WorldWideScience

Sample records for technology set task

  1. Small Engine Technology (SET) Task 24 Business and Regional Aircraft System Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieber, Lysbeth

    2003-01-01

    This final report has been prepared by Honeywell Engines & Systems, Phoenix, Arizona, a unit of Honeywell International Inc., documenting work performed during the period June 1999 through December 1999 for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Glenn Research Center, Cleveland, Ohio, under the Small Engine Technology (SET) Program, Contract No. NAS3-27483, Task Order 24, Business and Regional Aircraft System Studies. The work performed under SET Task 24 consisted of evaluating the noise reduction benefits compared to the baseline noise levels of representative 1992 technology aircraft, obtained by applying different combinations of noise reduction technologies to five business and regional aircraft configurations. This report focuses on the selection of the aircraft configurations and noise reduction technologies, the prediction of noise levels for those aircraft, and the comparison of the noise levels with those of the baseline aircraft.

  2. Task representation in individual and joint settings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolfgang ePrinz

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper outlines a framework for task representation and discusses applications to interference tasks in individual and joint settings. The framework is derived from the Theory of Event Coding. This theory regards task sets as transient assemblies of event codes in which stimulus and response codes interact and shape each other in particular ways. On the one hand, stimulus and response codes compete with each other within their respective subsets (horizontal interactions. On the other hand, stimulus and response code cooperate with each other (vertical interactions. Code interactions instantiating competition and cooperation apply to two time scales: on-line performance (i.e., doing the task and off-line implementation (i.e., setting the task. Interference arises when stimulus and response codes overlap in features that are irrelevant for stimulus identification, but relevant for response selection. To resolve this dilemma, the feature profiles of event codes may become restructured in various ways. The framework is applied to three kinds of interference paradigms. Special emphasis is given to joint settings where tasks are shared between two participants. Major conclusions derived from these applications include: (1 Response competition is the chief driver of interference. Likewise, different modes of response competition give rise to different patterns of interference. (2 The type of features in which stimulus and response codes overlap is also a crucial factor. Different types of such features give likewise rise to different patterns of interference. (3 Task sets for joint settings conflate intraindividual conflicts between responses (what, with interindividual conflicts between responding agents (whom. Features of response codes may, therefore, not only address responses, but also responding agents (both physically and socially.

  3. Set shifting training with categorization tasks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Soveri

    Full Text Available The very few cognitive training studies targeting an important executive function, set shifting, have reported performance improvements that also generalized to untrained tasks. The present randomized controlled trial extends set shifting training research by comparing previously used cued training with uncued training. A computerized adaptation of the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test was utilized as the training task in a pretest-posttest experimental design involving three groups of university students. One group received uncued training (n = 14, another received cued training (n = 14 and the control group (n = 14 only participated in pre- and posttests. The uncued training group showed posttraining performance increases on their training task, but neither training group showed statistically significant transfer effects. Nevertheless, comparison of effect sizes for transfer effects indicated that our results did not differ significantly from the previous studies. Our results suggest that the cognitive effects of computerized set shifting training are mostly task-specific, and would preclude any robust generalization effects with this training.

  4. Small Engine Technology (SET) - Task 13 ANOPP Noise Prediction for Small Engines: Jet Noise Prediction Module, Wing Shielding Module, and System Studies Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieber, Lysbeth; Golub, Robert (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    This Final Report has been prepared by AlliedSignal Engines and Systems, Phoenix, Arizona, documenting work performed during the period May 1997 through June 1999, under the Small Engines Technology Program, Contract No. NAS3-27483, Task Order 13, ANOPP Noise Prediction for Small Engines. The report specifically covers the work performed under Subtasks 4, 5 and 6. Subtask 4 describes the application of a semi-empirical procedure for jet noise prediction, subtask 5 describes the development of a procedure to predict the effects of wing shielding, and subtask 6 describes the results of system studies of the benefits of the new noise technology on business and regional aircraft.

  5. Is Performance in Task-Cuing Experiments Mediated by Task Set Selection or Associative Compound Retrieval?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrest, Charlotte L. D.; Monsell, Stephen; McLaren, Ian P. L.

    2014-01-01

    Task-cuing experiments are usually intended to explore control of task set. But when small stimulus sets are used, they plausibly afford learning of the response associated with a combination of cue and stimulus, without reference to tasks. In 3 experiments we presented the typical trials of a task-cuing experiment: a cue (colored shape) followed,…

  6. The neurodynamics underlying attentional control in set shifting tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stemme, Anja; Deco, Gustavo; Busch, Astrid

    2007-09-01

    In this work we address key phenomena observed with classical set shifting tasks as the "Wisconsin Card Sorting Test" or the "Stroop" task: Different types of errors and increased response times reflecting decreased attention. A component of major importance in these tasks is referred to as the "attentional control" thought to be implemented by the prefrontal cortex which acts primarily by an amplification of task relevant information. This mode of operation is illustrated by a neurodynamical model developed for a new kind of set shifting experiment: The Wisconsin-Delayed-Match-to-Sample task combines uninstructed shifts as investigated in Wisconsin-like tasks with a Delayed-Match-to-Sample paradigm. These newly developed WDMS experiments in conjunction with the neurodynamical simulations are able to explain the reason for decreased attention in set shifting experiments as well the different consequences of decreased attention in tasks requiring bivalent yes/no responses compared to tasks requiring multivalent responses.

  7. Influences of Task Type on Interaction under Group Work Setting

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘晓萍

    2005-01-01

    Interaction between learners under group work setting is considered to be signifieantly influenced by task types. The present empirical study was designed to explore interaction characteristics under convergent tasks and divergent tasks from three aspects: language production, meaning negotiation and attention to form while performing different types of tasks. The results reveal that there was significant statistical difference in the total language production between two types of tasks. In terms of the occurrence of meaning negotiation and the extent to which students paid attention to language form, there were no significant difference between the two task types.

  8. Designing rich sets of tasks for undergraduate calculus courses

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Research has shown that the types of tasks assigned to students affect their learning. Studies have found that many mathematical tasks created for second and third level students promote instrumental rather than relational understanding, and imitative rather than creative reasoning. In this paper, we describe some frameworks that aim to guide teachers when writing tasks. From these frameworks a set of task types that are deemed appropriate for undergraduate students, and that foster mathem...

  9. Technology simulation set: Multi-layered glazing. A part of an IEA working document. IEA Task 13 ``Advanced solar low-energy buildings``

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wittchen, K.B.

    1992-12-31

    This report gives an overview and some hints about the possibilities for simulating multi-layered glazing systems in building simulation programs. The thermal and optical processes taking part in the energy transport through a window are discussed in separate sections in this report. Most programs calculate the losses through a window in a routine differing from the routine calculating the gains through a window as these are two completely different physical processes that describe the two types of energy transport. The part of the window-model dealing with gains from transmitted solar energy is the one which is subject to the largest uncertainties in the simple routines which most programs use. Therefore, this problem is given the major emphasis in this report. The work is meant as a support to the IEA task XIII ``Advanced Solar Low-Energy Buildings`` for simulating advanced and innovative energy conservation features in future buildings. (au)

  10. Is performance in task-cuing experiments mediated by task set selection or associative compound retrieval?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrest, Charlotte L D; Monsell, Stephen; McLaren, Ian P L

    2014-07-01

    Task-cuing experiments are usually intended to explore control of task set. But when small stimulus sets are used, they plausibly afford learning of the response associated with a combination of cue and stimulus, without reference to tasks. In 3 experiments we presented the typical trials of a task-cuing experiment: a cue (colored shape) followed, after a short or long interval, by a digit to which 1 of 2 responses was required. In a tasks condition, participants were (as usual) directed to interpret the cue as an instruction to perform either an odd/even or a high/low classification task. In a cue + stimulus → response (CSR) condition, to induce learning of mappings between cue-stimulus compound and response, participants were, in Experiment 1, given standard task instructions and additionally encouraged to learn the CSR mappings; in Experiment 2, informed of all the CSR mappings and asked to learn them, without standard task instructions; in Experiment 3, required to learn the mappings by trial and error. The effects of a task switch, response congruence, preparation, and transfer to a new set of stimuli differed substantially between the conditions in ways indicative of classification according to task rules in the tasks condition, and retrieval of responses specific to stimulus-cue combinations in the CSR conditions. Qualitative features of the latter could be captured by an associative learning network. Hence associatively based compound retrieval can serve as the basis for performance with a small stimulus set. But when organization by tasks is apparent, control via task set selection is the natural and efficient strategy.

  11. Goal orientation, perceived task outcome and task demands in mathematics tasks: effects on students' attitude in actual task settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seegers, Gerard; van Putten, Cornelis M; de Brabander, Cornelis J

    2002-09-01

    In earlier studies, it has been found that students' domain-specific cognitions and personal learning goals (goal orientation) influence task-specific appraisals of actual learning tasks. The relations between domain-specific and task-specific variables have been specified in the model of adaptive learning. In this study, additional influences, i.e., perceived task outcome on a former occasion and variations in task demands, were investigated. The purpose of this study was to identify personality and situational variables that mediate students' attitude when confronted with a mathematics task. Students worked on a mathematics task in two subsequent sessions. Effects of perceived task outcome at the first session on students' attitude at the second session were investigated. In addition, we investigated how differences in task demands influenced students' attitude. Variations in task demands were provoked by different conditions in task-instruction. In one condition, students were told that the result on the test would add to their mark on mathematics. This outcome orienting condition was contrasted with a task-orienting condition where students were told that the results on the test would not be used to give individual grades. Participants were sixth grade students (N = 345; aged 11-12 years) from 14 primary schools. Multivariate and univariate analyses of (co)variance were applied to the data. Independent variables were goal orientation, task demands, and perceived task outcome, with task-specific variables (estimated competence for the task, task attraction, task relevance, and willingness to invest effort) as the dependent variables. The results showed that previous perceived task outcome had a substantial impact on students' attitude. Additional but smaller effects were found for variation in task demands. Furthermore, effects of previous perceived task outcome and task demands were related to goal orientation. The resulting pattern confirmed that, in general

  12. Progress report 1995 on fusion technology tasks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laan, J.G. van der [ed.

    1996-07-01

    This annual progress report describes research activities which have been performed at ECN within the framework of the European Fusion Technology Programme during the period 1 January to 31 December 1995. The work is organized in R and D contracts for the next step NET/ITER Technology, the Blanket Development Programme, the Long Term Programme and in NET contracts. The topics concern: Irradiation damage in austenitic and martensitic stainless steel, weldments, low-activation vanadium alloys, first wall coatings, simulation off-normal heat loads, nuclear data and neutronics for fusion, safety studies, development of ceramic breeding material and structural analysis on magnet coils. In addition the supporting and supplementary tasks and investigations in the category underlying technology are reported. A list of publications and staff members is also given. (orig.).

  13. Examining the Impact of Off-Task Multi-Tasking with Technology on Real-Time Classroom Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Eileen; Zivcakova, Lucia; Gentile, Petrice; Archer, Karin; De Pasquale, Domenica; Nosko, Amanda

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine the impact of multi-tasking with digital technologies while attempting to learn from real-time classroom lectures in a university setting. Four digitally-based multi-tasking activities (texting using a cell-phone, emailing, MSN messaging and Facebook[TM]) were compared to 3 control groups…

  14. Age-related changes in attentional selection: quality of task set or degradation of task set across time?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Jonathan D; Balota, David A

    2013-09-01

    The present study explores the nature of attentional selection in younger and older adults. Following R. De Jong, E. Berendsen, and R. Cools (1999, Acta Psychologica, Vol. 101, pp. 379-394), we manipulated the response to stimulus interval (RSI) in two attentional selection paradigms to examine if there are age-related differences in the quality of task set and/or the maintenance of task set across time. In Experiment 1, we found that the interference effect in a spatial interference task was (a) overall larger in older adults compared with younger adults, and (b) smaller at the short RSI (200 ms) compared with the long RSI (2000 ms), and (c) not associated with an interaction between age and RSI. The second experiment explored the same variables in a Stroop color interference paradigm. Again, older adults produced a disproportionately larger interference effect than younger adults, the interference effect was smaller at the short RSI compared with the long RSI, and there was no evidence of an interaction between age and RSI. In both experiments, the larger interference effect could not be attributed to age-related general slowing and there was evidence from Vincentile analyses of increasing interference and age effects at the slower response latencies. These results indicate that attentional selection deficits in these two experiments were due to a breakdown in the quality of the task set as opposed to age-related differences in the maintenance of the task set across time.

  15. Conceptual Task Setting for Defining the Tourist Product Notion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tankov Kostiantyn M.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The article set the conceptual task of defining the tourist product notion as one of the key notions in the tourism theory. It justifies conception of the tourist product as a “complex thing”, which includes a variety of tangible and intangible properties, including functional, social and psychological advantage or benefit. It shows that the conceptual foundation of presentation of the tourist product notion is the idea of formation and development of production interrelations of the product participants, which reflect system processes of interaction of tangible and intangible elements of the tourist product, their mutual conditionality and production of one element by another.

  16. Engineering, Trade, and Technical Cluster. Task Analyses. Drafting and Design Technology, Precision Machining Technology, Electronics Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henrico County Public Schools, Glen Allen, VA. Virginia Vocational Curriculum and Resource Center.

    Developed in Virginia, this publication contains task analysis guides to support selected tech prep programs that prepare students for careers in the engineering, trade, and technical cluster. Three occupations are profiled: drafting and design technology, precision machining technology, and electronics technology. Each guide contains the…

  17. What are task-sets: a single, integrated representation or a collection of multiple control representations?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dragan eRangelov

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Performing two randomly alternating tasks typically results in higher reaction times (RTs following a task switch, relative to a task repetition. These task switch costs (TSC reflect processes of switching between control settings for different tasks. The present study investigated whether task sets operate as a single, integrated representation or as an agglomeration of relatively independent components. In a cued task switch paradigm, target detection (present/absent and discrimination (blue/green/right-/left-tilted tasks alternated randomly across trials. The target was either a color or an orientation singleton among homogeneous distractors. Across two trials, the task and target-defining dimension repeated or changed randomly. For task switch trials, agglomerated task sets predict a difference between dimension changes and repetitions: joint task and dimension switches require full task set reconfiguration, while dimension repetitions permit re-using some control settings from the previous trial. By contrast, integrated task sets always require full switches, predicting dimension repetition effects (DREs to be absent across task switches. RT analyses showed significant DREs across task switches as well as repetitions supporting the notion of agglomerated task sets. Additionally, two event-related potentials (ERP were analyzed: the Posterior-Contralateral-Negativity (PCN indexing spatial selection dynamics, and the Sustained-Posterior-Contralateral-Negativity (SPCN indexing post-selective perceptual/semantic analysis. Significant DREs across task switches were observed for both the PCN and SPCN components. Together, DREs across task switches for RTs and two functionally distinct ERP components suggest that re-using control settings across different tasks is possible. The results thus support the ‘agglomerated-task-set’ hypothesis, and are inconsistent with ‘integrated task sets’.

  18. Expectation Suppression in Early Visual Cortex Depends on Task Set.

    Science.gov (United States)

    St John-Saaltink, Elexa; Utzerath, Christian; Kok, Peter; Lau, Hakwan C; de Lange, Floris P

    2015-01-01

    Stimulus expectation can modulate neural responses in early sensory cortical regions, with expected stimuli often leading to a reduced neural response. However, it is unclear whether this expectation suppression is an automatic phenomenon or is instead dependent on the type of task a subject is engaged in. To investigate this, human subjects were presented with visual grating stimuli in the periphery that were either predictable or non-predictable while they performed three tasks that differently engaged cognitive resources. In two of the tasks, the predictable stimulus was task-irrelevant and spatial attention was engaged at fixation, with a high load on either perceptual or working memory resources. In the third task, the predictable stimulus was task-relevant, and therefore spatially attended. We observed that expectation suppression is dependent on the cognitive resources engaged by a subjects' current task. When the grating was task-irrelevant, expectation suppression for predictable items was visible in retinotopically specific areas of early visual cortex (V1-V3) during the perceptual task, but it was abolished when working memory was loaded. When the grating was task-relevant and spatially attended, there was no significant effect of expectation in early visual cortex. These results suggest that expectation suppression is not an automatic phenomenon, but dependent on attentional state and type of available cognitive resources.

  19. Supporting Teachers Developing Mathematical Tasks with Digital Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratnayake, Iresha; Oates, Greg; Thomas, Mike

    2016-01-01

    A crucial step towards improving the conceptual use of digital technology (DT) in the mathematics classroom is to increase teacher involvement in the development of tasks. Hence, this research considers some teacher factors that might influence DT algebra task development and implementation in secondary schools. We observed and assisted one group…

  20. LWS/SET Technology Experiment Carrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherman, Barry; Giffin, Geoff

    2002-01-01

    This paper examines the approach taken to building a low-cost, modular spacecraft bus that can be used to support a variety of technology experiments in different space environments. It describes the techniques used and design drivers considered to ensure experiment independence from as yet selected host spacecraft. It describes the technology experiment carriers that will support NASA's Living With a Star Space Environment Testbed space missions. NASA has initiated the Living With a Star (LWS) Program to develop a better scientific understanding to address the aspects of the connected Sun-Earth system that affect life and society. A principal goal of the program is to bridge the gap between science, engineering, and user application communities. The Space Environment Testbed (SET) Project is one element of LWS. The Project will enable future science, operational, and commercial objectives in space and atmospheric environments by improving engineering approaches to the accommodation and/or mitigation of the effects of solar variability on technological systems. The SET Project is highly budget constrained and must seek to take advantage of as yet undetermined partnering opportunities for access to space. SET will conduct technology validation experiments hosted on available flight opportunities. The SET Testbeds will be developed in a manner that minimizes the requirements for accommodation, and will be flown as flight opportunities become available. To access the widest range of flight opportunities, two key development requirements are to maintain flexibility with respect to accommodation constraints and to have the capability to respond quickly to flight opportunities. Experiments, already developed to the technology readiness level of needing flight validation in the variable Sun-Earth environment, will be selected on the basis of the need for the subject technology, readiness for flight, need for flight resources and particular orbit. Experiments will be

  1. Progress report 1993 on fusion technology tasks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klippel, H.T. [ed.

    1994-09-01

    This annual progress report describes research activities which have been performed at ECN within the framework of the European Fusion Technology Programme during the period 1 January to 31 December 1993. The work is organized in RandD contracts for the next step NET/ITER Technology, the Solid Breeder Blanket Programme, the Long Term Programme and in JET and NET contracts. The topics concern: irradiation damage in austenitic and martensitic stainless steel, weldments, low-activation vanadium alloys, first wall coatings, simulation off-normal heat loads, nuclear data and neutronics for fusion, safety studies, development of ceramic breeding material and stress analysis on magnet coils. List of publications and staff members are also given. (orig.).

  2. Progress report 1994 on fusion technology tasks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klippel, H.T. [ed.

    1995-09-01

    This annual progress report describes research activities which have been performed at ECN within the framework of the European Fusion Technology Programme during the period 1 January to 31 December 1994. The work is organized in R and D contracts for the next step NET/ITER Technology, the Solid Breeder Blanket Programme, the Long Term Programme and in JET and NET contracts. The topics concern: irradiation damage in austenitic and martensitic stainless steel, weldments, low-activation vanadium alloys, first wall coatings, simulation off-normal heat loads, nuclear data and neutronics for fusion, safety studies, development of ceramic breeding material and stress analysis on magnet coils. A list of publications and staff members is also given. (orig.).

  3. Affordance Analysis--Matching Learning Tasks with Learning Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bower, Matt

    2008-01-01

    This article presents a design methodology for matching learning tasks with learning technologies. First a working definition of "affordances" is provided based on the need to describe the action potentials of the technologies (utility). Categories of affordances are then proposed to provide a framework for analysis. Following this, a…

  4. Expectation Suppression in Early Visual Cortex Depends on Task Set

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    St. John-Saaltink, E.C.; Utzerath, C.; Kok, P.; Lau, H.C.; Lange, F.P. de

    2015-01-01

    Stimulus expectation can modulate neural responses in early sensory cortical regions, with expected stimuli often leading to a reduced neural response. However, it is unclear whether this expectation suppression is an automatic phenomenon or is instead dependent on the type of task a subject is enga

  5. Using Goal Setting and Task Analysis to Enhance Task-Based Language Learning and Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, Joan

    2015-01-01

    Task-Based Language Learning and Teaching has received sustained attention from teachers and researchers for over thirty years. It is a well-established pedagogy that includes the following characteristics: major focus on authentic and real-world tasks, choice of linguistic resources by learners, and a clearly defined non-linguistic outcome. This…

  6. Texting and walking: effect of environmental setting and task prioritization on dual-task interference in healthy young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plummer, Prudence; Apple, Sarah; Dowd, Colleen; Keith, Eliza

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that young adults significantly reduce their gait speed and weave more when texting while walking. Previous research has not examined the simultaneous dual-task effects on texting performance, therefore, the attention prioritization strategy used by young adults while texting and walking is not currently known. Moreover, it is not known whether laboratory-based studies accurately reflect texting and walking performance in the real world. This study compared dual-task interference during texting and walking between laboratory and real-world settings, and examined the ability of young adults to flexibly prioritize their attention between the two tasks in each environment. Texting and walking were assessed in single-task and three dual-task conditions (no-priority, gait-priority, texting-priority) in the lab and a University Student Center, in 32 healthy young adults. Dual-task effects on gait speed, texting speed, and texting accuracy were significant, but did not significantly differ between the two environments. Young adults were able to flexibly prioritize their attention between texting and walking, according to specific instruction, and this ability was not influenced by environmental setting. In the absence of instructions, young adults prioritized the texting task in the low-distraction environment, but displayed more equal focus between tasks in the real world. The finding that young adults do not significantly modify their texting and walking behavior in high-distraction environments lends weight to growing concerns about cell phone use and pedestrian safety.

  7. Goal Setting and Task Performance: 1969-1980

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-06-01

    Organizatioral Effectivene ss Program, office of Naval Research(Code 452),under Contract No.1 Nh7-C-FT APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELIASE : DISTRIBUTION UNL...to set goals in the participative goal conditions than in the assigned conditions which may have accounted for the higher performance of this groc"p...goal acceptance and choice. (b) Values . When the perceived value of attaining or trying for a goal is higher, the goal is more likely to be accepted

  8. Response Selection Difficulty and Asymmetrical Costs of Switching Between Tasks and Stimuli: No Evidence for an Exogenous Component of Task-Set Reconfiguration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubner, Mike; Kluwe, Rainer H.; Luna-Rodriguez, Aquiles; Peters, Alexandra

    2004-01-01

    Four task-switching experiments examined the notion of an exogenous component of task-set reconfiguration (i.e., a process needed to shift task set that is not initiated in the absence of a task-associated figuration stimulus). The authors varied the complexity and familiarity of stimulus-response (SR) mapping rules to produce differentially…

  9. Employing Technology-Rich Mathematical Tasks to Develop Teachers' Technological, Pedagogical, and Content Knowledge (TPACK)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polly, Drew; McGee, Jennifer R.; Sullivan, Christie

    2010-01-01

    While technology has potential to improve the teaching and learning of mathematics, research indicates that teachers struggle in their efforts to implement technology-rich mathematical tasks in their classrooms. Effective technology integration in mathematics requires teachers to be able to apply their classroom knowledge related to mathematics…

  10. Animal neuropsychology: validation of the Intra-Dimensional Extra-Dimensional set shifting task for mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garner, Joseph P; Thogerson, Collette M; Würbel, Hanno; Murray, James D; Mench, Joy A

    2006-10-02

    Research in animal neuropsychology is providing an exciting new generation of behavioral tests for mice that promise to overcome many of the limitations of current high-throughput testing, and provide direct animal homologues of clinically important measures in human research. Set shifting tasks are some of the best understood and widely used human neuropsychological tasks, with clinical relevance to traumatic brain injury, schizophrenia, autism, obsessive compulsive disorder, trichotillomania, and many other disorders. Here we report the first successful modification of a human set shifting neuropsychological task, the Intra-Dimensional Extra-Dimensional (IDED) task, for use with mice. We presented mice with a series of compound discrimination and reversal tasks where one stimulus dimension consistently cued reward. Task performance improved with a new set of compound stimuli, as did reversal performance--indicating the formation of a cognitive-attentional set. We then overtrained a subset of the mice, and presented control and overtrained mice with a new compound discrimination where a novel stimulus dimension cued reward. As is the case in human control subjects, control mice persisted in responding to the now-incorrect stimulus dimension, performing poorly on this extra-dimensional shift compared with the previous intra-dimensional shift, thereby validating the task as a measure of set shifting. Furthermore, overtrained mice were impaired on this extra-dimensional shift compared with controls, further validating the task. The advantages and disadvantages of the IDED task compared to high-throughput approaches are discussed.

  11. Implicit sequence learning based on instructed task set.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaschler, Robert; Frensch, Peter A; Cohen, Asher; Wenke, Dorit

    2012-09-01

    How does the way we code and control actions influence automatic skill acquisition processes? Wenke and Frensch (2005) showed that instructions can lead participants to code spatial responses based on color. Here, we tested in 3 experiments to what extent response labeling and instruction-based response coding can determine what is learned in implicit sequence learning. Instructions mapped 4 gray shape stimuli to 1 of the 4 keys each in a serial reaction task, referring to the keys in terms of either their color or their spatial location. In Experiments 1 and 2 we found that people in the color instruction conditions used color for action control and acquired sequence knowledge containing color: They were susceptible to irrelevant stimulus colors at transfer and could transfer color sequence knowledge to a new arrangement of response positions and fingers, whereas participants who had received spatial instructions could not. Implicit sequence learning was thus surprisingly flexible. Depending on whether an arbitrary nonspatial response feature was used or not used to explain the stimulus-response mappings, we either found or did not find evidence that this feature became part of action control and sequence learning. Furthermore, Experiment 3 suggested that response position might become part of the sequence knowledge even if instructions do not emphasize this response feature. Together, the findings suggest that implicit sequence learning is based on action control, which in turn strongly, but not entirely, depends on which response features are used to explain the stimulus-response mappings in the instructions. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved.

  12. Off-line mapping of multi-rate dependent task sets to many-core platforms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Puffitsch, Wolfgang; Noulard, Eric; Pagetti, Claire

    2015-01-01

    model to safely execute dependent periodic task sets on these platforms. The four rules of the execution model entail that an off-line mapping of the application to the platform must be computed. The paper details our approach to automatically compute a valid mapping. Furthermore, we evaluate our...... approach, which is based on constraint programming, by applying it to several task sets that are derived from industrial applications....

  13. An Operant Intra-/Extra-dimensional Set-shift Task for Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheggia, Diego; Papaleo, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Alterations in executive control and cognitive flexibility, such as attentional set-shifting abilities, are core features of several neuropsychiatric diseases. The most widely used neuropsychological tests for the evaluation of attentional set-shifting in human subjects are the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST) and the CANTAB Intra-/Extra-dimensional set shift task (ID/ED). These tasks have proven clinical relevance and have been modified and successfully adapted for research in animal models. However, currently available tasks for rodents present several limitations, mainly due to their manual-based testing procedures, which are hampering translational advances in psychiatric medicine. To overcome these limitations and to better mimic the original version in primates, we present the development of a novel operant-based two-chamber ID/ED "Operon" task for rodents. We demonstrated the effectiveness of this novel task to measure different facets of cognitive flexibility in mice including attentional set formation and shifting, and reversal learning. Moreover, we show the high flexibility of this task in which three different perceptual dimensions can be manipulated with a high number of stimuli cues for each dimension. This novel ID/ED Operon task can be an effective preclinical tool for drug testing and/or large genetic screening relevant to the study of executive dysfunction and cognitive symptoms found in psychiatric disorders.

  14. Task-switching effects for visual and auditory pro- and antisaccades: evidence for a task-set inertia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heath, Matthew; Starrs, Faryn; Macpherson, Ewan; Weiler, Jeffrey

    2015-01-01

    The completion of an antisaccade delays the reaction time (RT) of a subsequent prosaccade; however, the converse switch does not influence RT. In accounting for this result, the task-set inertia hypothesis contends that antisaccades engender a persistent nonstandard task-set that delays the planning of a subsequent prosaccade. In contrast, the coordinate system transformation hypothesis asserts that the transformation required to construct a mirror-symmetrical target representation persistently inhibits prosaccade planning. The authors tested the latter hypothesis by examining switch-costs for pro- and antisaccades directed to visual (i.e., the stimuli used in previous work) and auditory targets. Notably, auditory cues are specified in a head-centered frame of reference prior to their conversion into the retinocentric coordinates necessary for saccade output. Thus, if the coordinate system transformation hypothesis is correct then auditory pro- and antisaccades should elicit a bidirectional switch-cost because each requires a coordinate transformation. RTs for visual and auditory modalities showed a reliable--and equivalent magnitude--prosaccade switch-cost. Moreover, performance (e.g., movement time) and kinematic (e.g., velocity) variables indicated the switch-cost was restricted to response planning. As such, results are incompatible with the coordinate system transformation hypothesis and therefore provide convergent evidence that a task-set inertia contributes to the prosaccade switch-cost.

  15. Are spatial responses to visuospatial stimuli and spoken responses to auditory letters ideomotor-compatible tasks? Examination of set-size effects on dual-task interference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Yun-Kyoung; Proctor, Robert W

    2008-11-01

    Previous studies have paired a visual-manual Task 1 with an auditory-vocal Task 2 to evaluate whether the psychological refractory period (PRP) effect is eliminated with two ideomotor-compatible tasks (for which stimuli resemble the response feedback). The present study varied the number of stimulus-response alternatives for Task 1 in three experiments to determine whether set-size and PRP effects were absent, as would be expected if the tasks bypass limited-capacity response-selection processes. In Experiments 1 and 2, the visual-manual task was used as Task 1, with lever-movement and keypress responses, respectively. In Experiment 3, the auditory-vocal task was used as Task 1 and the visual-manual task as Task 2. A significant lengthening of reaction time for 4 vs. 2 alternatives was found for the visual-manual Task 1 and the Task 2 PRP effect in Experiments 1 and 2, suggesting that the visual-manual task is not ideomotor compatible. Neither effect of set size was significant for the auditory-vocal Task 1 in Experiment 3, but there was still a Task 2 PRP effect. Our results imply that neither version of the visual-manual task is ideomotor compatible; other considerations suggest that the auditory-vocal task may also still require response selection.

  16. Mathematics for Gifted Students in an Arts- and Technology-Rich Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadanidis, George; Hughes, Janette; Cordy, Michelle

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we report on a study of a short-term mathematics program for grade 7-8 gifted students that integrated open-ended mathematics tasks with the arts (poetry and drama) and with technology. The program was offered partially online and partially in a classroom setting. The study sought to investigate (a) students' perceptions of their…

  17. The Effects of a Goal Setting Intervention on Productivity and Persistence in an Analogue Work Task

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tammemagi, Triona; O'Hora, Denis; Maglieri, Kristen A.

    2013-01-01

    The authors of this study sought to quantify the beneficial effect of goal setting on work performance, and to characterize the persistence or deterioration of goal-directed behavior over time. Twenty-six participants completed a computer-based data entry task. Performance was measured during an initial baseline, a goal setting intervention that…

  18. Reservoir Maintenance and Development Task Report for the DOE Geothermal Technologies Office GeoVision Study.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lowry, Thomas Stephen; Finger, John T.; Carrigan, Charles R.; Foris, Adam; Kennedy, Mack B.; Corbet, Thomas F.,; Doughty, Christine A.; Pye, Steven; Sonnenthal, Eric L.

    2017-09-01

    This report documents the key findings from the Reservoir Maintenance and Development (RM&D) Task of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE), Geothermal Technologies Office (GTO) Geothermal Vision Study (GeoVision Study). The GeoVision Study had the objective of conducting analyses of future geothermal growth based on sets of current and future geothermal technology developments. The RM&D Task is one of seven tasks within the GeoVision Study with the others being, Exploration and Confirmation, Potential to Penetration, Institutional Market Barriers, Environmental and Social Impacts, Thermal Applications, and Hybrid Systems. The full set of findings and the details of the GeoVision Study can be found in the final GeoVision Study report on the DOE-GTO website. As applied here, RM&D refers to the activities associated with developing, exploiting, and maintaining a known geothermal resource. It assumes that the site has already been vetted and that the resource has been evaluated to be of sufficient quality to move towards full-scale development. It also assumes that the resource is to be developed for power generation, as opposed to low-temperature or direct use applications. This document presents the key factors influencing RM&D from both a technological and operational standpoint and provides a baseline of its current state. It also looks forward to describe areas of research and development that must be pursued if the development geothermal energy is to reach its full potential.

  19. Priority setting for new technologies in medicine: A transdisciplinary study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Jennifer L; Martin, Douglas K; Singer, Peter A

    2002-01-01

    Background Decision makers in health care organizations struggle with how to set priorities for new technologies in medicine. Traditional approaches to priority setting for new technologies in medicine are insufficient and there is no widely accepted model that can guide decision makers. Discussion Daniels and Sabin have developed an ethically based account about how priority setting decisions should be made. We have developed an empirically based account of how priority setting decisions are made. In this paper, we integrate these two accounts into a transdisciplinary model of priority setting for new technologies in medicine that is both ethically and empirically based. Summary We have developed a transdisciplinary model of priority setting that provides guidance to decision makers that they can operationalize to help address priority setting problems in their institution. PMID:12126482

  20. Priority setting for new technologies in medicine: A transdisciplinary study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gibson Jennifer L

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Decision makers in health care organizations struggle with how to set priorities for new technologies in medicine. Traditional approaches to priority setting for new technologies in medicine are insufficient and there is no widely accepted model that can guide decision makers. Discussion Daniels and Sabin have developed an ethically based account about how priority setting decisions should be made. We have developed an empirically based account of how priority setting decisions are made. In this paper, we integrate these two accounts into a transdisciplinary model of priority setting for new technologies in medicine that is both ethically and empirically based. Summary We have developed a transdisciplinary model of priority setting that provides guidance to decision makers that they can operationalize to help address priority setting problems in their institution.

  1. Set-based Tasks within the Singularity-robust Multiple Task-priority Inverse Kinematics Framework: General Formulation, Stability Analysis and Experimental Results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Signe eMoe

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Inverse kinematics algorithms are commonly used in robotic systems to transform tasks to joint references, and several methods exist to ensure the achievement of several tasks simultaneously. The multiple task-priority inverse kinematicsframework allows tasks to be considered in a prioritized order by projecting task velocities through the nullspaces of higherpriority tasks. This paper extends this framework to handle setbased tasks, i.e. tasks with a range of valid values, in addition to equality tasks, which have a specific desired value. Examples of set-based tasks are joint limit and obstacle avoidance. The proposed method is proven to ensure asymptotic convergence of the equality task errors and the satisfaction of all high-priority set-based tasks. The practical implementation of the proposed algorithm is discussed, and experimental results are presented where a number of both set-based and equality tasks have been implemented on a 6 degree of freedom UR5 which is an industrial robotic arm from Universal Robots. The experiments validate thetheoretical results and confirm the effectiveness of the proposed approach.

  2. The unidirectional prosaccade switch-cost: electroencephalographic evidence of task-set inertia in oculomotor control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiler, Jeffrey; Hassall, Cameron D; Krigolson, Olave E; Heath, Matthew

    2015-02-01

    The execution of an antisaccade selectively increases the reaction time (RT) of a subsequent prosaccade (the unidirectional prosaccade switch-cost). To explain this finding, the task-set inertia hypothesis asserts that an antisaccade requires a cognitively mediated non-standard task-set that persists inertially and delays the planning of a subsequent prosaccade. The present study sought to directly test the theoretical tenets of the task-set inertia hypothesis by examining the concurrent behavioural and the event-related brain potential (ERP) data associated with the unidirectional prosaccade switch-cost. Participants pseudo-randomly alternated between pro- and antisaccades while electroencephalography (EEG) data were recorded. As expected, the completion of an antisaccade selectively increased the RT of a subsequent prosaccade, whereas the converse switch did not influence RTs. Thus, the behavioural results demonstrated the unidirectional prosaccade switch-cost. In terms of the ERP findings, we observed a reliable change in the amplitude of the P3 - time-locked to task-instructions - when trials were switched from a prosaccade to an antisaccade; however, no reliable change was observed when switching from an antisaccade to a prosaccade. This is a salient finding because extensive work has shown that the P3 provides a neural index of the task-set required to execute a to-be-completed response. As such, results showing that prosaccades completed after antisaccades exhibited increased RTs in combination with a P3 amplitude comparable to antisaccades provides convergent evidence that the unidirectional prosaccade switch-cost is attributed to the persistent activation of a non-standard antisaccade task-set.

  3. First year pre-service science teachers’ experiences of authentic instructional tasks in a PDS setting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pontoppidan, Birgitte; Nielsen, Birgitte Lund

    2011-01-01

    of the study presented is to contribute to the further development of the local PDS initiative, examine how the PDS setting can frame first year pre-service science teachers’ inquiries and understand their learning through such authentic instructional tasks. Two examples, which meet the five criteria......Professional development schools (PDS) have been a source of inspiration for a new approach at the teacher education in Aarhus (DK). The importance of student teachers’ inquiries in authentic settings is in line with various research-based approaches to educating (science) teachers. The purpose...... for an authentic instructional task, are presented. Ten students were asked to describe their experiences of working with these tasks during repeated interviews. They refer to concrete examples of school students’ activities and/or learning when reflecting on their own learning and to dialogue with school students...

  4. Dynamics of task sets: evidence from dense-array event-related potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulsen, Catherine; Luu, Phan; Davey, Colin; Tucker, Don M

    2005-06-01

    Prior research suggests that task sets facilitate coherent, goal-directed behavior by providing an internal, contextual frame that biases selection toward context-relevant stimulus attributes and responses. Questions about how task sets are engaged, maintained, and shifted have recently become a major focus of research on executive control processes. We employed dense-array (128-channel) event-related potential (ERP) methodology to examine the dynamics of brain systems engaged during the preparation and implementation of task switching. The EEG was recorded while participants performed letter and digit judgments to pseudorandomly-ordered, univalent (#3, A%) and bivalent (G5) stimulus trials, with the appropriate task cued by a colored rectangle presented 450 ms before target onset. Results revealed spatial and temporal variations in brain activity that could be related to preparatory processes common to both switch and repeat trials, switch-specific control processes engaged to reconfigure and maintain task set under conflict, and visual priming benefits of task repetition. Despite extensive practice and improvement, both behavioral and ERP results indicated that subjects maintained high levels of executive control processing with extended task engagement. The patterns of ERP activity obtained in the present study fit well with functional neuroanatomical models of self-regulation of action. The frontopolar and right-lateralized frontal switch effects obtained in the present study are consistent with the role of these regions in adapting to changing contextual contingencies. In contrast, the centroparietal P3b and N384 effects related to the contextual ambiguity of bivalent trials are consistent with the context monitoring and updating functions associated with the posterior cingulate learning circuit.

  5. Effect of Goal Setting on the Strategies Used to Solve a Block Design Task

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozencwajg, Paulette; Fenouillet, Fabien

    2012-01-01

    In this experiment we studied the effect of goal setting on the strategies used to perform a block design task called SAMUEL. SAMUEL can measure many indicators, which are then combined to determine the strategies used by participants when solving SAMUEL problems. Two experimental groups were created: one group was given an explicit, difficult…

  6. Reasoning about tasks, activities and technology to support collaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watts, L A; Monk, A F

    1998-11-01

    An aspect of collaboration described as 'semi-synchronized activity' is discussed as a particular challenge for the task analysis (TA) of collaborative work. TA typically involves the decomposition of work systems into essentially independent component processes between which commodities (information or materials) pass. In collaborative work, people routinely violate the condition of independence by moving seemlessly in and out of synchronization with one another, allowing for both independent and varying levels of conjoint activity. The shift between joint and independent projects is not fixed but managed through more or less explicit awareness of the other people over time. A number of case studies of the effect of communication technologies in telemedical consultation are drawn upon to illustrate the relationship between awareness and synchronization in collaborative work. They show that an analysis of collaborative activity requires a consideration of: (1) the activities constituting work; (2) the interactions between participants required to carry out the activities; (3) who else has access to these activities besides the primary participants in the ongoing work; (4) the contemporaneity of activities; (5) the locations/environments in which the activities are carried out; and (6) the constraints that apply to accessibility and participation within and between these environments. The Comms Usage Diagram is described as a framing notation incorporating these characteristics for a broad, communications-level analysis of collaborative activity. It shows how particular technologies relate to particular phases of work, indexing their effects to collaborative activities in those contexts.

  7. Decision Making and Sources of Knowledge: How Students Tackle Integrated Tasks in Science, Technology and Mathematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venville, Grady; Rennie, Léonie; Wallace, John

    2004-04-01

    This article reports on students'' decision making processes and sources of knowledge in an integrated teaching and learning setting. The study was conducted in a Year 9 classroom as students undertook a 10-week solar-powered boat project and were exposed to related concepts from science, technology and mathematics. Data collection involved detailed case studies of three pairs of students, interviews, classroom observation and analysis of the artefacts and portfolios produced by the students. Students were found to access knowledge from a variety of sources, including teacher''s notes from formal instruction, informal interactions with the teacher, observation of and interaction with other students, as well as sources outside the classroom. However, the utility of the knowledge sources was influenced by the nature of the task. When students were performing open-ended tasks, they drew on a wider variety of knowledge sources than when they were performing less open tasks. Moreover, subject discipline-based sources often were not as helpful in solving open tasks. The study leads to several important implications for designing teaching and learning in integrated curriculum settings.

  8. Competition and innovation in a technology setting software duopoly

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bitzer, Jürgen; Schröder, Philipp

    2003-01-01

    the assumption that software producers compete in technology rather than price or quantities. The model includes the presence of technological progress and menu costs of adjusting existing software, i.e. innovation. It is found that: (i) moving from monopoly to duopoly does increase the technology level set...... by firms in the software industry; (ii) a duopoly adjusts more readily to global technological progress than a monopolist. Furthermore, results are presented comparing open source versus for-profit firms in terms of technology levels and innovation....

  9. The Impact of Technology on Relationships in Educational Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costabile, Angela, Ed.; Spears, Barbara, Ed.

    2012-01-01

    As the linguistic, cognitive and social elements of individuals' lives are transformed by new and emerging technologies, educational settings are also challenged to respond to the issues that have arisen as a consequence. This book focuses on that challenge: using psychological theory as a lens to highlight the positive uses of new technologies in…

  10. A set for relational reasoning: Facilitation of algebraic modeling by a fraction task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeWolf, Melissa; Bassok, Miriam; Holyoak, Keith J

    2016-12-01

    Recent work has identified correlations between early mastery of fractions and later math achievement, especially in algebra. However, causal connections between aspects of reasoning with fractions and improved algebra performance have yet to be established. The current study investigated whether relational reasoning with fractions facilitates subsequent algebraic reasoning using both pre-algebra students and adult college students. Participants were first given either a relational reasoning fractions task or a fraction algebra procedures control task. Then, all participants solved word problems and constructed algebraic equations in either multiplication or division format. The word problems and the equation construction tasks involved simple multiplicative comparison statements such as "There are 4 times as many students as teachers in a classroom." Performance on the algebraic equation construction task was enhanced for participants who had previously completed the relational fractions task compared with those who completed the fraction algebra procedures task. This finding suggests that relational reasoning with fractions can establish a relational set that promotes students' tendency to model relations using algebraic expressions.

  11. Personal environmental control: Effects of pre-set conditions for heating and lighting on personal settings, task performance and comfort experience

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Korte, E.M. de; Spiekman, M.; Hoes-van Oeffelen, L.; Zande, B. van der; Vissenberg, G.; Huiskes, G.; Kuijt-Evers, L.F.M.

    2015-01-01

    The effects of pre-set environmental conditions of temperature and lighting on the preferred personal settings, comfort experience and task performance of office workers were investigated in an individually controlled workstation. Twenty subjects performed standardized tasks at a prototype workstati

  12. Personal environmental control: Effects of pre-set conditions for heating and lighting on personal settings, task performance and comfort experience

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Korte, E.M. de; Spiekman, M.; Hoes-van Oeffelen, L.; Zande, B. van der; Vissenberg, G.; Huiskes, G.; Kuijt-Evers, L.F.M.

    2015-01-01

    The effects of pre-set environmental conditions of temperature and lighting on the preferred personal settings, comfort experience and task performance of office workers were investigated in an individually controlled workstation. Twenty subjects performed standardized tasks at a prototype workstati

  13. Observations of Children’s Interactions with Teachers, Peers, and Tasks across Preschool Classroom Activity Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booren, Leslie M.; Downer, Jason T.; Vitiello, Virginia E.

    2014-01-01

    This descriptive study examined classroom activity settings in relation to children’s observed behavior during classroom interactions, child gender, and basic teacher behavior within the preschool classroom. 145 children were observed for an average of 80 minutes during 8 occasions across 2 days using the inCLASS, an observational measure that conceptualizes behavior into teacher, peer, task, and conflict interactions. Findings indicated that on average children’s interactions with teachers were higher in teacher-structured settings, such as large group. On average, children’s interactions with peers and tasks were more positive in child-directed settings, such as free choice. Children experienced more conflict during recess and routines/transitions. Finally, gender differences were observed within small group and meals. The implications of these findings might encourage teachers to be thoughtful and intentional about what types of support and resources are provided so children can successfully navigate the demands of particular settings. These findings are not meant to discourage certain teacher behaviors or imply value of certain classroom settings; instead, by providing an evidenced-based picture of the conditions under which children display the most positive interactions, teachers can be more aware of choices within these settings and have a powerful way to assist in professional development and interventions. PMID:25717282

  14. Task Performance vs. Learning Outcomes: A Study of Tangible User Interface in Classroom Setting

    OpenAIRE

    Do-Lenh, Son; Jermann, Patrick; Cuendet, Sébastien; Zufferey, Guillaume; Dillenbourg, Pierre

    2010-01-01

    Tangible User Interfaces (TUIs) offer the potential to facilitate collaborative learning in new ways. This paper presents an empirical study that investigated the effects of a TUE in a classroom setting on task performance and learning outcomes. In the tangible condition, apprentices worked together around an interactive tabletop warehouse simulation using tangible inputs. In the paper condition, they performed the same activity with only paper and pens. Results showed that the tangible condi...

  15. The application of persuasive technology to educational settings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mintz, Joseph; Aagaard, Morten

    2012-01-01

    Persuasive technology is a sub-discipline of Human–Computer Interaction that has emerged within the last 10 years, and which has generated increasing interest in the application of persuasion to systems design. Most applications have to date been developed in commercial contexts, as well...... in the domain of health promotion. We present a mainly theoretical consideration of how persuasive technology could be used in educational contexts, particularly in school settings. We consider how persuasive technology design may need to be modified to meet the needs of complex educational settings. We propose...... four design principles for the use of persuasive technology in instructional design, including credibility and Kairos. We derive these from theoretical considerations, as well as from our experience with the HANDS project, which has developed a mobile persuasive application for positive behaviour...

  16. Mind the Gap: Task Design and Technology in Novice Language Teachers' Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smits, Tom F. H.; Oberhofer, Margret; Colpaert, Jozef

    2016-01-01

    This paper focuses on the possibilities/challenges for English as a Foreign Language (EFL) teachers designing tasks grounded in Task-Based Language Teaching (TBLT) and taking advantage of the affordances of technology--Interactive WhiteBoards (IWBs). Teachers have been shown to confuse tasks with exercises or activities. The interactive…

  17. What Can You Learn in Three Minutes? Critical Reflection on an Assessment Task that Embeds Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Natalie Ruth

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to critically examine an assessment task, undertaken by pre-service science teachers, that integrates the use of technology (in this case digital video-recorders and video-editing software) whilst scaffolding skill development. The embedding of technology into the assessment task is purposeful, aiming to…

  18. A Time To Sow: Report from the Task Force on Learning Technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Council of Ontario Universities, Toronto.

    Information technology and telecommunications advances affect universities in addition to business. Ontario universities need to address the importance of incorporating learning technologies (LTs) into their teaching. The Task Force on Learning Technologies was established to address Ontario universities' need to utilize learning technologies and…

  19. The New Modus Operandi: Techno Tasking--Recognizing Students' Ability to Use Multiple Technologies Simultaneously Presents a New Paradigm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Alan E.

    2005-01-01

    The ability of students to multi-task with technology carries major ramifications for classroom instruction and decision making. Multi-tasking with technology has created a new way to process and use information. Techno tasking occurs when an individual uses two or more technologies at the same time. This is distinguished from multi-tasking where…

  20. Language Tasks Using Touch Screen and Mobile Technologies: Reconceptualizing Task-Based CALL for Young Language Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellerin, Martine

    2014-01-01

    This article examines how the use of mobile technologies (iPods and tablets) in language classrooms contributes to redesigning task-based approaches for young language learners. The article is based on a collaborative action research (CAR) project in Early French Immersion classrooms in the province of Alberta, Canada. The data collection included…

  1. Decontamination Technologies, Task 3, Urban Remediation and Response Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heiser,J.; Sullivan, T.

    2009-06-30

    In the aftermath of a Radiological Dispersal Device (RDD, also known as a dirty bomb) it will be necessary to remediate the site including building exteriors and interiors, equipment, pavement, vehicles, personal items etc. Remediation will remove or reduce radioactive contamination from the area using a combination of removing and disposing of many assets (including possible demolition of buildings), decontaminating and returning to service other assets, and fixing in place or leaving in place contamination that is deemed 'acceptable'. The later will require setting acceptable dose standards, which will require negotiation with all involved parties and a balance of risk and cost to benefit. To accomplish the first two, disposal or decontamination, a combination of technologies will be deployed that can be loosely classified as: Decontamination; Equipment removal and size reduction; and Demolition. This report will deal only with the decontamination technologies that will be used to return assets to service or to reduce waste disposal. It will not discuss demolition, size reduction or removal technologies or equipment (e.g., backhoe mounted rams, rock splitter, paving breakers and chipping hammers, etc.). As defined by the DOE (1994), decontamination is removal of radiological contamination from the surfaces of facilities and equipment. Expertise in this field comes primarily from the operation and decommissioning of DOE and commercial nuclear facilities as well as a small amount of ongoing research and development closely related to RDD decontamination. Information related to decontamination of fields, buildings, and public spaces resulting from the Goiania and Chernobyl incidents were also reviewed and provide some meaningful insight into decontamination at major urban areas. In order to proceed with decontamination, the item being processed needs to have an intrinsic value that exceeds the cost of the cleaning and justifies the exposure of any workers

  2. Informal Language Learning Setting: Technology or Social Interaction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahrani, Taher; Sim, Tam Shu

    2012-01-01

    Based on the informal language learning theory, language learning can occur outside the classroom setting unconsciously and incidentally through interaction with the native speakers or exposure to authentic language input through technology. However, an EFL context lacks the social interaction which naturally occurs in an ESL context. To explore…

  3. Introducing RFID technology in dynamic and time-critical medical settings: requirements and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parlak, Siddika; Sarcevic, Aleksandra; Marsic, Ivan; Burd, Randall S

    2012-10-01

    We describe the process of introducing RFID technology in the trauma bay of a trauma center to support fast-paced and complex teamwork during resuscitation. We analyzed trauma resuscitation tasks, photographs of medical tools, and videos of simulated resuscitations to gain insight into resuscitation tasks, work practices and procedures. Based on these data, we discuss strategies for placing RFID tags on medical tools and for placing antennas in the environment for optimal tracking and activity recognition. Results from our preliminary RFID deployment in the trauma bay show the feasibility of our approach for tracking tools and for recognizing trauma team activities. We conclude by discussing implications for and challenges to introducing RFID technology in other similar settings characterized by dynamic and collocated collaboration. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. IFMIF (International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility) key element technology phase task description

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ida, M.; Nakamura, H.; Sugimoto, M.; Yutani, T.; Takeuchi, H. [eds.] [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai Research Establishment, Fusion Neutron Laboratory, Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2000-08-01

    In 2000, a 3 year Key Element technology Phase (KEP) of the International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility (IFMIF) has been initiated to reduce the key technology risk factors needed to achieve continuous wave (CW) beam with the desired current and energy and to reach the corresponding power handling capabilities in the liquid lithium target system. In the KEP, the IFMIF team (EU, Japan, Russian Federation, US) will perform required tasks. The contents of the tasks are described in the task description sheet. As the KEP tasks, the IFMIF team have proposed 27 tasks for Test Facilities, 12 tasks for Target, 26 tasks for Accelerator and 18 tasks for Design Integration. The task description by RF is not yet available. The task items and task descriptions may be added or revised with the progress of KEP activities. These task description sheets have been compiled in this report. After 3 years KEP, the results of the KEP tasks will be reviewed. Following the KEP, 3 years Engineering Validation Phase (EVP) will continue for IFMIF construction. (author)

  5. Planetary Protection Technology Definition Team: Tasks, Status, and Feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, M. A.; Rummel, J. D.

    2016-10-01

    A Planetary Protection and Technology Definition Team will assess challenges to meeting planetary protection requirements to instruments and will suggest technological solutions. Status and initial findings will be reported.

  6. Investigating the use of an adjustment task to set preferred illuminances in a workplace environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Logadóttir, Ásta; Christoffersen, Jens; Fotios, Steve

    2011-01-01

    by variables inherent in the experimental design including the available stimulus range, the anchor (initial setting before adjustment) and adaptation time before onset of adjustment action. The experiment included three different stimulus ranges (21–482 lux, 38–906 lux and 72–1307 lux) and these lead...... to significantly different preferred illuminances (337 lux, 523 lux and 645 lux, respectively). The experimental results confirmed that stimulus range and anchor have significant effects on the outcome of the adjustment task, confirming the importance of considering and reporting these variables when determining...

  7. Programming of left hand exploits task set but that of right hand depends on recent history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Rixin; Zhu, Hong

    2017-07-01

    There are many differences between the left hand and the right hand. But it is not clear if there is a difference in programming between left hand and right hand when the hands perform the same movement. In current study, we carried out two experiments to investigate whether the programming of two hands was equivalent or they exploited different strategies. In the first experiment, participants were required to use one hand to grasp an object with visual feedback or to point to the center of one object without visual feedback on alternate trials, or to grasp an object without visual feedback and to point the center of one object with visual feedback on alternating trials. They then performed the tasks with the other hand. The result was that previous pointing task affected current grasping when it was performed by the left hand, but not the right hand. In experiment 2, we studied if the programming of the left (or right) hand would be affected by the pointing task performed on the previous trial not only by the same hand, but also by the right (or left) hand. Participants pointed and grasped the objects alternately with two hands. The result was similar with Experiment 1, i.e., left-hand grasping was affected by right-hand pointing, whereas right-hand grasping was immune from the interference from left hand. Taken together, the results suggest that when open- and closed-loop trials are interleaved, motor programming of grasping with the right hand was affected by the nature of the online feedback on the previous trial only if it was a grasping trial, suggesting that the trial-to-trial transfer depends on sensorimotor memory and not on task set. In contrast, motor programming of grasping with the left hand can use information about the nature of the online feedback on the previous trial to specify the parameters of the movement, even when the type of movement that occurred was quite different (i.e., pointing) and was performed with the right hand. This suggests that

  8. Set as an instance of a real-world visual-cognitive task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyamsuren, Enkhbold; Taatgen, Niels A

    2013-01-01

    Complex problem solving is often an integration of perceptual processing and deliberate planning. But what balances these two processes, and how do novices differ from experts? We investigate the interplay between these two in the game of SET. This article investigates how people combine bottom-up visual processes and top-down planning to succeed in this game. Using combinatorial and mixed-effect regression analysis of eye-movement protocols and a cognitive model of a human player, we show that SET players deploy both bottom-up and top-down processes in parallel to accomplish the same task. The combination of competition and cooperation of both types of processes is a major factor of success in the game. Finally, we explore strategies players use during the game. Our findings suggest that within-trial strategy shifts can occur without the need of explicit meta-cognitive control, but rather implicitly as a result of evolving memory activations.

  9. First year pre-service science teachers’ experiences of authentic instructional tasks in a PDS setting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pontoppidan, Birgitte Schou; Nielsen, Birgitte Lund

    2011-01-01

    . The small groups gave the student teachers the opportunity to get on a level with the school students. They also refer to the iterative dimension and the importance of formative assessment. Based on the evaluative criteria it may be concluded that the two examples are successful models for authentic......Professional development schools (PDS) have been a source of inspiration for a new approach at the teacher education in Aarhus (DK). The importance of student teachers’ inquiries in authentic settings is in line with various research-based approaches to educating (science) teachers. The purpose...... of the study presented is to contribute to the further development of the local PDS initiative, examine how the PDS setting can frame first year pre-service science teachers’ inquiries and understand their learning through such authentic instructional tasks. Two examples, which meet the five criteria...

  10. Nicotine improves performance in an attentional set shifting task in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allison, Claire; Shoaib, Mohammed

    2013-01-01

    A large number of studies in both humans and experimental animals have demonstrated nicotine-induced improvements in various aspects of cognitive function, including attention and memory. The prefrontal cortex (PFC) is thought to be critically involved in the modulation of executive function and these attentional processes are enhanced by nicotine acting at nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. The involvement of nicotinic processes on cognitive flexibility in particular has not been specifically investigated. The effects of nicotine on attentional flexibility were therefore evaluated using the rodent attentional set shifting task in rats. Nicotine injected both acutely and following repeated pre-exposure significantly improved both intradimensional and extradimensional set shifting performance in the task. Further investigation of the acute effects of nicotine demonstrated this improvement in attentional flexibility to be dose-dependent. These results implicate the nicotinic receptor system in the mediation of processes underlying cognitive flexibility and suggest that nicotine improves attentional flexibility in rats, both within and between perceptual dimensions of a compound stimulus. Nicotine-induced alterations in prefrontal circuitry may underlie these effects on cognitive flexibility. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'Cognitive Enhancers'. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Gonadal Hormones and Voluntary Exercise Interact to Improve Discrimination Ability in a Set-Shift Task

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eddy, Meghan C.; Rifken, Katharine M.; Toufexis, Donna J.; Green, John T.

    2014-01-01

    Exercise has been demonstrated to improve multiple facets of health, including cognitive function. Rodent studies have suggested that exercise has robust effects on the hippocampus, and on tasks that require the hippocampus. However, studies of the effects of exercise in humans often focus on the benefits to cognitive processes that engage areas outside of the hippocampus, such as executive function. Additionally, when exercise’s cognitive benefits are examined, consideration of both males and females, and gonadal hormones, is rarely made. Here we looked at the interaction of gonadal hormones and exercise in terms of the ability of male and female rats to learn to discriminate rewarded from unrewarded arms in a T-maze based on either brightness (white vs. black) or texture (rough vs. smooth), and then to set-shift (a measure of executive function), where this required discrimination based on the opposite dimension. Gonadectomized or intact males and females had access to running wheels for two weeks before being tested. Intact males and females given access to unlocked running wheels performed better at the initial discrimination (Set 1) compared to intact males and females with locked running wheels, but not at the set-shift (Set 2). No advantage of exercise was observed in gonadectomized rats. PMID:23978149

  12. 78 FR 16675 - First Technology Transitions; Policy Task Force Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-18

    ... technological capabilities of wireless and wireline (copper, fiber and coax) technologies today and in the...-division multiplexing (TDM) to Internet Protocol (IP); from copper to fiber; from only wireline services to greater use of wireless and their implications for modernizing Commission policy. DATES: The...

  13. Diversity of tasks and information technologies used by office workers at and away from work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciccarelli, Marina; Straker, Leon; Mathiassen, Svend Erik; Pollock, Clare

    2011-11-01

    Computer use is associated with musculoskeletal complaints among office workers. Insufficient exposure diversity between tasks is a proposed etiological factor, but little information exists on diversity of tasks and information and communication technologies (ICT) among office workers. Direct observation and self-report data were collected on tasks performed and ICT used among 24 office workers, over 12 h in work and non-work environments. Self-reports were repeated on four additional days. Observations were for a mean [SD] 642[40] min. Productive tasks comprised 63% of observations, instrumental 17%, self-care 12% and leisure 8%. Non-ICT tasks comprised 44% of observations; New electronic-based ICT 36%; Old paper-based ICT 15%, and Combined ICT tasks 4%. Proportions of tasks and ICT use differed between environments and days. Information about diversity in tasks and ICT provides the basis for future investigations into exposure variation in ICT-intensive environments and possible musculoskeletal health risks. STATEMENT OF RELEVANCE: Information and communication technologies (ICT) provide office workers access to perform work-related tasks after work hours and in away-from-work locations. Musculoskeletal disorder risk assessment for office workers should account for actual tasks performed over a work day, including away from work exposures. This study provides rich, detailed data on occurrence of tasks performed and ICT used by office workers throughout the day.

  14. Promoting Task Accuracy and Independence in Students with Autism across Educational Setting through the Use of Individual Work Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hume, Kara; Plavnick, Joshua; Odom, Samuel L.

    2012-01-01

    Strategies that promote the independent demonstration of skills across educational settings are critical for improving the accessibility of general education settings for students with ASD. This research assessed the impact of an individual work system on the accuracy of task completion and level of adult prompting across educational setting.…

  15. Tasks and activities to enhance technological Pedagogical Mathematical Content Knowledge of teachers

    OpenAIRE

    Powell, Arthur B.

    2016-01-01

    From a sociocultural perspective, we examine activities generated by genres of tasks to understand how the tasks shape teachers knowledge of technology and mathematical content for teaching. The tasks and activities come from a professional development project that engages the cyberlearning system, Virtual Math Teams with GeoGebra. Working in teams, teachers enhance their understanding of dynamic geometry and how to engage in productive mathematical discussion. We theorize and discuss princip...

  16. Generating technology assessment. Phase I work plan, Task 1 report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-10-15

    A plan of work outlining information to assess electric generating technologies is presented. Projections are made of realistic and understandable engineering and cost assessments of nonnuclear electrical generating technologies. A computer-based method of producing such engineering and cost estimates for use by EIA's Coal and Electric Power Analysis Division is to be developed and implemented. Technologies and processes to be assessed are: all nonnuclear conventional and nonconventional (coal gasification, advanced combustion turbines, atmospheric fluidized bed combustion, fuel cells, geothermal, solar thermal and photovoltaics, biomass conversion to electricity, ocean thermal, wind, and MHD). Engineering specifications recommended for determination are listed. Compatibility of the technologies are to be assessed with EIA models: MEFS, LEAP, and NCM.

  17. ImSET: Impact of Sector Energy Technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roop, Joseph M.; Scott, Michael J.; Schultz, Robert W.

    2005-07-19

    This version of the Impact of Sector Energy Technologies (ImSET) model represents the ''next generation'' of the previously developed Visual Basic model (ImBUILD 2.0) that was developed in 2003 to estimate the macroeconomic impacts of energy-efficient technology in buildings. More specifically, a special-purpose version of the 1997 benchmark national Input-Output (I-O) model was designed specifically to estimate the national employment and income effects of the deployment of Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) -developed energy-saving technologies. In comparison with the previous versions of the model, this version allows for more complete and automated analysis of the essential features of energy efficiency investments in buildings, industry, transportation, and the electric power sectors. This version also incorporates improvements in the treatment of operations and maintenance costs, and improves the treatment of financing of investment options. ImSET is also easier to use than extant macroeconomic simulation models and incorporates information developed by each of the EERE offices as part of the requirements of the Government Performance and Results Act.

  18. Suboptimal criterion setting in a perceptual choice task with asymmetric reinforcement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stüttgen, Maik C; Kasties, Nils; Lengersdorf, Daniel; Starosta, Sarah; Güntürkün, Onur; Jäkel, Frank

    2013-06-01

    Performance on psychophysical tasks is influenced by a variety of non-sensory factors, most notably the magnitude or probability of reinforcement following correct responses. When reinforcement probability is unequal for hits and correct rejections, signal detection theory specifies an optimal decision criterion which maximizes the number of reinforcers. We subjected pigeons to a task in which six different stimuli (shades of gray) had to be assigned to one of two categories. Animals were confronted with asymmetric reinforcement schedules in which correct responses to five of the stimuli were reinforced with a probability of 0.5, while correct responses to the remaining stimulus were extinguished. The subjects' resultant choice probabilities clearly deviated from those predicted by a maximization account. More specifically, the magnitude of the choice bias increased with the distance of the to-be-extinguished stimulus to the category boundary, a pattern opposite to that posited by maximization. The present and a previous set of results in which animals performed optimally can be explained by a simple choice mechanism in which a variable decision criterion is constantly updated according to a leaky integration of incomes attained from both response options.

  19. Mobile nursing information system utilization: the task-technology fit perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Tung-Cheng

    2014-03-01

    Task-technology fit theory considers how technology may best be deployed to support individuals and facilitate the completion of tasks. This study separates the fit construct into the two realms of task-technology fit and technology-individual fit and integrates organization readiness with the objective of investigating the effectiveness of mobile nursing information systems in terms of helping nursing staff to accomplish daily clinical tasks. Study participants were clinical professionals with system usage experience who work at one medical center. Results indicated that technology-individual fit is the factor that most strongly influences usage, followed respectively by task-technology fit and organization readiness. Therefore, strategies designed to implement mobile nursing information systems should focus greater effort on fitting the system to system users by making these systems easy to learn and use, and training easy to complete. System functions should not only facilitate accomplishment of daily clinical tasks such as quickly obtaining information and accurate data but also be portable and provide a user-friendly, easy-to-operate interface. Organizational readiness, the commitment and support of top management, and nursing staff willingness to learn and use the new system are also important factors that influence system usage.

  20. Task-specific effects of tDCS-induced cortical excitability changes on cognitive and motor sequence set shifting performance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Leite

    Full Text Available In this study, we tested the effects of transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS on two set shifting tasks. Set shifting ability is defined as the capacity to switch between mental sets or actions and requires the activation of a distributed neural network. Thirty healthy subjects (fifteen per site received anodal, cathodal and sham stimulation of the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC or the primary motor cortex (M1. We measured set shifting in both cognitive and motor tasks. The results show that both anodal and cathodal single session tDCS can modulate cognitive and motor tasks. However, an interaction was found between task and type of stimulation as anodal tDCS of DLPFC and M1 was found to increase performance in the cognitive task, while cathodal tDCS of DLPFC and M1 had the opposite effect on the motor task. Additionally, tDCS effects seem to be most evident on the speed of changing sets, rather than on reducing the number of errors or increasing the efficacy of irrelevant set filtering.

  1. Tech-Assisted Language Learning Tasks in an EFL Setting: Use of Hand phone Recording Feature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Shakarami

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Technology with its speedy great leaps forward has undeniable impact on every aspect of our life in the new millennium. It has supplied us with different affordances almost daily or more precisely in a matter of hours. Technology and Computer seems to be a break through as for their roles in the Twenty-First century educational system. Examples are numerous, among which CALL, CMC, and Virtual learning spaces come to mind instantly. Amongst the newly developed gadgets of today are the sophisticated smart Hand phones which are far more ahead of a communication tool once designed for. Development of Hand phone as a wide-spread multi-tasking gadget has urged researchers to investigate its effect on every aspect of learning process including language learning. This study attempts to explore the effects of using cell phone audio recording feature, by Iranian EFL learners, on the development of their speaking skills. Thirty-five sophomore students were enrolled in a pre-posttest designed study. Data on their English speaking experience using audio–recording features of their Hand phones were collected. At the end of the semester, the performance of both groups, treatment and control, were observed, evaluated, and analyzed; thereafter procured qualitatively at the next phase. The quantitative outcome lent support to integrating Hand phones as part of the language learning curriculum. Keywords:

  2. Report of the task group on fermentation technology.

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Andrews, RJ

    1978-09-01

    Full Text Available An ad hoc meeting held in Bloemfontein on 29th November, 1976, identified a need for greater contact between South African research groups involved in fermentation technology. The meeting also suggested that the stimulation of research and training...

  3. Lesions of the ventral midline thalamus produce deficits in reversal learning and attention on an odor texture set shifting task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linley, Stephanie B; Gallo, Michelle M; Vertes, Robert P

    2016-10-15

    The nucleus reuniens (RE) of the ventral midline thalamus is strongly reciprocally connected with the hippocampus (HF) and the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and has been shown to mediate the transfer of information between these structures. It has become increasingly well established that RE serves a critical role in mnemonic tasks requiring the interaction of the HF and mPFC, but essentially not tasks relying solely on the HF. Very few studies have addressed the independent actions of RE on prefrontal executive functioning. The present report examined the effects of lesions of the ventral midline thalamus, including RE and the dorsally adjacent rhomboid nucleus (RH) in rats on attention and behavioral flexibility using the attentional set shifting task (AST). The task uses odor and tactile stimuli to test for attentional set formation, attentional set shifting, behavioral flexibility and reversal learning. By comparison with sham controls, lesioned rats were significantly impaired on reversal learning and intradimensional (ID) set shifting. Specifically, RE/RH lesioned rats were impaired on the first reversal stage of the task which required a change in response strategy to select a previously non-rewarded stimulus for reward. RE/RH lesioned rats also exhibited deficits in the ability to transfer or generalize rules of the task which requires making the same modality-based choices (e.g., odor vs. tactile) to different sets of stimuli in the ID stage of the task. These results demonstrate that in addition to its role in tasks dependent on HF-mPFC interactions, nucleus reuniens is also critically involved cognitive/executive functions associated with the medial prefrontal cortex. As such, the deficits in the AST task produced by RE/RH lesions suggest the ventral midline thalamus directly contributes to flexible goal directed behavior. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Task 11 - systems analysis of environmental management technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Musich, M.A.

    1997-06-01

    A review was conducted of three systems analysis (SA) studies performed by Lockheed Idaho Technologies Company (LITCO) on integrated thermal treatment systems (ITTs) and integrated nonthermal treatment systems (INTSs) for the remediation of mixed low-level waste (MLLW) stored throughout the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) weapons complex. The review was performed by an independent team led by the Energy & Environment Research Center (EERC), including Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC), the Waste Policy Institute (WPI), and Virginia Tech.

  5. Implementing Tasks with Interactive Technologies in Classroom Computer Assisted Language Learning (CALL): Towards a Developmental Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whyte, Shona; Alexander, Julie

    2014-01-01

    Classroom foreign language teachers using technology in task-based language teaching (TBLT) may experience pedagogical regression during technological development (Fullan, 2001), and fail to transform pedagogy because tools like interactive whiteboards (IWBs) support traditional as well as newer approaches (Avvisati et al., 2013). IWB-supported…

  6. Current status and future tasks of the Sunshine Project. (Development of new energy technology)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takada, T.

    1983-01-01

    Since its inception in 1974, the Sunshine Project has involved advances in new energy technology in many areas. The present report covers the principal areas of activity in 1980, examining the development status of solar energy, goethermal energy, coal liquefaction and gasification, hydrogen energy, wind power, ocean thermal energy conversion, etc. Future trends and tasks of new energy technology development are discussed. (In Japanese)

  7. The Task-Based Teaching of Writing to Big Classes in Chinese EFL Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hai-yan, Miao

    2014-01-01

    This paper explores how to teach English writing to big classes in China from the task-based perspective. Based on a comparison between the traditional 3Ps approach and the tasked-based approach, the paper proposes a practical linear procedure as to how to teach English writing in the task-based classroom to big classes. An empirical study is…

  8. Semantic and Phonological Task-Set Priming and Stimulus Processing Investigated Using Magnetoencephalography (MEG)

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNab, F.; Rippon, G.; Hillebrand, A.; Singh, K. D.; Swithenby, S. J.

    2007-01-01

    In this study the neural substrates of semantic and phonological task priming and task performance were investigated using single word task-primes. Magnetoencephalography (MEG) data were analysed using Synthetic Aperture Magnetometry (SAM) to determine the spatiotemporal and spectral characteristics of cortical responses. Comparisons were made…

  9. SETTING OF TASK OF OPTIMIZATION OF THE ACTIVITY OF A MACHINE-BUILDING CLUSTER COMPANY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Romanenko

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The work is dedicated to the development of methodological approaches to the management of machine-building enterprise on the basis of cost reduction, optimization of the portfolio of orders and capacity utilization in the process of operational management. Evaluation of economic efficiency of such economic entities of the real sector of the economy is determined, including the timing of orders, which depend on the issues of building a production facility, maintenance of fixed assets and maintain them at a given level. Formulated key components of economic-mathematical model of industrial activity and is defined as the optimization criterion. As proposed formula accumulating profits due to production capacity and technology to produce products current direct variable costs, the amount of property tax and expenses appearing as a result of manifestations of variance when performing replacement of production tasks for a single period of time. The main component of the optimization of the production activity of the enterprise on the basis of this criterion is the vector of direct variable costs. It depends on the number of types of products in the current portfolio of orders, production schedules production, the normative time for the release of a particular product available Fund time efficient production positions, the current valuation for certain groups of technological operations and the current priority of operations for the degree of readiness performed internal orders. Modeling of industrial activity based on the proposed provisions would allow the enterprises of machine-building cluster, active innovation, improve the efficient use of available production resources by optimizing current operations at the high uncertainty of the magnitude of the demand planning and carrying out maintenance and routine repairs.

  10. Global Assessment of Hydrogen Technologies - Task 1 Report Technology Evaluation of Hydrogen Light Duty Vehicles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fouad, Fouad H.; Peters, Robert W.; Sisiopiku, Virginia P.; Sullivan Andrew J.; Rousseau, Aymeric

    2007-12-01

    This task analyzes the candidate hydrogen-fueled vehicles for near-term use in the Southeastern U.S. The purpose of this work is to assess their potential in terms of efficiency and performance. This report compares conventional, hybrid electric vehicles (HEV) with gasoline and hydrogen-fueled internal combustion engines (ICEs) as well as fuel cell and fuel cell hybrids from a technology as well as fuel economy point of view. All the vehicles have been simulated using the Powertrain System Analysis Toolkit (PSAT). First, some background information is provided on recent American automotive market trends and consequences. Moreover, available options are presented for introducing cleaner and more economical vehicles in the market in the future. In this study, analysis of various candidate hydrogen-fueled vehicles is performed using PSAT and, thus, a brief description of PSAT features and capabilities are provided. Detailed information on the simulation analysis performed is also offered, including methodology assumptions, fuel economic results, and conclusions from the findings.

  11. Time-on-task, technology and mathematics achievement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louw, Johann; Muller, Johan; Tredoux, Colin

    2008-02-01

    Information and communication technologies hold much promise for use in education in developing countries. This study reports on an evaluation conducted on the introduction of computers in the delivery of the mathematics curriculum in one of the provinces of South Africa. Although the request was for an outcome evaluation very early in the implementation of the program, it was tailored in such a way as to fulfill a more formative role. Despite substantial variability in implementation, and in most cases with very weak exposure of the learners to the intervention, sufficient evidence emerged to indicate that this mode of curriculum delivery may be effective. Improvement in mathematics performance was related to a range of variables: some concerned classroom teaching practices, some referred to social differences between the learners, and some to the specific intervention. The strongest of these predictors in the sample was the strength of the intervention: the more time learners spent on using the software to study mathematics, the more improvement they showed from 1 year to the next in their performance in the subject.

  12. Employee Involvement, Technology, and Evolution in Job Skills: A Task-Based Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Francis Green

    2012-01-01

    The author investigates the evolution of job skill distribution using task data derived from the U.K. Skills Surveys of 1997, 2001, and 2006, and the 1992 Employment Survey in Britain. He determines the extent to which employee involvement in the workplace and computer technologies promote the use of higher order cognitive and interactive skills. He finds that literacy, other communication tasks, and self-planning skills have grown especially fast. Numerical and problem-solving skills have al...

  13. INDICATOR FOR TECHNOLOGICAL PEDAGOGICAL CONTENT KNOWLEDGE (TPACK EVALUATION OF ONLINE TASKS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anat OSTER-LEVINZ

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Life in the computerized world, which is characterized by the penetration of information technologies and which changes rapidly, is affected in many fields. The penetration of the internet into different fields of teaching and learning may have a significant effect on the quality of teaching. Numerous researchers claim that time is needed in order to examine the real effects of technology on pedagogy (Gao et al. 2006; Hui et al. 2005 and on the teachers in the field "to harness the horses of technology to the cart of pedagogy" (Noski et al. 2006. However, the new learning environment must be created on a rational pedagogical basis and not only on a technological basis (Salomon 2000.The theoretical part of this article describes online learning, the characteristics of knowledge required of teachers who integrate technology in teaching, the characteristics of an online task, and various indicators for evaluating an online task. Because we did not find a dynamic and digital indicator for evaluating the quality of online tasks which encompasses all of the aspects which in our opinion should be expressed in an indicator, such as PK, PCK, TK and TPACK, which is actually the space expected to be expressed in an online task, we developed a digital indicator that evaluates the quality of online tasks. The goal was to develop a unique indicator that would reflect the quality of online tasks with reference to technological pedagogical content knowledge (TPACK. The indicator is described in detail together with the considerations that were taken into account during its construction. The processes by which its validity and reliability were tested are also described.

  14. IT-adoption and the interaction of task, technology and individuals: a fit framework and a case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iller Carola

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Factors of IT adoption have largely been discussed in the literature. However, existing frameworks (such as TAM or TTF are failing to include one important aspect, the interaction between user and task. Method Based on a literature study and a case study, we developed the FITT framework to help analyse the socio-organisational-technical factors that influence IT adoption in a health care setting. Results Our FITT framework ("Fit between Individuals, Task and Technology" is based on the idea that IT adoption in a clinical environment depends on the fit between the attributes of the individual users (e.g. computer anxiety, motivation, attributes of the technology (e.g. usability, functionality, performance, and attributes of the clinical tasks and processes (e.g. organisation, task complexity. We used this framework in the retrospective analysis of a three-year case study, describing the adoption of a nursing documentation system in various departments in a German University Hospital. We will show how the FITT framework helped analyzing the process of IT adoption during an IT implementation: we were able to describe every found IT adoption problem with regard to the three fit dimensions, and any intervention on the fit can be described with regard to the three objects of the FITT framework (individual, task, technology. We also derive facilitators and barriers to IT adoption of clinical information systems. Conclusion This work should support a better understanding of the reasons for IT adoption failures and therefore enable better prepared and more successful IT introduction projects. We will discuss, however, that from a more epistemological point of view, it may be difficult or even impossible to analyse the complex and interacting factors that predict success or failure of IT projects in a socio-technical environment.

  15. Why a successful task substitution in glaucoma care could not be transferred from a hospital setting to a primary care setting: a qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holtzer-Goor Kim M

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Healthcare systems are challenged by a demand that exceeds available resources. One policy to meet this challenge is task substitution-transferring tasks to other professions and settings. Our study aimed to explore stakeholders’ perceived feasibility of transferring hospital-based monitoring of stable glaucoma patients to primary care optometrists. Methods A case study was undertaken in the Rotterdam Eye Hospital (REH using semi-structured interviews and document reviews. They were inductively analysed using three implementation related theoretical perspectives: sociological theories on professionalism, management theories, and applied political analysis. Results Currently it is not feasible to use primary care optometrists as substitutes for optometrists and ophthalmic technicians working in a hospital-based glaucoma follow-up unit (GFU. Respondents’ narratives revealed that: the glaucoma specialists’ sense of urgency for task substitution outside the hospital diminished after establishing a GFU that satisfied their professionalization needs; the return on investments were unclear; and reluctant key stakeholders with strong power positions blocked implementation. The window of opportunity that existed for task substitution in person and setting in 1999 closed with the institutionalization of the GFU. Conclusions Transferring the monitoring of stable glaucoma patients to primary care optometrists in Rotterdam did not seem feasible. The main reasons were the lack of agreement on professional boundaries and work domains, the institutionalization of the GFU in the REH, and the absence of an appropriate reimbursement system. Policy makers considering substituting tasks to other professionals should carefully think about the implementation process, especially in a two-step implementation process (substitution in person and in setting such as this case. Involving the substituting professionals early on to ensure all

  16. The potential impact of 3D telepresence technology on task performance in emergency trauma care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Söderholm, Hanna M.; Sonnenwald, Diane H.; Cairns, Bruce

    2007-01-01

    Emergency trauma is a major health problem worldwide. To evaluate the potential of emerging 3D telepresence technology for facilitating paramedic - physician collaboration while providing emergency medical trauma care we conducted a between-subjects post-test experimental lab study. During...... proxy condition also reported higher levels of self-efficacy. These results indicate 3D telepresence technology has potential to improve paramedics' performance of complex emergency medical tasks and improve emergency trauma health care when designed appropriately. © 2007 ACM....

  17. Global Assessment of Hydrogen TechnologiesTask 6 Report Promoting a Southeast Hydrogen Consortium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fouad, Fouad H.; Peters, Robert W.; Sisiopiku, Virginia P.; Sullivan Andrew J.

    2007-12-01

    The purpose of this project task was to establish a technical consortium to promote the deployment of hydrogen technologies and infrastructure in the Southeast. The goal was to partner with fuel cell manufacturers, hydrogen fuel infrastructure providers, electric utilities, energy service companies, research institutions, and user groups to improve education and awareness of hydrogen technologies in an area that is lagging behind other parts of the country in terms of vehicle and infrastructure demonstrations and deployments. This report documents that effort.

  18. Exploring Greenland: science and technology in Cold War settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heymann, Matthias; Knudsen, Henrik; Lolck, Maiken L; Nielsen, Henry; Nielsen, Kristian H; Ries, Christopher J

    2010-01-01

    This paper explores a vacant spot in the Cold War history of science: the development of research activities in the physical environmental sciences and in nuclear science and technology in Greenland. In the post-war period, scientific exploration of the polar areas became a strategically important element in American and Soviet defence policy. Particularly geophysical fields like meteorology, geology, seismology, oceanography, and others profited greatly from military interest. While Denmark maintained formal sovereignty over Greenland, research activities were strongly dominated by U.S. military interests. This paper sets out to summarize the limited current state of knowledge about activities in the environmental physical sciences in Greenland and their entanglement with military, geopolitical, and colonial interests of both the USA and Denmark. We describe geophysical research in the Cold War in Greenland as a multidimensional colonial endeavour. In a period of decolonization after World War II, Greenland, being a Danish colony, became additionally colonized by the American military. Concurrently, in a period of emerging scientific internationalism, the U.S. military "colonized" geophysical research in the Arctic, which increasingly became subject to military directions, culture, and rules.

  19. The Effects of Task Clarification, Feedback, and Goal Setting on Student Advisors' Office Behaviors and Customer Service

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tittelbach, Danielle; DeAngelis, Maureen; Sturmey, Peter; Alvero, Alicia M.

    2007-01-01

    This study evaluated the effects of feedback, task clarification and goal-setting on office behaviors and customer service of ten undergraduate participants that served as university advisors. A multiple baseline design was implemented across three target behaviors: client greeting, front-desk behaviors, and punctuality. During intervention the…

  20. Creating the DISEQuA corpus: a multilingual test set for the monolingual question Answering tasks at CLEF 2003

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Magnini, B.; Romagnoli, S.; Vallin, A.; Herrera, J.; Peñas, A.; Peinado, V.; Verdejo, F.; de Rijke, M.

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes the procedure adopted by the three co-ordinators of the CLEF 2003 question answering track (ITC-irst, UNED and ILLC) to create the question set for the monolingual tasks. Despite thelittle resources available, the three groups collaborated and managed to formulate and verify a l

  1. Effects of Planning and Goal Setting on Reducing Latency to Task Engagement for Struggling Readers in Middle School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, Nathan A.

    2016-01-01

    The current study examined the effect of a planning and goal-setting intervention in reducing latency to task engagement. This study used a multiple baseline design across participants for two seventh-grade and two eighth-grade students in a remedial reading class. The behavioral intervention was administered in small groups at the start of each…

  2. University Students Setting Goals in the Context of Autonomy, Self-Efficacy and Important Goal-Related Task Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, Edward T., Jr.; Grantham, Susan

    2011-01-01

    In this study, the authors attempted to examine the roles of trait autonomy, trait self-efficacy, important goal-related task engagement and gender in predicting whether undergraduate university students are willing to set difficult goals. One hundred and thirty-six undergraduate communications students from the North-Eastern USA completed an…

  3. Effects of Planning and Goal Setting on Reducing Latency to Task Engagement for Struggling Readers in Middle School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, Nathan A.

    2016-01-01

    The current study examined the effect of a planning and goal-setting intervention in reducing latency to task engagement. This study used a multiple baseline design across participants for two seventh-grade and two eighth-grade students in a remedial reading class. The behavioral intervention was administered in small groups at the start of each…

  4. Mechanisms of masked evaluative priming: Task sets modulate behavioral and electrophysiological priming for picture and words differentially.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiefer, Markus; Liegel, Nathalie; Zovko, Monika; Wentura, Dirk

    2016-12-20

    Research with the evaluative priming paradigm has shown that affective evaluation processes reliably influence cognition and behavior, even when triggered outside awareness. However, the precise mechanisms underlying such subliminal evaluative priming effects, response activation vs. semantic processing, are matter of a debate. In the present study, we determined the relative contribution of semantic processing and response activation to masked evaluative priming with pictures and words. To this end, we investigated the modulation of masked pictorial vs. verbal priming by previously activated perceptual versus semantic task sets and assessed the electrophysiological correlates of priming using event-related potential (ERP) recordings. Behavioral and electrophysiological effects showed a differential modulation of pictorial and verbal subliminal priming by previously activated task sets: Pictorial priming was only observed during the perceptual but not during the semantic task set. Verbal priming, in contrast, was found when either task set was activated. Furthermore, only verbal priming was associated with a modulation of the N400 ERP component, an index of semantic processing, whereas a priming-related modulation of earlier ERPs, indexing visuo-motor S-R activation, was found for both picture and words. The results thus demonstrate that different neuro-cognitive processes contribute to unconscious evaluative priming depending on the stimulus format.

  5. Dual-task motor performance with a tongue-operated assistive technology compared with hand operations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johnson Ashley N

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To provide an alternative motor modality for control, navigation, and communication in individuals suffering from impairment or disability in hand functions, a Tongue Drive System (TDS has been developed that allows for real time tracking of tongue motion in an unobtrusive, wireless, and wearable device that utilizes the magnetic field generated by a miniature disk shaped magnetic tracer attached to the tip of the tongue. The purpose of the study was to compare the influence of a concurrent motor or cognitive task on various aspects of simple movement control between hand and tongue using the TDS technology. Methods Thirteen young able-bodied adults performed rapid and slow goal-directed movements of hand and tongue (with TDS with and without a concurrent motor (hand or tongue or cognitive (arithmetic and memory task. Changes in reaction time, completion time, speed, correctness, accuracy, variability of displacement, and variability of time due to the addition of a concurrent task were compared between hand and tongue. Results The influence of an additional concurrent task on motor performance was similar between the hand and tongue for slow movement in controlling their displacement. In rapid movement with a concurrent motor task, most aspects of motor performance were degraded in hand, while tongue speed during rapid continuous task was maintained. With a concurrent cognitive task, most aspects of motor performance were degraded in tongue, while hand accuracy during the rapid discrete task and hand speed during the rapid continuous task were maintained. Conclusion Rapid goal-directed hand and tongue movements were more consistently susceptible to interference from concurrent motor and cognitive tasks, respectively, compared with the other movement.

  6. R&D manpower and technological performance : The impact of demographic and task-related diversity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Faems, D.L.M.; Subramaniam, A.

    2013-01-01

    We assess the impact of R&D manpower diversity on firms' technological performance. Relying on insights from two theoretical perspectives on team diversity (i.e. social categorization perspective and information decision-making perspective), we hypothesize that both demographic and task-related sour

  7. President's Task Force on Communications Policy. Domestic Applications of Communication Satellite Technology. Staff Paper Four.

    Science.gov (United States)

    President's Task Force on Communications Policy, Washington, DC.

    A staff paper to the President's Task Force on Communications Policy examines the feasibility of a domestic communications satellite system. Although, with expected technological advancement, satellites may play a significant role in domestic transmission and are economically feasible right now, a number of remaining questions make the…

  8. R&D manpower and technological performance : The impact of demographic and task-related diversity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Faems, D.L.M.; Subramaniam, A.

    2013-01-01

    We assess the impact of R&D manpower diversity on firms' technological performance. Relying on insights from two theoretical perspectives on team diversity (i.e. social categorization perspective and information decision-making perspective), we hypothesize that both demographic and task-related sour

  9. Task analysis of information technology-mediated medication management in outpatient care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stiphout, F. van; Zwart-van Rijkom, J.E.F.; Maggio, L.A.; Aarts, J.E.C.M.; Bates, D.W.; Gelder, T. van; Jansen, P.A.F.; Schraagen, J.M.C.; Egberts, A.C.G.; Braak, E.W.M.T. ter

    2015-01-01

    Aims Educating physicians in the procedural as well as cognitive skills of information technology (IT)-mediated medication management could be one of the missing links for the improvement of patient safety. We aimed to compose a framework of tasks that need to be addressed to optimize medication man

  10. R&D manpower and technological performance : The impact of demographic and task-related diversity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Faems, D.L.M.; Subramaniam, A.

    2013-01-01

    We assess the impact of R&D manpower diversity on firms' technological performance. Relying on insights from two theoretical perspectives on team diversity (i.e. social categorization perspective and information decision-making perspective), we hypothesize that both demographic and task-related

  11. Tasks and challenges in prototype development with novel technology - an empirical study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravn, Poul Martin; Guðlaugsson, Tómas Vignir; Mortensen, Niels Henrik

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a thematic analysis of 138 monthly reports from a joint industrial and academic project where multiple prototypes were developed based on the same technology. The analysis was based on tasks and challenges described in the reports by project managers over a period of three years...

  12. Recurrence of task set-related MEG signal patterns during auditory working memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Benjamin; Bledowski, Christoph; Rieder, Maria; Kaiser, Jochen

    2016-06-01

    Processing of auditory spatial and non-spatial information in working memory has been shown to rely on separate cortical systems. While previous studies have demonstrated differences in spatial versus non-spatial processing from the encoding of to-be-remembered stimuli onwards, here we investigated whether such differences would be detectable already prior to presentation of the sample stimulus. We analyzed broad-band magnetoencephalography data from 15 healthy adults during an auditory working memory paradigm starting with a visual cue indicating the task-relevant stimulus feature for a given trial (lateralization or pitch) and a subsequent 1.5-s pre-encoding phase. This was followed by a sample sound (0.2s), the delay phase (0.8s) and a test stimulus (0.2s) after which participants made a match/non-match decision. Linear discriminant functions were trained to decode task-specific signal patterns throughout the task, and temporal generalization was used to assess whether the neural codes discriminating between the tasks during the pre-encoding phase would recur during later task periods. The spatial versus non-spatial tasks could indeed be discriminated after the onset of the cue onwards, and decoders trained during the pre-encoding phase successfully discriminated the tasks during both sample stimulus encoding and during the delay phase. This demonstrates that task-specific neural codes are established already before the memorandum is presented and that the same patterns are reestablished during stimulus encoding and maintenance. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI: Auditory working memory. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. TASKRADAR: TASK VISUALISATION AND MONITORING WITHIN AUTOMOTIVE PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT LIFECYCLE USING SEMANTIC TECHNOLOGIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selver Softic

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Project management within the automotive production in specific departments is still done separately and does not interact with engineering process. Our work aims on providing flexible data insights on collaboration tasks within such environments. We apply semantic technologies RDF, OWL and SPARQL with a specific domain related ontology PROTARES (PROject TAsks RESources to interlink, describe and query domain knowledge. As proof of concept we are introducing an experimental visualisation interface called TaskRadar. Our application resides on domain ontology and allows knowledge based browsing and visualisation of tasks in development process. With this example we want to show, how semantically driven customized views can support monitoring and reflection as well as decision-making within the early phases of the automotive product lifecycle.

  14. Controlled but independent: effects of mental rotation and developmental dyslexia in dual-task settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lachmann, Thomas; Schumacher, Bettina; van Leeuwen, Cees

    2009-01-01

    In two experiments, we compared the performance of normal-reading (n = 26) and dyslexic children (n = 22) in discriminating letters from their mirrored images. In experiment 1, they were always presented in the upright orientation; in experiment 2, they were presented in different angular orientations (0 degrees, 90 degrees, 180 degrees). In order to determine whether task and dyslexia affect reaction times in early or late stages of processing, a dual-task paradigm was adopted in which the primary task was tone discrimination. Stimulus onset asynchrony (SOA) between first and second task was systematically varied (50 ms versus 400 ms). In both experiments dyslexics were slower overall than controls. No effects of mirror-image letters were found. In experiment 2, mental-rotation effects were additive with SOA. In accordance with earlier findings we concluded that the mental-rotation effect involves central processing capacity. Mental-rotation effects were the same for normal-reading and dyslexic children; mental rotation is not impaired in dyslexia. Remarkably, SOA effects were larger in normal readers than in dyslexics. This result was explained by observing that dyslexics experience decision difficulties already on the first task. As a result, they do not benefit optimally from increased latencies between first and second tasks.

  15. Implementing the Science Assessment Standards: Developing and validating a set of laboratory assessment tasks in high school biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Gouranga Chandra

    Very often a number of factors, especially time, space and money, deter many science educators from using inquiry-based, hands-on, laboratory practical tasks as alternative assessment instruments in science. A shortage of valid inquiry-based laboratory tasks for high school biology has been cited. Driven by this need, this study addressed the following three research questions: (1) How can laboratory-based performance tasks be designed and developed that are doable by students for whom they are designed/written? (2) Do student responses to the laboratory-based performance tasks validly represent at least some of the intended process skills that new biology learning goals want students to acquire? (3) Are the laboratory-based performance tasks psychometrically consistent as individual tasks and as a set? To answer these questions, three tasks were used from the six biology tasks initially designed and developed by an iterative process of trial testing. Analyses of data from 224 students showed that performance-based laboratory tasks that are doable by all students require careful and iterative process of development. Although the students demonstrated more skill in performing than planning and reasoning, their performances at the item level were very poor for some items. Possible reasons for the poor performances have been discussed and suggestions on how to remediate the deficiencies have been made. Empirical evidences for validity and reliability of the instrument have been presented both from the classical and the modern validity criteria point of view. Limitations of the study have been identified. Finally implications of the study and directions for further research have been discussed.

  16. The ultimate technology: the end of technology and the task of nature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riis, Søren

    2013-01-01

    One of the most influential philosophers of the 20th century, Martin Heidegger (1889-1976), died prior to the remarkable cloning of the sheep Dolly and before Dr. Venter started his experiments on creating synthetic life, and he never explicitly discussed living technologies. However, by reinterpreting his notion of "modern technology," this article shows how it is possible to philosophically assess living technologies and to recognize ways in which Heidegger anticipated this phenomenon with his notion of cybernetics. The interpretation elucidates the fundamental process of technology becoming living and simultaneously presents living technology as the ultimate technology. The thesis of this article is that living technology is not just one more technology; rather, it is the perfection of technology as understood by Aristotle. Aristotle's thinking is in this way a key example of a profound reassessment of nature and technology. Aristotle clearly separates these two domains of being in his definition, but in doing so, he also connects them to one another in a highly influential way. Following this line of thought, the article finally offers an original perspective involving renewed respect for the perpetual self-unfolding nature of living technology.

  17. An investigation on task-technology fit of mobile nursing information systems for nursing performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiao, Ju-Ling; Chen, Rai-Fu

    2012-05-01

    This study investigates factors affecting the fit between nursing tasks and mobile nursing information systems and the relationships between the task-technology fit of mobile nursing information systems and nurse performance from the perspective of task-technology fit. Survey research recruited nursing staffs as subjects from selected case hospital. A total of 310 questionnaires were sent out, and 219 copies were obtained, indicating a valid response rate of 70.6%. Collected data were analyzed using the structural equation modeling technique. Our study found that dependence tasks have positive effects on information acquisition (γ=0.234, Pmobile nursing information systems in assisting nursing practices can help facilitate both independent and dependent nursing tasks. Our study discovered that the supporting functions of mobile nursing information systems have positive effects on information integration and interpretation (γ=0.365, Pmobile nursing information systems have positive effects on information acquisition (γ=0.318, Pmobile nursing information systems have positive effects on nursing performance, indicating 83.2% of totally explained variance. As shown, the use of mobile nursing information systems could provide nursing staffs with real-time and accurate information to increase efficiency and effectiveness in patient-care duties, further improving nursing performance.

  18. Investigating the use of an adjustment task to set preferred illuminances in a workplace environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Logadóttir, Ásta; Christoffersen, Jens; Fotios, Steve

    2011-01-01

    to significantly different preferred illuminances (337 lux, 523 lux and 645 lux, respectively). The experimental results confirmed that stimulus range and anchor have significant effects on the outcome of the adjustment task, confirming the importance of considering and reporting these variables when determining...

  19. Task Groups in the School Setting: Promoting Children's Social and Emotional Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Velsor, Patricia

    2009-01-01

    Through social and emotional learning (SEL), individuals develop skill in negotiating relationships successfully and expressing emotions appropriately. The socially and emotionally intelligent child reaps benefits in school and later life. Counselors are best qualified to promote children's SEL and the task group in the classroom provides an…

  20. Languaging in Translation Tasks Used in a University Setting: Particular Potential for Student Agency?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallkvist, Marie

    2013-01-01

    This article explores the value of judiciously used first language (L1)-to-second language (L2) translation in meaning-focused, advanced-level academic language education. It examines languaging in the teacher-led discourse (TLD) that arises when translation tasks are used and compares it to languaging during the TLD engendered by 4 other…

  1. The Technological Knowledge Used by Technology Education Students in Capability Tasks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauscher, Willem

    2011-01-01

    Since technology education is, compared to subjects such as mathematics and science, still a fairly new subject both nationally and internationally, it does not have an established subject philosophy. In the absence of an established subject philosophy for technology education, one can draw on other disciplines in the field, such as engineering…

  2. Exploring the Relationship between the Use of Technology with Enacted Tasks and Questions in Elementary School Mathematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polly, Drew

    2016-01-01

    This study explored the relationship between technology use, tasks, and questions posed during mathematics lessons in three elementary school classrooms. Teachers were observed between 21 to 30 times per classroom during the year. Data was recorded about the types of technologies, mathematical tasks, and questions observed. Chi-square tests for…

  3. An Examination of the Role of Technological Tools in Relation to the Cognitive Demand of Mathematical Tasks in Secondary Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherman, Milan

    2011-01-01

    This study investigates the role of digital cognitive technologies in supporting students' mathematical thinking while engaging with instructional tasks. Specifically, the study sought to better understand how the use of technology is related to the cognitive demand of tasks. Data were collected in four secondary mathematics classrooms via…

  4. Artificial intelligence and nuclear power. Report by the Technology Transfer Artificial Intelligence Task Team

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1985-06-01

    The Artificial Intelligence Task Team was organized to review the status of Artificial Intelligence (AI) technology, identify guidelines for AI work, and to identify work required to allow the nuclear industry to realize maximum benefit from this technology. The state of the nuclear industry was analyzed to determine where the application of AI technology could be of greatest benefit. Guidelines and criteria were established to focus on those particular problem areas where AI could provide the highest possible payoff to the industry. Information was collected from government, academic, and private organizations. Very little AI work is now being done to specifically support the nuclear industry. The AI Task Team determined that the establishment of a Strategic Automation Initiative (SAI) and the expansion of the DOE Technology Transfer program would ensure that AI technology could be used to develop software for the nuclear industry that would have substantial financial payoff to the industry. The SAI includes both long and short term phases. The short-term phase includes projects which would demonstrate that AI can be applied to the nuclear industry safely, and with substantial financial benefit. The long term phase includes projects which would develop AI technologies with specific applicability to the nuclear industry that would not be developed by people working in any other industry.

  5. A Task-Based Evaluation of Combined Set and Network Visualization

    OpenAIRE

    Rodgers, Peter; Stapleton, Gem; Alsallakh, Bilal; Micallef, Luana; Baker, Robert; Thompson, Simon

    2016-01-01

    This paper addresses the problem of how best to visualize network data grouped into overlapping sets. We address it by evaluating various existing techniques alongside a new technique. Such data arise in many areas, including social network analysis, gene expression data, and crime analysis. We begin by investigating the strengths and weakness of four existing techniques, namely Bubble Sets, EulerView, KelpFusion, and LineSets, using principles from psychology and known layout guides. Using i...

  6. Building a practically useful theory of goal setting and task motivation. A 35-year odyssey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locke, Edwin A; Latham, Gary P

    2002-09-01

    The authors summarize 35 years of empirical research on goal-setting theory. They describe the core findings of the theory, the mechanisms by which goals operate, moderators of goal effects, the relation of goals and satisfaction, and the role of goals as mediators of incentives. The external validity and practical significance of goal-setting theory are explained, and new directions in goal-setting research are discussed. The relationships of goal setting to other theories are described as are the theory's limitations.

  7. Opinions of Students' Parents about Performance Task in Science and Technology Class

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cengiz TÜYSÜZ

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to determine the students’ parents’ opinions and their confrontations problems about performance task of the alternative evaluation methods during Science and Technology courses. This new alternative evaluation method aims to remove students’ memorization in education. Performance task’ target is to make studies with their teachers, developing cognitive, sensitive, psycho-motor skills of students and revealing a product as solving problem, understanding what reads, researching. The study was applied to determine parents’ attitudes towards Science and Technology performance homework at two different Primary schools in Hatay. To examine the collected data One-Way ANOVA were used. Research results showed that parents’ have largely positive attitudes towards the performance task.

  8. Robotics and nuclear power. Report by the Technology Transfer Robotics Task Team

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1985-06-01

    A task team was formed at the request of the Department of Energy to evaluate and assess technology development needed for advanced robotics in the nuclear industry. The mission of these technologies is to provide the nuclear industry with the support for the application of advanced robotics to reduce nuclear power generating costs and enhance the safety of the personnel in the industry. The investigation included robotic and teleoperated systems. A robotic system is defined as a reprogrammable, multifunctional manipulator designed to move materials, parts, tools, or specialized devices through variable programmed motions for the performance of a variety of tasks. A teleoperated system includes an operator who remotely controls the system by direct viewing or through a vision system.

  9. A Complete Set of Technologies for Green Food Pork Production

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Xing-wu; SHAN An-shan; JIANG Jiu-tian; ZHANG Tian-feng

    2003-01-01

    Key technologies for green food pork production were described in this article,as aspects of business standardization;production equipments and facilities,product quality control;and pork production site establishment.

  10. Building a Practically Useful Theory of Goal Setting and Task Motivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locke, Edwin A.; Latham, Gary P.

    2002-01-01

    Summarizes 35 years of empirical research on goal-setting theory, describing core findings of the theory, mechanisms by which goals operate, moderators of goal effects, the relation of goals and satisfaction, and the role of goals as mediators of incentives. Explains the external validity and practical significance of goal setting theory,…

  11. Opinions of Students' Parents about Performance Task in Science and Technology Class

    OpenAIRE

    Cengiz TÜYSÜZ; Yunus KARAKUYU; Erdal TATAR

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the students’ parents’ opinions and their confrontations problems about performance task of the alternative evaluation methods during Science and Technology courses. This new alternative evaluation method aims to remove students’ memorization in education. Performance task’ target is to make studies with their teachers, developing cognitive, sensitive, psycho-motor skills of students and revealing a product as solving problem, understanding what reads, re...

  12. Improvements of task performance in daily life after acquired brain injury using commonly available everyday technology.

    OpenAIRE

    Lindén, Anita; Lexell, Jan; Larsson Lund, Maria

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. To investigate how individualised occupation-based interventions with commonly available everyday technology (ET) can compensate for perceived difficulties with daily life tasks after an aquired brain injury (ABI) and improve satisfaction with occupational performance. Method. This intervention study was designed as a multiple case study according to Yin. Ten men and women with an ABI (traumatic or non-traumatic) participated. Data were collected through interviews, observations and ...

  13. The Defense Science Board 1999 Summer Study Task Force on 21st Century Defense Technology Strategies. Volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-07

    Study Task Force On 21ST Century Defense Technology Strategies Volume 1 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR...3. Defense Technology Strategy and Management PART 4. Strategic Agility PART 5. Analysis and Quantitative Results iii PREFACE The Defense Science...Board (DSB) 1999 Summer Study Task Force on 21st Century Defense Technology Strategies continues a series of studies that have examined key challenges

  14. Competition and innovation in a technology setting software duopoly

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bitzer, Jürgen; Schröder, Philipp

    2003-01-01

    Recently the software industry has experienced fundamental changes in market structure through the entry of open source competitors, e.g. Linux's entry into the operating systems market. In a simple model we examine the effects of such a change in market structure from monopoly to duopoly under...... by firms in the software industry; (ii) a duopoly adjusts more readily to global technological progress than a monopolist. Furthermore, results are presented comparing open source versus for-profit firms in terms of technology levels and innovation....

  15. Operationalizing Macro-Scripts in CSCL Technological Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tchounikine, Pierre

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents a conceptual analysis of the technological dimensions related to the operationalization of CSCL macro-scripts. CSCL scripts are activity models that aim at enhancing the probability that knowledge generative interactions such as conflict resolution, explanation or mutual regulation occur during the collaboration process. We…

  16. The application of persuasive technology to educational settings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mintz, Joseph; Aagaard, Morten

    2012-01-01

    four design principles for the use of persuasive technology in instructional design, including credibility and Kairos. We derive these from theoretical considerations, as well as from our experience with the HANDS project, which has developed a mobile persuasive application for positive behaviour...

  17. What Top-Down Task Sets Do for Us: An ERP Study on the Benefits of Advance Preparation in Visual Search

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eimer, Martin; Kiss, Monika; Nicholas, Susan

    2011-01-01

    When target-defining features are specified in advance, attentional target selection in visual search is controlled by preparatory top-down task sets. We used ERP measures to study voluntary target selection in the absence of such feature-specific task sets, and to compare it to selection that is guided by advance knowledge about target features.…

  18. Mobile Urban Drama - Setting the Stage with Location Based Technologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Frank Allan; Kortbek, Karen Johanne; Grønbæk, Kaj

    2008-01-01

    This paper introduces the novel concept of location-based Mobile Urban Dramas. In a Mobile Urban Drama the user become the main character in a play where actors’ voices appear in the mobile phone headset linked to the physical setting in the city as the stage for the drama. The paper describes...

  19. The effects of foreknowledge and task-set shifting as mirrored in cue- and target-locked event-related potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finke, Mareike; Escera, Carles; Barceló, Francisco

    2012-01-01

    The present study examined the use of foreknowledge in a task-cueing protocol while manipulating sensory updating and executive control in both, informatively and non-informatively pre-cued trials. Foreknowledge, sensory updating (cue switch effects) and task-switching were orthogonally manipulated in order to address the question of whether, and to which extent, the sensory processing of cue changes can partly or totally explain the final task switch costs. Participants responded faster when they could prepare for the upcoming task and if no task-set updating was necessary. Sensory cue switches influenced cue-locked ERPs only when they contained conceptual information about the upcoming task: frontal P2 amplitudes were modulated by task-relevant cue changes, mid-parietal P3 amplitudes by the anticipatory updating of stimulus-response mappings, and P3 peak latencies were modulated by task switching. Task preparation was advantageous for efficient stimulus-response re-mapping at target-onset as mirrored in target N2 amplitudes. However, N2 peak latencies indicate that this process is faster for all repeat trials. The results provide evidence to support a very fast detection of task-relevance in sensory (cue) changes and argue against the view of task repetition benefits as secondary to purely perceptual repetition priming. Advanced preparation may have a stronger influence on behavioral performance and target-locked brain activity than the local effect of repeating or switching the task-set in the current trial.

  20. Information Technology and Community Restoration Studies/Task 1: Information Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Upton, Jaki F.; Lesperance, Ann M.; Stein, Steven L.

    2009-11-19

    Executive Summary The Interagency Biological Restoration Demonstration—a program jointly funded by the Department of Defense's Defense Threat Reduction Agency and the Department of Homeland Security's (DHS's) Science and Technology Directorate—is developing policies, methods, plans, and applied technologies to restore large urban areas, critical infrastructures, and Department of Defense installations following the intentional release of a biological agent (anthrax) by terrorists. There is a perception that there should be a common system that can share information both vertically and horizontally amongst participating organizations as well as support analyses. A key question is: "How far away from this are we?" As part of this program, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory conducted research to identify the current information technology tools that would be used by organizations in the greater Seattle urban area in such a scenario, to define criteria for use in evaluating information technology tools, and to identify current gaps. Researchers interviewed 28 individuals representing 25 agencies in civilian and military organizations to identify the tools they currently use to capture data needed to support operations and decision making. The organizations can be grouped into five broad categories: defense (Department of Defense), environmental/ecological (Environmental Protection Agency/Ecology), public health and medical services, emergency management, and critical infrastructure. The types of information that would be communicated in a biological terrorism incident include critical infrastructure and resource status, safety and protection information, laboratory test results, and general emergency information. The most commonly used tools are WebEOC (web-enabled crisis information management systems with real-time information sharing), mass notification software, resource tracking software, and NW WARN (web-based information to protect critical

  1. Offshore Code Comparison Collaboration (OC3) for IEA Wind Task 23 Offshore Wind Technology and Deployment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jonkman, J.; Musial, W.

    2010-12-01

    This final report for IEA Wind Task 23, Offshore Wind Energy Technology and Deployment, is made up of two separate reports, Subtask 1: Experience with Critical Deployment Issues and Subtask 2: Offshore Code Comparison Collaborative (OC3). Subtask 1 discusses ecological issues and regulation, electrical system integration, external conditions, and key conclusions for Subtask 1. Subtask 2 included here, is the larger of the two volumes and contains five chapters that cover background information and objectives of Subtask 2 and results from each of the four phases of the project.

  2. Exploration Requirements Development Utilizing the Strategy-to-Task-to-Technology Development Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drake, Bret G.; Josten, B. Kent; Monell, Donald W.

    2004-01-01

    The Vision for Space Exploration provides direction for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration to embark on a robust space exploration program that will advance the Nation s scientific, security, and economic interests. This plan calls for a progressive expansion of human capabilities beyond low earth orbit seeking to answer profound scientific and philosophical questions while responding to discoveries along the way. In addition, the Vision articulates the strategy for developing the revolutionary new technologies and capabilities required for the future exploration of the solar system. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration faces new challenges in successfully implementing the Vision. In order to implement a sustained and affordable exploration endeavor it is vital for NASA to do business differently. This paper provides an overview of the strategy-to-task-to-technology process being used by NASA s Exploration Systems Mission Directorate to develop the requirements and system acquisition details necessary for implementing a sustainable exploration vision.

  3. Model and technology of lingware support in tasks of the nuclear knowledge management system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavrilkina, A. S.; Golitsyna, O. L.; Fedorova, V. A.

    2017-01-01

    Model and technology of lingware application in the tasks of the knowledge management are presented. The used model of thesauri paradigmatic relationships allows measuring semantic similarity of documents. An algorithm for compiling a semantic intersection of conceptual patterns based on the coinciding maximum principle is described. The semantic neighborhood construction in accordance with the value of semantic similarity measure and descriptors ranking allows using in the expansion of the search query the descriptors, whose semantics are closer due to the links, which reflect the common semantics of genus-species and associative relationships. An algorithm for thesauri used in automatic classification tasks is considered. The technology of conceptual hierarchical dynamic formation of structures is proposed. The proposed method of constructing a terminological network structure with hierarchical relationships for the collection of texts of a particular subject area is based on the sequential formation of lexicographical neighborhoods of “nuclear” terms, which are used as high-frequency nouns. To build up a conceptual structure a documental databases are used.

  4. Computer-Based Video Instruction to Teach Young Adults with Moderate Intellectual Disabilities to Perform Multiple Step, Job Tasks in a Generalized Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mechling, Linda C.; Ortega-Hurndon, Fanny

    2007-01-01

    This study evaluated the effectiveness of computer-based video instruction (CBVI) to teach three young adults with moderate intellectual disabilities to perform complex, multiple step, job tasks in a generalized setting. A multiple probe design across three job tasks and replicated across three students was used to evaluate the effectiveness of…

  5. ECONOMIC EVALUATION OF CO2 SEQUESTRATION TECHNOLOGIES TASK 4, BIOMASS GASIFICATION-BASED PROCESSING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martha L. Rollins; Les Reardon; David Nichols; Patrick Lee; Millicent Moore; Mike Crim; Robert Luttrell; Evan Hughes

    2002-06-01

    Biomass derived energy currently accounts for about 3 quads of total primary energy use in the United States. Of this amount, about 0.8 quads are used for power generation. Several biomass energy production technologies exist today which contribute to this energy mix. Biomass combustion technologies have been the dominant source of biomass energy production, both historically and during the past two decades of expansion of modern biomass energy in the U. S. and Europe. As a research and development activity, biomass gasification has usually been the major emphasis as a method of more efficiently utilizing the energy potential of biomass, particularly wood. Numerous biomass gasification technologies exist today in various stages of development. Some are simple systems, while others employ a high degree of integration for maximum energy utilization. The purpose of this study is to conduct a technical and economic comparison of up to three biomass gasification technologies, including the carbon dioxide emissions reduction potential of each. To accomplish this, a literature search was first conducted to determine which technologies were most promising based on a specific set of criteria. The technical and economic performances of the selected processes were evaluated using computer models and available literature. Using these results, the carbon sequestration potential of the three technologies was then evaluated. The results of these evaluations are given in this final report.

  6. Comparing "pick and place" task in spatial Augmented Reality versus non-immersive Virtual Reality for rehabilitation setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khademi, Maryam; Hondori, Hossein Mousavi; Dodakian, Lucy; Cramer, Steve; Lopes, Cristina V

    2013-01-01

    Introducing computer games to the rehabilitation market led to development of numerous Virtual Reality (VR) training applications. Although VR has provided tremendous benefit to the patients and caregivers, it has inherent limitations, some of which might be solved by replacing it with Augmented Reality (AR). The task of pick-and-place, which is part of many activities of daily living (ADL's), is one of the major affected functions stroke patients mainly expect to recover. We developed an exercise consisting of moving an object between various points, following a flash light that indicates the next target. The results show superior performance of subjects in spatial AR versus non-immersive VR setting. This could be due to the extraneous hand-eye coordination which exists in VR whereas it is eliminated in spatial AR.

  7. IMPORTANCE OF COMPUTER TECHNOLOGY IN REALIZATION OF CULTURAL AND EDUCATIONAL TASKS OF PRESCHOOL INSTITUTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zvezdan Arsić

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The rapid scientific and technological development imposes numerous changes in all spheres of life and work. In such circumstances, a computer has become a part of all aspects of life: economy, education, free time, family. Since children in contemporary society increasingly acquire knowledge before the school age, the question is how to prepare them for the world in which we live, bearing in mind how significantly different it is from the world in which the previous generations grew up. The research was aimed at examining the attitudes of preschool teachers about the importance of computers in the realization of educational activities in preschool institutions. The study included 54 teachers from Kosovo and Metohija: Kosovska Mitrovica, Donja Gušterica and Ropotovo. The research results indicate that digital technology is a very important and a useful didactic tool in the realization of educational activities in preschool institutions and that preschool teachers have the required competence to implement the technology. However, they are not satisfied with the quality of their ICT education and training during their studies; they also feel that their institutions do not provide adequate working conditions for the use of computers in the realization of educational tasks.

  8. Exploring the strengths and weaknesses of European innovation capacity within the Strategic Energy Technologies (SET) Plan

    OpenAIRE

    Drmac, I.; Jakšic, D.; Karadža, N.; Kunze, R.; Dehler, J.; R. MIGLIO; Shivakumar, A.; Beltramo, A; Romero Nevado, M.; Welsch, M.; Basslim, M.; Lojanica, M.; Dobbins, A.

    2016-01-01

    This report explored the strengths and weaknesses of the European innovation capacity within the Strategic Energy Technologies (SET) Plan Integrated Roadmap through the assessment of energy technology R&I in these specific sectors. The methodology is based on collating publicly available data and compares how the EU performs in comparison to other key countries worldwide through key indicators (e.g., patents, publications and export/import) across these 13 SET Plan themes.

  9. Developing a Positive Mind-Set toward the Use of Technology for Classroom Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okojie, Mabel C. P. O.; Olinzock, Anthony

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to examine various indicators associated with the development of a positive mind-set toward the use of technology for instruction. The paper also examines the resources available to help teachers keep pace with technological innovation. Electronic classrooms have some complexities associated with them; therefore, support…

  10. The Potential of Using Virtual Reality Technology in Physical Activity Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasco, Denis

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, virtual reality technology has been successfully used for learning purposes. The purposes of the article are to examine current research on the role of virtual reality in physical activity settings and discuss potential application of using virtual reality technology to enhance learning in physical education. The article starts…

  11. The Potential of Using Virtual Reality Technology in Physical Activity Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasco, Denis

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, virtual reality technology has been successfully used for learning purposes. The purposes of the article are to examine current research on the role of virtual reality in physical activity settings and discuss potential application of using virtual reality technology to enhance learning in physical education. The article starts…

  12. ECONOMIC EVALUATION OF CO2 SEQUESTRATION TECHNOLOGIES TASK 4, BIOMASS GASIFICATION-BASED PROCESSING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martha L. Rollins; Les Reardon; David Nichols; Patrick Lee; Millicent Moore; Mike Crim; Robert Luttrell; Evan Hughes

    2002-04-01

    Biomass derived energy currently accounts for about 3 quads of total primary energy use in the United States. Of this amount, about 0.8 quads are used for power generation. Several biomass energy production technologies exist today which contribute to this energy mix. Biomass combustion technologies have been the dominant source of biomass energy production, both historically and during the past two decades of expansion of modern biomass energy in the U. S. and Europe. As a research and development activity, biomass gasification has usually been the major emphasis as a method of more efficiently utilizing the energy potential of biomass, particularly wood. Numerous biomass gasification technologies exist today in various stages of development. Some are simple systems, while others employ a high degree of integration for maximum energy utilization. The purpose of this study is to conduct a technical and economic comparison of up to three biomass gasification technologies, including the carbon dioxide emissions reduction potential of each. To accomplish this, a literature search was first conducted to determine which technologies were most promising based on a specific set of criteria. During this reporting period, the technical and economic performances of the selected processes were evaluated using computer models and available literature. The results of these evaluations are summarized in this report.

  13. Improvements of task performance in daily life after acquired brain injury using commonly available everyday technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindén, Anita; Lexell, Jan; Larsson Lund, Maria

    2011-01-01

    To investigate how individualised occupation-based interventions with commonly available everyday technology (ET) can compensate for perceived difficulties with daily life tasks after an aquired brain injury (ABI) and improve satisfaction with occupational performance. This intervention study was designed as a multiple case study according to Yin. Ten men and women with an ABI (traumatic or non-traumatic) participated. Data were collected through interviews, observations and field notes before and after the intervention and at follow-up (on average 11 weeks afterwards). The interventions focused on enabling each participant's prioritised goals related to task performance in daily life. All participants achieved all their goals by learning to use both new functions in their own familiar ET and new ET. The participant's perceived difficulties in occupational performance decreased and their satisfaction with occupational performance increased with the use of ET. An individualised intervention process, involving the use of own familiar ET or ET off-the-shelf, has the potential to compensate for perceived difficulties following an ABI and improve satisfaction with occupational performance in daily life.

  14. Hydrothermal processing of Hanford tank waste. Organic destruction technology development task annual report -- FY 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orth, R.J.; Schmidt, A.J.; Zacher, A.H. [and others

    1993-09-01

    Low-temperature hydrothermal processing (HTP) is a thermal-chemical autogenous processing method that can be used to destroy organics and ferrocyanide in Hanford tank waste at temperatures from 250 C to 400 C. With HTP, organics react with oxidants, such as nitrite and nitrate, already present in the waste. Ferrocyanides and free cyanide will hydrolyze at similar temperatures and may also react with nitrates or other oxidants in the waste. No air or oxygen or additional chemicals need to be added to the autogenous HTP system. However, enhanced kinetics may be realized by air addition, and, if desired, chemical reductants can be added to the system to facilitate complete nitrate/nitrate destruction. Tank waste can be processed in a plug-flow, tubular reactor, or a continuous-stirred tank reactor system designed to accommodate the temperature, pressure, gas generation, and heat release associated with decomposition of the reactive species. The work described in this annual report was conducted in FY 1993 for the Organic Destruction Technology Development Task of Hanford`s Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS). This task is part of an overall program to develop organic destruction technologies originally funded by TWRS to meet tank safety and waste form disposal criteria and condition the feed for further pretreatment. During FY 1993 the project completed seven experimental test plans, a 30-hr pilot-scale continuous run, over 200 hr of continuous bench-scale HTP testing, and 20 batch HTP tests; two contracts were established with commercial vendors, and a commercial laboratory reactor was procured and installed in a glovebox for HTP testing with actual Hanford tank waste.

  15. IEA Wind Task 23 Offshore Wind Technology and Deployment. Subtask 1 Experience with Critical Deployment Issues. Final Technical Report

    OpenAIRE

    Lemming, Jørgen Kjærgaard

    2010-01-01

    The final report for IEA Wind Task 23, Offshore Wind Energy Technology and Deployment, is made up of two separate reports: Subtask 1: Experience with Critical Deployment Issues and Subtask 2: Offshore Code Comparison Collaborative (OC3). The Subtask 1 report included here provides background information and objectives of Task 23. It specifically discusses ecological issues and regulation, electrical system integration and offshore wind, external conditions, and key conclusions for Subtask 1. ...

  16. Implementation of the concept of home hospitalisation for heart patients by means of telehomecare technology: integration of clinical tasks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birthe Dinesen

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To explore how the implementation of the concept ‘Home hospitalisation of heart patients’ by means of telehomecare technology influences the integration of clinical tasks across healthcare sectors. Theory: Inter-organisational theory. Methods: The case study approach was applied. Triangulations of data collection techniques were used: documentary materials, participant observation, qualitative and focus group interviews. Results: The clinical decision-making and task solving became multidisciplinary and integrated with the implementation of telehomecare and, therefore, complex in terms of the prescription and adjustment of patient medicine. Workflows between healthcare professionals across sectors changed from sequential to collective client flows. Pre-existing procedures for patient care, treatment, and responsibility were challenged. In addition, the number of tasks for the district nurses increased. Integration in the clinical task-solving area increases fragmentation in the knowledge technologies in a network perspective. Conclusions: Implementing the concept of ‘Home hospitalisation of heart patients’ by means of telehomecare technology will result in a more integrated clinical task-solving process that involves healthcare professionals from various sectors. Overall, the integration of clinical tasks between hospital and district nursing will result in a direct benefit for the heart patients.

  17. Implementation of the concept of home hospitalisation for heart patients by means of telehomecare technology: integration of clinical tasks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birthe Dinesen

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To explore how the implementation of the concept ‘Home hospitalisation of heart patients’ by means of telehomecare technology influences the integration of clinical tasks across healthcare sectors. Theory: Inter-organisational theory. Methods: The case study approach was applied. Triangulations of data collection techniques were used: documentary materials, participant observation, qualitative and focus group interviews. Results: The clinical decision-making and task solving became multidisciplinary and integrated with the implementation of telehomecare and, therefore, complex in terms of the prescription and adjustment of patient medicine. Workflows between healthcare professionals across sectors changed from sequential to collective client flows. Pre-existing procedures for patient care, treatment, and responsibility were challenged. In addition, the number of tasks for the district nurses increased. Integration in the clinical task-solving area increases fragmentation in the knowledge technologies in a network perspective. Conclusions: Implementing the concept of ‘Home hospitalisation of heart patients’ by means of telehomecare technology will result in a more integrated clinical task-solving process that involves healthcare professionals from various sectors. Overall, the integration of clinical tasks between hospital and district nursing will result in a direct benefit for the heart patients.

  18. Environmental management technology demonstration and commercialization: Tasks 2, 3, 4, and 8. Semiannual report, October 1994--March 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hawthorne, S.B.; Ness, R.O. Jr.; Nowok, J.W.; Pflughoeft-Hassett, D.; Hurley, J.P.; Steadman, E.N.

    1995-05-01

    The objective of the Environmental Management program at the Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC) is to develop, demonstrate, and commercialize technologies that address the environmental management needs of contaminated sites, including characterization, sensors, and monitoring; low-level mixed waste processing; material disposition technology; improved waste forms; in situ containment and remediation; and efficient separation technologies for radioactive wastes. Task 2 is the extraction and analysis of pollutant organics from contaminated solids using off-line supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) and on-line SFE-infrared spectroscopy. Task 3, pyrolysis of plastics, has as its objectives to develop a commercial process to significantly reduce the volume of mixed-plastics-paper-resin waste contaminated with low-level radioactive material; concentrate contaminants in a collectible form; and determine the distribution and form of contaminants after pyrolysis of the mixed waste. Task 4, stabilization of vitrified wastes, has as its objectives to (1) demonstrate a waste vitrification procedure for enhanced stabilization of waste materials and (2) develop a testing protocol to understand the long-term leaching behavior of the stabilized waste form. The primary objective of Task 8, Management and reporting, is coordination of this project with other programs and opportunities. In addition, management oversight will be maintained to ensure that tasks are completed and coordinated as planned and that deliverables are submitted in a timely manner. Accomplishments to date is each task are described. 62 refs.

  19. Technology and task parameters relating to the effectiveness of the bracing strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Book, Wayne J.; Wang, J. J.

    1989-01-01

    The bracing strategy has been proposed in various forms as a way to improve robot performance. One version of the strategy employs independent stages of motion. The first stage, referred to as the large or bracing arm, carries the second stage of motion. After the first stage has completed its motion it is braced to provide a more rigid base of motion with a more accurate relationship to the parts to be manipulated. The hypothesis is that more rapid completion of certain tasks is possible with lighter arms using the bracing strategy. While it is easy to make conceptual arguments why this should be so, it is less easy to specify even approximately when this will be true for some reasonably generic situation. There is no relevant experience base with bracing arms to be compared to non-bracing arms. Furthermore, if one were interested in obtaining such practical experience, there would be no methodical guidance on the selection of an interesting case, one in which the unproven approach, bracing, can show its superiority. If one such case exists, only the extent of applicability of the new approach is in question. One set of interesting cases is likely to be applications in which a large workspace must be covered, but where a series of small accurate moves will remain within a smaller region of the total workspace. A prototype application with these characteristics is set up and a skeleton design of arms using the competing strategies are compared.

  20. New technologies in the management of risk and violence in forensic settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tully, John; Larkin, Fintan; Fahy, Thomas

    2015-06-01

    Novel technological interventions are increasingly used in mental health settings. In this article, we describe 3 novel technological strategies in use for management of risk and violence in 2 forensic psychiatry settings in the United Kingdom: electronic monitoring by GPS-based tracking devices of patients on leave from a medium secure service in London, and closed circuit television (CCTV) monitoring and motion sensor technology at Broadmoor high secure hospital. A common theme is the use of these technologies to improve the completeness and accuracy of data used by clinicians to make clinical decisions. Another common thread is that each of these strategies supports and improves current clinical approaches rather than drastically changing them. The technologies offer a broad range of benefits. These include less restrictive options for patients, improved accountability of both staff and patients, less invasive testing, improved automated record-keeping, and better assurance reporting. Services utilizing technologies need also be aware of limitations. Technologies may be seen as unduly restrictive by patients and advocates, and technical issues may reduce effectiveness. It is vital that the types of technological innovations described in this article should be subject to thorough evaluation that addresses cost effectiveness, qualitative analysis of patients' attitudes, safety, and ethical considerations.

  1. Priority setting for horizon scanning of new health technologies in Denmark:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Douw, Karla; Vondeling, Hindrik; Oortwijn, Wija

    2006-01-01

     impact on health policy; such as the educational needs and organisational changes associated with the new technology. The proposed changes are regarded as an intermediate step in the process of producing a fully adapted instrument that can serve as a formal support for priority setting of new health technologies......In the context of the establishment of a Danish Horizon Scanning System (HSS) the views of health care stakeholders and health economists were solicitated by means of postal survey on the need for adaptation of a priority setting instrument for health technology assessment (HTA). The aim...... differing views between the two groups. The results show that the instrument should apply a health care perspective, and that technologies should be prioritised on the basis of the criteria: marginal benefits, marginal costs, budget impact, impact on access to care, and additional criteria with an...

  2. The Application of Persuasive Technology to educational settings: Some theoretical from the HANDS Project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mintz, Joseph; Aagaard, Morten

    2010-01-01

    In the HANDS project Persuasive Technology is applied in an educational context in special schools for children with autism, in which social skills development is the aim of the persuasion. We consider how in such educational settings the interventions can be theorized in the context of existing...... educational paradigms. We discuss the relation between such paradigms and persuasive technology, and the specific case of persuasion in the pedagogical context of children with autism....

  3. Virtual Task-Based Situated Language-Learning with "Second Life": Developing EFL Pragmatic Writing and Technological Self-Efficacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdallah, Mahmoud M. S.; Mansour, Marian M.

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports on an experimental research study that aimed at investigating the effectiveness of employing a virtual task-based situated language learning (TBSLL) environment mediated by Second Life (SL) in developing EFL student teachers' pragmatic writing skills and their technological self-efficacy. To reach this goal, a control-only…

  4. Using Task Data in Diagnostic Radiology. Research Report No. 8. Volume 2. Curriculum Objectives for Radiologic Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilpatrick, Eleanor; Gullion, Christina

    This volume is the result of the application of the Health Services Mobility Study (HSMS) curriculum design method in radiologic technology and is presented in conjunction with volume 1, which reports the task analysis results. Volume 2 contains job-related behavioral curriculum objectives for the aide, technician, and technologist levels in…

  5. The Integration of Task-based Language Teaching and Information and Communication Technology into English Language Teaching in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Qiong-fang

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to explore how important that task-based language teaching (TBLT) interacts with Infor-mation and Communication Technology (ICT) into English language teaching (ELT) in China. Many researchers have already studied that ICT and TBLT innovate the traditional teaching methods and improve our teaching or learning. However, they sepa-rated TBLT from ICT instead of integrating these two ways into ELT. Few researches studied on how importance task-based in-teracts with integration ICT into ELT in China. Under this circumstance, this article reviews the literature related to the present situation, which includes the brief introduction in English language teaching problems, the general concepts of ICT in ELT, task-based teaching methodology in ELT, some studies on task-based interacting with integration ICT into ELT, discussion and con-clusion.

  6. Using Task Clarification, Goal Setting, and Feedback to Decrease Table Busing Times in a Franchise Pizza Restaurant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amigo, Seth; Smith, Andrew; Ludwig, Timothy

    2008-01-01

    The current study investigated the effects of task-clarification, and manager verbal and graphic feedback on employee busing times at a pizza restaurant. Using an ABC design, task-clarification was provided in a memo, which described the process, priority, and goal time of busing. The busing time decreased slightly, from an average of 315 seconds…

  7. Setting New Standards, Reaching New Heights: A Report by the Governor's Advisory Task Force on Education and Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanle, Robert C.

    This report presents the findings of a governor's task force charged with developing the mission and direction of education in Wisconsin. The document provides the background behind the formation of the task force and the role of education in the state's economy. It relates how education represents the state's largest expenditure and describes the…

  8. A Tentative Study on the Task-Based Teaching of Writing to English Majors in Chinese Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhaochun, Sun

    2015-01-01

    Under task-based learning (TBL) framework, language learners engage in purposeful, problem-oriented, and outcome-driven tasks that are comparable to traditional teaching methods which focus only on the correctness of grammar. In this study, the author employs Jane Willis' TBL framework and examines its effects on the improvement of EFL learners'…

  9. Applying information and communications technologies to collect health data from remote settings: a systematic assessment of current technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashar, Raj; Lewis, Sheri; Blazes, David L; Chretien, J P

    2010-04-01

    Modern information and communications technologies (ICTs) are now so feature-rich and widely available that they can be used to "capture," or collect and transmit, health data from remote settings. Electronic data capture can reduce the time necessary to notify public health authorities, and provide important baseline information. A number of electronic health data capture systems based on specific ICTs have been developed for remote areas. We expand on that body of work by defining and applying an assessment process to characterize ICTs for remote-area health data capture. The process is based on technical criteria, and assesses the feasibility and effectiveness of specific technologies according to the resources and constraints of a given setting. Our characterization of current ICTs compares different system architectures for remote-area health data capture systems. Ultimately, we believe that our criteria-based assessment process will remain useful for characterizing future ICTs.

  10. Supervising nursing students in a technology-driven medication administration process in a hospital setting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaard, Mette; Orbæk, Janne

    2016-01-01

    REVIEW QUESTION/OBJECTIVE: The objective of this review is to identify, describe and synthesize the experiences of nurse supervisors and the factors that influence the supervision of pre-graduate nursing students in undertaking technology-driven medication administration in hospital settings...

  11. The Effectiveness of a Unit Study-Technology Approach within the High School Band Rehearsal Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustafson-Hinds, Melissa A.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this research study was to investigate the usefulness of implementing a Comprehensive Musicianship (CMP)--Unit Study within a high school band rehearsal setting, using music technology as a supplementary tool. While previous studies have emphasized the many benefits of Comprehensive Musicianship, it is not clear how such an approach…

  12. Issues and Considerations regarding Sharable Data Sets for Recommender Systems in Technology Enhanced Learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Drachsler, Hendrik; Bogers, Toine; Vuorikari, Riina

    2010-01-01

    This paper raises the issue of missing standardised data sets for recommender systems in Technology Enhanced Learning (TEL) that can be used as benchmarks to compare different recommendation approaches. It discusses how suitable data sets could be created according to some initial suggestions......, and investigates a number of steps that may be followed in order to develop reference data sets that will be adopted and reused within a scientific community. In addition, policies are discussed that are needed to enhance sharing of data sets by taking into account legal protection rights. Finally, an initial...... elaboration of a representation and exchange format for sharable TEL data sets is carried out. The paper concludes with future research needs....

  13. The Ministry of Industry and Information Technology Laid out Objectives and Tasks on Eliminating Backward Production Capacity for 18 Industries

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    @@ In order to implement the plan and requirements set forth by the State Council to further strengthen the work of eliminating backward production capacity,and assign and implement the tasks in 2010,the working conference of the national industrial system on eliminating backward production capacity was held in Beijing on May 27th and 28th,2010.

  14. Parents and technology in the inpatient pediatric setting: a beginning model for study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, Kelly; Board, Rhonda

    2011-01-01

    Medical technology has an increasing presence in the pediatric general care unit (GCU) and is an important tool in the provision of nursing care to children. As a result, both nurses and parents or other patient caregivers have had to integrate medical technology into their roles in the GCU setting. For nurses, this integration of technology into their workflow may be less stressful because new technologies are seen as additional resources to be used to provide proficient, safe patient care. Parents and other caregivers, however, may be more challenged by the sudden presence of technology in their caregiver role. Despite the increased presence of technology in the GCU, the impact of medical technology on nurse-parent-child relationships has not been explicitly researched. A descriptive review of the literature addresses some of the elements in these relationships and nursing care. A theoretical model of the influence of technology on the nurse-parent-child relationship is proposed, and suggestions for future research are made.

  15. Performance on a strategy set shifting task during adolescence in a genetic model of attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder: Methylphenidate vs. atomoxetine treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Roxann C; Jordan, Chloe J; Tassin, David H; Moody, Kayla R; Dwoskin, Linda P; Kantak, Kathleen M

    2013-01-01

    Research examining medication effects on set shifting in teens with attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is lacking. An animal model of ADHD may be useful for exploring this gap. The Spontaneously Hypertensive Rat (SHR) is a commonly used animal model of ADHD. SHR and two comparator strains, Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) and Wistar (WIS), were evaluated during adolescence in a strategy set shifting task under conditions of a 0-sec or 15-sec delay to reinforcer delivery. The task had three phases: initial discrimination, set shift and reversal learning. Under 0-sec delays, SHR performed as well as or better than WKY and WIS. Treatment with 0.3 mg/kg/day atomoxetine had little effect, other than to modestly increase trials to criterion during set shifting in all strains. Under 15-sec delays, SHR had longer lever press reaction times, longer latencies to criterion and more trial omissions than WKY during set shifting and reversal learning. These deficits were not reduced systematically by 1.5 mg/kg/day methylphenidate or 0.3 mg/kg/day atomoxetine. Regarding learning in SHR, methylphenidate improved initial discrimination, whereas atomoxetine improved set shifting but disrupted initial discrimination. During reversal learning, both drugs were ineffective in SHR, and atomoxetine made reaction time and trial omissions greater in WKY. Overall, WIS performance differed from SHR or WKY, depending on phase. Collectively, a genetic model of ADHD in adolescent rats revealed that neither methylphenidate nor atomoxetine mitigated all deficits in SHR during the set shifting task. Thus, methylphenidate or atomoxetine monotherapy may not mitigate all set shift task-related deficits in teens with ADHD. PMID:23376704

  16. Experiences, opportunities and challenges of implementing task shifting in underserved remote settings: the case of Kongwa district, central Tanzania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Munga Michael A

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tanzania is experiencing acute shortages of Health Workers (HWs, a situation which has forced health managers, especially in the underserved districts, to hastily cope with health workers’ shortages by adopting task shifting. This has however been due to limited options for dealing with the crisis of health personnel. There are on-going discussions in the country on whether to scale up task shifting as one of the strategies for addressing health personnel crisis. However, these discussions are not backed up by rigorous scientific evidence. The aim of this paper is two-fold. Firstly, to describe the current situation of implementing task shifting in the context of acute shortages of health workers and, secondly, to provide a descriptive account of the potential opportunities or benefits and the likely challenges which might ensue as a result of implementing task shifting. Methods We employed in-depth interviews with informants at the district level and supplemented the information with additional interviews with informants at the national level. Interviews focussed on the informants’ practical experiences of implementing task shifting in their respective health facilities (district level and their opinions regarding opportunities and challenges which might be associated with implementation of task shifting practices. At the national level, the main focus was on policy issues related to management of health personnel in the context of implementation of task shifting, in addition to seeking their opinions and perceptions regarding opportunities and challenges of implementing task shifting if formally adopted. Results Task shifting has been in practice for many years in Tanzania and has been perceived as an inevitable coping mechanism due to limited options for addressing health personnel shortages in the country. Majority of informants had the concern that quality of services is likely to be affected if appropriate policy

  17. Emerging technologies in point-of-care molecular diagnostics for resource-limited settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peeling, Rosanna W; McNerney, Ruth

    2014-06-01

    Emerging molecular technologies to diagnose infectious diseases at the point at which care is delivered have the potential to save many lives in developing countries where access to laboratories is poor. Molecular tests are needed to improve the specificity of syndromic management, monitor progress towards disease elimination and screen for asymptomatic infections with the goal of interrupting disease transmission and preventing long-term sequelae. In simplifying laboratory-based molecular assays for use at point-of-care, there are inevitable compromises between cost, ease of use and test performance. Despite significant technological advances, many challenges remain for the development of molecular diagnostics for resource-limited settings. There needs to be more advocacy for these technologies to be applied to infectious diseases, increased efforts to lower the barriers to market entry through streamlined and harmonized regulatory approaches, faster policy development for adoption of new technologies and novel financing mechanisms to enable countries to scale up implementation.

  18. The Use of Music to Increase Task-Oriented Behaviors in Preschool Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders in a Gross Motor Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dieringer, Shannon M.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the effect of music and music + instruction on task-oriented behaviors in preschool children with ASD within individual gross motor movement settings. Five preschool children (four boys; one girl) diagnosed with ASD attending a Midwestern private preschool for children with ASD served as participants. The…

  19. Injury surveillance in low-resource settings using Geospatial and Social Web technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schuurman Nadine

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Extensive public health gains have benefited high-income countries in recent decades, however, citizens of low and middle-income countries (LMIC have largely not enjoyed the same advancements. This is in part due to the fact that public health data - the foundation for public health advances - are rarely collected in many LMIC. Injury data are particularly scarce in many low-resource settings, despite the huge associated burden of morbidity and mortality. Advances in freely-accessible and easy-to-use information and communication (ICT technology may provide the impetus for increased public health data collection in settings with limited financial and personnel resources. Methods and Results A pilot study was conducted at a hospital in Cape Town, South Africa to assess the utility and feasibility of using free (non-licensed, and easy-to-use Social Web and GeoWeb tools for injury surveillance in low-resource settings. Data entry, geocoding, data exploration, and data visualization were successfully conducted using these technologies, including Google Spreadsheet, Mapalist, BatchGeocode, and Google Earth. Conclusion This study examined the potential for Social Web and GeoWeb technologies to contribute to public health data collection and analysis in low-resource settings through an injury surveillance pilot study conducted in Cape Town, South Africa. The success of this study illustrates the great potential for these technologies to be leveraged for public health surveillance in resource-constrained environments, given their ease-of-use and low-cost, and the sharing and collaboration capabilities they afford. The possibilities and potential limitations of these technologies are discussed in relation to the study, and to the field of public health in general.

  20. Technology Addiction among Treatment Seekers for Psychological Problems: Implication for Screening in Mental Health Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Aswathy; Sharma, Manoj Kumar; Thamilselvan, P.; Marimuthu, P.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Technology usage has seen an increase among users. The usage varies from social, personal, and psychological reasons. Users are frequently using to overcome mood states as well as to manage the other psychological states. This work is going to explore the information technology use among subjects with a psychiatric disorder. Materials and Methods: A total of 75 subjects were assessed using background data sheet, internet addiction impairment index, video game use pattern, pornography addiction screening tool and screening for mobile phone use, from in-patient and out-patient setting of tertiary mental health setting. Results: It showed the presence of addiction to mobile, internet, video game, and pornography. Age was found to be negatively correlated with this addiction. Average usage time had been associated with management of mood states. The addiction to information technology had been associated with a delay in initiation of sleep. Conclusion: This work has implication for screening technology addiction among subjects seeking treatment for psychological problems and motivate them to develop the healthy use of technology. PMID:28250554

  1. Technology Addiction among Treatment Seekers for Psychological Problems: Implication for Screening in Mental Health Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Aswathy; Sharma, Manoj Kumar; Thamilselvan, P; Marimuthu, P

    2017-01-01

    Technology usage has seen an increase among users. The usage varies from social, personal, and psychological reasons. Users are frequently using to overcome mood states as well as to manage the other psychological states. This work is going to explore the information technology use among subjects with a psychiatric disorder. A total of 75 subjects were assessed using background data sheet, internet addiction impairment index, video game use pattern, pornography addiction screening tool and screening for mobile phone use, from in-patient and out-patient setting of tertiary mental health setting. It showed the presence of addiction to mobile, internet, video game, and pornography. Age was found to be negatively correlated with this addiction. Average usage time had been associated with management of mood states. The addiction to information technology had been associated with a delay in initiation of sleep. This work has implication for screening technology addiction among subjects seeking treatment for psychological problems and motivate them to develop the healthy use of technology.

  2. The European Strategic Energy Technology (SET-Plan); PLan estrategico Europeo de Tecnologia energetica (Plan EETE)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liberali, R.

    2010-07-01

    Rafael Liberal i was appointed Director for Energy within the Directorate-General Research of the European Commission in October 2006. He is in charge of the implementation of the Non-Nuclear Energy priority of the 7th Framework Programme, as well as the definition of political priorities and coordination with Member States and research/industrial stake holders in the field of non-nuclear energy technologies, including the definition and implementation of the Strategic Energy Technology Plan (SET-Plan). (Author)

  3. IEA Wind Task 23 Offshore Wind Technology and Deployment. Subtask 1 Experience with Critical Deployment Issues. Final Technical Report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lemming, Jørgen Kjærgaard

    The final report for IEA Wind Task 23, Offshore Wind Energy Technology and Deployment, is made up of two separate reports: Subtask 1: Experience with Critical Deployment Issues and Subtask 2: Offshore Code Comparison Collaborative (OC3). The Subtask 1 report included here provides background...... information and objectives of Task 23. It specifically discusses ecological issues and regulation, electrical system integration and offshore wind, external conditions, and key conclusions for Subtask 1. The Subtask 2 report covers OC3 background information and objectives of the task, OC3 benchmark exercises...... of aero-elastic offshore wind turbine codes, monopile foundation modeling, tripod support structure modeling, and Phase IV results regarding floating wind turbine modeling....

  4. Identifying second language speech tasks and ability levels for successful nurse oral interaction with patients in a linguistic minority setting: an instrument development project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaacs, Talia; Laurier, Michel D; Turner, Carolyn E; Segalowitz, Norman

    2011-09-01

    One of the most demanding situations for members of linguistic minorities is a conversation between a health professional and a patient, a situation that frequently arises for linguistic minority groups in North America, Europe, and elsewhere. The present study reports on the construction of an oral interaction scale for nurses serving linguistic minorities in their second language (L2). A mixed methods approach was used to identify and validate a set of speech activities relating to nurse interactions with patients and to derive the L2 ability required to carry out those tasks. The research included an extensive literature review, the development of an initial list of speech tasks, and validation of this list with a nurse focus group. The retained speech tasks were then developed into a questionnaire and administered to 133 Quebec nurses who assessed each speech task for difficulty in an L2 context. Results were submitted to Rasch analysis and calibrated with reference to the Canadian Language Benchmarks, and the constructs underlying the speech tasks were identified through exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses. Results showed that speech tasks dealing with emotional aspects of caregiving and conveying health-specific information were reported as being the most demanding in terms of L2 ability, and the most strongly associated with L2 ability required for nurse-patient interactions. Implications are discussed with respect to the development and use of assessment instruments to facilitate L2 workplace training for health care professionals.

  5. Manufacturing Technology Support (MATES II) Task Order 0005: Manufacturing Integration and Technology Evaluation to Enable Technology Transition. Subtask Phase 0 Study Task: Manufacturing Technology (ManTech) and Systems Engineering For Quick Reaction Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    guidance on current MRL and MRA processes. In addition, Gene Wiggs of GE and Paul Hauwiller of General Dynamics Information Technology (GDIT...or Deployment) Team IPQA™ In-process quality assurance (trademark of Beyond Six Sigma) JDMTP Joint Defense Manufacturing Technology Panel KPC Key

  6. Critical Success Factors in The Infusion of Instructional Technologies for Open Learning in Development Settings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip M. Uys

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available This article seeks to identify critical success factors for the appropriate infusion of instructional technologies to advance open learning in higher education within developing settings. Describe here is a descriptive account of a two-year case study based on the author’s personal analysis of, and reflection on, factors that contributed to the infusion of instructional technologies to advance open learning at the University of Botswana. The first critical success factors identified in this article include: a clear vision, support of committed leadership, and dedicated personnel/ change agents to ensure successful project implementation. The second critical success factor identified was the need for all involved to fully appreciate and understand the systemic nature of the infusion of instructional technologies for open learning purposes, as well as garner the commitment of strategic partners working in related systems. Finally highlighted, are the requirements needed to address the complex nature of the infusion of instructional technologies into the University’s educational offerings. It is hoped that those involved in education in developing countries, and particularly those desirous of advancing open learning through the use of instructional technologies, will find this descriptive analysis useful. Indeed, those of us involved in implementing instructional technologies in developing nations are still in the initial stages of this exciting yet challenging endeavour.

  7. Teleconsultation in school settings: linking classroom teachers and behavior analysts through web-based technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frieder, Jessica E; Peterson, Stephanie M; Woodward, Judy; Crane, Jaelee; Garner, Marlane

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes a technically driven, collaborative approach to assessing the function of problem behavior using web-based technology. A case example is provided to illustrate the process used in this pilot project. A school team conducted a functional analysis with a child who demonstrated challenging behaviors in a preschool setting. Behavior analysts at a university setting provided the school team with initial workshop trainings, on-site visits, e-mail and phone communication, as well as live web-based feedback on functional analysis sessions. The school personnel implemented the functional analysis with high fidelity and scored the data reliably. Outcomes of the project suggest that there is great potential for collaboration via the use of web-based technologies for ongoing assessment and development of effective interventions. However, an empirical evaluation of this model should be conducted before wide-scale adoption is recommended.

  8. The Ministry of Industry and Information Technology Issued Detail Breakdown on the Tasks to Eliminate 2009 Backward Production Capacity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    @@ In order to implement the spirit of "The Announcement from the State Council about Issuing the 2009 Work Plan on Energy-Saving and Emission-Reduction" and the adjustment and revitalization plan for key industries, and further improve the work to eliminate backward production capacity, the Ministry of Industry and Information Technology issued a notice on the detail breakdown and implementation of tasks to eliminate 2009 backward production capacity on November 25, 2009.

  9. "Collaboration technology": a case study of innovation in order set and clinical care standardization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yount, Brian; McNamara, Timothy

    2008-11-06

    Effective standardization of clinical processes, which is a growing priority for healthcare provider organizations and networks, requires effective teamwork among clinicians and staff from multidisciplinary backgrounds--often from geographically dispersed facilities--to reach consensus on care practices. Yet, most healthcare provider organizations have no precedence or tools for managing large-scale, sustained, collaborative activities. This presentation explores the human and social implications of technology. It specifically addresses healthcare collaboration and describes how innovative collaboration management technologies can be used in the healthcare industry to accelerate care standardization, order set standardization and other initiatives necessary for successful computerized provider order entry and electronic health record deployments. These topics are explored through presentation of a survey of healthcare executives and a case study of an advanced collaboration application that was adapted and deployed in a partnership between a large healthcare provider organization and a commercial developer of document management and collaboration management technologies.

  10. Supporting research sites in resource-limited settings: challenges in implementing information technology infrastructure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whalen, Christopher J; Donnell, Deborah; Tartakovsky, Michael

    2014-01-01

    As information and communication technology infrastructure becomes more reliable, new methods of electronic data capture, data marts/data warehouses, and mobile computing provide platforms for rapid coordination of international research projects and multisite studies. However, despite the increasing availability of Internet connectivity and communication systems in remote regions of the world, there are still significant obstacles. Sites with poor infrastructure face serious challenges participating in modern clinical and basic research, particularly that relying on electronic data capture and Internet communication technologies. This report discusses our experiences in supporting research in resource-limited settings. We describe examples of the practical and ethical/regulatory challenges raised by the use of these newer technologies for data collection in multisite clinical studies.

  11. Setting research priorities across science, technology, and health sectors: the Tanzania experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Haan, Sylvia; Kingamkono, Rose; Tindamanyire, Neema; Mshinda, Hassan; Makandi, Harun; Tibazarwa, Flora; Kubata, Bruno; Montorzi, Gabriela

    2015-03-12

    Identifying research priorities is key to innovation and economic growth, since it informs decision makers on effectively targeting issues that have the greatest potential public benefit. As such, the process of setting research priorities is of pivotal importance for favouring the science, technology, and innovation (STI)-driven development of low- and middle-income countries. We report herein on a major cross-sectoral nationwide research priority setting effort recently carried out in Tanzania by the Tanzania Commission for Science and Technology (COSTECH) in partnership with the Council on Health Research for Development (COHRED) and the NEPAD Agency. The first of its type in the country, the process brought together stakeholders from 42 sub-sectors in science, technology, and health. The cross-sectoral research priority setting process consisted of a 'training-of-trainers' workshop, a demonstration workshop, and seven priority setting workshops delivered to representatives from public and private research and development institutions, universities, non-governmental organizations, and other agencies affiliated to COSTECH. The workshops resulted in ranked listings of research priorities for each sub-sector, totalling approximately 800 priorities. This large number was significantly reduced by an expert panel in order to build a manageable instrument aligned to national development plans that could be used to guide research investments. The Tanzania experience is an instructive example of the challenges and issues to be faced in when attempting to identify research priority areas and setting an STI research agenda in low- and middle-income countries. As countries increase their investment in research, it is essential to increase investment in research management and governance as well, a key and much needed capacity for countries to make proper use of research investments.

  12. One set of pliers for more tasks in installation work: The effects on (dis)comfort and productivity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groenesteijn, L.; Eikhout, S.M.; Vink, P.

    2004-01-01

    In installation work, the physical workload is high. Awkward postures, heavy lifting and repetitive movements are often seen. To improve aspects of the work situation, frequently used pliers were redesigned to make them suitable for more cutting tasks. In this study these multitask pliers are

  13. Health information technology and quality of health care: strategies for reducing disparities in underresourced settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millery, Mari; Kukafka, Rita

    2010-10-01

    Health information technology (health IT) has potential for facilitating quality improvement and reducing quality disparities found in underresourced settings (URSs). With this systematic literature review, complemented by key informant interviews, the authors sought to identify evidence regarding health IT and quality outcomes in URSs. The review included 105 peer-reviewed studies (2004-2009) in all settings. Only 15 studies included URSs, and 8 focused on URSs. Based on literature across settings, most evidence was available for quality impact of order entry, clinical decision support systems, and computerized reminders. Study designs were predominantly quasi-experimental (37%) or descriptive (35%); 90% of the studies focused on the microsystem level of quality improvement, indicating a need for expanding research into patient experience and organizational and environmental levels. Key informants highlighted organizational partnerships and health IT champions and emphasized that for health IT to have an impact on quality, there must be an organizational culture of quality improvement.

  14. Heat pump concepts for nZEB Technology developments, design tools and testing of heat pump systems for nZEB in the USA: Country report IEA HPT Annex 40 Task 2, Task 3 and Task 4 of the USA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baxter, Van D. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Payne, W. Vance [National Inst. of Standards and Technology (NIST), Gaithersburg, MD (United States); Ling, Jiazhen [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States); Radermacher, Reinhard [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States)

    2015-12-01

    The IEA HPT Annex 40 "Heat pump concepts for Nearly Zero Energy Buildings" deals with the application of heat pumps as a core component of the HVAC system for Nearly or Net Zero energy buildings (nZEB). This report covers Task 2 on the system comparison and optimisation and Task 3 dedicated to the development of adapted technologies for nZEB and field monitoring results of heat pump systems in nZEB. In the US team three institutions are involved and have worked on the following projects: The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) will summarize development activities through the field demonstration stage for several integrated heat pump (IHP) systems electric ground-source (GS-IHP) and air-source (AS-IHP) versions and an engine driven AS-IHP version. The first commercial GS-IHP product was just introduced to the market in December 2012. This work is a contribution to Task 3 of the Annex. The University of Maryland will contribute a software development project to Task 2 of the Annex. The software ThermCom evaluates occupied space thermal comfort conditions accounting for all radiative and convective heat transfer effects as well as local air properties. The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) is working on a field study effort on the NIST Net Zero Energy Residential Test Facility (NZERTF). This residential building was constructed on the NIST campus and officially opened in summer 2013. During the first year, between July 2013 and June 2014, baseline performance of the NZERTF was monitored under a simulated occupancy protocol. The house was equipped with an air-to-air heat pump which included a dedicated dehumidification operating mode. Outdoor conditions, internal loads and modes of heat pump operation were monitored. Field study results with respect to heat pump operation will be reported and recommendations on heat pump optimization for a net zero energy building will be provided. This work is a contribution to Task 3 of the Annex.

  15. Using Goal Setting, Task Clarification, and Feedback to Increase the Use of the Hands-Free Technique by Hospital Operating Room Staff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Thomas R; Austin, John

    2007-01-01

    We evaluated the effects of a behavioral treatment on the safe passing of sharp instruments using the hands-free technique among hospital operating room personnel during surgical procedures. Treatment consisted of participative goal setting, task clarification, and feedback. The average percentage of sharp instruments passed safely increased from 32% to 64% and 31% to 70% between baseline and treatment phases in the inpatient and outpatient surgery units, respectively. Five-month follow-up data suggested maintenance of treatment effects. These findings suggest the utility of organizational behavior management strategies in reducing risky behavior in hospital settings. PMID:18189098

  16. Teachers Choosing Rich Tasks: The Moderating Impact of Technology on Student Learning, Enjoyment, and Preparation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aubusson, Peter; Burke, Paul; Schuck, Sandy; Kearney, Matthew; Frischknecht, Bart

    2014-01-01

    This article reports on the pioneering use in education of Discrete Choice Experiments (DCEs) to assess teachers' decisions regarding deployment of rich tasks. The incorporation of this quantitative method into what is usually considered the domain of qualitative researchers is an innovative feature of this study. The DCEs enabled rigorous,…

  17. Introducing IoT and Wearable Technologies into Task-Based Language Learning for Young Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Guia, Elena; Camacho, Vincent Lopez; Orozco-Barbosa, Luis; Brea Lujan, Victor M.; Penichet, Victor M. R.; Perez, Maria Lozano

    2016-01-01

    In the last few years, in an attempt to further motivate students to learn a foreign language, there has been an increasing interest in task-based teaching techniques, which emphasize communication and the practical use of language, thus moving away from the repetitive grammar-translation methods. Within this approach, the significance of…

  18. Students' Expectations from Technology in Mathematical Tasks: Mathematical Relationships between Objects, Instrumental Genesis and Emergent Goals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laina, Vasiliki; Monaghan, John

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports on two students' work on geometry tasks in a dynamic geometry system. It augments prior work on students' instrumental geneses via a consideration of emergent goals that arise in students' work. It offers a way to interpret students' (working with new software) awareness of what software can and cannot do and students'…

  19. Investigation into Undergraduate International Students' Use of Digital Technology and Their Application in Formal and Informal Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strachan, Rebecca; Aljabali, Sanaa

    2015-01-01

    Digital technologies are being increasingly used in wider society including in educational settings. There are many examples that illustrate how universities embed technology enhanced learning within their educational provision. However there has been less research and evaluation of how these and other readily available technology based resources…

  20. A TOOL FOR STRATEGIC TARGET SETTING ON DEVELOPMENT AND IMPROVEMENT OF REMEDIATION TECHNOLOGIES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Yasushi; Katayama, Arata

    A tool for strategic development and improvement of remediation technologies was proposed to set a target specification by applying the RNSOIL, an evaluation index of remediation technologies for contaminated soil. Under the scenario of agricultural site contamination with dieldrin and its remediation, improving items and the target values of the bioremediation using charcoal material (charcoal bioremediation), as a developing technology, were determined. The development target was that the RNSOIL value of charcoal bioremediation fell below that of high temperature thermal desorption as a competing technology. Sensitivity assessments of the RNSOIL selected a remediation period and an incubation volume for bacterial growth and settlement in the charcoal as improving properties. Risk assessment and life cycle inventory analysis was introduced to determine a human health risk due to contaminant, and a total cost of remediation or a CO2 emission accompanied with remediation, as evaluating factors of RNSOIL, respectively. Assessment based on the RNSOIL was able to show clearly improving items for achieving the target or items with great effect for improvement.

  1. An Ethnographically Informed Participatory Design of Primary Healthcare Information Technology in a Developing Country Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shidende, Nima Herman; Igira, Faraja Teddy; Mörtberg, Christina Margaret

    2017-01-01

    Ethnography, with its emphasis on understanding activities where they occur, and its use of qualitative data gathering techniques rich in description, has a long tradition in Participatory Design (PD). Yet there are limited methodological insights in its application in developing countries. This paper proposes an ethnographically informed PD approach, which can be applied when designing Primary Healthcare Information Technology (PHIT). We use findings from a larger multidisciplinary project, Health Information Systems Project (HISP) to elaborate how ethnography can be used to facilitate participation of health practitioners in developing countries settings as well as indicating the importance of ethnographic approach to participatory Health Information Technology (HIT) designers. Furthermore, the paper discusses the pros and cons of using an ethnographic approach in designing HIT.

  2. Technology and complete set of the equipment of air-plasma method for synthesis of nanoaerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopytin, Yurii D.; Novikov, O. G.

    2004-02-01

    The paper is aimed at studying synthesis and construction, as well as physical-chemical characteristics of nanoaerosols. The technology and product line of the Air-plasma method for synthesis of metal oxide nanopowders to obtain high-performance ceramics (PSNP) is hot and set at manufacturing different-types zirconium ceramics stabilized by yttrium and magnesium oxides, as well as other dopes. For the available equipment, the technologies of producing nanopowders of other metal oxides alongside with circonium oxide and composite oxides (Al203, Ti02, CuO, SiO2, Fe2O2, ZnO, CoO, Cr2O3, PbO, MnO, MgO, CaO, CeO, etc.) are developed and adapted.

  3. Classroom Response Systems: Using Task Technology Fit to Explore Impact Potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Kenneth D., II.

    2010-01-01

    The primary purpose of this study is to determine how students are impacted by the use of Classroom Response System (CRS) technology. This research explores the nature of the outcomes experienced by students and their perceptions on the leading pedagogy and practices for using CRS technology in the classroom. The research is both quantitative and…

  4. Using Information Systems to Leverage Knowledge Management Processes: The Role of Work Context, Job Characteristics and Task-Technology Fit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Çev.: Nazlı Alkan

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This study focus on how an individual's particular work context, job characteristics and knowledge-related job requirements affect the relationship between task-technology fit (TTF and the use of information systems (IS in knowledge management activities. The literature on Knowledge Management (KM and Knowledge Management Systems (KMS is reviewed to identify relevant constructs and their dimensions. Based on this analysis, a model is proposed and tested. Our findings suggest that providing appropriate IT tools that fit tasks alone is no guarantee that they will be employed to leverage the acquisition, transfer and reuse of knowledge. Certain characteristics of jobs, driven by particular work contexts, generate greater need and opportunity for knowledge use. These latter factors moderate the relationship between TTF and actual use of IS for KM purposes: the greater the need and opportunity to conduct knowledgerelated activities, the stronger the relationship between TTF and actual IS use.

  5. Smartphone technology: Gentle reminders of everyday tasks for those with prospective memory difficulties post-brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Scott; Friedland, Daniel; Woodberry, Emma

    2015-01-01

    Prospective memory is a common deficit following brain injury that can reduce an individuals' ability to complete everyday tasks. The smartphone is a device that may compensate for these difficulties using the calendar's prompting function. Reminders can be programmed remotely using email to phone synchronization. To explore whether smartphone reminders help people complete pre-identified tasks as compared to when reminders are not provided. An ABAB case series design compared reminder present vs. reminder absent phases with regards completion of pre-set tasks. Six participants aged 24-55 with Acquired Brain Injury (ABI) and five caregivers participated in the study. Both completed a series of questionnaires looking at the impact of the smartphone reminders on everyday memory functioning at pre, post and follow-up. A 3-month follow-up questionnaire assessed continued use of the system. There was a significant improvement in task completion rates when smartphone reminders were provided. A thematic analysis identified that smartphone reminders improved independence, confidence in coping with memory difficulties and general mood. All participants were still using the system at 3-month follow-up. Smartphone reminders may provide a cost-effective, accessible and non-stigmatizing tool for participants to compensate for prospective memory difficulties.

  6. Set-up and characterization of a humidity sensor realized in LTCC-technology

    CERN Document Server

    Smetana, W

    2008-01-01

    A new type of integrated temperature and humidity sensor applying LTCC-technology has been developed and characterized. In this approach, sensing elements are implemented using heated metal resistors (Pt-elements), where one is exposed to the humid environment that causes the sensor element to cool down with increased humidity, while the other one is sealed from the environment. Sensor design is based on FEA (Finite Element Analyses) where the critical design parameters have been analyzed with regard to the performance characteristic of the device. The set-up of sensor element will be shown and the functional capability will be demonstrated by experimental results.

  7. Exploratory Use of Microaerosol Decontamination Technology (PAEROSOL) in Enclosed, Unoccupied Hospital Setting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rainina, Evguenia I.; McCune, D. E.; Luna, Maria L.; Cook, J. E.; Soltis, Michele A.; Demons, Samandra T.; Godoy-Kain, Patricia; Weston, J. H.

    2012-05-31

    The goal of this study was to validate the previously observed high biological kill performance of PAEROSOL, a semi-dry, micro-aerosol decontamination technology, against common HAI in a non-human subject trial within a hospital setting of Madigan Army Medical Center (MAMC) on Joint Base Lewis-McChord in Tacoma, Washington. In addition to validating the disinfecting efficacy of PAEROSOL, the objectives of the trial included a demonstration of PAEROSOL environmental safety, (i.e., impact to hospital interior materials and electronic equipment exposed during testing) and PAEROSOL parameters optimization for future deployment.

  8. The Influence of Clinoptilolite on Technological Properties of Fresh and Set Slag-Alkaline Slurries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafał Wiśniowski

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Since 1990 the AGH-UST scientists have been working on more efficient recipes of slag-alkaline slurries for sealing the soil and rock mass with hole injection methods.A special attention has been paid to the increasing efficiency of geoengineering works on a rational shaping of technological parameters of fresh and set slag-alkaline slurries.The properties of slurries containing clinoptiolite zeolites from the Košice area are presented in the paper.An addition of zeolites to the slurries increases the tightness of the set slurries. Zeolites favorably influence the course of crystallization of sodium zeolite and the hydroparameters in the slag-alkaline matrix.

  9. Task-switching cost and repetition priming: two overlooked confounds in the first-set procedure of the Sternberg paradigm and how they affect memory set-size effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jou, Jerwen

    2014-10-01

    Subjects performed Sternberg-type memory recognition tasks (Sternberg paradigm) in four experiments. Category-instance names were used as learning and testing materials. Sternberg's original experiments demonstrated a linear relation between reaction time (RT) and memory-set size (MSS). A few later studies found no relation, and other studies found a nonlinear relation (logarithmic) between the two variables. These deviations were used as evidence undermining Sternberg's serial scan theory. This study identified two confounding variables in the fixed-set procedure of the paradigm (where multiple probes are presented at test for a learned memory set) that could generate a MSS RT function that was either flat or logarithmic rather than linearly increasing. These two confounding variables were task-switching cost and repetition priming. The former factor worked against smaller memory sets and in favour of larger sets whereas the latter factor worked in the opposite way. Results demonstrated that a null or a logarithmic RT-to-MSS relation could be the artefact of the combined effects of these two variables. The Sternberg paradigm has been used widely in memory research, and a thorough understanding of the subtle methodological pitfalls is crucial. It is suggested that a varied-set procedure (where only one probe is presented at test for a learned memory set) is a more contamination-free procedure for measuring the MSS effects, and that if a fixed-set procedure is used, it is worthwhile examining the RT function of the very first trials across the MSSs, which are presumably relatively free of contamination by the subsequent trials.

  10. Task 10 - technology development integration. Semi-annual report, April 1--September 30, 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hendrikson, J.G.; Daly, D.J.

    1997-05-01

    The Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC), in conjunction with the Waste Policy Institute (WPI), will identify and integrate new technologies to meet site-specific environmental management (EM) requirements at contaminated sites appropriate to U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) interests. This paper briefly reports overall progress for three activities: technology management, project management, and technology integration. Work performed over the reporting period has focused on providing logistical and administrative support. In addition, six monthly WPI reports to the EERC are included as appendices. The WPI reports contained detailed information for progress in each activity.

  11. The validity of an accelerometer-based method for estimating fluidity in the sit-to-walk task in a community setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asakura, Tomoyuki; Miyazawa, Yoshiyuki; Usuda, Shigeru

    2017-01-01

    [Purpose] Fluidity in the sit-to-walk task has been quantitatively measured with three-dimensional motion analysis system. The purpose of this study was to determine the validity of an accelerometer-based method for estimating fluidity in community-dwelling elderly individuals. [Subjects and Methods] Seventeen community-dwelling elderly females performed a sit-to-walk task. The motion was recorded by an accelerometer, a three-dimensional motion analysis system and a foot pressure sensor simultaneously. The timings of events determined from the acceleration waveform were compared to the timings determined from the three-dimensional motion analysis data (task onset, maximum trunk inclination) or foot pressure sensor data (first heel strike). Regression analysis was used to estimate the fluidity index from the duration between events. [Results] The characteristics of the acceleration waveform were similar to those previously reported in younger adults. Comparisons of event timings from accelerometer and motion analysis system data indicated no systematic bias. Regression analysis showed that the duration from maximum trunk inclination to the first heel strike was the best predictor of fluidity index. [Conclusion] An accelerometer-based method using the duration between characteristic events may be used to precisely and conveniently assess fluidity in a sit-to-walk task in a community setting.

  12. Information seeking stopping behavior in online scenarios the impact of task, technology and individual characteristics

    CERN Document Server

    Hemmer, Erik

    2014-01-01

    The growing amount of information provided via web-based information technologies forces the users of these technologies to stop seeking for information before having acquired all available information. This stopping decision is either made actively following clear guidelines or subconsciously based on the seeker's intuition. This book analyzes the aforementioned duality by developing and testing a multi-theoretical research model dealing with information seeking stopping behavior in online scenarios. Thus, by delivering insights into the mechanisms that influence information seeking activitie

  13. Chaos enhanced differential evolution in the task of evolutionary control of selected set of discrete chaotic systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senkerik, Roman; Zelinka, Ivan; Pluhacek, Michal; Davendra, Donald; Oplatková Kominkova, Zuzana

    2014-01-01

    Evolutionary technique differential evolution (DE) is used for the evolutionary tuning of controller parameters for the stabilization of set of different chaotic systems. The novelty of the approach is that the selected controlled discrete dissipative chaotic system is used also as the chaotic pseudorandom number generator to drive the mutation and crossover process in the DE. The idea was to utilize the hidden chaotic dynamics in pseudorandom sequences given by chaotic map to help differential evolution algorithm search for the best controller settings for the very same chaotic system. The optimizations were performed for three different chaotic systems, two types of case studies and developed cost functions.

  14. Chaos Enhanced Differential Evolution in the Task of Evolutionary Control of Selected Set of Discrete Chaotic Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roman Senkerik

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Evolutionary technique differential evolution (DE is used for the evolutionary tuning of controller parameters for the stabilization of set of different chaotic systems. The novelty of the approach is that the selected controlled discrete dissipative chaotic system is used also as the chaotic pseudorandom number generator to drive the mutation and crossover process in the DE. The idea was to utilize the hidden chaotic dynamics in pseudorandom sequences given by chaotic map to help differential evolution algorithm search for the best controller settings for the very same chaotic system. The optimizations were performed for three different chaotic systems, two types of case studies and developed cost functions.

  15. Performance and touch characteristics of disabled and non-disabled participants during a reciprocal tapping task using touch screen technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irwin, Curt B; Sesto, Mary E

    2012-11-01

    Touch screens are becoming more prevalent in everyday environments. Therefore, it is important that this technology is accessible to those with varying disabilities. The objective of the current study was to evaluate performance and touch characteristics (forces, impulses, and dwell times) of individuals with and without a movement disorder during a reciprocal tapping touch screen task. Thirty-seven participants with a motor control disability and 15 non-disabled participants participated. Outcome measures include number of correct taps, dwell time, exerted force, and impulse. Results indicate non-disabled participants had 1.8 more taps than participants with fine motor control disabilities and 2.8 times more than those with gross motor impairments (ptouch characteristics exist between those with and without motor control disabilities. Understanding how people (including those with disabilities) interact with touch screens may allow designers and engineers to ultimately improve usability of touch screen technology.

  16. "I'm Going to Let My Students Do What!?": Addressing Safety in a Task-Involved Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todorovich, John R.; Model, Eric D.; Wirth, Christopher K.; Stopka, Christine B.

    2005-01-01

    Achievement goal theory (AGT) has shown great promise as a framework for developing motivational climates that positively influence student motivation (Nicholls, 1984, 1989). AGT was developed as researchers began to question how students measure their success in achievement settings such as sport or physical education (PE). The theory proposes…

  17. Future Goal Setting, Task Motivation and Learning of Minority and Non-Minority Students in Dutch Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andriessen, Iris; Phalet, Karen; Lens, Willy

    2006-01-01

    Background: Cross-cultural research on minority school achievement yields mixed findings on the motivational impact of future goal setting for students from disadvantaged minority groups. Relevant and recent motivational research, integrating Future Time Perspective Theory with Self-Determination Theory, has not yet been validated among minority…

  18. Future goal setting, task motivation and learning of minority and non-minority students in Dutch schools

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Andriessen, Iris; Phalet, Karen; Lens, Willy

    2006-01-01

    Background. Cross-cultural research on minority school achievement yields mixed findings on the motivational impact of future goal setting for students from disadvantaged minority groups. Relevant and recent motivational research, integrating Future Time Perspective Theory with Self-Determination Th

  19. Predictive information speeds up visual awareness in an individuation task by modulating threshold setting, not processing efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Loof, Esther; Van Opstal, Filip; Verguts, Tom

    2016-04-01

    Theories on visual awareness claim that predicted stimuli reach awareness faster than unpredicted ones. In the current study, we disentangle whether prior information about the upcoming stimulus affects visual awareness of stimulus location (i.e., individuation) by modulating processing efficiency or threshold setting. Analogous research on stimulus identification revealed that prior information modulates threshold setting. However, as identification and individuation are two functionally and neurally distinct processes, the mechanisms underlying identification cannot simply be extrapolated directly to individuation. The goal of this study was therefore to investigate how individuation is influenced by prior information about the upcoming stimulus. To do so, a drift diffusion model was fitted to estimate the processing efficiency and threshold setting for predicted versus unpredicted stimuli in a cued individuation paradigm. Participants were asked to locate a picture, following a cue that was congruent, incongruent or neutral with respect to the picture's identity. Pictures were individuated faster in the congruent and neutral condition compared to the incongruent condition. In the diffusion model analysis, the processing efficiency was not significantly different across conditions. However, the threshold setting was significantly higher following an incongruent cue compared to both congruent and neutral cues. Our results indicate that predictive information about the upcoming stimulus influences visual awareness by shifting the threshold for individuation rather than by enhancing processing efficiency.

  20. JV Task 126 - Mercury Control Technologies for Electric Utilities Burning Bituminous Coal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jason Laumb; John Kay; Michael Jones; Brandon Pavlish; Nicholas Lentz; Donald McCollor; Kevin Galbreath

    2009-03-29

    The EERC developed an applied research consortium project to test cost-effective mercury (Hg) control technologies for utilities burning bituminous coals. The project goal was to test innovative Hg control technologies that have the potential to reduce Hg emissions from bituminous coal-fired power plants by {ge}90% at costs of one-half to three-quarters of current estimates for activated carbon injection (ACI). Hg control technology evaluations were performed using the EERC's combustion test facility (CTF). The CTF was fired on pulverized bituminous coals at 550,000 Btu/hr (580 MJ/hr). The CTF was configured with the following air pollution control devices (APCDs): selective catalytic reduction (SCR) unit, electrostatic precipitator (ESP), and wet flue gas desulfurization system (WFDS). The Hg control technologies investigated as part of this project included ACI (three Norit Americas, Inc., and eleven Envergex sorbents), elemental mercury (Hg{sup 0}) oxidation catalysts (i.e., the noble metals in Hitachi Zosen, Cormetech, and Hitachi SCR catalysts), sorbent enhancement additives (SEAs) (a proprietary EERC additive, trona, and limestone), and blending with a Powder River Basin (PRB) subbituminous coal. These Hg control technologies were evaluated separately, and many were also tested in combination.

  1. The influence of desk and display design on posture and muscle activity variability whilst performing information technology tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straker, L; Burgess-Limerick, R; Pollock, C; Maslen, B

    2009-09-01

    Desk design and computer display height can affect posture and muscle activation during computer use. Amplitudes of postural variables and muscle activity during computer use do not explain the results from epidemiological studies of musculoskeletal discomfort and disorders related to computer use. The purpose of this study was to assess variability of posture and muscle activity during work with two computer display heights and book/paper, in conjunction with a curved desk designed to provide forearm support and a traditional, straight desk. 18 male and 18 female participants performed 10-min tasks involving keying, mousing, reading and writing in six desk/display conditions. 3D posture and surface emg were assessed for the final 2 min of each task. The curved desk resulted in greater postural and muscle activity variation, suggesting an advantage of this supportive surface over the straight desk. There was little difference in variability associated with the two display heights. However, greater variability of posture and muscle activity was evident with the book/paper condition. Non-touch typists had greater neck flexion variation. The design of information technology tasks and workstations can influence the short term variation in posture and muscle activity. Variation is influenced independently of mean postures and muscle amplitudes and therefore needs to be considered to adequately assess the risk of musculoskeletal disorders.

  2. Negative pressure wound therapy technologies for chronic wound care in the home setting: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhee, Susan M; Valle, M Frances; Wilson, Lisa M; Lazarus, Gerald; Zenilman, Jonathan M; Robinson, Karen A

    2015-01-01

    The use of negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) is increasing in both the inpatient and outpatient settings. We conducted a systematic review on the efficacy and safety of NPWT for the treatment of chronic wounds in the home setting. We searched MEDLINE, Embase, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, and the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, up to June 2014. Two independent reviewers screened search results. Seven studies met our criteria for inclusion. Six of the studies compared NPWT devices to other wound care methods and one study compared two different NPWT technologies. Data were limited by variability in the types of comparator groups, methodological limitations, and poor reporting of outcomes. We were unable to draw conclusions about the efficacy or safety of NPWT for the treatment of chronic wounds in the home setting due to the insufficient evidence. Consensus is needed on the methods of conducting and reporting wound care research so that future studies are able inform decisions about the use of NPWT in the home environment for chronic wounds.

  3. Monte Carlo reference data sets for imaging research: Executive summary of the report of AAPM Research Committee Task Group 195.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sechopoulos, Ioannis; Ali, Elsayed S M; Badal, Andreu; Badano, Aldo; Boone, John M; Kyprianou, Iacovos S; Mainegra-Hing, Ernesto; McMillan, Kyle L; McNitt-Gray, Michael F; Rogers, D W O; Samei, Ehsan; Turner, Adam C

    2015-10-01

    The use of Monte Carlo simulations in diagnostic medical imaging research is widespread due to its flexibility and ability to estimate quantities that are challenging to measure empirically. However, any new Monte Carlo simulation code needs to be validated before it can be used reliably. The type and degree of validation required depends on the goals of the research project, but, typically, such validation involves either comparison of simulation results to physical measurements or to previously published results obtained with established Monte Carlo codes. The former is complicated due to nuances of experimental conditions and uncertainty, while the latter is challenging due to typical graphical presentation and lack of simulation details in previous publications. In addition, entering the field of Monte Carlo simulations in general involves a steep learning curve. It is not a simple task to learn how to program and interpret a Monte Carlo simulation, even when using one of the publicly available code packages. This Task Group report provides a common reference for benchmarking Monte Carlo simulations across a range of Monte Carlo codes and simulation scenarios. In the report, all simulation conditions are provided for six different Monte Carlo simulation cases that involve common x-ray based imaging research areas. The results obtained for the six cases using four publicly available Monte Carlo software packages are included in tabular form. In addition to a full description of all simulation conditions and results, a discussion and comparison of results among the Monte Carlo packages and the lessons learned during the compilation of these results are included. This abridged version of the report includes only an introductory description of the six cases and a brief example of the results of one of the cases. This work provides an investigator the necessary information to benchmark his/her Monte Carlo simulation software against the reference cases included here

  4. Clinicians, security and information technology support services in practice settings--a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernando, Juanita

    2010-01-01

    This case study of 9 information technology (IT) support staff in 3 Australian (Victoria) public hospitals juxtaposes their experiences at the user-level of eHealth security in the Natural Hospital Environment with that previously reported by 26 medical, nursing and allied healthcare clinicians. IT support responsibilities comprised the entire hospital, of which clinician eHealth security needs were only part. IT staff believed their support tasks were often fragmented while work responsibilities were hampered by resources shortages. They perceived clinicians as an ongoing security risk to private health information. By comparison clinicians believed IT staff would not adequately support the private and secure application of eHealth for patient care. Preliminary data analysis suggests the tension between these cohorts manifests as an eHealth environment where silos of clinical work are disconnected from silos of IT support work. The discipline-based silos hamper health privacy outcomes. Privacy and security policies, especially those influencing the audit process, will benefit by further research of this phenomenon.

  5. Technology Assessment for Proof-of-Concept UF6 Cylinder Unique Identification Task 3.1.2 Report – Survey and Assessment of Technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wylie, Joann; Hockert, John

    2014-04-24

    The National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Office of Nonproliferation and International Security’s (NA-24) Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI) and the nuclear industry have begun to develop approaches to identify and monitor uranium hexafluoride (UF6) cylinders. The NA-24 interest in a global monitoring system for UF6 cylinders relates to its interest in supporting the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) in deterring and detecting diversion of UF6 (e.g., loss of cylinder in transit) and undeclared excess production at conversion and enrichment facilities. The industry interest in a global monitoring system for UF6 cylinders relates to the improvements in operational efficiencies that such a system would provide. This task is part of an effort to survey and assess technologies for a UF6 cylinder to identify candidate technologies for a proof-of-concept demonstration and evaluation for the Cylinder Identification System (CIS).

  6. Technology standard-setting under the lens of global administrative law : Accountability, participation and transparency of standard-setting organizations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kanevskaia, Olia

    2016-01-01

    The role of transnational non-governmental bodies in international standardization has often been in the limelight of recent academic discussions. While standards developed by Standard-Setting Organizations (SSOs) are typically non-binding, they can nevertheless acquire an obligatory character, eith

  7. Quarterly Technical Progress Report of Radioisotope Power System Materials Production and Technology Program tasks for April 2000 through June 2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, J.P.

    2000-10-23

    The Office of Space and Defense Power Systems (OSDPS) of the Department of Energy (DOE) provides Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS) for applications where conventional power systems are not feasible. For example, radioisotope thermoelectric generators were supplied by the DOE to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration for deep space missions including the Cassini Mission launched in October of 1997 to study the planet Saturn. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been involved in developing materials and technology and producing components for the DOE for more than three decades. For the Cassini Mission, for example, ORNL was involved in the production of carbon-bonded carbon fiber (CBCF) insulator sets, iridium alloy blanks and foil, and clad vent sets (CVSs) and weld shields (WSs). This quarterly report has been divided into three sections to reflect program guidance from OSDPS for fiscal year (FY) 2000. The first section deals primarily with maintenance of the capability to produce flight quality carbon-bonded carbon fiber (CBCF) insulator sets, iridium alloy blanks and foil, clad vent sets (CVSs), and weld shields (WSs). In all three cases, production maintenance is assured by the manufacture of limited quantities of flight quality (FQ) components. The second section deals with several technology activities to improve the manufacturing processes, characterize materials, or to develop technologies for two new RPS. The last section is dedicated to studies of the potential for the production of 238Pu at ORNL.

  8. Quarterly Technical Progress Report of Radioisotope Power System Materials Production and Technology Program tasks for January 2000 through March 2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, J.P.

    2000-08-18

    The Office of Space and Defense Power Systems (OSDPS) of the Department of Energy (DOE) provides radioisotope Power Systems (BPS) for applications where conventional power systems are not feasible. For example, radioisotope thermoelectric generators were supplied by the DOE to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration for deep space missions including the Cassini Mission launched in October of .I 997 to study the planet Saturn. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been involved in developing materials and technology and producing components for the DOE for more than three decades. For the Cassini Mission, for example, ORNL was involved in the production of carbon-bonded carbon fiber (CBCF) insulator sets, iridium alloy blanks and foil, and clad vent sets (CVSs) and weld shields (WSs). This quarterly report has been divided into three sections to reflect program guidance from OSDPS for fiscal year (FY) 2000. The first section deals primarily with maintenance of the capability to produce flight quality carbon-bonded carbon fiber (CBCF) insulator sets, iridium alloy blanks and foil, clad vent sets (CVSs), and weld shields (WSs). In all three cases, production maintenance is assured by the manufacture of limited quantities of flight quality (FQ) components. The second section deals with several technology activities to improve the manufacturing processes, characterize materials, or to develop technologies for two new RPS. The last section is dedicated to studies of the potential for the production of 238Pu at OBNL.

  9. Technological Change in an Auto Assembly Plant: The Impact on Workers' Tasks and Skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milkman, Ruth; Pullman, Cydney

    1991-01-01

    Worker surveys and interviews with workers, managers, and unions explored the impact of technological change and reorganization at General Motors' plant in Linden, New Jersey. Skilled trades workers experienced skill upgrading and increased responsibility, whereas production workers underwent deskilling and were increasingly subordinated to the…

  10. [Planning of working conditions and tasks in creating optimal standards of technology in coal mines].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meniaĭlo, N I; Tyshlek, E G

    1989-01-01

    During the next 20 years normalization of occupational factors at Donbas mines should be ensured by technical reconstruction of mines on the basis of the development of new technological circuits, automatization and mechanization means, the means of collective protection, physiologic labour rationalization.

  11. Indicator for Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge (TPACK) Evaluation of Online Tasks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oster-Levinz, Anat; Klieger, Aviva

    2010-01-01

    In the Information Communication Technology era teachers will have to wisely use the online environment in order to realize a new pedagogy. The penetration of the internet and collaborative online instruments to teaching and learning affect the quality of teaching. We have developed a digital indicator to evaluate the quality of the online tasks…

  12. Evaluating Progression in Students' Relational Thinking While Working on Tasks with Geospatial Technologies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Favier, Tim; van der Schee, Joop|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/072719575

    2014-01-01

    One of the facets of geographic literacy is the ability to think in a structured way about geographic relationships. Geospatial technologies offer many opportunities to stimulate students’ geographic relational thinking. The question is: How can these opportunities be effectuated? This paper discuss

  13. Multimodal Learning Analytics and Education Data Mining: Using Computational Technologies to Measure Complex Learning Tasks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blikstein, Paulo; Worsley, Marcelo

    2016-01-01

    New high-frequency multimodal data collection technologies and machine learning analysis techniques could offer new insights into learning, especially when students have the opportunity to generate unique, personalized artifacts, such as computer programs, robots, and solutions engineering challenges. To date most of the work on learning analytics…

  14. Evaluating Progression in Students' Relational Thinking While Working on Tasks with Geospatial Technologies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Favier, Tim; van der Schee, Joop

    2014-01-01

    One of the facets of geographic literacy is the ability to think in a structured way about geographic relationships. Geospatial technologies offer many opportunities to stimulate students’ geographic relational thinking. The question is: How can these opportunities be effectuated? This paper discuss

  15. Evaluating Progression in Students' Relational Thinking While Working on Tasks with Geospatial Technologies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Favier, Tim; van der Schee, Joop

    2014-01-01

    One of the facets of geographic literacy is the ability to think in a structured way about geographic relationships. Geospatial technologies offer many opportunities to stimulate students’ geographic relational thinking. The question is: How can these opportunities be effectuated? This paper

  16. Learners' Perceptions of the Use of Mobile Technology in a Task-Based Language Teaching Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calabrich, Simone L.

    2016-01-01

    This research explored perceptions of learners studying English in private language schools regarding the use of mobile technology to support language learning. Learners were first exposed to both a mobile assisted and a mobile unassisted language learning experience, and then asked to express their thoughts on the incorporation of mobile devices…

  17. The Integration of Course Content, Technology and Institutional Setting. A Three Year Report, 31 May 1973. Project TACT, Technological Aids to Creative Thought.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bossert, William H.; Oettinger, Anthony G.

    A description is provided of an attempt at Harvard University to integrate course content with technology and the institutional setting. The course, "Communication in Societies," was aimed at non-science majors and explored the science and technology of communication and their effects on social organization. The objective was to impart…

  18. Sensors and nuclear power. Report by the Technology Transfer Sensors Task Team

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1985-06-01

    The existing sensor systems for the basic process parameters in nuclear power plant operation have limitations with respect to accuracy, ease of maintenance and signal processing. These limitations comprise the economy of nuclear power generation. To reduce the costs and improve performance of nuclear power plant fabrication, operation, maintenance and repair we need to advance the sensor technology being applied in the nuclear industry. The economic viability and public acceptance of nuclear power will depend on how well we direct and apply technological advances to the industry. This report was prepared by a team with members representing a wide range of the nuclear industry embracing the university programs, national laboratories, architect engineers and reactor manufacturers. An intensive effort was made to survey current sensor technology, evaluate future trends and determine development needs. This included literature surveys, visits with utilities, universities, laboratories and organizations outside the nuclear industry. Several conferences were attended to take advantage of the access to experts in selected topics and to obtain opinions. Numerous telephone contacts and exchanges by mail supplemented the above efforts. Finally, the broad technical depth of the team members provided the basis for the stimulating working sessions during which this report was organized and drafted.

  19. A Science, Engineering and Technology (SET) Approach Improves Science Process Skills in 4-H Animal Science Participants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Katie C.

    2010-01-01

    A new Science, Engineering and Technology (SET) approach was designed for youth who participated in the Minnesota State Fair Livestock interview process. The project and evaluation were designed to determine if the new SET approach increased content knowledge and science process skills in participants. Results revealed that youth participants not…

  20. A Science, Engineering and Technology (SET) Approach Improves Science Process Skills in 4-H Animal Science Participants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Katie C.

    2010-01-01

    A new Science, Engineering and Technology (SET) approach was designed for youth who participated in the Minnesota State Fair Livestock interview process. The project and evaluation were designed to determine if the new SET approach increased content knowledge and science process skills in participants. Results revealed that youth participants not…

  1. Comparison of Scalar Expectancy Theory (SET) and the Learning-to-Time (LeT) model in a successive temporal bisection task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arantes, Joana

    2008-06-01

    The present research tested the generality of the "context effect" previously reported in experiments using temporal double bisection tasks [e.g., Arantes, J., Machado, A. Context effects in a temporal discrimination task: Further tests of the Scalar Expectancy Theory and Learning-to-Time models. J. Exp. Anal. Behav., in press]. Pigeons learned two temporal discriminations in which all the stimuli appear successively: 1s (red) vs. 4s (green) and 4s (blue) vs. 16s (yellow). Then, two tests were conducted to compare predictions of two timing models, Scalar Expectancy Theory (SET) and the Learning-to-Time (LeT) model. In one test, two psychometric functions were obtained by presenting pigeons with intermediate signal durations (1-4s and 4-16s). Results were mixed. In the critical test, pigeons were exposed to signals ranging from 1 to 16s and followed by the green or the blue key. Whereas SET predicted that the relative response rate to each of these keys should be independent of the signal duration, LeT predicted that the relative response rate to the green key (compared with the blue key) should increase with the signal duration. Results were consistent with LeT's predictions, showing that the context effect is obtained even when subjects do not need to make a choice between two keys presented simultaneously.

  2. The Potential Use of Intrauterine Insemination as a Basic Option for Infertility: A Review for Technology-Limited Medical Settings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdelrahman M. Abdelkader

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. There is an asymmetric allocation of technology and other resources for infertility services. Intrauterine insemination (IUI is a process of placing washed spermatozoa transcervically into the uterine cavity for treatment of infertility. This is a review of literature for the potential use of IUI as a basic infertility treatment in technology-limited settings. Study design. Review of articles on treatment of infertility using IUI. Results. Aspects regarding the use of IUI are reviewed, including ovarian stimulation, semen parameters associated with good outcomes, methods of sperm preparation, timing of IUI, and number of inseminations. Implications of the finding in light of the needs of low-technology medical settings are summarized. Conclusion. The reviewed evidence suggests that IUI is less expensive, less invasive, and comparably effective for selected patients as a first-line treatment for couples with unexplained or male factor infertility. Those couples may be offered three to six IUI cycles in technology-limited settings.

  3. Human Factors Process Task Analysis Liquid Oxygen Pump Acceptance Test Procedure for the Advanced Technology Development Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diorio, Kimberly A.

    2002-01-01

    A process task analysis effort was undertaken by Dynacs Inc. commencing in June 2002 under contract from NASA YA-D6. Funding was provided through NASA's Ames Research Center (ARC), Code M/HQ, and Industrial Engineering and Safety (IES). The John F. Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Engineering Development Contract (EDC) Task Order was 5SMA768. The scope of the effort was to conduct a Human Factors Process Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (HF PFMEA) of a hazardous activity and provide recommendations to eliminate or reduce the effects of errors caused by human factors. The Liquid Oxygen (LOX) Pump Acceptance Test Procedure (ATP) was selected for this analysis. The HF PFMEA table (see appendix A) provides an analysis of six major categories evaluated for this study. These categories include Personnel Certification, Test Procedure Format, Test Procedure Safety Controls, Test Article Data, Instrumentation, and Voice Communication. For each specific requirement listed in appendix A, the following topics were addressed: Requirement, Potential Human Error, Performance-Shaping Factors, Potential Effects of the Error, Barriers and Controls, Risk Priority Numbers, and Recommended Actions. This report summarizes findings and gives recommendations as determined by the data contained in appendix A. It also includes a discussion of technology barriers and challenges to performing task analyses, as well as lessons learned. The HF PFMEA table in appendix A recommends the use of accepted and required safety criteria in order to reduce the risk of human error. The items with the highest risk priority numbers should receive the greatest amount of consideration. Implementation of the recommendations will result in a safer operation for all personnel.

  4. Human Factors Process Task Analysis Liquid Oxygen Pump Acceptance Test Procedure for the Advanced Technology Development Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diorio, Kimberly A.

    2002-01-01

    A process task analysis effort was undertaken by Dynacs Inc. commencing in June 2002 under contract from NASA YA-D6. Funding was provided through NASA's Ames Research Center (ARC), Code M/HQ, and Industrial Engineering and Safety (IES). The John F. Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Engineering Development Contract (EDC) Task Order was 5SMA768. The scope of the effort was to conduct a Human Factors Process Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (HF PFMEA) of a hazardous activity and provide recommendations to eliminate or reduce the effects of errors caused by human factors. The Liquid Oxygen (LOX) Pump Acceptance Test Procedure (ATP) was selected for this analysis. The HF PFMEA table (see appendix A) provides an analysis of six major categories evaluated for this study. These categories include Personnel Certification, Test Procedure Format, Test Procedure Safety Controls, Test Article Data, Instrumentation, and Voice Communication. For each specific requirement listed in appendix A, the following topics were addressed: Requirement, Potential Human Error, Performance-Shaping Factors, Potential Effects of the Error, Barriers and Controls, Risk Priority Numbers, and Recommended Actions. This report summarizes findings and gives recommendations as determined by the data contained in appendix A. It also includes a discussion of technology barriers and challenges to performing task analyses, as well as lessons learned. The HF PFMEA table in appendix A recommends the use of accepted and required safety criteria in order to reduce the risk of human error. The items with the highest risk priority numbers should receive the greatest amount of consideration. Implementation of the recommendations will result in a safer operation for all personnel.

  5. Sour gas plant remediation technology research and demonstration project, Task 7.53. Topical report, January--December 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stepan, D.J.; Kuehnel, V.; Schmit, C.R.

    1994-02-01

    Recognizing the potential impacts of sour gas plant operations on the subsurface environment, the Canadian Association of Petroleum Producers (CAPP) and Environment Canada initiated a multiphase study focusing on research related to the development and demonstration of remedial technologies for soil and groundwater contamination at these facilities. Research performed under this project was designed to supplement and be coordinated with research activities being conducted at an operational sour gas plant located in Rocky Mountain House, Alberta, Canada. These research tasks included hydrogeological site characterization, subsurface contaminant characterization, ex situ treatment of groundwater, and subsurface remediation of residual contamination in the unsaturated zone. Ex situ treatment of groundwater included evaluations of air stripping, steam stripping, advanced oxidation, and biological treatment, as well as the development of an artificial freeze crystallization process. Soil vapor extraction was evaluated as a technique to address residual contamination in the unsaturated zone.

  6. “KMS-Fit”: a case-based exploration of task/technology fit in an applied knowledge management context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason M. Turner

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The notion of Task/Technology Fit (TTF posits that as the degree of overlap increases between the task domain, and the ways in which the capabilities of an information system (IS are suited to activities within that domain, performance gains experienced via use of the IS should also increase. This research proposes an expanded TTF model that is applicable to the context of Knowledge Management (KM and Knowledge Management Systems (KMS. In particular, additional individual, technological, and social factors and interrelationships between these factors could provide greater explanatory power of IS user behaviors, perceptions, and outcomes within the realm of knowledge work.A mixed-method field study approach was employed at a large government organization, currently in the process of developing and fielding a new KMS to support knowledge-intensive work, to investigate the underlying factors and relationships described within an expanded ―KMS Fit‖ model. Results suggest that the foundational mechanisms described by the TTF model may in fact change within KM contexts. In particular, the inherently social characteristics of knowledge-based work were found to play a very important role in determining the degree of fit relative to a KMS. Moreover, the social ecology within the organization was found to have significant impact on KMS Fit. Results of this research further reinforce the notion that KMS may be a unique subset of IS and that traditional IS models (such as TTF should be updated or tailored to reflect the social nature of knowledge-based work and knowledge management.

  7. Digial Technology Qualification Task 2 - Suitability of Digital Alternatives to Analog Sensors and Actuators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ted Quinn; Jerry Mauck

    2012-09-01

    The next generation reactors in the U.S. are an opportunity for vendors to build new reactor technology with advanced Instrumentation and Control Systems (control rooms, DCS, etc.). The advances made in the development of many current generation operating reactors in other parts of the world are being used in the design and construction of new plants. These new plants are expected to have fully integrated digital control rooms, computerized procedures, integrated surveillance testing with on-line monitoring and a major effort toward improving the O&M and fault survivability of the overall systems. In addition the designs are also incorporating major improvements in the man-machine interface based on lessons learned in nuclear and other industries. The above relates primarily to the scope of supply in instrumentation and control systems addressed by Chapter 7 of the Standard Review Plan (SRP) NUREG-0800 (Reference 9.5), and the associated Balance of Plant (BOP) I&C systems. This does not relate directly to the actuator and motor, breaker, initiation circuitry, valve position, etc. which is the subject of this report and normally outside of the traditional Distributed Control System (DCS), for both safety and non-safety systems. The recommendations presented in this report will be used as input to I&C research programming for the implementation of lessons learned during the early phases of new build both for large light water reactors (LWR) and also small modular reactors (SMR). This report is intended to support current research plans and provide user (vendor, owner-operator) input to the optimization of these research plans.

  8. Applications for radio-frequency identification technology in the perioperative setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Tiyu; Zhang, Xiaoxiang; Zeng, Lili; Xia, Shuyan; Hinton, Antentor Othrell; Li, Xiuyun

    2014-06-01

    We implemented a two-year project to develop a security-gated management system for the perioperative setting using radio-frequency identification (RFID) technology to enhance the management efficiency of the OR. We installed RFID readers beside the entrances to the OR and changing areas to receive and process signals from the RFID tags that we sewed into surgical scrub attire and shoes. The system also required integrating automatic access control panels, computerized lockers, light-emitting diode (LED) information screens, wireless networks, and an information system. By doing this, we are able to control the flow of personnel and materials more effectively, reduce OR costs, optimize the registration and attire-changing process for personnel, and improve management efficiency. We also anticipate this system will improve patient safety by reducing the risk of surgical site infection. Application of security-gated management systems is an important and effective way to help ensure a clean, convenient, and safe management process to manage costs in the perioperative area and promote patient safety. Copyright © 2014 AORN, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Toward Successful Implementation of Speech Recognition Technology: A Survey of SRT Utilization Issues in Healthcare Settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Martina A; King, Joshua L; Kim, Min Soon

    2015-07-01

    To evaluate physician utilization of speech recognition technology (SRT) for medical documentation in two hospitals. A quantitative survey was used to collect data in the areas of practice, electronic equipment used for documentation, documentation created after providing care, and overall thoughts about and satisfaction with the SRT. The survey sample was from one rural and one urban facility in central Missouri. In addition, qualitative interviews were conducted with a chief medical officer and a physician champion regarding implementation issues, training, choice of SRT, and outcomes from their perspective. Seventy-one (60%) of the anticipated 125 surveys were returned. A total of 16 (23%) participants were practicing in internal medicine and 9 (13%) were practicing in family medicine. Fifty-six (79%) participants used a desktop and 14 (20%) used a laptop (2%) computer. SRT products from Nuance were the dominant SRT used by 59 participants (83%). Windows operating systems (Microsoft, Redmond, WA) was used by more than 58 (82%) of the survey respondents. With regard to user experience, 42 (59%) participants experienced spelling and grammatical errors, 15 (21%) encountered clinical inaccuracy, 9 (13%) experienced word substitution, and 4 (6%) experienced misleading medical information. This study shows critical issues of inconsistency, unreliability, and dissatisfaction in the functionality and usability of SRT. This merits further attention to improve the functionality and usability of SRT for better adoption within varying healthcare settings.

  10. Testing the scalar expectancy theory (SET) and the learning-to-time model (LeT) in a double bisection task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, Armando; Pata, Paulo

    2005-02-01

    Two theories of timing, scalar expectancy theory (SET) and learning-to-time (LeT), make substantially different assumptions about what animals learn in temporal tasks. In a test of these assumptions, pigeons learned two temporal discriminations. On Type 1 trials, they learned to choose a red key after a 1-sec signal and a green key after a 4-sec signal; on Type 2 trials, they learned to choose a blue key after a 4-sec signal and a yellow key after either an 8-sec signal (Group 8) or a 16-sec signal (Group 16). Then, the birds were exposed to signals 1 sec, 4 sec, and 16 sec in length and given a choice between novel key combinations (red or green vs. blue or yellow). The choice between the green key and the blue key was of particular significance because both keys were associated with the same 4-sec signal. Whereas SET predicted no effect of the test signal duration on choice, LeT predicted that preference for green would increase monotonically with the length of the signal but would do so faster for Group 8 than for Group 16. The results were consistent with LeT, but not with SET.

  11. JV Task 107- Pilot-Scale Emission Control Technology Testing for Constellation Energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michael Jones; Brandon Pavlish; Stephen Sollom; John Kay

    2007-06-30

    An Indonesian, Colombian, and Russian coal were tested in the Energy & Environmental Research Center's combustion test facility for their performance and an evaluation of mercury release and capture with selected additives in both electrostatic precipitator and baghouse configurations. Sorbents included the carbon-based materials NORIT DARCO Hg, Sorbent Technologies B-PAC and B-PAC LC, STI Rejects provided by Constellation Energy, and Envergex e-Sorb, along with ChemMod's high-temperature additive. Each coal was evaluated over several days and compared. Ash-fouling tests were conducted, and mercury levels were monitored using continuous mercury monitors (CMMs). The Ontario Hydro mercury sampling method was also utilized. The Indonesian coal had the lowest ash content, lowest sulfur content, and lowest energy content of the three coals tested. The Colombian coal had the highest mercury content and did contain a significant level of selenium which can interfere with the ability of a CMM to monitor mercury in the gas stream. All sorbents displayed very favorable results. In most cases, mercury removal greater than 86% could be obtained. The Indonesian coal displayed the best mercury removal with sorbent addition. A maximum removal of 97% was measured with this coal using Envergex's carbon-based sorbent at a rate of 4 lb/Macf across an electrostatic precipitator. The high ash and selenium content of the Colombian coal caused it to be a problematic fuel, and ash plugging of the test furnace was a real concern. Problems with the baghouse module led to limited testing. Results indicated that native capture across the baghouse for each coal type was significant enough not to warrant sorbent addition necessary. The fouling potential was the lowest for the Indonesian coal. Low sulfur content contributes to the poor potential for fouling, as witnessed by the lack of deposits during testing. The Russian and Colombian coals had a much higher potential for fouling

  12. Testing a Technology Integration Education Model for Millennial Preservice Teachers: Exploring the Moderating Relationships of Goals, Feedback, Task Value, and Self-Regulation among Motivation and Technological, Pedagogical, and Content Knowledge Competencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, Denise D.; Piper, Randy T.

    2016-01-01

    The technology integration education model is a 12 construct model that includes 8 primary constructs and 4 moderator constructs. By testing the relationships among two primary constructs (motivation and technological, pedagogical, and content knowledge competencies) and four moderator constructs (goals, feedback, task value, and self-regulation),…

  13. Barriers to the Use of Technology in Jordanian Pre-School Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ihmeideh, Fathi Mahmoud

    2009-01-01

    Technology has increasingly become an important and accepted tool in early childhood education classrooms. Despite its power and significance in supporting children's development, early childhood educators still struggle with using technology in their teaching practice. This study investigated the barriers to the use of technology in Jordanian…

  14. Tools for Tomorrow's Science and Technology Workforce: MATE's 2006 ROV Competition Sets Students' Sights on Ocean Observing Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zande, Jill; Meeson, Blanche; Cook, Susan; Matsumoto, George

    2006-01-01

    Teams participating in the 2006 ROV competition organized by the Marine Advanced Technology Education (MATE) Center and the Marine Technology Society's (MTS) ROV Committee experienced first-hand the scientific and technical challenges that many ocean scientists, technicians, and engineers face every day. The competition tasked more than 1,000 middle and high school, college, and university students from Newfoundland to Hong Kong with designing and building ROVs to support the next generation of ocean observing systems. Teaming up with the National Office for Integrated and Sustained Ocean Observations, Ocean. US, and the Ocean Research Interactive Observatory Networks (ORION) Program, the competition highlighted ocean observing systems and the careers, organizations, and technologies associated with ocean observatories. The student teams were challenged to develop vehicles that can deploy, install, and maintain networks of instruments as well as to explore the practical applications and the research questions made possible by observing systems.

  15. NEW APPROACHES TO THE IMPLEMENTATION OF THE MINING TECHNOLOGY OF DIMENSION STONE USING A CLOSE-SET DRILLING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. V. Kalchuk

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The analysis of the current state the non-blasting monolith extraction technology was conducted. The further research direction was substantiated. Has been considered and justified the rational parameters of close-set drilling technology of dimension stones. Solution is offered that consist the combined drilling (a close-set and a holes line drilling, that provides to increase of stone splitting efficiency under its own weight. The calculation of the parameters of the scheme of partial underdrilling at a monolith of stone with the purpose of reducing the volume of drilling works is given. Diagrams of tensile stress changes depending on the specific area of splitting were built. A rational correlation between the drilling parameters of the holes has been established by solving the problems of loading the cantilever beam and stress concentration by the Kirsch solution. The most important parameter for the implementation of this technology is the ratio of monoloth hight to its length. Engineering formulas are proposed for calculating the technological parameters of the realization of the “gravitational-hole” stone splitting. The configuration of a rough block of stones is determined under which this technology can be realized. Creating of close-set holes provides the increase of maximal tensile stress with equal values of specific splitting area ratio. It is established that the effective drilling depth of close-set holes is 43,2 % of monolith height. It is estimated that combined drilling method application of savings from drilling operation will be 11,36 %.

  16. NEW TECHNOLOGY OF ROADSIDE ENTRY SUPPORT IN ADVANCING-MINING BY PUMPING HIGHWATER-CONTENT FAST SETTING-SOLIDIFYING MATERIALS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄玉诚; 孙恒虎

    1995-01-01

    Roadside entry supporting technology by pumping high water-content fast setting-solidifying materials in advancing-mining was industrially tested in Yangzhuang Coal Mine, Huaibei Coal Mining Administration. Roadside packing parameters were determined according to the properties of high water-content fast setting-solidifying materials, as well as geological and mining conditions. A new roadside packing technological system was designed to use pumping-delivery method to transport the materials. With respect to the special conditions in the advahcing mining system, effective temporary support systema were designed and tried. The technical and economic benefits from this new industrial experiment were carefully analyzed and evaluated.

  17. The health systems' priority setting criteria for selecting health technologies: A systematic review of the current evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mobinizadeh, Mohammadreza; Raeissi, Pouran; Nasiripour, Amir Ashkan; Olyaeemanesh, Alireza; Tabibi, Seyed Jamaleddin

    2016-01-01

    Background: In the recent years, using health technologies to diagnose and treat diseases has had a considerable and accelerated growth. The proper use of these technologies may considerably help in the diagnosis and treatment of different diseases. On the other hand, unlimited and unrestricted entry of these technologies may result in induced demand by service providers. The aim of this study was to determine the appropriate criteria used in health technologies priority-setting models in the world. Methods: Using MESH and free text, we sought and retrieved the relevant articles from the most appropriate medical databases (the Cochrane Library, PubMed and Scopus) through three separate search strategies up to March 2015. The inclusion criteria were as follows: 1) Studies with specific criteria; 2) Articles written in English; 3) Those articles conducted in compliance with priority setting of health technologies. Data were analyzed qualitatively using a thematic synthesis technique. Results: After screening the retrieved papers via PRISMA framework, from the 7,012 papers, 40 studies were included in the final phase. Criteria for selecting health technologies (in pre assessment and in the assessment phase) were categorized into six main themes: 1) Health outcomes; 2) Disease and target population; 3) Technology alternatives; 4) Economic aspects; 5) Evidence; 6) and other factors. "Health effects/benefits" had the maximum frequency in health outcomes (8 studies); "disease severity" had the maximum frequency in disease and target population (12 studies); "the number of alternatives" had the maximum frequency in alternatives (2 studies); "cost-effectiveness" had the maximum frequency in economic aspects (15 studies); "quality of evidence" had the maximum frequency in evidence (4 studies); and "issues concerning the health system" had the maximum frequency in other factors (10 studies). Conclusion: The results revealed an increase in the number of studies on health

  18. Further tests of the Scalar Expectancy Theory (SET) and the Learning-to-Time (LeT) model in a temporal bisection task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, Armando; Arantes, Joana

    2006-06-01

    To contrast two models of timing, Scalar Expectancy Theory (SET) and Learning to Time (LeT), pigeons were exposed to a double temporal bisection procedure. On half of the trials, they learned to choose a red key after a 1s signal and a green key after a 4s signal; on the other half of the trials, they learned to choose a blue key after a 4-s signal and a yellow key after a 16-s signal. This was Phase A of an ABA design. On Phase B, the pigeons were divided into two groups and exposed to a new bisection task in which the signals ranged from 1 to 16s and the choice keys were blue and green. One group was reinforced for choosing blue after 1-s signals and green after 16-s signals and the other group was reinforced for the opposite mapping (green after 1-s signals and blue after 16-s signals). Whereas SET predicted no differences between the groups, LeT predicted that the former group would learn the new discrimination faster than the latter group. The results were consistent with LeT. Finally, the pigeons returned to Phase A. Only LeT made specific predictions regarding the reacquisition of the four temporal discriminations. These predictions were only partly consistent with the results.

  19. The Use of Digital Technology in Finding Multiple Paths to Solve and Extend an Equilateral Triangle Task

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos-Trigo, Manuel; Reyes-Rodriguez, Aaron

    2016-01-01

    Mathematical tasks are crucial elements for teachers to orient, foster and assess students' processes to comprehend and develop mathematical knowledge. During the process of working and solving a task, searching for or discussing multiple solution paths becomes a powerful strategy for students to engage in mathematical thinking. A simple task that…

  20. Report of the Task Force for Improved Coordination of the DoD Science and Technology Program. Volume 1. Summary Report and Recommendations

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-08-01

    always balanced sheer Soviet nimerical advantages and thereby added to deterrence." 3 The Technological Gap Between the United States and the Soviet...effective way to improve productivity. D. ADVOCACY 1. Need to View S&T Program Costs as a Corporate Investment The narrowing of the technological gap between...that have been set. 11-8 E. SUMMARY OF FINDINGS 1. Erosion of Technological Leadership * The technological gap between US and Soviet military forces has

  1. Setting up a Low-Cost Lab Management System for a Multi-Purpose Computing Laboratory Using Virtualisation Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mok, Heng Ngee; Lee, Yeow Leong; Tan, Wee Kiat

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes how a generic computer laboratory equipped with 52 workstations is set up for teaching IT-related courses and other general purpose usage. The authors have successfully constructed a lab management system based on decentralised, client-side software virtualisation technology using Linux and free software tools from VMware that…

  2. Preschool Children's Exposure to Media, Technology, and Screen Time: Perspectives of Caregivers from Three Early Childcare Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharkins, Kimberly A.; Newton, Allison B.; Albaiz, Najla Essa A.; Ernest, James M.

    2016-01-01

    Young children are being increasingly exposed to media, technology, and screen time (MeTS) at home and in instructional settings. Little is known about the long-term effects of MeTS and there is a lack of research concerning caregivers' opinions regarding young children's exposure to and utilization of MeTS. Therefore, this study explored the…

  3. Preschool Children's Exposure to Media, Technology, and Screen Time: Perspectives of Caregivers from Three Early Childcare Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharkins, Kimberly A.; Newton, Allison B.; Albaiz, Najla Essa A.; Ernest, James M.

    2016-01-01

    Young children are being increasingly exposed to media, technology, and screen time (MeTS) at home and in instructional settings. Little is known about the long-term effects of MeTS and there is a lack of research concerning caregivers' opinions regarding young children's exposure to and utilization of MeTS. Therefore, this study explored the…

  4. Exploring the Integration of Technology into Jewish Education: Multi-User Virtual Environments and Supplementary School Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohn, Johannah Eve

    2014-01-01

    This descriptive case study explores the implementation of a multi-user virtual environment (MUVE) in a Jewish supplemental school setting. The research was conducted to present the recollections and reflections of three constituent populations of a new technology exploring constructivist education in the context of supplemental and online…

  5. Modelling the Factors that Affect Individuals' Utilisation of Online Learning Systems: An Empirical Study Combining the Task Technology Fit Model with the Theory of Planned Behaviour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Tai-Kuei; Yu, Tai-Yi

    2010-01-01

    Understanding learners' behaviour, perceptions and influence in terms of learner performance is crucial to predict the use of electronic learning systems. By integrating the task-technology fit (TTF) model and the theory of planned behaviour (TPB), this paper investigates the online learning utilisation of Taiwanese students. This paper provides a…

  6. Modelling the Factors that Affect Individuals' Utilisation of Online Learning Systems: An Empirical Study Combining the Task Technology Fit Model with the Theory of Planned Behaviour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Tai-Kuei; Yu, Tai-Yi

    2010-01-01

    Understanding learners' behaviour, perceptions and influence in terms of learner performance is crucial to predict the use of electronic learning systems. By integrating the task-technology fit (TTF) model and the theory of planned behaviour (TPB), this paper investigates the online learning utilisation of Taiwanese students. This paper provides a…

  7. Using Technology To Educate Deaf and Hard of Hearing Children in Rural Alaskan General Education Settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillai, Patrick

    1999-01-01

    A survey of 79 teachers of Alaskan students with deafness found those who use instructional technology tended to be older, hold an advanced degree and secondary education certification, benefit from in-service training onsite, are connected to the Internet, and actively use the technology available at their schools. (Contains references.)…

  8. The Affordance of Speech Recognition Technology for EFL Learning in an Elementary School Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liaw, Meei-Ling

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the use of speech recognition (SR) technology to support a group of elementary school children's learning of English as a foreign language (EFL). SR technology has been used in various language learning contexts. Its application to EFL teaching and learning is still relatively recent, but a solid understanding of its…

  9. Preschool Teachers' Perception and Use of Hearing Assistive Technology in Educational Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Lauri H.; Poole, Bridget; Munoz, Karen

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: This study explored how often sound-field amplification and personal frequency-modulated (FM) systems are used in preschool classrooms, teacher perceptions of advantages and disadvantages of using hearing assistive technology, and teacher recommendations for hearing assistive technology use. Method: The study used a cross-sectional survey…

  10. The Affordance of Speech Recognition Technology for EFL Learning in an Elementary School Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liaw, Meei-Ling

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the use of speech recognition (SR) technology to support a group of elementary school children's learning of English as a foreign language (EFL). SR technology has been used in various language learning contexts. Its application to EFL teaching and learning is still relatively recent, but a solid understanding of its…

  11. IEA Wind Task 23, offshore wind technology and deployment. Subtask 1: Experience with critical deployment issues. Final technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lemming, J.

    2010-10-15

    The final report for IEA Wind Task 23, Offshore Wind Energy Technology and Deployment, is made up of two separate reports: Subtask 1: Experience with Critical Deployment Issues and Subtask 2: Offshore Code Comparison Collaborative (OC3). The Subtask 1 report included here provides background information and objectives of Task 23. It specifically discusses ecological issues and regulation, electrical system integration and offshore wind, external conditions, and key conclusions for Subtask 1. A comprehensive approach to planning is needed that integrates impacts on ecology, the effects of electrical infrastructure, and the layout of wind farms. Governments, which usually finance ecological research, should disclose results for wide dissemination as they become available. As example the workshop held suggested that documents covering the issues like offshore wind energy legislation, Guidelines for EIAs and SEAs and best practices need to be produced and distributed on a regular basis, as ecological research progresses and experience from the planning and operation of existing wind farms emerges. Research should help strike the balance between optimum regulation and the need to get projects up and running. Such research is needed to increase understanding of offshore wind metrology and its impact on electrical power fluctuations. More work is needed to develop special grid code and standards for offshore. The transient behavior of large cable installations (switching / harmonic/ Behavior and modeling of large HV cable systems) must be better understood. Connection and control systems must be developed for large offshore wind farms. Work is needed to develop the technical architecture of offshore wind grid systems. Public access to measurements (e.g., turbine power output, meteorological masts, buoys) is important, especially for model validation. Determining wake effects is currently the most important challenge in wind engineering. Emphasis should be put into

  12. The impact of medical technology on sense of security in the palliative home care setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munck, Berit; Sandgren, Anna

    2017-03-02

    The increase in the use of medical devices in palliative home care requires that patients and next-of-kin feel secure. Therefore, the aim was to describe medical technology's impact on the sense of security for patients, next-of-kin and district nurses. Deductive content analysis was conducted on data from three previous studies, using the theoretical framework 'palliative home care as a secure base'. The use of medical technology was shown to have an impact on the sense of security for all involved. A sense of control was promoted by trust in staff and their competence in managing the technology, which was linked to continuity. Inner peace and being in comfort implied effective symptom relief facilitated by pain pumps and being relieved of responsibility. Health care professionals need to have practical knowledge about medical technology, but at the same time have an awareness of how to create and maintain a sense of security.

  13. Intra-orbitofrontal cortex injection of haloperidol removes the beneficial effect of methylphenidate on reversal learning of spontaneously hypertensive rats in an attentional set-shifting task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Jen-Tang; Li, Jay-Shake

    2013-02-15

    Numerous studies suggest that attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is caused by deficits in catecholaminergic systems. Furthermore, dysfunctions of prefrontal cortex can impair inhibitory controls of ADHD patients, resulting in their impulsive behaviors. Researchers also find that rats with lesions in the orbitofrontal cortex show deficits in the reversal learning of attentional set-shifting task (ASST), a behavioral test frequently used in human studies to asses the inhibition system. However, the role of orbitofrontal dopamine system in the mechanism responsible for the dysfunctions of inhibitory controls in ADHD patients and animal models remains unknown. In the present study, we manipulated orbitofrontal dopamine activities of spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR), a widely used ADHD animal model, through intra-peritoneal injection of methylphenidate (MPH) and central infusion of haloperidol, and observed their performances in ASST. The results show that juvenile SHRs learned slower than Wistar controls in the first and second reversal learnings of ASST. The deficits could be removed by intra-peritoneal injections of MPH. Furthermore, central infusions of haloperidol in the orbitofrontal cortex blocked the effects of MPH. In conclusions, dopamine activity in orbitofrontal cortex might play a crucial role in the neural mechanism of reversal learning deficits in this animal model of ADHD.

  14. The trait 'pessimism' does not interact with cognitive flexibility but makes rats more vulnerable to stress-induced motivational deficits: Results from the attentional set-shifting task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drozd, Robert; Rojek-Sito, Karolina; Rygula, Rafal

    2017-09-29

    In the present study, we have investigated the effects of the traits 'optimism' and 'pessimism' on cognitive flexibility in an animal model of depression based on chronic restraint stress. For this, first, we trained and tested the rats in a series of ambiguous-cue interpretation (ACI) tests, which allowed us to classify them as 'optimistic' or 'pessimistic'. Subsequently, we re-trained and re-tested the animals in the Attentional Set Shifting Task (ASST), which allowed evaluation of the differences between 'optimists' and 'pessimists' in terms of cognitive flexibility. Finally, we subjected half of the 'optimistic' and half of the 'pessimistic' rats to chronic (2 weeks) restraint stress and assessed the interaction between cognitive judgement bias and stress in the ASST. Although we did not observe statistically significant effects of the investigated traits and stress on cognitive flexibility, the 'pessimistic' animals subjected to chronic restraint stress showed significantly longer latencies to approach experimental rewards than their 'optimistic' conspecifics. This effect may indicate a stress-induced motivational deficit that is specific to 'pessimistic' animals. The results of the present study, along with our previous reports, indicate that the trait 'pessimism' determines animals' vulnerability to stress. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. The use of digital technology in finding multiple paths to solve and extend an equilateral triangle task

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos-Trigo, Manuel; Reyes-Rodriguez, Aaron

    2016-01-01

    Mathematical tasks are crucial elements for teachers to orient, foster and assess students' processes to comprehend and develop mathematical knowledge. During the process of working and solving a task, searching for or discussing multiple solution paths becomes a powerful strategy for students to engage in mathematical thinking. A simple task that involves the construction of an equilateral triangle is used to present and discuss multiple solution approaches that rely on a variety of concepts and ways of reasoning. To this end, the use of a Dynamic Geometry System (GeoGebra) became instrumental in constructing and exploring dynamic models of the task. These model explorations provided a means to generate novel mathematical results.

  16. Scheduling optimization of task allocation in integrated manufacturing system based on task decomposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Aijun Liu; Michele Pfund; John Fowler

    2016-01-01

    How to deal with the colaboration between task decomposition and task scheduling is the key problem of the integrated manufacturing system for complex products. With the development of manufacturing technology, we can probe a new way to solve this problem. Firstly, a new method for task granularity quantitative analysis is put forward, which can precisely evaluate the task granularity of complex product cooperation workflow in the integrated manufacturing system, on the above basis; this method is used to guide the coarse-grained task decomposition and recombine the sub-tasks with low cohesion coefficient. Then, a multi-objective optimieation model and an algorithm are set up for the scheduling optimization of task scheduling. Finaly, the appli-cation feasibility of the model and algorithm is ultimately vali-dated through an application case study.

  17. IEA Wind Task 26. Wind Technology, Cost, and Performance Trends in Denmark, Germany, Ireland, Norway, the European Union, and the United States: 2007–2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vitina, Aisma [Ea Energy Analyses, Copenhagen (Denmark); Lüers, Silke [Deutsche WindGuard, Varel (Germany); Wallasch, Anna-Kathrin [Deutsche WindGuard, Varel (Germany); Berkhout, Volker [Fraunhofer IWES, Kassel (Germany); Duffy, Aidan [Dublin Inst. of Technology and Dublin Energy Lab. (Ireland); Cleary, Brendan [Dublin Inst. of Technology and Dublin Energy Lab. (Ireland); Husabø, Lief I. [Norwegian Water Resources and Energy Directorate (NVE), Oslo (Norway); Weir, David E. [Norwegian Water Resources and Energy Directorate (NVE), Oslo (Norway); Lacal-Arántegui, Roberto [European Commission, Ispra (Italy). Joint Research Centre; Hand, Maureen [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Lantz, Eric [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Belyeu, Kathy [Belyeu Consulting, Takoma Park, MD (United States); Wiser, Ryan H [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Bolinger, Mark [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Hoen, Ben [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2015-06-01

    The International Energy Agency Implementing Agreement for cooperation in Research, Development, and Deployment of Wind Energy Systems (IEA Wind) Task 26—The Cost of Wind Energy represents an international collaboration dedicated to exploring past, present and future cost of wind energy. This report provides an overview of recent trends in wind plant technology, cost, and performance in those countries that are currently represented by participating organizations in IEA Wind Task 26: Denmark, Germany, Ireland, Norway, and the United States as well as the European Union.

  18. Equipment Design and Cost Estimation for Small Modular Biomass Systems, Synthesis Gas Cleanup, and Oxygen Separation Equipment; Task 9: Mixed Alcohols From Syngas -- State of Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nexant Inc.

    2006-05-01

    This deliverable is for Task 9, Mixed Alcohols from Syngas: State of Technology, as part of National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Award ACO-5-44027, ''Equipment Design and Cost Estimation for Small Modular Biomass Systems, Synthesis Gas Cleanup and Oxygen Separation Equipment''. Task 9 supplements the work previously done by NREL in the mixed alcohols section of the 2003 technical report Preliminary Screening--Technical and Economic Assessment of Synthesis Gas to Fuels and Chemicals with Emphasis on the Potential for Biomass-Derived Syngas.

  19. Wearable accelerometry-based technology capable of assessing functional activities in neurological populations in community settings: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steins, Dax; Dawes, Helen; Esser, Patrick; Collett, Johnny

    2014-03-13

    Integrating rehabilitation services through wearable systems has the potential to accurately assess the type, intensity, duration, and quality of movement necessary for procuring key outcome measures. This review aims to explore wearable accelerometry-based technology (ABT) capable of assessing mobility-related functional activities intended for rehabilitation purposes in community settings for neurological populations. In this review, we focus on the accuracy of ABT-based methods, types of outcome measures, and the implementation of ABT in non-clinical settings for rehabilitation purposes. Cochrane, PubMed, Web of Knowledge, EMBASE, and IEEE Xplore. The search strategy covered three main areas, namely wearable technology, rehabilitation, and setting. Potentially relevant studies were categorized as systems either evaluating methods or outcome parameters. Methodological qualities of studies were assessed by two customized checklists, depending on their categorization and rated independently by three blinded reviewers. Twelve studies involving ABT met the eligibility criteria, of which three studies were identified as having implemented ABT for rehabilitation purposes in non-clinical settings. From the twelve studies, seven studies achieved high methodological quality scores. These studies were not only capable of assessing the type, quantity, and quality measures of functional activities, but could also distinguish healthy from non-healthy subjects and/or address disease severity levels. While many studies support ABT's potential for telerehabilitation, few actually utilized it to assess mobility-related functional activities outside laboratory settings. To generate more appropriate outcome measures, there is a clear need to translate research findings and novel methods into practice.

  20. Setting the scene: Mobile and wearable technology for managing healthcare and wellbeing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amor, James D; James, Christopher J

    2015-01-01

    The growing proliferation of mobile and wearable technology (MWT) offers interesting use cases when applied to health and wellness management. Current trends towards more longer term health and wellness management coupled with global challenges around the provision of healthcare to aging populations with tighter budget constraints, create rich opportunities to exploit this new technology to maintain health and wellness. This paper provides an overview of commonly available MWT and examines how it can be used in health and wellness systems. Case studies are given from two recent research projects and the issues and challenges that arise in the use of MWT are discussed. We conclude that MWT offers some key advantages in some healthcare situations, but that care must be taken to select appropriate technology for each use.

  1. Climate-Adapted Soil Cultivation as an Aspect for Sustainable Farming – Task-Technology-Fit of a Decision Support System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Welf Guenther-Lübbers

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Due to global climate change and its impact on local weather conditions, decision support systems are becoming more important in agriculture. Such systems allow farmers to adapt more effectively to the complex changes affecting their farms. Marginal production sites must apply new tillage strategies adapted to new climatic conditions. Information about proper strategy adjustments is often disseminated through agricultural extension services and journals. A new internet information platform, KlimaBob, which focuses on climate-flexible tillage, was established under the auspices of the Innovation Network of Climate Change Adaptation Brandenburg Berlin. Successful and permanent introduction of such a system requires analysis and verification of its acceptance among individual farmers. This study addresses this need by applying the established task-technology fit approach. A survey was conducted among farmers in the Brandenburg region. The resulting data provided the basis for a structural equation model that explains and evaluates the task-technology fit of the KlimaBob platform. The results indicate that the performance spectrum of the system exerts a strong influence on the task-technology fit when assessed by both the name characteristics of KlimaBob and the individual characteristics of users (for example, time management, technology affinity and risk attitude.

  2. Implementation of BacMam virus gene delivery technology in a drug discovery setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kost, Thomas A; Condreay, J Patrick; Ames, Robert S; Rees, Stephen; Romanos, Michael A

    2007-05-01

    Membrane protein targets constitute a key segment of drug discovery portfolios and significant effort has gone into increasing the speed and efficiency of pursuing these targets. However, issues still exist in routine gene expression and stable cell-based assay development for membrane proteins, which are often multimeric or toxic to host cells. To enhance cell-based assay capabilities, modified baculovirus (BacMam virus) gene delivery technology has been successfully applied to the transient expression of target proteins in mammalian cells. Here, we review the development, full implementation and benefits of this platform-based gene expression technology in support of SAR and HTS assays across GlaxoSmithKline.

  3. Conceptions of the Nature of Science and Technology: a Study with Children and Youths in a Non-Formal Science and Technology Education Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha Fernandes, Geraldo W.; Rodrigues, António M.; Ferreira, Carlos Alberto

    2017-05-01

    This study investigated some of the aspects that characterise the understanding of the Nature of Science (NOS) and Nature of Technology (NOT) of 20 children and youths from different countries who perform scientific and technological activities in a non-formal teaching and learning setting. Data were collected using a questionnaire and semistructured interviews. A categorical instrument was developed to analyse the participants' conceptions of the following subjects: (1) the role of the scientist, (2) NOS and (3) NOT. The results suggest that the participants had naïve conceptions of NOS that are marked by empirical and technical-instrumental views. They characterised NOT primarily as an instrumental apparatus, an application of knowledge and something important that is part of their lives. They exhibited a stereotypical understanding of the role of the scientist (development of methods, demonstration of facts, relationship with technological devices, etc.).

  4. Making Culture and Language Real in a Rural Setting: The Technology Connection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Elizabeth A.

    2000-01-01

    Asserts that with the growth of the Internet, e-mail, synchronous chat, and videoconferencing, students in rural (and urban) areas have virtually endless access to culture and language from their school or home. Describes the utilization of technology as a means of cultural exchange between Southwest Virginia Community College and the University…

  5. 75 FR 44589 - Health Information Technology: Initial Set of Standards, Implementation Specifications, and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-28

    ... Representational state transfer RFA Regulatory Flexibility Act SNOMED-CT Systematized Nomenclature of Medicine... Accountability Act of 1996 (HIPAA) Privacy Rule Accounting of Disclosures Regulation under the HITECH Act... adopted ICD-9 or SNOMED- CT to provide that structure. As a result, Certified EHR Technology must...

  6. The Use of Multiple Monitor and KVM (Keyboard, Video, and Mouse) Technologies in an Educational Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Robin

    2004-01-01

    Having more than one screen of usable space can enhance productivity, both inside and outside of the classroom. So can using one keyboard, screen, and mouse with multiple computers. This paper (and session) will cover the author's use of multiple monitor and KVM (keyboard, video, and mouse) technologies both inside and outside the classroom, with…

  7. Integration of Information and Communication Technology and Pupils' Motivation in a Physical Education Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legrain, Pascal; Gillet, Nicolas; Gernigon, Christophe; Lafreniere, Marc-André

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to test an integrative model regarding the impact of information and communication technology (ICT) on achievement in physical education. Pupils' perceptions of autonomy-support from teacher, satisfaction of basic psychological needs, and self-determined motivation were considered to mediate the impact of ICT on…

  8. The Power of Natural Frameworks: Technology and the Question of Agency in CSCL Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lantz-Andersson, Annika

    2009-01-01

    Students frame activities in school in specific ways which are fundamental for their learning and problem solving. The introduction of digital technology and multimedia applications leads to additional aspects to consider, creating a need for research on interaction and activities in relation to new tools. The aim of this study is to analyze how…

  9. Integration of Information and Communication Technology and Pupils' Motivation in a Physical Education Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legrain, Pascal; Gillet, Nicolas; Gernigon, Christophe; Lafreniere, Marc-André

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to test an integrative model regarding the impact of information and communication technology (ICT) on achievement in physical education. Pupils' perceptions of autonomy-support from teacher, satisfaction of basic psychological needs, and self-determined motivation were considered to mediate the impact of ICT on…

  10. Technology Use in Nursery and Primary Education in Two Different Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bueno Alastuey, Mª Camino; García Laborda, Jesús

    2016-01-01

    This article studies which and how Information and Communications Technologies (ICTs) are used by nursery and primary education in-service teachers as reported by their pre-service teacher trainees after observations in their practicum in two provinces in Spain, Alcalá de Henares-Guadalajara and Navarre. Results indicate that in-service teachers…

  11. The Need for Integration of Technology in K-12 School Settings in Kenya, Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Momanyi, Lilian; Norby, RenaFaye; Strand, Sharon

    2006-01-01

    Many computer users around the world have access to the latest advances in technology and use of the World Wide Web (WWW or Web). However, for a variety of political, economic, and social reasons, some peoples of the world do not have access to these resources. The educational systems of developing countries have not completely missed the…

  12. Challenges in Linguistically and Culturally Diverse Elementary Settings with Math Instruction Using Learning Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganesh, Tirupalavanam G.; Middleton, James A.

    2006-01-01

    This research effort reports the findings of an empirical study focusing on the ways in which technological tools are implemented specifically in mathematics education in a Title I school. The purpose was to identify the perspectives and actions of the school's mathematics specialist and the multi-graded (grades 2-3) classroom teacher as they…

  13. Investigate-and-redesign tasks as a context for learning and doing science and technology: A study of naive, novice and expert high school and adult designers doing product comparisons and redesign tasks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crismond, David Paul

    This thesis studied high school students and adults with varying degrees of design experience doing two technology investigate-and-redesign (I&R) tasks. Each involved subjects investigating products, designing experiments to compare them fairly, and then redesigning the devices. A total of 25 pairs of subjects participated in this investigation and included naive and novice high school designers, as well as naive, novice, and expert adult designers. Subjects of similar age and design experience worked in same-gender teams and met for two 2-hour sessions. The essential research question of this thesis was: "What process skills and concepts do naive, novice and expert designers use and learn when investigating devices, designing experiments, and redesigning the devices?" Three methodologies were used to gather and analyze the data: clinical interviewing (Piaget, 1929/1960), protocol analysis (Ericsson & Simon, 1984) and interaction analysis (Jordan and Henderson, 1995). The thesis provides composite case-studies of 10 of the 50 test sessions, buttressed by descriptions of performance trends for all subjects. Given the small sample sizes involved, the findings are by necessity tentative and not supported by statistical analysis: (1) I&R activities are engaging, less time-intensive complements to design-and-build tasks, which involve simple mechanical devices and carry with them a host of potential "alternative understandings" in science and technology. Much gets learned during these tasks, more involving "device knowledge" and "device inquiry skills" than "big ideas" in science and technology. (2) Redesign tasks scaffold naive and novice designers to improved performance in the multidimensional and context-specific activity of design. The performances of naive and novice designers were more like that of expert designers when redesigning existing devices than when doing start-from-scratch designing. (3) Conceptual redesign involved more analysis- than synthesis

  14. Anatomy and Physiology. Module Set II: Major Body Systems. Teacher Edition [and] Student Edition. Surgical Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilley, Robert

    This document, which is the second part of a two-part set of modules on anatomy and physiology for future surgical technicians, contains the teacher and student editions of an introduction to anatomy and physiology that consists of modules on the following body systems: integumentary system; skeletal system; muscular system; nervous system;…

  15. Health Information Technology, Patient Safety, and Professional Nursing Care Documentation in Acute Care Settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavin, Mary Ann; Harper, Ellen; Barr, Nancy

    2015-04-14

    The electronic health record (EHR) is a documentation tool that yields data useful in enhancing patient safety, evaluating care quality, maximizing efficiency, and measuring staffing needs. Although nurses applaud the EHR, they also indicate dissatisfaction with its design and cumbersome electronic processes. This article describes the views of nurses shared by members of the Nursing Practice Committee of the Missouri Nurses Association; it encourages nurses to share their EHR concerns with Information Technology (IT) staff and vendors and to take their place at the table when nursing-related IT decisions are made. In this article, we describe the experiential-reflective reasoning and action model used to understand staff nurses' perspectives, share committee reflections and recommendations for improving both documentation and documentation technology, and conclude by encouraging nurses to develop their documentation and informatics skills. Nursing issues include medication safety, documentation and standards of practice, and EHR efficiency. IT concerns include interoperability, vendors, innovation, nursing voice, education, and collaboration.

  16. Multi-state Beef Reproduction Task Force provides science-based recommendations for the application of reproductive technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, S K; Funston, R N; Hall, J B; Kesler, D J; Lamb, G C; Lauderdale, J W; Patterson, D J; Perry, G A; Strohbehn, D R

    2011-09-01

    Since its formation, the Beef Reproduction Task Force (BRTF) has worked to enhance productivity and profitability of US beef herds by integrating research and extension efforts with the intent of more effectively transferring the use of reproductive technologies to the field. A key early step was to coordinate efforts in identifying effective breeding management protocols for beef cattle and to clarify their associated acronyms. A short list of recommended protocols and their acronyms for synchronization of estrus and ovulation in beef cattle was developed based on results from peer-reviewed, published research and a comprehensive review of data collected from the field. The list of recommended protocols was developed by the BRTF in cooperation with veterinarians and cattle AI industries. These protocols and their acronyms are presented uniformly in all of the major AI sire directories and are available online at http://www.beefrepro.info. Protocol updates are made annually to incorporate the most recent research findings related to estrous cycle control in beef cattle. The Estrus Synchronization Planner, a software program developed in cooperation with the Iowa Beef Center, now reflects these same recommendations. Beginning in 2002, the BRTF hosted and presented 11 educational workshops to more than 1,900 attendees in key cow-calf states. These Applied Reproductive Strategies in Beef Cattle workshops targeted beef producers, AI industry personnel, veterinarians, allied industry representatives, and academicians. A national media sponsor provided online coverage of the last 3 workshops at http://www.appliedreprostrategies.com. A postmeeting evaluation, developed to assess application of information from 2 recent workshops, was returned by 55% of those contacted (n = 150). Attendees averaged 16 (± 13.4 SD) yr of AI experience, and 80% of respondents represented more than 100 cows. Respondents were asked to estimate the value of AI-sired calves compared with natural

  17. Introduction of new technologies and decision making processes: a framework to adapt a Local Health Technology Decision Support Program for other local settings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poulin P

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Paule Poulin,1 Lea Austen,1 Catherine M Scott,2 Michelle Poulin,1 Nadine Gall,2 Judy Seidel,3 René Lafrenière1 1Department of Surgery, 2Knowledge Management, 3Public Health Innovation and Decision Support, Alberta Health Services, Calgary, AB, Canada Purpose: Introducing new health technologies, including medical devices, into a local setting in a safe, effective, and transparent manner is a complex process, involving many disciplines and players within an organization. Decision making should be systematic, consistent, and transparent. It should involve translating and integrating scientific evidence, such as health technology assessment (HTA reports, with context-sensitive evidence to develop recommendations on whether and under what conditions a new technology will be introduced. However, the development of a program to support such decision making can require considerable time and resources. An alternative is to adapt a preexisting program to the new setting. Materials and methods: We describe a framework for adapting the Local HTA Decision Support Program, originally developed by the Department of Surgery and Surgical Services (Calgary, AB, Canada, for use by other departments. The framework consists of six steps: 1 development of a program review and adaptation manual, 2 education and readiness assessment of interested departments, 3 evaluation of the program by individual departments, 4 joint evaluation via retreats, 5 synthesis of feedback and program revision, and 6 evaluation of the adaptation process. Results: Nine departments revised the Local HTA Decision Support Program and expressed strong satisfaction with the adaptation process. Key elements for success were identified. Conclusion: Adaptation of a preexisting program may reduce duplication of effort, save resources, raise the health care providers' awareness of HTA, and foster constructive stakeholder engagement, which enhances the legitimacy of evidence

  18. Application of Fuzzy Sets in an Expert System For Technological Process Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josef Tošenovský

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper is preoccupied with application of an expert system in the management of a process with one input and one output, using the fuzzy set theory. It resolves the problem of formalization of a verbal description of the process management coupled with the use of process operator’s experience. The procedure that calculates regulatory intervention in the process is presented and accompanied by graphical illustrations.

  19. Strategic Adaptation to Task Characteristics, Incentives, and Individual Differences in Dual-Tasking.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian P Janssen

    Full Text Available We investigate how good people are at multitasking by comparing behavior to a prediction of the optimal strategy for dividing attention between two concurrent tasks. In our experiment, 24 participants had to interleave entering digits on a keyboard with controlling a randomly moving cursor with a joystick. The difficulty of the tracking task was systematically varied as a within-subjects factor. Participants were also exposed to different explicit reward functions that varied the relative importance of the tracking task relative to the typing task (between-subjects. Results demonstrate that these changes in task characteristics and monetary incentives, together with individual differences in typing ability, influenced how participants choose to interleave tasks. This change in strategy then affected their performance on each task. A computational cognitive model was used to predict performance for a wide set of alternative strategies for how participants might have possibly interleaved tasks. This allowed for predictions of optimal performance to be derived, given the constraints placed on performance by the task and cognition. A comparison of human behavior with the predicted optimal strategy shows that participants behaved near optimally. Our findings have implications for the design and evaluation of technology for multitasking situations, as consideration should be given to the characteristics of the task, but also to how different users might use technology depending on their individual characteristics and their priorities.

  20. Models for Building Knowledge in a Technology-Rich Setting: Teacher Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory MacKinnon

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Technology offers promising opportunities for creating new types of classroom learning environments. This paper describes three technology models used by teacher education interns: electronic portfolios, negotiative concept mapping, cognote-supported electronic discussions. As implemented in the current study, these models invoke graduated attributes of knowledge building and as such serve as a useful continuum of examples of the potential of technology to assist in promoting progressive knowledge construction. A description of the models is followed by a discussion of the relationship of these classrooms to Knowledge-Building principles. Résumé La technologie offre des possibilités prometteuses pour la création de nouveaux types d’environnements d’apprentissage en classe. Le présent article décrit trois modèles technologiques utilisés par les stagiaires en enseignement : portfolios électroniques, cartographie conceptuelle de négociation, discussions électroniques avec codage. Tels que mis en œuvre dans le cadre de la présente étude, ces modèles font appel à des attributs hiérarchiques de coélaboration des connaissances et constituent donc en eux-mêmes un continuum utile d’exemples illustrant comment la technologie peut aider à encourager l’élaboration progressive des connaissances. Une description des modèles est suivie d’une discussion portant sur la relation de ces classes avec les principes de coélaboration des connaissances.

  1. Evaluation of an innovative communication technology in an acute care setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandenkerkhof, Elizabeth G; Hall, Susan; Wilson, Rosemary; Gay, Ann; Duhn, Lenora

    2009-01-01

    Wireless technology in healthcare has been associated with communication-related improvements in workflow; however, there are barriers to adoption. The purpose of this study was to assess perceptions and attitudes of staff toward the use of a wireless communication device (Vocera, Vocera Communications, Inc., San Jose, CA) and to compare communication patterns before and after implementation. A pretest-posttest quasi-experimental design and the Theory of Planned Behavior were used. Attitudes, subjective norms, and perceived control explained 25% of the variation in behavioral intent before and 45% of the variation in behavioral intent after Vocera implementation. The time for key communication activities was reduced by 25% overall. On average, each nurse engaged in these activities 16.2 times a day before Vocera and 11.6 times a day with Vocera. This study provides evidence that introduction of novel communication technology must account for user attitudes before implementation. Vocera improved "hand-off" communication, was perceived to be of benefit, and has the potential to improve patient safety and work environments. This may also translate to reduction in healthcare resources.

  2. ImSET 3.1: Impact of Sector Energy Technologies Model Description and User's Guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott, Michael J.; Livingston, Olga V.; Balducci, Patrick J.; Roop, Joseph M.; Schultz, Robert W.

    2009-05-22

    This 3.1 version of the Impact of Sector Energy Technologies (ImSET) model represents the next generation of the previously-built ImSET model (ImSET 2.0) that was developed in 2005 to estimate the macroeconomic impacts of energy-efficient technology in buildings. In particular, a special-purpose version of the Benchmark National Input-Output (I-O) model was designed specifically to estimate the national employment and income effects of the deployment of Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)–developed energy-saving technologies. In comparison with the previous versions of the model, this version features the use of the U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis 2002 national input-output table and the central processing code has been moved from the FORTRAN legacy operating environment to a modern C++ code. ImSET is also easier to use than extant macroeconomic simulation models and incorporates information developed by each of the EERE offices as part of the requirements of the Government Performance and Results Act. While it does not include the ability to model certain dynamic features of markets for labor and other factors of production featured in the more complex models, for most purposes these excluded features are not critical. The analysis is credible as long as the assumption is made that relative prices in the economy would not be substantially affected by energy efficiency investments. In most cases, the expected scale of these investments is small enough that neither labor markets nor production cost relationships should seriously affect national prices as the investments are made. The exact timing of impacts on gross product, employment, and national wage income from energy efficiency investments is not well-enough understood that much special insight can be gained from the additional dynamic sophistication of a macroeconomic simulation model. Thus, we believe that this version of ImSET is a cost-effective solution to estimating the economic

  3. Development and implementation of an institutional repository within a Science, Engineering and Technology (SET) environment

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Van der Merwe, Adèle

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available not be equated to plagiarism nor with inferior quality. 1.2 Benefits and value of an IR Allard et al [2005:170] explains the value of IRs as services that provides members with ‘…the ability to add, or self-archive, items they have authored … thereby... of the CSIR. It was also decided to deviate from the general academic institution approach and to make the repository a sub-set of an existing classified database. The IR therefore will contain all the publicly available publications and special...

  4. SET Careers Program: An interactive science, engineering, and technology career education exhibit. [A brief summary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cole, P.R.

    1993-03-31

    The New York Hall of Science, in response to the national crisis in education and employment in science and engineering, is developing and pilot testing a unique, interactive, video-based, hypermedia series on energy-related and other science and engineering careers for middle and junior high school students. Working in collaboration with the Consortium for Mathematics and its Applications (COMAP) and the Educational Film Center (EFC), this pilot-demonstration phase will last 14 months, during which time the basic design, production, and testing of eight science and engineering career modules (video and software) will be completed and installed as an interactive educational exhibit at the New York Hall of Science. This career education package will then be distributed to other science technology centers nationwide.

  5. Improved inhalation technology for setting safe exposure levels for workplace chemicals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuart, Bruce O.

    1993-01-01

    Threshold Limit Values recommended as allowable air concentrations of a chemical in the workplace are often based upon a no-observable-effect-level (NOEL) determined by experimental inhalation studies using rodents. A 'safe level' for human exposure must then be estimated by the use of generalized safety factors in attempts to extrapolate from experimental rodents to man. The recent development of chemical-specific physiologically-based toxicokinetics makes use of measured physiological, biochemical, and metabolic parameters to construct a validated model that is able to 'scale-up' rodent response data to predict the behavior of the chemical in man. This procedure is made possible by recent advances in personal computer software and the emergence of appropriate biological data, and provides an analytical tool for much more reliable risk evaluation and airborne chemical exposure level setting for humans.

  6. Multiple Agent Dynamic Task Allocation Algorithm Research Based on Dynamic Fuzzy Sets%基于动态模糊集的多Agent动态任务分配算法研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    殷凡; 牛丽

    2013-01-01

    In order to improve the efficiency of multi-agent dynamic task allocation, we do task assignment study at the theory of dynamic fuzzy set. Firstly, we introduce the relative definition and mathematical model of dynamic fuzzy set, then we conduct example simulation, It provide relevant multi-agent dynamic task allocation algorithm and do example test. The experience result shows that this method can well solved the problems in the multi-agent dynamic task allocation. Besides, it improved the efficiency of dynamic task allocation in a great extent, which has a high research value.%为了提高多Agent动态任务分配的效率,借助于动态模糊集理论对任务分配进行研究。首先详细介绍了动态模糊集相关定义和数学模型,接着进行实例仿真,给出相关的多Agent动态任务分配算法并进行实例测试。实验结果表明,此方法很好地解决了多Agent系统中动态任务分配的问题,并且在很大程度上提高了动态任务分配的效率,具有一定的研究价值。

  7. Use of the differentiated educational tasks during independent work of students.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharov S.V.

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Ways differentiations of learning tasks are set. Examples of differentiated tasks from different levels in programming and fundamentals of information technology were examined. In the research were used records of first year students' educational success and data from questionnaire. It was found that the implementation of differentiated learning tasks forms the required knowledge and skills, develops adequate estimation, allows to receive enjoy from doing the tasks. Their use enables to better organization of their independent work.

  8. A Survey of Telecommunications Technology. Part II. President's Task Force on Communications Policy. Staff Paper One, Part II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostow, Eugene V.

    The document contains the final four appendices to a staff paper submitted to the President's Task Force on Communications Policy. "The Digital Loop" describes changes in urban telecommunications which are predicted for 1970-80, considering three possible systems: paired wires with single analog signals (present telephones), coaxial…

  9. Task 9: deployment of photovoltaic technologies: co-operation with developing countries. Sources of financing for PV-based rural electrification in developing countries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parker, W. [Institute for Sustainable Power, Highlands Ranch, CO (United States); Syngellakis, K. [IT Power Ltd, The Manor house, Chineham (United Kingdom); Shanker, A. [Innovation Energie Developpement, IED, Francheville (France)

    2004-05-15

    This report for the International Energy Agency (IEA) made by Task 9 of the Photovoltaic Power Systems (PVPS) programme takes a look at how PV-based rural electrification in developing countries can be financed. The objective of Task 9 is to increase the overall rate of successful deployment of PV systems in developing countries through increased co-operation and information exchange. This document provides an introduction to PV project financing, including funding sources available, strategies and planning needed to secure the necessary financial resources for the deployment of PV technologies in developing and transitional economies. Topics discussed include risk analysis and the barriers to financing, sources of financing, considerations and variables that influence financing decisions and the process for securing financing. Various forms of international and national financing are looked at, as are the factors influencing financing decisions.

  10. Technology Development and Implementation in the Public Health Institutions: A Strategic and Pedagogical Task for the Learning Organization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wentzer, Helle

    2004-01-01

    solution is to put technology development and implementation together within a theoretical frame for the learning organization where and exist for both the IT-tools and the personnel. The personnel makes demands to which goals should be reached through technology and technology demands that the personnel...... is acquainted with hardware and software. As a communication system, technology offers new possibilities of realizing other forms of cooperation. The suggested solution is a synthesis between the strategy for organization development through technology and the implementation of IT as a learning process......-implementation in the secondary sector. The investigation indicated that the use of IT is a learning process which requires three types of knowledge and that continued IT-development in the organization requires a new fourth knowledge. reciprocal demands terms...

  11. JV Task 106 - Feasibility of CO2 Capture Technologies for Existing North Dakota Lignite-Fired Pulverized Coal Boilers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michael L. Jones; Brandon M. Pavlish; Melanie D. Jensen

    2007-05-01

    The goal of this project is to provide a technical review and evaluation of various carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) capture technologies, with a focus on the applicability to lignite-fired facilities within North Dakota. The motivation for the project came from the Lignite Energy Council's (LEC's) need to identify the feasibility of CO{sub 2} capture technologies for existing North Dakota lignite-fired, pulverized coal (pc) power plants. A literature review was completed to determine the commercially available technologies as well as to identify emerging CO{sub 2} capture technologies that are currently in the research or demonstration phase. The literature review revealed few commercially available technologies for a coal-fired power plant. CO{sub 2} separation and capture using amine scrubbing have been performed for several years in industry and could be applied to an existing pc-fired power plant. Other promising technologies do exist, but many are still in the research and demonstration phases. Oxyfuel combustion, a technology that has been used in industry for several years to increase boiler efficiency, is in the process of being tailored for CO{sub 2} separation and capture. These two technologies were chosen for evaluation for CO{sub 2} separation and capture from coal-fired power plants. Although oxyfuel combustion is still in the pilot-scale demonstration phase, it was chosen to be evaluated at LEC's request because it is one of the most promising emerging technologies. As part of the evaluation of the two chosen technologies, a conceptual design, a mass and energy balance, and an economic evaluation were completed.

  12. Consumer demand for green stormwater management technology in an urban setting: The case of Chicago rain barrels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ando, Amy W.; Freitas, Luiz P. C.

    2011-12-01

    Hydrological disruption and water pollution from urbanization can be reduced if households in urban areas adopt decentralized storm water controls. We study a citywide municipal subsidized rain-barrel program in the third biggest city in the United States, Chicago, to explore what factors influence whether households purchase this sort of green storm water management technology in an urban setting. Specifically, we regress census-tract level data on the number of rain barrels adopted in different parts of the city on socioeconomic variables, data on local flood frequency, and features of the housing stock. We find that rain-barrel purchases are not correlated with local levels of flooding, even though city residents were told by program managers that rain barrels could alleviate local flooding. Instead, rain barrels are heavily concentrated in places with high-income attitudinally green populations. We do find more rain barrels were adopted in places close to rain-barrel distribution points and near sites of hydrological information campaigns; thus, policy makers might increase green-technology adoption in areas where they can do the most good by reducing transaction costs and providing education programs to those areas. Finally, our results indicate that owner occupancy is positively correlated with green-technology adoption. Low-rise rental housing may have inefficiently low levels of adoption, such that city managers might want to develop programs to encourage storm water management investments by landlords who do not live in their own properties.

  13. APA Summit on Medical Student Education Task Force on Informatics and Technology: Learning about Computers and Applying Computer Technology to Education and Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilty, Donald M.; Hales, Deborah J.; Briscoe, Greg; Benjamin, Sheldon; Boland, Robert J.; Luo, John S.; Chan, Carlyle H.; Kennedy, Robert S.; Karlinsky, Harry; Gordon, Daniel B.; Yager, Joel; Yellowlees, Peter M.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: This article provides a brief overview of important issues for educators regarding medical education and technology. Methods: The literature describes key concepts, prototypical technology tools, and model programs. A work group of psychiatric educators was convened three times by phone conference to discuss the literature. Findings…

  14. APA Summit on Medical Student Education Task Force on Informatics and Technology: Steps to Enhance the Use of Technology in Education through Faculty Development, Funding and Change Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilty, Donald M.; Benjamin, Sheldon; Briscoe, Gregory; Hales, Deborah J.; Boland, Robert J.; Luo, John S.; Chan, Carlyle H.; Kennedy, Robert S.; Karlinsky, Harry; Gordon, Daniel B.; Yellowlees, Peter M.; Yager, Joel

    2006-01-01

    Objective: This article provides an overview of how trainees, faculty, and institutions use technology for acquiring knowledge, skills, and attitudes for practicing modern medicine. Method: The authors reviewed the literature on medical education, technology, and change, and identify the key themes and make recommendations for implementing…

  15. Standardization of seismic tomographic models and earthquake focal mechanisms data sets based on web technologies, visualization with keyhole markup language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postpischl, Luca; Danecek, Peter; Morelli, Andrea; Pondrelli, Silvia

    2011-01-01

    We present two projects in seismology that have been ported to web technologies, which provide results in Keyhole Markup Language (KML) visualization layers. These use the Google Earth geo-browser as the flexible platform that can substitute specialized graphical tools to perform qualitative visual data analyses and comparisons. The Network of Research Infrastructures for European Seismology (NERIES) Tomographic Earth Model Repository contains data sets from over 20 models from the literature. A hierarchical structure of folders that represent the sets of depths for each model is implemented in KML, and this immediately results into an intuitive interface for users to navigate freely and to compare tomographic plots. The KML layer for the European-Mediterranean Regional Centroid-Moment Tensor Catalog displays the focal mechanism solutions or moderate-magnitude Earthquakes from 1997 to the present. Our aim in both projects was to also propose standard representations of scientific data sets. Here, the general semantic approach of an XML framework has an important impact that must be further explored, although we find the KML syntax to more emphasis on aspects of detailed visualization. We have thus used, and propose the use of, Javascript Object Notation (JSON), another semantic notation that stems from the web-development community that provides a compact, general-purpose, data-exchange format.

  16. Strategy for design NIR calibration sets based on process spectrum and model space: An innovative approach for process analytical technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cárdenas, V; Cordobés, M; Blanco, M; Alcalà, M

    2015-10-10

    The pharmaceutical industry is under stringent regulations on quality control of their products because is critical for both, productive process and consumer safety. According to the framework of "process analytical technology" (PAT), a complete understanding of the process and a stepwise monitoring of manufacturing are required. Near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) combined with chemometrics have lately performed efficient, useful and robust for pharmaceutical analysis. One crucial step in developing effective NIRS-based methodologies is selecting an appropriate calibration set to construct models affording accurate predictions. In this work, we developed calibration models for a pharmaceutical formulation during its three manufacturing stages: blending, compaction and coating. A novel methodology is proposed for selecting the calibration set -"process spectrum"-, into which physical changes in the samples at each stage are algebraically incorporated. Also, we established a "model space" defined by Hotelling's T(2) and Q-residuals statistics for outlier identification - inside/outside the defined space - in order to select objectively the factors to be used in calibration set construction. The results obtained confirm the efficacy of the proposed methodology for stepwise pharmaceutical quality control, and the relevance of the study as a guideline for the implementation of this easy and fast methodology in the pharma industry.

  17. Can Technology Acceptance Model be Applied on the Rural Setting: The Case of Village Development and Security Committee in Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahaman A. Samah

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Malaysia has come out with a number of strategies such as National Information Technology Center, Universal Services Provider, Rural Internet Center and Rural Info Center to strengthen and encourage ICT usage among the rural community. Besides the efforts that are brought by the government, do the rural community especially their leaders which are the Village Development and Security Committee use ICT? Approach: The main objective of this study was to investigate any relationship that might occur between variables of Technology Acceptance Model and ICT usage among Village Development and Security Committee. A total of 240 Village Development and Security Committees were selected as the respondents for this study where a developed questionnaire was used to gain the data needed. For the purpose of analysis, SPSS was used where descriptive and inferential analyses were performed. Results: Based on the analyses run, it can be concluded that Village Development and Security Committee in Malaysia have a moderate level of ICT usage. Further analyses run showed that all of the three variables of Technology Acceptance Model namely attitude, perceive ease of use and perceive usefulness have a positive and significant relationship with ICT usage while attitude was detected as the main contributor towards ICT usage among Village Development and Security Committee. Conclusion/Recommendation: This study has revealed that Technology Acceptance Model that was used to explain ICT usage can be applied within the Malaysian rural setting. It also can be concluded that Village Development and Security Committee with a high level of attitude, perceive ease of use and perceive usefulness towards ICT will have higher level of ICT usage. To further develop and sustain this high level of attitude, perceive ease of use and perceive usefulness towards ICT usage, Village Development and Security Committee must be frequently exposed to ICT information and

  18. Report on the joint meeting of the Division of Development and Technology Plasma/Wall Interaction and High Heat Flux Materials and Components Task Groups

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, K.L. (ed.)

    1985-10-01

    This report of the Joint Meeting of the Division of Development and Technology Plasma/Wall Interaction and High Heat Flux Materials and Components Task Groups contains contributing papers in the following areas: Plasma/Materials Interaction Program and Technical Assessment, High Heat Flux Materials and Components Program and Technical Assessment, Pumped Limiters, Ignition Devices, Program Planning Activities, Compact High Power Density Reactor Requirements, Steady State Tokamaks, and Tritium Plasma Experiments. All these areas involve the consideration of High Heat Flux on Materials and the Interaction of the Plasma with the First Wall. Many of the Test Facilities are described as well. (LSP)

  19. Particularity of the Distributed Component Interconnection in Control Engineering Tasks and Method for Wider Usage of the Middleware Technologies

    CERN Document Server

    Karev, A A; Dobrianski, V M

    2003-01-01

    In this paper the investigation of specific types of the component interconnection for distributed system in control engineering (nonstandard queries and dataflow types) was performed. Implementation methods, using primitive objects Java/RMI and CORBA middleware technologies, were prepared.

  20. Strategies for reducing morbidity and mortality from diabetes through health-care system interventions and diabetes self-management education in community settings. A report on recommendations of the Task Force on Community Preventive Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-09-28

    Reducing morbidity and mortality and improving quality of life for persons with diabetes is an ongoing challenge for health-care providers and organizations and public health practitioners. Interventions are available that focus on persons with diabetes, health-care systems, families, and public policies. The Task Force on Community Preventive Services (the Task Force) has conducted systematic reviews of seven population-oriented interventions that can be implemented by health-care organizations and communities. Two of these interventions focus on health-care systems (disease and case management), and five focus on persons with diabetes (diabetes self-management education delivered in community settings). On the basis of these reviews, the Task Force has made recommendations regarding use of these seven interventions. The Task Force strongly recommends disease and case management in health-care systems for persons with diabetes. Diabetes self-management education is recommended in community gathering places (e.g., community centers or faith institutions) for adults and in the home for children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes. Evidence was insufficient to recommend diabetes self-management education interventions in other settings (i.e., schools, work sites, and recreational camps) or in the home for adults with type 2 diabetes. This report provides additional information regarding these recommendations, briefly describes how the reviews were conducted, provides sources of full reviews of interventions and information to assist in applying the interventions locally, and describes additional diabetes-related work in progress.

  1. In a secondary care setting, differences between neck pain subgroups classified using the Quebec task force classification system were typically small

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Hanne; Kent, Peter; Kjaer, Per

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The component of the Quebec Task Force Classification System that subgroups patients based on the extent of their radiating pain and neurological signs has been demonstrated to have prognostic implications for patients with low back pain but has not been tested on patients with neck...... and patients with NP + NRI had experienced the largest improvements in pain intensity. Similar results were obtained for activity limitation. CONCLUSIONS: This study found baseline and outcome differences between neck pain subgroups classified using the Quebec Task Force Classification System. However...... collected, routine clinical data. Patients were classified into Local NP only, NP + arm pain above the elbow, NP + arm pain below the elbow, and NP with signs of nerve root involvement (NP + NRI). Outcome was pain intensity and activity limitation. Associations were tested in longitudinal linear mixed...

  2. Technology Development and Implementation in the Public Health Institutions: A Strategic and Pedagogical Task for the Learning Organization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wentzer, Helle

    2004-01-01

    The article presents two overall problem issues for IT in the health sector. A strategic problem: Which organization structure and which work routines should be enhanced by technology? A pedagogical problem: How does the personnel learn to think, act and express work through IT-tools? The suggest......-implementation in the secondary sector. The investigation indicated that the use of IT is a learning process which requires three types of knowledge and that continued IT-development in the organization requires a new fourth knowledge. reciprocal demands terms......The article presents two overall problem issues for IT in the health sector. A strategic problem: Which organization structure and which work routines should be enhanced by technology? A pedagogical problem: How does the personnel learn to think, act and express work through IT-tools? The suggested...... solution is to put technology development and implementation together within a theoretical frame for the learning organization where and exist for both the IT-tools and the personnel. The personnel makes demands to which goals should be reached through technology and technology demands that the personnel...

  3. Using everyday technology to compensate for difficulties in task performance in daily life: experiences in persons with acquired brain injury and their significant others.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsson Lund, Maria; Lövgren-Engström, Ann-Louice; Lexell, Jan

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE. The purpose of this study is to illuminate how persons with acquired brain injury (ABI) and their significant others experienced individualised occupation-based interventions using commonly available everyday technology (ET) to compensate for perceived difficulties with performance of tasks in daily life. METHOD. Qualitative research interviews were conducted with 10 persons with ABI and with one of their significant others. The data were analysed according to qualitative content analysis. RESULTS. The persons with ABI experienced that they mastered their lives in a better way by the compensatory use of ET. They became capable of doing tasks independently and experienced themselves as being a new person. During the intervention process, persons with ABI became aware of the compensatory potential of familiar ET, and they were supported to use effective compensatory strategies and incorporate them into their habits. Their significant others felt a relief in daily life, and their mood was positively affected as they experienced reduced responsibility and need of control. CONCLUSIONS. This qualitative study has shown that persons with ABI, as well as their significant others, experienced a multitude of benefits from occupation-based interventions using commonly available ET to compensate for their difficulties in the performance of tasks in daily life and that the goals achieved affected their overall contentment with life.

  4. Naturally-Emerging Technology-Based Leadership Roles in Three Independent Schools: A Social Network-Based Case Study Using Fuzzy Set Qualitative Comparative Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velastegui, Pamela J.

    2013-01-01

    This hypothesis-generating case study investigates the naturally emerging roles of technology brokers and technology leaders in three independent schools in New York involving 92 school educators. A multiple and mixed method design utilizing Social Network Analysis (SNA) and fuzzy set Qualitative Comparative Analysis (FSQCA) involved gathering…

  5. New Scheduling Algorithm for Mixed-Criticality Real-Time Task Sets%新的混合关键任务调度算法的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱怡安; 黄姝娟; 段俊花; 陆伟

    2014-01-01

    By analyzing the problems of real-time scheduling in mix-criticality systems, a new scheduling algorithm, forward and backward time window partition-criticality factor prior (FBTWP-CFP), is proposed. It can separate the running time windows for the tasks of all criticality levels offline from the forward direction and backward direction and generate the idle windows for the tasks which get the lower priority by the criticality factor for the criticality level changed. The simulation results show that FBTWP-CFP is better than criticality assigned priority algorithm (CAPA) and own criticality based priority (OCBP) in completed tasks number and reduced miss deadline ratio.%分析了混合关键系统中当前任务调度方法存在的问题,提出一种正反向时间分割和关键因子优先的调度算法,该方法将所有混合关键任务按照不同级别进行时间正反向分割得出空闲时间窗口,并根据关键因子的大小决定优先级别。为了减少在关键级别转化过程中优先级低的任务丢失死限的工作数量,将空闲窗口分配给由于关键级别转化而使得优先级落后的任务。仿真实验表明,该方法在降低任务丢失死限率和完成任务的数量方面比按照关键级别进行优先级指派算法(CAPA)和OCBP方法较优。

  6. Thermodynamic assessment of amine based CO2 capture technologies in power plants based on European Benchmarking Task Force methodology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sanchez Fernandez, E.; Goetheer, E.L.V.; Manzolini, G.; Macchi, E.; Rezvani, S.; Vlugt, T.J.H.

    2014-01-01

    Post combustion CO2 capture (PCC) with amine solvents is seen as one of the possible technologies which can be implemented in the near term to significantly reduce CO2 emissions from fossil fuel power plants. One of the major concerns for its implementation at large scale in power plants is the high

  7. Thermodynamic assessment of amine based CO2 capture technologies in power plants based on European Benchmarking Task Force methodology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sanchez Fernandez, E.; Goetheer, E.L.V.; Manzolini, G.; Macchi, E.; Rezvani, S.; Vlugt, T.J.H.

    2014-01-01

    Post combustion CO2 capture (PCC) with amine solvents is seen as one of the possible technologies which can be implemented in the near term to significantly reduce CO2 emissions from fossil fuel power plants. One of the major concerns for its implementation at large scale in power plants is the high

  8. Digital footprints: facilitating large-scale environmental psychiatric research in naturalistic settings through data from everyday technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bidargaddi, N; Musiat, P; Makinen, V-P; Ermes, M; Schrader, G; Licinio, J

    2017-02-01

    Digital footprints, the automatically accumulated by-products of our technology-saturated lives, offer an exciting opportunity for psychiatric research. The commercial sector has already embraced the electronic trails of customers as an enabling tool for guiding consumer behaviour, and analogous efforts are ongoing to monitor and improve the mental health of psychiatric patients. The untargeted collection of digital footprints that may or may not be health orientated comprises a large untapped information resource for epidemiological scale research into psychiatric disorders. Real-time monitoring of mood, sleep and physical and social activity in a substantial portion of the affected population in a naturalistic setting is unprecedented in psychiatry. We propose that digital footprints can provide these measurements from real world setting unobtrusively and in a longitudinal fashion. In this perspective article, we outline the concept of digital footprints and the services and devices that create them, and present examples where digital footprints have been successfully used in research. We then critically discuss the opportunities and fundamental challenges associated digital footprints in psychiatric research, such as collecting data from different sources, analysis, ethical and research design challenges.

  9. Digital footprints: facilitating large-scale environmental psychiatric research in naturalistic settings through data from everyday technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bidargaddi, N; Musiat, P; Makinen, V-P; Ermes, M; Schrader, G; Licinio, J

    2017-01-01

    Digital footprints, the automatically accumulated by-products of our technology-saturated lives, offer an exciting opportunity for psychiatric research. The commercial sector has already embraced the electronic trails of customers as an enabling tool for guiding consumer behaviour, and analogous efforts are ongoing to monitor and improve the mental health of psychiatric patients. The untargeted collection of digital footprints that may or may not be health orientated comprises a large untapped information resource for epidemiological scale research into psychiatric disorders. Real-time monitoring of mood, sleep and physical and social activity in a substantial portion of the affected population in a naturalistic setting is unprecedented in psychiatry. We propose that digital footprints can provide these measurements from real world setting unobtrusively and in a longitudinal fashion. In this perspective article, we outline the concept of digital footprints and the services and devices that create them, and present examples where digital footprints have been successfully used in research. We then critically discuss the opportunities and fundamental challenges associated digital footprints in psychiatric research, such as collecting data from different sources, analysis, ethical and research design challenges. PMID:27922603

  10. Demonstration project as a procedure for accelerating the application of new technology (Charpie Task Force report). Volume II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1978-02-01

    This report examines the issues associated with government programs proposed for the ''commercialization'' of new energy technologies; these programs are intended to hasten the pace at which target technologies are adopted by the private sector. The ''commercial demonstration'' is the principal tool used in these programs. Most previous government interventions in support of technological change have focused on R and D and left to the private sector the decision as to adoption for commercial utilization; thus there is relatively little in the way of analysis or experience which bears direct application. The analysis is divided into four sections. First, the role of R, D, and D within the structure of the national energy goals and policies is examined. The issue of ''prices versus gaps'' is described as a crucial difference of viewpoint concerning the role of the government in the future of the energy system. Second, the process of technological change as it occurs with respect to energy technologies is then examined for possible sources of misalignment of social and private incentives. The process is described as a series of investments. Third, correction of these sources of misalignment then becomes the goal of commercial demonstration programs as this goal and the means for attaining it are explored. Government-supported commercialization may be viewed as a subsidy to the introduction stage of the process; the circumstances under which such subsidies are likely to affect the success of the subsequent diffusion stage are addressed. The discussion then turns to the political, legal, and institutional problems. Finally, methods for evaluation and planning of commercial demonstration programs are analyzed. The critical areas of ignorance are highlighted and comprise a research agenda for improved analytical techniques to support decisions in this area.

  11. Demonstration project as a procedure for accelerating the application of new technology (Charpie Task Force report). Volume II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1978-02-01

    This report examines the issues associated with government programs proposed for the ''commercialization'' of new energy technologies; these programs are intended to hasten the pace at which target technologies are adopted by the private sector. The ''commercial demonstration'' is the principal tool used in these programs. Most previous government interventions in support of technological change have focused on R and D and left to the private sector the decision as to adoption for commercial utilization; thus there is relatively little in the way of analysis or experience which bears direct application. The analysis is divided into four sections. First, the role of R, D, and D within the structure of the national energy goals and policies is examined. The issue of ''prices versus gaps'' is described as a crucial difference of viewpoint concerning the role of the government in the future of the energy system. Second, the process of technological change as it occurs with respect to energy technologies is then examined for possible sources of misalignment of social and private incentives. The process is described as a series of investments. Third, correction of these sources of misalignment then becomes the goal of commercial demonstration programs as this goal and the means for attaining it are explored. Government-supported commercialization may be viewed as a subsidy to the introduction stage of the process; the circumstances under which such subsidies are likely to affect the success of the subsequent diffusion stage are addressed. The discussion then turns to the political, legal, and institutional problems. Finally, methods for evaluation and planning of commercial demonstration programs are analyzed. The critical areas of ignorance are highlighted and comprise a research agenda for improved analytical techniques to support decisions in this area.

  12. Report of the Defense Science Board Task Force on Defense Science and Technology Base for the 21st Century

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-07

    equations are likely to be non- linear , the standard-matrix algebra -solution approach will probably not be applicable. Instead, an iterative optimization...and ultimately combat outcome. The depiction makes the problem seem fairly simple and linear . There is a flow from the technology base through...observation is that industry does not manage its research and development process in a linear fashion as does the Department of Defense. By linear , it is

  13. Sol-Gel Technology for Low-VOC, Nonchromated Adhesive Bonding Applications SERDP; Project PP-1113, Task 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-05-31

    Steve Risser of Battelle and Henry Zheng of Chemat Technology, Inc. were team members who contributed to PP-1113 efforts that are not documented in...High Volume Low Pressure (HVLP) spray gun (Binks Model M1-G). Baseline specimens were bonded with 3M Company AF 163-2M (0.06 pounds per square foot ...first experiment. During that experiment, a nearly flat -top beam spatial profile was used. Two laser fluence levels were evaluated: a level

  14. An ERP Study of the Task-set Effect on Automatic Semantic Activation%任务定势对自动语义激活过程调节作用的ERP研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋娟; 吕勇

    2012-01-01

    The study manily concerned the top-down modulation on automatic processing, which could modify the classical automatic processing theory and give suggestions for implicit study methods. Top-down modulation is the function of the brain to modulate and select task-related information and allocate attention to it so that we can accelerate information processing. Automatic processing is defined as a process that needs little attention and cognitive resources compared with controlled processing. Recent findings questioned the classical automatic processing theory by stating that automatic processing may also be modulated by top-down factors including intention, task-set, temporal attention, spatial attention, expectation, etc. We improved the previous studies by modifying the paradigm and using Chinese stimuli. The study used a masked priming paradigm to investigate if the top-down task-set factor could modulate automatic semantic processing by ERPs. The subjects were asked to perform categorization tasks or structure decision tasks of the former stimuli (primes) and lexical decision tasks of the latter ones (targets). So, there were two kinds of task-sets: semantic and perceptual . The stimuli were Chinese two-character words and pseudo-words cited from other articles. And the masks were a series of "#". 14 undergraduate students were chosen as subjects (6 males, 8 females). The mean age (±SD) was 21.9±(1.6) . The mean amplitude and peak latency of N400 which epoched between 300-450ms at F3,FZ,F4,C3,CZ,C4,CP3,CPZ,CP4,P3,PZ,P4,PO3,POZ,PO4 electrodes and the RT (response time) were used as indexes. The behavioral data and the electrophysiological data were acquired simultaneously by the software Stim 2 and Scan 4.2. We used Repeated-ANOVA. The experimental design was 2 (task factor: semantic task perceptual task) × 2 (priming conditions: prime-target semantic related unrelated). And the electrode factor was introduced as

  15. A task shifting approach to primary mental health care for adults in South Africa: human resource requirements and costs for rural settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Inge; Lund, Crick; Bhana, Arvin; Flisher, Alan J

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND A recent situational analysis suggests that post-apartheid South Africa has made some gains with respect to the decentralization and integration of mental health into primary health care. However, service gaps within and between provinces remain, with rural areas particularly underserved. Aim This study aims to calculate and cost a hypothetical human resource mix required to populate a framework for district adult mental health services. This framework embraces the concept of task shifting, where dedicated low cost mental health workers at the community and clinic levels supplement integrated care. METHOD The expected number and cost of human resources was based on: (a) assumptions of service provision derived from existing services in a sub-district demonstration site and a literature review of evidence-based packages of care in low- and middle-income countries; and (b) assumptions of service needs derived from other studies. RESULTS For a nominal population of 100 000, minimal service coverage estimates of 50% for schizophrenia, bipolar affective disorder, major depressive disorder and 30% for post-traumatic stress disorder and maternal depression would require that the primary health care staffing package include one post for a mental health counsellor or equivalent and 7.2 community mental health worker posts. The cost of these personnel amounts to £28 457 per 100 000 population. This cost can be offset by a reduction in the number of other specialist and non-specialist health personnel required to close service gaps at primary care level. CONCLUSION The adoption of the concept of task shifting can substantially reduce the expected number of health care providers otherwise needed to close mental health service gaps at primary health care level in South Africa at minimal cost and may serve as a model for other middle-income countries.

  16. Semi-Annual Technical Progress Report of Radioisotope Power System Materials Production and Technology Program Tasks for April 1, 2002 Through September 20, 2002

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, J.P.

    2002-12-03

    The Office of Space and Defense Power Systems of the Department of Energy (DOE) provides Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS) for applications where conventional power systems are not feasible. For example, radioisotope thermoelectric generators were supplied by the DOE to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration for deep space missions including the Cassini Mission launched in October of 1997 to study the planet Saturn. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been involved in developing materials and technology and producing components for the DOE for more than three decades. For the Cassini Mission, for example, ORNL was involved in the production of carbon-bonded carbon fiber (CBCF) insulator sets, iridium alloy blanks and foil, and clad vent sets (CVS). This report has been divided into three sections to reflect program guidance from the Office of Space and Defense Power Systems for fiscal year (FY) 2002. The first section deals primarily with maintenance of the capability to produce flight quality (FQ) CBCF insulator sets, iridium alloy blanks and foil, and CVS. In all three cases, production maintenance is assured by the manufacture of limited quantities of FQ components. The second section deals with several technology activities to improve the manufacturing processes, characterize materials, or to develop technologies for new radioisotope power systems. The last section is dedicated to studies related to the production of {sup 238}Pu.

  17. Annual Technical Progress Report of Radioisotope Power System Materials Production and Technology Program Tasks for October 1, 2002 Through September 30, 2003

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, J.F.

    2004-05-18

    The Office of Space and Defense Power Systems of the Department of Energy (DOE) provides Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS) for applications where conventional power systems are not feasible. For example, radioisotope thermoelectric generators were supplied by the DOE to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration for deep space missions including the Cassini Mission launched in October of 1997 to study the planet Saturn. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been involved in developing materials and technology and producing components for the DOE for more than three decades. For the Cassini Mission, for example, ORNL was involved in the production of carbon-bonded carbon fiber (CBCF) insulator sets, iridium alloy blanks and foil, and clad vent sets (CVS). This report has been divided into three sections to reflect program guidance from the Office of Space and Defense Power Systems for fiscal year (FY) 2003. The first section deals primarily with maintenance of the capability to produce flight quality (FQ) CBCF insulator sets, iridium alloy blanks and foil, and CVS. In all three cases, production maintenance is assured by the manufacture of limited quantities of FQ components. The second section deals with several technology activities to improve the manufacturing processes, characterize materials, or to develop technologies for new radioisotope power systems. The last section is dedicated to studies related to the production of {sup 238}Pu.

  18. Semi-Annual Technical Progress Report of the Radioisotope Power System Materials Production and Technology Program Tasks for September 2000 through March 2001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, J.P.

    2001-05-22

    The Office of Space and Defense Power Systems of the Department of Energy (DOE) provides Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS) for applications where conventional power systems are not feasible. For example, radioisotope thermoelectric generators were supplied by the DOE to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration for deep space missions including the Cassini Mission launched in October of 1997 to study the planet Saturn. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been involved in developing materials and technology and producing components for the DOE for more than three decades. For the Cassini Mission, for example, ORNL was involved in the production of carbon-bonded carbon fiber (CBCF) insulator sets, iridium alloy blanks and foil, and clad vent sets (CVS) and weld shields (WS). This report has been divided into three sections to reflect program guidance from the Office of Space and Defense Power Systems for fiscal year (FY) 2001. The first section deals primarily with maintenance of the capability to produce flight quality (FQ) CBCF insulator sets, iridium alloy blanks and foil, CVS, and WS. In all three cases, production maintenance is assured by the manufacture of limited quantities of FQ components. The second section deals with several technology activities to improve the manufacturing processes, characterize materials. or to develop technologies for new radioisotope power systems. The last section is dedicated to studies related to the production of {sup 238}Pu.

  19. A comparison of embedded total task instruction in teaching behavioral chains to massed one-on-one instruction for students with intellectual disabilities: accessing general education settings and core academic content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jameson, J Matt; Walker, Ryan; Utley, Kristen; Maughan, Ryan

    2012-05-01

    This study is a comparison of the embedded instruction of behavioral chains with more traditional (one-on-one massed trials in special education setting) instructional procedures for teaching behavioral chains to students with significant cognitive disabilities. Although embedded instruction has emerged as a promising potential instructional procedure, no literature has examined the efficacy of embedded instructional procedures to teach more complex chained behaviors. To date, all research on embedding instruction in general education settings has focused on teaching discrete skills. This study compares instruction of embedded total task chains with more traditional (one-on-one massed trials in special education setting) instructional procedures for teaching behavioral chains. The chains targeted for instruction were selected by state core educational needs and functional skill development.

  20. Manufacturing Technology Support (MATES) II Task Order 0006: Air Force Technology and Industrial Base Research and Analysis. Subtask Order 0004: Study on Supply Chains and Social Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-01

    tier visibility. For each scenario, relevant supply chain metrics were identified using the Supply Chain Operations Reference ( SCOR ®) model . These...chain metrics follow the SCOR model , although they can be changed to a different model at any time. The purpose of identifying relevant metrics is...AF Manufacturing Technology (ManTech) organization has a lengthy history of exploring and adapting leading edge business models to improve the

  1. The Influence of Horticultural Activities on Preschool-Aged Children's Peer Interaction and Task Engagement in an Inclusive Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiedeman-Rouse, Teri

    2012-01-01

    There is great concern by teachers, school administrators and parents regarding the increase in the number of preschool-aged students who exhibit challenging behavior in early childhood settings (Benedict, Horner & Squires 2007), need for early intervention procedures that focus on young children who may be at risk for developing patterns of…

  2. Estimating Total Program Cost of a Long-Term, High-Technology, High-Risk Project with Task Durations and Costs That May Increase Over Time

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Brown, Gerald G; Grose, Roger T; Koyak, Robert A

    2006-01-01

    .... Each task in the project can begin only when all its predecessor tasks have been completed, and each task has a range of feasible durations with a month-by-month cost profile for each duration...

  3. 浅析任务驱动法在农村中学信息技术课教学中的应用%On the Task-Driven Method in Rural Secondary Schools Teaching in Information Technology Application

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴富伟

    2013-01-01

    IT class is a set of knowledge and skills in one, very practical emerging technology disciplines, focus on teaching stu-dents to acquire theoretical knowledge should also have the appropriate practical skills, with a significant developmental character-istics of the times . This article based on the new curriculum reform background, analysis discussed in the rural middle school in-formation technology courses teaching how to use task-driven approach to carry out teaching activities to promote better student learning IT knowledge and skills, improve IT efficiency of classroom teaching.%信息技术课是一门集知识和技能于一体、实践性很强的新兴技术学科,教学中注重学生掌握理论知识的同时还应具备相应的实际操作能力,具有明显的时代发展性特点。该文立足新课程改革的时代背景,分析探讨在农村中学信息技术课教学中如何采用任务驱动法来开展教学活动,促进学生更好的学习信息技术知识和技能,提高信息技术课堂教学效率。

  4. Research on Multi-Agent Dynamic Task Allocation Algorithm and Based on Dynamic Fuzzy Set%基于DFS的多Agent动态任务分配算法研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张瑜; 李凡长

    2009-01-01

    Task allocation problem is one of the import researches of multi-agent system. For the complex problem, many researchers from different points of view put forward a variety of effective algorithms. These algorithms are effective for the determinative environment,but for the uncertain and dynamic environment are deficient. In mis paper,fuzzy characteristics of dynamic task environment are researched,using dynamic fuzzy set theory,given the relevant multi-Agent dynamic task allocation algorithm.Examples of the test show that the algorithm model can be a reasonable simulation of MAS system operation task allocation process, and have achieved the optimal task allocation strategy and a good effect.%任务分配问题是MAS的重要研究内容之一,对于任务分配这一复杂问题,很多研究者从不同的角度提出各种行之有效的算法.这些算法对于确定的环境是有效的,对于不确定的动态的环境存在不足.本文针对具有动态模糊特性的任务环境进行研究,借助动态模糊集理论,给出了相关的多Agent动态任务分配算法.实例测试表明,算法模型可以合理地模拟MAS系统中任务分配的运行过程,并获得最优的任务分配策略和良好的任务实现效果.

  5. 2D-Tasks for Cognitive Rehabilitation

    OpenAIRE

    Caballero Hernandez, Ruth; Martinez Moreno, Jose Maria; García Molina, A.; Ferrer Celma, S.; Solana Sánchez, Javier; Sanchez Carrion, R.; Fernandez Casado, E.; Pérez Rodríguez, Rodrigo; Gomez Pulido, A.; Anglès Tafalla, C.; Cáceres Taladriz, César; Ferre Vergada, M.; Roig Rovira, Teresa; Garcia Lopez, P.; Tormos Muñoz, Josep M.

    2011-01-01

    Neuropsychological Rehabilitation is a complex clinic process which tries to restore or compensate cognitive and behavioral disorders in people suffering from a central nervous system injury. Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs) in Biomedical Engineering play an essential role in this field, allowing improvement and expansion of present rehabilitation programs. This paper presents a set of cognitive rehabilitation 2D-Tasks for patients with Acquired Brain Injury (ABI). These t...

  6. Sentiment Analysis of Suicide Notes: A Shared Task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pestian, John P; Matykiewicz, Pawel; Linn-Gust, Michelle; South, Brett; Uzuner, Ozlem; Wiebe, Jan; Cohen, K Bretonnel; Hurdle, John; Brew, Christopher

    2012-01-30

    This paper reports on a shared task involving the assignment of emotions to suicide notes. Two features distinguished this task from previous shared tasks in the biomedical domain. One is that it resulted in the corpus of fully anonymized clinical text and annotated suicide notes. This resource is permanently available and will (we hope) facilitate future research. The other key feature of the task is that it required categorization with respect to a large set of labels. The number of participants was larger than in any previous biomedical challenge task. We describe the data production process and the evaluation measures, and give a preliminary analysis of the results. Many systems performed at levels approaching the inter-coder agreement, suggesting that human-like performance on this task is within the reach of currently available technologies.

  7. IEA Wind Task 26. Wind Technology, Cost and Performance Trends in Denmark, Germany, Ireland, Norway, the European Union, and the United States. 2007 - 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vitina, Aisma [Ea Energy Analyses, Copenhagen (Denmark); Luers, Silke [Deutsche WindGuard, Varel (Germany); Wallasch, Anna-Kathrin [Deutsche WindGuard, Varel (Germany); Berkhout, Volker [Fraunhofer IWES (Germany); Duffy, Aidan [Dublin Inst. of Technology and Dublin Energy Lab (Ireland); Cleary, Brendan [Dublin Inst. of Technology and Dublin Energy Lab (Ireland); Husabo, Leif I. [Norwegian Water Resources and Energy Directorate (NVE), Oslo (Norway); Weir, David E. [Norwegian Water Resources and Energy Directorate (NVE), Oslo (Norway); Lacal-Arantegui, Roberto [European Commission, Ispra (Italy). Joint Research Centre; Hand, M. Maureen [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Lantz, Eric [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Belyeu, Kathy [Belyeu Consulting, Tacoma Park, MD (United States); Wiser, Ryan [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Bolinger, Mark [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Hoen, Ben [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2015-06-12

    This report builds from a similar previous analysis (Schwabe et al., 2011) exploring the differences in cost of wind energy in 2008 among countries participating in IEA Wind Task 26 at that time. The levelized cost of energy (LCOE) is a widely recognized metric for understanding how technology, capital investment, operations, and financing impact the life-cycle cost of building and operating a wind plant. Schwabe et al. (2011) apply a spreadsheet-based cash flow model developed by the Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands (ECN) to estimate LCOE. This model is a detailed, discounted cash flow model used to represent the various cost structures in each of the participating countries from the perspective of a financial investor in a domestic wind energy project. This model is used for the present analysis as well, and comparisons are made for those countries who contributed to both reports, Denmark, Germany, and the United States.

  8. billingsMentor: Adapting natural family planning to information technology and relieving the user of unnecessary tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Audrey D; Smith, John L

    2014-08-01

    BillingsMentor is an automated Web-based service for the Billings Method of natural family planning in which the guidance and interpretation previously communicated from teacher to student is provided by programmed algorithms. There are two functions: (1) to instruct the client to generate proper descriptions of her fertility symptoms; and (2) to interpret the symptoms efficiently according to the Billings Method and to communicate the results to the client. The efficiency of billingsMentor was tested by using the historical records of students who were under the guidance of a teacher to emulate their experience under the guidance of billingsMentor. The results indicate that billingsMentor performs as well as the teacher/student in recognizing the peak of fertility but it is slightly less efficient than the teacher/student in establishing the basic infertile pattern. Advantages that arise from adapting natural family planning to information technology are discussed.

  9. Searching for optimal setting conditions in technological processes using parametric estimation models and neural network mapping approach: a tutorial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fjodorova, Natalja; Novič, Marjana

    2015-09-03

    Engineering optimization is an actual goal in manufacturing and service industries. In the tutorial we represented the concept of traditional parametric estimation models (Factorial Design (FD) and Central Composite Design (CCD)) for searching optimal setting parameters of technological processes. Then the 2D mapping method based on Auto Associative Neural Networks (ANN) (particularly, the Feed Forward Bottle Neck Neural Network (FFBN NN)) was described in comparison with traditional methods. The FFBN NN mapping technique enables visualization of all optimal solutions in considered processes due to the projection of input as well as output parameters in the same coordinates of 2D map. This phenomenon supports the more efficient way of improving the performance of existing systems. Comparison of two methods was performed on the bases of optimization of solder paste printing processes as well as optimization of properties of cheese. Application of both methods enables the double check. This increases the reliability of selected optima or specification limits. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Circumstance Set-up for Students' Language Construction in Task-based Teaching Class%在任务教学课堂中创设学生语言建构情境

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘晓齐

    2011-01-01

    任务教学是培养学生语用能力的教学途径。教师的任务教学设计应做到以学生为中心,创建合理的情境,使学生完成语言的意义建构。%Task-based language teaching is an effective approach to train students' pragmatic competence.Teachers need to set up suitable environment for students to reconstruct language in learning.

  11. Cortex-based inter-subject analysis of iEEG and fMRI data sets: application to sustained task-related BOLD and gamma responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, Fabrizio; Singer, Neomi; Podlipsky, Ilana; Fried, Itzhak; Hendler, Talma; Goebel, Rainer

    2013-02-01

    Linking regional metabolic changes with fluctuations in the local electromagnetic fields directly on the surface of the human cerebral cortex is of tremendous importance for a better understanding of detailed brain processes. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and intra-cranial electro-encephalography (iEEG) measure two technically unrelated but spatially and temporally complementary sets of functional descriptions of human brain activity. In order to allow fine-grained spatio-temporal human brain mapping at the population-level, an effective comparative framework for the cortex-based inter-subject analysis of iEEG and fMRI data sets is needed. We combined fMRI and iEEG recordings of the same patients with epilepsy during alternated intervals of passive movie viewing and music listening to explore the degree of local spatial correspondence and temporal coupling between blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) fMRI changes and iEEG spectral power modulations across the cortical surface after cortex-based inter-subject alignment. To this purpose, we applied a simple model of the iEEG activity spread around each electrode location and the cortex-based inter-subject alignment procedure to transform discrete iEEG measurements into cortically distributed group patterns by establishing a fine anatomic correspondence of many iEEG cortical sites across multiple subjects. Our results demonstrate the feasibility of a multi-modal inter-subject cortex-based distributed analysis for combining iEEG and fMRI data sets acquired from multiple subjects with the same experimental paradigm but with different iEEG electrode coverage. The proposed iEEG-fMRI framework allows for improved group statistics in a common anatomical space and preserves the dynamic link between the temporal features of the two modalities. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. La femme du ménage The "perfect wife". The bride's role in wedding organization: setting the stage for unequal task sharing in marriage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florence Maillochon

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Ce texte étudie la division sexuelle du travail dans l’organisation de la cérémonie de mariage. Les temporalités des hommes et des femmes divergent progressivement au cours des différentes étapes de la préparation du mariage (de l’élaboration du projet jusqu’au jour J en passant par l’organisation de la fête. Les femmes consacrent toujours plus de temps au collectif que les hommes. La cérémonie de mariage ne constitue donc pas seulement une étape de formation du couple mais aussi un point d’ancrage et d’incorporation du « partage inégal » du travail domestique au sein du couple. Au cours d’une série d’épreuves symboliques et techniques qu’elles traversent pour se métamorphoser en mariée et en épouse, les femmes apprennent progressivement à devenir la femme du ménage.This article studies the sexual division of labour when organizing the wedding ceremony. Men’s and women’s temporalities gradually diverge through the various steps of wedding preparation (from elaboration of the project up to the "big day" itself. Women spend more time than men on collective tasks.  The wedding ceremony is not only a key moment in founding the couple, but also a step towards instituting and embedding the “unequal sharing” of domestic work within the couple. The different symbolic and technical tests women go through to metamorphose into a spouse and bride make them learn how to become the "perfect wife".

  13. Task 2: Mild gasification technology development process research unit tests using slipstream sampling, February 1988--March 1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knight, R.A.; Gissy, J.; Onischak, M.; Babu, S.P.; Wootten, J.M.; Duthie, R.G.

    1990-07-01

    Under USDOE sponsorship, a project team consisting of the Institute of Gas Technology (IGT), Peabody Holding Company, Inc., and Bechtel Group is developing a process for the mild gasification of coal in a 100-pound/hour capacity isothermal process research unit (PRU) at IGT in Chicago. The IGT process is capable of converting bituminous coals to value-added co-products that can open new markets for the US coal industry. The conceptual IGT mild gasification process incorporates an integrated fluidized-/entrained-bed reactor supplying heat indirectly by a combination of char and gas recycle. The use of mild operating conditions (1000{degree} to 1300{degree}F), low pressures (<50 psig), and continuous operation in closed reactors, combined with the sale of value-added co-products, offer an environmentally sound and economical approach to advanced coal utilization. The PRU consists of an 8-inch-ID {times} 8-foot-long fluidized-bed reactor closely coupled to a 4-inch-ID {times} 13-foot-long entrained-bed reactor. The PRU test results have demonstrated process performance, including the effect of coal type and temperature on mild gasification co-product yields and their properties. The fates of the heteroatoms have also been analyzed. 9 refs., 16 figs., 41 tabs.

  14. Recommendations for the shallow-crack fracture toughness testing task within the HSST (Heavy-Section Steel Technology) Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Theiss, T.J. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA))

    1990-09-01

    Recommendations for Heavy-Section Steel Technology Program's investigation into the influence of crack depth on the fracture toughness of a steel prototypic of those in a reactor pressure vessel are included in this report. The motivation for this investigation lies in the fact that probabilistic fracture mechanics evaluations show that shallow flaws play a dominant role in the likelihood of vessel failure, and shallow-flaw specimens have exhibited an elevated toughness compared with conventional deep-notch fracture toughness specimens. Accordingly, the actual margin of safety of vessels may be greater than that predicted using existing deep-notch fracture-toughness results. The primary goal of the shallow-crack project is to investigate the influence of crack depth on fracture toughness under conditions prototypic of a reactor vessel. A limited data base of fracture toughness values will be assembled using a beam specimen of prototypic reactor vessel material and with a depth of 100 mm (4 in.). This will permit comparison of fracture-toughness data from deep-cracked and shallow-crack specimens, and this will be done for several test temperatures. Fracture-toughness data will be expressed in terms of the stress-intensity factor and crack-tip-opening displacement. Results of this investigation are expected to improve the understanding of shallow-flaw behavior in pressure vessels, thereby providing more realistic information for application to the pressurized-thermal shock issues. 33 refs., 17 figs.

  15. INPHO project. Task 1: the setting of electron lines - beam dynamics; Projet INPHO. Tache 1: mise en place des lignes - faisceaulogie. Bilan de la phase 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anselmetti, S.; Baze, J.M.; Brasseur, A.; Cazanou, M.; Cazaux, S.; Coadou, B.; Congretel, G.; Contrepois, P.; Curtoni, A.; Denis, J.F.; Desmons, M.; Dorlot, M.; Fontaine, M.; Jablonka, M.; Jannin, J.L.; Joly, J.M.; Launay, J.C.; Lotode, A.; Luong, M.; Mattei, P.; Nardin, P.; Perrin, J.L.; Saudemont, J.C.; Veyssiere, C. [CEA Saclay, Dept. d' Astrophysique, de Physique des Particules, de Physique Nucleaire et de l' Instrumentation Associee, 91- Gif sur Yvette (France); Laine, F. [CEA Saclay, Dept. des Technologies du Capteur et du Signal (DRT/LIST/DETECS/SSTM/L2MA), 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2005-07-01

    The INPHO project aims at upgrading and optimizing the SAPHIR installation that is dedicated to the measurement (through the detection of photofission reactions) of radioactive wastes containing transuranium elements. Some modifications have been made during the phase I of the upgrading: -) the supply of power between the 2 parts of the accelerator has been modified. Now the setting of the beam energy does not imply to compensate for a phase shift; -) the vacuum level of the accelerator has been improved, it passed from 10{sup -6} torr to 7.10{sup -8} torr); and current measurers have been set on the electron line (there were no direct diagnostics previously). Other modifications are planned for the phase II of the upgrading. It concerns: -) the power supply of the electron gun; -) the control system; and the power supply of the klystron. In parallel with the phase II, feasibility studies have been led for the design of an electron line that will allow the electron-photon converter target to be as near as possible to the waste package to probe. (A.C.)

  16. ANNUAL TECHNICAL PROGRESS REPORT OF RADIOISOTOPE POWER SYSTEM MATERIALS PRODUCTION AND TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM TASKS FOR OCTOBER 1, 2005 THROUGH SEPTEMBER 30, 2006

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, James F [ORNL

    2007-04-01

    The Office of Space and Defense Power Systems of the Department of Energy (DOE) provides Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS) for applications where conventional power systems are not feasible. For example, radioisotope thermoelectric generators were supplied by the DOE to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration for deep space missions including the Cassini Mission launched in October of 1997 to study the planet Saturn. For the Cassini Mission, ORNL produced carbon-bonded carbon fiber (CBCF) insulator sets, iridium alloy blanks and foil, and clad vent sets (CVS) used in the generators. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been involved in developing materials and technology and producing components for the DOE for more than three decades. This report reflects program guidance from the Office of Space and Defense Power Systems for fiscal year (FY) 2006. Production activities for prime quality (prime) CBCF insulator sets, iridium alloy blanks and foil, and CVS are summarized in this report. Technology activities are also reported that were conducted to improve the manufacturing processes, characterize materials, or to develop information for new radioisotope power systems.

  17. Annual Technical Progress Report of Radioisotope Power System Materials Production and Technology Programs Tasks for October 1, 2005, through September 30, 2006

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2006-09-30

    The Office of Space and Defense Power Systems of the Department of Energy (DOE) provides Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS) for applications where conventional power systems are not feasible. For example, radioisotope thermoelectric generators were supplied by the DOE to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration for deep space missions including the Cassini Mission launched in October of 1997 to study the planet Saturn. For the Cassini Mission, ORNL produced carbon-bonded carbon fiber (CBCF) insulator sets, iridium alloy blanks and foil, and clad vent sets (CVS) used in the generators. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been involved in developing materials and technology and producing components for the DOE for more than three decades. This report reflects program guidance from the Office of Space and Defense Power Systems for fiscal year (FY) 2006. Production activities for prime quality (prime) CBCF insulator sets, iridium alloy blanks and foil, and CVS are summarized in this report. Technology activities are also reported that were conducted to improve the manufacturing processes, characterize materials, or to develop information for new radioisotope power systems.

  18. ANNUAL TECHNICAL PROGRESS REPORT OF RADIOISOTOPE POWER SYSTEM MATERIALS PRODUCTION AND TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM TASKS FOR OCTOBER 1, 2004, THROUGH SEPTEMBER 30, 2005

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2005-09-30

    The Office of Space and Defense Power Systems of the Department of Energy (DOE) provides Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS) for applications where conventional power systems are not feasible. For example, radioisotope thermoelectric generators were supplied by the DOE to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration for deep space missions including the Cassini Mission launched in October of 1997 to study the planet Saturn. For the Cassini Mission, ORNL produced carbon-bonded carbon fiber (CBCF) insulator sets, iridium alloy blanks and foil, and clad vent sets (CVS) used in the generators. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been involved in developing materials and technology and producing components for the DOE for more than three decades. This report reflects program guidance from the Office of Space and Defense Power Systems for fiscal year (FY) 2005. Production activities for prime quality (prime) CBCF insulator sets, iridium alloy blanks and foil, and CVS are summarized in this report. Technology activities are also reported that were conducted to improve the manufacturing processes, characterize materials, or to develop information for new radioisotope power systems.

  19. Annual Technical Progress Report of Radioisotope Power System Materials Production and Technology Tasks for October 1, 2004 through September 30, 2005

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None listed

    2006-08-03

    The Office of Space and Defense Power Systems of the Department of Energy (DOE) provides Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS) for applications where conventional power systems are not feasible. For example, radioisotope thermoelectric generators were supplied by the DOE to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration for deep space missions including the Cassini Mission launched in October of 1997 to study the planet Saturn. For the Cassini Mission, ORNL produced carbon-bonded carbon fiber (CBCF) insulator sets, iridium alloy blanks and foil, and clad vent sets (CVS) used in the generators. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been involved in developing materials and technology and producing components for the DOE for more than three decades. This report reflects program guidance from the Office of Space and Defense Power Systems for fiscal year (FY) 2005. Production activities for prime quality (prime) CBCF insulator sets, iridium alloy blanks and foil, and CVS are summarized in this report. Technology activities are also reported that were conducted to improve the manufacturing processes, characterize materials, or to develop information for new radioisotope power systems.

  20. Annual Technical Progress Report of Radioisotope Power System Materials Production and Technology Program Tasks for October 1, 2004 Through September 30, 2005

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, James F [ORNL

    2006-06-01

    The Office of Space and Defense Power Systems of the Department of Energy (DOE) provides Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS) for applications where conventional power systems are not feasible. For example, radioisotope thermoelectric generators were supplied by the DOE to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration for deep space missions including the Cassini Mission launched in October of 1997 to study the planet Saturn. For the Cassini Mission, ORNL produced carbon-bonded carbon fiber (CBCF) insulator sets, iridium alloy blanks and foil, and clad vent sets (CVS) used in the generators. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been involved in developing materials and technology and producing components for the DOE for more than three decades. This report reflects program guidance from the Office of Space and Defense Power Systems for fiscal year (FY) 2005. Production activities for prime quality (prime) CBCF insulator sets, iridium alloy blanks and foil, and CVS are summarized in this report. Technology activities are also reported that were conducted to improve the manufacturing processes, characterize materials, or to develop information for new radioisotope power systems.

  1. Annual Technical Progress Report of Radioisotope Power Systems Materials Production and Technology Program Tasks for October 1, 2007 Through September 30,2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, James F [ORNL

    2009-04-01

    The Office of Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS) of the Department of Energy (DOE) provides RPS for applications where conventional power systems are not feasible. For example, radioisotope thermoelectric generators were supplied by the DOE to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) for deep space missions including the Cassini Mission launched in October of 1997 to study the planet Saturn. For the Cassini Mission, ORNL produced carbon-bonded carbon fiber (CBCF) insulator sets, iridium alloy blanks and foil, and clad vent sets (CVS) used in the generators. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been involved in developing materials and technology and producing components for the DOE for more than three decades. This report reflects program guidance from the Office of RPS for fiscal year (FY) 2008. Production activities for prime quality (prime) CBCF insulator sets, iridium alloy blanks and foil, and CVS are summarized in this report. Technology activities are also reported that were conducted to improve the manufacturing processes, characterize materials, or to develop information for new RPS.

  2. ANNUAL TECHNICAL PROGRESS REPORT OF RADIOISOTOPE POWER SYSTEMS MATERIALS PRODUCTION AND TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM TASKS FOR OCTOBER 1, 2010 THROUGH SEPTEMBER 30, 2011

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, James F [ORNL

    2012-05-01

    The Office of Space and Defense Power Systems of the Department of Energy (DOE) provides Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS) for applications where conventional power systems are not feasible. For example, radioisotope thermoelectric generators were supplied by the DOE to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) for deep space missions including the Cassini Mission launched in October of 1997 to study the planet Saturn. For the Cassini Mission, the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) produced carbon-bonded carbon fiber (CBCF) insulator sets, iridium alloy blanks and foil, and clad vent sets (CVS) used in the generators. These components were also produced for the Pluto New Horizons and Mars Science Lab missions launched in January 2006 and November 2011respectively. The ORNL has been involved in developing materials and technology and producing components for the DOE for nearly four decades. This report reflects program guidance from the Office of RPS for fiscal year (FY) 2011. Production activities for prime quality (prime) CBCF insulator sets, iridium alloy blanks and foil, and CVS are summarized in this report. Technology activities are also reported that were conducted to improve the manufacturing processes, characterize materials, or to develop information for new RPS. Work has also been initiated to establish fabrication capabilities for the Light Weight Radioisotope Heater Units.

  3. Annual Technical Progress Report of Radioisotope Power Systems Materials Production and Technology Program Tasks for October 1, 2006 Through September 30, 2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, James F [ORNL

    2008-04-01

    The Office of Radioisotope Power Systems of the Department of Energy (DOE) provides Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS) for applications where conventional power systems are not feasible. For example, radioisotope thermoelectric generators were supplied by the DOE to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration for deep space missions including the Cassini Mission launched in October of 1997 to study the planet Saturn. For the Cassini Mission, ORNL produced carbon-bonded carbon fiber (CBCF) insulator sets, iridium alloy blanks and foil, and clad vent sets (CVS) used in the generators. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been involved in developing materials and technology and producing components for the DOE for more than three decades. This report reflects program guidance from the Office of Radioisotope Power Systems for fiscal year (FY) 2007. Production activities for prime quality (prime) CBCF insulator sets, iridium alloy blanks and foil, and CVS are summarized in this report. Technology activities are also reported that were conducted to improve the manufacturing processes, characterize materials, or to develop information for new radioisotope power systems.

  4. Annual Technical Progress Report of the Radioisotope Power Systems Materials Production and Technology Program Tasks for October 1, 2008 through September 30, 2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, James F [ORNL

    2010-05-01

    The Office of Space and Defense Power Systems of the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) provides Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS) for applications where conventional power systems are not feasible. For example, radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTG) were supplied by the DOE to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) for deep space missions including the Cassini Mission launched in October of 1997 to study the planet Saturn. For the Cassini Mission, the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) produced carbon-bonded carbon fiber (CBCF) insulator sets, iridium alloy blanks and foil, and clad vent sets (CVS) used in the generators. ORNL has been involved in developing materials and technology and producing components for the DOE for more than three decades. This report reflects program guidance from the Office of Space and Defense Power Systems for fiscal year (FY) 2009. Production activities for prime quality (prime) CBCF insulator sets, iridium alloy blanks and foil, and CVS are summarized in this report. Technology activities are also reported that were conducted to improve the manufacturing processes, characterize materials, or to develop information for new RPS.

  5. Annual Technical Progress Report of Radioisotope Power System Materials Production and Technology Tasks for October 1, 2003 through September 30, 2004

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None listed

    2005-06-01

    The Office of Space and Defense Power Systems of the Department of Energy (DOE) provides Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS) for applications where conventional power systems are not feasible. For example, radioisotope thermoelectric generators were supplied by the DOE to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration for deep space missions including the Cassini Mission launched in October of 1997 to study the planet Saturn. For the Cassini Mission, ORNL produced carbon-bonded carbon fiber (CBCF) insulator sets, iridium alloy blanks and foil, and clad vent sets (CVS) used in the generators. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been involved in developing materials and technology and producing components for the DOE for more than three decades. This report reflects program guidance from the Office of Space and Defense Power Systems for fiscal year (FY) 2004. Production and production maintenance activities for flight quality (FQ) CBCF insulator sets, iridium alloy blanks and foil, and CVS are summarized in this report. In all three cases, production maintenance is assured by the manufacture of limited quantities of FQ components. Technology activities are also reported that were conducted to improve the manufacturing processes, characterize materials, or to develop information for new radioisotope power systems.

  6. The Use of Music Technology across the Curriculum in Music Education Settings: Case Studies of Two Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cremata, Radio

    2010-01-01

    This study is an investigation of the uses of music technology in music education programs in two universities. The purpose of this study was to discover the ways in which music technology was used in two schools of music across the entire music curriculum for music education students. This study detailed the ways in which music technology was…

  7. Development of an integrated in-situ remediation technology. Topical report for task No. 7 entitled: Development of degradation processes, September 26, 1994--May 25, 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brackin, M.J.; Heitkamp, M.A.; Ho, Sa V. [and others

    1997-04-01

    Contamination in low permeability soils poses a significant technical challenge to in-situ remediation efforts. Poor accessibility to the contaminants and difficulty in delivery of treatment reagents have rendered existing in-situ treatments such as bioremediation, vapor extraction, pump and treat rather ineffective when applied to law permeability soils present at many contaminated sites. The Lasagna technology is an integrated in-situ treatment in which established geotechnical methods are used to install degradation zones directly in the contaminated soil and electro-osmosis is utilized to move the contaminants back and forth through those zones until the treatment is completed. The general concept of the technology is to use electrokinetics to move contaminants from the soils into {open_quotes}treatment zones{close_quotes} where the contaminants can be removed from the water by either adsorption or degradation. The focus of technical task No. 7 was to optimize the conditions required for electro-osmotic movement of contaminants and microbial degradation in the treatment zones. This topical report summarizes the results of aerobic microbial research performed to evaluate the feasibility of incorporating the chemical-degrading organisms into biotreatment zones in laboratory-scale electro-osmosis units and to demonstrate the combination of electrokinetics and aerobic microbial degradation for the removal of contaminants from clay. Also included in this report are the results of investigating microbial movement during electro-osmosis and studies involving the optimization of the microbial support matrix in the biozone. The Stanford study was conducted in order to obtain a better understanding of rates of anaerobic reductive dehalogenation of TCE to ethylene and of factors affecting these rates in order to determine the potential for application of TCE biodegradation as part of the Lasagna technology.

  8. Understanding the digital divide in the clinical setting: the technology knowledge gap experienced by US safety net patients during teleretinal screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Sheba; Moran, Erin; Fish, Allison; Ogunyemi, Lola

    2013-01-01

    Differential access to everyday technology and healthcare amongst safety net patients is associated with low technological and health literacies, respectively. These low rates of literacy produce a complex patient "knowledge gap" that influences the effectiveness of telehealth technologies. To understand this "knowledge gap", six focus groups (2 African-American and 4 Latino) were conducted with patients who received teleretinal screenings in U.S. urban safety-net settings. Findings indicate that patients' "knowledge gap" is primarily produced at three points: (1) when patients' preexisting personal barriers to care became exacerbated in the clinical setting; (2) through encounters with technology during screening; and (3) in doctor-patient follow-up. This "knowledge gap" can produce confusion and fear, potentially affecting patients' confidence in quality of care and limiting their disease management ability. In rethinking the digital divide to include the consequences of this knowledge gap faced by patients in the clinical setting, we suggest that patient education focus on both their disease and specific telehealth technologies deployed in care delivery.

  9. Language Tasks and Mobile Technologies: A Paradigm Shift in Designing Task-Based CALL for Young Language Learners / Activités langagières et technologies mobiles : un changement de paradigme dans la conception des tâches en apprentissage des langues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martine Pellerin

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available This article examines how the use of mobile technologies (iPods and tablets in language classrooms contributes to redesigning task-based approaches for young language learners. The article is based on a collaborative action research (CAR project in Early French Immersion classrooms in the province of Alberta, Canada. The data collection included digital ethnographic observation in the classrooms, students’ artifacts, and interviews with teachers and students. The findings outlined how the use of mobile technologies such as iPods and tablets contributes to redesigning language tasks and activities by helping young learners to create their own learning environment and meaningful language tasks, as well as self-assess and regulate their language learning process. The research also provides evidence of how the use of mobile technologies contributes to redesigning task-based approaches for young language learners that reflect learning principles based on emergent learning theories as well as Vygotskian sociocultural theories in second language acquisition (SLA. Activités langagières et technologies mobiles : un changement de paradigme dans la conception des tâches en apprentissage des langues assisté par ordinateur pour jeunes apprenants Cet article étudie la façon dont l'utilisation des technologies mobiles (iPods et tablettes dans les classes de langue contribue à la refonte des approches basées sur des tâches pour les jeunes apprenants. L'article se fonde sur un projet de collaboration recherche-action (CRA dans les classes initiales d'immersion en français dans la province de l'Alberta, au Canada. La collecte de données comprenait l'observation ethnographique numérique dans les salles de classe, les artefacts des élèves, et des entrevues avec les enseignants et les étudiants. Les résultats ont montré comment l'utilisation des technologies mobiles telles que les iPods et tablettes contribue à la refonte des tâches et des

  10. GigaPan Technology to Enhance In-Class and In-Field Learning in Community College Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villalobos, J. I.; Bentley, C.

    2014-12-01

    Community college students account for over 40% of all undergraduates in the United States as well as the majority of minority and non-traditional students attending undergraduate courses. Implementing innovative, cost effective, and formative pedagogies to the diverse backgrounds of students that typically enroll at a community is often a challenge. Interactive pedagogies in geology pose a unique challenge considering that students gain the most long-term knowledge when topics covered in a course are exposed to them in outdoor settings where they are allowed to explore and make connections. The ability to expose students to real world examples is challenging to many community college faculty considering that that many; lack funds or means for transportation of students, do not have administrative support on such endeavors, teach evening or night classes, or have a high percentage of students who are physically limited or have obligations to work and family. A joint collaborative between El Paso Community College (EPCC) and Northern Virginia Community College (NOVA) has explored the usage of GigaPan technology to create multi-layered online material to minimize these issues faced by many community college faculty and students. The primary layer of the online material is GigaPans of local geological sites that highlight large-scale structures in the El Paso, Texas region that are commonly used in local field trips and lab book material. The second layer is of Macro-GigaPans of hand samples of key outcrops from the primarily GigaPans which facilitate student learning, exploration, and ability to make connections by exploring smaller scale features of the primary layer. A third layer of online material, GigaPans of thin sections of hand samples (from secondary layers), and curriculum based on the GigaPans was then created to assist students in evaluating proposed hypotheses on the primary layers' geological origin. GigaPan cirriculum was utilized in introductory

  11. Hysteresis in Mental Workload and Task Performance: The Influence of Demand Transitions and Task Prioritization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, Reinier J; Sawyer, Ben D; van Egmond, René; de Ridder, Huib; Hancock, Peter A

    2016-12-01

    We examine how transitions in task demand are manifested in mental workload and performance in a dual-task setting. Hysteresis has been defined as the ongoing influence of demand levels prior to a demand transition. Authors of previous studies predominantly examined hysteretic effects in terms of performance. However, little is known about the temporal development of hysteresis in mental workload. A simulated driving task was combined with an auditory memory task. Participants were instructed to prioritize driving or to prioritize both tasks equally. Three experimental conditions with low, high, and low task demands were constructed by manipulating the frequency of lane changing. Multiple measures of subjective mental workload were taken during experimental conditions. Contrary to our prediction, no hysteretic effects were found after the high- to low-demand transition. However, a hysteretic effect in mental workload was found within the high-demand condition, which degraded toward the end of the high condition. Priority instructions were not reflected in performance. Online assessment of both performance and mental workload demonstrates the transient nature of hysteretic effects. An explanation for the observed hysteretic effect in mental workload is offered in terms of effort regulation. An informed arrival at the scene is important in safety operations, but peaks in mental workload should be avoided to prevent buildup of fatigue. Therefore, communication technologies should incorporate the historical profile of task demand. © 2016, Human Factors and Ergonomics Society.

  12. Development of an integrated, in-situ remediation technology. Topical report for task No. 9. Part I. TCE degradation using nonbiological methods, September 26, 1994--May 25, 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shapiro, A.P.; Sivavec, T.M.; Baghel, S.S. [General Electric Research and Development, Schenectady, NY (United States)

    1997-04-01

    Contamination in low-permeability soils poses a significant technical challenge for in situ remediation efforts. Poor accessibility to the contaminants and difficulty in delivery of treatment reagents have rendered existing in situ treatments such as bioremediation, vapor extraction, pump and treat rather ineffective when applied to low-permeability soils present at many contaminated sites. The technology is an integrated in situ treatment in which established geotechnical methods are used to install degradation zones directly in the contaminated soil and electro-osmosis is used to move the contaminants back and forth through those zones until the treatment is completed. The present Draft Topical Report for Task No. 9 summarizes laboratory investigations into TCE degradation using nonbiological methods. These studies were conducted by the General Electric Company. The report concentrates on zero valent iron as the reducing agent and presents data on TCE and daughter product degradation rates in batch experiments, column studies, and electroosmotic cells. It is shown that zero valent iron effectively degrades TCE in electroosmotic experiments. Daughter product degradation and gas generation are shown to be important factors in designing field scale treatment zones for the Lasagna{trademark} process.

  13. MapMySmoke: feasibility of a new quit cigarette smoking mobile phone application using integrated geo-positioning technology, and motivational messaging within a primary care setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schick, Robert S; Kelsey, Thomas W; Marston, John; Samson, Kay; Humphris, Gerald W

    2018-01-01

    Approximately 11,000 people die in Scotland each year as a result of smoking-related causes. Quitting smoking is relatively easy; maintaining a quit attempt is a very difficult task with success rates for unaided quit attempts stubbornly remaining in the single digits. Pharmaceutical treatment can improve these rates by lowering the overall reward factor of nicotine. However, these and related nicotine replacement therapies do not operate on, or address, the spatial and contextual aspects of smoking behaviour. With the ubiquity of smartphones that can log spatial, quantitative and qualitative data related to smoking behaviour, there exists a person-centred clinical opportunity to support smokers attempting to quit by first understanding their smoking behaviour and subsequently sending them dynamic messages to encourage health behaviour change within a situational context. We have built a smartphone app-MapMySmoke-that works on Android and iOS platforms. The deployment of this app within a clinical National Health Service (NHS) setting has two distinct phases: (1) a 2-week logging phase where pre-quit patients log all of their smoking and craving events; and (2) a post-quit phase where users receive dynamic support messages and can continue to log craving events, and should they occur, relapse events. Following the initial logging phase, patients consult with their general practitioner (GP) or healthcare provider to review their smoking patterns and to outline a precise, individualised quit attempt plan. Our feasibility study consists of assessment of an initial app version during and after use by eight patients recruited from an NHS Fife GP practice. In addition to evaluation of the app as a potential smoking cessation aid, we have assessed the user experience, technological requirements and security of the data flow. In an initial feasibility study, we have deployed the app for a small number of patients within one GP practice in NHS Fife. We recruited eight

  14. How do Millennial Engineering and Technology Students Experience Learning Through Traditional Teaching Methods Employed in the University Setting?

    OpenAIRE

    Howard, Elizabeth A

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to document and analyze how Millennial engineering and technology students experience learning in large lecture classrooms. To help achieve this purpose, perceptions Millennials have toward traditional teaching methods employed in large lecture classes were analyzed and discussed. Additionally, this study documented how Millennials experienced technology within large lecture classrooms. A learning model depicting how Millennials experience learning within the larg...

  15. Task Phase Recognition for Highly Mobile Workers in Large Building Complexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stisen, Allan; Mathisen, Andreas; Krogh, Søren

    2016-01-01

    available for sensing and recognizing the activities and task phases the workers currently perform as such technologies have to be easily deployable and maintainable at a large scale. The methods presented in this paper consist of features that utilize data from sensing systems which are common in large......Being aware of activities of co-workers is a basic and vital mechanism for efficient work in highly distributed work settings. Thus, automatic recognition of the task phases the mobile workers are currently (or have been) in has many applications, e.g., efficient coordination of tasks...... by visualizing coworkers’ task progress, automatic notifications based on context awareness, and record filing of task statuses and completions. This paper presents methods to sense and detect highly mobile workers’ tasks phases in large building complexes. Large building complexes restrict the technologies...

  16. Global Assessment of Hydrogen TechnologiesTasks 3 & 4 Report Economic, Energy, and Environmental Analysis of Hydrogen Production and Delivery Options in Select Alabama Markets: Preliminary Case Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fouad, Fouad H.; Peters, Robert W.; Sisiopiku, Virginia P.; Sullivan Andrew J.; Gillette, Jerry; Elgowainy, Amgad; Mintz, Marianne

    2007-12-01

    This report documents a set of case studies developed to estimate the cost of producing, storing, delivering, and dispensing hydrogen for light-duty vehicles for several scenarios involving metropolitan areas in Alabama. While the majority of the scenarios focused on centralized hydrogen production and pipeline delivery, alternative delivery modes were also examined. Although Alabama was used as the case study for this analysis, the results provide insights into the unique requirements for deploying hydrogen infrastructure in smaller urban and rural environments that lie outside the DOE’s high priority hydrogen deployment regions. Hydrogen production costs were estimated for three technologies – steam-methane reforming (SMR), coal gasification, and thermochemical water-splitting using advanced nuclear reactors. In all cases examined, SMR has the lowest production cost for the demands associated with metropolitan areas in Alabama. Although other production options may be less costly for larger hydrogen markets, these were not examined within the context of the case studies.

  17. A New Way to Introduce Microarray Technology in a Lecture/Laboratory Setting by Studying the Evolution of This Modern Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowland-Goldsmith, Melissa

    2009-01-01

    DNA microarray is an ordered grid containing known sequences of DNA, which represent many of the genes in a particular organism. Each DNA sequence is unique to a specific gene. This technology enables the researcher to screen many genes from cells or tissue grown in different conditions. We developed an undergraduate lecture and laboratory…

  18. From Theory to Practice--Utilizing Human Performance Technology to Assess Computer Security in an Educational Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Kimfong; Schmidt, Therese; Schaffer, Scott P.; Um, Eun Joon

    2004-01-01

    The American Society for Training and Development (ASTD) defines human performance technology (HPT) as "a systematic approach to analyzing, improving, and managing performance in the workplace through the use of appropriate and varied interventions." The first step in this approach is the performance analysis (Gilbert, 1978). In this step, the…

  19. Advancing Mobile Learning in Formal and Informal Settings via Mobile App Technology: Where to from Here, and How?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khaddage, Ferial; Müller, Wolfgang; Flintoff, Kim

    2016-01-01

    In this paper a brief review of the framework that addressed mobile learning implementation challenges (pedagogical, technological, policy and research) that was developed by Khaddage et al. (2015) is briefly discussed, followed by possible solutions that could be deployed to tackle those challenges. A unique approach is then applied to bridge the…

  20. Advancing Mobile Learning in Formal and Informal Settings via Mobile App Technology: Where to from Here, and How?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khaddage, Ferial; Müller, Wolfgang; Flintoff, Kim

    2016-01-01

    In this paper a brief review of the framework that addressed mobile learning implementation challenges (pedagogical, technological, policy and research) that was developed by Khaddage et al. (2015) is briefly discussed, followed by possible solutions that could be deployed to tackle those challenges. A unique approach is then applied to bridge the…

  1. Digital Native Preservice Teachers: An Examination of Their Self-Efficacy Beliefs Regarding Technology Integration in Classroom Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Southall, Sarah Parker

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this mixed-method study was to investigate digital native preservice teachers' self-efficacy beliefs regarding their technology experiences and skills at the beginning and at the end of their field placement semester. Digital natives, as defined by Prensky (2001), are students born after 1980 who have been raised with digital…

  2. Determinants of User Adoption of Policy and Procedure Software: An Examination of Relationships between Task-Specific Computer Self-Efficacy, Perceived Relevance, Perceived Complexity and Predictions of Intent to Use Information Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Lori Jill

    2012-01-01

    For nurses or physicians practicing in any healthcare setting today, nothing seems to be as unsettling then change associated with the introduction of new information technology. The need for information technology has created a new host of challenges that do not easily align to clinical practice. In this study, perceptions of usefulness, ease of…

  3. Understanding of Student Task Interpretation, Design Planning, and Cognitive Strategies during Engineering Design Activities in Grades 9-12. Final Report. Research in Engineering and Technology Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawanto, Oenardi

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to describe the task interpretation of students engaged in a design activity and determine the extent to which students translate their understanding of their design task to their planning and cognitive strategies. Twenty-nine students at one Colorado high school participated in this study. Students worked…

  4. A Daunting Task Still

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG ZHIPING

    2010-01-01

    @@ Despite steady economic growth for three decades, China is still a developing country facing daunting poverty alleviation tasks. According to the poverty line of 1,196 yuan ($176) per capita net income in a year set in March 2009, the country still has a poverty population of more than 40 million, mainly living in rural areas.

  5. Agenda Setting in Vaccine Policy and Social Relevance of the Emerging Vaccine Technologies From Public Health Perspective – PART 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr Vikas Bajpai MD, MPH

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Part 1 has dealt with agenda setting in vaccine policy, the percepts of a scientific vaccine policy. Part 2 of the paper discusses the case of Rota virus and Hib pentavalent vaccines. The background, methodology and the results / conclusions of Part 2 remain along the line for the first Part. The thrust of the paper is to strengthen the case for an epidemiologically guided decision regarding inclusion of new vaccines.

  6. Use of communication technologies to cost-effectively increase the availability of interpretation services in healthcare settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masland, Mary C; Lou, Christine; Snowden, Lonnie

    2010-01-01

    Poor patient-provider communication due to limited English proficiency (LEP) costs healthcare providers and payers through lower patient use of preventive care, misdiagnosis, increased testing, poor patient compliance, and increased hospital and emergency room admissions. Scarcity of bilingual healthcare professionals and prohibitive interpretation costs hinder full implementation of language service despite federal and state laws requiring their provision. We review recent published literature and unpublished data documenting the use of telephonic and video interpretation methodologies to improve healthcare communication with LEP persons. For example, a cooperative of nine California public hospitals and their associated community clinics, psychiatric facilities, skilled nursing facilities, and public health departments have implemented shared video interpretation services with video/voice-over Internet Protocol call center technology that automatically routes requests for interpretation in 15 languages to a pool of 30 full-time interpreters and 4 trained bilingual staff. For organizations seeking to initiate or expand their language services, the Internet provides access to translated documents, promising practices, step-by-step guides, planning tools, and research briefs. Such recent technological advances make provision of language services-to respond to federal and state mandates and improve access and quality of care to LEP persons-more feasible than is widely believed. Increased government and foundation support, and collaboration among provider organizations themselves can catalyze these efforts.

  7. Task Dominance Determines Backward Inhibition in Task Switching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerstin Jost

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Switching between tasks is assumed to be accompanied by inhibiting currently irrelevant, but competing tasks. A dominant task that strongly interferes with performing a weaker task may receive especially strong inhibition. We tested this prediction by letting participants switch among three tasks that differ in dominance: a location discrimination task with strong stimulus–response bindings (responding with left-hand and right-hand button presses to stimuli presented left or right to the fixation cross was combined with a color/pattern and a shape discrimination task, for which stimulus–response mappings were arbitrary (e.g., left-hand button press mapped to a red stimulus. Across three experiments, the dominance of the location task was documented by faster and more accurate responses than in the other tasks. This even held for incompatible stimulus–response mappings (i.e., right-hand response to a left-presented stimulus and vice versa, indicating that set-level compatibility (i.e., “dimension overlap” was sufficient for making this location task dominant. As a behavioral marker for backward inhibition, we utilized n-2 repetition costs that are defined by higher reaction times for a switch back to a just abandoned and thus just inhibited task (ABA sequence than for a switch to a less recently inhibited task (CBA, n-2 non-repetition. Reliable n-2 task repetition costs were obtained for all three tasks. Importantly, these costs were largest for the location task, suggesting that inhibition indeed was stronger for the dominant task. This finding adds to other evidence that the amount of inhibition is adjusted in a context-sensitive way.

  8. a Task-Oriented Disaster Information Correlation Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linyao, Q.; Zhiqiang, D.; Qing, Z.

    2015-07-01

    With the rapid development of sensor networks and Earth observation technology, a large quantity of disaster-related data is available, such as remotely sensed data, historic data, case data, simulated data, and disaster products. However, the efficiency of current data management and service systems has become increasingly difficult due to the task variety and heterogeneous data. For emergency task-oriented applications, the data searches primarily rely on artificial experience based on simple metadata indices, the high time consumption and low accuracy of which cannot satisfy the speed and veracity requirements for disaster products. In this paper, a task-oriented correlation method is proposed for efficient disaster data management and intelligent service with the objectives of 1) putting forward disaster task ontology and data ontology to unify the different semantics of multi-source information, 2) identifying the semantic mapping from emergency tasks to multiple data sources on the basis of uniform description in 1), and 3) linking task-related data automatically and calculating the correlation between each data set and a certain task. The method goes beyond traditional static management of disaster data and establishes a basis for intelligent retrieval and active dissemination of disaster information. The case study presented in this paper illustrates the use of the method on an example flood emergency relief task.

  9. A TASK-ORIENTED DISASTER INFORMATION CORRELATION METHOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Q. Linyao

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available With the rapid development of sensor networks and Earth observation technology, a large quantity of disaster-related data is available, such as remotely sensed data, historic data, case data, simulated data, and disaster products. However, the efficiency of current data management and service systems has become increasingly difficult due to the task variety and heterogeneous data. For emergency task-oriented applications, the data searches primarily rely on artificial experience based on simple metadata indices, the high time consumption and low accuracy of which cannot satisfy the speed and veracity requirements for disaster products. In this paper, a task-oriented correlation method is proposed for efficient disaster data management and intelligent service with the objectives of 1 putting forward disaster task ontology and data ontology to unify the different semantics of multi-source information, 2 identifying the semantic mapping from emergency tasks to multiple data sources on the basis of uniform description in 1, and 3 linking task-related data automatically and calculating the correlation between each data set and a certain task. The method goes beyond traditional static management of disaster data and establishes a basis for intelligent retrieval and active dissemination of disaster information. The case study presented in this paper illustrates the use of the method on an example flood emergency relief task.

  10. 基于Hadoop分布式并行计算在继电保护整定计算中的应用%Application of Relay Protection Setting Calculation Based on Hadoop Distributed Parallel Technology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    俞京锋; 阮远峰; 于乐; 李雪冬

    2014-01-01

    Timeliness of computing applications should be also taken into consideration when relay setting calculation is conducted for county-level power companies. To achieve rapid relay setting calculation Parallel computing technology is used. First,this paper gives a general introduction to the hardware deployed to deliver possibility of realization for the parallel computing, and then based on Hadoop distributed parallel computing,it introduces Hadoop software framework and task decomposition. Finally,taking the relay setting calculation in Deqing County as an actual example,the paper specifies the implementation method of the parallel computing. The result shows that the proposed method meets the higher requirements for replay protection in the grid development and reduces the calculation time.%对地县进行继电保护整定计算时,也必须要考虑到计算应用的时效性。为了实现快速的继电保护整定计算,采用并行计算技术。首先对硬件部署做了总体介绍,为并行计算的实现提供可能性;然后采用基于Hadoop的分布式并行计算,介绍了Hadoop的软件框架及任务分解;最后以浙江湖州德清县调整定计算的具体实例来说明并行计算的实现方法。结果表明:该方案可适应电网发展对继电保护提出的更高要求,减少计算时间。

  11. An improved solution of local window parameters setting for local singularity analysis based on Excel VBA batch processing technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Daojun; Cheng, Qiuming; Agterberg, Frits; Chen, Zhijun

    2016-03-01

    In this paper Excel VBA is used for batch calculation in Local Singularity Analysis (LSA), which is for the information extracting from different kinds of geoscience data. Capabilities and advantages of a new module called Batch Tool for Local Singularity Index Mapping (BTLSIM) are: (1) batch production of series of local singularity maps with different settings of local window size, shape and orientation parameters; (2) local parameter optimization based on statistical tests; and (3) provision of extra output layers describing how spatial changes induced by parameter optimization are related to spatial structure of the original input layers.

  12. Application of task driven teaching method in computer application technology%计算机应用技术教学中任务驱动法的应用分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周安辉

    2013-01-01

    计算机应用技术的学习已经成为了一种主流的形式,因此在计算机应用技术教学的过程中要实现教学的创新化发展,任务驱动教学方法是计算机应用技术教学的新方法,这种方法有助于提高学生的计算机技术的实际应用,同时能够提高学生自主学习的能力。文章就系统的研究分析计算机应用技术中对于任务驱动教学方法的应用。%The application technology of computer learning has become a mainstream form,so in the process of application of computer technology in teaching to realize the innovation of the development of teaching, task driven teaching method is a new method of computer application technology teaching,this method helps to enhance the practical application of the students of computer technology,and can improve the students' ability of autonomous learning.The system analysis of the computer application technology in the application of task driven teaching method.

  13. Technology Policy Task Force Hearing Summary. The Technical Enterprise for Computers, Communications, and Manufacturing in the 21st Century. Report Prepared for the Technology Task Force, Transmitted to the Committee on Science, Space, and Technology. House of Representatives, One Hundredth Congress, First Session (November 1987).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Kevin

    It has been acknowledged that the federal government has a responsibility to provide significant support for the nation's basic research whereas the role for support of technology is less understood. This report concerns a study on the determination of the appropriate role of the federal government in technology development. Currently the federal…

  14. A pilot randomized trial of technology-assisted goal setting to improve physical activity among primary care patients with prediabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Devin M; Palmisano, Joseph; Lin, Jenny J

    2016-12-01

    Lifestyle behavior changes can prevent progression of prediabetes to diabetes but providers often are not able to effectively counsel about preventive lifestyle changes. We developed and pilot tested the Avoiding Diabetes Thru Action Plan Targeting (ADAPT) program to enhance primary care providers' counseling about behavior change for patients with prediabetes. Primary care providers in two urban academic practices and their patients with prediabetes were recruited to participate in the ADAPT study, an unblinded randomized pragmatic trial to test the effectiveness of the ADAPT program, including a streamlined electronic medical record-based goal setting tool. Providers were randomized to intervention or control arms; eligible patients whose providers were in the intervention arm received the ADAPT program. Physical activity (the primary outcome) was measured using pedometers, and data were gathered about patients' diet, weight and glycemic control. A total of 54 patients were randomized and analyzed as part of the 6-month ADAPT study (2010-2012, New York, NY). Those in the intervention group showed an increase total daily steps compared to those in the control group (+ 1418 vs - 598, p = 0.007) at 6 months. There was also a trend towards weight loss in the intervention compared to the control group (- 1.0 lbs. vs. 3.0 lbs., p = 0.11), although no change in glycemic control. The ADAPT study is among the first to use standard electronic medical record tools to embed goal setting into realistic primary care workflows and to demonstrate a significant improvement in prediabetes patients' physical activity.

  15. Acute dialysis and continuous renal replacement: the emergence of new technology involving the nephrologist in the intensive care setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yagi, N; Paganini, E P

    1997-07-01

    The emergence of dialytic support for patients with reversible renal failure was one of the most significant advances in critical care medicine. Supporting a patient with a failed organ till organ recovery has not had the same success with other organ failures. Despite the indispensable nature of the support, dialysis was intermittent at best, and carried its own morbidity. The emergence of a "continuous" dialysis delivery system, originally through an arteriovenous access and later through veno-venous methodology, began to simulate the continuity of the natural kidney, and lifted much of the fluid and drug restrictions imposed by the intermittent nature of standard dialytic therapies. Components of the system were next reviewed for improvement and biocompatability. Differences in patient outcome were documented with various component comparisons, and disparate patient tolerance of delivery modality was also clearly proven. The hemodynamic stability of continuous treatment created utilization to be focused on the more unstable, the more severely compromised patient group. In this context, comparative studies with intermittent delivery methods showed improved hemodynamic stability among patients treated with continuous renal replacement therapies (CRRT), but no clear difference in patient mortality. Patient characteristics and severity scoring have recently been undertaken to better describe the population, and attempts at dialysis dosing is currently being developed for ARF dialysis recipients. Early results seem to point toward a dialysis dose effect on mortality in certain groups of ICU acute renal failure patients. However, the dialytic process is only depurative and artificial. Plastic membrane bio-incompatibility, human physiological responses to foreign material exposure, either in the circuit material itself or introduced from therapy methodology, pose practical and theoretical problems. Recent advances in the field of bio-artificial technology have allowed

  16. Advanced Lost Foam Casting Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Charles E. Bates; Harry E. Littleton; Don Askeland; Taras Molibog; Jason Hopper; Ben Vatankhah

    2000-11-30

    This report describes the research done under the six tasks to improve the process and make it more functional in an industrial environment. Task 1: Pattern Pyrolysis Products and Pattern Properties Task 2: Coating Quality Control Task 3: Fill and Solidification Code Task 4: Alternate Pattern Materials Task 5: Casting Distortion Task 6: Technology Transfer

  17. Board Task Performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Minichilli, Alessandro; Zattoni, Alessandro; Nielsen, Sabina

    2012-01-01

    This paper addresses recent calls to narrow the micro–macro gap in management research (Bamberger, 2008), by incorporating a macro-level context variable (country) in exploring micro-level determinants of board effectiveness. Following the integrated model proposed by Forbes and Milliken (1999), we...... identify three board processes as micro-level determinants of board effectiveness. Specifically, we focus on effort norms, cognitive conflicts and the use of knowledge and skills as determinants of board control and advisory task performance. Further, we consider how two different institutional settings...... influence board tasks, and how the context moderates the relationship between processes and tasks. Our hypotheses are tested on a survey-based dataset of 535 medium-sized and large industrial firms in Italy and Norway, which are considered to substantially differ along legal and cultural dimensions...

  18. A system utilizing radio frequency identification (RFID) technology to monitor individual rodent behavior in complex social settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howerton, Christopher L; Garner, Joseph P; Mench, Joy A

    2012-07-30

    Pre-clinical investigation of human CNS disorders relies heavily on mouse models. However these show low predictive validity for translational success to humans, partly due to the extensive use of rapid, high-throughput behavioral assays. Improved assays to monitor rodent behavior over longer time scales in a variety of contexts while still maintaining the efficiency of data collection associated with high-throughput assays are needed. We developed an apparatus that uses radio frequency identification device (RFID) technology to facilitate long-term automated monitoring of the behavior of mice in socially or structurally complex cage environments. Mice that were individually marked and implanted with transponders were placed in pairs in the apparatus, and their locations continuously tracked for 24 h. Video observation was used to validate the RFID readings. The apparatus and its associated software accurately tracked the locations of all mice, yielding information about each mouse's location over time, its diel activity patterns, and the amount of time it was in the same location as the other mouse in the pair. The information that can be efficiently collected in this apparatus has a variety of applications for pre-clinical research on human CNS disorders, for example major depressive disorder and autism spectrum disorder, in that it can be used to quantify validated endophenotypes or biomarkers of these disorders using rodent models. While the specific configuration of the apparatus described here was designed to answer particular experimental questions, it can be modified in various ways to accommodate different experimental designs. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Compilation and evaluation of 14-MeV neutron-activation cross sections for nuclear technology applications. Set I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evain, B.P.; Smith, D.L.; Lucchese, P.

    1985-04-01

    Available 14-MeV experimental neutron activation cross sections are compiled and evaluated for the following reactions of interest for nuclear-energy technology applications: /sup 27/Al(n,p)/sup 27/Mg, Si(n,X)/sup 28/Al, Ti(n,X)/sup 46/Sc, Ti(n,X)/sup 47/Sc, Ti(n,X)/sup 48/Sc, /sup 51/V(n,p)/sup 51/Ti, /sup 51/V(n,..cap alpha..)/sup 48/Sc, Cr(n,X)/sup 52/V, /sup 55/Mn(n,..cap alpha..)/sup 52/V, /sup 55/Mn(n,2n)/sup 54/Mn, Fe(n,X)/sup 54/Mn, /sup 54/Fe(n,..cap alpha..)/sup 51/Cr, /sup 59/Co(n,p)/sup 59/Fe, /sup 59/Co(n,..cap alpha..)/sup 56/Mn, /sup 59/Co(n,2n)/sup 58/Co, /sup 65/Cu(n,p)/sup 65/Ni, Zn(n,X)/sup 64/Cu, /sup 64/Zn(n,2n)/sup 63/Zn, /sup 113/In(n,n')/sup 113m/In, /sup 115/In(n,n') /sup 115m/In. The compiled values are listed and plotted for reference without adjustments. From these collected results those values for which adequate supplementary information on nuclear constants, standards and experimental errors is provided are selected for use in reaction-by-reaction evaluations. These data are adjusted as needed to account for recent revisions in the nuclear constants and cross section standards. The adjusted results are subsequently transformed to equivalent cross sections at 14.7 MeV for the evaluation process. The evaluations are performed utilizing a least-squares method which considers correlations between the experimental data. 440 refs., 41 figs., 46 tabs.

  20. Setting Goals for Achievement in Physical Education Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baghurst, Timothy; Tapps, Tyler; Kensinger, Weston

    2015-01-01

    Goal setting has been shown to improve student performance, motivation, and task completion in academic settings. Although goal setting is utilized by many education professionals to help students set realistic and proper goals, physical educators may not be using goal setting effectively. Without incorporating all three types of goals and…

  1. Setting Goals for Achievement in Physical Education Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baghurst, Timothy; Tapps, Tyler; Kensinger, Weston

    2015-01-01

    Goal setting has been shown to improve student performance, motivation, and task completion in academic settings. Although goal setting is utilized by many education professionals to help students set realistic and proper goals, physical educators may not be using goal setting effectively. Without incorporating all three types of goals and…

  2. INCIDENCIA DE TAREAS DE APRENDIZAJE EN LA DINÁMICA DEL INTERÉS. UN ESTUDIO EN EDUCACIÓN TECNOLÓGICA (INCIDENCE OF LEARNING TASKS IN THE DYNAMICS OF INTEREST. A STUDY IN TECHNOLOGICAL EDUCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirigoyen María Amelia

    2011-04-01

    findings from a descriptive, instructional designs based on the impact of tasks considered the Science-Technology-Society-Environment (contextualized tasks and those who did not (not contextualized tasks, the dynamics of students' interest in the subject Technology Education. That is to say, we aimed to analyze and discuss whether the proposed tasks produced a greater or lesser interest in the students for their achievement. Data were collected through classroom observations, which responded to the qualitative paradigm of research, conducted in 2009. We worked with students in sixth grade, freshman and junior year and with their teachers in the city of Rio Cuarto (Cordoba, Argentina and in a nearby locality. The results confirmed that the contextualized tasks that were included in the content of technology (biotechnology, greenhouse, etc. To pose problems related to scientific, social and environmental generated interest among students. However, the study showed that contextualize the work was not always sufficient and necessary factors were linked to the promotion of interest-called situational interest factors, such as mode of presentation of tasks, explanations of the goals of the tasks and feedback on its realization, etc. Thus, we identified indicators of student interest (request for assistance, consultation questions, showing progress, permanence tasks, etc. and situational interest factors already mentioned. Consideration of situational interest and the contextualization of the tasks in the teaching of technology becomes important to promote the interests of individual students.

  3. Task based design of a digital work environment (DWE for an academic community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narayanan Meyyappan

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Task based design is considered one of the effective ways of designing functional software. It is generally accepted that tasks play an important role in system and user interface design. Identifying the user's tasks enables the designer to construct user interfaces reflecting the tasks' properties, including efficient usage patterns, easy-to-use interaction sequences, and powerful assistance features. In this paper, we present a prototype of a Digital Work Environment (DWE to support a task-oriented design to information access in a typical community of academic users. The resources in DWE are organized according to specific tasks performed by the research students and staff in the Division of Information Studies of Nanyang Technological University, Singapore. The tasks and resources were elicited based on the needs of faculty and students through interviews and focus groups. Examples of these tasks include preparation of a new course outline, setting of examination papers, preparation of reading lists and assignments, conducting literature reviews and writing dissertations. This paper discusses the problems of digital library users in an academic environment, highlights task oriented projects and focuses on the task of preparing and writing a Master dissertation. It highlights the importance of task based design in assisting and helping students and instructors from the time of selecting the research project to the time of submitting the final bound copies of the dissertation.

  4. Assistive Technology as a Self-Management Tool for Prompting Students with Intellectual Disabilities to Initiate and Complete Daily Tasks: A Literature Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mechling, Linda C.

    2007-01-01

    This paper summarizes the results of a review of the empirical literature (1990-2005) focusing on use of assistive technology as a self-management tool for persons with intellectual disabilities. Forty investigations were identified which provided information on assistive technology to assist persons with disabilities to initiate and complete…

  5. Task 1.13 -- Data collection and database development for clean coal technology by-product characteristics and management practices. Semi-annual report, July 1--December 31, 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pflughoeft-Hassett, D.F.

    1997-08-01

    Information from DOE projects and commercial endeavors in fluidized-bed combustion and coal gasification is the focus of this task by the Energy and Environmental Research Center. The primary goal of this task is to provide an easily accessible compilation of characterization information on CCT (Clean Coal Technology) by-products to government agencies and industry to facilitate sound regulatory and management decisions. Supporting objectives are (1) to fully utilize information from previous DOE projects, (2) to coordinate with industry and other research groups, (3) to focus on by-products from pressurized fluidized-bed combustion (PFBC) and gasification, and (4) to provide information relevant to the EPA evaluation criteria for the Phase 2 decision.

  6. Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Online-Offline, 1998

    1998-01-01

    Focuses on technology, on advances in such areas as aeronautics, electronics, physics, the space sciences, as well as computers and the attendant progress in medicine, robotics, and artificial intelligence. Describes educational resources for elementary and middle school students, including Web sites, CD-ROMs and software, videotapes, books,…

  7. Solutions based on load balancing technology to the access pressure of network tasks%基于负载均衡技术的网络作业系统访问压力解决方案

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    于梅英; 张海波; 王春彦

    2011-01-01

    为解决网上作业系统访问压力与数据阻塞问题,提出了一种应用缓存技术、负载均衡技术的解决方案,并对网上作业系统的信息载入慢、服务器压力大、成绩试算次数过多3个关键问题设计了相应的解决算法.经兰州大学网络教育学院网上作业系统运行验证,表明实施解决方案后,能够有效地降低因访问过于集中而引起的网络阻塞和死锁问题,提高作业系统的稳定性和有效性.%In order to solve the problem of the high access pressure of network task system and data blocking, this article proposes solutions based on cache technology and load balancing technology,and a plan for solving three key problems: low speed of information load of network task system, high pressure of server and too many times of pilot calculation for scores. We also tested the network task system on the website of Lanzhou University Distance Education College. The result shows that applying it can effectively solve the problem of network being blocked or locked caused by excessive access so as to enhance the stability and effectiveness of the network task system.

  8. Classroom-Based Functional Analysis and Intervention for Disruptive and Off-Task Behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shumate, Emily D.; Wills, Howard P.

    2010-01-01

    Although there is a growing body of literature on the use of functional analysis in schools, there is a need for more demonstrations of this technology being used during the course of typical instruction. In this study, we conducted functional analyses of disruptive and off-task behavior in a reading classroom setting for 3 participants of typical…

  9. ELECTROMAGNETIC SCATTERING AND ANTENNA TECHNOLOGY (EMSAT) Task Order 0003: Design of a Circularly Polarized, 20 60 GHZ Active Phased Array for Wide Angle Scanning

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-08

    RYMH) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 7622/3001 5e. TASK NUMBER N/A 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER Y1AB 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) 8...2017-2742, cleared March 31, 2017. Paper contains color. 14. ABSTRACT The radiating aperture of a circularly polarized, active electronically ...unlimited 1.0 Summary The radiating aperture of a circularly polarized, active electronically scanned array (AESA) that operates from 20 GHz to 60 GHz

  10. Heimdall System for MSSS Sensor Tasking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herz, A.; Jones, B.; Herz, E.; George, D.; Axelrad, P.; Gehly, S.

    In Norse Mythology, Heimdall uses his foreknowledge and keen eyesight to keep watch for disaster from his home near the Rainbow Bridge. Orbit Logic and the Colorado Center for Astrodynamics Research (CCAR) at the University of Colorado (CU) have developed the Heimdall System to schedule observations of known and uncharacterized objects and search for new objects from the Maui Space Surveillance Site. Heimdall addresses the current need for automated and optimized SSA sensor tasking driven by factors associated with improved space object catalog maintenance. Orbit Logic and CU developed an initial baseline prototype SSA sensor tasking capability for select sensors at the Maui Space Surveillance Site (MSSS) using STK and STK Scheduler, and then added a new Track Prioritization Component for FiSST-inspired computations for predicted Information Gain and Probability of Detection, and a new SSA-specific Figure-of-Merit (FOM) for optimized SSA sensor tasking. While the baseline prototype addresses automation and some of the multi-sensor tasking optimization, the SSA-improved prototype addresses all of the key elements required for improved tasking leading to enhanced object catalog maintenance. The Heimdall proof-of-concept was demonstrated for MSSS SSA sensor tasking for a 24 hour period to attempt observations of all operational satellites in the unclassified NORAD catalog, observe a small set of high priority GEO targets every 30 minutes, make a sky survey of the GEO belt region accessible to MSSS sensors, and observe particular GEO regions that have a high probability of finding new objects with any excess sensor time. This Heimdall prototype software paves the way for further R&D that will integrate this technology into the MSSS systems for operational scheduling, improve the software's scalability, and further tune and enhance schedule optimization. The Heimdall software for SSA sensor tasking provides greatly improved performance over manual tasking, improved

  11. Task Prioritization in Dual-Tasking: Instructions versus Preferences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, Reinier J.; van Egmond, René; de Ridder, Huib

    2016-01-01

    The role of task prioritization in performance tradeoffs during multi-tasking has received widespread attention. However, little is known on whether people have preferences regarding tasks, and if so, whether these preferences conflict with priority instructions. Three experiments were conducted with a high-speed driving game and an auditory memory task. In Experiment 1, participants did not receive priority instructions. Participants performed different sequences of single-task and dual-task conditions. Task performance was evaluated according to participants’ retrospective accounts on preferences. These preferences were reformulated as priority instructions in Experiments 2 and 3. The results showed that people differ in their preferences regarding task prioritization in an experimental setting, which can be overruled by priority instructions, but only after increased dual-task exposure. Additional measures of mental effort showed that performance tradeoffs had an impact on mental effort. The interpretation of these findings was used to explore an extension of Threaded Cognition Theory with Hockey’s Compensatory Control Model. PMID:27391779

  12. Augmenting a Child's Reality: Using Educational Tablet Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanner, Patricia; Karas, Carly; Schofield, Damian

    2014-01-01

    This study investigates the classroom integration of an innovative technology, augmented reality. Although the process of adding new technologies into a classroom setting can be daunting, the concept of augmented reality has demonstrated the ability to educate students and to assist with their comprehension of a procedural task. One half of the…

  13. Augmenting a Child's Reality: Using Educational Tablet Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanner, Patricia; Karas, Carly; Schofield, Damian

    2014-01-01

    This study investigates the classroom integration of an innovative technology, augmented reality. Although the process of adding new technologies into a classroom setting can be daunting, the concept of augmented reality has demonstrated the ability to educate students and to assist with their comprehension of a procedural task. One half of the…

  14. Rationale and study protocol for a multi-component Health Information Technology (HIT) screening tool for depression and post-traumatic stress disorder in the primary care setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biegler, Kelly; Mollica, Richard; Sim, Susan Elliott; Nicholas, Elisa; Chandler, Maria; Ngo-Metzger, Quyen; Paigne, Kittya; Paigne, Sompia; Nguyen, Danh V; Sorkin, Dara H

    2016-09-01

    The prevalence rate of depression in primary care is high. Primary care providers serve as the initial point of contact for the majority of patients with depression, yet, approximately 50% of cases remain unrecognized. The under-diagnosis of depression may be further exacerbated in limited English-language proficient (LEP) populations. Language barriers may result in less discussion of patients' mental health needs and fewer referrals to mental health services, particularly given competing priorities of other medical conditions and providers' time pressures. Recent advances in Health Information Technology (HIT) may facilitate novel ways to screen for depression and other mental health disorders in LEP populations. The purpose of this paper is to describe the rationale and protocol of a clustered randomized controlled trial that will test the effectiveness of an HIT intervention that provides a multi-component approach to delivering culturally competent, mental health care in the primary care setting. The HIT intervention has four components: 1) web-based provider training, 2) multimedia electronic screening of depression and PTSD in the patients' primary language, 3) Computer generated risk assessment scores delivered directly to the provider, and 4) clinical decision support. The outcomes of the study include assessing the potential of the HIT intervention to improve screening rates, clinical detection, provider initiation of treatment, and patient outcomes for depression and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) among LEP Cambodian refugees who experienced war atrocities and trauma during the Khmer Rouge. This technology has the potential to be adapted to any LEP population in order to facilitate mental health screening and treatment in the primary care setting.

  15. Quality assurance for nonradiographic radiotherapy localization and positioning systems: report of Task Group 147.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willoughby, Twyla; Lehmann, Joerg; Bencomo, Jose A; Jani, Shirish K; Santanam, Lakshmi; Sethi, Anil; Solberg, Timothy D; Tome, Wolfgang A; Waldron, Timothy J

    2012-04-01

    New technologies continue to be developed to improve the practice of radiation therapy. As several of these technologies have been implemented clinically, the Therapy Committee and the Quality Assurance and Outcomes Improvement Subcommittee of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine commissioned Task Group 147 to review the current nonradiographic technologies used for localization and tracking in radiotherapy. The specific charge of this task group was to make recommendations about the use of nonradiographic methods of localization, specifically; radiofrequency, infrared, laser, and video based patient localization and monitoring systems. The charge of this task group was to review the current use of these technologies and to write quality assurance guidelines for the use of these technologies in the clinical setting. Recommendations include testing of equipment for initial installation as well as ongoing quality assurance. As the equipment included in this task group continues to evolve, both in the type and sophistication of technology and in level of integration with treatment devices, some of the details of how one would conduct such testing will also continue to evolve. This task group, therefore, is focused on providing recommendations on the use of this equipment rather than on the equipment itself, and should be adaptable to each user's situation in helping develop a comprehensive quality assurance program.

  16. A survey of university students' perceptions of learning management systems in a low-resource setting using a technology acceptance model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chipps, Jennifer; Kerr, Jane; Brysiewicz, Petra; Walters, Fiona

    2015-02-01

    Learning management systems have been widely advocated for the support of distance learning. In low-resource settings, the uptake of these systems by students has been mixed. This study aimed to identify, through the use of the Technology Acceptance Model, the individual, organizational, and technological factors that could be influencing the use of learning management systems. A simple quantitative descriptive survey was conducted of nursing and health science students at a university in South Africa as part of their first exposure to a learning management system. A total of 274 respondents (56.7%) completed the survey questionnaire, made up of 213 nursing respondents (87.7%) and 61 health sciences respondents (25%). Overall, the respondents found the learning management system easy to use and useful for learning. There were significant differences between the two groups of respondents, with the respondents from health sciences being both younger and more computer literate. The nursing respondents, who received more support and orientations, reported finding the learning management system more useful. Recommendations are made for training and support to ensure uptake.

  17. Levels of Information Processing in a Fitts law task (LIPFitts)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosier, K. L.; Hart, S. G.

    1986-01-01

    State-of-the-art flight technology has restructured the task of human operators, decreasing the need for physical and sensory resources, and increasing the quantity of cognitive effort required, changing it qualitatively. Recent technological advances have the most potential for impacting a pilot in two areas: performance and mental workload. In an environment in which timing is critical, additional cognitive processing can cause performance decrements, and increase a pilot's perception of the mental workload involved. The effects of stimulus processing demands on motor response performance and subjective mental workload are examined, using different combinations of response selection and target acquisition tasks. The information processing demands of the response selection were varied (e.g., Sternberg memory set tasks, math equations, pattern matching), as was the difficulty of the response execution. Response latency as well as subjective workload ratings varied in accordance with the cognitive complexity of the task. Movement times varied according to the difficulty of the response execution task. Implications in terms of real-world flight situations are discussed.

  18. 信息技术教学中如何有效地设计课堂教学任务%How to Effectively Design Teaching Tasks in Information Technology Teaching

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王建阳

    2012-01-01

    Information technology courses is a basic tool for combining of knowledge and skills. Skills which nature, which is operation, that is operational, the nature of the dominant position occupied courses. Therefore, how to effectively design classroom tasks are the issues that every information technology teacher must address.%信息技术课程是一门知识性与技能性相结合的基础工具课程,而其中的技能性,也就是操作性,占据课程性质的主要地位。因此。如何有效地设计课堂教学任务是每一个信息技术教师必须要解决的问题。

  19. Assessing the Cost of Task Switching with a Three-Task Paradigm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remington, Roger W.; Ruthruff, Eric; Johnston, James C.; Connors, Mary M. (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    To study task switching when subjects need not inhibit inappropriate responses, we examine tasks with non-overlapping stimulus sets (e.g. color patches and uncolored letters). A new three-task paradigm permits the dissociation of several otherwise confounded variables. We find that performance declines monotonically with increasing time since last performance of a task. Adjusting for the effects of this factor permits a fresh assessment of the relationship between task expectancy and recency (Ruthruff, Remington & Johnston, 1996).

  20. Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Jing

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The traditional answer card reading method using OMR (Optical Mark Reader, most commonly, OMR special card special use, less versatile, high cost, aiming at the existing problems proposed a method based on pattern recognition of the answer card identification method. Using the method based on Line Segment Detector to detect the tilt of the image, the existence of tilt image rotation correction, and eventually achieve positioning and detection of answers to the answer sheet .Pattern recognition technology for automatic reading, high accuracy, detect faster

  1. Status report on energy recovery from municipal solid waste: technologies, lessons and issues. Information bulletin of the energy task force of the urban consortium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1980-01-01

    A review is presented of the lessons learned and issues raised regarding the recovery of energy from solid wastes. The review focuses on technologies and issues significant to currently operating energy recovery systems in the US - waterwall incineration, modular incineration, refuse derived fuels systems, landfill gas recovery systems. Chapters are: Energy Recovery and Solid Waste Disposal; Energy Recovery Systems; Lessons in Energy Recovery; Issues in Energy Recovery. Some basic conclusions are presented concerning the state of the art of energy from waste. Plants in shakedown or under construction, along with technologies in the development stages, are briefly described. Sources of additional information and a bibliography are included. (MCW)

  2. Task 9. Deployment of photovoltaic technologies: co-operation with developing countries. Summary of models for the implementation of solar home systems in developing countries - Part 1: Summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-03-15

    This first part of a two-part report for the International Energy Agency (IEA) made by Task 9 of the Photovoltaic Power Systems (PVPS) programme takes a look at the implementation of Solar Home systems in developing countries. The objective of Task 9 is to increase the successful deployment of PV systems in developing countries. This summary outlines various models for the implementation of small domestic photovoltaic (PV) systems (Solar Home Systems, SHS) in developing countries. Part 1 of this two-part document discusses three generic models. The second, separate part of the document provides a number of examples demonstrating the models described. This report focuses on the implementation of SHS. However, a considerable amount of the PV market in developing countries is stated as consisting of large systems providing electricity for social services, such as light for schools, mosques, churches, communal centres, refrigeration for health centres and drinking water for communities. It is noted that there are considerable differences between the 'social market' and the 'private market' for SHS. The 'social market' generally consists of large systems but fewer in number. The guide does not cover the detailed technical aspects of a Solar Home System or the issue of recycling old batteries.

  3. Task 9. Deployment of photovoltaic technologies: co-operation with developing countries. Summary of models for the implementation of solar home systems in developing countries - Part 1: Summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-03-15

    This first part of a two-part report for the International Energy Agency (IEA) made by Task 9 of the Photovoltaic Power Systems (PVPS) programme takes a look at the implementation of Solar Home systems in developing countries. The objective of Task 9 is to increase the successful deployment of PV systems in developing countries. This summary outlines various models for the implementation of small domestic photovoltaic (PV) systems (Solar Home Systems, SHS) in developing countries. Part 1 of this two-part document discusses three generic models. The second, separate part of the document provides a number of examples demonstrating the models described. This report focuses on the implementation of SHS. However, a considerable amount of the PV market in developing countries is stated as consisting of large systems providing electricity for social services, such as light for schools, mosques, churches, communal centres, refrigeration for health centres and drinking water for communities. It is noted that there are considerable differences between the 'social market' and the 'private market' for SHS. The 'social market' generally consists of large systems but fewer in number. The guide does not cover the detailed technical aspects of a Solar Home System or the issue of recycling old batteries.

  4. The Impact of Learning Context on Intent to Use Marketing and Sales Technology: A Comparison of Scenario-Based and Task-Based Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallin, Michael L.; Jones, Deirdre E.; Cordell, Jennifer L.

    2010-01-01

    With firms focused on increasing efficiency and effectiveness in today's marketing and sales environment, it is crucial that salesforce training methods facilitate greater adoption of salesforce automation technology. Given the growth in sales education at colleges and universities, firms are looking to recruit their frontline marketing and sales…

  5. Industrial Maintenance Technology. Technical Committee Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idaho State Dept. of Education, Boise. Div. of Vocational Education.

    This Technical Committee Report prepared by industry representatives in Idaho lists the skills currently necessary for an employee in that state to obtain a job in industrial maintenance technology, retain a job once hired, and advance in that occupational field. (Task lists are grouped according to duty areas generally used in industry settings,…

  6. Applied Welding Technology. Technical Committee Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idaho State Dept. of Education, Boise. Div. of Vocational Education.

    This Technical Committee Report prepared by industry representatives in Idaho lists the skills currently necessary for an employee in that state to obtain a job in applied welding technology, retain a job once hired, and advance in that occupational field. (Task lists are grouped according to duty areas generally used in industry settings, and are…

  7. Precision Machining Technology. Technical Committee Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idaho State Dept. of Education, Boise. Div. of Vocational Education.

    This Technical Committee Report prepared by industry representatives in Idaho lists the skills currently necessary for an employee in that state to obtain a job in precision machining technology, retain a job once hired, and advance in that occupational field. (Task lists are grouped according to duty areas generally used in industry settings, and…

  8. Efeitos de conjuntos de dicas em tarefas de discriminação condicional Efectos de conjuntos de prompts en tareas de discriminación condicional Effects of prompts sets in conditional discriminations tasks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thalita Filier Cazetto

    2011-06-01

    pares de las relaciones condicionales. Los resultados mostraron que los prompts acerca de los pares de las relaciones condicionales genero un mejor rendimiento.Conditional discriminations allow that by teaching some behaviors, others will emerge without having to be directly taught. Despite the supposed teaching economy, difficulties have been reported in the establishment of the adequate stimulus control in such discriminations. The use of prompts, such as demonstrations and/or instructions, can help establishing the adequate stimulus control. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate whether there would be differences in performance when two sets of prompts were presented. The study included 20 children aged between 9 and 12 years divided into two groups. To the first group, a matching to sample task was presented added to prompts (demonstration and instruction about the correct comparison stimulus. To the second group the same procedure was presented, but the prompts were about the conditional relation pairs. The results showed that the prompts about the conditional relation pairs yielded better performances.

  9. Scientific Research Program for Power, Energy, and Thermal Technologies. Task Order 0002: Power, Thermal and Control Technologies and Processes Experimental Research. Subtask: Laboratory Test Set-up to Evaluate Electromechanical Actuation Systems for Aircraft Flight Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-01

    41 Table 2 - Backlash of EMA gear train under varying loads ............................................. 46 Table 3...for maneuvering [4]. The linkage evolved from manually operated direct mechanical rods, levers, cables, and pulleys to fully power operated...10]. Wing warping involved a system of pulleys and cables affixed to the trailing edges of the wing that would twist each end of the wing in

  10. Task 9. Deployment of photovoltaic technologies: co-operation with developing countries. PV for rural electrification in developing countries - A guide to capacity building requirements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bates, J.; Gunning, R. [IT Power Ltd, The Manor house, Chineham (United Kingdom); Stapleton, G. [Global Sustainable Energy Solutions Pty Ltd, GSES, Ulladulla 2539 (Australia)

    2003-03-15

    This report for the International Energy Agency (IEA) made by Task 9 of the Photovoltaic Power Systems (PVPS) programme takes a look at the topic of 'capacity building' in rural electrification projects. Capacity building is defined here as the development of an organisation's or individual's core knowledge, skills and capabilities in order to build and enhance the organisation's effectiveness and sustainability. This document identifies capacity building measures that should be undertaken as an integral component of a PV-based rural electrification implementation programme. Capacity building is to be facilitated through the provision of technical support activities, training, specific technical assistance and resource networking. The assessment of existing knowledge and the identification of training needs are discussed and training needs and their implementation by governmental and commercial players is discussed. Eleven case studies complete the report.

  11. Task 9. Deployment of photovoltaic technologies: co-operation with developing countries. The role of quality management, hardware certification and accredited training in PV programmes in developing countries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fitzgerald, M. C. [Institute for Sustainable Power, Highlands Ranch, CO (United States); Oldach, R.; Bates, J. [IT Power Ltd, The Manor house, Chineham (United Kingdom)

    2003-09-15

    This report for the International Energy Agency (IEA) made by Task 9 of the Photovoltaic Power Systems (PVPS) programme takes a look at the role of quality management, hardware certification and accredited training in PV programmes in developing countries. The objective of this document is to provide assistance to those project developers that are interested in implementing or improving support programmes for the deployment of PV systems for rural electrification. It is to enable them to address and implement quality assurance measures, with an emphasis on management, technical and training issues and other factors that should be considered for the sustainable implementation of rural electrification programmes. It is considered important that quality also addresses the socio-economic and the socio-technical aspects of a programme concept. The authors summarise that, for a PV programme, there are three important areas of quality control to be implemented: quality management, technical standards and quality of training.

  12. Task 9. Deployment of photovoltaic technologies: co-operation with developing countries. PV for rural electrification in developing countries - Programme design, planning and implementation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parker, W. [Institute for Sustainable Power, Highlands Ranch, CO (United States); Oldach, R.; Wilshaw, A. [IT Power Ltd, The Manor house, Chineham (United Kingdom)

    2003-09-15

    This report for the International Energy Agency (IEA) made by Task 9 of the Photovoltaic Power Systems (PVPS) programme takes a look at the design, planning and implementation of PV programmes. The guide contains details on the preparation for PV programmes, including the assessment of needs, stakeholder consultation, social context analysis, supply options and national policy considerations. The establishment of goals, delivery modes, timelines, logistics and quality assurance are discussed. Further, the implementation, monitoring and evaluation of PV programmes is discussed, as are a number of methodologies that have been developed with the aim of improving programme design and implementation. The guide highlights issues pertinent to rural energy programmes in developing countries and leads programme administrators through the process of planning, implementing and evaluating a PV programme.

  13. Development of an Educational Game to Set Up Surgical Instruments on the Mayo Stand or Back Table: Applied Research in Production Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paim, Crislaine Pires Padilha; Goldmeier, Silvia

    2017-01-10

    Existing research suggests that digital games can be used effectively for educational purposes at any level of training. Perioperative nursing educators can use games to complement curricula, in guidance and staff development programs, to foster team collaboration, and to give support to critical thinking in nursing practice because it is a complex environment. To describe the process of developing an educational game to set up surgical instruments on the Mayo stand or back table as a resource to assist the instructor in surgical instrumentation training for students and nursing health professionals in continued education. The study was characterized by applied research in production technology. It included the phases of analysis and design, development, and evaluation. The objectives of the educational game were developed through Bloom's taxonomy. Parallel to the physical development of the educational game, a proposed model for the use of digital elements in educational game activities was applied to develop the game content. The development of the game called "Playing with Tweezers" was carried out in 3 phases and was evaluated by 15 participants, comprising students and professional experts in various areas of knowledge such as nursing, information technology, and education. An environment was created with an initial screen, menu buttons containing the rules of the game, and virtual tour modes for learning and assessment. The "digital" nursing student needs engagement, stimulation, reality, and entertainment, not just readings. "Playing with Tweezers" is an example of educational gaming as an innovative teaching strategy in nursing that encourages the strategy of involving the use of educational games to support theoretical or practical classroom teaching. Thus, the teacher does not work with only 1 type of teaching methodology, but with a combination of different methodologies. In addition, we cannot forget that skill training in an educational game does not

  14. Development of an Educational Game to Set Up Surgical Instruments on the Mayo Stand or Back Table: Applied Research in Production Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Background Existing research suggests that digital games can be used effectively for educational purposes at any level of training. Perioperative nursing educators can use games to complement curricula, in guidance and staff development programs, to foster team collaboration, and to give support to critical thinking in nursing practice because it is a complex environment. Objective To describe the process of developing an educational game to set up surgical instruments on the Mayo stand or back table as a resource to assist the instructor in surgical instrumentation training for students and nursing health professionals in continued education. Methods The study was characterized by applied research in production technology. It included the phases of analysis and design, development, and evaluation. The objectives of the educational game were developed through Bloom’s taxonomy. Parallel to the physical development of the educational game, a proposed model for the use of digital elements in educational game activities was applied to develop the game content. Results The development of the game called “Playing with Tweezers” was carried out in 3 phases and was evaluated by 15 participants, comprising students and professional experts in various areas of knowledge such as nursing, information technology, and education. An environment was created with an initial screen, menu buttons containing the rules of the game, and virtual tour modes for learning and assessment. Conclusions The “digital” nursing student needs engagement, stimulation, reality, and entertainment, not just readings. “Playing with Tweezers” is an example of educational gaming as an innovative teaching strategy in nursing that encourages the strategy of involving the use of educational games to support theoretical or practical classroom teaching. Thus, the teacher does not work with only 1 type of teaching methodology, but with a combination of different methodologies. In addition, we

  15. Research on multi task isolation technology of special wireless power network%电力无线专网多业务隔离技术研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    江华; 孙圆圆

    2015-01-01

    By studying the status quo of the current special wireless power network,analyzes the requirements of power distribution and consumption business on network communication and multi task isolation,puts forward implementation schemes of special wireless power network multi task operation and isolation based on RAN-SHARING and physical isolation,realizes business physical isolation in different security region and logic isolation in the same security region,provides the technical support for the hybrid networking and construction of different types of power distribution and consumption business in the future. The application result shows that the scheme can effectively save the cost of network construction and improve the power service level.%通过研究当前电力无线专网现状,分析配用电业务对网络的通信需求及多业务隔离需求,提出基于RAN-SHARING和基于物理隔离的无线专网多业务承载隔离实施方案,实现不同安全大区业务的物理隔离和同一安全大区的逻辑隔离,为未来不同类型配用电业务混合组网和建设提供技术支撑。应用结果表明:该方案能够有效节约建网成本,提高电力服务水平。

  16. Analysis on the Setting Key Factors in the Science and Technology Inducement Prize System:Based on the Content of the 135 international Science and Technology Inducement Prizes%科技悬赏奖设置关键因素研究:基于对国际上135项科技悬赏奖的内容分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曾婧婧; 王巧

    2016-01-01

    科技悬赏奖是指为解决某一特定领域难题而专门征集科技创新成果的一种非周期性奖励制度安排,其设置是一个复杂的过程,能否成功受一系列因素的影响,具有整体性、系统性、关联性等特征。运用文本内容分析法,分析135项科技悬赏奖的设置特点,认为其在设置过程中有7大关键因素,即悬赏任务发布主体的权威性,参与悬赏的准入标准,参赛者动机与激励方式、风险及行为,解决悬赏难题所需运用知识的隐性程度,悬赏设计标准具体化程度,悬赏过程的可沟通反馈性,悬赏结束后技术成果的转化等,研究结论可为建立科学合理、运作高效的科学资助体系提供依据。%Science and technology inducement prize (STIP) is non‐periodic prize system which collects high -tech achieve‐ments in order to solve a specific problem .Its'setting process is complex ,w hich success depends on a series of factors ,has the characteristics of integrity ,systematic ,relevance and so on .Using text analysis method to analyze the set of 135 prize in science and technology reward ,summing up the seven key factors in the process of setting ,namely :the authority of or‐ganizers in release the task ;the entry criteria of participate in rew ard ;motivation of the contestants and the means of in‐centives ;risks of contestants face and behaviors ;the extent of tacit knowledge needed by solving the difficult problem ;the specific degree of the design standards ;reward having communication and feedback in the process ;the technical achieve‐ments transformation after the rewards ;so as to establish the scientific funding system which is scientific ,reasonable and operating efficiently .

  17. 糯米酒制作凝固型酸奶的工艺研究%Production technology of set-style yogurt with glutinous rice wine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘婧竟; 乔发东

    2011-01-01

    A kind of set-style yogurt was prepared with the addition of glutinous rice wine. The optimum sterilizafion conditions for glutinous rice wine were 95℃ and 5 min. The optimal total solids content of milk was 16%. The single factor experiments for sucrose content, rice wine content,fermentation temperature, fermentation time and inoculum size were conducted respectively. With sensory evaluation of rice-wine yogurt as indicator,the optimal production technology of rice-wine set yogurt was obtained by orthogonal experiment as follows: sucrose 7%, rice wine 18%, inoculum size 1%, fermentation temperature 42℃ and fermentation time 4h. The addition amount of rice wine had a significant effect on the quality of rice-wine yogurt.%试验利用糯米酒制作凝固型酸奶,米酒发酵液的最适灭菌条件为95℃、5min,原料奶总固体物最佳含量16%.对蔗糖添加量、米酒发酵液添加量、发酵温度、发酵时间和发酵剂添加量做单因素试验,以米酒酸奶的感官评价为指标,通过正交试验,得出凝固型米酒酸奶最佳工艺组合蔗糖添加量7%、米酒发酵液添加量18%、发酵剂添加量1%、发酵温度42℃、发酵时间4h.其中米酒发酵液添加量对米酒酸奶品质影响显著.

  18. Nondestructive Evaluation Technology Initiatives Program II (NTIP II). Delivery Order 10, Task 010-015: In Search of Excellence - An Historical Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-05-01

    effort referenced above for the Sacramento Air Logistics Center (SM-ALC), McClellan AFB , California was transferred (upon closure of SM-ALC) to the...ML-WP Materials and Manufacturing Directorate Air Force Research Laboratory Air Force Materiel Command Wright-Patterson AFB , OH 45433-7750 11...Technology Insertion Program (RAMTIP), was secured by the NDE Program and conducted at the AFLC Sacramento Figure 4.28. Early Laser Ultrasonics

  19. Air Vehicle Integrated and Technology Research (AVIATR). Task Order 0027: Lighter Than Air (LTA) and Hybrid Aircraft Concept Assessment Tool Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT This report accompanies a new airship advanced design tool called “Advanced Airship Analysis and Design.” This report describes the tool’s...features, explores sizing and performance results for several airship configurations for several missions and outlines the influence of advanced...technologies on these results. The tool may be used to evaluate existing or proposed airship designs. It may also be used to create new designs. The tool

  20. Task 3.14 - demonstration of technologies for remote power generation in Alaska. Semi-annual report, July 1, 1996--December 31, 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, M.L.

    1998-12-31

    This paper very briefly summarizes progress in the demonstration of a small (up to 6 MWe), environmentally acceptable electric generating system fueled by indigenous fuels and waste materials to serve power distribution systems typical of Alaskan Native communities. Two detailed appendices supplement the report. The project is focused on two primary technologies: (1) atmospheric fluidized bed combustion (AFBC), and (2) coalbed methane and coal-fired diesel technologies. Two sites have been selected as possible locations for an AFBC demonstration, and bid proposals are under review. The transfer of a coal-fired diesel clean coal demonstration project from Maryland to Fairbanks, Alaska was approved, and the environmental assessment has been initiated. Federal support for a fuel cell using coalbed methane is also being pursued. The appendices included in the report provide: (1) the status of the conceptual design study for a 600-kWe coal-fired cogeneration plant in McGrath, Alaska; and (2) a global market assessment of coalbed methane, fluidized-bed combustion, and coal-fired diesel technologies in remote applications.

  1. Sequential modulation of cue use in the task switching paradigm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mike eWendt

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available In task switching studies, pre-cuing of the upcoming task improves performance, indicating preparatory activation of the upcoming task set and/or inhibition of the previous task set. To further investigate cue-based task preparation, the authors presented both valid and invalid task cues in a task switching experiment involving three tasks. Consistent with previous findings, a validity effect in terms of higher reaction times on invalidly compared to validly cued tasks was obtained. However, this validity effect was reduced following invalidly cued trials, suggesting dynamic adjustment in terms of decreased cue-based preparation after being misled. Performance was particularly impaired when the current task was the one that was invalidly cued on the preceding trial. This finding may reflect either particular reluctance to prepare or persisting inhibition of the erroneously prepared task set from the pre-trial.

  2. Sequential Modulation of Cue Use in the Task Switching Paradigm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendt, Mike; Luna-Rodriguez, Aquiles; Reisenauer, Renate; Jacobsen, Thomas; Dreisbach, Gesine

    2012-01-01

    In task switching studies, pre-cuing of the upcoming task improves performance, indicating preparatory activation of the upcoming task-set, and/or inhibition of the previous task-set. To further investigate cue-based task preparation, the authors presented both valid and invalid task cues in a task switching experiment involving three tasks. Consistent with previous findings, a validity effect in terms of higher reaction times on invalidly compared to validly cued tasks was obtained. However, this validity effect was reduced following invalidly cued trials, suggesting dynamic adjustment in terms of decreased cue-based preparation after being misled. Performance was particularly impaired when the current task was the one that was invalidly cued on the preceding trial. This finding may reflect either particular reluctance to prepare or persisting inhibition of the erroneously prepared task-set from the pre-trial. PMID:22908004

  3. Technology of building an expert system based on a set of quantitative features of tumor cell nuclei for diagnosing breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirillov, Vladimir

    2013-06-01

    The technology of building an expert system for diagnosing malignant nature of invasive tumors of the mammary gland based on a set of quantitative features of the cell nuclei has been developed. Its peculiarity was the presence of weighting coefficients in all the features. Quantitative features were obtained by transforming the initial morphometric data with the help of simple (evaluation of mean values and building of histograms) and complex (regression analysis) mathematical operations. The expert system consisted of one-dimensional X-matrix used for investigations and two-dimensional standard S-matrix. The X-matrix elements were assigned for filling with the quantitative features of the studied sample with a nonestablished diagnosis. The S-matrix elements contained threshold values of quantitative features from the system of diagnostic decision criteria for malignant forms of diseases and their weighting coefficients. Threshold values of nuclear features (larger or smaller) were determined taking into account the range of their values in the groups of malignant and benign pathology. Significance of quantitative features in diagnosing diseases has been assessed. The presence of weighting coefficients allowed diagnosing malignant and benign pathology in a quantitative form by the diagnostic index value. Diagnostic index was calculated by the sum of weighting coefficients of features of the studied sample, which fell within the range of system of the S-matrix diagnostic decision criteria. Clinical trials revealed high efficiency of the developed approach while diagnosis of breast cancer invasive forms at a preoperative stage. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Formal Methods for Information Protection Technology Task 1: Formal Grammar-Based Approach and Tool for Simulation Attacks against Computer Network Part II

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-02-19

    The Hacker Agent acts on the basis of a family of nested state machines. The state machine model of the Network Agent is represented by a single state...functions for processing the application domain ontology and the state machine model , specifying network configuration, initializing firewall model...classification, processing, and sending the response; • scripts component specifies a set of scripts initialized from the state machine model of the

  5. SYSTEM AND INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY OF INSTALLATION THE MAIN DOMINANTS IN THE STUDENTS MOTIVATION FOR A CLOSED TASK OF DECISION-MAKING REGARDING ABSENTEEISM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Volodymyr V. Kamyshyn

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Developed the system and information technology of the construction the evaluation of the utility functions of absenteeism, which is the main dominant, namely the tendency, not being indifferent to risk. Of utility functions built 45th student air traffic controllers for the six academic subjects revealed ratio of students with different attitudes to risk. Risk appetite – the desire of the student play virtual lottery to minimize absenteeism. Students are indifferent to risk, that is, with «linear» attitude to attendance, are only 18,52 %, indicating a need to develop special educational measures for the individualization of learning.

  6. TASK TECHNICAL AND QUALITY ASSURANCE PLAN FOR OUT-OF-TANK DESTRUCTION OF TETRAPHENYLBORATE VIA WET AIR OXIDATION TECHNOLOGY: PHASE I - BENCH SCALE TESTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adu-Wusu, K

    2006-03-31

    Tank 48H return to service is critical to the processing of high level waste (HLW) at Savannah River Site (SRS). Liquid Waste Disposition (LWD) management has the goal of returning Tank 48H to routine service by January 2010 or as soon as practical. Tank 48H currently holds legacy material containing organic tetraphenylborate (TPB) compounds from the operation of the In-Tank Precipitation process. This material is not compatible with the waste treatment facilities at SRS and must be removed or undergo treatment to destroy the organic compounds before the tank can be returned to Tank Farm service. Tank 48H currently contains {approx}240,000 gallons of alkaline slurry with about 2 wt % potassium and cesium tetraphenylborate (KTPB and CsTPB). The main radioactive component in Tank 48H is {sup 137}Cs. The waste also contains {approx}0.15 wt % Monosodium Titanate (MST) which has adsorbed {sup 90}Sr, U, and Pu isotopes. A System Engineering Evaluation of technologies/ideas for the treatment of TPB identified Wet Air Oxidation (WAO) as a leading alternative technology to the baseline aggregation approach. Over 75 technologies/ideas were evaluated overall. Forty-one technologies/ideas passed the initial screening evaluation. The 41 technologies/ideas were then combined to 16 complete solutions for the disposition of TPB and evaluated in detail. Wet Air Oxidation (WAO) is an aqueous phase process in which soluble or suspended waste components are oxidized using molecular oxygen contained in air. The process operates at elevated temperatures and pressures ranging from 150 to 320 C and 7 to 210 atmospheres, respectively. The products of the reaction are CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O, and low molecular weight oxygenated organics (e.g. acetate, oxalate). The basic flow scheme for a typical WAO system is as follows. The waste solution or slurry is pumped through a high-pressure feed pump. An air stream containing sufficient oxygen to meet the oxygen requirements of the waste stream is

  7. Technology evaluation report, commercial buildings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None,

    1976-04-01

    Criteria are presented which are to be met by solar hardware for inclusion in the demonstration program. Assessments are made, based on a survey made of solar hardware manufacturers and developers, of when components, subsystems, and systems will be available for demonstration according to the technology status categories set forth in ERDA 23A. Task outlines are provided for development activity recommended to improve available systems or develop advanced systems for later demonstration cycles. (WDM)

  8. Research of Task Scheduling Based on Genetic Algorithm Technology in Cloud Computing Environment%云计算环境下基于遗传算法的任务调度技术研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马俊涛; 陈业恩; 胡国杰; 严丽丽

    2016-01-01

    Genetic algorithm is a method of searching the optimal solution process by simulating natural evolution ,at pres-ent ,the genetic algorithm as the cloud computing task scheduling environment has gradually become a hot topic ,cloud computing as a new distributed computing model ,its the large number of dispersed resources through the network needed to be allocated by the user ,the implementation of resource allocation ,task scheduling technology will directly determine their "cloud computing"the level of performance .This paper discusses cloud computer task scheduling algorithm based on the current status of research on genetic algorithms ,problems and issues to be resolved ,as further pointed out the direc-tion of further research .%遗传算法是一种通过模拟自然进化过程搜索最优解的方法.目前 ,将遗传算法作为云计算环境下的任务调度算法已逐渐成为研究热点.云计算作为一种全新的分布式计算模式 ,通过网络将大量分散资源按用户所需进行分配 ,其实施资源分配、任务调度的技术将直接决定"云计算"性能的高低.探讨当前云计算中基于遗传算法的任务调度技术研究现状及有待解决的问题 ,为进一步研究指出方向.

  9. Development, implementation and evaluation of an evidence-based program for introduction of new health technologies and clinical practices in a local healthcare setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Claire; Garrubba, Marie; Allen, Kelly; King, Richard; Kelly, Cate; Thiagarajan, Malar; Castleman, Beverley; Ramsey, Wayne; Farjou, Dina

    2015-12-28

    This paper reports the process of establishing a transparent, accountable, evidence-based program for introduction of new technologies and clinical practices (TCPs) in a large Australian healthcare network. Many countries have robust evidence-based processes for assessment of new TCPs at national level. However many decisions are made by local health services where the resources and expertise to undertake health technology assessment (HTA) are limited and a lack of structure, process and transparency has been reported. An evidence-based model for process change was used to establish the program. Evidence from research and local data, experience of health service staff and consumer perspectives were incorporated at each of four steps: identifying the need for change, developing a proposal, implementation and evaluation. Checklists assessing characteristics of success, factors for sustainability and barriers and enablers were applied and implementation strategies were based on these findings. Quantitative and qualitative methods were used for process and outcome evaluation. An action research approach underpinned ongoing refinement to systems, processes and resources. A Best Practice Guide developed from the literature and stakeholder consultation identified seven program components: Governance, Decision-Making, Application Process, Monitoring and Reporting, Resources, Administration, and Evaluation and Quality Improvement. The aims of transparency and accountability were achieved. The processes are explicit, decisions published, outcomes recorded and activities reported. The aim of ascertaining rigorous evidence-based information for decision-making was not achieved in all cases. Applicants proposing new TCPs provided the evidence from research literature and local data however the information was often incorrect or inadequate, overestimating benefits and underestimating costs. Due to these limitations the initial application process was replaced by an Expression of

  10. Development of an integrated in-situ remediation technology. Topical report for Task {number_sign}3.2 entitled, ``Modeling and iron dechlorination studies`` (September 26, 1994--August 31, 1997)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shapiro, A.P.; Sivavec, T.M.; Principe, J.M. [General Electric Research and Development, Schenectady, NY (United States)

    1997-11-01

    Contamination in low-permeability soils poses a significant technical challenge to in-situ remediation efforts. Poor accessibility to the contaminants and difficulty in delivery of treatment reagents have rendered existing in-situ treatments such as bioremediation, vapor extraction, and pump and treat rather ineffective when applied to low-permeability soils present at many contaminated sites. The technology is an integrated in-situ treatment in which established geotechnical methods are used to install degradation zones directly in the contaminated soil, and electro-osmosis is utilized to move the contaminants back and forth through those zones until the treatment is complete. The present Topical Report for Task {number_sign}3.2 summarizes the modeling and dechlorination research conducted by General Electric Research and Development.

  11. Report on Project Action Sheet PP05 task 3 between the U.S. Department of Energy and the Republic of Korea Ministry of Education, Science, and Technology (MEST).

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snell, Mark Kamerer

    2013-01-01

    This report documents the results of Task 3 of Project Action Sheet PP05 between the United States Department of Energy (DOE) and the Republic of Korea (ROK) Ministry of Education, Science, and Technology (MEST) for Support with Review of an ROK Risk Evaluation Process. This task was to have Sandia National Laboratories collaborate with the Korea Institute of Nuclear Nonproliferation and Control (KINAC) on several activities concerning how to determine the Probability of Neutralization, PN, and the Probability of System Effectiveness, PE, to include: providing descriptions on how combat simulations are used to determine PN and PE; comparisons of the strengths and weaknesses of two neutralization models (the Neutralization.xls spreadsheet model versus the Brief Adversary Threat-Loss Estimator (BATLE) software); and demonstrating how computer simulations can be used to determine PN. Note that the computer simulation used for the demonstration was the Scenario Toolkit And Generation Environment (STAGE) simulation, which is a stand-alone synthetic tactical simulation sold by Presagis Canada Incorporated. The demonstration is provided in a separate Audio Video Interleave (.AVI) file.

  12. A DVB-RCS Multi-Channel, Multi-Frequency Demodulator Based on a Multi-Tasking Hardware-Software Architecture Using a System on Programmable Chip Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Doninck, A.; Dendoncker, M.; Adriaensen, F.; Delbeke, P.; Rolle, A.; Craey, T.; Krekels, S.

    : This paper highlights a multi-channel, multi-frequency DVB-RCS compatible burst demodulator implementation in a System On Programmable Chip (SOPC) technology. The core of the demodulator architecture is a SOPC device with an ARM processor located internally in FPGA. The ARM processor performs the hard real time signal processing functions and is supported by a COTS standard PC based processor module running Linux/RT-Linux for the non-hard real-time demodulator functions. The implemented architecture differs completely from classic multi-channel solutions, in which the multi- channel functionality is realised by means of a multiple instantiation of the entire demodulator. The paper also discusses the followed methodology for the SOPC design. Keywords: DVB-RCS, multi-channel, multi-frequency, SOPC, FPGA, ARM, RT-Linux

  13. JV TASK 45-MERCURY CONTROL TECHNOLOGIES FOR ELECTRIC UTILITIES BURNING LIGNITE COAL, PHASE I BENCH-AND PILOT-SCALE TESTING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John H. Pavlish; Michael J. Holmes; Steven A. Benson; Charlene R. Crocker; Edwin S. Olson; Kevin C. Galbreath; Ye Zhuang; Brandon M. Pavlish

    2003-10-01

    The Energy & Environmental Research Center has completed the first phase of a 3-year, two-phase consortium project to develop and demonstrate mercury control technologies for utilities that burn lignite coal. The overall project goal is to maintain the viability of lignite-based energy production by providing utilities with low-cost options for meeting future mercury regulations. Phase I objectives are to develop a better understanding of mercury interactions with flue gas constituents, test a range of sorbent-based technologies targeted at removing elemental mercury (Hg{sup o}) from flue gases, and demonstrate the effectiveness of the most promising technologies at the pilot scale. The Phase II objectives are to demonstrate and quantify sorbent technology effectiveness, performance, and cost at a sponsor-owned and operated power plant. Phase I results are presented in this report along with a brief overview of the Phase II plans. Bench-scale testing provided information on mercury interactions with flue gas constituents and relative performances of the various sorbents. Activated carbons were prepared from relatively high-sodium lignites by carbonization at 400 C (752 F), followed by steam activation at 750 C (1382 F) and 800 C (1472 F). Luscar char was also steam-activated at these conditions. These lignite-based activated carbons, along with commercially available DARCO FGD and an oxidized calcium silicate, were tested in a thin-film, fixed-bed, bench-scale reactor using a simulated lignitic flue gas consisting of 10 {micro}g/Nm{sup 3} Hg{sup 0}, 6% O{sub 2}, 12% CO{sub 2}, 15% H{sub 2}O, 580 ppm SO{sub 2}, 120 ppm NO, 6 ppm NO{sub 2}, and 1 ppm HCl in N{sub 2}. All of the lignite-based activated (750 C, 1382 F) carbons required a 30-45-minute conditioning period in the simulated lignite flue gas before they exhibited good mercury sorption capacities. The unactivated Luscar char and oxidized calcium silicate were ineffective in capturing mercury. Lignite

  14. Scientific Merit Review of Directed Research Tasks Within the NASA Human Research Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles, John B.

    2010-01-01

    The Human Research Program is instrumental in developing and delivering research findings, health countermeasures, and human systems technologies for spacecraft. :HRP is subdivided into 6 research entities, or Elements. Each Element is charged with providing the Program with knowledge and capabilities to conduct research to address the human health and performance risks as well as advance the readiness levels of technology and countermeasures. Project: An Element may be further subdivided into Projects, which are defined as an integrated set of tasks undertaken to deliver a product or set of products

  15. A Population of Assessment Tasks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daro, Phil; Burkhardt, Hugh

    2012-01-01

    We propose the development of a "population" of high-quality assessment tasks that cover the performance goals set out in the "Common Core State Standards for Mathematics." The population will be published. Tests are drawn from this population as a structured random sample guided by a "balancing algorithm."

  16. A Population of Assessment Tasks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daro, Phil; Burkhardt, Hugh

    2012-01-01

    We propose the development of a "population" of high-quality assessment tasks that cover the performance goals set out in the "Common Core State Standards for Mathematics." The population will be published. Tests are drawn from this population as a structured random sample guided by a "balancing algorithm."

  17. Development of an integrated, in-situ remediation technology: Task 1 -- Evaluation of treatment zone formation options. Topical report, September 26, 1994--May 25, 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shoemaker, S.H.; Landis, R.C.; Griffith, R.J.; Schultz, D.S. [Monsanto Co., St. Louis, MO (United States); Quinton, G.E. [E.I. duPont de Nemours and Co., Inc., Wilmington, DE (United States)

    1997-05-01

    Contamination in low permeability soils poses a significant technical challenge to in-situ remediation efforts. Poor accessibility to the contaminants and difficulty in delivery of treatment reagents have rendered existing in-situ treatments such as bioremediation, vapor extraction, pump and treat rather ineffective when applied to low permeability soils present at many contaminated sites. The technology is an integrated in-situ treatment in which established geotechnical methods are used to install degradation zones directly in the contaminated soil and electro-osmosis is utilized to move the contaminants back and forth through those zones until the treatment is completed. This topical report presents the results of evaluations by E.I. duPont de Nemours and Co., Inc. of treatment zone and electrode emplacement alternatives for use in the integrated treatment process. Specifically, the scope of this study was limited to vertical configuration emplacements. Several promising alternatives were identified ranging from approaches involving standard excavation techniques to relatively specialized geotechnical construction methods which could be modified for the treatment zone emplacement purpose. Information developed in this report is designed to help the user select the most promising emplacement method(s) for a given site on the basis of (1) depth of emplacement, and (2) restrictions on handling excavated soils. Advantages, disadvantages, and estimated costs are identified for each alternative, and possible bases for improvement and cost reduction through further development are described.

  18. The Instructor as Manager: Time and Task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collis, Betty; Nijhuis, Gerard Gervedink

    2000-01-01

    Discusses the use of information and communication technologies at the University of Twente (Netherlands) and considers the management tasks, defined as all tasks outside of content-specific aspects, related to online learning via the World Wide Web that instructors must address. Focuses on handling assignments and feedback. (LRW)

  19. Task Design in Videoconferencing-Supported Distance Language Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuping

    2007-01-01

    This article addresses a pervasive need in the area of videoconference-supported distance language learning: task design. On the basis of Chapelle's (2001) criteria for CALL task appropriateness, this article proposes a set of criteria for evaluating videoconferencing-based tasks which examine such aspects of a task as practicality,…

  20. The harder the task, the more inconsistent the performance: a PPT analysis on task difficulty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Stephen; Geels, Kasha; Hackett, Holly Raye; Trafimow, David; McCarley, Jason S; Schwark, Jeremy; Hunt, Gayle

    2012-01-01

    Previous research has demonstrated that as task difficulty increases, task performance subsequently decreases. These decrements in task performance as difficulty increases have been attributed to the processes individuals use to complete tasks. Over a series of three experiments, Potential Performance Theory (PPT; Trafimow & Rice, 2008 ; 2009), was used to test the hypothesis that decreases in task performance are, in part, due to inconsistency rather than only systematic factors. Task difficulty was manipulated in three visual search tasks by increasing set size (Experiment 1), decreasing contrast (Experiment 2), and increasing background distracters (Experiment 3). Findings over the three studies indicated that decreases in observed task performance as task difficulty increases are primarily due to a decrease of consistency rather than systematic factors. The theoretical implications of these findings are discussed.

  1. 基于μC/OS Ⅱ的三维打印机任务间的通信技术研究%Research on the tasks intercommunicate technology of the 3D printer based on the μC/OSⅡ

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    毕宏彦; 赵博; 卫甜甜; 丁浩

    2013-01-01

    The principle and control system of 3D printer is introduced. The tasks division and intercommunication technolo-gy of the 3D printer based on μC/OS II is mainly discussed. The 3D printing was divided into four tasks:touchscreen operation task,LCD display task,data generate task and print out task. Rely on the agile tasks intercommunicate ability of μC/OS II,the print data was sent from data generation task to print task by Mbox. In different tasks,the needed task is resumed and the un-needed tasks are hung up. In this way,the fast and accuracy control of 3D print is realized.%简要介绍了三维打印机原理与控制系统,重点论述了采用μC/OS Ⅱ操作系统开发三维打印机中任务的划分及任务间的通信技术。将三维打印分为4个用户任务,分别是触摸屏操作任务,显示屏显示任务,数据生成任务,打印任务。凭借μC/OS Ⅱ灵活的任务间通信的能力,采用消息邮箱Mbox从数据生成任务中将打印数据传送给打印任务。在不同任务中,将暂时不需要工作的任务挂起,而将需要工作的任务恢复运行,圆满地实现了三维打印的快速、精确控制。

  2. Systemic consultation and goal setting

    OpenAIRE

    Carr, Alan

    1993-01-01

    Over two decades of empirical research conducted within a positivist framework has shown that goal setting is a particularly useful method for influencing task performance in occupational and industrial contexts. The conditions under which goal setting is maximally effective are now clearly established. These include situations where there is a high level of acceptance and commitment, where goals are specific and challenging, where the task is relatively simple rather than ...

  3. Dynamics of the central bottleneck: dual-task and task uncertainty.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariano Sigman

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Why is the human brain fundamentally limited when attempting to execute two tasks at the same time or in close succession? Two classical paradigms, psychological refractory period (PRP and task switching, have independently approached this issue, making significant advances in our understanding of the architecture of cognition. Yet, there is an apparent contradiction between the conclusions derived from these two paradigms. The PRP paradigm, on the one hand, suggests that the simultaneous execution of two tasks is limited solely by a passive structural bottleneck in which the tasks are executed on a first-come, first-served basis. The task-switching paradigm, on the other hand, argues that switching back and forth between task configurations must be actively controlled by a central executive system (the system controlling voluntary, planned, and flexible action. Here we have explicitly designed an experiment mixing the essential ingredients of both paradigms: task uncertainty and task simultaneity. In addition to a central bottleneck, we obtain evidence for active processes of task setting (planning of the appropriate sequence of actions and task disengaging (suppression of the plan set for the first task in order to proceed with the next one. Our results clarify the chronometric relations between these central components of dual-task processing, and in particular whether they operate serially or in parallel. On this basis, we propose a hierarchical model of cognitive architecture that provides a synthesis of task-switching and PRP paradigms.

  4. Cognitive task load in a naval ship control centre: from identification to prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grootjen, M; Neerincx, M A; Veltman, J A

    Deployment of information and communication technology will lead to further automation of control centre tasks and an increasing amount of information to be processed. A method for establishing adequate levels of cognitive task load for the operators in such complex environments has been developed. It is based on a model distinguishing three load factors: time occupied, task-set switching, and level of information processing. Application of the method resulted in eight scenarios for eight extremes of task load (i.e. low and high values for each load factor). These scenarios were performed by 13 teams in a high-fidelity control centre simulator of the Royal Netherlands Navy. The results show that the method provides good prediction of the task load that will actually appear in the simulator. The model allowed identification of under- and overload situations showing negative effects on operator performance corresponding to controlled experiments in a less realistic task environment. Tools proposed to keep the operator at an optimum task load are (adaptive) task allocation and interface support.

  5. Scientific Research Program for Power, Energy, and Thermal Technologies. Task Order 0001: Energy, Power, and Thermal Technologies and Processes Experimental Research. Subtask: Thermal Management of Electromechanical Actuation System for Aircraft Primary Flight Control Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-01

    commercial aircraft utilize a cable and pulley scheme. In both setups, trim units, feel units, and power control units (PCUs) provide the pilot with...drives a mechanical transmission typically made up of a reduction gear box and a ball/roller screw (linear actuator) or flanged housing (rotary hinge... gear box or ball screw mechanism. Therefore it becomes the point of interest for TMS adaption. Current EMAS technology employs permanent magnet

  6. Flexible Assembly Solar Technology (FAST) Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toister, Elad [BrightSource Energy Inc., Jerusalem (Israel)

    2014-11-06

    The Flexible Assembly Solar Technology (FAST) project was initiated by BrightSource in an attempt to provide potential solar field EPC contractors with an effective set of tools to perform specific construction tasks. These tasks are mostly associated with heliostat assembly and installation, and require customized non-standard tools. The FAST concept focuses on low equipment cost, reduced setup time and increased assembly throughput as compared to the Ivanpah solar field construction tools.

  7. The Effects of a Self-Management Procedure on the On-Task Behavior, Academic Productivity, and Academic Accuracy of Female Students with Disabilities in a Juvenile Correctional High School Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldwell, Stacy Lynette

    2010-01-01

    Students served in juvenile correctional school settings often arrive with histories of trauma, aversive educational experiences, low achievement, and other severe risk factors that impeded psychosocial development, educational progress, and occupational outcomes. Schools serving adjudicated youth must address a higher percentage of severe…

  8. A Comparison of Embedded Total Task Instruction in Teaching Behavioral Chains to Massed One-on-One Instruction for Students with Intellectual Disabilities: Accessing General Education Settings and Core Academic Content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jameson, J. Matt; Walker, Ryan; Utley, Kristen; Maughan, Ryan

    2012-01-01

    This study is a comparison of the embedded instruction of behavioral chains with more traditional (one-on-one massed trials in special education setting) instructional procedures for teaching behavioral chains to students with significant cognitive disabilities. Although embedded instruction has emerged as a promising potential instructional…

  9. Guideline for Hand Hygiene in Health-Care Settings. Recommendations of the Healthcare Infection Control Practices Advisory Committee and the HIPAC/SHEA/APIC/IDSA Hand Hygiene Task Force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyce, John M; Pittet, Didier

    2002-12-01

    The Guideline for Hand Hygiene in Health-Care Settings provides health-care workers (HCWs) with a review of data regarding handwashing and hand antisepsis in health-care settings. In addition, it provides specific recommendations to promote improved hand-hygiene practices and reduce transmission of pathogenic microorganisms to patients and personnel in health-care settings. This report reviews studies published since the 1985 CDC guideline (Garner JS, Favero MS. CDC guideline for handwashing and hospital environmental control, 1985. Infect Control 1986;7:231-43) and the 1995 APIC guideline (Larson EL, APIC Guidelines Committee. APIC guideline for handwashing and hand antisepsis in health care settings. Am J Infect Control 1995;23:251-69) were issued and provides an in-depth review of hand-hygiene practices of HCWs, levels of adherence of personnel to recommended handwashing practices, and factors adversely affecting adherence. New studies of the in vivo efficacy of alcohol-based hand rubs and the low incidence of dermatitis associated with their use are reviewed. Recent studies demonstrating the value of multidisciplinary hand-hygiene promotion programs and the potential role of alcohol-based hand rubs in improving hand-hygiene practices are summarized. Recommendations concerning related issues (e.g., the use of surgical hand antiseptics, hand lotions or creams, and wearing of artificial fingernails) are also included.

  10. Talk and task mastery: the importance of socially shared talk during computer-based problem solving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagstrom, Fran; White, Michelle

    2006-01-01

    In order to examine more closely the ways that children use socially constructed dialogue to mediate task mastery a hierarchical set of computer tasks were presented in an animated game format (ToonTalk) to three adult/child (US Kindergarten) dyads over five sessions. Transcriptions of the adult-child talk were used to determine (1) the types of discourses utilized by the children (i.e., procedural, conversation, narrative) during problem solving and (2) the relationship of this talk to task mastery. It was found that (1) shared talk was associated with more successful problem solving; (2) socially shared talk did not have to be on task to be beneficial; and (3) procedural discourse was more successfully and frequently used for independent problem solving if first requested by the child. These results highlight the importance of socially shared talk in the development of problem solving strategies even when using computer technology.

  11. Dendroidal sets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weiss, I.

    2007-01-01

    The thesis introduces the new concept of dendroidal set. Dendroidal sets are a generalization of simplicial sets that are particularly suited to the study of operads in the context of homotopy theory. The relation between operads and dendroidal sets is established via the dendroidal nerve functor wh

  12. Garbage Collection Scheduling of Aperiodic Tasks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ning Zhang; Guang-Ze Xiong

    2009-01-01

    In the previous work of garbage collection (GC) models, scheduling analysis was given based on an assumption that there were no aperiodic mutator tasks. However, it is not true in practical real-time systems. The GC algorithm which can schedule aperiodic tasks is proposed, and the variance of live memory is analyzed. In this algorithm, active tasks are deferred to be processed by GC until the states of tasks become inactive, and the saved sporadic server time can be used to schedule aperiodic tasks. Scheduling the sample task sets demonstrates that this algorithm in this paper can schedule aperiodic tasks and decrease GC work. Thus, the GC algorithm proposed is more flexible and portable.

  13. "Task" as Research Construct

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seedhouse, Paul

    2005-01-01

    The article examines "task" as research construct as predominantly conceived in terms of task-as-workplan in the task-based learning/second language acquisition literature. It is suggested that "task" has weak construct validity and ontology in an overwhelmingly quantitative paradigm because the construct has a "split personality."…

  14. Augmenting a Child's Reality: Using Educational Tablet Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanner, Patricia; Karas, Carly; Schofield, Damian

    2014-01-01

    This study investigates the classroom integration of an innovative technology, augmented reality. Although the process of adding new technologies into a classroom setting can be daunting, the concept of augmented reality has demonstrated the ability to educate students and to assist with their comprehension of a procedural task. One half of the…

  15. The Impact of the Technology Used in Formative Assessment: The Case of Spelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vásquez, Andrea; Nussbaum, Miguel; Sciarresi, Enzo; Martínez, Tomás; Barahona, Camila; Strasser, Katherine

    2017-01-01

    This study demonstrates how the technology used to assist formative assessment in spelling can have an impact on learning. Formative assessment represents a set of student-centered practices, the results of which are not always optimal. Furthermore, different technologies are better suited to certain tasks than to others. The study follows a…

  16. The Impact of the Technology Used in Formative Assessment: The Case of Spelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vásquez, Andrea; Nussbaum, Miguel; Sciarresi, Enzo; Martínez, Tomás; Barahona, Camila; Strasser, Katherine

    2017-01-01

    This study demonstrates how the technology used to assist formative assessment in spelling can have an impact on learning. Formative assessment represents a set of student-centered practices, the results of which are not always optimal. Furthermore, different technologies are better suited to certain tasks than to others. The study follows a…

  17. SemEval-2016 task 10

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schneider, Nathan; Hovy, Dirk; Johannsen, Anders Trærup

    2016-01-01

    This task combines the labeling of multiword expressions and supersenses (coarse-grained classes) in an explicit, yet broad-coverage paradigm for lexical semantics. Nine systems participated; the best scored 57.7% F1 in a multi-domain evaluation setting, indicating that the task remains largely u...

  18. A Bilingual Advantage in Task Switching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prior, Anat; MacWhinney, Brian

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated the possibility that lifelong bilingualism may lead to enhanced efficiency in the ability to shift between mental sets. We compared the performance of monolingual and fluent bilingual college students in a task-switching paradigm. Bilinguals incurred reduced switching costs in the task-switching paradigm when compared with…

  19. Shaping Academic Task Engagement with Percentile Schedules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Athens, Elizabeth S.; Vollmer, Timothy R.; St. Peter Pipkin, Claire C.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the use of percentile schedules as a method of quantifying the shaping procedure in an educational setting. We compared duration of task engagement during baseline measurements for 4 students to duration of task engagement during a percentile schedule. As a secondary purpose, we examined the influence on…

  20. An ergonomic task analysis of spinal anaesthesia.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ajmal, Muhammad

    2009-12-01

    Ergonomics is the study of physical interaction between humans and their working environment. The objective of this study was to characterize the performance of spinal anaesthesia in an acute hospital setting, applying ergonomic task analysis.

  1. Recalling academic tasks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Draper, Franklin Gno

    This study was focused on what students remembered about five middle school science tasks when they were juniors and seniors in high school. Descriptions of the five tasks were reconstructed from available artifacts and teachers' records, notes and recollections. Three of the five tasks were "authentic" in the sense that students were asked to duplicate the decisions practitioners make in the adult world. The other two tasks were more typical school tasks involving note taking and preparation for a quiz. All five tasks, however, involved use of computers. Students were interviewed to examine what and how well they recalled the tasks and what forms or patterns of recall existed. Analysis of their responses indicated that different kinds of tasks produced different levels of recall. Authentically situated tasks were remembered much better than routine school tasks. Further, authentic tasks centered on design elements were recalled better than those for which design was not as pivotal. Patterns of recall indicated that participants most often recalled the decisions they made, the scenarios of the authentically situated tasks, the consequences of their tasks and the social contexts of the classroom. Task events, in other words, appeared to form a framework upon which students constructed stories of the tasks. The more salient the events, the richer the story, the deeper and more detailed the recall of the task. Thus, authentic tasks appeared to lend themselves to creating stories better than regular school tasks and therefore such tasks were recalled better. Implications of these patterns of recall are discussed with respect to issues of school learning and assessment.

  2. Dual task performance in normal aging: a comparison of choice reaction time tasks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eleftheria Vaportzis

    Full Text Available This study examined dual task performance in 28 younger (18-30 years and 28 older (>60 years adults using two sets of choice reaction time (RT tasks paired with digit tasks. Set one paired simple choice RT with digit forward; set two paired complex choice RT with digit backward. Each task within each set had easy and hard conditions. For the simple choice RT, participants viewed single letters and pressed a specified keyboard key if the letter was X or Z or a different key for other letters (easy. For the hard condition, there were 4 target letters (X, Z, O, Y. Digit forward consisted of 4 (easy or 5 (hard digits. For the complex choice RT, participants viewed 4×4 matrices of Xs and Os, and indicated whether four Xs (easy or four Xs or four Os (hard appeared in a row. Digit backward consisted of 3 (easy or 4 (hard digits. Within each set, participants performed every possible combination of tasks. We found that in the simple choice RT tasks older adults were significantly slower than, but as accurate as younger adults. In the complex choice RT tasks, older adults were significantly less accurate, but as fast as younger adults. For both age groups and both dual task sets, RT decreased and error rates increased with greater task difficulty. Older adults had greater dual task costs for error rates in the simple choice RT, whereas in the complex choice RT, it was the younger group that had greater dual task costs. Findings suggest that younger and older adults may adopt differential behavioral strategies depending on complexity and difficulty of dual tasks.

  3. Society of Automotive Engineering of China, Electricity Technology Branch Set up%中国汽车工程学会电器技术分会成立

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    甘雨文

    2016-01-01

    Oct. 27, 2016, Society of Automotive Engineering of China held a conference at Shanghai Automobile Exhibition Center to announce the establishment of the Electricity Technology Branch, together with the disclose of organizational lists of the branch.

  4. Kokkos? Task DAG Capabilities.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edwards, Harold C.; Ibanez, Daniel Alejandro

    2017-09-01

    This report documents the ASC/ATDM Kokkos deliverable "Production Portable Dy- namic Task DAG Capability." This capability enables applications to create and execute a dynamic task DAG ; a collection of heterogeneous computational tasks with a directed acyclic graph (DAG) of "execute after" dependencies where tasks and their dependencies are dynamically created and destroyed as tasks execute. The Kokkos task scheduler executes the dynamic task DAG on the target execution resource; e.g. a multicore CPU, a manycore CPU such as Intel's Knights Landing (KNL), or an NVIDIA GPU. Several major technical challenges had to be addressed during development of Kokkos' Task DAG capability: (1) portability to a GPU with it's simplified hardware and micro- runtime, (2) thread-scalable memory allocation and deallocation from a bounded pool of memory, (3) thread-scalable scheduler for dynamic task DAG, (4) usability by applications.

  5. Designing CALL Tasks for College English Learners

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    <正>As CALL(Computer Assisted Language Learning) became a new trend among China’s college English learners nowadays,it is time that teachers reflected on their teaching methodology innovation with the new technological advancement,one part of it is writing CALL tasks for their own individual classes.This paper presents a few basic principles and rationales of designing such tasks,and hope to work as a reminder for task writers.These principles and rationales include how to realize CLT(communicative language teaching) and learner-centredness and foster learner autonomy.In order to achieve this,it is reminded that task writers pay attention to a few points,like the communicativeness,contextualization,authenticity,and relatedness in task writing. Aspects of syllabus design,choice of texts,contents of activities and tasks and sequencing are put under investigation.

  6. Monitoring supports performance in a dual-task paradigm involving a risky decision-making task and a working memory task

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bettina eGathmann

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Performing two cognitively demanding tasks at the same time is known to decrease performance. The current study investigates the underlying executive functions of a dual-tasking situation involving the simultaneous performance of decision making under explicit risk and a working memory task. It is suggested that making a decision and performing a working memory task at the same time should particularly require monitoring - an executive control process supervising behavior and the state of processing on two tasks. To test the role of a supervisory/monitoring function in such a dual-tasking situation we investigated 122 participants with the Game of Dice Task plus 2-back task (GDT plus 2-back task. This dual task requires participants to make decisions under risk and to perform a 2-back working memory task at the same time. Furthermore, a task measuring a set of several executive functions gathered in the term concept formation (Modified Card Sorting Test, MCST and the newly developed Balanced Switching Task (BST, measuring monitoring in particular, were used. The results demonstrate that concept formation and monitoring are involved in the simultaneous performance of decision making under risk and a working memory task. In particular, the mediation analysis revealed that BST performance partially mediates the influence of MCST performance on the GDT plus 2-back task. These findings suggest that monitoring is one important subfunction for superior performance in a dual-tasking situation including decision making under risk and a working memory task.

  7. The Factors Influencing Young Children's Social Interaction in Technology Integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Eun Mee

    2015-01-01

    When technology integration is accomplished successfully in early childhood education settings, children tend to interact more with one another and exchange information related to computer tasks as well as the overall classroom on-going curriculum themes. Therefore, to explore how young children are interacting in computer areas when using…

  8. The shielding function of task rules in the context of task switching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reisenauer, Renate; Dreisbach, Gesine

    2014-02-01

    There is increasing evidence that task rules help shield the response against distractor interference. Here, the authors investigate the cognitive mechanisms underlying this assumed shielding function of task rules and how it is adjusted to changing task demands. In two experiments, participants switched between a noun categorization and an adjective categorization task. Target words were superimposed on distractor pictures. These pictures were always irrelevant and depicted either objects also used as target words in the noun task (noun distractors) or objects that were not part of the noun target-set but could be categorized according to the noun task (noun-related distractors). Results show that (a) on task repetitions shielding prevents interference from any distractors associated with a competing task; this is indicated by the lack of interference on adjective task repetitions; and (b) shielding is reduced on task switches. In the noun task, this reduction resulted in attenuated interference by noun-related distractors. In the adjective task, spatial distractors did not interfere despite the reduction. This result suggests that shielding is supported by a processing advantage for task-related information and not by distractor suppression.

  9. Melt processed crystalline ceramic waste forms for advanced nuclear fuel cycles: CRP T21027 1813: Processing technologies for high level waste, formulation of matrices and characterization of waste forms, Task 17208: Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amoroso, J. W. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Marra, J. C. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2015-08-26

    A multi-phase ceramic waste form is being developed at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) for treatment of secondary waste streams generated by reprocessing commercial spent nuclear. The envisioned waste stream contains a mixture of transition, alkali, alkaline earth, and lanthanide metals. Ceramic waste forms are tailored (engineered) to incorporate waste components as part of their crystal structure based on knowledge from naturally found minerals containing radioactive and non-radioactive species similar to the radionuclides of concern in wastes from fuel reprocessing. The ability to tailor ceramics to mimic naturally occurring crystals substantiates the long term stability of such crystals (ceramics) over geologic timescales of interest for nuclear waste immobilization [1]. A durable multi-phase ceramic waste form tailored to incorporate all the waste components has the potential to broaden the available disposal options and thus minimize the storage and disposal costs associated with aqueous reprocessing. This report summarizes results from three years of work on the IAEA Coordinated Research Project on “Processing technologies for high level waste, formulation of matrices and characterization of waste forms” (T21027), and specific task “Melt Processed Crystalline Ceramic Waste Forms for Advanced Nuclear Fuel Cycles” (17208).

  10. Melt processed crystalline ceramic waste forms for advanced nuclear fuel cycles: CRP T21027 1813: Processing technologies for high level waste, formulation of matrices and characterization of waste forms, task 17208: Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amoroso, J. W. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Marra, J. C. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2015-08-26

    A multi-phase ceramic waste form is being developed at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) for treatment of secondary waste streams generated by reprocessing commercial spent nuclear. The envisioned waste stream contains a mixture of transition, alkali, alkaline earth, and lanthanide metals. Ceramic waste forms are tailored (engineered) to incorporate waste components as part of their crystal structure based on knowledge from naturally found minerals containing radioactive and non-radioactive species similar to the radionuclides of concern in wastes from fuel reprocessing. The ability to tailor ceramics to mimic naturally occurring crystals substantiates the long term stability of such crystals (ceramics) over geologic timescales of interest for nuclear waste immobilization [1]. A durable multi-phase ceramic waste form tailored to incorporate all the waste components has the potential to broaden the available disposal options and thus minimize the storage and disposal costs associated with aqueous reprocessing. This report summarizes results from three years of work on the IAEA Coordinated Research Project on “Processing technologies for high level waste, formulation of matrices and characterization of waste forms” (T21027), and specific task “Melt Processed Crystalline Ceramic Waste Forms for Advanced Nuclear Fuel Cycles” (17208).

  11. Development of an integrated in-situ remediation technology. Topical report for task No. 11 entitled: Evaluation of TCE contamination before and after the field experiment, September 26, 1994--May 25, 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hughes, B.M.; Athmer, C.J.; Sheridan, P.W. [and others

    1997-04-01

    Contamination in low permeability soils poses a significant technical challenge to in-situ remediation efforts. Poor accessibility to the contaminants and difficulty in delivery of treatment reagents have rendered existing in-situ treatments such as bioremediation, vapor extraction, pump and treat rather ineffective when applied to low permeability soils present at many contaminated sites. The technology is an integrated in-situ treatment in which established geotechnical methods are used to install degradation zones directly in the contaminated soil and electro-osmosis is utilized to move the contaminants back and forth through those zones until the treatment is completed. The present Topical Report for Task No. 11 summarizes the results of TCE analysis in soil and carbon before and after conducting the field experiment. In addition, a discussion of the TCE material balance demonstrates that the Lasagna{trademark} process is effective in moving TCE from the contaminated soil into carbon treatment zones in the field experiment at DOE`s Gaseous Diffusion Plant in Paducah, Kentucky.

  12. IEA PVPS Task 7 'Photovoltaic power systems in the built environment'; IEA PVPS Task 7 'Photovoltaic power systems in the built environment'

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruoss, D.; Toggweiler, P.

    2002-07-01

    This final report for the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE) presents the results of Task 7, a task originally set up by the International Energy Agency (IEA) in 1997 to study the topic of building-integrated photovoltaic power systems (BIPV) that are incorporated into our built-up environment. The task's four subtasks are described that covered architectural design, systems technologies, non-technical barriers and the demonstration and dissemination of PV systems. The products of the task are introduced, including a publicly accessible PV database that presents a selection of BIPV applications in different building areas and an overview of BIPV technologies available today. A further subtask is described that published a book on 'Designing with Solar Power'. Other subtasks are also described: one dealt with the potential for PV power in IEA countries, another was involved with the setting up of DEMOSITE in Lausanne, Switzerland, where 32 different systems are on display. Also a 'Training and Education' package was developed and added to the Task 7 book as a CD-ROM supplement. The authors sum up by remarking that Task 7 provided a unique opportunity to link together leading programmes in the USA, Europe, Japan and other countries, to disseminate experience gained in BIPV applications and to promote the exchange of information on the subject.

  13. Binding Task-Based Language Teaching and Task-Based Language Testing: A Survey into EFL Teachers and Learners' Views of Task-Based Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panahi, Ali

    2012-01-01

    In most settings, task-based language teaching and testing have been dissociated from each other. That is why this study came to rethink of the learners' views towards awareness and implementation of task-based language teaching through IELTS listening tasks. To these objectives, after sketching instrumentation, the learners were divided into…

  14. A Blended Learning Study on Implementing Video Recorded Speaking Tasks in Task-Based Classroom Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkgoz, Yasemin

    2011-01-01

    This study investigates designing and implementing a speaking course in which face-to-face instruction informed by the principles of Task-Based Learning is blended with the use of technology, the video, for the first-year student teachers of English in Turkish higher education. The study consisted of three hours of task-based classroom…

  15. Supervisory Control of a Humanoid Robot in Microgravity for Manipulation Tasks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, Logan C.; Strawser, Phil; Hambuchen, Kimberly; Baker, Will; Badger, Julia

    2017-01-01

    Teleoperation is the dominant form of dexterous robotic tasks in the field. However, there are many use cases in which direct teleoperation is not feasible such as disaster areas with poor communication as posed in the DARPA Robotics Challenge, or robot operations on spacecraft a large distance from Earth with long communication delays. Presented is a solution that combines the Affordance Template Framework for object interaction with TaskForce for supervisory control in order to accomplish high level task objectives with basic autonomous behavior from the robot. TaskForce, is a new commanding infrastructure that allows for optimal development of task execution, clear feedback to the user to aid in off-nominal situations, and the capability to add autonomous verification and corrective actions. This framework has allowed the robot to take corrective actions before requesting assistance from the user. This framework is demonstrated with Robonaut 2 removing a Cargo Transfer Bag from a simulated logistics resupply vehicle for spaceflight using a single operator command. This was executed with 80% success with no human involvement, and 95% success with limited human interaction. This technology sets the stage to do any number of high level tasks using a similar framework, allowing the robot to accomplish tasks with minimal to no human interaction.

  16. Project Tasks in Robotics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Torben; Hansen, Poul Erik

    1998-01-01

    Description of the compulsary project tasks to be carried out as a part of DTU course 72238 Robotics......Description of the compulsary project tasks to be carried out as a part of DTU course 72238 Robotics...

  17. Bin Set 1 Calcine Retrieval Feasibility Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R. D. Adams; S. M. Berry; K. J. Galloway; T. A. Langenwalter; D. A. Lopez; C. M. Noakes; H. K. Peterson; M. I. Pope; R. J. Turk

    1999-10-01

    At the Department of Energy's Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center, as an interim waste management measure, both mixed high-level liquid waste and sodium bearing waste have been solidified by a calculation process and are stored in the Calcine Solids Storage Facilities. This calcined product will eventually be treated to allow final disposal in a national geologic repository. The Calcine Solids Storage Facilities comprise seven ''bit sets.'' Bin Set 1, the first to be constructed, was completed in 1959, and has been in service since 1963. It is the only bin set that does not meet current safe-shutdown earthquake seismic criteria. In addition, it is the only bin set that lacks built-in features to aid in calcine retrieval. One option to alleviate the seismic compliance issue is to transport the calcine from Bin Set 1 to another bin set which has the required capacity and which is seismically qualified. This report studies the feasibility of retrieving the calcine from Bi n Set 1 and transporting it into Bin Set 6 which is located approximately 650 feet away. Because Bin Set 1 was not designed for calcine retrieval, and because of the high radiation levels and potential contamination spread from the calcined material, this is a challenging engineering task. This report presents preconceptual design studies for remotely-operated, low-density, pneumatic vacuum retrieval and transport systems and equipment that are based on past work performed by the Raytheon Engineers and Constructors architectural engineering firm. The designs presented are considered feasible; however, future development work will be needed in several areas during the subsequent conceptual design phase.

  18. Launching Complex Tasks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Kara J.; Shahan, Emily C.; Gibbons, Lynsey K.; Cobb, Paul A.

    2012-01-01

    Mathematics lessons can take a variety of formats. In this article, the authors discuss lessons organized around complex mathematical tasks. These lessons usually unfold in three phases. First, the task is introduced to students. Second, students work on solving the task. Third, the teacher "orchestrates" a concluding whole-class discussion in…

  19. Task assignment and coaching

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dominguez-Martinez, S.

    2009-01-01

    An important task of a manager is to motivate her subordinates. One way in which a manager can give incentives to junior employees is through the assignment of tasks. How a manager allocates tasks in an organization, provides information to the junior employees about his ability. Without coaching fr

  20. Cue Representation and Situational Awareness in Task Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carl, Diana R.

    2009-01-01

    Task analysis in human performance technology is used to determine how human performance can be well supported with training, job aids, environmental changes, and other interventions. Early work by Miller (1953) and Gilbert (1969, 1974) addressed cue processing in task execution and recommended cue descriptions in task analysis. Modern task…