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Sample records for technology-based instruction represents

  1. DESIGNING INSTRUCTION FOR THE TRADITIONAL, ADULT, AND DISTANCE LEARNER: A New Engine for Technology-Based Teaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lawrence A. Tomei

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Adult students demand a wider variety of instructional strategies that encompass real-world, interactive, cooperative, and discovery learning experiences.Designing Instruction for the Traditional, Adult, and Distance Learner: A New Engine for Technology-Based Teaching explores how technology impacts the process of devising instructional plans as well as learning itself in adult students. Containing research from leading international experts, this publication proposes realistic and accurate archetypes to assist educators in incorporating state-of-the-art technologies into online instruction.This text proposes a new paradigm for designing, developing, implementing, and assessed technology-based instruction. It addresses three target populations of today's learner: traditional, adult, and distance education. The text proposes a new model of instructional system design (ISD for developing effective technology-based education that involves a five-step process focusing on the learner, learning theories, resources, delivery modalities, and outcomes.

  2. Introductory Statistics, College Student Attitudes and Knowledge--A Qualitative Analysis of the Impact of Technology-Based Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meletiou-Mavrotheris, M.; Lee, C.; Fouladi, R. T.

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents findings from a qualitative study that compared the learning experiences of a group of students from a technology-based college-level introductory statistics course with the learning experiences of a group of students with non-technology-based instruction. Findings from the study indicate differences with regards to classroom…

  3. The Influence of a Technology-Based Internship on First-Year Teachers' Instructional Decision-Making

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Curby; Kjellstrom, William

    2014-01-01

    This qualitative study examined the influence of technology-based internships on teachers' instructional decision-making during their first year in the classroom. Field experiences offer preservice teachers opportunities to observe and practice teaching, yet they rarely target technology. Using a case study design, this study explored the…

  4. The Influence of a Technology-Based Internship on First-Year Teachers' Instructional Decision-Making

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    Alexander, Curby; Kjellstrom, William

    2014-01-01

    This qualitative study examined the influence of technology-based internships on teachers' instructional decision-making during their first year in the classroom. Field experiences offer preservice teachers opportunities to observe and practice teaching, yet they rarely target technology. Using a case study design, this study explored the…

  5. Bonneville Purchasing Instructions. Appendix 14A, Contracting Officer`s Technical Representatives` Guide for Services Contracts.

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    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1993-07-01

    This guide outlines the duties of BPA personnel designated as Contracting Officers Technical Representatives (COTRs). The BPA Administrator gives contracting officers (COs) in BPA responsibility and authority for awarding and administering contracts. COs are authorized to designate other BPA employees to act as their representatives for purposes of contract administration, from the time of contract award until final receipt and acceptance of the contracted services. COTRs are the individuals primarily relied upon to perform technical contract administration functions. Similar functions for supply and construction contracts are performed by engineering representatives, construction inspectors, and inspectors. Although this Guide is written primarily with the COTR in mind, the concept and operation of teamwork is essential throughout the entire process of contract administration. The CO administers the contract during performance, but rarely has expertise in all of the relevant technical areas. Therefore, CO decisions rely on input from a team. The COTR is an indispensable member of that team. The instructions in this Guide are designed to facilitate this essential CO-COTR cooperation. COTR duties are usually additional to those required of the COTR in his or her assigned line organization. The COTR is still accountable to the line supervisor for performance of regularly-assigned duties. These duties are to be reflected appropriately in performance appraisals and job descriptions. For contract administration duties, however, the COTR reports directly to, and is accountable only to, the CO. The COTR`s supervisor must allow sufficient time to ensure that the COTR can adequately monitor the contract for technical compliance. This Guide is designed for COTRs who are performing service contract (including intergovernmental contract) administration functions as an adjunct to their normal technical duties.

  6. Representing Instructional Material for Scenario-Based Guided-Discovery Courseware

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    Greitzer, Frank L.; Merrill, M. DAVID.; Rice, Douglas M.; Curtis, Darren S.

    2004-12-06

    The focus of this paper is to discuss paradigms for learning that are based on sound principles of human learning and cognition, and to discuss technical challenges that must be overcome in achieving this research goal through instructional system design (ISD) approaches that are cost-effective as well as conformant with today's interactive multimedia instruction standards. Fundamental concepts are to: engage learners to solve real-world problems (progress from simple to complex); relate material to previous experience; demonstrate what is to be learned using interactive, problem-centered activities rather than passive exposure to material; require learners to use their new knowledge to solve problems that demonstrate their knowledge in a relevant applied setting; and guide the learner with feedback and coaching early, then gradually withdraw this support as learning progresses. Many of these principles have been put into practice by employing interactive learning objects as re-usable components of larger, more integrated exercises. A challenge is to make even more extensive use of interactive, scenario-based activities within a guided-discovery framework. Because the design and construction of interactive, scenario-based learning objects and more complex integrated exercises is labor-intensive, this paper explores the use of interactive learning objects and associated representation schema for instructional content to facilitate development of tools for creating scenario-based, guided-discovery courseware.

  7. A preliminary study of achievement, attitudes toward success in mathematics, and mathematics anxiety with technology-based instruction in brief calculus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkhateeb, Haitham M

    2002-02-01

    This study was designed to compare achievement, attitudes toward success in mathematics, and mathematics anxiety of college students taught brief calculus using a graphic calculator, with the achievement and attitudes and anxiety of students taught using the computer algebra system Maple, using a technology based text book. 50 men and 50 women, students in three classes at a large public university in the southwestern United States, participated. Students' achievement in brief calculus was measured by performance on a teacher-made achievement test given at the end of the study. Analysis of variance showed no significant difference in achievement between the groups. To measure change in attitudes and anxiety, responses to paper-and-pencil inventories indicated significant differences in favor of students using the computer.

  8. Representing Chemistry: How Instructional Use of Symbolic, Microscopic, and Macroscopic Mode Influences Student Conceptual Understanding in Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Lorelei

    Chemistry as a subject is difficult to learn and understand, due in part to the specific language used by practitioners in their professional and scientific communications. The language and ways of representing chemical interactions have been grouped into three modes of representation used by chemistry instructors, and ultimately by students in understanding the discipline. The first of these three modes of representation is the symbolic mode, which uses a standard set of rules for chemical nomenclature set out by the IUPAC. The second mode of representation is that of microscopic, which depicts chemical compounds as discrete units made up of atoms and molecules, with a particular ratio of atoms to a molecule or formula unit. The third mode of representation is macroscopic, what can be seen, experienced, or measured directly, like ice melting or a color change during a chemical reaction. Recent evidence suggests that chemistry instructors can assist their students in making the connections between the modes of representation by incorporating all three modes into their teaching and discussions, and overtly connecting the modes during instruction. In this research, chemistry teachers at the community college level were observed over the course of an entire semester, to evaluate their instructional use of mode of representation. The students of these teachers were tested prior to and after a semester's worth of instruction, and changes in the basic chemistry conceptual knowledge of these students were compared. Additionally, a subset of the overall population that was pre- and post-tested was interviewed at length using demonstrations of chemical phenomenon that students were asked to translate using all three modes of representation. Analysis of the instruction of three community college teachers shows there were significant differences among these teachers in their instructional use of mode of representation. Additionally, the students of these three teachers had

  9. The Effects of Schema-Broadening Instruction on Second Graders’ Word-Problem Performance and Their Ability to Represent Word Problems with Algebraic Equations: A Randomized Control Study

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    Fuchs, Lynn S.; Zumeta, Rebecca O.; Schumacher, Robin Finelli; Powell, Sarah R.; Seethaler, Pamela M.; Hamlett, Carol L.; Fuchs, Douglas

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the effects of schema-broadening instruction (SBI) on second graders’ word-problem-solving skills and their ability to represent the structure of word problems using algebraic equations. Teachers (n = 18) were randomly assigned to conventional word-problem instruction or SBI word-problem instruction, which taught students to represent the structural, defining features of word problems with overarching equations. Intervention lasted 16 weeks. We pretested and posttested 270 students on measures of word-problem skill; analyses that accounted for the nested structure of the data indicated superior word-problem learning for SBI students. Descriptive analyses of students’ word-problem work indicated that SBI helped students represent the structure of word problems with algebraic equations, suggesting that SBI promoted this aspect of students’ emerging algebraic reasoning. PMID:20539822

  10. Technology-Based Classroom Assessments: Alternatives to Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salend, Spencer J.

    2009-01-01

    Although many teachers are using new technologies to differentiate instruction and administer tests, educators are also employing a range of technology-based resources and strategies to implement a variety of classroom assessments as alternatives to standardized and teacher-made testing. Technology-based classroom assessments focus on the use of…

  11. Technology-Based Classroom Assessments: Alternatives to Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salend, Spencer J.

    2009-01-01

    Although many teachers are using new technologies to differentiate instruction and administer tests, educators are also employing a range of technology-based resources and strategies to implement a variety of classroom assessments as alternatives to standardized and teacher-made testing. Technology-based classroom assessments focus on the use of…

  12. Technology based Education System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kant Hiran, Kamal; Doshi, Ruchi; Henten, Anders

    2016-01-01

    Abstract - Education plays a very important role for the development of the country. Education has multiple dimensions from schooling to higher education and research. In all these domains, there is invariably a need for technology based teaching and learning tools are highly demanded in the acad...

  13. Technology base for microgravity horticulture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauer, R. L.; Magnuson, J. W.; Scruby, R. R.; Scheld, H. W.

    1987-01-01

    Advanced microgravity plant biology research and life support system development for the spacecraft environment are critically hampered by the lack of a technology base. This inadequacy stems primarily from the fact that microgravity results in a lack of convective currents and phase separation as compared to the one gravity environment. A program plan is being initiated to develop this technology base. This program will provide an iterative flight development effort that will be closely integrated with both basic science investigations and advanced life support system development efforts incorporating biological processes. The critical considerations include optimum illumination methods, root aeration, root and shoot support, and heat rejection and gas exchange in the plant canopy.

  14. Closing the Achievement Gap by Improving Reading Instruction. Hearing before the Committee on Education and the Workforce. House of Representatives, One Hundred Seventh Congress, First Session (Orlando, Florida, November 13, 2001).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. House Committee on Education and the Workforce.

    A field hearing of the United States House of Representatives' Committee on Education and the Workforce, entitled "Closing the Achievement Gap by Improving Reading Instruction," was held at Lancaster Elementary School in Orlando, Florida, on November 13, 2001. The hearing begins with welcoming statements by the committee chairman and one…

  15. FY04 Engineering Technology Reports Technology Base

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    Sharpe, R M

    2005-01-27

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's Engineering Directorate has two primary discretionary avenues for its investment in technologies: the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program and the ''Tech Base'' program. This volume summarizes progress on the projects funded for technology-base efforts in FY2004. The Engineering Technical Reports exemplify Engineering's more than 50-year history of researching and developing (LDRD), and reducing to practice (technology-base) the engineering technologies needed to support the Laboratory's missions. Engineering has been a partner in every major program and project at the Laboratory throughout its existence, and has prepared for this role with a skilled workforce and technical resources. This accomplishment is well summarized by Engineering's mission: ''Enable program success today and ensure the Laboratory's vitality tomorrow''. LDRD is the vehicle for creating those technologies and competencies that are cutting edge. These require a significant level of research or contain some unknown that needs to be fully understood. Tech Base is used to apply those technologies, or adapt them to a Laboratory need. The term commonly used for Tech Base projects is ''reduction to practice''. Tech Base projects effect the natural transition to reduction-to-practice of scientific or engineering methods that are well understood and established. They represent discipline-oriented, core competency activities that are multi-programmatic in application, nature, and scope. The objectives of technology-base funding include: (1) the development and enhancement of tools and processes to provide Engineering support capability, such as code maintenance and improved fabrication methods; (2) support of Engineering science and technology infrastructure, such as the installation or integration of a new capability; (3) support for technical and

  16. Teachers' Beliefs and Practices in Technology-Based Classrooms: A Developmental View

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Tamar; Wadmany, Rivka

    2006-01-01

    This paper reports on an exploratory, longitudinal study that analyzes and interprets the evolution of teachers' beliefs regarding learning, teaching, and technology, and their instructional practices, in the context of integrating technology-based information-rich tasks in six 4th-6th grade classrooms. The study used multiple research tools,…

  17. Transforming traditional communicative language instruction into computer-technology based instruction: experiences, challenges and considerations. Experiencias, retos y puntos para tener en cuenta en la transición entre un enfoque comunicativo de enseñanza del inglés como lengua extranjera a un enfoque mediado por el uso de las TICS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Héctor Alejandro Galvis

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This paper serves as a report on a qualitative study that was conducted in a language center in Colombia, with the aim of exploring the integration of computer technology into two EFL classes. This process involved the transformation of a traditional communicative language syllabus into a computer-technology oriented one which included the use of virtual communities, E-mail, Blogs and an instant-messaging application. Results of this study led to a critical discussion of the role of teachers and institutions when implementing computer technology. Other findings of this study suggest that some of the participants tended to choose computer-mediated communication over face-to-face interaction when communicating in EFL. It could also be observed that the participants expressed their willingness to continue using computer technology in future language instruction.Resumen Este artículo reporta una investigación de tipo cualitativo que se realizó en un centro de enseñanza del inglés en Colombia y cuyo objetivo fue explorar la implementación de la tecnología en dos clases de enseñanza del inglés como lengua extranjera. Este proceso se llevo a cabo por medio de modificaciones curriculares que llevaron a la inclusión de correo electrónico, foros de discusiones y aplicaciones de mensajería instantánea como medios para facilitar proyectos en el aula. Los resultados llevan a replantear el rol de docentes e instituciones para contribuir a la integración de las TIC cuando estas han sido excluidas curricularmente. De la misma manera, los resultados sugieren que algunos participantes preferirían seguir utilizando tecnología, y comunicarse por medios electrónicos en lengua extranjera en lugar de sostener conversaciones vis-à-vis entre sus compañeros de clase.

  18. FY02 Engineering Technology Reports Volume 1: Technology Base

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    Minichino, C; Meeker, D

    2003-01-28

    Engineering has touched on every challenge, every accomplishment, and every endeavor of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory during its fifty-year history. In this time of transition to new leadership, Engineering continues to be central to the mission of the Laboratory, returning to the tradition and core values of E. O. Lawrence: science-based engineering--turning scientific concepts into reality. This volume of Engineering Technical Reports summarizes progress on the projects funded for technology-base efforts. Technology-base projects effect the natural transition to reduction-to-practice of scientific or engineering methods that are well understood and established. They represent discipline-oriented, core competency activities that are multi-programmatic in application, nature, and scope. Objectives of technology-base funding include: (1) the development and enhancement of tools and processes to provide Engineering support capability, such as code maintenance and improved fabrication methods; (2) the support of Engineering science and technology infrastructure, such as the installation or integration of a new capability; (3) support for technical and administrative leadership through our technology Centers; and (4) the initial scoping and exploration of selected technology areas with high strategic potential, such as assessment of university, laboratory, and industrial partnerships. Five Centers focus and guide longer-term investments within Engineering. The Centers attract and retain top staff, develop and maintain critical core technologies, and enable programs. Through their technology-base projects, they oversee the application of known engineering approaches and techniques to scientific and technical problems.

  19. Engineering Technology Reports, Volume 2: Technology Base FY01

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    Minichino, C; Meeker, D

    2002-07-01

    Engineering has touched on every challenge, every accomplishment, and every endeavor of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory during its fifty-year history. In this time of transition to new leadership, Engineering continues to be central to the mission of the Laboratory, returning to the tradition and core values of E.O. Lawrence: science-based engineering--turning scientific concepts into reality. This volume of Engineering Technical Reports summarizes progress on the projects funded for technology-base efforts. Technology-base projects effect the natural transition to reduction-to-practice of scientific or engineering methods that are well understood and established. They represent discipline-oriented, core competency activities that are multi-programmatic in application, nature, and scope. Objectives of technology-base funding include: (1) the development and enhancement of tools and processes to provide Engineering support capability, such as code maintenance and improved fabrication methods; (2) the support of Engineering science and technology infrastructure, such as the installation or integration of a new capability; (3) support for technical and administrative leadership through our technology Centers; (4) the initial scoping and exploration of selected technology areas with high strategic potential, such as assessment of university, laboratory, and industrial partnerships.

  20. Technology-based Mergers and Acquisitions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Daojuan; Moini, Hamid

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this chapter is to provide an updated review of what is known about the performance of technology-based mergers and acquisitions (TBM&As) and their determinants. This review brings together papers published from 1990 to 2012 in top-rated academic journals within nearly all fields...

  1. Technology-based Mergers and Acquisitions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Daojuan; Moini, Hamid

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this chapter is to provide an updated review of what is known about the performance of technology-based mergers and acquisitions (TBM&As) and their determinants. This review brings together papers published from 1990 to 2012 in top-rated academic journals within nearly all fields...

  2. Student Models of Instructional Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magliaro, Susan G.; Shambaugh, Neal

    2006-01-01

    Mental models are one way that humans represent knowledge (Markman, 1999). Instructional design (ID) is a conceptual model for developing instruction and typically includes analysis, design, development, implementation, and evaluation (i.e., ADDIE model). ID, however, has been viewed differently by practicing teachers and instructional designers…

  3. Representing dispositions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Röhl Johannes

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Dispositions and tendencies feature significantly in the biomedical domain and therefore in representations of knowledge of that domain. They are not only important for specific applications like an infectious disease ontology, but also as part of a general strategy for modelling knowledge about molecular interactions. But the task of representing dispositions in some formal ontological systems is fraught with several problems, which are partly due to the fact that Description Logics can only deal well with binary relations. The paper will discuss some of the results of the philosophical debate about dispositions, in order to see whether the formal relations needed to represent dispositions can be broken down to binary relations. Finally, we will discuss problems arising from the possibility of the absence of realizations, of multi-track or multi-trigger dispositions and offer suggestions on how to deal with them.

  4. A Technology-based Model for Learning

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    Michael Williams

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available The Math Emporium, opened in 1997, is an open 7000-squaremeter facility with 550+ workstations arranged in an array of widely spaced hexagonal "pods", designed to support group work at the same time maintaining an academic air. We operate it 24/7 with math support personnel in attendance 12 hours per day. Students have access to online course resources at all times, from anywhere. We have used this unique asset to transform traditional classroom-based courses into technology based learning programs that have no class meetings at all. The structure of the program is very different from the conventional one, having a new set of expectations and motivations. The results include: more effective students, substantial cost savings, economies of scale and scope and a stream-lined process for creating new on-line courses.

  5. Energy conservation technologies based on thermodynamic principles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirata, Masaru [Shibaura Institute of Technology of Technology, Tokyo (Japan)

    1996-12-31

    In order to reduce CO{sub 2} emission to prevent global warming, the most promising way for electric generation in the Northeast Asia is to introduce cogeneration and {open_quotes}repowering{close_quotes} technologies based on high temperature gas turbines fueled by natural gas. Especially the old type coal burning boiler-steam turbine plants should be retrofit by introducing gas turbines to become highly efficient combined cycle. Same technologies should be applied to the old garbage incineration plants and/or even to the nuclear power plants. The exhaust heat or steam should become much increased and it should be utilized as the process heat for industries or heat supply as the distinct heating or cooling for residential area. This paper introduces a brief survey of these new technologies.

  6. Representing Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Representing Development presents the different social representations that have formed the idea of development in Western thinking over the past three centuries. Offering an acute perspective on the current state of developmental science and providing constructive insights into future pathways...... and development, addressing their contemporary enactments and reflecting on future theoretical and empirical directions. The first section of the book provides an historical account of early representations of development that, having come from life science, has shaped the way in which developmental science has...... approached development. Section two focuses upon the contemporary issues of developmental psychology, neuroscience and developmental science at large. The final section offers a series of commentaries pointing to the questions opened by the previous chapters, looking to outline the future lines...

  7. Reliability analysis for new technology-based transmitters

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    Brissaud, Florent, E-mail: florent.brissaud.2007@utt.f [Institut National de l' Environnement Industriel et des Risques (INERIS), Parc Technologique Alata, BP 2, 60550 Verneuil-en-Halatte (France); Universite de Technologie de Troyes (UTT), Institut Charles Delaunay (ICD) and STMR UMR CNRS 6279, 12 rue Marie Curie, BP 2060, 10010 Troyes cedex (France); Barros, Anne; Berenguer, Christophe [Universite de Technologie de Troyes (UTT), Institut Charles Delaunay (ICD) and STMR UMR CNRS 6279, 12 rue Marie Curie, BP 2060, 10010 Troyes cedex (France); Charpentier, Dominique [Institut National de l' Environnement Industriel et des Risques (INERIS), Parc Technologique Alata, BP 2, 60550 Verneuil-en-Halatte (France)

    2011-02-15

    The reliability analysis of new technology-based transmitters has to deal with specific issues: various interactions between both material elements and functions, undefined behaviours under faulty conditions, several transmitted data, and little reliability feedback. To handle these particularities, a '3-step' model is proposed, based on goal tree-success tree (GTST) approaches to represent both the functional and material aspects, and includes the faults and failures as a third part for supporting reliability analyses. The behavioural aspects are provided by relationship matrices, also denoted master logic diagrams (MLD), with stochastic values which represent direct relationships between system elements. Relationship analyses are then proposed to assess the effect of any fault or failure on any material element or function. Taking these relationships into account, the probabilities of malfunction and failure modes are evaluated according to time. Furthermore, uncertainty analyses tend to show that even if the input data and system behaviour are not well known, these previous results can be obtained in a relatively precise way. An illustration is provided by a case study on an infrared gas transmitter. These properties make the proposed model and corresponding reliability analyses especially suitable for intelligent transmitters (or 'smart sensors').

  8. iDIY: Video-Based Instruction Using Ipads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Pei-Lin; Savage, Melissa N.; Bouck, Emily C.

    2014-01-01

    Video-based instruction is technology-based instruction delivered through video clips in which a human model demonstrates target behaviors (Rayner, Denholm, & Sigafoos, 2009). It can be used to teach a variety of skills, including social communication and behavioral and functional skills (Cihak & Schrader, 2008). Despite the advantages,…

  9. Instructional Technology Innovation in the Liberal Arts Classroom: A Conversation with the Maryville College Faculty Instructional Technology (FIT) Fellows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Gina; Berry, Chad; Nugent, Chris; Wentz, Karen; Cowan, Peggy; O'Gorman, Mark

    Maryville College's (Tennessee) first Faculty Instructional Technology (FIT) Fellows, who received funding and release time to develop technology-based instructional materials for their courses, are developing and implementing exciting projects in history, religion, freshman seminar, and political sciences courses. In this paper, the FIT Fellows…

  10. Effects of Instructional Events in Computer-Based Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Florence; Klein, James; Sullivan, Howard

    2004-01-01

    Forty years ago, Robert Gagne published the first edition of his book The Conditions of Learning (1965) in which he proposed nine events of instruction that provide a sequence for organizing a lesson. These events remain the foundation of current instructional design practice (Reiser, 2002; Richey, 2000). They represent desirable conditions in an…

  11. Explicit Comprehension Instruction: A Review of Research and a New Conceptualization of Instruction.

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    Pearson, P. David; Dole, Janice A.

    1987-01-01

    Reviews representative instructional studies of inference training, reciprocal teaching, and process training. Discusses both the concept of explicit comprehension instruction and potential difficulties in classroom implementation. Raises two important curricular concerns. (NH)

  12. Instructional Competencies Needed to Develop Instructional Strategies for Mobile Learning in Fields of Agricultural Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irby, Travis; Strong, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Mobile learning is an evolving form of technology-based learning. The novelty of mobile learning gives educators a new tool for evaluating how to develop effective instruction for this new medium. A Delphi study was conducted using a 30-member panel comprised of experts across 20 states. The purpose was to determine the competencies needed to…

  13. Technology-based suicide prevention: current applications and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luxton, David D; June, Jennifer D; Kinn, Julie T

    2011-01-01

    This review reports on current and emerging technologies for suicide prevention. Technology-based programs discussed include interactive educational and social networking Web sites, e-mail outreach, and programs that use mobile devices and texting. We describe innovative applications such as virtual worlds, gaming, and text analysis that are currently being developed and applied to suicide prevention and outreach programs. We also discuss the benefits and limitations of technology-based applications and discuss future directions for their use.

  14. Understandings of the nature of science and decision making on science and technology-based issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Randy Lee

    nature of science did not figure prominently in either group's decisions. These findings contrast with the assumptions of the science education community and current reform efforts and call for a reexamination of the goals of nature of science instruction. Developing better decision making skills---even on science and technology based issues---may involve other factors, including more values-based instruction and attention to intellectual/moral development.

  15. Framework, process and tool for managing technology-based assets

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Kfir, R

    2000-10-01

    Full Text Available ) and the intellectual property (IP) of the organisation, The study describes a framework linking the core processes supporting the management of technology-based assets and offerings with other organisational elements such as leadership, strategy, and culture. Specific...

  16. Safety Instructions

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    Please note that the Safety Instructions N0 37 rev. 3 (IS 37 rev. 3) entitled ""LEVEL-3" SAFETY ALARMS AND ALARM SYSTEMS" Is available on the web at the following URL: http://edms.cern.ch/document/335802 Paper copies can also be obtained from the TIS divisional secretariat, e-mail: tis.secretariat@cern.ch TIS Secretariat

  17. Instructional Coaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, Jim

    2006-01-01

    The number of school districts using instructional coaches is growing at a staggering rate. Coaching is becoming popular, in part, because many educational leaders recognize the old form of professional development, built around traditional in-service sessions for teachers, simply does not affect student achievement. By offering support, feedback,…

  18. Dynamic managerial capability of technology-based international new ventures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Altshuler, Liliya

    2014-01-01

    case study of a technology-based INV conducted over the period of 3.5 years, starting 8 years into the firm’s history. This unique design has enabled close observation of the specific events and challenges the firm has been facing after its initial success, and of the aspects in the firm’s management......The article focuses on long-term development of technology-based international new ventures (INVs) and discusses aspects of managing such ventures once they are past the initial success and rapid internationalization and enter the stable development phase. The study builds on an in-depth process...... to resource availability. The study takes the dynamic capability perspective and focuses on INVs’ management, which are seen as founders and builders of the processes, rules and structures that lay the basis for long-term competitive advantage for such firms. Based on the findings, specific aspects...

  19. Assistive Technology Based on Robotics and Rise in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Xiaoyu; WANG Kaixuan

    2013-01-01

    The concept of assistive technology based on robotics,rehabilitation robot and intelligent assistive devices.Domestic intelligence assistive devices include intelligent prosthetics,intelligent orthotics,intelligent walker,assistive devices for smart home environment control,intelligent life assistive devices; Domestic intelligent rehabilitation robot include upper limb rehabilitation robot,hand rehabilitation robot,lower limb rehabilitation robot,robotic smart wheelchair,intelligent nursing bed,daily care robot,the development trend of intelligent assistive devices and rehabilitation robot.

  20. Comparison of technology-based cooperative learning with technology-based individual learning in enhancing fundamental nursing proficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Zu-Chun

    2013-05-01

    The aim of nursing education is to prepare students with critical thinking, high interests in profession and high proficiency in patient care. Cooperative learning promotes team work and encourages knowledge building upon discussion. It has been viewed as one of the most powerful learning methods. Technology has been considered an influential tool in teaching and learning. It assists students in gathering more information to solve the problems and master skills better. The purpose of this study was to compare the effect of technology-based cooperative learning with technology-based individual learning in nursing students' critical thinking in catheterization knowledge gaining, error discovering, skill acquisitions, and overall scores. This study used a pretest-posttest experimental design. Ninety-eight students were assigned randomly to one of two groups. Questionnaires and tests were collected at baseline and after completion of intervention. The results of this study showed that there was no significant difference in related catheterization skill performance. However, the remaining variables differed greatly between the two groups. CONCLUSIONS AND APPLICATIONS: This study's findings guide the researchers and instructors to use technology-based cooperative learning more appropriately. Future research should address the design of the course module and the availability of mobile devices to reach student-centered and learn on the move goals. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Innovative cold joining technologies based on tube forming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alves Luis M.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper is focused on innovative cold joining technologies for connecting tubes and fixing tubes to sheets. The proposed technologies are based on the utilization of plastic instability waves in thin-walled tubes subjected to axial compression and may be seen as an alternative to conventional joining technologies based on mechanical fixing with fasteners, welding and structural adhesive bonding. Besides allowing connecting dissimilar materials and being successfully employed in fixture conditions that are difficult and costly to achieve by means of conventional joining the new proposed technologies also cope with the growing concerns on the demand, lifecycle and recycling of materials.

  2. Women Administrators as Instructional Leaders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horner, Beth A.

    2013-01-01

    Women are under-represented in educational research and are much less likely to hold administrative positions than are men. This study, using the Liberal Feminist Theory and Structural Barrier Theory, proffers possible explanations for this phenomenon. Four women leaders were interviewed to gain insight into their instructional leadership…

  3. Women Administrators as Instructional Leaders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horner, Beth A.

    2013-01-01

    Women are under-represented in educational research and are much less likely to hold administrative positions than are men. This study, using the Liberal Feminist Theory and Structural Barrier Theory, proffers possible explanations for this phenomenon. Four women leaders were interviewed to gain insight into their instructional leadership…

  4. Responsiveness-to-Intervention: A "Systems" Approach to Instructional Adaptation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, Douglas; Fuchs, Lynn S.

    2016-01-01

    Classroom research on adaptive teaching indicates few teachers modify instruction for at-risk students in a manner that benefits them. Responsiveness-To-Intervention, with its tiers of increasingly intensive instruction, represents an alternative approach to adaptive instruction that may prove more workable in today's schools.

  5. A Classification Model and an Open E-Learning System Based on Intuitionistic Fuzzy Sets for Instructional Design Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Güyer, Tolga; Aydogdu, Seyhmus

    2016-01-01

    This study suggests a classification model and an e-learning system based on this model for all instructional theories, approaches, models, strategies, methods, and technics being used in the process of instructional design that constitutes a direct or indirect resource for educational technology based on the theory of intuitionistic fuzzy sets…

  6. The Alliance Capability of Technology-Based Born Globals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oxtorp, Liliya Altshuler; Elg, Ulf

    2015-01-01

    A detailed investigation of the aspects comprising the alliance capability of technology-based born globals. Alliance capability is regarded as a set of organizational skills necessary from the decision to search for a partner for a technology collaboration, which may also involve a marketing...... organisational skills that enable the firms to successfully initiate, manage and finish their R&D alliances with MNEs. The in-depth longitudinal methodology adds insight and value to the study. It is discussed how the specific aspects of the alliance capability can help born globals to counteract the challenges...... and risks of collaborating with MNEs.Methodology: A longitudinal process study of a Danish technology born global with three embedded cases of its R&D and marketing alliances with Asian MNEs.Findings: The organisational skills comprising the alliance capability are defined to be internal and external...

  7. The Alliance Capability of Technology-Based Born Globals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oxtorp, Liliya Altshuler; Elg, Ulf

    2015-01-01

    A detailed investigation of the aspects comprising the alliance capability of technology-based born globals. Alliance capability is regarded as a set of organizational skills necessary from the decision to search for a partner for a technology collaboration, which may also involve a marketing...... aspect, through initiation and management of the alliance, up until its objectives are achieved, or otherwise. Originality/value of paper: While earlier research discussed networking and alliance strategies of born globals on a strategic level, this paper investigates and analyses the specific...... and risks of collaborating with MNEs.Methodology: A longitudinal process study of a Danish technology born global with three embedded cases of its R&D and marketing alliances with Asian MNEs.Findings: The organisational skills comprising the alliance capability are defined to be internal and external...

  8. Image Restoration Technology Based on Discrete Neural network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Duoying

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available With the development of computer science and technology, the development of artificial intelligence advances rapidly in the field of image restoration. Based on the MATLAB platform, this paper constructs a kind of image restoration technology of artificial intelligence based on the discrete neural network and feedforward network, and carries out simulation and contrast of the restoration process by the use of the bionic algorithm. Through the application of simulation restoration technology, this paper verifies that the discrete neural network has a good convergence and identification capability in the image restoration technology with a better effect than that of the feedforward network. The restoration technology based on the discrete neural network can provide a reliable mathematical model for this field.

  9. An Instruction Sequence Semigroup with Involutive Anti-Automorphisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Ponse

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We introduce an algebra of instruction sequences by presenting asemigroup C in which programs can be represented without directionalbias: in terms of the next instruction to be executed, C has both forwardand backward instructions and a C-expression can be interpretedstarting from any instruction. We provide equations for thread extraction,i.e., C’s program semantics. Then we consider thread extractioncompatible (anti-homomorphisms and (anti-automorphisms. Finallywe discuss some expressiveness results.

  10. An Instruction Sequence Semigroup with Involutive Anti-Automorphisms

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    We introduce an algebra of instruction sequences by presenting a semigroup C in which programs can be represented without directional bias: in terms of the next instruction to be executed, C has both forward and backward instructions and a C-expression can be interpreted starting from any instruction. We provide equations for thread extraction, i.e., C's program semantics. Then we consider thread extraction compatible (anti-)homomorphisms and (anti-)automorphisms. Finally we discuss some expr...

  11. Designing the Instructional Interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohr, L. L.

    2000-01-01

    Designing the instructional interface is a challenging endeavor requiring knowledge and skills in instructional and visual design, psychology, human-factors, ergonomic research, computer science, and editorial design. This paper describes the instructional interface, the challenges of its development, and an instructional systems approach to its…

  12. List of Accredited Representatives

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — VA accreditation is for the sole purpose of providing representation services to claimants before VA and does not imply that a representative is qualified to provide...

  13. The representative animal

    OpenAIRE

    Harrison, J M

    1994-01-01

    The anthropocentric approach to the study of animal behavior uses representative nonhuman animals to understand human behavior. This approach raises problems concerning the comparison of the behavior of two different species. The datum of behavior analysis is the behavior of humans and representative animal phenotypes. The behavioral phenotype is the product of the ontogeny and phylogeny of each species, and this requires that contributions of genotype as well as behavioral history to experim...

  14. [Advance directives. Representatives' opinions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busquets I Font, J M; Hernando Robles, P; Font I Canals, R; Diestre Ortin, G; Quintana, S

    The use and usefulness of Advance Directives has led to a lot of controversy about their validity and effectiveness. Those areas are unexplored in our country from the perspective of representatives. To determine the opinion of the representatives appointed in a registered Statement of Advance Directives (SAD) on the use of this document. Telephone survey of representatives of 146 already dead people and who, since February 2012, had registered a SAD document. More the two-thirds (98) of respondents recalled that the SAD was consulted, with 86 (58.9%) saying that their opinion as representative was consulted, and 120 (82.1%) believe that the patient's will was respected. Of those interviewed, 102 (69.9%) believe that patients who had previously planned their care using a SAD had a good death, with 33 (22.4%) saying it could have been better, and 10 (6.9%) believe they suffered greatly. The SAD were mostly respected and consulted, and possibly this is related to the fact that most of the representatives declare that the death of those they represented was perceived as comfortable. It would be desirable to conduct further studies addressed at health personnel in order to know their perceptions regarding the use of Advance Directives in the process of dying. Copyright © 2016 SECA. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  15. Dontion From CCPIT Overseas Representative Offices To Earthquake

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    @@After the strong earthquake centered in Wenchuan County in the Southwestern Chinese Sichuan Province took place,the CCPIT Overseas Representative Offices immediately responding to the call of the CPC Central Committee,the State Council and following the instruction of CCPIT concerning disaster relief work,vigororsly organized.Below are the statistics of donation from partial overseas representative offices by May 19.

  16. GUIDELESS SPATIAL COORDINATE MEASUREMENT TECHNOLOGY BASED ON CODING POLE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Min; QIU Zongming; QU Jiamin; LIU Hongzhao

    2008-01-01

    A new method of guideless spatial coordinate measurement technology based on coding pole and vision measurement is proposed. Unequal spacing of bar code is adopted to pole, so that the code combination of pole image in measuring field is unique. Holographic characteristics of numeric coding pole are adopted to obtain pole pose and pole probe position by any section of bar code on the pole. Spatial coordinates of measuring points can be obtained by coordinate transform. The contradiction between high resolution and large visual field of image sensor is resolved, thereby providing a new concept for surface shape measurement of large objects with high precision. The measurement principles of the system are expounded and mathematic model is established. The measurement equation is evaluated by simulation experiments and the measurement precision is analyzed. Theoretical analysis and simulation experiments prove that this system is characterized by simple structure and wide measurement range. Therefore it can be used in the 3-dimentional coordinate measurement of large objects.

  17. Representing properties locally.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, K O; Barsalou, L W

    2001-09-01

    Theories of knowledge such as feature lists, semantic networks, and localist neural nets typically use a single global symbol to represent a property that occurs in multiple concepts. Thus, a global symbol represents mane across HORSE, PONY, and LION. Alternatively, perceptual theories of knowledge, as well as distributed representational systems, assume that properties take different local forms in different concepts. Thus, different local forms of mane exist for HORSE, PONY, and LION, each capturing the specific form that mane takes in its respective concept. Three experiments used the property verification task to assess whether properties are represented globally or locally (e.g., Does a PONY have mane?). If a single global form represents a property, then verifying it in any concept should increase its accessibility and speed its verification later in any other concept. Verifying mane for PONY should benefit as much from having verified mane for LION earlier as from verifying mane for HORSE. If properties are represented locally, however, verifying a property should only benefit from verifying a similar form earlier. Verifying mane for PONY should only benefit from verifying mane for HORSE, not from verifying mane for LION. Findings from three experiments strongly supported local property representation and ruled out the interpretation that object similarity was responsible (e.g., the greater overall similarity between HORSE and PONY than between LION and PONY). The findings further suggest that property representation and verification are complicated phenomena, grounded in sensory-motor simulations.

  18. Representing and Performing Businesses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boll, Karen

    2014-01-01

    and MacKenzie’s idea of performativity. Based on these two approaches, the article demonstrates that the segmentation model represents and performs the businesses as it makes up certain new ways to be a business and as the businesses can be seen as moving targets. Inspired by MacKenzie the argument......This article investigates a segmentation model used by the Danish Tax and Customs Administration to classify businesses’ motivational postures. The article uses two different conceptualisations of performativity to analyse what the model’s segmentations do: Hacking’s notion of making up people...... is that the segmentation model embodies cleverness in that it simultaneously alters what it represents and then represents this altered reality to confirm the accuracy of its own model of the businesses’ postures. Despite the cleverness of the model, it also has a blind spot. The model assumes a world wherein everything...

  19. Multiculturalism in Technology-Based Education: Case Studies on ICT-Supported Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Penalvo, Francicso Jose

    2013-01-01

    Our differences in language, cultures, and history around the world play a vital role in the way we learn. As technology-based education continues to be used worldwide, there is an ever growing interest in how multiculturalism comes into effect. Multiculturalism in Technology-Based Education: Case Studies on ICT-Supported Approaches explores the…

  20. Speechreading Instruction for Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshinaga-Itano, Christine

    1988-01-01

    This holistic approach to speechreading instruction proposes: enhancement of the child's self-motivation, strategy-based instruction, an interactive processing approach that focuses on meaning and psycholinguistic guessing, bisensory instruction, and a hierarchical continuum beginning with easy, successful activities that gradually increase in…

  1. Exploring the Role of Instructional Technology in Course Planning and Classroom Teaching: Implications for Pedagogical Reform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hora, Matthew T.; Holden, Jeremiah

    2013-01-01

    Instructional technology plays a key role in many teaching reform efforts at the postsecondary level, yet evidence suggests that faculty adopt these technology-based innovations in a slow and inconsistent fashion. A key to improving these efforts is to understand local practice and use these insights to design more locally attuned interventions.…

  2. Pre-Service Teachers' Learning Styles and Preferences towards Instructional Technology Activities and Collaborative Works

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusop, Farrah Dina; Sumari, Melati

    2015-01-01

    The main purpose of this exploratory study was to investigate pre-service teachers' learning styles and their preferences with respect to 15 technology-based instructional activities and collaborative work tasks. Felder and Silverman's online Index of Learning Style (ILS) and a questionnaire were used to measure students' learning styles and…

  3. Examining Feedback in an Instructional Video Game Using Process Data and Error Analysis. CRESST Report 817

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buschang, Rebecca E.; Kerr, Deirdre S.; Chung, Gregory K. W. K.

    2012-01-01

    Appropriately designed technology-based learning environments such as video games can be used to give immediate and individualized feedback to students. However, little is known about the design and use of feedback in instructional video games. This study investigated how feedback used in a mathematics video game about fractions impacted student…

  4. Representing distance, consuming distance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Gunvor Riber

    to mobility and its social context. Such an understanding can be approached through representations, as distance is being represented in various ways, most noticeably in maps and through the notions of space and Otherness. The question this talk subsequently asks is whether these representations of distance...... are being consumed in the contemporary society, in the same way as places, media, cultures and status are being consumed (Urry 1995, Featherstone 2007). An exploration of distance and its representations through contemporary consumption theory could expose what role distance plays in forming...... are present in theoretical and empirical elaborations on mobility, but these remain largely implicit and unchallenged (Bauman 1998). This talk will endeavour to unmask distance as a theoretical entity by exploring ways in which distance can be understood and by discussing distance through its representations...

  5. Instruction in Information Structuring Improves Bayesian Judgment in Intelligence Analysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David R. Mandel

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available An experiment was conducted to test the effectiveness of brief instruction in information structuring (i.e., representing and integrating information for improving the coherence of probability judgments and binary choices among intelligence analysts. Forty-three analysts were presented with comparable sets of Bayesian judgment problems before and immediately after instruction. After instruction, analysts’ probability judgments were more coherent (i.e., more additive and compliant with Bayes theorem. Instruction also improved the coherence of binary choices regarding category membership: after instruction, subjects were more likely to invariably choose the category to which they assigned the higher probability of a target’s membership. The research provides a rare example of evidence-based validation of effectiveness in instruction to improve the statistical assessment skills of intelligence analysts. Such instruction could also be used to improve the assessment quality of other types of experts who are required to integrate statistical information or make probabilistic assessments.

  6. Automated illustration of patients instructions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bui, Duy; Nakamura, Carlos; Bray, Bruce E; Zeng-Treitler, Qing

    2012-01-01

    A picture can be a powerful communication tool. However, creating pictures to illustrate patient instructions can be a costly and time-consuming task. Building on our prior research in this area, we developed a computer application that automatically converts text to pictures using natural language processing and computer graphics techniques. After iterative testing, the automated illustration system was evaluated using 49 previously unseen cardiology discharge instructions. The completeness of the system-generated illustrations was assessed by three raters using a three-level scale. The average inter-rater agreement for text correctly represented in the pictograph was about 66 percent. Since illustration in this context is intended to enhance rather than replace text, these results support the feasibility of conducting automated illustration.

  7. GROWTH AND VENTURE CAPITAL INVESTMENT IN TECHNOLOGY-BASED SMALL FIRMS THE CASE OF HUNGARY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Becsky Nagy Patricia

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Venture capital backed enterprises represent a low proportion of companies, even of innovative ones. The research question was, whether these companies have an important role in innovation and economic growth in Hungary compared to other countries. In the first part of the article I present the theoretical background of technology-based small firms, highlighting the most important models and theories of the economic impact and the special development of innovative technology-oriented small firms. In the second part of the article I present the status of the most important indicators of innovation in connection with entrepreneurship, than I elaborate on the measures of start-ups, mainly the high-tech ones with high-growth potential. I describe the current position of venture capital industry, detailing the venture capital investments, with particular emphasis on classical venture capital investments that points out the number and the amount of venture capital investments financing early stage firms with high-growth potential. At the end I summarize the status of Hungarian technology-based small firms and their possibilities to get financial sources form venture capital investors, with regards to the status and the prospects of the JEREMIE program. In Hungary the number of internationally competitive firms, ready and willing to obtain venture capital, is much lower than in the US or Western European countries. Hungary could take advantage of its competitive edges in some special fields of innovation. The efficiency of information flow would reduce the information gap between the demand and the supply side of the venture capital market and more Hungarian firms could be internationally successful through venture capital financing. The recent years’ policy and special programs like JEREMIE generated more transactions, that helped to inform the entrepreneurs about venture capital and helped to co-invest public resources with private equity more

  8. Representativity of TMA studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauter, Guido

    2010-01-01

    The smaller the portion of a tumor sample that is analyzed becomes, the higher is the risk of missing important histological or molecular features that might be present only in a subset of tumor cells. Many researchers have, therefore, suggested using larger tissue cores or multiple cores from the same donor tissue to enhance the representativity of TMA studies. However, numerous studies comparing the results of TMA studies with the findings from conventional large sections have shown that all well-established associations between molecular markers and tumor phenotype or patient prognosis can be reproduced with TMAs even if only one single 0.6 mm tissue spot is analyzed. Moreover, the TMA technology has proven to be superior to large section analysis in finding new clinically relevant associations. The high number of samples that are typically included in TMA studies, and the unprecedented degree of standardization during TMA experiments and analysis often give TMA studies an edge over traditional large-section studies.

  9. 78 FR 28124 - Registry for Attorneys and Representatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-14

    ... before EOIR upon completing the registration process. While administrative suspension, on its own, is not... addresses electronically by completing a two-step process. First, registrants must log in to their eRegistry... additional instructions regarding the registration process. DATES: Attorneys and accredited representatives...

  10. An Instructional Satellite System for the United States: Preliminary Considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DuMolin, James R.; Morgan, Robert P.

    Based on educational, social, political, and other considerations, an instructional satellite system, AVSIN (Ausio-Visual Satellite Instruction), is hypothesized which represents one possible organizational and administrative arrangement for delivering large amounts of quality software to schools and learning centers. The AVSIN system is conceived…

  11. Technology-Based Healthcare for Nursing Education Within The Netherlands: Past, Present and Future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koster, Ybranda; van Houwelingen, Cornelis T M

    2017-01-01

    At the present time, nearly all Dutch nursing schools are searching for suitable ways to implement technology-based healthcare in their curriculum. Some Universities chose elective education, others a mandatory solution. Several studies were executed to determine competencies needed by nurses in order to work with technology-based healthcare. In 2016 a nationwide new curriculum for nurses has been published. Providing technology-based healthcare is included under the core competencies of this new curriculum. All baccalaureate nursing educational institutes must implement this new curriculum at the start of 2016 which will have a huge impact on the implementation of technology-based healthcare in the education programs. In the future, technology centers from Universities will collaborate and specialize, partner with technology companies and crossovers between information and communication technology and healthcare education will be expanded.

  12. Designing Instructional Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furtado, Lorraine T.

    1974-01-01

    The author presents an instructional design model for teachers that evolves around a teacher-manager concept which recognizes management functions of: planning, organizing, leading, and controlling. (EA)

  13. Designing Instructional Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furtado, Lorraine T.

    1974-01-01

    The author presents an instructional design model for teachers that evolves around a teacher-manager concept which recognizes management functions of: planning, organizing, leading, and controlling. (EA)

  14. Impact of Gender on Patient Preferences for Technology-Based Behavioral Interventions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David J. Kim

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Technology-based interventions offer an opportunity to address high-risk behaviors in the emergency department (ED. Prior studies suggest behavioral health strategies are more effective when gender differences are considered. However, the role of gender in ED patient preferences for technology-based interventions has not been examined. The objective was to assess whether patient preferences for technology-based interventions varies by gender. Methods: This was a secondary analysis of data from a systematic survey of adult (18 years of age, English-speaking patients in a large urban academic ED. Subjects were randomly selected during a purposive sample of shifts. The iPad survey included questions on access to technology, preferences for receiving health information, and demographics. We defined ‘‘technology-based’’ as web, text message, e-mail, social networking, or DVD; ‘‘non-technology-based’’ was defined as in-person, written materials, or landline. We calculated descriptive statistics and used univariate tests to compare men and women. Gender-stratified multivariable logistic regression models were used to examine associations between other demographic factors (age, race, ethnicity, income and technology-based preferences for information on specific risky behaviors. Results: Of 417 participants, 45.1% were male. There were no significant demographic differences between men and women. Women were more likely to use computers (90.8% versus 81.9%; p¼0.03, Internet (66.8% versus 59.0%; p¼0.03, and social networks (53.3% versus 42.6%; p¼0.01. 89% of men and 90% of women preferred technology-based formats for at least type of health information; interest in technology-based for individual health topics did not vary by gender. Concern about confidentiality was the most common barrier to technology-based use for both genders. Multivariate analysis showed that for smoking, depression, drug/alcohol use, and injury

  15. Representing Energy. I. Representing a Substance Ontology for Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherr, Rachel E.; Close, Hunter G.; McKagan, Sarah B.; Vokos, Stamatis

    2012-01-01

    The nature of energy is not typically an explicit topic of physics instruction. Nonetheless, verbal and graphical representations of energy articulate models in which energy is conceptualized as a quasimaterial substance, a stimulus, or a vertical location. We argue that a substance ontology for energy is particularly productive in developing…

  16. Representing Energy. I. Representing a Substance Ontology for Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherr, Rachel E.; Close, Hunter G.; McKagan, Sarah B.; Vokos, Stamatis

    2012-01-01

    The nature of energy is not typically an explicit topic of physics instruction. Nonetheless, verbal and graphical representations of energy articulate models in which energy is conceptualized as a quasimaterial substance, a stimulus, or a vertical location. We argue that a substance ontology for energy is particularly productive in developing…

  17. Aesthetic Design as an Element of Service Innovation in New Technology-based Firms

    OpenAIRE

    Candi, Marina

    2008-01-01

    The goals of this thesis are to examine new technology-based firms’ use of aesthetic design as an element of service innovation and to explore potential relationships between aesthetic design and performance in this same context. There is a scarcity of research on aesthetic design as an element of service innovation, particularly in new technology-based firms. Because of this scarcity, a hybrid research strategy is appropriate and the empirical basis for this research encompasses multiple cas...

  18. A Review of Technology-Based Youth and Family-Focused Interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonell, Kathleen Watson; Prinz, Ronald J

    2016-10-27

    In the past 10 years, mental and behavioral health has seen a proliferation of technology-based interventions in the form of online and other computer-delivered programs. This paper focuses on technology-based treatment and preventive interventions aimed at benefitting children and adolescents via either involving the parents and families, or only the youth. The review considered only technology-based interventions that had at least one published study with a randomized controlled trial design. Questions being addressed included: (1) What are the technology-based interventions in the mental/behavioral health area that have been systematically evaluated in published studies? (2) What are the common and unique characteristics of these interventions and their application with respect to sample characteristics, target problems, and technology characteristics (platforms, structures, elements, and communication formats)? and (3) Which intervention approaches and strategies have accrued the greatest evidence? The review identified 30 technology-based psychosocial interventions for children and families, 19 of which were parent or family-focused (32 studies) and 11 of which were youth-focused (in 13 studies). For the parent/family-focused interventions, greatest promise was found in those that addressed either youth behavioral problems or depressive/anxious symptoms, as well as more general bolstering of parenting efficacy. The youth-focused interventions showed some promise in reducing depressive/anxious symptoms. Advantages and disadvantages of the technology-based approaches were considered, and areas for future research and development were discussed.

  19. General Systems Theory and Instructional Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salisbury, David F.

    The use of general systems theory in the field of instructional systems design (ISD) is explored in this paper. Drawing on work by Young, the writings of 12 representative ISD writers and researchers were surveyed to determine the use of 60 general systems theory concepts by the individual authors. The average number of concepts used by these…

  20. Engineering Technology Reports, Volume 2: Technology Base FY00

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baron, A L; Langland, R T; Minichino, C

    2001-10-03

    In FY-2000, Engineering at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory faced significant pressures to meet critical project milestones, and immediate demands to facilitate the reassignment of employees as the National Ignition Facility (the 600-TW laser facility being designed and built at Livermore, and one of the largest R&D construction projects in the world) was in the process of re-baselining its plan while executing full-speed its technology development efforts. This drive for change occurred as an unprecedented level of management and program changes were occurring within LLNL. I am pleased to report that we met many key milestones and achieved numerous technological breakthroughs. This report summarizes our efforts to perform feasibility and reduce-to-practice studies, demonstrations, and/or techniques--as structured through our technology centers. Whether using computational engineering to predict how giant structures like suspension bridges will respond to massive earthquakes or devising a suitcase-sized microtool to detect chemical and biological agents used by terrorists, we have made solid technical progress. Five Centers focus and guide longer-term investments within Engineering, as well as impact all of LLNL. Each Center is responsible for the vitality and growth of the core technologies it represents. My goal is that each Center will be recognized on an international scale for solving compelling national problems requiring breakthrough innovation. The Centers and their leaders are as follows: Center for Complex Distributed Systems--David B. McCallen; Center for Computational Engineering--Kyran D. Mish; Center for Microtechnology--Raymond P. Mariella, Jr.; Center for Nondestructive Characterization--Harry E. Martz, Jr.; and Center for Precision Engineering--Keith Carlisle.

  1. Why simulation can be efficient: on the preconditions of efficient learning in complex technology based practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hofmann Bjørn

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is important to demonstrate learning outcomes of simulation in technology based practices, such as in advanced health care. Although many studies show skills improvement and self-reported change to practice, there are few studies demonstrating patient outcome and societal efficiency. The objective of the study is to investigate if and why simulation can be effective and efficient in a hi-tech health care setting. This is important in order to decide whether and how to design simulation scenarios and outcome studies. Methods Core theoretical insights in Science and Technology Studies (STS are applied to analyze the field of simulation in hi-tech health care education. In particular, a process-oriented framework where technology is characterized by its devices, methods and its organizational setting is applied. Results The analysis shows how advanced simulation can address core characteristics of technology beyond the knowledge of technology's functions. Simulation's ability to address skilful device handling as well as purposive aspects of technology provides a potential for effective and efficient learning. However, as technology is also constituted by organizational aspects, such as technology status, disease status, and resource constraints, the success of simulation depends on whether these aspects can be integrated in the simulation setting as well. This represents a challenge for future development of simulation and for demonstrating its effectiveness and efficiency. Conclusion Assessing the outcome of simulation in education in hi-tech health care settings is worthwhile if core characteristics of medical technology are addressed. This challenges the traditional technical versus non-technical divide in simulation, as organizational aspects appear to be part of technology's core characteristics.

  2. Foreign Language Instruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birkmaier, Emma; Lange, Dale

    1967-01-01

    This review of research in foreign language instruction summarizes and interprets selected studies produced during the period 1963-66. Topics covered include the psychology of learning, comparisons o f methods, language skills, visual-auditory relationships, vocabulary, grammar, and FLES, as well as programed instruction, technological media,…

  3. Content-Based Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    DelliCarpini, M.; Alonso, O.

    2013-01-01

    DelliCarpini and Alonso's book "Content-Based Instruction" explores different approaches to teaching content-based instruction (CBI) in the English language classroom. They provide a comprehensive overview of how to teach CBI in an easy-to-follow guide that language teachers will find very practical for their own contexts. Topics…

  4. Presentation on Instructional Objectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naz, Bibi Asia

    2009-01-01

    "Learning can be defined as change in a student's capacity for performance as a result of experience" (Kenneth D. Moore). The intended changes should be specified in instructional objectives. Viewed in this context, an objective can be defined as a clear and unambiguous description of your instructional intent. An objective is not a…

  5. Content-Based Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    DelliCarpini, M.; Alonso, O.

    2013-01-01

    DelliCarpini and Alonso's book "Content-Based Instruction" explores different approaches to teaching content-based instruction (CBI) in the English language classroom. They provide a comprehensive overview of how to teach CBI in an easy-to-follow guide that language teachers will find very practical for their own contexts. Topics…

  6. Instructional Coaching. Issue Brief

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowal, Julie; Steiner, Lucy

    2007-01-01

    Schools and districts invest a great deal of time and money in professional development for teachers through instructional coaching. With this effort comes the responsibility to design coaching programs that have the greatest potential to improve classroom instruction and, in turn, increase student learning. What research is available to help…

  7. Instructional Design Team

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bancroft, Judith A.; Collins, Keith

    1974-01-01

    An instructional design team, composed of experts in nursing, education, and media production, is used at the University of Wisconsin School of Nursing, Madison, to produce instructional units for a new curriculum. The authors summarize steps of team/faculty communications, team methodology, and factors influencing the team's effectiveness. (EA)

  8. Scientific Notation in Instructional Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boutwell, Richard C.

    1978-01-01

    Discusses the adoption of a notation system that is generalizable to all instructional designers and will allow and encourage a common communication base. Ten instructional design models are discussed as systems approaches to instructional design. (JEG)

  9. Supplemental instruction in chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundeberg, Mary A.

    This study was designed to measure some effects of supplemental instruction in chemistry. Supplemental instruction is a peer-led cooperative learning program that encourages students to develop conceptual understanding by articulating both understandings and misconceptions in a think-aloud fashion. Supplemental instruction was offered three hours weekly outside of class and lab time for students in four classes of General Organic and Biological Chemistry. Over a two-year period 108 students volunteered to participate in this program; 45 students did not participate. As measured by final grades in chemistry and responses to a questionnaire, supplemental instruction was effective in increasing students' achievement in chemistry. Further research is needed to determine the in-depth effects of supplemental instruction on students' learning, problem solving, and self-esteem.

  10. Using Principles of Programmed Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huffman, Harry

    1971-01-01

    Although programmed instruction in accounting is available, it is limited in scope and in acceptance. Teachers, however, may apply principles of programming to the individualizing of instruction. (Author)

  11. Exploration of a Blended Learning Approach to Reading Instruction for Low SES Students in Early Elementary Grades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schechter, Rachel; Macaruso, Paul; Kazakoff, Elizabeth R.; Brooke, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the potential benefits of a blended learning approach on the reading skills of low socioeconomic status students in Grades 1 and 2. Treatment students received English language arts instruction that was both teacher-led and technology-based. Comparisons were made with control students who received the same English language…

  12. Exploration of a Blended Learning Approach to Reading Instruction for Low SES Students in Early Elementary Grades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schechter, Rachel; Macaruso, Paul; Kazakoff, Elizabeth R.; Brooke, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the potential benefits of a blended learning approach on the reading skills of low socioeconomic status students in Grades 1 and 2. Treatment students received English language arts instruction that was both teacher-led and technology-based. Comparisons were made with control students who received the same English language…

  13. Internet of Things technology-based management methods for environmental specimen banks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Lihong; Wang, Qian; Yu, Ang

    2015-02-01

    The establishment and management of environmental specimen banks (ESBs) has long been a problem worldwide. The complexity of specimen environment has made the management of ESB likewise complex. Through an analysis of the development and management of ESBs worldwide and in light of the sophisticated Internet of Things (IOT) technology, this paper presents IOT technology-based ESB management methods. An IOT technology-based ESB management system can significantly facilitate ESB ingress and egress management as well as long-term storage management under quality control. This paper elaborates on the design of IOT technology-based modules, which can be used in ESB management to achieve standardized, smart, information-based ESB management. ESB management has far-reaching implications for environmental management and for research in environmental science.

  14. Instructing for Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Bob

    1978-01-01

    To illustrate the importance of clarity and precision in stating objectives for learning a particular job task, a training consultant provides answers to the previous issue's questionnaire on writing instructional objectives. (MF)

  15. Instructions for Authors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    @@ GENERAL SUBMISSION INSTRUCTIONS These guidelines have been prepared in accordance with the Uniform Requirements for Manuscripts Submitted to Biomedical Journals.1 Authors should familiarize themselves with these requirements before submission.

  16. Reading Instruction Today.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Joanna

    1979-01-01

    Describes current achievement in the areas of reading theory and reading instruction. Reviews reading research in the fields of educational and cognitive psychology. Considers the overall role of formal education in the development of literacy. (GC)

  17. Designing Printed Instructional Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burbank, Lucille; Pett, Dennis

    1986-01-01

    Discusses the importance of identifying the audience and determining specific objectives when designing printed instructional materials that will communicate effectively and provides detailed guidelines for dealing with such design factors as content, writing style, typography, illustrations, and page organization. (MBR)

  18. Technology-based interventions in social work practice: a systematic review of mental health interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsey, Alex T; Montgomery, Katherine

    2014-10-01

    Despite concerns around the use of technology-based interventions, they are increasingly being employed by social workers as a direct practice methodology to address the mental health needs of vulnerable clients. Researchers have highlighted the importance of using innovative technologies within social work practice, yet little has been done to summarize the evidence and collectively assess findings. In this systematic review, we describe accounts of technology-based mental health interventions delivered by social workers over the past 10 years. Results highlight the impacts of these tools and summarize advantages and disadvantages to utilizing technologies as a method for delivering or facilitating interventions.

  19. Video Methods for Speechreading Instruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sims, Donald G.

    1988-01-01

    Addressed are the history, methodology, and instructional benefits of self-instruction video as a component of speechreading instruction with adolescent and adult hearing-impaired individuals, focusing on: factors in video lesson design, advantages of various hardware alternatives and computer-assisted learning, instructional evaluation methods,…

  20. Technologically-Based Mentoring Provided to Teachers: A Synthesis of the Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentry, Lauren B.; Denton, Carolyn A.; Kurz, Terri

    2008-01-01

    Instructional coaching or mentoring, as a form of professional development for teachers, has gained importance as educational policy has called for the implementation of research-validated instructional practices by highly qualified teachers. Technology-mediated mentoring has strong potential for overcoming barriers of accessibility and…

  1. Training Tactical-Level Planning Skills: An Investigation of Problem-Centered and Direct Instruction Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-01

    The present research chose three approaches representing distinct pedagogies and developed the instructional design and training materials for each...present research chose three approaches representing distinct pedagogies and developed the instructional design and training materials for each...4) • Group, hands on discussion in sharing of ideas (1) • Conducting the OPORD which allowed for autonomy and freedom (1) • Quality of

  2. Customer Service/Account Representative. Teacher Edition. Financial Services Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oklahoma State Dept. of Vocational and Technical Education, Stillwater. Curriculum and Instructional Materials Center.

    This curriculum guide is designed for 11th- and 12th-grade students or for adults who are interested in pursuing a career in the financial institution field. It can be used as a stand-alone curriculum for an entry-level career as a customer service/account representative. The guide consists of four units of instruction. Each unit contains some or…

  3. Applying learning theories and instructional design models for effective instruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalil, Mohammed K; Elkhider, Ihsan A

    2016-06-01

    Faculty members in higher education are involved in many instructional design activities without formal training in learning theories and the science of instruction. Learning theories provide the foundation for the selection of instructional strategies and allow for reliable prediction of their effectiveness. To achieve effective learning outcomes, the science of instruction and instructional design models are used to guide the development of instructional design strategies that elicit appropriate cognitive processes. Here, the major learning theories are discussed and selected examples of instructional design models are explained. The main objective of this article is to present the science of learning and instruction as theoretical evidence for the design and delivery of instructional materials. In addition, this article provides a practical framework for implementing those theories in the classroom and laboratory. Copyright © 2016 The American Physiological Society.

  4. Technology-Based Biliteracy Centers for the 21st Century Learner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercuri, Sandra; Ramos, Laura

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this reflective article is to present an alternative that incorporates the four language skills in all content areas through technology-based dual-language centers for emergent bilinguals at the elementary level. The authors propose a matrix to plan the centers and include three examples to facilitate language transfer in English…

  5. Silicon-technology based microreactors for high-temperature heterogeneous partial oxidation reactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tiggelaar, Roald Michel

    2004-01-01

    In this thesis the results of a study into the feasibility of silicon-technology based microreactors for fast oxidation reactions have been discussed. When designed properly, silicon microreactors are suitable for studying heterogeneous gas phase reactions, such as reaction kinetics of direct cataly

  6. Motivations of Women Participating in a Technology-Based Social Entrepreneurship Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzombak, Rachel; Mouakkad, Sally; Mehta, Khanjan

    2016-01-01

    Academic programs focused on engineering entrepreneurship are growing in number and popularity at American universities. However, the fields of engineering, entrepreneurship and technology-based entrepreneurship struggle to recruit and retain female students: a historic and endemic failure at obtaining gender-balanced participation. Understanding…

  7. Mandatory use of technology-based self-service: does expertise help or hurt?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reinders, Machiel J.; Frambach, Ruud; Kleijnen, Mirella

    2015-01-01

    Purpose – This study aims to investigate the effects of two types of expertise (self-service technology and service type) on the disconfirmation of customers’ expectations and the use-related outcomes of technology-based self-service (TBSS).
    Design/methodology/approach – This empirical study pe

  8. Technology-based service proposal screening and decision-making effectiveness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Riel, van Allard C.R.; Semeijn, Janjaap; Hammedi, Wafa; Henseler, Jörg

    2011-01-01

    Purpose – Decision-making in early stages of technology-based service (TBS) innovation projects proves to be challenging. Current failure rates in service innovation are high, while the investments in innovation projects are substantial. Research suggests that enhancing decision-making in the screen

  9. Innovation capabilities in food and beverages and technology-based innovation projects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tepic, M.; Fortuin, F.T.J.M.; Kemp, R.G.M.; Omta, S.W.F.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose - The aim of this paper is to establish the differences between the food and beverages (F&B) and technology-based industries with regards to the relation between previously identified success factors and innovation project performance. Design/methodology/approach - These differences are

  10. Innovative Technology-Based Interventions for Autism Spectrum Disorders: A Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grynszpan, Ouriel; Weiss, Patrice L.; Perez-Diaz, Fernando; Gal, Eynat

    2014-01-01

    This article reports the results of a meta-analysis of technology-based intervention studies for children with autism spectrum disorders. We conducted a systematic review of research that used a pre-post design to assess innovative technology interventions, including computer programs, virtual reality, and robotics. The selected studies provided…

  11. Consumer acceptance of technology-based food innovations: Lessons for the future of nutrigenomics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ronteltap, A.; Trijp, van J.C.M.; Renes, R.J.; Frewer, L.J.

    2007-01-01

    Determinants of consumer adoption of innovations have been studied from different angles and from the perspectives of various disciplines. In the food area, the literature is dominated by a focus on consumer concern. This paper reviews previous research into acceptance of technology-based innovation

  12. Consequences of Forcing Consumers to Use Technology-Based Self-Service

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reinders, M.J.; Dabholkar, P.A.; Frambach, R.T.

    2008-01-01

    Today, traditional full service is increasingly replaced with technology-based self-service (TBSS), sometimes with no other option for service delivery. This study develops a conceptual model to investigate the impact of forcing consumers to use TBSS. The model is tested using an experimental design

  13. Technology-Based Content through Virtual and Physical Modeling: A National Research Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernst, Jeremy V.; Clark, Aaron C.

    2009-01-01

    Visualization is becoming more prevalent as an application in science, engineering, and technology related professions. The analysis of static and dynamic graphical visualization provides data solutions and understandings that go beyond traditional forms of communication. The study of technology-based content and the application of conceptual…

  14. Innovation capabilities in food and beverages and technology-based innovation projects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tepic, M.; Fortuin, F.T.J.M.; Kemp, R.G.M.; Omta, S.W.F.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose - The aim of this paper is to establish the differences between the food and beverages (F&B) and technology-based industries with regards to the relation between previously identified success factors and innovation project performance. Design/methodology/approach - These differences are

  15. A technology-based stimulation program to reduce hand mouthing by an adolescent with multiple disabilities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lancioni, G.E.; Singh, N.N.; O'Reilly, M.F.; Didden, H.C.M.; Oliva, D.

    2009-01-01

    This study assessed the possibility of reducing hand mouthing, i.e., bringing fingers into or over the mouth, by an adolescent with multiple disabilities through a technology-based stimulation strategy. The strategy ensured that (a) the participant received 10 sec. of preferred stimulation

  16. A Constructivist Stretch: Preservice Teachers Meet Preteens in a Technology-Based Literacy Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, John F.; Anderson, Rebecca S.

    2002-01-01

    Describes a study conducted within a constructivist framework to examine pre-service teachers' development and implementation of a collaborative, technology-based literacy project with 11- and 12-year-old learners. Concludes that the pre-service teachers learned the value of Internet technology, e-mail, and hypermedia applications, but problems…

  17. Technology-Based Participatory Learning for Indigenous Children in Chiapas Schools, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heredia, Yolanda; Icaza, Jose I.

    2012-01-01

    This research created a technology-based learning environment at two schools belonging to the National Council of Educational Development (CONAFE) for indigenous children in the state of Chiapas, Mexico. The purpose of the study was to describe the educational impact of using the Classmate PC netbooks and the Sugar Educational Platform in the…

  18. A New Direction for Technology-Based Economic Development: The Role of Innovation Intermediaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bendis, Richard A.; Seline, Richard S.; Byler, Ethan J.

    2008-01-01

    Accelerating innovation to drive economic growth is the foremost goal for technology-based economic development organizations today. Realizing this goal through programmes is challenged by limited and outdated operating models. The authors outline their 21st Century Innovation Intermediary model, which pairs commercialization with regional…

  19. VATE: VAlidation of high TEchnology based on large database analysis by learning machine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meldolesi, E; Van Soest, J; Alitto, A R; Autorino, R; Dinapoli, N; Dekker, A; Gambacorta, M A; Gatta, R; Tagliaferri, L; Damiani, A; Valentini, V

    2014-01-01

    The interaction between implementation of new technologies and different outcomes can allow a broad range of researches to be expanded. The purpose of this paper is to introduce the VAlidation of high TEchnology based on large database analysis by learning machine (VATE) project that aims to combine

  20. Dynamic capabilities and the growth of technology-based new ventures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Strehle, Florian Thomas

    2006-01-01

    Under the influence of increasing globalisation the creation and development of technology-based entrepreneurial firms is considered a prevalent means to fuel economic growth and prevent further unemployment, especially in Western European economies. This dissertation denotes the process of new vent

  1. Bringing Technology to Students' Proximity: A Sociocultural Account of Technology-Based Learning Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukama, Evode

    2014-01-01

    This paper depicts a study carried out in Rwanda concerning university students who participated in a contest to produce short documentary films. The purpose of this research is to conceptualize these kinds of technology-based learning projects (TBLPs) through a sociocultural perspective. The methodology included focus group discussions and field…

  2. An Educational and Entrepreneurial Ecosystem to Actualize Technology-Based Social Ventures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Khanjan; Zappe, Sarah; Brannon, Mary Lynn; Zhao, Yu

    2016-01-01

    The Humanitarian Engineering and Social Entrepreneurship (HESE) Program engages students and faculty across Penn State in the rigorous research, design, field-testing, and launch of technology-based social enterprises that address global development challenges. HESE ventures are embedded in a series of five courses that integrate learning,…

  3. Dynamic capabilities and the growth of technology-based new ventures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Strehle, Florian Thomas

    2006-01-01

    Under the influence of increasing globalisation the creation and development of technology-based entrepreneurial firms is considered a prevalent means to fuel economic growth and prevent further unemployment, especially in Western European economies. This dissertation denotes the process of new vent

  4. Designing a Technology-Based Science Lesson: Student Teachers Grapple with an Authentic Problem of Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Susan McAleenan; Wiebe, Eric N.

    2003-01-01

    This project used techniques from problem-based learning to aid students in developing a technology-based science lesson. In this case, the "problem" students were asked to solve, was that of combining curriculum knowledge and pedagogical skills to incorporate computer graphics animation technology within a science lesson and then teach the lesson…

  5. Method of Computer-aided Instruction in Situation Control Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anatoliy O. Kargin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The article considers the problem of computer-aided instruction in context-chain motivated situation control system of the complex technical system behavior. The conceptual and formal models of situation control with practical instruction are considered. Acquisition of new behavior knowledge is presented as structural changes in system memory in the form of situational agent set. Model and method of computer-aided instruction represent formalization, based on the nondistinct theories by physiologists and cognitive psychologists.The formal instruction model describes situation and reaction formation and dependence on different parameters, effecting education, such as the reinforcement value, time between the stimulus, action and the reinforcement. The change of the contextual link between situational elements when using is formalized.The examples and results of computer instruction experiments of the robot device “LEGO MINDSTORMS NXT”, equipped with ultrasonic distance, touch, light sensors.

  6. Cross Cultural Instruction: An Instructional Design Case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica W. Tracey

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In an authentic example of linking design and development with learning and performance, an international real estate development firm defined a problem; implementing a cleaning system in the largest mall in the world with a cross-cultural unskilled work force in Dubai, UAE. Partnering with a university instructional design team employing a rapid prototyping methodology and the constructivist ID approach, Layers of Negotiation Model, a comprehensive curriculum was designed. This article describes the project background, initial design, the ID team's work in Dubai, illustrates the product, and summarizes the design experience.

  7. Instruct coders' manual

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friend, J.

    1971-01-01

    A manual designed both as an instructional manual for beginning coders and as a reference manual for the coding language INSTRUCT, is presented. The manual includes the major programs necessary to implement the teaching system and lists the limitation of current implementation. A detailed description is given of how to code a lesson, what buttons to push, and what utility programs to use. Suggestions for debugging coded lessons and the error messages that may be received during assembly or while running the lesson are given.

  8. Instructions for authors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Editors Editorial Board

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available

    INSTRUCTIONS FOR AUTHORS
    Author Guidelines
    Authors must submit their papers via email to brain@edusoft.ro (please! or they can create an account and submit their papers online, at www.brain.edusoft.ro. Submited papers must be written in DOC format (Microsoft Word document, in as clear and as simple as possible English. Preferred maximum paper length for the papers is 20 pages, including figures.
    The template for the paper is at this address:
    http://www.edusoft.ro/Template_for_BRAIN.docRAIN vol. 3, issue 3, Instructions for authors

  9. Secondary Dance Instructional Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery County Public Schools, Rockville, MD. Dept. of Instructional Planning and Development.

    This manual provides guidelines for dance teachers in secondary schools. A brief statement is made on the purpose and philosophy of dance education, and activities and instructional suggestions are presented for various dance forms: (1) group dance--folk/ethnic, square dance, and social dance; (2) aerobic dance; (3) jazz dance; (4) modern dance;…

  10. Paratransit: An Instructional Module.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scalici, Anthony

    A concept-based introduction to paratransit is provided in this instructional module for undergraduate and graduate transportation-related courses for disciplines such as engineering, business, marketing, and technology. The concept of paratransit generally refers to modes of transportation other than mass transit and solo-driven automobiles. The…

  11. Safety instruction no 50

    CERN Multimedia

    Secrétariat SC

    2004-01-01

    Please note that the safety instruction no 50 (IS 50) entitled 'Safety Coordination on CERN Worksites' is available on the web at the following url: https://edms.cern.ch/document/479454/LAST_RELEASED Paper copies can also be obtained from the SC unit Secretariat, email: sc.secretariat@cern.ch SC Secretariat

  12. Nuclear Energy. Instructional Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Kenneth; Thessing, Dan

    This document is one of five learning packets on alternative energy (see note) developed as part of a descriptive curriculum research project in Arkansas. The overall objectives of the learning packets are to improve the level of instruction in the alternative energies by vocational exploration teachers, and to facilitate the integration of new…

  13. Orwell's Instructive Errors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julian, Liam

    2009-01-01

    In this article, the author talks about George Orwell, his instructive errors, and the manner in which Orwell pierced worthless theory, faced facts and defended decency (with fluctuating success), and largely ignored the tradition of accumulated wisdom that has rendered him a timeless teacher--one whose inadvertent lessons, while infrequently…

  14. Instructional Guidelines. Welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fordyce, H. L.; Doshier, Dale

    Using the standards of the American Welding Society and the American Society of Mechanical Engineers, this welding instructional guidelines manual presents a course of study in accordance with the current practices in industry. Intended for use in welding programs now practiced within the Federal Prison System, the phases of the program are…

  15. Wind Power. Instructional Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Kenneth; Thessing, Dan

    This document is one of five learning packets on alternative energy developed as part of a descriptive curriculum research project in Arkansas (see note). The overall objectives of the learning packets are to improve the level of instruction in the alternative energies by vocational exploration teachers, and to facilitate the integration of new…

  16. Nuclear Energy. Instructional Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Kenneth; Thessing, Dan

    This document is one of five learning packets on alternative energy (see note) developed as part of a descriptive curriculum research project in Arkansas. The overall objectives of the learning packets are to improve the level of instruction in the alternative energies by vocational exploration teachers, and to facilitate the integration of new…

  17. Computer-assisted instruction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voogt, J.; Fisser, P.; Wright, J.D.

    2015-01-01

    Since the early days of computer technology in education in the 1960s, it was claimed that computers can assist instructional practice and hence improve student learning. Since then computer technology has developed, and its potential for education has increased. In this article, we first discuss th

  18. Wind Power. Instructional Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Kenneth; Thessing, Dan

    This document is one of five learning packets on alternative energy developed as part of a descriptive curriculum research project in Arkansas (see note). The overall objectives of the learning packets are to improve the level of instruction in the alternative energies by vocational exploration teachers, and to facilitate the integration of new…

  19. Instructional Guide for Cosmetology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ., Blacksburg. Dept. of Education.

    Intended as a tool for cosmetology teachers in Virginia public and private schools, the document is an instructional guide which offers 12 units of study, arranged in a three year course. Materials covered help prepare students for licensure in the State of Virginia and the guide is designed to cover the 1,500 hours required to be spent in the…

  20. Gaze Interactive Building Instructions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, John Paulin; Ahmed, Zaheer; Mardanbeigi, Diako

    We combine eye tracking technology and mobile tablets to support hands-free interaction with digital building instructions. As a proof-of-concept we have developed a small interactive 3D environment where one can interact with digital blocks by gaze, keystroke and head gestures. Blocks may be moved...

  1. Using Realia in Instruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanton, Lloyd H.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Seven articles in this issue focus on the use of realia in instruction. Authors discuss reasons why realia effectively motivate students and enhance learning; the place of realia in supervised occupational experience programs; the importance of real-life experiences to vocational agriculture; and student teaching as a reality experience. (SK)

  2. Psychologism and Instructional Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gur, Bekir S.; Wiley, David A.

    2009-01-01

    Little of the work in critical and hermeneutical psychology has been linked to instructional technology (IT). This article provides a discussion in order to fill the gap in this direction. The article presents a brief genealogy of American IT in relation to the influence of psychology. It also provides a critical and hermeneutical framework for…

  3. Sourcebook for Bibliographic Instruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dusenbury, Carolyn, Ed.; And Others

    Direction and guidance are provided for establishing and maintaining bibliographic instruction (BI) programs. This document provides an overview of BI and BI programs and points readers to other sources of information. Five key topics were identified and the following papers are presented: (1) "An Introduction to Learning Theory" (Lori Arp); (2)…

  4. Grammar Instruction and Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacina, Jan

    2005-01-01

    Much of the research literature from the past 25 years has supported the importance of teaching grammar in the context of writing instruction (Calkins, 1980; DiStefano & Killion, 1984; Weaver, 1996,1998). Unlike other content areas, practice does not make perfect when learning grammar. While isolated drill and practice of grammatical concepts may…

  5. Job Instruction Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfau, Richard H.

    Job Instruction Training (JIT) is a step-by-step, relatively simple technique used to train employees on the job. It is especially suitable for teaching manual skills or procedures; the trainer is usually an employee's supervisor but can be a co-worker. The JIT technique consists of a series of steps that a supervisor or other instructor follows…

  6. Instructions for Sampling Particulates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekman, Frank

    This technical report presents detailed instructions for sampling particulates. The table of contents includes sections on Introduction, Volume Determinations, Apparatus - Assembly and Operation, Sampling Techniques, and Acknowledgment. Six charts, 24 graphs, and one diagram are appended to facilitate sampling, as well as sections on Isokinetic…

  7. Characteristics of Instructional Technologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagne, Robert M.

    A thoroughly planned program for instructional technologists--one including selection, education, and on-the-job training--must take into consideration the competencies and characteristics desirable in such technologists. Such requirements fall into three categories: attitudes or values, specialized knowledge, and intellectual skills or…

  8. Safety Instruction No 43

    CERN Document Server

    2004-01-01

    Please note that the Safety Instruction No 43 (IS 43) entitled "ASBESTOS - DANGERS AND PRECAUTIONS" is available on the web at the following URL: https://edms.cern.ch/document/335809/LAST_RELEASED/ Paper copies can also be obtained from the SC secretariat, e-mail: tis.secretariat@cern.ch. SC Secretariat

  9. Scaffolding in Assisted Instruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available On-The-Job Training, developed as direct instruction, is one of the earliest forms of training. This method is still widely in use today because it requires only a person who knows how to do the task, and the tools the person uses to do the task. This paper is intended to be a study of the methods used in education in Knowledge Society, with more specific aspects in training the trainers; as a result of this approach, it promotes scaffolding in assisted instruction as a reflection of the digital age for the learning process. Training the trainers in old environment with default techniques and designing the learning process in assisted instruction, as an application of the Vygotskian concept of the zone of proximal development (ZPD to the area of computer literacy for the younger users, generate diversity in educational communities and requires standards for technology infrastructure, standards for the content, developed as a concepts map, and applications for personalized in-struction, based on ZPD theory.

  10. Functional Management Competence and Growth of Young Technology-Based Firms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salomo, Søren; Brinckmann, Jan; Talke, Katrin

    2008-01-01

    based on partial least squares modelling to investigate the performance effects. The results suggest that functional management competences generally are significant drivers of firm development speed. In particular, technology and marketing management competences are shown to impact development speed...... at delineating and validating an appropriate measurement model for functional management competence. In order to test the model's nomological validity, we investigate the impact of functional management competence on firm growth. Therefore, building on established firm development approaches, we propose a phase...... model for the development of young technology-based firms. Our study builds upon data from 212 young technology-based firms in the field of microtechnology, nanotechnology, electronics, optics and lasers. We use formative measurement models to establish valid and reliable constructs and a path model...

  11. Research progress of laser welding process dynamic monitoring technology based on plasma characteristics signal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teng WANG

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available During the high-power laser welding process, plasmas are induced by the evaporation of metal under laser radiation, which can affect the coupling of laser energy and the workpiece, and ultimately impact on the reliability of laser welding quality and process directly. The research of laser-induced plasma is a focus in high-power deep penetration welding field, which provides a promising research area for realizing the automation of welding process quality inspection. In recent years, the research of laser welding process dynamic monitoring technology based on plasma characteristics is mainly in two aspects, namely the research of plasma signal detection and the research of laser welding process modeling. The laser-induced plasma in the laser welding is introduced, and the related research of laser welding process dynamic monitoring technology based on plasma characteristics at home and abroad is analyzed. The current problems in the field are summarized, and the future development trend is put forward.

  12. 75 FR 13305 - Comment Request for Information Collection for Evaluation of the Technology-Based Learning Grants...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-19

    ... comments concerning a new data collection effort for the Technology- Based Learning Grants Evaluation. A... Evaluation of the Technology-Based Learning (TBL) Grants is a two-year evaluation of grantees funded under... Employment and Training Administration Comment Request for Information Collection for Evaluation of the...

  13. Adolescents' preference for technology-based emergency department behavioral interventions: does it depend on risky behaviors?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranney, Megan L; Choo, Esther K; Spirito, Anthony; Mello, Michael J

    2013-04-01

    This study aimed to (1) determine the prevalence of technology use and interest in technology-based interventions among adolescent emergency department patients and (2) examine the association between interest in an intervention and self-reported risky behaviors. Adolescents (age, 13-17 years) presenting to an urban pediatric emergency department completed a survey regarding baseline technology use, risky behaviors, and interest in and preferred format for behavioral health interventions. Questions were drawn from validated measures when possible. Descriptive statistics and χ2 tests were calculated to identify whether self-reported risky behaviors were differentially associated with intervention preference. Two hundred thirty-four patients (81.8% of eligible) consented to participate. Almost all used technology, including computers (98.7%), social networking (84.9%), and text messaging (95.1%). Adolescents reported high prevalence of risky behaviors as follows: unintentional injury (93.2%), peer violence exposure (29.3%), dating violence victimization (23.0%), depression or anxiety (30.0%), alcohol use (22.8%), drug use (36.1%), cigarette use (16.4%), and risky sexual behaviors (15.1%). Most were interested in receiving behavioral interventions (ranging from 93.6% interest in unintentional injury prevention, to 73.1% in smoking cessation); 45% to 93% preferred technology-based (vs in person, telephone call, or paper) interventions for each topic. Proportion interested in a specific topic and proportion preferring a technology-based intervention did not significantly differ by self-reported risky behaviors. Among this sample of adolescent emergency department patients, high rates of multiple risky behaviors are reported. Patients endorsed interest in receiving interventions for these behaviors, regardless of whether they reported the behavior. Most used multiple forms of technology, and approximately 50% preferred a technology-based intervention format.

  14. Market Segmentation in Business Technology Base: The Case of Segmentation of Sparkling

    OpenAIRE

    Valéria Riscarolli; Universidade Nove de Julho - UNINOVE; Sandra Regina Silva dos Santos Souza; Universidade Nove de Julho - UNINOVE; Leonel Cezar Rodrigues; Universidade Nove de Julho - UNINOVE; Fabrícia Durieux Zucco; FURB e UNIVALI

    2014-01-01

    A common market segmentation premise for products and services rules consumer behavior as the segmentation center piece. Would this be the logic for segmentation used by small technology based companies? In this article we target at determining the principles of market segmentation used by a vitiwinery company, as research object. This company is recognized by its products excellence, either in domestic as well as in the foreign market, among 13 distinct countries. The research method used is...

  15. Technology-based interventions in the treatment of overweight and obesity: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raaijmakers, Lieke C H; Pouwels, Sjaak; Berghuis, Kim A; Nienhuijs, Simon W

    2015-12-01

    The prevalence of obesity increases worldwide. The use of technology-based interventions can be beneficial in weight loss interventions. This review aims to provide insight in the effectiveness of technology-based interventions on weight loss and quality of life for patients suffering overweight or obesity compared to standard care. Pubmed, PsycInfo, Web of Science, ScienceDirect, CINAHL and Embase were searched from the earliest date (of each database) up to February 2015. Interventions needed to be aimed at reducing or maintaining weight loss in persons with a body mass index (BMI) ≥ 25 kg/m(2) and have a technology aspect. Cochrane Collaboration's tool for assessing risk of bias was used for rating the methodological quality. Twenty-seven trials met inclusion criteria. Thirteen studies showed significant effects on weight loss compared to controls. Most interventions used a web-based approach (42%). Interventions were screened for five technical key components: self-monitoring, counsellor feedback and communication, group support, use of a structured program and use of an individually tailored program. All interventions that used a combination of all five or four components showed significant decreases in weight compared to controls. No significant results for quality of life were found. Outcomes on program adherence were reported in six studies. No significant results were found between weight loss and program adherence. Evidence is lacking about the optimal use of technology in weight loss interventions. However, when the optimal combination of technological components is found, technology-based interventions may be a valid tool for weight loss. Furthermore, more outcomes on quality of life and information about the effect of technology-based intervention after bariatric surgery are needed.

  16. Technology-based strategies for promoting clinical reasoning skills in nursing education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shellenbarger, Teresa; Robb, Meigan

    2015-01-01

    Faculty face the demand of preparing nursing students for the constantly changing health care environment. Effective use of online, classroom, and clinical conferencing opportunities helps to enhance nursing students' clinical reasoning capabilities needed for practice. The growth of technology creates an avenue for faculty to develop engaging learning opportunities. This article presents technology-based strategies such as electronic concept mapping, electronic case histories, and digital storytelling that can be used to facilitate clinical reasoning skills.

  17. Bringing technology to students’ proximity: a sociocultural account of technology-based learning projects

    OpenAIRE

    Evode Mukama

    2014-01-01

    This paper depicts a study carried out in Rwanda concerning university students who participated in a contest to produce short documentary films. The purpose of this research is to conceptualize these kinds of technology-based learning projects (TBLPs) through a sociocultural perspective. The methodology included focus-group discussions and field notes to collect empirical data. The findings reveal that the more educational technologies capture objects of learning positioned in the students’ ...

  18. From Ideas to Opportunities: Exploring the Construction of Technology-Based Entrepreneurial Opportunities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferran Giones

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The transformation of business ideas into market opportunities is at the core of entrepreneurship. Nevertheless, the complexity of such a transformative process is seen to change depending on the variables influencing the opportunity-entrepreneur nexus. Although technology-entrepreneurship is regarded as a force of change and dynamism in socio-economic growth, it also depends upon an intricate process of opportunity development. The interest in understanding better how technology-based entrepreneurs simultaneously cope with technological uncertainty while trying to gain stakeholder support and access to resources, highlights a relevant research gap. The research described in this article uses the constructivist view to deepen our understanding of the technology-based entrepreneur’s conceptualization of the opportunity as a process of social construction. Our results show how initial consensus-building efforts and iteration with knowledgeable peers are an essential part of the emergence of the opportunity, changing both entrepreneur's and stakeholders' perceptions of the early business idea. Consequently, our results provide evidence in support of policy programs and measures that favour social-construction support mechanisms to foster technology-based entrepreneurship.

  19. Technology-based self-care methods of improving antiretroviral adherence: a systematic review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parya Saberi

    Full Text Available As HIV infection has shifted to a chronic condition, self-care practices have emerged as an important topic for HIV-positive individuals in maintaining an optimal level of health. Self-care refers to activities that patients undertake to maintain and improve health, such as strategies to achieve and maintain high levels of antiretroviral adherence.Technology-based methods are increasingly used to enhance antiretroviral adherence; therefore, we systematically reviewed the literature to examine technology-based self-care methods that HIV-positive individuals utilize to improve adherence. Seven electronic databases were searched from 1/1/1980 through 12/31/2010. We included quantitative and qualitative studies. Among quantitative studies, the primary outcomes included ARV adherence, viral load, and CD4+ cell count and secondary outcomes consisted of quality of life, adverse effects, and feasibility/acceptability data. For qualitative/descriptive studies, interview themes, reports of use, and perceptions of use were summarized. Thirty-six publications were included (24 quantitative and 12 qualitative/descriptive. Studies with exclusive utilization of medication reminder devices demonstrated less evidence of enhancing adherence in comparison to multi-component methods.This systematic review offers support for self-care technology-based approaches that may result in improved antiretroviral adherence. There was a clear pattern of results that favored individually-tailored, multi-function technologies, which allowed for periodic communication with health care providers rather than sole reliance on electronic reminder devices.

  20. Individual Differences, Computers, and Instruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayersman, David J.; Minden, Avril von

    1995-01-01

    Provides a conceptual foundation for the development of hypermedia as an instructional tool for addressing individual differences in learning styles. Highlights include a literature review; computers and instruction; individual differences, computers, and instruction; cognitive controls; cognitive styles and learning; personality types; and future…

  1. Academic and Military Instructional Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branson, Robert K.

    This paper examines the practices and accomplishments of the military in the area of instructional technology. An examination of historical background is used to increase the precision of the definition of instructional technology. Specific contributions of the military are described and then uses of instructional technology in the military and…

  2. Interactive Instruction in Bayesian Inference

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khan, Azam; Breslav, Simon; Hornbæk, Kasper

    2017-01-01

    An instructional approach is presented to improve human performance in solving Bayesian inference problems. Starting from the original text of the classic Mammography Problem, the textual expression is modified and visualizations are added according to Mayer’s principles of instruction...... that an instructional approach to improving human performance in Bayesian inference is a promising direction....

  3. Task-Based Writing Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bantis, Alexandros

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of task-based writing instruction, a communicative language-teaching method, on second language acquisition and differentiation of instruction for English language learners during the independent work time instructional component of the Open Court Reading program. Through student-teacher…

  4. Marc Treib: Representing Landscape Architecture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Braae, Ellen Marie

    2008-01-01

    The editor of Representing Landscape Architecture, Marc Treib, argues that there is good reason to evaluate the standard practices of representation that landscape architects have been using for so long. In the rush to the promised land of computer design these practices are now in danger of being...... left by the wayside. The 14 often both fitting and well crafted contributions of this publication offer an approach to how landscape architecture has been and is currently represented; in the design study, in presentation, in criticism, and in the creation of landscape architecture....

  5. Representative process sampling - in practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Esbensen, Kim; Friis-Pedersen, Hans Henrik; Julius, Lars Petersen

    2007-01-01

    Didactic data sets representing a range of real-world processes are used to illustrate "how to do" representative process sampling and process characterisation. The selected process data lead to diverse variogram expressions with different systematics (no range vs. important ranges; trends and....../or periodicity; different nugget effects and process variations ranging from less than one lag to full variogram lag). Variogram data analysis leads to a fundamental decomposition into 0-D sampling vs. 1-D process variances, based on the three principal variogram parameters: range, sill and nugget effect...

  6. Using Group Discussion with Taiwan's EFL College Students: A Comparison of Comprehension Instruction for Book Club, Literature Circles, and Instructional Conversations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Fu-Yuan

    2013-01-01

    The research presented here involved a one-semester study; during this period of time, reading comprehension instruction representing three major discussion-centered approaches (Book Club, BC; Literature Circles, LC; Instructional Conversations, IC) was designed and implemented. The effectiveness of the three experimental approaches and one…

  7. Computer technology-based interventions in HIV prevention: state of the evidence and future directions for research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noar, Seth M.

    2015-01-01

    Computer technology-based interventions (CBIs) represent a promising area for HIV prevention behavioral intervention research. Such programs are a compelling prevention option given their potential for broad reach, customized content, and low cost delivery. The purpose of the current article is to provide a review of the state of the literature on CBIs. First, we define CBIs in HIV prevention and highlight the many advantages of such interventions. Next, we provide an overview of what is currently known regarding the efficacy of CBIs in HIV prevention, focusing on two recent meta-analyses of this literature. Finally, we propose an agenda for future directions for research in the area of CBIs, using the RE-AIM model as an organizing guide. We conclude that with the continued growth of computer technologies, opportunities to apply such technologies in HIV prevention will continue to blossom. Further research is greatly needed to advance an understanding of not only how and under what circumstances CBIs can be efficacious, but also how the reach, adoption, implementation, and maintenance of such programs in clinical and community settings can be achieved. PMID:21287420

  8. Interactive radio instruction: developing instructional methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friend, J

    1989-01-01

    The USAID has, since 1972, funded the development of a new methodology for educational radio for young children through 3 projects: the Radio Mathematics PRoject of Nicaragua, the Radio Language Arts Project of Kenya, and the Radio Science PRoject of Papua New Guinea. These projects developed math programs for grades 1-4 and English as a second language for grades 1-3; programs to teach science in grades 4-6 are now being developed. Appropriate techniques were developed to engage young children actively in the learning process. Lessons are planned as a "conversation" between the children and the radio; scripts are written as 1/2 of a dialogue, with pauses carefully timed so that written as 12 of a dialogue, with pauses carefully timed so that students can contribute their 1/2. Teaching techniques used in all 3 projects include choral responses, simultaneous individual seatwork, and activities using simple materials such as pebbles and rulers. Certain techniques were specific to the subject being taught, or to the circumstances in which the lessons were to be used. Patterned oral drill was used frequently in the English lessons, including sound-cued drills. "Deferred" oral responses were used often in the math lessons. In this method, the children are instructed to solve a problem silently, not giving the answer aloud until requested, thus allowing time for even the slower children to participate. "One-child" questions were used in both English and science: the radio asks a question to be answered by a single child, who is selected on the spot by the classroom teacher. This allows for open-ended questions, but also requires constant supervision of the classroom teacher. Songs and games were used in all programs, and extensively for didactic purposes in the teaching of English. Instructions for science activities are often more complex than in other courses, particularly when the children are using science apparatus, especially when they work in pairs to share scarce

  9. Groundwater hydrology instructional system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Ronald G.

    Wright State University, Dayton, Ohio, is preparing for its third cycle of the Interactive Remote Instructional System (IRIS) in groundwater hydrology, beginning January 15, 1986. The first cycle finished with an impressive completion ratio for registered participants, and the second cycle has currently been underway since July. This comprehensive hydrogeology program was originally developed for the Soil Conservation Service (of the U.S. Department of Agriculture) to prepare their personnel for professional practice work. Since its evolution into IRIS, an 80% participant completion rate has been recorded for the first cycle, which is a significant departure from success rates traditionally recorded by correspondence courses. This excellent rate of success is the result of 2 years of refinement and demonstrates the progressive nature of the program. IRIS has met the needs of participants by developing a curriculum that reflects current trends in the groundwater industry and has provided a unique educational approach that ensures maximum interaction between the instructional staff and participants.

  10. Instructional immediacy in elearning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walkem, Kerrie

    2014-01-01

    Instructor immediacy has been positively associated with many desirable academic outcomes including increased student learning. This study extends existing understanding of instructional immediacy behaviours in elearning by describing postgraduate nursing students' reflections on their own experience. An exploratory, descriptive survey design was used to collect qualitative data. Participants were asked what behaviours or activities help to create rapport or a positive interpersonal connection (immediacy) between students and their online teacher(s). Thematic analysis of the data revealed three main themes: acknowledging and affirming student's personal and professional responsibilities; providing clear and timely information; and utilising rich media. These findings give lecturers insight into instructional strategies they may adopt to increase immediacy in elearning and hence improve student learning outcomes.

  11. Safety instruction No. 36

    CERN Multimedia

    SC Secretariat

    2005-01-01

    Please note that a revised version of Safety Instruction No. 36 (IS 36), entitled "Safety rules for the use of static magnetic fields at CERN" is available on the Web at the following url: https://edms.cern.ch/document/335801/LAST_RELEASED Paper copies can also be obtained from the SC unit secretariat (e-mail : sc.secretariat@cern.ch) SC Secretariat

  12. Instructional Psychology 1976 - 1981,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-06-01

    phoneme analysis and blending is reviewed by Resnick (1981) and by Williams (1980), and is discussed in terms of an interactive theory of reading...academically oriented. In a study of student ratings of instruction, Williams & Ware (1976) show that college students who received the most substantive...Rosen et al, 1977; Rosen et al, 1978; Bargh & Schul, 1980). Peer tutoring has been employed as a component of many forms of Personalized Systems of

  13. The Influence of Principals’ Instructional Leadership on Teachers’ Use of Autonomy-Supportive Instruction: An Analysis of Three Asia-Pacific Countries

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ham, Seung-Hwan; Kim, Rae Young

    2015-01-01

    ...’ effort to employ instructional strategies for nurturing student autonomy in learning. Nationally representative multi-level data for 7,879 teachers in 479 middle schools in Australia, Malaysia, and South Korea were analyzed in this study...

  14. Effective Multicultural Instruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franklin T. Thompson

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The reason why the Trayvon Martin murder trial and similar court cases create a philosophical rift in our nation is due in part to flaws in the delivery of multicultural education. Traditional multicultural instruction does not prepare citizens for the subtleties and complexities of race relations. This study investigates critical strategies and practices that address multicultural missing gaps. I also seek to fill a void in the literature created by a lack of student input regarding teaching strategies that encourage lifelong learning. Students (N = 337 enrolled at a Midwestern university were asked to rate the efficacy of selected instructional strategies. Utilizing a 9-point Likert-type scale, students gave themselves a personal growth rating of 7.15 (SD = 1.47. Variables important to predicting that growth (R2 = .56, p < .0005 were a six-factor variable known as a non-color-blind instructional approach (t = 10.509, p ≤ .0005, allowing students an opportunity to form their own opinions apart from the instructor (t = 4.797, p ≤ .0005, and a state law that mandated multicultural training (t = 3.234, p = .001. Results demonstrated that utilizing a 35% traditional and 65% critical pedagogy mixture when teaching multicultural education helped promote win/win scenarios for education candidates hoping to become difference makers.

  15. Representative process sampling - in practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Esbensen, Kim; Friis-Pedersen, Hans Henrik; Julius, Lars Petersen

    2007-01-01

    /or periodicity; different nugget effects and process variations ranging from less than one lag to full variogram lag). Variogram data analysis leads to a fundamental decomposition into 0-D sampling vs. 1-D process variances, based on the three principal variogram parameters: range, sill and nugget effect......Didactic data sets representing a range of real-world processes are used to illustrate "how to do" representative process sampling and process characterisation. The selected process data lead to diverse variogram expressions with different systematics (no range vs. important ranges; trends and...... presented cases of variography either solved the initial problems or served to understand the reasons and causes behind the specific process structures revealed in the variograms. Process Analytical Technologies (PAT) are not complete without process TOS....

  16. Judgments of and by Representativeness

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-05-15

    probably agree that John Updike is a more representative American writer than Norman Mailer. rlearly, such a judgment does not have a frequentistic...example, in an early study we presented people with the following description, " John is 27 years old, with an outgoing personality. At college he was an...outstanding athlete but did not show much ability or interest in in- tellectual matters". We found that John was judged to be more likely to be "a gym

  17. APPLICATION OF THE MODEL CERNE FOR THE ESTABLISHMENT OF CRITERIA INCUBATION SELECTION IN TECHNOLOGY BASED BUSINESSES : A STUDY IN INCUBATORS OF TECHNOLOGICAL BASE OF THE COUNTRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clobert Jefferson Passoni

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Business incubators are a great source of encouragement for innovative projects, enabling the development of new technologies, providing infrastructure, advice and support, which are key elements for the success of new business. The technology-based firm incubators (TBFs, which are 154 in Brazil. Each one of them has its own mechanism for the selection of the incubation companies. Because of the different forms of management of incubators, the business model CERNE - Reference Center for Support for New Projects - was created by Anprotec and Sebrae, in order to standardize procedures and promote the increase of chances for success in the incubations. The objective of this study is to propose selection criteria for the incubation, considering CERNE’s five dimensions and aiming to help on the decision-making in the assessment of candidate companies in a TBF incubator. The research was conducted from the public notices of 20 TBF incubators, where 38 selection criteria were identified and classified. Managers of TBF incubators validated 26 criteria by its importance via online questionnaires. As a result, favorable ratings were obtained to 25 of them. Only one criterion differed from the others, with a unfavorable rating.

  18. Old but sexy: Value creation of old technology-based businesses models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oke Christian Beckmann

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to contribute to a better understanding of the strategic and organisational con gurations that companies can use to generate value with product-market systems and their busi- ness models that have been dominant in the past but forced back into niche positions by innovation. The former dominant music format vinyl was rapidly substituted after the introduction of digital music. However, still nowadays some customers use and buy old technology-based products – vinyl sales boom again since 2007. Due to the two-sided nature of the market, customers have to get access to complementary goods. We are thus interested in technologies which have been outdated by the emergence of new technologies. The originality lies in the combination of the two areas: business models and old technologies. Furthermore, vinyl is an example not analysed in depth by scholars so far. We approached this by undertaking an in-depth literature review to generate hypotheses regarding the value-adding activities of old-technology based businesses as a basis for further research in this area. In addition the paper gives insights into the constellations to be expected over time for old technology-based businesses models in platform markets. We here focus on a neglected topic in the strategy literature which, however, bears relevance for many businesses locked into product-market systems which make it hard for them to (completely switch to a new technology emerging in the market. It is especially valuable to describe the consequences in a systematic fashion.

  19. The Impact of Technology-Based Interventions on Informal Caregivers of Stroke Survivors: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldehaim, Abdulkarim Yousef; Alotaibi, Faisal F; Uphold, Constance R; Dang, Stuti

    2016-03-01

    This article is a systematic review of the impact of technology-based intervention on outcomes related to care providers for those who survived a stroke. Literature was identified in the PubMed, PsycINFO, Scopus, and Cochrane databases for evidence on technology-based interventions for stroke survivors' caregivers. The search was restricted for all English-language articles from 1970 to February 2015 that implied technology-based interventions. This review included studies that measured the impact of these types of approaches on one or more of the following: depression and any of the following-problem-solving ability, burden, health status, social support, preparedness, and healthcare utilization by care recipient-as secondary outcomes. Telephone or face-to-face counseling sessions were not of interest for this review. The search strategy yielded five studies that met inclusion criteria: two randomized clinical trials and three pilot/preliminary studies, with diverse approaches and designs. Four studies have assessed the primary outcome, two of which reported significant decreases in caregivers' depressive symptoms. Two studies had measured each of the following outcomes-burden, problem-solving ability, health status, and social support-and they revealed no significant differences following the intervention. Only one study assessed caregivers' preparedness and showed improved posttest scores. Healthcare services use by the care recipient was assessed by one study, and the results indicated significant reduction in emergency department visits and hospital re-admissions. Despite various study designs and small sample sizes, available data suggest that an intervention that incorporates a theoretical-based model and is designed to target caregivers as early as possible is a promising strategy. Furthermore, there is a need to incorporate a cost-benefit analysis in future studies.

  20. AXIOLOGICAL MODEL OF INSTRUCTIONAL DESIGN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takushevich I. A.

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The article presents instructional design as a new approach to the issue of developing value-oriented worldview. Scientific research and analysis led the author to summarize instructional design theory, broaden the definition of instructional design and apply it to instruction and learning in a new manner. The goal to build a pattern of instruction aimed at developing learners’ value-oriented worldview required the author to study the existing instructional design model, to analyse and generalize a number of monographs and articles devoted to the problem of building value systems and value orientations, and finally to investigate and apply the new knowledge to real life in the form of experiment. The work conducted brought the author to axiological model of instructional design, which consists of three dimensions: a linear sequence of the events from designing the instructional material to independent learning activities, interaction between a teacher and a learner, pace of learning and design. The article touches upon every dimension, level and stage of the model, describes and defines the procedures that take place on each of them, as well as suggests a possible way to visualize the model in a form of a sketch. The author also points out the advantages of using instructional design as an efficient and smart tool to organize learning and justifies the use of the new instructional design model in XXI century

  1. Financial Management Competence of Founding Teams and Growth of New Technology-Based Firms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brinckmann, Jan; Gemuenden, Hans Georg; Salomo, Søren

    2009-01-01

    This article draws on the resource-based view to analyze the role founding teams' financial management competencies play for firm growth. Prior research stressed the importance of acquiring external financial resources. In this study, we broaden the understanding of financial management in new...... firms. We explore the relevance of strategic financial planning competence, external financing competence, competence in financing from cash flow, and controlling competence of entrepreneurial teams for the growth of new technology-based firms. A total of 212 founding teams provided self...

  2. Structural knowledge techniques for representing, conveying, and acquiring structural knowledge

    CERN Document Server

    Jonassen, David H; Beissner, Katherine; Yacci, Michael

    2013-01-01

    This book introduces the concept of a hypothetical type of knowledge construction -- referred to as structural knowledge -- that goes beyond traditional forms of information recall to provide the bases for knowledge application. Assuming that the validity of the concept is accepted, the volume functions as a handbook for supporting the assessment and use of structural knowledge in learning and instructional settings. It's descriptions are direct and short, and its structure is consistent. Almost all of the chapters describe a technique for representing and assessing structural knowledge acquis

  3. Representing culture in interstellar messages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vakoch, Douglas A.

    2008-09-01

    As scholars involved with the Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence (SETI) have contemplated how we might portray humankind in any messages sent to civilizations beyond Earth, one of the challenges they face is adequately representing the diversity of human cultures. For example, in a 2003 workshop in Paris sponsored by the SETI Institute, the International Academy of Astronautics (IAA) SETI Permanent Study Group, the International Society for the Arts, Sciences and Technology (ISAST), and the John Templeton Foundation, a varied group of artists, scientists, and scholars from the humanities considered how to encode notions of altruism in interstellar messages art_science/2003>. Though the group represented 10 countries, most were from Europe and North America, leading to the group's recommendation that subsequent discussions on the topic should include more globally representative perspectives. As a result, the IAA Study Group on Interstellar Message Construction and the SETI Institute sponsored a follow-up workshop in Santa Fe, New Mexico, USA in February 2005. The Santa Fe workshop brought together scholars from a range of disciplines including anthropology, archaeology, chemistry, communication science, philosophy, and psychology. Participants included scholars familiar with interstellar message design as well as specialists in cross-cultural research who had participated in the Symposium on Altruism in Cross-cultural Perspective, held just prior to the workshop during the annual conference of the Society for Cross-cultural Research . The workshop included discussion of how cultural understandings of altruism can complement and critique the more biologically based models of altruism proposed for interstellar messages at the 2003 Paris workshop. This paper, written by the chair of both the Paris and Santa Fe workshops, will explore the challenges of communicating concepts of altruism that draw on both biological and cultural models.

  4. Semantic Representatives of the Concept

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena N. Tsay

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In the article concept as one of the principle notions of cognitive linguistics is investigated. Considering concept as culture phenomenon, having language realization and ethnocultural peculiarities, the description of the concept “happiness” is presented. Lexical and semantic paradigm of the concept of happiness correlates with a great number of lexical and semantic variants. In the work semantic representatives of the concept of happiness, covering supreme spiritual values are revealed and semantic interpretation of their functioning in the Biblical discourse is given.

  5. Representative mass reduction in sampling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Lars; Esbensen, Harry Kim; Dahl, Casper Kierulf

    2004-01-01

    We here present a comprehensive survey of current mass reduction principles and hardware available in the current market. We conduct a rigorous comparison study of the performance of 17 field and/or laboratory instruments or methods which are quantitatively characterized (and ranked) for accuracy...... always be representative in the full Theory of Sampling (TOS) sense. This survey also allows empirical verification of the merits of the famous ??Gy?s formula?? for order-of-magnitude estimation of the Fundamental Sampling Error (FSE).......We here present a comprehensive survey of current mass reduction principles and hardware available in the current market. We conduct a rigorous comparison study of the performance of 17 field and/or laboratory instruments or methods which are quantitatively characterized (and ranked) for accuracy...... dividers, the Boerner Divider, the ??spoon method??, alternate/fractional shoveling and grab sampling. Only devices based on riffle splitting principles (static or rotational) passes the ultimate representativity test (with minor, but significant relative differences). Grab sampling, the overwhelmingly...

  6. The Development of Technology-Based Counseling Strategies to Enhance Outreach to Parents and Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Marie L.

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a program for counseling students enrolled in an online charter school located in Las Vegas, Nevada. The author presents a review of the process to establish an online school in Nevada and a unique model for delivery of services that combines face-to-face instruction and online education. The author describes the development of…

  7. A Survey of Hardware and Software Technologies for the Rapid Development of Multimedia Instructional Modules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganesan, Nanda

    2008-01-01

    A survey of hardware and software technologies was conducted to identify suitable technologies for the development of instructional modules representing various instructional approaches. The approaches modeled were short PowerPoint presentations, chalk-and-talk type of lectures and software tutorials. The survey focused on identifying application…

  8. The Role of the State Department of Public Instruction in the Del Mod System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiher, John F.

    This is one of a series of monographs providing information about the Delaware Model: A Systems Approach to Science Education (Del Mod System). The State Department of Public Instruction is the agency that represents the public schools of Delaware. The two branches of the state department with which Del Mod interacts are the Instructional Services…

  9. Web-Based Instruction on Preservice Teachers' Knowledge of Fraction Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Cheng-Yao

    2010-01-01

    This study determines whether web-based instruction (WBI) represents an improved method for helping preservice teachers learn procedural and conceptual knowledge of fractions.. The purpose was to compare the effectiveness of web-based instruction (WBI) with the traditional lecture in mathematics content and methods for the elementary school…

  10. The Changing Instructional Role of the High School Librarian. Occasional Papers Number 173.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craver, Kathleen W.

    This paper examines the changing instructional role of the high school librarian from 1951 to 1984 to determine: (1) if the purported changes in the instructional role have been fictional or factual; (2) if the changes were those of substance or of form; (3) if the changes represented a process of growth and development in direct relationship to…

  11. Development of Agricultural Instruction in Secondary Schools. Bulletin, 1919, No. 85

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrows, H. P.

    1920-01-01

    This bulletin represents a thesis presented by the late Harry Percy Barrows to the faculty of George Washington University in 1919 for the degree of doctor of philosophy. It furnishes an historic record that should be very helpful in the future development of instruction in agriculture in this country. Since secondary instruction in agriculture…

  12. Secondary School Students' Attitudes towards Mathematics Computer--Assisted Instruction Environment in Kenya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mwei, Philip K.; Wando, Dave; Too, Jackson K.

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports the results of research conducted in six classes (Form IV) with 205 students with a sample of 94 respondents. Data represent students' statements that describe (a) the role of Mathematics teachers in a computer-assisted instruction (CAI) environment and (b) effectiveness of CAI in Mathematics instruction. The results indicated…

  13. Title I Schools: A Qualitative Study of the Experiences of Effective Instructional Coaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkins, Hope L.

    2014-01-01

    This qualitative study examines the experiences associated with instructional coaching in Title I schools. The experiences of eight teachers and four instructional coaches are represented within the study. The personal experiences and beliefs are provided in the data collection process through the use of one-on-one interviews. Additional accounts…

  14. What We Learned from a Tomato: Partnering with a Content Expert Plants New Ideas for Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ermeling, Bradley A.

    2014-01-01

    The interactions described in this article represent an example of teachers expanding horizons of instructional plans as a direct result of outside expert contributions. After alerting teachers to oversimplified claims about the benefits of lycopene, the research fellow presented the team with a wider range of instructional options to consider…

  15. A Survey of Hardware and Software Technologies for the Rapid Development of Multimedia Instructional Modules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganesan, Nanda

    2008-01-01

    A survey of hardware and software technologies was conducted to identify suitable technologies for the development of instructional modules representing various instructional approaches. The approaches modeled were short PowerPoint presentations, chalk-and-talk type of lectures and software tutorials. The survey focused on identifying application…

  16. Comparing Vignette Instruction and Assessment Tasks to Classroom Observations and Reflections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffries, Carolyn; Maeder, Dale W.

    2011-01-01

    The growing body of research on the use of vignettes in teacher education courses suggests that vignette-based instruction and assessment tasks may represent a viable alternative to traditional forms of scaffolded instruction and reflective essays following classroom observations, thereby creating a bridge between college and K-12 classrooms for…

  17. IMPROVEMENT OF KEY PROCESSES THROUGH THE ANALYSIS OF VALUE ADDED IN TECHNOLOGY- BASED COMPANIES A SINGLE PROJECT PRODUCTIONS OF THE WATER SECTOR IN CUBA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reina Maylín, Hernández Oro

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we present the main results of research designed to improve key business processes, using a procedure designed for this purpose, and which includes among its main stages, the analysis of value added by activity, adapting to technology based companies’ productions by one of the water sector project in Cuba. The procedure consistently combines different techniques such as multi-criteria decision analysis for selection of the key processes and analysis of value added by activity to identify key processes to improve and identify opportunities for improvement. The main results are able to identify, classify and relate the processes taking place in the organization, and represent them in a process map, and then determine the key processes for improvement, based on the analysis of value added at each process of each of the activities in it. Derived from the results obtained are proposed and implemented a set of organizational improvements had a positive economic impact for the company under study, allowing a positive conclusion on the feasibility of implementation, flexibility and robustness of the procedure developed in technology-based companies single project productions of the water sector in Cuba to support their business management.

  18. USING GOOGLE+ FOR INSTRUCTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin YEE

    Full Text Available Introduced in July, 2011 in a beta test of invited users only, the new social media service Google+ (or G+ quickly spread by word of mouth, and Google leader Larry Page (2011 blogged that within sixteen days it had 10 million users. By August, it had 25 million users (Cashmore, 2011. Even with slower growth ahead (still with no marketing budget, the service looks likely to crest 100 million users perhaps as early as ten months, a feat that took Facebook three years. Other social networks, most notably Facebook and Twitter, have been used increasingly as instructional tools, since they are platforms with which students are already familiar (Maloney, 2007; McLoughlin & Lee, 2007. Selwyn (2009 found that students often eschew official channels for communication in favor of less formal community-based formats such as Facebook, implying a growing need for instructional communication tools that will be used willingly by students. The question is whether Google+ can be used like Twitter or Facebook to augment instruction, or even, perhaps, to improve upon those predecessors for academic purposes. Google+ is like Twitter in that anyone can follow a given user’s posts. There is no direct “friend” relationship required to read the posts written by others. However, it also approximates some features of Facebook. Rather than friends sorted into “lists” like in Facebook, Google+ allows users to place feeds into one or more “circles,” the better to monitor (or control the flow of information to and from different audiences. Circles are more intuitive, and more central to the experience, than the Facebook lists. They provide an explicit organizational structure, compared to the less-obvious listing functionality, which feels like an afterthought, found in Facebook.

  19. Competitive intelligence information management and innovation in small technology-based companies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanev, Stoyan

    2007-05-01

    In this article we examine how (i) company type and (ii) the competitive intelligence information used by small technology-based companies affect their innovation performance. The focus is on the specific information types used and not on the information sources. Information topics are classified in four groups - customers (10), company (9), competitor (11) and industry (12). The sample consists of 45 small new technology-based companies, specialized suppliers, and service companies from a variety of sectors - software, photonics, telecommunications, biomedical engineering and biotech, traditional manufacturing etc. The results suggest that the total number of intelligence information topics companies use to make decisions about innovation is not associated with the number of their new products, processes, services and patents. Therefore the companies in our sample do not seem to have the resources, processes or value systems required to use different competitive intelligence information when making decisions on innovation or may rely more on their own internal logic than on external information. Companies are classified using a Pavitt-like taxonomy. Service companies are considered as a separate company type. This allows for explicitly studying both, the innovative role of new services in product driven companies, and the role of new product development in service companies.

  20. Microfluidic interface technology based on stereolithography for glass-based lab-on-a-chips.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Song-I; Han, Ki-Ho

    2013-01-01

    As lab-on-a-chips are developed for on-chip integrated microfluidic systems with multiple functions, the development of microfluidic interface (MFI) technology to enable integration of complex microfluidic systems becomes increasingly important and faces many technical difficulties. Such difficulties include the need for more complex structures, the possibility of biological or chemical cross-contamination between functional compartments, and the possible need for individual compartments fabricated from different substrate materials. This chapter introduces MFI technology, based on rapid stereolithography, for a glass-based miniaturized genetic sample preparation system, as an example of a complex lab-on-a-chip that could include functional elements such as; solid-phase DNA extraction, polymerase chain reaction, and capillary electrophoresis. To enable the integration of a complex lab-on-a-chip system in a single chip, MFI technology based on stereolithography provides a simple method for realizing complex arrangements of one-step plug-in microfluidic interconnects, integrated microvalves for microfluidic control, and optical windows for on-chip optical processes.

  1. Efficacy of technology-based interventions to increase the use of hearing protections among adolescent farmworkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Khalid M; Evans, Sydney S; Bielko, Sylvanna L; Rohlman, Diane S

    2017-09-18

    Adolescent farmworkers are exposed to loud noise during farm activities. We present a prospective study that evaluated the efficacy of low-cost, technology-based intervention approaches in high schools to enhance the use of hearing protection among adolescent farmworkers. Six high schools in Iowa that agreed to participate in the study were divided into three equal groups through cluster-randomisation with each group receiving one of the three formats of hearing protection intervention: (a) classroom training, (b) classroom training coupled with smartphone app training and (c) computer training. Participants completed baseline (pre-training) and six-week post-intervention surveys for assessing hearing protection knowledge, attitudes and behaviour. Seventy participants from six schools were initially enrolled but 50 completed both pre- and post-intervention surveys. In most cases, all three groups showed significant improvement in hearing protection knowledge, attitude and frequency of use from pre- to post-intervention. However, changes between groups were statistically non-significant. Although all three formats led to improvements on hearing protection knowledge, attitude and behaviour, the findings of the study, perhaps due to the small sample size, did not allow us to detect whether technology-based hearing protection interventions were more effective than the traditional face-to-face training for adolescent farmworkers.

  2. Instructional Use of Weblogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yavuz AKBULUT

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Web 2.0 can provide learners with increased interaction and online collaboration. Among its applications, weblogs have gained an increasing popularity as they allow bloggers to voice their own perspectives which can be delivered to a large audience through the Web. Weblogs can be integrated into teaching-learning process as they encourage learners to collaborate and freely voice their ideas. However, innovative technologies might not always lead to innovative distance education practices if timely adaptation lags behind. This study presents a review on instructional use of weblogs along with implications for open and distance learning.

  3. Representing Conversations for Scalable Overhearing

    CERN Document Server

    Gutnik, G; 10.1613/jair.1829

    2011-01-01

    Open distributed multi-agent systems are gaining interest in the academic community and in industry. In such open settings, agents are often coordinated using standardized agent conversation protocols. The representation of such protocols (for analysis, validation, monitoring, etc) is an important aspect of multi-agent applications. Recently, Petri nets have been shown to be an interesting approach to such representation, and radically different approaches using Petri nets have been proposed. However, their relative strengths and weaknesses have not been examined. Moreover, their scalability and suitability for different tasks have not been addressed. This paper addresses both these challenges. First, we analyze existing Petri net representations in terms of their scalability and appropriateness for overhearing, an important task in monitoring open multi-agent systems. Then, building on the insights gained, we introduce a novel representation using Colored Petri nets that explicitly represent legal joint conv...

  4. Allocating instruction time: How language instruction can affect multiple skills

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borghans, L.; Diris, R.E.M.

    2014-01-01

    There exists substantial variation in how schools allocate instruction time to school subjects. The effectiveness of that allocation depends on the immediate effect of instruction in one subject on achievement in the same subject, on how skills further develop over time, and on possible spillover

  5. Direct Instruction Revisited: A Key Model for Instructional Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magliaro, Susan G.; Lockee, Barbara B.; Burton, John K.

    2005-01-01

    Rooted in behavioral theory, particularly the radical or selectivist behaviorism of B.F. Skinner (1953, 1954, 1966, 1968, 1974), the direct instruction (DI) approach to teaching is now well into its third decade of influencing curriculum, instruction, and research. It is also in its third decade of controversy. Our purpose is to present the DI…

  6. The Instructional Network: Using Facebook to Enhance Undergraduate Mathematics Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, Peter; Gregory, Karen; Eddy, Erik

    2014-01-01

    Facebook is a website with over one billion users worldwide that is synonymous with social-networking. However, in this study, Facebook is used as an "instructional network". Two sections of an undergraduate calculus course were used to study the effects of participating in a Facebook group devoted solely to instruction. One section was…

  7. The Instructional Network: Using Facebook to Enhance Undergraduate Mathematics Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, Peter; Gregory, Karen; Eddy, Erik

    2014-01-01

    Facebook is a website with over one billion users worldwide that is synonymous with social-networking. However, in this study, Facebook is used as an "instructional network". Two sections of an undergraduate calculus course were used to study the effects of participating in a Facebook group devoted solely to instruction. One section was…

  8. Allocating instruction time: How language instruction can affect multiple skills

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borghans, L.; Diris, R.E.M.

    2014-01-01

    There exists substantial variation in how schools allocate instruction time to school subjects. The effectiveness of that allocation depends on the immediate effect of instruction in one subject on achievement in the same subject, on how skills further develop over time, and on possible spillover ef

  9. Norming of Student Evaluations of Instruction: Impact of Noninstructional Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nargundkar, Satish; Shrikhande, Milind

    2014-01-01

    Student Evaluations of Instruction (SEIs) from about 6,000 sections over 4 years representing over 100,000 students at the college of business at a large public university are analyzed, to study the impact of noninstructional factors on student ratings. Administrative factors like semester, time of day, location, and instructor attributes like…

  10. Developing Elementary Science Skills: Instructional Effectiveness and Path Independence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strand-Cary, Mari; Klahr, David

    2008-01-01

    We explore the immediate and longer term consequences of different types of instruction about a central topic in middle school science: the "Control of Variables Strategy" (CVS). CVS represents the procedural and conceptual basis for designing simple, unconfounded experiments, such that unambiguous causal inferences can be made. CVS…

  11. Norming of Student Evaluations of Instruction: Impact of Noninstructional Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nargundkar, Satish; Shrikhande, Milind

    2014-01-01

    Student Evaluations of Instruction (SEIs) from about 6,000 sections over 4 years representing over 100,000 students at the college of business at a large public university are analyzed, to study the impact of noninstructional factors on student ratings. Administrative factors like semester, time of day, location, and instructor attributes like…

  12. Factors Related to Instructional Leadership Perception and Effect of Instructional Leadership on Organizational Variables: A Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sisman, Mehmet

    2016-01-01

    In this meta-analysis, effects of teacher characteristics on instructional leadership perceptions and some organizational variables is tested. Findings of the total of 67 independent studies are gathered in the meta-analysis which represents a population of 36,756. According to the findings of this meta-analysis performed by using random effects…

  13. Analyzing Classroom Instruction in Reading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutherford, William L.

    A method for analyzing instructional techniques employed during reading group instruction is reported, and the characteristics of the effective reading teacher are discussed. Teaching effectiveness is divided into two categories: (1) how the teacher acts and interacts with children on a personal level and (2) how the teacher performs his…

  14. Unpacking Corrections in Mobile Instruction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Levin, Lene; Broth, Mathias; Cromdal, Jakob

    2017-01-01

    This article deals with the organisation of correction in mobile instructional settings. Five sets of video data (>250 h) documenting how learners were instructed to fly aeroplanes, drive cars and ride bicycles in real life traffic were examined to reveal some common features of correction exchan...

  15. Distance Education Instructional Model Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackman, Diane H.; Swan, Michael K.

    1995-01-01

    A survey of graduate students involved in distance education on North Dakota State University's Interactive Video Network included 80 on campus and 13 off. The instructional models rated most effective were role playing, simulation, jurisprudential (Socratic method), memorization, synectics, and inquiry. Direct instruction was rated least…

  16. Instructional Strategies to Facilitate Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunenburg, Frederick C.; Irby, Beverly J.

    2011-01-01

    Teacher behavior research has shown that teacher behaviors, as well as specific teaching strategies, make a difference with regard to student achievement. Ten durable instructional strategies are discussed: set induction, stimulus variation, reinforcement, questioning, recognizing attending behavior, lecturing or direct instruction, planned…

  17. Instructional Analysis for Health Occupations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    East Texas State Univ., Commerce. Occupational Curriculum Lab.

    This instructional analysis centers on identifying the skills, related knowledge, teacher activities, and student activities that are central to teaching various topics included in the core curriculum for health occupations courses. Addressed in the volume are the following instructional areas: first aid; medical terminology; medical asepsis;…

  18. Adaptive instruction and pupil achievement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Houtveen, A.A M; Booy, N; de Jong, Robert (Rob); van de Grift, W.J C M

    1999-01-01

    In this article the results are reported of a quasi-experiment on effects of adaptive instruction on reading results of children in the first year of reading instruction in Dutch primary schools. The research involved 456 pupils from 23 schools (12 experimental and 11 control group schools). Teacher

  19. Professional Cosmetology Practices. Instructional Units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopcus, Sharron; Armstrong, Ivan J.

    This publication is designed to assist the instructor and students in understanding the latest concepts and techniques of the instructional phase of cosmetology programs. The instructional units are in five areas: (1) orientation, (2) professional practices: hair, (3) professional practices: skin and nails, (4) cosmetology science, and (5)…

  20. Overcoming Resistance to Instructional Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, William G.; Anderson, Susan; Love, Don

    2000-01-01

    Administrators must convince and motivate faculty to adopt instructional technology if departments are to remain on the cutting edge. Describes seven actions to promote the use of instructional technology: know your faculty; be aware of faculty concerns; use technology yourself; review potential barriers; explore and obtain resources; communicate…

  1. A Primer on Instructional Coaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, Jim

    2005-01-01

    The pressure to improve the quality of instruction in schools may be higher today than at any other time in the history of U.S. education. To respond to this urgent demand, schools across the nation are hiring instructional coaches (ICs), even though there is little published research that shows what works and what does not work when it comes to…

  2. Marketing Instructional Development Internally, Externally.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lied, James

    This description of the marketing process as a practical way to manage the function of instruction development emphasizes the importance of the identification and evaluation of customer needs before developing objectives. To assist the instructional development agency in focusing on this aspect of planning, a check list of possible marketing…

  3. ROTI-OPERATIONAL INSTRUCTIONAL MODEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Barker,

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The instructional model presented here is a combination of systems used by the United States Navy and R. F. Mager's Criteria Referenced Instruction Model for Analysis Design and Implementation. The author has taken what he believes is the best components from each system and established a working model.

  4. Bringing Technology to Students’ Proximity: A Sociocultural Account of Technology-Based Learning Projects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evode Mukama

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper depicts a study carried out in Rwanda concerning university students who participated in a contest to produce short documentary films. The purpose of this research is to conceptualize these kinds of technology-based learning projects (TBLPs through a sociocultural perspective. The methodology included focus-group discussions and field notes to collect empirical data. The findings reveal that the more educational technologies capture objects of learning positioned in the students’ sociocultural proximity, the more focused the learners’ attention is on these objects. The study shows also that a change in learning projects may depend to a large extent on whether the technology relates to the students’ sociocultural proximity, that is, taking into consideration students’ physical, cultural, and contextual real world. The study recommends a community of learning/inquiry embedded in a collaborative, problem-solving dynamic involving cognitive support from peers, teachers, external specialists, and the wider community.

  5. Inner structure detection by optical tomography technology based on feedback of microchip Nd:YAG lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Chunxin; Zhang, Shulian; Tan, Yidong; Zhao, Shijie

    2013-05-20

    We describe a new optical tomography technology based on feedback of microchip Nd:YAG lasers. In the case of feedback light frequency-shifted, light can be magnified by a fact of 10(6) in the Nd:YAG microchip lasers, which makes it possible to realize optical tomography with a greater depth than current optical tomography. The results of the measuring and imaging of kinds of samples are presented, which demonstrate the feasibility and potential of this approach in the inner structure detection. The system has a lateral resolution of ~1 μm, a vertical resolution of 15 μm and a longitudinal scanning range of over 10mm.

  6. Study on 8DPSK of multi-phase modulation technology based on CSRZ

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Heng-ying; NIU Hui-juan; ZHANG Min; WANG Fang; BAI Cheng-lin; ZHANG Xiao-guang

    2011-01-01

    A new modulation format in optical fiber communication system, the eight differential phase shift keying (8DPSK) of multi-phase modulation technology based on carrier-suppressed return-to-zero (CSRZ) is proposed in this paper. The formulae of CSRZ-8DPSK modem methods are derived theoretically and the methods are demonstrated. Spectra based on CSRZ and CSRZ-8DPSK modulation methods and their eye diagrams by simulation with MATLAB are obtained. The results show that the CSRZ-8DPSK modulation methods have narrower spectra with higher efficiency. The performance of eye diagrams is also much satisfactory after demodulation, suggesting some possible applications of the methods in the next generation of optical fiber communications.

  7. The application of confocal technology based on polycapillary X-ray optics in surface topography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Guangcui, E-mail: zgcshirley@yahoo.cn [The Key Laboratory of Beam Technology and Material Modification of the Ministry of Education, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); College of Nuclear Science and Technology, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); Beijing Radiation Center, Beijing 100875 (China); Sun, Tianxi; Liu, Zhiguo; Yuan, Hao; Li, Yude; Liu, Hehe; Zhao, Weigang; Zhang, Ruixia; Min, Qin; Peng, Song [The Key Laboratory of Beam Technology and Material Modification of the Ministry of Education, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); College of Nuclear Science and Technology, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); Beijing Radiation Center, Beijing 100875 (China)

    2013-09-01

    A confocal micro-X-ray fluorescence (MXRF) technology based on polycapillary X-ray optics was proposed for determining surface topography. This confocal topography method involves elemental sensitivity and can be used to classify the objects according to their elemental composition while obtaining their surface topography. To improve the spatial resolution of this confocal topography technology, the center of the confocal micro-volume was overlapped with the output focal spot of the polycapillary X-ray, focusing the lens in the excitation channel. The input focal spot of the X-ray lens parallel to the detection channel was used to determine the surface position of the sample. The corresponding surface adaptive algorithm was designed to obtain the surface topography. The surface topography of a ceramic chip was obtained. This confocal MXRF surface topography method could find application in the materials sciences.

  8. The application and development of radiography technology based on x-ray

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hao; Xu, Zhou; Li, Ming

    2009-07-01

    Modern Radiography technology was combined with radiation physics and modern imaging processing, which was an important branch of information obtainment and processing. We can get the inside information of the object, by the X ray's attenuation when the ray penetrated the object, and depending on the computer's fast processing, we can see the slice imaging of the object. Computerized Tomography, Computerized Laminography, and Digital Radiography were important parts in Radiography. The institute of applied electronics, CAEP in the research of intense radiation had developed several advanced radiation sources and some advanced radiography imaging systems, for example, S-band small spot linear accelerator, full solid state modulator, C-band linear accelerator, high energy Tera-hertz radiation source and CT technology based on cone beam, DR technology, CL Technology etc. Such imaging systems had been applied in industrial NDT/NDE, security check, medical diagnosis, petroleum and gas pipeline inspection system etc.

  9. Academic Service Quality and Instructional Quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greiner, Keith; Westbrook, Thomas S.

    2002-01-01

    Examined the relationship between academic service quality and instructional quality in higher education. Found a high correlation between academic service and instructional quality, with academic service overlapping instructional quality in three dimensions: enthusiasm, organization, and rapport. (EV)

  10. The Challenge of Individualized Instruction in Corrections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clements, Carl B.; McKee, John M.

    2000-01-01

    Discusses 14 challenges to the use of individualized instruction in corrections. Emphasizes a systems approach, motivational tools, programmed instructional materials, and approaches such as Direct Instruction and Precision Teaching. (SK)

  11. Intelligent Educational Systems for Anchored Instruction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, David D.

    1995-01-01

    Explores the potential for using Intelligent Educational Systems (IES) for anchoring instruction in macro contexts in science education. Topics include anchored instruction; situated cognition; problem solving; cognitivism; interactive video environments; and examples of combining IES and anchored instruction. (LRW)

  12. Intelligent Educational Systems for Anchored Instruction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, David D.

    1995-01-01

    Explores the potential for using Intelligent Educational Systems (IES) for anchoring instruction in macro contexts in science education. Topics include anchored instruction; situated cognition; problem solving; cognitivism; interactive video environments; and examples of combining IES and anchored instruction. (LRW)

  13. How Some College Students Represent Their Understandings of the Nature of Scientific Theories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagher, Zoubeida R.; Brickhouse, Nancy W.; Shipman, Harry; Letts, William J.

    2004-01-01

    This study explores college students' representations about the nature of theories during their enrollment in a large astronomy course with instruction designed to address a number of nature of science issues. We focus our investigation on how nine students represent their understanding of theory, how they distinguish between scientific theories…

  14. Using pictographs to enhance recall of spoken medical instructions II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houts, P S; Witmer, J T; Egeth, H E; Loscalzo, M J; Zabora, J R

    2001-06-01

    The first study in this series [Houts PS, Bachrach R, Witmer JT, Tringali CA, Bucher JA, Localio RA. Patient Educ. Couns. 1998;35:83-8] found that recall of spoken medical instructions averaged 14% but that, when pictographs (drawings representing the instructions) accompanied the spoken instructions and were present during recall, 85% of medical instructions were remembered correctly. Those findings suggested that spoken instructions plus pictographs may be a way to give people with low literacy skills access to medical information that is normally available only in written form. However, there were three important limitations to that study: (1) the subjects were literate and perhaps literate people remember pictograph meanings better than people with low literacy skills; (2) only short term recall was tested and, for medical information to be useful clinically, it must be remembered for significant periods of time and (3) a maximum of 50 instructions were shown in pictographs, whereas managing complex illnesses may require remembering several hundred instructions. This study addresses those limitations by investigating 4-week recall of 236 medical instructions accompanied by pictographs by people with low literacy skills. Subjects were 21 adult clients of an inner city job training program who had less than fifth grade reading skills. Results showed 85% mean correct recall of pictograph meanings immediately after training (range from 63 to 99%) and 71% after 4 weeks (range from 33 to 94%). These results indicate that people with low literacy skills can, with the help of pictographs, recall large amounts of medical information for significant periods of time. The impact of pictographs on symptom management and patient quality of life remains to be studied.

  15. Grouping for reading instruction: does one size fit all?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumm, J S; Moody, S W; Vaughn, S

    2000-01-01

    Twenty-nine third-grade teachers and selected students from their classes participated. Study 1 used teacher interviews and classroom observations to examine teachers' perceptions and practices for grouping for reading instruction; Study 2 examined the impact of these grouping practices on the academic progress, social progress, and attitudes about reading of students representing a range of achievement levels, including students with learning disabilities. Results indicated that, overall, teachers used whole class instruction for reading and the same materials for all students, including students with learning disabilities. Students with learning disabilities made little academic progress and their attitudes about reading did not improve over time.

  16. Tiered Instruction: An Effective Strategy to Differentiation of Instruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yahya BELER

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to examine the effects of a tiered instructional design on classroom management, attitude and the learning level of students. The instructional program was prepared for an introductory science course for 3rd grade students. The case study research method was used. Observation form, teacher and student interview forms were used to collect data. The teaching program was planned using a tiered instruction method for nine subjects of the “Yesterday, Today, Tomorrow” curriculum theme. The teacher made a short presentation and then students were classified into ability groups. Finally, each group completed learning activity via individual and group tasks based on activities appropriate to their abilities. The results indicate that tiered instruction had positive effects on the learning outcomes of students. All groups completed the classroom activities easily, which increased their motivation. Students participated in activities voluntarily and enthusiastically.

  17. Motivational Measure of the Instruction Compared: Instruction Based on the ARCS Motivation Theory vs Traditional Instruction in Blended Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colakoglu, Ozgur M.; Akdemir, Omur

    2012-01-01

    The ARCS Motivation Theory was proposed to guide instructional designers and teachers who develop their own instruction to integrate motivational design strategies into the instruction. There is a lack of literature supporting the idea that instruction for blended courses if designed based on the ARCS Motivation Theory provides different…

  18. 10 CFR 63.332 - Representative volume.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Representative volume. 63.332 Section 63.332 Energy... Protection Standards § 63.332 Representative volume. (a) The representative volume is the volume of ground... radionuclides released from the Yucca Mountain disposal system that will be in the representative volume....

  19. Measurement Control Workshop Instructional Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gibbs, Philip [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Crawford, Cary [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); McGinnis, Brent [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States) and Insolves LLC

    2014-04-01

    A workshop to teach the essential elements of an effective nuclear materials control and accountability (MC&A) programs are outlined, along with the modes of Instruction, and the roles and responsibilities of participants in the workshop.

  20. Hypermedia Environments and Adaptive Instruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Federico, Pat-Anthony

    1999-01-01

    Reviews relevant professional literature concerning hypermedia environments and adaptive instruction for online learning for distance education and continuing education. Highlights include aptitude-treatment interaction; cognitive processes; navigational paths; log files; and intelligent tutors. Contains 125 references. (LRW)

  1. Unpacking Corrections in Mobile Instruction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Levin, Lena; Cromdal, Jakob; Broth, Mathias

    2017-01-01

    This article deals with the organisation of correction in mobile instructional settings. Five sets of video data (>250 h) documenting how learners were instructed to fly aeroplanes, drive cars and ride bicycles in real life traffic were examined to reveal some common features of correction...... exchanges. Through detailed multimodal analysis of participants’ actions, it is shown how instructors systematically elaborate their corrective instructions to include relevant information about the trouble and remedial action – a practice we refer to as unpacking corrections. It is proposed...... that the practice of unpacking the local particulars of corrections (i) provides for the instructional character of the interaction, and (ii) is highly sensitive to the relevant physical and mobile contingencies. These findings contribute to the existing literature on the interactional organisation of correction...

  2. Measurement control workshop instructional materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gibbs, Philip [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Crawford, Cary [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); McGinnis, Brent [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Insolves LLC, Piketon, OH (United States)

    2014-04-01

    A workshop to teach the essential elements of an effective nuclear materials control and accountability (MC&A) programs are outlined, along with the modes of Instruction, and the roles and responsibilities of participants in the workshop.

  3. Zoology by Self-Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roach, Keith; Hammond, Roger

    1976-01-01

    A historical account is given of how a conventional university first-year undergraduate course in zoology has been replaced by a self-instructional one. Advantages and problems are weighed, and successful student achievement and interest are described. (LBH)

  4. A Fallibilistic Model for Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, A. J.

    1971-01-01

    Discusses models in inquiry and of instruction based on critical Fallibilistic philosophy, developed by Karl R. Popper, which holds that all knowledge grows by conjecture and refutation. Classroom applications of strategies which result from the model are presented. (JP)

  5. Managing Motivation In Personalized Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, G. R.; And Others

    1974-01-01

    addresses the topic of managing motivation in Keller's Personalized System of Instruction (PSI). Outlines the reinforcing features that are at the foundation of PSI theory, and examines methods used to ensure that these reinforcing properties are fu lly utilized. (JR)

  6. Expertise in Swiss mathematics instruction

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    This chapter draws on data and findings from several video studies to describe the quality of mathematics teaching in Switzerland. The focus is on features of instructional practice and quality as core components of classroom behavior that reflect the teacher’s expertise in creating optimal learning opportunities. The didactic triangle is used as the basis for describing the profile of expertise in Swiss mathematics instruction in terms of three interdependent dimensions of ins...

  7. Instructional Technology Must Contribute to Productivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molenda, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Those involved in instructional technology in higher education are urged to view instructional technology as a means of improving academic productivity. Instructional technology has been used for over forty years to analyze instructional problems and design solutions that reduce costs and improve learning outcomes. The Pew Program in Course…

  8. Colleague to Colleague: Deepening Instructional Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gullen, Kristine; Chaffee, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Collaborative dialogue about instructional practices is essential to the growth of the education profession. To determine what effective instruction is and how to improve their own instructional practice, educators must clarify and publicly state their beliefs about instruction, teaching, and leadership. This is messy and complex work, and to…

  9. Professional Development: Identifying Effective Instructional Coaching Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannino, Gina

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the instructional coaching activities most used by instructional coaches in southeast Texas school districts and to test if there was a relationship between the use of instructional coaching and perceived improvement in the instructional practices of teachers and student achievement. The participants for…

  10. Instructional Coaching: Leadership Styles and Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pruett, Maurisa M.

    2013-01-01

    Principals are traditionally the instructional leaders of a school. However, instructional coaching moves the emphasis from principals to instructional coaches by charging instructional coaches with improving the effectiveness of teachers who are critical to ensuring the successful education of a student. This research analyzed the leadership…

  11. Key Instructional Design Elements for Distance Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Lihua; Smaldino, Sharon

    2003-01-01

    Suggests that distance education instructors need to understand and apply important instructional design elements in order to successfully fulfill their role as instructional designers. Reviews the most recent literature pertaining to designing instruction in distance education. Identifies some key instructional design elements for teaching at a…

  12. The impact of computer-based versus "traditional" textbook science instruction on selected student learning outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothman, Alan H.

    This study reports the results of research designed to examine the impact of computer-based science instruction on elementary school level students' science content achievement, their attitude about science learning, their level of critical thinking-inquiry skills, and their level of cognitive and English language development. The study compared these learning outcomes resulting from a computer-based approach compared to the learning outcomes from a traditional, textbook-based approach to science instruction. The computer-based approach was inherent in a curriculum titled The Voyage of the Mimi , published by The Bank Street College Project in Science and Mathematics (1984). The study sample included 209 fifth-grade students enrolled in three schools in a suburban school district. This sample was divided into three groups, each receiving one of the following instructional treatments: (a) Mixed-instruction primarily based on the use of a hardcopy textbook in conjunction with computer-based instructional materials as one component of the science course; (b) Non-Traditional, Technology-Based -instruction fully utilizing computer-based material; and (c) Traditional, Textbook-Based-instruction utilizing only the textbook as the basis for instruction. Pre-test, or pre-treatment, data related to each of the student learning outcomes was collected at the beginning of the school year and post-test data was collected at the end of the school year. Statistical analyses of pre-test data were used as a covariate to account for possible pre-existing differences with regard to the variables examined among the three student groups. This study concluded that non-traditional, computer-based instruction in science significantly improved students' attitudes toward science learning and their level of English language development. Non-significant, positive trends were found for the following student learning outcomes: overall science achievement and development of critical thinking

  13. Market Segmentation in Business Technology Base: The Case of Segmentation of Sparkling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valéria Riscarolli

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available A common market segmentation premise for products and services rules consumer behavior as the segmentation center piece. Would this be the logic for segmentation used by small technology based companies? In this article we target at determining the principles of market segmentation used by a vitiwinery company, as research object. This company is recognized by its products excellence, either in domestic as well as in the foreign market, among 13 distinct countries. The research method used is a case study, through information from the company’s CEOs and crossed by primary information from observation and formal registries and documents of the company. In this research we look at sparkling wines market segmentation. Main results indicate that the winery studied considers only technological elements as the basis to build a market segment. One may conclude that a market segmentation for this company is based upon technological dominion of sparkling wines production, aligned with a premium-price policy. In the company, directorship believes that as sparkling wines market is still incipient in the country, sparkling wine market segments will form and consolidate after the evolution of consumers tasting preferences, depending on technologies that boost sparkling wines quality. 

  14. Technology-Based Innovations in Child Maltreatment Prevention Programs: Examples from SafeCare®

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa Cowart-Osborne

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Each year, hundreds of thousands of children in the U.S. are victims of child maltreatment. Experts recommend behavioral, skill-based parent training programs as a strategy for the prevention of child abuse and neglect. These programs can be enhanced using innovative technology strategies. This paper presents a brief history of the use of technology in SafeCare®, a home visiting program shown to prevent child neglect and physical abuse, and highlights current work that takes a technology-based hybrid approach to SafeCare delivery. With this unique approach, the provider brings a tablet computer to each session, and the parent interacts with the software to receive psychoeducation and modeling of target skills. The provider and parent then work together to practice the targeted skills until mastery is achieved. Initial findings from ongoing research of both of these strategies indicate that they show potential for improving engagement and use of positive parenting skills for parents and ease of implementation for providers. Future directions for technology enhancements in SafeCare are also presented.

  15. Computer and mobile technology-based interventions for substance use disorders: an organizing framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litvin, Erika B; Abrantes, Ana M; Brown, Richard A

    2013-03-01

    Research devoted to the development of therapeutic, behavioral interventions for substance use disorders (SUDs) that can be accessed and delivered via computer and mobile technologies has increased rapidly during the past decade. Numerous recent reviews of this literature have supported the efficacy of technology-based interventions (TBIs), but have also revealed their great heterogeneity and a limited understanding of treatment mechanisms. We conducted a "review of reviews" focused on summarizing findings of previous reviews with respect to moderators of TBIs' efficacy, and present an organizing framework of considerations involved in designing and evaluating TBIs for SUDs. The four primary elements that comprise our framework are Accessibility, Usage, Human Contact, and Intervention Content, with several sub-elements within each category. We offer some suggested directions for future research grouped within these four primary considerations. We believe that technology affords unique opportunities to improve, support, and supplement therapeutic and peer relationships via dynamic applications that adapt to individuals' constantly changing motivation and treatment needs. We hope that our framework will aid in guiding programmatic progress in this exciting field.

  16. An Analysis of Knowledge Sharing Approaches for Emerging-technology-based Strategic Alliances in Electronic Industry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Ju; LI Yong-jian

    2006-01-01

    Emerging technologies are now initiating new industries and transforming old ones with tremendous power. They are different games compared with established technologies with distinctive characteristics of knowledge management in knowledge-based and technological-innovation-based competition. How to obtain knowledge advantage and enhance competences by knowledge sharing for emerging-technology-based strategic alliances (ETBSA) is what we concern in this paper. On the basis of our previous work on emerging technologies'distinctive attributes, we counter the wide spread presumption that the primary purpose of strategic alliances is knowledge acquiring by means of learning. We offers new insight into the knowledge sharing approaches of ETBSAs - the knowledge integrating approach by which each member firm integrates its partner's complementary knowledge base into the products and services and maintains its own knowledge specialization at the same time. So that ETBSAs should plan and practice their knowledge sharing strategies from the angle of knowledge integrating rather than knowledge acquiring. A four-dimensional framework is developed to analyze the advantages and disadvantages of these two knowledge sharing approaches. Some cases in electronic industry are introduced to illustrate our point of view.

  17. Understanding adolescent response to a technology-based depression prevention program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gladstone, Tracy; Marko-Holguin, Monika; Henry, Jordan; Fogel, Joshua; Diehl, Anne; Van Voorhees, Benjamin W

    2014-01-01

    Guided by the Behavioral Vaccine Theory of prevention, this study uses a no-control group design to examine intervention variables that predict favorable changes in depressive symptoms at 6- to 8-week follow-up in at-risk adolescents who participated in a primary care, Internet-based prevention program. Participants included 83 adolescents from primary care settings ages 14 to 21 (M = 17.5, SD = 2.04), 56.2% female, with 41% non-White. Participants completed self-report measures, met with a physician, and then completed a 14-module Internet intervention targeting the prevention of depression. Linear regression models indicated that several intervention factors (duration on website in days, the strength of the relationship with the physician, perceptions of ease of use, and the perceived relevance of the material presented) were significantly associated with greater reductions in depressive symptoms from baseline to follow-up. Automatic negative thoughts significantly mediated the relation between change in depressive symptoms scores and both duration of use and physician relationship. Several intervention variables predicted favorable changes in depressive symptom scores among adolescents who participated in an Internet-based prevention program, and the strength of two of these variables was mediated by automatic negative thoughts. These findings support the importance of cognitive factors in preventing adolescent depression and suggest that modifiable aspects of technology-based intervention experience and relationships should be considered in optimizing intervention design.

  18. Instructional video for teaching venepuncture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Michael; Harcharik, Sara; Moskalenko, Marina; Luber, Adam; Bernardo, Sebastian; Levitt, Jacob

    2014-10-01

    Safe venepuncture technique is a critical skill for health care professionals, to avoid accidental occupational injury. This study investigates whether watching an instructional video improves medical students' ability to perform venepuncture safely. This was a randomised, controlled, assessor-blinded trial that evaluated the utility of an instructional video, with the primary outcome of the ability to perform venepuncture safely. Forty-two second-year medical students were recruited and randomised to receive either video instruction (group A, n = 20) or no intervention (group B, n = 22). Prior to the study, all students attended an instructor-led workshop on venepuncture. During the study, students were paired and instructed to perform venepuncture on a partner. Performance was assessed using a points-based checklist. Pre- and post-study surveys were conducted to assess confidence with technique. The mean total checklist score was higher in group A than in group B, with values of 14.15 and 9.18, respectively (p instructional video performed venepuncture more effectively and reported greater confidence with the technique. Medical students can benefit from having access to an instructional video on venepuncture as an adjunct to the standard curriculum. Safe venepuncture technique is a critical skill for health care professionals. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Experiential reward learning outweighs instruction prior to adulthood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decker, Johannes H; Lourenco, Frederico S; Doll, Bradley B; Hartley, Catherine A

    2015-06-01

    Throughout our lives, we face the important task of distinguishing rewarding actions from those that are best avoided. Importantly, there are multiple means by which we acquire this information. Through trial and error, we use experiential feedback to evaluate our actions. We also learn which actions are advantageous through explicit instruction from others. Here, we examined whether the influence of these two forms of learning on choice changes across development by placing instruction and experience in competition in a probabilistic-learning task. Whereas inaccurate instruction markedly biased adults' estimations of a stimulus's value, children and adolescents were better able to objectively estimate stimulus values through experience. Instructional control of learning is thought to recruit prefrontal-striatal brain circuitry, which continues to mature into adulthood. Our behavioral data suggest that this protracted neurocognitive maturation may cause the motivated actions of children and adolescents to be less influenced by explicit instruction than are those of adults. This absence of a confirmation bias in children and adolescents represents a paradoxical developmental advantage of youth over adults in the unbiased evaluation of actions through positive and negative experience.

  20. Student performance on conceptual questions: Does instruction matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heron, Paula R. L.

    2013-01-01

    As part of the tutorial component of introductory calculus-based physics at the University of Washington, students take weekly pretests that consist of conceptual questions. Pretests are so named because they precede each tutorial, but they are frequently administered after lecture instruction. Many variables associated with class composition and prior instruction (if any) could, in principle, affect student performance on these questions. Nonetheless, the results are often found to be "essentially the same" in all classes. With data available from a large number of classes, it is possible to characterize the typical variation quantitatively. In this paper three questions for which we have accumulated thousands of responses, from dozens of classes representing different conditions with respect to the textbook in use, the amount of prior instruction, etc., serve as examples. For each question, we examine the variation in student performance across all classes. We also compare subsets categorized according to the amount of relevant prior instruction each class had received. A preliminary analysis suggests that the variation in performance is essentially random. No statistically significant difference is observed between results obtained before relevant instruction begins and after it has been completed. The results provide evidence that exposure to concepts in lecture and textbook is not sufficient to ensure an improvement in performance on questions that require qualitative reasoning.

  1. Seeing around a Ball: Complex, Technology-Based Problems in Calculus with Applications in Science and Engineering-Redux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkel, Brian

    2008-01-01

    A complex technology-based problem in visualization and computation for students in calculus is presented. Strategies are shown for its solution and the opportunities for students to put together sequences of concepts and skills to build for success are highlighted. The problem itself involves placing an object under water in order to actually see…

  2. Assessing the needs of new technology based firms (NTBFs): An investigation among spin-off companies from six European Universities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kirwan, P.M.; van der Sijde, Peter; Groen, Arend J.

    2006-01-01

    New technology based firms (NTBFs) play a major role in the development and commercialisation of new technologies and the development of national economies. Using an entrepreneurship-in-networks approach, this paper examines the early stages of the development of these companies, i.e. from opportuni

  3. Research Trends in Technology-Based Learning from 2000 to 2009: A Content Analysis of Publications in Selected Journals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Yu-Chen; Ho, Hsin Ning Jessie; Tsai, Chin-Chung; Hwang, Gwo-Jen; Chu, Hui-Chun; Wang, Chin-Yeh; Chen, Nian-Shing

    2012-01-01

    This paper provides a content analysis of studies in technology-based learning (TBL) that were published in five Social Sciences Citation Index (SSCI) journals (i.e. "the British Journal of Educational Technology, Computers & Education, Educational Technology Research & Development, Educational Technology & Society, the Journal of Computer…

  4. How Adults Learn from Self-Paced, Technology-Based Corporate Training: New Focus for Learners, New Focus for Designers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobrovolny, Jackie

    2006-01-01

    "How" do adults learn from self-paced, technology-based corporate training, which they select based on its relevance to their current employment responsibilities? Specifically, "how" do adults use the following learning strategies: prior experience, reflection, metacognition, conversations, generative learning strategies, and authentic…

  5. Motivating Calculus-Based Kinematics Instruction with Super Mario Bros

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordine, Jeffrey C.

    2011-09-01

    High-quality physics instruction is contextualized, motivates students to learn, and represents the discipline as a way of investigating the world rather than as a collection of facts and equations. Inquiry-oriented pedagogy, such as problem-based instruction, holds great promise for both teaching physics content and representing the process of doing real science.2 A challenge for physics teachers is to find instructional contexts that are meaningful, accessible, and motivating for students. Today's students are spending a growing fraction of their lives interacting with virtual environments, and these environments—physically realistic or not—can provide valuable contexts for physics explorations3-5 and lead to thoughtful discussions about decisions that programmers make when designing virtual environments. In this article, I describe a problem-based approach to calculus-based kinematics instruction that contextualizes students' learning within the Super Mario Bros. video game—a game that is more than 20 years old, but still remarkably popular with today's high school and college students.

  6. Research of maneuvering target prediction and tracking technology based on IMM algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Zheng; Mao, Yao; Deng, Chao; Liu, Qiong; Chen, Jing

    2016-09-01

    Maneuvering target prediction and tracking technology is widely used in both military and civilian applications, the study of those technologies is all along the hotspot and difficulty. In the Electro-Optical acquisition-tracking-pointing system (ATP), the primary traditional maneuvering targets are ballistic target, large aircraft and other big targets. Those targets have the features of fast velocity and a strong regular trajectory and Kalman Filtering and polynomial fitting have good effects when they are used to track those targets. In recent years, the small unmanned aerial vehicles developed rapidly for they are small, nimble and simple operation. The small unmanned aerial vehicles have strong maneuverability in the observation system of ATP although they are close-in, slow and small targets. Moreover, those vehicles are under the manual operation, therefore, the acceleration of them changes greatly and they move erratically. So the prediction and tracking precision is low when traditional algorithms are used to track the maneuvering fly of those targets, such as speeding up, turning, climbing and so on. The interacting multiple model algorithm (IMM) use multiple models to match target real movement trajectory, there are interactions between each model. The IMM algorithm can switch model based on a Markov chain to adapt to the change of target movement trajectory, so it is suitable to solve the prediction and tracking problems of the small unmanned aerial vehicles because of the better adaptability of irregular movement. This paper has set up model set of constant velocity model (CV), constant acceleration model (CA), constant turning model (CT) and current statistical model. And the results of simulating and analyzing the real movement trajectory data of the small unmanned aerial vehicles show that the prediction and tracking technology based on the interacting multiple model algorithm can get relatively lower tracking error and improve tracking precision

  7. Technical Education Outreach in Materials Science and Technology Based on NASA's Materials Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, James A.

    2003-01-01

    The grant NAG-1 -2125, Technical Education Outreach in Materials Science and Technology, based on NASA s Materials Research, involves collaborative effort among the National Aeronautics and Space Administration s Langley Research Center (NASA-LaRC), Norfolk State University (NSU), national research centers, private industry, technical societies, colleges and universities. The collaboration aims to strengthen math, science and technology education by providing outreach related to materials science and technology (MST). The goal of the project is to transfer new developments from LaRC s Center for Excellence for Structures and Materials and other NASA materials research into technical education across the nation to provide educational outreach and strengthen technical education. To achieve this goal we are employing two main strategies: 1) development of the gateway website and 2) using the National Educators Workshop: Update in Engineering Materials, Science and Technology (NEW:Updates). We have also participated in a number of national projects, presented talks at technical meetings and published articles aimed at improving k-12 technical education. Through the three years of this project the NSU team developed the successful MST-Online site and continued to upgrade and update it as our limited resources permitted. Three annual NEW:Updates conducted from 2000 though 2002 overcame the challenges presented first by the September 11,2001 terrorist attacks and the slow U.S. economy and still managed to conduct very effective workshops and expand our outreach efforts. Plans began on NEW:Update 2003 to be hosted by NASA Langley as a part of the celebration of the Centennial of Controlled Flight.

  8. Structural capital, innovation capability, and company performance in technology-based colombian firms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nekane Aramburu

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In today’s economy, innovation is considered to be one of the main driving forces behind business competitiveness, if not the most relevant one. Traditionally, the study of innovation has been addressed from different perspectives. Recently, literature on knowledge management and intellectual capital has provided new insights. Considering this, the aim of this paper is to analyze the impact of different organizational conditions – i.e. “structural capital” – on innovation capability and innovation performance, from an “intellectual capital” (IC perspective. As regards innovation capability, two dimensions are considered: new idea generation and innovation project management. The population subject to study is made up of technology-based Colombian firms. In order to gather information about the relevant variables involved in the research, a questionnaire was designed and addressed to the CEOs of the companies making up the target population. The sample analyzed is made up of 69 companies and is large enough to carry out a statistical study based on structural equation modelling (partial least squares approach using PLS-Graph software (Chin and Frye, 2003. The results obtained show that structural capital explains to a great extent both the effectiveness of the new idea generation process and of innovation project management. However, the influence of each specific organizational component making up structural capital (organizational design, organizational culture, hiring and professional development policies, innovation strategy, technological capital, and external structure varies. Moreover, successful innovation project management is the only innovation capability dimension that exerts a significant impact on company performance.

  9. Vocabulary learning in Head Start: Nature and extent of classroom instruction and its contributions to children's learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hindman, Annemarie H; Wasik, Barbara A

    2013-06-01

    In the current study, we employed the 2006 cohort of the large-scale, nationally representative, Head Start Family and Child Experiences (FACES) dataset to construct a snapshot of vocabulary instruction and learning in high-poverty preschools. Specifically, we examined Head Start teachers' reports of the frequency of vocabulary instruction in their classrooms as well as the overall quality of their classroom instruction. We also explored the teacher- and center-level factors that predicted these dual aspects of instruction, and the role of that instruction in children's vocabulary development over the preschool year. Participants included 293 teachers in 116 Head Start centers, as well as 2501 children in their classrooms. Results showed that, whereas there was notable variation, most teachers reported providing a variety of vocabulary-focused instructional activities nearly every day. The quality of their classroom instruction was generally modest. Classroom instructional quality was predictive of children's vocabulary learning, with stronger relations apparent for children with lower initial skills and for classrooms with higher quality instruction. The frequency of instruction in vocabulary was not related to children's word learning. Results provide new descriptive data about the state of vocabulary instruction in Head Start preschools and highlight both areas of success and opportunities for additional support.

  10. VT Biodiversity Project - Representative Landscapes boundary lines

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — (Link to Metadata) This coverage represents the results of an analysis of landscape diversity in Vermont. Polygons in the dataset represent as much as possible (in a...

  11. Representing Uncertainty by Probability and Possibility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uncertain parameters in modeling are usually represented by probability distributions reflecting either the objective uncertainty of the parameters or the subjective belief held by the model builder. This approach is particularly suited for representing the statistical nature or variance of uncer......Uncertain parameters in modeling are usually represented by probability distributions reflecting either the objective uncertainty of the parameters or the subjective belief held by the model builder. This approach is particularly suited for representing the statistical nature or variance...

  12. Representing Uncertainty by Probability and Possibility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uncertain parameters in modeling are usually represented by probability distributions reflecting either the objective uncertainty of the parameters or the subjective belief held by the model builder. This approach is particularly suited for representing the statistical nature or variance of uncer......Uncertain parameters in modeling are usually represented by probability distributions reflecting either the objective uncertainty of the parameters or the subjective belief held by the model builder. This approach is particularly suited for representing the statistical nature or variance...

  13. 7 CFR 1280.611 - Representative period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Representative period. 1280.611 Section 1280.611... INFORMATION ORDER Procedures To Request a Referendum Definitions § 1280.611 Representative period. Representative period means the period designated by the Secretary pursuant to § 518 of the Act. ...

  14. 29 CFR 548.405 - Representative period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Representative period. 548.405 Section 548.405 Labor... Application § 548.405 Representative period. (a) The application must set forth the facts relied upon to show... employee exclusive of overtime premiums over a representative period of time. 21 The basic rate will be...

  15. 7 CFR 1230.618 - Representative period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Representative period. 1230.618 Section 1230.618... CONSUMER INFORMATION Procedures for the Conduct of Referendum Definitions § 1230.618 Representative period. The term Representative period means the 12-consecutive months prior to the first day of absentee and...

  16. 7 CFR 1220.612 - Representative period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Representative period. 1220.612 Section 1220.612... CONSUMER INFORMATION Procedures To Request a Referendum Definitions § 1220.612 Representative period. Representative period means the period designated by the Secretary pursuant to section 1970 of the Act. ...

  17. Advanced Insider Threat Mitigation Workshop Instructional Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gibbs, Philip [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Larsen, Robert [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); O' Brien, Mike [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Edmunds, Tom [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2009-02-01

    Insiders represent a formidable threat to nuclear facilities. This set of workshop materials covers methodologies to analyze and approaches to mitigate the threat of an insider attempting abrupt and protracted theft of nuclear materials. This particular set of materials is an update of a January 2008 version to add increased emphasis on Material Control and Accounting and its role with respect to protracted insider nuclear material theft scenarios. This report is a compilation of workshop materials consisting of lectures on technical and administrative measures used in Physical Protection (PP) and Material Control and Accounting (MC&A) and methods for analyzing their effectiveness against a postulated insider threat. The postulated threat includes both abrupt and protracted theft scenarios. Presentation is envisioned to be through classroom instruction and discussion. Several practical and group exercises are included for demonstration and application of the analysis approach contained in the lecture/discussion sessions as applied to a hypothetical nuclear facility.

  18. Mining Representative Subset Based on Fuzzy Clustering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Hongfang; FENG Boqin; L(U) Lintao

    2007-01-01

    Two new concepts-fuzzy mutuality and average fuzzy entropy are presented. Then based on these concepts, a new algorithm-RSMA (representative subset mining algorithm) is proposed, which can abstract representative subset from massive data.To accelerate the speed of producing representative subset, an improved algorithm-ARSMA(accelerated representative subset mining algorithm) is advanced, which adopt combining putting forward with backward strategies. In this way, the performance of the algorithm is improved. Finally we make experiments on real datasets and evaluate the representative subset. The experiment shows that ARSMA algorithm is more excellent than RandomPick algorithm either on effectiveness or efficiency.

  19. Discussion on Form Focused Instruction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冯滢

    2007-01-01

    The pedagogy of language teaching has moved from one extreme-Grammar Translation Method to the other-Communicative Language Teaching.Today Form Focused Instruction(FFI) has emerged,intending to bring language forms instruction back to the communicative language classroom.Despite of the approval of this new approach,there is a hot dispute on its two types of application:Focus on Form or Focus on FormS.This article briefly analyzes FFI in recent research studies with focus on the choice between the two types ...

  20. Best practices in writing instruction

    CERN Document Server

    Fitzgerald, Jill; MacArthur, Charles A

    2014-01-01

    An indispensable teacher resource and course text, this book presents evidence-based practices for helping all K-12 students develop their skills as writers. Every chapter draws clear connections to the Common Core State Standards (CCSS). Leading authorities describe how to teach the skills and strategies that students need to plan, draft, evaluate, and revise multiple types of texts. Also addressed are ways for teachers to integrate technology into the writing program, use assessment to inform instruction, teach writing in the content areas, and tailor instruction for English language learner

  1. Individualized additional instruction for calculus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takata, Ken

    2010-10-01

    College students enrolling in the calculus sequence have a wide variance in their preparation and abilities, yet they are usually taught from the same lecture. We describe another pedagogical model of Individualized Additional Instruction (IAI) that assesses each student frequently and prescribes further instruction and homework based on the student's performance. Our study compares two calculus classes, one taught with mandatory remedial IAI and the other without. The class with mandatory remedial IAI did significantly better on comprehensive multiple-choice exams, participated more frequently in classroom discussion and showed greater interest in theorem-proving and other advanced topics.

  2. DEVELOPING A TECHNOLOGY-BASED BUSINESS STRATEGY FOR THE INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS OF TELKOM SA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. John

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available

    ENGLISH ABSTRACT: This study was aimed at developing a technology-based business strategy for Telkom’s international business. Deregulation, competition and demand for converging voice, data and video in the telecommunication market were the driving forces behind this study. Without a proper strategy, Telkom will not be able to withstand the new competition. As the initial step in strategy formulation, Telkom’s strategic goals were identified. A SWOT analysis was conducted and a strategy formulation map was developed. A technology balance sheet and S-curve models were developed to analyse the current products and technologies. It become evident through the research that there is a high potential for business expansion into Africa and Telkom has sufficient capabilities to support this. The implementation of voice over Internet protocol technology will enable Telkom to deliver international services at competitive rates. The study concluded by developing a technology strategy for Telkom’s international business. Recommendations are put forward and future research gaps are identified.

    AFRIKAANSE OPSOMMING: Die doel van hierdie studie was om ‘n tegnologie-gebaseerde besigheidstrategie vir Telkom se internasionale besigheid te ontwikkel. Deregulering, mededinging en die vraag na konvergensie van stem, data en video in die telekommunikasiemark was die dryfkragte agter hierdie studie. Sonder ‘n behoorlike strategie sal Telkom nie teen die nuwe mededinging kan staande bly nie. As eerste stap in die formulering van ‘n strategie, is Telkom se doelwitte geïdentifiseer. ‘n SWOT-analise is uitgevoer en ‘n strategieformuleringskaart is ontwikkel. ‘n Tegnologiebalansstaat en S-krommemodelle is ontwikkel om die bestaande produkte en tegnologieë te ontleed. Hierdie navorsing het aangetoon dat daar ‘n hoë potensiaal vir uitbreiding van Telkom se besigheid in Afrika bestaan en dat Telkom genoegsame vermoëns besit om dit te

  3. Synthesis of Collaborative Learning Processes with Technology Based Education to Enhance Classroom Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Sumit

    2016-07-01

    A major hurdle in school education in India is the presence of large number of teachers who are inexperienced and have merely taken up the profession of teaching only after exhausting all avenues or getting rejected from all quarters. Empowering and training such teachers with information is a herculean task. Students tend to pay attention and show enthusiasm in learning when they view the class as relevant to themselves and connected to their interests. The current teaching-learning methods for teaching science and astronomy have become obsolete and require a major overhaul. A teaching-learning process which concentrates on an explorative-collaborative-comprehending methodology with simultaneous combination of technology has been developed with the objective to reignite the scientific temper among the future budding scientists. Attaining this goal will be possible when instructors adopt a bottom-up approach, which involves understanding the student's needs, designing flexible course content and synchronizing teaching techniques that focus on increasing student engagement by making the learning experience meaningful and purposeful. The International Year of Light (IYL 2015) is a global initiative that highlights to the citizens of the world the importance of light and optical technologies in their lives, for their futures, and for the development of society. One of the strong legacies left by the 2009 International Year of Astronomy was to use Astronomy in making the world a better place. On the eve of IYL 2015, an Optical Society funded outreach program, 'Spark of Light' was organised for under-privileged school children by using the explorative-collaborative-technology based mechanism and make them understand the nature and properties of light with emphasis on how Astronomy has been crucial for the evolution of sophisticated technology. A major paradigm shift from our previous program was the engagement of such untrained teachers in each and every aspect of

  4. Techno-Instruction or Primitivism: Blended Instruction in Algebra I

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNeely, Silvia Ann

    2014-01-01

    Integrated technology within a learning environment has become a common instructional expectation in public schools. Many school officials are embracing constructivist views that students learn best within a blended learning environment that promotes active learning by anchoring skills and concepts affiliated to real-world activities. This…

  5. Aligning Business Needs and Instructional Assets (Recycling Instructional Assets)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gendelman, Joel

    2009-01-01

    High-performing organizations and performance improvement professionals frequently speak about the alignment of their instructional curricula with the needs of the business. However, they often lack a systematic methodology for performing that alignment. This article presents such a method. The process provides the ability to better support…

  6. Extending Library Instruction: Using Blogger to Collaborate, Connect, and Instruct

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goss, Harold, Jr.

    2010-01-01

    The expectations placed on library instruction programs by the Association of College and Research Libraries are high. Many universities also include information literacy competencies as learning objectives to be assessed at the institutional level. With those standards in mind, it is becoming increasingly difficult to adequately educate students…

  7. Evaluating Instructional Effectiveness with the Instructional Improvement Questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohlmann, John T.

    The Instructional Improvement Questionnaire (IIQ) is a four-part questionnaire designed to collect evaluative feedback from students on their instructors and courses. The class characteristics section collects data from the student on variables such as grade point average, sex, class level, grade expected, time spent studying for the course, etc.…

  8. Technology-Based Communication and the Development of Interpersonal Competencies Within Adolescent Romantic Relationships: A Preliminary Investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesi, Jacqueline; Widman, Laura; Choukas-Bradley, Sophia; Prinstein, Mitchell J

    2017-06-01

    This study investigated longitudinal associations between adolescents' technology-based communication and the development of interpersonal competencies within romantic relationships. A school-based sample of 487 adolescents (58% girls; Mage  = 14.1) participated at two time points, one year apart. Participants reported (1) proportions of daily communication with romantic partners via traditional modes (in person, on the phone) versus technological modes (text messaging, social networking sites) and (2) competence in the romantic relationship skill domains of negative assertion and conflict management. Results of cross-lagged panel models indicated that adolescents who engaged in greater proportions of technology-based communication with romantic partners reported lower levels of interpersonal competencies one year later, but not vice versa; associations were particularly strong for boys. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Research on Adolescence © 2016 Society for Research on Adolescence.

  9. Representing Others in a Public Good Game

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Evelyn Hauge

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In many important public good situations the decision-making power and authority is delegated to representatives who make binding decisions on behalf of a larger group. The purpose of this study is to compare contribution decisions made by individuals with contribution decisions made by group representatives. We present the results from a laboratory experiment that compares decisions made by individuals in inter-individual public good games with decisions made by representatives on behalf of their group in inter-group public good games. Our main finding is that contribution behavior differs between individuals and group representatives, but only for women. While men’s choices are equally self-interested as individuals and group representatives, women make less self-interested choices as group representatives.

  10. Represented Speech in Qualitative Health Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Musaeus, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Represented speech refers to speech where we reference somebody. Represented speech is an important phenomenon in everyday conversation, health care communication, and qualitative research. This case will draw first from a case study on physicians’ workplace learning and second from a case study...... on nurses’ apprenticeship learning. The aim of the case is to guide the qualitative researcher to use own and others’ voices in the interview and to be sensitive to represented speech in everyday conversation. Moreover, reported speech matters to health professionals who aim to represent the voice...... of their patients. Qualitative researchers and students might learn to encourage interviewees to elaborate different voices or perspectives. Qualitative researchers working with natural speech might pay attention to how people talk and use represented speech. Finally, represented speech might be relevant...

  11. Report of the Defense Science Board Task Force on Defense Science and Technology Base for the 21st Century

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-07

    equations are likely to be non- linear , the standard-matrix algebra -solution approach will probably not be applicable. Instead, an iterative optimization...and ultimately combat outcome. The depiction makes the problem seem fairly simple and linear . There is a flow from the technology base through...observation is that industry does not manage its research and development process in a linear fashion as does the Department of Defense. By linear , it is

  12. Representing Quadric Surfaces Using NURBS Surfaces

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    秦开怀

    1997-01-01

    A method for representing quadrc surfaces using NURBS is presented.By means of the necessary and sufficient conditons for NURBS curves to precisely represent circular arcs and other conics,quadric surfaces can be represented by NURBS surfaces with fewer control vertices.The method can be used not only for NURBS surface representation of quadric surfaces,but also for rounding polyhedrons.Many examples are given in the paper.

  13. Understanding Medical Words Tutorial: Download Instructions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/medwords/medicalwordsdownload.html Understanding Medical Words Tutorial: Download Instructions To use the sharing features ... no Internet connection is available. Download: Understanding Medical Words [16MB zip file] Download instructions : Click on the ...

  14. Types of verbal interaction with instructable robots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crangle, C.; Suppes, P.; Michalowski, S.

    1987-01-01

    An instructable robot is one that accepts instruction in some natural language such as English and uses that instruction to extend its basic repertoire of actions. Such robots are quite different in conception from autonomously intelligent robots, which provide the impetus for much of the research on inference and planning in artificial intelligence. Examined here are the significant problem areas in the design of robots that learn from vebal instruction. Examples are drawn primarily from our earlier work on instructable robots and recent work on the Robotic Aid for the physically disabled. Natural-language understanding by machines is discussed as well as in the possibilities and limits of verbal instruction. The core problem of verbal instruction, namely, how to achieve specific concrete action in the robot in response to commands that express general intentions, is considered, as are two major challenges to instructability: achieving appropriate real-time behavior in the robot, and extending the robot's language capabilities.

  15. Gagne's Learning Theory Applied to Technical Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, Tom E.

    1974-01-01

    An overview of Robert M. Gagne's theoretical position of learning and instruction is presented with a discussion of possible applications and usefulness of the theory toward the development of technical instruction. (Author/AG)

  16. Learning Theory, Educational Media and Individualized Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagne, Robert M.

    1970-01-01

    An examination of learning theory and its applicability to the design of effective individualized instruction. The article also discusses the need to consider learning objectives when choosing media to perform instructional functions. (AA)

  17. Computer Animation in an Instructional Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Large, Andrew

    1996-01-01

    Reviews the effectiveness of animation in enhancing textual information for instructional purposes and identifies factors that determine effectiveness. Outlines methodological problems in the research and summarizes design criteria for multimedia instructional products. Contains 78 references. (PEN)

  18. Influence of firm related factors and industrial policy regime on technology based capacity utilization in sugar industry in Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. B. Akpan

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The study analyzed the technology based capacity utilization rate in sugar industry in Nigeria in the period 1970 to 2010. Data used in the study were obtained from the sugar firms, publications of the Central Bank of Nigeria and National Bureau of Statistics. Augmented Dicker Fuller unit root test was conducted on the specified data to ascertain their stationarity and order of integration. The result reveals that some variables were stationary at level while some were stationary at first difference. The diagnostic statistics from the multiple log linear regression on the specified variables confirmed the reliability of the model. The empirical result reveals that sugar cane price and sugar industry’s real energy consumption have significant negative relationship with the technology based capacity utilization in the sugar industry in Nigeria. On the other hand, the wage rate of skill workers, industry’s, real research expenditure, human capital and period of import substitution have significant positive influenced on the technology based capacity utilization rate in the industry. Our findings suggest that policy measures aim at expanding the hectares of industrial sugarcane and increase production of refined petroleum fuel in the country will promote capacity utilization in the industry. Also policies targeted on the intensification of research and improved worker’s remuneration in the sub-sector is strongly advocated.

  19. Instruction Scheduling Across Control Flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Charles Golumbic

    1993-01-01

    Full Text Available Instruction scheduling algorithms are used in compilers to reduce run-time delays for the compiled code by the reordering or transformation of program statements, usually at the intermediate language or assembly code level. Considerable research has been carried out on scheduling code within the scope of basic blocks, i.e., straight line sections of code, and very effective basic block schedulers are now included in most modern compilers and especially for pipeline processors. In previous work Golumbic and Rainis: IBM J. Res. Dev., Vol. 34, pp.93–97, 1990, we presented code replication techniques for scheduling beyond the scope of basic blocks that provide reasonable improvements of running time of the compiled code, but which still leaves room for further improvement. In this article we present a new method for scheduling beyond basic blocks called SHACOOF. This new technique takes advantage of a conventional, high quality basic block scheduler by first suppressing selected subsequences of instructions and then scheduling the modified sequence of instructions using the basic block scheduler. A candidate subsequence for suppression can be found by identifying a region of a program control flow graph, called an S-region, which has a unique entry and a unique exit and meets predetermined criteria. This enables scheduling of a sequence of instructions beyond basic block boundaries, with only minimal changes to an existing compiler, by identifying beneficial opportunities to cover delays that would otherwise have been beyond its scope.

  20. Psychology of Learning for Instruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driscoll, Marcy P.

    This cognitively-oriented book focuses on learning and instruction. Specific applications and implications of learning theories are discussed and examples are drawn from educational situations and educational problems. Theoretical concepts are illustrated in concrete terms and a wide variety of examples are provided. The text embodies a theme of…

  1. Aesthetic Principles for Instructional Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrish, Patrick E.

    2009-01-01

    This article offers principles that contribute to developing the aesthetics of instructional design. Rather than describing merely the surface qualities of things and events, the concept of aesthetics as applied here pertains to heightened, integral experience. Aesthetic experiences are those that are immersive, infused with meaning, and felt as…

  2. Succession Planning for Library Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobel, Karen; Drewry, Josiah

    2015-01-01

    Detailed succession planning helps libraries pass information from one employee to the next. This is crucial in preparing for hiring, turnover, retirements, training of graduate teaching assistants in academic libraries, and other common situations. The authors of this article discuss succession planning for instruction programs in academic…

  3. Safety instruction 51 (IS51)

    CERN Multimedia

    SC Secretariat

    2005-01-01

    Please note that Safety Instruction No. 51 (IS51) entitled 'Operational and Information Procedures in Response to Accidents' is available on the web at the following url: https://edms.cern.ch/document/502036/LAST_RELEASED Paper copies can also be obtained from the SC unit secretariat, e-mail : sc.secretariat@cern.ch SC Secretariat

  4. Health Instruction Packages: Cardiac Anatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Gwen; And Others

    Text, illustrations, and exercises are utilized in these five learning modules to instruct nurses, students, and other health care professionals in cardiac anatomy and functions and in fundamental electrocardiographic techniques. The first module, "Cardiac Anatomy and Physiology: A Review" by Gwen Phillips, teaches the learner to draw…

  5. Instruction Sequences for Computer Science

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergstra, J.A.; Middelburg, C.A.

    2012-01-01

    This book demonstrates that the concept of an instruction sequence offers a novel and useful viewpoint on issues relating to diverse subjects in computer science. Selected issues relating to well-known subjects from the theory of computation and the area of computer architecture are rigorously

  6. Classic writings on instructional technology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ely, D.P.; Ely, Donald P.; Plomp, T.

    1996-01-01

    This paper describes the selection process of 17 articles for inclusion in the book, "Classic Writings on Instructional Technology." The book brings together original "classic" educational technology articles into one volume to document the history of the field through its literature. It is also an

  7. Learning Strategy Instruction Innovation Configuration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumaker, Jean B.

    2011-01-01

    One way of helping students with learning disabilities and other struggling students to be independent life-long learners is to teach them how to use learning strategies in efficient ways. Learning strategy instruction can provide students the opportunity to succeed in today's schools and meet rigorous standards, transforming ineffective learners…

  8. The Role of Formal Instruction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sun Yu

    2011-01-01

    This paper looks at second language acquisition in a classroom setting. It considers whether formal instruction makes a difference to SLA. This is an important issue, because it address the question of the role played by environmental factors in SLA. It is also an important educational issue, as language pedagogy has traditionally operated on the assumption that grammar can be taught.

  9. Health Instruction Packages: Cardiac Anatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Gwen; And Others

    Text, illustrations, and exercises are utilized in these five learning modules to instruct nurses, students, and other health care professionals in cardiac anatomy and functions and in fundamental electrocardiographic techniques. The first module, "Cardiac Anatomy and Physiology: A Review" by Gwen Phillips, teaches the learner to draw…

  10. Dedicated online virtual reference instruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillot, Ladonna; Stahr, Beth; Plaisance, Louise

    2005-01-01

    To facilitate nursing students' information literacy skills and enhance traditional library user services, academic librarians have developed synchronous (real-time) online virtual reference instruction in nursing research classes. The authors discuss collaborative efforts of nursing and library faculty in planning, implementing, and evaluating a discipline-specific virtual reference pilot program.

  11. Succession Planning for Library Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobel, Karen; Drewry, Josiah

    2015-01-01

    Detailed succession planning helps libraries pass information from one employee to the next. This is crucial in preparing for hiring, turnover, retirements, training of graduate teaching assistants in academic libraries, and other common situations. The authors of this article discuss succession planning for instruction programs in academic…

  12. Attrition Cost Model Instruction Manual

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanagiura, Takeshi

    2012-01-01

    This instruction manual explains in detail how to use the Attrition Cost Model program, which estimates the cost of student attrition for a state's higher education system. Programmed with SAS, this model allows users to instantly calculate the cost of attrition and the cumulative attrition rate that is based on the most recent retention and…

  13. The Basics of Blended Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Catlin R.

    2013-01-01

    Even though many of teachers do not have technology-rich classrooms, the rapidly evolving education landscape increasingly requires them to incorporate technology to customize student learning. Blended learning, with its mix of technology and traditional face-to-face instruction, is a great approach. Blended learning combines classroom learning…

  14. Market Segmentation: An Instructional Module.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Peter H.

    A concept-based introduction to market segmentation is provided in this instructional module for undergraduate and graduate transportation-related courses. The material can be used in many disciplines including engineering, business, marketing, and technology. The concept of market segmentation is primarily a transportation planning technique by…

  15. Assistant for instructional development (AID)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meer, J.P. van; Veldhuis, G.J.; Emmerik, M.L. van; Theunissen, N.C.M.

    2007-01-01

    Introduction: Due to periodical job rotation within the military, instructional developers are not always experts in their field and are consequently unaware of the types of educational concepts that are available to teach with (Jans & Frazer-Jans, 2004). These observations have led to the construct

  16. Instructional Computing: Ten Case Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hargan, Carol; Hunter, Beverly

    These case studies are written for educational institutions that wish to plan, extend, or improve their use of computers for learning and teaching. Each case study includes a brief description of each of the following: profile of the institution, history of the development of instructional computing, organization and management, student access to…

  17. Cement Mason's Curriculum. Instructional Units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendirx, Laborn J.; Patton, Bob

    To assist cement mason instructors in providing comprehensive instruction to their students, this curriculum guide treats both the skills and information necessary for cement masons in commercial and industrial construction. Ten sections are included, as follow: related information, covering orientation, safety, the history of cement, and applying…

  18. Equal Opportunity Through Instructional Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrighi, Margarite A.

    1985-01-01

    The assumption is that sex-integrated classes are inherently equal by the very fact that boys and girls are in the same class. In fact, educational inequity has increased primarily because of instructional design which perpetuates differences among individuals. Good teaching must accommodate individual differences. (MT)

  19. Instructive selection and immunological theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lederberg, Joshua

    2002-07-01

    The turning point of modern immunological theory was the advent of the clonal selection theory (Burnet, Talmage - 1957). A useful heuristic in the classification of theoretical models was the contrast of 'instructive' with 'selective' models of the acquisition of information by biological systems. The neo-Darwinian synthesis of the 1940s had consolidated biologists' model of evolution based on prior random variation and natural selection, viz. differential fecundity. While evolution in the large was by then pretty well settled, controversy remained about examples of cellular adaptation to chemical challenges, like induced drug-resistance, enzyme formation and the antibody response. While instructive theories have been on the decline, some clear cut examples can be found of molecular imprinting in the abiotic world, leading, e.g. to the production of specific sorbents. Template-driven assembly, as in DNA synthesis, has remained a paradigm of instructive specification. Nevertheless, the classification may break down with more microscopic scrutiny of the processes of molecular fit of substrates with enzymes, of monomers to an elongating polymer chain, as the reactants often traverse a state space from with activated components are appropriately selected. The same process may be 'instructive' from a holistic, 'selective' from an atomic perspective.

  20. Three Logics of Instructional Leadership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigby, Jessica G.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: This study examines conceptions of instructional leadership in the institutional environment. We know that principals' practices affect student learning and that principals are influenced by ideas in the broader environment. This article examines and defines the multiple conceptions of what it means for principals to be instructional…

  1. Instructional Coaching and Emotional Intelligence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avant, Rue Celia

    2012-01-01

    School site-based instructional coaching is a form of job-embedded professional development for teachers and an element of school reform. Coaches are hired based upon their pedagogical knowledge, content expertise, prior teaching experience, and "people skills." They are adept at handling a variety of social interactions at school sites,…

  2. Embedded Instructional Coaching: What Works

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habegger, Shelly; Hodanbosi, Philip

    2011-01-01

    How are administrators leveraging the expertise and passion in their buildings? How do they inspire enthusiasm in their teachers and improve student achievement? How do they act as an agent for change? Those are the tasks the authors are given as instructional coaches. In the beginning, they were unsure how to tackle those tasks--or even if it was…

  3. Coaching Conversations: Enacting Instructional Scaffolding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Sharan A.

    2011-01-01

    This study analyzed coaching conversations and interviews of four coach/teacher partnerships for specific ways in which kindergarten and first-grade teachers, and coaches, conceptualized instructional scaffolding for guided reading. Interview transcripts were coded for coaches' and teachers' specific hypotheses/ ideas regarding instructional…

  4. Alternative Approaches to Classroom Instruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunan, David

    1992-01-01

    Reexamines the notion of "teaching." Drawing on data from a range of classrooms, as well as from recently published teaching texts, particular attention is focused on the question: "What do we mean by teaching/instruction?" (eight references) (Author/JL)

  5. Alternative Approaches to Classroom Instruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunan, David

    1992-01-01

    Reexamines the notion of "teaching." Drawing on data from a range of classrooms, as well as from recently published teaching texts, particular attention is focused on the question: "What do we mean by teaching/instruction?" (eight references) (Author/JL)

  6. Instructional Leadership for Quality Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Dumitrascu

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available According to this study, through leadership training, school principals learn about highqualityinstruction and about actions that they can take to motivate and support their teachers. Principalsthen organize professional learning for their teachers and otherwise help teachers improve their classroompractices. With improved instruction, the theory maintains, student achievement will also improve.Thestudy objective of learning for district and school administrators is guided by a theory of action that isdepicted in Figure 1. As the figure suggests, principals play a key role in the instructional improvementprocess by setting in motion a sequence of school-level behavior changes that make for improved teachingand learning. We want to definitive the method that can be used to improve learning and we named thisprogram - Principles of Learning - this Principles are about concrete actions that professor can take to motivateand support their teachers. Principals are expected to organize professional learning for their teachersas well as to monitor teachers’' classroom practices and help them incorporate new behaviors that are inaccordance with the Principles of Learning into their instructional repertory. With improved instruction,the theory holds, student achievement will improve.

  7. Archery: Success through Classroom Instruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hensley, Ralph W.

    1982-01-01

    For maximum early success in mastering the sport of archery, the first few days of instruction should be taken in the classroom. Two positions, the grip and the anchor, which can be taught and rehearsed in the classroom, are described. (JN)

  8. Instruction: A Basis beyond Performance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagne, Robert M.

    1979-01-01

    Reviews and discusses the potential accomplishments and limitations of a performance-based method of deriving instructional content, taking into account five broad classes of learning outcomes--intellectual skills, information, cognitive strategies, attitudes, and motor skills--which are viewed as what is learned in any or all of the subjects of a…

  9. Instructional Technology: The Research Field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagne, Robert M.

    1986-01-01

    Reflects upon opportunities for research in instructional technology provided by present state of media hardware technology and educational requirements. Prospects for research in incidental learning, including learning from television, are discussed, as well as traditional learning research on intentional learning, including possibilities for…

  10. Classic writings on instructional technology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ely, Donald P.; Plomp, Tjeerd

    1996-01-01

    This paper describes the selection process of 17 articles for inclusion in the book, "Classic Writings on Instructional Technology." The book brings together original "classic" educational technology articles into one volume to document the history of the field through its literature. It is also an

  11. Putting Pow into Art Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkowitz, Jay; Packer, Todd

    2004-01-01

    How would you like to put some "Pow!" into your art instruction? A lesson in comic books--history, design, story, and production--can make your classes come alive. The authors present a new approach to using comics to build artistic skills and involve students in art appreciation. Why Comics? Many art teachers have students who say, "I hate art!"…

  12. Interior Design: Teacher's Instructional Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hays, Tricia

    This teacher's instructional guide, which is part of a family and consumer sciences education series focusing on a broad range of employment opportunities, is intended to assist teachers responsible for teaching one- and two-year interior design programs for Texas high school students. The following are among the items included: (1) introductory…

  13. Emerging Issues in Handwriting Instruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spillman, Carolyn V.; And Others

    Noting the general lack of research on handwriting instruction, a study examined hand and eye dominance, hand positions, and handwriting production of children. Subjects were 310 children from grades one through five in classrooms of regular children, mainstreamed team teaching classrooms, and self-contained gifted classes in a large elementary…

  14. New Approaches to String Instruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teaching Music, 1994

    1994-01-01

    Maintains that use of the Suzuki, Orff, and Dalcroze methods have assisted string teachers in helping music students achieve mastery from the beginning of instruction. Describes how these methods are used by five music teachers. Includes addresses of organizations that provide information about these music teaching methods. CFR)

  15. Interior Design: Teacher's Instructional Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hays, Tricia

    This teacher's instructional guide, which is part of a family and consumer sciences education series focusing on a broad range of employment opportunities, is intended to assist teachers responsible for teaching one- and two-year interior design programs for Texas high school students. The following are among the items included: (1) introductory…

  16. Health Instruction Packages: Dental Personnel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Gary E.; And Others

    Text, illustrations, and exercises are utilized in this set of four learning modules designed to instruct non-professional dental personnel in selected job-related skills. The first module, by Gary E. Hayes, describes how to locate the hinge axis point of the jaw, place and secure a bitefork, and perform a facebow transfer. The second module,…

  17. Gestalt Theory and Instructional Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Patrick; Fitz, Chad

    1993-01-01

    Offers a brief overview of Gestalt theory. Shows how six Gestalt principles (proximity, closure, symmetry, figure-ground segregation, good continuation, and similarity) can be applied to improve a reader's comprehension of a badly designed instruction module that uses several graphics. (SR)

  18. Criterion Reading Instructional Project (CRIP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linden Board of Education, NJ.

    This booklet describes the Linden Title I Program between the years 1971-1974, with a focus on the Criterion Reading Instructional Project (CRIP). The program (in Linden, New Jersey) evolved from a supplemental reading and mathematics program to a structured developmental program of language arts designed to meet the needs of primary grade…

  19. Instruction of Competent Psychomotor Skill

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Valerie Dong

    2008-01-01

    Instruction of competent psychomotor skill necessitates an eclectic approach. The principles of learning, complemented with learning styles and sensory modalities preferences, provide a background for teaching physical skills. The use of the psychomotor domain of Bloom's Taxonomy as a map and corresponding behavioral objectives foster the mastery…

  20. Effective instruction for English learners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderón, Margarita; Slavin, Robert; Sánchez, Marta

    2011-01-01

    The fastest-growing student population in U.S. schools today is children of immigrants, half of whom do not speak English fluently and are thus labeled English learners. Although the federal government requires school districts to provide services to English learners, it offers states no policies to follow in identifying, assessing, placing, or instructing them. Margarita Calderón, Robert Slavin, and Marta Sánchez identify the elements of effective instruction and review a variety of successful program models. During 2007-08, more than 5.3 million English learners made up 10.6 percent of the nation's K-12 public school enrollment. Wide and persistent achievement disparities between these English learners and English-proficient students show clearly, say the authors, that schools must address the language, literacy, and academic needs of English learners more effectively. Researchers have fiercely debated the merits of bilingual and English-only reading instruction. In elementary schools, English learners commonly receive thirty minutes of English as a Second Language (ESL) instruction but attend general education classes for the rest of the day, usually with teachers who are unprepared to teach them. Though English learners have strikingly diverse levels of skills, in high school they are typically lumped together, with one teacher to address their widely varying needs. These in-school factors contribute to the achievement disparities. Based on the studies presented here, Calderón, Slavin, and Sánchez assert that the quality of instruction is what matters most in educating English learners. They highlight comprehensive reform models, as well as individual components of these models: school structures and leadership; language and literacy instruction; integration of language, literacy, and content instruction in secondary schools; cooperative learning; professional development; parent and family support teams; tutoring; and monitoring implementation and outcomes

  1. Alternative Evaluation Designs for Data-Centered Technology-Based Geoscience Education Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zalles, D. R.

    2012-12-01

    This paper will present different strategies for how to evaluate contrasting K-12 geoscience classroom-based interventions with different goals, leveraging the first author's experiences as principal investigator of four NSF and NASA-funded geoscience education projects. Results will also be reported. Each project had its own distinctive features but all had in common the broad goal of bringing to high school classrooms uses of real place-based geospatial data to study the relationships of Earth system phenomena to climate change and sustainability. The first project's goal was to produce templates and exemplars for curriculum and assessment designs around studying contrasting geoscience topics with different data sets and forms of data representation. The project produced a near transfer performance assessment task in which students who studied climate trends in Phoenix turned their attention to climate in Chicago. The evaluation looked at the technical quality of the assessment instrument as measured by inter-rater reliability. It then analyzed the assessment results against student responses to the instructional tasks about Phoenix. The evaluation proved useful in pinpointing areas of student strength and weakness on different inquiry tasks, from simple map interpretation to analysis of contrasting claims about what the data indicate. The goal of the second project was to produce an exemplar curriculum unit that bridges Western science and traditional American Indian ecological knowledge for student learning and skill building about local environmental sustainability issues. The evaluation looked at the extent to which Western and traditional perspectives were incorporated into the design of the curriculum. The curriculum was not constructed with a separate assessment, yet evidence centered design was utilized to extrapolate from the exemplar unit templates for future instructional and assessment tasks around other places, other sustainability problems, and

  2. ATRS - A Technology-based Solution to Automobility for Wheelchair Users

    OpenAIRE

    Gao, C.; Hoffman, I.; Panzarella, T.; Spletzer, J.

    2007-01-01

    International audience; In this paper, we present the Automated Transport and Retrieval System (ATRS). ATRS represents an alternative to van conversions for automobile drivers with lower body disabilities. It employs robotics and automation technologies that integrate into a standard minivan or sport utility vehicle (SUV). At the core of ATRS is a “smart” wheelchair that navigates between the driver's position and a powered lift at the rear of the vehicle - eliminating the need for an attenda...

  3. Demonstrating Empathy: A Phenomenological Study of Instructional Designers Making Instructional Strategy Decisions for Adult Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vann, Linda S.

    2017-01-01

    Instructional designers are tasked with making instructional strategy decisions to facilitate achievement of learning outcomes as part of their professional responsibilities. While the instructional design process includes learner analysis, that analysis alone does not embody opportunities to assist instructional designers with demonstrations of…

  4. A Comparison of Traditional Classroom Instruction and Anchored Instruction with University General Education Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langone, John; Malone, D. Michael; Stecker, Pamela M.; Greene, Eric

    1998-01-01

    Effects of a traditional instructional format and technology-enhanced anchored instruction on the immediate and long-term acquisition of knowledge was evaluated with 100 university students in a special-education course. The CD-ROM-based anchored-instruction group outperformed the traditional instruction group on the multiple-choice follow-up test…

  5. A History of Instructional Design and Technology: Part I: A History of Instructional Media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiser, Robert A.

    2001-01-01

    Discusses the history of the field of instructional design and technology in the United States. Includes a definition, major features, rational for using instructional design and technology as the label for the field, history of instructional media from 1900 to the present, effects media have had on instructional practices, and the effect…

  6. The Roles of Teacher Efficacy in Instructional Innovation: Its Predictive Relations to Constructivist and Didactic Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Youyan; Tan, Gim Hoon; Liau, Albert Kienfie; Lau, Shun; Chua, Bee Leng

    2013-01-01

    Constructivist instruction has been implemented in the current instructional innovation in Singapore. Large scale survey study was conducted to examine the roles of teacher efficacy in implementing the innovative constructivist instruction. The results showed that the positive correlation between teacher efficacy and constructivist instruction was…

  7. Review--Processing Instruction and Discourse

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Chang

    2014-01-01

    This book, written by the research experts in the field of processing instruction Alessandro G.Benati and James F.Lee, informs readers of the newest development in processing instruction research and suggests the directions for the future research on processing instruction at the discourse level.

  8. Review——Processing Instruction and Discourse

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu; Chang

    2014-01-01

    This book,written by the research experts in the field of processing instruction Alessandro G.Benati and James F.Lee,informs readers of the newest development in processing instruction research and suggests the directions for the future research on processing instruction at the discourse level.

  9. Students and Instructors Opinions about Piano Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilic, Deniz Beste Çevik

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the opinions of the students and piano instructors in the Turkish Education Faculties' Fine Arts Instruction Departments' music instruction programs about piano instruction. The study data were collected using a questionnaire administered to the piano instructors and the students who took lessons from them. The study results…

  10. Looking Mother Tongue Instruction through Different Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regmi, Kapil Dev

    2008-01-01

    Mother Tongue Instruction has been a debatable issue since long. There may be two options in the medium of instruction: either to teach especially primary and preprimary schoolchildren in their own mother tongue or continue using second or foreign language as the medium of instruction. Both of the approaches bear some pros and cons. This article…

  11. 16 CFR 1204.5 - Manufacturer's instructions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Manufacturer's instructions. 1204.5 Section... Manufacturer's instructions. (a) For all antennas covered under this part 1204, the following statement shall be included in the manufacturer's instructions, in addition to the material required by 16 CFR...

  12. Distributed Instructional Leadership in High Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halverson, Richard; Clifford, Matthew

    2013-01-01

    This article explores the idea of distributed instructional leadership as a way to understand instructional leadership practice in comprehensive high schools. Our argument is that distributed leadership analyses allow researchers to uncover and explain how instructional improvement in high schools occurs through the efforts of multiple individuals…

  13. Direct Reading Instruction and the NYS ELA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones-Carey, Margaret H.

    2013-01-01

    This study analyzed the impact of classroom based reading instruction ("direct instruction") on the standardized test scores of 6th grade students as measured by the New York State English Language Arts assessment (NYS ELA). It was hypothesized that the implementation of direct instruction in reading in grade 6 would improve NYS ELA…

  14. Building Conceptual Understanding through Vocabulary Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rupley, William H.; Nichols, William Dee; Mraz, Maryann; Blair, Timothy R.

    2012-01-01

    Instructional design is an integral part of a balanced approach to teaching vocabulary instruction. This article presents several instructional procedures using research-based vocabulary strategies and explains how to design and adapt those strategies in order to reach desired learning outcomes. Emphasis is placed on research-based principles that…

  15. Audi-Tutorial Instruction in Basic Business

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Richard D.

    1974-01-01

    Results of a study in which audio-tutorial instruction was compared to illustrated lecture instruction are reported. No great differences in achievement levels in the two strategies of instruction were found. The development of such an alternative teaching strategy forces better teacher organization, leading to improvement of the illustrated…

  16. New Electronic Technologies for Facilitating Differentiated Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scalise, Kathleen

    2009-01-01

    With electronic technologies, differentiated instruction has the same meaning as in traditional instruction, but different tools are available for teachers to help students learn. Electronic technologies for differentiated instruction can add powerful new types of media inclusion, levels of interactivity, and response actions. This rapidly…

  17. 33 CFR 157.49 - Instruction manual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Instruction manual. 157.49... Vessel Operation § 157.49 Instruction manual. The master of a tank vessel shall ensure that the instruction manual under § 157.23 is available and used when the cargo or ballast systems are operated....

  18. Audi-Tutorial Instruction in Basic Business

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Richard D.

    1974-01-01

    Results of a study in which audio-tutorial instruction was compared to illustrated lecture instruction are reported. No great differences in achievement levels in the two strategies of instruction were found. The development of such an alternative teaching strategy forces better teacher organization, leading to improvement of the illustrated…

  19. On the Practice Architectures of Instructional Leadership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salo, Petri; Nylund, Jan; Stjernstrøm, Else

    2015-01-01

    This paper explores the concept of instructional leadership and principals' perceptions of the practices of instructional leadership. Despite the emphasis on the effects of school leadership regarding teaching practices and learning outcomes, research on direct instructional leadership is scarce. It is focused either on identifying overall…

  20. A Reflexive Model for Teaching Instructional Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shambaugh, Neal; Magliaro, Susan

    2001-01-01

    Documents a five-year study of two instructors who collaborated on formally studying their teaching of a master's level instructional design course. Outlines their views on learning, teaching, and instructional design (ID), describes the ID course, and explains the reflexive instructional model used, in which the teachers examined their teaching…

  1. Effective Instruction: A Mathematics Coach's Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nebesniak, Amy L.

    2012-01-01

    Effective instruction is multifaceted, dependent largely on the context and, consequently, on numerous variables. Although "effective instruction" is difficult to define, in the author's experience--and as the work of mathematics education specialists and researchers indicates--three key features of quality instruction stand out: (1) Teaching…

  2. Representing Object Colour in Language Comprehension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connell, Louise

    2007-01-01

    Embodied theories of cognition hold that mentally representing something "red" engages the neural subsystems that respond to environmental perception of that colour. This paper examines whether implicit perceptual information on object colour is represented during sentence comprehension even though doing so does not necessarily facilitate task…

  3. Paving the Way to Successful Implementation: Identifying Key Barriers to Use of Technology-Based Therapeutic Tools for Behavioral Health Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsey, Alex; Lord, Sarah; Torrey, John; Marsch, Lisa; Lardiere, Michael

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to identify barriers to use of technology for behavioral health care from the perspective of care decision makers at community behavioral health organizations. As part of a larger survey of technology readiness, 260 care decision makers completed an open-ended question about perceived barriers to use of technology. Using the Consolidated Framework for Implementation Research (CFIR), qualitative analyses yielded barrier themes related to characteristics of technology (e.g., cost and privacy), potential end users (e.g., technology literacy and attitudes about technology), organization structure and climate (e.g., budget and infrastructure), and factors external to organizations (e.g., broadband accessibility and reimbursement policies). Number of reported barriers was higher among respondents representing agencies with lower annual budgets and smaller client bases relative to higher budget, larger clientele organizations. Individual barriers were differentially associated with budget, size of client base, and geographic location. Results are discussed in light of implementation science frameworks and proactive strategies to address perceived obstacles to adoption and use of technology-based behavioral health tools.

  4. Direct Vocabulary Instruction in Preschool: A Comparison of Extended Instruction, Embedded Instruction, and Incidental Exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loftus-Rattan, Susan M.; Mitchell, Alison M.; Coyne, Michael D.

    2016-01-01

    Based on its coincidence with a significant period in language development for children, preschool provides a favorable setting to foster vocabulary growth. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of two instructional conditions and an incidental exposure condition for teaching targeted vocabulary words to preschool students…

  5. Evaluation of a Theory of Instructional Sequences for Physics Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wackermann, Rainer; Trendel, Georg; Fischer, Hans E.

    2010-05-01

    The background of the study is the theory of basis models of teaching and learning, a comprehensive set of models of learning processes which includes, for example, learning through experience and problem-solving. The combined use of different models of learning processes has not been fully investigated and it is frequently not clear under what circumstances a particular model should be used by teachers. In contrast, the theory under investigation here gives guidelines for choosing a particular model and provides instructional sequences for each model. The aim is to investigate the implementation of the theory applied to physics instruction and to show if possible effects for the students may be attributed to the use of the theory. Therefore, a theory-oriented education programme for 18 physics teachers was developed and implemented in the 2005/06 school year. The main features of the intervention consisted of coaching physics lessons and video analysis according to the theory. The study follows a pre-treatment-post design with non-equivalent control group. Findings of repeated-measures ANOVAs show large effects for teachers' subjective beliefs, large effects for classroom actions, and small to medium effects for student outcomes such as perceived instructional quality and student emotions. The teachers/classes that applied the theory especially well according to video analysis showed the larger effects. The results showed that differentiating between different models of learning processes improves physics instruction. Effects can be followed through to student outcomes. The education programme effect was clearer for classroom actions and students' outcomes than for teachers' beliefs.

  6. TRUPACT-II Operating and Maintenance Instructions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westinghouse Electric Corporation, Waste Isolation Division

    1999-12-31

    The purpose of this document is to provide the technical requirements for preparation for use, operation, inspection, and maintenance of a Transuranic Package Transporter Model II (TRUPACT-II) Shipping Package and directly related components. This document complies with the minimum requirements as specified in the TRUPACT-II Safety Analysis Report for Packaging (SARP) and Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Certificate of Compliance (C of C) 9218. In the event there is a conflict between this document and the TRUPACT-II SARP, the TRUPACT-II SARP shall govern. TRUPACT-II C of C number 9218 states, ''... each package must be prepared for shipment and operated in accordance with the procedures described in Chapter 7.0, Operating Procedures, of the application.'' It further states, ''... each package must be tested and maintained in accordance with the procedures described in Chapter 8.0, Acceptance Tests and Maintenance Program of the application.'' Chapter 9 of the TRUPACT-II SARP charges the Westinghouse Electric Corporation Waste Isolation Division (WID) with assuring that the TRUPACT-II is used in accordance with the requirements of the C of C. To meet this requirement and verify consistency of operations when loading and unloading the TRUPACT-II on the trailer, placing a payload in the packaging, unloading the payload from the packaging, or performing maintenance, the U.S. Department of Energy Carlsbad Area Office (U.S. DOE/CAO) finds it necessary to implement the changes that follow. This TRUPACT-II maintenance document represents a change to previous philosophy regarding site specific procedures for the use of the TRUPACT-II. This document details the instructions to be followed to consistently operate and maintain the TRUPACT-II. The intent of these instructions is to ensure that all users of the TRUPACT-II follow the same or equivalent instructions. Users may achieve this intent by any of the following methods: (1

  7. Basic Operational Robotics Instructional System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd, Brian Keith; Fischer, James; Falgout, Jane; Schweers, John

    2013-01-01

    The Basic Operational Robotics Instructional System (BORIS) is a six-degree-of-freedom rotational robotic manipulator system simulation used for training of fundamental robotics concepts, with in-line shoulder, offset elbow, and offset wrist. BORIS is used to provide generic robotics training to aerospace professionals including flight crews, flight controllers, and robotics instructors. It uses forward kinematic and inverse kinematic algorithms to simulate joint and end-effector motion, combined with a multibody dynamics model, moving-object contact model, and X-Windows based graphical user interfaces, coordinated in the Trick Simulation modeling environment. The motivation for development of BORIS was the need for a generic system for basic robotics training. Before BORIS, introductory robotics training was done with either the SRMS (Shuttle Remote Manipulator System) or SSRMS (Space Station Remote Manipulator System) simulations. The unique construction of each of these systems required some specialized training that distracted students from the ideas and goals of the basic robotics instruction.

  8. Remote instruction in groundwater hydrology

    Science.gov (United States)

    staff of the Interactive Remote Instructional System

    Wright State University (Dayton, Ohio) is preparing for its fourth cycle of the Interactive Remote Instructional System (IRIS) in groundwater hydrology beginning July 15, 1986. The Department of Geological Sciences proudly announces that the first two cycles recorded an impressive 83% completion ratio for registered participants. This completion rate is a significant departure from success rates traditionally recorded by courses of this nature; it is the result of 2 years of implementation and refinement and demonstrates the progressive orientation of the program. The third cycle has been underway since January. This comprehensive hydrogeology program was originally developed for the U.S. Department of Agriculture Soil Conservation Service to prepare their personnel for professional practice work. As a result of that cooperative effort, the IRIS program has evolved to meet the needs of participants by developing a curriculum that reflects current trends in the groundwater industry and has provided a unique educational approach that ensures maximum interaction between the instructional staff and participants.

  9. Inclusive Design in Assisted Instruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel ZAMFIR

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Much instruction starts with abstract representations for which learners have insufficient foundation [1]. The British Standard, BS 7000-6:2005 Guide to Managing Inclusive Design, provides a comprehensive framework that can help all private enterprises, public sector and not-for-profit organizations, build a consistent approach to inclusive design into organizational culture as well as processes [2]. While courses, technology, and student services are typically designed for the narrow range of characteristics of the average student, the practice of universal design in education (UDE considers people with a broad range of characteristics in the design of all educational products and environments [3]. This paper has been designed to provide an overview about the curriculum paradigm consisting in the fusion of the technology and the classroom instruction in economic higher education.

  10. 7 CFR 1205.20 - Representative period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Representative period. 1205.20 Section 1205.20 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (MARKETING... period means the 2006 calendar year....

  11. Enhancing policy innovation by redesigning representative democracy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Eva

    2016-01-01

    . Two Danish case studies indicate that collaboration between politicians and relevant and affected stakeholders can promote policy innovation, but also that a redesign of representative democracy is needed in order to establish a productive combination of political leadership, competition...

  12. REFractions: The Representing Equivalent Fractions Game

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Stephen I.

    2014-01-01

    Stephen Tucker presents a fractions game that addresses a range of fraction concepts including equivalence and computation. The REFractions game also improves students' fluency with representing, comparing and adding fractions.

  13. SAFETY INSTRUCTION AND SAFETY NOTE

    CERN Multimedia

    TIS Secretariat

    2002-01-01

    Please note that the SAFETY INSTRUCTION N0 49 (IS 49) and the SAFETY NOTE N0 28 (NS 28) entitled respectively 'AVOIDING CHEMICAL POLLUTION OF WATER' and 'CERN EXHIBITIONS - FIRE PRECAUTIONS' are available on the web at the following urls: http://edms.cern.ch/document/335814 and http://edms.cern.ch/document/335861 Paper copies can also be obtained from the TIS Divisional Secretariat, email: TIS.Secretariat@cern.ch

  14. Optimal Structures for Multimedia Instruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-07-01

    Pinker , Steven , Simcox, William, and Parker,Leon. Understanding Charts and Graphs: A Project in Applied Cognitive Science. Technical Report, Office of...Prancisco, CA 96503 Dr. Steven Pinker Dr. Judith Orasanu Department of Psychology Army Research Institute E1O-018 5001 Eisenhower Avenue M.I.T...understanding of the audience. Similarly, in a study of Navy instruction manuals, [ Stevens & * Steinberg 811 provide a typology of explanations which

  15. Caspar Wessel on representing complex numbers (1799)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Branner, Bodil

    1999-01-01

    In celebration of the bicentenary of the publication of Wessel's paper on the geometric interpretation of complex numbers it is decsribed how Wessel used complex numbers to represent directions in surveying, at least as early as 1787.......In celebration of the bicentenary of the publication of Wessel's paper on the geometric interpretation of complex numbers it is decsribed how Wessel used complex numbers to represent directions in surveying, at least as early as 1787....

  16. Quadratic forms representing all odd positive integers

    CERN Document Server

    Rouse, Jeremy

    2011-01-01

    We consider the problem of classifying all positive-definite integer-valued quadratic forms that represent all positive odd integers. Kaplansky considered this problem for ternary forms, giving a list of 23 candidates, and proving that 19 of those represent all positive odds. (Jagy later dealt with a 20th candidate.) Assuming that the remaining three forms represent all positive odds, we prove that an arbitrary, positive-definite quadratic form represents all positive odds if and only if it represents the odd numbers from 1 up to 451. This result is analogous to Bhargava and Hanke's celebrated 290-theorem. In addition, we prove that these three remaining ternaries represent all positive odd integers, assuming the generalized Riemann hypothesis. This result is made possible by a new analytic method for bounding the cusp constants of integer-valued quaternary quadratic forms $Q$ with fundamental discriminant. This method is based on the analytic properties of Rankin-Selberg $L$-functions, and we use it to prove...

  17. Integrating Environmental Education With Beginning Reading and Phonics Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolsem, Anne M.

    The practice of integrating methods of instruction shows signs of promise as teachers seek new ways to raise student achievement. Although researchers have focused on the efficacy of environment-based education, little research has been done to investigate a framework for integration. The research question that guided this case study was designed to explore the instructional practices teachers employ to integrate environmental education with beginning reading and phonics instruction. The conceptual framework is based on the seminal idea of using the environment as an integrating context, which postulates that the natural world becomes the overarching theme for teaching and learning. Data were obtained through interviews and lesson observations using a purposeful sample of 4 kindergarten and first grade teacher participants. A focus group interview also included the on-site naturalist. Inductive data analysis was used to discover categories and themes. Findings indicated that teachers integrate instruction primarily in the areas of vocabulary and writing after purposeful planning, collaboration, and a deep understanding of broader student goals. Findings also specified that teachers' integration strategies represent a combination of who the teachers are, what they believe, and what action they take in the classroom. Site-specific recommendations for action include ongoing professional development for teachers and support staff, time for collaboration, and review of teacher personal beliefs. Implications for social change include reflection and improvement of practice by teachers at the study site, as well as continued evaluation and discussion about teaching practices and teacher roles leading to more cohesive, enriching integrated instruction rooted in authentic, place-based experiences.

  18. Constraints experienced by female students pursuing science and technology-based university programmes in their learning of science in Ghana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwaku Darko Amponsah

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper is part of a larger study to investigate female students in science and technology-based university (STU programs in their motivation, perception and constraint in learning science at senior high school and consequently science and technology-based programs at the university level. The conceptual framework is rooted in Steele’s concept of stereotype threat, which is the experience of anxiety or concern in a situation where a person has the potential to confirm a negative stereotype about their social group. The investigation was conducted among 328 final year female students pursuing engineering, medicine, pharmacy and computer science/ICT at Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology (KNUST, Kumasi, Ghana. The study utilized cross-sectional descriptive survey design. 328 final year female students in the 2008/2009 academic year pursuing engineering, medicine, pharmacy and computer science/ICT formed the sample. A Self-Report Survey Questionnaire on constraints female students experience in their learning of science was designed and administered. This study indicated that female students have to grapple with some challenges such as lack of funding, and the unavailability or expensive nature of some textbooks. One-way between group analysis of variance (ANOVA and Hotchberg GT2 Post hoc analyses indicated that there were significant differences in constraints among some of the four groups of students. It was concluded that Government and other stakeholders should provide funding, scholarships or bursaries to female students in order to enhance their full participation. These challenges may account in part to the low participation of females in science and technology-based programs.

  19. [Identification of special quality eggs with NIR spectroscopy technology based on symbol entropy feature extraction method].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yong; Hong, Wen-Xue

    2011-11-01

    Fast, nondestructive and accurate identification of special quality eggs is an urgent problem. The present paper proposed a new feature extraction method based on symbol entropy to identify near infrared spectroscopy of special quality eggs. The authors selected normal eggs, free range eggs, selenium-enriched eggs and zinc-enriched eggs as research objects and measured the near-infrared diffuse reflectance spectra in the range of 12 000-4 000 cm(-1). Raw spectra were symbolically represented with aggregation approximation algorithm and symbolic entropy was extracted as feature vector. An error-correcting output codes multiclass support vector machine classifier was designed to identify the spectrum. Symbolic entropy feature is robust when parameter changed and the highest recognition rate reaches up to 100%. The results show that the identification method of special quality eggs using near-infrared is feasible and the symbol entropy can be used as a new feature extraction method of near-infrared spectra.

  20. Technology-based intervention for healthy lifestyle promotion in Italian adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraticelli, Federica; Marchetti, Daniela; Polcini, Francesco; Mohn, Angelika Anna; Chiarelli, Francesco; Fulcheri, Mario; Vitacolonna, Ester

    2016-01-01

    Healthy lifestyle promotion programs are essential to prevent metabolic diseases such as obesity and diabetes. Adolescents could represent the ideal target population especially using serious web games. To test the improvement of knowledge about healthy nutrition in adolescents and to analyze participants' enjoyment in playing the web game "Gustavo in Gnam's Planet" in comparison with a leisure web game. Sixty-five adolescents were engaged in three supervised group sessions. Measures about healthy food knowledge and games' enjoyment were collected during the three stages of assessment. After playing Gustavo in Gnam's Planet, participants significantly improved their knowledge on a healthy diet, compared to the recreational web games; whereas the level of fun experienced while playing the recreational and the educational games was not significantly different. Gustavo in Gnam's Planet is an important promising tool, with entertainment property, to promote a healthy lifestyle in Italian adolescents.

  1. Hierarchical QSAR technology based on the Simplex representation of molecular structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuz'min, V E; Artemenko, A G; Muratov, E N

    2008-01-01

    This article is about the hierarchical quantitative structure-activity relationship technology (HiT QSAR) based on the Simplex representation of molecular structure (SiRMS) and its application for different QSAR/QSP(property)R tasks. The essence of this technology is a sequential solution (with the use of the information obtained on the previous steps) to the QSAR problem by the series of enhanced models of molecular structure description [from one dimensional (1D) to four dimensional (4D)]. It is a system of permanently improved solutions. In the SiRMS approach, every molecule is represented as a system of different simplexes (tetratomic fragments with fixed composition, structure, chirality and symmetry). The level of simplex descriptors detailing increases consecutively from the 1D to 4D representation of the molecular structure. The advantages of the approach reported here are the absence of "molecular alignment" problems, consideration of different physical-chemical properties of atoms (e.g. charge, lipophilicity, etc.), the high adequacy and good interpretability of obtained models and clear ways for molecular design. The efficiency of the HiT QSAR approach is demonstrated by comparing it with the most popular modern QSAR approaches on two representative examination sets. The examples of successful application of the HiT QSAR for various QSAR/QSPR investigations on the different levels (1D-4D) of the molecular structure description are also highlighted. The reliability of developed QSAR models as predictive virtual screening tools and their ability to serve as the base of directed drug design was validated by subsequent synthetic and biological experiments, among others. The HiT QSAR is realized as a complex of computer programs known as HIT QSAR: software that also includes a powerful statistical block and a number of useful utilities.

  2. Hierarchical QSAR technology based on the Simplex representation of molecular structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuz'min, V. E.; Artemenko, A. G.; Muratov, E. N.

    2008-06-01

    This article is about the hierarchical quantitative structure-activity relationship technology (HiT QSAR) based on the Simplex representation of molecular structure (SiRMS) and its application for different QSAR/QSP(property)R tasks. The essence of this technology is a sequential solution (with the use of the information obtained on the previous steps) to the QSAR problem by the series of enhanced models of molecular structure description [from one dimensional (1D) to four dimensional (4D)]. It is a system of permanently improved solutions. In the SiRMS approach, every molecule is represented as a system of different simplexes (tetratomic fragments with fixed composition, structure, chirality and symmetry). The level of simplex descriptors detailing increases consecutively from the 1D to 4D representation of the molecular structure. The advantages of the approach reported here are the absence of "molecular alignment" problems, consideration of different physical-chemical properties of atoms (e.g. charge, lipophilicity, etc.), the high adequacy and good interpretability of obtained models and clear ways for molecular design. The efficiency of the HiT QSAR approach is demonstrated by comparing it with the most popular modern QSAR approaches on two representative examination sets. The examples of successful application of the HiT QSAR for various QSAR/QSPR investigations on the different levels (1D-4D) of the molecular structure description are also highlighted. The reliability of developed QSAR models as predictive virtual screening tools and their ability to serve as the base of directed drug design was validated by subsequent synthetic and biological experiments, among others. The HiT QSAR is realized as a complex of computer programs known as HiT QSAR software that also includes a powerful statistical block and a number of useful utilities.

  3. Service quality and perceived value of technology-based service encounters: evaluation of clinical staff satisfaction in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Chung-Jye; Chang, Hsin Hsin; Eng, Cheng Joo; Wong, Kit Hong

    2013-01-01

    Previous research has evaluated technology-based service encounters (TBSEs) in the delivery of health care by assessing patient satisfaction. This study examined service quality and perceived value of TBSEs used in health organisations from the perspective of clinical staff, with staff technology readiness as a moderator. A quantitative survey was conducted in Taiwan, across private and public healthcare organisations. Results showed that TBSEs had a direct effect on service quality and perceived value, which in turn had a direct effect on staff satisfaction in using TBSEs. However, service quality had no effect on perceived value when moderated by technology readiness. Theoretical and managerial implications of these findings are discussed.

  4. 3D printing technology based on two-photon polymerization%双光子聚合3D打印

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋晓艳; 邢金峰

    2015-01-01

    3D 打印是一种快速成型的增材制造技术.光固化立体印刷(SLA)是技术较成熟和应用较广的一种 3D 打印技术.SLA 是采用紫外激光的单光子聚合过程,其加工分辨率受经典光学衍射极限的限制,难以满足分辨率高的微纳结构的加工.不同于 SLA,利用近红外波长飞秒激光的双光子聚合 3D 打印技术可以突破经典光学衍射的限制,制造分辨率高的纳米尺度任意形状三维结构.本文将介绍双光子吸收和双光子聚合的原理、双光子聚合的发展和双光子聚合 3D 打印技术的应用,最后对该技术的发展进行展望.%3D printing is a rapid prototyping technology based on an additive process. Stereolithography (SLA) as a mature 3D printing technology has been widely applied in industrial manufacture. SLA is the process of single-photon polymerization (SPP), and its resolution is controlled by the optical diffraction limit, which cannot meet the requirement for three dimensional micro/nanostructures with high resolution. Unlike SLA, 3D printing technology based on two-photon polymerization (TPP) induced by a near-infrared femtosecond laser can fabricate arbitrary and ultraprecise 3D microstructures with high resolution not only on the microscopic scale but also on the nanoscale. In this review, the principles of two-photon absorption and TPP were concisely explained. The development of TPP mainly focusing on TPP resolution and TPP initiators were introduced as well as the applications of 3D printing technology based on TPP. Finally, the perspective of 3D printing technology based on TPP was proposed.

  5. Application of confocal technology based on polycapillary X-ray optics in three-dimensional diffraction scanning analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Tianxi, E-mail: stxbeijing@163.com [The Key Laboratory of Beam Technology and Materials Modification of the Ministry of Education, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); College of Nuclear Science and Technology, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); Beijing Radiation Center, Beijing 100875 (China); Liu, Hehe; Liu, Zhiguo; Peng, Song [The Key Laboratory of Beam Technology and Materials Modification of the Ministry of Education, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); College of Nuclear Science and Technology, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); Beijing Radiation Center, Beijing 100875 (China); Ma, Yongzhong [Center for Disease Control and Prevention of Beijing, Beijing 100013 (China); Sun, Weiyuan; Luo, Ping; Ding, Xunliang [The Key Laboratory of Beam Technology and Materials Modification of the Ministry of Education, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); College of Nuclear Science and Technology, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); Beijing Radiation Center, Beijing 100875 (China)

    2014-03-15

    The confocal technology based on a polycapillary focusing X-ray lens in the excitation channel and a polycapillary parallel X-ray lens in the detection channel was used to perform three-dimensional energy dispersive X-ray diffraction scanning analysis of a copper film on a silicon substrate. A theoretical model of correcting the intensity of the diffracted X-rays from different parts of the sample in the confocal volume was designed. The point-to-point 3D diffraction information of the sample was obtained.

  6. Do regional climate models represent regional climate?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maraun, Douglas; Widmann, Martin

    2014-05-01

    When using climate change scenarios - either from global climate models or further downscaled - to assess localised real world impacts, one has to ensure that the local simulation indeed correctly represents the real world local climate. Representativeness has so far mainly been discussed as a scale issue: simulated meteorological variables in general represent grid box averages, whereas real weather is often expressed by means of point values. As a result, in particular simulated extreme values are not directly comparable with observed local extreme values. Here we argue that the issue of representativeness is more general. To illustrate this point, assume the following situations: first, the (GCM or RCM) simulated large scale weather, e.g., the mid-latitude storm track, might be systematically distorted compared to observed weather. If such a distortion at the synoptic scale is strong, the simulated local climate might be completely different from the observed. Second, the orography even of high resolution RCMs is only a coarse model of true orography. In particular in mountain ranges the simulated mesoscale flow might therefore considerably deviate from the observed flow, leading to systematically displaced local weather. In both cases, the simulated local climate does not represent observed local climate. Thus, representativeness also encompasses representing a particular location. We propose to measure this aspect of representativeness for RCMs driven with perfect boundary conditions as the correlation between observations and simulations at the inter-annual scale. In doing so, random variability generated by the RCMs is largely averaged out. As an example, we assess how well KNMIs RACMO2 RCM at 25km horizontal resolution represents winter precipitation in the gridded E-OBS data set over the European domain. At a chosen grid box, RCM precipitation might not be representative of observed precipitation, in particular in the rain shadow of major moutain ranges

  7. Instructional Support for the Teaching of Critical Thinking: Looking Beyond the Red Brick Walls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nancy Bowers

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Many instructors appreciate the importance of developing the critical thinking skills of their students yet are unfamiliar with pedagogical approaches for teaching critical thinking. These instructors rely on instructional support from teaching and learning centers or online resources. It can be time consuming, however, for instructors to translate generic teaching strategies into actual lessons related to their course content. The purpose of this paper is to review an under-utilized source of discipline-specific instructional resources for teaching critical thinking: professional organizations. Many national organizations support education within their discipline by providing a variety of instructional materials, pedagogical approaches and a venue for sharing teaching tips and lessons by their members. Hundreds of professional organizations across dozens of disciplines were examined to determine the types of instructional support provided. Representative teaching resources from these organizations are documented from a variety of disciplinary areas.

  8. Multi-materials drop-on-demand inkjet technology based on pneumatic diaphragm actuator

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Micro-droplet jetting belongs to the field of precision fluid dispensing techniques.Unlike traditional subtraction manufacture process,micro-droplet jetting as an additive fabrication technique with features of non-contact and data-driven represents a new development trend of modern manufacturing process.In this paper,the design,fabrication and performance of a multi-materials drop-on-demand (DOD) inkjet system based on pneumatic diaphragm actuator were described.For capturing the droplet ejection process and measuring the droplet dimension,a self-made in situ imaging system based on time delayed external trigger was set up.The performance of the generator was studied by adjusting the structure and control parameters.Furthermore,the influence of fluid properties on the droplet ejection process was experimentally investigated.Micro-solderballs of 160.5 μm in diameter and UV curing adhesive micro-bumps of 346.94 μm in contact diameter with the substrate were produced.The results demonstrated that the DOD inkjet generator possesses characteristics of robust,easy to operate and maintain,and able to withstand high temperature as well as applicability to a wide variety of materials including polymers,low melting point resin and high melting point metal.The system has a great potential of being used in the fields of IC and MEMS packaging,3D printing,organic semiconductor fabrication,and biological and chemical analysis.

  9. Representative Democracy in Australian Local Government

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colin Hearfield

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In an assessment of representative democracy in Australian local government, this paper considers long-run changes in forms of political representation, methods of vote counting, franchise arrangements, numbers of local government bodies and elected representatives, as well as the thorny question of constitutional recognition. This discussion is set against the background of ongoing tensions between the drive for economic efficiency and the maintenance of political legitimacy, along with more deep-seated divisions emerging from the legal relationship between local and state governments and the resultant problems inherent in local government autonomy versus state intervention.

  10. Representative Sampling for reliable data analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Lars; Esbensen, Kim Harry

    2005-01-01

    The Theory of Sampling (TOS) provides a description of all errors involved in sampling of heterogeneous materials as well as all necessary tools for their evaluation, elimination and/or minimization. This tutorial elaborates on—and illustrates—selected central aspects of TOS. The theoretical...... regime in order to secure the necessary reliability of: samples (which must be representative, from the primary sampling onwards), analysis (which will not mean anything outside the miniscule analytical volume without representativity ruling all mass reductions involved, also in the laboratory) and data...

  11. Representing Context in Hypermedia Data Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Frank Allan

    2005-01-01

    As computers and software systems move beyond the desktopand into the physical environments we live and workin, the systems are required to adapt to these environmentsand the activities taking place within them. Making applicationscontext-aware and representing context informationalong side...... application data can be a challenging task. Thispaper describes how digital context traditionally has beenrepresented in hypermedia data models and how this representationcan scale to also represent physical context. TheHyCon framework and data model, designed for the developmentof mobile context...

  12. Representing uncertainty on model analysis plots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Trevor I.

    2016-12-01

    Model analysis provides a mechanism for representing student learning as measured by standard multiple-choice surveys. The model plot contains information regarding both how likely students in a particular class are to choose the correct answer and how likely they are to choose an answer consistent with a well-documented conceptual model. Unfortunately, Bao's original presentation of the model plot did not include a way to represent uncertainty in these measurements. I present details of a method to add error bars to model plots by expanding the work of Sommer and Lindell. I also provide a template for generating model plots with error bars.

  13. Representative Sampling for reliable data analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Lars; Esbensen, Kim Harry

    2005-01-01

    regime in order to secure the necessary reliability of: samples (which must be representative, from the primary sampling onwards), analysis (which will not mean anything outside the miniscule analytical volume without representativity ruling all mass reductions involved, also in the laboratory) and data...... analysis (“data” do not exist in isolation of their provenance). The Total Sampling Error (TSE) is by far the dominating contribution to all analytical endeavours, often 100+ times larger than the Total Analytical Error (TAE).We present a summarizing set of only seven Sampling Unit Operations (SUOs...

  14. Dignity and Deferral Narratives as Strategies in Facilitated Technology-Based Support Groups for People with Advanced Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annette F. Street

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the value of facilitated telephone and online support groups for palliative care. Telephone interviews were conducted with twenty people living with advanced cancer who had participated in either a telephone or online support group facilitated by the Cancer Council Victoria, Melbourne, Australia. Two dominant participant narratives emerged: a focus on dying with dignity or an interest in deferring discussion of death and dying to focus on the present. Despite the different approaches, participants found the technology-based support groups to be accessible and safe environments in which to discuss difficult topics in privacy. Technology-based strategies provide opportunities for health professionals to provide social and emotional care to more people by moving beyond individualised care and facilitate peer-to-peer support at the end of life, especially to those with specific needs. Such options are feasible for palliative care services to set up and acceptable to a group of clients, especially for younger clients or those socially or geographically isolated.

  15. Performances for confocal X-ray diffraction technology based on polycapillary slightly focusing X-ray optics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Hehe; Liu, Zhiguo [The Key Laboratory of Beam Technology and Materials Modification of the Ministry of Education, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); College of Nuclear Science and Technology, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); Beijing Radiation Center, Beijing 100875 (China); Sun, Tianxi, E-mail: stxbeijing@163.com [The Key Laboratory of Beam Technology and Materials Modification of the Ministry of Education, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); College of Nuclear Science and Technology, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); Beijing Radiation Center, Beijing 100875 (China); Peng, Song [The Key Laboratory of Beam Technology and Materials Modification of the Ministry of Education, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); College of Nuclear Science and Technology, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); Beijing Radiation Center, Beijing 100875 (China); Ma, Yongzhong [Center for Disease Control and Prevention of Beijing, Beijing 100013 (China); Sun, Weiyuan; Li, Yude; Lin, Xiaoyan; Zhao, Weigang; Zhao, Guangcui; Luo, Ping; Pan, Qiuli; Ding, Xunliang [The Key Laboratory of Beam Technology and Materials Modification of the Ministry of Education, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); College of Nuclear Science and Technology, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); Beijing Radiation Center, Beijing 100875 (China)

    2013-09-21

    The confocal X-ray diffraction (XRD) technology based on a polycapillary slightly focusing X-ray lens (PSFXRL) in excitation channel and a polycapillary parallel X-ray lens (PPXRL) with a long input focal distance in detection channel was developed. The output focal spot of the PSFXRL and the input focal spot of the PPXRL were adjusted in confocal configuration, and only the X-rays from the volume overlapped by these foci could be accordingly detected. This confocal configuration was helpful in decreasing background. The convergence of the beam focused by the PSFXRL and divergence of the beam which could be collected by the PPXRL with a long input focal distance were both about 9 mrad at 8 keV. This was helpful in improving the resolution of lattice spacing of this confocal XRD technology. The gain in power density of such PSFXRL and PPXRL was about 120 and 7 at 11 keV, respectively, which was helpful in using the low power source to perform XRD analysis efficiently. The performances of this confocal XRD technology were provided, and some common plastics were analyzed. The experimental results demonstrated that the confocal diffraction technology base on polycapillary slightly focusing X-ray optics had wide potential applications.

  16. Participatory Research as One Piece of the Puzzle: A Systematic Review of Consumer Involvement in Design of Technology-Based Youth Mental Health and Well-Being Interventions

    OpenAIRE

    Orlowski, Simone; Lawn, Sharon; Venning, Anthony; Winsall, Megan; Jones, Gabrielle M; Wyld, Kaisha; Damarell, Raechel A; Antezana, Gaston; Schrader, Geoffrey; Smith, David; Collin, Philippa; Bidargaddi, Niranjan

    2015-01-01

    Background Despite the potential of technology-based mental health interventions for young people, limited uptake and/or adherence is a significant challenge. It is thought that involving young people in the development and delivery of services designed for them leads to better engagement. Further research is required to understand the role of participatory approaches in design of technology-based mental health and well-being interventions for youth. Objective To investigate consumer involvem...

  17. Learning procedures from interactive natural language instructions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huffman, Scott B.; Laird, John E.

    1994-01-01

    Despite its ubiquity in human learning, very little work has been done in artificial intelligence on agents that learn from interactive natural language instructions. In this paper, the problem of learning procedures from interactive, situated instruction is examined in which the student is attempting to perform tasks within the instructional domain, and asks for instruction when it is needed. Presented is Instructo-Soar, a system that behaves and learns in response to interactive natural language instructions. Instructo-Soar learns completely new procedures from sequences of instruction, and also learns how to extend its knowledge of previously known procedures to new situations. These learning tasks require both inductive and analytic learning. Instructo-Soar exhibits a multiple execution learning process in which initial learning has a rote, episodic flavor, and later executions allow the initially learned knowledge to be generalized properly.

  18. Instructions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    Animal Husbandry and Feed Science(ISSN 1943-9911)is an academic journal sponsored by Wu Chu(USA-China)Science and Culture Media Co.(USA).It was first published in 2009.The journal is published bimonthly to report basic theory and applied research about animal husbandry,veterinary,aquaculture,feed science and other related fields,including aspects of genetics and breeding,reproduction,physiology,biochemistry,nutrition,

  19. An information communication technology based approach for the acquisition of critical thinking skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pucer, Patrik; Trobec, Irena; Žvanut, Boštjan

    2014-06-01

    Both academics and practitioners agree that critical thinking skills are necessary to provide safe and comprehensive nursing care. In order to promote the development of critical thinking, nurse educators need to keep the teaching/learning process captivating and interesting using active learning environments. These can be implemented by using modern information and communication technologies that are simple, fun, and time and cost effective. The goal of our study was to design and test an approach, which allows individual and fast acquisition of critical thinking skills with the use of information and communication technology. A combination of qualitative and quantitative research design was implemented. The study consisted of a quasi-experiment (phases 1-3): (1) pre-test discussion board, (2) use of e-contents based on the presented approach, and (3) post-test discussion board. The participants' opinion about the presented approach was identified in phase 4. The study was performed in May 2012 during the course "Ethics and Philosophy in Nursing" at the Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Primorska, Slovenia. Forty first-year undergraduate nursing students. Qualitative analysis of the discussion boards (phases 1, 3) and an anonymous survey with open- and closed-ended questions (phase 4). Qualitative analysis of the discussion boards showed a significant (pposts (12.2%) for which the opinions and conclusions of the participants were justified with valid arguments. The survey results indicated that participants perceived the e-contents based on the presented approach as useful, and that they improved their critical thinking skills. Repeated confirmation of the validity of the presented approach through methodological triangulation represents a strong indication that the presented approach is a valuable tool to develop nursing students' critical thinking skills. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Attributes Heeded When Representing an Osmosis Problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuckerman, June Trop

    Eighteen high school science students were involved in a study to determine what attributes in the problem statement they need when representing a typical osmosis problem. In order to realize this goal students were asked to solve problems aloud and to explain their answers. Included as a part of the results are the attributes that the students…

  1. A Framework for Representing Moving Objects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Becker, Ludger; Blunck, Henrik; Hinrichs, Klaus

    2004-01-01

    We present a framework for representing the trajectories of moving objects and the time-varying results of operations on moving objects. This framework supports the realization of discrete data models of moving objects databases, which incorporate representations of moving objects based on non-li...

  2. 26 CFR 601.502 - Recognized representative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    .... 230; (4) Enrolled actuary. Any individual who is enrolled as an actuary by and is in active status with the Joint Board for the Enrollment of Actuaries pursuant to 29 U.S.C. 1242. (5) Other individuals... actuaries, and others); (3) I am authorized to represent the taxpayer(s) identified in the power of...

  3. Developing Creativity and Abstraction in Representing Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    South, Andy

    2012-01-01

    Creating charts and graphs is all about visual abstraction: the process of representing aspects of data with imagery that can be interpreted by the reader. Children may need help making the link between the "real" and the image. This abstraction can be achieved using symbols, size, colour and position. Where the representation is close to what…

  4. Scaffolding Instruction on Business English Writing Teaching

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邱迪

    2014-01-01

    The scaffolding instruction is to help students probe into knowledge learning independently, and achieve the construction of knowledge and information finally by constructing a series of appropriate conceptual frameworks and concrete teaching circumstances. This instruction has been extensively applied and has been proved to be very effective in teaching in western countries. But in China very few empirical studies have been carried out on the scaffolding instruction, especial y in the field of teaching Business English writing.

  5. Exploring Instruction Cache Analysis - On Arm

    OpenAIRE

    Svedenborg, Stian Valentin

    2014-01-01

    This thesis explores the challenges of implementing an instruction cache side-channel attack on an ARM platform. The information leakage through the instruction cache is formally discussed using information theoretic metrics. A successful Prime+Probe instruction cache side-channel attack against RSA is presented, recovering 967/1024 secret key bits by observing a single decryption using a synchronous spy process. Furthermore, an unsuccessful attempt is made at decoupling the spy from the vict...

  6. The effects of video modeling with voiceover instruction on accurate implementation of discrete-trial instruction

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Vladescu, Jason C; Carroll, Regina; Paden, Amber; Kodak, Tiffany M

    2012-01-01

    ...) with voiceover instruction to train staff to implement discrete-trial instruction (DTI). After staff trainees reached the mastery criterion when teaching an adult confederate with VM, they taught a child with a developmental disability using DTI...

  7. From Flowers to Fruits: How Children's Books Represent Plant Reproduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schussler, Elisabeth E.

    2008-01-01

    Children's trade books about science may be playing an increasing role in science instruction; however, the potential effects on student learning are unknown. To investigate whether a subset of books would be appropriate for classroom instruction about a specific science topic (plant reproduction), a selection of children's books about plants was…

  8. Effects of Instruction and Stage-Fright on Intelligence Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meijer, Joost; Oostdam, Ron

    2011-01-01

    In the present research, it was tried to unravel the influence of various types of instruction on test anxiety levels and, in turn, its influence on intelligence test performance. Three types of instruction were compared: a stressful, achievement-orientated instruction; a reassuring, task-orientated instruction; and an ambiguous instruction.…

  9. Effects of Instruction and Stage-Fright on Intelligence Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meijer, Joost; Oostdam, Ron

    2011-01-01

    In the present research, it was tried to unravel the influence of various types of instruction on test anxiety levels and, in turn, its influence on intelligence test performance. Three types of instruction were compared: a stressful, achievement-orientated instruction; a reassuring, task-orientated instruction; and an ambiguous instruction.…

  10. Archery: A Planning Guide for Group and Individual Instruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Association for Health, Physical Education, and Recreation, Washington, DC.

    This instructor's manual for group or individual instruction in archery includes line drawings as illustrations. The manual advances from facilities to beginning instruction and general instructional practices (safety tips, instructional aids, archery etiquette) to intermediate instruction (discussions of causes of faulty arrow flight, analysis of…

  11. Computer Assisted Instruction (CAI): A Partner for PI?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, John S.; Tillman, Murray

    1982-01-01

    Discusses differences between computer-delivered instruction and print-delivered instruction and the importance of the role of the instructional design process when adapting traditional teaching materials to newer media. The use of authoring systems for preparing materials and computer-managed instruction as a support for programed instruction are…

  12. Modified Cognitive Strategy Instruction: An Expository Writing Strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzel-Ozmen, Ruya

    2009-01-01

    In this article, modified cognitive strategy instruction in writing (CSIW), a cognitive strategy instructional model is described. Modified CSIW was designed based on two effective instructional models: cognitive strategy instruction in writing (CSIW) and self-regulated strategy development (SRSD). Modified CSIW provides tailored instruction to…

  13. Tutorial Instruction in Science Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rhea Miles

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the study is to examine the tutorial practices of in-service teachers to address the underachievement in the science education of K-12 students. Method: In-service teachers in Virginia and North Carolina were given a survey questionnaire to examine how they tutored students who were in need of additional instruction. Results: When these teachers were asked, “How do you describe a typical one-on-one science tutorial session?” the majority of their responses were categorized as teacher-directed. Many of the teachers would provide a science tutorial session for a student after school for 16-30 minutes, one to three times a week. Respondents also indicated they would rely on technology, peer tutoring, scientific inquiry, or themselves for one-on-one science instruction. Over half of the in-service teachers that responded to the questionnaire stated that they would never rely on outside assistance, such as a family member or an after school program to provide tutorial services in science. Additionally, very few reported that they incorporated the ethnicity, culture, or the native language of ELL students into their science tutoring sessions.

  14. How Much English Language Arts and Mathematics Instruction Do Students Receive? Investigating Variation in Instructional Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phelps, Geoffrey; Corey, Douglas; DeMonte, Jenny; Harrison, Delena; Loewenberg Ball, Deborah

    2012-01-01

    The amount of instruction students receive has long been viewed as a foundational educational resource. This article presents an analysis of the time students spend in elementary English language arts (ELA) and mathematics instruction. In mathematics, the average student received about 140 hr of instruction, but students in the top sixth of…

  15. Addressing the Missing Instructional Data Problem: Using a Teacher Log to Document Tier 1 Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurz, Alexander; Elliott, Stephen N.; Roach, Andrew T.

    2015-01-01

    Response-to-intervention (RTI) systems posit that Tier 1 consists of high-quality general classroom instruction using evidence-based methods to address the needs of most students. However, data on the extent to which general education teachers provide such instruction are rarely collected. This missing instructional data problem may result in RTI…

  16. Elementary Students' Retention of Environmental Science Knowledge: Connected Science Instruction versus Direct Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upadhyay, Bhaskar; DeFranco, Cristina

    2008-01-01

    This study compares 3rd-grade elementary students' gain and retention of science vocabulary over time in two different classes--"connected science instruction" versus "direct instruction." Data analysis yielded that students who received connected science instruction showed less gain in science knowledge in the short term compared to students who…

  17. Instructed Pragmatics at a Glance: Where Instructional Studies Were, Are, and Should Be Going

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taguchi, Naoko

    2015-01-01

    This paper brings together the research and developments of instructed pragmatics over the past three decades by reporting the synthesis findings of instructional intervention studies in interlanguage pragmatics. Two questions have guided this investigation: (1) is instruction effective in learning pragmatics?; and (2) what methods are most…

  18. Learning, Lecture, and Programmed Instruction Text: An Experiment in Bibliographic Instruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suprenant, Thomas T.

    1982-01-01

    Results of a study of college freshmen using a bibliographic instruction model that considers interaction of library tools, styles of instruction, and Robert M. Gagne's Learning Hierarchy indicate a superiority of programed instruction at factual and problem-solving levels, and also a need for further experimentation. Eight references are…

  19. Instructed Pragmatics at a Glance: Where Instructional Studies Were, Are, and Should Be Going

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taguchi, Naoko

    2015-01-01

    This paper brings together the research and developments of instructed pragmatics over the past three decades by reporting the synthesis findings of instructional intervention studies in interlanguage pragmatics. Two questions have guided this investigation: (1) is instruction effective in learning pragmatics?; and (2) what methods are most…

  20. Individualizing Student Instruction Precisely: Effects of Child x Instruction Interactions on First Graders' Literacy Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connor, Carol McDonald; Piasta, Shayne B.; Fishman, Barry; Glasney, Stephanie; Schatschneider, Christopher; Crowe, Elizabeth; Underwood, Phyllis; Morrison, Frederick J.

    2009-01-01

    Recent findings demonstrate that the most effective reading instruction may vary with children's language and literacy skills. These Child x Instruction interactions imply that individualizing instruction would be a potent strategy for improving students' literacy. A cluster-randomized control field trial, conducted in 10 high-moderate poverty…

  1. Using Heuristic Task Analysis to Create Web-Based Instructional Design Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiester, Herbert R.

    2010-01-01

    The first purpose of this study was to identify procedural and heuristic knowledge used when creating web-based instruction. The second purpose of this study was to develop suggestions for improving the Heuristic Task Analysis process, a technique for eliciting, analyzing, and representing expertise in cognitively complex tasks. Three expert…

  2. Literature Review of Faculty-Perceived Usefulness of Instructional Technology in Classroom Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salas, Alexandra

    2016-01-01

    This article provides a literature review of the research concerning the role of faculty perspectives about instructional technology. Learning management systems, massive open online courses (MOOCs), cloud-based multimedia applications, and mobile apps represent the tools and the language of academia in the 21st century. Research examined…

  3. Using Heuristic Task Analysis to Create Web-Based Instructional Design Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiester, Herbert R.

    2010-01-01

    The first purpose of this study was to identify procedural and heuristic knowledge used when creating web-based instruction. The second purpose of this study was to develop suggestions for improving the Heuristic Task Analysis process, a technique for eliciting, analyzing, and representing expertise in cognitively complex tasks. Three expert…

  4. Experts' Views on Using History and Philosophy of Science in the Practice of Physics Instruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galili, Igal; Hazan, Amnon

    2001-01-01

    Examines the views of a representative sample of experts in physics, physics education, and history and philosophy of science (HPS) on the incorporation of HPS-based materials in physics instruction. Reports on three areas: (1) the rationale to include HPS; (2) the most appropriate ways of doing so; and (3) anticipated difficulties with such a new…

  5. Discourse Synthesis, Analysis and Their Application to CAI (Computer Assisted Instruction).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Stanley Y. W.; Moore, Robert L.

    This paper deals with the computer's production and recognition of sentences in a connected discourse and its application to computer assisted instruction. Studies of textual properties in real discourses have been carried out at the paragraph level. The theoretical concepts of representing paragraph content in terms of (1) the factual data…

  6. Acquisition and Generalization of Chained Tasks Taught with Computer Based Video Instruction to Children with Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayres, Kevin M.; Maguire, Amy; McClimon, Desiree

    2009-01-01

    Three elementary aged students with autism participated in an evaluation of computer based video instruction that targeted functional life skills. The effects of the software were analyzed in the context of a multiple probe design across and replicated across participants. This study represents a departure from more traditional video based…

  7. Exploring K-3 Teachers' Implementation of Comprehension Strategy Instruction (CSI) Using Expectancy-Value Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foley, Laura S.

    2011-01-01

    This research investigated factors that influence the implementation levels of evidence-based comprehension strategy instruction (CSI) among K-3 teachers. An explanatory design was chosen to gather and probe the data. Quantitative data were gathered via a mailed survey distributed through a representative sample of the 40 school districts (through…

  8. Word Decoding Development in Incremental Phonics Instruction in a Transparent Orthography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaars, Moniek M.; Segers, Eliane; Verhoeven, Ludo

    2017-01-01

    The present longitudinal study aimed to investigate the development of word decoding skills during incremental phonics instruction in Dutch as a transparent orthography. A representative sample of 973 Dutch children in the first grade (M[subscript age] = 6;1, SD = 0;5) was exposed to incremental subsets of Dutch grapheme-phoneme correspondences…

  9. Collaborative Models of Instruction: The Empirical Foundations of Inclusion and Co-Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solis, Michael; Vaughn, Sharon; Swanson, Elizabeth; Mcculley, Lisa

    2012-01-01

    A summary of inclusion and co-teaching syntheses was conducted to better understand the evidence base associated with collaborative models of instruction. Six syntheses were identified: four investigated inclusion, and two investigated co-teaching. Collectively, the syntheses represented 146 studies. The syntheses investigated research on…

  10. Theoretical Perspectives and Empirical Evidence Relevant to Classroom Instruction with Manipulatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marley, Scott C.; Carbonneau, Kira J.

    2014-01-01

    The papers in this special issue focus on instructional strategies with manipulatives. Often described as "hands-on learning", these strategies emphasize the use of physical and, more recently, virtual objects to represent target information and concepts. These strategies are frequently suggested as effective techniques for teaching…

  11. Didactic Analysis as the Core of Preparation of Instruction = Didaktische Analyse als Kern der Unterrichtsvorbereitung.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klafki, Wolfgang

    1995-01-01

    Presents a crucial German essay, originally published in 1958, that defined and introduced didaktik to a new generation of educators. In this incarnation, didaktik represents an educational approach that incorporates critical thinking (as defined by Adorno and Habermas) into both content and instruction. Briefly outlines the essentials of didactic…

  12. Image Interpretation Instruction Via A Computer-Based-Training System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisman, Melanie

    1988-02-01

    As newer and more sophisticated imagery collection systems rapidly increase the volume of imagery requiring thorough exploitation, the need for imagery analysts to acquire and maintain expertise increases accordingly. In response, Loral Systems Group (Arizona) has produced a computer-based-training (CBT) system that presents a series of lessons on radar imaging principles and their application to the various orders of battle. The training system is composed of two host computers, four student/instructor workstations, a printer, and lesson material. The computers control the imagery presentation, deliver twenty-eight interactive lessons of computer-assisted instruction, and generate reports. Each dual-screen workstation presents lessons consisting of instructional text coupled with representative imagery annotated with color graphics. Although the system is designed for the unique characteristics of radar interpretation, alternative courseware could instruct interpretation techniques for other imagery (photographic, electro-optical, infrared). Regardless of the sensor type and amount of available imagery, both commercial and military segments of the interpretation community will benefit only if the interpreter/analyst is successfully trained to translate image information into useful terms.

  13. Climate Change and the Representative Agent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howarth, R.B. [Environmental Studies Program, Dartmouth College, Hanover, New Hampshire 03755 (United States)

    2000-02-01

    The artifice of an infinitely-lived representative agent is commonly invoked to balance the present costs and future benefits of climate stabilization policies. Since actual economies are populated by overlapping generations of finite-lived persons, this approach begs important questions of welfare aggregation. This paper compares the results of representative agent and overlapping generations models that are numerically calibrated based on standard assumptions regarding climate economy interactions. Under two social choice rules - Pareto efficiency and classical utilitarianism - the models generate closely similar simulation results. In the absence of policies to redistribute income between present and future generations, efficient rates of carbon dioxide emissions abatement rise from 15 to 20% between the years 2000 and 2105. Under classical utilitarianism, in contrast, optimal control rates rise from 48 to 79% this same period. 23 refs.

  14. Representing Boolean Functions by Decision Trees

    KAUST Repository

    Chikalov, Igor

    2011-01-01

    A Boolean or discrete function can be represented by a decision tree. A compact form of decision tree named binary decision diagram or branching program is widely known in logic design [2, 40]. This representation is equivalent to other forms, and in some cases it is more compact than values table or even the formula [44]. Representing a function in the form of decision tree allows applying graph algorithms for various transformations [10]. Decision trees and branching programs are used for effective hardware [15] and software [5] implementation of functions. For the implementation to be effective, the function representation should have minimal time and space complexity. The average depth of decision tree characterizes the expected computing time, and the number of nodes in branching program characterizes the number of functional elements required for implementation. Often these two criteria are incompatible, i.e. there is no solution that is optimal on both time and space complexity. © Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2011.

  15. Data structures and apparatuses for representing knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hohimer, Ryan E; Thomson, Judi R; Harvey, William J; Paulson, Patrick R; Whiting, Mark A; Tratz, Stephen C; Chappell, Alan R; Butner, Robert S

    2014-02-18

    Data structures and apparatuses to represent knowledge are disclosed. The processes can comprise labeling elements in a knowledge signature according to concepts in an ontology and populating the elements with confidence values. The data structures can comprise knowledge signatures stored on computer-readable media. The knowledge signatures comprise a matrix structure having elements labeled according to concepts in an ontology, wherein the value of the element represents a confidence that the concept is present in an information space. The apparatus can comprise a knowledge representation unit having at least one ontology stored on a computer-readable medium, at least one data-receiving device, and a processor configured to generate knowledge signatures by comparing datasets obtained by the data-receiving devices to the ontologies.

  16. Representing a public that does not exist

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korsgaard, Morten Timmermann

    and function of the teacher. Confronted by this teachers and educationalists in Denmark have chosen different paths. One current returns to nationalistic and traditional educational ideals and another accepts the global agenda and attempts to find a new form of legitimacy within the ‘what works’ framework......In her seminal essay ‘The Crisis in Education’ Hannah Arendt presents teachers with the challenge of having to represent a world that is becoming out of joint. This means that the teacher stands as a representative of a world that is becoming increasingly inexplicable and incomprehensible......, and the only way of retaining any form of authority (and legitimacy as a teacher) is to remain loyal to the task of presenting this world to the child. This challenge presents itself acutely in the form of a global reform agenda that legitimizes standardisation and accountability while eroding the authority...

  17. Can Monkeys (Macaca mulatta) Represent Invisible Displacement?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filion, Christine M.; Washburn, David A.; Gulledge, Jonathan P.

    1996-01-01

    Four experiments were conducted to assess whether or not rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) could represent the unperceived movements of a stimulus. Subjects were tested on 2 computerized tasks, HOLE (monkeys) and LASER (humans and monkeys), in which subjects needed to chase or shoot at, respectively, a moving target that either remained visible or became invisible for a portion of its path of movement. Response patterns were analyzed and compared between target-visible and target-invisible conditions. Results of Experiments 1, 2, and 3 demonstrated that the monkeys are capable of extrapolating movement. That this extrapolation involved internal representation of the target's invisible movement was suggested but not confirmed. Experiment 4, however, demonstrated that the monkeys are capable of representing the invisible displacements of a stimulus.

  18. Representing exact number visually using mental abacus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Michael C; Barner, David

    2012-02-01

    Mental abacus (MA) is a system for performing rapid and precise arithmetic by manipulating a mental representation of an abacus, a physical calculation device. Previous work has speculated that MA is based on visual imagery, suggesting that it might be a method of representing exact number nonlinguistically, but given the limitations on visual working memory, it is unknown how MA structures could be stored. We investigated the structure of the representations underlying MA in a group of children in India. Our results suggest that MA is represented in visual working memory by splitting the abacus into a series of columns, each of which is independently stored as a unit with its own detailed substructure. In addition, we show that the computations of practiced MA users (but not those of control participants) are relatively insensitive to verbal interference, consistent with the hypothesis that MA is a nonlinguistic format for exact numerical computation.

  19. Representativeness and significance factors in ESP texts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Curado Fuentes

    2000-04-01

    Full Text Available The development of communicative approaches and strategies in specialized discourse has led to revising notions of representative and significant language . Particularly in the work with academic genres, in science and technology (EST settings such as our own institution, the need for determining these factors is ever growing. The application of empirical resources such as specific language corpora, in fact, becomes convenient. In this paper, the aim is to specify the type of corpus linguistic representativeness and significance sought in the case of teaching English to our groups of Computer Science students. In that scope, we present data and samples on which to base our suggestions and claims regarding the exploitation of textual material.

  20. Meeting staff representatives of the European Agencies

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2014-01-01

      The AASC (Assembly of Agency Staff Committee) held its 27th Meeting of the specialized European Agencies on 26 and 27 May on the premises of the OHIM (Office for Harmonization in the Internal Market) in Alicante, Spain. Two representatives of the CERN Staff Association, in charge of External Relations, attended as observers. This participation is a useful complement to regular contacts we have with FICSA (Federation of International Civil Servants' Associations), which groups staff associations of the UN Agencies, and the annual CSAIO conferences (Conference of Staff Associations of International Organizations), where each Autumn representatives of international organizations based in Europe meet to discuss themes of common interest to better promote and defend the rights of the international civil servants. All these meetings allow us to remain informed on items that are directly or indirectly related to employment and social conditions of our colleagues in other international and Europ...

  1. Instructable autonomous agents. Ph.D. Thesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huffman, Scott Bradley

    1994-01-01

    In contrast to current intelligent systems, which must be laboriously programmed for each task they are meant to perform, instructable agents can be taught new tasks and associated knowledge. This thesis presents a general theory of learning from tutorial instruction and its use to produce an instructable agent. Tutorial instruction is a particularly powerful form of instruction, because it allows the instructor to communicate whatever kind of knowledge a student needs at whatever point it is needed. To exploit this broad flexibility, however, a tutorable agent must support a full range of interaction with its instructor to learn a full range of knowledge. Thus, unlike most machine learning tasks, which target deep learning of a single kind of knowledge from a single kind of input, tutorability requires a breadth of learning from a broad range of instructional interactions. The theory of learning from tutorial instruction presented here has two parts. First, a computational model of an intelligent agent, the problem space computational model, indicates the types of knowledge that determine an agent's performance, and thus, that should be acquirable via instruction. Second, a learning technique, called situated explanation specifies how the agent learns general knowledge from instruction. The theory is embodied by an implemented agent, Instructo-Soar, built within the Soar architecture. Instructo-Soar is able to learn hierarchies of completely new tasks, to extend task knowledge to apply in new situations, and in fact to acquire every type of knowledge it uses during task performance - control knowledge, knowledge of operators' effects, state inferences, etc. - from interactive natural language instructions. This variety of learning occurs by applying the situated explanation technique to a variety of instructional interactions involving a variety of types of instructions (commands, statements, conditionals, etc.). By taking seriously the requirements of flexible

  2. Yucca Mountain Climate Technical Support Representative

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharpe, Saxon E

    2007-10-23

    The primary objective of Project Activity ORD-FY04-012, “Yucca Mountain Climate Technical Support Representative,” was to provide the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) with expertise on past, present, and future climate scenarios and to support the technical elements of the Yucca Mountain Project (YMP) climate program. The Climate Technical Support Representative was to explain, defend, and interpret the YMP climate program to the various audiences during Site Recommendation and License Application. This technical support representative was to support DOE management in the preparation and review of documents, and to participate in comment response for the Final Environmental Impact Statement, the Site Recommendation Hearings, the NRC Sufficiency Comments, and other forums as designated by DOE management. Because the activity was terminated 12 months early and experience a 27% reduction in budget, it was not possible to complete all components of the tasks as originally envisioned. Activities not completed include the qualification of climate datasets and the production of a qualified technical report. The following final report is an unqualified summary of the activities that were completed given the reduced time and funding.

  3. Latency represents sound frequency in mouse IC

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Frequency is one of the fundamental parameters of sound.The frequency of an acoustic stimulus can be represented by a neural response such as spike rate,and/or first spike latency(FSL)of a given neuron.The spike rates/frequency function of most neurons changes with different acoustic ampli-tudes,whereas FSL/frequency function is highly stable.This implies that FSL might represent the fre-quency of a sound stimulus more efficiently than spike rate.This study involved representations of acoustic frequency by spike rate and FSL of central inferior colliculus(IC)neurons responding to free-field pure-tone stimuli.We found that the FSLs of neurons responding to characteristic frequency(CF)of sound stimulus were usually the shortest,regardless of sound intensity,and that spike rates of most neurons showed a variety of function according to sound frequency,especially at high intensities.These results strongly suggest that FSL of auditory IC neurons can represent sound frequency more precisely than spike rate.

  4. Latency represents sound frequency in mouse IC

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIU Qiang; TANG Jie; YU ZuLin; ZHANG Juan; ZHOU YingJie; XIAO ZhongJu; SHEN JunXian

    2007-01-01

    Frequency is one of the fundamental parameters of sound. The frequency of an acoustic stimulus can be represented by a neural response such as spike rate, and/or first spike latency (FSL) of a given neuron. The spike rates/frequency function of most neurons changes with different acoustic amplitudes, whereas FSL/frequency function is highly stable. This implies that FSL might represent the frequency of a sound stimulus more efficiently than spike rate. This study involved representations of acoustic frequency by spike rate and FSL of central inferior colliculus (IC) neurons responding to free-field pure-tone stimuli. We found that the FSLs of neurons responding to characteristic frequency (CF) of sound stimulus were usually the shortest, regardless of sound intensity, and that spike rates of most neurons showed a variety of function according to sound frequency, especially at high intensities.These results strongly suggest that FSL of auditory IC neurons can represent sound frequency more precisely than spike rate.

  5. Diversity and representativeness: two key factors

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2013-01-01

    In the past few weeks many of you have filled out the questionnaire for preparing the upcoming Five-yearly review. Similarly, Staff Association members have elected their delegates to the Staff Council for the coming two years. Once again we would like to thank all those who have taken the time and effort to make their voice heard on these two occasions. Elections to the Staff Council Below we publish the new Staff Council with its forty delegates who will represent in 2014 and 2015 all CERN staff in the discussions with Management and Member States in the various bodies and committees. Therefore it is important that the Staff Council represents as far as possible the diversity of the CERN population. By construction, the election process with its electoral colleges and two-step voting procedure guarantees that all Departments, even the small ones, and the various staff categories are correctly represented. Figure 1 shows the participation rate in the elections. The average rate is just above 52 %, with ...

  6. Sensemaking processes of organizational identity and technological capabilities: an empirical study in new technology-based firms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julio César Acosta-Prado

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available This article analyzes the sensemaking processes of organizational identity and technological capabilities that are facilitators of innovation at New-Technology-Based Firms (NTBFs. The research proposal points out that in this kind of organization, the knowledge transferred by these processes simultaneously addresses two core aspects: their organizational identity and technological capabilities. From a theoretical point of view, our study links two conceptual frameworks (organizational identity and technological capabilities, rarely mentioned together in the preceding research. From a practical point of view, the findings identify these processes and suggest that in this kind of organization both take place simultaneously, which could help stakeholders improve their management. Hence, members and managers of these organizations should take these processes into account as a framework to achieve competitiveness and therefore success.

  7. Analytical Study of Interdisciplinary Relations in Selected High Priority Areas of Science and Technology Based on Data of ISI Database

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehri Sedighi

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this research is to investigate the interdisciplinary relations in selected high priority areas of science and technology based on ISI data. This is an applied study using scientometric, citation analysis and network analysis methods. After identifying and extracting data from WOS, in order to determine the interdisciplinary relations and the evolution of these relationships, all citations of these records have been analysed. In order to judge the interdisciplinarity of data, the results of the two approaches have been considered: 1-To determine the subject areas of the journals 2- To determine the institutional affiliation of the authors.There is a positive correlation between co-authorship and interdisciplinary approach in all studied areas. There is no significant relation between the number of citations and interdisciplinary approach. Mapping of interdisciplinary relationships in nanotechnology showed this is a unique method to discover the structural patterns of a research area.

  8. Texture Mapping Technology Based on OpenGL%基于OpenGL的纹理贴图技术

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨键; 张敏

    2011-01-01

    Texture map is a technical basis for enhancing realistic 3D scene.This paper mainly introduces the texture mapping technology based on OpenGL,including the basic steps for realizing texture map base on OpenGL,and technical key points of each link of textu%纹理贴图是增强3D场景真实感的技术基础,主要介绍了基于OpenGL的纹理贴图技术,包含实现OpenGL纹理贴图的基本步骤,以及纹理贴图各环节的技术要点,对OpenGL Mip贴图的原理和实现方法也进行了简要的介绍。

  9. Mobile technology use and desired technology-based intervention characteristics among HIV+ Black men who have sex with men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senn, Theresa E; Braksmajer, Amy; Coury-Doniger, Patricia; Urban, Marguerite A; Carey, Michael P

    2017-04-01

    HIV positive Black men who have sex with men (MSM) are retained in HIV medical care at suboptimal rates. Interventions targeted to Black MSM are needed to help to improve their retention in care. The purposes of this study were to investigate the use of mobile technology among HIV+ Black MSM and to explore participants' thoughts about the use of mobile technology for HIV retention in care interventions. Twenty-two HIV+ Black MSM completed a technology use survey and participated in a qualitative interview regarding technology-based interventions. The majority of participants (95%) had access to a cell phone, and used their phones frequently (median 3 hours/day). Men preferred interventions that would allow for anonymous participation and that would provide individually tailored support. Mobile technology is a promising approach to intervention delivery for both younger and older HIV+ Black MSM. These interventions should incorporate features that are desirable to men (i.e., anonymous participation and individual tailoring).

  10. Development and pilot test of pictograph-enhanced breast health-care instructions for community-residing immigrant women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jeungok

    2012-08-01

    Current written text-based health-care instructions are not suitable for presenting lengthy, complex breast health-care instructions and are difficult for immigrant women with limited literacy skills. The aims of this study were to develop breast health-care instructions enhanced by pictographs (simple line drawings representing health-care actions) and pilot test the instructions in a sample of six immigrant women with limited literacy skills. Based on the Mayer's Cognitive Theory of Multimedia Learning, pictographs were developed in addition to low-literacy text. The text and the pictographs were then pilot tested with six immigrant women in community health centres for clarity, comprehension and acceptability through face-to-face interviews. Participants perceived that the drawings were engaging and enhanced clarity of the intended health-care messages. The black and white simple line drawings were well received by participants of varying race and ethnicity. The pictograph-based approach might be an effective tool in developing health-care instructions for immigrant women with limited literacy skills. Future research is needed to compare the effect of pictograph-enhanced instructions with written text-based instructions on adherence to instructions and health outcomes.

  11. Relationship between teacher preparedness and inquiry-based instructional practices to students' science achievement: Evidence from TIMSS 2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Lynn A.

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between teachers' self-reported preparedness for teaching science content and their instructional practices to the science achievement of eighth grade science students in the United States as demonstrated by TIMSS 2007. Six hundred eighty-seven eighth grade science teachers in the United States representing 7,377 students responded to the TIMSS 2007 questionnaire about their instructional preparedness and their instructional practices. Quantitative data were reported. Through correlation analysis, the researcher found statistically significant positive relationships emerge between eighth grade science teachers' main area of study and their self-reported beliefs about their preparedness to teach that same content area. Another correlation analysis found a statistically significant negative relationship existed between teachers' self-reported use of inquiry-based instruction and preparedness to teach chemistry, physics and earth science. Another correlation analysis discovered a statistically significant positive relationship existed between physics preparedness and student science achievement. Finally, a correlation analysis found a statistically significant positive relationship existed between science teachers' self-reported implementation of inquiry-based instructional practices and student achievement. The data findings support the conclusion that teachers who have feelings of preparedness to teach science content and implement more inquiry-based instruction and less didactic instruction produce high achieving science students. As science teachers obtain the appropriate knowledge in science content and pedagogy, science teachers will feel prepared and will implement inquiry-based instruction in science classrooms.

  12. Advancing Instructional Communication: Integrating a Biosocial Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horan, Sean M.; Afifi, Tamara D.

    2014-01-01

    Celebrating 100 years of the National Communication Association necessitates that, as we commemorate our past, we also look toward our future. As part of a larger conversation about the future of instructional communication, this essay reinvestigates the importance of integrating biosocial approaches into instructional communication research. In…

  13. Classroom Instruction: The Influences of Marie Clay

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNaughton, Stuart

    2014-01-01

    Marie Clay's body of work has influenced classroom instruction in direct and indirect ways, through large overarching themes in our pedagogical content knowledge as well as specific smart practices. This paper focuses on her the contributions to our thinking about instruction which come from two broad theoretical concepts; emergent literacy…

  14. Augmenting the ADDIE Paradigm for Instructional Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Xiaopeng; Branch, Robert Maribe

    2008-01-01

    The authors discuss topics appropriate for augmenting the ADDIE paradigm for instructional design. The topics selected are based on data from a study of working professionals who successfully completed an instructional design and technology certificate program and who identified related topics that they regarded as beneficial. The participants…

  15. A Self-Instructional System in Plastics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Mark M.; And Others

    The purpose of this system is to teach rural high school students the process of forming objects with expandable polystyrene plastic beads. Instruction in the system generally follows a three-step sequence in which the student: 1) views one of the four demonstration films; 2) progresses through a corresponding programed instruction book; and 3)…

  16. Individualized Instructional Systems Used by Xerox

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgwardt, Frederick C.

    1975-01-01

    A discussion of how individualized instruction has been used by Xerox to: 1) identify appropriate instructional techniques; and 2) reduce costs by devising a delivery system by which programs prepared under a "single point" design/development concept can be distributed to users at various geographical locations. (Author)

  17. Authentic Interdisciplinary Instruction: Raising the Bar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohnsen, Bonnie

    2011-01-01

    This article addressed the need for authentic interdisciplinary instruction. Authentic interdisciplinary instruction is defined as a learning activity that simultaneously improves student performance related to grade-level standards in two or more disciplines (e.g., science and physical education). The process described for creating authentic…

  18. Analysis of Research Data Management Instruction Materials

    OpenAIRE

    Dressel, Willow

    2015-01-01

    Poster given at the 2015 SLA - All Sciences Poster Session. Many academic libraries are developing research data management instruction programs including online guides and workshops. A wealth of materials are available to draw from. However, the quantity and variety can be overwhelming to someone just starting out. This poster examines and compares 17 publicly available research data management instruction materials.

  19. The Multimodal Possibilities of Online Instructions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kampf, Constance

    2006-01-01

    The WWW simplifies the process of delivering online instructions through multimodal channels because of the ease of use for voice, video, pictures, and text modes of communication built into it.  Given that instructions are being produced in multimodal format for the WWW, how do multi-modal analy...

  20. Assistant Principals: Their Readiness as Instructional Leaders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Searby, Linda; Browne-Ferrigno, Tricia; Wang, Chih-hsuan

    2017-01-01

    This article reports findings from a study investigating the capacity of assistant principals to be instructional leaders. Analyses of survey responses yielded four interesting findings: (a) years of experience as a teacher and age had no significance on assistant principals' perceived readiness as an instructional leader; (b) those completing…

  1. Culinary Occupations. Instructional Materials Committee Recommendations Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louisiana State Technical Resource Center, Natchitoches.

    This resource listing contains those culinary occupations instructional materials given a rating of "highly recommended" or "recommended" by a committee of instructors. Titles are arranged alphabetically by title within each of the following Classification of Instructional Programs (CIP) categories: institutional management;…

  2. Instructional Podcasting with Undergraduate Digital Natives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Kevin M.; Willis, Dottie

    2013-01-01

    This paper analyzes the use of instructional podcasts with students in introductory computer application classes at a small, independent, private university. Participants were all undergraduates in the school of education. In an effort to model effective use of instructional technology for preservice teachers and to "meet digital native…

  3. Technology: Differentiating Instruction by Flipping the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegle, Del

    2014-01-01

    Flipping the classroom can be an effective instructional strategy for differentiating instruction for gifted and talented students. The author presents a rationale for using the strategy with gifted students, possible problems educators might encounter, and practical tips for beginning the process of flipping the classroom.

  4. Text-Picture Relations in Cooking Instructions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Sluis, Ielka; Leito, Shadira; Redeker, Gisela; Bunt, Harry

    2016-01-01

    Like many other instructions, recipes on packages with ready-to-use ingredients for a dish combine a series of pictures with short text paragraphs. The information presentation in such multimodal instructions can be compact (either text or picture) and/or cohesive (text and picture). In an explorato

  5. Author and reader in Instructions for use

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steehouder, Michael F.

    1997-01-01

    Instructions for use should not be seen as merely instrumental-they should also persuade the reader to read the text and to act accordingly. Moreover, they should establish a positive image of the product and the manufacturer. In this paper, a collection of instructions for use is used to identify s

  6. Instructional Models Effective in Distance Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackman, Diane H.; Swan, Michael K.

    The purpose of this study was to identify which instructional models based on the framework of Joyce, Weil, and Showers, could be used effectively in distance education over the Interactive Video Network (IVN) system in North Dakota. Instructional models have been organized into families such as Information Processing, Social, Personal, and…

  7. Sources of Information for Instructional Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiley, Ann L., Comp.

    This booklet is designed to help instructional technologists, students of instructional technology, faculty, and researchers in the field locate information quickly and easily. Information services described are libraries, the ERIC system, online information services, state education departments, regional education centers, and information…

  8. An Automated Approach to Instructional Design Guidance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spector, J. Michael; And Others

    This paper describes the Guided Approach to Instructional Design Advising (GAIDA), an automated instructional design tool that incorporates techniques of artificial intelligence. GAIDA was developed by the U.S. Air Force Armstrong Laboratory to facilitate the planning and production of interactive courseware and computer-based training materials.…

  9. Measuring the Mathematical Quality of Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Journal of Mathematics Teacher Education, 2011

    2011-01-01

    In this article, we describe a framework and instrument for measuring the mathematical quality of mathematics instruction. In describing this framework, we argue for the separation of the "mathematical quality of instruction" (MQI), such as the absence of mathematical errors and the presence of sound mathematical reasoning, from pedagogical…

  10. Instructional Computing in Wyoming: Status and Recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kansky, Bob

    The status of instructional computing in Wyoming's public schols as of April 1980 is reported. Specifically the document indicates the nature and extent of computer usage in grades K-12, summarizes teachers' opinions regarding the potential instructional uses of computers in the schools, and presents the recommendations of a select committee of…

  11. Instructional Computing. An Action Guide for Educators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennis, J. Richard; Kansky, Robert J.

    This book is directed to any educator who is interested in the use of the computer to improve classroom instruction. It is a book about the materials, human factors, and decision-making procedures that make up the instructional application of computers. This document's single goal is to promote educators' thoughtful selection and use of both…

  12. Implicit and Explicit Instruction of Spelling Rules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemper, M. J.; Verhoeven, L.; Bosman, A. M. T.

    2012-01-01

    The study aimed to compare the differential effectiveness of explicit and implicit instruction of two Dutch spelling rules. Students with and without spelling disabilities were instructed a spelling rule either implicitly or explicitly in two experiments. Effects were tested in a pretest-intervention-posttest control group design. Experiment 1…

  13. Implicit and explicit instruction of spelling rules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kemper, M.J.; Verhoeven, L.T.W.; Bosman, A.M.T.

    2012-01-01

    The study aimed to compare the differential effectiveness of explicit and implicit instruction of two Dutch spelling rules. Students with and without spelling disabilities were instructed a spelling rule either implicitly or explicitly in two experiments. Effects were tested in a pretest-interventio

  14. Robust Vocabulary Instruction in a Readers' Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feezell, Greg

    2012-01-01

    This article presents strategies for integrating explicit vocabulary instruction within a reading workshop. The author begins by describing a process for involving students in word selection. The author then provides a weeklong instructional sequence using student-selected words. Finally, the author briefly examines the role of vocabulary…

  15. Instructional Leadership: Are Women Principals Better?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Richard L.; Basom, Margaret R.

    1990-01-01

    A 1984 study found that female elementary school principals spent 38.4 percent of their time on instructional leadership activities, while their male counterparts spent only 21.8 percent. A 1989 follow-up study found that women principals were more likely to be seen by their staffs as instructional leaders. A sidebar examines sex discrimination in…

  16. Mass Communication Instruction in the Secondary School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, James E.; Surlin, Stuart H.

    The steady increase of mass communication instruction in secondary schools has resulted from the demands by educators and the public for programs to help students cope with the impact and potential of mass media. This book describes the status and potential of mass communication instruction in secondary schools. Following an introductory chapter…

  17. Self-Paced Instruction: Hello, Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leuba, Richard J.; Flammer, Gordon H.

    1975-01-01

    Answers criticisms of self-paced instruction (SPI) by citing advantages of SPI over lecture methods. Concludes that criticisms of SPI are useful since they indicate in which areas further research should be conducted to improve this method of instruction. (MLH)

  18. Project Physics Programmed Instruction, Vectors 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA. Harvard Project Physics.

    This programmed instruction booklet is an interim version of instructional materials being developed by Harvard Project Physics. It is the first in a series of three booklets on vectors and covers the definitions of vectors and scalars, drawing vector quantities to scale, and negative vectors. For others in this series, see SE 015 550 and SE 015…

  19. 24 CFR 3285.401 - Anchoring instructions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... wind by use of anchor assembly type installations or by connecting the home to an alternative foundation system. See § 3285.301. (b) For anchor assembly type installations, the installation instructions... instructions and design for anchor type assemblies must be prepared by a registered professional engineer...

  20. Effects of Media Attributes in Anchored Instruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shyu, Hsin-Yih

    1999-01-01

    Investigates the effects of computer-assisted video-based anchored instruction on promoting students' attitudes toward mathematical instruction and problem-solving skills. Examines the effects of different media attributes on students' mathematical achievement and attitudes in a situated learning environment. Findings suggest that anchored…

  1. Preparing Instructional Objectives: Agony or Ecstasy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Wesley K.

    This paper 1) discusses the problems encountered in preparing objectives for instructional programs; 2) describes an informal research project in which seven instructional designers working on the same project attempted to determine agreement on an objective; and 3) suggests how to prepare objectives so that difficulties can be minimized. One…

  2. Sketching a Context for Instructional Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lone, Richard H.

    Instructional technology has dramatized the need for a complete overhaul of educational systems; tacking on "innovations" will not do. The grip of dead tradition on education must be pried loose. Process, rather than content, should be stressed in learning. The challenge for instructional technology, as for education in general, is to devise an…

  3. Aligning Learning Activities with Instructional Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurvitch, Rachel; Metzler, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Model-based instruction has been increasingly used in physical education for the past two decades. Metzler (2011) identified eight instructional models that are commonly used in physical education today. Each model is designed to promote certain kinds of learning outcomes for students and to address different combinations of the national…

  4. Guidelines for Language Classroom Instruction1(Ⅰ)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Craig Chaudron; Graham Crookes

    2008-01-01

    @@ In"Guidelines for Language Classroom Instruction,"Crookes and Chaudron review research and practice in both second and foreign language contexts.The main areas of classroom instruction described are:presentational modes and focus on form,types of activities and parameters of tasks and interaction,classroom organization,teacher control of interaction,and corrective feedback.

  5. English Instruction in English-Language Colleges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conseil des Colleges, Quebec (Quebec).

    Developed to promote the consistency and quality of English instruction and to support the English-language colleges of Quebec in this direction, the report presents an overview of English instruction at the college level and presents recommendations to the Minister of Higher Education and Science (MHES) and the English-language colleges. Part I…

  6. Motivational Design in Information Literacy Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, Amanda Nichols

    2015-01-01

    Motivational design theory complements instructional design theory and, when used together, both principles can affect learning, knowledge acquisition, and knowledge retention. In information literacy instruction, motivational design exists throughout the appropriate standards documents. However, there is limited current research on the best…

  7. Whitewater Kayaking Instruction: Skills and Techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poff, Raymond; Stuessy, Tom

    This paper briefly presents ideas and techniques that can facilitate effective whitewater kayaking instruction. Instructors often focus so much on the mechanics of specific skills that they overlook less obvious, but equally important, aspects of instruction. These aspects include the underlying purposes and guiding principles of kayaking…

  8. Vocabulary Instruction for Second Language Readers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nisbet, Deanna L.

    2010-01-01

    Over the past 20 years, research has consistently affirmed the importance of explicit vocabulary instruction for adult learners of English as a second language (ESL). Given the significant vocabulary demands faced by adult second language readers, ESL teachers must carefully target their instruction for maximum impact and to foster meaningful…

  9. Assessing the Cost of Instructional Coaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, David S.

    2012-01-01

    School-based instructional coaching is an increasingly popular approach to professional development used to support in-service learning for teachers. However, little is known about the cost of coaching. The following study aims to fill this gap. First, the study describes a framework for measuring the cost of an instructional coaching program;…

  10. Instructional Coaching in One Middle School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krohn, Cheryl Ann

    2013-01-01

    This qualitative study examines a model of instructional coaching in a middle school using interviews and observations of both teachers and their coaches. During the 2012-2013 school year, Creekside Middle School implemented a new model of instructional coaching that differed from the traditional model of coaching; it focused on student learning…

  11. 14 CFR Section 22 - General Reporting Instructions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false General Reporting Instructions Section 22 Section 22 Aeronautics and Space OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (AVIATION... General Reporting Provisions-Large Certificated Air Carriers Section 22 General Reporting Instructions (a...

  12. Instructional Alignment under No Child Left Behind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polikoff, Morgan S.

    2012-01-01

    The alignment of instruction with the content of standards and assessments is the key mediating variable separating the policy of standards-based reform (SBR) from the outcome of improved student achievement. Few studies have investigated SBR's effects on instructional alignment, and most have serious methodological limitations. This research uses…

  13. Linking Assessment and Instruction Innovation Configuration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosp, John L.

    2011-01-01

    This innovation configuration identifies the skills and competencies teachers need to make sound decisions about using assessment information to improve instruction and establishes a framework and justification for effective ways that teachers can collect and use assessment data to make instructional decisions. It is designed to provide a…

  14. Instructional or Managerial Leadership: The Principal Role!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jazzar, Michael

    2004-01-01

    "Instructional Or Managerial Leadership: The Principal Role" is a case study written to challenge the beliefs of graduate students preparing for educational leadership roles and educational leaders already in these positions as to the importance of the principal as an instructional leader. This case explores communication between superintendents…

  15. The Future of Instructional Teacher Leader Roles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangin, Melinda M.; Stoelinga, Sara Ray

    2010-01-01

    In response to increased performance expectations, schools and districts are turning to nonsupervisory, school-based, instructional teacher leader roles to help improve teachers' instruction and enhance student learning. Increased opportunities to learn about teacher leadership may facilitate the implementation and institutionalization of…

  16. 10 CFR 35.410 - Safety instruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... instruction, initially and at least annually, to personnel caring for patients or human research subjects who... the brachytherapy sources; (2) Safe handling and shielding instructions; (3) Patient or human research... designee, and an authorized user if the patient or the human research subject has a medical emergency or...

  17. THE ANALYSIS OF INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES. DRAFT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    GAGNE, ROBERT M.

    THIS PAPER DISCUSSES AIMS, EFFECTS, AND IMPLICATIONS OF SPECIFYING OBJECTIVES FOR PROGRAMED INSTRUCTION, AND CITES EXAMPLES FROM THE LITERATURE. THE PAPER WAS READ AS A PORTION OF THE SYMPOSIUM ON PROGRAMMED INSTRUCTION, NATIONAL EDUCATION ASSOCIATION, WASHINGTON, D.C., MARCH 24-26, 1963. (LH)

  18. The Foresee Approach to Integrated ESL Instruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kidd, Richard; Marquardson, Brenda

    1997-01-01

    Describes the Foresee Approach to integrating academic content, language, and learning instruction in English as a Second Language (ESL) from kindergarten to grade 12 or in mainstream/part ESL classrooms. The Foresee Model includes theoretical and practical constituents and guides the formulation of instructional objectives in the three target…

  19. Maurer computers for pipelined instruction processing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergstra, J.A.; Middelburg, C.A.

    2008-01-01

    We model micro-architectures with non-pipelined instruction processing and pipelined instruction processing using Maurer machines, basic thread algebra and program algebra. We show that stored programs are executed as intended with these micro-architectures. We believe that this work provides a new

  20. Rule Difficulty and the Usefulness of Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheffler, Pawel

    2009-01-01

    It is now generally agreed that some form of focus on the target code is necessary in adult L2 instruction. One question that remains to be answered is whether all aspects of L2 grammar are equally amenable to pedagogic intervention. A number of researchers have examined the effectiveness of instruction with regard to simple vs. difficult grammar…