WorldWideScience

Sample records for technology review july august

  1. Science & Technology Review July/August 2016

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogt, Ramona L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Meissner, Caryn N. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Chinn, Ken B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-07-18

    At Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, we focus on science and technology research to ensure our nation’s security. We also apply that expertise to solve other important national problems in energy, bioscience, and the environment. Science & Technology Review is published eight times a year to communicate, to a broad audience, the Laboratory’s scientific and technological accomplishments in fulfilling its primary missions. The publication’s goal is to help readers understand these accomplishments and appreciate their value to the individual citizen, the nation, and the world. In this issue for the months of July and August 2016, there are two features: one on Science and Technology in Support of Nuclear Nonproliferation, and another on Seeking Out Hidden Radioactive Materials. Then there are highlights are three research projects--on optics, plasma science, and the nature of neutrinos--along with a news section and patents and awards.

  2. Energy technology review, July--August 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, K.C. (ed.)

    1991-01-01

    This issue of Energy Technology Review'' gives the annual review of the programs at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. This State of the Laboratory issue includes discussions of all major programs: Defense Systems; Laser Research; Magnetic Fusion Energy; Energy and Earth Sciences; Environmental Technology Program; Biomedical and Environmental Science; Engineering; Physics; Chemistry and Materials Science; Computations; and Administrative and Institutional Services. An index is also given of the 1991 achievements with contact names and telephone number.

  3. Science and Technology Review July/August 2002

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Budil, K.

    2002-07-01

    This Science and Technology Review has the following stories: (1) Integration is Key to Understanding Climate Change; (2) The Outlook is for Warming, with Measurable Local Effects--Livermore climate models are zeroing in on the effects of human activities on global climate, representing them in simulations with the finest resolution ever; (2) How Metals Fail--experiments are guiding the development of codes that predict how metals react to high explosives; (4) Converting Data to Decisions--a new statistical method executed on supercomputers is bridging the gap between complex data and usable information; (5) Knowing the Enemy, Anticipating the Threat--The Laboratory's charter to counter the nuclear threat has evolved over the years and now includes intelligence analysis and technology to understand and counter biological and chemical threats.

  4. Science and Technology Review July/August 2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bearinger, J P

    2009-06-29

    This month's issue has the following articles: (1) Game-Changing Science in the National Interest - Commentary by Tomas Diaz de la Rubia; (2) Preventing Close Encounters of the Orbiting Kind - The Testbed Environment for Space Situational Awareness is improving capabilities for monitoring and detecting threats to space operations; (3) A CAT Scanner for Nuclear Weapon Components - A new x-ray system images nuclear weapon components in three dimensions, promising unprecedented resolution and clarity; (4) Mass-Producing Positrons - Scientists reveal a new method for yielding a greater density of positrons at a much faster rate inside a laboratory setting; and (5) The Next Generation of Medical Diagnostic Devices - Portable medical diagnostic devices using ultrawideband technology help first responders evaluate injuries in emergency situations and could improve overall health care.

  5. Science and Technology Review, August 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Failor, B.; Stull, S.; Wheatcraft, D. [eds.

    1996-08-01

    This review is published ten times a year to communicate, to a broad audience, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory`s scientific and technological accomplishments, particularly in the Laboratory`s core mission areas - global security, energy and the environment, and bioscience and biotechnology. Topics discussed in this August 1996 issue are: Keeping the nuclear stockpile safe, secure, and reliable; Molten salt takes the bang out of high explosives; Security clearances meet the electronic age; and Exploring oil fields with crosshole electromagnetic induction.

  6. Energy and Technology Review, August--September

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sefcik, J A [ed.

    1992-01-01

    This issue of Energy and Technology Review focuses on cooperative research and development agreements (CRADAs)-one of the Laboratory's most effective means of technology transfer. The first article chronicles the legislative evolution of these agreements. The second article examines the potential beneficial effects of CRADAs on the national economy and discusses their role in the development and marketing of Laboratory technologies. The third article provides information on how to initiate and develop CRADAs at LLNL, and the fourth and fifth articles describe the Laboratory's two most prominent technology transfer projects. One is a 30-month CRADA with General Motors to develop advanced lasers for cutting, welding, and heat-treating operations. The cover photograph shows this laser cutting through a piece of steel 1/16 of an inch thick. The other project is a three-year CRADA with Amoco, Chevron-Conoco, and Unocal to refine our oil shale retorting process.

  7. Science & Technology Review July/August 2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bearinger, J P

    2008-05-27

    This months issue has the following articles: (1) Science Translated for the Greater Good--Commentary by Steven D. Liedle; (2) The New Face of Industrial Partnerships--An entrepreneurial spirit is blossoming at Lawrence Livermore; (3) Monitoring a Nuclear Weapon from the Inside--Livermore researchers are developing tiny sensors to warn of detrimental chemical and physical changes inside nuclear warheads; (4) Simulating the Biomolecular Structure of Nanometer-Size Particles--Grand Challenge simulations reveal the size and structure of nanolipoprotein particles used to study membrane proteins; and (5) Antineutrino Detectors Improve Reactor Safeguards--Antineutrino detectors track the consumption and production of fissile materials inside nuclear reactors.

  8. Science & Technology Review July/August 2005

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aufderheide, M B

    2005-06-14

    This journal contains the following articles (1) The Grand Challenge of Thermonuclear Ignition--Commentary by Edward I. Moses; (2) Orchestrating the World's Most Powerful Laser--The computer control system for the National Ignition Facility will soon have about 1.4-million lines of code running on more than 750 computers; (3) A Randon Walk through Time and Space--Albert einstein's 1905 papers on Brownian motion, random fluctuations, and statistical mechanics are fundamental to many Livermore research projects; (4) The Search for Methane in Earth's Mantle--Scientists are discovering that Earth's mantle may have untapped reserves of methane; and (5) Testing the Physics of Nuclear Isomers--Results from a tri-laboratory project contradict claims of accelerated release of energy from the nuclear isomer hafnium-178.

  9. Science& Technology Review July/August 2003

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McMahon, D H

    2003-07-01

    This month's issue has the following articles: (1) Calling All Nuclear Scientists--Commentary by Tomas Diaz de la Rubia; (2) An Inside Attack on Cancer--Customizing the diagnosis and treatment of cancer, for individual cancers and individual patients, is the goal of a Livermore research initiative; (3) Cells Respond Uniquely to Low-Dose Ionizing Radiation--Mammalian cells and tissues exposed to low-level radiation respond by switching on hundreds of genes specialized in repairing damaged chromosomes, membranes, and proteins and in countering cellular stress. (4) A New Generation of Munitions--Warhead designers are developing low collateral damage munitions that only deliver their destructive force to the intended target; and (5) Whatever the Waste, New Facility Takes It On--A new decontamination and waste treatment facility makes it easier for Livermore to manage a variety of wastes effectively, practically, and responsibly.

  10. Science and Technology Review, July/August 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poyneer, L A

    2012-05-30

    This month's issue has the following articles: (1) Energetic Materials Research Finds an Enduring Home and Mission - Commentary by Bruce T. Goodwin; (2) A Home for Energetic Materials and Their Experts - The Energetic Materials Center has become the National Nuclear Security Administration's go-to facility for high explosives formulation, testing, and expertise; (3) A Spectra-Tacular Sight - Scientists use spectrographic techniques and a high-powered telescope to study the atmospheric composition of exoplanets; (4) Seismic Data Pinpoint Fractures for Geothermal Energy - Livermore researchers are developing advanced microseismic analysis techniques to understand what happens beneath Earth's surface, where hot rock can provide an energy source; and (5) Employees Keep Up with the Times - The Laboratory's Education Assistance Program helps its workforce stay productive, skilled, and dynamic.

  11. Energy and technology review, July--August, 1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burnham, A.K. (ed.)

    1990-01-01

    This report highlights various research programs conducted at the Lab to include: defense systems, laser research, fusion energy, biomedical and environmental sciences, engineering, physics, chemistry, materials science, and computational analysis. It also contains a statement on the state of the Lab and Laboratory Administration. (JEF)

  12. Science and Technology Review July-August 1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eimerl, D

    1999-07-01

    This issue covers the following topics: (1) Laboratory in the News; (2)Mike Anastasio's commentary on ''Fusion Ignition as an Integrated Test of Stockpile Stewardship; (3) ''On Target: Designing for Ignition''--researchers are designing and fabricating the exacting targets needed for laser fusion experimentation at the National Ignition Facility, now under construction; (4) ''A New View of the Universe''--Livermore's laser guide star and adaptive optics systems are opening up the skies for astronomers to take a better look; (5) Research Highlights of ''Quantum Molecular Virtual Laboratory'' and ''AAA in the Sky for Satellites; and (6) Patents, Awards and Abstracts.

  13. Science and Technology Review July/August 2001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quong, A.A.

    2001-07-01

    This issue contains the following articles: (1) ''National Security Is Our Unifying Theme''. (2) ''Annual Certification Takes a Snapshot of Stockpile's Health'' The annual assessment of the stockpile is central to Livermore's mission and vital to national nuclear security. (3) ''Sensing for Danger'' Networked sensors are getting smarter so they can better detect, track, and ward off a variety of threats. (4) ''It's the Pits in the Weapons Stockpile'' Getting old is serious business for nuclear weapon pits. (5) ''Looking into the Shadow World'' New software and better radiography are yielding higher-quality tomographs.

  14. Science and Technology Review July/August 2006

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radousky, H B

    2006-05-25

    This month's issue has the following articles: (1) Experiments at the Scale of Simulations--Commentary by Tomas Diaz de la Rubia; (2) A New Realm of Materials Science--Livermore scientists are combining experiment, theory, and simulation to study the response of solids to extreme dynamic stresses at nanometer and subnanosecond scales; (3) Planets and Stars under the Magnifying Glass--An international collaboration involving Laboratory scientists has discovered a planet made of rock or ice orbiting a dim star outside our solar system; and (4) Keeping an Eye on the Prize--A Livermore-IBM team uses a new code and the world's fastest computer to set a performance record for a science application.

  15. Science and technology review, July/August 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Upadhye, R.

    1997-08-01

    This month`s issues are entitled Assuring the Safety of Nuclear Power; The Microtechnology Center, When Smaller is Better; Speeding the Gene Hunt: High Speed DNA Sequencing; and Microbial Treatments of High Explosives.

  16. Science and Technology Review July/August 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blobaum, K M

    2010-05-27

    This issue has the following articles: (1) Deterrence with a Minimum Nuclear Stockpile - Commentary by Bruce T. Goodwin; (2) Enhancing Confidence in the Nation's Nuclear Stockpile - Livermore experts are participating in a national effort aimed at predicting how nuclear weapon materials and systems will likely change over time; (3) Narrowing Uncertainties - For climate modeling and many other fields, understanding uncertainty, or margin of error, is critical; (4) Insight into a Deadly Disease - Laboratory experiments reveal the pathogenesis of tularemia in host cells, bringing scientists closer to developing a vaccine for this debilitating disease. (5) Return to Rongelap - On the Rongelap Atoll, Livermore scientists are working to minimize radiological exposure for natives now living on or wishing to return to the islands.

  17. Science and technology review, July-August 1998 issue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smart, J

    1998-07-01

    On the occasion of Edward Teller's 90th birthday, S&TR has the pleasure of honoring Lawrence Livermore's co-founder and most influential scientist. Teller is known for his inventive work in physics, his concepts leading to thermonuclear explosions, and his strong stands on such issues as science education, the nation's strategic defense, the needs for science in the future, and sharing scientific information. The articles in this issue also show him, as always, tirelessly moving forward with his new and changing interests.

  18. Nuclear moments and nuclear structure. Annual progress report, August 1, 1978-July, 31, 1979. [John Hopkins Univ. , August 1, 1978-July 31, 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Madansky, L; Lee, Y K

    1979-01-01

    This report reviews activities for the period from August 1, 1978 through July 31, 1979. Four experiment reports and a list of publications are included. Separate abstracts were prepared for unpublished data. (RWR)

  19. Military Review: The Professional Journal of the U.S. Army. Volume 86, Number 4, July-August 2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-08-01

    Paz , and Riordan Roett, eds., The Andes in Focus: Security, Democracy and Economic Reform (Boulder, CO: Lynne Rienner Publishers, 2005), 45-65; and...Politics,” Web Log of Jonathan Olguin, a Bolivian studying at Florida State University, <http://b2bolivia.blogspot.com/>. 29. La Prensa, La Paz , 3 May...Max G. Manwaring, Ejército de los EE.UU., “El Nuevo Maestro del Ajedrez Mágico: El Verdadero Hugo Chávez y la Guerra Asimétrica,” Military Review

  20. Laser programs highlights, July--August 1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-01-01

    Laser research at LLNL is divided into five major programmatic areas: inertial confinement fusion (ICF), uranium atomic vapor laser isotope separation (U-AVLIS), special (plutonium) isotope separation (SIS), laser technology, and advanced applications. We have made important progress this past year in each of these areas. This report covers the current state of these 5 areas.

  1. Talking Stick. Volume 27, Number 6, July-August 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann, James A., Ed.

    2010-01-01

    The "Talking Stick" is published bimonthly, six times a year in January/February, March/April, May/June, July/August, September/October, and November/December by the Association of College and University Housing Officers-International. Each issue is divided into three sections: Features, Columns, and Departments. These sections contain articles…

  2. Monthly energy review, August 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-08-01

    The Monthly Energy Review for the month of August 1997, presents an overview of the Energy Information Administration`s recent monthly energy statistics. The statistics cover the major activities of U.S. production, consumption, trade, stocks, and prices for petroleum, natural gas, coal, electricity, and nuclear energy. Also included are international energy and thermal and metric conversion factors.

  3. Safety Training: places available in July / August 2012

    CERN Multimedia

    2012-01-01

    There are places available in the forthcoming Safety courses. For updates and to register, please refer to the Safety Training Catalogue.   July / August 2012 (alphabetical order)   Radiological Protection 02-JUL-12, 8.30 – 12.30, in English 06-JUL-12, 13.30 – 17.30, in English 12-JUL-12, 8.30 – 12.30, in English 19-JUL-12, 13.30 – 17.30, in English 27-JUL-12, 8.30 – 12.30, in English 10-AUG-12, 8.30 – 12.30, in English 21-AUG-12, 8.30 – 12.30, in English 24-AUG-12, 13.30 – 17.30, in English 28-AUG-12, 8.30 – 12.30, in English 31-AUG-12, 13.30 – 17.30, in English Refresher course for driving forklifts 03-JUL-12, 8.00 – 17.30, in French (with possibility to have the handouts in English) Refresher course for Electricians in Low voltage 29-AUG-12 to 30-AUG-12, 9.00 – 17.30, in French Refresher course for Electricians in Low and High voltage 30-AUG-12 to 31-AUG-12, .00 ...

  4. Safety Training: places available in July - August 2013

    CERN Multimedia

    Isabelle CUSATO, HSE Unit

    2013-01-01

    There are places available in the forthcoming Safety courses. For updates and registrations, please refer to the Safety Training Catalogue.   July - August 2013 (alphabetical order) Conduite de plates-formes élévatrices mobiles de personnel (PEMP) (Cherry-picker training) 01-JUL-13 to 02-JUL-13, 8.30 – 17.30, in French First-Aiders – Basic Course 31-JUL-13, 8.15 – 17.30, in English Habilitation électrique personnel électricien basse tension (electrical habilitation for low voltage) 01-JUL-13 to 03-JUL-13, 9.00 – 17.30, in French (with handouts in English) Pontier-élingueur (Crane training) 03-JUL-13 to 04-JUL-13, 8.30 – 17.30, in French (with handouts in English) Radiological Protection - Controlled Radiation Area - Course A for CERN employees and CERN associates 11-JUL-13, 8.30 – 17.00, in English 11-JUL-13, 8.30 – 17.00, in French 12-JUL-13, 8.30 – 17.00, i...

  5. Safety Training: places available in July - August 2013

    CERN Multimedia

    Isabelle CUSATO, HSE Unit

    2013-01-01

    There are places available in the forthcoming Safety courses. For updates and registrations, please refer to the Safety Training Catalogue.   July - August 2013 (alphabetical order) Conduite de plates-formes élévatrices mobiles de personnel (PEMP) (Cherry-picker training) 01-JUL-13 to 02-JUL-13, 8.30 – 17.30, in French First-Aiders – Basic Course 31-JUL-13, 8.15 – 17.30, in English Habilitation électrique personnel électricien basse tension (electrical habilitation for low voltage) 01-JUL-13 to 03-JUL-13, 9.00 – 17.30, in French (with handouts in English) Pontier-élingueur (Crane training) 03-JUL-13 to 04-JUL-13, 8.30 – 17.30, in French (with handouts in English) Radiological Protection - Controlled Radiation Area - Course A for CERN employees and CERN associates 11-JUL-13, 8.30 – 17.00, in English 11-JUL-13, 8.30 – 17.00, in French 12-JUL-13, 8.30 – 17.00, in...

  6. NREL photovoltaic subcontract reports: Abstracts and document control information, 1 August 1992--31 July 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-09-01

    This report contains document control information and abstracts for the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) subcontracted photovoltaic (PV) program publications. It also lists source information on additional publications that describe US Department of Energy (DOE) PV research activities. It is not totally exhaustive, so it lists NREL contacts for requesting further information on the DOE and NREL PV programs. This report covers the period from August 1, 1992, through July 31, 1993. This report is published periodically, with the previous one covering the period from August 1, 1991, through July 31, 1992. The purpose of continuing this type of publication is to help keep people abreast of specific PV interests, while maintaining a balance on the costs to the PV program. The information in this report is organized under PV technology areas: Amorphous Silicon Research; Polycrystalline Thin Films (including copper indium diselenide, cadmium telluride, and thin-film silicon); Crystalline Materials and Advanced Concepts (including silicon, gallium arsenide, and other group III-V materials); PV Manufacturing Technology Development (which may include manufacturing information for various types of PV materials).

  7. Military Review. July-August 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-01

    the international system, but today’s (A P P ho to /J er om e D el ay ) Anti-Gaddafi rebels hoist a child with an AK-47 and flash the “V for Victory...constant demands for detailed information at the tactical level, and this contributed to friction within SOUTHCOM and JTF Haiti headquarters. The most...caused friction due to organizational chart challenges. The more we define relationships along doctrinal lines, the better they work. Planners

  8. Monthly energy review, July 1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-10-29

    US total energy consumption in July 1990 was 6.7 quadrillion Btu Petroleum products accounted for 42 percent of the energy consumed in July 1990, while coal accounted for 26 percent and natural gas accounted for 19 percent. Residential and commercial sector consumption was 2.3 quadrillion Btu in July 1990, up 2 percent from the July 1989 level. The sector accounted for 35 percent of July 1990 total consumption, about the same share as in July 1989. Industrial sector consumption was 2.4 quadrillion Btu in July 1990, up 2 percent from the July 1989 level. The industrial sector accounted for 36 percent of July 1990 total consumption, about the same share as in July 1989. Transportation sector consumption of energy was 1.9 quadrillion Btu in July 1990, up 1 percent from the July 1989 level. The sector consumed 29 percent of July 1990 total consumption, about the same share as in July 1989. Electric utility consumption of energy totaled 2.8 quadrillion Btu in July 1990, up 2 percent from the July 1989 level. Coal contributed 53 percent of the energy consumed by electric utilities in July 1990, while nuclear electric power contributed 21 percent; natural gas, 12 percent; hydroelectric power, 9 percent; petroleum, 5 percent; and wood, waste, geothermal, wind, photovoltaic, and solar thermal energy, about 1 percent.

  9. Cheat Mountain Salamander search - Cabin Knob-July 7, 2011 and August 9, 2011

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Survey includes data gathered on two separate dates: July 7, 2011and August 9, 2011. A survey transect was established along Cabin Knob within the Idlemans Treatment...

  10. National Elk Refuge: May, June, July, August, 1949

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for National Elk Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1949. The report begins by summarizing the weather...

  11. National Elk Refuge: May, June, July, August, 1956

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for National Elk Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1956. The report begins by summarizing the weather...

  12. National Elk Refuge: May, June, July, August, 1952

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for National Elk Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1952. The report begins by summarizing the weather...

  13. National Elk Refuge: May, June, July, August, 1955

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for National Elk Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1955. The report begins by summarizing the weather...

  14. National Elk Refuge: May, June, July, August, 1954

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for National Elk Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1954. The report begins by summarizing the weather...

  15. National Elk Refuge: May, June, July, August, 1944

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for National Elk Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1944. The report begins by summarizing the weather...

  16. National Elk Refuge: May, June, July, August, 1953

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for National Elk Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1953. The report begins by summarizing the weather...

  17. National Elk Refuge: May, June, July, August, 1963

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for National Elk Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1963. The report begins by summarizing the weather...

  18. National Elk Refuge: May, June, July, August, 1961

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for National Elk Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1961. The report begins by summarizing the weather...

  19. NREL photovoltaic subcontract reports: Abstracts and document control information, 1 August 1991--31 July 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-08-01

    This report contains document control information and abstracts for the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) subcontracted photovoltaic program publications. It also lists source information on additional publications that describe US Department of Energy (DOE) PV research activities. It is not totally exhaustive, so it lists NREL contacts for requesting further information on the DOE and NREL PV programs. This report covers the period from August 1, 1991, through July 31, 1992. The purpose of continuing this type of publication is to help people keep abreast of specific PV interests, while maintaining a balance on the costs to the PV program. The information in this report is organized under PV technology areas: Amorphous silicon research; polycrystalline thin films (including copper indium diselenide, cadmium telluride, and thin-film silicon); crystalline materials and advanced concepts (including silicon, gallium arsenide, and other group III-V materials); and PV manufacturing technology development (which may include manufacturing information for various types of PV materials).

  20. Monthly energy review, August 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-08-26

    This publication presents information for the month of August, 1993 on the following: Energy overview; energy consumption; petroleum; natural gas; oil and gas resource development; coal; electricity; nuclear energy; energy prices, and international energy.

  1. Monthly energy review, August 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-08-26

    This publication presents information for the month of August, 1993 on the following: Energy overview; energy consumption; petroleum; natural gas; oil and gas resource development; coal; electricity; nuclear energy; energy prices, and international energy.

  2. Medical Surveillance Monthly Report (MSMR). Volume 15, Number 6, July-August 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-08-01

    laboratory specialist; cytology specialist; hemodialysis technician; medical, histopathology, cytotechnology apprentice, journeyman, or craftsman; iv...reported by August 7, 2007 and 2008 †Seventy medical events/conditions specified by Tri-Service Reportable Events Guidelines and Case Definitions , May...Service Reportable Events Guidelines and Case Definitions , May 2004. Note: Completeness and timeliness of reporting vary by facility. JULYAUGUST

  3. Army Logistician. Volume 41, Issue 4, July-August 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-08-01

    Army Retail Supply System (SARSS), and Property Book Unit Supply Enhanced (PBUSE) and are supported by the very small aperture ter- minal (VSAT), and...Transportation and Logistics Systems (2 credits) SCM 702: Procurement and Supplier Management (2 credits) SCM 704: Information Systems for...J. Cloutier and Brian K. Frank 50 Lightweight Modular Causeway System : Logistics Advanced Concept Technology Demonstration—Margaret A. Deming 52

  4. Provisional hourly values of equatorial dst for July, August, September and October 1972

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugiura, M.; Poros, D. J.

    1973-01-01

    The tabulated hourly magnetic storm-time variation (Dst) values were obtained using the four Dst stations of Hermanus, Kakioka, Honolulu, and San Juan. The provisional Dst values for July, August, and September 1972 previously published by World Data Center A and Goddard Space Flight Center are superseded by these values.

  5. Fires. A Joint Publication for U.S. Artillery Professionals. July - August 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    contractors, vendors and even shoppers that the city of Nu’maniyah has gone great lengths to restore its tourism industry by building along the waterfront...resbulletin Fires1 July-August 2010 • The Fires community is online 24/7. Fires Center of Excellence http://www.facebook.com

  6. INEL BNCT research program, July--August 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venhuizen, J.R.

    1992-10-01

    This report presents summaries for two months of current research of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) Program. Information is presented on development and murine screening experiments of low-density lipoprotein, carboranyl alanine, and liposome boron containing compounds. Pituitary tumor cell culture studies are described. Drug stability, pharmacology and toxicity evaluation of borocaptate sodium (BSH) and boronophenylalanine (BPA) are described. Treatment protocol development via the large animal (canine) model studies and physiological response evaluation in rats are discussed. Supporting technology development and technical support activities for boron drug biochemistry and purity, analytical and measurement dosimetry, and noninvasive boron quantification activities are included for the current time period. Current publications for the two months are listed.

  7. Monthly energy review, August 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-08-01

    The Monthly Energy Review (MER) presents an overview of the Energy Information Administration`s recent monthly energy statistics. The statistics cover the major activities of US production, consumption, trade, stocks, and prices for petroleum, natural gas, coal, electricity, and nuclear energy. Also included are international energy and thermal and metric conversion factors. The MER is intended for use by Members of Congress, Federal and State agencies, energy analysts, and the general public. 37 figs., 73 tabs.

  8. ORNL Nuclear Safety Research and Development Program Bimonthly Report for July-August 1968

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cottrell, W.B.

    2001-08-17

    The accomplishments during the months of July and August in the research and development program under way at ORNL as part of the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission's Nuclear Safety Program are summarized, Included in this report are work on various chemical reactions, as well as the release, characterization, and transport of fission products in containment systems under various accident conditions and on problems associated with the removal of these fission products from gas streams. Although most of this work is in general support of water-cooled power reactor technology, including LOFT and CSE programs, the work reflects the current safety problems, such as measurements of the prompt fuel element failure phenomena and the efficacy of containment spray and pool-suppression systems for fission-product removal. Several projects are also conducted in support of the high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR). Other major projects include fuel-transport safety investigations, a series of discussion papers on various aspects of water-reactor technology, antiseismic design of nuclear facilities, and studies of primary piping and steel, pressure-vessel technology. Experimental work relative to pressure-vessel technology includes investigations of the attachment of nozzles to shells and the implementation of joint AEX-PVFX programs on heavy-section steel technology and nuclear piping, pumps, and valves. Several of the projects are directly related to another major undertaking; namely, the AEC's standards program, which entails development of engineering safeguards and the establishment of codes and standards for government-owned or -sponsored reactor facilities. Another task, CHORD-S, is concerned with the establishment of computer programs for the evaluation of reactor design data, The recent activities of the NSIC and the Nuclear Safety journal in behalf of the nuclear community are also discussed.

  9. Monthly Energy Review, July 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1992-07-27

    The Monthly Energy Review is prepared by the Energy Information Administration. Topics discussed include: Energy Overview, Energy Consumption, Petroleum, Natural Gas, Oil and Gas Resource Development, Coal, Electricity, Nuclear Energy, Energy Prices, International Energy. (VC)

  10. Campbell Creek TVA 2010 First Year Performance Report July 1, 2009 August 31, 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christian, Jeffrey E [ORNL; Gehl, Anthony C [ORNL; Boudreaux, Philip R [ORNL; New, Joshua Ryan [ORNL

    2010-10-01

    This research project was initiated by TVA in March 2008 and encompasses three houses that are of similar size, design and located within the same community - Campbell Creek, Farragut TN with simulated occupancy. This report covers the performance period from July 1, 2009 to August 31, 2010. It is the intent of TVA that this Valley Data will inform electric utilities future residential retrofit incentive program.

  11. Teleconnection between rainfall over South China and the East European Plain in July and August

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Qin; Lu, Riyu

    2014-10-01

    In the present reported work, we identified that there is a significant negative relationship between rainfall over South China (SC) and the East European Plain (EEP) in the months of July and August, and investigated the possible reason for this negative relationship. The correlation coefficients between SC and the EEP rainfall were calculated to be -0.42 for July and -0.35 for August, both significant at the 95 % confidence level. We report that a wave-like train of circulation anomalies and a pathway of wave-activity flux stretching from Europe to East China connect the anticyclonic anomaly over Europe and the cyclonic anomaly over central and southern China, which are responsible for less EEP rainfall and more SC rainfall. We suggest that the teleconnection between SC and EEP rainfall results from the extension of stationary Rossby waves in the mid-latitudes in the upper troposphere for both July and August. This stationary Rossby wave is contributed to by summer North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) and its extension features are determined by the location and intensity of the climatological upper-tropospheric westerly jet. Furthermore, we found that there was an interdecadal change around the mid-1970s in the negative SC-EEP rainfall relationship for both July and August. The negative correlation was significant and strong in the period 1976-2005, but much weaker in the period 1955-1975. The extension of stationary Rossby waves from Europe to East China was responsible for the significant negative relationship during the period 1976-2005.

  12. Bulk Shielding Facility quarterly report, July, August, and September of 1977

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hurt, S.S. III; Lance, E.D.; Thomas, J.R.

    1978-02-01

    The BSR operated at an average power level of 1,868 kW for 23.58 percent of the time during July, August, and September. Water-quality control in both the reactor primary and secondary cooling systems was satisfactory. The PCA was used in training programs and was operated on two occasions when the Oak Ridge Associated Universities' students actively participated in training laboratories.

  13. Monthly energy review, July 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-07-01

    The Monthly Energy Review (MER) presents an overview of the Energy Information Administration`s recent monthly energy statistics. The statistics cover the major activities of US production, consumption, trade, stocks, and prices for petroleum, natural gas, coal, electricity, and nuclear energy. Also included are international energy and thermal and metric conversion factors. 37 figs. 73 tabs.

  14. Science & technology review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-08-01

    This document is the August, 1995 issue of the Science and Technology review, a Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory publication. It contains two major articles, one on Scanning Tunneling Microscopy - as applied to materials engineering studies, and one on risk assessment, in this case looking primarily at a health care problem. Separate articles will be indexed from this journal to the energy database.

  15. Monthly energy review, July 1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-07-01

    The Monthly Energy Review (MER) presents an overview of the Energy Information Administration`s recent monthly energy statistics. The statistics cover the major activities of US production, consumption, trade, stocks, and prices for petroleum, natural gas, coal, electricity, and nuclear energy. Also included are international energy and thermal and metric conversion factors. The MER is intended for use by Members of Congress, Federal and State agencies, energy analysts, and the general public. EIA welcomes suggestions from readers regarding data series in the MER and in other EIA publications. 37 figs., 75 tabs.

  16. Spatial variability of harmful algal blooms in Milford Lake, Kansas, July and August 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Guy M.; Graham, Jennifer L.; Stiles, Tom C.; Boyer, Marvin G.; King, Lindsey R.; Loftin, Keith A.

    2017-01-09

    Cyanobacterial harmful algal blooms (CyanoHABs) tend to be spatially variable vertically in the water column and horizontally across the lake surface because of in-lake and weather-driven processes and can vary by orders of magnitude in concentration across relatively short distances (meters or less). Extreme spatial variability in cyanobacteria and associated compounds poses unique challenges to collecting representative samples for scientific study and public-health protection. The objective of this study was to assess the spatial variability of cyanobacteria and microcystin in Milford Lake, Kansas, using data collected on July 27 and August 31, 2015. Spatially dense near-surface data were collected by the U.S. Geological Survey, nearshore data were collected by the Kansas Department of Health and Environment, and open-water data were collected by U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. CyanoHABs are known to be spatially variable, but that variability is rarely quantified. A better understanding of the spatial variability of cyanobacteria and microcystin will inform sampling and management strategies for Milford Lake and for other lakes with CyanoHAB issues throughout the Nation.The CyanoHABs in Milford Lake during July and August 2015 displayed the extreme spatial variability characteristic of cyanobacterial blooms. The phytoplankton community was almost exclusively cyanobacteria (greater than 90 percent) during July and August. Cyanobacteria (measured directly by cell counts and indirectly by regression-estimated chlorophyll) and microcystin (measured directly by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay [ELISA] and indirectly by regression estimates) concentrations varied by orders of magnitude throughout the lake. During July and August 2015, cyanobacteria and microcystin concentrations decreased in the downlake (towards the outlet) direction.Nearshore and open-water surface grabs were collected and analyzed for microcystin as part of this study. Samples were collected in the

  17. Sscience & technology review; Science Technology Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-07-01

    This review is published ten times a year to communicate, to a broad audience, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory`s scientific and technological accomplishments, particularly in the Laboratory`s core mission areas - global security, energy and the environment, and bioscience and biotechnology. This review for the month of July 1996 discusses: Frontiers of research in advanced computations, The multibeam Fabry-Perot velocimeter: Efficient measurement of high velocities, High-tech tools for the American textile industry, and Rock mechanics: can the Tuff take the stress.

  18. Proceedings of Summer Institute of Particle Physics, July 27-August 7, 1981: the strong interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mosher, A. (ed.)

    1982-01-01

    The ninth SLAC Summer Institute on Particle Physics was held in the period July 27 to August 7, 1981. The central topic was the strong interactions with the first seven days spent in a pedagogic mode and the last three in a topical conference. In addition to the morning lectures on experimental and theoretical aspects of the strong interactions, three were lectures on machine physics; this year it was electron-positron colliding beam machines, both storage rings and linear colliders. Twenty-three individual items from the meeting were prepared separately for the data base. (GHT)

  19. Combustion energy frontier research center (CEFRC) final report (August 1, 2009 – July 31, 2016)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Law, Chung [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States)

    2017-05-05

    -design rapid compression ignition instruments; and 4) develop a suite of validated petascale high-fidelity simulation and modeling capabilities to understand and predict chemistry-turbulence-radiation coupling for new fuels in new regimes, including the high pressure, low-temperature combustion in advanced engine and turbine designs, and 5) establish a knowledge highway between researchers and engineers in academia, national laboratories, and industry to facilitate the dissemination and exchange of knowledge on national and international levels, and enrich the talent pool and capabilities of the next generation of combustion scientists and engineers. The technical activities of the CEFRC were conducted through three Disciplinary Working Groups – Chemistry Theory, Experiment and Mechanism, and Reacting Flows, which coordinated the Center’s research on the development of combustion chemistry of Foundation Fuels (C0–C4 hydrocarbons), Alcohols, and Biodiesel through three corresponding Mechanism Thrust Groups. Such a two-dimensional coordinated and tightly interwoven research structure has been proven to be highly effective in assuring the interplay between the developments of the fundamentals of combustion science and the utilization of the various categories of fuels. The Center has accomplished the above goals over the five year period (August 1, 2009 – July 31, 2014) with appropriated funding, followed by two additional no-cost-extension (NCE) years. The research results are documented in 230 journal publications, with six legacy review papers on the study of combustion chemistry using shock tubes, flow reactors, rapid compression machines, and flames, on uncertainty quantification, and on theoretical reaction dynamics and chemical modeling of combustion. A robust outreach program complemented these PI-led research activities, consisting of: 1) a roving post-doc program comprised of a corps of Center-appointed, co- or multi-sponsored post-doctoral fellows with rotating

  20. Grand Challenges of Advanced Computing for Energy Innovation Report from the Workshop Held July 31-August 2, 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larzelere, Alex R.; Ashby, Steven F.; Christensen, Dana C.; Crawford, Dona L.; Khaleel, Mohammad A.; John, Grosh; Stults, B. Ray; Lee, Steven L.; Hammond, Steven W.; Grover, Benjamin T.; Neely, Rob; Dudney, Lee Ann; Goldstein, Noah C.; Wells, Jack; Peltz, Jim

    2013-03-06

    On July 31-August 2 of 2012, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) held a workshop entitled Grand Challenges of Advanced Computing for Energy Innovation. This workshop built on three earlier workshops that clearly identified the potential for the Department and its national laboratories to enable energy innovation. The specific goal of the workshop was to identify the key challenges that the nation must overcome to apply the full benefit of taxpayer-funded advanced computing technologies to U.S. energy innovation in the ways that the country produces, moves, stores, and uses energy. Perhaps more importantly, the workshop also developed a set of recommendations to help the Department overcome those challenges. These recommendations provide an action plan for what the Department can do in the coming years to improve the nation’s energy future.

  1. Proceedings of the Annual Meeting of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication (86th, Kansas City, Missouri, July 30-August 2, 2003). Communication Technology and Policy Division.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003

    The Communication Technology and Policy Division of the proceedings contains the following 15 papers: "Both Sides of the Digital Divide in Appalachia: Uses and Perceived Benefits of Internet Access" (Daniel Riffe); "Bridging Newsrooms and Classrooms: Preparing the Next Generation of Journalists for Converged Media" (Edgar…

  2. A summary of the proceedings of the Eleventh International Symposium on the Neurobiology and Neuroendocrinology of Aging, Bregenz, Austria, July 29-August 3, 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown-Borg, Holly M; Borg, Kurt E

    2013-07-01

    A summary of the Eleventh International Symposium on the Neurobiology and Neuroendocrinology of Aging that was held in July 29-August 3 in Bregenz, Austria, is presented. Sixteen of the speakers who presented at the conference submitted review papers covering the topic of their presentation as well as an overview of their respective fields and are included in this special issue. The abstracts from each poster presentation are also included at the end of the special issue.

  3. A Multiwavelength Campaign on 3C454.3 in July-August 2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wehrle, Ann E.; Kadler, M.; Thompson, D. J.; Observe 3C454. 3 in 2007, Multiwavelength Consortium to

    2007-12-01

    In July and August 2007, the gamma-ray blazar 3C454.3 flared to near-historic levels, only two years after its record-breaking 2005 optical flare. Luckily, Spitzer Space Telescope and Chandra X-ray Observatory were already scheduled for simultaneous observations. Swift, RXTE and the new gamma-ray AGILE spacecraft responded to this target of opportunity, and were joined by observatories around the world. We present the spectral energy distributions obtained during the ad-hoc multiwavelength campaigns. The observations, organized in part as a trial of the GLAST LAT multiwavelength program, presage the multiwavelength campaigns that will be coordinated with GLAST after its 2008 launch. We are grateful to the schedulers, project scientists, observatory directors and funding agencies who made the observations possible.

  4. Advanced turbine systems program conceptual design and product development. Annual report, August 1994--July 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-11-01

    This report summarizes the tasks completed under this project during the period from August 1, 1994 through July 31, 1994. The objective of the study is to provide the conceptual design and product development plan for an ultra high efficiency, environmentally superior and cost-competitive industrial gas turbine system to be commercialized by the year 2000. The tasks completed include a market study for the advanced turbine system; definition of an optimized recuperated gas turbine as the prime mover meeting the requirements of the market study and whose characteristics were, in turn, used for forecasting the total advanced turbine system (ATS) future demand; development of a program plan for bringing the ATS to a state of readiness for field test; and demonstration of the primary surface recuperator ability to provide the high thermal effectiveness and low pressure loss required to support the proposed ATS cycle.

  5. MTI Ground Truth Collection Ivanpah Dry Lake Bed, California, May, July, and August 2002

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David L. Hawley

    2002-10-01

    A multi-agency collaboration successfully completed a series of ground truth measurements at the Ivanpah Dry Lake bed during FY 2002. Four collection attempts were made: two in May, one in July, and one in August. The objective was to collect ground-based measurements and airborne data during Multispectral Thermal Imager satellite overpasses. The measurements were to aid in the calibration of the satellite data and in algorithm validation. The Remote Sensing Laboratory, Las Vegas, Nevada; the National Aeronautics and Space Administration; Los Alamos National Laboratory; and the University of Arizona participated in the effort. Field instrumentation included a sun photometer on loan from the University of Arizona and the Remote Sensing Laboratory's radiosonde weather balloon, weather station, thermal infrared radiometers, and spectral radiometer. In addition, three reflectance panels were deployed; certain tests used water baths set at two different temperatures. Local weather data as well as sky photography were collected. May presented several excellent days; however, it was later learned that tasking for the satellite was not available. A combination of cloud cover, wind, and dusty conditions limited useful data collections to two days, August 28 and 29. Despite less-than- ideal weather conditions, the data for the Multispectral Thermal Imager calibration were obtained. A unique set of circumstances also allowed data collection during overpasses of the LANDSAT7 and ASTER satellites.

  6. Seney National Wildlife Refuge Quarterly narrative report: July, August, and September, 1940 [August, September, and October, 1940

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Seney National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from August through October of 1940. The report begins by summarizing the...

  7. NRC Enforcement Policy Review, July 1995-July 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lieberman, J.; Pedersen, R.M.

    1998-04-01

    On June 30, 1995, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) issued a complete revision of its General Statement of Policy and Procedure for Enforcement Action (Enforcement Policy) (60 FR 34381). In approving the 1995 revision to the Enforcement Policy, the Commission directed the staff to perform a review of its implementation of the Policy after approximately 2 years of experience and to consider public comments. This report represents the results of that review.

  8. Neutron scattering studies in the actinide region. Progress report, August 1, 1991--July 31, 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kegel, G.H.R.; Egan, J.J.

    1994-09-01

    During the period August 1, 1991 to July 31, 1994 the authors report progress on the following: (a) prompt fission neutron energy spectra for {sup 235}U and {sup 239}Pu; (b) two-parameter measurement of nuclear lifetimes; (c) `black` neutron detector; (d) data reduction techniques for neutron scattering experiments; (e) elastic and inelastic neutron scattering studies in {sup 197}Au; (f) elastic and inelastic neutron scattering studies in {sup 239}Pu; (g) neutron induced defects in silicon dioxide MOS structures; (h) response of a {sup 235}U fission chamber near reaction thresholds; (i) efficiency calibration of a liquid scintillation detector using the WNR facility at LAMPF; (j) prompt fission neutron energy spectrum measurements below the incident neutron energy; (k) multi-parameter data acquisition system; (l) accelerator improvements; (m) non-DOE supported research. Eight Ph.D. dissertations and two M.S. theses were completed during the report period. Publications consisted of 6 journal articles, 10 conference proceedings, and 19 abstracts of presentations at scientific meetings. One invited talk was given.

  9. LLE Review Quarterly Report (July-September 1987). Volume 32

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donaldson, W. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States)

    1987-09-01

    This volume of the LLE Review, covering the period July-September 1987, contains an article on the measurement of pR in high-compression laser-fusion experiments using secondary reactions. The section on advanced technology has reports on the development of high-repetitionrate active-mirror amplifiers; electro-optic time-domain reflectometry; a new electro-optic finger probe; picosecond high-energy electron diffraction; and a method of using radial transmission lines to obtain very high electric fields. Finally, the activities of the National Laser Users facility and the glass development and OMEGA laser facilities are summarized.

  10. Military Review. Volume 92, Number 4, July-August 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-01

    Land Operations is consumed by definitions that ought to be relegated to ADRP 3-0. The art and challenge of operations are not in identifying...formations, with deploying Army National Guard units being the biggest consumers of Army IRR personnel. If, on the other hand, a future conflict...happening. Looking past our own experience and studying a new world is foreign to Americans. Most Ameri­ cans are ethnocentric in that we generally rebuff

  11. Military Review. Volume 82, Number 4, July-August 2002

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-08-01

    The War College study revealed a schizophrenia . The study found that “the ideal standards of ethi- cal/moral/professional behavior as epitomized by...future NCW environments. NCW promises “decentralized empowerment .” Decentralized empowerment frees organizations from centralized authority altogether... empowerment represent one path. Just as likely an outcome is a “very rapid movement toward even greater command centralization on the battlefield

  12. Military Review. Volume 80, Number 4, July-August 2000

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-08-01

    Montenegrin voting patterns reinforce the north- east-southwest split in the attitudes of the republi- can electorate . Voting results from the last presiden...joy and songs turned into si- Montenegrin voting patterns reinforce the northeast-southwest split in the attitudes of the republican electorate ...via Internet, for more on the 35-man Grupo Beta Sur and its activities. Jorge Alberto Cornejo, �Aplica México plan para proteger derechos de

  13. The Second Chernogolovka Workshop on Low Temperature Physics in Microgravity Environment (CWS-99), July 28-August 2, 1999

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mezhov-Deglin, L. P.

    2000-03-01

    The International Seminar CWS-99, devoted to a discussion of the current status and prospects for development of fundamental research in the field of low-temperature physics in a microgravity environment, was held in at the Research Center of the Russian Academy of Sciences (RCC RAN) in Chernogolovka, Moscow District on July 28-August 2, 1999. This seminar was organized by the Institute of Solid State Physics and the Space Materials Science section of the Space Council of the Russian Academy of Sciences with the financial support of the Russian Fund for Fundamental Research, the Ministry of Science and Technology of the Russian Federation, The Russian Aviation & Space Agency, and the Council on Low Temperature Physics of the Russian Academy of Sciences. The CWS-99 Seminar preceded the International Conference on Low Temperature Physics LT-22, and, as one of the satellite activities of LT-22 conducted in the framework of international scientific cooperation, it received substantial support from the Organizing Committee of LT-22 and from the OLMSA Division of the National Aeronoutics and Space Administration (NASA), USA.

  14. Volcanic unrest leading to the July-August 2001 lateral eruption at Mt. Etna: Seismological constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sicali, Simona; Barberi, Graziella; Cocina, Ornella; Musumeci, Carla; Patanè, Domenico

    2015-10-01

    A close relationship between earthquake swarms, volcanic eruptions, and ground deformation at Mt. Etna was well documented shortly before the beginning of the July-August 2001 eruption. Past experiences at this volcano suggest how magma/dike intrusion in the shallow crust or in the upper part of the volcanic pile normally occurs after several years/months of internal recharging. Since seismic investigations provide a means to study the scale and origin of stress perturbations at active volcanoes, allowing to better investigating the preparation phase of an eruption, in this paper, we performed a close examination of the seismic activity recorded at Mt. Etna in the months preceding the 2001 eruption and in particular between November 2000 and July 2001. After integrating data recorded by the two networks operating during that time and run by the Istituto Internazionale di Vulcanologia and SISTEMA POSEIDON, we relocated 522 earthquakes by using the tomoDD code in a 3D velocity model, and then we computed their fault plane solutions. The application of different selection criteria enabled obtaining a good-quality revised data set consisting of 111 fault plane solutions. The high-precision locations identified well-defined seismic clusters, in different periods, suggesting a link with the magma migration from a depth of 8-13 km b.s.l. towards shallower zones. Moreover, the computed maximum compressive stress axis, as inferred from earthquake focal mechanisms, indicated a roughly W-E-oriented σ1. This findings reflect an overpressure of the mid to shallow crust due to the progressive magma uprising in central portion of the volcano and also highlighted a rotation of the local stress field with respect to the regional one N-S trending. In addition, P-axis distribution pointed out the presence of a center of pressure located to the south of the Central Craters. These results provide particularly compelling evidence for a direct causal link between pressurization of the

  15. Western gas sands project. Status report, July-August-September 1981

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1981-03-01

    The progress during July, August and September 1981 on increasing gas production from low permeability gas sands of the Western United States, is summarized in this edition of the WGSP Quarterly Status Report. During the quarter, CK GeoEnergy completed the field work in the Rifle Gap area near Rifle, Colorado, as well as the Draft Phase VI report covering the prognosis about reservoir geometry in the Multi-Well site area. The improved pressure coring system project, officially terminated Sept. 30. Accomplishments included increased capabilities for the pressure core barrel, improvements in the low invasion fluid plus various laboratory core intrusion studies and improved designs for PDC drill bits. At Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, the P/sup 2/L/sup 2/ system described last quarter was evaluated further and the decision has been made to abandon further investigation. The Los Alamos National Laboratory Ceramics Materials Group is preparing to fabricate a ceramic sample with cylindrical pores of specified diameters. The NMR data on this type sample will contribute to a better understanding of the parameters affecting NMR relaxation rates in porous media. During the quarter, modifications were made in the operating and application software of the DOE Well Test Facility, which will support additions to the PDP-11/10 computer system. The Multi-Well Experiment well was spudded on Sept. 13 and by Sept. 30, total depth was 3358 ft. Coring operations are expected to begin at a depth of 4150 ft. At the Nevada Test Site, Sandia National Laboratories completed four additional coreholes for the Fluid Mechanics/ Proppant Transport Experiments.

  16. Continuous high-resolution midlatitude-belt simulations for July-August 2013 with WRF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwitalla, Thomas; Bauer, Hans-Stefan; Wulfmeyer, Volker; Warrach-Sagi, Kirsten

    2017-05-01

    Increasing computational resources and the demands of impact modelers, stake holders, and society envision seasonal and climate simulations with the convection-permitting resolution. So far such a resolution is only achieved with a limited-area model whose results are impacted by zonal and meridional boundaries. Here, we present the setup of a latitude-belt domain that reduces disturbances originating from the western and eastern boundaries and therefore allows for studying the impact of model resolution and physical parameterization. The Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model coupled to the NOAH land-surface model was operated during July and August 2013 at two different horizontal resolutions, namely 0.03 (HIRES) and 0.12° (LOWRES). Both simulations were forced by the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) operational analysis data at the northern and southern domain boundaries, and the high-resolution Operational Sea Surface Temperature and Sea Ice Analysis (OSTIA) data at the sea surface.The simulations are compared to the operational ECMWF analysis for the representation of large-scale features. To analyze the simulated precipitation, the operational ECMWF forecast, the CPC MORPHing (CMORPH), and the ENSEMBLES gridded observation precipitation data set (E-OBS) were used as references.Analyzing pressure, geopotential height, wind, and temperature fields as well as precipitation revealed (1) a benefit from the higher resolution concerning the reduction of monthly biases, root mean square error, and an improved Pearson skill score, and (2) deficiencies in the physical parameterizations leading to notable biases in distinct regions like the polar Atlantic for the LOWRES simulation, the North Pacific, and Inner Mongolia for both resolutions.In summary, the application of a latitude belt on a convection-permitting resolution shows promising results that are beneficial for future seasonal forecasting.

  17. Western gas sands project. Status report, July-August-September 1981

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1981-03-01

    The progress during July, August and September 1981 on increasing gas production from low permeability gas sands of the Western United States, is summarized in this edition of the WGSP Quarterly Status Report. During the quarter, CK GeoEnergy completed the field work in the Rifle Gap area near Rifle, Colorado, as well as the Draft Phase VI report covering the prognosis about reservoir geometry in the Multi-Well site area. The improved pressure coring system project, officially terminated Sept. 30. Accomplishments included increased capabilities for the pressure core barrel, improvements in the low invasion fluid plus various laboratory core intrusion studies and improved designs for PDC drill bits. At Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, the P/sup 2/L/sup 2/ system described last quarter was evaluated further and the decision has been made to abandon further investigation. The Los Alamos National Laboratory Ceramics Materials Group is preparing to fabricate a ceramic sample with cylindrical pores of specified diameters. The NMR data on this type sample will contribute to a better understanding of the parameters affecting NMR relaxation rates in porous media. During the quarter, modifications were made in the operating and application software of the DOE Well Test Facility, which will support additions to the PDP-11/10 computer system. The Multi-Well Experiment well was spudded on Sept. 13 and by Sept. 30, total depth was 3358 ft. Coring operations are expected to begin at a depth of 4150 ft. At the Nevada Test Site, Sandia National Laboratories completed four additional coreholes for the Fluid Mechanics/ Proppant Transport Experiments.

  18. Advanced turbine systems program conceptual design and product development. Annual report, August 1993--July 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-11-01

    This Yearly Technical Progress Report covers the period August 3, 1993 through July 31, 1994 for Phase 2 of the Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) Program by Solar Turbines Incorporated under DOE Contract No. DE-AC421-93MC30246. As allowed by the Contract (Part 3, Section J, Attachment B) this report is also intended to fulfill the requirements for a fourth quarterly report. The objective of Phase 2 of the ATS Program is to provide the conceptual design and product development plan for an ultra-high efficiency, environmentally superior and cost-competitive industrial gas turbine system to be commercialized in the year 2000. During the period covered by this report, Solar has completed three of eight program tasks and has submitted topical reports. These three tasks included a Project Plan submission of information required by NEPA, and the selection of a Gas-Fueled Advanced Turbine System (GFATS). In the latest of the three tasks, Solar`s Engineering team identified an intercooled and recuperated (ICR) gas turbine as the eventual outcome of DOE`s ATS program coupled with Solar`s internal New Product Introduction (NPI) program. This machine, designated ``ATS50`` will operate at a thermal efficiency (turbine shaft power/fuel LHV) of 50 percent, will emit less than 10 parts per million of NOx and will reduce the cost of electricity by 10 percent. It will also demonstrate levels of reliability, availability, maintainability, and durability (RAMD) equal to or better than those of today`s gas turbine systems. Current activity is concentrated in three of the remaining five tasks a Market Study, GFATS System Definition and Analysis, and the Design and Test of Critical Components.

  19. Observations of the eruptions of July 22 and August 7, 1980, at Mount St. Helens, Washington

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoblitt, Richard P.

    1986-01-01

    The explosive eruptions of July 22 and August 7, 1980, at Mount St. Helens, Wash., both included multiple eruptive pulses. The beginnings of three of the pulses-two on July 22 and one on August 7-were witnessed and photographed. Each of these three began with a fountain of gases and pyroclasts that collapsed around the vent and generated a pyroclastic density flow. Significant vertical-eruption columns developed only after the density flows were generated. This behavior is attributable to either an increase in the gas content of the eruption jet or a decrease in vent radius with time. An increase in the gas content may have occurred as the vent was cleared (by expulsion of a plug of pyroclasts) or as the eruption began to tap deeper, gas-rich magma after first expelling the upper, gas-depleted part of the magma body. An effective decrease of the vent radius with time may have occurred as the eruption originated from progressively deeper levels in the vent. All of these processes-vent clearing; tapping of deeper, gas-rich magma; and effective decrease in vent radius-probably operated to some extent. A 'relief-valve' mechanism is proposed here to account for the occurrence of multiple eruptive pulses. This mechanism requires that the conduit above the magma body be filled with a bed of pyroclasts, and that the vesiculation rate in the magma body be inadequate to sustain continuous eruption. During a repose interval, vesiculation of the magma body would cause gas to flow upward through the bed of pyroclasts. If the rate at which the magma produced gas exceeded the rate at which gas escaped to the atmosphere, the vertical pressure difference across the bed of pyroclastic debris would increase, as would the gas-flow rate. Eventually a gas-flow rate would be achieved that would suddenly diminish the ability of the bed to maintain a pressure difference between the magma body and the atmosphere. The bed of pyroclasts would then be expelled (that is, the relief valve would

  20. Solar Energy Technologies Program Newsletter - July 2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2009-07-01

    This quarterly newsletter is intended for participants and stakeholders in the DOE Solar Program. The content includes features on technology development, market transformation, and policy analysis for solar. Highlights include solar industry updates, DOE funding opportunity announcements and awards, and national laboratory technology developments.

  1. A summary of the Proceedings of the Twelfth International Symposium on the Neurobiology and Neuroendocrinology of Aging, Bregenz, Austria July 27-August 1, 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown-Borg, Holly M; Borg, Kurt E

    2015-08-01

    A summary of the Twelfth International Symposium on the Neurobiology and Neuroendocrinology of Aging that was held July 27-August 1, 2014 in Bregenz, Austria, is presented. Fifteen of the speakers that presented at the conference submitted review papers covering the topic of their presentation as well as an overview of their respective fields and are included in this special issue. The abstracts from each poster presentation as well as seven of the speakers' abstracts are also included at the end of the preface to the special issue.

  2. High Efficiency Generation of Hydrogen Fuels using Nuclear Power Annual Report August, 2000 - July 2001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, L.C.

    2002-11-01

    OAK B188 High Efficiency Generation of Hydrogen Fuels using Nuclear Power Annual Report August 2000 - July 2001. Currently no large scale, cost-effective, environmentally attractive hydrogen production process is available for commercialization nor has such a process been identified. Hydrogen is a promising energy carrier, which potentially could replace the fossil fuels used in the transportation sector of our economy. Carbon dioxide emissions from fossil fuel combustion are thought to be responsible for global warming. The purpose of this work is to determine the potential for efficient, cost-effective, large-scale production of hydrogen utilizing high temperature heat from an advanced nuclear power station. The benefits of this work will include the generation of a low-polluting transportable energy feedstock in an efficient method that has little or no implication for greenhouse gas emissions from a primary energy source whose availability and sources are domestically controlled. This will help to ensure energy for a future transportation/energy infrastructure that is not influenced/controlled by foreign governments. This report describes work accomplished during the second year (Phase 2) of a three year project whose objective is to ''define an economically feasible concept for production of hydrogen, by nuclear means, using an advanced high temperature nuclear reactor as the energy source.'' The emphasis of the first year (Phase 1) was to evaluate thermochemical processes which offer the potential for efficient, cost-effective, large-scale production of hydrogen from water, in which the primary energy input is high temperature heat from an advanced nuclear reactor and to select one (or, at most, three) for further detailed consideration. Phase 1 met its goals and did select one process, the sulfur-iodine process, for investigation in Phases 2 and 3. The combined goals of Phases 2 and 3 were to select the advanced nuclear reactor best

  3. EERE Peer Review Guide - August 2004

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2009-01-18

    Provides guidance in establishing formal in-progress peer review that provides intellectually fair expert evaluation of EERE research, development, demonstration, & deployment (supporting business administration) programs, both retrospective and pr

  4. Decontamination systems information and research programs. Quarterly report, July 1--August 31, 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-07-01

    The US contains numerous hazardous waste sites. Many sites are on private land near operating units of various companies. An effort is being made to determine the conditions under which such sites can be remediated voluntarily. The objective of the project will be to first assess the interest and willingness of industry in the Kanawha River Valley, WV to participate in discussions that would lead toward voluntary cleanup activities. The second will be to implement the activities agreed upon by the interested parties. The project will first involve individual discussions with the industrial, government, and other organized groups in the area. These discussions will help determine the feasibility of organizing voluntary efforts. If the discussions indicate that conditions may be favorable for developing individual or group voluntary cleanup projects, a working group will be convened to establish the environmental goals of the project as well as the technical approach for achieving those goals. The projects for the 1996 WVU Cooperative Agreement are categorized into three task focus areas: Task 1.0 Contaminant Plume Containment and Remediation, Task 2.0 Cross Cutting Innovative Technologies, and Task 3.0 Small Business Support Program. Summaries of the accomplishments for the subtasks reporting under these categories during the third quarter, 1 July 96 through 30 September 96, are presented.

  5. Solitary fibrous tumor of the central nervous system: a 15-year literature survey of 220 cases (August 1996-July 2011).

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Bisceglia, Michele

    2011-09-01

    We reviewed the world literature on solitary fibrous tumors of the central nervous system from August 1996 to July 2011, focusing on both clinicopathological features and diagnostic findings. The anatomical distribution of the 220 cases reported so far reveals that most are intracranial and just over one-fifth are intraspinal. In decreasing frequency, intracranial tumors involve the supratentorial and infratentorial compartments, the pontocerebellar angle, the sellar and parasellar regions, and the cranial nerves. Intraspinal tumors are mainly located in the thoracic and cervical segments. Although most solitary fibrous tumors of the central nervous system are dural based, a small subset presents as subpial, intraparenchymal, intraventricular, or as tumors involving the nerve rootlets with no dural connection. Preoperative imaging and intraoperative findings suggest meningioma, schwannoma or neurofibroma, hemangiopericytoma, or pituitary tumors. Immunohistochemistry is critical to establish a definitive histopathological diagnosis. Vimentin, CD34, BCL2, and CD99 are the most consistently positive markers. The usual histologic type generally behaves in a benign manner if complete removal is achieved. Recurrence is anticipated when resection is subtotal or when the tumor exhibits atypical histology. The proliferative index as assessed by MIB1 labeling is of prognostic significance. Occasionally, tumors featuring conventional morphology may recur, perhaps because of minimal residual disease left behind during surgical extirpation. Rare extracranial metastases and tumor-related deaths are on record. Surgery is the treatment of choice. Stereotactic and external beam radiation therapy may be indicated for postsurgical tumor remnants and for unresectable recurrences. Long-term active surveillance of the patients is mandatory.

  6. Geodetic data records (GDRs) from the GEOSAT Exact Repeat Mission (ERM) from 12 July 1988 to 15 August 1988 (NODC Accession 8800257)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This accession contains one month of geodetic data records (GDRs) from the GEOSAT Exact Repeat Mission (ERM) for the time period of July 12, 1988 to August 15, 1988....

  7. Zooplankton, salinity, and other data from the ALPHA HELIX using nets in the Bering Sea from 22 July 1999 to 14 August 1999 (NODC Accession 0000262)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Zooplankton, salinity, fluorescence, and temperature data were collected from the ALPHA HELIX from July 22, 1999 to August 14, 1999. Data were submitted by...

  8. Phytoplankton data collected using net casts in the Arctic Ocean from the USCGC POLAR SEA from 26 July 1994 to 26 August 1994 (NODC Accession 0000770)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Phytoplankton data were collected using net casts from the USCGC POLAR SEA in the Arctic Ocean. Data were collected from 26 July 1994 to 26 August 1994. Data were...

  9. Intermediate photovoltaic system application experiment operational performance report. Volume 14. For Lovington Square Shopping Center, Lovington, New Mexico, July and August 1982

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harrison, T.D.

    1982-12-01

    Presented are the data accumulated during July and August at the intermediate photovoltaic project at Lovington Square Shopping Center, Lovington, New Mexico. Generated energy and environmental (weather) data are presented graphically. Explanations of irregularities not attributable to weather are provided.

  10. Current direction data from moored current meter casts in the Gulf of Mexico during the Brine Disposal project, 16 July 1979 - 02 August 1979 (NODC Accession 8000501)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current direction data were collected using moored current meter casts in the Gulf of Mexico from July 16, 1979 to August 2, 1979. Data were submitted by Texas A...

  11. Intertidal organism and habitat data as part of Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 07 July 1977 to 26 August 1978 (NODC Accession 8000003)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Intertidal organism and habitat data were collected from 07 July 1977 to 26 August 1978. Data were collected by Western Washington University (WWU) as part of Outer...

  12. Intertidal organism and habitat data as part of Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 06 July 1977 to 26 August 1978 (NODC Accession 8000577)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Intertidal organism and habitat data were collected from 06 July 1977 to 26 August 1978. Data were collected by Western Washington State College (WWSC) as part of...

  13. Marine animal sighting and census data as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 10 July 1978 to 29 August 1978 (NODC Accession 7900078)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Marine animal sighting and census data were collected from 10 July 1978 to 29 August 1978. Data were collected by the University of Alaska - Fairbanks; Institute of...

  14. Indian Ocean Near Real-Time Temperature Profile Data from the GTSPP project from 31 July 1991 to 20 August 1991 (NODC Accession 0000749)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Physical data were collected from XBT casts from the Indian Ocean. Data were collected from 31 July 1991 to 20 August 1991. Data were submitted by the Commonwealth...

  15. DeSoto National Wildlife Refuge Narrative report for May, June, July, August, 1960

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for DeSoto National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1960. The report begins by summarizing the...

  16. DeSoto National Wildlife Refuge Narrative report for May, June, July, August, 1962

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for DeSoto National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1962. The report begins by summarizing the...

  17. A narrative report: May, June, July and August, 1953: Chautauqua National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Chautauqua NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1953. The report begins by summarizing the weather conditions...

  18. Tamarac National Wildlife Refuge: Narrative report: May, June, July, August, 1959

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Tamarac NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1959. The report begins by summarizing the weather conditions,...

  19. DeSoto National Wildlife Refuge Narrative report for May, June, July, August, 1961

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for DeSoto National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1961. The report begins by summarizing the...

  20. Narrative report May, June, July, August, 1948 Des Lacs National Wildlife Refuge & Easement Refuges - District IV

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Des Lacs National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1948. The report begins by summarizing the...

  1. Blackwater National Wildlife Refuge : Narrative report : May, June, July and August, 1953

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Blackwater NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1953. The report begins by summarizing the weather conditions and...

  2. Narrative report : Bombay Hook National Wildlife Refuge : May, June, July and August 1943

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Bombay Hook NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1943. The report begins by summarizing the weather conditions...

  3. Narrative report : Bombay Hook National Wildlife Refuge : May, June, July and August 1949

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Bombay Hook NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1949. The report begins by summarizing the weather conditions...

  4. Narrative report : Bombay Hook National Wildlife Refuge : May, June, July and August 1948

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Bombay Hook NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1948. The report begins by summarizing the weather conditions...

  5. Narrative report : Bombay Hook National Wildlife Refuge : May, June, July and August 1947

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Bombay Hook NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1947. The report begins by summarizing the weather conditions...

  6. Bombay Hook National Wildlife Refuge : Narrative report : May, June, July, and August 1942

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Bombay Hook NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1942. The report begins by summarizing the weather conditions...

  7. Bombay Hook National Wildlife Refuge : Narrative report : May, June, July, August 1954

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Bombay Hook NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1954. The report begins by summarizing the weather conditions...

  8. Narrative report : Bombay Hook National Wildlife Refuge : May, June, July and August 1945

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Bombay Hook NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1945. The report begins by summarizing the weather conditions...

  9. Bombay Hook National Wildlife Refuge : Narrative report : May, June, July, August 1953

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Bombay Hook NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1953. The report begins by summarizing the weather conditions...

  10. Narrative report : Bombay Hook National Wildlife Refuge : May, June, July and August 1950

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Bombay Hook NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1950. The report begins by summarizing the weather conditions...

  11. Narrative report : Bombay Hook National Wildlife Refuge : May, June, July, August, 1957

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Bombay Hook NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1957. The report begins by summarizing the weather conditions...

  12. Bombay Hook National Wildlife Refuge : Narrative report : May, June, July and August 1946

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Bombay Hook NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1946. The report begins by summarizing the weather conditions...

  13. Narrative report : Bombay Hook National Wildlife Refuge : May, June, July and August 1951

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Bombay Hook NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1951. The report begins by summarizing the weather conditions...

  14. Bombay Hook National Wildlife Refuge : Narrative report : May, June, July, August 1952

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Bombay Hook NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1952. The report begins by summarizing the weather conditions...

  15. Tewaukon National Wildlife Refuge : Narrative Report : May, June, July, August 1957

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Tewaukon National Wildlife Refuge summarizes refuge activities from May through August of 1957. The report begins with a summary of the...

  16. Narrative report Mark Twain National Wildlife Refuge Gardner Unit: May, June, July, August - 1961

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Great River National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1961. The report begins by summarizing the...

  17. Narrative report Mark Twain National Wildlife Refuge Gardner Unit: May, June, July, August, 1959

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Great River National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1959. The report begins by summarizing the...

  18. Narrative report: Tule Lake National Wildlife Refuge: May, June, July, and August, 1951

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Tule Lake National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1951. The report begins by summarizing the...

  19. Narrative report: Tule Lake National Wildlife Refuge: May, June, July, August, 1953

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Tule Lake National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1953. The report begins by summarizing the...

  20. Seney National Wildlife Refuge Narrative report: May, June, July and August, 1961

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Seney National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1961. The report begins by summarizing the...

  1. Seney National Wildlife Refuge Narrative report: May, June, July, and August, 1951

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Seney National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1951. The report begins by summarizing the...

  2. Seney National Wildlife Refuge Narrative report: May, June, July and August, 1963

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Seney National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1963. The report begins by summarizing the...

  3. Seney National Wildlife Refuge Narrative report: May, June, July and August, 1962

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Seney National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1962. The report begins by summarizing the...

  4. Seney National Wildlife Refuge Narrative report: May, June, July, and August, 1948

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Seney National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1948. The report begins by summarizing the...

  5. Seney National Wildlife Refuge Narrative report: May, June, July, and August, 1950

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Seney National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1950. The report begins by summarizing the...

  6. Seney National Wildlife Refuge Narrative report: May, June, July, and August, 1945

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Seney National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1945. The report begins by summarizing the...

  7. A narrative report: May, June, July and August, 1957: Chautauqua National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Chautauqua NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1957. The report begins by summarizing the weather conditions and...

  8. Chautauqua National Wildlife Refuge: Narrative report - May, June, July, and August 1942

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Chautauqua NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1942. The report begins by summarizing the weather conditions and...

  9. Rice Lake National Wildlife Refuge: Narrative report: May, June, July, August, 1944

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Rice Lake NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1944. The report begins by summarizing the weather conditions and...

  10. Upper Mississippi River Wildlife and Fish Refuge : Narrative Report : May, June, July, August, 1947

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Upper Mississippi River Wildlife and Fish Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May to August of 1947. The report begins by...

  11. Narrative report: Missisquoi National Wildlife Refuge: May, June, July, and August, 1956

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Missisquoi NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1956. The report begins by summarizing the weather conditions,...

  12. Upper Mississippi River Wildlife and Fish Refuge : Narrative Report : May, June, July, August, 1949

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Upper Mississippi River Wildlife and Fish Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May to August of 1949. The report begins by...

  13. Narrative report Mark Twain National Wildlife Refuge Gardner Unit: May, June, July, August - 1963

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Great River National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1963. The report begins by summarizing the...

  14. Seney National Wildlife Refuge Narrative report: May, June, July and August, 1960

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Seney National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1960. The report begins by summarizing the...

  15. Narrative report May, June, July, August, 1946 Des Lacs National Wildlife Refuge & Easement Refuges - District IV

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Des Lacs National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1946. The report begins by summarizing the...

  16. Narrative report: May, June, July, and August, 1962: Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Lake Andes NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1962. The report begins by summarizing the weather conditions,...

  17. Blackwater National Wildlife Refuge : Narrative report : May, June, July and August, 1961

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Blackwater NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1961. The report begins by summarizing the weather conditions,...

  18. Upper Mississippi River Wildlife and Fish Refuge : Narrative Report : May, June, July, August, 1958

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Upper Mississippi River Wildlife and Fish Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May to August of 1958. The report begins by...

  19. Lacreek National Wildlife Refuge Narrative report: May, June, July, and August, 1955

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Lacreek National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1955. The report begins by summarizing the...

  20. Arrowwood National Wildlife Refuge : Narrative report : May - June - July - August 1951

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Arrowwood NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1951. The report begins by summarizing the weather conditions and...

  1. Talcot Lake National Wildlife Refuge: Narrative report: May, June, July, August 1944

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Talcot Lake NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1944. The report begins by summarizing the weather conditions...

  2. Snake Creek National Wildlife Refuge: May June July August 1955: [Narrative report

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Snake Creek National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May - August of 1955. The report begins by summarizing the...

  3. Narrative report: Upper Souris National Wildlife Refuge: May - June - July - August, 1959

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Upper Souris National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1959. The report begins by summarizing the...

  4. Chautauqua National Wildlife Refuge: Narrative report: May - June - July and August - 1948

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Chautauqua NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1948. The report begins by summarizing the weather conditions and...

  5. Fort Peck Game Range: Refuge narrative report: May, June, July, August 1949

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Fort Peck NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1949. The report begins by summarizing the weather conditions and...

  6. Upper Mississippi River Wildlife and Fish Refuge : Narrative Report : May, June, July, August, 1948

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Upper Mississippi River Wildlife and Fish Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May to August of 1948. The report begins by...

  7. Trempealeau National Wildlife Refuge: Narrative report: May, June, July, August, 1947

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Trempealeau NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1947. The report begins by summarizing the weather conditions...

  8. Chincoteague National Wildlife Refuge: Narrative report: May June July and August 1959

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Chincoteague NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1959. The report begins by summarizing the weather conditions,...

  9. Chautauqua National Wildlife Refuge: Narrative report: May - June - July and August - 1947

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Chautauqua NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1947. The report begins by summarizing the weather conditions and...

  10. Narrative report Mark Twain National Wildlife Refuge Louisa-Keithsburg Unit: May, June, July, August - 1962

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Port Louisa National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1962. The report begins by summarizing the...

  11. Trempealeau National Wildlife Refuge: Narrative report: May, June, July, August, 1952

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Trempealeau NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1952. The report begins by summarizing the weather conditions...

  12. Upper Mississippi River Wildlife and Fish Refuge : Narrative Report : May, June, July, August, 1944

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Upper Mississippi River Wildlife and Fish Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May to August of 1944. The report begins by...

  13. Bear River Migratory Bird Refuge : Narrative report : For period May, June, July, and August, 1949

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Bear River Migratory Bird Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1949. The report begins by summarizing the...

  14. Burford Lake Wildlife Management Area Narrative report : May, June, July, August, 1951

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Burford Lake Wildlife Management Area outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1951. The report begins by summarizing the...

  15. Long Lake National Wildlife Refuge: Narrative report: May, June, July and August 1954

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Long Lake NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1954. The report begins by summarizing the weather conditions and...

  16. Mud Lake National Wildlife Refuge: Narrative report: May, June, July, August [1959

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Mud Lake NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1959. The report begins by summarizing the weather conditions,...

  17. Burford Lake Wildlife Management Area Narrative report : May, June, July, August, 1959

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Burford Lake Wildlife Management Area outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1959. The report begins by summarizing...

  18. Burford Lake Wildlife Management Area Narrative report : May, June, July, and August, 1956

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Burford Lake Wildlife Management Area outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1956. The report begins by summarizing the...

  19. Necedah National Wildlife Refuge: Narrative report: May, June, July and August, 1950

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Necedah NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1950. The report begins by summarizing the weather conditions and...

  20. Fort Peck Game Range: Refuge narrative report: May, June, July, August, 1954

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Fort Peck NWR and the easement refuges outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1954. The report begins by summarizing...

  1. Upper Mississippi River Wildlife and Fish Refuge : Narrative Report : May, June, July, August, 1957

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Upper Mississippi River Wildlife and Fish Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May to August of 1957. The report begins by...

  2. Valentine National Wildlife Refuge: Narrative report: [May, June, July, August 1956

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Valentine NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1956. The report begins by summarizing the weather conditions and...

  3. Lacreek National Wildlife Refuge Narrative report: May, June, July, and August, 1957

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Lacreek National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1957. The report begins by summarizing the...

  4. Narrative report: Valentine National Wildlife Refuge: May, June, July, and August, 1962

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Valentine NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1962. The report begins by summarizing the weather conditions,...

  5. Narrative report: May, June, July, August, 1959: Moosehorn National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Moosehorn NWR (including the Edmunds Unit) outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1959. The report begins by...

  6. Narrative report Mark Twain National Wildlife Refuge Calhoun-Batchtown Unit: May, June, July, August - 1961

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Two Rivers National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1961. The report begins by summarizing the...

  7. Blackwater National Wildlife Refuge : Narrative report : May, June, July and August, 1956

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Blackwater NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1956. The report begins by summarizing the weather conditions and...

  8. Blackwater National Wildlife Refuge : Narrative report : May, June, July and August, 1957

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Blackwater NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1957. The report begins by summarizing the weather conditions and...

  9. Bear River Migratory Bird Refuge : Narrative report : For period May, June, July, and August, 1944

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Bear River Migratory Bird Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1944. The report begins by summarizing the...

  10. Narrative report May, June, July, August, 1949, Des Lacs National Wildlife Refuge & Easement Refuges - District IV

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Des Lacs National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1949. The report begins by summarizing the...

  11. Calhoun and Batchtown Refuges Narrative Report : May, June, July, August, 1952

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Calhoun National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1952. The report begins by summarizing the...

  12. Narrative report: Missisquoi National Wildlife Refuge: May, June, July, and August, 1953

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Missisquoi NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1953. The report begins by summarizing the weather conditions,...

  13. Narrative report: Missisquoi National Wildlife Refuge: May, June, July, and August, 1955

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Missisquoi NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1955. The report begins by summarizing the weather conditions,...

  14. Narrative report: Missisquoi National Wildlife Refuge: May, June, July, and August, 1952

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Missisquoi NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1952. The report begins by summarizing the weather conditions,...

  15. Mud Lake National Wildlife Refuge: Narrative report: May, June, July, August [1957

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Mud Lake NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1957. The report begins by summarizing the weather conditions and...

  16. Long Lake National Wildlife Refuge: Narrative report: May, June, July and August 1962

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Long Lake NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1962. The report begins by summarizing the weather conditions,...

  17. Necedah National Wildlife Refuge: Narrative report: May, June, July, August, 1953

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Necedah NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1953. The report begins by summarizing the weather conditions, water...

  18. Tamarac National Wildlife Refuge: Narrative report: May, June, July, August, 1958

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Tamarac NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1958. The report begins by summarizing the weather conditions,...

  19. Mud Lake National Wildlife Refuge: Narrative report: May, June, July, August [1958

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Mud Lake NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1958. The report begins by summarizing the weather conditions,...

  20. Rice Lake National Wildlife Refuge: Narrative report: May, June, July, August, 1949

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Rice Lake NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1949. The report begins by summarizing the weather conditions and...

  1. Narrative report: Valentine National Wildlife Refuge: May, June, July, and August, 1960

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Valentine NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1960. The report begins by summarizing the weather conditions,...

  2. Arrowwood National Wildlife Refuge : Narrative report : May - June - July - August 1963

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Arrowwood NWR (including Chase Lake NWR and District VI Easement Refuge) outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1963....

  3. Lacreek National Wildlife Refuge Narrative report: May, June, July, and August, 1963

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Lacreek National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1963. The report begins by summarizing the...

  4. Lacreek National Wildlife Refuge Narrative report: May, June, July, and August, 1962

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Lacreek National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1962. The report begins by summarizing the...

  5. Lacreek National Wildlife Refuge Narrative report: May, June, July, and August, 1960

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Lacreek National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1960. The report begins by summarizing the...

  6. Lacreek National Wildlife Refuge Narrative report: May, June, July, and August, 1961

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Lacreek National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1961. The report begins by summarizing the...

  7. Quarterly narrative report: May, June, July, and August 1951: Chautauqua National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Chautauqua NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1951. The report begins by summarizing the weather conditions and...

  8. Lacreek National Wildlife Refuge Narrative report: May, June, July, and August, 1958

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Lacreek National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1958. The report begins by summarizing the...

  9. Lacreek National Wildlife Refuge Narrative report: May, June, July, and August, 1959

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Lacreek National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1959. The report begins by summarizing the...

  10. Bear River Migratory Bird Refuge : Narrative report : For period May, June, July, and August, 1943

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Bear River Migratory Bird Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1943. The report begins by summarizing the...

  11. Tamarac National Wildlife Refuge: Narrative report: May, June, July, August, 1955

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Tamarac NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1955. The report begins by summarizing the weather conditions and...

  12. Seney National Wildlife Refuge Narrative report: May, June, July, and August, 1944

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Seney National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1944. The report begins by summarizing the...

  13. Squaw Creek National Wildlife Refuge Narrative report for period: May, June, July, and August, 1948

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Squaw Creek National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1948. The report begins by summarizing the...

  14. Snake Creek National Wildlife Refuge Narrative report: May, June, July, August, 1963

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Snake Creek National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1963. The report begins by summarizing the...

  15. Narrative report May, June, July, August, 1952 Des Lacs National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Des Lacs National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1952. The report begins by summarizing the...

  16. Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge : Narrative report : May, June, July and August 1942

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Back Bay NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1942. The report begins by summarizing the weather conditions,...

  17. DeSoto National Wildlife Refuge Narrative report for May, June, July, August, 1963

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for DeSoto National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1963. The report begins by summarizing the...

  18. Missisquoi National Wildlife Refuge: Narrative report: May, June, July, and August, 1948

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Missisquoi NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1948. The report begins by summarizing the weather conditions,...

  19. Trempealeau National Wildlife Refuge: Narrative report: May, June, July, August, 1945

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Trempealeau NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1945. The report begins by summarizing the weather conditions...

  20. Narrative report, Crescent Lake National Wildlife Refuge (May, June, July, August, 1950)

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Crescent Lake National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1950. The report begins by summarizing...

  1. Seney National Wildlife Refuge Narrative report: May, June, July, and August, 1942

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Seney National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1942. The report begins by summarizing the...

  2. Trempealeau National Wildlife Refuge: Narrative report: May, June, July, August, 1948

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Trempealeau NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1948. The report begins by summarizing the weather conditions...

  3. Long Lake National Wildlife Refuge: Narrative report: May, June, July and August 1963

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Long Lake NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1963. The report begins by summarizing the weather conditions,...

  4. Lacreek National Wildlife Refuge Narrative report - May, June, July, and August 1945

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Lacreek National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1945. The report begins by summarizing the...

  5. Arrowwood National Wildlife Refuge : Narrative report : May - June - July - August 1947

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Arrowwood NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1947. The report begins by summarizing the weather conditions and...

  6. Bear River Migratory Bird Refuge : Narrative report : May, June, July, August, 1961

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Bear River Migratory Bird Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1961. The report begins by summarizing the...

  7. Narrative report Pathfinder National Wildlife Refuge: May, June, July, August, 1963

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Pathfinder National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1963. The report begins by summarizing the...

  8. Narrative report Pathfinder National Wildlife Refuge: May, June, July, August, 1962

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Pathfinder National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1962. The report begins by summarizing the...

  9. Pathfinder National Wildlife Refuge, Narrative report: May, June, July, August, 1958

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Pathfinder National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1958. The report begins by summarizing the...

  10. Narrative report Pathfinder National Wildlife Refuge: May, June, July, August, 1961

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Pathfinder National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1961. The report begins by summarizing the...

  11. Pathfinder National Wildlife Refuge, Narrative report: May, June, July, August, 1960

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Pathfinder National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1960. The report begins by summarizing the...

  12. Pathfinder National Wildlife Refuge, Narrative report: May, June, July, August, 1959

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Pathfinder National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1959. The report begins by summarizing the...

  13. Pathfinder National Wildlife Refuge, Narrative report: May, June, July, August, 1957

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Pathfinder National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1957. The report begins by summarizing the...

  14. Pathfinder National Wildlife Refuge, Narrative report: May, June, July, August, 1956

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Pathfinder National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1956. The report begins by summarizing the...

  15. Fort Peck Game Range: Refuge narrative report: May, June, July, August, 1953

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Fort Peck NWR and the easement refuges outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1953. The report begins by summarizing...

  16. Fort Peck Game Range: Refuge narrative report: May, June, July, August 1952

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Fort Peck NWR and the easement refuges outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1952. The report begins by summarizing...

  17. Narrative report North Platte Refuge: May, June, July, and August, 1943

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for North Platte National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1943. The report begins by summarizing the...

  18. Necedah National Wildlife Refuge: Narrative report: May, June, July, August, 1957

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Necedah NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1957. The report begins by summarizing the weather conditions, water...

  19. Arrowwood National Wildlife Refuge : Narrative report : May - June - July - August, 1944

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Arrowwood NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1944. The report begins by summarizing the weather conditions and...

  20. Tamarac National Wildlife Refuge: Narrative report: May, June, July, August 1946

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Tamarac NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1946. The report begins by summarizing the weather conditions and...

  1. Necedah National Wildlife Refuge: Narrative report: May, June, July, August 1948

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Necedah NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1948. The report begins by summarizing the weather conditions and...

  2. Rice Lake National Wildlife Refuge: Narrative report: May, June, July, August, 1948

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Rice Lake NWR and Mille Lacs NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1948. The report begins by summarizing the...

  3. Horicon National Wildlife Refuge Narrative report: May, June, July, & August - 1943

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Horicon National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1943. The report begins by summarizing the...

  4. Narrative report Mark Twain National Wildlife Refuge Louisa-Keithsburg Unit: May, June, July, August - 1959

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Port Louisa National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1959. The report begins by summarizing the...

  5. Narrative report Mark Twain National Wildlife Refuge Gardner Unit: May, June, July, August - 1962

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Great River National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1962. The report begins by summarizing the...

  6. Medicine Lake National Wildlife Refuge: Narrative report: May, June, July, and August, 1948

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Medicine Lake NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1948. The report begins by summarizing the weather conditions...

  7. Medicine Lake National Wildlife Refuge: Narrative report: May, June, July, and August, 1943

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Medicine Lake NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1943. The report begins by summarizing the weather conditions...

  8. Medicine Lake National Wildlife Refuge: Narrative report: May, June, July, and August, 1946

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Medicine Lake NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1946. The report begins by summarizing the weather conditions...

  9. Medicine Lake National Wildlife Refuge: Narrative report: May, June, July, and August, 1947

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Medicine Lake NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1947. The report begins by summarizing the weather conditions...

  10. Rice Lake National Wildlife Refuge: Narrative report: May, June, July, August, 1947

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Rice Lake NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1947. The report begins by summarizing the weather conditions and...

  11. Seney National Wildlife Refuge Narrative report: May, June, July, and August, 1952

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Seney National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1952. The report begins by summarizing the...

  12. First quarterly [narrative] report F. Y. 1938 Seney Migratory Waterfowl Refuge: July, August, September, 1937

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Seneca Unit of the Erie National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from July through September of 1937. The report...

  13. Report of the Council and Accounts for the session 2007 August 1 to 2008 July 31

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickard, R.; Boyd, D.

    2008-10-01

    The Council of the British Astronomical Association presents its annual Report and Accounts for the session ended 2008 July 31. The surplus of income over expenditure for the financial year ended 2008 June 30 was £2,642.

  14. LHCC COMPREHENSIVE REVIEW OF CMS (JULY 07)

    CERN Multimedia

    Extract from the Draft Report 1. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY The CMS Collaboration has made significant progress towards producing a detector ready for LHC operation in 2008. The past year saw all sub-detector groups success fully produce high-quality components and modules, and integrate them into the final objects to be installed into the CMS magnet. Installation and commissioning of final components in the CMS UXC55 cavern are well-under-way. In particular, the heavy lowering of detector elements into the CMS experiment cavern is a major success. The new CMS master schedule V36 incorporates the revised LHC machine schedule and includes an optimized detector sequencing. In spite of various delays, it remains possible that CMS will have an initial detector ready to exploit the initial LHC run in spring 2008. Installation of the Electromagnetic Calorimeter End-Cap (EE) and Pre-shower (ES) detectors is scheduled to be completed no sooner than July 2008 and CMS now plans to install the complete Pixel Detector for ...

  15. Career and Technology Center Honors Julie Hartman | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    By Carolynne Keenan, Contributing Writer On May 7, Julie Hartman was honored by the Frederick County Career and Technology Center (CTC) for her support of the CTC’s Biomedical Sciences Program. As an education program specialist for Outreach and Special Programs at NCI at Frederick, Hartman is responsible for NCI at Frederick’s participation in the program, which is designed to offer Frederick County high school students hands-on, practical laboratory experience beyond the typical classroom setting. 

  16. El Niño-based malaria epidemic warning for Oromia, Ethiopia, from August 2016 to July 2017.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouma, M J; Siraj, A S; Rodo, X; Pascual, M

    2016-11-01

    Tropical highland malaria intensifies and shifts to higher altitudes during exceptionally warm years. Above-normal temperatures associated with El Niño during boreal winter months (December-March) may intensify malaria in East African highlands. We assessed the malaria risk for Oromia, the largest region of Ethiopia with around 30 million inhabitants. Simple linear regression and spatial analyses were used to associate sea surface temperatures (SST) in the Pacific and surface temperatures in Ethiopia with annual malaria risk in Oromia, based on confirmed cases of malaria between 1982 and 2005. A strong association (R(2) = 0.6, P < 0.001) was identified between malaria and sea surface temperatures in the Pacific, anticipating a 70% increase in malaria risk for the period from August 2016 to July 2017. This forecast was quantitatively supported by elevated land surface temperatures (+1.6 °C) in December 2015. When more station data become available and mean March 2016 temperatures from meteorological stations can be taken into account, a more robust prediction can be issued. An epidemic warning is issued for Oromia, Ethiopia, between August 2016 and July 2017 and may include the pre-July short malaria season. Similar relationships reported for Madagascar point to an epidemic risk for all East African highlands with around 150 million people. Preparedness for this high risk period would include pre-emptive intradomestic spraying with insecticides, adequate stocking of antimalarials, and spatial extension of diagnostic capacity and more frequent reporting to enable a rapid public health response when and where required. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Energy and Technology Review, August 1984

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1984-08-01

    Three articles are presented. Article 1, earthquake safety at LLNL, discusses the intensive program to strengthen Laboratory structures, utilities and work stations, and to reduce personal risks undertaken at the Lab following the January 1980 earthquakes. An investigatin of the physiographic and seismologic setting of the LLNL site is discussed in article 2, geology of the Livermore Valley. Article 3 discusses monitoring groundwater quality at site 300. This system was designed to determine whether any groundwater contamination has occurred as a result of disposal operations of solid wastes from nonnuclear weapons component testing. Current analysis indicate that low levels of contamination are present.

  18. In memory of Delio Ruggiu (July 31st 1934 – August 8th 2004

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MARINA MANCA

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Delio Ruggiu, who died on August 8th 2004, was an outstanding colleague, but first and foremost a beloved and irreplaceable friend. We heard the news of his sudden and untimely death with immense sadness and a great sense of emptiness, along with a feeling of incredulity: he had got through apparently desperate times before, and none of us thought that this time he had come to the end. In the many years of our life at the Institute, Delio was always there to share so much of significance in the research activity, and his participation was invariably marked by a great sense of responsibility, intellectual rigour and enthusiasm.

  19. Polarization of Tremor Wave-field Before and During The July-august 2001 Mt. Etna Eruption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, F.; Patanè, D.; del Pezzo, E.; Gresta, S.; Ibanez, J.; Saccarotti, G.; Scarfi, L.

    One of the most important lateral eruptive events in the last 30 years started in July 2001, which has been characterized by an unusual eruptive style, with lava flow emis- sions at different quotes along a complex fracture system, frequent and power strom- bolian explosions sometimes culminating in lava fountains and abundant gas emis- sions. Apart from tectonic seismicity, volcanic tremor had a key role in monitoring the evolution of the eruption. Paroxysmal phases such as lava fountains and power- ful strombolian activity were associated with remarkable increments in the amplitude of tremor. Although with some fluctuation, high amplitude values maintained after the opening of the eruptive fractures, reaching a maximum on July 25. An inversion of this trend started in the late morning on July 31, when a sudden decrease in the amplitude of tremor occurred. In this work, polarization of the tremor wave-field, recorded simultaneously at 12 three-component digital stations, equipped with short period (1s) or broad-band (20s) sensors, is analyzed by use of a polarization filter. Spectrograms show predominant energy into 1-6ÿ7 Hz frequency band. Before and during the July-August 2001 Mt. Etna eruption, significant variations with time of direction of polarization, incidence angle and linear content of the tremor wave-field are found mainly on the broad-band recordings at frequencies lower than ca. 1.5 Hz. This is in agreement with temporal modifications of the activity observed during the pre- and the eruptive period. Moreover, we observe that the tremor shows steady hor- izontal, near-linear, ca. west-east pattern, at several stations (TDF, MNT, ESP, ERS, EC11). Such a behaviour excludes confinement of the source to the only active vents and suggests the possibility that a vertical extended source with overall north-south alignment might radiate SH waves, in the direction normal to the source.

  20. Reliability of the Solar One plant during the power production phase: August 1, 1984--July 31, 1987

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolb, G.J.; Lopez, C.W.

    1988-10-01

    The power production phase at Solar One spanned three years from August 1, 1984 through July 31, 1987. In that period the plant achieved an average availability, during hours of sunshine, of 81.7%. This report presents the frequencies and causes of the plant outages that occurred. The eleven most important causes composed 75% of the total outage time. Qualitative insights related to the origin and mitigation of these causes are provided. Also presented are insights and statistics regarding the reliability of the heliostat field. The quantitative and qualitative information presented in this report will be useful to studies aimed at improving the reliability of future solar central receiver power plants. 20 refs., 11 figs., 3 tabs.

  1. LLE Review quarterly report, July--September 1992. Volume 52

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Short, R.W. [ed.

    1992-12-31

    This volume of the LLE Review, covering the period July--September 1992, contains articles on methods of balancing the beam power on the OMEGA Upgrade and on the damping of ion-sound waves in laser-produced plasmas. The advanced technology section includes reports on optical nonlinearities in high-temperature superconductors, a method of increasing gas retention time for laser-fusion targets, and a study of stimulated Raman scattering of laser beams in air. Highlights of the research reported in this issue are: An efficient method has been developed for balancing the power in the 60 beams of the OMEGA Upgrade. The method can achieve 2% power balance for both main and foot beams using only four system shots. A study of ion-sound-wave damping has substantially revised and expanded our knowledge of this effect. The damping of ion waves can have important consequences for laser-plasma interaction. The use of femtosecond laser pulses to study the properties of thin-film, high-temperature superconductors is discussed. A method for increasing the gas retention time of polymer-shell laser-fusion targets by overcoating them with a thin layer of aluminum is described. A code has been developed to study stimulated rotational Raman scattering in high-power laser beams propagating through air.

  2. Ionospheric measurements of relative coronal brightness during the total solar eclipses of 11 August, 1999 and 9 July, 1945

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. J. Davis

    Full Text Available Swept-frequency (1-10 MHz ionosonde measurements were made at Helston, Cornwall (50°06'N, 5°18'W during the total solar eclipse on August 11, 1999. Soundings were made every three minutes. We present a method for estimating the percentage of the ionising solar radiation which remains unobscured at any time during the eclipse by comparing the variation of the ionospheric E-layer with the behaviour of the layer during a control day. Application to the ionosonde date for 11 August, 1999, shows that the flux of solar ionising radiation fell to a minimum of 25±2% of the value before and after the eclipse. For comparison, the same technique was also applied to measurements made during the total solar eclipse of 9 July, 1945, at Sörmjöle (63°68'N, 20°20'E and yielded a corresponding minimum of 16±2%. Therefore the method can detect variations in the fraction of solar emissions that originate from the unobscured corona and chromosphere. We discuss the differences between these two eclipses in terms of the nature of the eclipse, short-term fluctuations, the sunspot cycle and the recently-discovered long-term change in the coronal magnetic field.

    Key words: Ionosphere (solar radiation and cosmic ray effects - Radio science (ionospheric physics - Solar physics, astrophysics, and astronomy (corona and transition region

  3. Energy and technology review, July 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quirk, W.J.

    1993-07-01

    This report discusses the two-stage light-gas gun which was developed by the Super-High-Altitude Research Project (SHARP) is a step toward realizing a launcher that can do this at a fraction of the cost of rockets. The SHARP gun is different from other two-stage designs because it is larger and its launch and pump tube are joined at right angles. This configuration allows the launch tube to point at any angle toward the sky while the pump tube remains horizontal. We have demonstrated that this gun can fire projectiles when the launch tube is in the horizontal position. Dr. Michael M. May who was the Laboratory`s fifth Director (1965--71) and is now a Director Emeritus. Under his directorship, the groundwork was laid for the Laboratory`s Energy Program, environmental science programs, and Laser Program. May remains active in research on arms control, nonproliferation, and cooperative security, and he is doing research and teaching at UC San Diego and at Stanford University. As part of the Laboratory`s 40th anniversary celebration, May was invited to lecture on his views of the changing world and the role of LLNL. In 1992, he participated in an influential National Academy of Sciences study on the reduction of nuclear weapons. This study recommended that the US cut strategic weapons to one-third the present number, withdraw most tactical weapons, and dismantle the retired nuclear weapons. May is convinced that the relative stability now present among the major nations is a precondition for keeping the demand for nuclear weapons low among the nuclear ``have-not`` nations. In the coming years, May believes that the Laboratory will remain most useful at major government-funded R&D projects in the areas of defense, energy, and the environment. May is now working on a new report on the disposition of surplus plutonium from nuclear weapons.

  4. Advanced turbine systems phase II - conceptual design and product development. Final report, August 1993--July 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-10-01

    The National Energy Strategy (NES) calls for a balanced program of greater energy efficiency, use of alternative fuels, and the environmentally responsible development of all U.S. energy resources. Consistent with the NES, a Department of Energy (DOE) program has been created to develop Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS). The technical ATS requirements are based upon two workshops held in Greenville, SC that were sponsored by DOE and hosted by Clemson University. The objective of this 8-year program, managed jointly by DOE`s Office of Fossil Energy, and, Office of Conservation and Renewable Energy, is to develop natural-gas-fired base load power plants that will have cycle efficiencies greater than 60%, lower heating value (LHV), be environmentally superior to current technology, and also be cost competitive. The program will include work to transfer advanced technology to the coal- and biomass-fueled systems being developed in other DOE programs.

  5. 2012 ELECTRODEPOSITION GORDON RESEARCH CONFERENCE AND GORDON RESEARCH SEMINAR, JULY 29 - AUGUST 3, 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gewirth, Andrew

    2013-08-03

    The 2012 Gordon Conference on Electrodeposition: Electrochemical Materials Synthesis and Applications will present cutting-edge research on electrodeposition with emphasis on (i) advances in basic science, (ii) developments in next-generation technologies, and (iii) new and emerging areas. The Conference will feature a wide range of topics, from atomic scale processes, nucleation and growth, thin film deposition, and electrocrystallization, to applications of electrodeposition in devices including microelectronics, batteries, solar energy, and fuel cells.

  6. 2012 Electrodeposition Gordon Research Conference and Gordon Research Seminar, July 29 - August 3, 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gewirth, Andrew

    2013-08-03

    The 2012 Gordon Conference on Electrodeposition: Electrochemical Materials Synthesis and Applications will present cutting-edge research on electrodeposition with emphasis on (i) advances in basic science, (ii) developments in next-generation technologies, and (iii) new and emerging areas. The Conference will feature a wide range of topics, from atomic scale processes, nucleation and growth, thin film deposition, and electrocrystallization, to applications of electrodeposition in devices including microelectronics, batteries, solar energy, and fuel cells.

  7. Geodetic Monitoring of The Strain Evolution Field During The July - August 2001 Mt. Etna Eruption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puglisi, G.; Etna01-Geo Team

    zones. The Stop and Go kinematic technique has been adopted to measure the stations along the two profiles, while the two southernmost stations of the N-S profile, down to the Rifugio Sapienza area, have been measured in static mode. Static measurements have been carried out periodically also on 9 stations of the GPS network on the volcano and on the 5 reference stations on the surrounding areas. Thanks to this intense fieldwork activity, it was possible, de- spite the very complex eruptive fissure system, to define that no ground deformations occurred till July 11th, and that an almost definitive ground deformation pattern was achieved during the first days of the eruption.

  8. Program Manager: Journal of the Defense Systems Management College, Volume 22, Number 4, July-August 1993

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-08-01

    Irving Chmbr isa1toa rhv poorp.) 10( 26 3 Sprujcc, Dlope, anid Fordism : Acquisition Law Panel Reports Procurement Integrity The Flying Coffins to...Systems), and energy conservation . The DASD personnel actions. I look forward to and the ASD(C31) Committee for ac- (Environmental Technology) and the your...August 19c,3 SPRUCE, DOPE, AND FORDISM : THE FLYING COFFINS Amenrci-o Acquires an Air Arm, XV!right L rothcrs through the Great War Wilbur D. lones, Jr. A

  9. Cassini RTG Program monthly technical progress report, July 28--August 24, 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-09-24

    The technical progress achieved during this period is described. This report is organized by program task structure: (1) spacecraft and integration liaison; (2) engineering support; (3) safety; (4) qualified unicouple production; (5) ETG fabrication, assembly, and test; (6) ground support equipment (GSE); (7) RTG shipping and launch support; (8) designs, reviews, and mission applications; (9) project management, quality assurance, reliability, contract changes, CAGO acquisition (operating funds), and CAGO maintenance and repair; and (10) CAGO acquisition (capital funds).

  10. Bibliography of Soviet Laser Developments, Number 48 July-August 1980.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-07-01

    Golografiya. Optika anizotropnykh sred . Magnitnyye yavleniya v elementakh TsVM (Holography. Optics of anisotropic media. Magnetic phenomena in digital...dvukhifaznykh sred (Noneguilibrium and nonstationary processes in the gasdynamics of single and two-phase media). Moskva, Nauka, 1979. Reviewed by V.A...khimii AN UkrSSR). 521. Scientific Research Institute for Physics of Condensed Media, Yerevan State University (Nil fiziki kondensirovannykh sred

  11. LLE review. Quarterly report, July 1997--September 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-02-01

    This volume of the LLE Review, covering the period July--September 1997, begins with a general introduction to LLE`s experimental physics program and a report on recent results. This article includes a useful summary of the system`s operational capabilities and system parameters. Other highlights of the wide variety of research presented in this issue are: a promising method to directly observe the cold compressed shell of an imploding target. The shell is normally observed by backlighting. The proposal described here is to use a high-Z dopant that fluoresces under radiation from the hot core in the K{alpha} line. A study of the instabilities associated with near-forward stimulated Brillouin scattering. It includes a calculation of the saturation times and steady-state gain exponents. A successful program of pulse shaping for the OMEGA laser system. Examples of a variety of pulse shapes that can be programmed are presented. A description of the angular-scattering characteristics of ferroelectric liquid crystal electro-optical devices operating in transient and extended scattering modes. The possibility of applying these devices as modulators in practical IR imaging systems is evaluated. A faster method of shaping and finishing IR materials by the use of magnetorheological fluids. Detailed specifications and test results are included. An integrated circuit tester based on interferometric imaging. This technique holds promise of ultrafast noninvasive testing of the voltage states of sections of microchips. Continued success of the Laboratory`s High School Summer Research Program. The program, which started in 1989, has brought several dozen young people into intimate contact with modern science and technology. The volume concludes with a Laser Facility Report and the National Laser Users` Facility News.

  12. Field fracturing multi-sites project. Annual report, August 1, 1995--July 31, 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-12-31

    The objective of the Field Fracturing Multi-Sites Project (M-Site) is to conduct experiments to definitively determine hydraulic fracture dimensions using remote well and treatment well diagnostic techniques. In addition, experiments are to be conducted to provide data that will resolve significant unknowns with regard to hydraulic fracture modeling, fracture fluid rheology and fracture treatment design. These experiments will be supported by a well-characterized subsurface environment, as well as surface facilities and equipment conducive to acquiring high-quality data. The primary Project goal is to develop a fully characterized, tight reservoir-typical, field-scale hydraulic fracturing test site to diagnose, characterize, and test hydraulic fracturing technology and performance. It is anticipated that the research work being conducted by the multi-disciplinary team of GRI and DOE contractors will lead to the development of a commercial fracture mapping tool/service.

  13. Ethanol production for automotive fuel usage. Final technical report, July 1979-August 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stenzel, R.A.; Yu, J.; Lindemuth, T.E.; Soo-Hoo, R.; May, S.C.; Yim, Y.J.; Houle, E.H.

    1980-08-01

    Production of ethanol from potatoes, sugar beets, and wheat using geothermal resources in the Raft River area of Idaho was evaluated. The south-central region of Idaho produces approximately 18 million bushels of wheat, 1.3 million tons of sugar beets, and 27 million cwt potatoes annually. A 20-million-gallon-per-year ethanol facility has been selected as the largest scale plant that can be supported with the current agricultural resources. The conceptual plant was designed to operate on each of these three feedstocks for a portion of the year, but could operate year-round on any of them. The processing facility uses conventional alcohol technology and uses geothermal energy for all process heating. There are three feedstock preparation sections, although the liquefaction and saccharification steps for potatoes and wheat involve common equipment. The fermentation, distillation, and by-product handling sections are common to all three feedstocks. Maximum geothermal fluid requirements are approximately 6000 gpm. It is anticipated that this flow will be supplied by nine production wells located on private and BLM lands in the Raft River KGRA. The geothermal fluid will be flashed from 280/sup 0/F in three stages to supply process steam at 250/sup 0/F, 225/sup 0/F, and 205/sup 0/F for various process needs. Steam condensate plus liquid remaining after the third flash will be returned to receiving strata through six injection wells.

  14. Description of Posner Schlossman Syndrome Patients in Bandung, Indonesia during the Period of August 2009 to July 2011

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kavitha Arunasalam

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available genetic, often misdiagnosed, and rare disease characterized by recurrent unilateral episodes of markedly elevated intraocular pressure which occurs simultaneously with mild inflammation of the uvea. The underlying cause of this disease is still unknown. This syndrome usually affects those who are 20 to 50 years old. The aim of this study was to perform a descriptive study on subjects diagnosed with PSS at the National Eye Centre Cicendo Eye Hospital Bandung Indonesia. Methods: The method used was a descriptive study carried out on subjects diagnosed with PSS at the National Eye Centre Cicendo Eye Hospital Bandung, Indonesia during the period of August 2009 to July 2011. Results: Of 31 patients, 19 (61.3% female patients participated in the study, 12 (38.7% aged 31–40 years, 9 (29.0% had recurrences. All (100% complained of blurred vision, 24 (77.4% with accompanying vision of rainbow halo surrounding light in, and 22 (71% had headache. A total of 27 (87.1% patients suffered from the disease unilaterally. After treatment, 17 (54.8% patients’ visual acuity improved and 20 (64.4% patients’ intraocular pressure (IOP were in normal range. Conclusions: PSS mostly affects females. The most prevalent age range is 31–40 years. Most are affected unilaterally. All of them present with the symptom of blurred vision. Visual acuity and IOP are in normal limit after treatment.

  15. NASA SIMPL and AVIRIS-NG Coordinated Campaign in Support of ICESat-2; July-August, 2015, Thule, Greenland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunt, K. M.; Neumann, T.; Harding, D. J.; Green, R. O.; Markus, T.

    2015-12-01

    Ice, Cloud, and land Elevation Satellite-2 (ICESat-2) is a NASA mission scheduled to launch in 2017 and will carry the Advanced Topographic Laser Altimeter System (ATLAS), which is a photon-counting laser altimeter and represents a new approach to space-borne determination of surface elevation. In support of ICESat-2, NASA has deployed a series of airborne campaigns required for pre-launch satellite algorithm development. The Slope Imaging Multi-polarization Photon-Counting Lidar (SIMPL) and Airborne Visible-Infrared Imaging Spectrometer - Next Generation (AVIRIS-NG) were deployed to Thule, Greenland (July-August, 2015) with 2 science goals: 1) to assess how the lidar surface return, for both sea ice and the ice sheet, is effected in melting conditions; and 2) to investigate how variations in snow grain size effect the lidar surface return over the ice sheet. Each instrument was flown on a separate King Air B-200 in a coordinated airborne mission. This presentation will provide an overview for the campaign and the resultant data products.

  16. Loglines. July - August 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-01

    Coast Guard, and their support ranges from socks and underwear to body armor and combats helmets. The supply chain also provides ecclesiastical items...improve support for Soldiers in Afghanistan. The new pattern, called the MultiCam, was selected by the Army based on various tests and studies that

  17. Loglines. July - August 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-01

    nuggets, Italian sausage subs, beef enchiladas, chicken wings, pepperoni and cheese stromboli, hamburgers and hotdogs. The UGR-A short-order is a...even in the m ost rem ote loc ations. Oftentim es this is don e in co ordinat ion wit h host-na tion go vernme nt aut horities and U .S. emb

  18. LLE Review Quarterly Report (July-September 1984). Volume 20

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iwan, L. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States)

    1984-09-01

    This volume of the LLE Review contains articles on the activities in the GDL and OMEGA laser facilities, some design changes to be implemented on the OMEGA laser, techniques for estimating UV target-irradiation uniformity, progress in fabricating polymer-shell targets, refined estimates of thermal electron transport in IR-irradiated targets, a program to develop a surgical instrument to excise arterial blockages with a laser, a new damage criterion for optical coatings, and NI-UF activities for July-September 1984.

  19. Multi-Model Projection of July-August Climate Extreme Changes over China under CO2 Doubling. Part II: Temperature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Hongmei; FENG Lei; ZHOU Tianjun

    2011-01-01

    This is the second part of the authors' analysis on the output of 24 coupled climate models from the Twentieth-Century Climate in Coupled Models (20C3M) experiment and 1% per year CO2 increase experiment (to doubling) (lpctto2x) of phase 3 of the Coupled Model Inter-comparison Project (CMIP3). The study focuses on the potential changes of July-August temperature extremes over China. The pattern correlation coefficients of the simulated temperature with the observations are 0.6-0.9, which are higher than the results for precipitation. However, most models have cold bias compared to observation, with a larger cold bias over western China (>5℃) than over eastern China (<2℃). The multi-model ensemble (MME)exhibits a significant increase of temperature under the lpctto2x scenario. The amplitude of the MME warming shows a northwest-southeast decreasing gradient. The warming spread among the models (~1℃-2℃) is less than MME warming (~2℃-4℃), indicating a relativelyrobust temperature change under CO2doubling. Further analysis of Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory coupled climate model version 2.1(GFDL-CM2.1) simulations suggests that the warming pattern may be related to heat transport by summer monsoons. The contrast of cloud effects also has contributions. The different vertical structures of warming over northwestern China and southeastern China may be attributed to the different natures of vertical circulations. The deep, moist convection over southeastern China is an effective mechanism for "transporting"the warming upward, leading to more upper-level warming. In northwestern China, the warming is more surface-orientated, possibly due to the shallow, dry convection.

  20. Multi-model projection of July-August climate extreme changes over China under CO2 doubling. Part I: Precipitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hongmei; Feng, Lei; Zhou, Tianjun

    2011-03-01

    Potential changes in precipitation extremes in July-August over China in response to CO2 doubling are analyzed based on the output of 24 coupled climate models from the Twentieth-Century Climate in Coupled Models (20C3M) experiment and the 1% per year CO2 increase experiment (to doubling) (1pctto2x) of phase 3 of the Coupled Model Inter-comparison Project (CMIP3). Evaluation of the models' performance in simulating the mean state shows that the majority of models fairly reproduce the broad spatial pattern of observed precipitation. However, all the models underestimate extreme precipitation by ˜50%. The spread among the models over the Tibetan Plateau is ˜2-3 times larger than that over the other areas. Models with higher resolution generally perform better than those with lower resolutions in terms of spatial pattern and precipitation amount. Under the 1pctto2x scenario, the ratio between the absolute value of MME extreme precipitation change and model spread is larger than that of total precipitation, indicating a relatively robust change of extremes. The change of extreme precipitation is more homogeneous than the total precipitation. Analysis on the output of Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory coupled climate model version 2.1 (GFDL-CM2.1) indicates that the spatially consistent increase of surface temperature and water vapor content contribute to the large increase of extreme precipitation over contiguous China, which follows the Clausius-Clapeyron relationship. Whereas, the meridionally tri-polar pattern of mean precipitation change over eastern China is dominated by the change of water vapor convergence, which is determined by the response of monsoon circulation to global warming.

  1. Organizational Support for the 3rd Summer Institute on Complex Plasmas, July 30 – August 8, 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez, Jose L. [Seton Hall University

    2012-07-01

    This grant provided partial funds for American graduate students to attend the 3rd Graduate Summer Institute on Complex Plasmas, which was held from July 30 to August 8, 2012 at Seton Hall University in South Orange, New Jersey. The Graduate Summer Institute is a topical series of instructional workshops held bi-annually on the emerging field of complex plasmas that is jointly organized through a collaboration between American and German-European Union plasmas researchers. This specialized program brings together many of the world's leading researchers in the specialized area of complex plasmas, who freely provide instructional lectures and tutorials on the most recent research and discoveries done in this branch of plasma science. The partial funds provided by this grant helped support the travel and accommodation expenses of the participating American students and tutorial instructors. Partial funds further supported the travel and accommodation of three renown American plasma researchers that provided educational tutorials to the thirty-eight participating students from the United States, Europe, and Asia. The organized program afforded a unique opportunity for the participating American graduate students to learn about and engage more deeply in an area of plasma science that is not studied in any of the graduate educational curriculums provided by universities in the United States of America. The educational experience offered by this program provided the necessary knowledge needed by future American plasma researchers to keep the national plasma research effort on the cutting-edge and keep the national plasma community as a global leader.

  2. Atmospheric benzene observations from oil and gas production in the Denver-Julesburg Basin in July and August 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halliday, Hannah S.; Thompson, Anne M.; Wisthaler, Armin; Blake, Donald R.; Hornbrook, Rebecca S.; Mikoviny, Tomas; Müller, Markus; Eichler, Philipp; Apel, Eric C.; Hills, Alan J.

    2016-09-01

    High time resolution measurements of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were collected using a proton-transfer-reaction quadrupole mass spectrometry (PTR-QMS) instrument at the Platteville Atmospheric Observatory (PAO) in Colorado to investigate how oil and natural gas (O&NG) development impacts air quality within the Wattenburg Gas Field (WGF) in the Denver-Julesburg Basin. The measurements were carried out in July and August 2014 as part of NASA's "Deriving Information on Surface Conditions from Column and Vertically Resolved Observations Relevant to Air Quality" (DISCOVER-AQ) field campaign. The PTR-QMS data were supported by pressurized whole air canister samples and airborne vertical and horizontal surveys of VOCs. Unexpectedly high benzene mixing ratios were observed at PAO at ground level (mean benzene = 0.53 ppbv, maximum benzene = 29.3 ppbv), primarily at night (mean nighttime benzene = 0.73 ppbv). These high benzene levels were associated with southwesterly winds. The airborne measurements indicate that benzene originated from within the WGF, and typical source signatures detected in the canister samples implicate emissions from O&NG activities rather than urban vehicular emissions as primary benzene source. This conclusion is backed by a regional toluene-to-benzene ratio analysis which associated southerly flow with vehicular emissions from the Denver area. Weak benzene-to-CO correlations confirmed that traffic emissions were not responsible for the observed high benzene levels. Previous measurements at the Boulder Atmospheric Observatory (BAO) and our data obtained at PAO allow us to locate the source of benzene enhancements between the two atmospheric observatories. Fugitive emissions of benzene from O&NG operations in the Platteville area are discussed as the most likely causes of enhanced benzene levels at PAO.

  3. Chemical Technology Division progress report, July 1, 1991--December 31, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Genung, R.K.; Hightower, J.R.; Bell, J.T.

    1993-05-01

    This progress report reviews the mission of the Chemical Technology Division (Chem Tech) and presents a summary of organizational structure, programmatic sponsors, and funding levels for the period July 1, 1991, through December 31, 1992. The report also summarizes the missions and activities of organizations within Chem Tech for the reporting period. Specific projects performed within Chem Tech`s energy research programs, waste and environmental programs, and radiochemical processing programs are highlighted. Special programmatic activities conducted by the division are identified and described. Other information regarding publications, patents, awards, and conferences organized by Chem Tech staff is also included.

  4. Energy and technology review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1984-03-01

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory publishes the Energy and Technology Review Monthly. This periodical reviews progress mode is selected programs at the laboratory. This issue includes articles on in-situ coal gasification, on chromosomal aberrations in human sperm, on high speed cell sorting and on supercomputers.

  5. Six Cases of Paratyphoid Fever Due to Salmonella Paratyphi A in Travelers Returning from Myanmar Between July 2014 and August 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katanami, Yuichi; Kutsuna, Satoshi; Morita, Masatomo; Izumiya, Hidemasa; Ohnishi, Makoto; Yamamoto, Kei; Takeshita, Nozomi; Hayakawa, Kayoko; Kanagawa, Shuzo; Kato, Yasuyuki; Ohmagari, Norio

    2016-09-07

    We report six cases of Salmonella enterica serotype Paratyphi A infections in travelers returning from Myanmar. In 2015, 31 cases of paratyphoid fever were reported in Japan, and 54.8% of those traveled to Myanmar. Among them, six patients presented to our hospital. They had traveled to Myanmar from July 2014 to August 2015 for business purposes. All six isolates were phage type 1, and they were resistant to nalidixic acid. © The American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.

  6. Technology reviews: Glazing systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schuman, J.; Rubinstein, F.; Papamichael, K.; Beltran, L.; Lee, E.S.; Selkowitz, S.

    1992-09-01

    We present a representative review of existing, emerging, and future technology options in each of five hardware and systems areas in envelope and lighting technologies: lighting systems, glazing systems, shading systems, daylighting optical systems, and dynamic curtain wall systems. The term technology is used here to describe any design choice for energy efficiency, ranging from individual components to more complex systems to general design strategies. The purpose of this task is to characterize the state of the art in envelope and lighting technologies in order to identify those with promise for advanced integrated systems, with an emphasis on California commercial buildings. For each technology category, the following activities have been attempted to the extent possible: Identify key performance characteristics and criteria for each technology; determine the performance range of available technologies; identify the most promising technologies and promising trends in technology advances; examine market forces and market trends; and develop a continuously growing in-house database to be used throughout the project. A variety of information sources have been used in these technology characterizations, including miscellaneous periodicals, manufacturer catalogs and cut sheets, other research documents, and data from previous computer simulations. We include these different sources in order to best show the type and variety of data available, however publication here does not imply our guarantee of these data. Within each category, several broad classes are identified, and within each class we examine the generic individual technologies that fag into that class.

  7. Technology reviews: Shading systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schuman, J.; Rubinstein, F.; Papamichael, K.; Beltran, L.; Lee, E.S.; Selkowitz, S.

    1992-09-01

    We present a representative review of existing, emerging, and future technology options in each of five hardware and systems areas in envelope and lighting technologies: lighting systems, glazing systems, shading systems, daylighting optical systems, and dynamic curtain wall systems. The term technology is used here to describe any design choice for energy efficiency, ranging from individual components to more complex systems to general design strategies. The purpose of this task is to characterize the state of the art in envelope and lighting technologies in order to identify those with promise for advanced integrated systems, with an emphasis on California commercial buildings. For each technology category, the following activities have been attempted to the extent possible: Identify key performance characteristics and criteria for each technology. Determine the performance range of available technologies. Identify the most promising technologies and promising trends in technology advances. Examine market forces and market trends. Develop a continuously growing in-house database to be used throughout the project. A variety of information sources have been used in these technology characterizations, including miscellaneous periodicals, manufacturer catalogs and cut sheets, other research documents, and data from previous computer simulations. We include these different sources in order to best show the type and variety of data available, however publication here does not imply our guarantee of these data. Within each category, several broad classes are identified, and within each class we examine the generic individual technologies that fall into that class.

  8. Summary of PERF air program review - August 22-23, 2007, Annapolis, Maryland.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veil, J. A.; Schmalzer, D. K.; Leath, P. P.

    2007-10-24

    For many years, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has supported and sponsored various types of environmental research related to the oil and gas industry through its Office of Fossil Energy and its National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). In November 2005, Argonne National Laboratory (Argonne) organized and coordinated a review of DOE's water research program in conjunction with the fall 2005 meeting of the Petroleum Environmental Research Forum (PERF). PERF is a nonprofit organization created in 1986 to provide a stimulus and forum for collecting, exchanging, and analyzing research information related to the development of technology for the petroleum industry and also to provide a mechanism for establishing joint research projects in that field. Additional information on PERF can be accessed at http://www.perf.org. The water program review was so successful that both DOE and PERF agreed that a second program review would be useful -- this time on air research and issues. Argonne coordinated the air program review, which was held in Annapolis, Maryland, on August 22 and 23, 2007. This report summarizes the presentations and related discussions that were part of the air program review. The full agenda for the program review is included as Appendix A.

  9. Quality of groundwater and surface water, Wood River Valley, south-central Idaho, July and August 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, Candice B.; Bartolino, James R.

    2013-01-01

    Residents and resource managers of the Wood River Valley of south-central Idaho are concerned about the effects that population growth might have on the quality of groundwater and surface water. As part of a multi-phase assessment of the groundwater resources in the study area, the U.S. Geological Survey evaluated the quality of water at 45 groundwater and 5 surface-water sites throughout the Wood River Valley during July and August 2012. Water samples were analyzed for field parameters (temperature, pH, specific conductance, dissolved oxygen, and alkalinity), major ions, boron, iron, manganese, nutrients, and Escherichia coli (E.coli) and total coliform bacteria. This study was conducted to determine baseline water quality throughout the Wood River Valley, with special emphasis on nutrient concentrations. Water quality in most samples collected did not exceed U.S. Environmental Protection Agency standards for drinking water. E. coli bacteria, used as indicators of water quality, were detected in all five surface-water samples and in two groundwater samples collected. Some analytes have aesthetic-based recommended drinking water standards; one groundwater sample exceeded recommended iron concentrations. Nitrate plus nitrite concentrations varied, but tended to be higher near population centers and in agricultural areas than in tributaries and less populated areas. These higher nitrate plus nitrite concentrations were not correlated with boron concentrations or the presence of bacteria, common indicators of sources of nutrients to water. None of the samples collected exceeded drinking-water standards for nitrate or nitrite. The concentration of total dissolved solids varied considerably in the waters sampled; however a calcium-magnesium-bicarbonate water type was dominant (43 out of 50 samples) in both the groundwater and surface water. Three constituents that may be influenced by anthropogenic activity (chloride, boron, and nitrate plus nitrite) deviate from this

  10. LLE review: Quarterly report, July--September 1995. Volume 64

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Craxton, R.S. [ed.

    1995-09-01

    This volume of the LLE Review, covering the period July--September 1995, includes a description of the first target experiments performed on the upgraded OMEGA laser system. These experiments, carried out to active and test several diagnostics systems, have demonstrated successful functioning of the overall experimental system and have produced high neutron yields and high core temperatures. Other articles in this volume describe the diagnosis of core conditions using krypton line spectroscopy, a mix model for LILAC that can be applied to study the deceleration instability at the pusher-core interface, a simulated-annealing algorithm for improved phase-plate design, a simple method for characterizing the thickness and uniformity of transparent laser-fusion targets, and femtosecond pump-probe experiments on semiconducting YBCO.

  11. Puna Geothermal Research Facility technology transfer program. Final report, August 23, 1985--August 23, 1989

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, P.

    1989-12-31

    The funds were used in a series of small grants to entrepreneurs demonstrating the direct use of geothermal heat supplied by Hawaii`s HGP-A well; this effort was known as the Community Geothermal Technology Program. Summaries are presented of the nine completed projects: fruit dehydration, greenhouse bottom heating, lumber kiln, glass making, cloth dyeing, aquaculture (incomplete), nursery growing media pasteurization, bronze casting, and electrodeposition from geothermal brine.

  12. Smart structures for application in ceramic barrier filter technology. Final report, August 1991--August 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weinstein, S.J.; Lippert, T.E

    1994-12-01

    High temperature optical fiber sensors were developed to measure the in-service stressing that occurs in ceramic barrier filter systems. The optical fiber sensors were based on improvements to the sensor design developed under the DOE/METC Smart Structures for Fossil Energy Applications contract no. DE-AC21-89MC25159. In-house application testing of these sensors on both candle and cross-flow filters were performed in the Westinghouse Science and Technology Center High-Temperature, High-Pressure Filter Test Facility and the results analyzed. This report summarizes the sensor developments, methods to apply the sensors to the filters for in-situ testing, and the test results from the four in-house tests that were performed.

  13. U.S. Department of Energy electric and hybrid vehicle Site Operator Program at Platte River Power Authority. Final report, July 3, 1991--August 31, 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emmert, R.A.

    1996-12-31

    The Platte River Power Authority (Platte River) is a political subdivision of the state of Colorado, owned by the four municipalities of Fort Collins, Loveland, Longmont and Estes Park, Colorado. Platte River is a non-profit, publicly owned, joint-action agency formed to construct, operate and maintain generating plants, transmission systems and related facilities for the purpose of delivering to the four municipalities electric energy for distribution and resale. Platte River, as a participant in the US Department of Energy (DOE) Site Operator Program, worked to accomplish the Site Operator Program goals and objectives to field test and evaluate electric and electric-hybrid vehicles and electric vehicle systems in a real world application/environment. This report presents results of Platte River`s program (Program) during the five-years Platte River participated in the DOE Site Operator Program. Platte River participated in DOE Site Operator Program from July 3, 1991 through August 31, 1996. During its Program, Platte River conducted vehicle tests and evaluations, and electric vehicle demonstrations in the Front Range region of Northern Colorado. Platte River also investigated electric vehicle infrastructure issues and tested infrastructure components. Platte River`s Program objectives were as follows: evaluate the year round performance, operational costs, reliability, and life cycle costs of electric vehicles in the Front Range region of Northern Colorado; evaluate an electric vehicle`s usability and acceptability as a pool vehicle; test any design improvements or technological improvements on a component level that may be made available to PRPA and which can be retrofit into vehicles; and develop, test and evaluate, and demonstrate components to be used in charging electric vehicles.

  14. Nutrients profile data from various projects collected by the R/V ALPHA HELIX, THOMAS WASHINGTON and THOMAS G. THOMPSON in the Northeast Pacific and Bering Sea from 12 August 1980 to 17 July 1987 (NODC Accession 0000269)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Nutrients profile data were collected from the R/V ALPHA HELIX, THOMAS WASHINGTON, and THOMAS G. THOMPSON from August 12, 1980 to July 17, 1987. Data were submitted...

  15. Profile nutrients data from bottle casts from the R/V Alpha Helix in the Bering Sea, Gulf of Alaska and Northeast Pacific from 16 August 1983 to 30 July 1989 (NODC Accession 0000252)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Profile nutrients and other data were collected from the R/V ALPHA HELIX from August 16, 1983 to July 30, 1989. Data were submitted by University of Alaska -...

  16. Water physics and chemistry data from moored current meter and bottle casts in the Northwest Atlantic Ocean as part of the North East Monitoring Program (NEMP) project, 27 July 1982 - 02 August 1982 (NODC Accession 8400002)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Water physics and chemistry data were collected using moored current meter and bottle casts in the Northwest Atlantic Ocean from July 27, 1982 to August 2, 1982....

  17. Marine bird sighting and other data from the Beaufort Sea as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 27 July 1980 to 26 August 1980 (NODC Accession 8100692)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Marine bird sighting and other data were collected in the Beaufort Sea from 27 July 1980 to 26 August 1980. Data were collected by the University of California (UC)...

  18. Marine bird sighting and other data from the BURTON ISLAND and other platforms as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 30 July 1975 to 12 August 1978 (NODC Accession 7800157)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Marine bird sighting and other data were collected from the BURTON ISLAND and other platforms from 30 July 1975 to 12 August 1978. Data were collected by the Point...

  19. Marine toxic substance and other data from grab casts from the ACONA and other platforms as part of Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 01 July 1974 to 31 August 1978 (NODC Accession 8100533)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Marine toxic substance and other data were collected from grab casts from the ACONA and other platforms from 01 July 1974 to 31 August 1978. Data were collected by...

  20. Temperature, current meter, and other data from moored buoy from the HUMBOLDT as part of the GARP (Global Atmospheric Research Program) Atlantic Tropical Experiment (GATE) project, 28 July 1974 - 18 August 1974 (NODC Accession 7601676)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature, current meter, and other data were collected using moored buoy from the HUMBOLDT from July 28, 1974 to August 18, 1974. Data were submitted by US Coast...

  1. Marine animal sighting and census data from various small vessels as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 26 July 1982 to 24 August 1982 (NODC Accession 8300139)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Marine animal sighting and census data were collected from various small vessels from 26 July 1982 to 24 August 1982. Data were collected by the University of Alaska...

  2. Current meter data from moored current meter casts in the Coastal Waters of S. Alaska as part of the Fisheries-Oceanography Cooperative Investigations (FOCI) project from 21 August 1984 - 01 July 1985 (NCEI Accession 8700053)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current meter data were collected using moored current meter casts in the Coastal Waters of S. Alaska from August 21, 1984 to July 1, 1985. Data were submitted by...

  3. Wind direction and other data from the Utukok River and other locations from fixed platforms as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 27 July 1982 to 30 August 1982 (NODC Accession 8300064)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Wind direction and other data were collected from the Utukok River and other locations from fixed platforms from 27 July 1982 to 30 August 1982. Data were collected...

  4. Wind direction and other data from fixed platforms from the Beaufort Sea as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 15 July 1979 to 31 August 1979 (NODC Accession 8000332)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Wind direction and other data were collected from fixed platforms in the Beaufort Sea from 15 July 1979 to 31 August 1979. Data were collected by the University of...

  5. Temperature, salinity, and nutrients data from bottle, CTD, and XBT casts from the JOHN P. TULLY and other vessels in the North Atlantic and North Pacific Oceans from 03 August 1959 to 01 July 2001 (NODC Accession 0000664)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Bottle, CTD, and XBT data were collected in the North Atlantic and North Pacific Oceans from the John P. Tully and other vessels from 03 August 1959 to 01 July 2001....

  6. Current meter and other data from fixed platforms as part of the International Decade of Ocean Exploration / Coastal Upwelling Ecosystems Analysis (IDOE/CUEA) from 01 July 1972 to 01 August 1972 (NODC Accession 7500614)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current meter and other data were collected from fixed platforms from 01 July 1972 to 01 August 1972. Data were collected by the Pacific Marine Environmental...

  7. Current direction, temperature, depth, and salinity data from moored current meter casts in the Gulf of Mexico during the Brine Disposal project, 01 July 1980 - 01 August 1980 (NODC Accession 8000498)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current direction, temperature, depth, and salinity data were collected using moored current meter casts in the Gulf of Mexico from July 1, 1980 to August 1, 1980....

  8. Wind wave spectra data from moored current meter and bottle casts in the Gulf of Mexico as part of the Brine Disposal project, 01 July 1980 - 01 August 1980 (NODC Accession 8000496)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Wind wave spectra data were collected using moored current meter and moored buoy casts in the Gulf of Mexico from July 1, 1980 to August 1, 1980. Data were submitted...

  9. Temperature, current meter, and other data from moored buoy as part of the GARP (Global Atmospheric Research Program) Atlantic Tropical Experiment (GATE) project, 30 July 1974 - 14 August 1974 (NODC Accession 7601675)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature, current meter, and other data were collected using moored buoy from the CAPRICORNE from July 30, 1974 to August 14, 1974. Data were collected as part of...

  10. Marine mammal specimen and other data from the NOAA Ship SURVEYOR as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 22 July 1975 to 28 August 1979 (NODC Accession 8100349)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Marine mammal specimen and other data were collected from the NOAA Ship SURVEYOR from 22 July 1975 to 28 August 1979. Data were collected by the University of...

  11. Marine bird sighting and other data from aircraft in the Eastern Chukchi Sea as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 25 July 1978 to 20 August 1978 (NODC Accession 8200032)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Marine bird sighting and other data were collected from aircraft in the Eastern Chukchi Sea from 25 July 1978 to 20 August 1978. Data were collected by the...

  12. Refuge narrative report for May, June, July & August, 1949. Lostwood National Wildlife Refuge and Zahl, Clearlake, & Shell Lake Easements.

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Lostwood National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1949. The report begins by summarizing the...

  13. Refuge narrative report: May, June, July, August, 1944 for Lostwood National Wildlife Refuge & Lake Zahl, Clearwater, Shell Lake Easement Refuges

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Lostwood National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1944. The report begins by summarizing the...

  14. [Narrative report, Crescent Lake National Wildlife Refuge and North Platte National Wildlife Refuge : May, June, July & August, 1946

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Crescent Lake National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1946. The report begins by summarizing...

  15. Narrative report Fish Springs National Wildlife Refuge Dugway, UT for the period May - June - July - August, 1960

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Fish Springs National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1960. The report begins by summarizing the...

  16. Crescent Lake National Wildlife Refuge and North Platte National Wildlife Refuge Refuge narrative report : May, June, July, August, 1954

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Crescent Lake National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1954. The report begins by summarizing...

  17. Narrative report Fish Springs National Wildlife Refuge Dugway, UT for the period May - June - July - August, 1963

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Fish Springs National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1963. The report begins by summarizing the...

  18. [Narrative report, Crescent Lake National Wildlife Refuge and North Platte National Wildlife Refuge : May, June, July & August 1948

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Crescent Lake National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1948. The report begins by summarizing...

  19. Narrative report for May, June, July, August, 1945 Des Lacs National Wildlife Refuge & Easement Refuge in District IV

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Des Lacs National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1945. The report begins by summarizing the...

  20. Crescent Lake National Wildlife Refuge and North Platte National Wildlife Refuge Refuge narrative report : May, June, July, August, 1951

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Crescent Lake National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1951. The report begins by summarizing...

  1. [Narrative report, Crescent Lake National Wildlife Refuge and North Platte National Wildlife Refuge : May, June, July & August, 1949

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Crescent Lake National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1949. The report begins by summarizing...

  2. Crescent Lake National Wildlife Refuge and North Platte National Wildlife Refuge Refuge narrative report : May, June, July, August, 1956

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Crescent Lake National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1956. The report begins by summarizing...

  3. Refuge narrative report: May, June, July, August, 1946 for Lostwood National Wildlife Refuge & Lake Zahl, Clearwater, Shell Lake Easement Refuges

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Lostwood National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1946. The report begins by summarizing the...

  4. Lostwood National Wildlife Refuge Refuge narrative report: May, June, July, August, 1948 & Lake Zahl, Clearlake, & Shell Lake Easement Refuges

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Lostwood National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1948. The report begins by summarizing the...

  5. Crescent Lake National Wildlife Refuge and North Platte National Wildlife Refuge Refuge narrative report : May, June, July, August, 1953

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Crescent Lake National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1953. The report begins by summarizing...

  6. Narrative report for May, June, July and August 1944 Des Lacs National Wildlife Refuge & Easement Refuges in District IV

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Des Lacs National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1944. The report begins by summarizing the...

  7. Narrative report May, June, July and August, 1962 Lostwood National Wildlife Refuge & Waterfowl production areas - District IVA

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Lostwood National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1962. The report begins by summarizing the...

  8. LLE Review Quarterly Report (July - September 2004). Volume 100

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmid, Ansgar W. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics

    2004-09-01

    The key article in this volume of the LLE Review, covering July-September 2004, addresses "Shock Propagation in Deuterium-Tritium-Saturated Foam" by T. J. B. Collins (LLE) and A. Poludnenko, A. Cunningham, and A. Frank (UR, Department of Physics and Astronomy) (p. 227). Testing the assumption of homogeneous mixing in fibrous foams saturated with cryogenic deuterium and tritium, shock passage in wetted-foam mixtures was simulated by the adaptive-mesh, two-dimensional hydrodynamic code AstroBEAR. For foam fibers of diameter ~1/10 µm and relevant foam densities, the mixing length behind the shock is found to be of the order of microns. Transverse motion dampens out sufficiently that, at the mixing region's edge farthest from the shock, Rankine-Hugoniot jump conditions are obeyed to within a few percent and shock speeds are also within a few percent of their homogeneous values. In addition, questions of feedthrough and feedout are addressed, showing that the stability of the shock front, once it leaves the wetted-foam layer, minimizes the effect of feedthrough. As a result, simulations of whole-foam-pellet implosions may model the wetted foam as a homogeneous mixture.

  9. LLE Review Quarterly Report (July-September 2001). Volume 88

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hinterman, Thomas H. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics

    2001-09-01

    This volume of the LLE Review, covering July-September 2001, features an article by C. Stoeckl, V. Yu. Glebov, J. D. Zuegel, and D. D. Meyerhofer (p. 171) that describes a simple, low-cost, wide dynamic-range, neutron bang time (NBT) detector. This instrument complements the capabilities of the streak camera-based neutron temporal diagnostic (NTD), which is also installed on the OMEGA laser. The new NBT measures the neutron bang time of D2- and DT-filled inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosion capsules at neutron yields between 107 and 1011 with an absolute timing accuracy of better than100 ps. This level of accuracy allows the modeling of the implosions to be effectively guided using hydrocode calculations. Other articles in this volume include: Functional Damage Thresholds of Hafnia/Silica Coating Designs for the NIF Laser; High-Gain Direct-Drive Target Designs for the national Ignition Facility; Ultrafast Optoelectronic Interface for Digital Superconducting Electronics; Optimizing the Fabrication of Polyimide Shells; LLE's Summer High School Research Program; FY01 Laser Facility Report; and, National Laser Users' Facility News.

  10. SAVANNAH RIVER TECHNOLOGY CENTER MONTHLY REPORT AUGUST 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferrell, J.M.

    1999-06-21

    'This monthly report summarizes Programs and Accomplishments of the Savannah River Technology Center in support of activities at the Savannah River Site. The following categories are addressed: Reactor, Tritium, Separations, Environmental, Waste Management, General, and Items of Interest.'

  11. St. Vincent National Wildlife Refuge : Public Use Review/Plan : Update August, 1988

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Public Use Review/Plan for St. Vincent National Wildlife Refuge was updated August 19th, 1988. It outlines goals for interpretation, outdoor classrooms,...

  12. St. Vincent National Wildlife Refuge : Public Use Review/Plan : Update August, 1987

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Public Use Review/Plan for St. Vincent National Wildlife Refuge was updated August 19th, 1987. It outlines goals for interpretation, outdoor classrooms,...

  13. Energy and technology review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, P.S. (ed.)

    1983-06-01

    Research activities at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory are described in the Energy and Technology Review. This issue includes articles on measuring chromosome changes in people exposed to cigarette smoke, sloshing-ion experiments in the tandem mirror experiment, aluminum-air battery development, and a speech by Edward Teller on national defense. Abstracts of the first three have been prepared separately for the data base. (GHT)

  14. LLE Review Quarterly Report (July-September 1998). Volume 76

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Epstein, Reuben [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics

    1998-09-01

    This volume of the LLE Review, covering the period July-September 1998, includes reports on two of the newest subsystems in the OMEGA laser facility. A. V. Okishev, M. D. Skeldon, and W. Seka have developed a highly stable, diode-pumped Nd:YLF master oscillator for the OMEGA laser system. This new master oscillator produces either single-frequency Q-switched pulses or cw radiation for the OMEGA pulse-shaping system. The switch-over between these two regimes requires no laser realignment. The new master oscillator is completely computer controlled and has been operating continuously in OMEGA for six months without operator intervention. A. Babushkin, W. Bittle, S. A. Letzring, M. D. Skeldon, and W. Seka have designed a negative-feedback–controlled regenerative amplifier that has been part of the OMEGA laser system for the past two years. The negative feedback makes the energy output of the regenerative amplifier stable and insensitive to the variations in pulse energy. This amplifier’s long-term output energy stability is the highest ever demonstrated for a millijoule-level laser system, either flashlamp pumped or diode pumped. Other articles in this volume are titled: Transcient Bandwidth Analysis of Photoconductive Microwave Switches Implemented in the OMEGA Pulse-Shaping System; Simulations of Near-Field Intensity Modulations in High-Intensity Laser Beams due to Self- and Cross-Phase Modulation Between Orthogonally Polarized Laser Beams Emerging from a Diamond-Turned KDP Wedge; X-Ray Radiographic System Used to Measure the Evolution of Broadband Imprint in Laser-Driven Planar Targets; Collisionless Damping of Localized Plasma Waves in Laser-Produces Plasmas and Application to Stimulated Raman Scattering in Filaments; LLE's Summer High School Research Program; FY98 Laser Facility Report; and, National Laser Users' Facilty News.

  15. LLE Review. Volume 68, July--September 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-07-01

    This volume of the LLE Review, covering the period of July-September 1996, includes a description of an important experiment carried out on OMEGA by researchers from LANL, LLNL, and LLE to demonstrate the feasibility of using OMEGA for indirect drive. Additional topics include tetrahedral hohlraums, the speckle properties of phase- converted laser beams, design criteria for SSD phase modulators, and the design of slab amplifiers. Highlights of the research presented in this issue are (1) Results from the proof-of-principle indirect- drive experiments in which up to 40 OMEGA beams were used to irradiate cylindrical hohlraums. Nova results were reproduced, and new capabilities not available on other lasers were demonstrated. (2) A discussion of tetrahedral hohlraums (spherical hohlraums with four laser entrance holes) as a means of achieving better capsule irradiation uniformity. Tetrahedral hohlraums also allow the use of all 60 OMEGA beams and may provide an alternate route to ignition on the NIF. (3) An analysis of the residual target irradiation nonuniformity due to the fine laser speckle remaining on the beam after being phase converted by the DPP`s. A model shows how a uniformly ablating plasma atmosphere reduces the speckle contribution to the effective time-averaged irradiation nonuniformity. (4) A discussion of the theory, design, manufacture, testing, and implementation of the microwave SSD phase modulators used on OMEGA for two-dimensional SSD. The modulators are capable of operating in the gigahertz frequency range. (5) A discussion of the design and performance of a large-aperture, high-gain Nd:glass zig-zag slab amplifier for materials testing. The design incorporates improvements from previous work in addition to improvements obtained from careful design choices guided by analytic calculations.

  16. Energy and technology review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1983-10-01

    Three review articles are presented. The first describes the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory role in the research and development of oil-shale retorting technology through its studies of the relevant chemical and physical processes, mathematical models, and new retorting concepts. Second is a discussion of investigation of properties of dense molecular fluids at high pressures and temperatures to improve understanding of high-explosive behavior, giant-planet structure, and hydrodynamic shock interactions. Third, by totally computerizing the triple-quadrupole mass spectrometer system, the laboratory has produced a general-purpose instrument of unrivaled speed, selectivity, and adaptability for the analysis and identification of trace organic constituents in complex chemical mixtures. (GHT)

  17. Sscience & technology review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-05-01

    This monthly science and technology review features a report about Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory work on an awesome, inevitable, unpredictable, and potentially dangerous natural phenomenon, lightning. This feature article tells of the development of guidance by Laboratory engineers on how to deal with the effects of lightning on Department of Energy facilities, especially those where nuclear and high explosive materials are handled and stored. Other topics are Groundwater Modeling: More Cost Effective Cleanup by Design, Dual- Band Infrared Computed Tomography: Searching for Hidden Defects, and Plating Shop Moves to Finish Off Waste.

  18. Bioenergy Technologies Office Multi-Year Program Plan: July 2014

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2014-07-09

    This is the May 2014 Update to the Bioenergy Technologies Office Multi-Year Program Plan, which sets forth the goals and structure of the Office. It identifies the research, development, demonstration, and deployment activities the Office will focus on over the next five years and outlines why these activities are important to meeting the energy and sustainability challenges facing the nation.

  19. Energy and technology review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poggio, A.J. (ed.)

    1988-10-01

    This issue of Energy and Technology Review contains: Neutron Penumbral Imaging of Laser-Fusion Targets--using our new penumbral-imaging diagnostic, we have obtained the first images that can be used to measure directly the deuterium-tritium burn region in laser-driven fusion targets; Computed Tomography for Nondestructive Evaluation--various computed tomography systems and computational techniques are used in nondestructive evaluation; Three-Dimensional Image Analysis for Studying Nuclear Chromatin Structure--we have developed an optic-electronic system for acquiring cross-sectional views of cell nuclei, and computer codes to analyze these images and reconstruct the three-dimensional structures they represent; Imaging in the Nuclear Test Program--advanced techniques produce images of unprecedented detail and resolution from Nevada Test Site data; and Computational X-Ray Holography--visible-light experiments and numerically simulated holograms test our ideas about an x-ray microscope for biological research.

  20. Application of railgun principle to high-velocity hydrogen pellet injection for magnetic fusion reactor refueling. Technical progress report, [July 16, 1990--August 16, 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, K.

    1991-08-01

    This report contains three documents describing the progress made by the University of Illinois electromagnetic railgun program sponsored by the Office of Fusion Energy of the United States Department of Energy during the period from July 16, 1990 to August 16, 1991. The first document contains a brief summary of the tasks initiated, continued, or completed, the status of major tasks, and the research effort distribution, estimated and actual, during the period. The second document contains a description of the work performed on time resolved laser interferometric density measurement of the railgun plasma-arc armature. The third document is an account of research on the spectroscopic measurement of the electron density and temperature of the railgun plasma arc.

  1. Statistics of environmental events in China during period from July to August in 2012%2012年7-8月国内环境事件

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    安莹; 李生才

    2012-01-01

    简要统计了2012年7-8月国内发生的各种环境事件155起,包括沙尘天气2起,污染事件28起,地震50起,山体滑坡和泥石流33起,旱灾3起以及其他自然灾害39起.%The present paper summarizes the major environmental events in China during the period from July to August in the year 2012. These events are classified into six categories, i.e. dust weather, pollution accidents, earthquake, landslide and debris flow, draught, as well as other disasters. Total 2, 28 , 50, 33, 3, and 39 major events are reported with their detailed statistics on the loss, places, and the nature of the events respectively. Causes are also listed which actually led to the 155 events.

  2. Statistics of environmental events in China during period from July to August in 2011%2011年7-8月国内环境事件

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    安莹; 李生才

    2011-01-01

    The present paper summarizes the major environmental events in China during the period from July to August in the year 2011. These events are classified into six categories, I. E. dust weather, pollution accidents, earthquake, landslide and debris flow, draught, as well as other disasters. Total 4, 16, 23, 22, 6, and 25 major events are reported with their detailed statistics on the loss, places, and the nature of the events respectively. Causes are also listed which actually led to the % events.%简要统计了2011年7-8月国内发生的各种环境事件96起,包括沙尘天气4起,污染事件16起,地震23起,山体滑坡和泥石流22起,旱灾6起以及其他自然灾害25起.

  3. Measurements of the summer surface heat budget of the Northeast Water Polynya. USCGC Polar Sea cruise, July 15--August 15, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minnett, P.J.

    1994-03-01

    A research cruise of the USCGC Polar Sea to the Northeast Water Polynya, off the eastern coast of Greenland (77--81{degree}N, 6--17{degree}W), was made from mid-July to mid-August of 1992 (NEWP `92) as the first field component of the multi-disciplinary study of a high-Arctic polynya funded by the NSF as part of the Arctic Systems Science program. Instruments to measure the components of the surface heat budget of the polynya were installed on a foremast at the bow of the ship. This report presents the measured variables and derived surface fluxes in graphical and tabulated form. Profiles of atmospheric temperature and humidity were taken using radiosondes, and these are also presented.

  4. LLE Review Quarterly Report July-September 2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-12-01

    This volume of the LLE Review, covering July-September 2000, begins with an article by T. R. Boehly, V. N. Goncharov, O. Gotchev, J. P. Knauer, D. D. Meyerhofer, D. Oron, S. P. Regan, Y. Srebro, W. Seka, D. Shvarts, S. Skupsky, and V.A. Smalyuk, who describe measurements of the effect of beam smoothing and pulse shape on imprinting. (Imprinting is defined as the imposition of pressure perturbations on the target by spatial variations in the laser intensity.) A principal result is the observation of reduced levels of imprint with the higher beam smoothing afforded by 1-THz smoothing by spectral dispersion (SSD). Additional highlights of research presented in this issue are: (1) P. W. McKenty, V. N. Goncharov, R. P. J. Town, S. Skupsky, R. Betti, and R. L. McCrory describe calculations of directly driven ignition capsule performance on the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The authors detail how the various contributors to implosion disruption (laser imprint, power imbalance, and target roughness) affect target performance and final gain. The conclusions are obtained by examining the simulated target evolution with the two-dimensional hydrodynamics computer code ORCHID. (2) D. D. Meyerhofer, J. A. Delettrez, R. Epstein, V. Yu. Glebov, V. N. Goncharov, R. L. Keck, R. L. McCrory, P. W. McKenty, F. J. Marshall, P. B. Radha, S. P. Regan, S. Roberts, W. Seka, S. Skupsky, V. A. Smalyuk, C. Sorce, C. Stoeckl, J. M. Soures, R. P. J. Town, B. Yaakobi, J. D. Zuegel, J. Frenje, C. K. L1,R. D. Petrasso, F. Seguin, K. Fletcher, S. Padalino, C. Freeman, N. Izumi, R. Lerche, T. W. Phillips, and T. C. Sangster describe the results of a series of direct-drive implosions of gas-fusion-fuel-filled plastic shells performed on the OMEGA laser system. The experiments include those performed with 1-THZ SSD and high-quality power balance. (3) V. Yu. Glebov, D. D. Meyerhofer, C. Stoeckl, and J. D. Zuegel describe the technique of measuring secondary neutron yield (DT neutron yield from D

  5. Tree-ring latewood width based July-August SPEI reconstruction in South China since AD 1888 and its possible connection with ENSO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yesi; Shi, Jiangfeng; Shi, Shiyuan; Yu, Jian; Lu, Huayu

    2017-04-01

    Our understanding of the long-term hydroclimate variations in South China is prohibited by the shortness of meteorological records. Paleoclimatic proxies, such as tree-rings, can be pursued to extend the meteorological records back for centuries to help us better understand hydroclimatic conditions. In this study, we reconstructed the July-August Standardized Precipitation-Evapotranspiration Index (SPEIJul-Aug) based on a newly developed 127-year adjusted latewood width chronology from Tsuga longibracteata, South China. In specific, the latewood width chronology was regressed on the earlywood width chronology using a simple linear regression, and the residuals plus a constant 1.0 were defined as the adjusted latewood width chronology. The chronology explained 40% of the actual SPEIJul-Aug variance in the period 1953-2014. The reconstructed SPEIJul-Aug can represent large-scale July-August SPEI variations over South China, including northern Guangxi, Hunan, and Guizhou provinces. From the perspective of the past 127 years, the extreme summer drought in 2013 was not unusual because more extreme drought events occurred in the first half of the 20th century. A significant 2.0-3.6-year hydroclimatic cycle existed in the reconstruction, which indicated that the SPEIJul-Aug might be driven by El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO). We further checked the time-dependency of the relationship between SPEIJul-Augand ENSO and found that it was unstable. Their relationship was weak before the 1950s, became significant from the 1950s to early 1990s, and then dropped to be weak again and even out of phase since the early 1990s, which may be attributable to the significant westward extension of the western Pacific subtropical high. This study indicates that summer hydroclimate in South China can be reconstructed based on adjusted latewood width, and will be better understood when more and longer adjusted latewood width chronologies are obtained in the near future.

  6. Tree-ring latewood width based July-August SPEI reconstruction in South China since 1888 and its possible connection with ENSO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yesi; Shi, Jiangfeng; Shi, Shiyuan; Yu, Jian; Lu, Huayu

    2017-02-01

    Our understanding of the long-term hydroclimate variations in South China is prohibited by the shortness of meteorological records. Paleoclimatic proxies, such as tree-rings, can be pursued to extend the meteorological records back for centuries to help us better understand hydroclimatic conditions. In this study, we reconstructed the July-August standardized precipitation-evapotranspiration index (SPEIJul-Aug) based on a newly developed 127-yr adjusted latewood width chronology from Tsuga longibracteata, South China. The chronology explained 40% of the actual SPEIJul-Aug variance in the period 1953-2014. The reconstructed SPEIJul-Aug can represent large-scale July-August SPEI variations over South China, including northern Guangxi, Hunan, and Guizhou provinces. From the perspective of the past 127 years, the extreme summer drought in 2013 was not unusual because more extreme drought events occurred in the first half of the 20th century. A significant 2.0-3.6-yr hydroclimatic cycle existed in the reconstruction, which indicated that the SPEIJul-Aug might be driven by El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO). We further checked the time-dependency of the relationship between SPEIJul-Aug and ENSO and found that it was unstable. Their relationship was weak before the 1950s, became significant from the 1950s to early 1990s, and then dropped to be weak again and even out of phase since the early 1990s, which may be attributable to the significant westward extension of the western Pacific subtropical high.

  7. Summer-time salinity variability in the North Atlantic subtropical gyre; comparison of freshening events observed in June 2006 and in July-August 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reverdin, G. P.; Morisset, S.; David, L.; Boutin, J.; Martin, N.; Marié, L.; Gaillard, F.; Centurioni, L. R.; Font, J.; Salvador, J.; Ward, B.; Diverrès, D.

    2012-12-01

    The largest surface salinity in the world ocean away from semi-enclosed seas is found in late summer in the North Atlantic subtropical gyre near 25-26°N 35-40°W, where it often exceeds 37.7 psu. This region is the site of the SPURS experiment. We examined all thermosalinograph data between 2002 and 2012 from two ships regularly crossing this region, the MN Colibri and MN Toucan. The data show that this region presents a minimum of spatial variability in summer, but is interspersed by occasional tongues of lower salinity, the best observed instance having happened in June 2006. In this case, we interpret the feature as advected from the north by southward currents in front of a high feature propagating to the west as Rossby waves. In the same region, recent salinity observations from instrumented drifters indicate occasional drops (by 0.3) in July and August 2012. We will discuss how advection and vertical stirring contribute to the surface salinity budget of these features. Data from the Strasse cruise surveys in August 2012 will be used to further diagnose the summer-time surface salinity budget in this region.

  8. C-Division annual review and operating plan, August 1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morse, N.R.

    1990-11-01

    The Computing and Communications Division is responsible for the Laboratory's Integrated Computing Network as well as Laboratory-wide communications. Our computing network, used by 8000 people distributed throughout the nation, constitutes one of the most powerful scientific computing facilities in the world. The purpose of this publication is to inform our clients of our strategic and operating plans. We review major accomplishments since early 1989 and describe our strategic planning goals and specific projects that will guide our operations over the next couple of years. Our mission statement, planning considerations, and management policies and practices are also included.

  9. Program Manager: Journal of the Defense Systems Management College. Volume 17, Number 4, July-August 1988

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-08-01

    Senator Phil Gramm, ranking minority member, to advise the Senate Armed Services Committee Defense Industry and , . Technology Subcommittee on "...those... Crosby cisions concerning changes and others have translated to the process. general theories into prac- tical applications that are changing the corporate

  10. Military Review: The Professional Journal of the U.S. Army, July-August 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-08-01

    Navy, Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Matthew N. Jackson ) WhILE aMERICanS aRE widely distributed across the political spec-trum and are...be effective. Leveraging USAID The Percy amendment to the Foreign assistance act, signed into law in 1973, requires that gender issues be...Monroe Access Cmd Ft Jackson IMT/AG/CH/FI TPIO-BC CALL Ft Campbell 101 AASLT Ft Lewis I Corps&SBLL Ft Carson 4 ID Schofield Brks 25 ID Ft Bragg XVIII

  11. Military Review: The Professional Journal of the U.S. Army, July-August 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-01

    also a small but significant Christian population and an isolated Palestinian community. Most of the region was urban, with rural areas on its...ing will once again fertilize the darkest embryo of the human soul, and one of history’s greatest armies will give birth to yet another Abu Ghraib or

  12. Military Review: The Professional Journal of the U. S. Army. July-August 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-01

    as a basic unit in the international system, but today’s Anti-Gaddafi rebels hoist a child with an AK-47 and flash the “V for Victory” sign, Tripoli...heightened state of urgency. The urgency led to constant demands for detailed information at the tactical level, and this contributed to friction ...correct was difficult, and a different personal dynamic could have caused friction due to organizational chart challenges. The more we define

  13. Characterization of carbonaceous aerosols during the MINOS campaign in Crete, July-August 2001: a multi-analytical approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sciare, J.; Cachier, H.; Oikonomou, K.; Ausset, P.; Sarda-Estève, R.; Mihalopoulos, N.

    2003-07-01

    these two methods for determining BC brings here new insights on the origin of carbonaceous aerosols in a complex mixture of different sources. It brings also to our attention that important deviations in BC levels are observed using three widely used EGA techniques and most probably none of the EGA tested here are well adapted to fully characterize this aerosol mixture. Spherical, smooth and silico-aluminated fly-ash observed by Analytical Scanning Electron Microscope (ASEM) confirm the influence of coal combustion on the carbonaceous aerosol load throughout the campaign. A raw calculation based on BC/nss-SO4 mass ratio suggests that biomass burning could be responsible for half of the BC concentration recorded during the MINOS campaign. From the plot of BC as a function of TC, two linear correlations were observed corresponding to 2 times series (before and after 12 August). Such good correlations suggest, from a first look, that both BC and OC have similar origin and atmospheric transport. On the other hand, the plot of BC as a function of TC obtained from the 2-step thermal method applied to DEKATI Low Pressure Cascade Impactor samples does not show a similar correlation and points out a non conservative distribution of this ratio with 2 super micron modes enriched in OC, correlated with sea salt aerosols and probably originating from gas-to-particle conversion.

  14. Characterization of carbonaceous aerosols during the MINOS campaign in Crete, July August 2001: a multi-analytical approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sciare, J.; Cachier, H.; Oikonomou, K.; Ausset, P.; Sarda-Estève, R.; Mihalopoulos, N.

    2003-10-01

    two methods for determining BC brings here new insights on the origin of carbonaceous aerosols in a complex mixture of different sources. It brings also to our attention that important deviations in BC levels are observed using three widely used EGA's techniques and most probably none of the EGA tested here are well adapted to fully characterize this aerosol mixture. Spherical, smooth and silico-aluminated fly-ash observed by an Analytical Scanning Electron Microscope (ASEM) confirm the influence of coal combustion on the carbonaceous aerosol load throughout the campaign. A rough calculation based on a BC/nss-SO4 mass ratio suggests that biomass burning could be responsible for half of the BC concentration recorded during the MINOS campaign. From the plot of BC as a function of TC, two linear correlations were observed corresponding to 2 times series (before and after 12 August). Such good correlations suggest, from a first look, that both BC and OC have similar origin and atmospheric transport. On the other hand, the plot of BC as a function of TC obtained from the 2-step thermal method applied to DEKATI Low Pressure Cascade Impactor samples does not show a similar correlation and points out a non conservative distribution of this ratio with 2 super micron modes enriched in OC, correlated with sea salt aerosols and probably originating from gas-to-particle conversion.

  15. Transforming Science and Technology: Our Future Depends on It. Volume 1 [and] Volume 2: Proceedings and Contributions to the International Gender and Science and Technology Conference (7th, Waterloo, Ontario, Canada, July 31-August 5, 1993) = Transformer les sciences et la technologie: notre avenir en depend. Volume 1 [and] Volume 2. Les soumissions a la septieme conference internationale sur l'equite des sexes en science et en technologie (du 31 juillet au 5 aout 1993).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haggerty, Sharon, Ed.; Holmes, Ann, Ed.

    This two-volume set of papers was produced for the seventh International Gender and Science and Technology (GASTA) Conference. Abstracts of all papers and other presentations have been translated and are published in both English and French. Papers are published in the language in which they were submitted (English or French). GASAT provides a…

  16. Transforming Science and Technology: Our Future Depends on It. Volume 3: Proceedings of the International Gender and Science and Technology Conference (7th, Waterloo, Ontario, Canada, July 31-August 5, 1993) = Transformer les sciences et la technologie: notre avenir en depend. Volume 3: Les Actes de la septieme conference internationale sur l'equite des sexes en sciences et en technologie (du 31 juillet au 5 aout 1993).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haggerty, Sharon, Ed.; Holmes, Ann, Ed.

    This book contains the opening address, 2 forums, 3 symposia, 10 roundtables, 6 workshops, 18 discussion summaries, 9 miscellaneous reports, overview of home groups, preparation for home group facilitator, call to action, proposal for GASA 8, and 4 appendices. GASAT (Gender and Science and Technology) provides a forum for individuals and…

  17. Systematic review automation technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Systematic reviews, a cornerstone of evidence-based medicine, are not produced quickly enough to support clinical practice. The cost of production, availability of the requisite expertise and timeliness are often quoted as major contributors for the delay. This detailed survey of the state of the art of information systems designed to support or automate individual tasks in the systematic review, and in particular systematic reviews of randomized controlled clinical trials, reveals trends that see the convergence of several parallel research projects. We surveyed literature describing informatics systems that support or automate the processes of systematic review or each of the tasks of the systematic review. Several projects focus on automating, simplifying and/or streamlining specific tasks of the systematic review. Some tasks are already fully automated while others are still largely manual. In this review, we describe each task and the effect that its automation would have on the entire systematic review process, summarize the existing information system support for each task, and highlight where further research is needed for realizing automation for the task. Integration of the systems that automate systematic review tasks may lead to a revised systematic review workflow. We envisage the optimized workflow will lead to system in which each systematic review is described as a computer program that automatically retrieves relevant trials, appraises them, extracts and synthesizes data, evaluates the risk of bias, performs meta-analysis calculations, and produces a report in real time. PMID:25005128

  18. Comment on 'Propagation and Negative Refraction,' IEEE Microwave Magazine, pp. 58-65, July/August 2012

    CERN Document Server

    Eleftheriades, George

    2012-01-01

    We discuss and clarify some misleading statements appeared in a recent article on negative refraction in metamaterials. In this comment, we straighten the physical meaning and underlying phenomena behind negative refraction and negative index metamaterials and show that these phenomena are perfectly consistent with causality. It is hoped that this comment draws the attention of authors, reviewers and readers to the large body of rigorous analytical, numerical, and experimental evidence in favor of negative refraction at a single interface, so as to avoid reviving settled debates which mislead, rather than educate, the physics and engineering communities.

  19. Hillside National Wildlife Refuge public use review: July 1987

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document addresses the ten Public Use Requirements for Hillside National Wildlife Refuge, as well as General Impressions of the review team.

  20. Yazoo National Wildlife Refuge public use review: July 1987

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document addresses the ten Public Use Requirements for Yazoo National Wildlife Refuge, as well as General Impressions of the review team.

  1. Shock waves and shock tubes; Proceedings of the Fifteenth International Symposium, Berkeley, CA, July 28-August 2, 1985

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bershader, D. (Editor); Hanson, R. (Editor)

    1986-01-01

    A detailed survey is presented of shock tube experiments, theoretical developments, and applications being carried out worldwide. The discussions explore shock tube physics and the related chemical, physical and biological science and technology. Extensive attention is devoted to shock wave phenomena in dusty gases and other multiphase and heterogeneous systems, including chemically reactive mixtures. Consideration is given to techniques for measuring, visualizing and theoretically modeling flowfield, shock wave and rarefaction wave characteristics. Numerical modeling is explored in terms of the application of computational fluid dynamics techniques to describing flowfields in shock tubes. Shock interactions and propagation, in both solids, fluids, gases and mixed media are investigated, along with the behavior of shocks in condensed matter. Finally, chemical reactions that are initiated as the result of passage of a shock wave are discussed, together with methods of controlling the evolution of laminar separated flows at concave corners on advanced reentry vehicles.

  2. Potential for energy conservaton in the metal forming industries. Progress report, July 1, 1978-August 15, 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avitzur, B.; Beidleman, C.R.; Smackey, B.M.

    1979-08-01

    Reduced energy consumption and improved product attributes are realizable benefits that are achievable through the adoption of optimal metal forming techniques. With the meteoric rise in energy costs, certain segments of the metal forming industries have accelerated their efforts in switching from energy intensive manufacturing techniques, e.g., casting, to metal forming, and, furthermore, from hot forming and machined components to cold forming, notably the automotive industry. The first year results of a two year study that will identify and document potential energy and cost savings associated with the adoption of low energy consumption techniques are presented. When compared with techniques requiring energy for hot forming, heat treatments, and excess or scrap material, the utilizaton of alternative metal forming processes offer considerable promise for energy savings. Descriptions of savings achieved by a combination of analytical methods and imaginative new processes are provided in the form of specific industrial case studies. The elimination of defects through the use of an analytical criteria for the prevention of the central burst is presented. Such available criteria for central burst serve as a justification for the desirability to develop criteria for the prevention of fishskin and other defects. Other savings which may be possible through the development of new technologies are included in an Appendix entitled: Recent Developments in Wire Making. One specific new process, Continuous Hydrostatic Extrusion, has been developed at Western Electric and is described in detail.

  3. DOE FreedomCAR and vehicle technologies program advanced power electronic and electrical machines annual review report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olszewski, Mitch [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2006-10-11

    This report is a summary of the Review Panel at the FY06 DOE FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies (FCVT) Annual Review of Advanced Power Electronics and Electric Machine (APEEM) research activities held on August 15-17, 2006.

  4. Industry Standards for Technological Design and Construction Drawing Design of Rubber Factories Carried Out on August 1

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    On May 18, Ministry of Industry and Information Technology approved 2 industry standards of Rules of Technological Design Technology of Rubber Factories(HG/T 21558-2011) and Rules of Rubber Factories Construction Drawing Design Document Content and Depth (HG/T 21511-2011), which are to be carried out on August 1.

  5. Review of Residential Ventilation Technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Armin Rudd

    2005-08-30

    This paper reviews current and potential ventilation technologies for residential buildings, including a variety of mechanical systems, natural ventilation, and passive ventilation. with particular emphasis on North American climates and construction.

  6. Ground surface deformation patterns, magma supply, and magma storage at Okmok volcano, Alaska, from InSAR analysis: 2. Coeruptive deflation, July-August 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Zhong; Dzurisin, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    A hydrovolcanic eruption near Cone D on the floor of Okmok caldera, Alaska, began on 12 July 2008 and continued until late August 2008. The eruption was preceded by inflation of a magma reservoir located beneath the center of the caldera and ~3 km below sea level (bsl), which began immediately after Okmok's previous eruption in 1997. In this paper we use data from several radar satellites and advanced interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) techniques to produce a suite of 2008 coeruption deformation maps. Most of the surface deformation that occurred during the eruption is explained by deflation of a Mogi-type source located beneath the center of the caldera and 2–3 km bsl, i.e., essentially the same source that inflated prior to the eruption. During the eruption the reservoir deflated at a rate that decreased exponentially with time with a 1/e time constant of ~13 days. We envision a sponge-like network of interconnected fractures and melt bodies that in aggregate constitute a complex magma storage zone beneath Okmok caldera. The rate at which the reservoir deflates during an eruption may be controlled by the diminishing pressure difference between the reservoir and surface. A similar mechanism might explain the tendency for reservoir inflation to slow as an eruption approaches until the pressure difference between a deep magma production zone and the reservoir is great enough to drive an intrusion or eruption along the caldera ring-fracture system.

  7. Peer review of the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations, August 24-28, 1981

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1984-02-01

    On August 24-28, 1981, a peer review of three major areas of the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations was conducted at the Riviera Hotel in Las Vegas, Nevada. The three investigative areas were: (1) geology/hydrology, (2) geotechnical/geoengineering, and (3) environmental studies. A separate review panel was established for each of the investigative areas which was composed of experts representing appropriate fields of expertise. A total of twenty nationally known or prominent state and local experts served on the three review panels.

  8. Energy and technology review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stowers, I.F.; Crawford, R.B.; Esser, M.A.; Lien, P.L.; O' Neal, E.; Van Dyke, P. (eds.)

    1982-07-01

    The state of the laboratory address by LLNL Director Roger Batzel is summarized, and a breakdown of the laboratory funding is given. The Livermore defense-related committment is described, including the design and development of advanced nuclear weapons as well as research in inertial confinement fusion, nonnuclear ordnance, and particle beam technology. LLNL is also applying its scientific and engineering resources to the dual challenge of meeting future energy needs without degrading the quality of the biosphere. Some representative examples are given of the supporting groups vital for providing the specialized expertise and new technologies required by the laboratory's major research programs. (GHT)

  9. Energy and Technology Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bookless, W.A.; Quirk, W.J. [eds.

    1994-06-01

    This report discusses: The Clementine satellite, the first US satellite to the Moon in more than two decades, sent back more than 1.5 million images of the lunar surface using cameras designed and calibrated by LLNL. An LLNL-developed laser ranger provided information that will be used to construct a relief map of the Moon`s surface; and Uncertainty and the Federal Role in Science and Technology, Ralph E. Gomory was a recent participate in the Director`s Distinguished Lecturer Series at LLNL. In his lecture, he addressed some of the tensions, conflicts, and possible goals related to federal support for science and technology.

  10. Energy and Technology Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bookless, W.A.; McElroy, L.; Wheatcraft, D.; Middleton, C.; Shang, S. [eds.

    1994-10-01

    Two articles are included: the industrial computing initiative, and artificial hip joints (applying weapons expertise to medical technology). Three research highlights (briefs) are included: KEN project (face recognition), modeling groundwater flow and chemical migration, and gas and oil national information infrastructure.

  11. Energy and Technology Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1982-09-01

    This is the first of two issues commemorating the 30th anniversary of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The early history of the laboratory is reviewed, including: the LLNL-Nevada organization; project Plowshare; the chemistry and materials science department; and development of computer systems. (GHT)

  12. Energy and technology review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carr, R.B.; Bathgate, M.B.; Crawford, R.B.; McCaleb, C.S.; Prono, J.K. (eds.)

    1976-05-01

    The chief objective of LLL's biomedical and environmental research program is to enlarge mankind's understanding of the implications of energy-related chemical and radioactive effluents in the biosphere. The effluents are studied at their sources, during transport through the environment, and at impact on critical resources, important ecosystems, and man himself. We are pursuing several projects to acquire such knowledge in time to guide the development of energy technologies toward safe, reasonable, and optimal choices.

  13. Loglines. July-August 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-01

    agency will also turn over to the State Department such material as plasma cutters and industrial shredders deemed necessary for the new contractor to...started building that capability early on in Afghanistan. And we’ve got better, top-of-the-line shredders and cutters to tear stuff down. Today, we’re

  14. Loglines. July-August 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-01

    behaviors by making it convenient for them. By increasing their access to fresh fruits and vegetables and making it available right in front of them...the post restaurant manager in he said. In the year since DLA Distribution’s Eastern Distribution Center in New Cumberland, Pennsylvania, started

  15. Loglines. July-August 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-01

    Corps of Engineers projects in Afghanistan. Editor’s note: This article contains information from previous DLA Today articles . DLA Troop Support...authentic andouille sausage ,” Fairbanks stated. The biggest impact of the new menu was the addition of Baskin-Robbins ice cream, he added. For weeks

  16. LLE Review Quarterly Report (July-September 1991). Volume 48

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    1991-09-01

    This report was prepared as an account of work conducted by the Laboratory for Laser Energetics and sponsored by New York State Energy Research and Development Authority, the University of Rochester, the U.S. Department of Energy, and other agencies. Neither the above-named sponsors, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, expressed or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed. or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, mark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by the United States Government or any agency thereof or any other sponsor. Results reported in the LLE Review should not be taken as necessarily final results as they represent active research. The views and opinions of authors expressed herein do not necessarily state or reflect those of any of the above sponsoring entities.

  17. Energy and Technology Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quirk, W.J. [ed.

    1993-08-01

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory was established in 1952 to do research on nuclear weapons and magnetic fusion energy. Since then, we other major programs have been added including laser fusion, and laser isotope separation, biomedical and environmental science, strategic defense and applied energy technology. These programs, in turn, require research in basic scientific disciplines, including chemistry and materials science, computer science and technology, engineering and physics. In this issue, Herald Brown, the Laboratory`s third director and now counselor at the Center for Strategic and International Studies, reminisces about his years at Livermore and comments about the Laboratory`s role in the future. Also an article on visualizing dynamic systems in three dimensions is presented. Researchers can use our interactive algorithms to translate massive quantities of numerical data into visual form and can assign the visual markers of their choice to represent three- dimensional phenomena in a two-dimensional setting, such as a monitor screen. Major work has been done in the visualization of climate modeling, but the algorithms can be used for visualizing virtually any phenomena.

  18. Storm and flood of July 31-August 1, 1976, in the Big Thompson River and Cache la Poudre River basins, Larimer and Weld Counties, Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCain, Jerald F.; Shroba, R.R.

    1979-01-01

    PART A: Devastating flash floods swept through the canyon section of Larimer County in north-central Colorado during the night of July 31-August I, 1976, causing 139 deaths, 5 missing persons, and more than $35 million in total damages. The brunt of the storms occurred over the Big Thompson River basin between Drake and Estes Park with rainfall amounts as much as 12 inches being reported during the storm period. In the Cache la Poudre River basin to the north, a rainfall amount of 10 inches was reported for one locality while 6 inches fell over a widespread area near the central part of the basin. The storms developed when strong low-level easterly winds to the rear of a polar front pushed a moist, conditionally unstable airmass upslope into the Front Range of the Rocky Mountains. Orographic uplift released the convective instability, and light south-southeasterly winds at middle and upper levels allowed the storm complex to remain nearly stationary over the foothills for several hours. Minimal entrainment of relatively moist air at middle and upper levels, very low cloud bases, and a slightly tilted updraft structure contributed to a high precipitation efficiency. Intense rainfall began soon after 1900 MDT (Mountain Daylight Time) in the Big Thompson River and the North Fork Cache la Poudre River basins. A cumulative rainfall curve developed for Glen Comfort from radar data indicates that 7.5 inches of rain fell during the period 1930-2040 MDT on July 31. In the central part of the storm area west of Fort Collins, the heaviest rainfall began about 2200 MDT on July 31 and continued until 0100 MDT on August 1. Peak discharges were extremely large on many streams in the storm area-exceeding previously recorded maximum discharges at several locations. The peak discharge of the Big Thompson River at the gaging station at the canyon mouth, near Drake was 31,200 cubic feet per second or more than four times the previous maximum discharge of 7,600 cubic feet per second at

  19. Relative contributions of external SST forcing and internal atmospheric variability to July-August heat waves over the Yangtze River valley

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaolong; Zhou, Tianjun

    2017-08-01

    The Yangtze River valley (YRV), located in central-eastern China, has witnessed increased numbers of heat waves in the summer since 1951. Knowing what factors control and affect the interannual variability of heat waves, especially distinguishing the contributions of anomalous sea surface temperature (SST) forcings and those of internal modes of variability, is important to improving heat wave prediction. After evaluating 70 members of the atmospheric model intercomparison project (AMIP) experiments from the 25 models that participated in the coupled model intercomparison project phase 5 (CMIP5), 13 high-skill members (HSMs) are selected to estimate the SST-forced variability. The results show that approximately 2/3 of the total variability of the July-August heat waves in the YRV during 1979-2008 can be attributed to anomalous SST forcings, whereas the other 1/3 are due to internal variability. Within the SST-forced component, one-half of the influence is from the impact of the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) and the other half is from non-ENSO related SST forcings, specifically, the SST anomalies in the North Pacific and the North Atlantic. Both the decaying El Niño and developing La Niña accompanied by a warm Indian Ocean and cold central Pacific, respectively, are favorable to hotter summers in the YRV because these patterns strengthen and extend the western North Pacific Subtropical High (WNPSH) westwards, for which the decaying ENSO plays a dominant role. The internal variability shows a circumglobal teleconnection in which Rossby waves propagate southeastwards over the Eurasian Continent and strengthen the WNPSH. Atmospheric model sensitivity experiments confirm that non-ENSO SST forcings can modulate the WNPSH and heat wave variability by projecting their influences onto the internal mode.

  20. Multi-model Projection of July-August Climate Extreme Changes over China under CO2 Doubling. Part Ⅰ:Precipitation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Hongmei; FENG Lei; ZHOU Tianjun

    2011-01-01

    Potential changes in precipitation extremes in July-August over China in response to CO2 doubling are analyzed based on the output of 24 coupled climate models from the Twentieth-Century Climate in Coupled Models (20C3M) experiment and the 1% per year CO2 increase experiment (to doubling) (lpctto2x) of phase 3 of the Coupled Model Inter-comparison Project (CMIP3). Evaluation of the models' performance in simulating the mean state shows that the majority of models fairly reproduce the broad spatial pattern of observed precipitation. However, all the models underestimate extreme precipitation by ~50%. The spread among the models over the Tibetan Plateau is ~2-3 times larger than that over the other areas.Models with higher resolution generally perform better than those with lower resolutions in terms of spatial pattern and precipitation amount. Under the lpctto2x scenario, the ratio between the absolute value of MME extreme precipitation change and model spread is larger than that of total precipitation, indicating a relatively robust change of extremes. The change of extreme precipitation is more homogeneous than the total precipitation. Analysis on the output of Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory coupled climate model version 2.1 (GFDL-CM2.1) indicates that the spatially consistent increase of surface temperature and water vapor content contribute to the large increase of extreme precipitation over contiguous China,which follows the Clausius-Clapeyron relationship. Whereas, the meridionally tri-polar pattern of mean precipitation change over eastern China is dominated by the change of water vapor convergence, which is determined by the response of monsoon circulation to global warming.

  1. Science & Technology Review: September 2016

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogt, Ramona L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Meissner, Caryn N. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Chinn, Ken B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-09-30

    This is the September issue of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's Science & Technology Review, which communicates, to a broad audience, the Laboratory’s scientific and technological accomplishments in fulfilling its primary missions. This month, there are features on "Laboratory Investments Drive Computational Advances" and "Laying the Groundwork for Extreme-Scale Computing." Research highlights include "Nuclear Data Moves into the 21st Century", "Peering into the Future of Lick Observatory", and "Facility Drives Hydrogen Vehicle Innovations."

  2. Science & Technology Review June 2016

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogt, Ramona L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Chinn, Ken B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Kotta, Paul [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Meissner, Caryn N. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-06-01

    At Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, we focus on science and technology research to ensure our nation’s security. We also apply that expertise to solve other important national problems in energy, bioscience, and the environment. Science & Technology Review is published eight times a year to communicate, to a broad audience, the Laboratory’s scientific and technological accomplishments in fulfilling its primary missions. The publication’s goal is to help readers understand these accomplishments and appreciate their value to the individual citizen, the nation, and the world.

  3. Science & Technology Review June 2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chinn, D J

    2007-04-30

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is operated by the University of California for the Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration. At Livermore, we focus science and technology on ensuring our nation's security. We also apply that expertise to solve other important national problems in energy, bioscience, and the environment. Science & Technology Review is published 10 times a year to communicate, to a broad audience, the Laboratory's scientific and technological accomplishments in fulfilling its primary missions. The publication's goal is to help readers understand these accomplishments and appreciate their value to the individual citizen, the nation, and the world.

  4. Foundry Coating Technology: A Review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nwaogu, Ugochukwu Chibuzoh; Tiedje, Niels Skat

    2011-01-01

    is important. In this review, a detailed description of these topics and examples are provided where necessary. A potential area of research in foundry coating development, using sol-gel process is suggested. The application of sol-gel technology in the development of foundry coatings is a novel approach....

  5. Energy and Technology Review, July 1984: state of the Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1984-01-01

    Each year, Director Roger Batzel addresses the LLNL staff on the state of the Laboratory and the achievements of the past year. On May 17, 1984, Dr. Batzel reported on the estimated budget for fiscal year 1985, which includes an 8.5% increase in operating funds, and on recent progress in our major programs. In this issue, we summarize Dr. Batzel's address and present a sampling of Laboratory achievements.

  6. Final Review of Safety Assessment Issues at Savannah River Site, August 2011

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Napier, Bruce A.; Rishel, Jeremy P.; Bixler, Nathan E.

    2011-12-15

    At the request of Savannah River Nuclear Solutions (SRNS) management, a review team composed of experts in atmospheric transport modeling for environmental radiation dose assessment convened at the Savannah River Site (SRS) on August 29-30, 2011. Though the meeting was prompted initially by suspected issues related to the treatment of surface roughness inherent in the SRS meteorological dataset and its treatment in the MELCOR Accident Consequence Code System Version 2 (MACCS2), various topical areas were discussed that are relevant to performing safety assessments at SRS; this final report addresses these topical areas.

  7. Book review of: "Clinical aspects of electroporation" by Stephen T Kee, Julie Gehl, Edward W Lee

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spugnini Enrico

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This article is a review of the book: Clinical aspects of electroporation, by Stephen T. Kee, Julie Gehl, Edward W Lee, which is published by Springer Press. Basic information that should be helpful in deciding whether to read the book and whether to use it as a reference book is presented. This includes an introduction, a description of all the sections of the book, and a comparison with recently published books on the topic.

  8. Science & Technology Review October 2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chinn, D J

    2007-08-21

    Livermore researchers won five R&D 100 awards in R&D Magazine's annual competition for the top 100 industrial innovations worldwide. This issue of Science & Technology Review highlights the award-winning technologies: noninvasive pneumothorax detector, microelectromechanical system-based adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscope, large-area imager, hyper library of linear solvers, and continuous-phase-plate optics system manufactured using magnetorheological finishing. Since 1978, Laboratory researchers have received 118 R&D 100 awards. The R&D 100 logo (on the cover and p 1) is reprinted courtesy of R&D Magazine.

  9. University of Utah ASC site review. August 24-25, 2006

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hertel, Eugene S., Jr. (.,; .)

    2007-02-01

    This report is a review of progress made by the Center for the Simulation of Accidental Fires and Explosions (C-SAFE) at the University of Utah, during the ninth year (Fiscal 2006) of its existence as an activity funded by the Department of Energy's Advanced Simulation and Computing Program (ASC). The ten-member Review Team composed of the TST and AST spent two days (August 24-25, 2006) at the University, reviewing formal presentations and demonstrations by the C-SAFE researchers and conferring privately. The Review Team found that the C-SAFE project administrators and staff had prepared well for the review. C-SAFE management and staff openly shared extensive answers to unexpected questions and the advance materials were well prepared and very informative. We believe that the time devoted to the review was used effectively and hope that the recommendations included in this 2006 report will provide helpful guidance to C-SAFE personnel and ASC managers.

  10. Biomass Program 2007 Program Peer Review - Biodiesel and Other Technologies Summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2009-10-28

    This document discloses the comments provided by a review panel at the U.S. Department of Energy Office of the Biomass Program Peer Review held on November 15-16, 2007 in Baltimore, MD and the Biodiesel and Other Technologies, held on August 14th and 15th in Golden, Colorado.

  11. Oceanographic Station and CTD data from the EASTWARD from the SE Pacific (limit-140 W) as part of the International Decade of Ocean Exploration / Coastal Upwelling Ecosystems Analysis (IDOE/CUEA) from 23 July 1976 to 16 August 1976 (NODC Accession 7800803)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic Station and CTD data were collected from the EASTWARD from the SE Pacific (limit-140 W) from 23 July 1976 to 16 August 1976. Data were collected by...

  12. Ingestion of phosphorus-32 at Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts, identified on August 19, 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-12-01

    On Monday, October 16, 1995, the Massachussetts Institue of Technology (MIT, the licensee) notified the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) of an incident involving ingestion of phosphorus-32 by a researcher at the MIT Center for Cancer Research. The licensee informed the NRC that a researcher had reported the incident on August 19. The licensee initially estimated the intake as 500 microcuries (19 MBq) and the dose as 4000 millirem (40 mSv) to the individual. On October 12, the licensee informed the researcher that its final intake estimate was 579 microcuries (21 MBq), just under the 600 microcuries (22 MBq) which would represent an overexposure. On October 17, the NRC established an Incident Investigation Team to investigate the case. NRC also contracted with Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education to do independent dose assessments of the urine sample data and the whole-body data. The Team concluded that the licensee`s final intake and dose estimates were in accordance with accepted scientific references and NRC guidance. However, recognizing the uncertainties involved in the use of models to simulate human characteristics, the Team determined the intake would be better characterized as likely falling within a range of 500 to 750 microcuries (19--28 NMq). An NRC medical consultant concluded that no symptoms or acute effects should be observed from an intake of this level.

  13. Narrative report May, June, July, August, 1963 Des Lacs National Wildlife Refuge, Lake Ilo National Wildlife Refuge, & Easement Refuges - District IV

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Des Lacs National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1963. The report begins by summarizing the...

  14. Narrative report May, June, July, August, 1951 Des Lacs National Wildlife Refuge, Lostwood National Wildlife Refuge, Lake Ilo National Wildlife Refuge, Easement Refuges - District IV & 4a

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Des Lacs National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1951. The report begins by summarizing the...

  15. Narrative report May, June, July, August, 1950 Des Lacs National Wildlife Refuge, Lostwood National Wildlife Refuge, Lake Ilo National Wildlife Refuge, Easement Refuges - District IV & 4a

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Des Lacs National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1950. The report begins by summarizing the...

  16. Narrative report May, June, July, August, 1955 Des Lacs National Wildlife Refuge, Lostwood National Wildlife Refuge, Lake Ilo National Wildlife Refuge & Easement Refuges - District IV & IVa

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Des Lacs National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1955. The report begins by summarizing the...

  17. Narrative report May, June, July, August, 1953 Des Lacs National Wildlife Refuge, Lostwood National Wildlife Refuge, & Easement Refuges - District IV & 4a

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Des Lacs National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1953. The report begins by summarizing the...

  18. Narrative report May, June, July, August, 1961 Des Lacs National Wildlife Refuge, Lostwood National Wildlife Refuge, Lake Ilo National Wildlife Refuge, & Easement Refuges - District IV & IVa

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Des Lacs National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1961. The report begins by summarizing the...

  19. Narrative report May, June, July, August, 1957 Des Lacs National Wildlife Refuge, Lostwood National Wildlife Refuge, Lake Ilo National Wildlife Refuge, & Easement Refuges - District IV & IVa

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Des Lacs National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1957. The report begins by summarizing the...

  20. Narrative report May, June, July, August, 1954 Des Lacs National Wildlife Refuge, Lostwood National Wildlife Refuge, Lake Ilo National Wildlife Refuge, & Easement Refuges - District IV & 4a

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Des Lacs National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1954. The report begins by summarizing the...

  1. Narrative report May, June, July, August, 1956 Des Lacs National Wildlife Refuge, Lostwood National Wildlife Refuge, Lake Ilo National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Des Lacs National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1956. The report begins by summarizing the...

  2. Bathymetric and velocimetric surveys at highway bridges crossing the Missouri River in and into Missouri during summer flooding, July-August 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huizinga, Richard J.

    2012-01-01

    Bathymetric and velocimetric surveys were conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Kansas and Missouri Departments of Transportation, in the vicinity of 36 bridges at 27 highway crossings of the Missouri River between Brownville, Nebraska and St. Louis, Missouri, from July 13 through August 3, 2011, during a summer flood. A multibeam echo sounder mapping system was used to obtain channel-bed elevations for river reaches ranging from 1,350 to 1,860 feet and extending across the active channel of the Missouri River. These bathymetric scans provide a "snapshot" of the channel conditions at the time of the surveys and provide characteristics of scour holes that may be useful in the development of predictive guidelines or equations for scour holes. These data also may be used by the Kansas and Missouri Departments of Transportation to assess the bridges for stability and integrity issues with respect to bridge scour during floods. Bathymetric data were collected around every pier that was in water, except those at the edge of water, in extremely shallow water, or surrounded by debris rafts. Scour holes were present at most piers for which bathymetry could be obtained, except at piers on channel banks, those near or embedded in lateral or longitudinal spur dikes, and those on exposed bedrock outcrops. Scour holes observed at the surveyed bridges were examined with respect to depth and shape. Although exposure of parts of foundational support elements was observed at several piers, at most sites the exposure likely can be considered minimal compared to the overall substructure that remains buried in bed material; however, there were several notable exceptions where the bed material thickness between the bottom of the scour hole and bedrock was less than 6 feet. Such substantial exposure of usually buried substructural elements may warrant special observation in future flood events. Previous bathymetric surveys had been done at several of the sites

  3. Global O3-CO correlations in a chemistry and transport model during July-August: evaluation with TES satellite observations and sensitivity to input meteorological data and emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hyun-Deok; Liu, Hongyu; Crawford, James H.; Considine, David B.; Allen, Dale J.; Duncan, Bryan N.; Horowitz, Larry W.; Rodriguez, Jose M.; Strahan, Susan E.; Zhang, Lin; Liu, Xiong; Damon, Megan R.; Steenrod, Stephen D.

    2017-07-01

    We examine the capability of the Global Modeling Initiative (GMI) chemistry and transport model to reproduce global mid-tropospheric (618 hPa) ozone-carbon monoxide (O3-CO) correlations determined by the measurements from the Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES) aboard NASA's Aura satellite during boreal summer (July-August). The model is driven by three meteorological data sets (finite-volume General Circulation Model (fvGCM) with sea surface temperature for 1995, Goddard Earth Observing System Data Assimilation System Version 4 (GEOS-4 DAS) for 2005, and Modern-Era Retrospective Analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA) for 2005), allowing us to examine the sensitivity of model O3-CO correlations to input meteorological data. Model simulations of radionuclide tracers (222Rn, 210Pb, and 7Be) are used to illustrate the differences in transport-related processes among the meteorological data sets. Simulated O3 values are evaluated with climatological profiles from ozonesonde measurements and satellite tropospheric O3 columns. Despite the fact that the three simulations show significantly different global and regional distributions of O3 and CO concentrations, they show similar patterns of O3-CO correlations on a global scale. All model simulations sampled along the TES orbit track capture the observed positive O3-CO correlations in the Northern Hemisphere midlatitude continental outflow and the Southern Hemisphere subtropics. While all simulations show strong negative correlations over the Tibetan Plateau, northern Africa, the subtropical eastern North Pacific, and the Caribbean, TES O3 and CO concentrations at 618 hPa only show weak negative correlations over much narrower areas (i.e., the Tibetan Plateau and northern Africa). Discrepancies in regional O3-CO correlation patterns in the three simulations may be attributed to differences in convective transport, stratospheric influence, and subsidence, among other processes. To understand how various

  4. Science & Technology Review March 2005

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henson, V E

    2005-01-25

    This issue of Science and Technology Review has the following articles: (1) Enhanced National Security through International Research Collaborations--Commentary by Stephen G. Cochran; (2) Building Networks of Trust through Collaborative Science--Livermore scientists are leading collaborative science and technology projects with colleagues from Central and South Asia and the Middle East; (3) Tracing the Steps in Nuclear Material Trafficking--The Laboratory.s nuclear science expertise is helping to thwart the illicit trafficking of nuclear material; (4) Looking at Earth in Action--Geophysicists at Livermore are using laboratory experiments to examine such issues as how best to store nuclear wastes and how to mitigate the effects of greenhouse gases; and (5) Gamma-Ray Bursts Shower the Universe with Metals--Computer models indicate that gamma-ray bursts from dying stars may be important sources of elements such as iron, zinc, titanium, and copper.

  5. Preliminary Review of Safety Assessment Issues at Savannah River Site, August 2011

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Napier, Bruce A.; Rishel, Jeremy P.; Bixler, Nathan E.

    2011-09-19

    At the request of Savannah River Nuclear Solutions (SRNS) management, a review team composed of experts in atmospheric transport modeling for environmental radiation dose assessment convened at the Savannah River Site (SRS) on August 29-30, 2011. Several issues were presented at the meeting for discussion. This is a short summary that is organized in accordance with the primary issues discussed, which is not necessarily a chronological record. Issues include: SRS Meteorological Data and its Use in MACCS2; Deposition Velocities for Particles; Deposition Velocities for Tritium; MACCS2 Dispersion Coefficients; Use of Low Surface Roughness in Open Areas; Adequacy of Meteorological Tower and Instrumentation; Displacement Height; and Validity of MACCS2 Calculations at Close-in Distances. A longer report will be issued at a later date that expands upon these topics and recommendations.

  6. Preliminary Review of Safety Assessment Issues at Savannah River Site, August 2011

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Napier, Bruce A.; Rishel, Jeremy P.; Bixler, Nathan E.

    2011-09-19

    At the request of Savannah River Nuclear Solutions (SRNS) management, a review team composed of experts in atmospheric transport modeling for environmental radiation dose assessment convened at the Savannah River Site (SRS) on August 29-30, 2011. Several issues were presented at the meeting for discussion. This is a short summary that is organized in accordance with the primary issues discussed, which is not necessarily a chronological record. Issues include: SRS Meteorological Data and its Use in MACCS2; Deposition Velocities for Particles; Deposition Velocities for Tritium; MACCS2 Dispersion Coefficients; Use of Low Surface Roughness in Open Areas; Adequacy of Meteorological Tower and Instrumentation; Displacement Height; and Validity of MACCS2 Calculations at Close-in Distances. A longer report will be issued at a later date that expands upon these topics and recommendations.

  7. Annual advance of the research on gonadal disorders from August 2014 to July 2015%性腺疾病研究领域年度新进展--2014年8月至2015年7月

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    崔佳; 窦京涛

    2016-01-01

    随着影像学、生化检测以及分子生物学技术的不断进步,自2014年8月至2015年7月,国内外关于性腺疾病领域研究进展迅猛。有大量文献从不同角度探讨了性腺疾病的发病机制、基因诊断、临床诊断以及干预治疗方法。现就其中对临床工作有更多借鉴意义的部分经典病种文献进行汇总分析,以供临床医师参考。%From Aug 2014 to July 2015, researches in the field of gonadal diseases have achieved rapid advances with image technology, the technology of biochemistry, and molecular biotechnology progressing. Considerable literatures concerning the pathogenesis, gene and clinical diagnosis, and treatment of gonadal diseases have been published. We reviewed and analyzed some more instructive literatures for clinical practice, proposed some suggestions, and the work plans for the clinicians.

  8. Studying Classroom Teaching as a Medium for Professional Development: Proceedings of a U.S.-Japan Workshop (9th, Tokyo/Makuhari, Japan, July 31-August 6, 2000).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bass, Hyman, Ed.; Usiskin, Zalman P., Ed.; Burrill, Gail, Ed.

    The Ninth International Congress on Mathematics Education (ICME-9) held in Makuhari, Japan, in August 2000 provided a unique opportunity for the Mathematical Sciences Education Board and the U.S. National Commission on Mathematics Instruction. Together with educators from the Japanese mathematical community, they hosted a workshop on teacher…

  9. 1990 DOE/SANDIA crystalline photovoltaic technology project review meeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruby, D.S. (ed.)

    1990-07-01

    This document serves as the proceedings for the annual project review meeting held by Sandia's Photovoltaic Cell Research Division and Photovoltaic Technology Division. It contains information supplied by each organization making a presentation at the meeting, which was held August 7 through 9, 1990 at the Sheraton Hotel in Albuquerque, New Mexico. Sessions were held to discuss national photovoltaic programs, one-sun crystalline silicon cell research, concentrator silicon cell research, concentrator 3-5 cell research, and concentrating collector development.

  10. Science & Technology Review November 2002

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Budil, K

    2002-09-25

    This months issue of Science and Technology Review has the following articles: (1) High-Tech Help for Fighting Wildfires--Commentary by Leland W. Younker; (2) This Model Can Take the Heat--A physics-based simulation program to combat wildfires combines the capabilities and resources of Lawrence Livermore and Los Alamos national laboratories. (3) The Best and the Brightest Come to Livermore--The Lawrence Fellowship Program attracts the most sought-after postdoctoral researchers to the Laboratory. (4) A view to Kill--Livermore sensors are aimed at the ''kill'' vehicle when it intercepts an incoming ballistic missile. (5) 50th Anniversary Highlight--Biological Research Evolves at Livermore--Livermore's biological research program keeps pace with emerging national issues, from studying the effects of ionizing radiation to detecting agents of biological warfare.

  11. Science& Technology Review November 2003

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McMahon, D

    2003-11-01

    This issue of Science & Technology Review covers the following topics: (1) We Will Always Need Basic Science--Commentary by Tomas Diaz de la Rubia; (2) When Semiconductors Go Nano--experiments and computer simulations reveal some surprising behavior of semiconductors at the nanoscale; (3) Retinal Prosthesis Provides Hope for Restoring Sight--A microelectrode array is being developed for a retinal prosthesis; (4) Maglev on the Development Track for Urban Transportation--Inductrack, a Livermore concept to levitate train cars using permanent magnets, will be demonstrated on a 120-meter-long test track; and (5) Power Plant on a Chip Moves Closer to Reality--Laboratory-designed fuel processor gives power boost to dime-size fuel cell.

  12. Progress Report for the Chemical and Energy Research Section of the Chemical Technology Division: July-December 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jubin, R.T.

    1999-06-01

    This report summarizes the major activities conducted in the Chemical and Energy Research Section of the Chemical Technology Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) during the period July-December 1998. The section conducts basic and applied research and development in chemical engineering, applied chemistry, and bioprocessing, with an emphasis on energy-driven technologies and advanced chemical separations for nuclear and waste applications.

  13. Science& Technology Review May 2003

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McMahon, D H

    2003-05-01

    This May 2003 issue of ''Science and Technology Review'' covers the following articles: (1) ''Another Weapon in the Battle against Proliferation''; (2) ''Chemical Weapons Can't Evade This Lab'', Livermore's Forensic Science Center is certified to analyze samples collected during inspections conducted to monitor the Chemical Weapons Convention. (3) ''Bird's-Eye View Clarifies Research on the Ground'' Geobotanical remote sensing has applications in homeland security and energy resource development and provides new insights into complex ecologic systems. (4) ''Age Does Make a Difference'' Age-dating techniques and ultrasensitive technologies provide a comprehensive map of California's groundwater and indicate where it is most vulnerable to contaminants. (5) ''Reducing Aerodynamic Drag'' Simulations and experiments reveal ways to make heavy trucks more aerodynamic and fuel efficient.

  14. Science& Technology Review October 2002

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Budil, K S

    2002-10-01

    The October 2002 issue of Science and Technology Review has the following articles: (1) Applied Science Is a Hallmark of This Laboratory--Commentary by Hal Graboske. (2) Sending Up Signals for Genetic Variation--In situ rolling circle amplification promises to advance the detection and treatment of cancer and other diseases. (3) SiMM Is Anything But Simple--Modules of silicon microchannels and microlenses result in the smallest, most powerful, and least expensive laser diode pumps ever. (4) World's Most Powerful Solid-State Laser--A new design allows tremendous scaling up of solid-state laser power. (5) Stepping Up to Extreme Lithography--The next generation of computer chips can now be produced on a commercial scale. (6) Relief for Acute and Chronic Pain--New technology turns an ancient pain management method into a modern medical tool. (7)50th Anniversary Highlight--14 Energy and Environment: Understanding Our World--The Laboratory's energy and environmental research is an important adjunct to its core national security mission.

  15. Science& Technology Review October 2003

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McMahon, D H

    2003-10-01

    The October 2003 issue of Science & Technology Review consists of the following articles: (1) Award-Winning Technologies from Collaborative Efforts--Commentary by Hal Graboske; (2) BASIS Counters Airborne Bioterrorism--The Biological Aerosol Sentry and Information System is the first integrated biodefense system; (3) In the Chips for the Coming Decade--A new system is the first full-field lithography tool for use at extreme ultraviolet wavelengths; (4) Smoothing the Way to Print the Next Generation of Computer Chips--With ion-beam thin-film planarization, the reticles and projection optics made for extreme ultraviolet lithography are nearly defect-free; (5) Eyes Can See Clearly Now--The MEMS-based adaptive optics phoropter improves the process of measuring and correcting eyesight aberrations; (6) This Switch Takes the Heat--A thermally compensated Q-switch reduces the light leakage on high-average-power lasers; (7) Laser Process Forms Thick, Curved Metal Parts--A new process shapes parts to exact specifications, improving their resistance to fatigue and corrosion cracking; and (8) Characterizing Tiny Objects without Damaging Them--Livermore researchers are developing nondestructive techniques to probe the Lilliputian world of mesoscale objects.

  16. Microturbine Power Conversion Technology Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Staunton, R.H.

    2003-07-21

    In this study, the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is performing a technology review to assess the market for commercially available power electronic converters that can be used to connect microturbines to either the electric grid or local loads. The intent of the review is to facilitate an assessment of the present status of marketed power conversion technology to determine how versatile the designs are for potentially providing different services to the grid based on changes in market direction, new industry standards, and the critical needs of the local service provider. The project includes data gathering efforts and documentation of the state-of-the-art design approaches that are being used by microturbine manufacturers in their power conversion electronics development and refinement. This project task entails a review of power converters used in microturbines sized between 20 kW and 1 MW. The power converters permit microturbine generators, with their non-synchronous, high frequency output, to interface with the grid or local loads. The power converters produce 50- to 60-Hz power that can be used for local loads or, using interface electronics, synchronized for connection to the local feeder and/or microgrid. The power electronics enable operation in a stand-alone mode as a voltage source or in grid-connect mode as a current source. Some microturbines are designed to automatically switch between the two modes. The information obtained in this data gathering effort will provide a basis for determining how close the microturbine industry is to providing services such as voltage regulation, combined control of both voltage and current, fast/seamless mode transfers, enhanced reliability, reduced cost converters, reactive power supply, power quality, and other ancillary services. Some power quality improvements will require the addition of storage devices; therefore, the task should also determine what must be done to enable the power conversion circuits to

  17. Proceedings of Technology Showcase Held in Huntsville, Alabama on 7-9 August 1990

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-08-09

    Barbara J. Rogers Miles E. Holloman, and Stanley P. Patterson U. S. Army Missile Command Redstone Arsenal, AL 35898 Abstract The Hydrogen Fluoride...Function," ER-177446, Loral Defense Systems Division - Akron, August 1988. 4. McIngvale, Kilpatrick, and Carper , "A Wide Field-of- View, Small Target, TV

  18. Review of July 2013 Nuclear Security Insider Threat Exercise November 2013

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pederson, Ann C. [ORNL; Snow, Catherine L. [ORNL; Townsend, Jeremy [ORNL; Shannon, Michael [ORNL

    2013-11-01

    This document is a review of the Nuclear Security Insider Threat Exercise which was hosted at ORNL in July 2013. Nuclear security culture and the insider threat are best learned through experience. Culture is inherently difficult to teach, and as such is best learned through modeled behaviors and learning exercise. This TTX, NSITE, is a tool that strives to aid students in learning what an effective (and ineffective) nuclear security culture might look like by simulating dynamic events that strengthen or weaken the nuclear security regime. The goals of NSITE are to stimulate complex thought and discussion and assist decision makers and management in determining the most effective policies and procedures for their country or facility.

  19. Science& Technology Review September 2003

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McMahon, D

    2003-09-01

    This September 2003 issue of ''Science and Technology Review'' covers the following articles: (1) ''The National Ignition Facility Is Born''; (2) ''The National Ignition Facility Comes to Life'' Over the last 15 years, thousands of Livermore engineers, scientists, and technicians as well as hundreds of industrial partners have worked to bring the National Ignition Facility into being. (3) ''Tracking the Activity of Bacteria Underground'' Using real-time polymerase chain reaction and liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry, researchers at Livermore are gaining knowledge on how bacteria work underground to break down compounds of environmental concern. (4) ''When Every Second Counts--Pathogen Identification in Less Than a Minute'' Livermore has developed a system that can quickly identify airborne pathogens such as anthrax. (5) ''Portable Radiation Detector Provides Laboratory-Scale Precision in the Field'' A team of Livermore physicists and engineers has developed a handheld, mechanically cooled germanium detector designed to identify radioisotopes.

  20. National Transport Code Collaboration (NTCC) PTRANSP, Final Report to the US Department of Energy for the Period August 1, 2007 Through July 31, 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lao, Lang L. [General Atomics; St John, Holger [General Atomics; Staebler, Gary M. [General Atomics; Snyder, Phil B. [General Atomics

    2010-08-20

    This report describes the work done under U.S. Department of Energy grant number DE-FG02-07ER54935 for the period ending July 31, 2010. The goal of this project was to provide predictive transport analysis to the PTRANSP code. Our contribution to this effort consisted of three parts: (a) a predictive solver suitable for use with highly non-linear transport models and installation of the turbulent confinement models GLF23 and TGLF, (b) an interface of this solver with the PTRANSP code, and (c) initial development of an EPED1 edge pedestal model interface with PTRANSP. PTRANSP has been installed locally on this cluster by importing a complete PTRANSP build environment that always contains the proper version of the libraries and other object files that PTRANSP requires. The GCNMP package and its interface code have been added to the SVN repository at PPPL.

  1. State of the drilling technology in the conventional tunelling in the target seam Zollverein 6 at the mine Auguste Victoria; Stand der Bohrtechnik im konventionellen Streckenvortrieb im Floezhorizont Zollverein 6 auf dem Bergwerk Auguste Victoria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rossbach, Stefan [RAG Deutsche Steinkohle, Herne (Germany). Bergwerk Auguste Victoria; Andrzejewski, Michael [RAG Deutsche Steinkohle, Herne (Germany). Servicebereich Technik und Logistik; Gastberg, Ingolf [DMT GmbH und Co. KG, Essen (Germany). Wettertechnik

    2013-06-15

    The future mining activities and activities of advance at the mine Auguste Victoria mainly concentrate in the level of the target seam Zollverein 6. The achievement of a layer depth of nearly 1,400 m in connection with difficult geological conditions imposed particular demands on the planning, technology, organization and security in mining, so that appropriate adjustments were required in mining technology. The contribution under consideration reports on the process characteristics typical for conventional tunneling in the target seam Zollverein 6.

  2. Military Review: The Professional Journal of the U.S. Army. Volume 81, Number 4, July-August 2001

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-08-01

    Brazilian Army, Brazilian Edition Lieutenant Colonel Carlos Mezzano Chilean Army, Hispano-American Edition Lieutenant Colonel Hernan Vazquez Argentine Army...Crisis and Op- portunity in American Foreign and Defense Policy ( San Francisco, CA: Encoun- ter Books, 2000), 262-63. 7. Global Trends 2015: A...A workshop held in December included Dr. John Hillen, Mr. Richard Kerr, Dr. Steven Metz, Admiral William Small, Professor Martin van Creveld and

  3. Military Review: The Professional Journal of the U.S. Army. Volume 83, Number 4, July-August 2003

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-08-01

    Funk & Wagnalls , 1969), 65. 22. R. Ernest Dupuy and Trevor N. Dupuy, The Harper Encyclopedia of Military History, 4th ed. ( New York: HarperCollins Pub...How Effective is Strategic Bombing? Lessons Learned from World War II to Kosovo ( New York University Press, 2001); Mark Clodfelter, The Limits of...Battle of Taji on 16 April 2003, battle command in the 4th Infantry Division was exercised in a technically new style nicknamed Battle Command on the

  4. Military Review: The Professional Journal of the U.S. Army. Volume 87, Number 4, July-August 2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-08-01

    Production Manager Marlys Cook Supervisory Editor, English Edition John Garabedian Associate Editor Nancy Mazzia Books and Features Editor Barbara...replete with F-bombs, the training events are clarified with allusions to Jean -Claude Van Damme movies, and the central thesis is a recurring conclusion...those who are familiar with their European counterparts’ drawings— such as Max Beckmann’s or Luc - Albert Moreau’s—will appreciate the Americans

  5. Pipeline corridors through wetlands - impacts on plant communities: Bayou Grand Cane, De Soto Parish, Louisiana. Topical report, August 1991--July 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shem, L.M.; Zimmerman, R.E.; Hayes, D. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Van Dyke, G.D. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)]|[Trinity Christian College, Palos Heights, IL (United States)

    1994-12-01

    The goal of the Gas Research Institute Wetland Corridors Program is to document impacts of existing pipeline on the wetlands they traverse. To accomplish this goal, 12 existing wetland crossings were surveyed. These sites varied in elapsed time since pipeline construction, wetland type, pipeline installation techniques, and night of-way (ROW) management practices. This report presents the results of a survey conducted over the period of August 12-13, 1991, at the Bayou Grand Cane crossing in De Soto Parish, Louisiana, where a pipeline constructed three years prior to the survey crosses the bayou through mature bottomland hardwoods. The sit was not seeded or fertilized after construction activities. At the time of sampling, a dense herb stratum (composed of mostly native species) covered the 20-m-wide ROW, except within drainage channels. As a result of the creation of the ROW, new habitat was created, plant diversity increased, and forest habitat became fragmented. The ROW must be maintained at an early stage of succession to allow access to the pipeline however, impacts to the wetland were minimized by decreasing the width of the ROW to 20 m and recreating the drainage channels across the ROW. The canopy trees on the ROW`s edge shaded part of the ROW, which helped to minimize the effects of the ROW.

  6. 1992 DOE/Sandia crystalline photovoltaic technology project review meeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maish, A. [ed.

    1992-07-01

    This document serves as the proceedings for the annual project review meeting held by Sandia National Laboratories` Photovoltaic Technology and Photovoltaic Evaluation Departments. It contains information supplied by organizations making presentations at the meeting, which was held July 14--15, 1992 at the Sheraton Old Town Hotel in Albuquerque, New Mexico. Overview sessions covered the Department of Energy (DOE) program, including those at Sandia and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), and non-DOE programs, including the EPRI concentrator collector program, The Japanese crystalline silicon program, and some concentrating photovoltaic activities in Europe. Additional sessions included papers on Sandia`s Photovoltaic Device Fabrication Laboratory`s collaborative research, cell processing research, the activities of the participants in the Concentrator Initiative Program, and photovoltaic technology evaluation at Sandia and NREL.

  7. 2013 Bioenergy Technologies Office Peer Review Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2014-02-01

    This document summarizes the recommendations and evaluations provided by an independent external panel of experts at the 2013 U.S. Department of Energy Bioenergy Technologies Office's Peer Review meeting.

  8. Geothermal Technologies Program Overview - Peer Review Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milliken, JoAnn [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Washington, DC (United States)

    2011-06-06

    This Geothermal Technologies Program presentation was delivered on June 6, 2011 at a Program Peer Review meeting. It contains annual budget, Recovery Act, funding opportunities, upcoming program activities, and more.

  9. Gesture Recognition Technology: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PALLAVI HALARNKAR

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Gesture Recognition Technology has evolved greatly over the years. The past has seen the contemporary Human – Computer Interface techniques and their drawbacks, which limit the speed and naturalness of the human brain and body. As a result gesture recognition technology has developed since the early 1900s with a view to achieving ease and lessening the dependence on devices like keyboards, mice and touchscreens. Attempts have been made to combine natural gestures to operate with the technology around us to enable us to make optimum use of our body gestures making our work faster and more human friendly. The present has seen huge development in this field ranging from devices like virtual keyboards, video game controllers to advanced security systems which work on face, hand and body recognition techniques. The goal is to make full use of themovements of the body and every angle made by the parts of the body in order to supplement technology to become human friendly and understand natural human behavior and gestures. The future of this technology is very bright with prototypes of amazing devices in research and development to make the world equipped with digital information at hand whenever and wherever required.

  10. [Diesel emission control technologies: a review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Hong; Weng, Duan; Zi, Xin-Yun

    2007-06-01

    The authors reviewed the researches on diesel emission control for both new engine technologies and aftertreatment technologies. Emphases were focused on the recent advancements of the diesel particulate filter (DPF) and the selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NO(x). In addition, it was explored for the future development in this field.

  11. Review of Economic Submissions to NICE Medical Technologies Evaluation Programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alshreef, Abualbishr; Jenks, Michelle; Green, William; Dixon, Simon

    2016-12-01

    The economic evaluation of medical devices is increasingly used to inform decision making on adopting new or novel technologies; however, challenges are inevitable due to the unique characteristics of devices. Cost-consequence analyses are recommended and employed by the English National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) Medical Technologies Evaluation Programme (MTEP) to help address these challenges. The aim of this work was to review the critiques raised for previous MTEP submissions and explore if there were common problems across submissions. We reviewed a sample of 12 economic submissions to MTEP representing 50 % of 24 sets of guidance issued to July 2015. For each submission, we reviewed the External Assessment Centre's (EAC) report and the guidance document produced by NICE. We identified the main problems raised by the EAC's assessments and the committee's considerations for each submission, and explored strategies for improvement. We found that the identification and measurement of costs and consequences are the main shortcomings within economic submissions to MTEP. Together, these shortcomings accounted for 42 % of criticisms by the EACs among the reviewed submissions. In certain circumstances problems with these shortcomings may be unavoidable, for example, if there is a limited evidence base for the device being appraised. Nevertheless, strategies can often be adopted to improve submissions, including the use of more appropriate time horizons, whilst cost and resource use information should be taken, where possible, from nationally representative sources.

  12. Science& Technology Review June 2003

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McMahon, D

    2003-06-01

    This month's issue has the following articles: (1) Livermore's Three-Pronged Strategy for High-Performance Computing, Commentary by Dona Crawford; (2) Riding the Waves of Supercomputing Technology--Livermore's Computation Directorate is exploiting multiple technologies to ensure high-performance, cost-effective computing; (3) Chromosome 19 and Lawrence Livermore Form a Long-Lasting Bond--Lawrence Livermore biomedical scientists have played an important role in the Human Genome Project through their long-term research on chromosome 19; (4) A New Way to Measure the Mass of Stars--For the first time, scientists have determined the mass of a star in isolation from other celestial bodies; and (5) Flexibly Fueled Storage Tank Brings Hydrogen-Powered Cars Closer to Reality--Livermore's cryogenic hydrogen fuel storage tank for passenger cars of the future can accommodate three forms of hydrogen fuel separately or in combination.

  13. MIRAGE emitter improvements & technology review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, Steven L.; Irwin, Alan; Oleson, Jim; Sparkman, Kevin; Gallagher, Anthony M.; Lin, William; Pan, Jianmei

    2001-08-01

    With the increased demand for IR sensor and surveillance systems, there is a growing need for technologies to support their operational readiness. Measurement of sensor characteristics such as sensitivity, MRTD, and dynamic range should be standard in all mission critical systems. The Real-Time Infrared Test Set (RTIR) is a portable system designed to provide in-the-field calibration and testing of IR imaging systems and seekers. RTIR uses the high volume manufacturing processes of the Very Large Scale Integration (VLSI) and the Micro Electromechanical Systems (MEMS) technology to produce a Thermal Pixel Array (TPA). State-of-the-art CMOS processes define all the necessary on-chip digital and analog electronics. When properly driven, this array generates variable temperature,synthetic IR scenes. A nonuniformity measurement of several TPAs is presented.

  14. Review of nonconventional bioreactor technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turick, C.E.; Mcllwain, M.E.

    1993-09-01

    Biotechnology will significantly affect many industrial sectors in the future. Industrial sectors that will be affected include pharmaceutical, chemical, fuel, agricultural, and environmental remediation. Future research is needed to improve bioprocessing efficiency and cost-effectiveness in order to compete with traditional technologies. This report describes recent advances in bioprocess technologies and bioreactor designs and relates them to problems encountered in many industrial bioprocessing operations. The primary focus is directed towards increasing gas and vapor transfer for enhanced bioprocess kinetics as well as unproved by-product separation and removal. The advantages and disadvantages of various conceptual designs such as hollow-fiber, gas-phase, hyperbaric/hypobaric, and electrochemical bioreactors are also discussed. Specific applications that are intended for improved bioprocesses include coal desulfurization, coal liquefaction, soil bioremediation, biomass conversion to marketable chemicals, biomining, and biohydrometallurgy as well as bioprocessing of gases and vapors.

  15. Science & Technology Review September 2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bearinger, J P

    2009-07-24

    This month's issue has the following articles: (1) Remembering the Laboratory's First Director - Commentary by Harold Brown; (2) Herbert F. York (1921-2009): A Life of Firsts, an Ambassador for Peace - The Laboratory's first director, who died on May 19, 2009, used his expertise in science and technology to advance arms control and prevent nuclear war; (3) Searching for Life in Extreme Environments - DNA will help researchers discover new marine species and prepare to search for life on other planets; (4) Energy Goes with the Flow - Lawrence Livermore is one of the few organizations that distills the big picture about energy resources and use into a concise diagram; and (5) The Radiant Side of Sound - An experimental method that converts sound waves into light may lead to new technologies for scientific and industrial applications.

  16. Application of wind power systems to the Service Area of the Minnesota Power and Light Company. Final report, July 1975--August 1976

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindquist, O.H.; Malver, F.S.

    1976-01-01

    Honeywell, in a joint effort with Minnesota Power and Light Company (MP and L), Boeing Vertol Company, and Dr. C.G. Justus, Georgia Institute of Technology, has conducted a regional application study of wind energy systems. Minnesota Power and Light Company, an investor-owned company with 853-MW owned capacity, has served as the case study subject utility. An initial system definition was developed based on available wind information and near-term wind turbine generator (WTG) technology. The system was tailored to fit MP and L's forecasted generation needs and the company's existing transmission and distribution system. Honeywell developed a WECS simulation to convert wind data to wind energy available for input to the utility's grid. The simulation was used to evaluate the performance of preliminary design wind turbine generators developed for ERDA/NASA by the General Electric Company and Kaman Aerospace Corporation, and to evaluate the performance of a wind turbine optimized for the Northern Minnesota wind regime and developed by the Boeing Vertol Company under subcontract to Honeywell.

  17. Science & Technology Review October 2005

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aufderheide III, M B

    2005-08-22

    This month's issue has the following articles: (1) Important Missions, Great Science, and Innovative Technology--Commentary by Cherry A. Murray; (2) NanoFoil{reg_sign} Solders with Less Heat--Soldering and brazing to join an array of materials are now Soldering and brazing to join an array of materials are now possible without furnaces, torches, or lead; (3) Detecting Radiation on the Move--An award-winning technology can detect even small amounts An award-winning technology can detect even small amounts of radioactive material in transit; (4) Identifying Airborne Pathogens in Time to Respond--A mass spectrometer identifies airborne spores in less than A mass spectrometer identifies airborne spores in less than a minute with no false positives; (5) Picture Perfect with VisIt--The Livermore-developed software tool VisIt helps scientists The Livermore-developed software tool VisIt helps scientists visualize and analyze large data sets; (6) Revealing the Mysteries of Water--Scientists are using Livermore's Thunder supercomputer and new algorithms to understand the phases of water; and (7) Lightweight Target Generates Bright, Energetic X Rays--Livermore scientists are producing aerogel targets for use in inertial Livermore scientists are producing aerogel targets for use in inertial confinement fusion experiments and radiation-effects testing.

  18. An Experiment on the Utility and Viability of Providing Non-Skills Training to Underutilized, High Seniority Workers in the Canning Industry. An Industry-Specific Approach to Lay-Off Time Training. Final Report, July 1, 1972-August 31, 1973.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGrath, William T.

    An experimental project was conducted between July 1972 and August 1973 to offer adult basic education to high seniority, unskilled employees laid off because of the seasonal nature of their jobs in the fruit and vegetable canning industry in northern California. The project's purpose was to demonstrate that layoff time training (LOTT) would be…

  19. A Review Of The Mosquito Control Problem In Delaware July 1959

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Because of an unusual number of salt-marsh mosquitoes {Aedes sollicitans) in the State during July 1959, Governor J. Caleb Boggs called for a conference on...

  20. Interconnects for nanoscale MOSFET technology: a review

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Amit Chaudhry

    2013-01-01

    In this paper,a review of Cu/low-k,carbon nanotube (CNT),graphene nanoribbon (GNR) and optical based interconnect technologies has been done.Interconnect models,challenges and solutions have also been discussed.Of all the four technologies,CNT interconnects satisfy most of the challenges and they are most suited for nanometer scale technologies,despite some minor drawbacks.It is concluded that beyond 32 nm technology,a paradigm shift in the interconnect material is required as Cu/low-k interconnects are approaching fundamental limits.

  1. Interconnects for nanoscale MOSFET technology: a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhry, Amit

    2013-06-01

    In this paper, a review of Cu/low-k, carbon nanotube (CNT), graphene nanoribbon (GNR) and optical based interconnect technologies has been done. Interconnect models, challenges and solutions have also been discussed. Of all the four technologies, CNT interconnects satisfy most of the challenges and they are most suited for nanometer scale technologies, despite some minor drawbacks. It is concluded that beyond 32 nm technology, a paradigm shift in the interconnect material is required as Cu/low-k interconnects are approaching fundamental limits.

  2. Environmental Technology Verification; Baghouse Filtration Products TTG Inc., TG100 Filtration Media (Tested August 2012)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baghouses are air pollution control devices used to control particulate emissions from stationary sources and are among the technologies evaluated by the APCT Center. Baghouses and their accompanying filter media have long been one of the leading particulate control techniques fo...

  3. Environmental Technology Verification, Baghouse Filtration Products TTG Inc., TG800 Filtration Media (Tested August 2012)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baghouses are air pollution control devices used to control particulate emissions from stationary sources and are among the technologies evaluated by the APCT Center. Baghouses and their accompanying filter media have long been one of the leading particulate control techniques fo...

  4. Fiber-optic technology review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lyons, P.B.

    1980-01-01

    A history of fiber technology is presented. The advantages of fiber optics are discussed (bandwidth, cost, weight and size, nonmetallic construction and isolation). Some aspects of the disadvantages of fiber systems briefly discussed are fiber and cable availability, fiber components, radiation effects, receivers and transmitters, and material dispersion. Particular emphasis over the next several years will involve development of fibers and systems optimized for use at wavelengths near 1.3 ..mu..m and development of wavelengths multiplexers for simultaneous system operation at several wavelengths.

  5. Basic Research Needs for Advanced Nuclear Systems. Report of the Basic Energy Sciences Workshop on Basic Research Needs for Advanced Nuclear Energy Systems, July 31-August 3, 2006

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberto, J.; Diaz de la Rubia, T.; Gibala, R.; Zinkle, S.; Miller, J.R.; Pimblott, S.; Burns, C.; Raymond, K.; Grimes, R.; Pasamehmetoglu, K.; Clark, S.; Ewing, R.; Wagner, A.; Yip, S.; Buchanan, M.; Crabtree, G.; Hemminger, J.; Poate, J.; Miller, J.C.; Edelstein, N.; Fitzsimmons, T.; Gruzalski, G.; Michaels, G.; Morss, L.; Peters, M.; Talamini, K.

    2006-10-01

    The global utilization of nuclear energy has come a long way from its humble beginnings in the first sustained nuclear reaction at the University of Chicago in 1942. Today, there are over 440 nuclear reactors in 31 countries producing approximately 16% of the electrical energy used worldwide. In the United States, 104 nuclear reactors currently provide 19% of electrical energy used nationally. The International Atomic Energy Agency projects significant growth in the utilization of nuclear power over the next several decades due to increasing demand for energy and environmental concerns related to emissions from fossil plants. There are 28 new nuclear plants currently under construction including 10 in China, 8 in India, and 4 in Russia. In the United States, there have been notifications to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission of intentions to apply for combined construction and operating licenses for 27 new units over the next decade. The projected growth in nuclear power has focused increasing attention on issues related to the permanent disposal of nuclear waste, the proliferation of nuclear weapons technologies and materials, and the sustainability of a once-through nuclear fuel cycle. In addition, the effective utilization of nuclear power will require continued improvements in nuclear technology, particularly related to safety and efficiency. In all of these areas, the performance of materials and chemical processes under extreme conditions is a limiting factor. The related basic research challenges represent some of the most demanding tests of our fundamental understanding of materials science and chemistry, and they provide significant opportunities for advancing basic science with broad impacts for nuclear reactor materials, fuels, waste forms, and separations techniques. Of particular importance is the role that new nanoscale characterization and computational tools can play in addressing these challenges. These tools, which include DOE synchrotron X

  6. Science& Technology Review March 2004

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McMahon, D H

    2004-01-23

    This month's issue has the following articles: (1) ''Rethinking Atoms for Peace and the Future of Nuclear Technology'' a commentary by Ronald F. Lehman II; (2) ''Rich Legacy from Atoms for Peace'' In 1953, President Eisenhower encouraged world leaders to pursue peaceful uses of nuclear technology. Many of Livermore's contributions in the spirit of this initiative continue to benefit society today. (3) ''Tropopause Height Becomes Another Climate-Change Fingerprint'' Simulations and observational data show that human activities are largely responsible for the steady elevation of the tropopause, the boundary between the troposphere and the stratosphere. (4) ''A Better Method for Certifying the Nuclear Stockpile'' Livermore and Los Alamos are developing a common framework for evaluating the reliability and safety of nuclear weapons. (5) ''Observing How Proteins Loop the Loop'' A new experimental method developed at Livermore allows scientists to monitor the folding processes of proteins, one molecule at a time.

  7. Geothermal Technologies Program 2011 Peer Review Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hollett, Douglas [Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Washington, DC (United States); Stillman, Greg [Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Washington, DC (United States)

    2011-06-01

    On June 6-10, 2011, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Geothermal Technologies Program (GTP or the Program) conducted its annual program peer review in Bethesda, Maryland. In accordance with the EERE Peer Review Guide, the review provides an independent, expert evaluation of the strategic goals and direction of the program and is a forum for feedback and recommendations on future program planning. The purpose of the review was to evaluate DOE-funded projects for their contribution to the mission and goals of the Program and to assess progress made against stated objectives.

  8. 2013 Geothermal Technologies Office Peer Review Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geothermal Technologies Office

    2014-01-01

    Geothermal Technologies Office conducted its annual program peer review in April of 2013. The review provided an independent, expert evaluation of the technical progress and merit of GTO-funded projects. Further, the review was a forum for feedback and recommendations on future GTO strategic planning. During the course of the peer review, DOE-funded projects were evaluated for 1) their contribution to the mission and goals of the GTO and 2) their progress against stated project objectives. Principal Investigators (PIs) came together in sessions organized by topic “tracks” to disseminate information, progress, and results to a panel of independent experts as well as attendees.

  9. Science & Technology Review May 2005

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aufderheide, M B

    2005-04-05

    Articles in this month's issue include: (1) Einstein's Legacy Alive at Livermore--Commentary by Michael R. Anastasio; (2) Applying Einstein's Theories of Relativity--In their efforts to understand the cosmos, Livermore physicists must account for the relativistic effects postulated by Albert Einstein; (3) Locked in Rock: Sequestering Carbon Dioxide Underground--Livermore scientists are examining technologies to reduce atmospheric concentrations of carbon dioxide by burying it deep underground; (4) Modeling the Subsurface Movement of Radionuclides--Using data from past underground nuclear tests, a Livermore team is modeling radionuclide migration at the Nevada Test Site; and (5) Novel Materials from Solgel Chemistry--Livermore chemists are developing a method for fabricating solgels to better control the physical properties of the new materials.

  10. Energy & Technology Review, March 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quirk, W.J.; Canada, J.; de Vore, L.; Gleason, K.; Kirvel, R.D.; Kroopnick, H.; McElroy, L.; Van Dyke, P. [eds.

    1994-03-01

    This monthly report of research activities at Lawrence Livermore Laboratory highlights three different research programs. First, the Forensic Science Center supports a broad range of analytical techniques that focus on detecting and analyzing chemical, biological, and nuclear species. Analyses are useful in the areas of nonproliferation, counterterrorism, and law enforcement. Second, starting in 1977, the laboratory initiated a series of studies to understand a high incidence of melanoma among employees. Continued study shows that mortality from this disease has decreased from the levels seen in the 1980`s. Third, to help coordinate the laboratory`s diverse research projects that can provide better healthcare tools to the public, the lab is creating the new Center for Healthcare Technologies.

  11. Science & Technology Review December 2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chinn, D J

    2007-10-24

    This month's issue has the following articles: (1) Homeland Security Begins Abroad--Commentary by John C. Doesburg; (2) Out of Harm's Way--New physical protection and accountability systems, together with a focus on security, safeguard nuclear materials in the Russian Federation; (3) A Calculated Journey to the Center of the Earth--Determining the permeability of partially melted metals in a mineral matrix unlocks secrets about the formation of Earth's core; (4) Wireless That Works--Communication technologies using ultrawideband radar are improving national security; and (5) Power to the People--Edward Teller envisioned safe and plentiful nuclear power for peaceful applications.

  12. Science & Technology Review March 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bearinger, J P

    2010-01-29

    This month's issue has the following articles: (1) Countering the Growing Chem-Bio Threat -- Commentary by Penrose (Parney) C. Albright; (2) Responding to a Terrorist Attack Involving Chemical Warfare Agents -- Livermore scientists are helping the nation strengthen plans to swiftly respond to an incident involving chemical warfare agents; (3) Revealing the Secrets of a Deadly Disease -- A Livermore-developed system helps scientists better understand how plague bacteria infect healthy host cells; (4) A New Application for a Weapons Code -- Simulations reveal for the first time how blast waves cause traumatic brain injuries; (5) Testing Valuable National Assets for X-Ray Damage -- Experiments at the National Ignition Facility are measuring the effects of radiation on critical systems; and (6) An Efficient Way to Harness the Sun's Power -- New solar thermal technology is designed to supply residential electric power at nearly half of the current retail price.

  13. Science & Technology Review May 2006

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aufderheide III, M B

    2006-04-03

    This month's issue has the following articles: (1) Science and Technology Help the Nation Counter Terrorism--Commentary by Raymond J. Juzaitis; (2) Imagers Provide Eyes to See Gamma Rays--Gamma-ray imagers provide increased radiation detection capabilities and enhance the nation's arsenal for homeland security; (3) Protecting the Nation's Livestock--Foot-and-mouth disease could devastate America's livestock; a new assay provides a rapid means to detect it; (4) Measures for Measures--Laboratory physicists combine emissivity and reflectivity to achieve highly accurate temperature measurements of metal foils; and (5) Looping through the Lamb Shift--Livermore scientists measured a small perturbation in the spectra of highly ionized uranium--the first measurement of the two-loop Lamb shift in a bound state.

  14. Grid-Competitive Residential and Commercial Fully Automated PV Systems Technology: Final technical Report, August 2011

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Katie E.; Cousins, Peter; Culligan, Matt; Jonathan Botkin; DeGraaff, David; Bunea, Gabriella; Rose, Douglas; Bourne, Ben; Koehler, Oliver

    2011-08-26

    Under DOE's Technology Pathway Partnership program, SunPower Corporation developed turn-key, high-efficiency residential and commercial systems that are cost effective. Key program objectives include a reduction in LCOE values to 9-12 cents/kWh and 13-18 cents/kWh respectively for the commercial and residential markets. Target LCOE values for the commercial ground, commercial roof, and residential markets are 10, 11, and 13 cents/kWh. For this effort, SunPower collaborated with a variety of suppliers and partners to complete the tasks below. Subcontractors included: Solaicx, SiGen, Ribbon Technology, Dow Corning, Xantrex, Tigo Energy, and Solar Bridge. SunPower's TPP addressed nearly the complete PV value chain: from ingot growth through system deployment. Throughout the award period of performance, SunPower has made progress toward achieving these reduced costs through the development of 20%+ efficient modules, increased cell efficiency through the understanding of loss mechanisms and improved manufacturing technologies, novel module development, automated design tools and techniques, and reduced system development and installation time. Based on an LCOE assessment using NREL's Solar Advisor Model, SunPower achieved the 2010 target range, as well as progress toward 2015 targets.

  15. Quarterly progress report for the Chemical and Energy Research Section of the Chemical Technology Division: July--September 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jubin, R.T.

    1998-07-01

    This report summarizes the major activities conducted in the Chemical and Energy Research Section of the Chemical Technology Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) during the period July--September 1997. The section conducts basic and applied research and development in chemical engineering, applied chemistry, and bioprocessing, with an emphasis on energy-driven technologies and advanced chemical separations for nuclear and waste applications. The report describes the various tasks performed within nine major areas of research: Hot Cell Operations, Process Chemistry and Thermodynamics, Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) Remediation Studies, Chemistry Research, Biotechnology, Separations and Materials Synthesis, Fluid Structure and Properties, Biotechnology Research, and Molecular Studies. The name of a technical contact is included with each task described, and readers are encouraged to contact these individuals if they need additional information.

  16. Radioecology of natural systems. Fifteenth annual progress report, August 1, 1976--July 31, 1977. [Plutonium transport in terrestrial ecosystems at Rocky Flats Plant with emphasis on biological effects on mule deer and coyotes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whicker, F.W.

    1977-08-01

    This report summarizes project activities during the period August 1, 1976 through July 31, 1977. Four major areas of effort are reported, namely plutonium behavior in a terrestrial ecosystem at Rocky Flats, mule deer and coyote studies at Rocky Flats, ecological consequences of transuranics in the terrestrial environment, and lead geochemistry of an alpine lake ecosystem. Much of the first area of effort involved the synthesis of data and preparation of manuscripts, although some new data are reported on plutonium levels in small mammals, plant uptake of plutonium from contaminated soil, and plutonium deposition rates on macroplot 1. The mule deer studies generated a substantial body of new information which will permit quantitative assessment of plutonium dispersion by deer that utilize contaminated areas. These studies involve population dynamics, movement and use patterns, food habits, ingestion rates of contaminated soil and vegetation and plutonium burdens of deer tissues. A related study of coyote food habits in summer at Rocky Flats is reported. A manuscript dealing with the question of ecological effects of transuranics was prepared. This manuscript incorporates data from Rocky Flats on characteristics of natural populations which occupy ecologically similar areas having differing levels of plutonium contamination. The lead geochemistry studies continued to generate new data but the data are not yet reported.

  17. Science & Technology Review June 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poyneer, L A

    2012-04-20

    This month's issue has the following articles: (1) A New Era in Climate System Analysis - Commentary by William H. Goldstein; (2) Seeking Clues to Climate Change - By comparing past climate records with results from computer simulations, Livermore scientists can better understand why Earth's climate has changed and how it might change in the future; (3) Finding and Fixing a Supercomputer's Faults - Livermore experts have developed innovative methods to detect hardware faults in supercomputers and help applications recover from errors that do occur; (4) Targeting Ignition - Enhancements to the cryogenic targets for National Ignition Facility experiments are furthering work to achieve fusion ignition with energy gain; (5) Neural Implants Come of Age - A new generation of fully implantable, biocompatible neural prosthetics offers hope to patients with neurological impairment; and (6) Incubator Busy Growing Energy Technologies - Six collaborations with industrial partners are using the Laboratory's high-performance computing resources to find solutions to urgent energy-related problems.

  18. A Review of Optical NDT Technologies

    OpenAIRE

    Hong Zhang(Department of Physics and Center for Quantum Spacetime (CQUeST), Sogang University, 35 Baekbeom-ro, Mapo-gu, Seoul, 121-742 Korea); Rong-Sheng Lu; Gui-Yun Tian; Yong-Kai Zhu

    2011-01-01

    Optical non-destructive testing (NDT) has gained more and more attention in recent years, mainly because of its non-destructive imaging characteristics with high precision and sensitivity. This paper provides a review of the main optical NDT technologies, including fibre optics, electronic speckle, infrared thermography, endoscopic and terahertz technology. Among them, fibre optics features easy integration and embedding, electronic speckle focuses on whole-field high precision detection, inf...

  19. The Terascale Simulation Tools and Technologies Center Annual Report August 15, 2001-September 30, 2002

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glimm, J; Brown, D L; Freitag, L

    2002-09-30

    The overall goal of the TSTT Center is to enable the scientific community to more easily use modern high-order, adaptive, parallel mesh and discretization tools. To achieve this goal, we are following three distinct but related paths. The first is to work directly with a number of lead application teams (for the most part SciDAC-funded) to use such technologies in their application domains. The second is to create new technology that eases the use of such tools, not only for our designated application partners, but across a broad range of application areas that require mesh and discretization tools for scientific simulation. The main technology thrust is not to create new tools (although some of this will occur), but to create new capabilities that will allow the use of these tools interoperably. This very profound step can be compared to the shift from hand craftmanship to manufactured products with interchangable components which revolutionized the world economy one to two centuries ago. The third component of our efforts is to embed this work in a larger framework of related activities, each seeking a similar, and profound, change in the practice of computational science. To ensure the relevance of our work to the SciDAC program goals, we originally selected six application areas, and in each, one or more application projects and teams with which to work directly. One application collaboration which targeted the development of an adaptive mesh refinement capability for the oceanographic code POP was postponed and may be dropped due to unanticipated technical obstacles in the specific goal selected. One new application involving jet breakup for spray combustion was added. The initial job of establishing good working relations, agreement on a plan of action, and obtaining initial results was accomplished in all cases. In general, our work with the applications has been more difficult than anticipated, in spite of the experience of the TSTT team members in similar

  20. The Terascale Simulation Tools and Technologies Center Annual Report August 15, 2001-September 30, 2002

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glimm, J; Brown, D L; Freitag, L

    2002-09-30

    The overall goal of the TSTT Center is to enable the scientific community to more easily use modern high-order, adaptive, parallel mesh and discretization tools. To achieve this goal, we are following three distinct but related paths. The first is to work directly with a number of lead application teams (for the most part SciDAC-funded) to use such technologies in their application domains. The second is to create new technology that eases the use of such tools, not only for our designated application partners, but across a broad range of application areas that require mesh and discretization tools for scientific simulation. The main technology thrust is not to create new tools (although some of this will occur), but to create new capabilities that will allow the use of these tools interoperably. This very profound step can be compared to the shift from hand craftmanship to manufactured products with interchangable components which revolutionized the world economy one to two centuries ago. The third component of our efforts is to embed this work in a larger framework of related activities, each seeking a similar, and profound, change in the practice of computational science. To ensure the relevance of our work to the SciDAC program goals, we originally selected six application areas, and in each, one or more application projects and teams with which to work directly. One application collaboration which targeted the development of an adaptive mesh refinement capability for the oceanographic code POP was postponed and may be dropped due to unanticipated technical obstacles in the specific goal selected. One new application involving jet breakup for spray combustion was added. The initial job of establishing good working relations, agreement on a plan of action, and obtaining initial results was accomplished in all cases. In general, our work with the applications has been more difficult than anticipated, in spite of the experience of the TSTT team members in similar

  1. Proceedings of the 1999 Review Conference on Fuel Cell Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None Available

    2000-06-05

    The 1999 Review Conference on Fuel Cell Technology was jointly sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy, Federal Energy Technology Center (FETC), the Gas Research Institute (GRI), and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI). It was held August 3 to 5 in Chicago, Illinois. The goal of this conference was to provide a forum for reviewing fuel cell research and development (R&D) programs, assist in strategic R&D planning, promote awareness of sponsor activities, and enhance interactions between manufacturers, researchers, and stakeholders. This conference was attended by over 250 representatives from industry, academia, national laboratories, gas and electric utilities, DOE, and other Government agencies. The conference agenda included a keynote session, five presentation sessions, a poster presentation reception, and three breakout sessions. The presentation session topics were DOD Fuel Cell Applications, Low-Temperature Fuel Cell Manufacturers, Low-Temperature Component Research, High-Temperature Fuel Cell Manufacturers, and High-Temperature Component Research; the breakout session topics were Future R&D Directions for Low-Temperature Fuel Cells, Future R&D Directions for High-Temperature Fuel Cells, and a plenary summary session. All sessions were well attended.

  2. Science and Technology Review, November 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eimerl, D.

    1998-11-01

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is operated by the University of California for the Department of Energy. At Livermore, we focus science and technology on assuring our nationÕs security. We also apply that expertise to solve other important national problems in energy, bioscience, and the environment. Science & Technology Review is published 10 times a year to communicate, to a broad audience, the LaboratoryÕs scientific and technological accomplishments in fulfilling its primary missions. The publicationÕs goal is to help readers understand these accomplishments and appreciate their value to the individual citizen, the nation, and the world.

  3. Science & Technology Review October/November 2015

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orme, C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Meissner, C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Kotta, P. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-11-05

    At Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, we focus on science and technology research to ensure our nation’s security. We also apply that expertise to solve other important national problems in energy, bioscience, and the environment. Science & Technology Review is published eight times a year to communicate, to a broad audience, the Laboratory’s scientific and technological accomplishments in fulfilling its primary missions. The publication’s goal is to help readers understand these accomplishments and appreciate their value to the individual citizen, the nation, and the world.

  4. Science & Technology Review January/February 2017

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogt, R. L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Meissner, C. N. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Kotta, P. R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-01-12

    At Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, we focus on science and technology research to ensure our nation’s security. We also apply that expertise to solve other important national problems in energy, bioscience, and the environment. Science & Technology Review is published eight times a year to communicate, to a broad audience, the Laboratory’s scientific and technological accomplishments in fulfilling its primary missions. The publication’s goal is to help readers understand these accomplishments and appreciate their value to the individual citizen, the nation, and the world.

  5. Science & Technology Review January/February 2016

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orme, C. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Meissner, C. N. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Kotta, P. R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-01-18

    At Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, we focus on science and technology research to ensure our nation’s security. We also apply that expertise to solve other important national problems in energy, bioscience, and the environment. Science & Technology Review is published eight times a year to communicate, to a broad audience, the Laboratory’s scientific and technological accomplishments in fulfilling its primary missions. The publication’s goal is to help readers understand these accomplishments and appreciate their value to the individual citizen, the nation, and the world.

  6. Science and Technology Review, December 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eimerl, D.

    1998-12-01

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is operated by the University of California for the Department of Energy. At Livermore, we focus science and technology on assuring our nationÕs security. We also apply that expertise to solve other important national problems in energy, bioscience, and the environment. Science & Technology Review is published 10 times a year to communicate, to a broad audience, the LaboratoryÕs scientific and technological accomplishments in fulfilling its primary missions. The publicationÕs goal is to help readers understand these accomplishments and appreciate their value to the individual citizen, the nation, and the world.

  7. A Review of Optical NDT Technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Zhang

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Optical non-destructive testing (NDT has gained more and more attention in recent years, mainly because of its non-destructive imaging characteristics with high precision and sensitivity. This paper provides a review of the main optical NDT technologies, including fibre optics, electronic speckle, infrared thermography, endoscopic and terahertz technology. Among them, fibre optics features easy integration and embedding, electronic speckle focuses on whole-field high precision detection, infrared thermography has unique advantages for tests of combined materials, endoscopic technology provides images of the internal surface of the object directly, and terahertz technology opens a new direction of internal NDT because of its excellent penetration capability to most of non-metallic materials. Typical engineering applications of these technologies are illustrated, with a brief introduction of the history and discussion of recent progress.

  8. Assisted reproductive technology: an overview of Cochrane Reviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farquhar, Cindy; Rishworth, Josephine R; Brown, Julie; Nelen, Willianne L D M; Marjoribanks, Jane

    2015-07-15

    As many as one in six couples will encounter problems with fertility, defined as failure to achieve a clinical pregnancy after regular intercourse for 12 months. Increasingly, couples are turning to assisted reproductive technology (ART) for help with conceiving and ultimately giving birth to a healthy live baby of their own. Fertility treatments are complex, and each ART cycle consists of several steps. If one of the steps is incorrectly applied, the stakes are high as conception may not occur. With this in mind, it is important that each step of the ART cycle is supported by good evidence from well-designed studies. To summarise the evidence from Cochrane systematic reviews on procedures and treatment options available to couples with subfertility undergoing assisted reproductive technology (ART). Published Cochrane systematic reviews of couples undergoing ART (in vitro fertilisation or intracytoplasmic sperm injection) were eligible for inclusion in the overview. We also identified Cochrane reviews in preparation, for future inclusion.The outcomes of the overview were live birth (primary outcome), clinical pregnancy, multiple pregnancy, miscarriage and ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome (secondary outcomes). Studies of intrauterine insemination and ovulation induction were excluded.Selection of systematic reviews, data extraction and quality assessment were undertaken in duplicate. Review quality was assessed by using the AMSTAR tool. Reviews were organised by their relevance to specific stages in the ART cycle. Their findings were summarised in the text and data for each outcome were reported in 'Additional tables'. Fifty-nine systematic reviews published in The Cochrane Library up to July 2015 were included. All were high quality. Thirty-two reviews identified interventions that were effective (n = 19) or promising (n = 13), 14 reviews identified interventions that were either ineffective (n = 2) or possibly ineffective (n = 12), and 13 reviews were unable to

  9. Decommissioning of the Astra research reactor: Review and status on July 2003

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meyer Franz

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes work on the decommissioning of the ASTRA research reactor at the Austrian Research Centers Seibersdorf. Organizational, planning, and dismantling work done until July 2003 including radiation protection and waste management procedures as well as the current status of the project are presented. Completion of the decommissioning activities is planned for 2006.

  10. CERN Technical Training 2006: Software and System Technologies Curriculum - Scheduled Course Sessions (August-December 2006)

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    The Software and System Technologies Curriculum of the CERN Technical Training Programme offers comprehensive training in C++, Java, Perl, Python, XML, OO programming, JCOP/PVSS, database design and Oracle. In the PERL, C++, OO and Java course series there are some places available on the following course sessions, scheduled until the end of this year: PERL 5 - Introduction: 31.8-1.9.2006 (2 days) C++ for Particle Physicists: 16-20.10.2006 (6 half days, the popular course given by Paul Kunz) Object-Oriented Analysis and Design using UML: 17-19.10.2006 (3 days) JAVA 2 Enterprise Edition - Part 1: Web Applications: 19-20.10.2006 (2 days) JAVA - Level 1: 30.10-1.11.2006 (3 days) PERL 5 - Advanced Aspects: 2.11.2006 (1 day) C++ Programming Part 1 - Introduction to Object-Oriented Design and Programming: 14-16.11.2006 (3 days) JAVA - Level 2: 4-7.12.2006 (4 days) C++ Programming Part 2 - Advanced C++ and its Traps and Pitfalls: 12-15.12.2006 (4 days) JAVA 2 Enterprise Edition - Part 2: Enterprise JavaBea...

  11. A Literature Review of Spreadsheet Technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bock, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    number of people from different backgrounds. This literature review presents an overview of research on spreadsheet technology, its challenges and its solutions. We also attempt to identify why software developers generally frown upon spreadsheets and how spreadsheet research can help alter this view....

  12. Geothermal Technologies Office 2012 Peer Review Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2013-04-01

    On May 7-10, 2012, the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Geothermal Technologies Office conducted its annual program peer review in Westminster, CO. In accordance with the EERE Peer Review Guide, the review provides an independent, expert evaluation of the strategic goals and direction of the office and is a forum for feedback and recommendations on future office planning. The purpose of the review was to evaluate DOE-funded projects for their contribution to the mission and goals of the office and to assess progress made against stated objectives. Project scoring results, expert reviewer comments, and key findings and recommendations are included in this report.

  13. The Army War College Review. Volume 1, Number 3, August 2015. Student Publications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-25

    Framing the impact of a cyber event as a constant and sustained vulnerability ignores the reality that we can be proactive in adjusting our posture ...call for better “cyber- hygiene ,” most of the effort has been on the technical aspects of securing digital networks and developing new command...2010, Quadrennial Defense Review Report 2014, QDR in Perspective Report 2010, Nuclear Posture Review Report 2014, Ballistic Missile Defense Review

  14. Operation HUSKY July-August, 1943

    Science.gov (United States)

    1943-08-01

    FREDERICK FUNSTAN on the West, the XAP FLORENCE NIGHTINGALE in the center,’ and the APA BIDDLE on the East, respectively of the 180th, 179th, and 157th...8217 SECTION II 1 PC 3 SC SECTION III 2 PC 1 SC CENT: LEONARD WOOD 1 PC 1 AM FLORENCE NIGHTINGALE 1 PC 1 AM STANTON 1 PC 1 SC .1 AM THURSTON 1 PC 1 AM 𔃽

  15. LogLines. July-August 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-08-01

    CONFIRM Story by Beth Reece C ommercial retailers let custom- ers track the delivery of their purchases online , but Defense Logistics Agency customers... online electronic shopping hub known as DOD EMALL, warfighters and other authorized government custom- ers have a secure location and a powerful...sources of supply, officials said. More than $800 million worth of orders were placed using DOD EMALL in fiscal 2008. Shoppers can also meet

  16. EIA new releases, July--August, 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-10-02

    This publication identifies energy related publications of the Energy Information Administration of the US Department of Energy. The topics and articles in this issue include data on residential energy use available on diskettes and Internet, natural gas price predictions, coal deliveries to electric utilities, growth in the US uranium industry, microfiche products, features and press releases, EIA`s electronic publishing system, new reports, machine-readable files, how to order EIA publications and energy data information contacts.

  17. Valve Technology Arrangement of Cryopump: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjiv Y. Rajput

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available A cryopump or a "cryogenic pump" is a vacuum pump that pumps the trap gases and vapours by condensing them on a cold surface. Helium gas which is very light can only be pumped by Cryopump. Cryopump cannot be used when working for continuous operation as it pumps the effluent till the saturation state is achieved. Then the absorbed gases are to be collected through other mechanical pump through regeneration process. Hence, valve technology arrangement is incorporated with the cryopump in order to achieve the continuous pumping when two cryopump are used in alternate processes (i.e. absorption and regeneration. Various design of Valve technology arrangement is proposed by different researcher all over the world. This review paper focuses on the different proposed valve technology arrangement and elaborately explains the various components of valve technology and concludes the best possible arrangement that can be used in Cryopump.

  18. Review of Current Nuclear Vacuum System Technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carroll, M.; McCracken, J.; Shope, T.

    2003-02-25

    Nearly all industrial operations generate unwanted dust, particulate matter, and/or liquid wastes. Waste dust and particulates can be readily tracked to other work locations, and airborne particulates can be spread through ventilation systems to all locations within a building, and even vented outside the building - a serious concern for processes involving hazardous, radioactive, or nuclear materials. Several varieties of vacuum systems have been proposed and/or are commercially available for clean up of both solid and liquid hazardous and nuclear materials. A review of current technologies highlights both the advantages and disadvantages of the various systems, and demonstrates the need for a system designed to address issues specific to hazardous and nuclear material cleanup. A review of previous and current hazardous/nuclear material cleanup technologies is presented. From simple conventional vacuums modified for use in industrial operations, to systems specifically engineered for such purposes, the advantages and disadvantages are examined in light of the following criteria: minimal worker exposure; minimal secondary waste generation;reduced equipment maintenance and consumable parts; simplicity of design, yet fully compatible with all waste types; and ease of use. The work effort reviews past, existing and proposed technologies in light of such considerations. Accomplishments of selected systems are presented, including identified areas where technological improvements could be suggested.

  19. Letter Report for the Review of ORD Nanomaterial Case Studies Workshop (August 2010)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The following is a letter report from the Executive Committee of the BOSC concerning the review of the ORD Nanomaterial Case Studies Workshop: Developing a Comprehensive Environmental Assessment Research Strategy for Nanoscale Titanium Dioxide.

  20. Seney National Wildlife Refuge Biological Program Review 28-30 August 2006

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — In this report we summarize the observations and comments made by a panel of experts brought together to conduct a Wildlife and Habitat Review for Seney National...

  1. Ion Implantation Technology: Proceedings of the International Conference on Ion Implantation Technology (8th) Held at the University of Surrey, Guildford, UK on 30 July - 3 August 1990

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-01

    tesi site to ground by adding the site to substrate tial of conductors large enough to trap the whole beam. voltage and the substrate to ground voltage...phosphorus and arsenic dopants in thermally reacted titanium sili- cide thin films on silicon (100) have been determined 20. - Aexperimentally using SIMS and...2 by conventional furnace anneal- ing [10]. There is, however, little lateral growth of sili- cides in the samples which were As’ implanted after

  2. Health effects of synfuels technology: a review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanathanan, L.P.; Reilly, C.A.; Marshall, S.A.; Wilzbach, K.E.

    1981-04-01

    This document contains annotated synopses of available information pertinent to health impacts of synthetic fuel technologies under development, and identifies needs for further information. The report focuses on carcinogenesis, which appears to be a special problem with coal conversion technologies. This review is intended to serve as a reference for the NEPA Affairs Division of DOE in its evaluation of the overall synthetic fuel program and specific projects in the program. Updated versions of this document are expected to be prepared annually or semiannually as new information becomes available.

  3. Wackenhut Services, Incorporated: Report from the DOE Voluntary Protection Program onsite review, August 10--14, 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-05-01

    This report summarizes the Department of Energy Voluntary Protection Program (DOE-VPP) Review Team`s findings from the five-day onsite evaluation of Wackenhut Services, Inc. (WSI) at Savannah River Site (SRS), conducted August 10-14, 1998. The site was evaluated against the program requirements contained in US Department of Energy Voluntary Protection Program, Part 1: Program Elements to determine its success in implementing the five DOE-VPP tenets. The Team determined that WSI has met in varying degrees, all the tenets of the DOE-VPP. In every case, WSI programs and procedures exceed the level or degree necessary for compliance with existing standards, DOE Orders, and guidelines. In addition, WSI has systematically integrated their occupational safety and health (OSH) program into management and work practices at all levels. WSI`s efforts toward implementing the five major DOE-VPP tenets are summarized.

  4. August Strindberg theatre-maker

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chemi, Tatiana

    2005-01-01

    Review of the only Italian monographic study based on original texts about August Strindberg: August Strindberg il teatro della vita (August Strindberg the theatre of life), published in 1990 by Laterza and revised and updated in 2003 (publisher: Iperborea, Milano). By one of the most remarkable...

  5. Milliken Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Project. Environmental monitoring report, July--September 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-05-01

    New York State Electric and Gas Corporation (NYSEG) has installed and is presently operating a high-efficiency flue gas desulfurization (FGD) system to demonstrate innovative emissions control technology and comply with the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990. The host facility for this demonstration project is NYSEG`s Milliken Station, in the Town of Lansing, New York. The primary objective of this project is to demonstrate a retrofit of energy-efficient SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} control systems with minimal impact on overall plant efficiency. The demonstration project has added a forced oxidation, formic acid-enhanced wet limestone FGD system, which is expected to reduce SO{sub 2} emissions by at least 90 percent. NYSEG also made combustion modifications to each boiler and plans to demonstrate selective non-catalytic reduction (SNCR) technology on unit 1, which will reduce NO{sub x} emissions. Goals of the proposed demonstration include up to 98 percent SO{sub 2} removal efficiency while burning high-sulfur coal, 30 percent NO{sub x} reductions through combustion modifications, additional NO{sub x} reductions using SNCR technology, production of marketable commercial-grade gypsum and calcium chloride by-products to minimize solid waste disposal, and zero wastewater discharge.

  6. Milliken Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Project. Environmental monitoring report, July--September 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-05-01

    New York State Electric and Gas Corporation (NYSEG) has installed and is presently operating a high-efficiency flue gas desulfurization (FGD) system to demonstrate innovative emissions control technology and comply with the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990. The host facility for this demonstration project is NYSEG`s Milliken Station, in the Town of Lansing, New York. The primary objective of this project is to demonstrate a retrofit of energy-efficient SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} control systems with minimal impact on overall plant efficiency. The demonstration project has added a forced oxidation, formic acid-enhanced wet limestone FGD system, which is expected to reduce SO{sub 2} emissions by at least 90 percent. NYSEG also made combustion modifications to each boiler and plans to demonstrate selective non-catalytic reduction (SNCR) technology on unit 1, which will reduce NO{sub x} emissions. Goals of the proposed demonstration include up to 98 percent SO{sub 2} removal efficiency while burning high-sulfur coal, 30 percent NO{sub x} reductions through combustion modifications, additional NO{sub x} reductions using SNCR technology, production of marketable commercial-grade gypsum and calcium chloride by-products to minimize solid waste disposal, and zero wastewater discharge.

  7. Emerging Technologies Landscape on Education. A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis de la Fuente Valentin

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a desk research that analysed available recent studies in the field of Technology Enhanced Learning. The desk research is focused on work produced in the frame of FP6 and FP7 European programs, in the area of Information and Communication Technologies. It concentrates in technologies that support existing forms of learning, and also in technologies that enhance new learning paradigms. This approach includes already adopted and successfully piloted technologies. The elaboration of the desk research had three main parts: firstly, the collection of documents from CORDIS and other institutions related to TEL research; secondly, the identification of relevant terms appearing in those documents and the elaboration of a thesaurus; and thirdly, a quantitative analysis of each term occurrences. Many of the identified technologies belong to the fields of interactive multimedia, Human-computer Interaction and-or related to recommendation and learning analytics. This study becomes a thorough review of the current state of these fields through the actual development of R&D European projects. This research, will be used as a basis to better understand the evolution of the sector, and to focus future research efforts on these sectors and their application to education.

  8. 2012 DOE Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2012-10-26

    The 2012 DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting was held May 14-18, 2012 in Crystal City, Virginia. The review encompassed all of the work done by the Hydrogen Program and the Vehicle Technologies Program: a total of 309 individual activities were reviewed for Vehicle Technologies, by a total of 189 reviewers. A total of 1,473 individual review responses were received for the technical reviews.

  9. Medical imaging technology reviews and computational applications

    CERN Document Server

    Dewi, Dyah

    2015-01-01

    This book presents the latest research findings and reviews in the field of medical imaging technology, covering ultrasound diagnostics approaches for detecting osteoarthritis, breast carcinoma and cardiovascular conditions, image guided biopsy and segmentation techniques for detecting lung cancer, image fusion, and simulating fluid flows for cardiovascular applications. It offers a useful guide for students, lecturers and professional researchers in the fields of biomedical engineering and image processing.

  10. MHD Technology Transfer, Integration and Review Committee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-01-01

    This fifth semi-annual status report of the MHD Technology Transfer, Integration, and Review Committee (TTIRC) summarizes activities of the TTIRC during the period April 1990 through September 1990. It includes summaries and minutes of committee meetings, progress summaries of ongoing Proof-of-Concept (POC) contracts, discussions pertaining to technical integration issues in the POC program, and planned activities for the next six months.

  11. Review: Security in Wireless Technologies in Business

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sattarova, F. Y.; Kim, Tai-Hoon

    Wireless technology seems to be everywhere now - but it is still relatively in its infancy. New standards and protocols continue to emerge and problems and bugs are discovered. Nevertheless, wireless networks make many things much more convenient and it appears that wireless networks are here to stay. The differences and similarities of wireless and wired security, the new threats brought by mobility, the security of networks and devices and effects of security, or lack of it are shortly discussed in this review paper.

  12. Timeliness of epidemiological outbreak investigations in peer-reviewed European publications, January 2003 to August 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Venter, Ec; Oliver, I; Stuart, J M

    2015-02-12

    Timely outbreak investigations are central in containing communicable disease outbreaks; despite this, no guidance currently exists on expectations of timeliness for investigations. A literature review was conducted to assess the length of epidemiological outbreak investigations in Europe in peer-reviewed publications. We determined time intervals between outbreak declaration to hypothesis generation, and hypothesis generation to availability of results from an analytical study. Outbreaks were classified into two groups: those with a public health impact across regions within a country and requiring national coordination (level 3) and those with a severe or catastrophic impact requiring direction at national level (levels 4 and 5). Investigations in Europe published between 2003 and 2013 were reviewed. We identified 86 papers for review: 63 level 3 and 23 level 4 and 5 investigations. Time intervals were ascertained from 55 papers. The median period for completion of an analytical study was 15 days (range: 4-32) for levels 4 and 5 and 31 days (range: 9-213) for level 3 investigations. Key factors influencing the speed of completing analytical studies were outbreak level, severity of infection and study design. Our findings suggest that guidance for completing analytical studies could usefully be provided, with different time intervals according to outbreak severity.

  13. [Experience of information sharing between local healthcare management and regional Administration of Federal Service for Surveillance for Protection of Consumers Rights and Human Welfare in Sverdlovsk region during outbreak of Legionnaires' disease in town Verkhnyaya Pyshma in July-August 2007].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syrochkina, M A; Skliar, M S; Romanenko, V V; Smirnova, S S; Mikhaĭlova, A O; Bubnova, E M; Fefilov, V V; Tatareva, S V; Chadova, E A; Bobyleva, Z D; Amon, E P; Beĭkin, Ia B; Besedina, L G; Mel'nikova, O V; Shilova, V P; Rozanova, S M; Pervalova, E Iu

    2008-01-01

    Issues of reliability, uniformity, and timeliness of reporting and sharing of information during outbreaks of infectious diseases are basic for establishment of tactics and strategy of organizational, antiepidemic, and clinical measures. Analysis of experience in sharing of information between medical care organization service and services ensuring sanitary-epidemiological welfare of population during outbreak of Legionnaires' disease in town Verkhnyaya Pyshma in July-August 2007 was performed in the article.

  14. Center for Technology for Advanced Scientific Component Software (TASCS) Consolidated Progress Report July 2006 - March 2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernholdt, D E; McInnes, L C; Govindaraju, M; Bramley, R; Epperly, T; Kohl, J A; Nieplocha, J; Armstrong, R; Shasharina, S; Sussman, A L; Sottile, M; Damevski, K

    2009-04-14

    A resounding success of the Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing (SciDAC) program is that high-performance computational science is now universally recognized as a critical aspect of scientific discovery [71], complementing both theoretical and experimental research. As scientific communities prepare to exploit unprecedented computing capabilities of emerging leadership-class machines for multi-model simulations at the extreme scale [72], it is more important than ever to address the technical and social challenges of geographically distributed teams that combine expertise in domain science, applied mathematics, and computer science to build robust and flexible codes that can incorporate changes over time. The Center for Technology for Advanced Scientific Component Software (TASCS) tackles these issues by exploiting component-based software development to facilitate collaborative high-performance scientific computing.

  15. Cesium and Strontium Separation Technologies Literature Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    T. A. Todd; T. A. Todd; J. D. Law; R. S. Herbst

    2004-03-01

    Integral to the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) Program’s proposed closed nuclear fuel cycle, the fission products cesium and strontium in the dissolved spent nuclear fuel stream are to be separated and managed separately. A comprehensive literature survey is presented to identify cesium and strontium separation technologies that have the highest potential and to focus research and development efforts on these technologies. Removal of these high-heat-emitting fission products reduces the radiation fields in subsequent fuel cycle reprocessing streams and provides a significant short-term (100 yr) heat source reduction in the repository. This, along with separation of actinides, may provide a substantial future improvement in the amount of fuel that could be stored in a geologic repository. The survey and review of the candidate cesium and strontium separation technologies are presented herein. Because the AFCI program intends to manage cesium and strontium together, technologies that simultaneously separate both elements are of the greatest interest, relative to technologies that separate only one of the two elements.

  16. Preservation technologies for fresh meat - a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, G H; Xu, X L; Liu, Y

    2010-09-01

    Fresh meat is a highly perishable product due to its biological composition. Many interrelated factors influence the shelf life and freshness of meat such as holding temperature, atmospheric oxygen (O(2)), endogenous enzymes, moisture, light and most importantly, micro-organisms. With the increased demand for high quality, convenience, safety, fresh appearance and an extended shelf life in fresh meat products, alternative non-thermal preservation technologies such as high hydrostatic pressure, superchilling, natural biopreservatives and active packaging have been proposed and investigated. Whilst some of these technologies are efficient at inactivating the micro-organisms most commonly related to food-borne diseases, they are not effective against spores. To increase their efficacy against vegetative cells, a combination of several preservation technologies under the so-called hurdle concept has also been investigated. The objective of this review is to describe current methods and developing technologies for preserving fresh meat. The benefits of some new technologies and their industrial limitations is presented and discussed.

  17. Evidence review of technology and dietary assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, JoAnn D; Littlefield, Laurel A; Estep, Gary; Martin, Hope; Rogers, Toby J; Boswell, Carol; Shriver, Brent J; Roman-Shriver, Carmen R

    2010-12-01

    Diets high in fruit and vegetable consumption are associated with a decrease in chronic diseases. Dietary factors are linked to 4 of the 10 leading noncommunicable causes of death: cardiovascular disease, some cancers, stroke, and type 2 diabetes. Accurately measuring dietary patterns has many challenges. Dietary intake measurement has traditionally relied on self-report instruments such as 24-hour recall, food record, and food frequency questionnaires to record consumption history. These methods have inherent limitations in detecting small but important changes in fruit and vegetable consumption patterns. Promising advances in technology have made more sophisticated techniques for recording dietary intake possible. Computers and Web-based programs, handheld personal digital assistants with cameras and telephone cards, smart phones, cameras, and video recorders options may reduce the burden of recording what has been consumed. Furthermore, technology-based methods of dietary assessment may provide a higher degree of reliability and validity in visually determining fruit and vegetable consumption, and additional study is warranted. The purpose of this article is to present a review of the evidence on the effectiveness of technology-based methods for dietary assessment, which included fruit and vegetable consumption. One hundred and eighty-seven articles published between 1998 and 2008 were initially identified. Fifteen met the study inclusion criteria and were evaluated by an interdisciplinary team using the Stetler Strength of Evidence Scale. Six technology-based methods for dietary assessment were identified. Findings from validity and reliability testing of technology-based methods are encouraging and need replication. Clinically important features offered through technology may reduce reporting burden and offer behavioral feedback to users. Methodologically sound, empirical research into using technology-based application for dietary assessment in a variety of

  18. JOWOG 22/2 - Actinide Chemical Technology (July 9-13, 2012)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jackson, Jay M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lopez, Jacquelyn C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wayne, David M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Schulte, Louis D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Finstad, Casey C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Stroud, Mary Ann [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mulford, Roberta Nancy [Los Alamos National Laboratory; MacDonald, John M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Turner, Cameron J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lee, Sonya M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-07-05

    The Plutonium Science and Manufacturing Directorate provides world-class, safe, secure, and reliable special nuclear material research, process development, technology demonstration, and manufacturing capabilities that support the nation's defense, energy, and environmental needs. We safely and efficiently process plutonium, uranium, and other actinide materials to meet national program requirements, while expanding the scientific and engineering basis of nuclear weapons-based manufacturing, and while producing the next generation of nuclear engineers and scientists. Actinide Process Chemistry (NCO-2) safely and efficiently processes plutonium and other actinide compounds to meet the nation's nuclear defense program needs. All of our processing activities are done in a world class and highly regulated nuclear facility. NCO-2's plutonium processing activities consist of direct oxide reduction, metal chlorination, americium extraction, and electrorefining. In addition, NCO-2 uses hydrochloric and nitric acid dissolutions for both plutonium processing and reduction of hazardous components in the waste streams. Finally, NCO-2 is a key team member in the processing of plutonium oxide from disassembled pits and the subsequent stabilization of plutonium oxide for safe and stable long-term storage.

  19. Evaluation of the Inhalation Carcinogenicity of Ethylene Oxide (Revised August 2014 External Review Draft) (SAB Review Draft)

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA is seeking peer review of the scientific basis supporting the human health hazard and dose-response assessment of ethylene oxide (cancer) that will appear in the Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS) database.

  20. Carbon dioxide, hydrographic, and chemical data obtained in the Central South Pacific Ocean (WOCE sections P17S and P16S) during the tunes-2-expedition of the R/V Thomas Washington, July--August 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1991-12-31

    This data documentation discusses the procedures and methods used to measure total carbon dioxide (TCO{sub 2}), discrete partial pressure of TCO{sub 2} (pCO{sub 2}), and total alkalinity (TALK), during the Research Vessel (R/V) Thomas Washington TUNES Leg 2 Expedition in the central South Pacific Ocean. Conducted as part of the World Ocean Circulation Experiment (WOCE), the cruise began in Papeete, Tahiti, French Polynesia, on July 16, 1991, and returned to Papeete on August 25, 1991. WOCE Meridional Sections P17S along 135{degrees} W and P16S along 150{degrees} W were completed during the 40-day expedition. A total of 97 hydrographic stations were occupied. Hydrographic and chemical measurements made along WOCE Sections P17S and P16S included pressure, temperature, salinity, and oxygen measured by conductivity, temperature and depth sensor; bottle salinity; oxygen; phosphate; nitrate; nitrite; silicate; CFC-12; CFC- 11; TCO{sub 2}; TALK; and pCO{sub 2} measured at 20{degrees}C. The TCO{sub 2} concentration in 1000 seawater samples was determined with a coulometric analysis system, the pCO{sub 2} in 940 water samples was determined with an equilibrator/gas chromatograph system, while the TALK concentration in 139 samples was determined on shore at the laboratory of C. Goyet of Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution with an alkalinity titration system. In addition, 156 coulometric measurements for the Certified Reference Material (Batch {number_sign}6) were made and yielded a mean value of 2303.2 {plus_minus} 1.5 {mu}mol/kg. This mean value agrees within a standard deviation of the 2304.6 {plus_minus} 1.6 {mu}mol/kg (N=9) value determined with the manometer of C. D. Keeling at Scripps Institution of Oceanography (SIO). Replicate samples from 11 Niskin bottles at 4 stations were also collected for later shore-based reference analyses of TCO{sub 2} and TALK by vacuum extraction and manometry in the laboratory of C. D. Keeling of SIO.

  1. Cyclic distillation technology - A mini-review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bîldea, Costin Sorin; Pătruţ, Cătălin; Jørgensen, Sten Bay;

    2016-01-01

    Process intensification in distillation systems has received much attention during the past decades, with the aim of increasing both energy and separation efficiency. Various techniques, such as internal heat-integrated distillation, membrane distillation, rotating packed bed, dividing-wall columns...... and reactive distillation were studied and reported in literature. All these techniques employ the conventional continuous counter-current contact of vapor and liquid phases. Cyclic distillation technology is based on an alternative operating mode using separate phase movement which leads to key practical...... advantages in both chemical and biochemical processes. This article provides a mini-review of cyclic distillation technology. The topics covered include the working principle, design and control methods, main benefits and limitations as well as current industrial applications. Cyclic distillation can...

  2. Science and Technology Review, September 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Failor, B.; Upadhye, R.; Wheatcraft, D. [eds.

    1996-09-01

    This review is published ten times a year to communicate, to a broad audience, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory`s scientific and technological accomplishments in fulfilling its primary missions. The feature articles are `Taking Lasers beyond the National Ignition Facility` and `Jumpin` Jupiter! Metallic Hydrogen`. The first article describes the ultimate goal of laser fusion as the production of electricity by inertial confinement fusion. Advances in diode-laser technology promise to take another step closer to that goal. The latter article discusses a Laboratory team`s efforts to provide evidence for the metallization of hydrogen based on the team`s expertise in shock compression. A commentary on `The Next Frontiers of Advanced Lasers Research is provided, and a research highlight is given on `Modeling Human Joints and Prosthetic Implants.

  3. Modoc National Wildlife Refuge wildlife and habitat management review June 30 [ to ] July 3 2003

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report summarizes the findings and recommendations from an evaluation of the wildlife and habitat management program conducted by a review team during June 30...

  4. Architectures, Concepts and Technologies for Service Oriented Computing : proceedings of ACT4SOC 2010, 4th International Workshop on Architectures, Concepts and Technologies for Service Oriented Computing in cnjunction with ICSOFT 2010, Athens, Greece, July 2010

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sinderen, van Marten; Sapkota, Brahmananda

    2010-01-01

    This volume contains the proceedings of the Fourth International Workshop on Architectures, Concepts and Technologies for Service Oriented Computing (ACT4SOC 2010), held on July 23 in Athens, Greece, in conjunction with the Fourth International Conference on Software and Data Technologies (ICSOFT 20

  5. A comprehensive review on proppant technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Liang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The main function of traditional proppants is to provide and maintain conductive fractures during well production where proppants should meet closure stress requirement and show resistance to diagenesis under downhole conditions. Many different proppants have been developed in the oil & gas industry, with various types, sizes, shapes, and applications. While most proppants are simply made of silica or ceramics, advanced proppants like ultra-lightweight proppant is also desirable since it reduces proppant settling and requires low viscosity fluids to transport. Additionally, multifunctional proppants may be used as a crude way to detect hydraulic fracture geometry or as matrices to slowly release downhole chemical additives, besides their basic function of maintaining conductive hydraulic fractures. Different from the conventional approach where proppant is pumped downhole in frac fluids, a revolutionary way to generate in-situ spherical proppants has been reported recently. This paper presents a comprehensive review of over 100 papers published in the past several decades on the subject. The objectives of this review study are to provide an overview of current proppant technologies, including different types, compositions, and shapes of proppants, new technologies to pump and organize proppants downhole such as channel fracturing, and also in-situ proppant generation. Finally, the paper sheds light on the current challenges and emphasizes needs for new proppant development for unconventional resources.

  6. A Review of Ultrasonic Nano Manipulation Technology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Junhui Hu∗

    2016-01-01

    Nano manipulation technology has great potential applications in the assembly, measurement and fabrication of nano materials, actuating and high-sensitivity sensing of biological samples, manufacture of nano sensors, decontamination of air and water, etc. As an actuating technology which is far from being mature, the nano manipulation still faces lots of challenges in the device principles, design, scaling up, sample safety, etc. The ultrasonic nano manipulation, in which nanoscale objects are handled and actuated by controlled ultrasound, is an emerging technology to meet some of challenges in nano manipulations. The author’ s research team and other groups have proposed and realized a series of nano manipulation functions such as trapping, transfer, rotation and concentration since 2012, by controlled ultrasound. Compared with other nano manipulating techniques, the ultrasonic method has the merits such as very low temperature rise at the manipulation area, little selectivity to the material properties of manipulated samples, capability of being implemented on the substrates without MENS or NEMS structure, etc. This paper reviews the progresses in principles, functions, structures and characteristics of the ultrasonic devices for nano manipulations.

  7. Science & Technology Review October/November 2016

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogt, R. L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Meissner, C. N. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Kotta, P. R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-11-11

    At Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, we focus on science and technology research to ensure our nation’s security. We also apply that expertise to solve other important national problems in energy, bioscience, and the environment. Science & Technology Review is published eight times a year to communicate, to a broad audience, the Laboratory’s scientific and technological accomplishments in fulfilling its primary missions. The publication’s goal is to help readers understand these accomplishments and appreciate their value to the individual citizen, the nation, and the world. The Laboratory is operated by Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC (LLNS), for the Department of Energy’s National Nuclear Security Administration. LLNS is a partnership involving Bechtel National, University of California, Babcock & Wilcox, Washington Division of URS Corporation, and Battelle in affiliation with Texas A&M University. More information about LLNS is available online at www.llnsllc.com. Please address any correspondence (including name and address changes) to S&TR, Mail Stop L-664, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, Livermore, California 94551, or telephone (925) 423-3893. Our e-mail address is str-mail@llnl.gov. S&TR is available on the Web at str.llnl.gov.

  8. 9 Waste Rubber Technologies Passed the Review on Advanced Applicable Technologies by MIIT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qiart Bozhang

    2012-01-01

    To promote the development of integrative utilization technologies of industrial solid wastes and to enhance the level of integrative utilization, the Ministry of Industry and Information Technology (MIIT) held Reviewing Meeting of Advanced Applicable Technologies for the Integrative Utilization of Industrial Solid Wastes on April 27. 9 integrative utilization technologies of waste rubber passed this review.

  9. Brote de gripe A H1N1 en la base española de Camp "Arena" (Herat, Afganistán durante julio y agosto de 2009. Parte II: Medidas clínicas y preventivas Outbreak of Influenza A H1N1 in Spanish base Camp "Arena" (Herat, Afghanistan during july and august 2009. Part II: Clinical and preventive measures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Maimir Jané

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available La Base de Camp "Arena" en Herat (Afganistán presentó durante los pasados meses de julio y agosto de 2009 un total de 121 casos de gripe A H1N1, 22 de ellos casos confirmados y el resto diagnosticados por "vínculo epidemiológico". Presentamos en el presente artículo las medidas clínicas y preventivas que fueron tomadas en la Base, en el intento de controlar el número de casos y asegurar la operatividad de la Base y el cumplimiento de la misión encomendada al contingente. Se revisan las características de la Base, las medidas tomadas con los pacientes, las medidas tomadas con los contactos, reflejando las dos distintas organizaciones que se realizaron al inicio del brote y posteriormente, las medidas generales tomadas en la Base y las medidas especiales características por tratarse de una unidad militar en una Zona de Operaciones. Finalmente realizamos una reflexión sobre algunas de las medidas tomadas.The Base Camp "Arena" in Herat (Afghanistan presented during the months of July and August 2009 a total of 121 cases of Flu A H1N1 (22 confirmed cases and the rest were diagnosed by epidemiological link. We present in this article the clinical and preventive measures taken at the base in an attempt to control the number of cases and ensure the operability of the base and fulfilling the mission entrusted to the quota. We review the characteristics of the Base, measures taken with patients, the measures taken with the contacts reflecting the two different organizations taken initially and during the second period that conducted at the outset of the outbreak, the general measures taken on the base and special measures because it features of a military unit in an area of operations. Finally we perform a reflection of some taken actions.

  10. Proceedings of the black liquor research program review fourth meeting held July 28--30, 1987

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emerson, D. B.; Whitworth, B. A.

    1987-10-01

    Research programs, presented at the black liquor review meeting are described. Research topics include the following: Cooperative Program in Kraft Recovery; Black Liquor Physical Properties; Viscosity of Strong Black Liquor; Ultrafiltration of Kraft Black Liquor; Molecular Weight Distribution of Kraft Lignin; Black Liquor Droplet Formation Project; Fundamental Studies of Black Liquor Combustion; Black Liquor Combustion Sensors; Flash X-ray Imagining of Black Liquor Sprays; Laser Induced Fluorescence For Process Control In The Pulp and Paper Industry; Recovery Boiler Optimization; Black Liquor Gasification and Use of the Products in Combined-Cycle Cogeneration; Black Liquor Steam Plasma Automization; The B and W Pyrosonic 2000R System; Monsteras Boiler Control System; and Cooperative Program Project Reviews. Individual projects are processed separately for the data bases.

  11. 78 FR 11902 - Review of Gun Safety Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-20

    ... of Justice Programs Review of Gun Safety Technologies AGENCY: National Institute of Justice, JPO, DOJ...) is conducting a review of existing and emerging gun safety technologies and plans to issue a report... to help inform its technology assessment and market research of existing and emerging gun...

  12. Science and Technology Review June 2002

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Budil, K.

    2002-06-01

    This Science and Technology Review has the following stories: (1) Fighting Bioterrorism, Fighting Cancer; (2) A Two-Pronged Attack on Bioterrorism--synthetic two-legged molecules will be excellent detectors of biowarfare agents and cancer cells; (3) Adaptive Optics Sharpen the View from Earth--astronomers are obtaining images with unprecedented resolution, thanks to telescopes equipped with adaptive optics developed at Livermore; (4) Experiments Re-create X Rays from Comets--Experiments using the Laboratory's electron beam ion trap and an x-ray spectrometer designed by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration are shedding light on how comets emit x rays as they pass the Sun; (5) Chemistry--50 Years of exploring the Material World--from isotopic analysis to atomic-level simulations of material behavior, Livermore's chemists and materials scientists apply their expertise to fulfill the Laboratory's mission.

  13. Biosensor technology for pesticides--a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Neelam; Bhardwaj, Atul

    2015-03-01

    Pesticides, due to their lucrative outcomes, are majorly implicated in agricultural fields for crop production enhancement. Due to their pest removal properties, pesticides of various classes have been designed to persist in the environment over a longer duration after their application to achieve maximum effectiveness. Apart from their recalcitrant structure and agricultural benefits, pesticides also impose acute toxicological effects onto the other various life forms. Their accumulation in the living system may prove to be detrimental if established in higher concentrations. Thus, their prompt and accurate analysis is a crucial matter of concern. Conventional techniques like chromatographic techniques (HPLC, GC, etc.) used for pesticides detection are associated with various limitations like stumpy sensitivity and efficiency, time consumption, laboriousity, requirement of expensive equipments and highly trained technicians, and many more. So there is a need to recruit the methods which can detect these neurotoxic compounds sensitively, selectively, rapidly, and easily in the field. Present work is a brief review of the pesticide effects, their current usage scenario, permissible limits in various food stuffs and 21st century advancements of biosensor technology for pesticide detection. Due to their exceptional performance capabilities, easiness in operation and on-site working, numerous biosensors have been developed for bio-monitoring of various environmental samples for pesticide evaluation immensely throughout the globe. Till date, based on sensing element (enzyme based, antibody based, etc.) and type of detection method used (Electrochemical, optical, and piezoelectric, etc.), a number of biosensors have been developed for pesticide detection. In present communication, authors have summarized 21st century's approaches of biosensor technology for pesticide detection such as enzyme-based biosensors, immunosensors, aptamers, molecularly imprinted polymers, and

  14. Publication of the Bulletin in August

    CERN Multimedia

    DG Unit

    2009-01-01

    During August, there will be one issue of the Bulletin (No. 32-33-34/2009) covering the weeks of 3, 10 and 17 August. The deadline for articles for this issue will be midday on Tuesday 28 July. The deadline for articles for the following issue of the Bulletin, No. 35-36/2009, will be midday on Tuesday 18 August. Thank you for your understanding. The Bulletin team

  15. Review of Biojet Fuel Conversion Technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Wei-Cheng [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Tao, Ling [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Markham, Jennifer [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Zhang, Yanan [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Tan, Eric [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Batan, Liaw [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Warner, Ethan [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Biddy, Mary [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2016-07-01

    Biomass-derived jet (biojet) fuel has become a key element in the aviation industry’s strategy to reduce operating costs and environmental impacts. Researchers from the oil-refining industry, the aviation industry, government, biofuel companies, agricultural organizations, and academia are working toward developing commercially viable and sustainable processes that produce long-lasting renewable jet fuels with low production costs and low greenhouse gas emissions. Additionally, jet fuels must meet ASTM International specifications and potentially be a 100% drop-in replacement for the current petroleum jet fuel. The combustion characteristics and engine tests demonstrate the benefits of running the aviation gas turbine with biojet fuels. In this study, the current technologies for producing renewable jet fuels, categorized by alcohols-to-jet, oil-to-jet, syngas-to-jet, and sugar-to-jet pathways, are reviewed. The main challenges for each technology pathway, including feedstock availability, conceptual process design, process economics, life-cycle assessment of greenhouse gas emissions, and commercial readiness, are discussed. Although the feedstock price and availability and energy intensity of the process are significant barriers, biomass-derived jet fuel has the potential to replace a significant portion of conventional jet fuel required to meet commercial and military demand.

  16. Oceanographic Data collected during the Florida Shelf Edge Expedition (FLoSEE) (CIOERT2010) on RV Seward Johnson in the Gulf of Mexico and North Atlantic Ocean between July 9, 2010 - August 9, 2010 (NODC Accession 0074541)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A science team on the research vessel Seward Johnson left from Fort Pierce, Fla. in early July to go to the eastern Gulf of Mexico. The researchers used a...

  17. Movements and Spatial Use of Odontocetes in the Western Main Hawaiian Islands: Results From Satellite-tagging and Photo-Identification Off Kaua’i and Ni’ihau in July/August 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-01

    Bayless, Michele Bane, Meredith Fagan, Paul Furumo, Samantha Hamilton, Oscar Johnson, David Kuhn, Allan Ligon, Morgan Richie, Julie Rivers, Kim Rogers...Research Consultants, Inc. Honolulu, HI Jim Eckman Office of Naval Research Arlington, VA Ari Friedlaender Duke University Beaufort

  18. Quarterly Progress Report for the Chemical and Energy Research Section of the Chemical Technology Division: July-September 1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jubin, R.T.

    2001-04-16

    This report summarizes the major activities conducted in the Chemical and Energy Research Section of the Chemical Technology Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) during the period July-September 1999. The section conducts basic and applied research and development in chemical engineering, applied chemistry, and bioprocessing, with an emphasis on energy-driven technologies and advanced chemical separations for nuclear and waste applications. The report describes the various tasks performed within ten major areas of research: Hot Cell Operations, Process Chemistry, Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) Remediation Studies, Chemistry Research, Physical Properties Research, Biochemical Engineering, Separations and Materials Synthesis, Fluid Structures and Properties, Biotechnology Research, and Molecular Studies. The name of a technical contact is included with each task described, and readers are encouraged to contact these individuals if they need additional information. Activities conducted within the area of the Cell Operations involved the testing of two continuously stirred tank reactors in series to evaluate the Savannah River-developed process of small-tank tetraphenylborate precipitation to remove cesium, strontium and transuranics from supernatant. Within the area of Process Chemistry, various topics related to solids formation in process solutions from caustic treatment of Hanford sludge were addressed. Saltcake dissolution efforts continued, including the development of a predictive algorithm. New initiatives for the section included modeling activities centered on detection of hydrogen in {sup 233}U storage wells and wax formation in petroleum mixtures, as well as support for the Spallation Neutron Source (investigation of transmutation products formed during operation). Other activities involved in situ grouting and evaluation of options for use (i.e., as castable shapes) of depleted uranium. In a continuation of activities of the preceding

  19. 78 FR 20091 - Certain Pasta From Italy: Notice of Partial Rescission of Antidumping Duty Administrative Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-03

    ... Administrative Review, 77 FR 39216 (July 2, 2012). \\2\\ See Initiation of Antidumping and Countervailing Duty Administrative Reviews and Request for Revocation in Part, 77 FR 52688 (August 30, 2012) (Initiation). On August... Shipment Determination and Revocation of Order, in Part; 2010-2011, 78 FR 9364 (February 8, 2013)...

  20. 76 FR 23973 - Certain Pasta From Italy: Notice of Partial Rescission of Antidumping Duty Administrative Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-29

    ... FR 38074 (July 1, 2010). \\2\\ See Initiation of Antidumping and Countervailing Duty Administrative Reviews and Deferral of Initiation of Administrative Review, 75 FR 53274, (August 31, 2010) (``Initiation... and Revocation, in Part, 74 FR 41120 (August 14, 2009). The merchandise subject to this order...