WorldWideScience

Sample records for technology students student

  1. Training Students as Technology Assistants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onishi, Esther; Peto, Erica

    1996-01-01

    Describes a program where fifth and sixth graders are trained as school technology assistants. The childrens' duties include installation of software, making minor repairs, cleaning computer equipment, and assisting teachers and students. Outlines components of the program, lists forms the assistants use and skills they are taught, and provides…

  2. Student Technology Use for Powerful Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidenrich, Carol

    2013-01-01

    Technology has evolved as a valuable information and communication tool. In our knowledge and information society, students with information and communication technology (ICT) competence will be prepared for success. Teacher pedagogy and student learning have to change to fully integrate technology into the curriculum. Students may not have…

  3. Building technology services that address student needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Ber, Jeanne M; Lombardo, Nancy T; Wimmer, Erin

    2015-01-01

    A 16-question technology use survey was conducted to assess incoming health sciences students' knowledge of and interest in current technologies, and to identify student device and tool preferences. Survey questions were developed by colleagues at a peer institution and then edited to match this library's student population. Two years of student responses have been compiled, compared, and reviewed as a means for informing library decisions related to technology and resource purchases. Instruction and event programming have been revised to meet student preferences. Based on the number of students using Apple products, librarians are addressing the need to become more proficient with this platform.

  4. Digital Technology and Student Cognitive Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavanaugh, J. Michael; Giapponi, Catherine C.; Golden, Timothy D.

    2016-01-01

    Digital technology has proven a beguiling, some even venture addictive, presence in the lives of our 21st century (millennial) students. And while screen technology may offer select cognitive benefits, there is mounting evidence in the cognitive neuroscience literature that digital technology is restructuring the way our students read and think,…

  5. New Technology "Clouds" Student Data Privacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krueger, Keith R.; Moore, Bob

    2015-01-01

    As technology has leaped forward to provide valuable learning tools, parents and policy makers have begun raising concerns about the privacy of student data that schools and systems have. Federal laws are intended to protect students and their families but they have not and will never be able to keep up with rapidly evolving technology. School…

  6. Medical students' online learning technology needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Heeyoung; Nelson, Erica; Wetter, Nathan

    2014-02-01

    This study investigated medical students' online learning technology needs at a medical school. The study aimed to provide evidence-based guidance for technology selection and online learning design in medical education. The authors developed a 120-item survey in collaboration with the New Technology in Medical Education (NTIME) committee at the Southern Illinois University School of Medicine (SIUSOM). Overall, 123 of 290 medical students (42%) at the medical school participated in the survey. The survey focused on five major areas: students' hardware and software use; perception of educational technology (ET) in general; online behaviours; perception of ET use at the school; and demographic information. Students perceived multimedia tools, scheduling tools, communication tools, collaborative authoring tools, learning management systems and electronic health records useful educational technologies for their learning. They did not consider social networking tools useful for their learning, despite their frequent use. Third-year students were less satisfied with current technology integration in the curriculum, information sharing and collaborative learning than other years. Students in clerkships perceived mobile devices as useful for their learning. Students using a mobile device (i.e. a smartphone) go online, text message, visit social networking sites and are online during classes more frequently than non-users. Medical students' ET needs differ between preclinical and clinical years. Technology supporting ubiquitous mobile learning and health information technology (HIT) systems at hospitals and out-patient clinics can be integrated into clerkship curricula. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Engaging At-Risk Students with Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duttweiler, Patricia Cloud

    1992-01-01

    Educational technology can be used to engage students in interesting activities through which teachers can present skills, concepts, and problems to be solved. At-risk students benefit from the investigation of relevant real world problems and the immediate feedback and privacy that technology affords. (EA)

  8. Information Technology Diffusion: Impact on Student Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Gregory M.; Lind, Mary L.

    2011-01-01

    For student achievement, the diffusion and adoption of information technology (IT) infrastructure enabled by special funding was posited to have a positive impact on student achievement. Four urban school districts provided the context for this study to assess the impact of IT adoption on standardized test scores.

  9. Evaluating Technology Resistance and Technology Satisfaction on Students' Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norzaidi, Mohd Daud; Salwani, Mohamed Intan

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Using the extended task-technology fit (TTF) model, this paper aims to examine technology resistance, technology satisfaction and internet usage on students' performance. Design/methodology/approach: The study was conducted at Universiti Teknologi MARA, Johor, Malaysia and questionnaires were distributed to 354 undergraduate students.…

  10. Information Communication Technology and the African Student ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    To engage students, improve learning and become a cutting edge educator, ... instruction with online or mobile learning activities through the technological world ... The benefits of collaborative learning and teaching with multiple instructors; ...

  11. university students` perception and utilization of technology

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2018-02-01

    Feb 1, 2018 ... university students` perceptions and utilization of technology for learning at Haramaya University in. Ethiopia (as a ... teaching and learning in classroom can greatly enhance the ..... benefits that it should be deliver. Looking at ...

  12. Marginalized Student Access to Technology Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurtcu, Wanda M.

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to investigate how a teacher can disrupt an established curriculum that continues the cycle of inequity of access to science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) curriculum by students in alternative education. For this paper, I will focus on the technology components of the STEM curriculum. Technology in the…

  13. Marginalized Student Access to Technology Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurtcu, Wanda M.

    The purpose of this paper is to investigate how a teacher can disrupt an established curriculum that continues the cycle of inequity of access to science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) curriculum by students in alternative education. For this paper, I will focus on the technology components of the STEM curriculum. Technology in the United States, if not the world economy, is developing at a rapid pace. Many areas of day to day living, from applying for a job to checking one's bank account online, involve a component of science and technology. The 'gap' in technology education is emphasized between the 'haves and have-nots', which is delineated along socio-economic lines. Marginalized students in alternative education programs use this equipment for little else than remedial programs and credit recovery. This level of inequity further widens in alternative education programs and affects the achievement of marginalized students in credit recovery or alternative education classes instead of participation technology classes. For the purposes of this paper I focus on how can I decrease the inequity of student access to 21st century technology education in an alternative education program by addressing the established curriculum of the program and modifying structural barriers of marginalized student access to a technology focused curriculum.

  14. Technologies, diabetes and the student body.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balfe, Myles; Jackson, Peter

    2007-12-01

    This paper uses qualitative methodologies to understand young people's use of technology in the management of Type 1 diabetes. The paper begins by outlining the nature of Type 1 diabetes. We provide an account of recent debates on the consumption of health-care technologies. We consider the advantages of qualitative approaches for studying young people with diabetes. Our specific focus is on university students with diabetes who are commonly represented as having a lifestyle that is ill-suited to good management of the disease. We consider the pros and cons that these young people associate with their technologies, and the role that place plays in these young people's accounts. We argue that diabetes' management technologies provide these young people with the ability to discipline their bodies and position their identities as 'normal' students in student spaces, as well as to manage risks to their health and identities. However, we highlight that the use of these technologies, especially in public spaces such as student night-clubs and bars, poses risks for students with diabetes, for example, by highlighting their 'difference' from other students.

  15. Improving student retention in computer engineering technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierozinski, Russell Ivan

    The purpose of this research project was to improve student retention in the Computer Engineering Technology program at the Northern Alberta Institute of Technology by reducing the number of dropouts and increasing the graduation rate. This action research project utilized a mixed methods approach of a survey and face-to-face interviews. The participants were male and female, with a large majority ranging from 18 to 21 years of age. The research found that participants recognized their skills and capability, but their capacity to remain in the program was dependent on understanding and meeting the demanding pace and rigour of the program. The participants recognized that curriculum delivery along with instructor-student interaction had an impact on student retention. To be successful in the program, students required support in four domains: academic, learning management, career, and social.

  16. Information technologies in physical education of students.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivchatova T.V.

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available In the article is presented the systematized information about the using features of modern information technologies in practice of student physical education in not athletic universities. The analysis of domestic and foreign literature is conducted, and also Internet sources related to the problem of healthy way of life of students, and also to forming of active position in maintenance and strengthening of the health.

  17. Nigerian Dental Technology Students and Human ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    study of dental technology students of Federal School of Dental Therapy and Technology. Enugu, Nigeria ... HIV-infected individuals is also known to be achieved through the provision of ... to care for HIV-infected patients among this group of dental professionals ..... Table 7: Willingness to care versus training needs on care.

  18. Dental students' uptake of mobile technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khatoon, B; Hill, K B; Walmsley, A D

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this study was to understand how new mobile technologies, such as smartphones and laptops, are used by dental students. A questionnaire was distributed to undergraduate dental students from years 1 to 4, at the University of Birmingham Dental School. Questionnaires were completed between February and April 2013. Two hundred and seventy questionnaires were completed. Laptops 55% (145) and smartphones 34% (88) were the most popular choice of device for connecting to the net and searching information. Laptops were preferred in first and second year. Students in year 3 preferred mobile phones, and by year 4 the use of mobile phones and laptops was similar. The top two application ideas chosen by students as the most useful on their smart phones were a dictionary for dental education (56%) and multiple choice questions (50%). Students who chose smartphones as their first choice or second choice of device strongly agreed that having the Internet on their smartphones had a positive impact on their dental education (55%). With laptops (48%), students preferred to be at home when using them while for smartphones (31%) they used them anywhere with a connection. E-mail (47%) and social networks (44%) were the top two Internet communication tools used most on laptops. Instant messaging was popular on smartphones (17%). Depending on the year in the course, laptops and smartphones are the most popular choice of device and desktop computers are the least popular. Applications on smartphones are very popular and instant messaging is an upcoming form of communication for students.

  19. Student Outreach With Renewable Energy Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Eric B. (Technical Monitor); Buffinger, D.; Fuller, C.; Kalu, A.

    2003-01-01

    The Student Outreach with Renewable Energy Technology (SORET) program is a joint grant that involves a collaboration between three HBCU's (Central State University, Savannah State University, and Wilberforce University) and NASA John H. Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field. The overall goal of the grant is to increase the interest of minority students in the technical disciplines, to encourage participating minority students to continue their undergraduate study in these disciplines, and to promote graduate school to these students. As a part of SORET, Central State University has developed an undergraduate research associates program over the past two years. As part of this program, students are required to take special laboratory courses offered at Wilberforce University that involve the application of renewable energy systems. The course requires the students to design, construct, and install a renewable energy project. In addition to the applied renewable energy course, Central State University provided four undergraduate research associates the opportunity to participate in summer internships at Texas Southern University (Renewable Energy Environmental Protection Program) and the Cleveland African-American Museum (Renewable Energy Summer Camp for High School Students) an activity co sponsored by NASA and the Cleveland African-American Museum. Savannah State University held a high school summer program with a theme of the Direct Impact of Science on Our Every Day Lives. The purpose of the institute was to whet the interest of students in science, mathematics, engineering, and technology (SMET) by demonstrating the effectiveness of science to address real world problems. The 2001 institute involved the design and installation of a PV water pumping system at the Center for Advanced Water Technology and Energy Systems at Savannah State. Both high school students and undergraduates contributed to this project. Wilberforce University has used NASA support to provide

  20. Emerging Technologies as a Form of Student Engagement for Nontraditional California Community College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogilvie, Gina M.

    2011-01-01

    Technology usage is increasing important for community college students, but whether nontraditional students differ from traditional students in technology usage and support was unclear. Further, it was not known whether Nontraditional and Traditional community college students feel equally connected to the college when using social networking…

  1. Social Adjustment of At-Risk Technology Education Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernst, Jeremy V.; Moye, Johnny J.

    2013-01-01

    Individual technology education students' subgroup dynamic informs progressions of research while apprising technology teacher educators and classroom technology education teachers of intricate differences between students. Recognition of these differences help educators realize that classroom structure, instruction, and activities must be…

  2. Students' Engagement with Learning Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larkin, Derek; Huett, Kim C.

    2013-01-01

    This paper seeks to add to the discussion surrounding young adults' relationship and engagement with learning technologies, exploring whether they naturally engage with these technologies when the use of them is either compulsory or optional. We discuss our findings in relation to whether young people are truly engaging with technologies or…

  3. Engineering and Technology Students' Perceptions of Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mativo, John M.; Womble, Myra N.; Jones, Karen H.

    2013-01-01

    As cultural, social, political and economic changes take place, the secondary or high school curriculum should reflect and respond to changing needs and aspirations of students. Technology Education has been proactive in this arena as it has transformed over the decades to meet ever-changing societal needs. The most recent change to the discipline…

  4. Diesel Technology: Engines. [Teacher and Student Editions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbieri, Dave; Miller, Roger; Kellum, Mary

    Competency-based teacher and student materials on diesel engines are provided for a diesel technology curriculum. Seventeen units of instruction cover the following topics: introduction to engine principles and procedures; engine systems and components; fuel systems; engine diagnosis and maintenance. The materials are based on the…

  5. Nigerian dental technology students and human immunodeficiency ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The rehabilitative dental care is important for maintaining adequate nutrition, guarding against wasting syndrome and malnutrition among human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)‑infected individuals. Aim: The aim of this study is to determine the Nigerian dental technology students' knowledge and ...

  6. Technology Activities for Life Skills Support Students. [and] CNC for Lower-Achieving Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ressel, Michael J.; Smith, Clayton

    1995-01-01

    Ressel shows how providing technology education to special needs students can reaffirm belief in technology education and revitalize desire to teach. Smith suggests that breaking down processes into special steps allows these students to be successful. (JOW)

  7. Increasing Student Engagement through Paired Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basko, Lynn; Hartman, Jillian

    2017-01-01

    This article highlights efficient ways to combine tech tools, such as Remind and video conferencing, to increase student engagement and faculty/student communication. Using Remind is a great way to provide information to students outside of LoudCloud, and video conferencing is a tool for having synchronous meetings and conferences with students.…

  8. Educational technologies for the benefit of students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yngve Nordkvelle

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available By Yngve Troye NordkvelleEditorThis issue of Seminar.net offers four different experiences on how students can gain from using educational technologies. In the article "Adopting digital skills in an international project in teacher education", associate professor Hugo Nordseth of Nord-Trøndelag University College present the aims of a project aimed at making students in teacher training able to collaborate across national borders and contexts. The project demonstrates the feasibility of training students to use new technologies that offer opportunities for learning. Nordseth emphasizes the importance of proper training in the selected tools.Professor Ragnhild Nilsen, of the University of Tromsø, presents her article "Digital Network as a Learning Tool for Health Sciences Students", as an example from studies in health. She presents how an online learning module for health sciences students with different educational backgrounds was implemented at the University of Tromsø (UiT. The intention was to improve communication and cooperation abilities across professional boundaries. The purpose of this article is to examine how participation in a joint, web-based course can be a didactic tool that helps health sciences students learn from one another by means of collaboration. Yvonne Fritze and Yngve Troye Nordkvelle, both editors of the journal present their article "Online dating and education". The research was carried out in their home institution, Lillehammer University College.Taking its inspiration from Luhmann's communication theory, this article looks at online dating from the perspective of teaching and education. The findings of this project indicate that students do use netdating as an experience and that quite a few of them find this valuable for their own communicative skills. The article explores those features of online dating characteristic of distance dialogue, and discusses the extent to which these can be transferred to

  9. Student Technology Mentors: A Community College Success Story

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corso, Josephine; Devine, Jane

    2013-01-01

    The LaGuardia Community College Student Technology Mentor (STM) program demonstrates how a college's own students can become resources for the technology development of faculty, the improvement of teaching tools, and the expansion of library services. The program also illustrates how the Student Technology Mentors themselves benefit from campus…

  10. A Role for Technology in Enhancing Students' Engagement with Feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkin, Helen J.; Hepplestone, Stuart; Holden, Graham; Irwin, Brian; Thorpe, Louise

    2012-01-01

    This paper explores the potential of technology-enabled feedback to improve student learning. "Technology, Feedback, Action!: The impact of learning technology upon students' engagement with their feedback" aimed to evaluate how a range of technical interventions might encourage students to engage with feedback and formulate actions to…

  11. Roles of Technology in Student Learning of University Level Biostatistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Weili; Zhang, Yuchen; Su, Cheng; Cui, Zhuang; Qi, Xiuying

    2014-01-01

    This study explored threshold concepts and areas of troublesome knowledge among students enrolled in a basic biostatistics course at the university level. The main area of troublesome knowledge among students was targeted by using technology to improve student learning. A total of 102 undergraduate students who responded to structured…

  12. Faculty Integration of Technology into Instruction and Students' Perceptions of Computer Technology to Improve Student Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keengwe, Jared

    2007-01-01

    There has been a remarkable improvement in access and rate of adoption of technology in higher education. Even so, reports indicate that faculty members are not integrating technology into instruction in ways that make a difference in student learning (Cuban, 2001; McCannon & Crews, 2000). To help faculty make informed decisions on student…

  13. [The analysis of the bipolarity features in students of arts and the students of technology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siwek, Marcin; Dudek, Dominika; Arciszewska, Aleksandra; Filar, Dorota; Rybicka, Monika; Cieciora, Anna; Pilecki, Maciej Wojciech

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the research was to assess the prevalence of the bipolar spectrum features among students of a variety of faculties, by dividing them arbitrarily into 'art' or 'technology' cohorts. 120 subjects were examined, including 57 students of arts, and 63 students of technology. The tools used included a basic socio-demographic questionnaire and the Hirschfeld Mood Disorder Questionnaire (MDQ). The bipolar spectrum features (as identified by the MDQ responses) were significantly more prevalent among the students of arts, as compared to the students of technology (28.2% vs. 4.8%, p students of technology, the students of arts were more likely to: 1) report mood patterns of intermittent 'highs' and 'lows' (49.1% vs. 15.9%, p students of arts indicate a significant association between artistic talents and creativity, and the bipolar spectrum disorders.

  14. Middle School Students' Motivation for Learning Technology in South Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Hyuksoo

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to develop a feasible instrument for determining middle school students' motivation to learn technology in South Korea. The authors translated Glynn's motivational instrument and modified it to measure Korean middle school students' motivation to learn technology. The instrument was applied to 441 students of grade 8 and 9 from six…

  15. Science Student Teachers and Educational Technology: Experience, Intentions, and Value

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efe, Rifat

    2011-01-01

    The primary purpose of this study is to examine science student teachers' experience with educational technology, their intentions for their own use, their intentions for their students' use, and their beliefs in the value of educational technology in science instruction. Four hundred-forty-eight science student teachers of different disciplines…

  16. Redefining Student Affairs through Digital Technology: A Ten-Year Historiography of Digital Technology Use by Student Affairs Administrators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabellon, Edmund T.

    2016-01-01

    The student affairs profession is at a crossroads (Torres & Walbert, 2010) given digital technology's growth and the academy's administrative expansion (Bowen, 2013). Student affairs administrators must simultaneously respond to digital technology's implications in students' lives (Kirschner & Karpinski, 2010) and to new state and federal…

  17. Using Technology-Nested Instructional Strategies to Enhance Student Learning

    OpenAIRE

    Angela Lumpkin, PhD; Rebecca M. Achen, PhD; Regan K. Dodd, PhD

    2015-01-01

    Students today expect the use of technology in their classes, rather than have to listen to less-than-engaging lectures. College students are connected electronically and incessant technology consumers. As a result, they may prefer the infusion of technologies to help them learn and enjoy the process of learning, rather than having to listen exclusively to lectures. To investigate this, the authors solicited student perceptions to assess the importance of learning through technology-nested...

  18. An investigation into the attitudes of nursing students toward technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tubaishat, Ahmad

    2014-06-01

    Attitudes toward technology may impact the levels of technology acceptance and training willingness among nursing students. Nurse acceptance and effective utilization of technology are critical to improving patient care and safety. The aims of this cross-sectional study were to measurethe attitude of nursing students toward technology and to determine if demographic characteristics affect their attitudinal measures. Furthermore, the amount of formal education provided on the use of technology applications is explored. A convenience sample of nursing students attending a public university in Jordan was recruited, and a technology attitude scale designed to measure the attitude of nursing students toward technology was used. Scales designed to gather data on participant demographics, self-reported technology skills, and level of formal technology education were also used. The results showed that participants held a positive attitude toward technology. Students who reported a high level of technology skill had the most positive attitude toward technology. The impact years of formal education on the use of technology applications were low, whereas academic level had a significant impact on technology attitudes. Senior student participants had the highest level of technology education, likely because of their exposure to relatively more educational opportunities, and the most positive attitude toward technology. Despite the positive attitude of nursing students toward technology, the problem of minimal technology education should be addressed in future nursing programs to further enhance positive attitudes toward technology.

  19. Adapting to Student Learning Styles: Engaging Students with Cell Phone Technology in Organic Chemistry Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pursell, David P.

    2009-01-01

    Students of organic chemistry traditionally make 3 x 5 in. flash cards to assist learning nomenclature, structures, and reactions. Advances in educational technology have enabled flash cards to be viewed on computers, offering an endless array of drilling and feedback for students. The current generation of students is less inclined to use…

  20. What Do Students Want? Making Sense of Student Preferences in Technology-Enhanced Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pechenkina, Ekaterina; Aeschliman, Carol

    2017-01-01

    This article, with its focus on university students as intended recipients and users of technological innovations in education, explores student preferences across three dimensions of technology-enhanced learning: mode of instruction; communication; and educational technology tools embedded in learning and teaching activities. The article draws on…

  1. Using Technology to Differentiate and Accommodate Students with Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahoney, Jamie; Hall, Carol

    2017-01-01

    Improving the abilities of students with disabilities is a difficult task. Students with disabilities strive to be successful academically in the content areas of reading, writing, and mathematical concepts. Teachers can use technology to individualize and differentiate instruction for students who need the assistance and support. Vocaroo, Quick…

  2. Shedding Light on Students' Technology Preferences: Implications for Academic Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirriahi, Negin; Alonzo, Dennis

    2015-01-01

    This study built on previous research in 2010 to determine changes to students' current use of and expectations for future integration of technologies in their learning experience. The findings reveal a continued trend of conservative technology use amongst students but with a growing demand for more integration of technologies for assessment and…

  3. Digital Downsides: Exploring University Students' Negative Engagements with Digital Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selwyn, Neil

    2016-01-01

    Digital technologies are now an integral feature of university study. As such, academic research has tended to concentrate on the potential of digital technologies to support, extend and even "enhance" student learning. This paper, in contrast, explores the rather more messy realities of students' engagements with digital technology. In…

  4. Using Technology-Nested Instructional Strategies to Enhance Student Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lumpkin, Angela; Achen, Rebecca M.; Dodd, Regan K.

    2015-01-01

    Students today expect the use of technology in their classes, rather than have to listen to less-than-engaging lectures. College students are connected electronically and incessant technology consumers. As a result, they may prefer the infusion of technologies to help them learn and enjoy the process of learning, rather than having to listen…

  5. Using Multiple Technologies to Teach Nursing Students about Adoption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Sharonlyn; Henneman, Kris; Herrera, Maida Y.; Hockman, Elaine; Brooks, Evelyn; Darland, Nancy; Kulik, Noel; Sandy-Hanson, Anika E.

    2013-01-01

    Technology is becoming increasingly more important in the enhancement of educating university students. Very little research has been done regarding how the combination of educational technologies affects test scores, compared to the use of one technology alone. This research article examines whether the post-scores of nursing students increased…

  6. Student Interactions in Technology-Rich Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonkert, Karen L.

    2010-01-01

    Students are more likely to develop a deep conceptual understanding of mathematics when they interact with and discuss their thoughts with others. The National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM) (1989, 2000) has recommended that students be active learners--communicating with one another, conjecturing, exploring, and justifying claims by…

  7. Mobile Technologies in Schools: The Student Voice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodge, Emma-Leigh; Robertson, Neville; Sargisson, Rebecca J.

    2017-01-01

    Intermediate and high school students spend a large amount of time using mobile devices (Lauricella, Cingel, Blackwell, Wartella, & Conway, 2014), and such devices are increasingly being integrated into our school system. We conducted a series of student-led focus groups, with this early adolescent cohort, in order to better understand their…

  8. Does Clicker Technology Improve Student Learning?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fike, David; Fike, Renea; Lucio, Krystal

    2012-01-01

    This prospective, intervention-based study was conducted to assess the impact of in-class review methods on student learning outcomes in a course preparing pre-service teachers for the Texas Pedagogy and Professional Responsibilities teacher certification exam. Students were tested on midterm and end-of-term exams comprised of questions similar to…

  9. Understanding Durban University of Technology Students ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    African university students' perceptions and understandings of biodiversity. This paper seeks to describe the knowledge, attitudes and perceptions of students at Durban University of ..... Doctoral dissertation, New York State School of Industrial and Labor ... Journal of Counseling and Development, 85(2), 189–195.

  10. Health-related behaviors and technology usage among college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melton, Bridget F; Bigham, Lauren E; Bland, Helen W; Bird, Matthew; Fairman, Ciaran

    2014-07-01

    To examine associations between technology usage and specific health factors among college students. The research employed was a quantitative, descriptive, cross-sectional design; undergraduate students enrolled in spring 2012 general health education courses were recruited to participate. To explore college students' specific technology usage and health-related behaviors, a 28-item questionnaire was utilized. Statistical significant differences of technology usage were found between 3 of the 4 health-related behaviors under study (BMI, sleep, and nutrition) (p technology usage continues to evolve within the college student population, health professionals need to understand its implications on health behaviors.

  11. Using Technology-Nested Instructional Strategies to Enhance Student Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Lumpkin, PhD

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Students today expect the use of technology in their classes, rather than have to listen to less-than-engaging lectures. College students are connected electronically and incessant technology consumers. As a result, they may prefer the infusion of technologies to help them learn and enjoy the process of learning, rather than having to listen exclusively to lectures. To investigate this, the authors solicited student perceptions to assess the importance of learning through technology-nested instructional strategies. Student perceptions give direction to and affirm the benefits of instructional strategies that increase student motivation to engage more actively in their learning. Based on quantitative and qualitative responses through action research in multiple courses, students perceive their learning as more engaging and enjoyable when technology-nested instructional strategies are infused into their classes.

  12. Understanding Durban University of Technology Students ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Southern African Journal of Environmental Education ... This paper seeks to describe the knowledge, attitudes and perceptions of students at Durban ... of South African conditions and rich biodiversity found in Durban's urban green spaces.

  13. Taking Part in Technology Education: Elements in Students' Motivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Autio, Ossi; Hietanoro, Jenni; Ruismaki, Heikki

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the elements motivating comprehensive school students to study technology education. In addition, we tried to discover how students' motivation towards technology education developed over the period leading up to their school experience and the effect this might have on their future involvement with…

  14. Students' Attitudes towards Craft and Technology in Iceland and Finland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorsteinsson, Gísli; Ólafsson, Brynjar; Autio, Ossi

    2012-01-01

    Craft education in both Finland and Iceland originated over 140 years ago and was influenced by the Scandinavian Sloyd pedagogy. Since then, the subject has moved away from craft and towards technology, with the aim being to increase students' technological abilities. In the beginning, the subject largely focused on the students copying artefacts,…

  15. Validating a Technology Enhanced Student-Centered Learning Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Myunghee; Hahn, Jungsun; Chung, Warren

    2015-01-01

    The Technology Enhanced Student Centered Learning (TESCL) Model in this study presents the core factors that ensure the quality of learning in a technology-supported environment. Although the model was conceptually constructed using a student-centered learning framework and drawing upon previous studies, it should be validated through real-world…

  16. Student-Initiated Use of Technology--Friend and Foe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiklund, Matilda; Andersson, Annika

    2018-01-01

    A multitude of different technologies are used in school today. Some are provided by the school and others are brought by the individual teacher or student. In addition, different applications are available. In this study the focus is on student-initiated uses of technology and how it conditions learning. Based on a case study with surveys,…

  17. Mapping Students Use of Technologies in Problem Based Learning Environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rongbutsri, Nikorn; Khalid, Md. Saifuddin; Ryberg, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    This paper aims to understand how students use technology to enhance their learning in problem-based learning environments. The research methodology is based on both qualitative and quantitative studies. The results are based on students’ interviews, a survey and students’ reflections in course......-related blog posts; they show that students have positive perceptions toward using technologies in problem-based learning environments....

  18. Accelerating Technologies: Consequences for the Future Wellbeing of Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saltinski, Ronald

    2015-01-01

    Today's students, K-12 and beyond, will face an ominous future unless educators quickly invest in preparing student perspectives for the accelerating technologies that will have global implications for the wellbeing of all humanity. Accelerating technologies are quietly, almost insidiously, transforming the world with little fanfare and certainly…

  19. Students' Perceptions of and Experiences With Educational Technology: A Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royal, Kenneth; Hedgpeth, Mari-Wells; McWhorter, Dan

    2016-05-18

    It is generally assumed that incoming students in medical education programs will be better equipped for the "digital age" given their younger age and an educational upbringing in which technology was seemingly omnipresent. In particular, many assume that today's medical students are more likely to hold positive attitudes and increased comfortability with technology and possess greater information technology (IT) skills. The purpose of this study was to compare responses of incoming veterinary medical students to a series of IT-related questions contained in a common questionnaire over the course of a 10-year period (2005-2015) to discern whether students' attitudes have improved and uses and comfortability with technology have increased as anticipated. A survey measuring attitudes and preferences, computing experience, and technology ownership was administered each year for the past 10 years to incoming veterinary medical students at a large veterinary school in the United States. Students' responses to survey items were compared at 3 data points (2005, 2010, and 2015). Today's incoming veterinary medical students tend to indicate the same desire to improve skills using spreadsheets and web page design as incoming students from 10 years ago. It seems that despite technological advances and increased exposure to such applications and skills, there remains a challenge for students to "keep up" with the ever evolving technology. Moreover, although students continue to report they are very comfortable with using a computer (and related devices), many use their computers as typewriters or word processors, as opposed to a means for performing more advanced computing functions. In general, today's medical students are not expert computer users as many assume. Despite an upbringing in a digitized world, many students still lack many basic computing skills.

  20. A Case Study of Technology Choices by High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owens-Hartman, Amy R.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this case study was to examine student technology choices when given the freedom to choose technology devices to complete a project-based learning activity in a content area of study. The study also analyzed factors affecting technology choice as well as how technology proficiency scores aligned to technology choices. Patterns and…

  1. Using Game Development to Engage Students in Science and Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiacek, John

    2011-01-01

    Game design workshops, camps and activities engage K-12 students In STEM disciplines that use game engine and development tools. Game development will have students create games and simulations that Will inspire them to love technology while learning math, physics, and,logic. By using tools such as Gamemaker, Alice, Unity, Gamesalad and others, students will get a sense of confidence and accomplishment creating games and simulations.

  2. The Student Perspective: Can the Use of Technologies Transform Learning?

    OpenAIRE

    O'Donnell, Eileen

    2010-01-01

    PUBLISHED This chapter explores students? perspectives on the transformations that the use of technology has brought to higher education. The use of technologies in higher education facilitates flexible learning environments but the benefits to students who engage with these technologies will only be realised if the design is pedagogically sound. The pedagogic approach employed by lecturers when designing their e-learning platforms or learning management systems has the cap...

  3. 76 FR 4137 - Comment Request: Innovative Technology Experiences for Students and Teachers (ITEST) Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-24

    ... NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION Comment Request: Innovative Technology Experiences for Students and... Friday. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Title of Collection: Innovative Technology Experiences for Students... Technology Experiences for Students and Teachers (ITEST) is a National Science Foundation program that...

  4. 77 FR 22359 - Innovative Technology Experiences for Students and Teachers (ITEST) Program; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-13

    ... NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION Innovative Technology Experiences for Students and Teachers (ITEST.... SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Title of Collection: Innovative Technology Experiences for Students and Teachers... opportunities for students and teachers to learn about, experience, and use information technologies within the...

  5. INFORMATION TECHNOLOGIES IN EDUCATION OF MEDICAL STUDENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    О В Полякова

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In article research about introduction of information materials in the form of the computer program is given to pedagogical process of students pediatricians. The concept of the program consists in systematization of medicines in a multilevel format for the purpose of a multilateral choice of medicines in the conditions of modern pharmacotherapy.

  6. ASM Student Technology and Career Night

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Jeff

    2005-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation presents a general overview of Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) for students who are perspective MSFC employees. The presentation includes an organizational chart and a summary of MSFC activities, as well as photographs and descriptions of some of the center's test facilities.

  7. Growing Misconception of Technology: Investigation of Elementary Students' Recognition of and Reasoning about Technological Artifacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firat, Mehmet

    2017-01-01

    Knowledge of technology is an educational goal of science education. A primary way of increasing technology literacy in a society is to develop students' conception of technology starting from their elementary school years. However, there is a lack of research on student recognition of and reasoning about technology and technological artifacts. In…

  8. Technology Integration in Elementary Classrooms: Teaching Practices of Student Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ping

    2016-01-01

    This study examines how and why student teachers integrated technology to enhance instruction in elementary classrooms. The participants were 31 student teachers who completed an assignment of eight weeks. Multiple data sets including observation notes of 347 lessons were obtained from three key groups for data triangulation. Results reveal that…

  9. Technology to Support Sign Language for Students with Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donne, Vicki

    2013-01-01

    This systematic review of the literature provides a synthesis of research on the use of technology to support sign language. Background research on the use of sign language with students who are deaf/hard of hearing and students with low incidence disabilities, such as autism, intellectual disability, or communication disorders is provided. The…

  10. Discovery Camp Excites Students about Engineering and Technology Careers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massiha, G. H.

    2011-01-01

    In the United States and elsewhere, there is a dramatic shortage of engineers and technologists. And, unfortunately, these professions often suffer from a lack of awareness among K-12 students. Clearly, educators need to show students the very exciting and lucrative aspects of these fields. Engineering and technology are consistently listed by…

  11. Attitude Of Students Of Federal University Of Technology Owerri ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The paper analyzed the attitude of students of federal university of technology Owerri towards a career in Agriculture with a view to understanding the effect on future manpower needs for Nigeria Agricultural Development. Fifty final year student were randomly selected from the five departments in the school of Agric and ...

  12. Student Affairs and Information Technology: Collaborating in the Cloud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbatis, Peter Reyes

    2014-01-01

    Student affairs and information technology have opportunities to partner in order to increase student satisfaction and retention rates and to assist institutions to comply with federal educational regulations. This chapter contains four examples of emerging best practices and future initiatives including: (a) the admissions pipeline, (b)…

  13. University Students' Opinions Concerning Science-Technology-Society Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolu, Gamze

    2016-01-01

    Determining what students think about science, technology, and society (STS) is of great importance. This also provides the basis for scientific literacy. As such, this study was conducted with a total of 102 senior students attending a university located in western Turkey. This study utilized the survey model as a research model and the…

  14. Student Technology Rollouts in Higher Education: Lessons from DISCOVERe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delcore, Henry D.; Neufeld, Philip

    2017-01-01

    ICT rollouts are no longer discretionary: they have become a mandatory function of effective educational institutions. This study examines the rollout of tablet technology at a public, four-year university with particular attention to variations within the student population and the student voice. The research questions included: Do expectations…

  15. Automotive Technology Student Learning Styles and Their Implications for Faculty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Threeton, Mark D.; Walter, Richard A.

    2009-01-01

    In an effort to provide Career and Technical Education (CTE) professionals with additional insight on how to better meet the educational needs of the learner, this study sought to identify the preference for learning of postsecondary automotive technology students. While it might appear logical to naturally classify auto-tech students as primarily…

  16. Blending Student Technology Experiences in Formal and Informal Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, K.-W.; Khaddage, F.; Knezek, Gerald

    2013-01-01

    In this article, we discuss the importance of recognizing students' technology-enhanced informal learning experiences and develop pedagogies to connect students' formal and informal learning experiences, in order to meet the demands of the knowledge society. The Mobile-Blended Collaborative Learning model is proposed as a framework to…

  17. Motivating students to perform an experiment in technological design contexts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Logman, P.S.W.M.; Kaper, W.H.; Ellermeijer, A.L.; Lindell, A.; Kähkönen, A.-L.; Viiri, J.

    2012-01-01

    In a teaching-learning sequence on the subject of energy we have tried technological design contexts to motivate students by using only context-based reasons to perform experiments on the subject of energy. We use these experiments to have the students reinvent practical laws of energy conservation

  18. Developing engineering students' research and technology assessment abilities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vries, de M.J.; Stroeken, J.H.M.

    1996-01-01

    This article describes research done among M. Eng. students in several faculties of the Eindhoven University of Technology into their abilities to integrate nontechnical (social) elements in the research that led to their M. Eng. theses. It was found that these students often lacked research skills

  19. Social Media as a Learning Technology for University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Irshad; Cakir, Ozlem; Candeger, Ümmügülsüm

    2018-01-01

    This paper demonstrates the role of social media as a learning technology for university students and highlights their problems associated with its use. The population of the study consisted of Masters' and Bachelor Studies students studying in their final semesters in the departments of Social Sciences at The Islamia University of Bahawalpur,…

  20. An Introduction to Technologies Commonly Used by College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junco, Reynol; Cole-Avent, Gail A.

    2008-01-01

    Today's college students, the Net generation, have woven technology into their everyday repertoire of communication and connection tools. They use the Internet, e-mail, instant messaging, blogs, and social networking Web sites like Facebook and MySpace at higher rates than individuals from any other generation. Student affairs professionals,…

  1. Audacity in Vocal Improvisation: Motivating Elementary School Students through Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sichivitsa, Veronica

    2007-01-01

    Every day, music teachers face the challenge of motivating less-confident student singers in general music classes. Teaching vocal improvisation can be a difficult task, because students are often self-conscious about their voices and too intimidated to sing in front of their peers. Technology can be an excellent motivational tool in the classroom…

  2. The habitus and technological practices of rural students: a case study

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This student is one of five self-declared rural students, from a group of 23 ... not a unique local problem: research from other countries has shown that students from ..... case. Rural students feel estranged and depressed by these technologies.

  3. Study habits and technology use in Italian university students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poscia, Andrea; Frisicale, Emanuela Maria; Parente, Paolo; de Waure, Chiara; La Milia, Daniele Ignazio; Di Pietro, Maria Luisa

    2015-01-01

    Students' ability of learning is influenced by study habits. Among these, the use of technologies has assumed a controversial role. The aim of this paper is to analyse studying approach, the use of technologies and how they affect study habits in a population of university students addressed by the "Sportello Salute Giovani" ("Youth Health Information Desk") questionnaire. 16 questions referred to the approach to studying and the use of technologies (number 77-93) were analyzed. Absolute and relative frequencies were calculated. Stratification for sex, age and socio-economic status were performed and Chi square test was used to test the difference between sex, age class and socio-economic groups. 99.7% of students declared to have at least one mobile phone and 68.7% to use smartphones, i-phones and i-pads. Males (20.9% vs 14.9% female, p students (31.7% among 25-30 years old students vs 21.3% among 18-21 years old, p students with the highest socio-economic level (87.8% vs 54.2% of the lowest) seem more likely to use digital technologies/Internet for educational purposes. Our survey revealed that most college students still prefer approach the study using books instead of digital tools, but this attitude is conflicting with how many hours they use computers and surf Internet per weeks. Therefore, further studies are needed to understand better technology influence on study habits and its implication on health.

  4. Students' Perception of Technology Use in Nursing Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Kathleen M; Muckle, Janelle

    2018-02-01

    Technology is an integral part of a nurse's practice; therefore, it is necessary for technology to be integrated into the nursing curriculum for students. Nursing schools are shifting paradigms by integrating technology into the teaching environment to foster active and meaningful learning experiences. Factors related to external influences on individual beliefs, attitudes, and intention to use need to be studied so nurse educators can support the integration of technology into pedagogy. The Technology Acceptance Model was used to evaluate student perceptions of usefulness and ease of use of technology, while matriculated in a baccalaureate level nursing program. Quantitative and qualitative data were collected to uncover how nursing students (N = 375) perceived the usefulness and ease of use of technology while in nursing school. Almost every student (99.7%) owned a smartphone, and 95% were reasonably comfortable using various technologies. Selecting and incorporating technological tools to successfully support learning is essential to overcome challenges and support the innovative delivery of content and use of technology by students.

  5. Examining Engineering & Technology Students' Acceptance of Network Virtualization Technology Using the Technology Acceptance Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousif, Wael K.

    2010-01-01

    This causal and correlational study was designed to extend the Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) and to test its applicability to Valencia Community College (VCC) Engineering and Technology students as the target user group when investigating the factors influencing their decision to adopt and to utilize VMware as the target technology. In…

  6. Information technologies in physical education of student young people

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivchatova T.V.

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The uses of modern information technologies given about features are systematized in practice of physical education of students. Perspective directions of the use of computer technologies are considered in physical education of student young people. In a student environment the insufficient level of knowledges is felt on the indicated theme. There is a requirement in the receipt of the proper information on forming valued orientations which determine the healthy way of life of young people. The computer informative systems are the attractive source of popularization and propaganda of healthy way of life.

  7. Understanding Students' Use and Value of Technology for Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckman, Karley; Bennett, Sue; Lockyer, Lori

    2014-01-01

    Despite significant research in the field of educational technology, there is still much we do not fully understand about students' experiences with technology. This article proposes that research in the field of educational technology would benefit from a sociological framing that pays attention to the understandings and lives of learners. Within…

  8. Teen Culture, Technology and Literacy Instruction: Urban Adolescent Students' Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jia; Snow, Catherine; White, Claire

    2015-01-01

    Modern teens have pervasively integrated new technologies into their lives, and technology has become an important component of teen popular culture. Educators have pointed out the promise of exploiting technology to enhance students' language and literacy skills and general academic success. However, there is no consensus on the effect of…

  9. Essential Conditions for Technology-Supported, Student-Centered Learning: An Analysis of Student Experiences with Math Out Loud Using the ISTE Standards for Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dondlinger, Mary Jo; McLeod, Julie; Vasinda, Sheri

    2016-01-01

    This article explores links between student experiences with technology-rich mathematics instruction and the ISTE Standards for Students. Research methods applied constructivist grounded theory to analyze data from student interviews against the ISTE Standards for Students to identify which elements of the design of this learning environment…

  10. Student pharmacists' use and perceived impact of educational technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolte, Scott K; Richard, Craig; Rahman, Ateequr; Kidd, Robert S

    2011-06-10

    To assess the frequency of use by and perceived impact of various educational technologies on student pharmacists. Data were obtained using a validated, Web-based survey instrument designed to evaluate the frequency of use and impact on learning of various technologies used in educating first-, second-, and third-year student pharmacists. Basic demographic data also were collected and analyzed. The majority (89.4%) of the 179 respondents were comfortable with the technology used in the academic program. The most frequently used technologies for educational purposes were in class electronic presentations, course materials posted on the school Web site, and e-mail. The technologies cited as having the most beneficial impact on learning were course materials posted on the Web site and in-class electronic presentations, and those cited as most detrimental were video-teleconferencing and online testing. Compared to the course textbook, students reported more frequent use of technologies such as electronic course materials, presentations, digital lecture recordings, e-mail, and hand-held devices. Because students' opinions of educational technologies varied, colleges and schools should incorporate educational technologies that students frequently use and that positively impact learning.

  11. How to change students' images of science and technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherz, Zahava; Oren, Miri

    2006-11-01

    This paper examines the images middle school students have of science and technology, the workplaces, and the relevant professions. It also describes the effect on these images caused by an instructional initiative, Investigation into Science and Technology (IST), designed to introduce students to science and technology in the real life. Students' images were delineated via questionnaires, drawing tasks, and interviews before and after their participation in the IST program. The sample consisted of 100 students from six classes (eighth or ninth grade) of three schools. We found that before the IST intervention students' images about the scientific or technological environments were superficial, unreal, and even incorrect. Their impressions of the characteristics of scientists and technologists were superficial, misleading, and sometimes reflected ignorance. The findings demonstrate that the IST program stimulated a positive effect on students' images. Their preconceptions were altered in several dimensions: in the cognitive dimension, from superficial and vague to precise and correct images; in the perceptive dimension, from stereotypic to rational and open-minded images; and in the affective dimension, from negative to positive attitudes.

  12. Views of Students about Technology, Effects of Technology on Daily Living and Their Professional Preferences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daghan, Gökhan

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study is to examine the views of students about technology and their professional preferences and put forth the correlation between professional preferences and views about technology. For this purpose, in a private school in Ankara, 109 students from 6th and 7th grades were asked about their views on what technology is, the…

  13. Collaborating to optimize nursing students' agency information technology use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fetter, Marilyn S

    2009-01-01

    As the learning laboratory for gaining actual patient care experience, clinical agencies play an essential role in nursing education. With an information technology revolution transforming healthcare, nursing programs are eager for their students to learn the latest informatics systems and technologies. However, many healthcare institutions are struggling to meet their own information technology needs and report limited resources and other as barriers to nursing student training. In addition, nursing students' information technology access and use raise security and privacy concerns. With the goal of a fully electronic health record by 2014, it is imperative that agencies and educational programs collaborate. They need to establish educationally sound, cost-effective, and secure policies and procedures for managing students' use of information technology systems. Strategies for evaluating options, selecting training methods, and ensuring data security are shared, along with strategies that may reap clinical, economic, and educational benefits. Students' information technology use raises numerous issues that the nursing profession must address to participate in healthcare's transformation into the digital age.

  14. Physical education of students from sports-oriented technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U.A. Dolinnyj

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available In theory grounded and experimentally tested the efficiency of employments on physical education of students on the basis of sporting oriented technologies. In experiment participated 30 students of 3 courses. The improvement of growth of most physical indexes rate is marked: speed qualities (at run on 100 m, power (bending, unbending of hands in support lying, speed-power (broad jump from a place, flexibility (inclination in before from position sitting on the floor. Recommendations are resulted on education of student youth a sense of collectivism; to the persistence, decision, purposefulness; attention and speed of thought; perfections of ability to manage the emotions, to development of physical qualities. It is proved that physical education of students on the basis of sporting oriented technologies positively influences on development of physical qualities, skills and abilities that is necessary for the future specialist.

  15. Blogs: Enhancing the Learning Experience for Technology Students

    OpenAIRE

    Birney, Rosanne

    2006-01-01

    Weblogs can be used to enhance the learning experience for technology students, by providing them with several features that are often absent in Learning Management Systems (LMSs). This research aims to demonstrate that weblogs can improve the learning experience by allowing students to reflect on their learning, and by allowing them to easily collaborate with their tutors and with one another. The incorporation of weblogs into the existing learning environment can provide several enhancemen...

  16. The Nature of Primary Students' Conversation in Technology Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox-Turnbull, Wendy H.

    2016-01-01

    Classroom conversations are core to establishing successful learning for students. This research explores the nature of conversation in technology education in the primary classroom and the implications for teaching and learning. Over a year, two units of work in technology were taught in two primary classrooms. Most data was gathered in Round 2…

  17. Engaging Students Regarding Special Needs in Technology and Engineering Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, David W.

    2015-01-01

    In 1984, James Buffer and Michael Scott produced the book "Special Needs Guide for Technology Education" (Buffer and Scott, 1984). This was a pivotal offering insofar as it set the stage for technology education educators, at the time, to think about and be provided with information regarding students with special needs in their…

  18. The Influence of Technological Literacy on Students' Writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Kristen H.; Katic, Elvira K.

    2009-01-01

    Many forms of technological communication exist in non-linear environments and there is potential for new approaches to learning and teaching which may more closely approximate naturalistic and authentic approaches to learning. The following study examined the ways in which high school students were influenced by technology as they wrote and how…

  19. A Novel Technology to Investigate Students' Understandings of Enzyme Representations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linenberger, Kimberly J.; Bretz, Stacey Lowery

    2012-01-01

    Digital pen-and-paper technology, although marketed commercially as a bridge between old and new note-taking capabilities, synchronizes the collection of both written and audio data. This manuscript describes how this technology was used to improve data collection in research regarding students' learning, specifically their understanding of…

  20. Technology and Academic Advising: Student Usage and Preferences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaines, Trudi

    2014-01-01

    When both time and financial resources are limited, administrators selectively decide upon proper utilization of current technology and determine whether monies should be expended on new, flashy, and attractive technology realizing that it may not contribute to the advising experience. By obtaining feedback from the students whom the academic…

  1. Effects of Game Technology on Elementary Student Learning in Mathematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Namsoo; Sutherland, LeeAnn M.; Norris, Cathleen A.; Soloway, Elliot

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports the effects of game technology on student learning in mathematics as investigated in two data sets collected from slightly different subjects. In the first, 41 second graders (7 or 8 years old) from two classes used either a technology-based game or a paper-based game for 5 weeks. For the next 13 weeks, both classes used a…

  2. Tech Team: Student Technology Assistants in the Elementary & Middle School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peto, Erica; Onishi, Esther; Irish, Barbara

    A step-by-step manual of worksheets, templates, forms and examples, this comprehensive handbook is designed for librarians, classroom teachers, and technology specialists who are interested in training students to be technology aides. The "Tech Team" program not only systematically outlines how one organizes and manages a support program, but…

  3. The Educational Technology of Ethical Development for Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Ting; Ustin, Pavel N.; Popov, Leonid M.; Mudarisov, Marat M.

    2017-01-01

    The relevance of this work was connected with the problem of ethical competencies forming among future psychologists during their learning in university. The first task of research was to work out the technology of ethical development for students-psychologists. The structure of this technology included four main educational components:…

  4. Using Technology to Improve Student Learning. NCREL Viewpoints, Volume 12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gahala, Jan, Ed.

    2004-01-01

    "Viewpoints" is a multimedia package containing two audio CDs and a short, informative booklet. This volume of "Viewpoints" focuses on how technology can help improve student learning. The audio CDs provide the voices, or viewpoints, of various leaders from the education field who work closely with technology issues. Their…

  5. Building Multicultural Awareness in University Students Using Synchronous Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stork, Michele Garabedian; Zhang, Jingshun; Wang, Charles Xiaoxue

    2018-01-01

    To explore the potential for building multicultural awareness in university students using synchronous technology, faculty members from an American regional state university and a Chinese regional university collaborated to find appropriate ways to integrate synchronous technology (e.g., Adobe Connect) into a teacher education program in the…

  6. The Effects of Assistive Technology on Students with Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sze, Susan

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to analyze assistive technology literature for students with disabilities. The literature search rendered N = 57 literature and n = 17 manuscripts were identified in the special education technology field studies. Each source was evaluated according to the following criteria: types of disability, learning objectives…

  7. Teacher Candidate Technology Integration: For Student Learning or Instruction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Cynthia; Zhang, Shaoan; Strudler, Neal

    2015-01-01

    Transfer of instructional technology knowledge for student-centered learning by teacher candidates is investigated in this study. Using the transfer of learning theoretical framework, a mixed methods research design was employed to investigate whether secondary teacher candidates were able to transfer the instructional technology knowledge for…

  8. Study habits and technology use in Italian university students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Poscia

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Students' ability of learning is influenced by study habits. Among these, the use of technologies has assumed a controversial role. The aim of this paper is to analyse studying approach, the use of technologies and how they affect study habits in a population of university students addressed by the "Sportello Salute Giovani" ("Youth Health Information Desk" questionnaire. METHODS: 16 questions referred to the approach to studying and the use of technologies (number 77-93 were analyzed. Absolute and relative frequencies were calculated. Stratification for sex, age and socio-economic status were performed and Chi square test was used to test the difference between sex, age class and socio-economic groups. RESULTS: 99.7% of students declared to have at least one mobile phone and 68.7% to use smartphones, i-phones and i-pads. Males (20.9% vs 14.9% female, p < 0.05, older students (31.7% among 25-30 years old students vs 21.3% among 18-21 years old, p < 0.05 and students with the highest socio-economic level (87.8% vs 54.2% of the lowest seem more likely to use digital technologies/Internet for educational purposes. CONCLUSION: Our survey revealed that most college students still prefer approach the study using books instead of digital tools, but this attitude is conflicting with how many hours they use computers and surf Internet per weeks. Therefore, further studies are needed to understand better technology influence on study habits and its implication on health.

  9. The effect of technology on student science achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilton, June Kraft

    2003-10-01

    Prior research indicates that technology has had little effect on raising student achievement. Little empirical research exists, however, studying the effects of technology as a tool to improve student achievement through development of higher order thinking skills. Also, prior studies have not focused on the manner in which technology is being used in the classroom and at home to enhance teaching and learning. Empirical data from a secondary school representative of those in California were analyzed to determine the effects of technology on student science achievement. The quantitative analysis methods for the school data study included a multiple linear path analysis, using final course grade as the ultimate exogenous variable. In addition, empirical data from a nationwide survey on how Americans use the Internet were disaggregated by age and analyzed to determine the relationships between computer and Internet experience and (a) Internet use at home for school assignments and (b) more general computer use at home for school assignments for school age children. Analysis of data collected from the a "A Nation Online" Survey conducted by the United States Census Bureau assessed these relationships via correlations and cross-tabulations. Finally, results from these data analyses were assessed in conjunction with systemic reform efforts from 12 states designed to address improvements in science and mathematics education in light of the Third International Mathematics and Science Survey (TIMSS). Examination of the technology efforts in those states provided a more nuanced understanding of the impact technology has on student achievement. Key findings included evidence that technology training for teachers increased their use of the computer for instruction but students' final science course grade did not improve; school age children across the country did not use the computer at home for such higher-order cognitive activities as graphics and design or spreadsheets

  10. Determination of nursing students' attitudes towards the use of technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terkes, Nurten; Celik, Ferya; Bektas, Hicran

    2018-03-11

    The use of technology is increasingly important in nursing education and practice. For this reason, it is necessary to determine the attitudes of nursing students towards technology. This study was conducted with 508 nursing students. A personal information form that was prepared by the researchers and the Attitudes Toward Technology Scale were used as the data collection tools. The mean score that was obtained by the nursing students from the Attitudes Toward Technology Scale was 61.53 ± 1.13. The Cronbach's alpha coefficient was found to be 0.90. There was a statistically significant difference between the sexes, using a computer, tablet, or laptop, using technology to reach health-related information, and for professional development, using mobile applications related to drug information. There was also a statistical difference between using the Periscope and Scorpio accounts from social media and using Excel and PowerPoint from Microsoft programs. Nursing students are capable of technology-based teaching, which can be expanded as a result. © 2018 Japan Academy of Nursing Science.

  11. Does Mobile Technology Matter? A Student Centric Perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Wenshin

    2010-01-01

    Based on a student-centric perspective, this study seeks to understand how mobile technology influences students’ learning experiences. Our research motivation is driven by the increasing attention paid to mobile technology in the research and business community. Set in a public university setting, our investigation seeks to shed light on how teaching and learning could be reshaped by mobile technology, most specifically, emerging tablet PCs. The findings, based on two MIS (Management Informa...

  12. Evaluation of Student Outcomes in Materials Science and Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piippo, Steven

    1996-01-01

    This paper specifies 14 benchmarks and exit standards for the introduction of Materials Science and Technology in a secondary school education. Included is the standard that students should be able to name an example of each category of technological materials including metals, glass/ceramics, polymers (plastics) and composites. Students should know that each type of solid material has specific properties that can be measured. Students will learn that all solid materials have either a long range crystalline structure or a short range amorphous structure (i.e., glassy). They should learn the choice of materials for a particular application depends on the properties of the material, and the properties of the material depends on its crystal structure and microstructure. The microstructure may be modified by the methods by which the material is processed; students should explain this by the example of sintering a ceramic body to reduce its porosity and increase its densification and strength. Students will receive exposure to the world of work, post secondary educational opportunities, and in general a learning that will lead to a technologically literate intelligent citizen.

  13. MLS student active learning within a "cloud" technology program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tille, Patricia M; Hall, Heather

    2011-01-01

    In November 2009, the MLS program in a large public university serving a geographically large, sparsely populated state instituted an initiative for the integration of technology enhanced teaching and learning within the curriculum. This paper is intended to provide an introduction to the system requirements and sample instructional exercises used to create an active learning technology-based classroom. Discussion includes the following: 1.) define active learning and the essential components, 2.) summarize teaching methods, technology and exercises utilized within a "cloud" technology program, 3.) describe a "cloud" enhanced classroom and programming 4.) identify active learning tools and exercises that can be implemented into laboratory science programs, and 5.) describe the evaluation and assessment of curriculum changes and student outcomes. The integration of technology in the MLS program is a continual process and is intended to provide student-driven active learning experiences.

  14. European pharmacy students' experience with virtual patient technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavaco, Afonso Miguel; Madeira, Filipe

    2012-08-10

    To describe how virtual patients are being used to simulate real-life clinical scenarios in undergraduate pharmacy education in Europe. One hundred ninety-four participants at the 2011 Congress of the European Pharmaceutical Students Association (EPSA) completed an exploratory cross-sectional survey instrument. Of the 46 universities and 23 countries represented at the EPSA Congress, only 12 students from 6 universities in 6 different countries reported having experience with virtual patient technology. The students were satisfied with the virtual patient technology and considered it more useful as a teaching and learning tool than an assessment tool. Respondents who had not used virtual patient technology expressed support regarding its potential benefits in pharmacy education. French and Dutch students were significantly less interested in virtual patient technology than were their counterparts from other European countries. The limited use of virtual patients in pharmacy education in Europe suggests the need for initiatives to increase the use of virtual patient technology and the benefits of computer-assisted learning in pharmacy education.

  15. Supporting students' knowledge integration with technology-enhanced inquiry curricula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Jennifer Lopseen

    Dynamic visualizations of scientific phenomena have the potential to transform how students learn and understand science. Dynamic visualizations enable interaction and experimentation with unobservable atomic-level phenomena. A series of studies clarify the conditions under which embedding dynamic visualizations in technology-enhanced inquiry instruction can help students develop robust and durable chemistry knowledge. Using the knowledge integration perspective, I designed Chemical Reactions, a technology-enhanced curriculum unit, with a partnership of teachers, educational researchers, and chemists. This unit guides students in an exploration of how energy and chemical reactions relate to climate change. It uses powerful dynamic visualizations to connect atomic level interactions to the accumulation of greenhouse gases. The series of studies were conducted in typical classrooms in eleven high schools across the country. This dissertation describes four studies that contribute to understanding of how visualizations can be used to transform chemistry learning. The efficacy study investigated the impact of the Chemical Reactions unit compared to traditional instruction using pre-, post- and delayed posttest assessments. The self-monitoring study used self-ratings in combination with embedded assessments to explore how explanation prompts help students learn from dynamic visualizations. The self-regulation study used log files of students' interactions with the learning environment to investigate how external feedback and explanation prompts influence students' exploration of dynamic visualizations. The explanation study compared specific and general explanation prompts to explore the processes by which explanations benefit learning with dynamic visualizations. These studies delineate the conditions under which dynamic visualizations embedded in inquiry instruction can enhance student outcomes. The studies reveal that visualizations can be deceptively clear

  16. Technology's Potential, Promise for Enhancing Student Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golden, Michael

    2004-01-01

    Technology is a tool that has the potential to empower educational leaders at all levels--whether they are superintendents, principals, teachers, board members or state officials--as well as to redefine what education means in the 21st century. Technology provides more accurate information and advanced communication capabilities. Technology can be…

  17. Technological Literacy for All: A Course Designed to Raise the Technological Literacy of College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baskette, Kimberly G.; Fantz, Todd D.

    2013-01-01

    Understanding what technology is, and is not, is the first step in becoming technologically literate. One should also understand how technology is created, how it works, how it shapes society, and how society shapes technology. This study was designed to gauge the ability of a single-semester course to raise students' technological literacy as…

  18. Implementing digital technology to enhance student learning of pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farah, C S; Maybury, T

    2009-08-01

    The introduction of digital technologies into the dental curriculum is an ongoing feature of broader changes going on in tertiary education. This report examines the introduction of digital virtual microscopy technology into the curriculum of the School of Dentistry at the University of Queensland (UQ) in Brisbane, Australia. Sixty students studying a course in pathology in 2005 were introduced to virtual microscopy technology alongside the more traditional light microscope and then asked to evaluate their own learning outcomes from this technology via a structured 5-point LIKART survey. A wide variety of questions dealing the pedagogic implications of the introduction of virtual microscopy into pathology were asked of students with the overall result being that it positively enhanced their learning of pathology via digital microscopic means. The success of virtual microscopy in dentistry at UQ is then discussed in the larger context of changes going on in tertiary education. In particular, the change from the print-literate tradition to the electronic one, that is from 'literacy to electracy'. Virtual microscopy is designated as a component of this transformation to electracy. Whilst traditional microscopic skills may still be valued in dental curricula, the move to virtual microscopy and computer-assisted, student-centred learning of pathology appears to enhance the learning experience in relation to its effectiveness in helping students engage and interact with the course material.

  19. Student Views of Technology-Mediated Written Corrective Feedback

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærgaard, Hanne Wacher

    2017-01-01

    and practices concerning the specific – and time-consuming – language-teacher activity of providing WCF and 2) potential changes in student attitudes when technology is used to mediate the feedback. At the core of the study is an eight-month intervention which was carried out with three teachers of English...

  20. Diesel Technology: Engines. Second Edition. Teacher Edition [and] Student Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbieri, Dave; Miller, Roger; Kellum, Mary

    This diesel technology series offers secondary and postsecondary students an opportunity for learning required skills in the diesel industry. It aligns with the medium/heavy duty truck task list developed by the National Automotive Technicians Education Foundation and used by the National Institute for Automotive Service Excellence in…

  1. Voice Assessment of Student Work: Recent Studies and Emerging Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckhouse, Barry; Carroll, Rebecca

    2013-01-01

    Although relatively little attention has been given to the voice assessment of student work, at least when compared with more traditional forms of text-based review, the attention it has received strongly points to a promising form of review that has been hampered by the limits of an emerging technology. A fresh review of voice assessment in light…

  2. The Relationship Between Student and Faculty Attitudes Toward Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnell, Virginia

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine student and faculty attitudes toward computer technology in advanced arts classes at a southeastern university in the United States. This one semester study was focused on the traditional arts disciplines of art, dance, music, and theatre. This correlational analysis limited to faculty members and students…

  3. Diesel Technology: Brakes. Teacher Edition [and] Student Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilley, Robert; Scarberry, Terry; Kellum, Mary

    This document contains teacher and student materials for a course on brakes in the diesel technology curriculum. The course consists of 12 units organized in three sections. The three units of the introductory section cover: (1) brakes; (2) wheel bearings and seals; and (3) antilock brake systems. The second section, Hydraulic Brakes, contains the…

  4. Changing Technology = Empowering Students through Media Literacy Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Abreu, Belinha

    2010-01-01

    Background: As the world is changing quickly due to the technological advances, educators are looking at ways in which to empower their students' learning with digital platforms. Media literacy education is key for how this can happen in the 21st century classroom which seeks to promote learning without censoring the learner. Considering how media…

  5. A Financial Technology Entrepreneurship Program for Computer Science Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawler, James P.; Joseph, Anthony

    2011-01-01

    Education in entrepreneurship is becoming a critical area of curricula for computer science students. Few schools of computer science have a concentration in entrepreneurship in the computing curricula. The paper presents Technology Entrepreneurship in the curricula at a leading school of computer science and information systems, in which students…

  6. Dance, Technology, and the Web Culture of Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Jon D.

    2012-01-01

    Media and technological advances over the past decade have significantly influenced teaching--its design, delivery, and interactivity. At the same time, social media now dominates the ways in which most of the students encounter and engage the world. The implications of these developments present a number of critical questions about teaching…

  7. Ethics and Information Technology: Some Principles To Guide Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodi, Sonia

    1998-01-01

    Discusses the ethical challenges of information technology, particularly electronic indexes and the Internet; considers principles to guide students; and discusses possible librarian responses. Topics include Kant's categorical imperative, ownership, right to privacy, social responsibility, self-respect, plagiarism and copyrights, and three…

  8. Students' Use of Mobile Technologies: Motivational Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baytiyeh, Hoda

    2018-01-01

    Mobile technologies are all-pervasive in the current digital generation, and college students rely on their mobile phones to communicate on a daily basis. In the midst of the myriad of applications available to download on the mobile, some tools have become more well-known and more often adopted than others. An example of such a tool is WhatsApp,…

  9. Teaching Using New Technologies and Students Resilience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onofrei, Smaranda Gabriela

    2015-01-01

    Under the conditions of a digital age, new technologies undergo various interpretations, approaches and usages. Education reaches new dimensions at all its levels, by adopting new technologies in order to deeper support modern possibilities of learning that define the new generations: a high degree of digital capabilities, the capacity to…

  10. Simulation technology achievement of students in physical education classes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Тіmoshenko A.V.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Technology of evaluation of progress was studied during employments by physical exercises. Possibility of the use of design method was probed in an educational process during determination of progress of students. The value of mathematical models in pedagogical activity in the field of physical culture and sport is certain. Mathematical models are offered for the evaluation of success of student young people during employments swimming. Possibility of development of models of evaluation of success is rotined on sporting games, track-and-field, gymnastics.

  11. Intentional Planning to Provide Technology to Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flagg-Williams, Joan B.; Rey, Janice M.

    2016-01-01

    Mobile technology plays a prominent role in teaching and learning. To address this vital component of teacher preparation, the education department of a small college provided the freshman class with iPads. iPads were selected because they are common in public schools, lightweight, portable, touch-screen controlled and have an abundance of…

  12. Experimental Research on How Instructing Students to Use Lecture Capture (Podcasting) Technology Affects Student Learning in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, William A., Jr.

    2012-01-01

    Students' use of new technology is prevalent. Many of them own mobile phones, laptop computers, and various entertainment devices. However, they are seldom taught how to maximize these technologies for academic purposes. This experimental study examined whether students who received instructions on how to use podcasts for academic purposes…

  13. Student Disengagement in Higher Education : Two Trends in Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Main

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available As internet-based technologies increasingly colonize learning environments in higher education, they allow purposes contrary to learning to have direct access to students. The internet as a governing metaphor for transparent connectivity and equal access is a red herring because the power relations across the connections are unequal. The internet also functions as a mechanism for the operant conditioning of students by commercial interests and for surveillance and control by political authorities, purposes which can, if not restrained, undermine the intentions of teachers using technology.Teachers should resist fully automating their course management, especially grading and assessment because too much mechanization can only produce reductive thinking.A related trend is the gradual replacement of liberal studies by vocational courses that feature technology as the subject. This cooperates with the aforementioned trend to effectively censor the creative and critical thinking that instructors strive to teach.

  14. Making Use of the New Student Assessment Standards To Enhance Technological Literacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Jill

    2003-01-01

    Describes the student assessment standards outlined in "Advancing Excellence in Technological Literacy: Student Assessment, Professional Development, and Program Standards," a companion to the "Standards for Technological Literacy." Discusses how the standards apply to everyday teaching practices. (JOW)

  15. What Factors Predict Undergraduate Students' Use of Technology for Learning? A Case from Hong Kong

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Chun; Wang, Qiu; Lei, Jing

    2012-01-01

    A sound understanding of technology use from the learners' perspective is crucial. This study intends to contribute to our understanding on student technology use by focusing on identifying the factors that influence students' adoption of technology for learning and the relationships between these factors. Students studying at a Hong Kong…

  16. Addressing the Nets for Students through Constructivist Technology Use in K-12 Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niederhauser, Dale S.; Lindstrom, Denise L.

    2006-01-01

    The National Educational Technology Standards for Students promote constructivist technology use for K-12 students in U.S. schools. In this study, researchers reported on 716 cases in which teachers described technology-based activities they conducted with their students. Narrative analysis was used to examine case transcripts relative to the…

  17. THE USE OF CASE TECHNOLOGIES IN TEACHING STUDENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuliya M. Tsarapkina

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Аbstract. The aim of the article is to consider the possibilities of use of case technologies in educational process of the university; to prove the efficiency and perspectivity of the given method while training the future expertsprofessionalsMethods. Retrospective and abstract analyses of the scientific-theoretical and practical literature are used while describing the history of development of case-study technology and its didactic possibilities. Test materials are used as the measuring tool of dynamics of informative activity of students, changes of level of their knowledge and abilities in the process of skilled-experimental work.Results and scientific novelty. The way of formation of concept «case technology» is shown; examples of various approaches to understanding of the given method are given; author's experience of research of the given problem is described; stages of work with case technology are allocated. It is experimentally proved that case technologies not only help to fix subject knowledge, to find professional the competence, but also promote development of creative thinking, and form skills of behaviour in a group: abilities to operate in a team, to state and defend the point of view, to listen, to carry on dialogue, to ask questions, to operate with the knowledge, building logic schemes of the problem solution. Besides, during the training period using a case technology students study independent ways of knowledge acquisition which are necessary for the modern professional in constantly ever-changing economic and social realities.The case method reveals creative potential, learns to think and operate differently not only students, but also teachers. This method promotes democratisation of educational process, formation of teachers’ progressive thinking, raises motivation of pedagogical activity.Practical significance. The article provides conclusions and recommendations for the use of case technologies in the

  18. The Influence of Interactive Multimedia Technology to Enhance Achievement Students on Practice Skills in Mechanical Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Made Rajendra, I.; Made Sudana, I.

    2018-01-01

    Interactive multimedia technology empowers the educational process by means of increased interaction between teachers and the students. The utilization of technology in the instructional media development has an important role in the increase of the quality of teaching and learning achievements of students. The application of multimedia technology in the instructional media development is able to integrate aspects of knowledge and skills. The success of multimedia technology has revolutionized teaching and learning methods. The design of the study was quasi-experimental with pre and post. The instrument used is the form of questionnaires and tests This study reports research findings indicated that there is a significance difference between the mean performances of students in the experimental group than those students in the control group. The students in the experimental group performed better in mechanical technology practice and in retention test than those in the control group. The study recommended that multimedia instructional tool is an effective tool to enhance achievement students on practice skills in mechanical Technology.

  19. Visible Parts, Invisible Whole: Swedish Technology Student Teachers' Conceptions about Technological Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallström, Jonas; Klasander, Claes

    2017-01-01

    Technological systems are included as a component of national technology curricula and standards for primary and secondary education as well as corresponding teacher education around the world. Little is known, however, of how pupils, students, and teachers conceive of technological systems. In this article we report on a study investigating…

  20. The effectiveness of Family Science and Technology Workshops on parental involvement, student achievement, and student curiosity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosten, Lora Bechard

    The literature suggests that parental involvement in schools results in positive changes in students and that schools need to provide opportunities for parents to share in the learning process. Workshops are an effective method of engaging parents in the education of their children. This dissertation studies the effects of voluntary Family Science and Technology Workshops on elementary children's science interest and achievement, as well as on parents' collaboration in their child's education. The study involved 35 second and third-grade students and their parents who volunteered to participate. The parental volunteers were randomly assigned to either the control group (children attending the workshops without a parent) or the treatment group (children attending the workshops with a parent). The study was conducted in the Fall of 1995 over a four-week period. The Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) and Kruskal-Wallis tests were used to determine the effects of the workshops on children's science achievement and science curiosity, as well as on parents' involvement with their child's education. The study revealed that there was no significant statistical difference at the.05 level between the treatment/control groups in children's science achievement or science curiosity, or in parent's involvement with their children's education. However, the study did focus parental attention on effective education and points the way to more extensive research in this critical learning area. This dual study, that is, the effects of teaching basic technology to young students with the support of their parents, reflects the focus of the Salve Regina University Ph.D. program in which technology is examined in its effects on humans. In essence, this program investigates what it means to be human in an age of advanced technology.

  1. Engaging Students in the Ethics of Engineering and Technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keiko, Yasukawa

    This paper argues that education for engineers and technologists should focus on the ethics of technology and engineering, and not just ethics in technology and engineering projects. It argues that one's expression of their ethical position is linked closely to their identity formation, and is di......, and is different to other "competencies" that are emphasised in engineering and technology education. Principles of sustainable development are proposed as a framework for engaging students in reflecting on their ethical positions and practices.......This paper argues that education for engineers and technologists should focus on the ethics of technology and engineering, and not just ethics in technology and engineering projects. It argues that one's expression of their ethical position is linked closely to their identity formation...

  2. IEngage: Using Technology to Enhance Students' Engagement in a Large Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawang, Sukanlaya; O'Connor, Peter; Ali, Muhammad

    2017-01-01

    This paper aims to answer how we can increase students' engagement in a large class. We hypothesised that the use of KeyPad, an interactive student response system, can lead to enhanced student engagement in a large classroom. We tested a model of classroom technology integration enhancing the students' engagement among first year undergraduate…

  3. Students' Ethical Decision-Making in an Information Technology Context: A Theory of Planned Behavior Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riemenschneider, Cynthia K.; Leonard, Lori N. K.; Manly, Tracy S.

    2011-01-01

    Business educators have increased the focus on ethics in the classroom. In order for students to become ethical professionals, they must first be held to an ethical standard as students. As information technology continues to permeate every aspect of students' lives, it becomes increasingly important to understand student decision-making in this…

  4. Developing an instrument for assessing students' concepts of the nature of technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liou, Pey-Yan

    2015-05-01

    Background:The nature of technology has been rarely discussed despite the fact that technology plays an essential role in modern society. It is important to discuss students' concepts of the nature of technology, and further to advance their technological literacy and adaptation to modern society. There is a need to assess high school students' concepts of the nature of technology. Purpose:This study aims to engage in discourse on students' concepts of the nature of technology based on a proposed theoretical framework. Moreover, another goal is to develop an instrument for measuring students' concepts of the nature of technology. Sample:Four hundred and fifty-five high school students' perceptions of technology were qualitatively analyzed. Furthermore, 530 students' responses to a newly developed questionnaire were quantitatively analyzed in the final test. Design and method:First, content analysis was utilized to discuss and categorize students' statements regarding technology and its related issues. The Student Concepts of the Nature of Technology Questionnaire was developed based on the proposed theoretical framework and was supported by the students' qualitative data. Finally, exploratory factor analysis and reliability analysis were applied to determine the structure of the items and the internal consistency of each scale. Results:Through a process of instrument development, the Student Concepts of the Nature of Technology Questionnaire was shown to be a valid and reliable tool for measuring students' concepts of the nature of technology. This newly developed questionnaire is composed of 29 items in six scales, namely 'technology as artifacts,' 'technology as an innovation change,' 'the current role of technology in society,' 'technology as a double-edged sword,' 'technology as a science-based form,' and 'history of technology.' Conclusions:The Student Concepts of the Nature of Technology Questionnaire has been confirmed as a reasonably valid and reliable

  5. Youtube for millennial nursing students; using internet technology to support student engagement with bioscience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Amy Nb; Barton, Matthew J; Williams-Pritchard, Grant A; Todorovic, Michael

    2018-06-09

    Undergraduate nursing programs typically include students with limited 'on-campus' time who need learning resources that are flexible, technologically appropriate, remotely-accessible (mobile smart devices), and above all, engaging. This has presented academics with challenges surrounding institutional security firewalls, password-access requirements, intellectual property/ownership and staff/student privacy. To overcome these challenges a collection of evidence-based YouTube videos, posted on the Biological Sciences YouTube Channel, supported by the Biosciences in Nurse Education, and underpinned by Benner's pedagogical framework, were developed with the intention of moving students from novice to competent clinical bioscience users. The videos are highly successful; with over 310,000 views, 1.5 million minutes of viewing and more than 5000 subscribers since its inception (YouTube videos was enhanced by their familiarity with the presenter and the breadth of information available in small portions, creating a solid basis for the development of bioscience-competent nursing graduates. Moreover, these open source videos provide a free resource for continual revision and professional development informed by an international minimum bioscience standard for nurses post registration. Crown Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Student Engagement and Completion in Precalculus Precalculus Mega Section: Efficiently Assisting Student Engagement and Completion with Communications and Information Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brusi, Rima; Portnoy, Arturo; Toro, Nilsa

    2013-01-01

    The Precalculus Mega Section project was developed with the main purpose of improving the overall performance of the student body in Precalculus, an important gatekeeper course that affects student engagement and completion, with typical drop/failure rates of over 50 percent. Strategies such as integration of technology and additional practice…

  7. Interdisciplinary project-based learning: technology for improving student cognition

    OpenAIRE

    Natalia Stozhko; Boris Bortnik; Ludmila Mironova; Albina Tchernysheva; Ekaterina Podshivalova

    2015-01-01

    The article studies a way of enhancing student cognition by using interdisciplinary project-based learning (IPBL) in a higher education institution. IPBL is a creative pedagogic approach allowing students of one area of specialisation to develop projects for students with different academic profiles. The application of this approach in the Ural State University of Economics resulted in a computer-assisted learning system (CALS) designed by IT students. The CALS was used in an analytical chemi...

  8. Internet and information technology use by dental students in Chile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uribe, S; Mariño, R J

    2006-08-01

    As part of a larger cross-country survey of dental students, students from the School of Dentistry, The University of Valparaiso, were invited to participate in a study to describe their use of information and communication technology (ICT). Information was derived from a 124-item questionnaire which included 14 socio-demographic items and 29 items asking about ICT use. ICT items were derived from a University of Birmingham, UK, battery. Data was collected in July and August 2004. A total of 162 of the 249 dental students participated in the study. The average age of students was 21.0 years (SD 2.4 years). The majority of participants (62.1%) were female. All participants had access to a computer, and 96.4% used the Internet. Most students had home Internet connections (73.4%). The most commonly used Internet sites on at least a weekly basis were: email (92.2%); and search engines (88.3%). However, a very few (21.1%) used the Internet to search for dental information for their studies on at least a weekly basis. Furthermore, although the majority (70.4%) found Internet use easy/very easy, 56.2% indicated that any search for information was easy/very easy. The majority (72.2%) indicated that the use of virtual education would not affect their class attendance. The final multivariate model explained 26% of the variance in ICT use, significant predictors for ICT use were gender, year of study, level of difficulty in using Internet, and place of Internet use. However, Internet use was mostly for non-dental purposes.

  9. Improving Technological Competency in Nursing Students: The Passport Project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie Edwards

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Integration of informatics competency into a nursing curriculum is important to ensure success throughout the education and career of contemporary nursing students. As enrollment in nursing programs increases, the diverse population of students from many different cultural and socioeconomic backgrounds presents a challenge for faculty in addressing unique learning needs. Competency in informatics will allow the beginning nursing student to navigate the on-line teaching software used by colleges. With rigorous expectations in nursing programs, students may feel overwhelmed with assignments, organization, and time management. Frustration may build when students struggle with basic informatics competency, often leaving them unable to navigate instructional websites or work with necessary on-line learning content. The purpose of this project, Passport Project for Nursing Success, was to assess the skills, knowledge, and informatics comfort level of students, while providing computer training and teaching for beginning nursing students in an undergraduate nursing program in Central Illinois. The community college encompassed students from a ten county area, with 20 percent of the student population enrolled in the Applied Science curriculum. Initial implementation occurred prior to the students' first nursing course and emphasized basic skills necessary to navigate on-line learning software, library search engines, and electronic communication. The greatest barrier to successful implementation was faculty resistance and academic support during completion of the initial implementation of the Passport Project. Post- project surveys indicated overwhelming student support for the education received and improved retention rates of first semester nursing students.

  10. Developing Technological Literacy with All Students in Mind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clausen, Courtney K.; Greenhaigh, Scott D.

    2017-01-01

    As U.S. public schools continue to diversify, it is necessary for educators to find ways to meet all students' needs in the classroom. By beginning small, with some of the teaching ideas presented within this article such as learning about and supporting your students' cultural competencies and integrating students' backgrounds and interests into…

  11. Technology Management Education for Students with Educational Background of Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoyama, Atsushi; Abe, Atsushi

    Japanese industry has been encouraged to transform from a mode of ‘recovery’ to one of 'front-runner' in effective innovation and creation of new businesses and markets based in accomplishments of basic research. Graduate School of Technology Management at Ritsumeikan University strives to not only offer knowledge and skills, but also business experiences to its students so that they may acquire the abilities to discover and solve practical problems logically, analytically and systematically. To achieve these aims, it has inaugurated the Ritsumeikan University Practicum Program by enhancing existing internship programs. Under the guidance of its faculties, this program will allow its students a chance to set and solve actual problems in real world business environments.

  12. Are Digital Natives a Myth or Reality? University Students' Use of Digital Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margaryan, Anoush; Littlejohn, Allison; Vojt, Gabrielle

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the extent and nature of university students' use of digital technologies for learning and socialising. The findings show that students use a limited range of mainly established technologies. Use of collaborative knowledge creation tools, virtual worlds, and social networking sites was low. "Digital natives" and students of…

  13. Testing the Utility of Person-Environment Correspondence Theory with Instructional Technology Students in Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkmen, Serkan

    2012-01-01

    The main objective of this study was to examine the validity and usefulness of the person-environment correspondence theory with instructional technology students in Turkey. The participants included 211 students and three teachers. Results revealed that instructional technology students value achievement most and that they believe that entering a…

  14. Patent Information Use in Engineering Technology Design: An Analysis of Student Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Margaret; Zwicky, Dave

    2017-01-01

    How might engineering technology students make use of patent information in the engineering design process? Librarians analyzed team project reports and personal reflections created by students in an undergraduate mechanical engineering technology design course, revealing that the students used patents to consider the patentability of their ideas,…

  15. Digital Natives: Fifth-Grade Students' Authentic and Ritualistic Engagement with Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietrich, Trevor; Balli, Sandra J.

    2014-01-01

    Thirty four fifth-grade students were interviewed about classroom learning and technology. Interview data were considered through Schlechty's (2002) levels of engagement framework to explore students' authentic or ritualistic engagement during technology supported lessons. Student engagement is defined as interest in and commitment to learning.…

  16. Fostering Entrepreneurship: an Empirical study of Entrepreneurial mind set of Engineering and Technology students in Pakistan

    OpenAIRE

    Aslam, Tahseen Mahmood; Asghar, Muhammad Zaheer; Liñán, Francisco (Coordinador); Guzmán Cuevas, Joaquín J. (Coordinador)

    2011-01-01

    Purpose- Entrepreneurship is usually considered only subject of business students. Due to lack of knowledge of entrepreneurship and entrepreneurial skills engineering and technology education students are left behind in entrepreneurial activities. In order to add to literature on forecasting entrepreneurial intentions this research paper aims to examine levels of Entrepreneurial Intentions amongst Engineering and Technology students in Pakistan. Theoretical Framework- This research is bas...

  17. Comic Relief: Graduate Students Address Multiple Meanings for Technology Integration with Digital Comic Creation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sockman, Beth Rajan; Sutton, Rhonda; Herrmann, Michele

    2016-01-01

    This study determined the usefulness of digital comic creation with 77 graduate students in a teacher technology course. Students completed an assigned reading and created digital comics that addressed technology integration concerns in the schools and society. Using practical action research, 77 student-created comics were analyzed. The findings…

  18. Improving Undergraduate Student Satisfaction with the Consumer Behavior Course: Will Interactive Technology Help?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eastman, Jacqueline K.; Iyer, Rajesh; Eastman, Kevin L.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we measure the impact of interactive technology on student satisfaction and find support for the hypothesis that students who find a class is more interesting because of the use of interactive technology will be more satisfied with the course. The results also support the hypothesis that if students like the course, they will be…

  19. METASYSTEMIC TECHNOLOGY OF INSTRUCTION, STUDENT RESEARCH AND INNOVATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dumitru BALANEL

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Metasystemic technology of training, student research and innovation (D.Balanel – MTTRI is the development of educational technology J.F. Herbart by cybernetic, metasystem approach, feedbacks, diffusion of knowledges, com­petences in real time, intuition and with application in high education. “Metasystemic technology training, student research and innovation (D.Balanel” is introducing in science by author. Technology is based on metasystem, including pedagogy, psychology, management, cybernetics, mathematics.The paper discusses training, student-centered and competence-centered, the equation of training, equation of training with notes early, appropriate to Bologna Process, ways to educate interest and research capabilities, innovation of students; studying the factors that determine the student make transition to self-knowledge accumulation, learn with satisfaction the research and innovation, transition from apperception to intuition. The author relies on metasystemic training technology, skills to work in real time, using student thesaurus from computer science, informatics and history of cybernetics; learn experience and performance of the most eminent personalities in the development of computer science and cybernetics, Norbert Wiener and Alain Turing, William Ross Ashby and John von Neumann, others personalities, holding the Turing and Neumann and other Awards in cybernetics and informatics . Scientific education of students includes identifying scientific issues, enrollment of students in research. Identifying the scientific problems inherited as millennial problems in mathematics and computer science, current issues and future of science; incentives in applying forces young people to solve them. The enrollment of students in scientific work is done by conducting research with students on issues of university research in the scientific teams, scientific laboratories and simulators, training. The result of "IRI–triangle activity

  20. Student Teachers of Technology and Design: Can Short Periods of STEM-Related Industrial Placement Change Student Perceptions of Engineering and Technology?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Ken S.

    2012-01-01

    This is a report, on a small-scale case study, of a programme of short industrial placements (5 day block) for student teachers of technology and design in Northern Ireland. Such placements increase student awareness and understanding of the nature of Engineering and Technology and therefore better prepare them to teach these subjects, as integral…

  1. Hidden Disruptions: Technology and Technological Literacy as Influences on Professional Writing Student Teams

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGrady, Lisa

    2010-01-01

    This article reports on a study designed to explore whether and in what ways individual students' technological literacies might impact collaborative teams. For the collaborative team discussed in this article, technological literacy--specifically, limited repertoires for solving technical problems, clashes between document management strategies,…

  2. Starting a New Technology Course?: An Opportunity to Develop Student Technological Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moye, Johnny J.

    2008-01-01

    Starting a new course can be intimidating, especially if the person is the first to teach it in his or her school district. A teacher must take many things into consideration when constructing the content for a new course. The primary focus should be on the development of student technological literacy. The International Technology Education…

  3. Understanding Student Teachers' Behavioural Intention to Use Technology: Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) Validation and Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Kung-Teck; Osman, Rosma bt; Goh, Pauline Swee Choo; Rahmat, Mohd Khairezan

    2013-01-01

    This study sets out to validate and test the Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) in the context of Malaysian student teachers' integration of their technology in teaching and learning. To establish factorial validity, data collected from 302 respondents were tested against the TAM using confirmatory factor analysis (CFA), and structural equation…

  4. Technology to Advance High School and Undergraduate Students with Disabilities in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leddy, Mark H.

    2010-01-01

    Americans with disabilities are underemployed in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) at higher rates than their nondisabled peers. This article provides an overview of the National science Foundation's Research in Disabilities Education (RDE) program, of technology use by students with disabilities (SWD) in STEM, and of…

  5. Teaching of students technology early professional orientation of schoolchildren

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilmanshina, S. I.; Sagitova, R. N.; Gilmanshin, I. R.; Kamaleeva, A. R.

    2017-09-01

    The necessity of early professional orientation of schoolchildren on the engineering profession and a new type of teacher was proved. Theoretically substantiated and experimentally tested pedagogical conditions of training of students - future teachers of technology early professional orientation of schoolchildren in the system of university preparation of teacher of a new type. This development of courses of special disciplines, aimed at developing of future teachers of readiness for early career guidance activities; development of interactive group projects for schoolchildren of different age groups (including primary school), expanding their understanding of the world of professions; practical testing of career guidance projects dealing with children’s audience.

  6. E-Learning Interactions, Information Technology Self Efficacy and Student Achievement at the University of Sharjah, UAE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abulibdeh, Enas Said; Hassan, Sharifah Sariah Syed

    2011-01-01

    The purpose for this study is to validate a model of student interactions (student-content, student-instructor and student-student interactions and vicarious interaction), information technology self efficacy and student achievement. Investigation of the relationships was undertaken with structural equation modeling analyses, in a study with 250…

  7. Developing an Instrument for Assessing Students' Concepts of the Nature of Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liou, Pey-Yan

    2015-01-01

    Background: The nature of technology has been rarely discussed despite the fact that technology plays an essential role in modern society. It is important to discuss students' concepts of the nature of technology, and further to advance their technological literacy and adaptation to modern society. There is a need to assess high school students'…

  8. The influence of interactive technology on student performance in an Oklahoma secondary Biology I program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feltman, Vallery

    Over the last decade growth in technologies available to teach students and enhance curriculum has become an important consideration in the educational system. The profile of today's secondary students have also been found to be quite different than those of the past. Their learning styles and preferences are issues that should be addressed by educators. With the growth and availability of new technologies students are increasingly expecting to use these as learning tools in their classrooms. This study investigates how interactive technology may impact student performance. This study specifically focuses on the use of the Apple Ipad in 4 Biology I classrooms. This study used an experimental mixed method design to examine how using Ipads for learning impacted student achievement, motivation to learn, and learning strategies. Qualitatively the study examined observed student behaviors and student perceptions regarding the use of interactive technologies. Data was analyzed using descriptive statistics, t-tests, 2-way ANOVAs, and qualitative analysis. Quantitatively the results revealed no significant difference between students who used the interactive technology to learn and those who did not. Qualitative data revealed behaviors indicative of being highly engaged with the subject matter and the development of critical thinking skills which may improve student performance. Student perceptions also revealed overall positive experiences with using interactive technology in the classroom. It is recommended that further studies be done to look at using interactive technologies for a longer period of time using multiple subjects areas. This would provide a more in-depth exploration of interactive technologies on student achievement.

  9. Sleeping with technology: cognitive, affective, and technology usage predictors of sleep problems among college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, Larry; Carrier, Louis M; Miller, Aimee; Rokkum, Jeffrey; Ruiz, Abraham

    2016-03-01

    Sleep problems related to technology affect college students through several potential mechanisms including displacement of sleep due to technology use, executive functioning abilities, and the impact of emotional states related to stress and anxiety about technology availability. In the present study, cognitive and affective factors that influence technology usage were examined for their impact upon sleep problems. More than 700 US college students completed an online questionnaire addressing technology usage, anxiety/dependence, executive functioning, nighttime phone usage, bedtime phone location, and sleep problems. A path model controlling for background variables was tested using the data. The results showed that executive dysfunction directly predicted sleep problems as well as affected sleep problems through nighttime awakenings. In addition, anxiety/dependence increased daily smartphone usage and also increased nighttime awakenings, which, in turn, affected sleep problems. Thus, both the affective and cognitive factors that influence technology usage affected sleep problems. Copyright © 2016 National Sleep Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Perceptions of pharmacy students, faculty members, and administrators on the use of technology in the classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiVall, Margarita V; Hayney, Mary S; Marsh, Wallace; Neville, Michael W; O'Barr, Stephen; Sheets, Erin D; Calhoun, Larry D

    2013-05-13

    To gather and evaluate the perceptions of students, faculty members, and administrators regarding the frequency and appropriateness of classroom technology use. Third-year pharmacy students and faculty members at 6 colleges and schools of pharmacy were surveyed to assess their perceptions about the type, frequency, and appropriateness of using technology in the classroom. Upper-level administrators and information technology professionals were also interviewed to ascertain overall technology goals and identify criteria used to adopt new classroom technologies. Four hundred sixty-six students, 124 faculty members, and 12 administrators participated in the survey. The most frequently used and valued types of classroom technology were course management systems, audience response systems, and lecture capture. Faculty members and students agreed that faculty members appropriately used course management systems and audience response systems. Compared with their counterparts, tech-savvy, and male students reported significantly greater preference for increased use of classroom technology. Eighty-six percent of faculty members reported having changed their teaching methodologies to meet student needs, and 91% of the students agreed that the use of technology met their needs. Pharmacy colleges and schools use a variety of technologies in their teaching methods, which have evolved to meet the needs of the current generation of students. Students are satisfied with the appropriateness of technology, but many exhibit preferences for even greater use of technology in the classroom.

  11. Principlesand technology competence approach to formation of professional career students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. S. Biskup

    2016-03-01

    In general, the article features acquired theoretical justification of career development of students in conjunction with practical mechanisms for achieving the appropriate level of career competence.

  12. Formation of a New Entity to Support Effective Use of Technology in Medical Education: The Student Technology Committee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shenson, Jared Andrew; Adams, Ryan Christopher; Ahmed, S Toufeeq; Spickard, Anderson

    2015-09-17

    As technology in medical education expands from teaching tool to crucial component of curricular programming, new demands arise to innovate and optimize educational technology. While the expectations of today's digital native students are significant, their experience and unique insights breed new opportunities to involve them as stakeholders in tackling educational technology challenges. The objective of this paper is to present our experience with a novel medical student-led and faculty-supported technology committee that was developed at Vanderbilt University School of Medicine to harness students' valuable input in a comprehensive fashion. Key lessons learned through the initial successes and challenges of implementing our model are also discussed. A committee was established with cooperation of school administration, a faculty advisor with experience launching educational technologies, and a group of students passionate about this domain. Committee membership is sustained through annual selective recruitment of interested students. The committee serves 4 key functions: acting as liaisons between students and administration; advising development of institutional educational technologies; developing, piloting, and assessing new student-led educational technologies; and promoting biomedical and educational informatics within the school community. Participating students develop personally and professionally, contribute to program implementation, and extend the field's understanding by pursuing research initiatives. The institution benefits from rapid improvements to educational technologies that meet students' needs and enhance learning opportunities. Students and the institution also gain from fostering a campus culture of awareness and innovation in informatics and medical education. The committee's success hinges on member composition, school leadership buy-in, active involvement in institutional activities, and support for committee initiatives. Students

  13. The BERG faculty students readiness for information technologies study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Horovèák Pavel

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available The contribution deals with the reconnaissance of our students’ readiness to study information technologies, its interpretation, comparison with some published data as well as with a completion and evaluation of the reconnaissance. It specifies methods and processes of evaluation, structure, sections and questions of the reconnaissance. The reconnaissance was oriented particularly to the evaluation of knowledge in the information technologies area acquired at secondary schools. It was completed in a classical paper form as a preparation for the realization and utilization of questionnaire in the electronic form. The following is constructed using modern internet and database technologies and presents extensive possibilities of evaluation answers respondents. The results of the reconnaissance are presented in the form distribution (sex, domicile, secondary school, secondary school influence, work with a computer, operating and exploitation of internet technologies, familiarity with operating systems and typical applications software and programming languages as well as the interest in information technologies of respondents. The results are compared with some other published data and future perspectives of completion and its evaluation of completion are outlined.

  14. Breaking through barriers: using technology to address executive function weaknesses and improve student achievement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, David M

    2014-01-01

    Assistive technologies provide significant capabilities for improving student achievement. Improved accessibility, cost, and diversity of applications make integration of technology a powerful tool to compensate for executive function weaknesses and deficits and their impact on student performance, learning, and achievement. These tools can be used to compensate for decreased working memory, poor time management, poor planning and organization, poor initiation, and decreased memory. Assistive technology provides mechanisms to assist students with diverse strengths and weaknesses in mastering core curricular concepts.

  15. Can a Tablet Device Alter Undergraduate Science Students' Study Behavior and Use of Technology?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Neil P.; Ramsay, Luke; Chauhan, Vikesh

    2012-01-01

    This article reports findings from a study investigating undergraduate biological sciences students' use of technology and computer devices for learning and the effect of providing students with a tablet device. A controlled study was conducted to collect quantitative and qualitative data on the impact of a tablet device on students' use of…

  16. Turkish University Students' Technology Use Profiles and Their Thoughts about Distance Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baran, Bahar; Kilic, Eylem; Bakar Corez, Aysegul; Cagiltay, Kursat

    2010-01-01

    This study presents the results of a survey implemented to investigate Turkish university students' technology use profile and their thoughts about distance education. The sample of the study is 6504 students from four universities in Turkey. The results of the study are reported in five main sections: 1) demographic information of the students,…

  17. Assistive Technology for Students with Disabilities: A Legal Analysis of Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etscheidt, Susan Larson

    2016-01-01

    Individualized Education Program (IEP) teams are required by the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) to consider a student's need for assistive technology (AT). Despite this legal requirement, AT supports are often not available to students with disabilities. Many students with disabilities and their families have addressed the…

  18. Technology: Student Animation Projects: An Avenue to Promote Creativity and Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegle, Del

    2014-01-01

    Using readily available technology, students of all ages can easily create impressive animated products. Animation allows educators to capitalize on the natural desire that students of all ages hold to tell stories and share their understanding of the world. In the course of planning their animations, students conduct research on topics, organize…

  19. Meeting the Assistive Technology Needs of Students with Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heller, Kathryn Wolff; Mezei, Peter J.; Avant, Mary Jane Thompson

    2009-01-01

    Students with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) have a degenerative disease that requires ongoing changes in assistive technology (AT). The AT team needs to be knowledgeable about the disease and its progression in order to meet these students' changing needs in a timely manner. The unique needs of students with Duchenne muscular dystrophy in…

  20. Teaching Mathematical Problem Solving to Middle School Students in Math, Technology Education, and Special Education Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottge, Brian A.; Heinrichs, Mary; Mehta, Zara Dee; Rueda, Enrique; Hung, Ya-Hui; Danneker, Jeanne

    2004-01-01

    This study compared two approaches for teaching sixth-grade middle school students to solve math problems in math, technology education, and special education classrooms. A total of 17 students with disabilities and 76 students without disabilities were taught using either enhanced anchored instruction (EAI) or text-based instruction coupled with…

  1. Variability in University Students' Use of Technology: An "Approaches to Learning" Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mimirinis, Mike

    2016-01-01

    This study reports the results of a cross-case study analysis of how students' approaches to learning are demonstrated in blended learning environments. It was initially propositioned that approaches to learning as key determinants of the quality of student learning outcomes are demonstrated specifically in how students utilise technology in…

  2. Using Technology-Enhanced, Cooperative, Group-Project Learning for Student Comprehension and Academic Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tlhoaele, Malefyane; Suhre, Cor; Hofman, Adriaan

    2016-01-01

    Cooperative learning may improve students' motivation, understanding of course concepts, and academic performance. This study therefore enhanced a cooperative, group-project learning technique with technology resources to determine whether doing so improved students' deep learning and performance. A sample of 118 engineering students, randomly…

  3. The Scope of Assistive Technology in Learning Process of Students with Blindness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleem, Saira; Sajjad, Shahida

    2016-01-01

    This study was carried out to investigate the scope of assistive technology in learning process of students with blindness. The sample of this study included 56 students with blindness between the ages of 11-22 years from secondary level of education. These students were selected through convenient sampling from five special schools located in…

  4. Assistive Technology Competencies of Teachers of Students with Visual Impairments: A Comparison of Perceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Li; Smith, Derrick W.; Parker, Amy T.; Griffin-Shirley, Nora

    2011-01-01

    This study surveyed teachers of students with visual impairments in Texas on their perceptions of a set of assistive technology competencies developed for teachers of students with visual impairments by Smith and colleagues (2009). Differences in opinion between practicing teachers of students with visual impairments and Smith's group of…

  5. Student Reactions to Classroom Management Technology: Learning Styles and Attitudes toward Moodle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Christina; Ackerman, David

    2015-01-01

    The authors look at student perceptions regarding the adoption and usage of Moodle. Self-efficacy theory and the Technology Acceptance Model were applied to understand student reactions to instructor implementation of classroom management software Moodle. They also looked at how the learning styles of students impacted their reactions to Moodle.…

  6. Preferences and Practices among Students Who Read Braille and Use Assistive Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Andrea, Frances Mary

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Students who read braille use assistive technology to engage in literacy tasks and to access the general curriculum. There is little research on the ways in which technology has changed the reading and writing practices and preferences of students who use braille, nor is there much research on how assistive technology is learned by…

  7. Mobile technologies in teaching a foreign language to non-linguistic major students

    OpenAIRE

    KAPRANCHIKOVA KSENIYA

    2014-01-01

    The paper addresses methodological potential of mobile technologies in teaching a foreign language to non-linguistic students. The author a) gives definition of the term "mobile education", b) suggests a list of mobile technologies used in foreign language teaching; c) develops a list of non-linguistic major students'' language abilities and language skills, which can be developed via mobile technologies.

  8. Engaging College Science Students and Changing Academic Achievement with Technology: A Quasi-Experimental Preliminary Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carle, Adam C.; Jaffee, David; Miller, Deborah

    2009-01-01

    Can modern, computer-based technology engage college students and improve their academic achievement in college? Although numerous examples detail technology's classroom uses, few studies empirically examine whether technologically oriented pedagogical changes factually lead to positive outcomes among college students. In this pilot study, we used…

  9. "Simply the Best": Professors Nominated by Students for Their Exemplary Technology Practices in Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorgensen, Mary; Havel, Alice; Fichten, Catherine; King, Laura; Marcil, Evelyne; Lussier, Alex; Budd, Jillian; Vitouchanskaia, Cristina

    2018-01-01

    Our goal was to explore the technology related pedagogical practices of college professors deemed by their students to be excellent in using technology in their teaching. We explored the views of 114 community/junior college professors who were nominated by their students as excellent in using technology in their teaching using both questionnaires…

  10. Technology and Teacher-Student Interactions: A Review of Empirical Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, Ben

    2018-01-01

    As technology becomes ubiquitous in education, it is critical to understand the ways in which technology influences interactions between teachers and their students. The overarching research question that guided this systematic review was: What does research tell us about how technology influences interactions between teachers and students in K-12…

  11. A Historical Perspective on Student Affairs Professionals' Use of Digital Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabellon, Edmund T.; Payne-Kirchmeier, Julie

    2016-01-01

    This chapter provides a historical perspective of student affairs professionals' use of digital and social technologies in their work on college campuses. The purpose of the chapter is to describe how digital technology tools have evolved since 2005, demonstrate how student affairs technology shifted and changed during this time, and shape student…

  12. Summer Students in Virtual Reality: A Pilot Study on Educational Applications of Virtual Reality Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bricken, Meredith; Byrne, Chris M.

    The goal of this study was to take a first step in evaluating the potential of virtual reality (VR) as a learning environment. The context of the study was The Technology Academy, a technology-oriented summer day camp for students ages 5-18, where student activities center around hands-on exploration of new technology (e.g., robotics, MIDI digital…

  13. Validation of an Instrument to Measure Students' Motivation and Self-Regulation towards Technology Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liou, Pey-Yan; Kuo, Pei-Jung

    2014-01-01

    Background: Few studies have examined students' attitudinal perceptions of technology. There is no appropriate instrument to measure senior high school students' motivation and self-regulation toward technology learning among the current existing instruments in the field of technology education. Purpose: The present study is to validate an…

  14. Using Research to Inform Learning Technology Practice and Policy: A Qualitative Analysis of Student Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Carol; Malfroy, Janne; Gosper, Maree; McKenzie, Jo

    2014-01-01

    As learning technologies are now integral to most higher education student learning experiences, universities need to make strategic choices about what technologies to adopt and how to best support and develop the use of these technologies, particularly in a climate of limited resources. Information from students is therefore a valuable…

  15. How Undergraduate Students Use Social Media Technologies to Support Group Project Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAliney, Peter J.

    2013-01-01

    Technology continues to evolve and become accessible to students in higher education. Concurrently, teamwork has become an important skill in academia and the workplace and students have adopted established technologies to support their learning in both individual and team project work. Given the emergence of social media technologies, I examined…

  16. The Effect of Creative Drama on Student Achievement in the Course of Information Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özek, Müzeyyen Bulut

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the effect of creative drama on student achievement in the Information Technologies course. The study was carried out for the unit "Tomorrow's Technology" which is the first unit of Information Technologies course. For this study, 89 sixth grade students were selected from primary school in…

  17. Student Use of Technology in Class: Engaged or Unplugged?

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Roche, Claire R.; Flanigan, Mary A.

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, there has been a great deal of discussion about the need for student engagement and a meaningful connection in the classroom. With the advent of cell phones, computers and the Internet, students are more connected to, and, at the same time, more disconnected from each other than ever before. We are living in the age of exponential…

  18. Improving Technological Competency in Nursing Students: The Passport Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Julie; O'Connor, Patricia A.

    2011-01-01

    Integration of informatics competency into a nursing curriculum is important to ensure success throughout the education and career of contemporary nursing students. As enrollment in nursing programs increases, the diverse population of students from many different cultural and socioeconomic backgrounds presents a challenge for faculty in…

  19. Students developing resources for students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearce, Michael; Evans, Darrell

    2012-06-01

    The development of new technologies has provided medical education with the ability to enhance the student learning experience and meet the needs of changing curricula. Students quickly adapt to using multimedia learning resources, but these need to be well designed, learner-centred and interactive for students to become significantly engaged. One way to ensure that students become committed users and that resources become distinct elements of the learning cycle is to involve students in resource design and production. Such an approach enables resources to accommodate student needs and preferences, but also provides opportunities for them to develop their own teaching and training skills. The aim of the medical student research project was to design and produce an electronic resource that was focused on a particular anatomical region. The views of other medical students were used to decide what features were suitable for inclusion and the resulting package contained basic principles and clinical relevance, and used a variety of approaches such as images of cadaveric material, living anatomy movies and quizzes. The completed package was assessed using a survey matrix and found to compare well with commercially available products. Given the ever-diversifying arena of multimedia instruction and the ability of students to be fully conversant with technology, this project demonstrates that students are ideal participants and creators of multimedia resources. It is hoped that such an approach will help to further develop the skill base of students, but will also provide an avenue of developing packages that are student user friendly, and that are focused towards particular curricula requirements. © Blackwell Publishing Ltd 2012.

  20. Bringing Technology to Students' Proximity: A Sociocultural Account of Technology-Based Learning Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukama, Evode

    2014-01-01

    This paper depicts a study carried out in Rwanda concerning university students who participated in a contest to produce short documentary films. The purpose of this research is to conceptualize these kinds of technology-based learning projects (TBLPs) through a sociocultural perspective. The methodology included focus group discussions and field…

  1. Getting Students Outside: Using Technology as a Way to Stimulate Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyce, Carrie J.; Mishra, Chandrani; Halverson, Kristy L.; Thomas, Aimée K.

    2014-12-01

    Informal environments provide students with unique experiences that allow them to actively participate in activities while promoting a positive attitude toward and an increased interest in science. One way to enhance informal science experiences is through the integration of mobile technologies. This integration is particularly useful in engaging underrepresented students in learning science. Our informal environmental science program engages underrepresented, fifth-grade students in an informal learning environment supplemented with mobile tablet technology (iPads). The purpose of this study was to explore how fifth-grade students interacted with nature using mobile technology during a nature hike series. Participants included 55 fifth-grade students from two low-income schools. We found that students used the mobile technology to explore nature and stay engaged throughout the hike. The iPads were used as references, data collectors, and engagement tools. Students had an intense desire in returning to the site and responded positively toward interacting with nature. Prior research has indicated that students in this age group are likely to lose interest in science and the incorporation of field-friendly technology that engages students with nature, not technology alone, is a useful tool for keeping students interested in science.

  2. [Guidelines for blood transfusion teaching to medical laboratory technology students].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moncharmont, P; Tourlourat, M; Fourcade, C; Julien, E; Peyrard, T; Cabaud, J-J

    2012-02-01

    The new French law about clinical laboratory medicine, the requirements of the ISO/CEI 15189 standard, the numerous abilities expected from the medical laboratory technologists and their involvement in blood bank management has led the working group "Recherche et démarche qualité" of the French Society of Blood Transfusion to initiate an inventory of blood transfusion teaching syllabus for medical laboratory technology students and to propose transfusion medicine teaching guidelines. Seven worksheets have been established for that purpose including red blood cell antigen typing and antibody screening, blood sampling in immunohaematology, automation, clinical practices, blood products, blood delivery and haemovigilance. These guidelines aim at contributing to the harmonization of transfusion medicine teaching and at providing objective elements to the medical laboratory managers regarding the practical and theoretical skills of theirs collaborators. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Understanding student participation and choice in science and technology education

    CERN Document Server

    Dillon, Justin; Ryder, Jim

    2015-01-01

    Drawing on data generated by the EU’s Interests and Recruitment in Science (IRIS) project, this volume examines the issue of young people’s participation in science, technology, engineering and mathematics education. With an especial focus on female participation, the chapters offer analysis deploying varied theoretical frameworks, including sociology, social psychology and gender studies. The material also includes reviews of relevant research in science education and summaries of empirical data concerning student choices in STEM disciplines in five European countries. Featuring both quantitative and qualitative analyses, the book makes a substantial contribution to the developing theoretical agenda in STEM education. It augments available empirical data and identifies strategies in policy-making that could lead to improved participation—and gender balance—in STEM disciplines. The majority of the chapter authors are IRIS project members, with additional chapters written by specially invited contribu...

  4. Motivation and innovation: Mobile technology acceptance among student teachers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Carlos Sánchez-Prieto

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Mobile technologies constitute a didactic resource with great potential. However, their incorporation process to the classroom is not being implemented in a satisfying way. The future teachers will play a key role in the integration process of these technologies’ integration process in formal education contexts and, therefore, it is essential to know the factors that condition their decision-making process.This article presents the results of a research which analyzes the influence of motivational factors on the behavioral intention to use mobile technologies in the future teaching practice of the students from the Pre-primary Education Degree from the University of Salamanca. With this purpose, we have developed a TAM-based technology adoption model including the following constructs: perceived usefulness, perceived ease of use, perceived enjoyment, resistance to change and behavioral intention. The employed PLS-SEM analysis confirms the validity and reliability of the model. The results of the analysis of the structural model reflect the importance of perceived enjoyment and perceived usefulness in the adoption process, as well as the low relevance of perceived ease of use. In total, the motivational factors enable the prediction of a high percentage of the variance of behavioral intention, which reveals the need to design educational programmes that emphasize on these elements.

  5. Technology and the study of wildfire: Middle school students study the impacts of wildfire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox-Gliessman, D.; Kerski, J.J.

    2005-01-01

    Various technologies that can assist students in exploring the human and environmental impacts of wildfire and in communicating their findings are discussed. Wildfires occur in many parts of the world, and provide an excellent opportunity for students to study local and global interdisciplinary issues using technology. Prior to the beginning of the field study, students take instructions in both their math and science classes about the distinction and appropriate uses of quantitative and qualitative data. Use of computer programs such as Excel spreadsheets which can contain data, and interaction of research and technology group with students, can help them collect best of the information and in making an accurate report.

  6. "Disruptive Technologies", "Pedagogical Innovation": What's New? Findings from an In-Depth Study of Students' Use and Perception of Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conole, Grainne; de Laat, Maarten; Dillon, Teresa; Darby, Jonathan

    2008-01-01

    The paper describes the findings from a study of students' use and experience of technologies. A series of in-depth case studies were carried out across four subject disciplines, with data collected via survey, audio logs and interviews. The findings suggest that students are immersed in a rich, technology-enhanced learning environment and that…

  7. Technology Use as a Support Tool by Secondary Students with Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedges, Susan H.; Odom, Samuel L.; Hume, Kara; Sam, Ann

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine how secondary students with autism spectrum disorder use technology in supportive ways. In this self-report survey study, 472 adolescents with autism spectrum disorder enrolled in high school described the forms of technology they use and purposes for which they use it. Students reported the benefits as…

  8. Socio-Pedagogical Complex as a Pedagogical Support Technology of Students' Social Adaptation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadovaya, Victoriya V.; Simonova, Galina I.

    2016-01-01

    The relevance of the problem stated in the article is determined by the need of developing technological approaches to pedagogical support of students' social adaptation. The purpose of this paper is to position the technological sequence of pedagogical support of students' social adaptation in the activities of the socio-pedagogical complex. The…

  9. An Instrument to Determine the Technological Literacy Levels of Upper Secondary School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luckay, Melanie B.; Collier-Reed, Brandon I.

    2014-01-01

    In this article, an instrument for assessing upper secondary school students' levels of technological literacy is presented. The items making up the instrument emerged from a previous study that employed a phenomenographic research approach to explore students' conceptions of technology in terms of their understanding of the "nature…

  10. What Can Students Learn in an Extended Role-Play Simulation on Technology and Society?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loui, Michael C.

    2009-01-01

    In a small course on technology and society, students participated in an extended role-play simulation for two weeks. Each student played a different adult character in a fictional community, which faces technological decisions in three scenarios set in the near future. The three scenarios involved stem cell research, nanotechnology, and privacy.…

  11. Promising Practices: A Literature Review of Technology Use by Underserved Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zielezinski, Molly B.; Darling-Hammond, Linda

    2016-01-01

    How can technologies and digital learning experiences be used to support underserved, under-resourced, and underprepared students? For many years, educators, researchers, and policy makers looking for strategies to close the achievement gap and improve student learning have sought solutions involving new uses of technology, especially for students…

  12. Self-Directed Learning: College Students' Technology Preparedness Change in the Last 10 Years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caravello, Michael J.; Jiménez, Joel R.; Kahl, Lois J.; Brachio, Brian; Morote, Elsa-Sofia

    2015-01-01

    This study compares a sample of approximately 44 first year college students in 2005 and 2015 on Long Island, New York, in their technology preparedness and self-directed instruction. The researchers used a survey instrument including demographic information focused upon students' preparation for classroom technology in high school and college.…

  13. Attitudes and Behavior of Ajman University of Science and Technology Students towards the Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raman, Rasha Abdel

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the attitudes and behavior of Ajman University of Science and Technology (AUST) students towards the environment according to their gender and college. The research was based on a descriptive approach. The sample consisted of (375) students (230 males and 145 females) from different colleges (Law, Information Technology, Mass…

  14. Examining the Influence of Educational Mobile Application Software on Students' Technology Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twu, Ming-Lii

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this mixed methods study was to employ the International Society for Technology in Education (ISTE) Standards for Students as taxonomy to classify educational mobile application (app) software into seven categories and empirically examine the influence on students' technology literacy. A purposeful sample of fifth grade core subject…

  15. University Students and Ethics of Computer Technology Usage: Human Resource Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyadat, Waleed; Iyadat, Yousef; Ashour, Rateb; Khasawneh, Samer

    2012-01-01

    The primary purpose of this study was to determine the level of students' awareness about computer technology ethics at the Hashemite University in Jordan. A total of 180 university students participated in the study by completing the questionnaire designed by the researchers, named the Computer Technology Ethics Questionnaire (CTEQ). Results…

  16. Developing Musical Creativity: Student and Teacher Perceptions of a High School Music Technology Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Lance D.

    2013-01-01

    Music technology classes designed to use the latest in music software to develop music compositional skills within high school students are becoming more prominent in K-12 education. The purpose of this case study was to describe the development of creativity in high school students through their participation in a music technology course at one…

  17. Utilization of Information and Communication Technologies as a Predictor of Educational Stress on Secondary School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eskicumali, Ahmet; Arslan, Serhat; Demirtas, Zeynep

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the relationship between utilization of information and communication technologies and educational stress. Participants were 411 secondary school students. Educational Stress Scale and Utilization of Information and Communication Technologies Scale were used as measures. The relationships between students'…

  18. Information and Communication Technology Literacy among Student-Teachers in Universities in Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daramola, Florence Olutunu; Yusuf, Mudasiru Olalere; Oyelekan, Oloyede Solomon

    2015-01-01

    The use of information and communication technology (ICT) in the school system is becoming increasingly prominent. This study was conducted to find out the information and communication technology literacy levels among student-teachers in the universities in North-Central Nigeria. The study involved a total of 638 student-teachers out of which 360…

  19. Familiarity with Technology among First-Year Students in Rwandan Tertiary Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byungura, Jean Claude; Hansson, Henrik; Muparasi, Mugabe; Ruhinda, Ben

    2018-01-01

    The more the students get experienced with technologies, the more the need for tertiary education systems to adopt innovative pedagogical strategies for accommodating different learning needs. Depending on students' prior experience with computer-based tools, they may have different degrees of familiarity with new technologies. At University of…

  20. Identify the Motivational Factors to Affect the Higher Education Students to Learn Using Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yau, Hon Keung; Cheng, Alison Lai Fong; Ho, Wing Man

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is twofold. Firstly, engineering students' motivation in using technology for learning in one of Hong Kong universities is investigated. Secondly, new research model about students' perception in using technology for learning is developed. Survey was employed and the questionnaires were distributed to targeted university…

  1. Integration of Technology in Teaching and Learning: Comprehensive Initiatives Enhance Student Engagement and Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nebbergall, Allison

    2012-01-01

    As technology increasingly transforms our daily lives, educators too are seeking strategies and resources that leverage technology to improve student learning. Research demonstrates that high-quality professional development, digital standards-based content, and personalized learning plans can increase student achievement, engagement, and…

  2. Senior Students' Experiences, Perspectives, and Attitudes of Technological Competencies in Nursing Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Patricia C.

    2017-01-01

    Technological standards appear to be needed in undergraduate nursing education, as existing research has yet to establish technological standards for undergraduate nursing students. The purpose of this qualitative study was to examine the lived experiences of senior nursing students with respect to their perceptions regarding exposure to and…

  3. Students' Age Difference of Confidence in Using Technology for Learning in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yau, Hon Keung; Cheng, Alison Lai Fong

    2012-01-01

    Some past studies find that older students have more confidence in using technology for learning than younger students but some other studies find the opposite result. However, it is found that there are a few researches studying on the age difference in the perception of using technology for learning in Hong Kong. Therefore, the aim of the study…

  4. A Quantitative Examination of User Experience as an Antecedent to Student Perception in Technology Acceptance Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Rory

    2013-01-01

    Internet-enabled mobile devices have increased the accessibility of learning content for students. Given the ubiquitous nature of mobile computing technology, a thorough understanding of the acceptance factors that impact a learner's intention to use mobile technology as an augment to their studies is warranted. Student acceptance of mobile…

  5. Love in the Time of Facebook: How Technology Now Shapes Romantic Attachments in College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Michael C.

    2013-01-01

    College counseling clinicians need to understand how students use technology to form, sustain, and end romantic attachments. Students now frequently incorporate aspects of these technologically based interactions, or mediated communications, into counseling sessions and often make important attributions based on them. Heavy daily use of a growing…

  6. Effects of Commercial Web Videos on Students' Attitude toward Learning Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tai, Yaming; Ting, Yu-Liang

    2015-01-01

    This study values the broad range of web videos produced by businesses to introduce new technologies while also promoting their products. When the promoted technology is related to the topic taught in a school course, it may be beneficial for students to watch such videos. However, most students view the web as a source for entertainment, and may…

  7. Impact of Information Technologies on Faculty and Students in Distance Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jensen J.; Alexander, Melody W.; Perreault, Heidi; Waldman, Lila

    2003-01-01

    A survey of distance education technologies received responses from 81 business faculty and 153 students, who indicated that e-mail, Internet lectures/assignments, and discussion groups were most frequently used. There were few differences between teachers and students. A technology's frequent usage and positive impact on productivity did not…

  8. Junior / Community College Students with Learning Disabilities and Their Use of Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Mai Nhu; Fichten, Catherine; King, Laura; Barile, Maria; Mimouni, Zohra; Havel, Alice; Raymond, Odette; Juhel, Jean-Charles; Jorgensen, Shirley; Chauvin, Alexandre; Gutberg, Jennifer; Budd, Jillian; Hewlett, Maureen; Heiman, Tali; Gaulin, Chris; Asuncion, Jennison

    2013-01-01

    Junior / community college students who have learning disabilities (LD), such as dyslexia, often do not maximize their use of information and communication technologies (ICTs) for school work. They do not use many of these technologies nor do they know as much about them as other students. These are the results of an Adaptech Research Network…

  9. Different Backgrounds--Different Priorities? Student Perceptions of a Technology Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eriksson, Miikka J.; Vuojärvi, Hanna

    2014-01-01

    A multitude of studies has assessed the success of different technology initiatives but rarely has the focus been on special groups. This paper examines whether university students with children and those without have different perceptions of a technology initiative where students were able to acquire university sponsored laptops and were provided…

  10. Exploring How Digital Media Technology Can Foster Saudi EFL Students' English Language Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altawil, Abdulmohsin

    2016-01-01

    Digital media technology has become an integral part of daily life for almost all young students, and for the majority of Saudi EFL (English as a Foreign Language) students. Digital media technology may not be limited to one or two kinds; it has various types such as software and programs, devices, application, websites, social media tools, etc.…

  11. Student Teachers' Perceptions on Educational Technologies' Past, Present and Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orhan Goksun, Derya; Filiz, Ozan; Kurt, Adile Askim

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this study is to reveal Computer Education and Instructional Technologies student teachers', who are in a distance teacher education program, perceptions on past, present and educational technologies of future via infographics. In this study, 54 infographics, which were created by student teachers who were enrolled in Special Teaching…

  12. SERVQUAL-Based Measurement of Student Satisfaction with Classroom Instructional Technologies: A 2001 Update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleen, Betty; Shell, L. Wayne

    The researchers, using a variation of the SERVQUAL instrument, repeated a 1999 study to measure students' satisfaction with instructional technology tools used in their classrooms. Student satisfaction varied by course discipline, by instructional technology, by anticipated grade, and by frequency of use. Female respondents were less satisfied…

  13. Enhancing traditional, televised, and videotaped courses with Web-based technologies: a comparison of student satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sole, M L; Lindquist, M

    2001-01-01

    Varied distance learning strategies can be used to deliver nursing courses, including interactive television, videotape, and Web-based approaches. (1) To assess student assess student satisfaction with a critical care elective course offered simultaneously via traditional and distance learning formats in which Web-based strategies were added, and (2) to compare satisfaction of students taking the traditional course versus those taking the class via distance technology. Students (n = 113) who took the course during the spring 1998 and 1999 semesters completed a teacher-constructed evaluation at the end of the semester. Mean ratings on the evaluation were positive. Ratings of interaction, communication with instructor, and facilitation of learning were higher from students who took the traditional course. The application of Web-based technologies may be one factor for the overall course satisfaction. However, it is important to continue to evaluate strategies that work best for students taking courses via distance technology.

  14. Quantity versus Quality: A New Approach to Examine the Relationship between Technology Use and Student Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Jing

    2010-01-01

    The author argues that to examine the relationship between technology use and student outcomes, the quality of technology use--how, and what, technology is used--is a more significant factor than the quantity of technology use--how much technology is used. This argument was exemplified by an empirical study that used both angles to examine the…

  15. Using technology-enhanced, cooperative, group-project learning for student comprehension and academic performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tlhoaele, Malefyane; Suhre, Cor; Hofman, Adriaan

    2016-05-01

    Cooperative learning may improve students' motivation, understanding of course concepts, and academic performance. This study therefore enhanced a cooperative, group-project learning technique with technology resources to determine whether doing so improved students' deep learning and performance. A sample of 118 engineering students, randomly divided into two groups, participated in this study and provided data through questionnaires issued before and after the experiment. The results, obtained through analyses of variance and structural equation modelling, reveal that technology-enhanced, cooperative, group-project learning improves students' comprehension and academic performance.

  16. Student Access to Information Technology and Perceptions of Future Opportunities in Two Small Labrador Communities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Della Healey

    2002-02-01

    Full Text Available The potential of information technology is increasingly being recognized for the access it provides to educational and vocational opportunities. In Canada, many small schools in rural communities have taken advantage of information technologies to help overcome geographic isolation for students. This article is about students in two small and geographically isolated Labrador communities. Twenty senior students were found to have varying degrees of access to information technologies. Differences were found in their perceptions of the benefits of information technology for their educational and vocational futures.

  17. LEARNING TECHNOLOGIES FOR STUDENTS IN THE CLOUD ORIENTED LEARNING ENVIRONMENT OF COMPREHENSIVE EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTIONS

    OpenAIRE

    Svitlana G. Lytvynova

    2015-01-01

    The paper analyzes the «flipped» learning and «Web Quest» technologies. The features of the «flipped» learning technology are generalized, as well as compared with traditional learning, clarified the benefits of the technology for teachers and students, described the features of the technology used by teacher and students, developed a teacher’s and student’s flow chart for preparation to the lesson, generalized control and motivation components for activating learning activities of students, ...

  18. Mars mission program for primary students: Building student and teacher skills in science, technology, engineering and mathematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathers, Naomi; Pakakis, Michael; Christie, Ian

    2011-09-01

    The Victorian Space Science Education Centre (VSSEC) scenario-based programs, including the Mission to Mars and Mission to the Orbiting Space Laboratory, utilize methodologies such as hands-on applications, immersive learning, integrated technologies, critical thinking and mentoring. The use of a scenario provides a real-life context and purpose to what students might otherwise consider disjointed information. These programs engage students in the areas of maths and science, and highlight potential career paths in science and engineering. The introduction of a scenario-based program for primary students engages students in maths and science at a younger age, addressing the issues of basic numeracy and science literacy, thus laying the foundation for stronger senior science initiatives. Primary students absorb more information within the context of the scenario, and presenting information they can see, hear, touch and smell creates a memorable learning and sensory experience. The mission also supports development of teacher skills in the delivery of hands-on science and helps build their confidence to teach science. The Primary Mission to the Mars Base gives primary school students access to an environment and equipment not available in schools. Students wear flight suits for the duration of the program to immerse them in the experience of being an astronaut. Astronauts work in the VSSEC Space Laboratory, which is transformed into a Mars base for the primary program, to conduct experiments in areas such as robotics, human physiology, microbiology, nanotechnology and environmental science. Specialist mission control software has been developed by La Trobe University Centre for Games Technology to provide age appropriate Information and Communication Technology (ICT) based problem solving and support the concept of a mission. Students in Mission Control observe the astronauts working in the space laboratory and talk to them via the AV system. This interactive

  19. Undergraduate Student Nurses' Use of Information and Communication Technology in Their Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honey, Michelle

    2018-01-01

    Students expect to use technology in their study just as they use technology in other aspects of their life. Technology is embedded in the day-to-day work of nursing, and therefore needs to be integrated in education to prepare students to assume professional roles and develop skills for lifelong learning. A quantitative descriptive study, using an anonymous survey, explored how undergraduate student nurses from one New Zealand school of nursing, access information and communication technologies for their learning. In total 226 completed questionnaires were returned (75%). Nearly all students (96%) have smart phones, all students have a computer and 99% use the university learning management system daily or several times a week. The search engine most commonly used to find information for assignments was Google Scholar (91%), with only 78% using subject specific academic databases. Implications from this study include the need for charging stations and further education on information searching.

  20. Technology skills assessment for deaf and hard of hearing students in secondary school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luft, Pamela; Bonello, Mary; Zirzow, Nichole K

    2009-01-01

    To BE COMPETITIVE in the workplace, deaf and hard of hearing students must not only possess basic computer literacy but also know how to use and care for personal assistive and listening technology. An instrument was developed and pilot-tested on 45 middle school and high school deaf and hard of hearing students in 5 public school programs, 4 urban and 1 suburban, to assess these students' current technology skills and to prepare them for post-high school expectations. The researchers found that the students' computer skills depended on their access to technology, which was not always present in the schools. Many students also did not know basic care practices or troubleshooting techniques for their own personal hearing aids (if worn), or how to access or use personal assistive technology.

  1. Use of information and communication technology among dental students at the University of Jordan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajab, Lamis D; Baqain, Zaid H

    2005-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the current knowledge, skills, and opinions of undergraduate dental students at the University of Jordan with respect to information communication technology (ICT). Dental students from the second, third, fourth, and fifth years were asked to complete a questionnaire presented in a lecture at the end of the second semester in the 2002-03 academic year. The response rate was 81 percent. Besides free and unlimited access to computers at the school of dentistry, 74 percent of the students had access to computers at home. However, 44 percent did not use a computer regularly. Male students were more regular and longer users of computers than females (pstudents (70 percent) judged themselves competent in information technology (IT) skills. More males felt competent in basic IT skills than did females (pstudents felt competent in word-processing skills (pstudents. More males used word processing for their studies than females (pStudents used computers for personal activities more frequently than for academic reasons. More males used computers for both academic (pstudents had access to the Internet at the university, and 54 percent had access at home. A high percentage of students (94 percent) indicated they were comfortable using the Internet, 75 percent said they were confident in the accuracy, and 80 percent said they were confident in the relevance of information obtained from the Internet. Most students (90 percent) used email. Most students (83 percent) supported the idea of placing lectures on the web, and 61.2 percent indicated that this would not influence lecture attendance. Students used the Internet more for personal reasons than for the study of dentistry. More clinical students used the Internet for dentistry than preclinical students (pstudents at the University of Jordan have access to substantial IT resources and demonstrated attitudes toward the computer and Internet technology and use that were similar to other

  2. Facebook Usage Pattern of the Students of Mawlana Bhasani Science and Technology University

    OpenAIRE

    N. N., Afroz; R. P., Lima

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Facebook is one of the popular social networking sites. This study investigates Facebook usage pattern of the students" of Mawlana Bhashani Science and Technology University. This research has been conducted over the Bachelor and Master"s degree students from the MBSTU. Frequency distribution, cross tabulation and chi-square test has been applied for data analysis. A self-administered structured close-ended questionnaire used to collect data from 250 students. This research found ...

  3. Anabolic steroid use among students at a British college of technology.

    OpenAIRE

    Williamson, D J

    1993-01-01

    To determine the rate of current or previous use of anabolic steroids by students at a UK college of technology, a questionnaire survey of 687 day students was conducted. The questionnaire began with a general section for all of the students, which ended with the question 'Have you ever used anabolic steroids?'. A further section specifically for anabolic steroid users examined patterns of use, and how certain circumstances might affect the individual's decision to use anabolic steroids. The ...

  4. Evaluating interactive technology for an evolving case study on learning and satisfaction of graduate nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogt, Marjorie A; Schaffner, Barbara H

    2016-07-01

    Nursing education is challenged to prepare students for complex healthcare needs through the integration of teamwork and informatics. Technology has become an important teaching tool in the blended classroom to enhance group based learning experiences. Faculty evaluation of classroom technologies is imperative prior to adoption. Few studies have directly compared various technologies and their impact on student satisfaction and learning. The purpose of this study was to evaluate technology enhanced teaching methods on the learning and satisfaction of graduate students in an advanced pharmacology class using an unfolding case study. After IRB approval, students were randomly assigned to one of three groups: blogging group, wiki group or webinar group. Students completed the evolving case study using the assigned interactive technology. Student names were removed from the case studies. Faculty evaluated the case study using a rubric, while blinded to the assigned technology method used. No significant difference was found on case study grades, the range of grades on the assignment demonstrated little differences between the methods used. Students indicated an overall positive impact related to networking and collaboration on a satisfaction survey. Impact of technology methods needs to be explored in other areas of graduate nursing education. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Edification of Multimedia Resources: Aligning Technology for Student Empowerment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thamarasseri, Ismail

    2014-01-01

    Multimedia offers exciting possibilities for meeting the needs of 21st century learners. Multimedia learning can be defined in a number of ways. Multimedia learning is the delivery of instructional content using multiple modes that include visual and auditory information and students' use of this information to construct knowledge. Today's…

  6. Tangible Technology-Enhanced Learning for Improvement of Student Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barneva, Reneta P.; Gelsomini, Federico; Kanev, Kamen; Bottoni, Paolo

    2018-01-01

    Collaboration among students in the course of learning plays an important role in developing communication skills. In particular, it helps for team building and brainstorming on solutions of complex problems. While an effective group organization is critical for the success of such collaborative learning, many instructors would make arbitrary…

  7. Technology and Pedagogy: Using Big Data to Enhance Student Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinton, Christopher Greg

    2016-01-01

    The "big data revolution" has penetrated many fields, from network monitoring to online retail. Education and learning are quickly becoming part of it, too, because today, course delivery platforms can collect unprecedented amounts of behavioral data about students as they interact with learning content online. This data includes, for…

  8. Fix It with TAPE: Repurposing Technology to Be Assistive Technology for Students with High-Incidence Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouck, Emily C.; Shurr, Jordan C.; Tom, Kinsey; Jasper, Andrea D.; Bassette, Laura; Miller, Bridget; Flanagan, Sara M.

    2012-01-01

    This article discusses how practitioners can repurpose technology--common and socially desirable technology in particular--to be assistive technology for students with high-incidence disabilities. The authors provide a framework for practitioners to consider technology for repurposing: TAPE (Transportable, Available, Practical, Engaging) and…

  9. An Investigation of Factors Affecting Utilization of Information Technology (IT by Agricultural Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoud Rezaei

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The present study was carried out with the aim of investigating factors affecting utilization of information technology by students of agriculture. A survey approach was used in this study and a questionnaire was developed to gather the data. The study population was postgraduate students (MS and PhD of economic and agricultural development faculty in Tehran University who were selected by applying random sampling technique. Sample size for students was 61 persons. Data was analyzed by using SPSS/WIN software. The results of the research indicated that there was a positive significant relationship between using of information technology by students and their age, average, prior experience, information technology skills, innovativeness, perceived ease of use, attitude and self-efficacy. The relationship between computer anxiety and using of IT was negative. Stepwise Regression Analysis showed that innovativeness and attitude predict 53.2 percent of variations of IT use by students.

  10. Nursing students' attitudes toward video games and related new media technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch-Sauer, Judith; Vandenbosch, Terry M; Kron, Frederick; Gjerde, Craig Livingston; Arato, Nora; Sen, Ananda; Fetters, Michael D

    2011-09-01

    Little is known about Millennial nursing students' attitudes toward computer games and new media in nursing education and whether these attitudes differ between undergraduates and graduates. This study elicited nursing students' experience with computer games and new media, their attitudes toward various instructional styles and methods, and the role of computer games and new media technologies in nursing education. We e-mailed all nursing students enrolled in two universities to invite their participation in an anonymous cross-sectional online survey. The survey collected demographic data and participants' experience with and attitudes toward video gaming and multi-player online health care simulations. We used descriptive statistics and logistic regression to compare the differences between undergraduates and graduates. Two hundred eighteen nursing students participated. Many of the nursing students support using new media technologies in nursing education. Nurse educators should identify areas suitable for new media integration and further evaluate the effectiveness of these technologies. Copyright 2011, SLACK Incorporated.

  11. TECHNOLOGIES OF INITIATING STUDENTS INTO INDEPENDENT (SELF-GUIDED ACTIVITY IN SUPPLEMENTARY DISTANCE LEARNING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina V. Abakumova

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The research in question investigates the technologies of initiating independent activity within the framework of distance learning and their psychological aspects. The authors’ classification of educational technologies of initiating students into independent cognitive activity is presented. Such technologies utilize various psychological mechanisms of exciting students’ cognitive interest, intensifying cognitive processes, developing independent activity skills, and, as a result, increase motivation for independent activity and learning on the whole. These include such types of technologies as developmental technologies, interactive technologies, technologies of information transfer, technologies of meaning-making initiation. The research of the attitude of distance learning educators to independent activity of students and the content of the academic courses were done at Moodle-based education programs. The findings show the differences in retention rate among distance learning educators whose competence in terms of initiating students into independent (self-guided activity varies. It’s emphasized that interactive lectures, videoconferences, audio-visual aids, interactive seminars, glossaries, interactive tests are considered the most efficient technologies in initiating students into independent (self-guided activity. The obtained results have made it possible to stress the developmental effect of distance learning technologies and the technologies of initiating students into independent (self-guided activity in various psychic spheres of students: cognitive, individual, emotional. We mention the changes in motivational sphere of students and their meaning-making activity. In the course of correct development of distance learning we notice the development of voluntary and nonvoluntary cognitive activity. A student starts actively participating in educational process, he becomes the creator of his own world.

  12. Teacher Verbal Aggressiveness and Credibility Mediate the Relationship between Teacher Technology Policies and Perceived Student Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finn, Amber N.; Ledbetter, Andrew M.

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we extend previous work on teacher technology policies by refining the teacher technology policies instrument to account for the technology purpose (social, academic) and type (cell phone, laptop/tablet), and examine a model of teacher technology policies and perceived learning. We found that students are more sensitive to policies…

  13. Students' Perceptions of Self-Directed Learning and Collaborative Learning with and without Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, K.; Tsai, P.-S.; Chai, C. S.; Koh, J. H. L.

    2014-01-01

    This study explored students' perceptions of self-directed learning (SDL) and collaborative learning (CL) with/without technology in an information and communications technology-supported classroom environment. The factors include SDL, CL, SDL supported by technology, and CL supported by technology. Based on the literature review, this study…

  14. Technology's Role in Learning at a Commuter Campus: The Student Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckenmeyer, Janet A.; Barczyk, Casimir; Hixon, Emily; Zamojski, Heather; Tomory, Annette

    2016-01-01

    Patterns of technology ownership and usage, as well as skills with and preferences for various technologies, affect the college experience (Educause 2012). Students at a commuter campus of a large Midwestern public university were surveyed about technology and the learning process: 94% of the respondents believed that technology had the potential…

  15. SIMULATIONS IN TECHNOLOGICAL ENVIRONMENTS AS A TOOL FOR TRAINING IN TRANSVERSAL COMPETENCES FOR UNIVERSITY STUDENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mercè Gisbert Cervera

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper consists of a reflection on how the technological environments can play a key role in the current Higher Education scene. This reflection observes the structural configuration and the key agents of the educational process. The content is developed firstly locating the student in the University of the 21st century; the methodological renovation is analyzed from two perspectives: the development of the technologies and the new role of teacher and student in this new scene; finally the simulations in technological environments are proposed as a valuable strategy to give response to the formative needs of the student in the current society.

  16. QUALITATIVE INDICATORS OF EFFICIENCY OF TECHNOLOGIES DEVELOPING ESP COMPETENCE IN STUDENTS MAJORING IN SCIENCES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Наталія Микитинко

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The article is dedicated to identifying and diagnosing qualitative indicators of efficiency of technologies developing ESP competence in students majoring in Sciences, namely: indicators of objective and subjective assessment  of students’ ESP competence, students’ motivation regarding professional choice, organizational features of professional training, its contents, the most popular learning activities, use of active methods of study in educational process. The paradigm of experimental research of efficiency of technologies developing ESP competence in students majoring in Sciences has been defined. Based on the interpretation of the qualitative indicators the hypothesis of efficiency of technologies developing ESP competence in students majoring in Sciences has been proven.

  17. Predicting Middle School Students' Use of Web 2.0 Technologies out of School Using Home and School Technological Variables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Joan E.; Read, Michelle F.; Jones, Sara; Mahometa, Michael

    2015-01-01

    This study used multiple regression to identify predictors of middle school students' Web 2.0 activities out of school, a construct composed of 15 technology activities. Three middle schools participated, where sixth- and seventh-grade students completed a questionnaire. Independent predictor variables included three demographic and five computer…

  18. Student Perceptions of Using Tablet Technology in Post-Secondary Classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mang, Colin F.; Wardley, Leslie J.

    2013-01-01

    This paper assesses students' attitudes towards using tablets, such as the Apple iPad, in university classes. Tablets are found to be a substitute for laptop computers. Students initially expressed a great deal of optimism regarding the technology, and, although their views diminished slightly as they gained experience with using a tablet,…

  19. Internet Self-Efficacy Does Not Predict Student Use of Internet-Mediated Educational Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchanan, Tom; Joban, Sanjay; Porter, Alan

    2014-01-01

    Two studies tested the hypothesis that use of learning technologies among undergraduate psychology students was associated with higher Internet self-efficacy (ISE). In Study 1, the ISE scores of 86 students were found not to be associated with either attitudes towards, or measured use of, blogs and wikis as part of an IT skills course. ISE was…

  20. Investigating the Use of Web 2.0 Technology by Malaysian Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakaria, Mohd Hafiz; Watson, Jason; Edwards, Sylvia L.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Many research have uncovered the use of Web 2.0 technology by students from various countries. Yet, limited studies have been done from the context of developing country such as Malaysia. This paper aims to highlight the development of a survey instrument that captured the use of Web 2.0 applications by Malaysian students for learning.…

  1. Technology Acceptance of Healthcare E-Learning Modules: A Study of Korean and Malaysian Students' Perceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neo, Mai; Park, Heykyung; Lee, Min-Jae; Soh, Jian-Yuan; Oh, Ji-Young

    2015-01-01

    Educators today are moving towards transforming their teaching and learning methods from conventional teacher-centered approaches to student-centered learning approaches with the support of technology so as to better motivate students to participate and engage in their learning process. This study was developed as a joint collaborative effort…

  2. Development of Reading Comprehension Skills among Students with Intellectual Disabilities Using Technologically-Based Reading Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macklin, Ella M.

    2016-01-01

    This research paper reported the results from research conducted regarding technologically-based reading comprehension programs for students who have intellectual disabilities. It provided evidence-based research and theoretical bases for learning (i.e. Zone of Generativity, Constructivism, Self-Efficacy) on the issue of these students not being…

  3. Effects of Mathematics Innovation and Technology on Students Performance in Open and Distance Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Israel, Oginni 'Niyi

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of mathematics innovation and technology on students' academic performance in open and distance learning. Quasi -- experimental research design was adopted for the study. The population for the study consisted of all the 200 level primary education students at the National Open University of Nigeria (Ekiti and…

  4. On the knowledge of students and professors at Eindhoven UNiversity of Technology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eikelder, ten H.M.M.; Meer, van der J.C.

    2007-01-01

    Using methods from statistical learning theory we compute the Vapnik-Chervonenkis dimension of full professors and students of the Eindhoven University of Technology. The results are surprising and disappointing. Furthermore, it is shown that during their study the students must have learned things

  5. The Influence of Interactive Technology on Student Performance in an Oklahoma Secondary Biology I Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feltman, Vallery

    2013-01-01

    Over the last decade growth in technologies available to teach students and enhance curriculum has become an important consideration in the educational system. The profile of today's secondary students have also been found to be quite different than those of the past. Their learning styles and preferences are issues that should be addressed by…

  6. Longitudinal Effects of Technology Integration and Teacher Professional Development on Students' Mathematics Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bicer, Ali; Capraro, Robert M.

    2017-01-01

    MathForward is a program that provides teacher professional development and integrates the use of technology as a tool in the classroom. The present study examined students' mathematics growth from 2012 to 2013 and observed how students' mathematics scores changed after their school implemented the MathForward program. The sample consisted of two…

  7. Effect of Middle School Students' Motivation to Learn Technology on Their Attitudes toward Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Hyuksoo

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of motivation to learn technology, as perceived by South Korean middle school students, on their attitudes toward engineering. Using the instruments of Glynn et al. (2011) and Lee (2008), the study focused on eighth and ninth grade students in four middle schools located in South Korea's…

  8. Students' Views about the Problem Based Collaborative Learning Environment Supported by Dynamic Web Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ünal, Erhan; Çakir, Hasan

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to design a problem based collaborative learning environment supported by dynamic web technologies and to examine students' views about this learning environment. The study was designed as a qualitative research. Some 36 students who took an Object Oriented Programming I-II course at the department of computer…

  9. Social Representations and Uses of Technologies of African High-School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karsenti, Thierry; Kouawo, Achille

    2015-01-01

    This article examines social representations of information and communications technologies (ICT) in high school students in Niamey, Niger, and explores whether these representations are determined by training in and regular use of ICT. A sample of 50 students attending two "lycées" was studied. Only one "lycée" offered…

  10. Business Students' Perceptions, Attitudes, and Satisfaction with Interactive Technology: An Exploratory Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eastman, Jacqueline Kilsheimer; Iyer, Rajesh; Eastman, Kevin L.

    2011-01-01

    The authors modeled the relationships between students' perceptions of interactive technology in terms of whether it helps them pay more attention and be better prepared in a Consumer Behavior course and their attitude toward and satisfaction with it. The results suggest that students who feel they pay more attention due to the use of Interactive…

  11. Students' Voices about Information and Communication Technology in Upper Secondary Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olofsson, Anders D.; Lindberg, Ola J.; Fransson, Göran

    2018-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to explore upper secondary school students' voices on how information and communication technology (ICT) could structure and support their everyday activities and time at school. Design/methodology/approach: In all, 11 group interviews were conducted with a total of 46 students from three upper secondary…

  12. Emerging Technologies Acceptance in Online Tutorials: Tutors' and Students' Behavior Intentions in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susilo, Adhi

    2014-01-01

    Tutors' and students' intentions to use emerging technologies (ETs) in e-learning systems in higher education institutions are a central concern of researchers, academicians, and practitioners. However, tutors' and students' intentions to use ETs in e-learning systems in distance learning are relatively low. The goal of the study, developed in…

  13. Virtual Classroom Instruction and Academic Performance of Educational Technology Students in Distance Education, Enugu State

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akpan, Sylvester J.; Etim, Paulinus J.; Udom, Stella Ogechi

    2016-01-01

    The virtual classroom and distance education have created new teaching pedagogy. This study was carried out to investigate Virtual Classroom Instruction on Academic Performance of Educational Technology Students in Distance Education, Enugu State. The population for this study was limited to the Students in National Open University, Enugu study…

  14. Using Mobile Apps to Entice General Education Students into Technology Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Michelle; Murphy, Diane

    2013-01-01

    It is of national importance to increase the number of college students pursuing degrees in information systems/information technology (IT/IS) subjects. The primary focus at many institutions is renovating or enhancing existing IT/IS programs and the target audience is the students who have selected to major in IT/IS subjects. This paper looks at…

  15. Using Interactive Technology to Support Students' Understanding of the Greenhouse Effect and Global Warming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varma, Keisha; Linn, Marcia C.

    2012-01-01

    In this work, we examine middle school students' understanding of the greenhouse effect and global warming. We designed and refined a technology-enhanced curriculum module called "Global Warming: Virtual Earth". In the module activities, students conduct virtual experiments with a visualization of the greenhouse effect. They analyze data and draw…

  16. Increasing Motivation and Engagement in Elementary and Middle School Students through Technology-Supported Learning Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godzicki, Linda; Godzicki, Nicole; Krofel, Mary; Michaels, Rachel

    2013-01-01

    This action research project report was conducted in order to increase motivation and engagement in elementary and middle school students through technology-supported learning environments. The study was conducted from August 27, 2012, through December 14, 2012 with 116 participating students in first-, fourth-, fifth- and eighth-grade classes. To…

  17. Students' Characteristics, Self-Regulated Learning, Technology Self-Efficacy, and Course Outcomes in Online Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chih-Hsuan; Shannon, David M.; Ross, Margaret E.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship among students' characteristics, self-regulated learning, technology self-efficacy, and course outcomes in online learning settings. Two hundred and fifty-six students participated in this study. All participants completed an online survey that included demographic information, the modified…

  18. The Relationship between Ethical Decision Making and Ethical Reasoning in Information Technology Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodward, Belle; Davis, Diane C.; Hodis, Flaviu A.

    2007-01-01

    This study examined undergraduate information technology (IT) students' (N = 122) level of ethical reasoning and decision making at a Midwestern university. The purpose was to determine whether IT students' level of ethical reasoning provided information about the degree of their ethical decision making. The Defining Issues Test-2 (DIT-2) was used…

  19. Facilitating Student-Generated Content Using Web 2.0 Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Eunbae

    2011-01-01

    Web 2.0 technologies have created a trend of user-generated content by supporting media production, collaboration, communication, and dissemination. User-generated content is translated into student-generated content (SGC) in education. SGC engages learners in an authentic project that fosters students' autonomy, creativity, and real-world…

  20. Internet-generation nursing students' view of technology-based health care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Houwelingen, C.T.M.; Ettema, R.G.A.; Kort, H.S.M.; ten Cate, O.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Today's nursing school applicants are considered “digital natives.” This study investigated students' views of new health care technologies. METHOD: In a cross-sectional survey among first-year nursing students, 23 common nursing activities and five telehealth nursing activities were

  1. Standards, Firewalls, and General Classroom Mayhem: Implementing Student-Centered Technology Projects in the Elementary Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofer, Mark; Swan, Kathleen Owings

    2006-01-01

    Educators are simultaneously bombarded with both calls to integrate technology in meaningful ways into their teaching and to promote more student-centered activities which combine both content learning and higher-order thinking. This is no small task given the range of student abilities and interests, the increasing emphasis on state standards and…

  2. Using Text Mining to Uncover Students' Technology-Related Problems in Live Video Streaming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdous, M'hammed; He, Wu

    2011-01-01

    Because of their capacity to sift through large amounts of data, text mining and data mining are enabling higher education institutions to reveal valuable patterns in students' learning behaviours without having to resort to traditional survey methods. In an effort to uncover live video streaming (LVS) students' technology related-problems and to…

  3. Capitalizing on Mobile Technology to Support Healthy Eating in Ethnic Minority College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodgers, Rachel F.; Pernal, Wendy; Matsumoto, Atsushi; Shiyko, Mariya; Intille, Stephen; Franko, Debra L.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the capacity of a mobile technology-based intervention to support healthy eating among ethnic minority female students. Participants: Forty-three African American and Hispanic female students participated in a 3-week intervention between January and May 2013. Methods: Participants photographed their meals using their smart…

  4. A Flipped First-Year Digital Circuits Course for Engineering and Technology Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yelamarthi, Kumar; Drake, Eron

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes a flipped and improved first-year digital circuits (DC) course that incorporates several active learning strategies. With the primary objective of increasing student interest and learning, an integrated instructional design framework is proposed to provide first-year engineering and technology students with practical knowledge…

  5. Campus-Based Student Experiences of Learning Technologies in a First-Year Science Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Robert; Weyers, Mark; Hughes, Jane

    2013-01-01

    This study reports on an investigation into the campus-based experience of university students studying mammalian physiology that was significantly supported with learning technologies. The design of the course enabled the students to interrogate the key ideas that they came across in their lectures and laboratories through online activities which…

  6. Investigating Elementary School Students' Technology Acceptance by Applying Digital Game-Based Learning to Environmental Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yuh-Ming; Lou, Shi-Jer; Kuo, Sheng-Huang; Shih, Ru-Chu

    2013-01-01

    In order to improve and promote students' environmental knowledge, attitudes, and behaviour, integrating environmental education into the primary education curriculum has become a key issue for environmental education. For this reason, this study aimed to investigate elementary school students' acceptance of technology applying digital game-based…

  7. Mathematics for Gifted Students in an Arts- and Technology-Rich Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadanidis, George; Hughes, Janette; Cordy, Michelle

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we report on a study of a short-term mathematics program for grade 7-8 gifted students that integrated open-ended mathematics tasks with the arts (poetry and drama) and with technology. The program was offered partially online and partially in a classroom setting. The study sought to investigate (a) students' perceptions of their…

  8. Effects of Multimedia Information Technology Integrated Multi-Sensory Instruction on Students' Learning Motivation and Outcome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Tung-Ju; Tai, Yu-Nan

    2016-01-01

    Under the waves of the Internet and the trend of era, information technology is a door connecting to the world to generate the multiplier effect of learning. Students' learning should not be regarded as the tool to cope with school examinations. The frequent contact with computers, networks, and relevant information allow students enjoying the…

  9. ICT Use: Educational Technology and Library and Information Science Students' Perspectives--An Exploratory Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aharony, Noa; Shonfeld, Miri

    2015-01-01

    This study seeks to explore what factors influence students' ICT use and web technology competence. The objectives of this study are the following: (a) To what extent do certain elements of Rogers' (2003) Diffusion of Innovations Theory (DOI) explain students' ICT use, (b) To what extent do personality characteristics derived from the Big Five…

  10. Student research activities in the Technology Assessments Section of the Health and Safety Research Division, Summer 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chester, R.O.; Roberts, D.A.

    1981-08-01

    Reports summarizing activities of students assigned to the Technology Assessments Section of the Health and Safety Research Division for the summer 1980 are presented. Unless indicated otherwise, each report was written by the student whose work is being described. For each student, the student's supervisor, the name of the program under which the student was brought to ORNL, the academic level of the student, and the name of the ORNL project to which the student was assigned are tabulated. The reports are presented in alphabetical order of the students' last names.

  11. Student research activities in the Technology Assessments Section of the Health and Safety Research Division, Summer 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chester, R.O.; Roberts, D.A.

    1981-08-01

    Reports summarizing activities of students assigned to the Technology Assessments Section of the Health and Safety Research Division for the summer 1980 are presented. Unless indicated otherwise, each report was written by the student whose work is being described. For each student, the student's supervisor, the name of the program under which the student was brought to ORNL, the academic level of the student, and the name of the ORNL project to which the student was assigned are tabulated. The reports are presented in alphabetical order of the students' last names

  12. Understanding Student Teachers’ Behavioural Intention to Use Technology: Technology Acceptance Model (TAM Validation and Testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kung-Teck, Wong

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study sets out to validate and test the Technology Acceptance Model (TAM in the context of Malaysian student teachers’ integration of their technology in teaching and learning. To establish factorial validity, data collected from 302 respondents were tested against the TAM using confirmatory factor analysis (CFA, and structural equation modelling (SEM was used for model comparison and hypotheses testing. The goodness-of-fit test of the analysis shows partial support of the applicability of the TAM in a Malaysian context. Overall, the TAM accounted for 37.3% of the variance in intention to use technology among student teachers and of the five hypotheses formulated, four are supported. Perceived usefulness is a significant influence on attitude towards computer use and behavioural intention. Perceived ease of use significantly influences perceived usefulness, and finally, behavioural intention is found to be influenced by attitude towards computer use. The findings of this research contribute to the literature by validating the TAM in the Malaysian context and provide several prominent implications for the research and practice of technology integration development.

  13. Student use and perceptions of mobile technology in clinical clerkships - Guidance for curriculum design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, Joanna K; Thome, Parker A; Lindeman, Brenessa; Jackson, Daren C; Lidor, Anne O

    2018-01-01

    We examined the types of technology used by medical students in clinical clerkships, and the perception of technology implementation into the curriculum. An online survey about technology use was completed prior to general surgery clinical clerkship. Types of devices and frequency/comfort of use were recorded. Perceptions of the benefits and barriers to technology use in clerkship learning were elicited. 125/131 (95.4%) students responded. Most students owned a smart phone (95.2%), tablet (52.8%), or both (50%); 61.6% spent > 11 h/week learning on a device at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine for educational purposes. Technology use was seen as beneficial by 97.6% of students. Classes that used technology extensively were preferred by 54% of students, although 47.2% perceived decreased faculty/classmate interaction. Students use mobile technology to improve how they learn new material, and prefer taking classes that incorporate information technology. However, in-person/blended curricula are preferable to completely online courses. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Using the Artistic Pedagogical Technology of Photovoice to Promote Interaction in the Online Post-Secondary Classroom: The Students' Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Margaret; Perry, Beth; Janzen, Katherine; Menzies, Cynthia

    2012-01-01

    This study explores the effect of the artistic pedagogical technology (APT) called photovoice (PV) on interaction in the online post-secondary classroom. More specifically, this paper focuses on students' perspectives regarding the effect of PV on student to student and student to instructor interactions in online courses. Artistic pedagogical…

  15. The potential effect of technology and distractions on undergraduate students' concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attia, Najya A; Baig, Lubna; Marzouk, Yousef I; Khan, Anwar

    2017-01-01

    In the present era, it is difficult to keep the concentration of college students at its maximum potential during the class time, as there are many distractions that negatively impact students' concentration and prevent optimal learning. Technologies such as laptops and cell phones have invaded the classroom, raising considerable concerns about their effects on college students' attention in the classroom. Despite these concerns, no research has been done in Saudi Arabia on the effects of technology and other types of classroom distractions on students' concentration. In the current study, we have attempted to identify students' perceptions of major distractions in the classroom based on seventeen internally (self-produced) and twenty-four externally produced classroom situations. The students participating in this study rated the degree to which each distraction interferes with their concentration on the class materials and their ability to learn. Data were collected through surveys of 265 students (66 and 199 students from medical and basic classes, respectively), including 97 females and 168 males 17-23 years of age from the academic years 2010 to 2014. A validated self-administered questionnaire was handed to the students in the classroom. The students were asked to report and rate the classroom distraction produced by 24 external internal distracters (Table-II), on a 5-point scale. The results revealed that ringing cell phones in the class were the most commonly reported electronic external distractor for 68% of students, and 21% of them reported being extremely distracted by this noise. Having an instructor who is difficult to understand was the most commonly reported external behavioral distractor for 75% of students, and 48% of them rated this as extremely distracting. Students talking in class were the most self-produced distractor for 72% of students; negatively impacting their concentration and ability to learn, and 42% of them rated it as an extreme

  16. The effect of technology-enabled active learning on undergraduate students understanding of electromagnetism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dori, Y.J.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text:The Technology-Enabled Active Learning Project at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) involves media-rich software for simulation and visualization in freshman physics carried out in a specially redesigned classroom to facilitate group interaction. These technology-based learning materials are especially useful in electromagnetism to help students conceptualize phenomena and processes. This study analyzes the effects of the unique learning environment of the Technology-Enabled Active Learning Project project on students cognitive and affective outcomes. The assessment of the project included examining students conceptual understanding before and after studying electromagnetism in a media-rich environment. We also investigated the effect of this environment on students preferences regarding the various teaching methods. As part of the project, we developed pre- and post-tests consisting of conceptual questions from standardized tests, as well as questions designed to assess the effect of visualizations and experiments. The research population consisted of 811 undergraduate students. It consisted of a small- and a large-scale experimental groups and a control group. Technology-Enabled Active Learning Project students improved their conceptual understanding concepts of the subject matter to a significantly higher extent than their control group peers. A majority of the students in the small-scale experiment noted that they would recommend the Technology-Enabled Active Learning Project course to fellow students, indicating the benefits of inter activity, visualization, and hands-on experiments, which the technology helped enable. In the large-scale implementation students expressed both positive and negative attitudes in the course survey

  17. Validation of an instrument to measure students' motivation and self-regulation towards technology learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liou, Pey-Yan; Kuo, Pei-Jung

    2014-05-01

    Background:Few studies have examined students' attitudinal perceptions of technology. There is no appropriate instrument to measure senior high school students' motivation and self-regulation toward technology learning among the current existing instruments in the field of technology education. Purpose:The present study is to validate an instrument for assessing senior high school students' motivation and self-regulation towards technology learning. Sample:A total of 1822 Taiwanese senior high school students (1020 males and 802 females) responded to the newly developed instrument. Design and method:The Motivation and Self-regulation towards Technology Learning (MSRTL) instrument was developed based on the previous instruments measuring students' motivation and self-regulation towards science learning. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses were utilized to investigate the structure of the items. Cronbach's alpha was applied for measuring the internal consistency of each scale. Furthermore, multivariate analysis of variance was used to examine gender differences. Results:Seven scales, including 'Technology learning self-efficacy,' 'Technology learning value,' 'Technology active learning strategies,' 'Technology learning environment stimulation,' 'Technology learning goal-orientation,' 'Technology learning self-regulation-triggering,' and 'Technology learning self-regulation-implementing' were confirmed for the MSRTL instrument. Moreover, the results also showed that male and female students did not present the same degree of preference in all of the scales. Conclusions:The MSRTL instrument composed of seven scales corresponding to 39 items was shown to be valid based on validity and reliability analyses. While male students tended to express more positive and active performance in the motivation scales, no gender differences were found in the self-regulation scales.

  18. Students views of integrating web-based learning technology into the nursing curriculum - A descriptive survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Audrey; Timmins, Fiona

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes students' experiences of a Web-based innovation at one university. This paper reports on the first phase of this development where two Web-based modules were developed. Using a survey approach (n=44) students' access to and use of computer technology were explored. Findings revealed that students' prior use of computers and Internet technologies was higher than previously reported, although use of databases was low. Skills in this area increased during the programme, with a significant rise in database, email, search engine and word processing use. Many specific computer skills were learned during the programme, with high numbers reporting ability to deal adequately with files and folders. Overall, the experience was a positive one for students. While a sense of student isolation was not reported, as many students kept in touch by phone and class attendance continued, some individual students did appear to isolate themselves. This teaching methodology has much to offer in the provision of convenient easy to access programmes that can be easily adapted to the individual lifestyle. However, student support mechanisms need careful consideration for students who are at risk of becoming isolated. Staff also need to supported in the provision of this methodology and face-to-face contact with teachers for some part of the programme is preferable.

  19. College students' use of communication technology with parents: comparisons between two cohorts in 2009 and 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsey, Meagan A; Gentzler, Amy L; Morey, Jennifer N; Oberhauser, Ann M; Westerman, David

    2013-10-01

    Although communication technology is beneficial to maintain important close relationships, not all findings suggest that communication technology use between college students and their parents is indicative of positive adjustment or relational qualities. A study in 2009 found that only 24.2% of college students used a social networking site (SNS) to communicate with a parent, yet those students reported more loneliness, anxious attachment, and conflict with their parent (Gentzler et al., 2011 ). Because technology and trends in use change rapidly, we investigated a new cohort of college students 2 years later to determine if rates of using communication technology with parents and their links to student adjustment have changed. Comparisons between 2009 and 2011 samples indicated that in-person contact and telephone use did not vary across cohorts. However, texting and SNS use with parents became more common, and using e-mail with parents declined. Consistent with the 2009 data, students' phone use with parents was related to positive relationship qualities (satisfaction, intimacy, support, instrumental aid). In the new 2011 sample, e-mail was linked to aid. However, the present findings indicate students' SNS use with parents is no longer linked to maladaptive outcomes. The study highlights how quickly the use and implications of communication technology changes, and suggests that communication patterns may reflect broader psychosocial adjustment and parent-child dynamics.

  20. Teaching Science Through the Language of Students in Technology-Enhanced Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryoo, Kihyun

    2015-02-01

    This study examines whether and how tapping into students' everyday language in a web-based learning environment can improve all students' science learning in linguistically heterogeneous classrooms. A total of 220 fifth-grade English Language Learners (ELLs) and their non-ELL peers were assigned to either an everyday English approach condition or a textbook approach condition, and completed technology-enhanced instruction focusing on respiration and photosynthesis. Students in the everyday English approach condition were taught the concepts in everyday, conversational English before content-specific scientific terms were introduced, while students in the textbook approach condition were taught the same concepts and vocabulary simultaneously. The results show that the everyday English approach was significantly more effective in helping both ELLs and non-ELL students develop a coherent understanding of abstract concepts related to photosynthesis and respiration. Students in the everyday English approach condition were also better able to link content-specific terms to their understanding of the concepts. These findings show the potential advantage of using students' everyday English as a resource to make science more accessible to linguistically diverse students in mainstream classrooms. By integrating students' everyday language in science instruction, it is possible for all students including ELLs to acquire both the content and language of science.

  1. Students from UMass/Lowell Win $15,000 EPA Grant for Innovative Technology Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    A student research team from the University of Massachusetts in Lowell has been awarded $15,000 from the US Environmental Protection Agency to research a technology that would turn seafood shells and waste into fertilizer.

  2. iPads: Intuitive Technology for 21st-Century Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegle, Del

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide a rationale for using iPad technology with young students. Various inexpensive apps are described that parents and educators will find useful. (Contains 9 figures.)

  3. Investigating Student Use of Technology for Engaged Citizenship in A Global Age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brad M. Maguth

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available This study undertook a five month qualitative investigation into technology use amongst twelve high school social studies students in two different sites in the Midwestern United States. This study examined students’ use of technology and its relationship to three dimensions of citizenship in a global age: understand global events, issues, and perspectives, participate in global networks to communicate and collaborate with global audiences, and advocate on global problems and issues to think and act globally. Collecting data through semi-structured student interviews, online-threaded discussions and document analysis, I triangulated findings, and employed a qualitative approach. The study finds a relationship between student participants’ use of technology and their serving as engaged citizenship in a global age. In using technology, students accessed international news and information, joined global networks to communicate and collaborate with global audiences, and produced digital content for international audiences.

  4. Education technology with continuous real time monitoring of the current functional and emotional students' states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alyushin, M. V.; Kolobashkina, L. V.

    2017-01-01

    The education technology with continuous monitoring of the current functional and emotional students' states is suggested. The application of this technology allows one to increase the effectiveness of practice through informed planning of the training load. For monitoring the current functional and emotional students' states non-contact remote technologies of person bioparameters registration are encouraged to use. These technologies are based on recording and processing in real time the main person bioparameters in a purely passive mode. Experimental testing of this technology has confirmed its effectiveness.

  5. Adapting to Student Learning Styles: Using Cell Phone Technology in Undergraduate Science Instruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Pennington

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Students of science traditionally make 3x5 flash cards to assist learning nomenclature, structures, and reactions. Advances in educational technology have enabled flashcards viewed on computers, offering an endless array of drilling and feedback opportunities for students. The current generation of students is less inclined to use computers, but they use their cell phones 24 hours a day. This report outlines these trends and an even more recent educational technology initiative, that of using cell phone flash cards to help students learn biology and chemistry nomenclature, structures, and reactions. Students responded positively to cell phone flash cards in a pilot study and a more detailed study is planned for the coming year.

  6. Perspectives of Students on Acceptance of Tablets and Self-directed Learning with Technology

    OpenAIRE

    Gokcearslan, Sahin

    2017-01-01

    Recent mobile learning technologies offer the opportunity for students to take charge ofthe learning process both inside and outside the classroom. One of these tools is the tabletPC (hereafter ‘tablet’). In parallel with increased access to e-content, the role of tablets inlearning has recently begun to be examined. This study aims to reveal the relationshipbetween the level of acceptance of tablets (TAM) and the level of selfdirectedlearning with technology (SDLT) of students and to differe...

  7. Attitudes and Behavior of Ajman University of Science and Technology Students Towards the Environment

    OpenAIRE

    Rasha Abdel Raman

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the attitudes and behavior of Ajman University of Science and Technology (AUST) students towards the environment according to their gender and college. The research was based on a descriptive approach. The sample consisted of (375) students (230 males and 145 females) from different colleges (Law, Information Technology, Mass Communication and Humanities, Engineering, Dentistry and Pharmacy). The Attitudes and Behavior Scale Towards the Environment (ABSTE) w...

  8. Technology and College Students: What Faculty Members Think About the Use of Technology in Higher Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omer Faruk ISLIM

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Tablet PCs especially iPads are one of the most commonly used devices that most educational institutions from elementary school to colleges have been using as a main or supplementary part of their educational system. This article aims at investigating faculty members’ personal and educational use of technology especially iPads, their opinions on educational use of technology, and their students’ technology competency. This study was conducted at a college of education in the Southwestern United States where a technology initiative was carried out and iPads were distributed. In this qualitative research, case study research was utilized as a research method and a purposeful sampling method was employed. The data were obtained from eight faculty members via semi structured interviews. Results of the study show that faculty members own a variety of devices in addition to iPad, and they are using many apps based on the class needs. Almost all faculty members define themselves and their current students as technology competent, and they stated that experience, socioeconomic status and willingness to use the technology are the main factors affecting technology competence.

  9. Educational technology for millennial dental hygiene students: a survey of U.S. dental hygiene programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beebe, Catherine R R; Gurenlian, JoAnn R; Rogo, Ellen J

    2014-06-01

    A growing body of literature suggests that today's learners have changed and education must change as well since Millennial generation students expect technology to be used in their coursework. This study sought to determine what educational technology is being used in U.S. dental hygiene programs, what student and faculty perceptions are of the effectiveness of technology, and what barriers exist to implementing educational technology. A stratified random sample of 120 entry-level dental hygiene programs nationwide were invited to participate in a survey. Fourteen programs participated, yielding a pool of 415 potential individual participants; out of those, eighty-four student and thirty-eight faculty respondents were included in the analysis, a total of 122. Results were analyzed using descriptive statistics and a Mann-Whitney U test (peducational technology in all areas except clickers and wikis. The faculty members tended to rate the effectiveness of educational technology higher than did the students. The greatest perceived barrier to implementing technology was technical difficulties. This study suggests that support services should be available to faculty and students to ensure successful implementation of technology. Dental hygiene educators have adopted many types of educational technology, but more data are needed to determine best practices.

  10. Can a tablet device alter undergraduate science students' study behavior and use of technology?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Neil P; Ramsay, Luke; Chauhan, Vikesh

    2012-06-01

    This article reports findings from a study investigating undergraduate biological sciences students' use of technology and computer devices for learning and the effect of providing students with a tablet device. A controlled study was conducted to collect quantitative and qualitative data on the impact of a tablet device on students' use of devices and technology for learning. Overall, we found that students made extensive use of the tablet device for learning, using it in preference to laptop computers to retrieve information, record lectures, and access learning resources. In line with other studies, we found that undergraduate students only use familiar Web 2.0 technologies and that the tablet device did not alter this behavior for the majority of tools. We conclude that undergraduate science students can make extensive use of a tablet device to enhance their learning opportunities without institutions changing their teaching methods or computer systems, but that institutional intervention may be needed to drive changes in student behavior toward the use of novel Web 2.0 technologies.

  11. Nursing students' attitudes towards information and communication technology: an exploratory and confirmatory factor analytic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jung Jae; Clarke, Charlotte L

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this study was to develop and psychometrically test a shortened version of the Information Technology Attitude Scales for Health, in the investigation of nursing students with clinical placement experiences. Nurses and nursing students need to develop high levels of competency in information and communication technology. However, they encounter statistically significant barriers in the use of the technology. Although some instruments have been developed to measure factors that influence nurses' attitudes towards technology, the validity is questionable and few studies have been developed to test the attitudes of nursing students, in particular. A cross-sectional survey design was performed. The Information Technology Attitude Scales for Health was used to collect data from October 2012-December 2012. A panel of experts reviewed the content of the instrument and a pilot study was conducted. Following this, a total of 508 nursing students, who were engaged in clinical placements, were recruited from six universities in South Korea. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses were performed and reliability and construct validity were assessed. The resulting instrument consisted of 19 items across four factors. Reliability of the four factors was acceptable and the validity was supported. The instrument was shown to be both valid and reliable for measuring nursing students' attitudes towards technology, thus aiding in the current understandings of this aspect. Through these measurements and understandings, nursing educators and students are able to be more reflexive of their attitudes and can thus seek to develop them positively. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Factors Influencing Agricultural Leadership Students' Behavioral Intentions: Examining the Potential Use of Mobile Technology in Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strong, Robert; Irby, Travis L.; Dooley, Larry M.

    2013-01-01

    Mobile technology is pervasive at institutions across the U.S. The study was framed with self-efficacy theory, self-directed learning theory, and the unified theory for acceptance and use of technology. The purpose of this study was to assess undergraduate students' behavioral intention towards mobile technology acceptance in agricultural…

  13. Videophone Technology and Students with Deaf-Blindness: A Method for Increasing Access and Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emerson, Judith; Bishop, John

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Seeing the Possibilities with Videophone Technology began as research project funded by the National Center for Technology Innovation. The project implemented a face-to-face social networking program for students with deaf-blindness to investigate the potential for increasing access and communication using videophone technology.…

  14. Student Achievement versus Technology in the Catholic Classroom: Correlation or Added Bonus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Cheryl L. Boze

    2017-01-01

    Spending limited educational budgets on technology for classrooms is a strategy many school districts have used to increase student achievement (Levenson, Baehr, Smith, & Sullivan, 2014). In recent years, the technology movement allowed for arbitrary purchasing of devices with little to no pedagogical planning for how technology device usage…

  15. An Investigation of Factors Influencing Student Use of Technology in K-12 Classrooms Using Path Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritzhaupt, Albert D.; Dawson, Kara; Cavanaugh, Cathy

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to examine the effects of teachers' characteristics, school characteristics, and contextual characteristics on classroom technology integration and teacher use of technology as mediators of student use of technology. A research-based path model was designed and tested based on data gathered from 732 teachers from…

  16. Use of iPads as Assistive Technology for Students with Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ok, Min Wook

    2018-01-01

    Over the past decades, technology has been considered an essential tool for providing equal accessibility and opportunities for students with disabilities. As technology has evolved, a new type of technology, mobile devices, emerged in the late 2000s. Specifically, iPads have quickly gained attention and popularity in special education settings.…

  17. Integrating Technology into the Classroom: How Does It Impact Student Achievement?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey-Woodall, Antionette

    2009-01-01

    As an educator during the 21st century, it is important to note that technology is becoming more and more dominant in society. Many teachers have become very knowledgeable of how technologically-savvy students have become. In the field of technology, everyday upgrades are being made and new innovations are being discovered. As a result, the…

  18. The Impact of an Online Collaborative Learning Program on Students' Attitude towards Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magen-Nagar, Noga; Shonfeld, Miri

    2018-01-01

    This quantitative research examined the contribution of an Online Collaborative Learning (OCL) program on attitudes towards technology in terms of technological anxiety, self-confidence and technology orientation among M.Ed. students. The advanced online collaborative program was implemented at two teacher training colleges in Israel for a period…

  19. PhD Year 1 Students' Experience with the Educational Technology and Innovation Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asamoah, Moses Kumi; Mackin, Eva Esi

    2016-01-01

    The advent of information, communication and new technologies, globalisation and rising costs has prompted rethinking what we teach, how we teach and even where teaching and learning take place. The Educational Technology and Innovation Course (Adlt704) was designed to enable students to create, use and manage appropriate technological processes…

  20. A Phenomenological Study: Experiences of Chinese Students Using Educational Technology in American Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Ying

    2017-01-01

    This phenomenological study explores the educational technology experiences of ten Chinese international students at American universities. It describes their technology experiences and the influence on their technology self-efficacy and acculturation to the university culture in America. Seidman's (1998) three-interview approach was employed to…

  1. Millennial generation student nurses' perceptions of the impact of multiple technologies on learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montenery, Susan M; Walker, Marjorie; Sorensen, Elizabeth; Thompson, Rhonda; Kirklin, Dena; White, Robin; Ross, Carl

    2013-01-01

    To determine how millennial nursing students perceive the effects of instructional technology on their attentiveness, knowledge, critical thinking, and satisfaction. BACKGROUND Millennial learners develop critical thinking through experimentation, active participation, and multitasking with rapid shifts between technological devices. They desire immediate feedback. METHOD; A descriptive, longitudinal, anonymous survey design was used with a convenience sample of 108 sophomore, junior, and senior baccalaureate nursing students (participation rates 95 percent, winter, 85 percent, spring). Audience response, virtual learning, simulation, and computerized testing technologies were used. An investigator-designed instrument measured attentiveness, knowledge, critical thinking, and satisfaction (Cronbach's alphas 0.73, winter; 0.84, spring). Participants positively rated the audience response, virtual learning, and simulation instructional technologies on their class participation, learning, attention, and satisfaction. They strongly preferred computerized testing. Consistent with other studies, these students engaged positively with new teaching strategies using contemporary instructional technology. Faculty should consider using instructional technologies.

  2. Teaching science in a technology rich environment: Probeware's effect on student attitude and achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelmanowicz, Marc

    Purpose The use of technology in the science classroom has been a major part of the initiative toward increasing student attitude and achievement in Science, Technology, Education and Math [STEM] education in the United States. The purpose of this study was to determine the extent to which the use of probeware in a high school science living environment classroom impacts student attitude towards science and/or student achievement on standards-based assessments. This study sought to answer the following quantitative questions with a qualitative component: To what extent does the use of probeware in a high school level living environment course influence student attitudes toward science compared to students who are not using probeware? What is the impact, if any, on student achievement in a living environment course, as measured by New York State Living Environment Regents [NYSLER] exam grades, between students who use probeware and students who do not? Is there a significant difference between the two groups with regard to achieving mastery on the NYSLER exam? Sample The participants in the study were Living Environment students of a suburban high school outside of New York City. Methods The quasiexperimental study examined the effects of the replacement of traditional scientific equipment with probeware on student attitude and achievement in a living environment classroom. Student attitude was measured by the modified Attitude Toward Science Inventory [mATSI] and student achievement was measured by the New York State Living Environment Regents [NSLER] Exam. Descriptive statistics, ANCOVA and hierarchical regression analysis were conducted to answer the research questions in this study. A qualitative component was included to enhance the understanding of the quantitative analysis. Major Findings Through this study, results demonstrated a statistically significant impact of probeware on student attitude, but did not show a statistically significant impact of

  3. Exploring assistive technology and post-school outcomes for students with severe disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouck, Emily C; Flanagan, Sara M

    2016-11-01

    This study sought to understand the extent to which students with severe disabilities receive assistive technology in school and out-of-school, and the relationship between receipt of assistive technology in school and post-school outcomes for these students. This study was a secondary analysis of the National Longitudinal Transition Study-2 (NLTS2) from the USA. To analyze the data in this correlational study, researchers conducted frequency distributions, Chi Square Tests of Associations, significance tests and logistic regressions. The main results suggest (a) receipt of assistive technology in school varied greatly by disability identification; (b) receipt of assistive technology post-school also varied by disability identification, but receipt was generally lower; and (c) few statistically significant post-school outcome differences existed between students who received assistive technology and those who did not. An under-utilization of assistive technology exists in practice in the USA for students with severe disabilities. Implications for Rehabilitation An under-utilization of assistive technology for secondary students and adults with severe disabilities likely exists. A need exists for improved collaboration between professionals in rehabilitation and professionals in schools to ensure continuation of needed services or aids, such as assistive technology. Additional research is needed to better understand the adult life (or post-school) outcomes of individuals with severe disabilities, factors from PK-12 schooling or post-school services that positively and negative impact those outcomes.

  4. EFFECTS OF EDUCATIONAL TECHNOLOGY APPLICATIONS ON STUDENT ACHIEVEMENT FOR DISADVANTAGED STUDENTS: WHAT FORTY YEARS OF RESEARCH TELLS US

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan Cheung

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this review is to examine the effectiveness of educational technology applications and how features of using technology programs and characteristics of these evaluations affect achievement outcomes for disadvantaged students in grades K-12. The review applies consistent inclusion standards to focus on studies that met high methodological standards. A total of 154 qualifying studies were included in the final analysis. The findings of the review suggest that educational technology applications generally produced a positive, though modest, effect (ES=+0.16 in comparison to traditional methods. A marginally significant difference was found among four types of educational technology applications. Larger effect sizes were found with comprehensive models (ES=+0.23 and innovative technology applications (ES=+0.20. Effect sizes for supplemental programs and computer-managed learning were +0.15 and +0.12, respectively. The findings provide some suggestive evidence that approaches that integrated computer and non-computer instruction in the classrooms and innovative approaches are effective in improving student achievement. Differential impacts were also found by both substantive and methodological features.

  5. Use of mobile learning technology among final year medical students in Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masika, Moses Muia; Omondi, Gregory Barnabas; Natembeya, Dennis Simiyu; Mugane, Ephraim Mwatha; Bosire, Kefa Ogonyo; Kibwage, Isaac Ongubo

    2015-01-01

    Mobile phone penetration has increased exponentially over the last decade as has its application in nearly all spheres of life including health and medical education. This study aimed at assessing the use of mobile learning technology and its challenges among final year undergraduate students in the College of Health sciences, University of Nairobi. This was a cross-sectional descriptive study conducted among final year undergraduate students at the University of Nairobi, College of Health Sciences. Self-administered, anonymous questionnaires were issued to all final year students in their lecture rooms after obtaining informed consent. Data on demographics, mobile device ownership and mobile learning technology use and its challenges was collected. Data entry and analysis was done using SPSS(®). Chi-square and t-test were used for bivariate analysis. We had 292 respondents; 62% were medical students, 16% were nursing students, 13% were pharmacy students and 9% were dental surgery students. The majority were female (59%) and the average age was 24 years. Eighty eight percent (88%) of the respondents owned a smart device and nearly all of them used it for learning. 64% of the respondents used medical mobile applications. The main challenges were lack of a smart device, lack of technical know-how in accessing or using apps, sub-optimal internet access, cost of acquiring apps and limited device memory. Mobile learning is increasingly popular among medical students and should be leveraged in promoting access and quality of medical education.

  6. The effect of gender, ethnicity, and income on college students' use of communication technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junco, Reynol; Merson, Dan; Salter, Daniel W

    2010-12-01

    Because campus officials are relying on personal communication technologies to communicate with students, a question arises about access and usage. Although communication technologies are popular among college students, some evidence suggests that differences exist in ownership and use. We examined patterns of student ownership and use of cell phones and use of instant messaging, focusing on three predictors of digital inequality: gender, ethnicity, and income. Logistic and hierarchical linear regression analyses were used to analyze results from 4,491 students. The odds that female and white students owned cell phones were more than twice as high as for men and African-American students. Students in the $100,000-$149,000 per year income bracket were more than three times as likely to own a cell phone than those from the median bracket. However, being female, African-American, and/or from the highest income brackets was positively predictive of the number of text messages sent and the amount of time spent talking on a cell phone per week. We found no differences between students on the use of instant messaging. Implications of these results, as well as areas for further research, are provided.

  7. Enhancing students' science literacy using solar cell learning multimedia containing science and nano technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliyawati, Sunarya, Yayan; Mudzakir, Ahmad

    2017-05-01

    This research attempts to enhance students' science literacy in the aspects of students' science content, application context, process, and students' attitude using solar cell learning multimedia containing science and nano technology. The quasi-experimental method with pre-post test design was used to achieve these objectives. Seventy-two students of class XII at a high school were employed as research's subject. Thirty-six students were in control class and another thirty-six were in experiment class. Variance test (t-test) was performed on the average level of 95% to identify the differences of students' science literacy in both classes. As the result, there were significant different of learning outcomes between experiment class and control class. Almost half of students (41.67%) in experiment class are categorized as high. Therefore, the learning using solar cell learning multimedia can improve students' science literacy, especially in the students' science content, application context, and process aspects with n-gain(%) 59.19 (medium), 63.04 (medium), and 52.98 (medium). This study can be used to develop learning multimedia in other science context.

  8. Occupational therapy students' technological skills: Are 'generation Y' ready for 21st century practice?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hills, Caroline; Ryan, Susan; Smith, Derek R; Warren-Forward, Helen; Levett-Jones, Tracy; Lapkin, Samuel

    2016-12-01

    Technology is becoming increasingly integral to the practice of occupational therapists and part of the everyday lives of clients. 'Generation Y' are purported to be naturally technologically skilled as they have grown up in the digital age. The aim of this study was to explore one cohort of 'Generation Y' occupational therapy students' skills and confidence in the use of technologies relevant to contemporary practice. A cross-sectional survey design was used to collect data from a cohort of 274 students enrolled in an Australian undergraduate occupational therapy programme. A total of 173 (63%) students returned the survey. Those born prior to 1982 were removed from the data. This left 155 (56%) 'Generation Y' participants. Not all participants reported to be skilled in everyday technologies although most reported to be skilled in word, Internet and mobile technologies. Many reported a lack of skills in Web 2.0 (collaboration and sharing) technologies, creating and using media and gaming, as well as a lack of confidence in technologies relevant to practice, including assistive technology, specialist devices, specialist software and gaming. Overall, the results suggested that this group of 'Generation Y' students were not universally skilled in all areas of technology relevant to practice but appear to be skilled in technologies they use regularly. Recommendations are therefore made with view to integrating social networking, gaming, media sharing and assistive technology into undergraduate programmes to ensure that graduates have the requisite skills and confidence required for current and future practice. © 2016 Occupational Therapy Australia.

  9. Webcast for students to highlight science and technology

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    Argonne research meteorologist Doug Sisterson and other scientists from across the United States will interact with a worldwide audience of students via a special World Wide Web broadcast Monday, April 29. The two-hour Webcast will begin at 1 p.m. with introductions by host David Heil, science communicator and former host of the US TV show "Newton's Apple." A series of short (five- to 15-minute) presentations by scientists will follow. Each presentation will include time for questions by the online audience (1 PC screen).

  10. TECHNOLOGY USAGE AMONG CONSTRUCTION STUDENTS THE MODERATING ROLE OF GENDER

    OpenAIRE

    T. Ramayah; Mastura Jaafar

    2008-01-01

    This study examines the impact of perceived usefulness and perceived ease of use on the extent of personal computer (PC) usage among a group of undergraduates at the School of Housing, Building and Planning, Universiti Sains Malaysia. It also looks at the moderating role of gender in the above said relationship. Data was collected using a structured questionnaire. A total of 244 students responded to the survey. Results showed that perceived ease of use (β = 0.309, p < 0.01) was positively re...

  11. Technology of forming a positive attitude to physical training students of special medical group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukhamediarov N.N.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Defined effective technology stages of forming a positive attitude towards physical education of students in special medical groups, stimulate motivation, epistemologically, informative, content-procedural, analytical and adjustment. For each stage technology offered special tools: lectures, seminars, analysis articles, mini conference on improving technique, racing games, mini-competitions, diagnostic interviews, questionnaires, analysis of log data on attendance. Selected criteria forming positive attitudes towards physical education: theoretical and practical, formed groups for research: experimental and control, analyzed results introduction of technology, efficiency of the proposed technology and means forming a positive attitude towards physical education students in special medical groups.

  12. Information technologies in education of medical students at the university of sarajevo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masic, Izet; Karcic, Emina; Hodzic, Ajla; Mulic, Smaila

    2014-08-01

    Information and communication technology have brought about many changes in medical education and practice, especially in the field of diagnostics. During the academic year 2013/2014, at Faculty of Medicine, University of Sarajevo, students in the final year of the study were subjected to examination which aim was to determine how medical students in Bosnia and Herzegovina subjectively assessing their skills for using computers, have gained insight into the nature of Information Technology's (IT) education and possessive knowledge. The survey was conducted voluntary by anonymous questionnaire consisting of 27 questions, divided into five categories, which are collecting facts about student's: sex, age, year of entry, computer skills, possessing the same, the use of the Internet, the method of obtaining currently knowledge and recommendations of students in order to improve their IT training. According to the given parameters, indicate an obvious difference in the level of knowledge, use and practical application of Information Technology's knowledge among students of the Bologna process to the students educated under the old system in favor of the first ones. Based on a comparison of similar studies conducted in Croatia, Sri Lanka, Pakistan and Denmark, it was observed that the level of knowledge of students of the Medical Faculty in Sarajevo was of equal height or greater than in these countries.

  13. Predictors of Osteopathic Medical Students' Readiness to Use Health Information Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Robin J; Iqbal, Hassan; Rana, Arif M; Rana, Zaid; Kane, Michael N

    2017-12-01

    The advent of health information technology (HIT) tools can affect the practice of modern medicine in many ways, ideally by improving quality of care and efficiency and reducing medical errors. Future physicians will play a key role in the successful implementation of HIT. However, osteopathic medical students' willingness to learn, adopt, and use technology in a health care setting is not well understood. To understand osteopathic medical students' knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors regarding HIT and to identify factors that may be related to their readiness to use HIT. Using a cross-sectional approach, quantitative surveys were collected from students attending a large osteopathic medical school. Multivariate regression modeling was used to determine whether knowledge, attitudes, behaviors, and personal characteristics were associated with students' readiness to use HIT in future clinical practice. Six hundred four students responded to at least 70% of the survey and were included in the analysis. Multivariate modeling successfully explained the 26% of variance in predicting students' readiness to use HIT (F8,506=22.6, Ptechnology use, younger age, being male, and prior exposure to technology were associated with readiness to use HIT. Understanding students' level of HIT readiness may help guide medical education intervention efforts to better prepare future osteopathic physicians for HIT engagement and use. Innovative approaches to HIT education in medical school curricula that include biomedical informatics may be necessary.

  14. Modern technology of physical education of disabled students in conditions of inclusive education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.G. Adyrkhaev

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available There is a problem of physical education of disabled students during period of their study in higher educational establishments. Insufficiency of this problem’s studying conditioned fulfillment of research of perfection of physical education and sports system. Purpose: substantiation of physical education pedagogic technology for disabled students. Material: in experiment students with following nosologies participated: hearing, eyesight, muscular-skeletal apparatus, after effects of cerebral palsy, somatic diseases and diabetes. In total 664 students of 18-24 years’ age took part in experiment. They were 337 boys and 307 girls. Results: we have worked out organizational-methodic algorithm, which permits to combine theoretical, scientific-methodic and practical training. Its basis is current information about students’ psychic-physiological condition. We determined levels of health and physical condition, physical workability and physical fitness as well as psychic state of students. Demand in optimization of students’ motor functioning during all period of study was substantiated as well as effective means of physical education and pulse regimes, considering peculiarities of nosologies. Students’ orientation on sport style of life was formed. Conclusions: implementation of physical education pedagogic technology for students with different nosologies in the process of their studying stipulates solution of training, health-related and educational tasks. It is possible through creation of conditions for motor actions’ training and intensification of motor functioning during all period of study. Practical application of the technology and received results points at integration of disabled students in students’ medium.

  15. The challenges of clinical education in a baccalaureate surgical technology students in Iran: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zardosht, Roghayeh; Moonaghi, Hossein Karimi; Razavi, Mohammad Etezad; Ahmady, Soleiman

    2018-02-01

    Clinical education is an integral part of the surgical technology curriculum, in which students combine and integrate knowledge, skills, attitudes, values and philosophies of the profession. It is difficult to learn and adapt to different types of skills and roles in the operating room environment. This qualitative study examines the difference between the clinical education of Surgical Technology and other clinical settings, and the challenges faced by students in the field, within the course. This was a qualitative content analysis study conducted in 2016. The participants in this study were 16 baccalaureate surgical technology students of the University for Medical Sciences in Khorasan Razavi province. A semi-structured interview method was run to collect the required data. The sampling was initially purposive, then in the snowball method which continued until data saturation. All interviews were recorded, then transcribed, and analyzed using a continuous comparative method and conventional qualitative content analysis method. From the deep and rich descriptions of the participants, three themes including "stressful environment", "controversy between anticipation of role and reality", and "humiliating experiences" as well as a general theme of "bitter education" were obtained. Students' orientation before attending the operating room, accompanying, supporting, and a full-time attendance of the specialist instructor, strengthening the prerequisite knowledge and skills for the students in this field, teaching ethics, and professional interactions, play an important role in the student's acceptance of the operating room, in the surgery team and the improvement of the quality of clinical education of these students.

  16. Technology use as a support tool by secondary students with autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedges, Susan H; Odom, Samuel L; Hume, Kara; Sam, Ann

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine how secondary students with autism spectrum disorder use technology in supportive ways. In this self-report survey study, 472 adolescents with autism spectrum disorder enrolled in high school described the forms of technology they use and purposes for which they use it. Students reported the benefits as well as barriers to technology use at school. They reported using technology in school and home settings in a variety of supportive ways such as increasing their independence, reducing their anxiety, and increasing their social opportunities. Findings suggest that practitioners may benefit from learning how to integrate technology as an instructional and support tool for their students with autism spectrum disorder. Recommendations for future research are provided.

  17. Using Technology to Increase Physical Activity in Health Profession Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Ann Stark

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Health profession students may need help establishing and maintaining positive health behaviors when they are in college. This study explored the effectiveness of text messaging as an innovative method for promoting an increase in daily physical activity. A convenience sample (N = 134 was recruited from students at a college of Health and Human Services in Michigan. The participants were randomized into an intervention or control group (n = 67 each. The intervention group received daily affective text messages encouraging more physical activity by taking more steps. The control group received only messages reminding them to report their number of steps. All of the participants received a pedometer, completed a demographics and daily habits questionnaire, and completed the Perceived Stress Scale (PSS. There was no significant difference between the intervention and control groups in their number of daily steps. However, the most inactive participants had a significant increase in steps during the study period. Health profession students’ lifestyle behaviors have consequences, as they become caregivers in our dynamic, demanding health-care system. For those with the greatest need for physical activity, encouraging such activity via text messaging may improve their ability to care for themselves and their clients.

  18. TECHNOLOGY USAGE AMONG CONSTRUCTION STUDENTS THE MODERATING ROLE OF GENDER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Ramayah

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available This study examines the impact of perceived usefulness and perceived ease of use on the extent of personal computer (PC usage among a group of undergraduates at the School of Housing, Building and Planning, Universiti Sains Malaysia. It also looks at the moderating role of gender in the above said relationship. Data was collected using a structured questionnaire. A total of 244 students responded to the survey. Results showed that perceived ease of use (β = 0.309, p < 0.01 was positively related to PC usage. A surprising finding of this study was that perceived usefulness was not a significant predictor of PC usage whereas perceived ease of use was. This can be explained in the context of mandated use where the usefulness is no longer an issue and ease of use becomes the primary concern. Gender was not a moderator in the above said relationship but was a significant independent predictor of usage. Males exhibited higher usage of the PC compared to the female students.

  19. LEARNING TECHNOLOGIES FOR STUDENTS IN THE CLOUD ORIENTED LEARNING ENVIRONMENT OF COMPREHENSIVE EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svitlana G. Lytvynova

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper analyzes the «flipped» learning and «Web Quest» technologies. The features of the «flipped» learning technology are generalized, as well as compared with traditional learning, clarified the benefits of the technology for teachers and students, described the features of the technology used by teacher and students, developed a teacher’s and student’s flow chart for preparation to the lesson, generalized control and motivation components for activating learning activities of students, found out that a component of cloud oriented learning environment (COLE – Lync (Skype Pro can be used to develop video clips and support «flipped» learning technology. The author defines the concept of «Web Quest» technology, generalizes the «Web Quest» structure components. In the article the functions, features of this technology, the types of problems that can be solved with the help of this technology, as well as «Web Quest» classification are presented. It has been found out that the cloud oriented learning environment gives all the possibilities for «Web Quest» technology implementation in teaching of different subjects of all branches of science. With the help of «flipped» technology training and «Web Quest» a number of important problems of education can be solved – providing the continuous communication intensive training beyond general educational establishment and activation of learning activities of students.

  20. The Effects of Technology Innovativeness and System Exposure on Student Acceptance of E-textbooks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madison N. Ngafeeson

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The efforts of educators in the last three decades have, among other things, focused on the use of information technology (IT in education. It has become commonplace to view information systems both as an effective carrier of course content as well as a cost-effective tool to improve student learning outcomes. One of such technologies is the e-book. Decision-makers in the education field need make sense of this technological transformation. However, despite the growing popularity of e-books in higher education, its adoption by students is yet to be crystalized. This study exploits the technology acceptance model (TAM framework to examine student acceptance of e-textbooks as “internally” impacted by technology innovativeness and “externally” influenced by system exposure. The results showed that students’ technology innovativeness is associated with student acceptance of e-textbooks and that system exposure was a strong moderator of the TAM relationships. The findings suggest that students’ openness to new technology, in general, is likely to positively affect the adoption of a specific new instructional technology. Additionally, system exposure was found to be a significant moderator of the TAM relationships. It is concluded that students’ technology innovativeness and system exposure must therefore be factored into instructional technology usage decision-making models.

  1. Differences in Student Information and Communication Technology Literacy Based on Socio-Economic Status, Ethnicity, and Gender: Evidence of a Digital Divide in Florida Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritzhaupt, Albert D.; Liu, Feng; Dawson, Kara; Barron, Ann E.

    2013-01-01

    This research examines student information and communication technology (ICT) literacy and its relationships to a student's socio-economic status (SES), gender, and ethnicity of middle school students. We recruited 5,990 students from 13 school districts across the state of Florida. Student participants completed the Student Tool for Technology…

  2. Marine Technology for Teachers and Students: A Multi-modal Approach to Integrate Technology and Ocean Sciences Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gingras, A.; Knowlton, C. W.; Scowcroft, G. A.; Babb, I.; Coleman, D.; Morin, H.

    2016-02-01

    The Marine Technology for Teachers and Students (MaTTS) Project implements a year-long continuum of activities beginning with educators reading and reporting on peer-reviewed publications, followed by face-to-face, hands-on weekend workshops and virtual professional development activities. Teams of teacher and student leaders then participate in an intensive, residential Summer Institute (SI) that emphasizes hands-on building of marine related technologies and exposure to career pathways through direct interactions with ocean scientists and engineers. During the school year, teachers integrate ocean science technology and data into their classrooms and participate, along with colleagues and students from their schools, in science cafes and webinars. Student leaders transfer knowledge gained by engaging their district's middle school students in ocean science activities and technologies by serving as hosts for live broadcasts that connect classrooms with ocean scientists and engineers though the Inner Space Center, a national ocean science telecommunications hub. Communication technologies bridge formal and informal learning environments, allowing MaTTS participants to interact with their fellow cohort members, scientists, and engineers both during and outside of school. Evaluation results indicate that for teachers both the weekend workshops and SI were most effective in preparing them to integrate ocean science and technology in STEM curricula and increase their ocean science content knowledge and leadership characteristics. For students the SI and the middle school interactions supported gains in knowledge, awareness, leadership skills and interest in ocean sciences and technologies, and related STEM careers. In particular, the connections made by working directly with scientists have positively impacted both student and teacher leaders. This presentation will provide an overview of the MaTTS model and early evaluation results.

  3. The performance of ethics course for increasing students intention to blow the whistle using information technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munandar, Agus

    2017-10-01

    The profession of accounting believes that ethics is very important in the workplace. For that, profession recommends that ethics course should be taught for accounting student. Unfornutaly, the impact of ethics courses on accounting students intention to blow the whistle on organizational wrongdoing using information technology have not been determined. For that, this paper attempts to measure the impact of ethics courses on accounting student intention to blow the whistle on organizational wrongdoing. The research using experimental design for investigate the impact of ethic course on students intention to blow the whistle using IT. The respondents for this study are 40 accountig students. The respondent were given the ethical scenarios and were measured their intention to blow the whistle using information technology. This result of study reports that 70% of accounting student who completed ethic course indicated high intention to blow the whistle on organizational wrongdoing using information technology. Hence, ethics course is beneficial for increasing accounting professionalism especially their intentio to blow the whistle wrongdoing using information technology.

  4. Technological Readiness of UiTM students in Using Mobile Phones in their English Language Classroom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agelyia a/p Murugan

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Mobile Assisted Language Learning (MALL by using devices such as mobile phones is an ideal learning platform for learners to acquire language and share knowledge beyond the confines of a fixed location. By utilising the mobile applications available via smartphone, learners can engage in collaborative networks and find information that they need in a variety of diverse environments. This paper shares the findings of a research at UiTM to determine the technological readiness of the students by measuring their digital skills using the Digital Competence Framework (EU. 50 students from the English language proficiency course were purposively sampled because they have been exposed to MALL by their lecturer participated in this research. Their responses were collected through an online questionnaire. The findings showed that all 50 of the students owned a smartphone. 82.6% of the students did not attend any training on how to use the smartphones. 80.4% of the students have their own storing strategies and nearly 90% of the students reported having the following technological skills in operating their smartphone such as accessing applications, ability to record, share and produce technological resources. The findings reiterate that to ensure successful MALL, educators need to be aware of the background and technological skills of the learners before embedding m-learning into the English Language lessons. View it in PDF

  5. Theoretical and methodological reasoning of correction technologies of the physical conditions of students of music speciality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petro Marynchuk

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The article emphasizes the lack of development of the methodological basis for the physical education of students of Music Arts. Professionally dependent indicators of physical condition were taken into account. The article also outlines the main theoretical and methodological provisions that underlie the development of technology for correction of the physical condition of students of music arts. They are in particular actualization of life-giving motivation of students to increase the level of physical condition, regular physical exercises, the need for the development of professionally important physical qualities, ensuring the differentiation of physical activity, taking into account the level of physical state and physical conditions of students of Music Arts. The structure of the technology of correction of the physical condition of students of Music Arts is considered. The technology contains the purpose, tasks, principles, stages of implementation, the program with the use of physical culture, performance criteria. The main stages of the technology implementation – preparatory, main, final – are analyzed. The means of motor activity of innovative direction are described for use in the practice of higher educational institutions, which take into account the features of the student staff, their mode of educational activity.

  6. Influence of Science, Technology, and Engineering Curriculum on Rural Midwestern High School Student Career Decisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killingsworth, John

    Low degree completion in technical and engineering degrees is a growing concern for policymakers and educators in the United States. This study was an examination of the behaviors of adolescents specific to career decisions related to technology and engineering. The central research question for this study was: do rural, Midwestern high school technical and engineering curricula serve to engage students sufficiently to encourage them to persist through high school while sustaining their interests in technology and engineering careers? Engaging students in technology and engineering fields is the challenge for educators throughout the country and the Midwest. Rural schools have the additional challenge of meeting those issues because of resource limitations. Students in three Midwestern schools were surveyed to determine the level of interest in technology and engineering. The generalized likelihood ratio test was used to overcome concerns for small sample sizes. Accounting for dependent variables, multiple independent variables are examined using descriptive statistics to determine which have greater influence on career decisions, specifically those related to technology and engineering. A typical science curriculum is defined for rural Midwestern high schools. This study concludes that such curriculum achieves the goal of maintaining or increasing student interest and engagement in STEM careers. Furthermore, those schools that incorporate contextual and experiential learning activities into the curriculum demonstrate increased results in influencing student career choices toward technology and engineering careers. Implications for parents, educators, and industry professionals are discussed.

  7. Teacher learning in technology professional development and its impact on student achievement in science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyunju; Longhurst, Max; Campbell, Todd

    2017-07-01

    This research investigated teacher learning and teacher beliefs in a two-year technology professional development (TPD) for teachers and its impact on their student achievement in science in the western part of the United States. Middle-school science teachers participated in TPD focused on information communication technologies (ICTs) and their applications in science inquiry pedagogy. Three self-reporting teacher instruments were used alongside their student achievement scores on the end-of-year state-science-test. The teacher self-reporting measures investigated technological literacy, ICT capabilities, and pedagogical beliefs about science inquiry pedagogy. Data were collected every year, and descriptive statistics, t-tests, and Pearson's correlations were used for analysis. We found teachers' technological skills and ICT capabilities increasing over time with significant gains each year. Additionally, teachers' pedagogical beliefs changed to become more science inquiry oriented over time; however, the gains were not significant until after the second year of TPD. Comparisons of teacher learning and belief measures with student achievement revealed that the students' performance was correlated to teachers' pedagogical beliefs about science inquiry, but not to their technological skills nor to their ICT capabilities. This research suggests that pedagogical considerations should be foregrounded in TPD and that this may require more longitudinal TPD to ensure that technology integration in science instruction is consequential to student learning.

  8. Critical thinking instruction and technology enhanced learning from the student perspective: A mixed methods research study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swart, Ruth

    2017-03-01

    Critical thinking is acclaimed as a valuable asset for graduates from higher education programs. Technology has advanced in quantity and quality; recognized as a requirement of 21st century learners. A mixed methods research study was undertaken, examining undergraduate nursing student engagement with critical thinking instruction, platformed on two technology-enhanced learning environments: a classroom response system face-to-face in-class and an online discussion forum out-of-class. The Community of Inquiry framed the study capturing constructivist collaborative inquiry to support learning, and facilitate critical thinking capability. Inclusion of quantitative and qualitative data sources aimed to gather a comprehensive understanding of students' development of critical thinking and engagement with technology-enhanced learning. The findings from the students' perspectives were positive toward the inclusion of technology-enhanced learning, and use in supporting their development of critical thinking. Students considered the use of two forms of technology beneficial in meeting different needs and preferences, offering varied means to actively participate in learning. They valued critical thinking instruction being intentionally aligned with subject-specific content facilitating understanding, application, and relevance of course material. While the findings are limited to student participants, the instructional strategies and technology-enhanced learning identified as beneficial can inform course design for the development of critical thinking. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Research Students' Conceptions of the Role of Information and Communication Technologies in Educational Technology Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markauskaite, Lina; Wardak, Dewa

    2015-01-01

    The emergence of "big data," "digital scholarship" and "eResearch" raises the question of how these digital developments in research methods and practices affect research students. This paper presents findings from a phenomenographic study that investigated postgraduate students' conceptions of the role of information…

  10. Harnessing Technology to Improve Formative Assessment of Student Conceptions in STEM: Forging a National Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haudek, Kevin C.; Kaplan, Jennifer J.; Knight, Jennifer; Long, Tammy; Merrill, John; Munn, Alan; Nehm, Ross; Smith, Michelle; Urban-Lurain, Mark

    2011-01-01

    Concept inventories, consisting of multiple-choice questions designed around common student misconceptions, are designed to reveal student thinking. However, students often have complex, heterogeneous ideas about scientific concepts. Constructed-response assessments, in which students must create their own answer, may better reveal students’ thinking, but are time- and resource-intensive to evaluate. This report describes the initial meeting of a National Science Foundation–funded cross-institutional collaboration of interdisciplinary science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) education researchers interested in exploring the use of automated text analysis to evaluate constructed-response assessments. Participants at the meeting shared existing work on lexical analysis and concept inventories, participated in technology demonstrations and workshops, and discussed research goals. We are seeking interested collaborators to join our research community. PMID:21633063

  11. Use of media technology to enhance the learning of student nurses in regards to auditory hallucinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mawson, Kerry

    2014-04-01

    The aim of this study was to determine if simulation aided by media technology contributes towards an increase in knowledge, empathy, and a change in attitudes in regards to auditory hallucinations for nursing students. A convenience sample of 60 second-year undergraduate nursing students from an Australian university was invited to be part of the study. A pre-post-test design was used, with data analysed using a paired samples t-test to identify pre- and post-changes on nursing students' scores on knowledge of auditory hallucinations. Nine of the 11 questions reported statistically-significant results. The remaining two questions highlighted knowledge embedded within the curriculum, with therapeutic communication being the core work of mental health nursing. The implications for practice are that simulation aided by media technology increases the knowledge of students in regards to auditory hallucinations. © 2013 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc.

  12. Metacognitive factors that impact student nurse use of point of care technology in clinical settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuiper, RuthAnne

    2010-01-01

    The utility of personal digital assistants (PDA) as a point of care resource in health care practice and education presents new challenges for nursing faculty. While there is a plethora of PDA resources available, little is known about the variables that effect student learning and technology adoption. In this study nursing students used PDA software programs which included a drug guide, medical dictionary, laboratory manual and nursing diagnosis manual during acute care clinical experiences. Analysis of student journals comparative reflective statements about the PDA as an adjunct to other available resources in clinical practice are presented. The benefits of having a PDA included readily available data, validation of thinking processes, and facilitation of care plan re-evaluation. Students reported increased frequency of use and independence. Significant correlations between user perceptions and computer self-efficacy suggested greater confidence in abilities with technology resulting in increased self-awareness and achievement of learning outcomes.

  13. Technology in Note Taking and Assessment: The Effects of Congruence on Student Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew E. Barrett

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study examined the encoding specificity principle in relation to traditional and computer-based note taking and assessment formats in higher education. Students (N = 79 took lecture notes either by hand (n = 40 or by computer (n = 39 and then completed either a computer or a paper-based assessment. When note taking and assessment formats were congruent, students scored significantly higher on the assessment when compared to students whose note taking and assessment format were incongruent. These findings highlight the importance of research on how in-class technology may affect student performance, and suggest that faculty and administrators seek to coordinate and standardize the use of assessment and note taking technologies where possible.

  14. Video Lecture Capture Technology Helps Students Study without Affecting Attendance in Large Microbiology Lecture Courses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Lynn McLean

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Recording lectures using video lecture capture software and making them available for students to watch anytime, from anywhere, has become a common practice in many universities across many disciplines. The software has become increasingly easy to use and is commonly provided and maintained by higher education institutions. Several studies have reported that students use lecture capture to enhance their learning and study for assessments, as well as to catch up on material they miss when they cannot attend class due to extenuating circumstances. Furthermore, students with disabilities and students from non-English Speaking Backgrounds (NESB may benefit from being able to watch the video lecture captures at their own pace. Yet, the effect of this technology on class attendance remains a controversial topic and largely unexplored in undergraduate microbiology education. Here, we show that when video lecture captures were available in our large enrollment general microbiology courses, attendance did not decrease. In fact, the majority of students reported that having the videos available did not encourage them to skip class, but rather they used them as a study tool. When we surveyed NESB students and nontraditional students about their attitudes toward this technology, they found it helpful for their learning and for keeping up with the material.

  15. Understanding technology use and constructivist strategies when addressing Saudi primary students' mathematics difficulties.

    OpenAIRE

    Alabdulaziz, M.; Higgins, S.

    2017-01-01

    This paper will investigate the relationship between technology use and the use of constructivist strategies when addressing Saudi primary students' mathematics difficulties. Semi-structured interviews and observations were used for the purpose of this research, which were undertaken with three mathematics teachers from school A which used technology, and the other three from school B, which did not use technology. We found that technology can support constructivist approach when teaching and...

  16. PECULIARITIES OF AN INDIVIDUAL APPROACH TO HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS MAJORING IN TECHNOLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andriy Uruskyi

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The features of the methodology of the implementation of an individual approach to high school students majoring in technology are analysed. The main stages of the implementation have been defined as the analysis of the individual student characteristics; grouping 10–11 grade students; usage of the modern informational and communicational techniques and a set of facilities of differentiated studying. The examples of the differentiated tasks for different phases of the high school training such as providing training material by teachers; academic progress monitoring; self-studying materials; fulfilling tasks of practical (laboratory and practical works; goods manufacturing; carrying out creative projects have been provided.

  17. The role of self-dependence in modern health improvemental technologies of physical students' education.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shumakov O.V.

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available A normative base is considered on the problems of physical education, physical culture and independent work of students. An analysis is conducted scientifically-methodical and special literature on issue of research. Basic features and modern going are selected near independent work in health technologies of physical education of students. A concept «Independent work» is examined as activity of man and as a teaching method. A teaching method plugs in itself independent employments by physical exercises. During correct organization they can substantially increase motive activity of students.

  18. Science Teaching Orientations and Technology-Enhanced Tools for Student Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Todd; Longhurst, Max; Duffy, Aaron M.; Wolf, Paul G.; Shelton, Brett E.

    2013-01-01

    This qualitative study examines teacher orientations and technology-enhanced tools for student learning within a science literacy framework. Data for this study came from a group of 10 eighth grade science teachers. Each of these teachers was a participant in a professional development (PD) project focused on reformed and technology-enhanced…

  19. Teacher Learning in Technology Professional Development and Its Impact on Student Achievement in Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyunju; Longhurst, Max; Campbell, Todd

    2017-01-01

    This research investigated teacher learning and teacher beliefs in a two-year technology professional development (TPD) for teachers and its impact on their student achievement in science in the western part of the United States. Middle-school science teachers participated in TPD focused on information communication technologies (ICTs) and their…

  20. The Influence of Information Technology on Student's Behavioural Nature in the Class Room

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Liaqat

    2018-01-01

    The use of mobile phones and other gadgets in the university class room is becoming a culture in the modern age of technology. Some students use this technology for the purpose of information only. However, it was noted that others use mobile phone to receive messages through different applications such as WhatsApp, Facebook, Instagram and Viber.…

  1. For All Students Everywhere: Technology Means Independence in a Beautiful Digital World

    Science.gov (United States)

    Childress, Tina

    2015-01-01

    Technology benefits everyone, but perhaps especially deaf and hard of hearing students; it allows them direct access to the world around them and continued connection with others. Technology can mean increased access, independence, and self-reliance. The T-coil and all of the cables and accessories that come with hearing devices are essential for…

  2. Examining Changes of Preservice Teachers' Beliefs about Technology Integration during Student Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Pi-Sui

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative case study was to examine changes in preservice teachers' beliefs about technology integration during the student teaching semester in USA. This study used in-depth interviews, review of documents, and observations. The findings indicated the preservice teachers' beliefs about technology integration changed in two…

  3. Teachers' Views about Science and Technology Lesson Effects on the Development of Students' Entrepreneurship Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacanak, Ahmet

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the views of science and technology teachers about the effects of 6th, 7th and 8th grade science and technology courses on students' entrepreneurship skills. In the study, phenomenographic method was used and data were collected through a semi-structured interview method with 8 questions. 5 science and…

  4. Female Students' Experiences of Computer Technology in Single- versus Mixed-Gender School Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Lee-Ann; Murphy, Elizabeth

    2006-01-01

    This study explores how female students compare learning computer technology in a single- versus a mixed- gender school setting. Twelve females participated, all of whom were enrolled in a grade 12 course in Communications' Technology. Data collection included a questionnaire, a semi-structured interview and focus groups. Participants described…

  5. The Correlation between Temperament, Technology Preference, and Proficiency in Middle School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colvin-Sterling, Sabrina

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between middle school students' personality type and their academic performance in the technology courses in which they participated. It also explored the differences in technology use by personality. Most participants identified games as a favorite pas-time. However, there were some noted temperamental…

  6. Retrospective Analysis of Technological Literacy of K-12 Students in the USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenkraft, Arthur

    2010-01-01

    Assessing technological literacy in the USA will require a large expenditure of resources. While these important initiatives are taking place, it is useful to analyze existing archival data to get a sense of students' understanding of technology. Such archival data exists from the entries submitted to the Toshiba/NSTA ExploraVisions competition…

  7. Introduction of 3D Printing Technology in the Classroom for Visually Impaired Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Wonjin; I, Jang Hee; Harianto, Rachel Ananda; So, Ji Hyun; Lee, Hyebin; Lee, Heon Ju; Moon, Myoung-Woon

    2016-01-01

    The authors investigate how 3D printing technology could be utilized for instructional materials that allow visually impaired students to have full access to high-quality instruction in history class. Researchers from the 3D Printing Group of the Korea Institute of Science and Technology (KIST) provided the Seoul National School for the Blind with…

  8. Exploring the Use of Technology to Support Literacy of Sixth Grade Students with Reading Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball-Inman, Jaime Renee

    2017-01-01

    The degree to which the utilization of technology supports the academic achievement of sixth grade students with reading disabilities was examined using a quantitative research design. The data analysis involved the results from the Educational Technology Assessment Program to measure achievement. The Standardized Test for the Assessment of…

  9. Using Computer-Based Artificial Intelligence Technology to Help ESL Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Dennis M.

    This paper discusses ways in which artificial intelligence (AI) technologies may be used to aid students for whom English is a second language in the development of language and reading skills, and asserts that the coupling of technology with close adult-teacher contacts within a context of cultural precedents and social rewards is an important…

  10. Lecture Capture Technology and Student Performance in an Operations Management Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sloan, Thomas W.; Lewis, David A.

    2014-01-01

    Lecture capture technologies (LCT) such as Echo360, Mediasite, and Tegrity have become very popular in recent years. Many studies have shown that students favor the use of such technology, but relatively little research has studied the impact of LCT on learning. This article examines two research questions: (1) whether the use of LCT actually…

  11. Views of Students on Learning with Technologies in Dutch Education and Training

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jeroen Bottema; Pieter Swager

    2012-01-01

    The integrated use of technologies in learning in formal education and training in The Netherlands is far from realized, and there is still a long way to go to reach that goal. But what are the views of students and early career teachers about learning with technologies? This chapter focuses on

  12. Enhancing the Students' Positive Attitude in Learning Business English by Using Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agustina, Lia

    2017-01-01

    Many research findings have stated that the use of technology in EFL classroom results invaluable achievements and develops positive attitudes. Technology may integrate sounds, pictures, motions, and colors that fi ure out a natural picture of real life. The aim of the study was to enhance the students' attitude toward learning English by using…

  13. The Attitudes of Physical Education and Sport Students towards Information and Communication Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goktas, Zekeriya

    2012-01-01

    Studies that examine the attitudes toward information and communication technologies (ICT) among physical education and sport students, pre-service teachers and teachers are fairly limited, even though the investments in information and communication technologies at schools and universities have reached an efficient level. This study investigates…

  14. Web 2.0 Technologies and Building Online Learning Communities: Students' Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelmalak, Mariam Mousa Matta

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this action research was to explore students' perspectives regarding using Web 2.0 technologies to develop a community of learners. The course described in this study was a fully online course in an Educational Learning Technologies master's program at a medium-sized university in the U.S. Southwest. A variety of Web 2.0 tools…

  15. Re-Imagining the Nature of (Student-Focused) Learning through Digital Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hood, Nina

    2018-01-01

    Digital technology is frequently positioned as being central to the establishment of a 'future focused' education system that provides high quality student-focused learning opportunities and re-envisioned educational outcomes. While recognising the potential of technology, this paper explores some of the questions about its role in education and…

  16. Expanding Horizons for Students with Dyslexia in the 21st Century: Universal Design and Mobile Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Gavin; Strnadova, Iva; Cumming, Therese

    2013-01-01

    This paper discusses the role of mobile technology in supporting people with dyslexia within the theoretical framework of Universal Design for Learning. The authors discuss how students with dyslexia can use mobile technology to address a diverse range of academic needs (such as reading, composing text, notetaking, metacognition and studying…

  17. The Effects of Technology Innovativeness and System Exposure on Student Acceptance of E-Textbooks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngafeeson, Madison N.; Sun, Jun

    2015-01-01

    The efforts of educators in the last three decades have, among other things, focused on the use of information technology (IT) in education. It has become commonplace to view information systems both as an effective carrier of course content as well as a cost-effective tool to improve student learning outcomes. One of such technologies is the…

  18. Teaching in a Digital Age: How Educators Use Technology to Improve Student Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKnight, Katherine; O'Malley, Kimberly; Ruzic, Roxanne; Horsley, Maria Kelly; Franey, John J.; Bassett, Katherine

    2016-01-01

    A successful digital conversion for classrooms, districts, and states is not determined by the technology, but by how technology enables teaching and learning. The purpose of our multisite case study was to document digital instructional strategies teachers use to enhance and transform student learning, and align that use with learning research.…

  19. The Effect of Technology on Students' Opinions about Authentic Learning Activities in Science Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coskun, Hilal; Dogan, Alev; Uluay, Gulsah

    2017-01-01

    Today, most of the researchers have agreed on the importance of classroom environment where students responsible of their own learning. It is important to use modern learning methods with technology to reach this aim in courses. The main purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of using Technology in science courses to investigate 7th…

  20. Integrating Technology in Teaching Students with Special Learning Needs in the SPED Schools in Baguio City

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balmeo, Marilyn L.; Nimo, Erika Mae A.; Pagal, Aubrey M.; Puga, Stephanie C.; ArisDafQuiño; Sanwen, Jaleen L.

    2014-01-01

    Leading-edge creation and development of technologies including those for the children with special learning needs found common place in the educational system. Allowably, this study's focal point engages in the integration of technologies in the educational environments where students with special learning needs are housed. Respondents include 53…

  1. A Comparative Analysis of Spatial Visualization Ability and Drafting Models for Industrial and Technology Education Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsioloudis, Petros; Jovanovic, Vukica; Jones, Mildred

    2014-01-01

    The main purpose of this study was to determine significant positive effects among the use of three different types of drafting models, and to identify whether any differences exist towards promotion of spatial visualization ability for students in Industrial Technology and Technology Education courses. In particular, the study compared the use of…

  2. Understanding the Use of Educational Technology among Faculty, Staff, and Students at a Medical University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazley, Abby Swanson; Annan, Dustin L.; Carson, Nancy E.; Freeland, Melissa; Hodge, Ashley B.; Seif, Gretchen A.; Zoller, James S.

    2013-01-01

    A college of health professions at a medical university located in the southeastern United States is striving to increase the use of educational technology among faculty, staff, and students. A strategic planning group was formed and charged with enhancing the use of educational technology within the college. In order to understand the current…

  3. Stay in the Box! Embedded Assistive Technology Improves Access for Students with Disabilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine Koch

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Assistive technology is not only a required component of a student’s IEP; it can be an effective way to help students with (and without disabilities access their education and to provide them with required instructional accommodations. Teachers, however, are often not adequately prepared in their pre-service course work and ongoing professional development to address the technology needs of their special education students and have not had the opportunities to access technology due to limited availability and cost. While assistive technology can be purchased to augment an existing computer, it is often unnecessary to do that. Both Microsoft and Apple operating systems in “off-the-shelf” computers and handheld devices have embedded assistive technology that is easy to access and easy to use. This embedded technology can help teachers become familiar with technology and assist students with sensory, physical, learning, and attention disabilities, and it might have practical applications with Universal Design for Learning. This paper provides a discussion on how embedded technology can support students with disabilities in the school setting and provides examples for access and use.

  4. The impact of a technology-rich intervention on grade 7 students' skills in initial algebra

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jupri, Al; Drijvers, Paul; van den Heuvel - Panhuizen, Marja

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes a classroom experiment on the use of digital technology in initial algebra. Indonesian grade seven students of 12-13 year-old took part in a four session teaching sequence on beginning algebra enriched with digital technology, and in particular applets embedded in the Digital

  5. Improving Science Student Teachers' Self-Perceptions of Fluency with Innovative Technologies and Scientific Inquiry Abilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çalik, Muammer; Ebenezer, Jazlin; Özsevgeç, Tuncay; Küçük, Zeynel; Artun, Hüseyin

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of "Environmental Chemistry" elective course via Technology-Embedded Scientific Inquiry (TESI) model on senior science student teachers' (SSSTs) self-perceptions of fluency with innovative technologies (InT) and scientific inquiry abilities. The study was conducted with 117 SSSTs (68…

  6. Urban Adolescent Students and Technology: Access, Use and Interest in Learning Language and Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jia; Snow, Catherine; White, Claire

    2015-01-01

    Adolescents today have vastly different opportunities to learn and process information via pervasive digital technologies and social media. However, there is scant literature on the impact of these technologies on urban adolescents with lower socioeconomic status. This study of 531 urban students in grades 6-8 used a self-reported survey to…

  7. A Necessary Addiction: Student Conceptualizations of Technology and Its Impact on Teaching and Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Laurie B.

    2018-01-01

    The near constant use of technology today has led to widespread changes in the way literacy is imagined, used, and theorized. Since college students spend a significant amount of time using and being involved with various acts of technology, there is no doubt that their literate lives are changing and adapting as well. Although most college-aged…

  8. Using mobile technologies to give health students access to learning resources in the UK community setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walton, Graham; Childs, Susan; Blenkinsopp, Elizabeth

    2005-12-01

    This article describes a project which explored the potential for mobile technologies to give health students in the community access to learning resources. The purpose included the need to identify possible barriers students could face in using mobile technologies. Another focus was to assess the students perceptions of the importance of being able to access learning resources in the community. This 1-year project used two main approaches for data collection. A review of the literature on mobile technologies in the health context was conducted. This was used in a systematic way to identify key issues and trends. The literature review was used to inform the design and production of a questionnaire. This was distributed to and completed by a group of community health students at Northumbria University, UK. The questionnaire was piloted and there was a 100% completion rate with 49 returned forms. The literature review indicated that most mobile technology applications were occurring in the US. At the time of the review the most prevalent mobile technologies were PDAs, laptops, WAP phones and portable radios with use being concentrated around doctors in the acute sector. A range of advantages and disadvantages to the technology were discovered. Mobile technologies were mainly being used for clinical rather than learning applications. The students showed a low level of awareness of the technology but placed great importance to accessing learning resources from the community. Significant development and changes are taking place in mobile technologies. Since the data collection for this work was completed in 2004 podcasting and videocasting have become significant in mobile learning for health professionals. Librarians will need to address the relevance and implications of m-learning for their practice. Care and consideration needs to be given on the time and resources librarians allocate for the necessary development work around mobile technologies. Collaboration and

  9. Using assistive technology adaptations to include students with learning disabilities in cooperative learning activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryant, D P; Bryant, B R

    1998-01-01

    Cooperative learning (CL) is a common instructional arrangement that is used by classroom teachers to foster academic achievement and social acceptance of students with and without learning disabilities. Cooperative learning is appealing to classroom teachers because it can provide an opportunity for more instruction and feedback by peers than can be provided by teachers to individual students who require extra assistance. Recent studies suggest that students with LD may need adaptations during cooperative learning activities. The use of assistive technology adaptations may be necessary to help some students with LD compensate for their specific learning difficulties so that they can engage more readily in cooperative learning activities. A process for integrating technology adaptations into cooperative learning activities is discussed in terms of three components: selecting adaptations, monitoring the use of the adaptations during cooperative learning activities, and evaluating the adaptations' effectiveness. The article concludes with comments regarding barriers to and support systems for technology integration, technology and effective instructional practices, and the need to consider technology adaptations for students who have learning disabilities.

  10. Self-reported oral health behavior and attitudes of dental and technology students in Lithuania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacauskiene, Ingrida M; Smailiene, Dalia; Siudikienė, Jolanta; Savanevskyte, Julija; Nedzelskiene, Irena

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess self-reported oral health habits, attitudes, lifestyle between the sample groups of preclinical and clinical dental and technology students in Lithuania using the Hiroshima University Dental Behavioral Inventory (HU-DBI), and to evaluate the impact of education on their behavior and self-reported oral health. A sample of 183 dental and 75 technology students at the Lithuanian University of Health Sciences, Medical Academy, Faculty of Odontology, and Kaunas University of Technology completed the Lithuanian version the HU-DBI questionnaire with 11 additional items. The data were analyzed using the "SPSS 19.0 for Windows" software package. The mean HU-DBI score of clinical final-year dentistry students was significantly higher (p=0.001) than the score of the preclinical group (6.81 (1.2) and 5.96 (1.5), respectively). The mean scores of both groups of dental students were significantly (ptechnology group (5.37 (1.8)). Oral health behaviors and knowledge were superior in dental students. Dental education had a significant positive impact on the oral health and behavior improvement. The attitudes of the Lithuanian dental students should be further improved by initiating a comprehensive program that would emphasize the importance of oral hygiene before the clinical program starts.

  11. Information Technology Practices Amongst Dental Undergraduate Students at a Private Dental Institution in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Kumar

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: In dental and medical education, information and communication technology (ICT has been playing an important role and its use is rapidly increasing. In developing countries, however, information technology is still only available to a minority of health professionals. The present study aimed to assess the level of computer use among dental undergraduate students pursuing their career at a private dental institution in India.Materials and Methods: The study population comprised dental undergraduate students from first to fourth year pursuing their career in a private dental institution of India. Informationtechnology practices were assessed using a questionnaire that consisted of 14 questions.Results: In total, 247 students with an overall response rate of 66% participated in the study. Only 58.3% of the study population mentioned that they had access to computers.Students from preclinical years reported to be competent in IT skills more frequently than the clinical year students (chi square test, P=0.007. Compared to women, men used computers more regularly both for academic activities (P=0.082 and personal use (P=0.006.Similarly, students of clinical years used computers more than preclinical students for both purposes (academic activities, P=0.045; personal use, P=0.124.Conclusion: The present study revealed that computer literacy of Indian dental undergraduate students was comparable with students of other countries whereas accessibility of IT sources was poor. Expansion of computer-assisted learning which requires careful strategic planning, resource sharing, staff incentives, active promotion of multidisciplinary working, and effective quality control should be implemented.

  12. INTEGRATING GEOSPATIAL TECHNOLOGIES AND SECONDARY STUDENT PROJECTS: THE GEOSPATIAL SEMESTER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bob Kolvoord

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Resumen:El Semestre Geoespacial es una actividad de educación geográfica centrada en que los estudiantes del último curso de secundaria en los institutos norteamericanos, adquieran competencias y habilidades específicas en sistemas de información geográfica, GPS y teledetección. A través de una metodología de aprendizaje basado en proyectos, los alumnos se motivan e implican en la realización de trabajos de investigación en los que analizan, e incluso proponen soluciones, diferentes procesos, problemas o cuestiones de naturaleza espacial. El proyecto está coordinado por la Universidad James Madison y lleva siete años implantándose en diferentes institutos del Estado de Virginia, implicando a más de 20 centros educativos y 1.500 alumnos. Los alumnos que superan esta asignatura de la enseñanza secundaria obtienen la convalidación de determinados créditos académicos de la Universidad de referencia.Palabras clave:Sistemas de información geográfica, enseñanza, didáctica de la geografía, semestre geoespacial.Abstract:The Geospatial Semester is a geographical education activity focused on students in their final year of secondary schools in the U.S., acquiring specific skills in GIS, GPS and remote sensing. Through a methodology for project-based learning, students are motivated and involved in conducting research using geographic information systems and analyze, and even propose solutions, different processes, problems or issues spatial in nature. The Geospatial Semester university management not only ensures proper coaching, guidance and GIS training for teachers of colleges, but has established a system whereby students who pass this course of secondary education gain the recognition of certain credits from the University.Key words:Geographic information system, teaching, geographic education, geospatial semester. Résumé:Le semestre géospatial est une activité axée sur l'éducation géographique des étudiants en derni

  13. Student Violence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloomberg, Edward

    This report discusses student violence within the framework of causes, issues, and false and true solutions. The author decries the abdication of responsibilities by both college administrators, who have permitted students to "do their thing," and leftwing students, who crusade thoughtlessly against educational institutions. Some true solutions…

  14. STUDENT PLACEMENT

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    students express lack of interest in the field they are placed, it ... be highly motivated to learn than students placed in a department ... the following research questions. Research Questions. •. Did the criteria used by Mekelle. University for placement of students into different departments affect the academic performance of ...

  15. Saudi high school students' attitudes and barriers toward the use of computer technologies in learning English.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabti, Ahmed Abdulateef; Chaichan, Rasha Sami

    2014-01-01

    This study examines the attitudes of Saudi Arabian high school students toward the use of computer technologies in learning English. The study also discusses the possible barriers that affect and limit the actual usage of computers. Quantitative approach is applied in this research, which involved 30 Saudi Arabia students of a high school in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. The respondents comprised 15 males and 15 females with ages between 16 years and 18 years. Two instruments, namely, Scale of Attitude toward Computer Technologies (SACT) and Barriers affecting Students' Attitudes and Use (BSAU) were used to collect data. The Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) of Davis (1989) was utilized. The analysis of the study revealed gender differences in attitudes toward the use of computer technologies in learning English. Female students showed high and positive attitudes towards the use of computer technologies in learning English than males. Both male and female participants demonstrated high and positive perception of Usefulness and perceived Ease of Use of computer technologies in learning English. Three barriers that affected and limited the use of computer technologies in learning English were identified by the participants. These barriers are skill, equipment, and motivation. Among these barriers, skill had the highest effect, whereas motivation showed the least effect.

  16. A Technique for Continuous Evaluation of Student Performance in Two Different Domains: Structural Engineering and Computer Information Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Niranjan; Stefanek, George

    2017-01-01

    Student access to the Internet has made it much easier for students to find solutions to traditional homework problems online and thereby has made this traditional assessment method of monitoring student progress and gauging the assimilation of knowledge in engineering and technology courses less reliable. This paper presents an in-class,…

  17. Redesigning Schools to Reach Every Student with Excellent Teachers: Financial Planning for Time-Technology Swap--Rotation Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Public Impact, 2012

    2012-01-01

    This brief shows how teachers in a Time-Technology swap school model may earn more, sustainably. In this model, schools use age-appropriate portions of digital learning (as little as about an hour daily per student) to free the time of excellent teachers to teach more students and potentially to collaborate with peers. By teaching more students,…

  18. Effects of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) on Students' Academic Achievement and Retention in Chemistry at Secondary Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Ishtiaq; Suleman, Qaiser; ud Din, M. Naseer; Shafique, Farhan

    2017-01-01

    The current paper investigated the effects of information and communication technology on the students' academic achievement and retention in chemistry. Fifty students of 9th grade were selected randomly from Kohsar Public School and College Latamber Karak. The students were grouped into equivalent groups based on pretest score. In order to…

  19. University Student and Teacher Perceptions of Teacher Roles in Promoting Autonomous Language Learning with Technology outside the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Chun; Yeung, Yuk; Hu, Jingjing

    2016-01-01

    Helping students to become autonomous learners, who actively utilize technologies for learning outside the classroom, is important for successful language learning. Teachers, as significant social agents who shape students' intellectual and social experiences, have a critical role to play. This study examined students' and teachers' perceptions of…

  20. Student Attitudes towards and Use of ICT in Course Study, Work and Social Activity: A Technology Acceptance Model Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmunds, Rob; Thorpe, Mary; Conole, Grainne

    2012-01-01

    The increasing use of information and communication technology (ICT) in higher education has been explored largely in relation to student experience of coursework and university life. Students' lives and experience beyond the university have been largely unexplored. Research into student experience of ICT used a validated model--the technology…

  1. Exploring changes in nursing students' attitudes towards the use of technology: A four-wave longitudinal panel study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tubaishat, Ahmad; Aljezawi, Ma'en; Al-Rawajfah, Omar M; Habiballah, Laila; Akhu-Zaheya, Laila M

    2016-03-01

    It is essential for nursing students to be equipped with the necessary technology skills throughout and after their study period. Their acceptance of this technology depends largely on their attitudes towards technology. To explore the evolution in nursing students' attitudes towards technology, and to determine whether there was a change in participants' formal education in technology over their four years of study. A longitudinal panel study was conducted in a single school of nursing in Jordan. A total of 140 students were followed over their four years of undergraduate study. They completed the same tool (the Technology Attitude Scale) each year, to capture any changes in their attitudes towards technology across the years. In all four waves of data collection, students showed positive attitudes towards technology, with the highest attitude scores being in their final year (M=6.19, SD=0.72). As the students spent more time on their nursing education, they were found to have a more positive attitude. Thus, a strong positive relationship existed between this formal education in technology and attitudes: as the students' education in technology increased, their attitudes were more positive. A remarkable development in students' attitudes towards technology is reported in this study. The positive attitudes displayed by the students should be enhanced by providing technology-related subjects during their studies in nursing schools at a very early stage. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Nagging, Noobs and New Tricks--Students' Perceptions of School as a Context for Digital Technology Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulfin, Scott; Johnson, Nicola; Nemorin, Selena; Selwyn, Neil

    2016-01-01

    While digital technology is an integral feature of contemporary education, schools are often presumed to constrain and compromise students' uses of technology. This paper investigates students' experiences of school as a context for digital technology use. Drawing upon survey data from three Australian secondary schools (n = 1174), this paper…

  3. A Whole New World: Technology and Its Impact on Students Who Are Deaf or Hard-of-Hearing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    In this article, the author describes technology used with children or students who are deaf or hard-of-hearing. Specifically, three technological developments are highlighted: cochlear implants, universal newborn infant hearing screening, and telepractice. The positive impact of each type of technology on students who are deaf or hard-of-hearing…

  4. A Comparative Analysis of Preferred Learning and Teaching Styles for Engineering, Industrial, and Technology Education Students and Faculty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsioloudis, Petros; Fantz, Todd D.

    2012-01-01

    In the spring semester of 2010, a materials process course was selected as a means to perform a preferred learning style research study. This course was selected because it contained three groups of students: technology education, engineering technology, and industrial technology. The researchers believed that the differences in the students'…

  5. Investigating the Predictive Power of TAM: A Case Study of CEGEP Students' Intentions to Use Online Learning Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazelais, Paul; Doleck, Tenzin; Lemay, David John

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to investigate pre-university science "Collège d'enseignement général et professionnel" (CEGEP) students' behavioral intentions towards using online learning technologies. Heretofore, CEGEP students' use of technology has received scant attention, yet online learning technologies are found to play an…

  6. The Impact of a Geospatial Technology-Supported Energy Curriculum on Middle School Students' Science Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulo, Violet; Bodzin, Alec

    2013-02-01

    Geospatial technologies are increasingly being integrated in science classrooms to foster learning. This study examined whether a Web-enhanced science inquiry curriculum supported by geospatial technologies promoted urban middle school students' understanding of energy concepts. The participants included one science teacher and 108 eighth-grade students classified in three ability level tracks. Data were gathered through pre/posttest content knowledge assessments, daily classroom observations, and daily reflective meetings with the teacher. Findings indicated a significant increase in the energy content knowledge for all the students. Effect sizes were large for all three ability level tracks, with the middle and low track classes having larger effect sizes than the upper track class. Learners in all three tracks were highly engaged with the curriculum. Curriculum effectiveness and practical issues involved with using geospatial technologies to support science learning are discussed.

  7. The Attitudes of Social Programs Students in Vocational High Schools Towards the Use of Information Technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emel BAHAR

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Adaptation and internalization of innovations in science and technology, business processes and education system in an easy way depend on the attitudes of individuals. In the study, it is intended to determine whether there is a relationship between the arguments such as the subject, college, department, gender, computer usage, internet access facilities of the students' enrolled in social programs of vocational high school and their attitudes towards information technology, or not. The data were obtained by applying questionnaires to 884 students studying in business administration, logistics, marketing, tourism, accounting, Office management and executive assistance programs at Çukurova, Mersin, Kırıkkale and Abant İzzet Baysal Universities. As a result of the research, statistically significant relationships were determined between the attitudes of the students of social sciences toward information technology and their subject, college, department and gender.

  8. Technology and Communications Coursework: Facilitating the Progression of Students with Learning Disabilities through High School Science and Math Coursework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shifrer, Dara; Callahan, Rebecca

    2010-09-01

    Students identified with learning disabilities experience markedly lower levels of science and mathematics achievement than students who are not identified with a learning disability. Seemingly compounding their disadvantage, students with learning disabilities also complete more credits in non-core coursework-traditionally considered non-academic coursework-than students who are not identified with a learning disability. The Education Longitudinal Study of 2002, a large national dataset with both regular and special education high school students, is utilized to determine whether credit accumulation in certain types of non-core coursework, such as Technology and Communications courses, is associated with improved science and math course-taking outcomes for students with learning disabilities. Results show that credit accumulation in Technology and Communications coursework uniquely benefits the science course-taking, and comparably benefits the math course-taking, of students identified with learning disabilities in contrast to students who are not identified with a learning disability.

  9. Integrating Technology in Teaching Students with Special Learning Needs in the SPED Schools in Baguio City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marilyn L. Balmeo

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Leading-edge creation and development of technologies including those for the children with special learning needs found common place in the educational system. Allowably, this study’s focal point engages in the integration of technologies in the educational environments where students with special learning needs are housed. Respondents include 53 teachers employed in the special education schools in Baguio City, who were to determine the availability and effectiveness of technology in their schools and the problems encountered in the integration of technologies. Results indicate that availability and effectiveness of technologies are at limited level and that there are problems encountered in technology integration. This is significant for the achievement of the aim of students with special learning needs for they would be guided appropriately in the development of their skills with the challenges of educational attainment and life itself

  10. Evaluating the effectiveness of personal response system technology on millennial student learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCurry, Mary K; Hunter Revell, Susan M

    2011-08-01

    As nurse educators, we must explore new technologies that capitalize on the characteristics of millennial learners. One such technology, the personal response system (PRS), is an effective way to promote active learning and increase comprehension. Few nursing studies have examined the benefits of PRS technology on student outcomes. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of PRS technology on learning outcomes in two sections of an undergraduate nursing research course. A crossover design compared class quiz averages between and within groups. Findings related to between and within class quiz scores were mixed, whereas the effectiveness of in-class PRS questions on paper-and-pencil quiz scores and PRS-targeted quiz items was significant. Knowledge gained from this study can be used to enhance our ability to actively engage our technologically savvy undergraduate students. By threading technology into the undergraduate curriculum, learning outcomes may be improved. Copyright 2011, SLACK Incorporated.

  11. Exploration of the lived experiences of undergraduate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics minority students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snead-McDaniel, Kimberly

    An expanding ethnicity gap exists in the number of students pursuing science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) careers in the United States. The National Action Council for Minorities in Engineering revealed that the number of minorities pursuing STEM degrees and careers has declined over the past few years. The specific origins of this trend are not quite evident; one variable to consider is that undergraduate minority students are failing in STEM disciplines at various levels of education from elementary to postsecondary. The failure of female and minority students to enter STEM disciplines in higher education have led various initiatives to establish programs to promote STEM disciplines among these groups. Additional funding for minority STEM programs have led to a increase in undergraduate minority students entering STEM disciplines, but the minority students' graduation rate in STEM disciplines is approximately 7% lower than the graduation of nonminority students in STEM disciplines. This phenomenological qualitative research study explores the lived experiences of underrepresented minority undergraduate college students participating in an undergraduate minority-mentoring program. The following nine themes emerged from the study: (a) competitiveness, (b) public perception, (c) dedication, (d) self-perception, (e) program activities, (f) time management, (g) exposure to career and graduate opportunities, (h) rigor in the curriculum, and (i) peer mentoring. The themes provided answers and outcomes to better support a stronger minority representation in STEM disciplines.

  12. Utilization of information technology in medical education: a questionnaire survey of students in a Malaysian institution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurjahan, M I; Lim, T A; Yeong, S W; Foong, A L S; Ware, J

    2002-12-01

    The objective of this survey was to obtain a self-reported assessment of the use of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) by medical students at the International Medical University, Malaysia. Students' perceived skills and extent of usage of ICT were evaluated using a questionnaire. Chi-square analysis were performed to ascertain the association between variables. Further statistical testing using Chi-square test for trend was done when one of the variables was ordered, and Spearman rank correlation when both variables were ordered. Overall, (98%) of students responded to the questionnaire. Twenty seven students (5.7%) did not use a computer either in the university or at home. Most students surveyed reported adequate skills at word processing (55%), e-mailing (78%) and surfing the internet (67%). The results suggests that in order to increase the level of computer literacy among medical students, positive steps would need to be taken, for example the formal inclusion of ICT instruction in the teaching of undergraduate medicine. This will enhance medical students' ability to acquire, appraise, and use information in order to solve clinical and other problems quickly and efficiently in the course of their studies, and more importantly when they graduate.

  13. Health promoting interactive technology: Finnish, Norwegian, Russian and Swedish students' reflections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostenius, Catrine; Hertting, Krister

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study was to elucidate Finnish, Norwegian, Russian and Swedish students' reflections and ideas on how interactive technology can be used to promote health in school. The data were collected in the northern part of these four countries, and 630 students aged 13-15 filled out the World Health Organization's 'Health Behavior in School-Aged Children' self-completion questionnaire with one additional open question, which is analyzed in this article (n = 419). The phenomenological analysis resulted in four themes: A sense of control, Balancing enjoyable options, Sharing with others and Learning made easier. The students point out that interactive technology promotes empowerment and independence, reduces stress and makes learning easier. They argue for a healthy balance of Internet use for it to be health promoting. According to the students, good relationships increase well-being; and interactive technology can offer a way to socialize, provide a tool for meeting and making new friends, help when not feeling well and give support when encouraging classmates. We argue, based on the findings of the present study and previous research, that students need a combination of freedom and meaningful relationships with adults who have an empowered child perspective, to fully take advantage of the empowering effects of interactive technology. We suggest, as implications for practice, that teachers, school leaders and health care professionals find ways to act as partners using an appreciative process, asking questions on what works well, to make interactive technology an enabling technology to increase health literacy, thus improving health and well-being in students. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Student employment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacob, Marita; Gerth, Maria; Weiss, Felix

    2018-01-01

    , according to social origins, in student employment from first-year students through graduating students. We show that inequality in job quality exists and is partly attributable to the need for students from lower social origins to work to finance their studies. We hypothesise that initial inequalities......In this article, we examine social origin differences in employment patterns across different stages of higher education and compare these differences between vocational and academic fields of study. Using data from a large-scale German student survey, we study the development of inequality...

  15. Virtual reality simulation: using three-dimensional technology to teach nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenson, Carole E; Forsyth, Diane McNally

    2012-06-01

    The use of computerized technology is rapidly growing in the classroom and in healthcare. An emerging computer technology strategy for nursing education is the use of virtual reality simulation. This computer-based three-dimensional educational tool simulates real-life patient experiences in a risk-free environment, allows for repeated practice sessions, requires clinical decision making, exposes students to diverse patient conditions, provides immediate feedback, and is portable. The purpose of this article was to review the importance of virtual reality simulation as a computerized teaching strategy. In addition, a project to explore readiness of nursing faculty at one major Midwestern university for the use of virtual reality simulation as a computerized teaching strategy is described where faculty thought virtual reality simulation would increase students' knowledge of an intravenous line insertion procedure. Faculty who practiced intravenous catheter insertion via virtual reality simulation expressed a wide range of learning experiences from using virtual reality simulation that is congruent with the literature regarding the barriers to student learning. Innovative teaching strategies, such as virtual reality simulation, address barriers of increasing patient acuity, high student-to-faculty ratio, patient safety concerns from faculty, and student anxiety and can offer rapid feedback to students.

  16. Perception of medical students for utility of mobile technology use in medical education

    OpenAIRE

    Sushama Subhash Thakre; Subhash Bapurao Thakre

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Mobile technology is changing the way we live, and it is beginning to change the way we learn. Current literature reviews have shown that research on mobile technology in medical education primarily focused on efficacy, of mobile devices as an educational tool and resource, infrastructure to support m-learning, benefits, challenges, and appropriate use. Objectives: To assess the perception of medical student for the utility of mobile technology in their learning experience and t...

  17. FACTORS OF INFLUENCE ON THE ENTREPRENEURIAL INTEREST: AN ANALYSIS WITH STUDENTS OF INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY RELATED COURSES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Guilherme Bonfim

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the research was to analyze the entrepreneurial interest of students in information technology related courses. A literature review was performed, from which four hypotheses were announced, affirming that the student interest in entrepreneurial activity is influenced by (1 the perceived vocation of the area, (2 the ownership of a company, (3 the perceived social support from friends and family, and (4 the entrepreneurial skills mastery. A field study was developed, with data collected from the 171 students of higher education institutions from Fortaleza. The data were analyzed by using statistical techniques of descriptive analysis, analysis of variance, and multiple regression analysis. It was found that: (1 students, in general, have a moderate predisposition to engage in entrepreneurial activities; (2 the entrepreneurial interest is influenced by the perceived entrepreneurial vocation of the area, the social support, and the perceived strategic entrepreneurial skills mastery.

  18. Using the Process and Excitement of Science and Technology to Empower Teachers and Engage their Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crannell, Carol Jo

    2002-01-01

    Students United with NASA Becoming Enthusiastic About Math and Science (SUNBEAMS) is a Partnership between NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) and the District of Columbia Public Schools (DCPS). It empowers teachers and inspires students with the process and excitement of science and technology. SUNBEAMS is being developed as a model urban intervention program for sixth grade teachers and their students. The teachers come to Goddard for five weeks during the summer. They partner with Goddard mentors and work much the same way that summer students do. In addition, the teachers are responsible for developing lesson plans that they pilot at their schools and post on the SUNBEAMS web site. During the school year, each teacher brings one class to Goddard for a full week of total immersion in math and science.

  19. Reading habits in university students of careers in science and technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cornejo, Jorge Norberto;

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Communication and dissemination of science are an integral part of science itself, where the reading, in addition, must be a constitutive aspect of scientific training. Especially, reading works of scientific divulgation can become an excellent tool for the integral formation of students in scientific or technological careers. This research is a preliminary diagnosis on the reading habits of 158 students of the Faculty of Engineering of the University of Buenos Aires, conducted by a written survey. From the results, we conclude that students are not whitout reading habits, but that they have little interaction with his training as a professionals. The printed book is still the main vehicle for reading, well above the electronic formats. A problem arises with the issue of scientific divulgation, as students manifest ignore to the very nature of this genre. Future work is proposed for the development of intervention strategies that take into account the results of this research.

  20. Improving mathematics teaching and learning experiences for hard of hearing students with wireless technology-enhanced classrooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chen-Chung; Chou, Chien-Chia; Liu, Baw-Jhiune; Yang, Jui-Wen

    2006-01-01

    Hard of hearing students usually face more difficulties at school than other students. A classroom environment with wireless technology was implemented to explore whether wireless technology could enhance mathematics learning and teaching activities for a hearing teacher and her 7 hard of hearing students in a Taiwan junior high school. Experiments showed that the highly interactive communication through the wireless network increased student participation in learning activities. Students demonstrated more responses to the teacher and fewer distraction behaviors. Fewer mistakes were made in in-class course work because Tablet PCs provided students scaffolds. Students stated that the environment with wireless technology was desirable and said that they hoped to continue using the environment to learn mathematics.

  1. Advances in health informatics education: educating students at the intersection of health care and information technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kushniruk, Andre; Borycki, Elizabeth; Armstrong, Brian; Kuo, Mu-Hsing

    2012-01-01

    The paper describes the authors' work in the area of health informatics (HI) education involving emerging health information technologies. A range of information technologies promise to modernize health care. Foremost among these are electronic health records (EHRs), which are expected to significantly improve and streamline health care practice. Major national and international efforts are currently underway to increase EHR adoption. However, there have been numerous issues affecting the widespread use of such information technology, ranging from a complex array of technical problems to social issues. This paper describes work in the integration of information technologies directly into the education and training of HI students at both the undergraduate and graduate level. This has included work in (a) the development of Web-based computer tools and platforms to allow students to have hands-on access to the latest technologies and (b) development of interdisciplinary educational models that can be used to guide integrating information technologies into HI education. The paper describes approaches that allow for remote hands-on access by HI students to a range of EHRs and related technology. To date, this work has been applied in HI education in a variety of ways. Several approaches for integration of this essential technology into HI education and training are discussed, along with future directions for the integration of EHR technology into improving and informing the education of future health and HI professionals.

  2. Awareness and using of medical students about mobile health technology in clinical areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehteshami, Asghar; Hachesu, Peyman Rezaei; Esfahani, Mahtab Kasayi; Rezazadeh, Esmaeil

    2013-01-01

    NONE DECLARED. Necessity of data transmission and getting contact with specialists is so evident in impassable regions. In order to solve such problems, there are different solutions one of which is mobile health technology. Being small and user-friendly, easy to enter data and having low expense are some of its advantages. This study aims to define the association between awareness of medical students in clinical stage about mobile health technology application and the rate of their using this technology in educational hospital of Isfahan in 2011. The study is a cross-sectional analytical application research. Sixty medical students were selected as samples from a society of 240 medical students. A researcher-made questionnaire was used. The questionnaire included 21 multiple choice and 15 yes no questions, which were corrected to reach a score. A researcher-made checklist with 5-fold Likert scale was used to define the rate of applying such technology. The reliability of questionnaire was confirmed through a test-retest. The collected data were analyzed with the help of SPSS software in descriptive and deductive statistics level. The highest percentage of awareness about mobile health technology among medical students in the clinical stage of Azzahra educational hospital is 45.6 in nature areas, and their lowest percentage of awareness is 17.8 in the infrastructure area. In addition, their mean awareness of all areas is 54.4. The highest percentage of using mobile health technology by medical students is 14.6 in the education area, and their lowest percentage of usage is 6.8 in the treatment area. Their mean usage of all areas is 9.4 as well. The rate of awareness and application of mobile health technology is not favorable. Except for treatment, there is no significant association between the rate of awareness and application of mobile health technology.

  3. Awareness and Using of Medical Students About Mobile Health Technology in Clinical Areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehteshami, Asghar; Hachesu, Peyman Rezaei; Esfahani, Mahtab Kasayi

    2013-01-01

    CONFLICT OF INTEREST: NONE DECLARED Introduction Necessity of data transmission and getting contact with specialists is so evident in impassable regions. In order to solve such problems, there are different solutions one of which is mobile health technology. Being small and user-friendly, easy to enter data and having low expense are some of its advantages. This study aims to define the association between awareness of medical students in clinical stage about mobile health technology application and the rate of their using this technology in educational hospital of Isfahan in 2011. Method The study is a cross-sectional analytical application research. Sixty medical students were selected as samples from a society of 240 medical students. A researcher-made questionnaire was used. The questionnaire included 21 multiple choice and 15 yes no questions, which were corrected to reach a score. A researcher-made checklist with 5-fold Likert scale was used to define the rate of applying such technology. The reliability of questionnaire was confirmed through a test–retest. The collected data were analyzed with the help of SPSS software in descriptive and deductive statistics level. Findings The highest percentage of awareness about mobile health technology among medical students in the clinical stage of Azzahra educational hospital is 45.6 in nature areas, and their lowest percentage of awareness is 17.8 in the infrastructure area. In addition, their mean awareness of all areas is 54.4. The highest percentage of using mobile health technology by medical students is 14.6 in the education area, and their lowest percentage of usage is 6.8 in the treatment area. Their mean usage of all areas is 9.4 as well. Conclusion The rate of awareness and application of mobile health technology is not favorable. Except for treatment, there is no significant association between the rate of awareness and application of mobile health technology. PMID:24058250

  4. SENSE IT: Student Enabled Network of Sensors for the Environment using Innovative Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hotaling, L. A.; Stolkin, R.; Kirkey, W.; Bonner, J. S.; Lowes, S.; Lin, P.; Ojo, T.

    2010-12-01

    SENSE IT is a project funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF) which strives to enrich science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) education by providing teacher professional development and classroom projects in which high school students build from first principles, program, test and deploy sensors for water quality monitoring. Sensor development is a broad and interdisciplinary area, providing motivating scenarios in which to teach a multitude of STEM subjects, from mathematics and physics to biology and environmental science, while engaging students with hands on problems that reinforce conventional classroom learning by re-presenting theory as practical tools for building real-life working devices. The SENSE IT program is currently developing and implementing a set of high school educational modules which teach environmental science and basic engineering through the lens of fundamental STEM principles, at the same time introducing students to a new set of technologies that are increasingly important in the world of environmental research. Specifically, the project provides students with the opportunity to learn the engineering design process through the design, construction, programming and testing of a student-implemented water monitoring network in the Hudson and St. Lawrence Rivers in New York. These educational modules are aligned to state and national technology and science content standards and are designed to be compatible with standard classroom curricula to support a variety of core science, technology and mathematics classroom material. For example, while designing, programming and calibrating the sensors, the students are led through a series of tasks in which they must use core mathematics and physics theory to solve the real problems of making their sensors work. In later modules, students can explore environmental science and environmental engineering curricula while deploying and monitoring their sensors in local rivers. This

  5. Information and communication technology use among Victorian and South Australian oral health professions students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariño, Rodrigo; Habibi, Elmira; Morgan, Michael; Au-Yeung, Winnie

    2012-12-01

    The objective of this study was to determine and analyze the use of information and communication technology (ICT) by oral health professions students in Victoria and South Australia. Data were collected during the 2009 and 2010 academic years via electronic survey. Out of 1,138 students studying in Adelaide and Victorian dental schools, 740 students participated, for an overall response rate of 65 percent. The majority were dental students (n=609) with 131 seeking a Bachelor of Oral Health (B.O.H.) degree. The majority were female (62.0 percent), had home Internet access (91.7 percent), and no barriers to accessing the Internet (87.2 percent). Among those who mentioned barriers, difficult access and cost were the most common. The Internet was accessed at least once a week by the majority for general purposes (93.5 percent) and for study purposes (84.2 percent). Nonetheless, thirty-nine students (5.3 percent) were non-frequent ICT users. The probability of an oral health professions student being in the non-ICT users group was explored utilizing a logistic regression analysis. The final model contained three predictors: location of school, ethnic background, and place of Internet use (χ(2) [3]=117.7; pstudents from an Asian background were three times more likely to be non-users (OR=3.06; 95 percent CI 1.16 to 8.08). Those who had access to the Internet at home (OR=0.02; 95 percent CI 0.01 to 0.05) were less likely to be a non-user. These results represent a preliminary evaluation of ICT use among oral health professions students in Australia. It seems that a digital divide exists among these students. The information can be utilized in planning dental education programs and incorporating the use of ICT suitable for oral health professions students and in the design and implementation of employment recruitment and retention programs.

  6. Epistemological Belief Congruency in Mathematics between Vocational Technology Students and Their Instructors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schommer-Aikins, Marlene; Unruh, Susan; Morphew, Jason

    2015-01-01

    Three questions were addressed in this study. Is there evidence of epistemological beliefs congruency between students and their instructor? Do students' epistemological beliefs, students' epistemological congruence, or both predict mathematical anxiety? Do students' epistemological beliefs, students' epistemological congruence, or both predict…

  7. Educational Technology and Student Voice: Examining Teacher Candidates' Perceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byker, Erik Jon; Putman, S. Michael; Handler, Laura; Polly, Drew

    2017-01-01

    Student Voice is a term that honors the participatory roles that students have when they enter learning spaces like classrooms. Student Voice is the recognition of students' choice, creativity, and freedom. Seminal educationists--like Dewey and Montessori--centered the purposes of education in the flourishing and valuing of Student Voice. This…

  8. Use and Acceptance of Information and Communication Technology Among Laboratory Science Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Brenda C.

    Online and blended learning platforms are being promoted within laboratory science education under the assumption that students have the necessary skills to navigate online and blended learning environments. Yet little research has examined the use of information and communication technology (ICT) among the laboratory science student population. The purpose of this correlational, survey research study was to explore factors that affect use and acceptance of ICT among laboratory science students through the theoretical lens of the unified theory of acceptance and use of technology (UTAUT) model. An electronically delivered survey drew upon current students and recent graduates (within 2 years) of accredited laboratory science training programs. During the 4 week data collection period, 168 responses were received. Results showed that the UTAUT model did not perform well within this study, explaining 25.2% of the variance in use behavior. A new model incorporating attitudes toward technology and computer anxiety as two of the top variables, a model significantly different from the original UTAUT model, was developed that explained 37.0% of the variance in use behavior. The significance of this study may affect curriculum design of laboratory science training programs wanting to incorporate more teaching techniques that use ICT-based educational delivery, and provide more options for potential students who may not currently have access to this type of training.

  9. How can students contribute? A qualitative study of active student involvement in development of technological learning material for clinical skills training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haraldseid, Cecilie; Friberg, Febe; Aase, Karina

    2016-01-01

    Policy initiatives and an increasing amount of the literature within higher education both call for students to become more involved in creating their own learning. However, there is a lack of studies in undergraduate nursing education that actively involve students in developing such learning material with descriptions of the students' roles in these interactive processes. Explorative qualitative study, using data from focus group interviews, field notes and student notes. The data has been subjected to qualitative content analysis. Active student involvement through an iterative process identified five different learning needs that are especially important to the students: clarification of learning expectations, help to recognize the bigger picture, stimulation of interaction, creation of structure, and receiving context- specific content. The iterative process involvement of students during the development of new technological learning material will enhance the identification of important learning needs for students. The use of student and teacher knowledge through an adapted co-design process is the most optimal level of that involvement.

  10. An Online Student Research Institute Designed to Engage Students in Original Scientific Research Using State of the Art Technologies to Increase Participation in STEM Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freed, R.

    2015-12-01

    Affordable and accessible technology has advanced tremendously in the last decade allowing educational paradigms to change dramatically to more student-centered, experiential and project-based models. Additionally, as the need to increase the number of students entering STEM fields in the United States becomes more critical it is imperative to understand the factors that determine student career pathways and to provide opportunities for students to experience, understand and pursue scientific endeavors. The Institute for Student Astronomical Research was founded in order to provide a means for high school and early undergraduate students to engage in meaningful and relevant scientific research. A major goal is to give students the experience of true-to-life scientific investigation from the planning and proposal stages to the data collection and analysis, writing up and presenting of scientific findings and finally to the publication of results. Furthermore, the Institute is designed to collect data on how involvement in the Science Research Seminars influences educational and career choices for students in longitudinal studies following participants for several years. In the first year of the online course of the Institute 10 student teams conducted original research and published their findings in peer-reviewed journals. Lessons learned from the pilot year are being applied to the Institute as efforts to scale up the program are underway.

  11. Integration of Geospatial Technologies into K-12 Curriculum: An Investigation of Teacher and Student Perceptions and Student Academic Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Donna L.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore outcomes of a GIS/GPS integration process: to (a) examine student responses to GIS and GPS inclusion in their curriculum, (b) determine whether a relationship exists between inclusion of GIS into existing K-12 curriculum and student achievement, (c) examine the effectiveness of GIS professional development…

  12. Student-to-Student Diplomacy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bislev, Ane Katrine

    2017-01-01

    Chinese international students have become an increasingly visible presence around the globe, and interest in these students has consequently increased among universities, researchers, and policy-makers, who often see international students as a source of increased soft power. This article...... questions the idea of Chinese international students as a soft-power tool. This is done through a critical discussion of the concept of soft power and the rather limited research on educational diplomacy, demonstrating that the analytical vagueness of the concept of soft power leads to an oversimplified...... understanding of the linkage between international students and soft power. In order to provide a more nuanced understanding of this linkage, the article examines the actual overseas experience of Chinese international students and argues that the linkage between international students and soft power is highly...

  13. Italian University Students and Digital Technologies: Some Results from a Field Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferri, Paolo; Cavalli, Nicola; Costa, Elisabetta; Mangiatordi, Andrea; Mizzella, Stefano; Pozzali, Andrea; Scenini, Francesca

    Developments in information and communication technologies have raised the issue of how a kind of intergenerational digital divide can take place between "digital natives" and "digital immigrants". This can in turn have important consequences for the organization of educative systems. In this paper we present the result of a research performed during the course of 2008 to study how university students in Italy make use of digital technologies. The methodology was based on a mix of quantitative and qualitative approaches. A survey research was done, on a sample of 1186 students of the University of Milan-Bicocca, based on a questionnaire administrated through the Intranet of the University. A series of focus groups and in depth interviews with students, parents, and new media experts was furthermore performed. The results are consistent with the presence of a strong intergenerational divide. The implications of the results for the future organization of educative systems are discussed in the paper.

  14. Capitalizing on mobile technology to support healthy eating in ethnic minority college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodgers, Rachel F; Pernal, Wendy; Matsumoto, Atsushi; Shiyko, Mariya; Intille, Stephen; Franko, Debra L

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the capacity of a mobile technology-based intervention to support healthy eating among ethnic minority female students. Forty-three African American and Hispanic female students participated in a 3-week intervention between January and May 2013. Participants photographed their meals using their smart phone camera and received motivational text messages 3 times a day. At baseline, postintervention, and 10 weeks after the intervention, participants reported on fruit, vegetable, and sugar-sweetened beverage consumption. Participants were also weighed at baseline. Among participants with body mass index (BMI) ≥25, fruit and vegetable consumption increased with time (p technology-based interventions could facilitate healthy eating among female ethnic minority college students, particularly those with higher BMI.

  15. The use of Information and Communication Technologies from the students of Elbasan University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bederiana Shyti

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This article analyses the use of information and communication technologies from the students of Elbasan University, which is one of the biggest and the most important universities in Albania. The data was collected through a questionnaire designed specifically for this study during two time periods: the first period was December 2004- June 2005 and the second one was during the year 2010. The analysis makes a comparison of the data for these two periods, which indicates that information and communication technologies are part of the students and their family’s life. While some of them, such as mobile phones, are already widely used from the students, others like the Internet are still far. Therefore, this paper suggests that it is necessary to develop several specific policies in order to improve the actual situation.

  16. The Positive Effects of Technology on Teaching and Student Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costley, Kevin C.

    2014-01-01

    Technology is such a big part of the world of which we live. Many of the jobs that did not require technology use in years past do require the use of technology today. Many more homes have computers than in years past and increasing numbers of people know how to use them. Technology is being used by children and adults on a daily basis by way of…

  17. Students attendance monitoring using near field communication technology

    OpenAIRE

    Stakėnas, Tautvydas

    2017-01-01

    Today, near field communication technology (NFC) is one of the most popular automatic identification technologies. There is a lot of research and development in this area trying to make as much use of this technology as possible, and in coming years many new applications and research areas will continue to appear. In this paper the author examines NFC technology application for student’s attendance monitoring. In the first part of the thesis NFC uses, application methods and security levels a...

  18. Integrating Technology Tools for Students Struggling with Written Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedora, Pledger

    2015-01-01

    This exploratory study was designed to assess the experience of preservice teachers when integrating written language technology and their likelihood of applying that technology in their future classrooms. Results suggest that after experiencing technology integration, preservice teachers are more likely to use it in their future teaching.

  19. Adopting Technology: Using Student Qualitative Data and Gartner's Hype Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grundmeyer, Trent

    2014-01-01

    Technology is changing education. School leaders are charged with purchasing and leveraging technology to maximize an ever-changing landscape of teaching and learning. They have many factors to consider as they make decisions about what specific technologies to purchase for their schools. Gartner's Hype Cycle is an annually published report that…

  20. Development and validation of the computer technology literacy self-assessment scale for Taiwanese elementary school students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chiung-Sui

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the development and validation of an instrument to identify various dimensions of the computer technology literacy self-assessment scale (CTLS) for elementary school students. The instrument included five CTLS dimensions (subscales): the technology operation skills, the computer usages concepts, the attitudes toward computer technology, the learning with technology, and the Internet operation skills. Participants were 1,539 elementary school students in Taiwan. Data analysis indicated that the instrument developed in the study had satisfactory validity and reliability. Correlations analysis supported the legitimacy of using multiple dimensions in representing students' computer technology literacy. Significant differences were found between male and female students, and between grades on some CTLS dimensions. Suggestions are made for use of the instrument to examine complicated interplays between students' computer behaviors and their computer technology literacy.

  1. Information technology industry certification's impact on undergraduate student perception of instructor effectiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, David L.

    The field of Computer Information Systems (CIS) or Information Technology (IT) is experiencing rapid change. A 2003 study analyzing the IT degree programs and those of competing disciplines at 10 post-secondary institutions concluded that information technology programs are perceived differently from information systems and computer science programs and are significantly less focused on both math and pure science subjects. In Information Technology programs, voluntary professional certifications, generally known in the Information Technology field as "IT" certifications, are used as indicators of professional skill. A descriptive study noting one subject group's responses to items that were nearly identical except for IT certification information was done to investigate undergraduate CIS/IT student perceptions of IT industry certified instructors. The subject group was comprised of undergraduate CIS/IT students from a regionally accredited private institution and a public institution. The methodology was descriptive, based on a previous model by Dr. McKillip, Professor of Psychology, Southern Illinois University at Carbondale, utilizing a web-based survey instrument with a Likert scale, providing for voluntary anonymous responses outside the classroom over a ten day window. The results indicated that IT certification affected student perceptions of instructor effectiveness, teaching methodology, and student engagement in the class, and to a lesser degree, instructor technical qualifications. The implications suggest that additional research on this topic is merited. Although the study was not designed to examine the precise cause and effect, an important implication is that students may be motivated to attend classes taught by instructors they view as more confident and effective and that teachers with IT industry certification can better engage their students.

  2. Tooth brushing, tongue cleaning and snacking behaviour of dental technology and therapist students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clement C. Azodo

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine the tooth brushing, tongue cleaning and snacking behaviour of dental technology and therapist students. Methods: A descriptive cross-sectional study of students of Federal School of Dental Therapy and Technology Enugu, Nigeria. Self-administered questionnaire was used to obtain information on demography, frequency, duration and technique of tooth brushing and tongue cleaning as well as information on consumption of snacks. Results: A total of 242 students responded. Dental technology students made up 52.5% of the respondents and dental therapist in training made up 47.5%. Majority (63.2% of the respondents considered the strength of tooth brush when purchasing a tooth brush and 78.9% use tooth brushes with medium strength. Seven-tenth (71.9% of the respondents brush their teeth twice daily and 52.1% brush for 3–5 minutes. About one-third (30.2% brush their teeth in front of a mirror. Chewing stick was used by 51.7% of respondents in addition to the use of tooth brush. Tongue cleaning was done by 94.2% with only 9.5% using a tongue cleaner. Only 20.2% reported regular snacks consumption. Nine-tenth (90.4% of respondents were previously involved in educating others, apart from their colleagues, on tooth brushing. Conclusion: This survey revealed that most of the dental therapy and technology students had satisfactory tooth-brushing behaviour. The zeal to educate others about proper tooth brushing revealed in this study suggests that the students may be helpful in oral health promotion.

  3. Information and Communication Technology Literacy among Student-Teachers in Universities in Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florence Olutunu Daramola

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The use of Information and Communications Technology (ICT in the school system is becoming increasingly prominent. This study was conducted to find out the ICT literacy levels among student-teachers in the universities in North-Central Nigeria. The study involved a total of 638 student-teachers consisting of 360 males and 248 females. The instrument used for the study was a researcher-designed questionnaire with a reliability index of .74. The results indicated that student-teachers in North-central Nigeria have an average ICT literacy level. No significant difference was established in the level of ICT literacy between male and female student-teachers {t(636=1.672 >.05} and there was no significant difference in the level of ICT literacy by student-teachers in the Arts, Sciences, and Social Sciences {F(2,635 = 0.935 > 0.05}. It was recommended that universities make available more ICT equipment and facilitate the student-teachers in adopting the culture of integrating ICT into pedagogy and educational administration since they have an average ICT literacy level.

  4. The effects of a learning analytics empowered technology on students' arithmetic skill development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Molenaar, I.; Knoop-van Campen, C.A.N.; Hasselman, F.W.

    2017-01-01

    Learning analytics empowered educational technologies (LA-ET) in primary classrooms allow for blended learning scenarios with teacher-lead instructions, class-paced and individually-paced practice. This quasi-experimental study investigates the effects of a LA-ET on the development of students'

  5. Perspectives of Students on Acceptance of Tablets and Self-Directed Learning with Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gokcearslan, Sahin

    2017-01-01

    Recent mobile learning technologies offer the opportunity for students to take charge of the learning process both inside and outside the classroom. One of these tools is the tablet PC (hereafter "tablet"). In parallel with increased access to e-content, the role of tablets in learning has recently begun to be examined. This study aims…

  6. Urban Environmental Education: Leveraging Technology and Ecology to Engage Students in Studying the Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, Michael; Vaughn, Meredith Houle; Strauss, Eric; Cotter, Lindsey

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we describe the outcomes of the first year of an intensive, urban ecology focused, summer program for urban high school youth. Students in our program conduct scientific investigations of their urban ecosystems while exploring potential career options in science and technology fields. In conducting their investigations, the students…

  7. Effects of Video Streaming Technology on Public Speaking Students' Communication Apprehension and Competence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupagne, Michel; Stacks, Don W.; Giroux, Valerie Manno

    2007-01-01

    This study examines whether video streaming can reduce trait and state communication apprehension, as well as improve communication competence, in public speaking classes. Video streaming technology has been touted as the next generation of video feedback for public speaking students because it is not limited by time or space and allows Internet…

  8. The Impact of Assistive Technology on Curriculum Accommodation for a Braille-Reading Student

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farnsworth, Charles R.; Luckner, John L.

    2008-01-01

    Over 5 months, the authors evaluated the efficacy of electronic assistive technology (the BrailleNote mPower BT-32 notetaker and Tiger Cub Jr. embosser) and associated software components in creating curriculum materials for a middle school Braille-reading student. The authors collected data at the beginning and end of the study from parents,…

  9. Broaden Engineering Technology students' knowledge through hands-on with motion robotics

    Science.gov (United States)

    The skills and knowledge that employers value most are not always well-aligned with undergraduate engineering technology programs. With the support of a federal grant, we identify and propose to broaden the undergraduate student experience to include training in transferable skills with agricultura...

  10. Learning Design and Technology through Social Networks for High School Students in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Hao; Tang, MingXi; Peng, Xiang; Liu, Xiaoli

    2018-01-01

    The subject of design and technology was introduced to the curriculum for high schools in China 10 years ago. However, the teaching and learning of this subject have become difficult for both teachers and students because there is a lack of qualified teachers with design background to deliver this subject in a way to stimulate the learning…

  11. Urban Elementary Students' Conceptions of Learning Goals for Agricultural Science and Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trexler, Cary J.; Hess, Alexander J.; Hayes, Kathryn N.

    2013-01-01

    Nationally, both science and agricultural education professional organizations have identified agriculture as a fundamental technology to be studied by students, with the goal of achieving an understanding of the agri-food system necessary for democratic participation. Benchmarks representing the content that K-12 children need to understand about…

  12. The Effects of Technology Instruction on the Academic Achievement of Fifth Grade Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Karen Cortina

    2012-01-01

    A digital native is an individual born between 1981 and 2001, and children born after 2001 are called millennials. Educators are expected to meet the needs of today's technologically savvy students. Some researchers assert that an academic "moral panic" is taking place that lacks the empirical and theoretical knowledge to support…

  13. Exploring Pre-Service Physical Education Teacher Technology Use during Student Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Emily M.; Baek, Jun-hyung; Wyant, James D.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate the factors influencing preservice teachers' (PST) experiences integrating technology within a guided action-based research project in the context of student teaching. Methods: Participants were enrolled at a rural, mid-Atlantic university (N = 80, 53 male; 27 female). Researchers retrieved…

  14. Technological Development and Its Impact on Student Reception of a Campus Radio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Shafizan; Wok, Saodah; Lahabou, Mahaman

    2018-01-01

    In 2011, a study was conducted to look at students' reception of IIUM.FM, a newly launched online campus radio. Using the Technological Acceptance Model (TAM), the study found that factors such as perceived ease of use, perceived usefulness, and attitude highly influenced audience reception of the online radio. In 2016, a corresponding study,…

  15. A Study on Information Technology Integrated Guided Iscovery Instruction towards Students' Learning Achievement and Learning Retention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shieh, Chich-Jen; Yu, Lean

    2016-01-01

    In the information explosion era with constant changes of information, educators have promoted various effective learning strategies for students adapting to the complex modern society. The impact and influence of traditional teaching method have information technology integrated modern instruction and science concept learning play an important…

  16. New Zealand Management Students' Perceptions of Communication Technologies in Correspondence Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostman, Ronald E.; Wagner, Graham A.

    1987-01-01

    Describes a survey of 724 management students in New Zealand's Technical Correspondence Institute which was conducted to determine whether the introduction of educational technologies could decrease the dropout rate. The multiple linear regression model that was used to analyze the questionnaire responses is presented, and predictor variables are…

  17. Just-in-Time Teaching Techniques through Web Technologies for Vocational Students' Reading and Writing Abilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chantoem, Rewadee; Rattanavich, Saowalak

    2016-01-01

    This research compares the English language achievements of vocational students, their reading and writing abilities, and their attitudes towards learning English taught with just-in-time teaching techniques through web technologies and conventional methods. The experimental and control groups were formed, a randomized true control group…

  18. Knowledge and Power in the Technology Classroom: A Framework for Studying Teachers and Students in Action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danielsson, Anna T.; Berge, Maria; Lidar, Malena

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to develop and illustrate an analytical framework for exploring how relations between knowledge and power are constituted in science and technology classrooms. In addition, the empirical purpose of this paper is to explore how disciplinary knowledge and knowledge-making are constituted in teacher-student interactions.…

  19. A Survey of Former Drafting & Engineering Design Technology Students. Summary Findings of Respondents District-Wide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glyer-Culver, Betty

    In fall 2001 staff of the Los Rios Community College District Office of Institutional Research collaborated with occupational deans, academic deans, and faculty to develop and administer a survey of former Drafting and Engineering Design Technology students. The survey was designed to determine how well courses had met the needs of former drafting…

  20. Student Teachers of Technology and Design into Industry: A Northern Ireland Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Ken

    2013-01-01

    This paper, based in Northern Ireland, is a case study of an innovative programme which places year 3 B.Ed. post-primary student teachers of Technology and Design into industry for a five-day period. The industrial placement programme is set in an international context of evolving pre-service field placements and in a local context defined by the…

  1. Towards a Personality Understanding of Information Technology Students and Their IT Learning in UAE University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Qirim, Nabeel; Rouibah, Kamel; Tarhini, Ali; Serhani, Mohamed Adel; Yammahi, Aishah Rashid; Yammahi, Maraim Ahmed

    2018-01-01

    This research investigates the personality characteristics of Information Technology students (CIT) in UAE University (UAEU) and how such features impact their IT learning. To achieve this objective, this research attempts to explain the impact of the Big-5 factors on learning using survey research. Results from 179 respondents suggested that…

  2. Didactic Content of Constructively-Projective Function of Students Learning: The Extrapolation in Information Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutuev, Ruslan A.; Nuriyeva, Elvira N.; Safiullina, Tatyana R.; Kryukova, Nina I.; Tagirova, Nataliya P.; Karpenko, Galina V.

    2016-01-01

    The relevance of the study is conditioned by a radical impact on the learning process of the university by information technology, which put start a new phase in its transformation. According to experts at the present time the main factor of efficiency of university's activity becomes the expansion of students' learning activities, realized on the…

  3. Do Accounting Students Have Realistic Expectations of Information Technology Usage in Nonprofit Organizations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foust, Karen M.; Kleen, Betty A.; Shell, L. Wayne

    Not-for-profit organizations employ 11% of all U.S. workers; these organizations are often the recipients of hand-me-down hardware and software. This study investigates accounting students expectations of the information technology available to and used by not-for-profit organizations. In this descriptive study, based on two different surveys,…

  4. Student Multimedia Autobiographies: The Roles of Technology, Personal Narrative, and Signifying Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keane, Julie Thompson

    2010-01-01

    In 2009, the Parsons StoryCorps qualitative case study was designed to closely observe the complexity of youth engagement with digital media for self-presentation in an afterschool digital storytelling project designed to provide students with rich, varied uses of technology in a urban middle school in North Carolina. Several frameworks were…

  5. Academic versus Non-Academic Emerging Adult College Student Technology Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanson, Joan Ann; Walker, Erica

    2015-01-01

    Emerging adult college students have developmental and educational needs which are unique to their phase of life. Emerging adults are also increasingly identified by their technology use and practices. Collegiate instructors will be better equipped for educating these individuals when armed with insights concerning emerging adults' technology…

  6. Career and Technology Center Guides Students in Real-Life Careers | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    By Carolynne Keenan, Contributing Writer Frederick County Public School students have a unique opportunity—a chance to get a real-world, hands-on experience in biomedical science and biotechnology before they even graduate from high school, thanks to the Frederick County Career and Technology Center (CTC). Several years ago, the CTC established its biomedical sciences program

  7. Supervising nursing students in a technology-driven medication administration process in a hospital setting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaard, Mette; Orbæk, Janne

    2016-01-01

    REVIEW QUESTION/OBJECTIVE: The objective of this review is to identify, describe and synthesize the experiences of nurse supervisors and the factors that influence the supervision of pre-graduate nursing students in undertaking technology-driven medication administration in hospital settings...

  8. Supporting a 1:1 Program with a Student Technology Team

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Lana; Scharber, Cassandra

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to describe the practice of using student technology teams (STTs) offered at a high school within a 1:1 district. Design/methodology/approach: This qualitative case study (Merriam, 1998, 2009) documents how an STT program functioned in 2015-2016 academic year. Findings: Findings show the STT provided a rich…

  9. The Effects of Maple Integrated Strategy on Engineering Technology Students' Understanding of Integral Calculus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salleh, Tuan Salwani; Zakaria, Effandi

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this research is to investigate the effectiveness of a learning strategy using Maple in integral calculus. This research was conducted using a quasi-experimental nonequivalent control group design. One hundred engineering technology students at a technical university were chosen at random. The effectiveness of the learning…

  10. Trading Places: When Teachers Utilize Student Expertise in Technology-Intensive Classrooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ringstaff, Cathy; And Others

    Utilizing self-report data from 32 elementary and secondary teachers, this longitudinal, qualitative study examines the role shifts of both teachers and students as they adapted to teaching and learning in educational, technology-rich, Apple Classrooms of Tomorrow environments. At first, teachers in these instructionally innovative classrooms…

  11. The Effect of Technology Integration on High School Students' Literacy Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Kara

    2016-01-01

    This literature review presents a critical appraisal of current research on the role technology integration plays in high school students' literacy achievement. It identifies the gaps within the research through comprehensive analysis. The review develops an argument that the use of laptops in secondary English classrooms has a significant impact…

  12. Teacher Effectiveness as Correlate of Students' Cognitive Achievement at Upper Basic Education in Basic Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owoh, Titus M.

    2016-01-01

    This study sought to find out the relationship between students perception of their teacher effectiveness and academic achievement in Basic Technology. Teacher's personality, teaching techniques/classroom management strategy and appearance, all integrate to make for teacher effectiveness. To carry out this research, two research questions and one…

  13. Students' Guided Reinvention of Definition of Limit of a Sequence with Interactive Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, Alfinio; Park, Jungeun

    2016-01-01

    In a course emphasizing interactive technology, 19 students, including 18 mathematics education majors, mostly in their first year, reinvented the definition of limit of a sequence while working in small cooperative groups. The class spent four sessions of 75 minutes each on a cyclical process of guided reinvention of the definition of limit of a…

  14. Research Degrees in Information and Communication Technology (ICT): Why so Few Doctoral Students?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerin, Cally; Jayatilaka, Asangi; Ranasinghe, Damith; McCulloch, Alistair; Calder, Paul

    2017-01-01

    A "knowledge society" relies on a workforce with high-level skills in Information and Communication Technology (ICT). Continuing development of ICT will arise partly from research undertaken by doctoral graduates. However, compared to other cognate disciplines, ICT has relatively few students taking up doctoral studies. This article…

  15. Evaluating Web 2.0 Technologies in Higher Education Using Students' Perceptions and Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karvounidis, T.; Chimos, K.; Bersimis, S.; Douligeris, C.

    2014-01-01

    In this work, Web 2.0 technologies in higher education are evaluated using students' perceptions, satisfaction, performance and behaviour. The study evaluates the Web 2.0 tools as stand-alone entities as well in terms of their cross-operability and integration (confluence) to synergistic contributions towards the enhancement of student…

  16. Web 2.0 Technologies and Parent Involvement of ELL Students: An Ecological Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Dong-shin; Seger, Wendy

    2016-01-01

    This study explores how ELL students' parents participated in a blog-mediated English language arts curriculum in a second grade classroom at a U.S. urban school, and how they supported their children's learning of school-based writing. Adopting ecological perspectives on technological affordances, this study views digital literacy as discursive…

  17. Bridging the Gap: Meeting the Needs of Early Childhood Students by Integrating Technology and Environmental Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, Jana; Weiser, Brenda; Kirkwood, Donna

    2014-01-01

    Children come from diverse backgrounds, particularly in terms of their access to the environment and technology. It is our job as teachers to help level the playing field and provide all students an equal chance to succeed. By integrating these two seemingly opposed curricular areas we can create an opportunity for young children to become both…

  18. Technology Experiences of Student Interns in a One to One Mobile Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cullen, Theresa A.; Karademir, Tugra

    2018-01-01

    This article describes how a group of student intern teachers (n = 51) in a one to one teacher education iPad program were asked to reflect using Experience Sampling Method (ESM) on their use of technology in the classroom during internship. Interns also completed summative reflections and class discussions. Data collected both in online and…

  19. Student Teachers' Discourse about Digital Technologies and Transitions between Formal and Informal Learning Contexts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pöntinen, Susanna; Dillon, Patrick; Väisänen, Pertti

    2017-01-01

    This research is a contribution to issues of digital technology use at the interface of formal and informal learning contexts. The research was conducted in the discourse tradition and investigates Finnish teacher training students' 'manners of speaking' as resources for, and obstacles to, making pedagogical changes in response to the potential of…

  20. Exploration of the Lived Experiences of Undergraduate Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics Minority Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snead-McDaniel, Kimberly

    2010-01-01

    An expanding ethnicity gap exists in the number of students pursuing science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) careers in the United States. The National Action Council for Minorities in Engineering revealed that the number of minorities pursuing STEM degrees and careers has declined over the past few years. The specific origins of…

  1. Spanish High School Students' Interests in Technology: Applying Social Cognitive Career Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inda-Caro, Mercedes; Rodríguez-Menéndez, Carmen; Peña-Calvo, José-Vicente

    2016-01-01

    The authors have examined the relative contribution of personal (emotional state, gender-role attitudes), contextual (perceived social supports and barriers), and cognitive (self-efficacy beliefs, outcome expectations) variables to technological interests in a sample (N = 2,364) of 10th-grade Spanish students. The results of path analysis…

  2. Inquiry-Based Science and Technology Enrichment Program for Middle School-Aged Female Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hanna

    2016-01-01

    This study investigates the effects of an intensive 1-week Inquiry-Based Science and Technology Enrichment Program (InSTEP) designed for middle school-aged female students. InSTEP uses a guided/open inquiry approach that is deepened and redefined as eight sciences and engineering practices in the Next Generation Science Standards, which aimed at…

  3. The Relationship among Principals' Technology Leadership, Teaching Innovation, and Students' Academic Optimism in Elementary Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Chuan-Chung; Yen, Hung-Chin; Kuan, Liu-Yen

    2014-01-01

    This study empirically investigates the relationships among principals' technology leadership, teaching innovations, and students' academic optimism by surveying elementary school educators across Taiwan. Of the total 1,080 questionnaires distributed, 755 valid surveys were returned for a 69.90% return rate. Teachers were asked to indicate the…

  4. Technology Use as a Support Tool by Secondary Students with Autism: A Mixed Methods Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedges, Susan H.

    2016-01-01

    The majority of students with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) are leaving high school ill prepared to integrate successfully into adult life, which comes at a huge cost, not only to themselves and to their families, but also to society at large. Technology supports have the potential to improve their outcomes and thus enhance their quality of life.…

  5. The Case for Using SMS Technologies to Support Distance Education Students in South Africa: Conversations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viljoen, Jeanne-Marie; Du Preez, Carl; Cook, Antoinette

    2005-01-01

    The rate of adoption of mobile technologies in Africa's developing countries is amongst the highest in the world and by 2005 there may be almost 100 billion mobile users in Africa (Keegan, 2002; Brown, 2005). This is just one of the reasons why servicing distance students in this country through m-learning support tools should enjoy…

  6. Guiding Curriculum Development: Student Perceptions for the Second Language Learning in Technology-Enhanced Learning Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gürleyik, Sinan; Akdemir, Elif

    2018-01-01

    Developing curriculum to enhance student learning is the primer purpose of all curricular activities. Availability of recent tools supporting to teach various skills including reading, listening, speaking and writing has opened a new avenue for curricular activities in technology-enhanced learning environments. Understanding the perceptions of…

  7. Needs Analysis for Graphic Design Learning Module Based on Technology & Learning Styles of Deaf Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Zainuddin; Alias, Norlidah; Nordin, Abu Bakar

    2016-01-01

    The field of Information Communication Technology has offered a promising future for deaf students. Web design, animation, and multimedia application design are a branch of graphic design area, which aim to aid their learning visually. However, most of the technical terms cannot be interpreted in Malaysian sign language. Moreover, the development…

  8. Applying Questioning or Reading Strategy to Review Technology Enhanced Coedited Notes of Elementary School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Chiung-Hui; Cheng, Hsiao-Wei; Wu, Chiu-Yi

    2016-01-01

    The authors examined whether applying questioning review better enhances elementary level students' learning from technology-enhanced coediting-based note taking than does traditional reading review. A nonequivalent comparison group quasi-experimental design was implemented and replicated on four independent units. Two sixth grade elementary…

  9. Cloud Computing Technologies in Writing Class: Factors Influencing Students' Learning Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jenny

    2017-01-01

    The proposed interactive online group within the cloud computing technologies as a main contribution of this paper provides easy and simple access to the cloud-based Software as a Service (SaaS) system and delivers effective educational tools for students and teacher on after-class group writing assignment activities. Therefore, this study…

  10. Experiences and Challenges of International Students in Technology-Rich Learning Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habib, Laurence; Johannesen, Monica; Øgrim, Leikny

    2014-01-01

    This article presents a study of international students and their use of technology in a Scandinavian institution of Higher Education. A special emphasis is placed on patterns of use of a virtual learning environment (VLE) that is available to all the study programmes at the institution. Actor-Network Theory (ANT) is used as a theoretical approach…

  11. Investigating Students' Acceptance of a Statistics Learning Platform Using Technology Acceptance Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yanjie; Kong, Siu-Cheung

    2017-01-01

    The study aims at investigating university students' acceptance of a statistics learning platform to support the learning of statistics in a blended learning context. Three kinds of digital resources, which are simulations, online videos, and online quizzes, were provided on the platform. Premised on the technology acceptance model, we adopted a…

  12. An Investigation of University Student Readiness Towards M-Learning Using Technology Acceptance Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iqbal, Shakeel; Bhatti, Zeeshan Ahmed

    2015-01-01

    M-learning is learning delivered via mobile devices and mobile technology. The research indicates that this medium of learning has potential to enhance formal as well as informal learning. However, acceptance of m-learning greatly depends upon the personal attitude of students towards this medium; therefore this study focuses only on the…

  13. Utilizing Technology Effectively to Improve Millennials' Educational Performance: An Exploratory Look at Business Students' Perceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aviles, Maria; Eastman, Jacqueline K.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to discuss how technological tools, such as Web 2.0 and online learning management systems, can be utilized to improve Millennials' educational performance. Design/methodology/approach: An exploratory survey of Millennial business students was conducted to measure their self-reported use and perceived…

  14. The Application of Kohlberg's Moral Development Model to College Students' Technology Ethics Decisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiser, Angelina I. T.; Morrison, Eileen E.; Craven, Annette

    2009-01-01

    This study examined undergraduate university students' (n=121) responses to six ethical dilemmas within the realm of information technology (IT). Using a framework based on Kohlberg's stages of moral development, the study evaluated the level of moral development as demonstrated in these responses. An apriori coding system was used to analyze the…

  15. Laboratory 3.0: Manufacturing Technologies Laboratory Virtualization with a Student-Centred Methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabregat-Sanjuan, Albert; Pàmies-Vilà, Rosa; Ferrando Piera, Francesc; De la Flor López, Silvia

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a blended-learning strategy for improving the teaching method applied in the laboratory subject Manufacturing Technologies. The teaching method has been changed from a predominantly teacher-centred to an active learning system with a student-centred focus and e-learning activities. In face-to-face classes, a game-based learning…

  16. Students' Attitudes towards Information Technology and the Relationship with Their Academic Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdullah, Zhwan Dalshad; Bit Abu Ziden, Azidah; Binti Chi Aman, Rahimi; Mustafa, Khalid Ismail

    2015-01-01

    The present quantitative study aims to find out the underlying factors of attitudes towards information technology and the relationship with academic achievement among students, through a self-developed questionnaire. The attitudes of the respondents were assessed in terms of three dimensions; namely affection, behavior, and belief. The results…

  17. Persistence Motivations of Chinese Doctoral Students in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ji

    2014-01-01

    This study explored what motivated 6 Chinese international students to complete a PhD in science, technology, engineering, and math fields in the United States despite perceived dissatisfaction. This study was grounded in the value-expectancy achievement motivation theory and incorporated a Confucian cultural lens to understand motivation. Four…

  18. A Qualitative Study of Information Technology Students' Learning Outcomes during a Cooperative Education Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krejci, Katherine T.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative descriptive study was to describe the learning outcomes of the cooperative-education experience from an Information Technology student's perspective at a large Fortune 500 manufacturing/sales company located in the Midwest United States. Open-ended interview questions were developed based on the four-component model…

  19. Using Appreciative Inquiry to Discover and Deliver Change for Surgical Technology Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabai, Katherine A.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine efficacious teaching-learning strategies that community college stakeholders employ that enhance surgical technology student outcomes. Knowles's adult learning theory, constructivist theory, and appreciative inquiry served as the theoretical foundation for this study. Discovering effective aspects and…

  20. Fostering Sustainable Energy Entrepreneurship among Students: The Business Oriented Technological System Analysis (BOTSA Program at Eindhoven University of Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mara Wijnker

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The Business Oriented Technological System Analysis (BOTSA program is a new teaching and learning concept developed by Eindhoven University of Technology (the Netherlands with participation from innovative companies in renewable energy. It is designed to stimulate sustainable entrepreneurship among engineering students in this field. The program combines the placement of students in companies to study and contribute to the development and incubation of sustainable energy innovations, with a curriculum at the university designed to support these internships from a scientific perspective. The teaching method assists students in developing a broad system view that enables them to analyze the potential of, and bottlenecks to promising innovations from a realistic business perspective. This empowers students to identify those techno-economic aspects that are critical to innovation success, and advise the entrepreneurs about these aspects. Experience indicates that teachers, students, and entrepreneurs find BOTSA a valuable way of coaching, learning and working. Theoretical support for this method is found in system analysis originating in evolutionary innovation theory in combination with concepts of entrepreneurship, business model generation and sustainable/green innovation.