DsRed receptors. By combining TIRF microscopy with the technique of fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP, we measured the rate of perimembrane turnover of P2X3-DsRed receptors expressed in hippocampal neurons. At room temperature, the P2X3-DsRed perimembrane turnover as measured by TIRF-FRAP had a time constant of ~2 min. At 29oC, receptor turnover was strongly accelerated, yielding an extremely high temperature dependence coefficient Q10 ~4.5. In comparison, AMPA receptor turnover measured with TIRF-FRAP was only moderately sensitive to temperature (Q10 ~1.5. The traffic inhibitor Brefeldin A selectively decelerated P2X3-DsRed receptor turnover at 29oC, but had no effect at 21oC (Q10 ~1.5. This indicates that receptor traffic to plasma membrane, rather than endosomal recycling, is the key temperature-sensitive component of P2X3 turnover. The selective inhibitor of the RhoA kinase Y27632 significantly decreased the temperature dependence of P2X3-DsRed receptor turnover (Q10 ~2.0. In summary, the RhoA kinase-dependent membrane trafficking of P2X3 receptors to plasma membrane has an exceptional sensitivity to temperature. These data link two fundamental sensory processes, thermoreception and nociception, which are likely co-involved in hyperthermia-associated pain states.

  3. Temperature dependence of the electrical, mechanical and electromechanical properties of high sensitivity novel piezoceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Algueró, M.

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available The temperature dependence of the ε33 T dielectric permittivity and losses of piezoelectric Mn doped 0.65Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3O3-0.35PbTiO3 ceramics has been measured up to 350oC at frequencies between 1 and 100 kHz by impedance spectroscopy. The temperature dependence of the low frequency Young´s modulus and mechanical losses of the ceramics has been measured in the same temperature range by dynamic mechanical analysis in three points bending configuration. Complex ε33 T, s11 E compliance and d31 piezoelectric coefficients have been obtained from radial piezoelectric resonances at temperatures up to 90oC (before depolarisation by an automatic iterative method. All the measurements reflect the occurrence of the ferroelectric rhombohedral to ferroelectric tetragonal phase transition, which is thougth to be responsible of the high electromechanical response of the PMN-PT system, and allow describing some of its characteristics for the investigated ceramics.

    Se ha medido por espectroscopía de impedancias la dependencia con la temperatura hasta 350oC de la permitividad y las pérdidas dieléctricas, ε33 T y tan δ, de cerámicas piezoeléctricas de 0.65Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3O3-0.35PbTiO3 dopadas con Mn a frecuencias entre 1 y 100 kHz. Se ha medido por análisis mecánico dinámico en la configuración de flexión por tres puntos la dependencia con la temperatura en el mismo rango del módulo de Young y las pérdidas mecánicas de baja frecuencia de las cerámicas. Se han obtenido por un método automático iterativo los coeficientes del material ε33 T, módulo elástico s11 E y coeficiente piezoeléctrico d31 en forma compleja a partir de resonancias radiales piezoeléctricas a temperaturas entre ambiente y 90oC (antes de la despolarización. Todas las medidas reflejan la existencia de la transición de la fase ferroeléctrica con estructura romboédrica a la fase ferroeléctrica con estructura tetragonal, que se cree responsable de la alta respuesta

  4. Global patterns in lake ecosystem responses to warming based on the temperature dependence of metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraemer, Benjamin M; Chandra, Sudeep; Dell, Anthony I; Dix, Margaret; Kuusisto, Esko; Livingstone, David M; Schladow, S Geoffrey; Silow, Eugene; Sitoki, Lewis M; Tamatamah, Rashid; McIntyre, Peter B

    2017-05-01

    Climate warming is expected to have large effects on ecosystems in part due to the temperature dependence of metabolism. The responses of metabolic rates to climate warming may be greatest in the tropics and at low elevations because mean temperatures are warmer there and metabolic rates respond exponentially to temperature (with exponents >1). However, if warming rates are sufficiently fast in higher latitude/elevation lakes, metabolic rate responses to warming may still be greater there even though metabolic rates respond exponentially to temperature. Thus, a wide range of global patterns in the magnitude of metabolic rate responses to warming could emerge depending on global patterns of temperature and warming rates. Here we use the Boltzmann-Arrhenius equation, published estimates of activation energy, and time series of temperature from 271 lakes to estimate long-term (1970-2010) changes in 64 metabolic processes in lakes. The estimated responses of metabolic processes to warming were usually greatest in tropical/low-elevation lakes even though surface temperatures in higher latitude/elevation lakes are warming faster. However, when the thermal sensitivity of a metabolic process is especially weak, higher latitude/elevation lakes had larger responses to warming in parallel with warming rates. Our results show that the sensitivity of a given response to temperature (as described by its activation energy) provides a simple heuristic for predicting whether tropical/low-elevation lakes will have larger or smaller metabolic responses to warming than higher latitude/elevation lakes. Overall, we conclude that the direct metabolic consequences of lake warming are likely to be felt most strongly at low latitudes and low elevations where metabolism-linked ecosystem services may be most affected. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Monte Carlo method for photon heating using temperature-dependent optical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slade, Adam Broadbent; Aguilar, Guillermo

    2015-02-01

    The Monte Carlo method for photon transport is often used to predict the volumetric heating that an optical source will induce inside a tissue or material. This method relies on constant (with respect to temperature) optical properties, specifically the coefficients of scattering and absorption. In reality, optical coefficients are typically temperature-dependent, leading to error in simulation results. The purpose of this study is to develop a method that can incorporate variable properties and accurately simulate systems where the temperature will greatly vary, such as in the case of laser-thawing of frozen tissues. A numerical simulation was developed that utilizes the Monte Carlo method for photon transport to simulate the thermal response of a system that allows temperature-dependent optical and thermal properties. This was done by combining traditional Monte Carlo photon transport with a heat transfer simulation to provide a feedback loop that selects local properties based on current temperatures, for each moment in time. Additionally, photon steps are segmented to accurately obtain path lengths within a homogenous (but not isothermal) material. Validation of the simulation was done using comparisons to established Monte Carlo simulations using constant properties, and a comparison to the Beer-Lambert law for temperature-variable properties. The simulation is able to accurately predict the thermal response of a system whose properties can vary with temperature. The difference in results between variable-property and constant property methods for the representative system of laser-heated silicon can become larger than 100K. This simulation will return more accurate results of optical irradiation absorption in a material which undergoes a large change in temperature. This increased accuracy in simulated results leads to better thermal predictions in living tissues and can provide enhanced planning and improved experimental and procedural outcomes. Copyright

  6. Temperature effects on stocks and stability of a phytoplankton-zooplankton model and the dependence on light and nutrients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norberg, J.; DeAngelis, D.L.

    1997-01-01

    A model of a closed phytoplankton—zooplankton ecosystem was analyzed for effects of temperature on stocks and stability and the dependence of these effects on light and total nutrient concentration of the system. An analysis of the steady state equations showed that the effect of temperature on zooplankton and POM biomass was levelled when primary production is nutrient limited. Temperature increase had a generally negative effect on all biomasses at high nutrient levels due to increased maintenance costs. Nutrient limitation of net primary production is the main factor governing the effect of stocks and flows as well as the stability of the system. All components of the system, except for phytoplankton biomass, are proportional to net production and thus to the net effect of light on photosynthesis. However, temperature determines the slope of that relationship. The resilience of the system was measured by calculating the eigenvalues of the steady state. Under oligotrophic conditions, the system can be stable, but an increase in temperature can cause instability or a decrease in resilience. This conclusion is discussed in the face of recent models that take spatial heterogeneity into account and display far more stable behavior, in better agreement to empirical data. Using simulations, we found that the amplitude of fluctuations of the herbivore stock increases with temperature while the mean biomass and minimum values decrease in comparison with steady state predictions

  7. Effect of Structural Heterogeneity of 17Mn1Si Steel on the Temperature Dependence of Impact Deformation and Fracture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dmitry Moiseenko

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with a theoretical and experimental study of the relationship between the microstructural parameters, mechanical properties, and impact deformation and fracture of steels using the example of 17Mn1Si pipe steel. A model for the behavior of a polycrystalline grain conglomerate under impact loading at different temperatures was proposed within a cellular automata framework. It was shown that the intensity of dissipation processes explicitly depends on temperature and these processes play an important role in stress relaxation at the boundaries of structural elements. The Experimental study reveals the relationship between pendulum impact test temperature and the deformation/fracture energy of the steel. The impact toughness was shown to decrease almost linearly with the decreasing test temperature, which agrees with the fractographic analysis data confirming the increase in the fraction of brittle fracture in this case. It was shown with the aid of the proposed model and numerical simulations that the use of the excitable cellular automata method and an explicit account of test temperature through the possibility of energy release at internal interfaces help to explain the experimentally observed features of impact failure at different temperatures.

  8. Temperature dependence of o-Ps annihilation lifetime in non-uniform cylindrical pores in comparison with ETE model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khaghani, Morteza, E-mail: m.khaghani@pgs.usb.ac.ir; Mehmandoost-Khajeh-Dad, Ali Akbar, E-mail: mehmandoost@phys.usb.ac.ir

    2017-04-01

    Highlights: • Using the well known multi-physics program COMSOL calculating o-Ps annihilation lifetime in complex geometries. • Investigation of shape non-uniformity of cylindrical pores on o-Ps annihilation lifetime. • Verifying temperature dependency of o-Ps lifetime in non-uniform cylindrical pores. • Suggesting PALS at low temperature as a method to verify pore uniformity in porous material. - Abstract: Ortho-positronium (o-Ps) annihilation lifetime was calculated in non-uniform cylinder-shaped pores by solving Schrodinger equation using a well-known multi-physics program called COMSOL. The o-Ps annihilation lifetime variation in terms of temperature was calculated on the basis of ETE model via a numerical method. The COMSOL simulations indicate that as long as the pore is uniform cylinder-shaped, the results agree with those of two-dimensional ETE model, whereas deformations in the cylinder shape (indentation or protrusion) change the temperature behavior of ETE model and, thereby, higher values are predicted for o-Ps lifetime in the pore at lower temperatures. The geometry of the non-uniform cylinder-shaped pores, which is accompanied by empirical evidence, can be used for the analysis of empirical results obtained from positron lifetime spectroscopy in different temperatures.

  9. Temperature-dependent modulation of regional lymphatic contraction frequency and flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solari, Eleonora; Marcozzi, Cristiana; Negrini, Daniela; Moriondo, Andrea

    2017-11-01

    Lymph drainage and propulsion are sustained by an extrinsic mechanism, based on mechanical forces acting from the surrounding tissues against the wall of lymphatic vessels, and by an intrinsic mechanism attributable to active spontaneous contractions of the lymphatic vessel muscle. Despite being heterogeneous, the mechanisms underlying the generation of spontaneous contractions share a common biochemical nature and are thus modulated by temperature. In this study, we challenged excised tissues from rat diaphragm and hindpaw, endowed with spontaneously contracting lymphatic vessels, to temperatures from 24°C (hindpaw) or 33°C (diaphragmatic vessels) to 40°C while measuring lymphatic contraction frequency (fc) and amplitude. Both vessel populations displayed a sigmoidal relationship between fc and temperature, each centered around the average temperature of surrounding tissue (36.7 diaphragmatic and 32.1 hindpaw lymphatics). Although the slope factor of the sigmoidal fit to the fc change of hindpaw vessels was 2.3°C·cycles-1·min-1, a value within the normal range displayed by simple biochemical reactions, the slope factor of the diaphragmatic lymphatics was 0.62°C·cycles-1·min-1, suggesting the added involvement of temperature-sensing mechanisms. Lymph flow calculated as a function of temperature confirmed the relationship observed on fc data alone and showed that none of the two lymphatic vessel populations would be able to adapt to the optimal working temperature of the other tissue district. This poses a novel question whether lymphatic vessels might not adapt their function to accommodate the change if exposed to a surrounding temperature, which is different from their normal condition.NEW & NOTEWORTHY This study demonstrates to what extent lymphatic vessel intrinsic contractility and lymph flow are modulated by temperature and that this modulation is dependent on the body district that the vessels belong to, suggesting a possible functional misbehavior

  10. Temperature dependent growth, feeding, nutritional condition and aerobic metabolism of juvenile spiny lobster, Sagmariasus verreauxi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgibbon, Quinn P; Simon, Cedric J; Smith, Gregory G; Carter, Chris G; Battaglene, Stephen C

    2017-05-01

    We examined the effects of temperature on the growth, feeding, nutritional condition and aerobic metabolism of juvenile spiny lobster, Sagmariasus verreauxi, in order to determine if temperature acclimated aerobic scope correlates with optimum for growth and to establish the thermal tolerance window for this emerging aquaculture species. Juvenile lobsters (initial weight=10.95±0.47g) were reared (n=7) at temperatures from 11.0 to 28.5°C for 145days. All lobsters survived from 14.5 to 25.0°C while survival was reduced at 11.0°C (86%) and all lobsters died at 28.5°C. Lobster specific growth rate and specific feed consumption displayed a unimodal response with temperature, peaking at 21.5°C. Lobster standard, routine and maximum metabolic rates, and aerobic scope all increased exponentially up to maximum non-lethal temperature. Optimum temperature for growth did not correspond to that for maximum aerobic scope suggesting that aerobic scope is not an effective predictor of the thermal optimum of spiny lobsters. Plateauing of specific feed consumption beyond 21.5°C suggests that temperature dependent growth of lobsters is limited by capacity to ingest or digest sufficient food to meet increasing maintenance metabolic demands at high temperatures. The nutritional condition of lobsters was not influenced by temperature and feed conversion ratio was improved at lower temperatures. These findings add to a growing body of evidence questioning the generality of aerobic scope to describe the physiological thermal boundaries of aquatic ectotherms and suggest that feed intake plays a crucial role in regulating performance at thermal extremes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Anomalous temperature dependence of photoluminescence in GeO x films and GeO x /SiO2 nano-heterostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marin, D. V.; Volodin, V. A.; Rinnert, H.; Vergnat, M.

    2012-06-01

    The optical properties of GeO x film and GeO x /SiO2 multilayer heterostructures (with thickness of GeO x layers down to 1 nm) were studied with the use of Raman scattering and infrared spectroscopy, ellipsometry and photoluminescence spectroscopy including temperature dependence of photoluminescence. The observed photoluminescence is related to defect (dangling bonds) in GeO x and interface defects for the case of GeO x /SiO2 multilayer heterostructures. From analysis of temperature dependence of photoluminescence intensity, it was found that rate of nonradiative transitions in GeO x film has Berthelot type, but anomalous deviations from Berthelot type temperature dependence were observed in temperature dependences of photoluminescence intensities for GeO x /SiO2 multilayer heterostructures.

  12. Temperature and ionization balance dependence of O VII line ratios. [in solar corona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acton, L. W.; Brown, W. A.

    1978-01-01

    The forbidden-plus-intersystem to resonance line ratio (G) for the heliumlike ion O VII is calculated, taking into account cascades, blended satellite lines, and radiative plus dielectric recombination. It is noted that G is of particular use for investigating radiative-transfer effects and nonequilibrium ionization in the solar corona and that the calculations are applicable to a low-density optically thin Maxwellian plasma. The temperature dependence of G is considered for the case of a steady-state equilibrium plasma, and the effect of departures from ionization equilibrium on G is examined. It is found that G is quite insensitive to temperature over the range from 600,000 to 6 million K for a steady-state plasma, but that recombinations may be suppressed or dominant, depending on the relative abundance of O VIII, for a plasma in which the state of ionization is not in equilibrium with the electron temperature. This latter effect is shown to be capable of causing large variations in G that are dependent on electron temperature.

  13. Investigation of temperature-dependent small-signal performances of TB SOI MOSFETs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yuping; Liu, Jun; Lü, Kai; Chen, Jing

    2017-04-01

    This paper investigated the temperature dependence of the cryogenic small-signal ac performances of multi-finger partially depleted (PD) silicon-on-insulator (SOI) metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistors (MOSFETs), with T-gate body contact (TB) structure. The measurement results show that the cut-off frequency increases from 78 GHz at 300 K to 120 GHz at 77 K and the maximum oscillation frequency increases from 54 GHz at 300 K to 80 GHz at 77 K, and these are mainly due to the effect of negative temperature dependence of threshold voltage and transconductance. By using a simple equivalent circuit model, the temperature-dependent small-signal parameters are discussed in detail. The understanding of cryogenic small-signal performance is beneficial to develop the PD SOI MOSFETs integrated circuits for ultra-low temperature applications. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 61331006) and the National Defense Pre-Research Foundation of China (No. 9140A11040114DZ04152).

  14. Temperature dependence of critical currents in REBCO thin films with artificial pinning centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Kaname; Nishihara, Masaya; Kimoto, Takamasa; Horide, Tomoya; Jha, Alok Kumar; Yoshida, Yutaka; Awaji, Satoshi; Ichinose, Ataru

    2017-10-01

    Conventionally, δT c type (order parameter modulation) and δl type (mean free path modulation) pinning mechanisms have been proposed to explain the temperature dependence of the flux pinning of superconducting materials. According to previous studies, it is assumed that the temperature dependence of J c of REBa2Cu3O7 (REBCO, RE = Y, Gd, Sm, etc) films without artificial pinning centers (APCs) is δl type, but it is unidentified when APCs are introduced into the films. In this paper, GdBCO thin films doped with BaHfO3 (BHO) deposited on LaAlO3 substrates by pulsed laser deposition were studied. A target exchange method was used to alternately ablate two targets of pure GdBCO and BHO for introducing nanorods as APCs into GdBCO films. Since the insulative BHO acts as a strong pinning center, the δT c pinning mechanism is expected for the temperature dependence of J c of these thin films. However, the experimental results showed that the J c of the films with BHO nanorods was determined by the δl pinning mechanism over a wide temperature range. In order to explain these unexpected results, we examined the pinning mechanism by nanorods based on a resultant pinning force model.

  15. Time-Dependent Behavior of Shrinkage Strain for Early Age Concrete Affected by Temperature Variation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Qin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Shrinkage has been proven to be an important property of early age concrete. The shrinkage strain leads to inherent engineering problems, such as cracking and loss of prestress. Atmospheric temperature is an important factor in shrinkage strain. However, current research does not provide much attention to the effect of atmospheric temperature on shrinkage of early age concrete. In this paper, a laboratory study was undertaken to present the time-dependent shrinkage of early age concrete under temperature variation. A newly developed Material Deformation Tester (MDT, which can simulate consecutive variation of atmospheric temperature, was used to collect the shrinkage strain of specimens and temperature data. A numerical model was established to describe the thermoelastic strain of a specimen. The results show that (1 there are several sharp shrinkages up to 600 μ for early age concrete in the first 3 days; (2 the absolute value of shrinkage strain is larger than thermal strain; and (3 the difference of shrinkage strain under temperature variation or constant temperature is up to 500 μ.

  16. Plasmon resonance enhanced temperature-dependent photoluminescence of Si-V centers in diamond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, Shaoheng [State Key Laboratory of Superhard Materials, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China); State Key Laboratory on Integrated Optoelectronics, College of Electronic Science and Engineering, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China); Song, Jie; Wang, Qiliang; Liu, Junsong; Li, Hongdong, E-mail: hdli@jlu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Superhard Materials, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China); Zhang, Baolin [State Key Laboratory on Integrated Optoelectronics, College of Electronic Science and Engineering, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China)

    2015-11-23

    Temperature dependent optical property of diamond has been considered as a very important factor for realizing high performance diamond-based optoelectronic devices. The photoluminescence feature of the zero phonon line of silicon-vacancy (Si-V) centers in Si-doped chemical vapor deposited single crystal diamond (SCD) with localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) induced by gold nanoparticles has been studied at temperatures ranging from liquid nitrogen temperature to 473 K, as compared with that of the SCD counterpart in absence of the LSPR. It is found that with LSPR the emission intensities of Si-V centers are significantly enhanced by factors of tens and the magnitudes of the redshift (width) of the emissions become smaller (narrower), in comparison with those of normal emissions without plasmon resonance. More interestingly, these strong Si-V emissions appear remarkably at temperatures up to 473 K, while the spectral feature was not reported in previous studies on the intrinsic Si-doped diamonds when temperatures are higher than room temperature. These findings would lead to reaching high performance diamond-based devices, such as single photon emitter, quantum cryptography, biomarker, and so forth, working under high temperature conditions.

  17. Temperature dependence of resonant x-ray magnetic scattering in holmium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helgesen, G.; Hill, J. P.; Thurston, T. R.; Gibbs, Doon; Kwo, J.; Hong, M.

    1994-08-01

    We report the results of resonant x-ray magnetic scattering experiments on bulk and thin-film single crystals of holmium. The scattering at the principal magnetic reflection has been characterized as a function of the temperature in the spiral phases near and below their respective Néel temperatures. The integrated intensity of the principal magnetic peak in both samples shows power-law behavior versus reduced temperature with nearly equal exponents. The exponents for the scattering at the resonant second and third harmonics in the bulk sample are not simple integer multiples of the first, and motivate the consideration of simple scaling corrections to mean-field theory. We also present and compare the results of high-resolution measurements of the temperature dependence of the magnetic wave vectors, c-axis lattice constants, and correlation lengths of the magnetic scattering of the two samples in their spiral phases. Although the qualitative behavior is similar, systematic differences are found, including uniformly larger magnetic wave vectors and the suppression of the 1/6 phase in the film. The spiral magnetic structure of the film forms a domain state at all temperatures in the ordered phase. The magnetic correlation lengths of both samples are greatest near the Néel temperature, where that of the film appears to exceed the translational correlation lengths of the lattice. As the temperature decreases, the magnetic correlation lengths also decrease. These results are discussed in terms of the strain present in the samples.

  18. Temperature dependent fracture properties of shape memory alloys: novel findings and a comprehensive model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maletta, Carmine; Sgambitterra, Emanuele; Niccoli, Fabrizio

    2016-12-21

    Temperature dependent fracture properties of NiTi-based Shape Memory Alloys (SMAs), within the pseudoelastic regime, were analyzed. In particular, the effective Stress Intensity Factor (SIF) was estimated, at different values of the testing temperature, by a fitting of the William's expansion series, based on Digital Image Correlation (DIC) measurements. It was found that temperature plays an important role on SIF and on critical fast fracture conditions. As a consequence, Linear Elastic Fracture Mechanics (LEFM) approaches are not suitable to predict fracture properties of SMAs, as they do not consider the effects of temperature. On the contrary, good agreements between DIC results and the predictions of an ad-hoc analytical model were observed. In fact, the model takes into account the whole thermo mechanical loading condition, including both mechanical load and temperature. Results revealed that crack tip stress-induced transformations do not represent a toughening effect and this is a completely novel result within the SMA community. Furthremore, it was demonstrated that the analytical model can be actually used to define a temperature independent fracture toughness parameter. Therefore, a new approach is proposed, based on the analytical model, where both mechanical load and temperature are considered as loading parameters in SIF computation.

  19. Temperature dependent lattice misfit in nickel-base superalloys - Simulation and experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neumeier, Steffen; Goeken, Mathias [Lehrstuhl fuer Allgemeine Werkstoffeigenschaften, Universitaet Erlangen-Nuernberg, Erlangen (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    Ni-base superalloys are widely used in high temperature applications like jet engines and land-based turbines, because of their excellent high temperature properties. They derive their excellent high temperature strength and creep resistance from the presence of a high volume fraction of Ni{sub 3}Al {gamma}{sup '} precipitates (L1{sub 2} structure), which are embedded coherently within the face centred cubic (A1) {gamma} matrix. The magnitude and sign of the lattice misfit between {gamma} and {gamma}{sup '} are important parameters affecting the microstructural evolution and high temperature strength of Ni-base superalloys. Therefore the knowledge of the lattice misfit at application temperature is of great importance. In this study the lattice misfit of several 1{sup st}, 2{sup nd} and 4{sup th} generation Ni-base superalloys in dependence of temperature has been measured by means of HRXRD and compared with lattice misfit simulations based on thermodynamic calculations. The influence of the thermal expansion coefficients and the change in the chemical composition of both {gamma} and {gamma}{sup '} due to the {gamma}{sup '} dissolution with increasing temperature has been taking into account. The experimentally measured {gamma} and {gamma}{sup '} lattice parameters could be reproduced by the simulation and the {gamma}/{gamma}{sup '} lattice misfit could be reasonably predicted.

  20. Embryonic origin of mate choice in a lizard with temperature-dependent sex determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putz, Oliver; Crews, David

    2006-01-01

    Individual differences in the adult sexual behavior of vertebrates are rooted in the fetal environment. In the leopard gecko (Eublepharis macularius), a species with temperature-dependent sex determination (TSD), hatchling sex ratios differ between incubation temperatures, as does sexuality in same-sex animals. This variation can primarily be ascribed to the temperature having direct organizing actions on the brain. Here we demonstrate that embryonic temperature can affect adult mate choice in the leopard gecko. Given the simultaneous choice between two females from different incubation temperatures (30.0 and 34.0 degrees C), males from one incubation temperature (30.0 degrees C) preferred the female from 34.0 degrees C, while males from another incubation temperature (32.5 degrees C) preferred the female from 30.0 degrees C. We suggest that this difference in mate choice is due to an environmental influence on brain development leading to differential perception of opposite-sex individuals. This previously unrecognized modulator of adult mate choice lends further support to the view that mate choice is best understood in the context of an individual's entire life-history. Thus, sexual selection results from a combination of the female's as well as the male's life history. Female attractiveness and male choice therefore are complementary. Copyright 2005 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.