WorldWideScience

Sample records for technology veterans affairs

  1. Veterans Affairs Suicide Prevention Synthetic Dataset

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The VA's Veteran Health Administration, in support of the Open Data Initiative, is providing the Veterans Affairs Suicide Prevention Synthetic Dataset (VASPSD). The...

  2. Veterans Affairs Suicide Prevention Synthetic Dataset Metadata

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The VA's Veteran Health Administration, in support of the Open Data Initiative, is providing the Veterans Affairs Suicide Prevention Synthetic Dataset (VASPSD). The...

  3. Veterans Affairs Central Cancer Registry (VACCR)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The Veterans Affairs Central Cancer Registry (VACCR) receives and stores information on cancer diagnosis and treatment constraints compiled and sent in by the local...

  4. The value from investments in health information technology at the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, Colene M; Mercincavage, Lauren M; Pan, Eric C; Vincent, Adam G; Johnston, Douglas S; Middleton, Blackford

    2010-04-01

    We compare health information technology (IT) in the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) to norms in the private sector, and we estimate the costs and benefits of selected VA health IT systems. The VA spent proportionately more on IT than the private health care sector spent, but it achieved higher levels of IT adoption and quality of care. The potential value of the VA's health IT investments is estimated at $3.09 billion in cumulative benefits net of investment costs. This study serves as a framework to inform efforts to measure and calculate the benefits of federal health IT stimulus programs.

  5. Department of Veterans Affairs' Implementation of Information Security Education Assistance Program. GAO-10-170R

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilshusen, Gregory C.; Melvin, Valerie C.

    2009-01-01

    The Veterans Benefits, Health Care, and Information Technology Act of 2006 authorizes the Secretary of Veterans Affairs to establish an educational assistance program for information security. The Information Security Education Assistance Program is envisioned as a means for the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) to attract and retain individuals…

  6. Department of Veterans Affairs - Monthly Report to Congress of Data Incidents (April 2014)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — This is a monthly report that the VA Office of Information Technology provides to congress about data incidents that took place during the month (April 2014). The...

  7. Civilian Health and Medical Program of the Department of Veterans Affairs (CHAMPVA)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — Civilian Health and Medical Program of the Department of Veterans Affairs (CHAMPVA) is a health care benefit program designed for the dependents of certain Veterans....

  8. 75 FR 78807 - Agency Information Collection (Notice to Department of Veterans Affairs of Veteran or Beneficiary...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-16

    ... Incarcerated in Penal Institution) Activity Under OMB Review AGENCY: Veterans Benefits Administration... Veterans Affairs of Veteran or Beneficiary Incarcerated in Penal Institution, VA Form 21-4193. OMB Control... should be reduced or terminated when he or she is incarcerated in a penal institution in excess of...

  9. Accuracy of Veterans Affairs Databases for Diagnoses of Chronic Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Singh, Jasvinder A.

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Epidemiologic studies usually use database diagnoses or patient self-report to identify disease cohorts, but no previous research has examined the extent to which self-report of chronic disease agrees with database diagnoses in a Veterans Affairs (VA) health care setting. Methods All veterans who had a medical care visit from October 1, 1996, through May 31, 1998, at any of the Veterans Integrated Service Network 13 facilities were surveyed about physician diagnosis of chronic ob...

  10. PTSD Treatment Programs in the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs In a Crisis? If you are in crisis dial 911 or ... Employment Center Returning Service Members Vocational Rehabilitation & Employment Homeless Veterans Women Veterans Minority Veterans Plain Language Surviving ...

  11. Assessment of Service Members Knowledge and Trust of the Department of Veterans Affairs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-12

    OIF Operation Iraqi Freedom VA Department of Veterans Affairs VA OIG Department of Veterans Affairs Office of Inspector General VBA Veterans Benefits...Figure 3. The Decision Trust Model ...............................................................................20 Figure 4. Demographics-Age...reorganization into the three administrations: Veterans Health Administration (VHA), Veterans Benefits Administration ( VBA ) and National Cemetery

  12. 48 CFR 852.203-71 - Display of Department of Veterans Affairs hotline poster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Veterans Affairs hotline poster. 852.203-71 Section 852.203-71 Federal Acquisition Regulations System... Provisions and Clauses 852.203-71 Display of Department of Veterans Affairs hotline poster. As prescribed in 803.7001, insert the following clause: Display of Department of Veterans Affairs Hotline Poster...

  13. Veterans' use of Department of Veterans Affairs care and perceptions of outsourcing inpatient care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakefield, Bonnie J; Tripp-Reimer, Toni; Rosenbaum, Marcy E; Rosenthal, Gary E

    2007-06-01

    The objective of the study was to examine veterans' perceptions of problems and benefits of outsourcing inpatient care from Veterans Affairs (VA) hospitals to private sector hospitals. Primary data were collected from a cross-section of 42 veterans who were VA users and nonusers using focus groups. Focus group discussion examined reasons patients use VA care, differences between VA and civilian care, positive and negative impacts of outsourcing, and special needs of veterans. Analyses revealed five domains related both to use of VA services and perceptions of outsourcing: costs, access, quality of care, contract (i.e., a covenant between veterans and the U.S. government), veteran milieu, and special needs. Participants identified a variety of potential positive and negative impacts. In general, veterans perceived more advantages than disadvantages to outsourcing VA care but still expressed significant concerns related to outsourcing. These issues should be considered in the development of future policy toward outsourcing VA care to the private sector.

  14. Did Massachusetts Health Reform Affect Veterans Affairs Primary Care Use?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Edwin S; Maciejewski, Matthew L; Hebert, Paul L; Batten, Adam; Nelson, Karin M; Fihn, Stephan D; Liu, Chuan-Fen

    2016-09-20

    Massachusetts Health Reform (MHR), implemented in 2006, introduced new health insurance options that may have prompted some veterans already enrolled in the Veterans Affairs Healthcare System (VA) to reduce their reliance on VA health services. This study examined whether MHR was associated with changes in VA primary care (PC) use. Using VA administrative data, we identified 147,836 veterans residing in Massachusetts and neighboring New England (NE) states from October 2004 to September 2008. We applied difference-in-difference methods to compare pre-post changes in PC use among Massachusetts and other NE veterans. Among veterans not enrolled in Medicare, VA PC use was not significantly different following MHR for Massachusetts veterans relative to other NE veterans. Among VA-Medicare dual enrollees, MHR was associated with an increase of 24.5 PC visits per 1,000 veterans per quarter (p = .048). Despite new non-VA health options through MHR, VA enrollees continued to rely on VA PC. © The Author(s) 2016.

  15. Iraq and Afghanistan War Veterans with Reintegration Problems: Differences by Veterans Affairs Healthcare User Status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayer, Nina A; Orazem, Robert J; Noorbaloochi, Siamak; Gravely, Amy; Frazier, Patricia; Carlson, Kathleen F; Schnurr, Paula P; Oleson, Heather

    2015-07-01

    We studied 1,292 Iraq and Afghanistan War veterans who participated in a clinical trial of expressive writing to estimate the prevalence of perceived reintegration difficulty and compare Veterans Affairs (VA) healthcare users to nonusers in terms of demographic and clinical characteristics. About half of participants perceived reintegration difficulty. VA users and nonusers differed in age and military background. Levels of mental and physical problems were higher in VA users. In multivariate analysis, military service variables and probable traumatic brain injury independently predicted VA use. Findings demonstrate the importance of research comparing VA users to nonusers to understand veteran healthcare needs.

  16. Management of Bacteriuria in Veterans Affairs Hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spivak, Emily S; Burk, Muriel; Zhang, Rongping; Jones, Makoto M; Neuhauser, Melinda M; Goetz, Matthew Bidwell; Cunningham, Francesca E

    2017-09-15

    Bacteriuria contributes to antibiotic overuse through treatment of asymptomatic bacteriuria (ASB) and long durations of therapy for symptomatic urinary tract infections (UTIs), yet large-scale evaluations of bacteriuria management among inpatients are lacking. Inpatients with bacteriuria were classified as asymptomatic or symptomatic based on established criteria applied to data collected by manual chart review. We examined frequency of treatment of ASB, factors associated with treatment of ASB, durations of therapy, and frequency of complications including Clostridium difficile infection, readmission, and all-cause mortality within 28 days of discharge. Among 2225 episodes of bacteriuria, 64% were classified as ASB. After excluding patients with non-UTI indications for antibiotics, 72% of patients with ASB received antibiotics. When evaluating only patients not meeting SIRS criteria, 68% of patients with ASB received antibiotics. The mean (±SD) days of antibiotic therapy for ASB, cystitis, CA-UTI and pyelonephritis were 10.0 (4.5), 11.4 (4.7), 12.0 (6.1), and 13.6 (5.3), respectively. In sum, 14% of patients with ASB were treated for greater than 14 days, and fluoroquinolones were the most commonly used empiric antibiotic for ASB [245/691 (35%)]. Complications were rare but more common among patients with ASB treated with antibiotics. The majority of bacteriuria among inpatient veterans is due to ASB with high rates of treatment of ASB and prolonged durations of therapy for ASB and symptomatic UTIs.

  17. The Health and Social Isolation of American Veterans Denied Veterans Affairs Disability Compensation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fried, Dennis Adrian; Passannante, Marian; Helmer, Drew; Holland, Bart K; Halperin, William E

    2017-02-01

    Authors comparatively analyzed health and social isolation between U.S. military veterans denied Veterans Affairs (VA) disability compensation and veterans awarded VA disability compensation. The 2001 National Survey of Veterans was used to create a sample of 4,522 veterans denied or awarded VA disability compensation. Using the Andersen health services utilization model as a conceptual framework, multivariate logistic regression was applied to assess relationships between VA disability compensation award status, three separate domains of health, and correlates of social isolation. Results indicate that denied applicants were more likely than those awarded to have poor overall health (odds ratio [OR] = 1.45, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.23, 1.70), and limitations in activities of daily living (OR = 1.12, 95% CI: 1.03, 1.21). Denied applicants' physical functioning (40.3) and mental functioning (41.2) composite summary scores were not clinically different from those of awarded applicants (39.0 and 40.1, respectively), indicating that both were comparably impaired. Veterans denied VA disability compensation had poor health and functional impairments. They also experienced poverty and isolation, suggesting that they may be in need of additional supportive services. Connecting veterans to community resources could be a vital service to provide to all veterans applying for disability compensation. © 2016 National Association of Social Workers.

  18. 32 CFR Appendix D to Part 45 - State Directors of Veterans Affairs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ..., App. D Appendix D to Part 45—State Directors of Veterans Affairs Alabama Director, Department of..., Trenton, NJ 08608. New Mexico Director, Veterans Service Commission, P.O. Box 2324, Santa Fe, NM 87503...

  19. The Post-9/11 GI Bill: Insights from Veterans Using Department of Veterans Affairs Educational Benefits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Geri L.; Boland, Elizabeth A.; Dudgeon, Brian; Johnson, Kurt

    2013-01-01

    Because the Post-9/11 GI Bill was implemented in August of 2009, increasing numbers of veterans returning from the Global War on Terror (GWT) have drawn on Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) educational benefits. Based on the findings of a mixed-methods study, quantitative and qualitative survey responses from veterans enrolled at a major…

  20. Department of Veterans Affairs compensation and medical care benefits accorded to veterans with major limb loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maynard, Charles; Flohr, Brad; Guagliardo, Tony A; Martin, Chris H; McFarland, Lynne V; Pruden, Jonathan D; Reiber, Gayle E

    2010-01-01

    Veterans injured in theaters of combat operations are eligible for benefits, including medical care and compensation. This article describes veterans with service-connected disability for major lower- and/or upper-limb loss resulting from combat-field-associated injuries sustained in the Vietnam war, Operation Desert Shield/Operation Desert Storm, and Operation Iraqi Freedom/Operation Enduring Freedom (OIF/OEF). Using the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) Compensation and Pension Mini-Master file, we identified 2,690 veterans who in August 2007 received compensation for loss of one or more limbs. More than 97% sustained their injuries in Vietnam; most were young men who served in the U.S. Army or Marine Corps. All but 5% had at least 50% combined service-connected disability and nearly half had a 100% rating. In addition to limb loss, one of the most prevalent compensable conditions was posttraumatic stress disorder, present in 46% of OIF/OEF and 20% of Vietnam veterans. Of these veterans, 82% visited VA outpatient clinics in 2007, although only 4% were hospitalized. A special obligation exists to those who have sustained serious injuries related to combat; this responsibility extends for the life of the servicemember and beyond to his or her spouse and dependents.

  1. Dengue surveillance in Veterans Affairs healthcare facilities, 2007-2010.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia L Schirmer

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Although dengue is endemic in Puerto Rico (PR, 2007 and 2010 were recognized as epidemic years. In the continental United States (US, outside of the Texas-Mexico border, there had not been a dengue outbreak since 1946 until dengue re-emerged in Key West, Florida (FL, in 2009-2010. The objective of this study was to use electronic and manual surveillance systems to identify dengue cases in Veterans Affairs (VA healthcare facilities and then to clinically compare dengue cases in Veterans presenting for care in PR and in FL. METHODOLOGY: Outpatient encounters from 1/2007-12/2010 and inpatient admissions (only available from 10/2009-12/2010 with dengue diagnostic codes at all VA facilities were identified using VA's Electronic Surveillance System for Early Notification of Community-based Epidemics (ESSENCE. Additional case sources included VA data from Centers for Disease Control and Prevention BioSense and VA infection preventionists. Case reviews were performed. Categorical data was compared using Mantel-Haenszel or Fisher Exact tests and continuous variables using t-tests. Dengue case residence was mapped. FINDINGS: Two hundred eighty-eight and 21 PR and FL dengue cases respectively were identified. Of 21 FL cases, 12 were exposed in Key West and 9 were imported. During epidemic years, FL cases had significantly increased dengue testing and intensive care admissions, but lower hospitalization rates and headache or eye pain symptoms compared to PR cases. There were no significant differences in clinical symptoms, laboratory abnormalities or outcomes between epidemic and non-epidemic year cases in FL and PR. Confirmed/probable cases were significantly more likely to be hospitalized and have thrombocytopenia or leukopenia compared to suspected cases. CONCLUSIONS: Dengue re-introduction in the continental US warrants increased dengue surveillance and education in VA. Throughout VA, under-testing of suspected cases highlights the need to

  2. Department of Veterans Affairs, Gulf War Veterans’ Illnesses Task Force to the Secretary of Veterans Affairs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-29

    Rates of adverse reproductive outcomes are similar among GW- exposed and non-exposed pregnancies . 14. Do Gulf War Veterans report more pulmonary...lymphoma, prostate cancer and respiratory cancer. Other diseases, such as osteoporosis , have been presumptively service connected for some former

  3. Veterans Affairs Geographic Distribution of Expenditures FY07 by State and County

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The Geographic Distribution of VA Expenditures (GDX) is an annual report that shows estimated VA expenditures for major programmatic areas by geographic area (state,...

  4. Veterans Affairs Geographic Distribution of Expenditures FY06 by State and County

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The Geographic Distribution of VA Expenditures (GDX) is an annual report that shows estimated VA expenditures for major programmatic areas by geographic area (state,...

  5. Veterans Affairs Geographic Distribution of Expenditures FY09 by State and County

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The Geographic Distribution of VA Expenditures (GDX) is an annual report that shows estimated VA expenditures for major programmatic areas by geographic area (state,...

  6. Veterans Affairs Geographic Distribution of Expenditures FY08 by Congressional District

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The Geographic Distribution of VA Expenditures (GDX) is an annual report that shows estimated VA expenditures for major programmatic areas by geographic area (state,...

  7. Veterans Affairs Geographic Distribution of Expenditures FY07 by Congressional District

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The Geographic Distribution of VA Expenditures (GDX) is an annual report that shows estimated VA expenditures for major programmatic areas by geographic area (state,...

  8. Veterans Affairs Geographic Distribution of Expenditures FY07 by State and County

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The Geographic Distribution of VA Expenditures (GDX) is an annual report that shows estimated VA expenditures for major programmatic areas by geographic area (state,...

  9. Veterans Affairs Geographic Distribution of Expenditures FY09 by Congressional District

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The Geographic Distribution of VA Expenditures (GDX) is an annual report that shows estimated VA expenditures for major programmatic areas by geographic area (state,...

  10. Veterans Affairs Geographic Distribution of Expenditures FY08 by State and County

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The Geographic Distribution of VA Expenditures (GDX) is an annual report that shows estimated VA expenditures for major programmatic areas by geographic area (state,...

  11. Veterans Affairs Geographic Distribution of Expenditures FY06 by Congressional District

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The Geographic Distribution of VA Expenditures (GDX) is an annual report that shows estimated VA expenditures for major programmatic areas by geographic area (state,...

  12. Analysis of Differences in Disability Compensation in the Department of Veterans Affairs

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The paper provids analytical support to the VA by reporting on the state-by-state and VA regional office variation in disability compensation claims, ratings, and...

  13. Veterans Affairs Geographic Distribution of Expenditures FY09 by Congressional District

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The Geographic Distribution of VA Expenditures (GDX) is an annual report that shows estimated VA expenditures for major programmatic areas by geographic area (state,...

  14. Veterans Affairs Geographic Distribution of Expenditures FY06 by Congressional District

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The Geographic Distribution of VA Expenditures (GDX) is an annual report that shows estimated VA expenditures for major programmatic areas by geographic area (state,...

  15. Veterans Affairs Geographic Distribution of Expenditures FY06 by State and County

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The Geographic Distribution of VA Expenditures (GDX) is an annual report that shows estimated VA expenditures for major programmatic areas by geographic area (state,...

  16. Veterans Affairs Geographic Distribution of Expenditures FY08 by Congressional District

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The Geographic Distribution of VA Expenditures (GDX) is an annual report that shows estimated VA expenditures for major programmatic areas by geographic area (state,...

  17. Veterans Affairs Geographic Distribution of Expenditures FY07 by Congressional District

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The Geographic Distribution of VA Expenditures (GDX) is an annual report that shows estimated VA expenditures for major programmatic areas by geographic area (state,...

  18. Veterans Affairs Geographic Distribution of Expenditures FY09 by State and County

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The Geographic Distribution of VA Expenditures (GDX) is an annual report that shows estimated VA expenditures for major programmatic areas by geographic area (state,...

  19. Veterans Affairs Geographic Distribution of Expenditures FY08 by State and County

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The Geographic Distribution of VA Expenditures (GDX) is an annual report that shows estimated VA expenditures for major programmatic areas by geographic area (state,...

  20. Analysis of Differences in Disability Compensation in the Department of Veterans Affairs

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The paper provids analytical support to the VA by reporting on the state-by-state and VA regional office variation in disability compensation claims, ratings, and...

  1. Costs Associated With Surgical Site Infections in Veterans Affairs Hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweizer, Marin L; Cullen, Joseph J; Perencevich, Eli N; Vaughan Sarrazin, Mary S

    2014-06-01

    Surgical site infections (SSIs) are potentially preventable complications that are associated with excess morbidity and mortality. To determine the excess costs associated with total, deep, and superficial SSIs among all operations and for high-volume surgical specialties. Surgical patients from 129 Veterans Affairs (VA) hospitals were included. The Veterans Health Administration Decision Support System and VA Surgical Quality Improvement Program databases were used to assess costs associated with SSIs among VA patients who underwent surgery in fiscal year 2010. Linear mixed-effects models were used to evaluate incremental costs associated with SSIs, controlling for patient risk factors, surgical risk factors, and hospital-level variation in costs. Costs of the index hospitalization and subsequent 30-day readmissions were included. Additional analysis determined potential cost savings of quality improvement programs to reduce SSI rates at hospitals with the highest risk-adjusted SSI rates. Among 54,233 VA patients who underwent surgery, 1756 (3.2%) experienced an SSI. Overall, 0.8% of the cohort had a deep SSI, and 2.4% had a superficial SSI. The mean unadjusted costs were $31,580 and $52,620 for patients without and with an SSI, respectively. In the risk-adjusted analyses, the relative costs were 1.43 times greater for patients with an SSI than for patients without an SSI (95% CI, 1.34-1.52; difference, $11,876). Deep SSIs were associated with 1.93 times greater costs (95% CI, 1.71-2.18; difference, $25,721), and superficial SSIs were associated with 1.25 times greater costs (95% CI, 1.17-1.35; difference, $7003). Among the highest-volume specialties, the greatest mean cost attributable to SSIs was $23,755 among patients undergoing neurosurgery, followed by patients undergoing orthopedic surgery, general surgery, peripheral vascular surgery, and urologic surgery. If hospitals in the highest 10th percentile (ie, the worst hospitals) reduced their SSI rates to the

  2. 77 FR 14600 - Public Availability of the Department of Veterans Affairs Fiscal Year (FY) 2011 Service Contract...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-12

    ... AFFAIRS Public Availability of the Department of Veterans Affairs Fiscal Year (FY) 2011 Service Contract... Contract Inventories. SUMMARY: In accordance with Section 743 of Division C of the Consolidated Appropriations Act of 2010 (Public Law 111-117), Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) is publishing this notice...

  3. A Health Assessment Survey of Veteran Students: Utilizing a Community College-Veterans Affairs Medical Center Partnership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra-Hebert, Anita D; Santurri, Laura; DeChant, Richard; Watts, Brook; Sehgal, Ashwini R; Aron, David C

    2015-10-01

    To assess health status among student veterans at a community college utilizing a partnership between a Veterans Affairs Medical Center and a community college. Student veterans at Cuyahoga Community College in Cleveland, Ohio, in January to April 2013. A health assessment survey was sent to 978 veteran students. Descriptive analyses to assess prevalence of clinical diagnoses and health behaviors were performed. Logistic regression analyses were performed to assess for independent predictors of functional limitations. 204 students participated in the survey (21% response rate). Self-reported depression and unhealthy behaviors were high. Physical and emotional limitations (45% and 35%, respectively), and pain interfering with work (42%) were reported. Logistic regression analyses confirmed the independent association of self-reported depression with functional limitation (odds ratio [OR] = 3.3, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.4-7.8, p student veterans at a community college. A partnership between a Veterans Affairs Medical Center and a community college can be utilized to help understand the health needs of veteran students. Reprint & Copyright © 2015 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  4. Implementation of the Department of Veterans Affairs' first point-of-care clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Avolio, Leonard; Ferguson, Ryan; Goryachev, Sergey; Woods, Patricia; Sabin, Thomas; O'Neil, Joseph; Conrad, Chester; Gillon, Joseph; Escalera, Jasmine; Brophy, Mary; Lavori, Phillip; Fiore, Louis

    2012-06-01

    The Massachusetts Veterans Epidemiology Research and Information Center in collaboration with the Stanford Center for Innovative Study Design set out to test the feasibility of a new method of evidence generation. The first pilot of a point-of-care clinical trial (POCCT), adding randomization and other study processes to an electronic medical record (EMR) system, was launched to compare the effectiveness of two insulin regimens. Existing functionalities of the Veterans Affairs (VA) computerized patient record system (CPRS)/veterans health information systems and technology architecture (VISTA) were modified to support the activities of a randomized controlled trial including enrolment, randomization, and longitudinal data collection. The VA's CPRS/VISTA was successfully adapted to support the processes of a clinical trial and longitudinal study data are being collected from the medical record automatically. As of 30 June 2011, 55 of the 67 eligible patients approached received a randomized intervention. The design of CPRS/VISTA made integration of study workflows and data collection possible. Institutions and investigators considering similar designs must carefully map clinical workflows and clinical trial workflows to EMR capabilities. POCCT study teams are necessarily interdisciplinary and interdepartmental. As a result, executive sponsorship is critical. POCCT represent a promising new method for conducting clinical science. Much work is needed to understand better the optimal uses and designs for this new approach. Next steps include focus groups to measure patient and clinician perceptions, multisite deployment of the current pilot, and implementation of additional studies.

  5. Veterans Affairs: Presumptive Service Connection and Disability Compensation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-28

    requirements that a veteran must show diagnosis by a medical examination conducted by a medical officer of the then Veterans Bureau or duly qualified...to include a “medically unexplained chronic multisymptom illness (such as chronic fatigue syndrome, fibromyalgia , and irritable bowel syndrome) that

  6. 38 CFR 17.95 - Outpatient medical services for Department of Veterans Affairs employees and others in emergencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... services for Department of Veterans Affairs employees and others in emergencies. 17.95 Section 17.95... Outpatient medical services for Department of Veterans Affairs employees and others in emergencies. Outpatient medical services for which charges shall be made as required by § 17.101 may be authorized...

  7. Evaluation of Outpatient Parenteral Antimicrobial Therapy at a Veterans Affairs Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spivak, Emily Sydnor; Kendall, Brian; Orlando, Patricia; Perez, Christian; De Amorim, Marina; Samore, Matthew; Pavia, Andrew T; Hersh, Adam L

    2015-09-01

    We reviewed outpatient parenteral antimicrobial therapy at a Veterans Affairs Medical Center to identify opportunities for antimicrobial stewardship intervention. A definite or possible modification would have been recommended in 60% of courses. Forty-one percent of outpatient parenteral antimicrobial therapy courses were potentially avoidable, including 22% involving infectious diseases consultation.

  8. Baccalaureate Nursing Faculty Competencies and Teaching Strategies to Enhance the Care of the Veteran Population: Perspectives of Veteran Affairs Nursing Academy (VANA) Faculty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Judy

    2016-01-01

    It is critical that faculty competencies, teaching strategies, and the essential knowledge relating to the care of our veterans be delineated and taught to health care professionals in order for our Veterans to receive optimal care. The purpose of this qualitative study was to ascertain from nursing faculty members who have worked extensively with veterans, the necessary faculty competencies, essential knowledge, and teaching strategies needed to prepare baccalaureate level nurses to provide individualized, quality, and holistic care to veterans. Six Veteran Affairs Nursing Academy faculty members participated in two 2-hour focus group sessions. There were a total of 12 multidimensional major concepts identified: 5 faculty competencies, 4 essential knowledge areas, and 3 teaching strategies specifically related to veteran care. The information generated can be used for faculty, staff, and or nurse development. Having a comprehensive understanding of veteran health care needs enable effective patient-centered care delivery to veterans, which is the gold standard in health care our veterans deserve.

  9. Physical activity in postdeployment Operation Iraqi Freedom/Operation Enduring Freedom veterans using Department of Veterans Affairs services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorraine R. Buis, PhD

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Veteran activity levels may decrease between Active Duty and postdeployment. We examined attitudes and changes in self-reported activities between the two in Operation Iraqi Freedom/Operation Enduring Freedom (OIF/OEF veterans using Department of Veterans Affairs (VA services. We conducted an online cross-sectional survey (June-August 2008 of postdeployment OIF/OEF veterans registered with the VA Ann Arbor Healthcare System, Ann Arbor, Michigan. Descriptive statistics summarized demographic data and attitudes, while regression analyses compared physical activities during Active Duty with physical activities postdeployment. Participants (n = 319, 15.6% response rate reported that they believe staying physically fit is important, they worry about gaining weight, and they believe exercise will keep them healthy (77%, 72%, and 90% agree or strongly agree, respectively. Running (30.0%, Exercise with Gym Equipment (21.5%, Occupational Activities (14.9%, and Walking (13.0% were the most frequently reported Active Duty physical activities. The most frequently reported postdeployment physical activities included Walking (21.1%, Running (18.5%, and Exercise with Gym Equipment (17.9%. Health problems (39% and chronic pain (52% were common barriers to physical activity. Postdeployment OIF/OEF veterans using the VA believe physical activity is beneficial, yet many report health problems and/or chronic pain that makes exercise difficult. Physical activity promotes health, and strategies are needed to facilitate physical activity in this population.

  10. Local Area Unemployment and the Demand for Inpatient Care Among Veterans Affairs Enrollees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Edwin S; Hebert, Paul L; Nelson, Karin M; Hernandez, Susan E; Sylling, Philip W; Fihn, Stephan D; Liu, Chuan-Fen

    2015-08-01

    Prior research examining the relationship between economic conditions and health service demand has focused primarily on outpatient use. This study examines whether local area unemployment, as an indicator of economic conditions, was associated with use of inpatient care, which is theoretically less subject to discretionary use. Using a random sample of 131,603 patients dually enrolled in the Veterans Affairs (VA) Health System and fee-for-service Medicare, we measured VA, Medicare, and total (VA and Medicare) hospitalizations. Overall, local unemployment was not associated with VA, Medicare, or total hospitalization probability. Among low-income veterans exempt from VA copayments, higher local unemployment was moderately associated with a lower probability of hospitalization through Medicare. For veterans subject to VA copayments, higher local unemployment was moderately associated with a higher likelihood of VA hospitalization. These results suggest inpatient use is less sensitive to the economy, although worse economic conditions slightly affected inpatient demand for select veterans. © The Author(s) 2015.

  11. Rapid HIV testing experience at Veterans Affairs North Texas Health Care System's Homeless Stand Downs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooshyar, Dina; Surís, Alina M; Czarnogorski, Maggie; Lepage, James P; Bedimo, Roger; North, Carol S

    2014-01-01

    In the USA, 21% of the estimated 1.1 million people living with human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immune deficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) are unaware they are HIV-infected. In 2011, Veterans Health Administration (VHA)'s Office of Public Health in conjunction with VHA's Health Care for Homeless Veterans Program funded grants to support rapid HIV testing at homeless outreach events because homeless populations are more likely to obtain emergent rather than preventive care and have a higher HIV seroprevalence as compared to the general population. Because of a Veterans Affairs North Texas Health Care System (VANTHCS)'s laboratory testing requirement, VANTHCS partnered with community agencies to offer rapid HIV testing for the first time at VANTHCS' 2011 Homeless Stand Downs in Dallas, Fort Worth, and Texoma, Texas. Homeless Stand Downs are outreach events that connect Veterans with services. Veterans who declined testing were asked their reasons for declining. Comparisons by Homeless Stand Down site used Pearson χ², substituting Fisher's Exact tests for expected cell sizes Stand Downs, 261 Veterans reported reasons for declining HIV testing, and 133 Veterans were tested, where 92% of the tested Veterans obtained their test results at the events - all tested negative. Veterans' reported reasons for declining HIV testing included previous negative result (n=168), no time to test (n=49), no risk factors (n=36), testing is not a priority (n=11), uninterested in knowing serostatus (n=6), and HIV-infected (n=3). Only "no time to test" differed significantly by Homeless Stand Down site. Nonresponse rate was 54%. Offering rapid HIV testing at Homeless Stand Downs is a promising testing venue since 15% of Veterans attending VANTHCS' Homeless Stand Downs were tested for HIV, and majority obtained their HIV test results at point-of-care while further research is needed to determine how to improve these rates.

  12. Applying behavior change theory to technology promoting veteran mental health care seeking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whealin, Julia M; Kuhn, Eric; Pietrzak, Robert H

    2014-11-01

    Despite the availability of effective mental health interventions, the vast majority of veterans with a mental disorder underutilize psychological services. Contemporary research has revealed that several factors such as low education, stigma, stoicism, lack of knowledge, and negative beliefs about mental health services are associated with veterans' underutilization of services. In this article, the authors provide an overview of factors that affect symptomatic veterans' decisions about whether to seek mental health services. Second, they describe the theory of planned behavior (Ajzen & Fishbein, 1980), a useful model for understanding mental health care seeking that can inform the development of technology-based interventions designed to increase veterans' willingness to seek psychological services. Third, the authors describe the development of Considering Professional Help, a personalized web-based tool developed by the Department of Veterans Affairs, which has been designed to promote mental health care seeking in veterans with mental health problems. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved).

  13. Examination of Veterans Affairs disability compensation as a disincentive for employment in a population-based sample of Veterans under age 65.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Jack; Rosenheck, Robert A

    2013-12-01

    Concerns that disability benefits may create disincentives for employment may be especially relevant for young American military veterans, particularly veterans of the recent wars in Iraq and Afghanistan who are facing a current economic recession and turning in large numbers to the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) for disability compensation. This study describes the rate of employment and VA disability compensation among a nationally representative sample of veterans under the age of 65 and examines the association between levels of VA disability compensation and employment, adjusting for sociodemographics and health status. Data on a total of 4,787 veterans from the 2010 National Survey of Veterans were analyzed using multinomial logistic regressions to compare employed veterans with two groups that were not employed. Two-thirds of veterans under the age of 65 were employed, although only 36 % of veterans with a VA service-connected disability rating of 50 % or higher were employed. Veterans who received no VA disability compensation or who were service-connected 50 % or more were more likely to be unemployed and not looking for employment than veterans who were not service-connected or were service-connected less than 50 %, suggesting high but not all levels of VA disability compensation create disincentives for employment. Results were similar when analyses were limited to veterans who served in Iraq and Afghanistan. Education and vocational rehabilitation interventions, as well as economic work incentives, may be needed to maximize employment among veterans with disabilities.

  14. Infertility Care Among OEF/OIF/OND Women Veterans in the Department of Veterans Affairs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattocks, Kristin; Kroll-Desrosiers, Aimee; Zephyrin, Laurie; Katon, Jodie; Weitlauf, Julie; Bastian, Lori; Haskell, Sally; Brandt, Cynthia

    2015-01-01

    Background An increasing number of young women Veterans seek reproductive health care through the VA, yet little is known regarding the provision of infertility care for this population. The VA provides a range of infertility services for Veterans including artificial insemination, but does not provide in vitro fertilization. This study will be the first to characterize infertility care among OEF/OIF/OND women Veterans using VA care. Methods We analyzed data from the OEF/OIF/OND roster file from the Defense Manpower Data Center (DMDC)—Contingency Tracking System Deployment file of military discharges from October 1, 2001–December 30, 2010, which includes 68,442 women Veterans between the ages of 18 and 45 who utilized VA health care after separating from military service. We examined the receipt of infertility diagnoses and care using ICD-9 and CPT codes. Results Less than 2% (n = 1323) of OEF/OIF/OND women Veterans received an infertility diagnosis during the study period. Compared with women VA users without infertility diagnosis, those with infertility diagnosis were younger, obese, black, or Hispanic, have a service-connected disability rating, a positive screen for military sexual trauma, and a mental health diagnosis. Overall, 22% of women with an infertility diagnosis received an infertility assessment or treatment. Thirty-nine percent of women Veterans receiving infertility assessment or treatment received this care from non-VA providers. Conclusions Overall, a small proportion of OEF/OIF/OND women Veterans received infertility diagnoses from the VA during the study period, and an even smaller proportion received infertility treatment. Nearly 40% of those who received infertility treatments received these treatments from non-VA providers, indicating that the VA may need to examine the training and resources needed to provide this care within the VA. Understanding women’s use of VA infertility services is an important component of understanding VA

  15. Modeling an integrative physical examination program for the Departments of Defense and Veterans Affairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodrich, Scott G

    2006-10-01

    Current policies governing the Departments of Defense and Veterans Affairs physical examination programs are out of step with current evidence-based medical practice. Replacing periodic and other routine physical examination types with annual preventive health assessments would afford our service members additional health benefit at reduced cost. Additionally, the Departments of Defense and Veterans Affairs repeat the physical examination process at separation and have been unable to reconcile their respective disability evaluation systems to reduce duplication and waste. A clear, coherent, and coordinated strategy to improve the relevance and utility of our physical examination programs is long overdue. This article discusses existing physical examination programs and proposes a model for a new integrative physical examination program based on need, science, and common sense.

  16. The Department of Defense and Veteran Affairs Health Care Joint Venture at Tripler Army Medical Center Needs More Management Oversight

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-18

    E M B E R 1 8 , 2 0 1 3 The Department of Defense and Veteran Affairs Health Care Joint Venture at Tripler Army Medical Center Needs More...Department of Defense and Veteran Affairs Health Care Joint Venture at Tripler Army Medical Center Needs More Management Oversight 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER...Health Care Joint Venture at Tripler Army Medical Center Needs More Management Oversight Objective Our audit objective was to determine whether the

  17. 38 CFR 18a.1 - Delegations of responsibility between the Secretary of Veterans Affairs and the Secretary...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... VI, CIVIL RIGHTS ACT OF 1964 § 18a.1 Delegations of responsibility between the Secretary of Veterans... responsibilities of those Departments and of the responsible Departmental officials under Title VI of the Civil... responsibility between the Secretary of Veterans Affairs and the Secretary, Department of Health and...

  18. 76 FR 71442 - Enhanced-Use Lease (EUL) of Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) Real Property for the Development...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-17

    ... Veterans. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Edward Bradley, Office of Asset Enterprise Management (044... of Permanent Supportive Housing Facility in St. Cloud, MN AGENCY: Department of Veterans Affairs... to enter into an EUL on an approximately 6.0-acre parcel of land at the VA St. Cloud Health...

  19. 2 CFR 801.1010 - Suspending official (Department of Veterans Affairs supplement to government-wide definition at 2...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Affairs supplement to government-wide definition at 2 CFR 180.1010). 801.1010 Section 801.1010 Grants and... supplement to government-wide definition at 2 CFR 180.1010). In addition to the suspending official listed at 2 CFR 180.1010, the suspending official for the Department of Veterans Affairs is: (a) For...

  20. 76 FR 72045 - Enhanced-Use Lease (EUL) of Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) Real Property for the Development...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-21

    ... finance, design, develop, construct, maintain and operate the EUL development. The lessee will also be... AFFAIRS Enhanced-Use Lease (EUL) of Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) Real Property for the Development... to enter into an Enhanced-Use Lease (EUL). SUMMARY: The Secretary of VA intends to enter into an...

  1. 76 FR 72047 - Enhanced-Use Lease (EUL) of Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) Real Property for the Development...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-21

    ... lease, the lessee will be required to finance, design, develop, construct, manage, operate, and maintain... AFFAIRS Enhanced-Use Lease (EUL) of Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) Real Property for the Development... Enhanced-Use Lease (EUL). SUMMARY: The Secretary of VA intends to enter into an EUL on an approximately...

  2. 76 FR 72046 - Enhanced-Use Lease (EUL) of Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) Real Property for the Development...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-21

    ..., the lessee will be required to finance, design, develop, renovate, operate, and maintain one building... AFFAIRS Enhanced-Use Lease (EUL) of Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) Real Property for the Development.... ACTION: Notice of intent to enter into an Enhanced-Use Lease (EUL). SUMMARY: The Secretary of VA...

  3. Perceived Stigma, Discrimination, and Disclosure of Sexual Orientation Among a Sample of Lesbian Veterans Receiving Care in the Department of Veterans Affairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattocks, Kristin M; Sullivan, J Cherry; Bertrand, Christina; Kinney, Rebecca L; Sherman, Michelle D; Gustason, Carolyn

    2015-06-01

    Many lesbian women experience stigma and discrimination from their healthcare providers as a result of their sexual orientation. Additionally, others avoid disclosure of their sexual orientation to their providers for fear of mistreatment. With the increasing number of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) veterans seeking care from the Veterans Health Administration (VHA), it is important to understand lesbian veterans' experiences with stigma, discrimination, and disclosure of sexual orientation. This article examines lesbian veterans' experiences with perceived stigma and discrimination in VHA healthcare, their perspectives on disclosure of sexual orientation to VHA providers, and their recommendations for improvements in VHA healthcare to create a welcoming environment for lesbian veterans. This is a mixed methods study of twenty lesbian veterans at four VHA facilities. The women veterans participated in a one-hour interview and then completed an anonymous survey. Ten percent of lesbian veterans had experienced mistreatment from VHA staff or providers, but nearly 50% feared that their Veterans Affairs (VA) providers would mistreat them if they knew about their sexual orientation. A majority of lesbian veterans (70%) believed that VHA providers should never ask about sexual orientation or should only ask if the veteran wanted to discuss it. A majority (80%) believed the VHA had taken steps to create a welcoming environment for LBGT veterans. Though many lesbian veterans have fears of stigma and discrimination in the context of VHA care, few have experienced this. Most lesbian veterans believed the VHA was trying to create a welcoming environment for its LGBT veterans. Future research should focus on expanding this study to include a larger and more diverse sample of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender veterans receiving care at VA facilities across the country.

  4. Military to civilian questionnaire: a measure of postdeployment community reintegration difficulty among veterans using Department of Veterans Affairs medical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayer, Nina A; Frazier, Patricia; Orazem, Robert J; Murdoch, Maureen; Gravely, Amy; Carlson, Kathleen F; Hintz, Samuel; Noorbaloochi, Siamak

    2011-12-01

    The primary objective of this study was to describe the development, reliability, and construct validity of scores on the Military to Civilian Questionnaire (M2C-Q), a 16-item self-report measure of postdeployment community reintegration difficulty. We surveyed a national, stratified sample of 1,226 Iraq and Afghanistan veterans who used U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) medical care; 745 completed the M2C-Q and validated mental health screening measures. All analyses were based on weighted estimates. The internal consistency of the M2C-Q was .95 in this sample. Factor analyses indicated a single total score was the best-fitting model. Total scores were associated with measures theoretically related to reintegration difficulties including perception of overall difficulty readjusting back into civilian life (R(2) = .49), probable PTSD (d = 1.07), probable problem drug or alcohol use (d = 0.34), and overall mental health (r = -.83). Subgroup analyses revealed a similar pattern of findings in those who screened negative for PTSD. Nonwhite and unemployed veterans reported greater community reintegration difficulty (d = 0.20 and 0.45, respectively). Findings offer preliminary support for the reliability and construct validity of M2C-Q scores.

  5. 75 FR 61247 - Proposed Information Collection (Notice to Department of Veterans Affairs of Veteran or...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-04

    ... Beneficiary Incarcerated in Penal Institution) Activity: Comment Request AGENCY: Veterans Benefits... the notice. This notice solicits comments for information needed from penal institutions regarding... Beneficiary Incarcerated in Penal Institution, VA Form 21-4193. OMB Control Number: 2900-0116. Type of...

  6. 78 FR 46420 - Proposed Information Collection (Notice to Department of Veterans Affairs of Veteran or...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-31

    ... Beneficiary Incarcerated in Penal Institution) Activity: Comment Request AGENCY: Veterans Benefits... the notice. This notice solicits comments for information needed from penal institutions regarding... in Penal Institution, VA Form 21-4193. OMB Control Number: 2900-0116. Type of Review: Extension of...

  7. Gap analysis: transition of health care from Department of Defense to Department of Veterans Affairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randall, Marjorie J

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the effectiveness of Public Law 110-181, "National Defense Authorization Act of Fiscal Year 2008, Title XVI-Wounded Warriors Matter," as it relates to health care for returning Operation Enduring Freedom and Operation Iraqi Freedom (OEF/OIF) combat veterans. Specifically, it examined the gap between the time an OEF/OIF combat service member left active service and subsequently obtained health care within the Veteran Affairs (VA) Healthcare System, and which factors influenced or impeded the veteran from obtaining health care sooner. Data were collected from 376 OEF/OIF combat veterans who sought health care at the Nashville or Murfreesboro VA Medical Centers. A questionnaire was designed exclusively for this study. The average time gap for an OEF/OIF combat veteran to transition from Department of Defense to VA health care was 3.83 months (SD 7.17). Twenty-six percent of respondents reported there were factors that impeded them from coming to the VA sooner. Factors included lack of knowledge about VA benefits, transportation/distance, perceptions of losing military career, seeking help as sign of weakness, and VA reputation. The study provided some evidence to support that Department of Defense and VA are meeting mandates for providing seamless transition of health care set forth by "Public Law 110-181, National Defense Authorization Act of Fiscal Year 2008."

  8. The Veterans Affairs's Corporate Data Warehouse: Uses and Implications for Nursing Research and Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Lauren E; Shea, Kimberly; Gephart, Sheila

    2015-01-01

    The Department of Veterans Affairs Veterans Healthcare Administration (VHA) is supported by one of the largest integrated health care information systems in the United States. The VHA's Corporate Data Warehouse (CDW) was developed in 2006 to accommodate the massive amounts of data being generated from more than 20 years of use and to streamline the process of knowledge discovery to application. This article describes the developments in research associated with the VHA's transition into the world of Big Data analytics through CDW utilization. The majority of studies utilizing the CDW also use at least one other data source. The most commonly occurring topics are pharmacy/medications, systems issues, and weight management/obesity. Despite the potential benefit of data mining techniques to improve patient care and services, the CDW and alternative analytical approaches are underutilized by researchers and clinicians.

  9. Chaplaincy and mental health in the department of Veterans affairs and department of defense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieuwsma, Jason A; Rhodes, Jeffrey E; Jackson, George L; Cantrell, William C; Lane, Marian E; Bates, Mark J; Dekraai, Mark B; Bulling, Denise J; Ethridge, Keith; Drescher, Kent D; Fitchett, George; Tenhula, Wendy N; Milstein, Glen; Bray, Robert M; Meador, Keith G

    2013-01-01

    Chaplains play important roles in caring for Veterans and Service members with mental health problems. As part of the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) and Department of Defense (DoD) Integrated Mental Health Strategy, we used a sequential approach to examining intersections between chaplaincy and mental health by gathering and building upon: 1) input from key subject matter experts; 2) quantitative data from the VA / DoD Chaplain Survey (N = 2,163; response rate of 75% in VA and 60% in DoD); and 3) qualitative data from site visits to 33 VA and DoD facilities. Findings indicate that chaplains are extensively involved in caring for individuals with mental health problems, yet integration between mental health and chaplaincy is frequently limited due to difficulties between the disciplines in establishing familiarity and trust. We present recommendations for improving integration of services, and we suggest key domains for future research.

  10. Improving trends in gender disparities in the Department of Veterans Affairs: 2008-2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitehead, Alison M; Czarnogorski, Maggie; Wright, Steve M; Hayes, Patricia M; Haskell, Sally G

    2014-09-01

    Increasing numbers of women veterans using Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) services has contributed to the need for equitable, high-quality care for women. The VA has evaluated performance measure data by gender since 2006. In 2008, the VA launched a 5-year women's health redesign, and, in 2011, gender disparity improvement was included on leadership performance plans. We examined data from VA Office of Analytics and Business Intelligence quarterly gender reports for trends in gender disparities in gender-neutral performance measures from 2008 to 2013. Through reporting of data by gender, leadership involvement, electronic reminders, and population management dashboards, VA has seen a decreasing trend in gender inequities on most Health Effectiveness Data and Information Set performance measures.

  11. Effect of Lean Processes on Surgical Wait Times and Efficiency in a Tertiary Care Veterans Affairs Medical Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valsangkar, Nakul P; Eppstein, Andrew C; Lawson, Rick A; Taylor, Amber N

    2017-01-01

    There are an increasing number of veterans in the United States, and the current delay and wait times prevent Veterans Affairs institutions from fully meeting the needs of current and former service members. Concrete strategies to improve throughput at these facilities have been sparse. To identify whether lean processes can be used to improve wait times for surgical procedures in Veterans Affairs hospitals. Databases in the Veterans Integrated Service Network 11 Data Warehouse, Veterans Health Administration Support Service Center, and Veterans Information Systems and Technology Architecture/Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol were queried to assess changes in wait times for elective general surgical procedures and clinical volume before, during, and after implementation of lean processes over 3 fiscal years (FYs) at a tertiary care Veterans Affairs medical center. All patients evaluated by the general surgery department through outpatient clinics, clinical video teleconferencing, and e-consultations from October 2011 through September 2014 were included. Patients evaluated through the emergency department or as inpatient consults were excluded. The surgery service and systems redesign service held a value stream analysis in FY 2013, culminating in multiple rapid process improvement workshops. Multidisciplinary teams identified systemic inefficiencies and strategies to improve interdepartmental and patient communication to reduce canceled consultations and cases, diagnostic rework, and no-shows. High-priority triage with enhanced operating room flexibility was instituted to reduce scheduling wait times. General surgery department pilot projects were then implemented mid-FY 2013. Planned outcome measures included wait time, clinic and telehealth volume, number of no-shows, and operative volume. Paired t tests were used to identify differences in outcome measures after the institution of reforms. Following rapid process improvement workshop project rollouts, mean

  12. Smoking mediates the effect of conscientiousness on mortality: The Veterans Affairs Normative Aging Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turiano, Nicholas A; Hill, Patrick L; Roberts, Brent W; Spiro, Avron; Mroczek, Daniel K

    2012-12-01

    This study examined the relationship between conscientiousness and mortality over 18 years and whether smoking behavior mediated this relationship. We utilized data from the Veterans Affairs Normative Aging Study on 1349 men who completed the Goldberg (1992) adjectival markers of the Big Five. Over the 18-year follow-up, 547 (41%) participants died. Through proportional hazards modeling in a structural equation modeling framework, we found that higher levels of conscientiousness significantly predicted longer life, and that this effect was mediated by current smoking status at baseline. Methodologically, we also demonstrate the effectiveness of using a structural equation modeling framework to evaluate mediation when using a censored outcome such as mortality.

  13. 76 FR 24571 - Proposed Information Collection (Veterans Mortgage Life Insurance Inquiry); Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-02

    ... AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (Veterans Mortgage Life Insurance Inquiry); Comment Request AGENCY... information needed to maintain Veterans Mortgage Life Insurance accounts. DATES: Written comments and... techniques or the use of other forms of information technology. Title: Veterans Mortgage Life...

  14. 78 FR 36829 - Proposed Information Collection (Veterans Mortgage Life Insurance Statement) Activity: Comment...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-19

    ... AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (Veterans Mortgage Life Insurance Statement) Activity: Comment... solicits comments for information needed to decline Veterans Mortgage Life Insurance. DATES: Written... techniques or the use of other forms of information technology. Title: Veterans Mortgage Life...

  15. BRCA testing within the Department of Veterans Affairs: concordance with clinical practice guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chun, Danielle S; Berse, Brygida; Venne, Vickie L; DuVall, Scott L; Filipski, Kelly K; Kelley, Michael J; Meyer, Laurence J; Icardi, Michael S; Lynch, Julie A

    2017-01-01

    Guideline-concordant cancer care is a priority within the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA). In 2009, the VA expanded its capacity to treat breast cancer patients within VA medical centers (VAMCs). We sought to determine whether male and female Veterans diagnosed with breast cancer received BRCA testing as recommended by the National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) guidelines on Genetic/Familial High-Risk Assessment in Breast and Ovarian Cancer (v. 1.2010-1.2012). Using the 2011-2012 VA Central Cancer Registry and BRCA test orders from Myriad Genetics, we conducted a retrospective study. The outcome variable was a recommendation for genetic counseling or BRCA testing, determined by chart review. Independent variables expected to predict testing included region, site of care, and patient characteristics. We performed descriptive analysis of all patients and conducted multivariable logistic regression on patients who sought care at VAMCs that offered BRCA testing. Of the 462 Veterans who met NCCN testing criteria, 126 (27 %) received guideline-concordant care, either a referral for counseling or actual testing. No BRCA testing was recommended in 49 (50 %) VAMCs that provide cancer treatment. Surprisingly, patients with second primary breast cancer were less likely to be referred/tested (OR 0.39; CI 0.17, 0.89; p = 0.025). For patients under age 51, a yearly increase in age decreased likelihood of referral or testing (OR 0.85; CI 0.76, 0.94; p BRCA testing for Veterans diagnosed with breast cancer. Our research suggests the need for clinical decision support tools to facilitate delivery of guideline-concordant cancer care and improve Veteran access to BRCA testing.

  16. Time course and predictors of use of erectile dysfunction treatment in a Veterans Affairs medical center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clavijo, R I; Daskivich, T; Kwan, L; Bassett, J; Keller, T; Bennett, C

    2016-09-01

    The objective of this study was to define the pattern and time course of use of ED treatments in a Veterans Affairs (VA) medical center and to identify clinical or demographic variables that are associated with the use of second- or third-line ED treatments. We identified 702 men treated for ED at the Greater Los Angeles Veterans Affairs between 2007 and 2013. We extracted demographics, Charlson co-morbidity score, pertinent surgical/medication history as well as use of ED treatments from medical records. On multivariate analysis, age over 65 (OR 1.83, 95% CI: 1.31-2.56) and Charlson co-morbidity score of 1 (OR 1.77, 95% CI: 1.13-2.77) and 2+ (OR 2.07, 95% CI: 1.28-3.36) were significantly associated with use of medicated urethral suppositories for erection (MUSE)/intracorporal injections (ICI) compared with PDE5i/erection devices. Across all men who used second- or third-line treatments, median time until receiving MUSE was 0.6 years and median time until receiving ICI/implant was 2 years. We conclude that men who will ultimately use more invasive ED treatments, such as men with more co-morbidities, tend to have a prolonged treatment course. This information may be incorporated into a shared decision-making model for more efficient treatment of ED.

  17. Comparing Catheter-Associated Urinary Tract Infection Prevention Programs Between Veterans Affairs Nursing Homes and Non-Veterans Affairs Nursing Homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mody, Lona; Greene, M Todd; Saint, Sanjay; Meddings, Jennifer; Trautner, Barbara W; Wald, Heidi L; Crnich, Christopher; Banaszak-Holl, Jane; McNamara, Sara E; King, Beth J; Hogikyan, Robert; Edson, Barbara S; Krein, Sarah L

    2017-03-01

    OBJECTIVE The impact of healthcare system integration on infection prevention programs is unknown. Using catheter-associated urinary tract infection (CAUTI) prevention as an example, we hypothesize that US Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) nursing homes have a more robust infection prevention infrastructure due to integration and centralization compared with non-VA nursing homes. SETTING VA and non-VA nursing homes participating in the AHRQ Safety Program for Long-Term Care collaborative. METHODS Nursing homes provided baseline information about their infection prevention programs to assess strengths and gaps related to CAUTI prevention via a needs assessment questionnaire. RESULTS A total of 353 of 494 nursing homes from 41 states (71%; 47 VA and 306 non-VA facilities) responded. VA nursing homes reported more hours per week devoted to infection prevention-related activities (31 vs 12 hours; Phomes reported tracking CAUTI rates (94% vs 66%; Phomes reported having policies for appropriate catheter use (64% vs 81%; P=.004) and catheter insertion (83% vs 94%; P=.004). CONCLUSIONS Among nursing homes participating in an AHRQ-funded collaborative, VA and non-VA nursing homes differed in their approach to CAUTI prevention. Best practices from both settings should be applied universally to create an optimal infection prevention program within emerging integrated healthcare systems. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2017;38:287-293.

  18. Delegations of authority/claims for cost of medical care and services--Department of Veterans Affairs. Final regulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-07-22

    The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) has amended VA regulations to increase the settlement and waiver authority delegated to officials within the Office of the General Counsel and District Counsels. This change follows increased authority delegated by the Department of Justice to heads of departments and agencies of the United States.

  19. Lower-Limb Amputation and Effect of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder on Department of Veterans Affairs Outpatient Cost Trends

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-07-01

    highlighting the importance of accurate diagnosis, treatment, and support for PTSD. Key words: amputation, amputee, Department of Veterans Affairs...2014;51(5):697–710. [PMID:25509056] http://dx.doi.org/10.1682/JRRD.2013.06.0143 33. Reger MA, Gahm GA, Swanson RD, Duma SJ. Associa- tion between number

  20. The Annual Burden of Seasonal Influenza in the US Veterans Affairs Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young-Xu, Yinong; Russo, Ellyn; Lee, Jason K. H.; Chit, Ayman

    2017-01-01

    Seasonal influenza epidemics have a substantial public health and economic burden in the United States (US). On average, over 200,000 people are hospitalized and an estimated 23,000 people die from respiratory and circulatory complications associated with seasonal influenza virus infections each year. Annual direct medical costs and indirect productivity costs across the US have been found to average respectively at $10.4 billion and $16.3 billion. The objective of this study was to estimate the economic impact of severe influenza-induced illness on the US Veterans Affairs population. The five-year study period included 2010 through 2014. Influenza-attributed outcomes were estimated with a statistical regression model using observed emergency department (ED) visits, hospitalizations, and deaths from the Veterans Health Administration of the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) electronic medical records and respiratory viral surveillance data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Data from VA’s Managerial Cost Accounting system were used to estimate the costs of the emergency department and hospital visits. Data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics were used to estimate the costs of lost productivity; data on age at death, life expectancy and economic valuations for a statistical life year were used to estimate the costs of a premature death. An estimated 10,674 (95% CI 8,661–12,687) VA ED visits, 2,538 (95% CI 2,112–2,964) VA hospitalizations, 5,522 (95% CI 4,834–6,210) all-cause deaths, and 3,793 (95% CI 3,375–4,211) underlying respiratory or circulatory deaths (inside and outside VA) among adult Veterans were attributable to influenza each year from 2010 through 2014. The annual value of lost productivity amounted to $27 (95% CI $24–31) million and the annual costs for ED visits were $6.2 (95% CI $5.1–7.4) million. Ninety-six percent of VA hospitalizations resulted in either death or a discharge to home, with annual costs

  1. Intensive care unit admitting patterns in the Veterans Affairs health care system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lena M; Render, Marta; Sales, Anne; Kennedy, Edward H; Wiitala, Wyndy; Hofer, Timothy P

    2012-09-10

    Critical care resource use accounts for almost 1% of US gross domestic product and varies widely among hospitals. However, we know little about the initial decision to admit a patient to the intensive care unit (ICU). To describe hospital ICU admitting patterns for medical patients after accounting for severity of illness on admission, we performed a retrospective cohort study of the first nonsurgical admission of 289,310 patients admitted from the emergency department or the outpatient clinic to 118 Veterans Affairs acute care hospitals between July 1, 2009, and June 30, 2010. Severity (30-day predicted mortality rate) was measured using a modified Veterans Affairs ICU score based on laboratory data and comorbidities around admission. The main outcome measure was direct admission to an ICU. Of the 31,555 patients (10.9%) directly admitted to the ICU, 53.2% had 30-day predicted mortality at admission of 2% or less. The rate of ICU admission for this low-risk group varied from 1.2% to 38.9%. For high-risk patients (predicted mortality >30%), ICU admission rates also varied widely. For a 1-SD increase in predicted mortality, the adjusted odds of ICU admission varied substantially across hospitals (odds ratio = 0.85-2.22). As a result, 66.1% of hospitals were in different quartiles of ICU use for low- vs high-risk patients (weighted κ = 0.50). The proportion of low- and high-risk patients admitted to the ICU, variation in ICU admitting patterns among hospitals, and the sensitivity of hospital rankings to patient risk all likely reflect a lack of consensus about which patients most benefit from ICU admission.

  2. Ethnic Disparities in Emergency Severity Index Scores among U.S. Veteran's Affairs Emergency Department Patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacob M Vigil

    Full Text Available The goal of these analyses was to determine whether there were systematic differences in Emergency Severity Index (ESI scores, which are intended to determine priority of treatment and anticipate resource needs, across categories of race and ethnicity, after accounting for patient-presenting vital signs and examiner characteristics, and whether these differences varied among male and female Veterans Affairs (VA ED patients.We used a large national database of electronic medical records of ED patients from twenty-two U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs ED stations to determine whether ESI assignments differ systematically by race or ethnicity. Multi-level, random effects linear modeling was used to control for demographic characteristics and patient's vital signs (heart rate, respiratory rate, and pain level, as well as age, gender, and experience of triage nurses. The dataset included 129,991 VA patients presenting for emergency care between 2008 and 2012 (91% males; 61% non-Hispanic White, 28% Black, 7% Hispanic, 2% Asian, <1% American Indian/Alaska Native, 1% mixed ethnicity and 774 nurses for a total of 359,642 patient/examiner encounters. Approximately 13% of the variance in ESI scores was due to patient characteristics and 21% was due to the nurse characteristics. After controlling for characteristics of nurses and patients, Black patients were assigned less urgent ESI scores than White patients, and this effect was more prominent for Black males compared with Black females. A similar interaction was found for Hispanic males. It remains unclear how these results may generalize to EDs and patient populations outside of the U.S. VA Health Care system.The findings suggest the possibility that subgroups of VA patients receive different ESI ratings in triage, which may have cascading, downstream consequences for patient treatment quality, satisfaction with care, and trust in the health equity of emergency care.

  3. Redesigning a joint replacement program using Lean Six Sigma in a Veterans Affairs hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gayed, Benjamin; Black, Stephen; Daggy, Joanne; Munshi, Imtiaz A

    2013-11-01

    In April 2009, an analysis of joint replacement surgical procedures at the Richard L. Roudebush Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Indianapolis, Indiana, revealed that total hip and knee replacements incurred $1.4 million in non-Veterans Affairs (VA) care costs with an average length of stay of 6.1 days during fiscal year 2008. The Joint Replacement Program system redesign project was initiated following the Vision-Analysis-Team-Aim-Map-Measure-Change-Sustain (VA-TAMMCS) model to increase efficiency, decrease length of stay, and reduce non-VA care costs. To determine the effectiveness of Lean Six Sigma process improvement methods applied in a VA hospital. Perioperative processes for patients undergoing total joint replacement were redesigned following the VA-TAMMCS model--the VA's official, branded method of Lean Six Sigma process improvement. A multidisciplinary team including the orthopedic surgeons, frontline staff, and executive management identified waste in the current processes and initiated changes to reduce waste and increase efficiency. Data collection included a 1-year baseline period and a 20-month sustainment period. The primary endpoint was length of stay; a secondary analysis considered non-VA care cost reductions. Length of stay decreased 36% overall, decreasing from 5.3 days during the preproject period to 3.4 days during the 20-month sustainment period (P Six Sigma process improvement initiatives in a surgical practice, producing a 36% sustained reduction in length of stay and completely eliminating non-VA care for total hip and knee replacements while increasing total joint replacement volume at this medical center.

  4. Variation in outcomes in Veterans Affairs intensive care units with a computerized severity measure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Render, Marta L; Kim, H Myra; Deddens, James; Sivaganesin, Siva; Welsh, Deborah E; Bickel, Karen; Freyberg, Ron; Timmons, Stephen; Johnston, Joseph; Connors, Alfred F; Wagner, Douglas; Hofer, Timothy P

    2005-05-01

    To quantify the variability in risk-adjusted mortality and length of stay of Veterans Affairs intensive care units using a computer-based severity of illness measure. Retrospective cohort study. A stratified random sample of 34 intensive care units in 17 Veterans Affairs hospitals. A consecutive sample of 29,377 first intensive care unit admissions from February 1996 through July 1997. Standardized mortality ratio (observed/expected deaths) and observed minus expected length of stay (OMELOS) with 95% confidence intervals were estimated for each unit using a hierarchical logistic (standardized mortality ratio) or linear (OMELOS) regression model with Markov Chain Monte Carlo simulation. We adjusted for patient characteristics including age, admission diagnosis, comorbid disease, physiology at admission (from laboratory data), and transfer status. Mortality across the intensive care units for the 12,088 surgical and 17,289 medical cases averaged 11% (range, 2-30%). Length of stay in the intensive care units averaged 4.0 days (range, mean unit length of stay 3.0-5.9). Standardized mortality ratio of the intensive care units varied from 0.62 to 1.27; the standardized mortality ratio and 95% confidence interval were units and >1.0 for seven intensive care units. OMELOS of the intensive care units ranged from -0.89 to 1.34 days. In a random slope hierarchical model, variation in standardized mortality ratio among intensive care units was similar across the range of severity, whereas variation in length of stay increased with severity. Standardized mortality ratio was not associated with OMELOS (Pearson's r = .13). We identified intensive care units whose indicators for mortality and length of stay differ substantially using a conservative statistical approach with a severity adjustment model based on data available in computerized clinical databases. Computerized risk adjustment employing routinely available data may facilitate research on the utility of intensive care

  5. Department of Veterans Affairs Geriatric Research, Education and Clinical Centers: translating aging research into clinical geriatrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Supiano, Mark A; Alessi, Cathy; Chernoff, Ronni; Goldberg, Andrew; Morley, John E; Schmader, Kenneth E; Shay, Kenneth

    2012-07-01

    Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) Geriatric Research, Education and Clinical Centers (GRECCs) originated in 1975 in response to the rapidly aging veteran population. Since its inception, the GRECC program has made major contributions to the advancement of aging research, geriatric training, and clinical care within and outside the VA. GRECCs were created to conduct translational research to enhance the clinical care of future aging generations. GRECC training programs also provide leadership in educating healthcare providers about the special needs of older persons. GRECC programs are also instrumental in establishing robust clinical geriatric and aging research programs at their affiliated university schools of medicine. This report identifies how the GRECC program has successfully adapted to changes that have occurred in VA since 1994, when the program's influence on U.S. geriatrics was last reported, focusing on its effect on advancing clinical geriatrics in the last 10 years. This evidence supports the conclusion that, after more than 30 years, the GRECC program remains a vibrant "jewel in the crown of the VA" and is poised to make contributions to aging research and clinical geriatrics well into the future. © 2012, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2012, The American Geriatrics Society.

  6. Prevalence and Risk Factors of Dry Eye Syndrome in a United States Veterans Affairs Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    GALOR, ANAT; FEUER, WILLIAM; LEE, DAVID J.; FLOREZ, HERMES; CARTER, DAVID; POUYEH, BOZORGMEHR; PRUNTY, WILLIAM J.; PEREZ, VICTOR L.

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE To evaluate the prevalence of dry eye syndrome (DES) and its associated risk factors in a US Veterans Affairs population receiving ocular care services. DESIGN Retrospective study. METHODS SETTINGS Patients were seen in the Miami and Broward Veterans Affairs eye clinics between 2005 and 2010. PATIENTS POPULATION Patients were divided into cases and controls with regard to their dry eye status (cases = ICD9 code for DES plus dry eye therapy; controls = patients without ICD9 code plus no therapy). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES The prevalence of DES and its associated risk factors. RESULTS A total of 16 862 patients were identified as either a dry eye case (n = 2056) or control (n = 14 806). Overall, 12% of male and 22% of female patients had a diagnosis of DES, with female gender imparting a 2.40 increased risk (95% confidence interval [CI] 2.04–2.81) over male gender. Several medical conditions were found to increase DES risk including post-traumatic stress disorder (odds ratio [OR] 1.97, 95% CI 1.75–2.23), depression (OR 1.91, 95% CI 1.73–2.10), thyroid disease (OR 1.81, 95% CI 1.46–2.26), and sleep apnea (OR 2.20, 95% CI 1.97–2.46) (all analyses adjusted for gender and age). The use of several systemic medications, including anti-depressant medications (OR 1.97, 95% CI 1.79–2.17), anti-anxiety medication (OR 1.74, 95% CI 1.58–1.91), and anti–benign prostatic hyperplasia medications (OR 1.68, 95% CI 1.51–1.86), was likewise associated with an increased risk of DES. CONCLUSIONS The prevalence of DES was found to be high in both men and women in our eye care population. This is the first study to demonstrate that in a veteran population, several diagnoses were significantly associated with DES, including post-traumatic stress disorder and depression. PMID:21684522

  7. Assessing Hospital Disaster Readiness Over Time at the US Department of Veterans Affairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Der-Martirosian, Claudia; Radcliff, Tiffany A; Gable, Alicia R; Riopelle, Deborah; Hagigi, Farhad A; Brewster, Pete; Dobalian, Aram

    2017-02-01

    Introduction There have been numerous initiatives by government and private organizations to help hospitals become better prepared for major disasters and public health emergencies. This study reports on efforts by the US Department of Veterans Affairs (VA), Veterans Health Administration, Office of Emergency Management's (OEM) Comprehensive Emergency Management Program (CEMP) to assess the readiness of VA Medical Centers (VAMCs) across the nation. Hypothesis/Problem This study conducts descriptive analyses of preparedness assessments of VAMCs and examines change in hospital readiness over time. To assess change, quantitative analyses of data from two phases of preparedness assessments (Phase I: 2008-2010; Phase II: 2011-2013) at 137 VAMCs were conducted using 61 unique capabilities assessed during the two phases. The initial five-point Likert-like scale used to rate each capability was collapsed into a dichotomous variable: "not-developed=0" versus "developed=1." To describe changes in preparedness over time, four new categories were created from the Phase I and Phase II dichotomous variables: (1) rated developed in both phases; (2) rated not-developed in Phase I but rated developed in Phase II; (3) rated not-developed in both phases; and (4) rated developed in Phase I but rated not- developed in Phase II. From a total of 61 unique emergency preparedness capabilities, 33 items achieved the desired outcome - they were rated either "developed in both phases" or "became developed" in Phase II for at least 80% of VAMCs. For 14 items, 70%-80% of VAMCs achieved the desired outcome. The remaining 14 items were identified as "low-performing" capabilities, defined as less than 70% of VAMCs achieved the desired outcome. Measuring emergency management capabilities is a necessary first step to improving those capabilities. Furthermore, assessing hospital readiness over time and creating robust hospital readiness assessment tools can help hospitals make informed decisions

  8. Basic fibroblast growth factor predicts cardiovascular disease occurrence in participants from the Veterans Affairs Diabetes Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark B Zimering

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Cardiovascular disease is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus. The aim of the present study was to test whether plasma basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF levels predict future cardiovascular disease (CVD occurrence in adults from the Veterans Affairs Diabetes Trial. Methods: Nearly four- hundred veterans, 40 years of age or older, having a mean baseline diabetes duration of 11.4 years were recruited from outpatient clinics at six geographically distributed sites in the Veterans Affairs Diabetes Trial (VADT. Within the VADT, they were randomly assigned to intensive or standard glycemic treatment, with follow-up as much as seven and one-half years. Cardiovascular disease occurrence was examined at baseline in the patient population and during randomized treatment. Plasma bFGF was determined with a sensitive, specific two-site enzyme-linked immunoassay at the baseline study visit in all 399 subjects. Results: One hundred-five first cardiovascular events occurred in these 399 subjects. The best fit model of risk factors associated with the time to first cardiovascular disease occurrence (in the study over a seven and one-half year period had as significant predictors: prior cardiovascular event, (hazard ratio [HR] 3.378; 95% confidence intervals [CI] 3.079- 3.807; P < .0001, baseline plasma bFGF (HR 1.008; 95% CI 1.002-1.014; P =.01, age, (HR 1.027; 95% CI 1.004-1.051; P =.019, baseline plasma triglycerides, (HR 1.001; 95% CI 1.000-1.002; P =.02 and diabetes duration-treatment interaction (P =.03. Intensive glucose-lowering was associated with significantly decreased hazard ratios for CVD occurrence (0.38-0.63 in patients with known diabetes duration of 0-10 years, and non-significantly increased hazard ratios for CVD occurrence (0.82-1.78 in patients with longer diabetes duration. Conclusion: High level ofplasma basic fibroblast growth factor is a predictive biomarker of future cardiovascular

  9. Measuring Associations of the Department of Veterans Affairs' Suicide Prevention Campaign on the Use of Crisis Support Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karras, Elizabeth; Lu, Naiji; Zuo, Guoxin; Tu, Xin M; Stephens, Brady; Draper, John; Thompson, Caitlin; Bossarte, Robert M

    2016-08-01

    Campaigns have become popular in public health approaches to suicide prevention; however, limited empirical investigation of their impact on behavior has been conducted. To address this gap, utilization patterns of crisis support services associated with the Department of Veterans Affairs' Veterans Crisis Line (VCL) suicide prevention campaign were examined. Daily call data for the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline, VCL, and 1-800-SUICIDE were modeled using a novel semi-varying coefficient method. Analyses reveal significant increases in call volume to both targeted and broad resources during the campaign. Findings underscore the need for further research to refine measurement of the effects of these suicide prevention efforts.

  10. Bridging the Gap: Technology and Veteran Academic Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cass, David; Hammond, Shane

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents two unique yet confluent perspectives regarding the use of technology to support student veterans in college, and is meant to ignite discussion of the blending of high impact practices with technology to promote their academic success. The authors highlight the historical trends of student veterans in the academy and discuss…

  11. Department of Veterans Affairs Quarterly Notice to Congress on Data Breaches First Quarter of Fiscal Year 2014 October 1, 2013 through December 31, 2013

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — This is a quarterly notice to congress containing statistics on data breeches for fiscal year 2014 for the first quarter (2014 October 1, 2013 through December 31,...

  12. Report to Joint Standing Committee on Education and Cultural Affairs and Joint Standing Committee on Veteran and Legal Affairs: Student Veterans (PL 2015, Chapter 465)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langhauser, Derek P.

    2017-01-01

    Because The Maine Community College System (MCCS) is aware of that fact that student veterans and those veterans seeking to enroll in college have specific needs, each of the colleges in the MCCS system is working to develop and strengthen target responses to meet those needs. The Maine Community College System is therefore providing this report…

  13. Application of the U.S. Army’s Integrated Planning to the Department of Veterans Affairs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-22

    Art and Science MDMP Military Decision Making Process SOP Standard Operating Procedure SAMS School of Advanced Military Studies VBA Veterans...inefficiencies in healthcare management and delivery as well as propose options for reduction in bureaucracy and encourage efficiency. The model of...technological elements in the course of action. Furthermore the staff had access to Veterans Benefits Administration ( VBA ) data showing that factors

  14. Drivers of Continuing Education Learning Preferences for Veterans Affairs Women's Health Primary Care Providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuchowski, Jessica L; Hamilton, Alison B; Washington, Donna L; Gomez, Arthur G; Veet, Laure; Cordasco, Kristina M

    2017-01-01

    Documented gaps in health professionals' training in women's health are a special concern for continuing education (CE). In the Veterans Affairs (VA) health care system, women veterans are a numerical minority, preferably assigned to designated women's health primary care providers (DWHPs). DWHPs need to maintain their knowledge and skills in women's health topics, in addition to general internal medicine topics. We explored drivers of VA DWHPs' learning preferences for women's health topics-ie, factors which influence greater and lesser learning interest. We conducted semistructured telephone interviews with DWHPs across six VA health care systems. Interviews were audio recorded, transcribed, and coded in ATLAS.ti. We synthesized results by grouping relevant coded sections of text to form emergent themes. Among the 31 DWHPs interviewed, reported drivers of learning interests among women's health topics were (1) high frequency of clinical incidence of particular issues; (2) perceived appropriateness of particular issues for management in primary care settings; and (3) perceived appropriateness of particular issues for partial management in primary care. Lower interest in particular women's health topics was associated with (1) perceived existing competency or recent training in an issue and (2) perceived need for specialty care management of an issue. Understanding drivers of DWHPs' CE learning priorities lays a foundation for developing CE programming that will be of interest to women's health primary care providers. Attention to drivers of learning interests may have applicability beyond women's health, suggesting a general approach for CE programming that prioritizes high-volume topics within the practice scope of target providers.

  15. Implementing and Evaluating a Telephone-Based Centralized Maternity Care Coordination Program for Pregnant Veterans in the Department of Veterans Affairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattocks, Kristin M; Kuzdeba, Judy; Baldor, Rebecca; Casares, Jose; Lombardini, Lisa; Gerber, Megan R

    The purpose of this study was to develop and evaluate a comprehensive, telephonic maternity care coordination (MCC) program for all pregnant veterans enrolled for care at New England Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) facilities that comprise the Veterans Integrated Service Network 1. Telephone interviews were conducted with postpartum women veterans who had participated in the MCC program during their pregnancies. The program evaluation instrument assessed satisfaction and use of MCC services, prenatal education classes, and infant and maternal outcomes (e.g., newborn birthweight, insurance status, maternal depression) using both closed-ended and open-ended questions. A substantial majority (95%) of women enrolled in the MCC program expressed satisfaction with the services they received in the program. Women were most satisfied with help understanding VA maternity benefits and acquiring VA services and equipment, such as breast pumps and pregnancy-related medications. More than one-third of women noted their infants had experienced health problems since delivery, including neonatal intensive care unit hospitalizations. A majority of women planned to return to VA care in the future. Our findings suggest that MCC services play an important role for women veterans as they navigate both VA and non-VA care systems. MCC staff members coordinated maternity, medical, and mental health care services for women veterans. Additionally, by maintaining contact with the veteran during the postpartum period, MCC staff were able to assess the health of the mother and the infant, and refer women and their infants to medical and psychosocial services in the community as needed. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  16. A participatory approach to designing and enhancing integrated health information technology systems for veterans: protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haun, Jolie N; Nazi, Kim M; Chavez, Margeaux; Lind, Jason D; Antinori, Nicole; Gosline, Robert M; Martin, Tracey L

    2015-02-27

    The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) has developed health information technologies (HIT) and resources to improve veteran access to health care programs and services, and to support a patient-centered approach to health care delivery. To improve VA HIT access and meaningful use by veterans, it is necessary to understand their preferences for interacting with various HIT resources to accomplish health management related tasks and to exchange information. The objective of this paper was to describe a novel protocol for: (1) developing a HIT Digital Health Matrix Model; (2) conducting an Analytic Hierarchy Process called pairwise comparison to understand how and why veterans want to use electronic health resources to complete tasks related to health management; and (3) developing visual modeling simulations that depict veterans' preferences for using VA HIT to manage their health conditions and exchange health information. The study uses participatory research methods to understand how veterans prefer to use VA HIT to accomplish health management tasks within a given context, and how they would like to interact with HIT interfaces (eg, look, feel, and function) in the future. This study includes two rounds of veteran focus groups with self-administered surveys and visual modeling simulation techniques. This study will also convene an expert panel to assist in the development of a VA HIT Digital Health Matrix Model, so that both expert panel members and veteran participants can complete an Analytic Hierarchy Process, pairwise comparisons to evaluate and rank the applicability of electronic health resources for a series of health management tasks. This protocol describes the iterative, participatory, and patient-centered process for: (1) developing a VA HIT Digital Health Matrix Model that outlines current VA patient-facing platforms available to veterans, describing their features and relevant contexts for use; and (2) developing visual model simulations based on

  17. Assessment of diabetic teleretinal imaging program at the Portland Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsan, Grace L; Hoban, Keely L; Jun, Weon; Riedel, Kevin J; Pedersen, Amy L; Hayes, John

    2015-01-01

    We conducted a retrospective chart review of 200 diabetic patients who had teleretinal imaging performed between January 1, 2010, and January 1, 2011, at Portland Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) Medical Center outpatient clinics to assess the effectiveness of the diabetic teleretinal imaging program. Twenty patients (10%) had diabetic retinopathy. Ninety percent of the available teleretinal imaging studies were of adequate quality for interpretation. In accordance with local VA policy at that time, all teleretinal imaging patients should have been referred for a dilated retinal examination the following year. Image readers referred 97.5% of the patients to eye clinics for subsequent eye examinations, but the imagers scheduled appointments for only 80% of these patients. The redundancy rate, i.e., patients who had an eye examination within the past 6 mo, was 11%; the duplicate recall rate, i.e., patients who had a second teleretinal imaging performed within 1 yr of the eye examination, was 37%. Rates of timely diabetic eye examinations at clinics with teleretinal imaging programs, particularly when teleretinal imaging and eye clinics were colocated at the same community-based outpatient clinic, were higher than those without a teleretinal imaging program. We concluded that the Portland VA Medical Center's teleretinal imaging program was successful in increasing the screening rate for diabetic retinopathy.

  18. MMPI-2 Symptom Validity (FBS) Scale: psychometric characteristics and limitations in a Veterans Affairs neuropsychological setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gass, Carlton S; Odland, Anthony P

    2014-01-01

    The Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2 (MMPI-2) Symptom Validity (Fake Bad Scale [FBS]) Scale is widely used to assist in determining noncredible symptom reporting, despite a paucity of detailed research regarding its itemmetric characteristics. Originally designed for use in civil litigation, the FBS is often used in a variety of clinical settings. The present study explored its fundamental psychometric characteristics in a sample of 303 patients who were consecutively referred for a comprehensive examination in a Veterans Affairs (VA) neuropsychology clinic. FBS internal consistency (reliability) was .77. Its underlying factor structure consisted of three unitary dimensions (Tiredness/Distractibility, Stomach/Head Discomfort, and Claimed Virtue of Self/Others) accounting for 28.5% of the total variance. The FBS's internal structure showed factoral discordance, as Claimed Virtue was negatively related to most of the FBS and to its somatic complaint components. Scores on this 12-item FBS component reflected a denial of socially undesirable attitudes and behaviors (Antisocial Practices Scale) that is commonly expressed by the 1,138 males in the MMPI-2 normative sample. These 12 items significantly reduced FBS reliability, introducing systematic error variance. In this VA neuropsychological referral setting, scores on the FBS have ambiguous meaning because of its structural discordance.

  19. An Evolving Ecosystem for Natural Language Processing in Department of Veterans Affairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garvin, Jennifer H; Kalsy, Megha; Brandt, Cynthia; Luther, Stephen L; Divita, Guy; Coronado, Gregory; Redd, Doug; Christensen, Carrie; Hill, Brent; Kelly, Natalie; Treitler, Qing Zeng

    2017-02-01

    In an ideal clinical Natural Language Processing (NLP) ecosystem, researchers and developers would be able to collaborate with others, undertake validation of NLP systems, components, and related resources, and disseminate them. We captured requirements and formative evaluation data from the Veterans Affairs (VA) Clinical NLP Ecosystem stakeholders using semi-structured interviews and meeting discussions. We developed a coding rubric to code interviews. We assessed inter-coder reliability using percent agreement and the kappa statistic. We undertook 15 interviews and held two workshop discussions. The main areas of requirements related to; design and functionality, resources, and information. Stakeholders also confirmed the vision of the second generation of the Ecosystem and recommendations included; adding mechanisms to better understand terms, measuring collaboration to demonstrate value, and datasets/tools to navigate spelling errors with consumer language, among others. Stakeholders also recommended capability to: communicate with developers working on the next version of the VA electronic health record (VistA Evolution), provide a mechanism to automatically monitor download of tools and to automatically provide a summary of the downloads to Ecosystem contributors and funders. After three rounds of coding and discussion, we determined the percent agreement of two coders to be 97.2% and the kappa to be 0.7851. The vision of the VA Clinical NLP Ecosystem met stakeholder needs. Interviews and discussion provided key requirements that inform the design of the VA Clinical NLP Ecosystem.

  20. Adherence to clinical practice guidelines for the treatment of candidemia at a Veterans Affairs Medical Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashong, Chester N; Hunter, Andrew S; Mansouri, M David; Cadle, Richard M; Hamill, Richard J; Musher, Daniel M

    2017-01-01

    The primary objective of this study was to examine the appropriateness of candidemia management at a Veterans Affairs Medical Center as recommended by the 2009 Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA) guidelines for treatment of Candida infections. A retrospective analysis of 94 adult patients with blood cultures positive for Candida spp. was performed. Patients were stratified by severity of disease into two groups: non-neutropenic, mild-moderate disease (Group 1, n = 54, 56%) and non-neutropenic, moderate-severe disease (Group 2, n = 40, 42%). Adherence to the IDSA recommendations for recommended antifungal drug, dose, and duration of therapy was low in both groups (16.7% in Group 1 and 17.5% in Group 2). Although adherence was not associated with higher clinical resolution of infection (P = 0.111), it was associated with a significantly lower mortality rate (P = 0.001) when compared to variance from the guidelines at 6 weeks. Although adherence to published guidelines for treating patients with candidemia was suboptimal at our institution, patients that were managed based on the guidelines had a statistically lower mortality rate.

  1. Advanced earthquake monitoring system for U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs medical buildings--instrumentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalkan, Erol; Banga, Krishna; Ulusoy, Hasan S.; Fletcher, Jon Peter B.; Leith, William S.; Reza, Shahneam; Cheng, Timothy

    2012-01-01

    In collaboration with the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA), the National Strong Motion Project (NSMP; http://nsmp.wr.usgs.gov/) of the U.S. Geological Survey has been installing sophisticated seismic systems that will monitor the structural integrity of 28 VA hospital buildings located in seismically active regions of the conterminous United States, Alaska, and Puerto Rico during earthquake shaking. These advanced monitoring systems, which combine the use of sensitive accelerometers and real-time computer calculations, are designed to determine the structural health of each hospital building rapidly after an event, helping the VA to ensure the safety of patients and staff. This report presents the instrumentation component of this project by providing details of each hospital building, including a summary of its structural, geotechnical, and seismic hazard information, as well as instrumentation objectives and design. The structural-health monitoring component of the project, including data retrieval and processing, damage detection and localization, automated alerting system, and finally data dissemination, will be presented in a separate report.

  2. Improving patient care through leadership engagement with frontline staff: a Department of Veterans Affairs case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, Sara J; Rivard, Peter E; Hayes, Jennifer E; Shokeen, Priti; Gaba, David; Rosen, Amy

    2013-08-01

    Leveraging Frontline Expertise (LFLE) is a patient safety intervention for engaging senior managers with the work-systems challenges faced by frontline workers and ensuring follow-up and accountability for systemic change. A study was conducted to assess the ability to refine, implement, and demonstrate the effectiveness of LFLE, which was designed for and tested in private-sector hospitals, in a Department of Veterans Affairs medical center (VAMC), typically a more hierarchical setting. LFLE was pilot tested in an urban, East coast-based VAMC, which implemented LFLE in its emergency department and operating room, with the medical/surgical ward and ICU serving as controls. A 20-month multimethod evaluation involved interviews, observation, data-tracking forms, and surveys to measure participant perceptions of the program, operational benchmarks of effectiveness, and longitudinal change in safety climate. Implementation showed fidelity to program design. Participating units identified 22 improvement opportunities, 16 (73%) of which were fully or partially resolved. Senior managers' attitudes toward LFLE were more positive than those of frontline staff, whose attitudes were mixed. Perceptions of safety climate deteriorated during the study period in the implementation units relative to controls. LFLE can be implemented in the VA, yield work-system improvements, and increase alignment of improvement aims and actions across hierarchical levels. Yet the results also warn against dangers inherent in adapting improvement programs to new settings. Findings suggest the need for active listening and learning from frontline staff by senior managers and trust building across hierarchical

  3. Transition to the new race/ethnicity data collection standards in the Department of Veterans Affairs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stroupe Kevin

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patient race in the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA information system was previously recorded based on an administrative or clinical employee's observation. Since 2003, the VA started to collect self-reported race in compliance with a new federal guideline. We investigated the implications of this transition for using race/ethnicity data in multi-year trends in the VA and in other healthcare data systems that make the transition. Methods All unique users of VA healthcare services with self-reported race/ethnicity data in 2004 were compared with their prior observer-recorded race/ethnicity data from 1997 – 2002 (N = 988,277. Results In 2004, only about 39% of all VA healthcare users reported race/ethnicity values other than "unknown" or "declined." Females reported race/ethnicity at a lower rate than males (27% vs. 40%; p Conclusion For overall VA healthcare users, the agreement between observer-recorded and self-reported race/ethnicity was excellent and observer-recorded and self-reported data can be used together for multi-year trends without creating serious bias. However, this study also showed that observation was not a reliable method of race/ethnicity data collection for non-African American minorities and racial disparity might be underestimated if observer-recorded data are used due to systematic patterns of inaccurate race/ethnicity assignments.

  4. The Veterans Choice Act: A Qualitative Examination of Rapid Policy Implementation in the Department of Veterans Affairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattocks, Kristin M; Mengeling, Michelle; Sadler, Anne; Baldor, Rebecca; Bastian, Lori

    2017-07-01

    Congress enacted the Veterans Access, Choice, and Accountability Act of 2014 [Veterans Choice Act (VCA)] to improve access to timely, high-quality health care for Veterans. Although Congress mandated that VCA must begin within 90 days of passage of the legislation, no guidelines were provided in the legislation to ensure that Veterans had access to an adequate number of community providers across different specialties of care or distinct geographic areas, including rural areas of the country. To examine VCA policy implementation across a sampling of Veterans Health Administration (VHA) Medical Centers. We conducted a qualitative study of 43 VHA staff and providers by conducting in-person interviews at 5 VA medical centers in the West, South, and Midwest United States. Interview questions focused on perceptions and experiences with VCA and challenges related to implementation for VHA staff and providers. We identified 3 major themes to guide description of choice implementation: (1) VCA implemented too rapidly with inadequate preparation; (2) community provider networks insufficiently developed; and (3) communication and scheduling problems with subcontractors may lead to further delays in care. Our evaluation suggests that VCA was implemented far too rapidly, with little consideration given to the adequacy of community provider networks available to provide care to Veterans. Given the challenges we have highlighted in VCA implementation, it is imperative that the VHA continue to develop care coordination systems that will allow the Veterans to receive seamless care in the community.

  5. Adaptation of Lean Six Sigma Methodologies for the Evaluation of Veterans Choice Program at 3 Urban Veterans Affairs Medical Centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, Sherry L; Stevenson, Lauren D; Ladebue, Amy C; McCreight, Marina S; Lawrence, Emily C; Oestreich, Taryn; Lambert-Kerzner, Anne C

    2017-07-01

    The Veterans Health Administration (VHA) is adapting to meet the changing needs of our Veterans. VHA leaders are promoting quality improvement strategies including Lean Six Sigma (LSS). This study used LSS tools to evaluate the Veterans Choice Program (VCP), a program that aims to improve access to health care services for eligible Veterans by expanding health care options to non-VHA providers. LSS was utilized to assess the current process and efficiency patterns of the VCP at 3 VHA Medical Centers. LSS techniques were used to assess data obtained through semistructured interviews with Veterans, staff, and providers to describe and evaluate the VCP process by identifying wastes and defects. The LSS methodology facilitated the process of targeting priorities for improvement and constructing suggestions to close identified gaps and inefficiencies. Identified key process wastes included inefficient exchange of clinical information between stakeholders in and outside of the VHA; poor dissemination of VCP programmatic information; shortages of VCP-participating providers; duplication of appointments; declines in care coordination; and lack of program adaptability to local processes. Recommendations for improvement were formulated using LSS. This evaluation illustrates how LSS can be utilized to assess a nationally mandated health care program. By focusing on stakeholder, staff, and Veteran perspectives, process defects in the VCP were identified and improvement recommendations were made. However, the current LSS language used is not intuitive in health care and similar applications of LSS may consider using new language and goals adapted specifically for health care.

  6. Allowing Family to be Family: End-of-Life Care in Veterans Affairs Medical Foster Homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manheim, Chelsea E; Haverhals, Leah M; Jones, Jacqueline; Levy, Cari R

    2016-01-01

    The Medical Foster Home program is a unique long-term care program coordinated by the Veterans Health Administration. The program pairs Veterans with private, 24-hour a day community-based caregivers who often care for Veterans until the end of life. This qualitative study explored the experiences of care coordination for Medical Foster Home Veterans at the end of life with eight Veterans' family members, five Medical Foster Home caregivers, and seven Veterans Health Administration Home-Based Primary Care team members. A case study, qualitative content analysis identified these themes addressing care coordination and impact of the Medical Foster Home model on those involved: (a) Medical Foster Home program supports Veterans' families; (b) Medical Foster Home program supports the caregiver as family; (c) Veterans' needs are met socially and culturally at the end of life; and (d) the changing needs of Veterans, families, and caregivers at Veterans' end of life are addressed. Insights into how to best support Medical Foster Home caregivers caring for Veterans at the end of life were gained including the need for more and better respite options and how caregivers are compensated in the month of the Veteran's death, as well as suggestions to navigate end-of-life care coordination with multiple stakeholders involved.

  7. On the Teaching of Science, Technology and International Affairs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Charles

    2012-01-01

    Despite the ubiquity and critical importance of science and technology in international affairs, their role receives insufficient attention in traditional international relations curricula. There is little literature on how the relations between science, technology, economics, politics, law and culture should be taught in an international context.…

  8. Rosiglitazone treatment and cardiovascular disease in the Veterans Affairs Diabetes Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florez, H; Reaven, P D; Bahn, G; Moritz, T; Warren, S; Marks, J; Reda, D; Duckworth, W; Abraira, C; Hayward, R; Emanuele, N

    2015-10-01

    To evaluate the relationship between patterns of rosiglitazone use and cardiovascular (CV) outcomes in the Veterans Affairs Diabetes Trial (VADT). Time-dependent survival analyses, case-control and 1 : 1 propensity matching approaches were used to examine the relationship between patterns of rosiglitazone use and CV outcomes in the VADT, a randomized controlled study that assessed the effect of intensive glycaemic control on CV outcomes in 1791 patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D) whose mean age was 60.4 ± 9 years. Participants were recruited between 1 December 2000 and 31 May 2003, and were followed for 5-7.5 years (median 5.6) with a final visit by 31 May 2008. Rosiglitazone (4 mg and 8 mg daily) was initiated per protocol in both the intensive-therapy and standard-therapy groups. Main outcomes included a composite CV outcome, CV death and myocardial infarction (MI). Both daily doses of rosiglitazone were associated with lower risk for the primary composite CV outcome [4 mg: hazard ratio (HR) 0.63, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.49-0.81 and 8 mg: HR 0.60, 95% CI 0.49-0.75] after adjusting for demographic and clinical covariates. A reduction in CV death was also observed (HR 0.25, p < 0.001, for both 4 and 8 mg/day rosiglitazone); however, the effect on MI was less evident for 8 mg/day and not significant for 4 mg/day. In older patients with T2D the use of rosiglitazone was associated with decreased risk of the primary CV composite outcome and CV death. Rosiglitazone use did not lead to a higher risk of MI. © 2015 This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  9. Examining Burnout, Depression, and Self-Compassion in Veterans Affairs Mental Health Staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, David M; Rodman, John L; Thuras, Paul D; Shiroma, Paulo R; Lim, Kelvin O

    2017-07-01

    Burnout, a state of emotional exhaustion associated with negative personal and occupational outcomes, is prevalent among healthcare providers. A better understanding of the psychological factors that may be associated with resilience to burnout is essential to develop effective interventions. Self-compassion, which includes kindness toward oneself, recognition of suffering as part of shared human experience, mindfulness, and nonjudgment toward inadequacies and failures, may be one such factor. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationships between burnout, depression, and self-compassion in Veterans Affairs (VA) mental health staff. Cross-sectional study. VA medical center and affiliated community-based clinics. VA mental health staff. The 19-item Copenhagen Burnout Inventory, the 26-item Self-Compassion Scale, and the Patient Health Questionnaire 2-item depression screen. Demographic information included age, sex, years worked in current position, and number of staff supervised. One hundred and twenty-eight of a potential 379 individuals (33.8%) responded. Clerical support, nursing, social work, psychology, and psychiatry were the major professions represented. Self-compassion was inversely correlated with burnout (r = -0.41, p burnout remained significant even after accounting for depressive symptoms and demographic variables in a multiple linear regression model. Of all the variables examined, self-compassion was the strongest predictor of burnout. The results of this study support the hypothesis that self-compassion may be associated with resilience to burnout. Alternatively, decreased self-compassion may be a downstream effect of increased burnout. Prospective, longitudinal studies are needed to determine the directional relationship between these factors, and whether interventions that cultivate self-compassion may decrease burnout and/or protect against its negative personal and professional outcomes.

  10. 2007 Veterans Employability Research Survey

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The 2007 Veterans Employability Research Survey (VERS) was conducted to determine the factors that impact veterans' employability resulting from participation in the...

  11. 2007 Veterans Employability Research Survey

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The 2007 Veterans Employability Research Survey (VERS) was conducted to determine the factors that impact veterans' employability resulting from participation in the...

  12. Women Veteran Report

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — This report summarizes the history of women Veterans in the military and as Veterans. It profiles the characteristics of women Veterans in 2015, and illustrates how...

  13. 76 FR 24570 - Proposed Information Collection (Veterans Mortgage Life Insurance-Change of Address Statement...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-02

    ... AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (Veterans Mortgage Life Insurance--Change of Address Statement... Mortgage Life Insurance. DATES: Written comments and recommendations on the proposed collection of... information technology. Title: Veterans Mortgage Life Insurance--Change of Address Statement, VA Form...

  14. Lower-limb amputation and effect of posttraumatic stress disorder on Department of Veterans Affairs outpatient cost trends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatnagar, Vibha; Richard, Erin; Melcer, Ted; Walker, Jay; Galarneau, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) outpatient costs were analyzed for combat Veterans injured in Iraq and Afghanistan from 2001 to 2008. Patients had serious lower-limb injuries (n = 170) or unilateral (n = 460) or bilateral (n = 153) lower-limb amputation(s). Total costs over the follow-up period (2003 to 2012) and annual costs were analyzed. Unadjusted mean costs per year in 2012 U.S. dollars were $7,200, $14,700 and $18,700 for limb injuries and unilateral and bilateral lower-limb amputation(s), respectively (p amputation(s) (p Amputation status was associated with an adjusted 3.12-fold increase in mean prosthetic cost per year (p amputation status (p amputation. Finally, PTSD affected cost for multiple domains of health, highlighting the importance of accurate diagnosis, treatment, and support for PTSD.

  15. AVTA Federal Fleet PEV Readiness Data Logging and Characterization Study for Department of Veterans Affairs – VA Manhattan Campus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stephen Schey; Jim Francfort

    2014-10-01

    This report focuses on the Department of Veterans Affairs, VA Manhattan Campus (VA- Manhattan) fleet to identify the daily operational characteristics of select vehicles and report findings on vehicle and mission characterizations to support successful introduction of plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs) into the agency’s fleet. Individual observations of these selected vehicles provide the basis for recommendations related to electric vehicle adoption and whether a battery electric vehicle or plug-in hybrid electric vehicle (collectively called PEVs) can fulfill the mission requirements.

  16. Primary Care-Based Skin Cancer Screening in a Veterans Affairs Health Care System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swetter, Susan M; Chang, Julia; Shaub, Amanda R; Weinstock, Martin A; Lewis, Eleanor T; Asch, Steven M

    2017-08-01

    Skin cancer screening may improve melanoma outcomes and keratinocyte carcinoma morbidity, but little is known about the feasibility of skin cancer training and clinical skin examination (CSE) by primary care practitioners (PCPs) in large health care systems. To assess the association of skin cancer training and screening by PCPs with dermatology referral patterns and rates of skin biopsies. In this pilot interventional study performed at the Veterans Affairs Palo Alto Health Care System, patients 35 years or older scheduled for an annual health habits screen in the PCP general medicine clinics were studied. Six PCPs underwent Internet Curriculum for Melanoma Early Detection (INFORMED) training in May 2015, and 5 screened patients during the following 14 months. Proportion of dermatology referrals, subsequent skin biopsies, and PCP diagnostic accuracy for skin cancer or precancer compared with dermatologist diagnosis were assessed in screened patients 14 months before the intervention (February 18, 2014, through April 30, 2015) and after the intervention (June 18, 2015, through August 30, 2016). Among 258 patients offered screening (median age, 70 years; age range, 35-94 years; 255 [98.8%] male), 189 (73.3%) received CSE and 69 (26.7%) declined. A total of 62 of 189 patients (32.8%) were referred to a dermatologist after intervention: 33 (53.2%) for presumptive skin cancers and 15 (24.2%) for precancers. Nine of 50 patients (18.0%) evaluated in dermatology clinic underwent biopsy to exclude skin cancer. Correct diagnoses were made by PCPs in 13 of 38 patients (34.2%; 4 of 27 patients [14.8%] diagnosed with skin cancers and 5 of 11 patients [45.5%] diagnosed with actinic keratoses). Comparison of all outpatient visits for the 5 main participating PCPs before vs after intervention revealed no significant differences in dermatology referrals overall and those for presumptive skin cancer or actinic keratoses, skin biopsies, or PCP diagnostic accuracy with the exception

  17. Student Affairs and Information Technology: Collaborating in the Cloud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbatis, Peter Reyes

    2014-01-01

    Student affairs and information technology have opportunities to partner in order to increase student satisfaction and retention rates and to assist institutions to comply with federal educational regulations. This chapter contains four examples of emerging best practices and future initiatives including: (a) the admissions pipeline, (b)…

  18. Plastic surgery within the Veterans Affairs Medical System: proposed modified indications for operative procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdmann, Detlev; Pradka, Sarah P; Similie, Ernest; Marcus, Jeffrey R; Moyer, Kurtis E; Shelburne, John D; Tyler, Douglas S; Levin, Scott L

    2009-07-01

    Many plastic surgery procedures span the divide between aesthetic ("cosmetic") and reconstructive surgery. However, definitions and guidelines may be inconsistent, which may decrease patients' access to legitimate procedures. The article aims to assist Veterans' Health Administration-affiliated plastic surgeons in continuing to provide optimal care to the Nation's Veterans and family members, and should be regarded as an open discussion.

  19. Global power knowledge science and technology in international affairs

    CERN Document Server

    Barth, Kai-Henrik

    2006-01-01

    Osiris annualy examines a particular topic in the history of science, bringing together experts in the field to consider multiple aspects of the time period, episode, or theme. Volume 21, Historical Perspectives on Science, Technology, and International Affairs, explores the ways in which scientists and issues in science and technology have played significant roles in foreign policy and international relations, especially since the Second World War.

  20. Disability Compensation: Review of Concurrent Receipt of Department of Defense Retirement, Department of Veterans Affairs Disability Compensation, and Social Security Disability Insurance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-30

    Page 1 GAO-14-854R Disability Compensation 441 G St. N.W. Washington, DC 20548 September 30, 2014 The Honorable Tom Coburn, M.D. Ranking...Member Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs United States Senate Disability Compensation: Review of Concurrent Receipt of...Department of Defense Retirement, Department of Veterans Affairs Disability Compensation, and Social Security Disability Insurance Dear Dr. Coburn: The

  1. PTSD Treatment Programs in the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Contact Us: ncptsd@va.gov Also see: VA Mental Health Connect with us return to top CONNECT Veterans Crisis Line: 1-800-273-8255 (Press 1) Social Media Complete Directory EMAIL UPDATES Email Address Required Button ...

  2. 38 CFR 3.159 - Department of Veterans Affairs assistance in developing claims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... application means an application containing the claimant's name; his or her relationship to the veteran, if..., notice to the claimant means notice to the claimant or his or her fiduciary, if any, as well as to his or...

  3. Fluoroquinolone-Resistant Escherichia coli Infections After Transrectal Biopsy of the Prostate in the Veterans Affairs Healthcare System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saade, Elie A.; Suwantarat, Nuntra; Zabarsky, Trina F.; Wilson, Brigid; Donskey, Curtis J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Recent reports suggest that infections due to fluoroquinolone-resistant Escherichia coli (E. coli) are an increasingly common complication of transrectal biopsy of the prostate (TBP) in the United States. A better understanding of the magnitude and scope of these infections is needed to guide prevention efforts. Our objective is to determine whether the incidence of infections due to fluoroquinolone-resistant E. coli after TBP has increased nationwide in the Veterans Affairs Health Care System and to identify risk factors for infection. Methods We performed a retrospective, observational cohort study and a nested case-control study within the US Deparment of Veterans Affairs Healthcare System. The primary outcomes were the incidence of urinary tract infection (UTI) and bacteremia with E. coli and with fluoroquinolone- resistant E. coli strains within 30 days after TBP. Secondary endpoints focused on the correlation between fluoroquinolone-resistance in all urinary E. coli isolates and post-TBP infection and risk factors for infection due to fluoroquinolone-resistant E. coli infection. Results 245 618 patients undergoing 302 168 TBP procedures from 2000 through 2013 were included in the cohort study, and 59 469 patients undergoing TBP from 2011 through 2013 were included in the nested case-control study. Between 2000 and 2013, there was a 5-fold increase in the incidence of E. coli UTI (0.18%–0.93%) and a 4-fold increase in the incidence of E. coli bacteremia (0.04%–0.18%) after TBP that was attributable to an increase in the incidence of fluoroquinolone- resistant E. coli UTI (0.03%–0.75%) and bacteremia (0.01%–0.14%). The increasing incidence of fluoroquinolone-resistant E. coli infections after TBP occurred in parallel with increasing rates of fluoroquinolone-resistance in all urinary E. coli isolates. By multivariable logistic regression analysis, independent risk factors for fluoroquinolone-resistant E. coli UTI after TBP included diabetes

  4. Psychotherapy utilization for acute depression within the Veterans Affairs health care system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnett-Zeigler, Inger E; Pfeiffer, Paul; Zivin, Kara; Glass, Joseph E; Ilgen, Mark A; Flynn, Heather A; Austin, Karen; Chermack, Stephen T

    2012-11-01

    This study examined the demographic characteristics and psychiatric comorbidities associated with the receipt of psychotherapy. The sample included 217,816 VA patients with a new depression diagnosis. Multinomial logistic regression analyses examined the relationships between the independent variables and the initiation of individual, group, or both individual and group psychotherapy within 90 days of a new diagnosis. Eighteen percent of VA patients received some form of psychotherapy. Veterans received a greater mean number of group therapy than individual therapy visits. Veterans who were female, younger than 35, unmarried, and with substance use, anxiety, or personality disorders were more likely to receive individual therapy only. Veterans who were male, 35-49 years old, Black, Other, or Hispanic, and with substance-use or anxiety disorders were more likely to receive group therapy only than no psychotherapy. Veterans who were male, 35-49 years old, Black, or Other race and with substance-use or anxiety disorders were more likely to receive both individual and group psychotherapy. Increased efforts are needed to encourage early initiation of psychotherapy treatment among depressed veterans.

  5. National Dissemination of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Depression in the Department of Veterans Affairs Health Care System: Therapist and Patient-Level Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlin, Bradley E.; Brown, Gregory K.; Trockel, Mickey; Cunning, Darby; Zeiss, Antonette M.; Taylor, C. Barr

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) health care system is nationally disseminating and implementing cognitive behavioral therapy for depression (CBT-D). The current article evaluates therapist and patient-level outcomes associated with national training in and implementation of CBT-D in the VA health care system. Method: Therapist…

  6. National Dissemination of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Depression in the Department of Veterans Affairs Health Care System: Therapist and Patient-Level Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlin, Bradley E.; Brown, Gregory K.; Trockel, Mickey; Cunning, Darby; Zeiss, Antonette M.; Taylor, C. Barr

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) health care system is nationally disseminating and implementing cognitive behavioral therapy for depression (CBT-D). The current article evaluates therapist and patient-level outcomes associated with national training in and implementation of CBT-D in the VA health care system. Method: Therapist…

  7. Rural veteran access to healthcare services: investigating the role of information and communication technologies in overcoming spatial barriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schooley, Benjamin L; Horan, Thomas A; Lee, Pamela W; West, Priscilla A

    2010-04-01

    This multimethod pilot study examined patient and practitioner perspectives on the influence of spatial barriers to healthcare access and the role of health information technology in overcoming these barriers. The study included a survey administered to patients attending a Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) health visit, and a focus group with VA care providers. Descriptive results and focus group findings are presented. Spatial distance is a significant factor for many rural veterans when seeking healthcare. For this sample of rural veterans, a range of telephone, computer, and Internet technologies may become more important for accessing care as Internet access becomes more ubiquitous and as younger veterans begin using the VA health system. The focus group highlighted the negative impact of distance, economic considerations, geographic barriers, and specific medical conditions on access to care. Lack of adequate technology infrastructure was seen as an obstacle to utilization. This study discusses the need to consider distance, travel modes, age, and information technology infrastructure and adoption when designing health information technology to care for rural patients.

  8. Effectiveness of Cognitive Processing Therapy and Prolonged Exposure in the Department of Veterans Affairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutt, Benjamin T; Oehlert, Mary E; Krieshok, Thomas S; Lichtenberg, James W

    2017-01-01

    Objective This study evaluated the effectiveness of cognitive processing therapy and prolonged exposure in conditions reflective of current clinical practice within the Veterans Health Administration. Method This study involved a retrospective review of 2030 charts. A total of 750 veterans from 10 U.S. states who received cognitive processing therapy or prolonged exposure in individual psychotherapy were included in the study (participants in cognitive processing therapy, N = 376; participants in prolonged exposure, N = 374). The main dependent variable was self-reported posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms as measured by total scores on the Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Checklist. The study used multilevel modeling to evaluate the absolute and relative effectiveness of both treatments and determine the relationship between patient-level variables and total Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Checklist scores during treatment. Results Cognitive processing therapy and prolonged exposure were equally effective at reducing total Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Checklist scores. Veterans who completed therapy reported significantly larger reductions in the Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Checklist than patients who did not complete therapy. There were no significant differences in the improvement of posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms with respect to age and three racial/ethnic groups (Caucasian, African American, and Hispanic). Conclusions Cognitive processing therapy and prolonged exposure were shown to be effective in conditions highly reflective of clinical practice and with a highly diverse sample of veterans. Challenges related to dropout from trauma focused therapy should continue to be researched.

  9. Assessing Health Status Differences Between Veterans Affairs Home-Based Primary Care and State Medicaid Waiver Program Clients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wharton, Tracy C.; Nnodim, Joseph; Hogikyan, Robert; Mody, Lona; James, Mary; Montagnini, Marcos; Fries, Brant E.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Comprehensive health care for older adults is complex, involving multiple comorbidities and functional impairments of varying degrees and numbers. In response to this complexity and associated barriers to care, home-based care models have become prevalent. The home-based primary care (HBPC) model, based at a Michigan Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center, and the Michigan Waiver Program (MWP) that includes home-based care are 2 of these. Although both models are formatted to address barriers to effective and efficient health care, there are differences in disease prevalence and functional performance between groups. The objective of this study was to explore the differences between the 2 groups, to shed some light on potential trends that could suggest areas for resource allocation by service providers. Design Using a retrospective analysis of data collected using the interRAI-home care, we examined a cross-sectional representation of clients enrolled in HBPC and MWP in 2008. Participants The HBPC sample had 89 participants. The MWP database contained 9324 participants from across the State of Michigan and were weighted to be comparable to the HBPC population in sex and age, and to simulate the HBPC sample size. Results Veterans were more independent in basic activities of daily living performance, but there was no difference in the rate of reported falls between the 2 groups. Veterans had more pain and a higher prevalence of coronary artery disease (z = 7.0; P <.001), Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (z = 3.9; P < .001), and cancer (z = 8.5; P < .001). There was no statistically significant difference between the 2 groups in terms of the prevalence of geriatric syndromes. Scores on subscales of the interRAI-home care indicated a lower risk of serious health decline and adverse outcomes for MWP compared with HBPC clients (1.4 ± 1.1 vs 0.9 ± 0.1; z = 2.5; P = .012). Veterans receiving home-based care through the Veterans Affairs Medical

  10. Implementation of a brief anxiety assessment and evaluation in a Department of Veterans Affairs geriatric primary care clinic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine E. Gould, PhD

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Anxiety disorders are common and debilitating in older individuals, yet anxiety is often not formally assessed in primary care. We conducted a quality improvement project to examine the feasibility of implementing a brief anxiety assessment, the Geriatric Anxiety Inventory (GAI, in a Department of Veterans Affairs geriatric primary care clinic. We compared the GAI with a depression assessment, the 15-item Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS-15. Fifty older Veterans (mean age = 78.5 +/– 7.4 yr completed the GAI and GDS-15. Mean completion time and feedback to patients was brief (6.20 min; n = 10. Good internal consistency (alpha = 0.82 was found for GAI scores. Patients with psychiatric diagnoses obtained significantly higher GAI scores (mean = 4.73 +/– 1.15 compared with patients without psychiatric diagnoses (mean = 1.15 +/– 1.86, t(11.46 = –3.10, p = 0.01. Findings suggest that the GAI is acceptable to patients but may not be suitable for differentiating anxiety symptoms or disorders from depression. Interdisciplinary team members continued to implement the GAI after project completion to screen for and track anxiety symptoms in our geriatric primary care patients. Detecting anxiety with the GAI had the benefit of allowing providers to initiate conversations about available treatments and track symptoms as part of noting treatment progress.

  11. Veterans Crisis Line

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The caring responders at the Veterans Crisis Line are specially trained and experienced in helping Veterans of all ages and circumstances. Some of the responders are...

  12. Treatment of dupuytren disease with injectable collagenase in a veteran population: a case series at the department of veterans affairs new jersey health care system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sood, Aditya; Therattil, Paul J; Paik, Angie M; Simpson, Mary F; Lee, Edward S

    2014-01-01

    Clinical trials seeking to establish long-term efficacy of injectable collagenase clostridium histolyticum for treatment of Dupuytren disease are ongoing. In this quality improvement study, the efficacy, recurrence rate, and complications of collagenase injection for Dupuytren disease are reviewed in a population of Veteran patients. A retrospective chart review was performed for patients who underwent treatment with injectable collagenase for Dupuytren disease from 2010 to 2013 at our regional Department of Veterans Affairs medical center. Data points of interest included the degree of joint contracture preoperatively, immediately after treatment, and at follow-up, complications, and patient satisfaction. Sixteen patients received 27 injections (18 metacarpophalangeal and 9 proximal interphalangeal injections). The mean time of follow-up was 12.3 months. There was a 50% or greater reduction of the original extension deficit in 74.1% (n = 27) of the joints treated. Metacarpophalangeal joint recurrence was "high" (≥50°) in 0% (n = 18) of joints, and "low" (5°-50°) in 33.3% (n = 18) of joints with a mean follow-up of 12 months. Proximal interphalangeal joint recurrence was "high" (≥40°) in 18.5% (n = 9) of joints and "low" (5°-40°) in 7.4% (n = 9) of joints with a mean follow-up of 12.9 months. Minor complications were experienced in 93.8% (n = 16) of patients who underwent collagenase injection and included ecchymosis, skin laceration, injection-site swelling, injection-site hemorrhage, tenderness, and pruritus. Seventy-five percent (n = 12) of patients in our study reported they would undergo treatment with collagenase again. The case series presented demonstrates that injectable collagenase clostridium histolyticum produced a clinical success rate of 74.1% and is a safe method to treat Dupuytren disease.

  13. An Examination of the External and Internal Forces that have Shaped the Department of Veterans Affairs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-22

    vacation to the West coast.65 However, before his death, and in another of his interesting management choices , he selected a highly qualified...of the bonus.98 Congress was more forgiving and recognized the public perception of the Army’s use of force on veterans. They voted to provide a per...Hoover to head the review. Mr. Hoover, a Republican, may have seemed an unusual choice for a Democratic President, but he was a respected organizer

  14. U.S. Dept. Veterans Affairs (VA) SMEC-bio Reporting for Leadership Decision Support

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Objective To assess Reports sent from the United States VA Subject Matter Expertise Center for Biological Events (SMEC-bio) – a proof-of-concept decision support initiative – to the VA Integrated Operations Center (VA IOC). Introduction VA is the U.S. federal agency responsible for providing services to America’s Veterans. Within VA, VHA is the organization responsible for administration of health care services. VHA, with 152 Medical Centers and over 900 outpatient clinics located throughout ...

  15. Spousal labor market effects from government health insurance: Evidence from a veterans affairs expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, Melissa A; Lahey, Joanna N

    2016-01-01

    Measuring the total impact of health insurance receipt on household labor supply is important in an era of increased access to publicly provided and subsidized insurance. Although government expansion of health insurance to older workers leads to direct labor supply reductions for recipients, there may be spillover effects on the labor supply of uncovered spouses. While the most basic model predicts a decrease in overall household work hours, financial incentives such as credit constraints, target income levels, and the need for own health insurance suggest that spousal labor supply might increase. In contrast, complementarities of spousal leisure would predict a decrease in labor supply for both spouses. Utilizing a mid-1990s expansion of health insurance for U.S. veterans, we provide evidence on the effects of public insurance availability on the labor supply of spouses. Using data from the Current Population Survey and Health and Retirement Study, we employ a difference-in-differences strategy to compare the labor market behavior of the wives of older male veterans and non-veterans before and after the VA health benefits expansion. Although husbands' labor supply decreases, wives' labor supply increases, suggesting that financial incentives dominate complementarities of spousal leisure. This effect is strongest for wives with lower education levels and lower levels of household wealth and those who were not previously employed full-time. These findings have implications for government programs such as Medicare and Social Security and the Affordable Care Act.

  16. 76 FR 3017 - VA Veteran-Owned Small Business Verification Guidelines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-19

    ... to one business has no foundation in law and that there is no compelling reason to limit... AFFAIRS 38 CFR Part 74 RIN 2900-AM78 VA Veteran-Owned Small Business Verification Guidelines AGENCY..., and Information Technology Act of 2006. This law requires the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA)...

  17. Hearing testing in the U.S. Department of Defense: Potential impact on Veterans Affairs hearing loss disability awards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, J T; Swan, A A; Swiger, B; Packer, M; Pugh, M J

    2017-06-01

    Hearing loss is the second most common disability awarded by the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) to former members of the U.S. uniformed services. Hearing readiness and conservation practices differ among the four largest uniformed military services (Air Force, Army, Marine Corps, and Navy). Utilizing a data set consisting of all hearing loss claims submitted to the VA from fiscal years 2003-2013, we examined characteristics of veterans submitting claims within one year of separation from military service. Our results indicate that having a hearing loss disability claim granted was significantly more likely for men, individuals over the age of 26 years at the time of the claim, individuals most recently serving in the U.S. Army, and those with at least one hearing loss diagnosis. Importantly, individuals with at least one test record in the Defense Occupational and Environmental Health Readiness System-Hearing Conservation (DOEHRS-HC) system were significantly less likely to have a hearing loss disability claim granted by the VA. Within the DOEHRS-HC cohort, those with at least one threshold shift or clinical hearing loss diagnosis while on active duty were more than two and three times more likely to have a hearing loss disability claim granted, respectively. These findings indicate that an established history of reduced hearing ability while on active duty was associated with a significantly increased likelihood of an approved hearing loss disability claim relative to VA claims without such a history. Further, our results show a persistent decreased rate of hearing loss disability awards overall. These findings support increased inclusion of personnel in DoD hearing readiness and conservation programs to reduce VA hearing loss disability awards. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. The association of race with timeliness of care and survival among Veterans Affairs health care system patients with late-stage non-small cell lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zullig LL

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Leah L Zullig,1,2 William R Carpenter,2 Dawn T Provenzale,1,3 Morris Weinberger,1,2 Bryce B Reeve,2 Christina D Williams,1 George L Jackson1,4 1Center of Excellence for Health Services Research in Primary Care, Durham Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Durham, NC, USA; 2Department of Health Policy and Management, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC, USA; 3Division of Gastroenterology, Duke University, Durham, NC, USA; 4Division of General Internal Medicine, Duke University, Durham, NC, USA Background: Non-small cell lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related mortality in the United States. Patients with late-stage disease (stage 3/4 have five-year survival rates of 2%–15%. Care quality may be measured as time to receiving recommended care and, ultimately, survival. This study examined the association between race and receipt of timely non-small cell lung cancer care and survival among Veterans Affairs health care system patients. Methods: Data were from the External Peer Review Program, a nationwide Veterans Affairs quality-monitoring program. We included Caucasian or African American patients with pathologically confirmed late-stage non-small cell lung cancer in 2006 and 2007. We examined three quality measures: time from diagnosis to (1 treatment initiation, (2 palliative care or hospice referral, and (3 death. Unadjusted analyses used log-rank and Wilcoxon tests. Adjusted analyses used Cox proportional hazard models. Results: After controlling for patient and disease characteristics using Cox regression, there were no racial differences in time to initiation of treatment (72 days for African American versus 65 days for Caucasian patients, hazard ratio 1.04, P = 0.80 or palliative care or hospice referral (129 days versus 116 days, hazard ratio 1.10, P = 0.34. However, the adjusted model found longer survival for African American patients than for Caucasian patients (133 days versus 117 days, hazard ratio 0

  19. A Qualitative Analysis of Resource Sharing Agreements Between Naval Hospital Great Lakes and North Chicago Veterans Affairs Medical Center: The Iron Triangle Theory of Healthcare Integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-05-19

    in Healthcare Administration ) 3151 Scott Road, Suite 1411- 11. SPONSOR/MONITOR’S REPORT Fort Sam Houston, TX 78234-6135 NUMBER(S) --32-05 12...the Requirements for A Master in Health Administration By Lieutenant Melissa J. Harnly, MSC Naval Hospital Great Lakes, Illinois May 19, 2005 20060315...Services Capital Asset Realignment for Enhanced Services, announced on May 7, 2004, by former Secretary of Veterans Affairs Anthony J. Principi , is a

  20. Electrocardiographic practices: the current report of monitoring and education in Veterans Affairs facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaremba, Jennifer L; Carroll, Karen; Manley, Kathleen

    2014-01-01

    In 2004, practice standards for electrocardiographic (ECG) monitoring were published to address the need for an expanded use of ECG monitoring beyond heart rate and basic rhythm determination. This article reports the data collected from a survey distributed throughout the Veterans Healthcare Administration hospitals to determine the extent to which practice standards have been adopted. Survey data were used to identify the differences between actual practice and evidence-based standards. The results were divided into ECG electrode application, lead selection, alarm limits, monitoring capabilities, monitoring during patient transport, and education and competencies. The results confirm the need for improvement, including a thorough evaluation of facility practices and education. The data demonstrate the differences among actual practice and evidence-based recommendations.

  1. Infection surveillance and control programs in the Department of Veterans Affairs nursing home care units: a preliminary assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsan, Linda; Hojlo, Christa; Kearns, Martha A; Davis, Chester; Langberg, Robert; Claggett, Maurice; Coughlin, Nancy; Miller, Michael; Gaynes, Robert; Gibert, Cynthia; Montgomery, Ona; Richards, Chesley; Danko, Linda; Roselle, Gary

    2006-03-01

    A survey was conducted to assess the capacity and current practices of the infection surveillance and control programs at the Department of Veterans Affairs' 130 nursing home care units (VA NHCUs) covering a total of 15,006 beds in 2003. All 130 VA NHCUs responded to the survey, although not all NHCUs answered every question. The majority of the VA NHCUs provided specialized services that might pose increased risks of infection. For every 8 to 10 VA NHCU beds, there was 1 regular-pressure or negative-pressure infection control room available. Each VA NHCU had an active ongoing infection surveillance and control program managed by highly educated infection control personnel (ICP), of which 96% had a minimum of a bachelor degree. A median of 12 hours per week of these ICP efforts was devoted to the infection surveillance and control activities. The most frequently used surveillance methods were targeted surveillance for specific infections and for specific organisms. Most VA NHCUs conducted surveillance for antibiotic-resistant organisms. However, VA NHCUs did not use a uniform set of definitions for nosocomial infections for their infection surveillance and control purposes. We conclude that VA NHCUs have a considerable infrastructure and capacity for infection surveillance and control. This information can be used to develop a nationwide VA NHCU nosocomial infection surveillance system.

  2. Training satisfaction for subspecialty fellows in internal medicine: Findings from the Veterans Affairs (VA Learners' Perceptions Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Byrne John M

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Learner satisfaction assessment is critical in the design and improvement of training programs. However, little is known about what influences satisfaction and whether trainee specialty is correlated. A national comparison of satisfaction among internal medicine subspecialty fellows in the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA provides a unique opportunity to examine educational factors associated with learner satisfaction. We compared satisfaction across internal medicine fellows by subspecialty and compared factors associated with satisfaction between procedural versus non-procedural subspecialty fellows, using data from the Learners' Perceptions Survey (LPS, a validated survey tool. Methods We surveyed 2,221 internal medicine subspecialty fellows rotating through VA between 2001 and 2008. Learners rated their overall training satisfaction on a 100-point scale, and on a five-point Likert scale ranked satisfaction with items within six educational domains: learning, clinical, working and physical environments; personal experience; and clinical faculty/preceptor. Results Procedural and non-procedural fellows reported similar overall satisfaction scores (81.2 and 81.6. Non-procedural fellows reported higher satisfaction with 79 of 81 items within the 6 domains and with the domain of physical environment (4.06 vs. 3.85, p Conclusions Internal medicine fellows are highly satisfied with their VA training. Nonprocedural fellows reported higher satisfaction with most items. For both procedural and non-procedural fellows, clinical faculty/preceptor and personal experience have the strongest impact on overall satisfaction.

  3. Professional Quality of Life of Veterans Affairs Staff and Providers in a Patient-Centered Care Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locatelli, Sara M; LaVela, Sherri L

    2015-01-01

    Changes to the work environment prompted by the movement toward patient-centered care have the potential to improve occupational stress among health care workers by improving team-based work activities, collaboration, and employee-driven quality improvement. This study was conducted to examine professional quality of life among providers at patient-centered care pilot facilities. Surveys were conducted with 76 Veterans Affairs employees/providers at facilities piloting patient-centered care interventions, to assess demographics, workplace practices and views (team-based environment, employee voice, quality of communication, and turnover intention), and professional quality of life (compassion satisfaction, burnout, and secondary traumatic stress).Professional quality-of-life subscales were not related to employee position type, age, or gender. Employee voice measures were related to lower burnout and higher compassion satisfaction. In addition, employees who were considering leaving their position showed higher burnout and lower compassion satisfaction scores. None of the work practices showed relationships with secondary traumatic stress.

  4. Is Body Mass Index the Best Adiposity Measure for Prostate Cancer Risk? Results From a Veterans Affairs Biopsy Cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrios-Rivera, Lourdes; Howard, Lauren; Frank, Jennifer; De Hoedt, Amanda; Beverly, Devon; Grant, Delores J; Hoyo, Cathrine; Freedland, Stephen J

    2017-07-01

    To test multiple adiposity measures and prostate cancer (PC) risk in men undergoing prostate biopsy. We hypothesized that body mass index (BMI), body fat, and waist circumference would be highly correlated, and all would be associated with aggressive PC, but not overall risk. A case (483)-control (496) study among men undergoing prostate biopsy from 2007 to 2016 was conducted at the Durham Veterans Affairs Medical Center. Anthropometric and self-reported measurements were taken. Percent body fat was measured. Associations between adiposity measures and PC risk and high-grade PC (Gleason ≥7) were examined using logistic regression. BMI, percent body fat, and waist circumference were highly correlated (ρ ≥ .79) (P BMI (P = .011) was associated with overall PC risk, but percent body fat (P = .16) and waist circumference (P = .19) were not. However, all adiposity measurements were associated with high-grade disease (P BMI, body fat, and waist circumference were all highly correlated and associated with aggressive PC. This study supports the idea that higher adiposity is selectively associated with high-grade PC and reinforces the continued use of self-reported BMI as a measure of obesity in epidemiologic studies of PC. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  5. Automated quality measurement in Department of the Veterans Affairs discharge instructions for patients with congestive heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garvin, Jennifer H; Elkin, Peter L; Shen, Shuying; Brown, Steven; Trusko, Brett; Wang, Enlai; Hoke, Linda; Quiaoit, Ylenia; Lajoie, Joan; Weiner, Mark G; Graham, Pauline; Speroff, Theodore

    2013-01-01

    Quality measurement is an important issue for the United States Department of Veterans Affairs (VA). In this study, we piloted the use of an informatics tool, the Multithreaded Clinical Vocabulary Server (MCVS), which extracted automatically whether the VA Office of Quality and Performance measures of quality of care were met for the completion of discharge instructions for inpatients with congestive heart failure. We used a single document, the discharge instructions, from one section of the medical records for 152 patients and developed a reference standard using two independent reviewers to assess performance. When evaluated against the reference standard, MCVS achieved a sensitivity of 0.87, a specificity of 0.86, and a positive predictive value of 0.90. The automated process using the discharge instruction document worked effectively. The use of the MCVS tool for concept-based indexing resulted in mostly accurate data capture regarding quality measurement, but improvements are needed to further increase the accuracy of data extraction. © 2012 National Association for Healthcare Quality.

  6. Declining mortality following acute myocardial infarction in the Department of Veterans Affairs Health Care System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piñeros Sandy

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mortality from acute myocardial infarction (AMI is declining worldwide. We sought to determine if mortality in the Veterans Health Administration (VHA has also been declining. Methods We calculated 30-day mortality rates between 2004 and 2006 using data from the VHA External Peer Review Program (EPRP, which entails detailed abstraction of records of all patients with AMI. To compare trends within VHA with other systems of care, we estimated relative mortality rates between 2000 and 2005 for all males 65 years and older with a primary diagnosis of AMI using administrative data from the VHA Patient Treatment File and the Medicare Provider Analysis and Review (MedPAR files. Results Using EPRP data on 11,609 patients, we observed a statistically significant decline in adjusted 30-day mortality following AMI in VHA from 16.3% in 2004 to 13.9% in 2006, a relative decrease of 15% and a decrease in the odds of dying of 10% per year (p = .011. Similar declines were found for in-hospital and 90-day mortality. Based on administrative data on 27,494 VHA patients age 65 years and older and 789,400 Medicare patients, 30-day mortality following AMI declined from 16.0% during 2000-2001 to 15.7% during 2004-June 2005 in VHA and from 16.7% to 15.5% in private sector hospitals. After adjusting for patient characteristics and hospital effects, the overall relative odds of death were similar for VHA and Medicare (odds ratio 1.02, 95% C.I. 0.96-1.08. Conclusion Mortality following AMI within VHA has declined significantly since 2003 at a rate that parallels that in Medicare-funded hospitals.

  7. Departments of Defense and Veterans Affairs: Status of the Integrated Electronic Health Record (iEHR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-26

    technologies. The infrastructure would have included an Enterprise Service Bus ( ESB ) with an integrated federated data repository that could have performed...technology efforts, the two Departments have undertaken ad hoc activities to accelerate the transmission of health information on severely wounded

  8. Geriatric-focused educational offerings in the Department of Veterans Affairs from 1999 to 2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thielke, Stephen; Tumosa, Nina; Lindenfeld, Rivkah; Shay, Kenneth

    2011-01-01

    The scope of geriatrics-related educational offerings in large health care systems, in either the target audiences or topics covered, has not previously been analyzed or reported in the professional literature. The authors reviewed the geriatrics-related educational sessions that were provided between 1999 and 2009 by the Geriatrics Research, Education, and Clinical Centers (GRECCs) and the Employee Education System (EES) of the United States' largest integrated health care system, the Veterans Health Administration (VHA). Using records of attendance and content at local training events and regional and national conferences, the authors estimated the number of attendees in different health disciplines and the number and types of lectures. During the past 11 years, GRECCs and EES provided geriatric-related educational sessions to about one third of a million attendees, most of them nurses and physicians, in about 15,000 lectures. About three-fourths of the educational events occurred through local, rather than regional or national, events. Lectures covered a wide variety of topics, with a particular emphasis on dementia and other mental health topics. A comparison of the number of potential learners in VHA with the number of geriatric-related educational presentations over this time period yields an average of one offering per VHA provider every 3 years; most providers likely never received any. Since 1999 the GRECCs have been the dominant source for geriatrics-related education for VHA health professionals, but given that about one half of VHA patients are older than age 65, there is still a large unmet need to provide geriatric education to VHA providers. Examination of the GRECC resources that have been put to use in the past to develop and deliver the face-to-face education experiences described sheds light on the magnitude of resources that might be required to address remaining unmet need in the future, and supports the prediction that there will need to be

  9. Study of verification, validation, and testing in the automated data processing system at the Department of Veterans Affairs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrews, A. (Argonne National Lab., IL (USA). Energy Systems Div.); Formento, J.W.; Hill, L.G.; Riemer, C.A. (Argonne National Lab., IL (USA). Environmental Assessment and Information Sciences Div.)

    1990-01-01

    Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) studied the role of verification, validation, and testing (VV T) in the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) automated data processing (ADP) system development life cycle (SDLC). In this study, ANL reviewed and compared standard VV T practices in the private and government sectors with those in the VA. The methodology included extensive interviews with, and surveys of, users, analysts, and staff in the Systems Development Division (SDD) and Systems Verification and Testing Division (SV TD) of the VA, as well as representatives of private and government organizations, and a review of ADP standards. The study revealed that VA's approach to VV T already incorporates some industry practices -- in particular, the use of an independent organization that relies on the acceptability of test results to validate a software system. Argonne recommends that the role of SV TD be limited to validation and acceptance testing (defined as formal testing conducted independently to determine whether a software system satisfies its acceptance criteria). It also recommends that the role of the SDD be expanded to include verification testing (defined as formal testing or revaluation conducted by the developer to determine whether a software development satisfies design criteria). Integrated systems testing should be performed by Operations in a production-like environment under stressful situations to assess how trouble-free and acceptable the software is to the end user. A separate, independent, quality assurance group should be responsible for ADP auditing and for helping to establish policies for managing software configurations and should report directly to the VA central office. Finally, and of no less importance, an in-house training program and procedures manual should be instituted for the entire SDLC for all involved staff; it should incorporate or reference ADP standards.

  10. Root proximity as a risk factor for progression of alveolar bone loss: the Veterans Affairs Dental Longitudinal Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Taera; Miyamoto, Takanari; Nunn, Martha E; Garcia, Raul I; Dietrich, Thomas

    2008-04-01

    The purpose of the present longitudinal study was to evaluate the association between root proximity and the risk for alveolar bone loss (ABL). We used data from the Veterans Affairs Dental Longitudinal Study, a closed-panel longitudinal cohort study of 1,231 men enrolled in 1968 with triennial follow-up examinations. Periapical radiographs of mandibular incisors from subjects with > or =10 years of follow-up were selected. Interradicular distance (IRD) at the cemento-enamel junction and alveolar bone levels at baseline and last follow-up were measured using digitized radiographs. The rate of progressive ABL was determined and expressed as millimeters per 10 years. Site-specific multivariate regression models were fit to evaluate the association between IRD and ABL rate, adjusting for age and smoking. Empirical standard errors and generalized estimating equations were used to account for the correlation among sites within subjects. There were 473 dentate subjects, aged 28 to 71 years at baseline, with > or =10 years of follow-up data available for analyses. The mean follow-up time was 23 years. The mean IRD was 1.0 +/- 0.3 mm, and the mean ABL rate during 10 years was 0.61 +/- 0.59 mm. There was a significant non-linear association between IRD and ABL rate (P or =0.8 mm, sites with IRD or =0.5 mm of bone during 10 years (relative risk: 1.28 [95% CI: 1.11 to 1.48]) and 56% (95% CI: 11% to 117%) more likely to lose > or =1.0 mm of bone during 10 years (relative risk: 1.56 [95% CI: 1.11 to 2.17]). IRD loss in mandibular anterior teeth. Measurement of IRD may have important prognostic value in making treatment decisions.

  11. Robotic surgical telepathology between the Iron Mountain and Milwaukee Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Centers: a 12-year experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, Bruce E; Choi, Hongyung; Recla, Daniel L; Kerr, Sarah E; Wagenman, Benjamin L

    2009-08-01

    Since mid-1996, we have operated a diagnostic robotic telepathology (TP) system at the Iron Mountain, MI, Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center (VAMC) from the Milwaukee, WI, VAMC, located some 220 miles away. No on-site pathologist is present in Iron Mountain. Instead, an experienced, well-trained pathologist assistant, under direction of pathologists located in Milwaukee, is responsible for tissue grossing and sectioning. The pathologist assistant places slides onto the stage of the robotic microscope, which is then controlled by pathologists in Milwaukee. Each case read by TP is subsequently read by light microscopy (LM) by the same pathologist. Three distinct phases of TP have been recognized. Our experience during phase I (mid-1996 to early 1999) has been published previously. During phase II (early 1999 to mid-2004), 1 of the 2 senior telepathologists in phase I retired, and 3 junior pathologists were hired. During phase III (mid-2004 to June 2008), 2 new junior pathologists were hired, and ASAP Imaging (Apollo Telemedicine, Inc., Falls Church, VA) was implemented. The number of TP case opportunities in phases I, II, and III was 2200, 5841, and 3512, respectively, resulting in a total of 11 553. A total of 1834 cases were deferred to LM for a variety of reasons. The number of TP diagnoses rendered in phases I, II, and III was 2144, 4636, and 2939, respectively, resulting in a total of 9719. The major discordance rates in phases I, II, and III were 0.33%, 0.45%, and 0.20%, respectively, with an overall rate of 0.35%. Pathologist-specific discordance rates were not significantly different and ranged from a low of 0.12% to a high of 0.77%, whereas case deferral rates were significantly different (P Iron Mountain clinicians have expressed great satisfaction with the services provided by their off-site pathologist colleagues.

  12. Robotic surgical telepathology between the Iron Mountain and Milwaukee Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Centers: a twelve year experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, Bruce E; Choi, Hongyung; Recla, Daniel L; Kerr, Sarah E; Wagenman, Benjamin L

    2009-11-01

    Since mid-1996 we have operated a diagnostic robotic telepathology (TP) system at the Iron Mountain, Michigan, Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center (VAMC) from the Milwaukee, Wisconsin VAMC, located some 220 miles away. No on-site pathologist is present in Iron Mountain. Instead, an experienced, well-trained pathologist assistant, under direction of pathologists located in Milwaukee, is responsible for tissue grossing and sectioning. The pathologist assistant places slides onto the stage of the robotic microscope, which is then controlled by pathologists in Milwaukee. Each case read by TP is subsequently read by light microscopy (LM) by the same pathologist. Three distinct phases of TP have been recognized. Our experience during Phase I (mid-1996 through early 1999) has been published previously. During Phase II (early 1999 through mid-2004), one of the two senior telepathologists in Phase I retired and three junior pathologists were hired. During Phase III (mid-2004 though June 2008), two new junior pathologists were hired and ASAP Imaging (Apollo Telemedicine, Inc., Falls Church, VA) was implemented. The number of TP case opportunities in Phases I, II and III was 2,200; 5,841 and 3,512; respectively resulting in a total of 11,553. A total of 1,834 cases were deferred to LM for a variety of reasons. The number of TP diagnoses rendered in Phases I, II and III was 2,144; 4,636 and 2,939; respectively, for a total of 9,719. The major discordance rates in Phases I, II and III were 0.33%, 0.45% and 0.20%, respectively with an overall rate of 0.35%. Pathologist-specific discordance rates were not significantly different and ranged from a low of 0.12% to a high of 0.77%, while case deferral rates were significantly different (P Iron Mountain clinicians have expressed great satisfaction with the services provided by their off-site pathologist colleagues.

  13. Outcomes after cataract surgery in eyes with pseudoexfoliation: Results from the Veterans Affairs Ophthalmic Surgery Outcomes Data Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turalba, Angela; Cakiner-Egilmez, Tulay; Payal, Abhishek R; Gonzalez-Gonzalez, Luis A; Chomsky, Amy S; Vollman, David E; Baze, Elizabeth F; Lawrence, Mary G; Daly, Mary K

    2017-02-01

    To compare clinical outcomes of cataract surgery in eyes with and without pseudoexfoliation (PXF). Retrospective deidentified data analysis. A total of 123 PXF and 4776 non-PXF eyes of patients who underwent cataract surgery. We compared data on visual acuity, Visual Function Questionnaire (VFQ)-based quality of life, and complications in PXF and non-PXF eyes from the Veterans Affairs (VA) Ophthalmic Surgery Outcomes Data Project across 5 VA medical centres. Pupillary expansion devices were used in 31 (25.2%) PXF cases and 398 (8.4%) non-PXF cases (p < 0.0001). Capsular tension rings were used in 6 (4.9%) PXF cases and 55 (1.2%) non-PXF cases (p < 0.004). The following complications occurred more frequently in PXF cases: zonular dehiscence without vitrectomy (4 [3.3%] PXF cases vs 40 [0.8%] non-PXF cases p = 0.02), persistent inflammation (28 [24.1%] vs 668 [14.5%]; p = 0.007), and persistent intraocular pressure elevation (5 [4.3%] vs 68 [1.5%]; p = 0.03). Best corrected visual acuity (BCVA) improved in both groups after 1 month, but 87 (83.7%) PXF cases achieved postoperative BCVA better than or equal to 20/40 compared to 3991 (93.8%) non-PXF cases (p = 0.0003). There was no significant difference in the postoperative composite VFQ scores between PXF (82.1 ± 16.9) and non-PXF cases (84.2 ± 16.8, p = 0.09). Several complications occurred more frequently in the PXF group compared to the non-PXF group, and fewer PXF cases achieved BCVA better than or equal to 20/40. Despite this, both groups experienced similar improvement in vision-related quality of life after cataract surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  14. Patient Ethnicity Affects Triage Assessments and Patient Prioritization in U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs Emergency Departments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigil, Jacob M; Coulombe, Patrick; Alcock, Joe; Kruger, Eric; Stith, Sarah S; Strenth, Chance; Parshall, Mark; Cichowski, Sara B

    2016-04-01

    Ethnic minority patients receive lower priority triage assignments in Veteran's Affairs (VA) emergency departments (EDs) compared to White patients, but it is currently unknown whether this disparity arises from generalized biases across the triage assessment process or from differences in how objective and/or subjective institution-level or person-level information is incorporated into the triage assessment process, thus contributing to disparate treatment.The VA database of electronic medical records of patients who presented to the VA ED from 2008 to 2012 was used to measure patient ethnicity, self-reported pain intensity (PI) levels, heart rate (HR), respiratory rate (RR), and nurse-provided triage assignment, the Emergency Severity Index (ESI) score. Multilevel, random effects linear modeling was used to control for demographic and clinical characteristics of patients as well as age, gender, and experience of triage nurses.A total of 359,642 patient/provider encounters between 129,991 VA patients and 774 nurses were included in the study. Patients were 61% non-Hispanic White [NHW], 28% African-American, 7% Hispanic, 2% Asian-American, nurses and patients, African-American, Hispanic, and mixed-ethnicity patients reported higher average PI scores but lower HRs and RRs than NHW patients. NHW patients received higher priority ESI ratings with lower PI when compared against African-American patients. NHW patients with low to moderate HRs also received higher priority ESI scoring than African-American, Hispanic, Asian-American, and Mixed-ethnicity patients; however, when HR was high NHWs received lower priority ESI ratings than each of the minority groups (except for African-Americans).This study provides evidence for systemic differences in how patients' vital signs are applied for determining ESI scores for different ethnic groups. Additional prospective research will be needed to determine how this specific person-level mechanism affects healthcare quality and

  15. Multimorbidity and healthcare utilisation among high-cost patients in the US Veterans Affairs Health Care System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zulman, Donna M; Pal Chee, Christine; Wagner, Todd H; Yoon, Jean; Cohen, Danielle M; Holmes, Tyson H; Ritchie, Christine; Asch, Steven M

    2015-04-16

    To investigate the relationship between multimorbidity and healthcare utilisation patterns among the highest cost patients in a large, integrated healthcare system. In this retrospective cross-sectional study of all patients in the U.S. Veterans Affairs (VA) Health Care System, we aggregated costs of individuals' outpatient and inpatient care, pharmacy services and VA-sponsored contract care received in 2010. We assessed chronic condition prevalence, multimorbidity as measured by comorbidity count, and multisystem multimorbidity (number of body systems affected by chronic conditions) among the 5% highest cost patients. Using multivariate regression, we examined the association between multimorbidity and healthcare utilisation and costs, adjusting for age, sex, race/ethnicity, marital status, homelessness and health insurance status. USA VA Health Care System. 5.2 million VA patients. Annual total costs; absolute and share of costs generated through outpatient, inpatient, pharmacy and VA-sponsored contract care; number of visits to primary, specialty and mental healthcare; number of emergency department visits and hospitalisations. The 5% highest cost patients (n=261,699) accounted for 47% of total VA costs. Approximately two-thirds of these patients had chronic conditions affecting ≥3 body systems. Patients with cancer and schizophrenia were less likely to have documented comorbid conditions than other high-cost patients. Multimorbidity was generally associated with greater outpatient and inpatient utilisation. However, increased multisystem multimorbidity was associated with a higher outpatient share of total costs (1.6 percentage points per affected body system, psystem, p<0.01). Multisystem multimorbidity is common among high-cost VA patients. While some patients might benefit from disease-specific programmes, for most patients with multimorbidity there is a need for interventions that coordinate and maximise efficiency of outpatient services across multiple

  16. Veterans Affairs Health System and mental health treatment retention among patients with serious mental illness: evaluating accessibility and availability barriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, John F; Blow, Frederic C; Valenstein, Marcia; Fischer, Ellen P; Owen, Richard R; Barry, Kristen L; Hudson, Teresa J; Ignacio, Rosalinda V

    2007-06-01

    We examine the impact of two dimensions of access-geographic accessibility and availability-on VA health system and mental health treatment retention among patients with serious mental illness (SMI). Among 156,631 patients in the Veterans Affairs (VA) health care system with schizophrenia or bipolar disorder in fiscal year 1998 (FY98), we used Cox proportional hazards regression to model time to first 12-month gap in health system utilization, and in mental health services utilization, by the end of FY02. Geographic accessibility was operationalized as straight-line distance to nearest VA service site or VA psychiatric service site, respectively. Service availability was assessed using county-level VA hospital beds and non-VA beds per 1,000 county residents. Patients who died without a prior gap in care were censored. There were 32, 943 patients (21 percent) with a 12-month gap in health system utilization; 65,386 (42 percent) had a 12-month gap in mental health services utilization. Gaps in VA health system utilization were more likely if patients were younger, nonwhite, unmarried, homeless, nonservice-connected, if they had bipolar disorder, less medical morbidity, an inpatient stay in FY98, or if they lived farther from care or in a county with fewer VA inpatient beds. Similar relationships were observed for mental health, however being older, female, and having greater morbidity were associated with increased risks of gaps, and number of VA beds was not significant. Geographic accessibility and resource availability measures were associated with long-term continuity of care among patients with SMI. Increased distance from providers was associated with greater risks of 12-month gaps in health system and mental health services utilization. Lower VA inpatient bed availability was associated with increased risks of gaps in health system utilization. Study findings may inform efforts to improve treatment retention.

  17. Characteristics of Rural Veterans: 2010

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — This report uses data from the 2010 American Community Survey to compare the demographic and socioeconomic characteristics of Veterans and non-Veterans who live in...

  18. Master Veteran Index (MVI)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — As of June 28, 2010, the Master Veteran Index (MVI) database based on the enhanced Master Patient Index (MPI) is the authoritative identity service within the VA,...

  19. Rural Veterans by State

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — This speadsheet contains data from the 2014 American Community Survey and shows the demographic and socioeconomic characteristics of Veterans who live in rural and...

  20. Minority Veteran Report

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — This report is the first comprehensive report that chronicles the history of racial and ethnic minorities in the military and as Veterans, profiles characteristics...

  1. Minority Veteran Report 2014

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — This report is the first comprehensive report that chronicles the history of racial and ethnic minorities in the military and as Veterans, profiles characteristics...

  2. AVTA Federal Fleet PEV Readiness Data Logging and Characterization Study for Department of Veterans Affairs. James J. Peters VA Medical Center, Bronx, NY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schey, Stephen [Intertek Testing Services, North America, Phoenix, AZ (United States); Francfort, Jim [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2014-10-01

    This report focuses on the Department of Veterans Affairs, James J. Peters VA Medical Center (VA - Bronx) fleet to identify daily operational characteristics of select vehicles and report findings on vehicle and mission characterizations to support the successful introduction of PEVs into the agencies’ fleets. Individual observations of these selected vehicles provide the basis for recommendations related to electric vehicle adoption and whether a battery electric vehicle or plug-in hybrid electric vehicle (collectively referred to as PEVs) can fulfill the mission requirements.

  3. 76 FR 67257 - Computer Matching Program Between the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) and the Department of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-31

    ... veterans, servicemembers, and reservists who have applied for or who are receiving education benefit... meet the conditions of military service and eligibility criteria for payment of benefits determined...

  4. Clinical Characteristics, Comorbidities, and Response to Treatment of Veterans With Obstructive Sleep Apnea, Cincinnati Veterans Affairs Medical Center, 2005-2007

    OpenAIRE

    Samson, Pamela; Casey, Kenneth R.; Knepler, James; Panos, Ralph J.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a common disorder that is associated with significant morbidity. Veterans may be at an elevated risk for OSA because of increased prevalence of factors associated with the development and progression of OSA. The objective of this study was to determine the clinical characteristics, comorbidities, polysomnographic findings, and response to treatment of veterans with OSA. Methods We performed a retrospective chart review of 596 patients undergoing p...

  5. Enhanced health event detection and influenza surveillance using a joint Veterans Affairs and Department of Defense biosurveillance application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wojcik Richard

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The establishment of robust biosurveillance capabilities is an important component of the U.S. strategy for identifying disease outbreaks, environmental exposures and bioterrorism events. Currently, U.S. Departments of Defense (DoD and Veterans Affairs (VA perform biosurveillance independently. This article describes a joint VA/DoD biosurveillance project at North Chicago-VA Medical Center (NC-VAMC. The Naval Health Clinics-Great Lakes facility physically merged with NC-VAMC beginning in 2006 with the full merger completed in October 2010 at which time all DoD care and medical personnel had relocated to the expanded and remodeled NC-VAMC campus and the combined facility was renamed the Lovell Federal Health Care Center (FHCC. The goal of this study was to evaluate disease surveillance using a biosurveillance application which combined data from both populations. Methods A retrospective analysis of NC-VAMC/Lovell FHCC and other Chicago-area VAMC data was performed using the ESSENCE biosurveillance system, including one infectious disease outbreak (Salmonella/Taste of Chicago-July 2007 and one weather event (Heat Wave-July 2006. Influenza-like-illness (ILI data from these same facilities was compared with CDC/Illinois Sentinel Provider and Cook County ESSENCE data for 2007-2008. Results Following consolidation of VA and DoD facilities in North Chicago, median number of visits more than doubled, median patient age dropped and proportion of females rose significantly in comparison with the pre-merger NC-VAMC facility. A high-level gastrointestinal alert was detected in July 2007, but only low-level alerts at other Chicago-area VAMCs. Heat-injury alerts were triggered for the merged facility in June 2006, but not at the other facilities. There was also limited evidence in these events that surveillance of the combined population provided utility above and beyond the VA-only and DoD-only components. Recorded ILI activity for NC

  6. 76 FR 60965 - Enhanced-Use Lease (EUL) of Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) Real Property for the Development...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-30

    ... priority placement for homeless Veterans and Veterans at risk of homelessness and their families; and...-sufficiency. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Edward Bradley, Office of Asset Enterprise Management (044... toll-free number). SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Title 38 U.S.C. 8161 et seq. states that the...

  7. Systems innovation model: an integrated interdisciplinary team approach pre- and post-bariatric surgery at a veterans affairs (VA) medical center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenberg, Dan; Lohnberg, Jessica A; Kubat, Eric P; Bates, Cheryl C; Greenberg, Lauren M; Frayne, Susan M

    2017-04-01

    Provision of bariatric surgery in the Veterans Health Administration must account for obese veterans' co-morbidity burden and the geographically dispersed location of patients relative to Veterans Affairs (VA) bariatric centers. To evaluate a collaborative, integrated, interdisciplinary bariatric team of surgeons, bariatricians, psychologists, dieticians, and physical therapists working in a hub-and-spokes care model, for pre- and post-bariatric surgery assessment and management. This is a description of an interdisciplinary clinic and bariatric program at a VA healthcare system and a report on program evaluation findings. Retrospective data of a prospective database was abstracted. For program evaluation, we abstracted charts to characterize patient data and conducted a patient survey. Since 2009, 181 veterans have undergone bariatric surgery. Referrals came from 7 western U.S. states. Mean preoperative body mass index was 46 kg/m(2) (maximum 71). Mean age was 53 years, with 33% aged>60 years; 79% were male. Medical co-morbidity included diabetes (70%), hypertension (85%), and lower back or extremity joint pain (84%). A psychiatric diagnosis was present in 58%. At 12 months, follow-up was 81% and percent excess body mass index loss was 50.5%. Among 54 sequential clinic patients completing anonymous surveys, overall satisfaction with the interdisciplinary team approach and improved quality of life were high (98% and 94%, respectively). The integrated, interdisciplinary team approach using a hub-and-spokes model is well suited to the VA bariatric surgery population, with its heavy burden of medical and mental health co-morbidity and its system of geographically dispersed patients receiving treatment at specialty centers. As the VA seeks to expand the use of bariatric surgery as an option for obese veterans, interdisciplinary models crafted to address case complexity, care coordination, and long-term outcomes should be part of policy planning efforts. Published by

  8. Association of Admission to Veterans Affairs Hospitals Versus non-Veterans Affairs Hospitals with Mortality and Readmission Rates Among Older Men Hospitalized with Acute Myocardial Infarction, Heart Failure, and Pneumonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuti, Sudhakar V.; Qin, Li; Rumsfeld, John S.; Ross, Joseph S.; Masoudi, Frederick A.; Normand, Sharon-Lise T.; Murugiah, Karthik; Bernheim, Susannah M.; Suter, Lisa G.; Krumholz, Harlan M.

    2017-01-01

    Importance Little contemporary information is available about comparative performance between Veterans Affairs (VA) and non-VA hospitals, particularly related to mortality and readmission rates, 2 important outcomes of care. Objective To assess and compare mortality and readmission rates among men in VA and non-VA hospitals. To avoid confounding geographic effects with health care system effects, we studied VA and non-VA hospitals within the same metropolitan statistical area (MSA). Design Cross-sectional analysis between 2010 and 2013 Setting Medicare Standard Analytic Files and Enrollment Database Participants Male Medicare Fee-for-Service beneficiaries aged 65 or older hospitalized between 2010 and 2013 in VA and non-VA acute care hospitals for acute myocardial infarction (AMI), heart failure (HF), or pneumonia. Exposures Hospitalization in a VA or non-VA hospital in urban MSAs that contained at least 1 VA and non-VA hospital Main Outcomes and Measures For each condition, 30-day risk-standardized mortality rates and risk-standardized readmission rates for VA and non-VA hospitals. Mean-aggregated within-MSA differences in mortality and readmission rates were also assessed. Results We studied 104 VA and 1,513 non-VA hospitals, with each condition-outcome analysis cohort for VA and non-VA hospitals containing at least 7,900 patients, in 92 MSAs. Mortality rates were lower in VA hospitals than non-VA hospitals for AMI (13.5% vs. 13.7%, p=0.02; −0.2 percentage point difference) and HF (11.4% vs. 11.9%, p=0.008; −0.5 percentage point difference), but higher for pneumonia (12.6% vs. 12.2%, phospitals for all 3 conditions (AMI: 17.8% vs. 17.2%, 0.6 percentage point difference; HF: 24.7% vs. 23.5%, 1.2 percentage point difference; pneumonia: 19.4% vs. 18.7%, 0.7 percentage point difference, all phospitals had lower mortality rates for AMI (percentage point difference: −0.22, 95% CI: −0.40 to −0.04) and HF (−0.63, 95% CI: −0.95 to −0.31), and mortality

  9. Systemic Vulnerabilities to Suicide among Veterans from the Iraq and Afghanistan Conflicts: Review of Case Reports from a National Veterans Affairs Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Peter D.; Huber, Samuel J.; Watts, Bradley Vince; Bagian, James P.

    2011-01-01

    While suicide among recently returned veterans is of great concern, it is a relatively rare occurrence within individual hospitals and clinics. Root cause analysis (RCA) generates a detailed case report that can be used to identify system-based vulnerabilities following an adverse event. Review of a national database of RCA reports may identify…

  10. 75 FR 30915 - Computer Matching Program Between the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) and the Department of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-02

    ... eligibility status of Veterans, Servicemembers, and reservists, and eligible dependents who have applied for... is to enable VA to verify that individuals meet the conditions of military service and...

  11. Comparison of mobility device delivery within Department of Veterans Affairs for individuals with multiple sclerosis versus spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrosio, Fabrisia; Boninger, Michael L; Fitzgerald, Shirley G; Hubbard, Sandra L; Schwid, Steven R; Cooper, Rory A

    2007-01-01

    Individuals with multiple sclerosis (MS) report decreased satisfaction with their mobility devices compared with individuals with spinal cord injuries (SCIs). This study (1) investigated the demographic differences between veterans with MS (V-MS) and veterans with SCI (V-SCI) who were issued a wheelchair by the Veterans Health Administration (VHA) and (2) described differences in mobility device prescription. We merged two VHA databases to obtain demographic and wheelchair information for all V-MS and V-SCI in 2000 and 2001. Descriptive information for issued wheelchairs was available for 2,154 V-MS and V-SCI. We found that V-MS were significantly less likely to receive higher quality wheelchairs (manual or power) compared with V-SCI (p wheelchair prescription between these two groups indicates a need for further research regarding the assistive device prescription process in these populations.

  12. 38 CFR 14.605 - Suits against Department of Veterans Affairs employees arising out of a wrongful act or omission...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... by a physician, dentist, nurse, physician's assistant, dentist's assistant, pharmacist or paramedical... Department of Justice will be asked to remove such suit to the appropriate Federal District Court before... Federal District Court. Should a Federal District Court determine that the Department of Veterans...

  13. Does comorbid chronic pain affect posttraumatic stress disorder diagnosis and treatment? Outcomes of posttraumatic stress disorder screening in Department of Veterans Affairs primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Outcalt, Samantha D; Hoen, Helena Maria; Yu, Zhangsheng; Franks, Tenesha Marie; Krebs, Erin E

    2016-01-01

    Because posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is both prevalent and underrecognized, routine primary care-based screening for PTSD has been implemented across the Veterans Health Administration. PTSD is frequently complicated by the presence of comorbid chronic pain, and patients with both conditions have increased symptom severity and poorer prognosis. Our objective was to determine whether the presence of pain affects diagnosis and treatment of PTSD among Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) patients who have a positive PTSD screening test. This retrospective cohort study used clinical and administrative data from six Midwestern VA medical centers. We identified 4,244 VA primary care patients with a positive PTSD screen and compared outcomes for those with and without a coexisting pain diagnosis. Outcomes were three clinically appropriate responses to positive PTSD screening: (1) mental health visit, (2) PTSD diagnosis, and (3) new selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) prescription. We found that patients with coexisting pain had a lower rate of mental health visits than those without pain (hazard ratio: 0.889, 95% confidence interval: 0.821-0.962). There were no significant differences in the rate of PTSD diagnosis or new SSRI prescription between patients with and without coexisting pain.

  14. 76 FR 67557 - Proposed Information Collection (Survey of Veteran Enrollees' Health and Reliance Upon VA...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-01

    ... use of other forms of information technology. Title: Survey of Veteran Enrollees' Health and Reliance... on population-based budget formulation, policy scenario testing, and strategic planning. Affected... AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (Survey of Veteran Enrollees' Health and Reliance Upon VA...

  15. 77 FR 3843 - Agency Information Collection (Board of Veterans' Appeals Customer Satisfaction With Hearing...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-25

    ... AFFAIRS Agency Information Collection (Board of Veterans' Appeals Customer Satisfaction With Hearing... techniques or the use of other forms of information technology. Title: Board of Veterans' Appeals Customer Satisfaction with Hearing Survey, VA Form 0745. OMB Control Number: 2900-0548. Type of Review: Extension of a...

  16. 76 FR 70827 - Proposed Information Collection (Board of Veterans' Appeals Customer Satisfaction With Hearing...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-15

    ... AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (Board of Veterans' Appeals Customer Satisfaction With Hearing... techniques or the use of other forms of information technology. Title: Board of Veterans' Appeals Customer Satisfaction with Hearing Survey Card, VA Form 0745. OMB Control Number: 2900-0548. Type of Review: Extension...

  17. Blue Button use by patients to access and share health record information using the Department of Veterans Affairs' online patient portal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turvey, Carolyn; Klein, Dawn; Fix, Gemmae; Hogan, Timothy P; Woods, Susan; Simon, Steven R; Charlton, Mary; Vaughan-Sarrazin, Mary; Zulman, Donna M; Dindo, Lilian; Wakefield, Bonnie; Graham, Gail; Nazi, Kim

    2014-01-01

    The Blue Button feature of online patient portals promotes patient engagement by allowing patients to easily download their personal health information. This study examines the adoption and use of the Blue Button feature in the Department of Veterans Affairs' (VA) personal health record portal, My HealtheVet. An online survey presented to a 4% random sample of My HealtheVet users between March and May 2012. Questions were designed to determine characteristics associated with Blue Button use, perceived value of use, and how Veterans with non-VA providers use the Blue Button to share information with their non-VA providers. Of the survey participants (N=18 398), 33% were current Blue Button users. The most highly endorsed benefit was that it helped patients understand their health history better because all the information was in one place (73%). Twenty-one percent of Blue Button users with a non-VA provider shared their VA health information, and 87% reported that the non-VA provider found the information somewhat or very helpful. Veterans' self-rated computer ability was the strongest factor contributing to both Blue Button use and to sharing information with non-VA providers. When comparing Blue Button users and non-users, barriers to adoption were low awareness of the feature and difficulty using the Blue Button. This study contributes to the understanding of early Blue Button adoption and use of this feature for patient-initiated sharing of health information. Educational efforts are needed to raise awareness of the Blue Button and to address usability issues that hinder adoption. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  18. The Veteran Population Projection 2014

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — VetPop2014 is an actuarial projection model developed by the Office of the Actuary (OACT) for Veteran population projection from Fiscal Year FY2014 to FY2043. Using...

  19. Veteran Religious Affiliation by State

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — This dataset provide a count of Veteran by their religious affiliation and state of residence. The dataset set covers all 50 states, District of Columbia and other...

  20. Rural Veterans by State (2015)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — This spreadsheet contains data from the 2015 American Community Survey and shows the demographic and socioeconomic characteristics of Veterans who live in rural and...

  1. Rural Veterans by State (2014)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — This speadsheet contains data from the 2014 American Community Survey and shows the demographic and socioeconomic characteristics of Veterans who live in rural and...

  2. The Veteran Population Projection 2014

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — VetPop2014 is an actuarial projection model developed by the Office of the Actuary (OACT) for Veteran population projection from Fiscal Year FY2014 to FY2043. Using...

  3. Technology Use among College Students: Implications for Student Affairs Professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gemmill, Erin; Peterson, Michael

    2006-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to explore the extent to which technology disrupts and occupies the time of a college student and to determine the degree to which these disruptions contribute to perceived stress. A 71-item survey to assess perceived stress, technology use and disruptions, and social support was administered to 299 undergraduate …

  4. Use of the Adaptive LASSO Method to Identify PM2.5 Components Associated with Blood Pressure in Elderly Men: The Veterans Affairs Normative Aging Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Lingzhen; Koutrakis, Petros; Coull, Brent A; Sparrow, David; Vokonas, Pantel S; Schwartz, Joel D

    2016-01-01

    PM2.5 (particulate matter ≤ 2.5 μm) has been associated with adverse cardiovascular outcomes, but it is unclear whether specific PM2.5 components, particularly metals, may be responsible for cardiovascular effects. We aimed to determine which PM2.5 components are associated with blood pressure in a longitudinal cohort. We fit linear mixed-effects models with the adaptive LASSO penalty to longitudinal data from 718 elderly men in the Veterans Affairs Normative Aging Study, 1999-2010. We controlled for PM2.5 mass, age, body mass index, use of antihypertensive medication (ACE inhibitors, non-ophthalmic beta blockers, calcium channel blockers, diuretics, and angiotensin receptor antagonists), smoking status, alcohol intake, years of education, temperature, and season as fixed effects in the models, and additionally applied the adaptive LASSO method to select PM2.5 components associated with blood pressure. Final models were identified by the Bayesian Information Criterion (BIC). For systolic blood pressure (SBP), nickel (Ni) and sodium (Na) were selected by the adaptive LASSO, whereas only Ni was selected for diastolic blood pressure (DBP). An interquartile range increase (2.5 ng/m3) in 7-day moving-average Ni was associated with 2.48-mmHg (95% CI: 1.45, 3.50 mmHg) increase in SBP and 2.22-mmHg (95% CI: 1.69, 2.75 mmHg) increase in DBP, respectively. Associations were comparable when the analysis was restricted to study visits with PM2.5 below the 75th percentile of the distribution (12 μg/m3). Our study suggested that exposure to ambient Ni was associated with increased blood pressure independent of PM2.5 mass in our study population of elderly men. Further research is needed to confirm our findings, assess generalizability to other populations, and identify potential mechanisms for Ni effects. Dai L, Koutrakis P, Coull BA, Sparrow D, Vokonas PS, Schwartz JD. 2016. Use of the adaptive LASSO method to identify PM2.5 components associated with blood pressure in

  5. Despite variation in volume, Veterans Affairs hospitals show consistent outcomes among patients with non-postoperative mechanical ventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooke, Colin R; Kennedy, Edward H; Wiitala, Wyndy L; Almenoff, Peter L; Sales, Anne E; Iwashyna, Theodore J

    2012-09-01

    To assess the relationship between volume of nonoperative mechanically ventilated patients receiving care in a specific Veterans Health Administration hospital and their mortality. Retrospective cohort study. One-hundred nineteen Veterans Health Administration medical centers. We identified 5,131 hospitalizations involving mechanically ventilated patients in an intensive care unit during 2009, who did not receive surgery. None. We extracted demographic and clinical data from the VA Inpatient Evaluation Center. For each hospital, we defined volume as the total number of nonsurgical admissions receiving mechanical ventilation in an intensive care unit during 2009. We examined the hospital contribution to 30-day mortality using multilevel logistic regression models with a random intercept for each hospital. We quantified the extent of interhospital variation in 30-day mortality using the intraclass correlation coefficient and median odds ratio. We used generalized estimating equations to examine the relationship between volume and 30-day mortality and risk-adjusted all models using a patient-level prognostic score derived from clinical data representing the risk of death conditional on treatment at a high-volume hospital. Mean age for the sample was 65 (SD 11) yrs, 97% were men, and 60% were white. The median VA hospital cared for 40 (interquartile range 19-62) mechanically ventilated patients in 2009. Crude 30-day mortality for these patients was 36.9%. After reliability and risk adjustment to the median patient, adjusted hospital-level mortality varied from 33.5% to 40.6%. The intraclass correlation coefficient for the hospital-level variation was 0.6% (95% confidence interval 0.1, 3.4%), with a median odds ratio of 1.15 (95% confidence interval 1.06, 1.38). The relationship between hospital volume of mechanically ventilated and 30-day mortality was not statistically significant: each 50-patient increase in volume was associated with a nonsignificant 2% decrease in

  6. Health Information Seeking and Technology Use Among Veterans With Spinal Cord Injuries and Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogan, Timothy P; Hill, Jennifer N; Locatelli, Sara M; Weaver, Frances M; Thomas, Florian P; Nazi, Kim M; Goldstein, Barry; Smith, Bridget M

    2016-02-01

    Access to health information is crucial to persons living with a spinal cord injury or disorder (SCI/D). Although previous research has provided insights on computer and Internet use among persons with SCI/D, as well as how and where persons with SCI/D gather health information, few studies have focused on U.S. veterans with SCI/D. To characterize health information seeking among veterans with SCI/D and to examine the association between technology use and the characteristics of veterans with SCI/D. Cross-sectional. Veterans Health Administration (VHA). Sample of 290 veterans with SCI/D who utilize services at 2 VHA SCI/D Centers. Postal mail survey. Extent of computer, Internet, and text messaging use, information source use, and e-Health literacy rates. The survey response rate was 38%. The majority of respondents were male (97.2%), younger than 65 years (71.0%), and white (71.7%). Of the respondents, 64.8% indicated that they use a computer, 62.9% reported use of the Internet, and 26.2% reported use of text messaging. The mean overall e-Health Literacy Scale score was 27.3 (standard deviation = 7.2). Similar to findings reported in studies focused outside the veteran population, the most frequent source that veterans turned to for information about SCI/D was a health professional (85.1%); this was also the most frequent source that veterans indicated they would turn to first to get information about SCI/D (75.9%). Other frequently reported sources of information included other persons with SCI/D (41.0%), Internet resources (31.0%), and family and friends (27.9%). Fairly high levels of computer and Internet use exist among veterans with SCI/D. Veterans with SCI/D also have a strong preference for people-particularly health professionals, and to a lesser extent peers and family and friends-as sources of information about SCI/D. These findings highlight the importance of combining technology and human interaction to meet the information needs of this population

  7. The development of professional identity and the formation of teams in the Veterans Affairs Connecticut Healthcare System's Center of Excellence in Primary Care Education Program (CoEPCE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Emily M; Zapatka, Susan; Brienza, Rebecca S

    2015-06-01

    The United States Department of Veterans Affairs Connecticut Healthcare System (VACHS) is one of five Centers of Excellence in Primary Care Education (CoEPCE) pilot sites. The overall goal of the CoEPCE program, which is funded by the Office of Academic Affiliations, is to develop and implement innovative approaches for training future health care providers in postgraduate education programs to function effectively in teams to provide exceptional patient care. This longitudinal study employs theoretically grounded qualitative methods to understand the effect of a combined nursing and medical training model on professional identity and team development at the VACHS CoEPCE site. The authors used qualitative approaches to understand trainees' experiences, expectations, and impressions of the program. From September 2011 to August 2012, they conducted 28 interviews of 18 trainees (internal medicine [IM] residents and nurse practitioners [NPs]) and subjected data to three stages of open, iterative coding. Major themes illuminate both the evolution of individual professional identity within both types of trainees and the dynamic process of group identity development. Results suggest that initially IM residents struggled to understand NPs' roles and responsibilities, whereas NP trainees doubted their ability to work alongside physicians. At the end of one academic year, these uncertainties disappeared, and what was originally artificial had transformed into an organic interprofessional team of health providers who shared a strong sense of understanding and trust. This study provides early evidence of successful interprofessional collaboration among NPs and IM residents in a primary care training program.

  8. Institutional Incentives for Mentoring at the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs and Universities: Associations With Mentors' Perceptions and Time Spent Mentoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maisel, Natalya C; Halvorson, Max A; Finney, John W; Bi, Xiaoyu; Hayashi, Ko P; Blonigen, Daniel M; Weitlauf, Julie C; Timko, Christine; Cronkite, Ruth C

    2017-04-01

    Limited empirical attention to date has focused on best practices in advanced research mentoring in the health services research domain. The authors investigated whether institutional incentives for mentoring (e.g., consideration of mentoring in promotion criteria) were associated with mentors' perceptions of mentoring benefits and costs and with time spent mentoring. The authors conducted an online survey in 2014 of a national sample of mentors of U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) Health Services Research and Development Service (HSR&D) mentored career development award recipients who received an award during 2000-2012. Regression analyses were used to examine institutional incentives as predictors of perceptions of benefits and costs of mentoring and time spent mentoring. Of the 145 mentors invited, 119 (82%) responded and 110 (76%) provided complete data for the study items. Overall, mentors who reported more institutional incentives also reported greater perceived benefits of mentoring (P = .03); however, more incentives were not significantly associated with perceived costs of mentoring. Mentors who reported more institutional incentives also reported spending a greater percentage of time mentoring (P = .02). University incentives were associated with perceived benefits of mentoring (P = .02), whereas VA incentives were associated with time spent mentoring (P = .003). Institutional policies that promote and support mentorship of junior investigators, specifically by recognizing and rewarding the efforts of mentors, are integral to fostering mentorship programs that contribute to the development of early-career health services researchers into independent investigators.

  9. Utilizing the ECHO Model in the Veterans Health Affairs System: Guidelines for Setup, Operations and Preliminary Findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herschel Knapp

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: In 2011, the Veterans Health Administration (VHA consulted with the Project ECHO (Extension for Community Healthcare Outcomes team at the University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, to reproduce their successful model within the VHA. Methods: The VHA launched SCAN-ECHO (Specialty Care Access Network-Extension for Community Healthcare Outcomes, a multisite videoconferencing system to conduct live clinical consultations between specialists at a VHA Medical Center (hospital and primary care providers stationed at satellite VHA CBOCs (Community-Based Outpatient Clinic. Results: Analysis of the first three years rendered a mean attendee satisfaction of 89.53% and a consultation satisfaction score of 88.10%. About half of the SCAN-ECHO consultations resulted in patients receiving their treatment from their local primary care providers; the remaining half were referred to the VHA Medical Center when the treatment involved equipment or services not available at the CBOCs (e.g., MRI, surgery. Conclusion: This paper details the setup, operation logistics and preliminary findings, suggesting that SCAN-ECHO is a viable model for providing quality specialty clinical consultation service, prompter access to care, reduced commutes and continuing education. Additionally, the use of a secured Internet-based videoconferencing system that supports connectivity to multiple (mobile devices could expand the utilization of this service.

  10. Veterans Choice Program

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — If you are already enrolled in VA health care, the Choice Program allows you to receive health care within your community. Using this program does NOT impact your...

  11. Veterans Health Administration (VHA)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — The purpose of this agreement is for SSA to verify SSNs and other identifying information for the Department of Veterans Affairs, VHA. DVA will use the information...

  12. Cooperation, Technology, and Performance: A Case Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavanagh, Thomas; Dickenson, Sabrina; Brandt, Suzanne

    1999-01-01

    Describes the CTP (Cooperation, Technology, and Performance) model and explains how it is used by the Department of Veterans Affairs-Veteran's Benefit Administration (VBA) for training. Discusses task analysis; computer-based training; cooperative-based learning environments; technology-based learning; performance-assessment methods; courseware…

  13. Initial Results from the Survey of Organizational Research Climates (SOuRCe in the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs Healthcare System.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian C Martinson

    Full Text Available In service to its core mission of improving the health and well-being of veterans, Veterans Affairs (VA leadership is committed to supporting research best practices in the VA. Recognizing that the behavior of researchers is influenced by the organizational climates in which they work, efforts to assess the integrity of research climates and share such information with research leadership in VA may be one way to support research best practices. The Survey of Organizational Research Climate (SOuRCe is the first validated survey instrument specifically designed to assess the organizational climate of research integrity in academic research organizations. The current study reports on an initiative to use the SOuRCe in VA facilities to characterize the organizational research climates and pilot test the effectiveness of using SOuRCe data as a reporting and feedback intervention tool.We administered the SOuRCe using a cross-sectional, online survey, with mailed follow-up to non-responders, of research-engaged employees in the research services of a random selection of 42 VA facilities (e.g., Hospitals/Stations believed to employ 20 or more research staff. We attained a 51% participation rate, yielding more than 5,200 usable surveys.We found a general consistency in organizational research climates across a variety of sub-groups in this random sample of research services in the VA. We also observed similar SOuRCe scale score means, relative rankings of these scales and their internal reliability, in this VA-based sample as we have previously documented in more traditional academic research settings. Results also showed more substantial variability in research climate scores within than between facilities in the VA research service as reflected in meaningful subgroup differences. These findings suggest that the SOuRCe is suitable as an instrument for assessing the research integrity climates in VA and that the tool has similar patterns of results that

  14. Initial Results from the Survey of Organizational Research Climates (SOuRCe) in the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs Healthcare System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinson, Brian C; Nelson, David; Hagel-Campbell, Emily; Mohr, David; Charns, Martin P; Bangerter, Ann; Thrush, Carol R; Ghilardi, Joseph R; Bloomfield, Hanna; Owen, Richard; Wells, James A

    2016-01-01

    In service to its core mission of improving the health and well-being of veterans, Veterans Affairs (VA) leadership is committed to supporting research best practices in the VA. Recognizing that the behavior of researchers is influenced by the organizational climates in which they work, efforts to assess the integrity of research climates and share such information with research leadership in VA may be one way to support research best practices. The Survey of Organizational Research Climate (SOuRCe) is the first validated survey instrument specifically designed to assess the organizational climate of research integrity in academic research organizations. The current study reports on an initiative to use the SOuRCe in VA facilities to characterize the organizational research climates and pilot test the effectiveness of using SOuRCe data as a reporting and feedback intervention tool. We administered the SOuRCe using a cross-sectional, online survey, with mailed follow-up to non-responders, of research-engaged employees in the research services of a random selection of 42 VA facilities (e.g., Hospitals/Stations) believed to employ 20 or more research staff. We attained a 51% participation rate, yielding more than 5,200 usable surveys. We found a general consistency in organizational research climates across a variety of sub-groups in this random sample of research services in the VA. We also observed similar SOuRCe scale score means, relative rankings of these scales and their internal reliability, in this VA-based sample as we have previously documented in more traditional academic research settings. Results also showed more substantial variability in research climate scores within than between facilities in the VA research service as reflected in meaningful subgroup differences. These findings suggest that the SOuRCe is suitable as an instrument for assessing the research integrity climates in VA and that the tool has similar patterns of results that have been

  15. Initial Results from the Survey of Organizational Research Climates (SOuRCe) in the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs Healthcare System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinson, Brian C.; Nelson, David; Hagel-Campbell, Emily; Mohr, David; Charns, Martin P.; Bangerter, Ann; Thrush, Carol R.; Ghilardi, Joseph R.; Bloomfield, Hanna; Owen, Richard; Wells, James A.

    2016-01-01

    Background In service to its core mission of improving the health and well-being of veterans, Veterans Affairs (VA) leadership is committed to supporting research best practices in the VA. Recognizing that the behavior of researchers is influenced by the organizational climates in which they work, efforts to assess the integrity of research climates and share such information with research leadership in VA may be one way to support research best practices. The Survey of Organizational Research Climate (SOuRCe) is the first validated survey instrument specifically designed to assess the organizational climate of research integrity in academic research organizations. The current study reports on an initiative to use the SOuRCe in VA facilities to characterize the organizational research climates and pilot test the effectiveness of using SOuRCe data as a reporting and feedback intervention tool. Methods We administered the SOuRCe using a cross-sectional, online survey, with mailed follow-up to non-responders, of research-engaged employees in the research services of a random selection of 42 VA facilities (e.g., Hospitals/Stations) believed to employ 20 or more research staff. We attained a 51% participation rate, yielding more than 5,200 usable surveys. Results We found a general consistency in organizational research climates across a variety of sub-groups in this random sample of research services in the VA. We also observed similar SOuRCe scale score means, relative rankings of these scales and their internal reliability, in this VA-based sample as we have previously documented in more traditional academic research settings. Results also showed more substantial variability in research climate scores within than between facilities in the VA research service as reflected in meaningful subgroup differences. These findings suggest that the SOuRCe is suitable as an instrument for assessing the research integrity climates in VA and that the tool has similar patterns of

  16. Mood disorders and risk of lung cancer in the EAGLE case-control study and in the U.S. Veterans Affairs inpatient cohort.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David E Capo-Ramos

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mood disorders may affect lung cancer risk. We evaluated this hypothesis in two large studies. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We examined 1,939 lung cancer cases and 2,102 controls from the Environment And Genetics in Lung cancer Etiology (EAGLE case-control study conducted in Italy (2002-2005, and 82,945 inpatients with a lung cancer diagnosis and 3,586,299 person-years without a lung cancer diagnosis in the U.S. Veterans Affairs Inpatient Cohort (VA study, composed of veterans with a VA hospital admission (1969-1996. In EAGLE, we calculated odds ratios (ORs and 95% confidence intervals (CI, with extensive adjustment for tobacco smoking and multiple lifestyle factors. In the VA study, we estimated lung cancer relative risks (RRs and 95% CIs with time-dependent Poisson regression, adjusting for attained age, calendar year, hospital visits, time within the study, and related previous medical diagnoses. In EAGLE, we found decreased lung cancer risk in subjects with a personal history of mood disorders (OR: 0.59, 95% CI: 0.44-0.79, based on 121 lung cancer incident cases and 192 controls and family history of mood disorders (OR: 0.62, 95% CI: 0.50-0.77, based on 223 lung cancer cases and 345 controls. The VA study analyses yielded similar results (RR: 0.74, 95% CI: 0.71-0.77, based on 2,304 incident lung cancer cases and 177,267 non-cancer person-years in men with discharge diagnoses for mood disorders. History of mood disorders was associated with nicotine dependence, alcohol and substance use and psychometric scales of depressive and anxiety symptoms in controls for these studies. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The consistent finding of a relationship between mood disorders and lung cancer risk across two large studies calls for further research into the complex interplay of risk factors associated with these two widespread and debilitating diseases. Although we adjusted for smoking effects in EAGLE, residual confounding of the results by

  17. Hurricanes Katrina and Rita and the Department of Veterans Affairs: a conceptual model for understanding the evacuation of nursing homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobalian, Aram; Claver, Maria; Fickel, Jacqueline J

    2010-01-01

    Hurricanes Katrina and Rita exposed significant flaws in US preparedness for catastrophic events and the nation's capacity to respond to them. These flaws were especially evident in the affected disaster areas' nursing homes, which house a particularly vulnerable population of frail older adults. Although evacuation of a healthcare facility is a key preparedness activity, there is limited research on factors that lead to effective evacuation. Our review of the literature on evacuation is focused on developing a conceptual framework to study future evacuations rather than as a comprehensive assessment of prior work. This paper summarizes what is known thus far about disaster response activities of nursing homes following natural and human-caused disasters, describes a conceptual model to guide future inquiry regarding this topic, and suggests future areas of research to further understand the decision-making process of nursing home facilitators regarding evacuating nursing home residents. To demonstrate the utility of the conceptual model and to provide guidance about effective practices and procedures, this paper focuses on the responses of Veterans Health Administration (VHA) nursing homes to the 2 hurricanes. Quarantelli's conceptual framework, as modified by Perry and Mushkatel, is useful in guiding the development of central hypotheses related to the decision-making that occurred in VA nursing homes and other healthcare facilities following Hurricanes Katrina and Rita. However, we define evacuation somewhat differently to account for the fact that evacuation may, in some instances, be permanent. Thus, we propose modifying this framework to improve its applicability beyond preventive evacuation. We need to better understand how disaster plans can be adapted to meet the needs of frail elders and other residents in nursing homes. Moreover, we must address identified gaps in the scientific literature with respect to health outcomes by tracking outcomes over time

  18. Employment of Veterans in the Federal Executive Branch

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — These quick facts use data from the 2011 Employment of Veterans in the Federal Executive Branch to compare Veteran employment in the Federal Government by agency,...

  19. Employment of Veterans in the Federal Executive Branch

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — These quick facts use data from the 2011 Employment of Veterans in the Federal Executive Branch to compare Veteran employment in the Federal Government by agency,...

  20. Veteran Students Received Similar Amounts of Title IV Aid as Nonveterans but More Total Aid with GI Benefits. Report to the Ranking Member, Subcommittee on Economic Opportunity, Committee on Veterans' Affairs, House of Representatives. GAO-08-741

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, George A.

    2008-01-01

    In 2002, the Government Accountability Office (GAO) reported that veteran students were awarded similar amounts of Title IV aid as nonveteran students, and veterans' total federal aid was greater when Chapter 30 GI benefits were included. This report responds to request from the Subcommittee on Economic Opportunity, Committee on Veterans' Affairs…

  1. National Survey of Veterans, Active Duty Service Members, Demobilized National Guard and Reserve Members, Family Members, and Surviving Spouses

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The 2010 National Survey of Veterans (NSV) is the sixth in a series of comprehensive nationwide surveys designed to help the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) plan...

  2. National Survey of Veterans, Active Duty Service Members, Demobilized National Guard and Reserve Members, Family Members, and Surviving Spouses

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The 2010 National Survey of Veterans (NSV) is the sixth in a series of comprehensive nationwide surveys designed to help the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) plan...

  3. 78 FR 28292 - Gulf War Veterans' Illnesses Task Force

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-14

    ... AFFAIRS Gulf War Veterans' Illnesses Task Force AGENCY: Department of Veterans Affairs (VA). ACTION... the Gulf War Veterans' Illnesses Task Force (GWVI-TF) in August 2009 to conduct a comprehensive review... War Veterans' Illnesses Task Force Draft Written Report is now complete. VA is inviting...

  4. 76 FR 65321 - Gulf War Veterans' Illnesses Task Force

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-20

    ... AFFAIRS Gulf War Veterans' Illnesses Task Force AGENCY: Department of Veterans Affairs (VA). ACTION... the Gulf War Veterans' Illnesses Task Force (GWVI-TF) in August 2009 to conduct a comprehensive review... War Veterans' Illnesses Task Force Draft Written Report is now complete. VA is inviting...

  5. 75 FR 16577 - Gulf War Veterans' Illnesses Task Force

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... AFFAIRS Gulf War Veterans' Illnesses Task Force AGENCY: Department of Veterans Affairs (VA). ACTION... the Gulf War Veterans' Illnesses Task Force (GWVI-TF) in August 2009 to conduct a comprehensive review... Veterans' Illnesses Task Force Draft Written Report is now complete. The VA is inviting public comments...

  6. Transmission of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus to health care worker gowns and gloves during care of residents in Veterans Affairs nursing homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pineles, Lisa; Morgan, Daniel J; Lydecker, Alison; Johnson, J Kristie; Sorkin, John D; Langenberg, Patricia; Blanco, Natalia; Lesse, Alan; Sellick, John; Gupta, Kalpana; Leykum, Luci; Cadena, Jose; Lepcha, Nickie; Roghmann, Mary-Claire

    2017-09-01

    This was an observational study designed to estimate the frequency of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) transmission to gowns and gloves worn by health care workers (HCWs) interacting with Veterans Affairs Community Living Center (VA nursing home) residents to inform MRSA prevention policies. Participants included residents and HCWs from 7 VA nursing homes in 4 states and Washington, DC. Residents were cultured for MRSA at the anterior nares, perianal skin, and wound (if present). HCWs wore gowns and gloves during usual care activities. After each activity, a research coordinator swabbed the HCW's gown and gloves. Swabs were cultured for MRSA. There were 200 residents enrolled; 94 (46%) were MRSA colonized. Glove contamination was higher than gown contamination (20% vs 11%, respectively; P  1.0, P < .05) for gown contamination included changing dressings (eg, wound), dressing, providing hygiene (eg, brushing teeth), and bathing. Low-risk care activities (OR < 1.0, P < .05 or no transmission) for gown contamination included glucose monitoring, giving medications, and feeding. MRSA transmission from colonized residents to gloves was higher than transmission to gowns. Transmission to gloves varies by type of care, but all care had a risk of contamination, demonstrating the importance of hand hygiene after all care. Transmission to gowns was significantly higher with certain types of care. Optimizing gown and glove use by targeting high-risk care activities could improve resident-centered care for MRSA-colonized residents by promoting a home-like environment. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. Prevalence and Trends of Concurrent Opioid Analgesic and Benzodiazepine Use Among Veterans Affairs Patients with Post-traumatic Stress Disorder, 2003-2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins, Eric J; Malte, Carol A; Grossbard, Joel R; Saxon, Andrew J

    2015-10-01

    Patients with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) have complex and multiple symptoms, including anxiety, insomnia, and co-occurring pain, often treated with opioids and benzodiazepines. While concurrent use of these medications poses safety concerns, little is known about the trends of long-term concurrent use and the prevalence of high-risk conditions among those who are prescribed them. Study objectives were to examine the trends in annual prevalence of long-term concurrent opioid and benzodiazepine use among patients with PTSD and prevalence of high-risk conditions in concurrent users of these medications. Retrospective review of pharmacy records of the Veteran Affairs Northwest Integrated Network (VISN20). Patients (n = 66,210) with PTSD receiving care during 2003-2011. Concurrent use was defined as overlapping opioid and benzodiazepine prescriptions for ≥90 consecutive days. Gender-specific logistic regressions estimated long-term concurrent use of these medications and tested for linear trends over 9-years. The trend in age-adjusted long-term concurrent opioid and benzodiazepine use over 9-years increased 52.7%, from 3.6% (95% confidence interval, 3.3-3.9%) to 5.5% (5.3-5.8%), in men and 79.5%, from 3.9% (3.0-5.0%) to 7.0% (6.2-7.9%), in women. In 2011, 17.1% of long-term concurrent users were prescribed morphine-equivalent daily doses of opioids ≥100 mg and 49.4% had a documented high-risk condition. Despite known risks associated with prescribing opioids and benzodiazepines concurrently, the adjusted prevalence of long-term concurrent use rose significantly among men and women with PTSD in VISN20 over a 9-year period. Common use of these medications among patients with high-risk conditions suggests comprehensive strategies are needed to identify and monitor patients at increased risk for adverse outcomes. Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. A comparison of HAART outcomes between the US military HIV Natural History Study (NHS and HIV Atlanta Veterans Affairs Cohort Study (HAVACS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jodie L Guest

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The Department of Defense (DoD and the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA provide comprehensive HIV treatment and care to their beneficiaries with open access and few costs to the patient. Individuals who receive HIV care in the VA have higher rates of substance abuse, homelessness and unemployment than individuals who receive HIV care in the DoD. A comparison between individuals receiving HIV treatment and care from the DoD and the VA provides an opportunity to explore the impact of individual-level characteristics on clinical outcomes within two healthcare systems that are optimized for clinic retention and medication adherence. METHODS: Data were collected on 1065 patients from the HIV Atlanta VA Cohort Study (HAVACS and 1199 patients from the US Military HIV Natural History Study (NHS. Patients were eligible if they had an HIV diagnosis and began HAART between January 1, 1996 and June 30, 2010. The analysis examined the survival from HAART initiation to all-cause mortality or an AIDS event. RESULTS: Although there was substantial between-cohort heterogeneity and the 12-year survival of participants in NHS was significantly higher than in HAVACS in crude analyses, this survival disparity was reduced from 21.5% to 1.6% (mortality only and 26.8% to 4.1% (combined mortality or AIDS when controlling for clinical and demographic variables. CONCLUSION: We assessed the clinical outcomes for individuals with HIV from two very similar government-sponsored healthcare systems that reduced or eliminated many barriers associated with accessing treatment and care. After controlling for clinical and demographic variables, both 12-year survival and AIDS-free survival rates were similar for the two study cohorts who have open access to care and medication despite dramatic differences in socioeconomic and behavioral characteristics.

  9. Wheeled mobility: factors influencing mobility and assistive technology in veterans and servicemembers with major traumatic limb loss from Vietnam war and OIF/OEF conflicts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laferrier, Justin Z; McFarland, Lynne V; Boninger, Michael L; Cooper, Rory A; Reiber, Gayle E

    2010-01-01

    Returning wounded veterans and servicemembers to their highest level of function following traumatic injury is a priority of the Departments of Defense and Veterans Affairs. We surveyed 245 veterans from the Vietnam war and 226 servicemembers and veterans from Operation Iraqi Freedom/Operation Enduring Freedom (OIF/OEF) conflicts with at least one major traumatic lower-limb loss to determine their use of mobility assistive technology (AT) and patterns of limb abandonment. Prosthetic device use without wheelchair use is found in 50.5% of Vietnam and 42.8% of OIF/OEF groups. Prostheses and supplementary wheelchairs are used by Vietnam (32%) and OIF/OEF (53%) groups (p multiple-limb loss (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 14.5; 95% confidence interval [CI] 5.5-38.5), bilateral lower-limb loss (AOR = 12.7; 95% CI 6.2-26.1), and number of comorbidities (AOR = 1.3; 95% CI 1.2-1.5) are associated with increased likelihood of wheelchair use. In OIF/OEF participants, bilateral lower-limb loss (AOR = 29.8; 95% CI 11.0-80.7), multiple-limb loss (AOR = 16.3; 95% CI 3.1-85.3), cumulative trauma disorder (AOR = 2.4; 95% CI 1.2-4.9), and number of combat injuries (AOR = 1.4; 95% CI 1.2-1.7) are associated with wheelchair use. Combined use of different types of mobility ATs promotes improved rehabilitation and ability to function.

  10. Preliminary needs assessment of mobile technology use for healthcare among homeless veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McInnes, D Keith; Fix, Gemmae M; Solomon, Jeffrey L; Petrakis, Beth Ann; Sawh, Leon; Smelson, David A

    2015-01-01

    Background. Homeless veterans have complex healthcare needs, but experience many barriers to treatment engagement. While information technologies (IT), especially mobile phones, are used to engage patients in care, little is known about homeless veterans' IT use. This study examines homeless veterans' access to and use of IT, attitudes toward health-related IT use, and barriers to IT in the context of homelessness. Methods. Qualitative interviews were conducted with 30 homeless veterans in different housing programs in Boston, MA, ranging from emergency shelters to supportive transitional housing that allow stays of up to 2 years. Interviews were conducted in person, audio recorded and then transcribed. Three researchers coded transcripts. Inductive thematic analysis was used. Results. Most participants (90%) had a mobile phone and were receptive to IT use for health-related communications. A common difficulty communicating with providers was the lack of a stable mailing address. Some participants were using mobile phones to stay in touch with providers. Participants felt mobile-phone calls or text messages could be used to remind patients of appointments, prescription refills, medication taking, and returning for laboratory results. Mobile phone text messaging was seen as convenient, and helped participants stay organized because necessary information was saved in text messages. Some reported concerns about the costs associated with mobile phone use (calls and texting), the potential to be annoyed by too many text messages, and not knowing how to use text messaging. Conclusion. Homeless veterans use IT and welcome its use for health-related purposes. Technology-assisted outreach among this population may lead to improved engagement in care.

  11. Effect of an Intensive Outpatient Program to Augment Primary Care for High-Need Veterans Affairs Patients: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zulman, Donna M; Pal Chee, Christine; Ezeji-Okoye, Stephen C; Shaw, Jonathan G; Holmes, Tyson H; Kahn, James S; Asch, Steven M

    2017-02-01

    Many organizations are adopting intensive outpatient care programs for high-need patients, yet little is known about their effectiveness in integrated systems with established patient-centered medical homes. To evaluate how augmenting the Veterans Affairs (VA) medical home (Patient Aligned Care Teams [PACT]) with an Intensive Management program (ImPACT) influences high-need patients' costs, health care utilization, and experience. Randomized clinical trial at a single VA facility. Among 583 eligible high-need outpatients whose health care costs or hospitalization risk were in the top 5% for the facility, 150 were randomly selected for ImPACT; the remaining 433 received standard PACT care. The ImPACT multidisciplinary team addressed health care needs and quality of life through comprehensive patient assessments, intensive case management, care coordination, and social and recreational services. Primary difference-in-difference analyses examined changes in health care costs and acute and extended care utilization over a 16-month baseline and 17-month follow-up period. Secondary analyses estimated the intervention's effect on ImPACT participants (using randomization as an instrument) and for patients with key sociodemographic and clinical characteristics. ImPACT participants' satisfaction and activation levels were assessed using responses to quality improvement surveys administered at baseline and 6 months. Of 140 patients assigned to ImPACT, 96 (69%) engaged in the program (mean [SD] age, 68.3 [14.2] years; 89 [93%] male; mean [SD] number of chronic conditions, 10 [4]; 62 [65%] had a mental health diagnosis; 21 [22%] had a history of homelessness). After accounting for program costs, adjusted person-level monthly health care expenditures decreased similarly for ImPACT and PACT patients (difference-in-difference [SE] -$101 [$623]), as did acute and extended care utilization rates. Among respondents to the ImPACT follow-up survey (n = 54 [56% response rate]), 52

  12. Effective detection of the 2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic in U.S. Veterans Affairs medical centers using a national electronic biosurveillance system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Schirmer

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The 2008-09 influenza season was the time in which the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA utilized an electronic biosurveillance system for tracking and monitoring of influenza trends. The system, known as ESSENCE or Electronic Surveillance System for the Early Notification of Community-based Epidemics, was monitored for the influenza season as well as for a rise in influenza cases at the start of the H1N1 2009 influenza pandemic. We also describe trends noted in influenza-like illness (ILI outpatient encounter data in VA medical centers during the 2008-09 influenza season, before and after the recognition of pandemic H1N1 2009 influenza virus. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We determined prevalence of ILI coded visits using VA's ESSENCE for 2008-09 seasonal influenza (Sept. 28, 2008-April 25, 2009 corresponding to CDC 2008-2009 flu season weeks 40-16 and the early period of pandemic H1N1 2009 (April 26, 2009-July 31, 2009 corresponding to CDC 2008-2009 flu season weeks 17-30. Differences in diagnostic ICD-9-CM code frequencies were analyzed using Chi-square and odds ratios. There were 649,574 ILI encounters captured representing 633,893 patients. The prevalence of VA ILI visits mirrored the CDC's Outpatient ILI Surveillance Network (ILINet data with peaks in late December, early February, and late April/early May, mirroring the ILINet data; however, the peaks seen in the VA were smaller. Of 31 ILI codes, 6 decreased and 11 increased significantly during the early period of pandemic H1N1 2009. The ILI codes that significantly increased were more likely to be symptom codes. Although influenza with respiratory manifestation (487.1 was the most common code used among 150 confirmed pandemic H1N1 2009 cases, overall it significantly decreased since the start of the pandemic. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: VA ESSENCE effectively detected and tracked changing ILI trends during pandemic H1N1 2009 and represents an important temporal alerting

  13. 38 CFR 21.155 - Services to a veteran's family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... family. 21.155 Section 21.155 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS.... Chapter 31 Special Rehabilitation Services § 21.155 Services to a veteran's family. (a) General. VA shall provide services to a veteran's family which are necessary to the implementation of the veteran's...

  14. 38 CFR 3.454 - Veterans disability pension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Veterans disability pension. 3.454 Section 3.454 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS ADJUDICATION Pension, Compensation, and Dependency and Indemnity Compensation Apportionments § 3.454 Veterans...

  15. House Committee on Veterans' Affairs

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... continuity of care while we work with the Trump administration to develop a strategic plan that addresses ... Congress to get VA accountability legislation to President Trump's desk, and I thank Secretary Shulkin for making ...

  16. Preliminary needs assessment of mobile technology use for healthcare among homeless veterans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fix, Gemmae M.; Solomon, Jeffrey L.; Petrakis, Beth Ann; Sawh, Leon; Smelson, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Homeless veterans have complex healthcare needs, but experience many barriers to treatment engagement. While information technologies (IT), especially mobile phones, are used to engage patients in care, little is known about homeless veterans’ IT use. This study examines homeless veterans’ access to and use of IT, attitudes toward health-related IT use, and barriers to IT in the context of homelessness. Methods. Qualitative interviews were conducted with 30 homeless veterans in different housing programs in Boston, MA, ranging from emergency shelters to supportive transitional housing that allow stays of up to 2 years. Interviews were conducted in person, audio recorded and then transcribed. Three researchers coded transcripts. Inductive thematic analysis was used. Results. Most participants (90%) had a mobile phone and were receptive to IT use for health-related communications. A common difficulty communicating with providers was the lack of a stable mailing address. Some participants were using mobile phones to stay in touch with providers. Participants felt mobile-phone calls or text messages could be used to remind patients of appointments, prescription refills, medication taking, and returning for laboratory results. Mobile phone text messaging was seen as convenient, and helped participants stay organized because necessary information was saved in text messages. Some reported concerns about the costs associated with mobile phone use (calls and texting), the potential to be annoyed by too many text messages, and not knowing how to use text messaging. Conclusion. Homeless veterans use IT and welcome its use for health-related purposes. Technology-assisted outreach among this population may lead to improved engagement in care. PMID:26246964

  17. Preliminary needs assessment of mobile technology use for healthcare among homeless veterans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Keith McInnes

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background. Homeless veterans have complex healthcare needs, but experience many barriers to treatment engagement. While information technologies (IT, especially mobile phones, are used to engage patients in care, little is known about homeless veterans’ IT use. This study examines homeless veterans’ access to and use of IT, attitudes toward health-related IT use, and barriers to IT in the context of homelessness.Methods. Qualitative interviews were conducted with 30 homeless veterans in different housing programs in Boston, MA, ranging from emergency shelters to supportive transitional housing that allow stays of up to 2 years. Interviews were conducted in person, audio recorded and then transcribed. Three researchers coded transcripts. Inductive thematic analysis was used.Results. Most participants (90% had a mobile phone and were receptive to IT use for health-related communications. A common difficulty communicating with providers was the lack of a stable mailing address. Some participants were using mobile phones to stay in touch with providers. Participants felt mobile-phone calls or text messages could be used to remind patients of appointments, prescription refills, medication taking, and returning for laboratory results. Mobile phone text messaging was seen as convenient, and helped participants stay organized because necessary information was saved in text messages. Some reported concerns about the costs associated with mobile phone use (calls and texting, the potential to be annoyed by too many text messages, and not knowing how to use text messaging.Conclusion. Homeless veterans use IT and welcome its use for health-related purposes. Technology-assisted outreach among this population may lead to improved engagement in care.

  18. 38 CFR 12.1 - Designee cases; competent veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... may not be an employee of the Department of Veterans Affairs unless such employee be the wife (or husband), child, grandchild, mother, father, grandmother, grandfather, brother, or sister of the veteran... the Department of Veterans Affairs in Personal Funds of Patients which were derived from...

  19. VA INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY: Important Initiatives Begun, Yet Serious Vulnerabilities Persist

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    We appreciate the opportunity to join in today s hearing and share updated information on the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) information ... technology (IT) program. As you know, IT is essential to VA s ability to effectively serve the veteran population and is the cornerstone of the department’s

  20. 77 FR 3842 - Proposed Information Collection (Conversion from Servicemembers' Group Life Insurance to Veterans...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-25

    ... AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (Conversion from Servicemembers' Group Life Insurance to Veterans' Group Life Insurance); Comment Request AGENCY: Veterans Benefits Administration, Department of Veterans... members, especially service members with disabilities are informed about their life insurance...

  1. 77 FR 20886 - Agency Information Collection (Conversion From Servicemembers' Group Life Insurance to Veterans...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-06

    ... AFFAIRS Agency Information Collection (Conversion From Servicemembers' Group Life Insurance to Veterans' Group Life Insurance); Activity Under OMB Review AGENCY: Veterans Benefits Administration, Department of... Evaluation of the Conversion Privilege from Servicemembers' Group Life Insurance (SGLI) to Veterans'...

  2. America's Women Veterans: Military Service History and VA Benefit Utilization Statistics

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — This comprehensive report chronicles the history of women in the military and as Veterans, profiles the characteristics of women Veterans in 2009, illustrates how...

  3. 76 FR 72243 - Proposed Information Collection (Operation Enduring Freedom/Operation Iraqi Freedom Veterans...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-22

    ... facilities for returning Operation Enduring Freedom/ Operation Iraqi Freedom veterans and their families... AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (Operation Enduring Freedom/ Operation Iraqi Freedom Veterans.... Title: Operation Enduring Freedom/Operation Iraqi Freedom Veterans Health Needs Assessment, VA Form 10...

  4. Employment of Veterans in the Federal Executive Branch: Fiscal Year (FY) 2008 to 2013

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — This chart summarizes Veteran employment in the federal government using data from the Office of Personnel Management's (OPM) report, Employment of Veterans in the...

  5. 78 FR 55777 - Proposed Information Collection (VA, National Veterans Sports Programs and Special Events, Event...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-11

    ... AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (VA, National Veterans Sports Programs and Special Events, Event... Events, Department of Veterans Affairs. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Office of National Veterans Sports... Service Application, VA Form 0927f. k. National Veterans Summer sports Clinic Event Application, VA...

  6. Personal technology use by U.S. military service members and veterans: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bush, Nigel E; Wheeler, William M

    2015-04-01

    Although personal electronic devices, such as mobile phones, computers, and tablets, increasingly are being leveraged as vehicles for health in the civilian world, almost nothing is known about personal technology use in the U.S. military. In 2012 we conducted a unique survey of personal technologies used by U.S. military service members. However, with the rapidly growing sophistication of personal technology and changes in consumer habits, that knowledge must be continuously updated to be useful. Accordingly, we recently surveyed new samples of active duty service members, National Guard and Reserve, and veterans. We collected data by online surveys in 2013 from 239 active, inactive, and former service members. Online surveys were completed in-person via laptop computers at a large military installation and remotely via Web-based surveys posted on the Army Knowledge Online Web site and on a Defense Center Facebook social media channel. We measured high rates of personal technology use by service members at home across popular electronic media. The most dramatic change since our earlier survey was the tremendous increase in mobile phone use at home for a wide variety of purposes. Participants also reported moderate non-work uses of computers and tablets while on recent deployment to Iraq and Afghanistan, but almost no mobile phone use, ostensibly because of military restrictions in the war zone. These latest results will enable researchers and technology developers target their efforts on the most promising and popular technologies for psychological health in the military.

  7. Veterans Administration Databases

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Veterans Administration Information Resource Center provides database and informatics experts, customer service, expert advice, information products, and web technology to VA researchers and others.

  8. 38 CFR 21.328 - Two veteran cases-dependents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Two veteran cases-dependents. 21.328 Section 21.328 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS.... Chapter 31 Authorization of Subsistence Allowance and Training and Rehabilitation Services § 21.328 Two...

  9. 78 FR 59861 - VA Acquisition Regulation: Service-Disabled Veteran-Owned and Veteran-Owned Small Business Status...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-30

    ... (definition service-disabled Veteran)''. Upon rendering a decision, new VAAR 819.307(g) provides that the... AFFAIRS 48 CFR Part 819 RIN 2900-AM92 VA Acquisition Regulation: Service-Disabled Veteran-Owned and... Service-Disabled Veteran-Owned Small Businesses (SDVOSB) and Veteran-Owned Small Businesses (VOSB)...

  10. 38 CFR 13.57 - Payment to the wife or husband of incompetent veteran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Payment to the wife or husband of incompetent veteran. 13.57 Section 13.57 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS VETERANS BENEFITS ADMINISTRATION, FIDUCIARY ACTIVITIES § 13.57 Payment to the wife...

  11. Visit of H.E. Mr. Attila Chikan, Minister of Economic Affairs, Prof. Adam Török, President, National Committee for Technological Development, Mr. Pal Koncz, Deputy Director General, National Committee for Technological Development, Hungary

    CERN Multimedia

    Laurent Guiraud

    1999-01-01

    Visit of H.E. Mr. Attila Chikan, Minister of Economic Affairs, Prof. Adam Török, President, National Committee for Technological Development, Mr. Pal Koncz, Deputy Director General, National Committee for Technological Development, Hungary

  12. Lessons for non-VA care delivery systems from the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs Quality Enhancement Research Initiative: QUERI Series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solberg Leif

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The U.S. Veterans Health Administration (VHA may have a very different structure and function from the organizations and practices that provide medical care to most Americans, but those organizations and practices could learn a lot from the VHA's Quality Enhancement Research Initiative (QUERI. There are at least six topics of increasing importance for implementation research where QUERI experience should be of value to other non-VHA organizations, both within and external to the United States: 1 Researcher-clinical leader partnerships for care improvement; 2 Attention to culture, capacity, leadership, and a supportive infrastructure; 3 Practical economic evaluation of quality implementation efforts; 4 Human subject protection problems; 5 Sustainability of improvements; and 6 Scale-up and spread of improvements. The articles in Implementation Science's QUERI Series provide the details of those lessons for others who are willing to invest the time to translate them into their different settings.

  13. Technology Reference Model (TRM) Reports: Technology/Standards Decisions Report

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The One VA Enterprise Architecture (OneVA EA) is a comprehensive picture of the Department of Veterans Affairs' (VA) operations, capabilities and services and the...

  14. Technology Reference Model (TRM): Technology/Standard List

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The One VA Enterprise Architecture (OneVA EA) is a comprehensive picture of the Department of Veterans Affairs' (VA) operations, capabilities and services and the...

  15. Technology Reference Model (TRM) Reports: Technology/Operating System Report

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The One VA Enterprise Architecture (OneVA EA) is a comprehensive picture of the Department of Veterans Affairs' (VA) operations, capabilities and services and the...

  16. 77 FR 18307 - Gulf War Veterans' Illnesses Task Force Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-27

    ... published the report in the Federal Register (76 FR 65321) and posted it on a social media Web site created... over 450 comments from over 500 registered users through the social media Web site. VA sincerely thanks... AFFAIRS Gulf War Veterans' Illnesses Task Force Report AGENCY: Department of Veterans Affairs....

  17. 75 FR 8789 - Veterans' Rural Health Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-25

    ... AFFAIRS Veterans' Rural Health Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) gives notice under Public Law 92-463 (Federal Advisory Committee Act) that the Veterans' Rural... Carnegie Hotel, 1216 West State of Franklin Road, Johnson City, Tennessee. The sessions will begin at 8...

  18. 77 FR 58913 - Veterans' Rural Health Advisory Committee, Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-24

    ... AFFAIRS Veterans' Rural Health Advisory Committee, Notice of Meeting The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) gives notice under Public Law 92-463 (Federal Advisory Committee Act) that the Veterans' Rural Health Advisory Committee will hold a meeting on October 25-26, 2012, at the Waterfront Place Hotel,...

  19. 76 FR 60965 - Veterans' Rural Health Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-30

    ... AFFAIRS Veterans' Rural Health Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) gives notice under Public Law 92-463 (Federal Advisory Committee Act) that the Veterans' Rural... Hotel, 363 Maine Mall Road, Portland, ME. The sessions will begin at 8 a.m. each day and adjourn at 4...

  20. 76 FR 15055 - Advisory Committee on Minority Veterans; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-18

    ... updates on the roles of the advisory committee, ethics, ] Center for Minority Veterans, Office of Policy... Administration. In the morning on April 6, the Committee will have a panel discussion with Center for Women... AFFAIRS Advisory Committee on Minority Veterans; Notice of Meeting The Department of Veterans Affairs...

  1. Veteran Competencies for Undergraduate Nursing Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, Jacqueline A; Moore, Randy L; Selleck, Cynthia S

    2015-01-01

    Military Veterans comprise approximately 10% of the US population. Most Veterans do not receive their health care through Veterans Affairs facilities, are seen across the health care system, and their prior military service and associated health issues often go unrecognized. In this study, a modified Delphi design was used to develop a set of 10 Veteran Care Competencies and associated knowledge, skills, and attitudes for Undergraduate Nursing Education: Military and Veteran Culture, Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, Amputation and Assistive Devices, Environmental/Chemical Exposures, Substance Use Disorder, Military Sexual Trauma, Traumatic Brain Injury, Suicide, Homelessness, and Serious Illness Especially at the End of Life.

  2. Veterans Affairs Information Technology: Management Attention Needed to Improve Critical System Modernizations, Consolidate Data Centers, and Retire Legacy Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-02-07

    VA health care as a high -risk area; and VA’s development of its system for processing disability benefits, data center consolidation, and legacy...their families, including disability compensation, educational opportunities, assistance with home ownership, and life insurance. Further, NCA provides...February 2015, GAO designated VA health care as a high -risk area, with IT challenges being one contributing factor. Specifically, GAO noted that the

  3. Defense and Veterans Brain Injury Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 24/7) Department of Veterans Affairs Military & Veterans Crisis Line 800-273-8255, press 1 National Headquarters 1335 East-West Highway, Ste. 6-100 Silver Spring, MD 20910 800-870-9244 TBI & Psychological Health Information DCoE Outreach Center (24/7) 866- ...

  4. 38 CFR 21.400 - Veterans' Advisory Committee on Rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Committee on Rehabilitation. 21.400 Section 21.400 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS (CONTINUED) VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION AND EDUCATION Vocational Rehabilitation and Employment Under 38 U.S.C. Chapter 31 Veterans' Advisory Committee on Rehabilitation § 21.400...

  5. Use of Psychotherapy by Rural and Urban Veterans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cully, Jeffrey A.; Jameson, John P.; Phillips, Laura L.; Kunik, Mark E.; Fortney, John C.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To examine whether differences exist between rural and urban veterans in terms of initiation of psychotherapy, delay in time from diagnosis to treatment, and dose of psychotherapy sessions. Methods: Using a longitudinal cohort of veterans obtained from national Veterans Affairs databases (October 2003 through September 2004), we extracted…

  6. Technology Reference Model (TRM) Reports: Vendor

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The One VA Enterprise Architecture (OneVA EA) is a comprehensive picture of the Department of Veterans Affairs' (VA) operations, capabilities and services and the...

  7. 78 FR 58611 - Agency Information Collection (Veterans Mortgage Life Insurance Statement) Activity Under OMB Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-24

    ... AFFAIRS Agency Information Collection (Veterans Mortgage Life Insurance Statement) Activity Under OMB... ``OMB Control No. 2900-0212.'' SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Title: Veterans Mortgage Life Insurance... collection. Abstract: Veterans complete VA Form 29-8636 to decline Veterans Mortgage Life Insurance (VMLI)...

  8. VA Puget Sound Telemental Health Service to rural veterans: a growing program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnwell, Sara V Smucker; Juretic, Meghan A; Hoerster, Katherine D; Van de Plasch, Richard; Felker, Bradford L

    2012-05-01

    The VA Puget Sound Health Care System Telemental Health program connects veterans with psychologists, psychiatrists, and social workers via live clinical video teleconferencing. Providers deliver care to veterans in rural Veteran Affairs medical centers, community-based outpatient clinics and residences, and thus, increase access to specialty mental health care for rural and medically underserved veteran communities.

  9. 38 CFR 3.453 - Veterans compensation or service pension or retirement pay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Veterans compensation or service pension or retirement pay. 3.453 Section 3.453 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS ADJUDICATION Pension, Compensation, and Dependency and Indemnity Compensation...

  10. 76 FR 27384 - Agency Information Collection Activity (Veteran Suicide Prevention Online Quantitative Surveys...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-11

    ... better understand Veterans and their families' awareness of VA's suicide prevention and mental health... AFFAIRS Agency Information Collection Activity (Veteran Suicide Prevention Online Quantitative Surveys.... Veterans Online Survey, VA Form 10-0513. b. Veterans Family Online Survey, VA Form 10-0513a. c....

  11. 77 FR 69549 - Proposed Information Collection (Compensation and Pension Examination Program (CPEP) Veterans...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-19

    ... AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (Compensation and Pension Examination Program (CPEP) Veterans.... This notice solicits comments on the Veteran experience in taking the Compensation and Pension... on the collection of information through the Federal Docket Management System (FDMS) at...

  12. 76 FR 3209 - West Los Angeles VA Medical Center Veterans Programs Enhancement Act of 1998; Draft Master Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-19

    ... AFFAIRS West Los Angeles VA Medical Center Veterans Programs Enhancement Act of 1998; Draft Master Plan... an opportunity for public comment on the West Los Angeles (WLA) Department of Veterans Affairs (VA... is part of the larger VA Greater Los Angeles (GLA) Healthcare System, serving Veterans in Los...

  13. Lean Six Sigma in health care and the challenge of implementation of Six Sigma methodologies at a Veterans Affairs Medical Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pocha, Christine

    2010-01-01

    Six Sigma and Lean Thinking are quality initiatives initially deployed in industry to improve operational efficiency leading to better quality and subsequent cost savings. The financial rationale for embarking on this quality journey is clear; applying it to today's health care remains challenging. The cost of medical care is increasing at an alarming rate; most of these cost increases are attributed to an aging population and technological advances; therefore, largely beyond control. Furthermore, health care cost increases are caused by unnecessary operational inefficiency associated with the direct medical service delivery process. This article describes the challenging journey of implementing Six Sigma methodology at a tertiary care medical center. Many lessons were learned; however, of utmost importance were team approach, "buy in" of the stakeholders, and the willingness of team members to change daily practice and to adapt new and innovative ways how health care can be delivered. Six Sigma incorporated as part of the "company's or hospital's culture" would be most desirable but the learning curve will be steep.

  14. Health Programs for Veterans

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Health Administration » Health Programs for Veterans Veterans Health Administration Health Programs for Veterans Beyond the doctors and nurses who ... Veterans Plain Language Surviving Spouses & Dependents Adaptive Sports Program ... Veterans Health Administration Veterans Benefits Administration National Cemetery ...

  15. Variation in Empiric Coverage Versus Detection of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Hospitalizations for Community-Onset Pneumonia Across 128 US Veterans Affairs Medical Centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Barbara E; Brown, Kevin Antoine; Jones, Makoto M; Huttner, Benedikt D; Greene, Tom; Sauer, Brian C; Madaras-Kelly, Karl; Rubin, Michael A; Bidwell Goetz, Matthew; Samore, Matthew H

    2017-08-01

    OBJECTIVE To examine variation in antibiotic coverage and detection of resistant pathogens in community-onset pneumonia. DESIGN Cross-sectional study. SETTING A total of 128 hospitals in the Veterans Affairs health system. PARTICIPANTS Hospitalizations with a principal diagnosis of pneumonia from 2009 through 2010. METHODS We examined proportions of hospitalizations with empiric antibiotic coverage for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PAER) and with initial detection in blood or respiratory cultures. We compared lowest- versus highest-decile hospitals, and we estimated adjusted probabilities (AP) for patient- and hospital-level factors predicting coverage and detection using hierarchical regression modeling. RESULTS Among 38,473 hospitalizations, empiric coverage varied widely across hospitals (MRSA lowest vs highest, 8.2% vs 42.0%; PAER lowest vs highest, 13.9% vs 44.4%). Detection rates also varied (MRSA lowest vs highest, 0.5% vs 3.6%; PAER lowest vs highest, 0.6% vs 3.7%). Whereas coverage was greatest among patients with recent hospitalizations (AP for anti-MRSA, 54%; AP for anti-PAER, 59%) and long-term care (AP for anti-MRSA, 60%; AP for anti-PAER, 66%), detection was greatest in patients with a previous history of a positive culture (AP for MRSA, 7.9%; AP for PAER, 11.9%) and in hospitals with a high prevalence of the organism in pneumonia (AP for MRSA, 3.9%; AP for PAER, 3.2%). Low hospital complexity and rural setting were strong negative predictors of coverage but not of detection. CONCLUSIONS Hospitals demonstrated widespread variation in both coverage and detection of MRSA and PAER, but probability of coverage correlated poorly with probability of detection. Factors associated with empiric coverage (eg, healthcare exposure) were different from those associated with detection (eg, microbiology history). Providing microbiology data during empiric antibiotic decision making could better align coverage to risk

  16. New York State Technology Education: History, the Current State of Affairs, and the Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dettelis, Phil

    2011-01-01

    Since the early 1980s, technology education has undergone several changes, incorporating new philosophies, new courses, and even a new name. This discipline, which is historically rooted in industrial arts, has endeavored to carve out a niche based on preparing students for careers, hands-on applications of mathematics and science, critical…

  17. Technology Reference Model (TRM) Reports: VA Category Framework Count Report

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The One VA Enterprise Architecture (OneVA EA) is a comprehensive picture of the Department of Veterans Affairs' (VA) operations, capabilities and services and the...

  18. Technology Reference Model (TRM) Reports: VA Category Mapping Report

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The One VA Enterprise Architecture (OneVA EA) is a comprehensive picture of the Department of Veterans Affairs' (VA) operations, capabilities and services and the...

  19. VA Health Care: Improved Monitoring Needed for Effective Oversight of Care for Women Veterans

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    Health Care Letter 1 Background 6 VHA Lacks Complete and Accurate Data on VAMC Compliance with Environment of Care Requirements for Women Veterans...of Care Requirements 40 Appendix IV Veterans Health Administration (VHA) Gynecologist Availability 44 Appendix V Veterans Affairs (VA) Clinics...Veterans Health Administration (VHA) Requirements Related to the Outpatient Environment of Care for Women Veterans, December 2015-March 2016 40 Table

  20. 77 FR 64386 - Agency Information Collection Activities (Per Diem for Nursing Home Care of Veterans in State...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-19

    ... AFFAIRS Agency Information Collection Activities (Per Diem for Nursing Home Care of Veterans in State Homes; Per Diem for Adult Day Care of Veterans in State Homes) Under OMB Review AGENCY: Veterans Health... day health services care to Veterans. VA requires facilities providing nursing home and adult...

  1. Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) Registry Veterans in VHA Care in 2015, for the Nation, by VISN and by Station

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — This report describes the number of Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) registry Veterans in VHA care in 2015 based on serologic evidence of HCV infection status (HCV Positive)...

  2. 78 FR 70414 - Agency Information Collection (Supportive Services for Veteran Families (SSVF) Program...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-25

    ... AFFAIRS Agency Information Collection (Supportive Services for Veteran Families (SSVF) Program..., Department of Veterans Affairs, will submit the collection of information abstracted below to the Office of... information collection and its expected cost and burden and includes the actual data collection...

  3. 77 FR 38395 - Agency Information Collection (Appointment of Veterans Service Organization/or Individuals as...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-27

    ... AFFAIRS Agency Information Collection (Appointment of Veterans Service Organization/or Individuals as... of Veterans Affairs, will submit the collection of information abstracted below to the Office of... information collection and its expected cost and burden; it includes the actual data collection instrument...

  4. The Digital Identity of Student Affairs Professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahlquist, Josie

    2016-01-01

    This chapter highlights opportunities in the digital space for student affairs professionals. A blended approach, grounded in the new technology competency recently added in the ACPA and NASPA student affairs professional competencies, is proposed for student affairs professionals' digital identity development. It includes the awareness of one's…

  5. Patient-Centered Pain Care Using Artificial Intelligence and Mobile Health Tools: Protocol for a Randomized Study Funded by the US Department of Veterans Affairs Health Services Research and Development Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piette, John D; Krein, Sarah L; Striplin, Dana; Marinec, Nicolle; Kerns, Robert D; Farris, Karen B; Singh, Satinder; An, Lawrence; Heapy, Alicia A

    2016-04-07

    Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) is one of the most effective treatments for chronic low back pain. However, only half of Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) patients have access to trained CBT therapists, and program expansion is costly. CBT typically consists of 10 weekly hour-long sessions. However, some patients improve after the first few sessions while others need more extensive contact. We are applying principles from "reinforcement learning" (a field of artificial intelligence or AI) to develop an evidence-based, personalized CBT pain management service that automatically adapts to each patient's unique and changing needs (AI-CBT). AI-CBT uses feedback from patients about their progress in pain-related functioning measured daily via pedometer step counts to automatically personalize the intensity and type of patient support. The specific aims of the study are to (1) demonstrate that AI-CBT has pain-related outcomes equivalent to standard telephone CBT, (2) document that AI-CBT achieves these outcomes with more efficient use of clinician resources, and (3) demonstrate the intervention's impact on proximal outcomes associated with treatment response, including program engagement, pain management skill acquisition, and patients' likelihood of dropout. In total, 320 patients with chronic low back pain will be recruited from 2 VA healthcare systems and randomized to a standard 10 sessions of telephone CBT versus AI-CBT. All patients will begin with weekly hour-long telephone counseling, but for patients in the AI-CBT group, those who demonstrate a significant treatment response will be stepped down through less resource-intensive alternatives including: (1) 15-minute contacts with a therapist, and (2) CBT clinician feedback provided via interactive voice response calls (IVR). The AI engine will learn what works best in terms of patients' personally tailored treatment plans based on daily feedback via IVR about their pedometer-measured step counts, CBT skill

  6. Veterans Medical Care: FY2011 Appropriations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-21

    employees receiving preventative occupational immunizations such as Hepatitis A&B and flu vaccinations. 49 Department of Veterans Affairs, FY2011...such as Hepatitis A&B and flu vaccinations. Veterans Medical Care: FY2011 Appropriations Congressional Research Service 20 Formulation of VHA’s...1,977,000 1,225,000 Emergency appropriations- Gulf Coast Hurricanes (P.L. 109-148) — — — — 198,265 — — 198,265 Emergency appropriations- Avian Flu

  7. 77 FR 73312 - Technical Revisions-State Veterans Homes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-10

    ... structure. Under VHA's new organizational structure, the Secretary of Veterans Affairs has delegated... must be updated because of recent changes to the Veterans Health Administration (VHA) organizational structure, which reassigned certain administrative duties of the Chief Consultant of the Office of...

  8. Veterans Crisis Line: Videos About Reaching out for Help

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs and other organizations about reaching out for help. Bittersweet More Videos ... Health Administration I am A Veteran Family/Friend Active Duty/Reserve and Guard Signs of Crisis Identifying ...

  9. 78 FR 77204 - Proposed Information Collection (VA National Veterans Sports Programs and Special Event Surveys...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-20

    ... AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (VA National Veterans Sports Programs and Special Event Surveys... ``OMB Control No. 2900-NEW (VA National Veterans Sports Programs and Special Event Surveys)'' in any... National Veterans Sports Programs and Special Event Surveys. OMB Control Number: 2900-NEW (VA...

  10. 76 FR 40451 - Agency Information Collection (Veterans Mortgage Life Insurance-Change of Address Statement...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-08

    ... AFFAIRS Agency Information Collection (Veterans Mortgage Life Insurance-- Change of Address Statement.... 2900-0503.'' SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Title: Veterans Mortgage Life Insurance--Change of Address... continued ownership of property issued under Veterans Mortgage Life Insurance when an address change for...

  11. 78 FR 58264 - Servicemembers' Group Life Insurance and Veterans' Group Life Insurance Information Access

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-23

    ... AFFAIRS 38 CFR Part 9 RIN 2900-AO42 Servicemembers' Group Life Insurance and Veterans' Group Life... Insurance (SGLI), Family SGLI, SGLI Traumatic Injury Protection, and Veterans' Group Life Insurance (all...-AO42 Servicemembers' Group Life Insurance and Veterans' Group Life Insurance Information...

  12. 75 FR 68038 - Agency Information Collection (Veterans Mortgage Life Insurance Statement) Activity Under OMB Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-04

    ... AFFAIRS Agency Information Collection (Veterans Mortgage Life Insurance Statement) Activity Under OMB....'' SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Title: Veterans Mortgage Life Insurance Statement, VA Form 29-8636. OMB Control... complete VA Form 29-8636 to decline Veterans Mortgage Life Insurance (VMLI) or to provide information...

  13. 76 FR 40455 - Agency Information Collection (Veterans Mortgage Life Insurance Inquiry) Activity Under OMB Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-08

    ... AFFAIRS Agency Information Collection (Veterans Mortgage Life Insurance Inquiry) Activity Under OMB Review... INFORMATION: Title: Veterans Mortgage Life Insurance Inquiry, VA Form 29-0543. OMB Control Number: 2900-0501... insured under Veterans Mortgage Life Insurance (VMLI) completes VA Form 29-0543 to report any...

  14. 75 FR 68040 - Proposed Information Collection (Veterans Mortgage Life Insurance Statement) Activity: Comment...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-04

    ... AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (Veterans Mortgage Life Insurance Statement) Activity: Comment... solicits comments for information needed to decline Veterans Mortgage Life Insurance. DATES: Written...: Veterans Mortgage Life Insurance Statement, VA Form 29-8636. OMB Control Number: 2900-0212. Type of...

  15. 75 FR 52065 - Proposed Information Collection (Veterans Mortgage Life Insurance Statement) Activity: Comment...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-24

    ... AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (Veterans Mortgage Life Insurance Statement) Activity: Comment... solicits comments for information needed to decline Veterans Mortgage Life Insurance. DATES: Written...: Veterans Mortgage Life Insurance Statement, VA Form 29-8636. OMB Control Number: 2900-0212. Type of...

  16. 75 FR 26683 - Hospital and Outpatient Care for Veterans Released From Incarceration to Transitional Housing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-12

    ...-26685] [FR Doc No: 2010-11177] DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS 38 CFR Part 17 RIN 2900-AN41 Hospital and... its regulations to authorize VA to provide hospital and outpatient care to a veteran in a program that... 2900-AN41 Hospital and Outpatient Care for Veterans Released from Incarceration to Transitional...

  17. 78 FR 36309 - Research Advisory Committee on Gulf War Veterans' Illnesses, Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-17

    ... diagnosing and treating Gulf War Veterans, and a drug treatment trial which is underway. On June 18, the... AFFAIRS Research Advisory Committee on Gulf War Veterans' Illnesses, Notice of Meeting The Department of... Research Advisory Committee on Gulf War Veterans' Illnesses will meet on June 17 and 18, 2013, in room...

  18. 76 FR 78569 - Medical Benefits for Newborn Children of Certain Woman Veterans

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-19

    ... AFFAIRS 38 CFR Part 17 RIN 2900-AO05 Medical Benefits for Newborn Children of Certain Woman Veterans... to provide certain health care services to a newborn child of a woman veteran who is receiving... woman veteran who is receiving maternity care furnished by for not more than seven days after the...

  19. Using a Cognitive Information Processing Approach to Group Career Counseling with Visually Impaired Veterans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osborne, Lauren K.

    2014-01-01

    Unemployment continues to be a growing concern among both civilian and veteran populations. As 14% of the veteran population currently identify as disabled because of service, this population's need for specialized vocational rehabilitation is increasing. Specifically in Veterans Affairs (VA) Blind Rehabilitation Centers (BRC) where holistic…

  20. Technology Reference Model (TRM) Reports: Federal Enterprise Architecture (FEA) Category Count Report

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The One VA Enterprise Architecture (OneVA EA) is a comprehensive picture of the Department of Veterans Affairs' (VA) operations, capabilities and services and the...

  1. Technology Reference Model (TRM) Reports: Federal Enterprise Architecture (FEA) Mapping Report

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The One VA Enterprise Architecture (OneVA EA) is a comprehensive picture of the Department of Veterans Affairs' (VA) operations, capabilities and services and the...

  2. A Proactive Approach to Serving Military and Veteran Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Tracey L.; Schma, Geraldine A.

    2011-01-01

    With the introduction of the Post 9/11 GI Bill in August 2009, Veterans Affairs anticipated a 25% increase in the number of service members who would enroll in higher education (Student Affairs Leadership Council, 2009). Between fall 2005 and spring 2010 semesters, Western Michigan University (WMU; Kalamazoo, MI) experienced a 43% boom, from just…

  3. Access, utilization, and interest in mHealth applications among veterans receiving outpatient care for PTSD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erbes, Christopher R; Stinson, Rebecca; Kuhn, Eric; Polusny, Melissa; Urban, Jessica; Hoffman, Julia; Ruzek, Josef I; Stepnowsky, Carl; Thorp, Steven R

    2014-11-01

    Mobile health (mHealth) refers to the use of mobile technology (e.g., smartphones) and software (i.e., applications) to facilitate or enhance health care. Several mHealth programs act as either stand-alone aids for Veterans with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) or adjuncts to conventional psychotherapy approaches. Veterans enrolled in a Veterans Affairs outpatient treatment program for PTSD (N = 188) completed anonymous questionnaires that assessed Veterans' access to mHealth-capable devices and their utilization of and interest in mHealth programs for PTSD. The majority of respondents (n = 142, 76%) reported having access to a cell phone or tablet capable of running applications, but only a small group (n = 18) reported use of existing mHealth programs for PTSD. Age significantly predicted ownership of mHealth devices, but not utilization or interest in mHealth applications among device owners. Around 56% to 76% of respondents with access indicated that they were interested in trying mHealth programs for such issues as anger management, sleep hygiene, and management of anxiety symptoms. Findings from this sample suggest that Veterans have adequate access to, and interest in, using mHealth applications to warrant continued development and evaluation of mobile applications for the treatment of PTSD and other mental health conditions.

  4. Sexual Self-Esteem and Psychosocial Functioning in Military Veterans After Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Syme, Maggie L.; Delaney, Eileen; Moye, Jennifer; Gosian, Jeffrey; Wachen, Jennifer Schuster

    2013-01-01

    Little is known about the sexual well-being of male Veteran cancer survivors, or the relationship of sexual concerns to psychosocial adaptation postcancer. This study examined the association between sexual self-esteem and psychosocial concerns in male Veteran cancer survivors. Forty-one male survivors were recruited from a Veterans Affairs (VA) hospital to participate in a pilot study addressing cancer survivorship care for Veterans. Sixty- to 90-minute interviews were conducted, assessing s...

  5. Accessing Skills: Assisting Military Veteran Students in the Traditional Writing Classroom

    OpenAIRE

    Singleton, Meredith

    2014-01-01

    Through Post-911 GI Bill benefits, military veterans are flooding college admissions offices and writing classes at rates not seen since the World War II era. According to the United States Department of Veterans Affairs, over 1 million veterans attended colleges and universities between 2009 and 2013; and 53.6 percent of veteran students using benefits applied them toward completing undergraduate work at a college or vocational/technical school (“Annual Benefits Report,” 2011). Clearly, many...

  6. Mindfulness as a Weight Loss Treatment for Veterans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Vicente Stanton

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Despite substantial evidence for their effectiveness in treating disordered eating and obesity, mindfulness-based treatments have not been broadly implemented among Veterans. A number of reviews have reported mindfulness to be beneficial in promoting healthy eating behaviors and weight loss among non-Veteran samples. We discuss this approach in the context of the Veterans Affairs system, the largest integrated healthcare provider in the United States and in the context of Veterans, among whom obesity is at epidemic proportions. In this article, we discuss what is known about treating obesity using a mindfulness approach, mindfulness interventions for Veterans, a new pilot mindfulness-based weight loss program designed for Veterans, and future directions for this type of obesity treatment in Veterans. We conclude that this population may be uniquely poised to benefit from mindfulness-based treatments.

  7. Veterans Health Administration

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... code here VA » Veterans Health Administration Veterans Health Administration Robotic Brace for Veterans of Spinal Cord Injury ... Read more » VA Medical Centers The Veterans Health Administration is home to the United States’ largest integrated ...

  8. Sustainability, Student Affairs, and Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerr, Kathleen G.; Hart-Steffes, Jeanne S.

    2012-01-01

    Colleges and universities are developing both the next generation of leaders as well as state-of-the-art technology that allow climate reduction aspirations and triple bottom-line outcomes to become realities. Divisions of student affairs play a crucial role in the sustainability movement in colleges and universities. The technology-savvy,…

  9. Tribal Veterans Representative (TVR) training program: the effect of community outreach workers on American Indian and Alaska Native Veterans access to and utilization of the Veterans Health Administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufmann, L Jeanne; Buck Richardson, W J; Floyd, James; Shore, Jay

    2014-10-01

    American Indians and Alaska Natives serve at the highest rate of any US race or ethnic group, yet are the most underserved population of Veterans and do not take advantage of the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) benefits and services. Barriers to seeking care include stigma, especially for mental health issues; distance to care; and lack of awareness of benefits and services they are entitled to receive. In response to this underutilization of the VA, an innovative program--the Tribal Veterans Representative (TVR) program--was developed within the VA to work with American Indians and Alaska Natives in rural and remote areas. The TVR goes through extensive training every year; is a volunteer, a Veteran and tribal community member who seeks out unenrolled Native Veterans, provides them with information on VA health care services and benefits, and assists them with enrollment paperwork. Being from the community they serve, these outreach workers are able to develop relationships and build rapport and trust with fellow Veterans. In place for over a decade in Montana, this program has enrolled a countless number of Veterans, benefiting not only the individual, but their family and the community as well. Also resulting from this program, are the implementation of Telemental Health Clinics treating Veterans with PTSD, a transportation program helping Veterans get to and from distant VA facilities, a Veteran Resource Center, and a Veteran Tribal Clinic. This program has successfully trained over 800 TVRs, expanded to other parts of the country and into remote areas of Alaska.

  10. 78 FR 46421 - Proposed Information Collection (Per Diem for Nursing Home Care of Veterans in State Homes; Per...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-31

    ... AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (Per Diem for Nursing Home Care of Veterans in State Homes; Per Diem for Adult Day Care of Veterans in State Homes): Comment Request AGENCY: Veterans Health... the notice. This notice solicits comments on information needed to ensure that nursing home and adult...

  11. Revolution in Detection Affairs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stern W.

    2013-11-02

    The detection of nuclear or radioactive materials for homeland or national security purposes is inherently difficult. This is one reason detection efforts must be seen as just one part of an overall nuclear defense strategy which includes, inter alia, material security, detection, interdiction, consequence management and recovery. Nevertheless, one could argue that there has been a revolution in detection affairs in the past several decades as the innovative application of new technology has changed the character and conduct of detection operations. This revolution will likely be most effectively reinforced in the coming decades with the networking of detectors and innovative application of anomaly detection algorithms.

  12. How Veterans With Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder and Comorbid Health Conditions Utilize eHealth to Manage Their Health Care Needs: A Mixed-Methods Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whealin, Julia M; Jenchura, Emily C; Wong, Ava C; Zulman, Donna M

    2016-10-26

    Mental health conditions are prevalent among US veterans and pose a number of self-management and health care navigation challenges. Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) with comorbid chronic medical conditions (CMCs) is especially common, in both returning Iraq or Afghanistan and earlier war-era veterans. Patient-facing electronic health (eHealth) technology may offer innovative strategies to support these individuals' needs. This study was designed to identify the types of eHealth tools that veterans with PTSD and comorbid CMCs use, understand how they currently use eHealth technology to self-manage their unique health care needs, and identify new eHealth resources that veterans feel would empower them to better manage their health care. A total of 119 veterans with PTSD and at least one CMC who have used the electronic personal health record system of the US Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) responded to a mailed survey about their chronic conditions and preferences related to the use of technology. After the survey, 2 focus groups, stratified by sex, were conducted with a subgroup of patients to explore how veterans with PTSD and comorbid CMCs use eHealth technology to support their complex health care needs. Focus groups were transcribed verbatim and analyzed using standard content analysis methods for coding textual data, guided by the "Fit between Individual, Task, and Technology" framework. Survey respondents had a mean age of 64.0 (SD 12.0) years, 85.1% (97/114) were male, 72.4% (84/116) were white, and 63.1% (70/111) had an annual household income of PTSD and comorbid CMCs: (1) interactions with social support, (2) condition management, (3) access to and communication with providers, (4) information access, and (5) coordination of care. The "Fit between Individual, Task, and Technology" model provided a useful framework to examine the clinical tasks that arose for veterans and their resourceful adoption of eHealth tools. This study suggests that

  13. 75 FR 8789 - Research Advisory Committee on Gulf War Veterans' Illnesses; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-25

    ... Secretary of Veterans Affairs on proposed research studies, research plans and research strategies relating.... Individuals who speak are invited to submit a 1-2 page summary of their comments at the time of the...

  14. Profile of Sheltered Homeless Veterans for Fiscal Years 2009 and 2010

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — This brief uses data from the 2009 and 2010 Annual Homeless Assessment Reports (AHAR) to Congress. The reports were sponsored by the Department of Housing and Urban...

  15. Profile of Sheltered Homeless Veterans for Fiscal Years 2009 and 2010

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — This brief uses data from the 2009 and 2010 Annual Homeless Assessment Reports (AHAR) to Congress. The reports were sponsored by the Department of Housing and Urban...

  16. Public Affairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snow, C. P.

    In this book effects of technological developments on world conditions are discussed on the basis of the author's public statements made between 1959-70. A total of seven pieces is presented under the headings: The Two Cultures and the Scientific Revolution, The Two Cultures: A Second Look, The Case of Leavis and the Serious Case, Science and…

  17. Center for Women Veterans

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 2014-2020 VA Plans, Budget, & Performance VA Claims Representation RESOURCES Careers at VA Employment Center Returning Service Members Vocational Rehabilitation & Employment Homeless Veterans Women Veterans Minority Veterans Plain Language Surviving Spouses & Dependents ...

  18. Veteran, Primary Care Provider, and Specialist Satisfaction With Electronic Consultation

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Background Access to specialty care is challenging for veterans in rural locations. To address this challenge, in December 2009, the Veterans Affairs (VA) Pittsburgh Healthcare System (VAPHS) implemented an electronic consultation (e-consult) program to provide primary care providers (PCPs) and patients with enhanced specialty care access. Objective The aim of this quality improvement (QI) project evaluation was to: (1) assess satisfaction with the e-consult process, and (2) identify perceive...

  19. Systematic review of women veterans' mental health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Runnals, Jennifer J; Garovoy, Natara; McCutcheon, Susan J; Robbins, Allison T; Mann-Wrobel, Monica C; Elliott, Alyssa

    2014-01-01

    Given recent, rapid growth in the field of women veterans' mental health, the goal of this review was to update the status of women veterans' mental health research and to identify current themes in this literature. The scope of this review included women veterans' unique mental health needs, as well as gender differences in veterans' mental health needs. Database searches were conducted for relevant articles published between January 2008 and July 2011. Searches were supplemented with bibliographic reviews and consultation with subject matter experts. The database search yielded 375 titles; 32 met inclusion/exclusion criteria. The women veterans' mental health literature crosses over several domains, including prevalence, risk factors, health care utilization, treatment preferences, and access barriers. Studies were generally cross-sectional, descriptive, mixed-gender, and examined Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) health care users from all service eras. Results indicate higher rates of specific disorders (e.g., depression) and comorbidities, with differing risk factors and associated medical and functional impairment for female compared with male veterans. Although satisfaction with VA health care is generally high, unique barriers to care and indices of treatment satisfaction exist for women. There is a breadth of descriptive knowledge in many content areas of women veterans' mental health; however, the research base examining interventional and longitudinal designs is less developed. Understudied content areas and targets for future research and development include certain psychiatric disorders (e.g., schizophrenia), the effects of deployment on woman veterans' families, and strategies to address treatment access, attrition, and provision of gender-sensitive care. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. 75 FR 2594 - Proposed Information Collection (Compensation and Pension Examination Program (CPEP) Veterans...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-15

    ... AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (Compensation and Pension Examination Program (CPEP) Veterans... comments on the Veteran experience in taking the Compensation and Pension examination at individual CPEP... through the Federal Docket Management System (FDMS) at http://www.Regulations.gov ; or to Mary...

  1. 76 FR 50540 - Pilot Program of Enhanced Contract Care Authority for Veterans in Highly Rural Areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-15

    ... AFFAIRS Pilot Program of Enhanced Contract Care Authority for Veterans in Highly Rural Areas AGENCY... implementing Sec. 403 of Public Law (Pub. L.) 110-387, ``Veterans' Mental Health and Other Care Improvements Act of 2008,'' which requires VA to establish a pilot program to contract with non-VA health...

  2. 76 FR 74849 - Fund Availability Under the Supportive Services for Veteran Families Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-01

    ... and significant increase in utility costs; f. Mental health and substance use issues; g. Physical... AFFAIRS Fund Availability Under the Supportive Services for Veteran Families Program AGENCY: Department of... availability of funds for supportive services grants under the Supportive Services for Veteran Families...

  3. Military and Veteran Student Perceptions of Military Friendliness on the College Campus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dulchinos, Paul C.

    2014-01-01

    Over two million military personnel will leave the service over the next decade (Cook & Kim; 2009). The majority of these veterans will receive the most generous GI Bill since its inception (United States Department of Veterans Affairs [VA], 2011). Institutions will covet these students to offset discounting (Barr & McClellan, 2011; Basch,…

  4. Military and Veteran Student Perceptions of Military Friendliness on the College Campus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dulchinos, Paul C.

    2014-01-01

    Over two million military personnel will leave the service over the next decade (Cook & Kim; 2009). The majority of these veterans will receive the most generous GI Bill since its inception (United States Department of Veterans Affairs [VA], 2011). Institutions will covet these students to offset discounting (Barr & McClellan, 2011; Basch,…

  5. Posttraumatic Stress Disorder, Traumatic Brain Injury, and Suicide Attempt History among Veterans Receiving Mental Health Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenner, Lisa A.; Betthauser, Lisa M.; Homaifar, Beeta Y.; Villarreal, Edgar; Harwood, Jeri E. F.; Staves, Pamela J.; Huggins, Joseph A.

    2011-01-01

    History of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) or traumatic brain injury (TBI) has been found to increase risk of suicidal behavior. The association between suicide attempt history among veterans with PTSD and/or TBI was explored. Cases (N = 81) and 2:1 matched controls (N = 160) were randomly selected from a Veterans Affairs Medical Center…

  6. 78 FR 12617 - Grants for the Rural Veterans Coordination Pilot (RVCP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-25

    ... Federal Register on July 18, 2012 (77 FR 42230), VA proposed regulations to establish the RVCP to meet the... AFFAIRS 38 CFR Part 64 RIN 2900-AO35 Grants for the Rural Veterans Coordination Pilot (RVCP) AGENCY... Veterans Coordination Pilot (RVCP). The RVCP will provide grants to eligible community-based...

  7. 78 FR 33472 - Notice of Funds Availability Inviting Applications for the Rural Veterans Coordination Pilot

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-04

    ... information and requirements, see the final rule published in the Federal Register (78 FR 12617) on February... AFFAIRS Notice of Funds Availability Inviting Applications for the Rural Veterans Coordination Pilot... Rural Veterans Coordination Pilot (RVCP). This Notice of Funding Availability (NOFA) includes...

  8. Changes in characteristics of veterans using the VHA health care system between 1996 and 1999

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chuan-Fen; Maciejewski, Matthew L; Sales, Anne EB

    2005-01-01

    Background The Department of Veterans Affairs' Veterans Health Administration (VHA) provides a health care safety net to veterans. This study examined changes in characteristics of veterans using the VHA health care system between 1996 and 1999 when VHA implemented major organizational changes to improve access of ambulatory care and to provide care to more veterans. Methods The study used two cross-sectional samples of the Medical Expenditures Panel Survey (MEPS), a national representative survey, in 1996 and 1999. The 1996 MEPS survey included 1,944 veterans and the 1999 MEPS survey included 1,974 veterans. There were 534 veterans and 740 veterans who used VHA services in 1996 and 1999, respectively. Results The proportion of veterans using the VHA system increased from 12.4% in 1996 to 14.6% in 1999. In both years, veterans were more likely to use VHA care if they were older, male, less educated, uninsured, unemployed, and in fair or poor health status. Only two variables, marital status and income, were different between the two years. Married veterans were more likely to use VHA care in 1999, but not in 1996. Veterans with higher incomes had greater odds of using VHA care in 1996, but there was no significant association between income and VHA use in 1999. Conclusion Characteristics of VHA users did not fundamentally change despite the reorganization of VHA health care delivery system and changes in eligibility and enrollment policy. The VHA system maintains its safety net mission while attracting more veterans. PMID:15836789

  9. Veterans and Homelessness

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-29

    health care of veterans, operates all but one of the programs for homeless veterans. The Veterans Benefits Administration ( VBA ), which is responsible...Robert Rosenheck and Alan Fontana, “A Model of Homelessness Among Male Veterans of the Vietnam War Generation,” The American Journal of Psychiatry...151, no. 3 (March 1994): 421-427 (hereinafter, “A Model of Homelessness Among Male Veterans of the Vietnam War Generation”). 45 See, for example

  10. Research on the Application of 3D Panoramic Technology for the Electronic Police Affairs%电子警务中三维全景技术应用研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    唐德彬; 易佳; 向煜; 张建; 白宝玉; 李鹏

    2012-01-01

      随着信息技术的飞速发展,三维全景技术已成为电子警务中重要的组成部分。本文通过对三维全景技术特点和发展状况的介绍,提出了一套三维全景地理信息系统的应用框架,探讨了三维全景技术应用中的关键技术,并结合电子警务建设实际,详细介绍了三维全景技术在电子警务中的具体应用。可以预测,随着三维全景技术和物联网技术、云计算的集成,未来三维全景技术将成为电子警务的主流技术。%  Along with the rapid development of IT, the 3D panoramic technology has become an important constituent part of the electronic police affairs. This article passes through to 3D panoramic technical characteristics and development status, the paper puts forward a set of 3D panoramic geographic information system application framework, this paper discusses the 3D panoramic technology application of the key technology, combined with electronic police construction practice, detailed introduces the 3D panoramic technology in the electronic police affairs in the specific application. to be able to predict, with things networking technology, the 3D panoramic technology and cloud computing of integration, the next 3D panoramic technology will become the mainstream technology.for the electronic police affairs.

  11. Review of American Indian veteran telemental health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shore, Jay; Kaufmann, L Jeanne; Brooks, Elizabeth; Bair, Byron; Dailey, Nancy; Richardson, W J Buck; Floyd, James; Lowe, Jeff; Nagamoto, Herbert; Phares, Robert; Manson, Spero

    2012-03-01

    Rural American Indian veterans have unique healthcare needs and face numerous barriers to accessing healthcare services. Over the past decade, the Department of Veterans Affairs in conjunction with the University of Colorado Denver has turned to the promising field of telemental health to develop a series of videoconferencing-based clinics to reach this vulnerable population and improve mental healthcare services. The ongoing development, implementation, and expansion of these clinics have been assessed as part of a program improvement. The outcomes of these assessments have been documented in a series of published articles, controlled studies, program and case reports, and model descriptions. This article summarizes a decade of experience with the American Indian Telemental Health Clinics, the clinic model, and the literature arising from these clinics and presents lessons learned while establishing, maintaining, and evaluating these clinics. The ability to tailor the clinics to individual sites and cultures and to provide various services has been critical to the operation of the clinics. Culturally specific care through culturally knowledgeable providers, onsite tribal outreach workers, and collaboration with community services has proven essential in operating the clinics, as well as building rapport, trust, and engagement with the target patient population. It is hoped that the lessons learned and practices presented here can not only assist others working to improve the care for rural Native veterans but also serve as a model in the use of telemental health services for improving care and access to rural veteran and non-veteran populations.

  12. An innovative approach to treating combat veterans with PTSD at risk for suicide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendin, Herbert

    2014-10-01

    Suicide rates among military personnel had a significant drop in 2013, but there is no evidence of a drop among veterans. The problem of suicide among combat veterans with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) remains a source of concern. The Department of Defense and the Department of Veterans Affairs are now calling for innovative treatment approaches to the problem. A short-term psychodynamic therapy presented here may be able to fill that need by dissipating the guilt from veterans' combat-related actions that leads to suicidal behavior. The treatment showed promise of success with veterans of the war in Vietnam. Preliminary work with combat veterans of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan indicates that it may be equally successful in treating them. Basic aspects of the psychodynamic approach could be incorporated into current therapies and should improve their ability to treat veterans with PTSD at risk for suicide.

  13. Perspectives of family and veterans on family programs to support reintegration of returning veterans with posttraumatic stress disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Ellen P; Sherman, Michelle D; McSweeney, Jean C; Pyne, Jeffrey M; Owen, Richard R; Dixon, Lisa B

    2015-08-01

    Combat deployment and reintegration are challenging for service members and their families. Although family involvement in mental health care is increasing in the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) system, little is known about family members' preferences for services. This study elicited the perspectives of returning Afghanistan and Iraq war veterans with posttraumatic stress disorder and their families regarding family involvement in veterans' mental health care. Semistructured qualitative interviews were conducted with 47 veterans receiving care for posttraumatic stress disorder at the Central Arkansas Veterans Healthcare System or Oklahoma City VA Medical Center and 36 veteran-designated family members. Interviews addressed perceived needs related to veterans' readjustment to civilian life, interest in family involvement in joint veteran/family programs, and desired family program content. Interview data were analyzed using content analysis and constant comparison. Both groups strongly supported inclusion of family members in programs to facilitate veterans' postdeployment readjustment and reintegration into civilian life. Both desired program content focused on information, practical skills, support, and gaining perspective on the other's experience. Although family and veteran perspectives were similar, family members placed greater emphasis on parenting-related issues and the kinds of support they and their children needed during and after deployment. To our knowledge, this is the first published report on preferences regarding VA postdeployment reintegration support that incorporates the perspectives of returning male and female veterans and those of their families. Findings will help VA and community providers working with returning veterans tailor services to the needs and preferences of this important-to-engage population. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  14. Benchmarking in Student Affairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosier, Robert E.; Schwarzmueller, Gary J.

    2002-01-01

    Discusses the use of benchmarking in student affairs, focusing on issues related to student housing. Provides examples of how benchmarking has influenced administrative practice at many institutions. (EV)

  15. The Influence of iPad Technology on the Academic and Social Experiences of Veteran and Military Students: Academic Preparation, Collaboration Socialization, and Information Access

    Science.gov (United States)

    Compomizzi, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    With the recent changes to the Post 9/11 GI Bill, it is anticipated that the number of military personnel and U.S. veteran students enrolled in college will double to nearly two million by 2015. As non-traditional students, military and veteran college students also have unique social and academic experiences and needs which have been identified…

  16. The Influence of iPad Technology on the Academic and Social Experiences of Veteran and Military Students: Academic Preparation, Collaboration Socialization, and Information Access

    Science.gov (United States)

    Compomizzi, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    With the recent changes to the Post 9/11 GI Bill, it is anticipated that the number of military personnel and U.S. veteran students enrolled in college will double to nearly two million by 2015. As non-traditional students, military and veteran college students also have unique social and academic experiences and needs which have been identified…

  17. Changes in Suicide Mortality for Veterans and Nonveterans by Gender and History of VHA Service Use, 2000-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmire, Claire A; Kemp, Janet E; Bossarte, Robert M

    2015-09-01

    Veterans are believed to be at high risk of suicide. However, research comparing suicide rates between veterans and nonveterans is limited, and even less is known regarding differences by history of Veterans Health Administration (VHA) service use. This study directly compared veteran and nonveteran suicide risk while for the first time differentiating veterans by VHA service use. The cross-sectional study analyzed data from 173,969 adult suicide decedents from 23 states (2000-2010) included in the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs suicide data archive. Annual standardized mortality ratios (SMRs) were computed for veterans compared with nonveterans and for veterans who used VHA services compared with veterans who did not, overall and separately for males and females. After the analysis controlled for age and gender differences, the number of observed veteran suicides was approximately 20% higher than expected in 2000 (SMR=1.19, 95% confidence interval [CI]=1.10-1.28), and this increased to 60% higher by 2010 (SMR=1.63, CI=1.58-1.68). The elevated risk for female veterans (2010 SMR=5.89) was higher than that observed for male veterans (2010 SMR=1.54). Trends for non-VHA-utilizing veterans mirrored those of the veteran population as a whole, and the SMR for VHA-utilizing veterans declined. Since 2003, the number of suicides among VHA-utilizing veterans was less than expected when compared directly with the suicide rate among non-VHA-utilizing veterans. Veterans are members of the community and, as such, are an important part of observed increases in U.S. suicide rates. Not all veterans are at equal or increasing risk of suicide, however. VHA-utilizing veterans appear to have declining absolute and relative suicide rates.

  18. Extension of the Presumptive Period for Compensation for Gulf War Veterans. Interim final rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-17

    The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) is issuing this interim final rule to amend its adjudication regulations regarding compensation for disabilities resulting from undiagnosed illnesses suffered by veterans who served in the Persian Gulf War. This amendment is necessary to extend the presumptive period for qualifying chronic disabilities resulting from undiagnosed illnesses that must become manifest to a compensable degree in order that entitlement for compensation be established. The intended effect of this amendment is to provide consistency in VA adjudication policy and preserve certain rights afforded to Persian Gulf War veterans and ensure fairness for current and future Persian Gulf War veterans.

  19. Veterans' Group Life Insurance (VGLI) no-health period extension. Final rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-01

    The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) is issuing this final rule that amends the regulations governing eligibility for Veterans' Group Life Insurance (VGLI) to extend to 240 days the current 120-day "no-health" period during which veterans can apply for VGLI without proving that they are in good health for insurance purposes. The purpose of this rule is to increase the opportunities for disabled veterans to enroll in VGLI, some of whom would not qualify for VGLI coverage under existing provisions. This document adopts as a final rule, without change, the proposed rule published in the Federal Register on June 25, 2012.

  20. Paralyzed Veterans of America

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Have Served Attend an Event Host an Event Sports Events Volunteer Opportunities We Are #UNSTOPPABLE Get Sports Sports ... Vehicle Donate Clothing or Housegoods Host an Event Sports Events Attend an Event Veterans Day Veterans Day Poster ...

  1. 38 CFR 17.81 - Contracts for residential treatment services for veterans with alcohol or drug dependence or...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... treatment services for veterans with alcohol or drug dependence or abuse disabilities. 17.81 Section 17.81... dependence or abuse disabilities. (a) Contracts for treatment services authorized under § 17.80(a) may be... Department of Veterans Affairs sponsored residents to adjust to and maintain freedom from dependence on...

  2. Recovering Servicemembers and Veterans: Sustained Leadership Attention and Systematic Oversight Needed to Resolve Persistent Problems Affecting Care and Benefits

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-01

    servicemembers and veterans who suffer from traumatic brain injuries, amputations , burns, spinal cord injuries, visual impairment, and PTSD. The... amputations , spinal cord injuries, or blindness, or more than one of these. Soon after the program was initiated, the Department of Veterans Affairs...williamsonr@gao.gov In addition to the contact name above, Bonnie Anderson, Assistant Director; Mark Bird , Assistant Director; Michele Grgich, Assistant

  3. Introducing Veteran Critical Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Glenn A.; Lincoln, Yvonna S.

    2017-01-01

    Research on student veterans is in an infant state. As veterans continue to enroll in institutions of higher education, researchers must explore new ways of "knowing" student veterans. It is not enough to only describe and model this growing demographic, researchers must also have a tool for criticism and question. The next in an…

  4. How Veterans With Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder and Comorbid Health Conditions Utilize eHealth to Manage Their Health Care Needs: A Mixed-Methods Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenchura, Emily C; Wong, Ava C; Zulman, Donna M

    2016-01-01

    Background Mental health conditions are prevalent among US veterans and pose a number of self-management and health care navigation challenges. Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) with comorbid chronic medical conditions (CMCs) is especially common, in both returning Iraq or Afghanistan and earlier war-era veterans. Patient-facing electronic health (eHealth) technology may offer innovative strategies to support these individuals’ needs. Objective This study was designed to identify the types of eHealth tools that veterans with PTSD and comorbid CMCs use, understand how they currently use eHealth technology to self-manage their unique health care needs, and identify new eHealth resources that veterans feel would empower them to better manage their health care. Methods A total of 119 veterans with PTSD and at least one CMC who have used the electronic personal health record system of the US Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) responded to a mailed survey about their chronic conditions and preferences related to the use of technology. After the survey, 2 focus groups, stratified by sex, were conducted with a subgroup of patients to explore how veterans with PTSD and comorbid CMCs use eHealth technology to support their complex health care needs. Focus groups were transcribed verbatim and analyzed using standard content analysis methods for coding textual data, guided by the “Fit between Individual, Task, and Technology” framework. Results Survey respondents had a mean age of 64.0 (SD 12.0) years, 85.1% (97/114) were male, 72.4% (84/116) were white, and 63.1% (70/111) had an annual household income of < US $50,000. Mean score on a measure of eHealth literacy was 27.7 (SD 9.8). Of the respondents, 44.6% (50/112) used health-related technology 1 to 3 times per month and 21.4% (24/112) used technology less than once per month. Veterans reported using technology most often to search for health information (78.9%, 90/114), communicate with providers (71.1%, 81

  5. Transfer component skill deficit rates among Veterans who use wheelchairs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alicia M. Koontz, PhD

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to quantify the deficit rates for transfer component skills in a Veteran cohort and explore the relationship between deficit rates and subject characteristics. Seventy-four men and 18 women performed up to four transfers independently from their wheelchair to a mat table while a therapist evaluated their transfer techniques using the Transfer Assessment Instrument. The highest deficit rates concerned the improper use of handgrips (63%. Other common problems included not setting the wheelchair up at the proper angle (50% and not removing the armrest (58%. Veterans over 60 yr old and Veterans with moderate shoulder pain were more likely to set up their wheelchairs inappropriately than younger Veterans (p = 0.003 and Veterans with mild shoulder pain (p = 0.004. Women were less likely to remove their armrests than men (p = 0.03. Subjects with disabilities other than spinal cord injury were less inclined to set themselves up for a safe and easy transfer than the subjects with spinal cord injury (p Veterans and will inform the development of future transfer training programs both within and outside of the Department of Veterans Affairs.

  6. Homelessness and money mismanagement in Iraq and Afghanistan veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elbogen, Eric B; Sullivan, Connor P; Wolfe, James; Wagner, Henry Ryan; Beckham, Jean C

    2013-12-01

    We examined the empirical link between money mismanagement and subsequent homelessness among veterans. We used a random sample of Iraq and Afghanistan War era veterans from the National Post-Deployment Adjustment Survey in 2009-2011. Veterans were randomly selected from a roster of all US military service members in Operation Iraqi Freedom or Operation Enduring Freedom who were separated from active duty or in the Reserves/National Guard. Veterans (n = 1090) from 50 states and all military branches completed 2 waves of data collection 1 year apart (79% retention rate). Thirty percent reported money mismanagement (e.g., bouncing or forging a check, going over one's credit limit, falling victim to a money scam in the past year). Multivariate analysis revealed money mismanagement (odds ratio [OR] = 4.09, 95% CI = 1.87, 8.94) was associated with homelessness in the next year, as were arrest history (OR = 2.65, 95% CI = 1.33, 5.29), mental health diagnosis (OR = 2.59, 95% CI = 1.26, 5.33), and income (OR = 0.30, 95% CI = 0.13, 0.71). Money mismanagement, reported by a substantial number of veterans, was related to a higher rate of subsequent homelessness. The findings have implications for policymakers and clinicians, suggesting that financial education programs offered by the US Departments of Defense and Veterans Affairs may be targeted to effectively address veteran homelessness.

  7. Military and veteran health behavior research and practice: challenges and opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haibach, Jeffrey P; Haibach, Michael Ann; Hall, Katherine S; Masheb, Robin M; Little, Melissa A; Shepardson, Robyn L; Dobmeyer, Anne C; Funderburk, Jennifer S; Hunter, Christopher L; Dundon, Margaret; Hausmann, Leslie R M; Trynosky, Stephen K; Goodrich, David E; Kilbourne, Amy M; Knight, Sara J; Talcott, Gerald W; Goldstein, Michael G

    2017-02-01

    There are 2.1 million current military servicemembers and 21 million living veterans in the United States. Although they were healthier upon entering military service compared to the general U.S. population, in the longer term veterans tend to be of equivalent or worse health than civilians. One primary explanation for the veterans' health disparity is poorer health behaviors during or after military service, especially areas of physical activity, nutrition, tobacco, and alcohol. In response, the Department of Defense and Department of Veterans Affairs continue to develop, evaluate, and improve health promotion programs and healthcare services for military and veteran health behavior in an integrated approach. Future research and practice is needed to better understand and promote positive health behavior during key transition periods in the military and veteran life course. Also paramount is implementation and evaluation of existing interventions, programs, and policies across the population using an integrated and person centered approach.

  8. USSR Report, International Affairs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    BELORUSSIYA, 12 Nov 86) 20 -a - SOCIALIST COMMUNITY AND CEMA AFFAIRS CEMA Academic, Scientific Cooperation Fruitful (I. Zakharchenko; NARODNOYE...KHOZYAYSTVO BELORUSSII, No 1, Jan 87) 23 Briefs Vietnam- CEMA Agricultural Cooperation 27 THIRD WORLD ISSUES Table of Contents of AZIYA I AFRIKA...more obvious example of the anti-humane nature of this world. 13329 CSO: 1807/149 22 SOCIALIST COMMUNITY AND CEMA AFFAIRS CEMA ACADEMIC

  9. USSR Report, International Affairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    167092 JPRS-UIA-87-014 7 APRIL 1987 USSR Report INTERNATIONAL AFFAIRS DTSTPIBÜTTON HT^TFM’oKT Ä Approved fox ou’-K- ’c<£x;se; Distribution... USSR REPORT INTERNATIONAL AFFAIRS CONTENTS EAST-WEST RELATIONS Ambassador, Correspondents View CSCE Process, Progress (NEPSZABADSAG, 13 Feb 87...Range Program (Boris Remizov, Valdimir Proskuryakov ; EKONOMICHESKOYE SOTRUDNICHESTVO STRAN-CHLENOV SEV, No 10, 1986) 21 - a - Measures for

  10. Military Construction, Veterans Affairs, and Related Agencies: FY2010 Appropriations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-04

    Lemonier from Expeditionary to Enduring Status Construction at Camp Lemonier , a former French Foreign Legion facility in Djibouti that is now the location...report on S. 1407, the SAC observed that AFRICOM headquarters is located in Stuttgart, Germany. With Camp Lemonier , still an expeditionary outpost...ashore to Camp Lemonier during 2003. Its area of responsibility encompassed Kenya, Somalia, Sudan, Eritrea, Djibouti and Ethiopia in Africa, and Yemen

  11. Sleep characteristics of Veterans Affairs Adult Day Health Care participants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Jaime M; Martin, Jennifer L

    2015-01-01

    Addressing sleep disturbance can help to slow functional decline, delay nursing home admission, and improve overall health among older adults; however, sleep is not widely studied in high-risk older adults such as Adult Day Health Care (ADHC) participants. Sixty-eight ADHC participants were interviewed for sleep disturbance using a 28-item screening questionnaire. More than two thirds (n = 48, 70.6%) reported one or more characteristics of poor sleep, and 38% of participants met basic criteria for insomnia. Individuals with insomnia attended ADHC less frequently, reported worse sleep quality and shorter sleep duration, and were more likely to endorse trouble falling asleep, staying asleep, and waking up too early (ps sleep disturbance within ADHC participants.

  12. Alcohol Consumption among Urban, Suburban, and Rural Veterans Affairs Outpatients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Emily C.; McFarland, Lynne V.; Nelson, Karin M.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: United States rural residents tend toward poorer health than urban residents. Although alcohol use is associated with multiple medical conditions and can be reduced via brief primary care-based interventions, it is unknown whether alcohol consumption differs by rurality among primary care patients. We sought to describe alcohol…

  13. Military Construction, Veterans Affairs, and Related Agencies: FY2008 Appropriations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-06-12

    population and the current conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan. As a result of the increase in the number of claims, the average processing time for a...communities across the nation during 2007 and 2008. New Vet Centers will be located in Montgomery, Alabama; Fayetteville, Arkansas; Modesto , California

  14. Veterans Affairs Contracting: Improved Oversight Needed for Certain Contractual Arrangements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-07-01

    accounting officials. Financial Services Center officials reported that compliance has improved as a result of this training. Currently, VA does not provide...States Government Accountability Office Report Documentation Page Form ApprovedOMB No. 0704-0188 Public reporting burden for the collection of... provision of law, no person shall be subject to a penalty for failing to comply with a collection of information if it does not display a currently valid

  15. Public affairs plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-09-01

    The purpose of the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project Public Affairs Plan is to establish goals for the fiscal year (FY) 1996 UMTRA Project public affairs program and to identify specific activities to be conducted during the year. It describes the roles of various agencies involved in the public affairs program and defines the functions of the UMTRA Project Technical Assistance Contractor (TAC) Public Affairs Department. It replaces the FY 1995 Public Affairs Plan (DOE/AL/62350-154). The plan also describes the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) plans to keep stakeholders and other members of the public informed about UMTRA Project policies, plans, and activities, and provide opportunities for stakeholders and interested segments of the public to participate in UMTRA Project decision-making processes. The plan applies to the UMTRA Project Team; the DOE Grand Junction Projects Office (GJPO); the DOE Albuquerque Operations Office, Office of Public Affairs (OPA); the TAC; the UMTRA Project Remedial Action Contractor (RAC); and other cooperating agencies.

  16. Public affairs plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-09-01

    The purpose of the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project Public Affairs Plan is to establish goals for the Fiscal Year 1995 UMTRA public affairs program and identify specific activities to be conducted during the year. It also describes the roles of various agencies involved in the conduct of the public affairs program and defines the functions of the Technical Assistance Contractor (TAC) Public Affairs Department. It integrates and replaces the Public Participation Plan (DOE/AL/62350-47D) and Public Information Plan (DOE/AL/623590-71). The plan describes the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) plans to keep stakeholders and other members of the public informed about project policies, plans, and activities, and provide opportunities for stakeholders and interested segments of the public to participate in project decision-making processes. The plan applies to the UMTRA Project Office; the DOE Albuquerque Operations Office, Office of Intergovernmental and External Affairs (OIEA); the UMTRA TAC; the UMTRA Remedial Action Contractor (RAC); and other cooperating agencies.

  17. The Correlation of the Tinnitus Handicap Inventory with Depression and Anxiety in Veterans with Tinnitus

    OpenAIRE

    Jinwei Hu; Jane Xu; Matthew Streelman; Helen Xu; O’neil Guthrie

    2015-01-01

    Objective. The mechanisms of tinnitus are known to alter neuronal circuits in the brainstem and cortex, which are common to several comorbid conditions. This study examines the relationship between tinnitus and anxiety/depression. Subjects and Methods. Ninety-one male veterans with subjective tinnitus were enrolled in a Veterans Affairs Tinnitus Clinic. The Tinnitus Handicap Inventory (THI) was used to assess tinnitus severity. ICD-9 codes for anxiety/depression were used to determine their p...

  18. Music therapy to promote movement from isolation to community in homeless veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, James S; Heim, Daniel; Grant, Brian; Rollins, John

    2012-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs' Operation Stand Down has done much to address homeless needs among veterans. Gaining client trust is central to the effectiveness of the program. Music therapy has been found beneficial in moving individuals from isolation to community. We report our experience with participatory music therapy in Operation Stand Down and offer this as a legitimate intervention to enhance client participation.

  19. Mixed methods study examining work reintegration experiences from perspectives of Veterans with mental health disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kukla, Marina; Rattray, Nicholas A; Salyers, Michelle P

    2015-01-01

    Recent findings have demonstrated that reintegration for Veterans is often challenging. One difficult aspect of reintegration—transitioning into the civilian workplace—has not been fully explored in the literature. To address this gap and examine work reintegration, this mixed methods study examined the perspectives of Veterans with mental health disorders receiving Department of Veterans Affairs healthcare. Forty Veterans rated factors that affect work success; participants also provided narratives on their most and least successful work experiences. We used t-tests and qualitative analysis to compare participants who did and did not serve in combat. Several themes relevant to work reintegration emerged in the narratives, particularly for Veterans who served in combat. An array of work difficulties were reported in the months following military discharge. In addition, Veterans who served in combat reported significantly more work barriers than Veterans who did not serve in combat, particularly health-related barriers. In conclusion, Veterans with mental health disorders who served in combat experienced more work reintegration difficulty than their counterparts who did not serve in combat. The role of being a Veteran affected how combat Veterans formed their self-concept, which also shaped their work success and community reintegration, especially during the early transition period.

  20. Changes in characteristics of veterans using the VHA health care system between 1996 and 1999

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maciejewski Matthew L

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Department of Veterans Affairs' Veterans Health Administration (VHA provides a health care safety net to veterans. This study examined changes in characteristics of veterans using the VHA health care system between 1996 and 1999 when VHA implemented major organizational changes to improve access of ambulatory care and to provide care to more veterans. Methods The study used two cross-sectional samples of the Medical Expenditures Panel Survey (MEPS, a national representative survey, in 1996 and 1999. The 1996 MEPS survey included 1,944 veterans and the 1999 MEPS survey included 1,974 veterans. There were 534 veterans and 740 veterans who used VHA services in 1996 and 1999, respectively. Results The proportion of veterans using the VHA system increased from 12.4% in 1996 to 14.6% in 1999. In both years, veterans were more likely to use VHA care if they were older, male, less educated, uninsured, unemployed, and in fair or poor health status. Only two variables, marital status and income, were different between the two years. Married veterans were more likely to use VHA care in 1999, but not in 1996. Veterans with higher incomes had greater odds of using VHA care in 1996, but there was no significant association between income and VHA use in 1999. Conclusion Characteristics of VHA users did not fundamentally change despite the reorganization of VHA health care delivery system and changes in eligibility and enrollment policy. The VHA system maintains its safety net mission while attracting more veterans.

  1. The Digital Age of Student Affairs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabellon, Edmund T.; Junco, Reynol

    2015-01-01

    This chapter describes the student affairs profession in the digital age. The authors explore new challenges educators and professionals face as new areas are added and expanded, how social networks and digital technology tools continue to evolve, and what skills are needed to engage with students in person and online.

  2. USSR Report, Military Affairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    watermelons, tobacco and grain on the Black Sea and the Sea of Azov for many years. A distinctive characteristic of theirs was a virtually zero forward...military-patriot- ic films and books, debates, trips to historic places, meetings with veterans, "Me- morial Shifts" and military sport

  3. Factors associated with receipt of pension and compensation benefits for homeless veterans in the VBA/VHA Homeless Outreach Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Joyce H; Rosenheck, Robert A; Greenberg, Greg A; Seibyl, Catherine

    2007-03-01

    Public support payments may facilitate exit from homelessness for persons with mental illness. We examined data from 10,641 homeless veterans contacted from October 1, 1995 to September 30, 2002 in a collaborative outreach program designed to facilitate access to Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) disability benefits. Those who were awarded benefits (22% of contacted veterans) were more likely to report disability, poor to fair self-rated health, and were more likely to have used VA services in the past. Thus, this program achieved only modest success and was most successful with veterans who were already receiving VA services and who might have received benefits even without the outreach effort.

  4. Implementation and early utilization of a Suicide Hotline for veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knox, Kerry L; Kemp, Janet; McKeon, Richard; Katz, Ira R

    2012-03-01

    Suicide crisis lines have a respected history as a strategy for reducing deaths from suicide and suicidal behaviors. Until recently, however, evidence of the effectiveness of these crisis lines has been sparse. Studies published during the past decade suggest that crisis lines offer an alternative to populations who may not be willing to engage in treatment through traditional mental health settings. Given this promising evidence, in 2007, the Department of Veterans Affairs in collaboration with the Department of Health and Human Services' Substance Abuse and Mental Health Administration implemented a National Suicide Hotline that is staffed 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, by Veterans Affairs clinical staff. We report here on the implementation of this suicide hotline and our early observations of its utilization in a largely male population.

  5. US veterans and their unique issues: enhancing health care professional awareness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olenick, Maria; Flowers, Monica; Diaz, Valerie J

    2015-01-01

    United States veterans are a multifaceted population with a distinct culture that includes, but is not limited to, values, customs, ethos, selfless duty, codes of conduct, implicit patterns of communication, and obedience to command. Veterans experience mental health disorders, substance use disorders, post-traumatic stress, and traumatic brain injury at disproportionate rates compared to their civilian counterparts. Eighteen to 22 American veterans commit suicide daily and young veterans aged 18-44 are most at risk. Health care professionals must be aware of patients' military history and be able to recognize suicide-risk factors, regardless of age. Advancement in medical technology has allowed servicemen to survive their injuries but, for many, at the cost of a traumatic limb amputation and associated mental scarring. Health care professionals must be able to address physical safety concerns, as well as, emotional health of veterans. Approximately 49,933 American veterans are homeless and face the same difficulties as non-veterans in addition to service-related matters. Separation from military service and issues related to complex multiple deployments are among specifically identified veteran issues. Successful veteran reintegration into civilian life rests upon providing veterans with training that builds on their military knowledge and skill, employment post-separation from service, homelessness prevention, and mental health programs that promote civilian transition. Preparing health care providers to meet the complex needs of a vast veteran population can be facilitated by implementing veteran content into curricula that includes veteran patient simulations and case studies, and utilizes veteran clinical faculty.

  6. Arthritis and Veterans

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2015-11-09

    One in three veterans has arthritis. This podcast provides information on how veterans can improve their quality of life with physical activity and other arthritis management strategies.  Created: 11/9/2015 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 11/9/2015.

  7. Student Veterans Organizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summerlot, John; Green, Sean-Michael; Parker, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    Students who have experienced conflict as members of the military come to college expecting to be supported, if not honored for their service. One way that campus administrators can facilitate transitions for student veterans is to assist in founding and maintaining campus-based student organizations for veterans. Military service is a bonding…

  8. Better Transitions for Troops: An Application of Schlossberg's Transition Framework to Analyses of Barriers and Institutional Support Structures for Student Veterans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Kimberly A.; Gilbert, Claire K.

    2015-01-01

    Scholssberg's transition theory is used to frame qualitative analysis of narratives from veterans, administrators, and student affairs professionals, examining whether and how institutions can influence veterans' transitions to higher education. Findings suggest how institutional structures assist students in developing navigational…

  9. Better Transitions for Troops: An Application of Schlossberg's Transition Framework to Analyses of Barriers and Institutional Support Structures for Student Veterans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Kimberly A.; Gilbert, Claire K.

    2015-01-01

    Scholssberg's transition theory is used to frame qualitative analysis of narratives from veterans, administrators, and student affairs professionals, examining whether and how institutions can influence veterans' transitions to higher education. Findings suggest how institutional structures assist students in developing navigational…

  10. Toward Renewal in Student Affairs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindahl, Charles W.

    1972-01-01

    Student affairs has made substantial contributions to the physical, moral, and social development of students. However, student affairs professionals must assume their central role in the intellectual development of students by serving as true educators. (Author)

  11. US veterans and their unique issues: enhancing health care professional awareness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olenick M

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Maria Olenick,1 Monica Flowers,1 Valerie J Diaz1,21Nicole Wertheim College of Nursing and Health Science, Florida International University, Miami, FL, USA; 2Operational Health Support Unit Jacksonville, United States Navy Nurse Corps, Jacksonville, FL, USAAbstract: United States veterans are a multifaceted population with a distinct culture that includes, but is not limited to, values, customs, ethos, selfless duty, codes of conduct, implicit patterns of communication, and obedience to command. Veterans experience mental health disorders, substance use disorders, post-traumatic stress, and traumatic brain injury at disproportionate rates compared to their civilian counterparts. Eighteen to 22 American veterans commit suicide daily and young veterans aged 18–44 are most at risk. Health care professionals must be aware of patients' military history and be able to recognize suicide-risk factors, regardless of age. Advancement in medical technology has allowed servicemen to survive their injuries but, for many, at the cost of a traumatic limb amputation and associated mental scarring. Health care professionals must be able to address physical safety concerns, as well as, emotional health of veterans. Approximately 49,933 American veterans are homeless and face the same difficulties as non-veterans in addition to service-related matters. Separation from military service and issues related to complex multiple deployments are among specifically identified veteran issues. Successful veteran reintegration into civilian life rests upon providing veterans with training that builds on their military knowledge and skill, employment post-separation from service, homelessness prevention, and mental health programs that promote civilian transition. Preparing health care providers to meet the complex needs of a vast veteran population can be facilitated by implementing veteran content into curricula that includes veteran patient simulations and case studies

  12. Revolution in military affairs, missile defence and weapons in space ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Revolution in military affairs, missile defence and weapons in space: the US ... 1991 Gulf War that captured the imagination of military planners and policy makers, ... Firstly, very few countries have the financial and technological capability to ...

  13. Professionalisation of Student Affairs Educators in China: History ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    of Humanistic Quality Education Center, Hefei University of Technology, Hefei, Anhui, China. ... governance, with student affairs practitioners, i.e. advisors to students, being ... 1978, the practice was resumed in universities throughout China.

  14. Veterans' Perspectives on Interventions to Improve Retention in HIV Care.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie G Minick

    Full Text Available Poor retention in HIV medical care is associated with increased mortality among patients with HIV/AIDS. Developing new interventions to improve retention in HIV primary care is needed. The Department of Veteran Affairs (VA is the largest single provider of HIV care in the US. We sought to understand what veterans would want in an intervention to improve retention in VA HIV care. We conducted 18 one-on-one interviews and 15 outpatient focus groups with 46 patients living with HIV infection from the Michael E. DeBakey VAMC (MEDVAMC. Analysis identified three focus areas for improving retention in care: developing an HIV friendly clinic environment, providing mental health and substance use treatment concurrent with HIV care and encouraging peer support from other Veterans with HIV.

  15. The use of VA Disability Compensation and Social Security Disability Insurance among working-aged veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilmoth, Janet M; London, Andrew S; Heflin, Colleen M

    2015-07-01

    Although there is substantial disability among veterans, relatively little is known about working-aged veterans' uptake of Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) Disability Compensation and Social Security Disability Insurance (DI). This study identifies levels of veteran participation in VA disability and/or DI benefit programs, examines transitions into and out of VA and DI programs among veterans, and estimates the size and composition of the veteran population receiving VA and/or DI benefits over time. Data from the 1992, 1993, 1996, 2001, 2004, and 2008 Survey of Income and Program Participation (SIPP) are used to describe VA and DI program participation among veterans under the age of 65. The majority of working-aged veterans do not receive VA or DI benefits and joint participation is low, but use of these programs has increased over time. A higher percentage of veterans receive VA compensation, which ranges from 4.9% in 1992 to 13.2% in 2008, than DI compensation, which ranges from 2.9% in 1992 to 6.7% in 2008. The rate of joint participation ranges from less than 1% in 1992 to 3.6% in 2008. Veterans experience few transitions between VA and DI programs during the 36-48 months they are observed. The number of veterans receiving benefits from VA and/or DI nearly doubled between 1992 and 2008. There have been substantial shifts in the composition of veterans using these programs, as cohorts who served prior to 1964 are replaced by those who served after 1964. The findings suggest potential gaps in veterans' access to disability programs that might be addressed through improved coordination of VA and DI benefits. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Development and initial evaluation of Transdiagnostic Behavior Therapy (TBT) for veterans with affective disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gros, Daniel F

    2014-12-15

    Considerable attention has focused on the growing need for evidence-based psychotherapy for veterans with affective disorders within the Department of Veteran Affairs. Despite, and possibly due to, the large number of evidence-based protocols available, several obstacles remain in their widespread delivery within Veterans Affairs Medical Centers. In part as an effort to address these concerns, newer transdiagnostic approaches to psychotherapy have been developed to provide a single treatment that is capable of addressing several, related disorders. The goal of the present investigation was to develop and evaluate a transdiagnostic psychotherapy, Transdiagnostic Behavior Therapy (TBT), in veterans with affective disorders. Study 1 provided initial support for transdiagnostic presentation of evidence-based psychotherapy components in veterans with principal diagnoses of affective disorders (n=15). These findings were used to inform the development of the TBT protocol. In Study 2, an initial evaluation of TBT was completed in a second sample of veterans with principal diagnoses of affective disorders (n=29). The findings of Study 2 demonstrated significant improvements in symptoms of depression, anxiety, stress, posttraumatic stress, and related impairment across participants with various principal diagnoses. Together, the investigation provided preliminary support for effectiveness of TBT in veterans with affective disorders.

  17. Student Affairs Researcher: Information Broker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadley, Thomas D.

    1999-01-01

    Examines the skills and research tools necessary for the student affairs researcher to become an agent for organizational learning within the student affairs division and the institution. Draws upon Peter Senge's theory of "The Learning Organization" and discusses the resulting implications for student affairs researchers. (GCP)

  18. A sailor's pain: Veterans' musculoskeletal disorders, chronic pain, and disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, James M; Chiasson, Roland; Loisel, Patrick; Besemann, Lt Col Markus; Pranger, Tina

    2009-11-01

    A few years after leaving the navy, a 50-year-old Veteran* presents to a new family physician with chronic knee and back pain. He is seeking a new physician for opioid and benzodiazepine refills, referrals for ongoing acupuncture and massage therapy, and completion of Veteran Affairs Canada (VAC) disability claim forms for his back. He was medically released at the rank of Petty Officer owing to knee impairment secondary to a fracture sustained aboard ship. He twice strained his back on deployments, but did not develop chronic low back pain until after leaving the Canadian Forces (CF). On release from the CF he completed comprehensive medical, psychosocial, and vocational rehabilitation in the VAC Rehabilitation Program for disability related to his knee impairment. Lately, chronic low back pain prevents him from continuing civilian employment and enjoying life.The physician takes the Veteran's history, performs appropriate physical examination and diagnostic investigations, and obtains previous medical records. The physician diagnoses chronic mechanic allow back pain and knee osteoarthritis, and is concerned about the Veteran's mental health. When the family physician tries to explore the mental health differential diagnosis, the Veteran initially becomes upset,but he responds to motivational interviewing. The physician books follow-up appointments to develop a therapeutic relationship with the Veteran and completes the VAC forms. With consent, the physician also sends a referral letter to the VAC district office, outlining the Veteran's health issues. The client is found to be eligible to re-enter the VAC Rehabilitation Program to manage disability related to his back pain. The Veteran is ultimately able to withdraw from chronic opiate and benzodiazepine medications and optimize his participation in life.

  19. Student Veteran perceptions of facilitators and barriers to achieving academic goals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, Sonya B; Rosen, Jay; Himmerich, Sara; Myers, Ursula S; Davis, Brittany; Browne, Kendall C; Piland, Neill

    2015-01-01

    According to recent estimates, over 1 million Operation Iraqi Freedom/Operation Enduring Freedom (OIF/OEF) Veterans are utilizing the post-9/11 GI Bill to pursue higher education. Data collected by the Department of Defense suggests that greater than 17% of returning Veterans may suffer from mental and physical health disorders, which can negatively affect school performance. The current study explored student Veterans' perceived facilitators and barriers to achieving academic goals. Thirty-one student Veterans completed self-report measures and interviews. Results suggested that Veterans that were reporting problems or symptoms in one mental or physical health domain were likely to be reporting symptoms or problems in others as well. The interview data were coded, and three overarching themes related to barriers and facilitators emerged: person features (e.g., discipline and determination, symptoms and stressors), institutional structure (i.e., what schools and the Department of Veterans Affairs do that was perceived to help or hinder student Veteran success), and policy concerns (i.e., how the structure of the GI Bill affects student Veteran school experience). Results from this research indicate the need for larger studies and program development efforts aimed at enhancing academic outcomes for Veterans.

  20. Enhancing health and independent living for veterans with disabilities by leveraging community-based resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hale-Gallardo, Jennifer; Jia, Huanguang; Delisle, Tony; Levy, Charles E; Osorio, Valentina; Smith, Jennifer A; Hannold, Elizabeth M

    2017-01-01

    The number of US veterans with disabilities has increased in recent years as service members have returned home with extensive injuries and veterans from previous wars acquire functional limitations as a consequence of aging with chronic diseases. Veterans with severe disabilities need assistance and support to maintain independence at home and to avoid institutionalization. The US Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) strives to network with community organizations to achieve the best possible outcomes for veterans. Key community resources in the US for individuals with disabilities are Centers for Independent Living (CILs) that provide a wide range of services, promoting independent living and well-being for people across disabilities. The widespread availability and services of CILs nationwide suggest their potential as a community-based resource for veterans, particularly for those with limited access to VA care. In this article, we discuss long-term needs of veterans with disabilities, efforts to address veterans' rehabilitation needs at the VA and opportunities for leveraging the strengths of community-based organizations for veterans. More research is warranted to investigate CIL services and potential for CIL-VA partnerships.

  1. Veterans Affairs: Better Understanding Needed to Enhance Services to Veterans Readjusting to Civilian Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-01

    September 28, 2012. Defense Health: Coordinating Authority Needed for Psychological Health and Traumatic Brain Injury Activities. GAO-12-154...Subscribe to our RSS Feeds or E-mail Updates. Listen to our Podcasts . Visit GAO on the web at www.gao.gov. Contact: Website: http://www.gao.gov/fraudnet

  2. Developing a Leadership Development Program for the Veterans Benefits Administration within the Department of Veterans Affairs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-13

    adapt, make difficult decisions, and overcome obstacles . They are more capable of taking the lead and...school, it did not make any sense to teach 9th grade students calculus or trigonometry until such time as they demonstrated they had mastered

  3. Veterans Affairs: Health Care and Benefits for Veterans Exposed to Agent Orange

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-22

    pharynx (including tonsils), or nasal cavity (including ears and sinuses); cancers of the pleura, mediastinum, and other unspecified sites within the...1) Achondroplasia; (2) Cleft lip and cleft palate; (3) Congenital heart disease; (4) Congenital talipes equinovarus (clubfoot); (5) Esophageal and

  4. Using International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health to understand challenges in community reintegration of injured veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resnik, Linda J; Allen, Susan M

    2007-01-01

    This pilot study used the framework of the World Health Organization's International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) to understand the challenges faced by Operation Enduring Freedom (OEF) and Operation Iraqi Freedom (OIF) veterans as they reintegrate into the community. We conducted semistructured interviews with 14 injured veterans, 12 caregivers, and 14 clinicians. We used ICF taxonomy to code data and identify issues. We identified challenges in the following ICF domains: learning and applying knowledge; general tasks and demands; communication; mobility; self-care; domestic life; interpersonal interactions, major life areas; and community, social, and civic life. We found many similarities between the challenges faced by veterans with and without polytraumatic injuries, although veterans with polytraumatic injuries faced challenges of greater magnitude. Identifying community reintegration challenges early and promoting reintegration are important mandates for the Department of Veterans Affairs. The findings of this study are useful in understanding the needs of OEF/OIF veterans.

  5. Celebrities in International Affairs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Richey, Lisa Ann; Budabin, Alexandra Cosima

    2016-01-01

    , media, and NGOs, then considers exemplary cases of Angelina Jolie in Burma, Ben Affleck in the Democractic Republic of Congo, and Madonna in Malawi. These celebrity practices as diplomats, experts, and humanitarians in international affairs illustrate the diverse and contradictory forms of engagement......Celebrity engagement in global “helping” is not a simple matter of highly photogenic caring for needy others across borders; it is a complex relationship of power that often produces contradictory functions in relation to the goals of humanitarianism, development, and advocacy. This article argues...... that celebrities are acting as other elite actors in international affairs: investing considerable capital into processes that are highly political. It traces the emergence and practices of the elite politics of celebrities in North-South relations, an evolution made possible by recent changes in aid practices...

  6. For Homeless Veterans

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... paid at least the federal or state minimum wage, whichever is the higher. More Information Compensated Work ... residential treatment services to help Veterans transition from living on the street or in institutions to stable ...

  7. Center for Women Veterans

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Aid & Attendance & Housebound Caregivers Community Living Centers (CLC) Community Nursing Homes Domiciliaries (Please contact your local VA Medical Center) Homemaker & Home Health Aid Care Hospice and Palliative Care State Veterans ...

  8. Suicide among War Veterans

    OpenAIRE

    Vsevolod Rozanov; Vladimir Carli

    2012-01-01

    Studies aiming to identify if war veterans are at higher risk of suicide have often produced inconsistent results; this could be due to the complexity of comparisons and different methodological approaches. It should be noted that this contingent has many risk factors, such as stressful exposures, wounds, brain trauma and pain syndrome. Most recent observations confirm that veterans are really more likely to die of suicide as compared to the general population; they are also more likely to ex...

  9. Do medical house officers value the health of veterans differently from the health of non-veterans?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luckhaupt Sara

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Little information is available regarding medical residents' perceptions of patients' health-related quality of life. Patients cared for by residents have been shown to receive differing patterns of care at Veterans Affairs facilities than at community or university settings. We therefore examined: 1 how resident physicians value the health of patients; 2 whether values differ if the patient is described as a veteran; and 3 whether residency-associated variables impact values. Methods All medicine residents in a teaching hospital were asked to watch a digital video of an actor depicting a 72-year-old patient with mild-moderate congestive heart failure. Residents were randomized to 2 groups: in one group, the patient was described as a veteran of the Korean War, and in the other, he was referred to only as a male. The respondents assessed the patient's health state using 4 measures: rating scale (RS, time tradeoff (TTO, standard gamble (SG, and willingness to pay (WTP. We also ascertained residents' demographics, risk attitudes, residency program type, post-graduate year level, current rotation, experience in a Veterans Affairs hospital, and how many days it had been since they were last on call. We performed univariate and multivariable analyses using the RS, TTO, SG and WTP as dependent variables. Results Eighty-one residents (89.0% of eligible participated, with 36 (44.4% viewing the video of the veteran and 45 (55.6% viewing the video of the non-veteran. Their mean (SD age was 28.7 (3.1 years; 51.3% were female; and 67.5% were white. There were no differences in residents' characteristics or in RS, TTO, SG and WTP scores between the veteran and non-veteran groups. The mean RS score was 0.60 (0.14; the mean TTO score was 0.80 (0.20; the mean SG score was 0.91 (0.10; and the median (25th, 75th percentile WTP was $10,000 ($7600, $20,000 per year. In multivariable analyses, being a resident in the categorical program was

  10. Frequency of HIV Screening in the Veterans Health Administration: Implications for Early Diagnosis of HIV Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdiserri, Ronald O.; Rodriguez, Fred; Holodniy, Mark

    2008-01-01

    We evaluated the frequency of HIV testing across the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA), the largest provider of HIV care in the United States. An electronic survey was used to determine the volume and location of HIV screening, confirmatory testing, rapid testing and laboratory consent policies in VA medical centers between October 1, 2005, and…

  11. 77 FR 54783 - Improving Access to Mental Health Services for Veterans, Service Members, and Military Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-05

    ... strategies to support collaborative research to address suicide prevention. (c) The Departments of Defense..., Veterans Affairs, and Homeland Security to expand suicide prevention strategies and take steps to meet the... members, and their families. Sec. 2. Suicide Prevention. (a) By December 31, 2012, the Department of...

  12. Trauma Spectrum Disorders: Emerging Perspectives on the Impact on Military and Veteran Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donnell, Lolita; Begg, Lisa; Lipson, Linda; Elvander, Erika

    2011-01-01

    This article summarizes the findings from the Second Annual Trauma Spectrum Disorders Conference, which was held in December 2009 and was sponsored by the Defense Centers of Excellence for Psychological Health and Traumatic Brain Injury in conjunction with the Department of Veterans Affairs and the National Institutes of Health. The conference…

  13. Trauma Spectrum Disorders: Emerging Perspectives on the Impact on Military and Veteran Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donnell, Lolita; Begg, Lisa; Lipson, Linda; Elvander, Erika

    2011-01-01

    This article summarizes the findings from the Second Annual Trauma Spectrum Disorders Conference, which was held in December 2009 and was sponsored by the Defense Centers of Excellence for Psychological Health and Traumatic Brain Injury in conjunction with the Department of Veterans Affairs and the National Institutes of Health. The conference…

  14. 78 FR 38099 - Notice of Funds Availability Inviting Applications for the Rural Veterans Coordination; Amendment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-25

    ... (NOFA) in the Federal Register on June 4, 2013 (78 FR 33472) to announce the availability of funds for..., see the final rule published in the Federal Register on February 25, 2013 (78 FR 12617), which is... AFFAIRS Notice of Funds Availability Inviting Applications for the Rural Veterans Coordination;...

  15. 77 FR 20890 - Proposed Information Collection (Appointment of Veterans Service Organization/or Individuals as...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-06

    ... AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (Appointment of Veterans Service Organization/or Individuals as... of certain information by the agency. Under the Paperwork Reduction Act (PRA) of 1995, Federal... information, including each proposed extension of currently approved collection, and allow 60 days for public...

  16. Race/Ethnicity and End-of-Life Care Among Veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutney-Lee, Ann; Smith, Dawn; Thorpe, Joshua; Del Rosario, Cindy; Ibrahim, Said; Ersek, Mary

    2017-04-01

    Few studies have examined comprehensively racial/ethnic variations in quality of end-of-life care. Examine end-of-life care quality received by Veterans and their families, comparing racial/ethnic minorities to nonminorities. This is a retrospective, cross-sectional analysis of chart review and survey data. Nearly all deaths in 145 Veterans Affairs Medical Centers nationally (n=94,697) in addition to Bereaved Family Survey (BFS) data (n=51,859) from October 2009 to September 2014. Outcomes included 15 BFS items and 4 indicators of high-quality end-of-life care, including receipt of a palliative care consult, chaplain visit, bereavement contact, and death in hospice/palliative care unit. Veteran race/ethnicity was measured via chart review and defined as non-Hispanic white, non-Hispanic black, Hispanic, or other. In adjusted models, no differences were observed by race/ethnicity in receipt of a palliative care consult or death in a hospice unit. Although black Veterans were less likely than white Veterans to receive a chaplain visit, Hispanic Veterans were more likely than white Veterans to receive a chaplain visit and to receive a bereavement contact. Less favorable outcomes for racial/ethnic minorities were noted on several BFS items. In comparison with family members of white Veterans, families of minority Veterans were less likely to report excellent overall care, and this difference was largest for black Veterans (48% vs. 62%). Bereaved family members of minority Veterans generally rate the quality of end-of-life care less favorably than those of white Veterans. Family perceptions are critical to the evaluation of equity and quality of end-of-life care.

  17. 17 October 2013 - C. Ashton High Representative of the European Union for Foreign Affairs and Security Policy, Vice-President of the European Commission visiting the ATLAS cavern with ATLAS Collaboration Spokesperson D. Charlton; visiting the LHC tunnel at Point 1 with Technology Department Head F. Bordry and signing the Guest book with CERN Director-General R. Heuer.

    CERN Document Server

    Maximilien Brice

    2013-01-01

    17 October 2013 - C. Ashton High Representative of the European Union for Foreign Affairs and Security Policy, Vice-President of the European Commission visiting the ATLAS cavern with ATLAS Collaboration Spokesperson D. Charlton; visiting the LHC tunnel at Point 1 with Technology Department Head F. Bordry and signing the Guest book with CERN Director-General R. Heuer.

  18. 30th November 2010 - Norwegian Ministry of Government Administration, Reform and Church Affairs State Secretary R. Valle signing the guest book with Head of International Relations F. Pauss and Director for Research and Scientific Computing S. Bertolucci; visiting CERN Computer Centre with Information Technology Department Head F. Hemmer.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2010-01-01

    30th November 2010 - Norwegian Ministry of Government Administration, Reform and Church Affairs State Secretary R. Valle signing the guest book with Head of International Relations F. Pauss and Director for Research and Scientific Computing S. Bertolucci; visiting CERN Computer Centre with Information Technology Department Head F. Hemmer.

  19. Significant differences in fecal microbiota are associated with various stages of glucose tolerance in African American male veterans

    OpenAIRE

    Ciubotaru, Irina; Stefan J Green; KUKREJA, SUBHASH; Barengolts, Elena

    2015-01-01

    The importance of gut microbiota in pathogenesis of diabetes remains unknown. This study investigated the relationship between microbiota and metabolic markers in African American men (AAM) with prediabetes and hypovitaminosis D. The study was ancillary to a randomized trial of vitamin D supplementation with weekly ergocalciferol (50,000 IU) conducted in AAM veterans over 12 months (D Intervention in Veterans Affairs). Glycemic groups (Gr) were characterized based on changes in oral glucose t...

  20. VA (Veterans Administration) can Reduce Excess Disability Payments by Improving Pay Data Exchange with the Military Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-26

    Recoup the additional $385,000 on the 64 separation payment cases GAO identified where the recoupment balance was understated. -- Follow Agency appeal...D-R157 613 Vfi (VETERANS ADMINISTRATION) CAN REDUCE EXCESS / DI SRILITY PAYMENTS BY IMP..(UL) GENERAL ACCOUNTING U U LASI E OFFIC WASHINGTON DC...Affairs < VA Can Reduce Excess Disability Payments By Improving Pay Data * Exchange With The Military Services Federal law requires that the Veterans

  1. Practice affairs committee

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Sadowski

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The Practice Affairs Committee has had a productive year representing the interests of gastroenterologists involved in clinical care. The principle mandate of the committee is to address all issues relevant to the practice of gastroenterology, such as participation in the development of clinical practice guidelines and education programs, and the facilitation of clinical research. A major activity in 2003 was participation in the drafting of several new clinical practice guidelines: Infliximab and the management of Crohn's disease;Screening for colorectal cancer; andManagement of gastroesophageal reflux disease.

  2. Measuring sustainability within the Veterans Administration Mental Health System Redesign initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, James H; Krahn, Dean; Wise, Meg; Oliver, Karen Anderson

    2011-01-01

    To examine how attributes affecting sustainability differ across Veterans Health Administration organizational components and by staff characteristics. Surveys of 870 change team members and 50 staff interviews within the Veterans Affairs' Mental Health System Redesign initiative. A 1-way ANOVA with a Tukey post hoc test examined differences in sustainability by Veteran Integrated Service Networks, job classification, and tenure from staff survey data of the Sustainability Index. Qualitative interviews used an iterative process to identify "a priori" and "in vivo" themes. A simple stepwise linear regression explored predictors of sustainability. Sustainability differed across Veteran Integrated Service Networks and staff tenure. Job classification differences existed for the following: (1) benefits and credibility of the change and (2) staff involvement and attitudes toward change. Sustainability barriers were staff and institutional resistance and nonsupportive leadership. Facilitators were commitment to veterans, strong leadership, and use of quality improvement tools. Sustainability predictors were outcomes tracking, regular reporting, and use of Plan, Do, Study, Adjust cycles. Creating homogeneous implementation and sustainability processes across a national health system is difficult. Despite the Veterans Affairs' best evidence-based implementation efforts, there was significant variance. Locally tailored interventions might better support sustainability than "one-size-fits-all" approaches. Further research is needed to understand how participation in a quality improvement collaborative affects sustainability.

  3. Driving distance eligibility for the Veterans Choice Program. Interim final rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-24

    The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) amends its medical regulations implementing section 101 of the Veterans Access, Choice, and Accountability Act of 2014, which directed VA to establish a program to furnish hospital care and medical services through eligible non-VA health care providers to eligible veterans who either cannot be seen within the wait-time goals of the Veterans Health Administration or who qualify based on their place of residence (hereafter referred to as the Veterans Choice Program, or the "Program''). VA published an interim final rule implementing the Veterans Choice Program on November 5, 2014. Under current law, VA uses a straight-line or geodesic distance to determine eligibility based on place of residence. This interim final rule modifies how VA measures the distance from a veteran's residence to the nearest VA medical facility. This modified standard will consider the distance the veteran must drive to the nearest VA medical facility, rather than the straight-line or geodesic distance to such a facility.

  4. Compensation and treatment: disability benefits and outcomes of U.S. veterans receiving residential PTSD treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belsher, Bradley E; Tiet, Quyen Q; Garvert, Donn W; Rosen, Craig S

    2012-10-01

    The U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) provides specialized intensive posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) programs to treat trauma-related symptoms in addition to providing service-connected disability to compensate veterans for injury sustained while serving in the military. Given the percentage of veterans who are receiving treatment for PTSD, in addition to seeking compensation for PTSD, a debate has emerged about the impact of compensation on symptom recovery. This study examined the associations among status of compensation, treatment expectations, military cohort, length of stay, and outcomes for 776 veterans who were enrolled in 5 VA residential PTSD programs between the years of 2005 and 2010. Mixed model longitudinal analyses, with age, gender, and baseline symptoms nested within treatment site in the model, found that treatment expectations were modestly predictive of treatment outcomes. Veterans seeking increased compensation reported marginally lower treatment expectations (d = .008), and did not experience poorer outcomes compared to veterans not seeking increased compensation with the effect of baseline symptoms partialled out. Veterans from the era of the Iraq and Afghanistan conflicts reported lower treatment expectations (d = .020) and slightly higher symptoms at intake (d = .021), but had outcomes at discharge equivalent to veterans from other eras with baseline symptoms partialled out. These findings help further inform the debate concerning disability benefits and symptom changes across time. Published 2012. This article is a US Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  5. Evaluation of Cholesterol as a Biomarker for Suicidality in a Veteran Sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuter, Chuck; Caldwell, Barbara; Basehore, Heather

    2017-08-01

    A reduction in total cholesterol may alter the microviscosity of the brain-cell-membrane, reducing serotonin receptor exposure. The resulting imbalance between serotonin and dopamine may lead to an increased risk for suicidality. The objective of this research was to evaluate total cholesterol as a biological marker for suicidality in a sample of US military veterans. The study population consisted of veterans who received care at the Coatesville Veterans Affairs Medical Center (VAMC) and were included in the Suicide Prevention Coordinator's database for having suicidal ideation with evidence of escalating intent, a documented suicide attempt, or committed suicide between 2009 and 2015. The veterans' medical data were obtained from the facility's computerized patient record system. The final sample was 188 observations from 128 unique veterans. Veterans with total cholesterol levels below 168 mg/dl appeared to have a higher suicide risk than those with higher levels. The cholesterol levels of veterans reporting suicidal ideation or attempt were significantly lower than the group reporting neither [F(2, 185) = 30.19, p cholesterol levels from an earlier visit in which they did not report suicidality. A latent class analysis revealed that among other differences, suicidal veterans were younger, leaner, and had more anxiety, sleep problems, and higher education than those being seen for an issue unrelated to suicidality. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Veterans' Employment and Training Service

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Careers Women Who Served Programs & Services Transition GPS Frequently Asked Questions Hire a Veteran Find qualified Veterans Policy & Compliance Employer Toolkit Strengthening Military Families Apprenticeships Service Providers Grants & Opportunities Compliance Assistance ...

  7. Veterans Crisis Line: 1-800-273-8255

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Expect Resource Locator Veterans Live Chat Veterans Text Homeless Veterans Live Chat Military Live Chat Deaf - Hard of Hearing Contact Us About About the Veterans Crisis Line FAQs Veteran Suicide Welcome to the Veterans ...

  8. Veteran Stereotypes: A Closer Look

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    All Americans, however, should have an interest in veteran reintegration . The success with which we reintegrate our veterans and their families as... successful reintegration through simple coaching and mentoring that assists veterans in navigating reintegration challenges. As explained above, most...already living in the civilian community can have a profound effect on a veteran’s reintegration success . Veterans do not need a hand-out, but a

  9. Psychosocial Equine Program for Veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferruolo, David M

    2016-01-01

    Nearly half of all combat veterans suffer from serious psychological disorders and reintegration issues. Veterans shy away from typical talk therapy and are seeking alternative treatments. Equine-facilitated mental health therapy has shown promise in treating veterans with depressive and anxiety disorders and reintegration issues. This article reports on an institutional review board-approved pilot program designed to address the mental health needs of veterans. Furthermore, this article discusses future directions for evolving development of equine treatment programming.

  10. Student Affairs Capitalism and Early-Career Student Affairs Professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jenny J.; Helm, Matthew

    2013-01-01

    This study explores student affairs capitalism as the alteration of professional practice towards the financial interests of institutions. Student affairs capitalism has the potential to create dynamics in which the interests of students become secondary to the institution's economic needs. This study examined this phenomenon from the…

  11. Student Affairs Capitalism and Early-Career Student Affairs Professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jenny J.; Helm, Matthew

    2013-01-01

    This study explores student affairs capitalism as the alteration of professional practice towards the financial interests of institutions. Student affairs capitalism has the potential to create dynamics in which the interests of students become secondary to the institution's economic needs. This study examined this phenomenon from the perspectives…

  12. Student Affairs Capitalism and Early-Career Student Affairs Professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jenny J.; Helm, Matthew

    2013-01-01

    This study explores student affairs capitalism as the alteration of professional practice towards the financial interests of institutions. Student affairs capitalism has the potential to create dynamics in which the interests of students become secondary to the institution's economic needs. This study examined this phenomenon from the perspectives…

  13. Modeling veterans healthcare administration disclosure processes :

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beyeler, Walter E; DeMenno, Mercy B.; Finley, Patrick D.

    2013-09-01

    As with other large healthcare organizations, medical adverse events at the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) facilities can expose patients to unforeseen negative risks. VHA leadership recognizes that properly handled disclosure of adverse events can minimize potential harm to patients and negative consequences for the effective functioning of the organization. The work documented here seeks to help improve the disclosure process by situating it within the broader theoretical framework of issues management, and to identify opportunities for process improvement through modeling disclosure and reactions to disclosure. The computational model will allow a variety of disclosure actions to be tested across a range of incident scenarios. Our conceptual model will be refined in collaboration with domain experts, especially by continuing to draw on insights from VA Study of the Communication of Adverse Large-Scale Events (SCALE) project researchers.

  14. Data on Vietnam Era Veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veterans Administration, Washington, DC. Office of the Controller.

    Statistical data are presented on Vietnam era veterans for the following topics: employment status, medical status, compensation and pension, education, housing assistance, expenditures, and demographic information. The estimated number and age of veterans in civil life, categorized by sex and state, and the educational attainment of veterans at…

  15. Organizational Alternatives for Student Affairs

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntyre, James P.

    1974-01-01

    Institutions of higher education that have become disenchanted with the traditional ways of organizing student personnel services have begun to seek a new model. This model calls for the creation of a new university office called University Affairs, at least one subunit of which would be student affairs. (Author/WM)

  16. Hearing loss in veterans and the need for hearing loss prevention programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunders, Gabrielle H; Griest, Susan E

    2009-01-01

    Currently, there are more than 445,000 veterans receiving compensation for hearing loss associated with military service, and 395,000 receiving compensation for service-related tinnitus. In addition to compensation payments, service-related hearing disorders cost the US Department of Veterans Affairs in terms of provision of hearing aids, hearing aid-related services, and clinical services at its 220 facilities nationwide. It is imperative that hearing conservation among military personnel and veterans be addressed. In this paper, we describe the rationale for and the development of a multimedia Hearing Loss Prevention Program aimed at preventing the progression of hearing loss among veterans associated with social, recreational, and nonmilitary occupational noise exposure. The program was developed based on the principles outlined in the Health Belief Model of Rosenstock (1966) and the Health Promotion Model of Pender et al. (2002).

  17. Serving Our Homeless Veterans: Patient Perpetrated Violence as a Barrier to Health Care Access

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luz M. Semeah

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available In 2009, the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA set a goal to end veteran homelessness by 2015. Since then there has been a 36% reduction in homelessness due, in part, to the VA Supportive Housing (HUD-VASH program. These services include the receipt of home-based services to the veterans’ home. However, safety concerns and the threat of violence toward health care workers remain problematic in non-institutional care settings. This article discusses the concept of access to care and how safety concerns act as a barrier to services and optimal patient outcomes. Our study provides information on the prevalence of patient violence toward health care workers in the HUD-VASH program in a large veterans’ health system. Results suggest 70% of home-based service providers were exposed to violence and aggression. Providing services to veterans outside of institutional care settings, and the goal of eradicating homelessness among veterans, warrants further examination of access barriers.

  18. Infidelity: Mending Your Marriage After an Affair

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... understand what has happened, avoid delving into the intimate details of the affair initially. Doing so without ... end the affair and stop all interaction or communication with the person. If the affair involved a ...

  19. 75 FR 22164 - Urban Non-Urban Homeless Female Veterans and Homeless Veterans With Families' Reintegration Into...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-27

    ... Veterans and Homeless Veterans With Families' Reintegration Into Employment AGENCY: Veterans' Employment... training, and skills training) to expedite the reintegration of homeless Veterans into the labor...

  20. The underdiagnosis of cannabis use disorders and other Axis-I disorders among military veterans within VHA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonn-Miller, Marcel O; Bucossi, Meggan M; Trafton, Jodie A

    2012-07-01

    Recent evidence suggests that rates of cannabis use disorders are significantly lower among military veterans within the Veterans Affairs Health Care System (VA) than the general U.S. population. However, prevalence rates obtained from the VA rely on clinician diagnosis, which have been shown to be underrepresentative of actual disorder rates. The present study utilized structured clinical interviews to assess a sample of 84 military veterans with a cannabis use disorder and compared Axis-I disorder diagnosis rates to those obtained through a retrospective electronic medical record chart review. Findings indicated that cannabis use disorders, as well as posttraumatic stress disorder and other anxiety disorders, were significantly underdiagnosed within this military veteran population. In contrast, rates of other substance use disorders as well as mood disorders were overdiagnosed within this VA population. Findings are discussed in relation to the improvement of screening and repeated structured assessment of military veterans within the VA.

  1. Metal Exposure in Veterans With Embedded Fragments From War-Related Injuries: Early Findings From Surveillance Efforts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaitens, Joanna M; Condon, Marian; Squibb, Katherine S; Centeno, Jose A; McDiarmid, Melissa A

    2017-07-28

    To characterize systemic metal exposures from retained fragments in a cohort of war-injured US Veterans enrolled in the Department of Veterans Affairs' Embedded Fragment Registry. Five hundred seventy nine registry-enrolled Veterans submitted an exposure questionnaire and urine sample for analyses of 14 metals often found in fragments. Urine metal results were compared with reference values of unexposed populations to identify elevations. 55% of Veterans had normal urine metal values. When observed, tungsten and zinc were the metals most frequently elevated, followed by cobalt; however, cobalt levels were not associated with a fragment source, but with surgical implants present. Though most metal elevations observed are not significantly outside the normal range, on-going accrual of metal burdens in these Veterans over time recommends continued surveillance which may inform future medical management.

  2. Intimate partner violence among female service members and veterans: information and resources available through military and non-military websites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Amy; Joshi, Manisha

    2014-01-01

    With the expansion of women's roles in the military, the number of female service members and veterans has increased. Considerable knowledge about intimate partner violence (IPV) in civilian couples exists but little is known about IPV among female service members and veterans. Prevalence rates of IPV range from 17% to 39% for female service members, and 21.9% to 74% for veterans. Most service members and veterans indicated using the Internet at least occasionally and expressed willingness to seek information about services via the Internet. Informed by data, we conducted a systematic review of military (Army, Navy, Air Force, and Marine Corps) and non-military (Veterans Affairs and Google) websites to explore the availability and presentation of information and resources related to IPV. The websites search revealed a variety of resources and information available, and important differences between sites with regard to what and how information is presented. Implications for practice and further research are discussed.

  3. Optimizing strategies to improve interprofessional practice for veterans, part 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhattacharya SB

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Shelley B Bhattacharya,1–3 Michelle I Rossi,1,2 Jennifer M Mentz11Geriatric Research Education and Clinical Center (GRECC, Veteran's Affairs Pittsburgh Healthcare System, 2University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, PA, USA; 3Albert Schweitzer Fellowship Program, Pittsburgh, PA, USAIntroduction: Interprofessional patient care is a well-recognized path that health care systems are striving toward. The Veteran's Affairs (VA system initiated interprofessional practice (IPP models with their Geriatric Evaluation and Management (GEM programs. GEM programs incorporate a range of specialties, including but not limited to, medicine, nursing, social work, physical therapy and pharmacy, to collaboratively evaluate veterans. Despite being a valuable resource, they are now faced with significant cut-backs, including closures. The primary goal of this project was to assess how the GEM model could be optimized at the Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania VA to allow for the sustainability of this important IPP assessment. Part 1 of the study evaluated the IPP process using program, patient, and family surveys. Part 2 examined how well the geriatrician matched patients to specialists in the GEM model. This paper describes Part 1 of our study.Methods: Three strategies were used: 1 a national GEM program survey; 2 a veteran/family satisfaction survey; and 3 an absentee assessment.Results: Twenty-six of 92 programs responded to the GEM IPP survey. Six strategies were shared to optimize IPP models throughout the country. Of the 34 satisfaction surveys, 80% stated the GEM clinic was beneficial, 79% stated their concerns were addressed, and 100% would recommend GEM to their friends. Of the 24 absentee assessments, the top three reasons for missing the appointments were transportation, medical illnesses, and not knowing/remembering about the appointment. Absentee rate diminished from 41% to 19% after instituting a reminder phone call policy.Discussion: Maintaining the

  4. The Veteran's View

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellegrin, Jeanette

    2013-01-01

    In one important way, student-veterans are like all other students. They need supportive relationships to achieve their academic goals. Serving these students well means learning their stories and helping them succeed. In the process, some of these people may change one's life. In this article, the author shares the touching stories of some of the…

  5. Correlates of Initiation of Treatment for Chronic Hepatitis C Infection in United States Veterans, 2004-2009.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adi V Gundlapalli

    Full Text Available We describe the rates and predictors of initiation of treatment for chronic hepatitis C (HCV infection in a large cohort of HCV positive Veterans seen in U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA facilities between January 1, 2004 and December 31, 2009. In addition, we identify the relationship between homelessness among these Veterans and treatment initiation. Univariate and multivariable Cox Proportional Hazards regression models with time-varying covariates were used to identify predictors of initiation of treatment with pegylated interferon alpha plus ribavirin. Of the 101,444 HCV treatment-naïve Veterans during the study period, rates of initiation of treatment among homeless and non-homeless Veterans with HCV were low and clinically similar (6.2% vs. 7.4%, p<0.0001. For all U.S. Veterans, being diagnosed with genotype 2 or 3, black or other/unknown race, having Medicare or other insurance increased the risk of treatment. Veterans with age ≥50 years, drug abuse, diabetes, and hemoglobin < 10 g/dL showed lower rates of treatment. Initiation of treatment for HCV in homeless Veterans is low; similar factors predicted initiation of treatment. Additionally, exposure to treatment with medications for diabetes predicted lower rates of treatment. As newer therapies become available for HCV, these results may inform further studies and guide strategies to increase treatment rates in all U.S. Veterans and those who experience homelessness.

  6. Impact of Psychological Problems and Marital Adjustment of Iranian Veterans on Their Children's Quality of Life and Happiness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zargar, Fatemeh

    2014-09-01

    The Iran-Iraq war during the 1980-1988 has left many consequences on veterans and their families that persist long after the war ended. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of psychological problems and marital adjustment of Iranian veterans on their children's quality of life and happiness 24 years after the war ended. The sample was all children of veterans in Isfahan city that registered by Veterans and Martyrs Affair Foundation (VMAF). One hundred sixty-three veterans were selected by systematic randomized sampling and the symptom checklist-90-revised (SCL-90-R) and dyadic adjustment scale (DAS) were administered for them. Their wives filled out the DAS and their children answered to World Health Organization Quality of Life-Brief version (WHOQOL-BREF) and Oxford Happiness Inventory (OHI). The data from questionnaires completed by 149 families were analyzed using the multiple regressions analysis. Global Severity Index (GSI) scores of veterans and veteran's age were inversely correlated with the scores of children's quality of life, while marital adjustment of parents and number of rooms in house were positively correlated. Mother's age was inversely correlated with the scores of children's happiness, while marital adjustment of the parents, the number of rooms in their house and the number of children were positively correlated. In veterans' family, psychological health of the veterans and marital adjustment of the parents have a significant relationship with their children's quality of life and happiness.

  7. Military veteran mortality following a survived suicide attempt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Conigliaro Joseph

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Suicide is a global public health problem. Recently in the U.S., much attention has been given to preventing suicide and other premature mortality in veterans returning from Iraq and Afghanistan. A strong predictor of suicide is a past suicide attempt, and suicide attempters have multiple physical and mental comorbidities that put them at risk for additional causes of death. We examined mortality among U.S. military veterans after hospitalization for attempted suicide. Methods A retrospective cohort study was conducted with all military veterans receiving inpatient treatment during 1993-1998 at United States Veterans Affairs (VA medical facilities following a suicide attempt. Deaths occurring during 1993-2002, the most recent available year at the time, were identified through VA Beneficiary and Records Locator System data and National Death Index data. Mortality data for the general U.S. adult population were also obtained from the National Center for Health Statistics. Comparisons within the veteran cohort, between genders, and against the U.S. population were conducted with descriptive statistics and standardized mortality ratios. The actuarial method was used estimate the proportion of veterans in the cohort we expect would have survived through 2002 had they experienced the same rate of death that occurred over the study period in the U.S. population having the age and sex characteristics. Results During 1993-1998, 10,163 veterans were treated and discharged at a VA medical center after a suicide attempt (mean age = 44 years; 91% male. There was a high prevalence of diagnosed alcohol disorder or abuse (31.8%, drug dependence or abuse (21.8%, psychoses (21.2%, depression (18.5%, and hypertension (14.2%. A total of 1,836 (18.1% veterans died during follow up (2,941.4/100,000 person years. The cumulative survival probability after 10 years was 78.0% (95% CI = 72.9, 83.1. Hence the 10-year cumulative mortality risk was 22

  8. Enhancing health and independent living for veterans with disabilities by leveraging community-based resources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hale-Gallardo J

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Jennifer Hale-Gallardo,1 Huanguang Jia,1 Tony Delisle,2 Charles E Levy,1,3–5 Valentina Osorio,1 Jennifer A Smith,1 Elizabeth M Hannold,1,† 1Center of Innovation on Disability and Rehabilitation Research, North Florida/South Georgia Veterans Health System, 2Center for Independent Living of North Central Florida, 3Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Service, North Florida/South Georgia Veterans Health Service, 4The Department of Occupational Therapy, College of Public Health and Health Professions, 5The Center for the Arts in Medicine, College of the Arts, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA †Elizabeth M Hannold passed away on September 28, 2015. Abstract: The number of US veterans with disabilities has increased in recent years as service members have returned home with extensive injuries and veterans from previous wars acquire functional limitations as a consequence of aging with chronic diseases. Veterans with severe disabilities need assistance and support to maintain independence at home and to avoid institutionalization. The US Department of Veterans Affairs (VA strives to network with community organizations to achieve the best possible outcomes for veterans. Key community resources in the US for individuals with disabilities are Centers for Independent Living (CILs that provide a wide range of services, promoting independent living and well-being for people across disabilities. The widespread availability and services of CILs nationwide suggest their potential as a community-based resource for veterans, particularly for those with limited access to VA care. In this article, we discuss long-term needs of veterans with disabilities, efforts to address veterans’ rehabilitation needs at the VA and opportunities for leveraging the strengths of community-based organizations for veterans. More research is warranted to investigate CIL services and potential for CIL–VA partnerships. Keywords: rehabilitation, community engagement

  9. Investigating Veterans' Pre-, Peri-, and Post-Deployment Experiences as Potential Risk Factors for Problem Gambling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiting, Seth W; Potenza, Marc N; Park, Crystal L; McKee, Sherry A; Mazure, Carolyn M; Hoff, Rani A

    2016-06-01

    Background and aims Gambling disorder and its comorbid diagnoses are observed at higher rates in military veterans than in the general population. A significant research gap exists regarding the relationships of veterans' life and service experiences to problematic gambling. The present study explored pre-, peri-, and post-deployment factors associated with problem gambling in veterans. Methods Veterans of Operation Iraqi Freedom, Operation Enduring Freedom, and Operation New Dawn (n = 738; 463 males, and 275 females) completed questionnaires via structured telephone interview. We conducted bivariate and multinomial logistic regression analyses exploring associations among problem-gambling severity and socio-demographic variables, psychiatric comorbidities, and 10 scales of the Deployment Risk and Resilience Inventory measuring experiences pre-, peri-, and post-deployment. Results Approximately 4.2% of veterans indicated at-risk or probable pathological gambling (ARPG) post-deployment (two or more DSM-IV criteria for pathological gambling). Bivariate analyses found more severe gambling in males, higher frequencies of post-traumatic stress disorder, substance dependence, traumatic brain injury, panic disorder, and depression in veterans with ARPG, and higher general harassment during deployment, and lower social support and more stressful life events post-deployment in those with ARPG. In multivariable models, both post-deployment factors remained significantly associated with ARPG. Discussion The study suggests that problem gambling among veterans is related to service experiences, and particularly to life experiences post-deployment. Conclusions Adverse service and life experiences and lack of social support may contribute to the risk of problem gambling in military veterans. Investigation of how Veterans Affairs clinical settings may serve veterans following deployment to prevent behavioral addictions is warranted.

  10. Sexual self-esteem and psychosocial functioning in military veterans after cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syme, Maggie L; Delaney, Eileen; Wachen, Jennifer Schuster; Gosian, Jeffrey; Moye, Jennifer

    2013-01-01

    Little is known about the sexual well-being of male Veteran cancer survivors, or the relationship of sexual concerns to psychosocial adaptation postcancer. This study examined the association between sexual self-esteem and psychosocial concerns in male Veteran cancer survivors. Forty-one male survivors were recruited from a Veterans Affairs (VA) hospital to participate in a pilot study addressing cancer survivorship care for Veterans. Sixty- to 90-minute interviews were conducted, assessing sociodemographic, medical, stress/burden (cancer-related posttraumatic stress disorder [PTSD], depression), and resource (social support, post-traumatic growth) variables. Twenty-one (51.2%) Veteran cancer survivors reported lowered sexual self-esteem as a result of cancer, which corresponded to significantly higher levels of depression and cancer-related PTSD. The lowered sexual self-esteem group also indicated significantly lower social support. Veteran cancer survivors with lowered sexual self-esteem tend to have higher levels of stress and lower levels of resources, putting them at risk for lowered quality of life. This increased risk highlights the importance of addressing sexual well-being in the survivorship care of Veterans.

  11. Implementing a Veteran-Centered Community Health Clinical Experience in a Baccalaureate Nursing Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Champlin, Barbara E; Kunkel, Dorcas Elisabeth

    2017-03-01

    In a baccalaureate nursing curriculum, students focused on the unique health care needs of veterans and their families. The learning experiences aimed to equip them with the knowledge, skills, and attitudes (KSAs) to provide holistic relation-centered care to veterans and their families. The clinical course integrated the findings of several veteran-centered publications and the American Association of Colleges of Nursing veteran-centered resources. Formative and summative anecdotal information was gathered in the learning experience during weekly postclinical discussions, course assignments, and a seminar after completion of the experience. Three noteworthy themes stand out: Increased Descriptions of Resources and Services Available to Veterans and Their Families, Increased Expressions of the Complex Health Care Needs of Veterans, and Increasing Recognition of the Autonomous Nature of the Community Health Nursing Role. Early indicators are that this community health field work experience will be sustainable into the future. The academic institution and clinical partner remain committed to working together to provide meaningful learning opportunities to students. Students completed the experience with increased KSAs and a beginning orientation to the Veterans Affairs Health Care System. [J Nurs Educ. 2017;56(3):186-190.]. Copyright 2017, SLACK Incorporated.

  12. Understanding the Health Needs and Barriers to Seeking Health Care of Veteran Students in the Community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra-Hebert, Anita D; Santurri, Laura; DeChant, Richard; Watts, Brook; Rothberg, Michael; Sehgal, Ashwini R; Aron, David C

    2015-08-01

    Access to care at Veterans Affairs facilities may be limited by long wait times; however, additional barriers may prevent US military veterans from seeking help at all. We sought to understand the health needs of veterans in the community to identify possible barriers to health-seeking behavior. Focus groups were conducted with veteran students at a community college until thematic saturation was reached. Qualitative data analysis involved both an inductive content analysis approach and deductive elements. A total of 17 veteran students participated in 6 separate focus groups. Health needs affecting health-seeking behavior were identified. Themes included lack of motivation to improve health, concern about social exclusion and stigma, social interactions and behavior, limited access to affordable and convenient health care, unmet basic needs for self and family, and academics competing with health needs. Veterans face a range of personal, societal, and logistical barriers to accessing care. In addition to decreasing wait times for appointments, efforts to improve the transition to civilian life; reduce stigma; and offer assistance related to work, housing, and convenient access to health care may improve health in veteran students.

  13. Demographic characteristics associated with homelessness and risk among female and male veterans accessing VHA outpatient care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery, Ann Elizabeth; Dichter, Melissa E; Thomasson, Arwin M; Fu, Xiaoying; Roberts, Christopher B

    2015-01-01

    This study explored demographic influences on veterans' reports of homelessness or imminent risk of homelessness with a particular focus on gender. We analyzed data for a cohort of veterans who responded to the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA), Veterans Health Administration (VHA) universal screener for homelessness and risk during a 3-month period. Multinomial mixed effects models-stratified by gender-predicted veterans' reports of homelessness or risk based on age, race, marital status, and receipt of VA compensation. The proportion of positive screens-homelessness or risk-was 2.7% for females and 1.7% for males. Women more likely to report being at risk of homelessness were aged 35 to 54 years, Black, and unmarried; those more likely to experience homelessness were Black and unmarried. Among male veterans, the greatest predictors of both homelessness and risk were Black race and unmarried status. Among both genders, receiving VA disability compensation was associated with lesser odds of being homeless or at risk. The findings describe the current population of veterans using VHA health care services who may benefit from homelessness prevention or intervention services, identify racial differences in housing stability, and distinguish subpopulations who may be in particular need of intervention. Interventions to address these needs are described. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  14. US veterans and their unique issues: enhancing health care professional awareness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olenick, Maria; Flowers, Monica; Diaz, Valerie J

    2015-01-01

    United States veterans are a multifaceted population with a distinct culture that includes, but is not limited to, values, customs, ethos, selfless duty, codes of conduct, implicit patterns of communication, and obedience to command. Veterans experience mental health disorders, substance use disorders, post-traumatic stress, and traumatic brain injury at disproportionate rates compared to their civilian counterparts. Eighteen to 22 American veterans commit suicide daily and young veterans aged 18–44 are most at risk. Health care professionals must be aware of patients’ military history and be able to recognize suicide-risk factors, regardless of age. Advancement in medical technology has allowed servicemen to survive their injuries but, for many, at the cost of a traumatic limb amputation and associated mental scarring. Health care professionals must be able to address physical safety concerns, as well as, emotional health of veterans. Approximately 49,933 American veterans are homeless and face the same difficulties as non-veterans in addition to service-related matters. Separation from military service and issues related to complex multiple deployments are among specifically identified veteran issues. Successful veteran reintegration into civilian life rests upon providing veterans with training that builds on their military knowledge and skill, employment post-separation from service, homelessness prevention, and mental health programs that promote civilian transition. Preparing health care providers to meet the complex needs of a vast veteran population can be facilitated by implementing veteran content into curricula that includes veteran patient simulations and case studies, and utilizes veteran clinical faculty. PMID:26664252

  15. 77 FR 45719 - Proposed Information Collection (Per Diem for Nursing Home Care of Veterans in State Homes; Per...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-01

    ... to Section 3506(c)(2)(A) of the PRA. With respect to the following collection of information, VHA... Drug-Free Workplace Requirements for Grantees Other Than Individuals, VA Form 10- 0143. f. Statement of... hours. e. Department of Veterans Affairs Certification Regarding Drug-Free Workplace Requirements for...

  16. The Hybronaut Affair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beloff, Laura

    2013-01-01

    Instead of considering wearable technology devices as prosthetic tools that aim to aid and enhance the human body, the article investigates how technology impacts our perception of the world and a human (body). It sees a human as a construct of multiplicity of relations within a heterogeneous...... network; an entity that is enhanced by technological, wearable devices. The author claims that artistic approaches in the field of wearable technology propose an experimental and holistic approach to human design and that these kinds of artistic experiments are, in a sense, exercises helping us to adjust...

  17. Veterans Benefits: Federal Employment Assistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-09

    Heart recipients; • the spouse of a veteran unable to work because of a service-connected disability; • the unmarried widow of certain deceased...veterans; and • certain mothers of veterans who died in service or who are permanently and totally disabled.12...12 To receive the 10-point preference, the mother must be either: (1) married with a husband who is totally disabled; or (2

  18. Aging Veterans and Posttraumatic Stress Symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Care Apply Online Application Process Veteran Eligibility Active Duty Families of Veterans Women Veterans Determine Costs Copays ... VHA Forms & Publications Quality & Safety Quality of Care Ethics VA/DOD Clinical Practice Guidelines Access and Quality ...

  19. Women Veterans Health Care: Frequently Asked Questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Care Apply Online Application Process Veteran Eligibility Active Duty Families of Veterans Women Veterans Determine Costs Copays ... VHA Forms & Publications Quality & Safety Quality of Care Ethics VA/DOD Clinical Practice Guidelines Access and Quality ...

  20. Women Veterans Health Care: Frequently Asked Questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Violence Intimate Partner Violence Domestic Abuse Sexual Trauma Culture Change Culture Change I'm One Proud Veteran Women Veterans ... online at www.va.gov/directory ). During normal business hours, you can contact the Veterans Health Administration ( ...

  1. Danish Gulf War Veterans Revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nissen, Lars Ravnborg; Stoltenberg, Christian; Nielsen, Anni B Sternhagen

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the assumption that postdeployment incidence of sickness and other absence from work are higher among Gulf War Veterans compared with nonveterans. METHODS: A prospective registry study including a cohort of 721 Danish Gulf War Veterans and a control cohort of 3,629 nonveterans...... and nonveterans in the incidence rate of long-term sickness absence. After an initial short period (3 months) with elevated incidence rate of long-term absence from work among veterans, there was no difference between the cohorts. CONCLUSION: Among Danish Gulf War Veterans, no postdeployment increased risk...

  2. 3rd May 2009 - Japanese Minister of State for Science and Technology Policy, Food Safety, Minister of Consumer Affairs, Minister of Space Policy S. Noda, visiting ATLAS experimental area, LHC tunnel and CERN Control Centre with CERN Director-General R. Heuer, Collaboration Spokesperson F. Gianotti and Beams Department Head P. Collier.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2009-01-01

    090506101-08: signature of the guest book and exchange of gifts; 090506109 + 46-64: Japanese Ambassador to the United Nations Office S. Kitajima, Japanese Minister of State for Science and Technology Policy, Food Safety, Minister of Consumer Affairs, Minister of Space Policy S. Noda, CERN Director-General R. Heuer, Non Member-State relations Adviser J. Ellis and ATLAS Collaboration Spokesperson F. Gianotti visiting the LHC tunnel at Point 1; 090506110-11 + 28-45: Japanese Minister of State for Science and Technology Policy, Food Safety, Minister of Consumer Affairs, Minister of Space Policy S. Noda and his delegation visiting ATLAS experimental area with CERN Japanese users and Management; 090506112 + 86-94: Japanese Minister of State for Science and Technology Policy, Food Safety, Minister of Consumer Affairs, Minister of Space Policy S. Noda, CERN Director-General R. Heuer and Japanese users in front of an LHC superconducting magnet; sLHC Project Leader also present. 090506113-19: Arrival of Japanese Min...

  3. Veterans Crisis Line: Videos About Reaching out for Help

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Expect Resource Locator Veterans Live Chat Veterans Text Homeless Veterans Live Chat Military Live Chat Deaf - Hard of Hearing Contact Us About About the Veterans Crisis Line FAQs Veteran Suicide Spread the Word Videos ...

  4. Veterans Crisis Line: Videos About Reaching out for Help

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Expect Resource Locator Veterans Live Chat Veterans Text Homeless Veterans Live Chat Military Live Chat Deaf - Hard of Hearing Contact Us About About the Veterans Crisis Line FAQs Veteran Suicide Spread the Word Videos ...

  5. Automobile or other conveyance and adaptive equipment certificate of eligibility for veterans or members of the armed forces with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Interim final rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-02-25

    The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) is amending its adjudication regulation regarding certificates of eligibility for financial assistance in the purchase of an automobile or other conveyance and adaptive equipment. The amendment authorizes automatic issuance of a certificate of eligibility for financial assistance in the purchase of an automobile or other conveyance and adaptive equipment to all veterans with service-connected amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and members of the Armed Forces serving on active duty with ALS.

  6. Risk factors for hepatitis C infection among Vietnam era veterans versus nonveterans: results from the Chronic Hepatitis Cohort Study (CHeCS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boscarino, Joseph A; Sitarik, Alexandra; Gordon, Stuart C; Rupp, Loralee B; Nerenz, David R; Vijayadeva, Vinutha; Schmidt, Mark A; Henkle, Emily; Lu, Mei

    2014-10-01

    Research suggests that Vietnam era veterans have a higher prevalence of hepatitis C virus (HCV) than other veterans and nonveterans. However, the reasons for this are unclear, since this research has been conducted among Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) patients and most veterans do not use the VA. The current study compares HCV risk factors between the Vietnam era veterans and nonveterans seen in 4 large non-VA systems to explain this disparity. A total of 4,636 HCV patients completed surveys in 2011-2012. Vietnam era veterans were defined as those who served in the military any time between 1964 and 1975. Bivariate tests followed by logistic regressions, and multivariable modeling were conducted to study risk factors among Vietnam era veterans and nonveterans. Since few veterans were female (~2 %), they were excluded. Among male respondents (N = 2,638), 22.5 % were classified as Vietnam era veterans. Compared to nonveterans, these patients were older (p Vietnam era veterans = 41.4 %, p = 0.06), only reported sex with men was significant (nonveterans = 2.4 % vs. Vietnam era veterans = 0.6 %, p = 0.013). In multivariate logistic regression controlling for age, education, country of birth, marital status and study site, no HCV risk factor was associated with Vietnam era veteran status. However, veterans were more likely to report "other" exposures were the source of infection than nonveterans (p Vietnam era veterans seen in non-VA facilities do not report a higher prevalence of common HCV risk factors, such as injection drug use, they are more likely to report "other" exposures, typically associated with military service, as the source of HCV infection.

  7. The Invisible Wound: Moral Injury and Its Impact on the Health of Operation Enduring Freedom/Operation Iraqi Freedom Veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Grace W

    2016-05-01

    Many veterans are now returning from Operation Enduring Freedom and Operation Iraqi Freedom (OEF/OIF) deployments with physical and mental health problems. However, there are few studies that examine the impact of moral injury on both physical and mental well-being. This study examines the impact of moral injury on self-reported general physical health, general mental health, post-traumatic stress disorder symptoms, and depression symptoms. Cross-sectional data were collected at as part of a pilot study at the New Jersey Veteran Affairs. 100 OEF/OIF veterans recruited at the New Jersey Veteran Affairs completed the paper questionnaire. We found that moral injury and combat experiences positively predicted post-traumatic stress disorder scores. Seeing the aftermath of battle and moral injury were negatively associated with mental well-being and positively associated with depression. Physical health status was negatively associated with depression. Spirituality and moral injury were negatively associated with physical health, whereas age was positively associated with physical health. Moral injury plays an important role in both physical and mental health outcomes for OEF/OIF veterans, but it is often not addressed in health care. These results underline the need for an approach to veterans' health care that includes discussion of existential and moral issues since they may impact health outcomes for many service members.

  8. Uninsured veterans who will need to obtain insurance coverage under the patient protection and affordable care act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Jack; Rosenheck, Robert

    2014-03-01

    We examined the number and clinical needs of uninsured veterans, including those who will be eligible for the Medicaid expansion and health insurance exchanges in 2014. We analyzed weighted data for 8710 veterans from the 2010 National Survey of Veterans, classifying it by veterans' age, income, household size, and insurance status. Of 22 million veterans, about 7%, or more than 1.5 million, were uninsured and will need to obtain coverage by enrolling in US Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) care or the Medicaid expansion or by participating in the health insurance exchanges. Of those uninsured, 55%, or more than 800 000, are likely eligible for the Medicaid expansion if states implement it. Compared with veterans with any health coverage, those who were uninsured were younger and more likely to be single, Black, and low income and to have been deployed to Iraq and Afghanistan. The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act is likely to have a considerable impact on uninsured veterans, which may have implications for the VA, the Medicaid expansion, and the health insurance exchanges.

  9. Improving risk assessment of violence among military veterans: an evidence-based approach for clinical decision-making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elbogen, Eric B; Fuller, Sara; Johnson, Sally C; Brooks, Stephanie; Kinneer, Patricia; Calhoun, Patrick S; Beckham, Jean C

    2010-08-01

    Increased media attention to post-deployment violence highlights the need to develop effective models to guide risk assessment among military Veterans. Ideally, a method would help identify which Veterans are most at risk for violence so that it can be determined what could be done to prevent violent behavior. This article suggests how empirical approaches to risk assessment used successfully in civilian populations can be applied to Veterans. A review was conducted of the scientific literature on Veteran populations regarding factors related to interpersonal violence generally and to domestic violence specifically. A checklist was then generated of empirically-supported risk factors for clinicians to consider in practice. To conceptualize how these known risk factors relate to a Veteran's violence potential, risk assessment scholarship was utilized to develop an evidence-based method to guide mental health professionals. The goals of this approach are to integrate science into practice, overcome logistical barriers, and permit more effective assessment, monitoring, and management of violence risk for clinicians working with Veterans, both in Department of Veteran Affairs settings and in the broader community. Research is needed to test the predictive validity of risk assessment models. Ultimately, the use of a systematic, empirical framework could lead to improved clinical decision-making in the area of risk assessment and potentially help prevent violence among Veterans.

  10. Exploring Rural Disparities in Medical Diagnoses Among Veterans With Transgender-related Diagnoses Utilizing Veterans Health Administration Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bukowski, Leigh A; Blosnich, John; Shipherd, Jillian C; Kauth, Michael R; Brown, George R; Gordon, Adam J

    2017-09-01

    Research shows transgender individuals experience pronounced health disparities compared with their nontransgender peers. Yet, there remains insufficient research about health differences within transgender populations. This study seeks to fill this gap by exploring how current urban/rural status is associated with lifetime diagnosis of mood disorder, alcohol dependence disorder, illicit drug abuse disorder, tobacco use, posttraumatic stress disorder, human immunodeficiency virus, and suicidal ideation or attempt among veterans with transgender-related diagnoses. This study used a retrospective review of The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) administrative data for transgender patients who received VA care from 1997 through 2014. Transgender patients were defined as individuals that had a lifetime diagnosis of any of 4 International Classification of Diseases-9 diagnosis codes associated with transgender status. Independent multivariable logistic regression models were used to explore associations of rural status with medical conditions. Veterans with transgender-related diagnoses residing in small/isolated rural towns had increased odds of tobacco use disorder (adjusted odds ratio=1.39; 95% confidence intervals, 1.09-1.78) and posttraumatic stress disorder (adjusted odds ratio=1.33; 95% confidence intervals, 1.03-1.71) compared with their urban transgender peers. Urban/rural status was not significantly associated with other medical conditions of interest. This study contributes the first empirical investigations of how place of residence is associated with medical diagnoses among veterans with transgender-related diagnoses. The importance of place as a determinant of health is increasingly clear, but for veterans with transgender-related diagnoses this line of research is currently limited. The addition of self-reported sex identity data within VA electronic health records is one way to advance this line of research.

  11. Understanding Student Veterans in Transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Kevin C.

    2013-01-01

    In this research report the author details a phenomenological study documenting identity development in student veterans making the transition from active military service to higher education. This study took place at a doctoral granting proprietary university with a significant veteran population and consisted of in-depth interviews. This…

  12. Measurement of social participation outcomes in rehabilitation of veterans with traumatic brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William Stiers, PhD

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic brain injury (TBI is a significant concern in the veteran population, and the Department of Veteran Affairs (VA has devoted substantial healthcare resources to the rehabilitation of veterans with TBI. Evaluating the outcomes of these rehabilitation activities requires measuring whether they meaningfully improve veterans’ lives, especially with regard to community and vocational participation, which are strongly linked to perceived quality of life. In January 2010, the VA Rehabilitation Research and Development Service convened an invitational conference focused on outcome measurement in rehabilitation with a specific focus on veterans’ community and vocational participation. This article reports on the working group, addressing the issues of conceptualizing and operationalizing such participation outcome measures for veterans with TBI; we discuss conceptual models of participation, review participation subdomains and their instruments of measurement, and identify current research issues and needs. Two avenues are identified for advancing participation measurement in veterans with TBI. First, we describe suggestions to facilitate the immediate implementation of participation measurement into TBI clinical practice and rehabilitation research within the VA healthcare system. Second, we describe recommendations for future VA research funding initiatives specific to improving the measurement of participation in veterans with TBI.

  13. Veterans’ Health Care: Limited Progress Made to Address Concerns That Led to High Risk Designation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-15

    VETERANS’ HEALTH CARE Limited Progress Made to Address Concerns That Led to High-Risk Designation Statement of Debra A...Progress Made to Address Concerns That Led to High-Risk Designation What GAO Found The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) has taken action to...establishing a task force, working groups, and a governance structure for addressing the issues that led to the high-risk designation. VA provided

  14. Combining Surveillance Systems: Effective Merging of U.S. Veteran and Military Health Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-04

    analyses demonstrate two complementary surveillance systems with evident benefits for the national health picture. Relative timeliness of reporting could...incorporating a national perspective to provide a broad picture across regions or jurisdictions. In 2011, the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) system had 8.6...National Biosurveillance Strategy. Here we describe the geographic coverage and outpatient visit characteristics of the two populations, the relative

  15. Korean Affairs Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-05-29

    strategy for linking industries, scientific and technological development, and for the over- coming of obesity of large cities...Because the work was carried out in a very clumsy and childish manner, the plan to confiscate Impure books made made shameful. Another official

  16. Foot care education and self management behaviors in diverse veterans with diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan M Olson

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Jonathan M Olson1, Molly T Hogan2, Leonard M Pogach3, Mangala Rajan3, Gregory J Raugi4, Gayle E Reiber51University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, WA, USA; 2Department of Internal Medicine, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, WA, USA; 3Department of Veterans Affairs, New Jersey Healthcare System, Center for Healthcare Knowledge Management, East Orange, NJ, USA; 4Division of Dermatology, VA Puget Sound Healthcare System, Department of Veterans Affairs, Seattle, WA, USA; 5Research and Development, VA Puget Sound Healthcare System, Department of Veterans Affairs, Seattle, WA, USAAbstract: The objective of this study was to examine differences in self-reported diabetes foot care education, self management behaviors, and barriers to good foot care among veterans with diabetes by race and ethnicity. Data was collected using the Veterans Health Administration Footcare Survey, a validated tool that assessed demographic, general health, diabetes and foot self-care information, barriers to foot self-care, receipt of professional foot care, and satisfaction with current care. We mailed surveys to a random sample of patients with diabetes from eight VA medical centers. Study participants were 81% White; 13% African American; 4% Asian, and 2% American Indian and Pacific Islanders. The majority of respondents felt that they did not know enough about foot self-care. There were large gaps between self-reported knowledge and actual foot care practices, even among those who reported “knowing enough” on a given topic. There were significant differences in self-reported foot care behaviors and education by race and ethnicity. These findings document the need for culturally-specific self-management education to address unique cultural preferences and barriers to care.Keywords: diabetes mellitus, diabetic foot, patient self-management, ethnic groups, education

  17. Student Affairs in Complex Contexts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birgit Schreiber

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available While the Western world – with Brexit, Trump, Festung Europa, and so forth – seems to be increasingly retreating into narrow nationalism, the Journal of Student Affairs in Africa is connecting African academics, executives and administrators and is becoming an evermore accessed international, African platform for publishing research on higher education and Student Affairs in Africa. In this issue, we do not only publish several commentaries on the recent Global Summit of Student Affairs and Services held in October 2016 at Stellenbosch University, South Africa. We also publish contributions from Ethiopia alongside articles from Australia, the USA, and universities in South Africa (University of the Free State, University of Johannesburg.

  18. Rates and predictors of referral for individual psychotherapy, group psychotherapy, and medications among Iraq and Afghanistan veterans with PTSD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mott, Juliette M; Barrera, Terri L; Hernandez, Caitlin; Graham, David P; Teng, Ellen J

    2014-04-01

    This study examined rates of referral for medication, individual psychotherapy, and group psychotherapy within a Veterans Affairs (VA) posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) specialty mental health clinic. Participants were 388 Iraq and Afghanistan veterans who were referred for PTSD treatment following a mental health evaluation required for all new VA enrollees. The majority of the sample was referred for medication (79 %), with comparatively fewer referrals for individual (39 %) or group psychotherapy (24 %). Forty percent of participants were referred for combined medication and psychotherapy. Patient demographic and clinical characteristics were examined to determine whether these variables predicted referral type. Female veterans and those with lower clinician ratings of overall functioning were more likely to be referred for individual therapy. Group psychotherapy referrals were more common in veterans who were older, unemployed, identified as an ethnic minority, and had a comorbid anxiety disorder. There were no significant predictors of medication referral.

  19. Korean Affairs Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    are deteriorating because of the escalating construction cost of nuclear power plants. Also, nuclear power plants increase our foreign debt because...precious, accumulated experience and technology now simply because we have again some excess reserve capacity and difficulties with foreign debts . In...is the work of completely liberating the peasants from the bondage of the old ideology and develping them into inde- pendent and creative men

  20. USSR Report, International Affairs

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-03-26

    Coca-Sola Production To Begin 65 Pepsico Chairman Received 65 Sports Protocol With Canada 65 WESTERN EUROPE Perle ’Lectures’ NATO Allies at Munich...sale in May this year. [Text] [Moscow Domestic Service in Russian 1715 GMT 11 Feb 87 LD] /8309 PEPSICO CHAIRMAN RECEIVED—Moscow February 10 TASS...Gosagroprom), today received Donald Kendall, chairman of Pepsico Inc. They discussed some issues of economic, scientific and technological cooperation

  1. Facilitating reintegration for military service personnel, veterans, and their families: An introduction to the special issue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elnitsky, Christine A; Kilmer, Ryan P

    2017-01-01

    As service members return from active duty and, in some cases, exit the military, they face a process of reintegration (also referred to as community reintegration) as they seek to resume participation in their life roles as civilians. Facilitating this dynamic process of reintegration for service members, veterans, and their families-including outlining potential strategies for supporting this return to civilian life and its demands, roles, and responsibilities-is the focus of this Special Issue. Reintegration has been framed as a national priority (U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs, 2015) and has been a point of emphasis of efforts at federal, state, and local levels. As the articles in this issue suggest, multiple public, private, and voluntary systems and the communities to which service members, veterans, and their families return can help influence their health outcomes and, ultimately, their reintegration. (PsycINFO Database Record

  2. Substance use disorders in military veterans: prevalence and treatment challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teeters JB

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Jenni B Teeters,1,2 Cynthia L Lancaster,1,2 Delisa G Brown,3 Sudie E Back1,2 1Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC, USA; 2Ralph H Johnson Veterans Affairs (VA Medical Center, Charleston, SC, USA, 3Department of Human Development and Psychoeducation, Howard University, Washington, DC, USA Abstract: Substance use disorders (SUDs are a significant problem among our nation’s military veterans. In the following overview, we provide information on the prevalence of SUDs among military veterans, clinical characteristics of SUDs, options for screening and evidence-based treatment, as well as relevant treatment challenges. Among psychotherapeutic approaches, behavioral interventions for the management of SUDs typically involve short-term, cognitive-behavioral therapy interventions. These interventions focus on the identification and modification of maladaptive thoughts and behaviors associated with increased craving, use, or relapse to substances. Additionally, client-centered motivational interviewing approaches focus on increasing motivation to engage in treatment and reduce substance use. A variety of pharmacotherapies have received some support in the management of SUDs, primarily to help with the reduction of craving or withdrawal symptoms. Currently approved medications as well as treatment challenges are discussed. Keywords: addiction, alcohol use disorders, drug use disorders, treatment, pharmacotherapy, psychotherapy

  3. VA Is Here for the People Who Support Our Veterans

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... confidential Homeless Veterans Chat and see resources for homeless Veterans . Network of Support The Veterans Crisis Line can put you in touch with VA ... Expect Resource Locator Veterans Live Chat Veterans Text Homeless Veterans Live Chat Military Live Chat Deaf - Hard ... Suicide The Veterans Crisis Line ...

  4. Burden and mental health among caregivers of veterans with traumatic brain injury/polytrauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Joan M; Lee, Minji K; Bangerter, Lauren R; Van Houtven, Courtney Harold; Friedemann-Sánchez, Greta; Phelan, Sean M; Carlson, Kathleen F; Meis, Laura A

    2017-01-01

    Veterans who survive multiple traumatic injuries, including traumatic brain injuries (TBI), must often rely on family caregivers for ongoing care and support with reintegration. Understanding factors associated with caregiving that help or harm caregivers' health is critical for identifying appropriate and effective interventions that support caregiver health and promote the provision of quality care to veterans. This study utilized cross-sectional data from the Family and Caregiver Experiences Study, a survey of 564 caregivers caring for veterans who served after September 11, 2001, survived TBI/polytrauma during service, and received inpatient rehabilitation care in a Veterans Affairs Polytrauma Rehabilitation Center. Structural equation modeling was used to examine the relationship between caregiver stress (i.e., veterans' neurobehavioral problems and intensity of care required), and caregiver well-being (i.e., caregiver burden and mental health). Analyses also examined how intrapersonal, family or social, and financial resources mediate and moderate the relationship between caregiver stress and well-being. Results indicate that veterans' neurobehavioral problems and intensity of required care were associated with more caregiver burden, and more burden was associated with poor mental health. Intrapersonal and family or social resources mediated the relationship between veteran functioning and mental health. Family or social resources also moderated the relationship between care intensity and burden. The model explained a moderate amount of variability in burden (59%) and a substantial amount in mental health (75%). We conclude that caregivers of veterans with neurobehavioral problems who require intense care are at risk for burden and poor mental health. Increasing resources to bolster family or social resources may reduce risks. (PsycINFO Database Record

  5. Student Affairs in Complex Contexts

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Journal of Student Affairs in Africa | Volume 4(2) 2016, v–viii | 2307-6267 ... is to ensure that graduates will have benefited from the higher education experience – even in difficult times – as a personal transformation experience that enriches their ... values, clarify their goals and career choice direction, and improve their job ...

  6. Indigenous Affairs = Asuntos Indigenas, 2000.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Indigenous Affairs, 2000

    2000-01-01

    This document contains the four English-language issues of Indigenous Affairs published in 2000 and four corresponding issues in Spanish. The Spanish issues contain all or some of the articles contained in the English issues plus additional articles on Latin America. These periodicals provide a resource on the history, current conditions, and…

  7. Indigenous Affairs = Asuntos Indigenas, 1997.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Indigenous Affairs, 1997

    1997-01-01

    This document contains the three 1997 English-language issues of Indigenous Affairs and the three corresponding issues in Spanish. (The last two quarterly issues were combined.) These periodicals provide a resource on the history, current conditions, and struggles for self-determination and human rights of indigenous peoples around the world.…

  8. Indigenous Affairs = Asuntos Indigenas, 1998.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Indigenous Affairs, 1998

    1998-01-01

    This document contains the four 1998 English-language issues of Indigenous Affairs and the four corresponding issues in Spanish. These periodicals provide a resource on the history, current conditions, and struggles for self-determination and human rights of indigenous peoples around the world. The first issue is a theme issue on the indigenous…

  9. Indigenous Affairs = Asuntos Indigenas, 1996.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Indigenous Affairs, 1996

    1996-01-01

    This document contains the four 1996 English-language issues of Indigenous Affairs and the four corresponding issues in Spanish. These newsletters provide a resource on the history, current conditions, and struggles for self-determination and human rights of indigenous peoples around the world. Articles on the United States and Canada (1) discuss…

  10. Indigenous Affairs = Asuntos Indigenas, 2000.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Indigenous Affairs, 2000

    2000-01-01

    This document contains the four English-language issues of Indigenous Affairs published in 2000 and four corresponding issues in Spanish. The Spanish issues contain all or some of the articles contained in the English issues plus additional articles on Latin America. These periodicals provide a resource on the history, current conditions, and…

  11. Indigenous Affairs = Asuntos Indigenas, 1998.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Indigenous Affairs, 1998

    1998-01-01

    This document contains the four 1998 English-language issues of Indigenous Affairs and the four corresponding issues in Spanish. These periodicals provide a resource on the history, current conditions, and struggles for self-determination and human rights of indigenous peoples around the world. The first issue is a theme issue on the indigenous…

  12. Indigenous Affairs = Asuntos Indigenas, 1996.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Indigenous Affairs, 1996

    1996-01-01

    This document contains the four 1996 English-language issues of Indigenous Affairs and the four corresponding issues in Spanish. These newsletters provide a resource on the history, current conditions, and struggles for self-determination and human rights of indigenous peoples around the world. Articles on the United States and Canada (1) discuss…

  13. Indigenous Affairs = Asuntos Indigenas, 1997.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Indigenous Affairs, 1997

    1997-01-01

    This document contains the three 1997 English-language issues of Indigenous Affairs and the three corresponding issues in Spanish. (The last two quarterly issues were combined.) These periodicals provide a resource on the history, current conditions, and struggles for self-determination and human rights of indigenous peoples around the world.…

  14. Using Intersectionality in Student Affairs Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strayhorn, Terrell L.

    2017-01-01

    This chapter presents intersectionality as a useful heuristic for conducting research in higher education and student affairs contexts. Much more than just another theory, intersectionality can powerfully shape student affairs research in both obvious and tacit ways.

  15. Improving Performance through Knowledge Translation in the Veterans Health Administration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, Joseph; Perlin, Jonathan B.

    2006-01-01

    The Veterans Health Administration (VA) provides a case study for linking performance measurement, information technology, and aligned research efforts to facilitate quality improvement in a large, complex health system. Dialogue between clinical researchers and VA leaders occurs through structured activities (e.g., the Quality Enhancement…

  16. Neural network modulation by trauma as a marker of resilience: differences between veterans with posttraumatic stress disorder and resilient controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Lisa M; Engdahl, Brian E; Leuthold, Art C; Lewis, Scott M; Van Kampen, Emily; Georgopoulos, Apostolos P

    2013-04-01

    Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and resilience reflect 2 distinct outcomes after exposure to potentially traumatic events. The neural mechanisms underlying these different outcomes are not well understood. To examine the effect of trauma on synchronous neural interactions for veterans with PTSD and resilient controls using magnetoencephalography. Participants underwent diagnostic interviews, a measure of exposure to potentially traumatic events, and magnetoencephalography. U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs medical center. Eighty-six veterans with PTSD and 113 resilient control veterans recruited from a large Midwestern Medical Center. Multiple regression analyses were performed to examine the effect of lifetime trauma on global and local synchronous neural interactions. In analyses examining the local synchronous neural interactions, the partial regression coefficient indicates the strength and direction of the effect of trauma on the synchronous interactions between the 2 neural signals recorded by a pair of sensors. The partial regression coefficient, or slope, is the primary outcome measure for these analyses. Global synchronous neural interactions were significantly modulated downward with increasing lifetime trauma scores in resilient control veterans (P = .003) but not in veterans with PTSD (P = .91). This effect, which was primarily characterized by negative slopes (i.e., decorrelations) in small neural networks, was strongest in the right superior temporal gyrus. Significant negative slopes were more common, stronger, and observed between sensors at shorter distances than positive slopes in both hemispheres (P resilient veterans from those with PTSD and is postulated to have an important role in healthy response to trauma.

  17. Using the WHODAS 2.0 to Assess Functioning Among Veterans Seeking Compensation for Posttraumatic Stress Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marx, Brian P; Wolf, Erika J; Cornette, Michelle M; Schnurr, Paula P; Rosen, Marc I; Friedman, Matthew J; Keane, Terence M; Speroff, Theodore

    2015-12-01

    One of the major changes in DSM-5 was removal of the Global Assessment of Functioning (GAF). To determine whether the World Health Organization Disability Assessment Schedule 2.0 (WHODAS 2.0) is a suitable replacement for the GAF, this study compared how well the WHODAS 2.0 and the GAF measured functional impairment and other phenomena related to posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) among veterans applying for financial compensation (service connection) for PTSD. Clinicians evaluating veteran claimants administered the Clinician Administered PTSD Scale (CAPS) and the WHODAS 2.0 to 177 veterans during their evaluations. Veterans also completed the Inventory of Psychosocial Functioning (IPF), a self-report measure of functional impairment, and received a GAF rating from the examiner. Actual benefit determinations and ratings were obtained. Confirmatory factor analyses demonstrated that the WHODAS 2.0 and the IPF were stronger indicators of a latent variable reflecting functioning compared with the GAF. In receiver operating characteristic curve analyses, the WHODAS 2.0, IPF, and GAF all displayed similar ability to identify veterans with PTSD-related impairment assessed by the CAPS. Compared with the GAF, the WHODAS 2.0 and IPF were less strongly related to PTSD symptom severity and disability ratings by the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs, but these variables are typically influenced by GAF scores. The WHODAS 2.0 and IPF are acceptable replacements for the GAF and can be used to assess functional impairment among veterans seeking compensation for PTSD.

  18. Essential Values of Student Affairs Work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Robert B.; Elfrink, Victoria L.

    1991-01-01

    Examined perceptions of student affairs professionals about the importance of the American Association of Colleges of Nursing essential values to student affairs work. Findings from 68 student affairs professionals revealed that respondents regarded aesthetics, altruism, community, equality, freedom, human dignity, justice, and truth as essential…

  19. 2015 Veteran Economic Opportunity Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    and data analysis to the VBA and stakeholders. PA&I developed the VBA Enterprise Data Warehouse to enable the generation of recurring and ad hoc...reports in response to VBA decision-making and business needs. PA&I will be a primary source of information on Veteran education, vocational...competitiveness from preliminary analyses pre- sented in this document. 4. Build predictive models through analysis of individual-level stakeholder data on Veteran

  20. The Veterans Health Administration: quality, value, accountability, and information as transforming strategies for patient-centered care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perlin, Johnathan B; Kolodner, Robert M; Roswell, Robert H

    2005-01-01

    The Veterans Health Administration is the United States' largest integrated health system. Once disparaged as a bureaucracy providing mediocre care, the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) reinvented itself during the past decade through a policy shift mandating structural and organizational change, rationalization of resource allocation, explicit measurement and accountability for quality and value, and development of an information infrastructure supporting the needs of patients, clinicians, and administrators. Today, the VA is recognized for leadership in clinical informatics and performance improvement, cares for more patients with proportionally fewer resources, and sets national benchmarks in patient satisfaction and for 18 indicators of quality in disease prevention and treatment.

  1. Korean Affairs Report No. 308.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-09-14

    Dropouts Can Enter Underenrolled Departments Editorial on Education System Change. FOREIGN RELATIONS Daily Editorial on President Chon’s ’Vision...than 521,000 million won from "old politicians," "minister and vice-ministers of the government," "high-ranking officials" and big entrepreneurs to...revision of the controversial college gradua- tion system, while the Foreign Affairs and Defense Committees are for the recent defection of a Chinese

  2. Effectiveness of acceptance and commitment therapy for depression: comparison among older and younger veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlin, Bradley E; Walser, Robyn D; Yesavage, Jerome; Zhang, Aimee; Trockel, Mickey; Taylor, C Barr

    2013-01-01

    Limited data exist on outcomes of older adults receiving psychotherapy for depression in real-world settings. Acceptance and Commitment Therapy for depression (ACT-D) offers potential utility for older individuals who may experience issues of loss, reduced control, and other life changes. The present article examines and compares outcomes of older and younger Veterans receiving ACT-D nationally in the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs health care system. Patient outcomes were assessed using the Beck Depression Inventory-Second Edition and the World Health Organization Quality of Life-BREF. Therapeutic alliance was assessed using the Working Alliance Inventory-Short Revised. Six hundred fifty-five Veterans aged 18-64 and 76 Veterans aged 65+ received ACT-D. Seventy-eight percent of older and 67% of younger patients completed all sessions or finished early. Mean depression scores declined from 28.4 (SD = 11.4) to 17.5 (SD = 12.0) in the older group and 30.3 (SD = 10.6) to 19.1 (SD = 14.3) in the younger group. Within-group effect sizes were d = .95 and d = 1.06 for the two age groups, respectively. Quality of life and therapeutic alliance also increased during treatment. The findings suggest that ACT-D is an effective and acceptable treatment for older Veterans treated in routine clinical settings, including those with high levels of depression.

  3. Comparison of Veteran experiences of low-cost, home-based diet and exercise interventions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bree Holtz, PhD

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Obesity is a significant health problem among Veterans who receive care from the Department of Veterans Affairs, as it is for so many other Americans. Veterans from Operation Enduring Freedom (OEF and Operation Iraqi Freedom (OIF experience a myriad of chronic conditions, which can make it difficult to maintain a physically active lifestyle. This pilot study tested the feasibility and user satisfaction with three low-cost, home-based diet and exercise programs, as well as point-of-decision prompts among these Veterans. The three programs target mechanisms that have been shown to improve healthy behavior change, including (1 online mediated social support, (2 objective monitoring of physical activity, and (3 structured high-intensity workouts. This was a randomized crossover trial; each participant used two of the three programs, and all used the point-of-decision prompts. Our qualitative results identified five overall themes related to social support, objective monitoring, structured activity, awareness and understanding, and the point-of-decision prompts. In general, participants were satisfied with and lost weight with each of the interventions. This study demonstrated that these low-cost interventions could be successful with the OIF/OEF Veteran population. A larger and longer study is planned to further investigate the effectiveness of these interventions.

  4. Veterans Crisis Line: Videos About Reaching out for Help

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Help see more videos from Veterans Health Administration Suicide Prevention PSA for Military Families see more videos ... About About the Veterans Crisis Line FAQs Veteran Suicide The Veterans Crisis Line text-messaging service does ...

  5. Strategic planning to reduce the burden of stroke among veterans: using simulation modeling to inform decision making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lich, Kristen Hassmiller; Tian, Yuan; Beadles, Christopher A; Williams, Linda S; Bravata, Dawn M; Cheng, Eric M; Bosworth, Hayden B; Homer, Jack B; Matchar, David B

    2014-07-01

    Reducing the burden of stroke is a priority for the Veterans Affairs Health System, reflected by the creation of the Veterans Affairs Stroke Quality Enhancement Research Initiative. To inform the initiative's strategic planning, we estimated the relative population-level impact and efficiency of distinct approaches to improving stroke care in the US Veteran population to inform policy and practice. A System Dynamics stroke model of the Veteran population was constructed to evaluate the relative impact of 15 intervention scenarios including both broad and targeted primary and secondary prevention and acute care/rehabilitation on cumulative (20 years) outcomes including quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) gained, strokes prevented, stroke fatalities prevented, and the number-needed-to-treat per QALY gained. At the population level, a broad hypertension control effort yielded the largest increase in QALYs (35,517), followed by targeted prevention addressing hypertension and anticoagulation among Veterans with prior cardiovascular disease (27,856) and hypertension control among diabetics (23,100). Adjusting QALYs gained by the number of Veterans needed to treat, thrombolytic therapy with tissue-type plasminogen activator was most efficient, needing 3.1 Veterans to be treated per QALY gained. This was followed by rehabilitation (3.9) and targeted prevention addressing hypertension and anticoagulation among those with prior cardiovascular disease (5.1). Probabilistic sensitivity analysis showed that the ranking of interventions was robust to uncertainty in input parameter values. Prevention strategies tend to have larger population impacts, though interventions targeting specific high-risk groups tend to be more efficient in terms of number-needed-to-treat per QALY gained. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  6. A multidisciplinary stroke clinic for outpatient care of veterans with cerebrovascular disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moran E

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Arlene A Schmid1,2,3,4, John R Kapoor5, Edward J Miech1, Deborah Kuehn6, Mary I Dallas7, Robert D Kerns8, Albert C Lo9,10, John Concato11,12, Michael S Phipps13,14,15, Cody D Couch13, Eileen Moran13, Linda S Williams1,2,3,16, Layne A Goble17,18, Dawn M Bravata1,2,3,191Department of Veteran Affairs (VA Health Services Research & Development (HSR&D Center of Excellence on Implementing Evidence-Based Practice (CIEBP, 2VA HSR&D Stroke Quality Enhancement Research Initiative (QUERI Program, Richard L Roudebush VA Medical Center, Indianapolis, IN, USA; 3Regenstrief Institute, Indianapolis, IN, USA; 4Department of Occupational Therapy, Indiana University, IN, USA; 5Department of Medicine, University of Chicago Pritzker School of Medicine, Chicago, IL, USA; 6Nursing Service, 7Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Service, 8Psychology Service, Veterans Affairs Connecticut Healthcare System, West Haven, CT, USA; 9Departments of Neurology, Community Health, and Engineering at Brown University, Providence, RI, USA; 10Providence Veterans Administration Medical Center, Providence, RI, USA; 11Clinical Epidemiology Research Center (CERC, Veterans Affairs Connecticut Healthcare System, West Haven, CT, USA; 12Department of Internal Medicine, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, USA; 13Department of Veterans Affairs Connecticut Healthcare System, West Haven, CT, USA; 14Robert Wood Johnson Clinical Scholars Program, 15Department of Neurology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, USA; 16Department of Neurology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN, USA; 17Department of Anesthesia and Perioperative Medicine, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC, USA; 18Veterans Administration Medical Center, Charleston, SC, USA; 19Department of Internal Medicine, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN, USABackground: Managing cerebrovascular risk factors is complex and difficult. The objective of this

  7. Renal Replacement Therapy and Incremental Hemodialysis for Veterans with Advanced Chronic Kidney Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalantar-Zadeh, Kamyar; Crowley, Susan T; Beddhu, Srinivasan; Chen, Joline L T; Daugirdas, John T; Goldfarb, David S; Jin, Anna; Kovesdy, Csaba P; Leehey, David J; Moradi, Hamid; Navaneethan, Sankar D; Norris, Keith C; Obi, Yoshitsugu; O'Hare, Ann; Shafi, Tariq; Streja, Elani; Unruh, Mark L; Vachharajani, Tushar J; Weisbord, Steven; Rhee, Connie M

    2017-05-01

    Each year approximately 13,000 Veterans transition to maintenance dialysis, mostly in the traditional form of thrice-weekly hemodialysis from the start. Among >6000 dialysis units nationwide, there are currently approximately 70 Veterans Affairs (VA) dialysis centers. Given this number of VA dialysis centers and their limited capacity, only 10% of all incident dialysis Veterans initiate treatment in a VA center. Evidence suggests that, among Veterans, the receipt of care within the VA system is associated with favorable outcomes, potentially because of the enhanced access to healthcare resources. Data from the United States Renal Data System Special Study Center "Transition-of-Care-in-CKD" suggest that Veterans who receive dialysis in a VA unit exhibit greater survival compared with the non-VA centers. Substantial financial expenditures arise from the high volume of outsourced care and higher dialysis reimbursement paid by the VA than by Medicare to outsourced providers. Given the exceedingly high mortality and abrupt decline in residual kidney function (RKF) in the first dialysis year, it is possible that incremental transition to dialysis through an initial twice-weekly hemodialysis regimen might preserve RKF, prolong vascular access longevity, improve patients' quality of life, and be a more patient-centered approach, more consistent with "personalized" dialysis. Broad implementation of incremental dialysis might also result in more Veterans receiving care within a VA dialysis unit. Controlled trials are needed to examine the safety and efficacy of incremental hemodialysis in Veterans and other populations; the administrative and health care as well as provider structure within the VA system would facilitate the performance of such trials. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Couple Therapy with Veterans: Early Improvements and Predictors of Early Dropout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Melanie S; Bhatia, Vickie; Baddeley, Jenna L; Al-Jabari, Rawya; Libet, Julian

    2017-07-28

    Family services within Veterans Affairs Medical Centers fulfill an important role in addressing relationship distress among Veterans, which is highly prevalent and comorbid with psychopathology. However, even for evidence-based couple therapies, effectiveness is weaker compared to controlled studies, maybe because many Veteran couples drop out early and do not reach the "active" treatment stage after the 3-4 session assessment. In order to improve outcomes, it is critical to identify couples at high risk for early dropout, and understand whether couples may benefit from the assessment as an intervention. The current study examined (a) demographics, treatment delivery mode, relationship satisfaction, and psychological symptoms as predictors of dropout during and immediately following the assessment phase, and (b) changes in relationship satisfaction during assessment. 174 couples completed questionnaires during routine intake procedures. The main analyses focused on 140 male Veterans and their female civilian partners; 36.43% dropped out during the assessment phase and 24.74% of the remaining couples immediately following the first treatment session. More severe depressive symptoms in non-Veteran partners were associated with dropout during assessment. Relationship satisfaction improved significantly during the assessment phase for couples who did not drop out, with larger gains for non-Veteran partners. No demographics or treatment delivery mode were associated with dropout. Although more research is needed on engaging couples at risk for early dropout and maximizing early benefits, the findings suggest that clinicians should attend to the civilian partner's and Veteran's depressive symptoms at intake and consider the assessment part of active treatment. © 2017 Family Process Institute.

  9. Competitive Employment Outcomes Among Veterans in VHA Therapeutic and Supported Employment Services Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, Kristen M; Yosef, Matheos; Resnick, Sandra G; Zivin, Kara

    2017-09-01

    The study assessed whether receiving specific types of Veterans Health Administration (VHA) Therapeutic and Supported Employment Services (TSES) between fiscal years (FYs) 2006 and 2010 (a time frame that encompasses the Great Recession) was associated with obtaining competitive employment among veterans with mental illnesses. The sample included 38,199 veterans discharged from the VHA's TSES program in FY 2006 through FY 2010. On the basis of program monitoring forms completed by TSES clinicians and workload data, veterans were classified as having received one main type of employment service: supported employment (SE), transitional work in the community (TW-community), transitional work in a Department of Veterans Affairs medical center (TW-VA), incentive therapy or sheltered workshop (IT/SW), and no main type of employment service. Compared with veterans who received TW-VA, those who received SE (odds ratio [OR]=1.25) or TW-community (OR=1.24) were more likely to be competitively employed (p<.001), and veterans who received IT/SW were less likely (OR=.85) (p<.001). The predicted probabilities for obtaining competitive employment ranged from 27.2% (IT/SW) to 34.9% (SE). Odds of achieving competitive employment (ORs=.60-.97) were significantly lower during the years of the Great Recession (2007-2009) and in the subsequent year (2010), compared with the year prior (p<.001 to <.05). Although rates of competitive employment were modest across all types of services, community-based employment services were associated with higher odds of achieving competitive employment, compared with services based in a medical center. The Great Recession negatively affected the likelihood of achieving competitive employment, regardless of the employment service received.

  10. Identifying Homelessness among Veterans Using VA Administrative Data: Opportunities to Expand Detection Criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Rachel; Gundlapalli, Adi V; Metraux, Stephen; Carter, Marjorie E; Palmer, Miland; Redd, Andrew; Samore, Matthew H; Fargo, Jamison D

    2015-01-01

    Researchers at the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) have used administrative criteria to identify homelessness among U.S. Veterans. Our objective was to explore the use of these codes in VA health care facilities. We examined VA health records (2002-2012) of Veterans recently separated from the military and identified as homeless using VA conventional identification criteria (ICD-9-CM code V60.0, VA specific codes for homeless services), plus closely allied V60 codes indicating housing instability. Logistic regression analyses examined differences between Veterans who received these codes. Health care services and co-morbidities were analyzed in the 90 days post-identification of homelessness. VA conventional criteria identified 21,021 homeless Veterans from Operations Enduring Freedom, Iraqi Freedom, and New Dawn (rate 2.5%). Adding allied V60 codes increased that to 31,260 (rate 3.3%). While certain demographic differences were noted, Veterans identified as homeless using conventional or allied codes were similar with regards to utilization of homeless, mental health, and substance abuse services, as well as co-morbidities. Differences were noted in the pattern of usage of homelessness-related diagnostic codes in VA facilities nation-wide. Creating an official VA case definition for homelessness, which would include additional ICD-9-CM and other administrative codes for VA homeless services, would likely allow improved identification of homeless and at-risk Veterans. This also presents an opportunity for encouraging uniformity in applying these codes in VA facilities nationwide as well as in other large health care organizations.

  11. Health information technology and implementation science: partners in progress in the VHA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hynes, Denise M; Whittier, Erika R; Owens, Arika

    2013-03-01

    The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) Quality Enhancement Research Initiative (QUERI) has demonstrated how implementation science can enhance the quality of health care. During this time an increasing number of implementation research projects have developed or utilized health information technology (HIT) innovations to leverage the VA's electronic health record and information systems. To describe the HIT approaches used and to characterize the facilitators and barriers to progress within implementation research projects in the VA QUERI program. Nine case studies were selected from among 88 projects and represented 8 of 14 HIT categories identified. Each case study included key informants whose roles on the project were principal investigator, implementation science and informatics development. We conducted documentation analysis and semistructured in-person interviews with key informants for each of the 9 case studies. We used qualitative analysis software to identify and thematically code information and interview responses. : Thematic analyses revealed 3 domains or pathways critical to progression through the QUERI steps. These pathways addressed: (1) compliance and collaboration with information technology policies and procedures; (2) operating within organizational policies and building collaborations with end users, clinicians, and administrators; and (3) obtaining and maintaining research resources and approvals. Sustained efforts in HIT innovation and in implementation science in the Veterans Health Administration demonstrates the interdependencies of these initiatives and the critical pathways that can contribute to progress. Other health care quality improvement efforts that rely on HIT can learn from the Veterans Health Administration experience.

  12. Eligibility of disabled veterans and members of the armed forces with severe burn injuries for financial assistance in the purchase of an automobile or other conveyance and adaptive equipment. Final rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-19

    The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) adopts as a final rule its proposal to amend its adjudication regulation concerning a certificate of eligibility for financial assistance in the purchase of an automobile or other conveyance and adaptive equipment, which was published in the Federal Register on November 5, 2012, and republished for minor technical corrections on November 26, 2012. The amendment is necessary to incorporate statutory changes made by the Veterans' Benefits Act of 2010.

  13. Intimate Partner Violence Between Male Iraq and Afghanistan Veterans and Their Female Partners Who Seek Couples Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tharp, Andra Teten; Sherman, Michelle D; Bowling, Ursula; Townsend, Bradford J

    2016-03-01

    The current study has three aims: (1) to describe the frequency, gender differences, and agreement in couples' reports of male-to-female and female-to-male intimate partner violence (IPV) reported by male veterans and their female partners who were seeking couples therapy; (2) to describe the pattern of violence reported by these couples (e.g., one-sided, mutual) and determine if frequency of violence varied based on patterns; and (3) to examine whether frequency of violence or pattern of violence were associated with veteran diagnosis of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). One hundred heterosexual couples (male Iraq/Afghanistan veteran, female civilian) seeking couples therapy at a Veterans Affairs (VA) clinic completed self-report measures of violence in their relationship. Almost all couples reported verbal aggression. Men reported perpetrating more frequent sexual coercion, and women reported perpetrating more frequent physical aggression. Correspondence in partners' reports of violence varied based on type of violence from high correspondence on verbal aggression to low correspondence on sexual coercion. Three patterns of violence were identified: verbally aggressive (n = 45), one-sided physically aggressive (n = 27), and mutually physically aggressive (n = 26). Mutually physically aggressive couples generally reported the most frequent violence. Frequency and pattern of violence were not associated with veteran diagnosis of PTSD. Findings underscore the need for clinicians to assess both partners for violence perpetration and the need for effective prevention strategies and treatments for IPV among veterans.

  14. Veteran family reintegration, primary care needs, and the benefit of the patient-centered medical home model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinojosa, Ramon; Hinojosa, Melanie Sberna; Nelson, Karen; Nelson, David

    2010-01-01

    Men and women returning from the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq face a multitude of difficulties while integrating back into civilian life, but the importance of their veteran status is often overlooked in primary care settings. Family physicians have the potential to be the first line of defense to ensure the well-being of veterans and their families because many will turn to nonmilitary and non-Veterans Affairs providers for health care needs. An awareness of the unique challenges faced by this population is critical to providing care. A patient-centered medical home orientation can help the family physician provide veterans and their families the care they need. Specific recommendations for family physicians include screening their patient population; providing timely care; treating the whole family; and integrating care from multiple disciplines and specialties, providing veterans and families with "one-stop shopping" care. An awareness of the unique challenges faced by veterans and their families translates into better overall outcomes for this population.

  15. 38 CFR 3.401 - Veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... compensation payable by reason of need for aid and attendance or housebound status shall also be awarded for... claim additional disability compensation payable to a veteran by reason of the veteran's spouse's need....) (Authority: 38 U.S.C. 5110 (f), (n)) (c) Divorce of veteran and spouse. See § 3.501(d). (d)...

  16. 77 FR 20849 - Homeless Veterans' Reintegration Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-06

    ... Veterans' Reintegration Program AGENCY: Veterans' Employment and Training Service (VETS), Department of...: Section 2021 of Title 38 of the United States Code (U.S.C.) reauthorizes the Homeless Veterans Reintegration Program (HVRP) through fiscal year (FY) 2012 and indicates: ``the Secretary of Labor shall...

  17. Gender, race & the veteran wage gap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vick, Brandon; Fontanella, Gabrielle

    2017-01-01

    This paper analyzes earnings outcomes of Iraq/Afghanistan-era veterans. We utilize the 2009-2013 American Community Survey and a worker-matching methodology to decompose wage differences between veteran and non-veteran workers. Among fully-employed, 25-40 year-olds, veteran workers make 3% less than non-veteran workers. While male veterans make 9% less than non-veterans, female and black veterans experience a wage premium (2% and 7% respectively). Decomposition of the earnings gap identifies some of its sources. Relatively higher rates of disability and lower rates of educational attainment serve to increase the overall wage penalty against veterans. However, veterans work less in low-paying occupations than non-veterans, serving to reduce the wage penalty. Finally, among male and white subgroups, non-veterans earn more in the top quintile due largely to having higher educational attainment and greater representation in higher-paying occupations, such as management. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. D-Day for Veterans' Jobs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nathan, Robert R.

    1977-01-01

    Focuses on the unemployment problem among Vietnam veterans and on the various Federal and private employment programs open to these veterans. Discussion also covers labor force statistics, readjustment to civilian life, changes in the American economy, and the role of the Department of Defense and civilian employers in helping veterans to find…

  19. Increasing Prevalence of Chronic Lung Disease in Veterans of the Wars in Iraq and Afghanistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pugh, Mary Jo; Jaramillo, Carlos A; Leung, Kar-Wei; Faverio, Paola; Fleming, Nicholas; Mortensen, Eric; Amuan, Megan E; Wang, Chen-Pin; Eapen, Blessen; Restrepo, Marcos; Morris, Michael J

    2016-05-01

    Research from the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq have focused on traumatic brain injury (TBI) and mental health conditions; however, it is becoming clear that other health concerns, such as respiratory illnesses, warrant further scientific inquiry. Early reports from theater and postdeployment health assessments suggested an association with deployment-related exposures (e.g., sand, burn pits, chemical, etc.) and new-onset respiratory symptoms. We used data from Veterans Affairs medical encounters between fiscal years 2003 and 2011 to identify trends in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, asthma, and interstitial lung disease in veterans. We used data from Veterans Affairs and Department of Defense sources to identify sociodemographic (age, sex, race), military (e.g., service branch, multiple deployments) and clinical characteristics (TBI, smoking) of individuals with and without chronic lung diseases. Generalized estimating equations found significant increases over time for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and asthma in both unadjusted and adjusted analyses. Trends for interstitial lung disease were significant only in adjusted analyses. Age, smoking, and TBI were also significantly associated with chronic lung diseases; however, multiple deployments were not associated. Research is needed to identify which characteristics of deployment-related exposures are linked with chronic lung disease.

  20. Intersectionality in Student Affairs: Perspective from a Senior Student Affairs Officer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moneta, Larry

    2017-01-01

    The author draws upon over four decades of experience in student affairs administration to investigate how senior student affairs officers can incorporate intersectionality into comprehensive and targeted decision-making processes, strategic planning, and organizational considerations.

  1. Older Veteran Digital Disparities: Examining the Potential for Solutions Within Social Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Luger, Tana M; Hogan, Timothy P; Richardson, Lorilei M; Cioffari, Lisa S; Harvey, Kimberly; Houston, Thomas K.

    2016-01-01

    Background Older adults typically have less access to the Internet than other age groups, and older Veterans may use the Internet even less due to economic and geographic reasons. Objective To explore solutions to this problem, our study examined older Veterans’ reported ability to access technology through their close social ties. Methods Data were collected via mail survey from a sample of Veterans aged 65 years and older (N=266). Results Nearly half (44.0%, 117/266) of the sample reported ...

  2. An examination of sociodemographic, health, psychological factors, and fruit and vegetable consumption among overweight and obese U.S. veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Linda K; Allicok, Marlyn; Campbell, Marci K; Valle, Carmina G; Armstrong-Brown, Janelle; Carr, Carol; Dundon, Margaret; Anthony, Tammy

    2011-11-01

    A diet high in fruits and vegetables (F&Vs) is associated with decreased risk for cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and cancer. This study investigated the relationship between sociodemographic, health, and psychosocial factors and F&V consumption among overweight and obese U.S. veterans. Participants were recruited from two Veterans Affairs medical center sites in 2005. Two hundred eighty-nine participants completed a self-administered survey. Bivariate and multivariate linear regression models were built to examine the association between sociodemographic, health, and psychosocial variables and F&V consumption. Older age (B = 0.01; p obese conditions. Age, race, tobacco use, and psychosocial factors should be considered carefully when developing dietary interventionsamong overweight ana obese U.S. veterans.

  3. Nursing advocacy for women veterans and suicide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conard, Patricia L; Armstrong, Myrna L; Young, Cathy; Hogan, La Micha

    2015-03-01

    Little is known about suicide variables in women Veterans. The authors reviewed numerous applicable health care and military literary sources regarding suicide in this population. The current article describes the surrounding circumstances, military war/conflict culture, and potential effects on women Veterans, including major collection problems with current Veteran data. Women Veterans are increasingly reporting more behavioral health issues (e.g., posttraumatic stress disorder) and attempting suicide upon civilian reintegration. Outcomes from this literature review suggest the importance of nursing advocacy to create better rapport and communication with women Veterans from Vietnam, Gulf I, Iraq, and Afghanistan wars seeking care at civilian health facilities, as some may present with suicidal ideologies.

  4. News Event: UK to host Science on Stage Travel: Gaining a more global perspective on physics Event: LIYSF asks students to 'cross scientific boundaries' Competition: Young Physicists' tournament is international affair Conference: Learning in a changing world of new technologies Event: Nordic physical societies meet in Lund Conference: Tenth ESERA conference to publish ebook Meeting: Rugby meeting brings teachers together Note: Remembering John L Lewis OBE

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    Event: UK to host Science on Stage Travel: Gaining a more global perspective on physics Event: LIYSF asks students to 'cross scientific boundaries' Competition: Young Physicists' tournament is international affair Conference: Learning in a changing world of new technologies Event: Nordic physical societies meet in Lund Conference: Tenth ESERA conference to publish ebook Meeting: Rugby meeting brings teachers together Note: Remembering John L Lewis OBE

  5. An exploratory study of activity in veterans with Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trail, Marilyn; Petersen, Nancy J; Nelson, Naomi; Lai, Eugene C

    2012-08-01

    Movement disorder specialists have limited information on the specifics of how patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD) spend their time. We deemed it important to examine the relationships among activity and daily energy expenditure (DEE), non-motor symptoms, and body mass index in veterans with PD who were outpatients at a Veterans Affairs medical center. In this exploratory study, we mailed demographic and activity questionnaires and gathered data on 100 patients. Activity was categorized into five domains and three intensity levels, and DEE was measured in kilocalories. Light activities accounted for 64.9% of DEE (9.1 h), moderate activities for 32.9% (2.1 h), and vigorous activities for 2.2% (0.1 h) of DEE. Television viewing comprised 10.6% (2.5 h) of the day. The effects of non-motor symptoms were significantly associated with more time spent on activities of daily life (ADL). Patients rated fatigue and pain as having the greatest impact on their daily activities. The overweight/obese group of PD patients expended more overall DEE (p = 0.044) and more DEE on social activities (p = 0.024) and light intensity activities (p = 0.021) than did the underweight/normal group. Leisure activities for both groups changed from active to passive. Veterans with PD primarily expended DEE on ADL, TV viewing, and light intensity activities. Television viewing time may have been under reported. Movement disorder specialists can be more proactive in referring patients to physical therapy and encouraging their participation in community exercise and support groups.

  6. Cataract surgery practices in the United States Veterans Health Administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havnaer, Annika G; Greenberg, Paul B; Cockerham, Glenn C; Clark, Melissa A; Chomsky, Amy

    2017-04-01

    To describe current cataract surgery practices within the United States Veterans Health Administration (VHA). Veterans Health Administration hospitals in the U.S. Retrospective data analysis. An initial e-mail containing a link to an anonymous 32-question survey of cataract surgery practices was sent to participants in May 2016. Two reminder e-mails were sent to nonresponders 1 week and 2 weeks after the initial survey was sent; the remaining nonresponders were called twice over a 2-week period. The data were analyzed using descriptive statistics. The response rate was 75% (67/89). Cataract surgeons routinely ordered preoperative testing in 29 (45%) of 65 sections and preoperative consultations in 26 (39%) of 66 sections. In 22 (33%) of 66 sections, cataract surgeons administered intracameral antibiotics. In 61 (92%) of 66 sections, cataract surgeons used toric intraocular lenses (IOLs). In 20 (30%) of 66 sections, cataract surgeons used multifocal IOLs. Cataract surgeons in 6 (9%) of 66 sections performed femtosecond laser-assisted cataract surgery. In 6 (9%) of 66 sections, cataract surgeons performed immediate sequential bilateral cataract surgery. Forty-nine (74%) ophthalmology chiefs reported a high level of satisfaction with Veterans Affairs ophthalmology. The survey results indicate that in cataract surgery in the VHA, routine preoperative testing is commonly performed and emerging practices, such as femtosecond laser-assisted cataract surgery and immediate sequential bilateral cataract surgery, have limited roles. The results of this survey could benchmark future trends in U.S. cataract surgery practices, especially in teaching hospital settings. Copyright © 2017 ASCRS and ESCRS. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. The Veteran Student in 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Anthony M.; Jackson, Robert; Lindsay, Douglas R.; McCabe, Damian G.; Sanders, Joseph E., III

    2010-01-01

    The President of the United States promises to return servicemen and servicewomen back home from the war in the Middle East by 2011. This raises important questions about how the people in higher education will view and serve those who have worn the military uniform. As they watch the veterans who are making the transition from the battlefield to…

  8. Traumatic Brain Injury Severity, Comorbidity, Social Support, Family Functioning, and Community Reintegration Among Veterans of the Afghanistan and Iraq Wars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pugh, Mary Jo; Swan, Alicia A; Carlson, Kathleen F; Jaramillo, Carlos A; Eapen, Blessen C; Dillahunt-Aspillaga, Christina; Amuan, Megan E; Delgado, Roxana E; McConnell, Kimberly; Finley, Erin P; Grafman, Jordan H

    2017-06-23

    To examine the association between traumatic brain injury (TBI) severity; social, family, and community reintegration outcomes; and return to work status among post-9/11 veterans in Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) care. Retrospective observational cohort study. Mail/online survey fielded to a national sample of veterans. Sample of post-9/11 veterans with at least 3 years of VA care stratified according to TBI severity and comorbidities who completed and returned surveys (N=2023). Not applicable. Deployment Risk and Resilience Inventory-2 family functioning and social support subscales; Military to Civilian Questionnaire; and employment status. Bivariate analyses revealed that veterans with every classification of TBI severity reported significantly more difficulty on social, family, and community reintegration outcomes than those with no TBI. In the fully adjusted model, veterans with unclassified and moderate/severe TBI reported significantly more difficulty with community reintegration and were less likely to be employed relative to those with no TBI; those with unclassified TBI also reported significantly more difficulty with family functioning. Veterans with mild TBI also reported significantly more difficulty with community reintegration. This study provides insight into long-term outcomes associated with TBI in post-9/11 veterans and suggests that exposure to TBI has a negative effect on social and family functioning, community reintegration, and return to work even after controlling for comorbidity, deployment experiences, and sociodemographic characteristics. Additional research is required to explicate what appears to be complex interactions among TBI severity, psychosocial well-being, combat exposures, and socioeconomic resources in this population. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. Personality assessment inventory internalizing and externalizing structure in veterans with posttraumatic stress disorder: associations with aggression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Voorhees, Elizabeth E; Dennis, Paul A; Elbogen, Eric B; Clancy, Carolina P; Hertzberg, Michael A; Beckham, Jean C; Calhoun, Patrick S

    2014-01-01

    Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is associated with aggressive behavior in veterans, and difficulty controlling aggressive urges has been identified as a primary postdeployment readjustment concern. Yet only a fraction of veterans with PTSD commit violent acts. The goals of this study were to (1) examine the higher-order factor structure of Personality Assessment Inventory (PAI) scales in a sample of U.S. military veterans seeking treatment for PTSD; and (2) to evaluate the incremental validity of higher-order latent factors of the PAI over PTSD symptom severity in modeling aggression. The study sample included male U.S. Vietnam (n = 433) and Iraq/Afghanistan (n = 165) veterans who were seeking treatment for PTSD at an outpatient Veterans Affairs (VA) clinic. Measures included the Clinician Administered PTSD Scale, the PAI, and the Conflict Tactics Scale. The sample was randomly split into two equal subsamples (n's = 299) to allow for cross-validation of statistically derived factors. Parallel analysis, variable clustering analysis, and confirmatory factor analyses were used to evaluate the factor structure, and regression was used to examine the association of factor scores with self-reports of aggression over the past year. Three factors were identified: internalizing, externalizing, and substance abuse. Externalizing explained unique variance in aggression beyond PTSD symptom severity and demographic factors, while internalizing and substance abuse did not. Service era was unrelated to reports of aggression. The constructs of internalizing versus externalizing dimensions of PTSD may have utility in identifying characteristics of combat veterans in the greatest need of treatment to help manage aggressive urges.

  10. East Europe Report, Economic and Industrial Affairs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    22201. JPRS-EEI-84-095 20 August 19 84 EAST EUROPE REPORT ECONOMIC AND INDUSTRIAL AFFAIRS CONTENTS INTERNATIONAL AFPAIRS CEMA Conference Expresses...Soviet Idea of Integration (V. Meier; FRANKFURTER ALLGEMEINE, 16 Jul 84) 1 CEMA Cooperation in Machine Construction Reviewed (AUSSENWIRTSCHAFT...Viktor Meier; FRANKFURTER ALLGEMEINE, 17 Jul 84) 69 - b - INTERNATIONAL AFFAIRS CEMA CONFERENCE EXPRESSES SOVIET IDEA OF INTEGRATION

  11. Professional Competencies for Student Affairs Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munsch, Patty; Cortez, Lori

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this chapter is to explore the integration of the ACPA/NASPA Professional Competency Areas for Student Affairs Practitioners (ACPA/NASPA, 2010) on community college campuses. The competencies provide specific skill sets for a broad range of student affairs practice areas that should be met by professionals throughout their careers.…

  12. The Student Affairs Pathway to the Presidency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putman, Jeffrey Scott

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the pathway issues supporting or challenging the advancement of student affairs officers to college and university presidencies and the experiences and skills student affairs officers must have to be competitive candidates in searches for presidencies. There is an impending serious gap between the number…

  13. Indigenous Affairs = Asuntos Indigenas, 1994-1995.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Indigenous Affairs, 1995

    1995-01-01

    This document consists of the eight issues of the IWGIA newsletter "Indigenous Affairs" published during 1994-95. Each issue is published in separate English and Spanish versions. The newsletter is published by the International Work Group for Indigenous Affairs (IWGIA), an organization that supports indigenous peoples in their efforts…

  14. How Effective Was Civil Affairs in Bosnia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-13

    50 Planning the Deployment of the Implementation Force...Allied Rapid Reaction Corps BiH Bosnia and Herzegovina CA Civil Affairs CAO Civil Affairs Operations CIM Civil Information Management CIMIC Civil...and replaced a 2003 version. This publication serves as a guideline for planning and conducting civil military operations in the joint (multi

  15. Indigenous Affairs = Asuntos Indigenas, 1994-1995.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Indigenous Affairs, 1995

    1995-01-01

    This document consists of the eight issues of the IWGIA newsletter "Indigenous Affairs" published during 1994-95. Each issue is published in separate English and Spanish versions. The newsletter is published by the International Work Group for Indigenous Affairs (IWGIA), an organization that supports indigenous peoples in their efforts to gain…

  16. Regional variation in post-stroke multidisciplinary rehabilitation care among veteran residents in community nursing homes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Huanguang; Pei, Qinglin; Sullivan, Charles T; Cowper Ripley, Diane C; Wu, Samuel S; Vogel, W Bruce; Wang, Xinping; Bidelspach, Douglas E; Hale-Gallardo, Jennifer L; Bates, Barbara E

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Effective post-acute multidisciplinary rehabilitation therapy improves stroke survivors’ functional recovery and daily living activities. The US Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) places veterans needing post-acute institutional care in private community nursing homes (CNHs). These placements are made under the same rules and regulations across the VA health care system and through individual per diem contracts between local VA facilities and CNHs. However, there is limited information about utilization of these veterans’ health services as well as the geographic variation of the service utilization. Aim The aims of this study were to determine rehabilitation therapy and restorative nursing care utilization by veterans with stroke in VA-contracted CNHs and to assess risk-adjusted regional variations in the utilization of rehabilitation therapy and restorative nursing care. Methods This retrospective study included all veterans diagnosed with stroke residing in VA-contracted CNHs between 2006 and 2009. Minimum Dataset (a health status assessment tool for CNH residents) for the study CNHs was linked with veterans’ inpatient and outpatient data within the VA health care system. CNHs were grouped into five VA-defined geographic regions: the North Atlantic, Southeast, Midwest, Continental, and Pacific regions. A two-part model was applied estimating risk-adjusted utilization probability and average weekly utilization days. Two dependent variables were rehabilitation therapy and restorative nursing care utilization by veterans during their CNH stays. Results The study comprised 6,206 veterans at 2,511 CNHs. Rates for utilization of rehabilitation therapy and restorative nursing care were 75.7% and 30.1%, respectively. Veterans in North Atlantic and Southeast CNHs were significantly (pnursing care compared with veterans in all other regions, before and after risk adjustment. Conclusion The majority of veterans with stroke received rehabilitation

  17. Veteran satisfaction and treatment preferences in response to a posttraumatic stress disorder specialty clinic orientation group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumm, Jeremiah A; Walter, Kristen H; Bartone, Anne S; Chard, Kathleen M

    2015-06-01

    To maximize accessibility to evidence-based treatments for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), the United States Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) has widely disseminated cognitive processing therapy (CPT) and prolonged exposure (PE) therapy to VA clinicians. However, there is a lack of research on veteran preferences when presented with a range of psychotherapy and medication options. This study uses a mixed-method approach to explore veteran satisfaction with a VA PTSD specialty clinic pre-treatment orientation group, which provides education about available PTSD treatment options. This study also tested differences in treatment preference in response to the group. Participants were 183 US veterans. Most were White, male, and referred to the clinic by a VA provider. Results indicated high satisfaction with the group in providing an overview of services and helping to inform treatment choice. Most preferred psychotherapy plus medications (63.4%) or psychotherapy only (30.1%). Participants endorsed a significantly stronger preference for CPT versus other psychotherapies. PE was significantly preferred over nightmare resolution therapy and present-centered therapy, and both PE and cognitive-behavioral conjoint therapy were preferred over virtual reality exposure therapy. Results suggest that by informing consumers about evidence-based treatments for PTSD, pre-treatment educational approaches may increase consumer demand for these treatment options.

  18. Nursing leadership succession planning in Veterans Health Administration: creating a useful database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Lizabeth M; Drake, Audrey

    2007-01-01

    An electronic database was developed for succession planning and placement of nursing leaders interested and ready, willing, and able to accept an assignment in a nursing leadership position. The tool is a 1-page form used to identify candidates for nursing leadership assignments. This tool has been deployed nationally, with access to the database restricted to nurse executives at every Veterans Health Administration facility for the purpose of entering the names of developed nurse leaders ready for a leadership assignment. The tool is easily accessed through the Veterans Health Administration Office of Nursing Service, and by limiting access to the nurse executive group, ensures candidates identified are qualified. Demographic information included on the survey tool includes the candidate's demographic information and other certifications/credentials. This completed information form is entered into a database from which a report can be generated, resulting in a listing of potential candidates to contact to supplement a local or Veterans Integrated Service Network wide position announcement. The data forms can be sorted by positions, areas of clinical or functional experience, training programs completed, and geographic preference. The forms can be edited or updated and/or added or deleted in the system as the need is identified. This tool allows facilities with limited internal candidates to have a resource with Department of Veterans Affairs prepared staff in which to seek additional candidates. It also provides a way for interested candidates to be considered for positions outside of their local geographic area.

  19. Associations between provider designation and female-specific cancer screening in women Veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bean-Mayberry, Bevanne; Bastian, Lori; Trentalange, Mark; Murphy, Terrence E; Skanderson, Melissa; Allore, Heather; Reyes-Harvey, Evelyn; Maisel, Natalya C; Gaetano, Vera; Wright, Steven; Haskell, Sally; Brandt, Cynthia

    2015-04-01

    In 2010, the Department of Veterans Affairs Healthcare System (VA) implemented policy to provide Comprehensive Primary Care (for acute, chronic, and female-specific care) from designated Women's Health providers (DWHPs) at all VA sites. However, since that time no comparisons of quality measures have been available to assess the level of care for women Veterans assigned to these providers. To evaluate the associations between cervical and breast cancer screening rates among age-appropriate women Veterans and designation of primary-care provider (DWHP vs. non-DWHP). Cross-sectional analyses using the fiscal year 2012 data on VA women's health providers, administrative files, and patient-specific quality measures. The sample included 37,128 women Veterans aged 21 through 69 years. Variables included patient demographic and clinical factors (ie, age, race, ethnicity, mental health diagnoses, obesity, and site), and provider factors (ie, DWHP status, sex, and panel size). Screening measures were defined by age-appropriate subgroups using VA national guidelines. Female-specific cancer screening rates were higher among patients assigned to DWHPs (cervical cytology 94.4% vs. 91.9%, Pcervical cancer screening (odds ratio, 1.26; 95% confidence interval, 1.07-1.47; Pcancer screening (odds ratio, 1.24; 95% CI, 1.10-1.39; Pcancer screening within VA. Separate evaluation of sex neutral measures is needed to determine whether other measures accrue benefits for patients with DWHPs.

  20. Mobilization of Metal From Retained Embedded Fragments in a Blast-Injured Iraq War Veteran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaitens, Joanna M; Centeno, Jose A; Squibb, Katherine S; Condon, Marian; McDiarmid, Melissa A

    2016-06-01

    A frequent comorbidity of traumatic injury due to a blast or explosion, commonly reported in Iraq and Afghanistan veterans, is that of retained embedded fragments typically of unknown content. Because of concerns over both local and systemic health effects related to both the physical presence of and mobilization of materials from embedded fragments, the Department of Veterans Affairs established a surveillance program for this group of veterans. We present here the case of a surveillance-enrolled veteran who submitted: (1) three surgically removed fragments for content analyses, (2) tissue adhered to the fragments for histology and metal concentration evaluation, and (3) pre- and postfragment removal urine samples to assess concentrations of various metals often found in fragments. Results indicate that removed fragments were aluminum-copper alloys. Surrounding tissue analyses revealed elevated concentrations of these metals and evidence of chronic inflammation, but no neoplastic changes. Urine aluminum concentrations, initially elevated compared to normal population values, decreased significantly after fragment removal, illustrating the utility of urine biomonitoring to provide insight into fragment composition. A medical surveillance program integrating fragment composition data, tissue analyses, and repeat urine biomonitoring can help inform the patient-specific medical management of both the local and systemic effects of retained metal fragments. Reprint & Copyright © 2016 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.