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Sample records for technology phage display

  1. Advancement and applications of peptide phage display technology in biomedical science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chien-Hsun; Liu, I-Ju; Lu, Ruei-Min; Wu, Han-Chung

    2016-01-19

    Combinatorial phage library is a powerful research tool for high-throughput screening of protein interactions. Of all available molecular display techniques, phage display has proven to be the most popular approach. Screening phage-displayed random peptide libraries is an effective means of identifying peptides that can bind target molecules and regulate their function. Phage-displayed peptide libraries can be used for (i) B-cell and T-cell epitope mapping, (ii) selection of bioactive peptides bound to receptors or proteins, disease-specific antigen mimics, peptides bound to non-protein targets, cell-specific peptides, or organ-specific peptides, and (iii) development of peptide-mediated drug delivery systems and other applications. Targeting peptides identified using phage display technology may be useful for basic research and translational medicine. In this review article, we summarize the latest technological advancements in the application of phage-displayed peptide libraries to applied biomedical sciences.

  2. Phage Display Technology in Biomaterials Engineering: Progress and Opportunities for Applications in Regenerative Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Ivone M; Reis, Rui L; Azevedo, Helena S

    2016-11-18

    The field of regenerative medicine has been gaining momentum steadily over the past few years. The emphasis in regenerative medicine is to use various in vitro and in vivo approaches that leverage the intrinsic healing mechanisms of the body to treat patients with disabling injuries and chronic diseases such as diabetes, osteoarthritis, and degenerative disorders of the cardiovascular and central nervous system. Phage display has been successfully employed to identify peptide ligands for a wide variety of targets, ranging from relatively small molecules (enzymes, cell receptors) to inorganic, organic, and biological (tissues) materials. Over the past two decades, phage display technology has advanced tremendously and has become a powerful tool in the most varied fields of research, including biotechnology, materials science, cell biology, pharmacology, and diagnostics. The growing interest in and success of phage display libraries is largely due to its incredible versatility and practical use. This review discusses the potential of phage display technology in biomaterials engineering for applications in regenerative medicine.

  3. Display technology on filamentous phage in the search for anti-infective biological agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelson Santiago Vispo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The causes of antibiotic resistance are complex. The phage display technology has been used mainly to produce monoclonal antibodies (MAbs and peptides directed against cancer or inflammatory disease targets. Today, this technology is recognized as a powerful tool for selecting novel peptides and antibodies that can bind to a wide range of antigens, ranging from whole cells to proteins and lipid targets. In this review, we highlight research that exploits the phage display technology to discover new drugs against infectious diseases, with a focus on antimicrobial peptides and antibodies. Methods: Basic and recent literature review was made, mainly focused on general aspects of phage display technology and the application in the search of new peptides or antibodies of pharmaceutical use to combat the infectious diseases transmitted by bacteria and virus. Results: Updated information on the selected topics is shown, with a guiding and practical approach aimed at researchers in the field of molecular biology to continue deepening the technology with special emphasis in the applications that have been developed in Cuba. Conclusions: Advances in methods of screening, manufacturing, and humanization technologies show that phage display technology can significantly contribute in the fight against clinically important pathogens.

  4. Challenges in Optimizing a Prostate Carcinoma Binding Peptide, Identified through the Phage Display Technology

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    Jürgen Debus

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The transfer of peptides identified through the phage display technology to clinical applications is difficult. Major drawbacks are the metabolic degradation and label instability. The aim of our work is the optimization of DUP-1, a peptide which was identified by phage display to specifically target human prostate carcinoma. To investigate the influence of chelate conjugation, DOTA was coupled to DUP-1 and labeling was performed with 111In. To improve serum stability cyclization of DUP-1 and targeted D-amino acid substitution were carried out. Alanine scanning was performed for identification of the binding site and based on the results peptide fragments were chemically synthesized. The properties of modified ligands were investigated in in vitro binding and competition assays. In vivo biodistribution studies were carried out in mice, carrying human prostate tumors subcutaneously. DOTA conjugation resulted in different cellular binding kinetics, rapid in vivo renal clearance and increased tumor-to-organ ratios. Cyclization and D-amino acid substitution increased the metabolic stability but led to binding affinity decrease. Fragment investigation indicated that the sequence NRAQDY might be significant for target-binding. Our results demonstrate challenges in optimizing peptides, identified through phage display libraries, and show that careful investigation of modified derivatives is necessary in order to improve their characteristics.

  5. Application of phage peptide display technology for the study of food allergen epitopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xueni; Dreskin, Stephen C

    2017-06-01

    Phage peptide display technology has been used to identify IgE-binding mimotopes (mimics of natural epitopes) that mimic conformational epitopes. This approach is effective in the characterization of those epitopes that are important for eliciting IgE-mediated allergic responses by food allergens and those that are responsible for cross-reactivity among allergenic food proteins. Application of this technology will increase our understanding of the mechanisms whereby food allergens elicit allergic reactions, will facilitate the discovery of diagnostic reagents and may lead to mimotope-based immunotherapy. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Identification of ligand-selective peptidic ActRIIB-antagonists using phage display technology

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    Kotaro Sakamoto

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available ActRIIB (activin receptor type-2B is an activin receptor subtype constitutively expressed in the whole body, playing a role in cellular proliferation, differentiation, and metabolism. For its various physiological activities, ActRIIB interacts with activin and multiple other ligands including myostatin (MSTN, growth differentiation factor 11 (GDF11, and bone morphogenetic protein 9 (BMP9. Notably, the protein-protein interaction (PPI between ActRIIB and MSTN negatively controls muscular development. Therefore, this PPI has been targeted for effective treatment of muscle degenerative diseases such as muscular dystrophy and sarcopenia. Here, we report the identification of ligand-selective peptidic ActRIIB-antagonists by phage display technology. Our peptides bound to the extracellular domain of ActRIIB, inhibited PPIs between ActRIIB expressed on the cell surface and its ligands, and subsequently suppressed activation of Smad that serves as the downstream signal of the ActRIIB pathway. Interestingly, these peptidic antagonists displayed different ligand selectivities; the AR2mini peptide inhibited multiple ligands (activin A, MSTN, GDF11, and BMP9, AR9 inhibited MSTN and GDF11, while AR8 selectively inhibited MSTN. This is the first report of artificial peptidic ActRIIB-antagonists possessing ligand-selectivity.

  7. Identification of a LFA-1 region involved in the HIV-1-induced syncytia formation through phage-display technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poloni, F; Puddu, P; Moretti, F; Flego, M; Romagnoli, G; Tombesi, M; Capone, I; Chersi, A; Felici, F; Cianfriglia, M

    2001-01-01

    We have identified a peptide region on CD18 molecule (the beta subunit of the LFA-1 molecule) involved in syncytia formation of HIV-1-infected lymphocytes. Several phage clones mimicking an epitope of the CD18 cell-surface determinant were isolated from two 9-mer random peptide phage-displayed libraries via their binding to the CD18-specific monoclonal antibody (mAb) MHM23, which in in vitro assay inhibits syncytia formation in HIV-1-infected cells. The peptide sequences displayed on phages that blocked immunolabeling of this mAb on LFA-1-expressing cells were used to identify the epitope recognized by mAb MHM23 by sequence comparison. On the basis of this analysis, two peptides which inhibited syncytia formation in HIV-1-infected cells in vitro were synthesized, thus confirming that they mimic a CD18 domain that is involved in this phenomenon. The results here presented highlight the potential of phage-display technology for the study of biological processes at the basis of virus infection, but also suggest new approaches for the therapy of AIDS.

  8. A new peptide ligand for targeting human carbonic anhydrase IX, identified through the phage display technology.

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    Vasileios Askoxylakis

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Carbonic anhydrase IX (CAIX is a transmembrane enzyme found to be overexpressed in various tumors and associated with tumor hypoxia. Ligands binding this target may be used to visualize hypoxia, tumor manifestation or treat tumors by endoradiotherapy.Phage display was performed with a 12 amino acid phage display library by panning against a recombinant extracellular domain of human carbonic anhydrase IX. The identified peptide CaIX-P1 was chemically synthesized and tested in vitro on various cell lines and in vivo in Balb/c nu/nu mice carrying subcutaneously transplanted tumors. Binding, kinetic and competition studies were performed on the CAIX positive human renal cell carcinoma cell line SKRC 52, the CAIX negative human renal cell carcinoma cell line CaKi 2, the human colorectal carcinoma cell line HCT 116 and on human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC. Organ distribution studies were carried out in mice, carrying SKRC 52 tumors. RNA expression of CAIX in HCT 116 and HUVEC cells was investigated by quantitative real time PCR.In vitro binding experiments of (125I-labeled-CaIX-P1 revealed an increased uptake of the radioligand in the CAIX positive renal cell carcinoma cell line SKRC 52. Binding of the radioligand in the colorectal carcinoma cell line HCT 116 increased with increasing cell density and correlated with the mRNA expression of CAIX. Radioligand uptake was inhibited up to 90% by the unlabeled CaIX-P1 peptide, but not by the negative control peptide octreotide at the same concentration. No binding was demonstrated in CAIX negative CaKi 2 and HUVEC cells. Organ distribution studies revealed a higher accumulation in SKRC 52 tumors than in heart, spleen, liver, muscle, intestinum and brain, but a lower uptake compared to blood and kidney.These data indicate that CaIX-P1 is a promising candidate for the development of new ligands targeting human carbonic anhydrase IX.

  9. Production of a phage-displayed single chain variable fragment ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To develop specific single chain variable fragments (scFv) against infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) via phage display technology. Methods: Purified viruses were initially applied for iterative panning rounds of scFv phage display libraries. The binding ability of the selected scFv antibody fragments against the ...

  10. Screening Phage-Display Antibody Libraries Using Protein Arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jara-Acevedo, Ricardo; Díez, Paula; González-González, María; Dégano, Rosa María; Ibarrola, Nieves; Góngora, Rafael; Orfao, Alberto; Fuentes, Manuel

    2018-01-01

    Phage-display technology constitutes a powerful tool for the generation of specific antibodies against a predefined antigen. The main advantages of phage-display technology in comparison to conventional hybridoma-based techniques are: (1) rapid generation time and (2) antibody selection against an unlimited number of molecules (biological or not). However, the main bottleneck with phage-display technology is the validation strategies employed to confirm the greatest number of antibody fragments. The development of new high-throughput (HT) techniques has helped overcome this great limitation. Here, we describe a new method based on an array technology that allows the deposition of hundreds to thousands of phages by micro-contact on a unique nitrocellulose surface. This setup comes in combination with bioinformatic approaches that enables simultaneous affinity screening in a HT format of antibody-displaying phages.

  11. Identifying Bacterial Immune Evasion Proteins Using Phage Display.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fevre, Cindy; Scheepmaker, Lisette; Haas, Pieter-Jan

    2017-01-01

    Methods aimed at identification of immune evasion proteins are mainly rely on in silico prediction of sequence, structural homology to known evasion proteins or use a proteomics driven approach. Although proven successful these methods are limited by a low efficiency and or lack of functional identification. Here we describe a high-throughput genomic strategy to functionally identify bacterial immune evasion proteins using phage display technology. Genomic bacterial DNA is randomly fragmented and ligated into a phage display vector that is used to create a phage display library expressing bacterial secreted and membrane bound proteins. This library is used to select displayed bacterial secretome proteins that interact with host immune components.

  12. Construction of Recombinant Single Chain Variable Fragment (ScFv) Antibody Against Superantigen for Immunodetection Using Antibody Phage Display Technology.

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    Singh, Pawan Kumar; Agrawal, Ranu; Kamboj, D V; Singh, Lokendra

    2016-01-01

    Superantigens are a class of antigens that bind to the major histocompatibility complex class (MHC) II and T-cell receptor (TCR) and cause the nonspecific activation of T cells, resulting in a massive release of pro-inflammatory mediators. They are produced by the gram-positive organisms Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pyogenes, and by a variety of other microbes such as viruses and mycoplasma, and cause toxic shock syndrome (TSS) and even death in some cases. The immunodetection of superantigens is difficult due to the polyclonal activation of T-cells leading to nonspecific antibody production. The production of recombinant monoclonal antibodies against superantigens can solve this problem and are far better than polyclonal antibodies in terms of detection. Here, we describe the construction of recombinant single chain variable fragments (ScFv) antibodies against superantigens with specific reference to SEB (staphylococcal enterotoxin B) using antibody phage display technology.

  13. Development of two murine antibodies against Neospora caninum using phage display technology and application on the detection of N. caninum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinhua Dong

    Full Text Available Neosporosis, caused by an intracellular parasite, Neospora caninum, is an infectious disease primarily of cattle and dogs. It occurs worldwide and causes huge damages to dairy farms. In this study, we immunized mice with recombinant surface-associated protein 1 of N. caninum (rNcSAG1 and developed two novel monoclonal antibodies, A10 and H3, against NcSAG1 using phage-display technology. Both clones bound to purified rNcSAG1 and the half maximal inhibitory concentrations of A10 and H3 are 50 and 72 nM of rNcSAG1, respectively. In immunofluorescence assays, both A10 and H3 Fabs bound to N. caninum parasites. Direct detection of N. caninum parasites was developed firstly using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA with A10 and H3. Binding of A10 and H3 antibodies to rNcSAG1 was also inhibited by some certain anti-N. caninum antibodies in the neosporosis-positive cattle sera, suggesting they might bind to the same epitopes of NcSAG1 with those anti-N. caninum antibodies of bovine. These antibodies were demonstrated to have a potential for monitoring the N. caninum parasites in a dairy farm, which may lead to protect livestock from parasite-infection.

  14. Development of Two Murine Antibodies against Neospora caninum Using Phage Display Technology and Application on the Detection of N. caninum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Jinhua; Otsuki, Takahiro; Kato, Tatsuya; Kohsaka, Tetsuya; Ike, Kazunori; Park, Enoch Y.

    2013-01-01

    Neosporosis, caused by an intracellular parasite, Neospora caninum, is an infectious disease primarily of cattle and dogs. It occurs worldwide and causes huge damages to dairy farms. In this study, we immunized mice with recombinant surface-associated protein 1 of N. caninum (rNcSAG1) and developed two novel monoclonal antibodies, A10 and H3, against NcSAG1 using phage-display technology. Both clones bound to purified rNcSAG1 and the half maximal inhibitory concentrations of A10 and H3 are 50 and 72 nM of rNcSAG1, respectively. In immunofluorescence assays, both A10 and H3 Fabs bound to N. caninum parasites. Direct detection of N. caninum parasites was developed firstly using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) with A10 and H3. Binding of A10 and H3 antibodies to rNcSAG1 was also inhibited by some certain anti-N. caninum antibodies in the neosporosis-positive cattle sera, suggesting they might bind to the same epitopes of NcSAG1 with those anti-N. caninum antibodies of bovine. These antibodies were demonstrated to have a potential for monitoring the N. caninum parasites in a dairy farm, which may lead to protect livestock from parasite-infection. PMID:23308179

  15. Interaction Analysis through Proteomic Phage Display

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    Gustav N. Sundell

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Phage display is a powerful technique for profiling specificities of peptide binding domains. The method is suited for the identification of high-affinity ligands with inhibitor potential when using highly diverse combinatorial peptide phage libraries. Such experiments further provide consensus motifs for genome-wide scanning of ligands of potential biological relevance. A complementary but considerably less explored approach is to display expression products of genomic DNA, cDNA, open reading frames (ORFs, or oligonucleotide libraries designed to encode defined regions of a target proteome on phage particles. One of the main applications of such proteomic libraries has been the elucidation of antibody epitopes. This review is focused on the use of proteomic phage display to uncover protein-protein interactions of potential relevance for cellular function. The method is particularly suited for the discovery of interactions between peptide binding domains and their targets. We discuss the largely unexplored potential of this method in the discovery of domain-motif interactions of potential biological relevance.

  16. Phage Display for the Generation of Antibodies for Proteome Research, Diagnostics and Therapy

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    Michael Hust

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Twenty years after its development, antibody phage display using filamentous bacteriophage represents the most successful in vitro antibody selection technology. Initially, its development was encouraged by the unique possibility of directly generating recombinant human antibodies for therapy. Today, antibody phage display has been developed as a robust technology offering great potential for automation. Generation of monospecific binders provides a valuable tool for proteome research, leading to highly enhanced throughput and reduced costs. This review presents the phage display technology, application areas of antibodies in research, diagnostics and therapy and the use of antibody phage display for these applications.

  17. Nanoscale bacteriophage biosensors beyond phage display.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jong-Wook; Song, Jangwon; Hwang, Mintai P; Lee, Kwan Hyi

    2013-01-01

    Bacteriophages are traditionally used for the development of phage display technology. Recently, their nanosized dimensions and ease with which genetic modifications can be made to their structure and function have put them in the spotlight towards their use in a variety of biosensors. In particular, the expression of any protein or peptide on the extraluminal surface of bacteriophages is possible by genetically engineering the genome. In addition, the relatively short replication time of bacteriophages offers researchers the ability to generate mass quantities of any given bacteriophage-based biosensor. Coupled with the emergence of various biomarkers in the clinic as a means to determine pathophysiological states, the development of current and novel technologies for their detection and quantification is imperative. In this review, we categorize bacteriophages by their morphology into M13-based filamentous bacteriophages and T4- or T7-based icosahedral bacteriophages, and examine how such advantages are utilized across a variety of biosensors. In essence, we take a comprehensive approach towards recent trends in bacteriophage-based biosensor applications and discuss their outlook with regards to the field of biotechnology.

  18. Phages and HIV-1: from display to interplay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delhalle, Sylvie; Schmit, Jean-Claude; Chevigné, Andy

    2012-01-01

    The complex hide-and-seek game between HIV-1 and the host immune system has impaired the development of an efficient vaccine. In addition, the high variability of the virus impedes the long-term control of viral replication by small antiviral drugs. For more than 20 years, phage display technology has been intensively used in the field of HIV-1 to explore the epitope landscape recognized by monoclonal and polyclonal HIV-1-specific antibodies, thereby providing precious data about immunodominant and neutralizing epitopes. In parallel, biopanning experiments with various combinatorial or antibody fragment libraries were conducted on viral targets as well as host receptors to identify HIV-1 inhibitors. Besides these applications, phage display technology has been applied to characterize the enzymatic specificity of the HIV-1 protease. Phage particles also represent valuable alternative carriers displaying various HIV-1 antigens to the immune system and eliciting antiviral responses. This review presents and summarizes the different studies conducted with regard to the nature of phage libraries, target display mode and biopanning procedures.

  19. Phages and HIV-1: From Display to Interplay

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    Andy Chevigné

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The complex hide-and-seek game between HIV-1 and the host immune system has impaired the development of an efficient vaccine. In addition, the high variability of the virus impedes the long-term control of viral replication by small antiviral drugs. For more than 20 years, phage display technology has been intensively used in the field of HIV-1 to explore the epitope landscape recognized by monoclonal and polyclonal HIV-1-specific antibodies, thereby providing precious data about immunodominant and neutralizing epitopes. In parallel, biopanning experiments with various combinatorial or antibody fragment libraries were conducted on viral targets as well as host receptors to identify HIV-1 inhibitors. Besides these applications, phage display technology has been applied to characterize the enzymatic specificity of the HIV-1 protease. Phage particles also represent valuable alternative carriers displaying various HIV-1 antigens to the immune system and eliciting antiviral responses. This review presents and summarizes the different studies conducted with regard to the nature of phage libraries, target display mode and biopanning procedures.

  20. A novel approach for separating bacteriophages from other bacteriophages using affinity chromatography and phage display.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceglarek, Izabela; Piotrowicz, Agnieszka; Lecion, Dorota; Miernikiewicz, Paulina; Owczarek, Barbara; Hodyra, Katarzyna; Harhala, Marek; Górski, Andrzej; Dąbrowska, Krystyna

    2013-11-14

    Practical applications of bacteriophages in medicine and biotechnology induce a great need for technologies of phage purification. None of the popular methods offer solutions for separation of a phage from another similar phage. We used affinity chromatography combined with competitive phage display (i) to purify T4 bacteriophage from bacterial debris and (ii) to separate T4 from other contaminating bacteriophages. In 'competitive phage display' bacterial cells produced both wild types of the proteins (expression from the phage genome) and the protein fusions with affinity tags (expression from the expression vectors). Fusion proteins were competitively incorporated into the phage capsid. It allowed effective separation of T4 from a contaminating phage on standard affinity resins.

  1. Phage display of an intracellular carboxylesterase of Bacillus subtilis : Comparison of sec and tat pathway export capabilities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Droge, Melloney J.; Boersma, Ykelien L.; Braun, Peter G.; Buining, Robbert Jan; Julsing, Mattijs K.; Selles, Karin G. A.; van Dijl, Jan Maarten; Quax, Wim J.

    Using the phage display technology, a protein can be displayed at the surface of bacteriophages as a fusion to one of the phage coat proteins. Here we describe development of this method for fusion of an intracellular carboxylesterase of Bacillus subtilis to the phage minor coat protein g3p. The

  2. Epitope mapping of the monoclonal antibody MM12.10 to external MDR1 P-glycoprotein domain by synthetic peptide scanning and phage display technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romagnoli, G; Poloni, F; Flego, M; Moretti, F; Di Modugno, F; Chersi, A; Falasca, G; Signoretti, C; Castagna, M; Cianfriglia, M

    1999-05-01

    Epitope mapping of MDR1-P-glycoprotein using specific monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) may help in delineating P-glycoprotein topology and hence in elucidating the relationship between its structural organization and drug-efflux pump function. In this work, by using synthetic peptide scanning and phage display technologies, the binding sites of the mAb MM12.10, a novel antibody to intact human multidrug resistant (MDR) cells, were studied. The results we obtained confirm that two regions localized on the predicted fourth and sixth loops are indeed external and that MDR1 peptides covering the inner domain of the current 12 transmembrane segment (TMs) model of P-glycoprotein could form part of the MM12.10 epitope.

  3. Efficient identification of phosphatidylserine-binding proteins by ORF phage display

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caberoy, Nora B.; Zhou, Yixiong; Alvarado, Gabriela; Fan, Xianqun; Li, Wei

    2009-01-01

    To efficiently elucidate the biological roles of phosphatidylserine (PS), we developed open-reading-frame (ORF) phage display to identify PS-binding proteins. The procedure of phage panning was optimized with a phage clone expressing MFG-E8, a well-known PS-binding protein. Three rounds of phage panning with ORF phage display cDNA library resulted in ∼300-fold enrichment in PS-binding activity. A total of 17 PS-binding phage clones were identified. Unlike phage display with conventional cDNA libraries, all 17 PS-binding clones were ORFs encoding 13 real proteins. Sequence analysis revealed that all identified PS-specific phage clones had dimeric basic amino acid residues. GST fusion proteins were expressed for 3 PS-binding proteins and verified for their binding activity to PS liposomes, but not phosphatidylcholine liposomes. These results elucidated previously unknown PS-binding proteins and demonstrated that ORF phage display is a versatile technology capable of efficiently identifying binding proteins for non-protein molecules like PS.

  4. Oligopeptide M13 Phage Display in Pathogen Research

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    Michael Hust

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Phage display has become an established, widely used method for selection of peptides, antibodies or alternative scaffolds. The use of phage display for the selection of antigens from genomic or cDNA libraries of pathogens which is an alternative to the classical way of identifying immunogenic proteins is not well-known. In recent years several new applications for oligopeptide phage display in disease related fields have been developed which has led to the identification of various new antigens. These novel identified immunogenic proteins provide new insights into host pathogen interactions and can be used for the development of new diagnostic tests and vaccines. In this review we focus on the M13 oligopeptide phage display system for pathogen research but will also give examples for lambda phage display and for applications in other disease related fields. In addition, a detailed technical work flow for the identification of immunogenic oligopeptides using the pHORF system is given. The described identification of immunogenic proteins of pathogens using oligopeptide phage display can be linked to antibody phage display resulting in a vaccine pipeline.

  5. A novel helper phage enabling construction of genome-scale ORF-enriched phage display libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Amita; Shrivastava, Nimisha; Grover, Payal; Singh, Ajay; Mathur, Kapil; Verma, Vaishali; Kaur, Charanpreet; Chaudhary, Vijay K

    2013-01-01

    Phagemid-based expression of cloned genes fused to the gIIIP coding sequence and rescue using helper phages, such as VCSM13, has been used extensively for constructing large antibody phage display libraries. However, for randomly primed cDNA and gene fragment libraries, this system encounters reading frame problems wherein only one of 18 phages display the translated foreign peptide/protein fused to phagemid-encoded gIIIP. The elimination of phages carrying out-of-frame inserts is vital in order to improve the quality of phage display libraries. In this study, we designed a novel helper phage, AGM13, which carries trypsin-sensitive sites within the linker regions of gIIIP. This renders the phage highly sensitive to trypsin digestion, which abolishes its infectivity. For open reading frame (ORF) selection, the phagemid-borne phages are rescued using AGM13, so that clones with in-frame inserts express fusion proteins with phagemid-encoded trypsin-resistant gIIIP, which becomes incorporated into the phages along with a few copies of AGM13-encoded trypsin-sensitive gIIIP. In contrast, clones with out-of-frame inserts produce phages carrying only AGM13-encoded trypsin-sensitive gIIIP. Trypsin treatment of the phage population renders the phages with out-of-frame inserts non-infectious, whereas phages carrying in-frame inserts remain fully infectious and can hence be enriched by infection. This strategy was applied efficiently at a genome scale to generate an ORF-enriched whole genome fragment library from Mycobacterium tuberculosis, in which nearly 100% of the clones carried in-frame inserts after selection. The ORF-enriched libraries were successfully used for identification of linear and conformational epitopes for monoclonal antibodies specific to mycobacterial proteins.

  6. A novel helper phage enabling construction of genome-scale ORF-enriched phage display libraries.

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    Amita Gupta

    Full Text Available Phagemid-based expression of cloned genes fused to the gIIIP coding sequence and rescue using helper phages, such as VCSM13, has been used extensively for constructing large antibody phage display libraries. However, for randomly primed cDNA and gene fragment libraries, this system encounters reading frame problems wherein only one of 18 phages display the translated foreign peptide/protein fused to phagemid-encoded gIIIP. The elimination of phages carrying out-of-frame inserts is vital in order to improve the quality of phage display libraries. In this study, we designed a novel helper phage, AGM13, which carries trypsin-sensitive sites within the linker regions of gIIIP. This renders the phage highly sensitive to trypsin digestion, which abolishes its infectivity. For open reading frame (ORF selection, the phagemid-borne phages are rescued using AGM13, so that clones with in-frame inserts express fusion proteins with phagemid-encoded trypsin-resistant gIIIP, which becomes incorporated into the phages along with a few copies of AGM13-encoded trypsin-sensitive gIIIP. In contrast, clones with out-of-frame inserts produce phages carrying only AGM13-encoded trypsin-sensitive gIIIP. Trypsin treatment of the phage population renders the phages with out-of-frame inserts non-infectious, whereas phages carrying in-frame inserts remain fully infectious and can hence be enriched by infection. This strategy was applied efficiently at a genome scale to generate an ORF-enriched whole genome fragment library from Mycobacterium tuberculosis, in which nearly 100% of the clones carried in-frame inserts after selection. The ORF-enriched libraries were successfully used for identification of linear and conformational epitopes for monoclonal antibodies specific to mycobacterial proteins.

  7. Phage survival: the biodegradability of M13 phage display library in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tóthová, L'ubomíra; Bábíčková, Janka; Celec, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Administration of bacteriophages is used for phage therapy modulation of gut microbiome or for in vivo phage display. The aim of the study was to analyze the survival of M13 phage in different body fluids and tissues in vitro. The survival of M13 phage was measured in vitro in human blood, saliva, urine, artificial gastric juice (AGJ), and mouse homogenates of stomach, jejunum, and colon after defined time points (5, 15, or 45 Min). The plates were inspected after overnight incubation and the plaques were counted. No phage was recovered after 5 Min of incubation with AGJ. In urine, the phage survival was decreased by 44% after 5 Min of incubation (P = 0.004). In saliva, the recovered titer was decreased by 33% and 88% (P Phage coincubation with jejunum homogenate led to significant decrease of phage titer by 72% (P M13 phage depending on time of incubation was proved under several in vitro conditions, with low pH in the AGJ having the most detrimental effect on phage survival. Phage pharmacokinetics described in vitro might have applications for the use of bacteriophages in vivo. © 2012 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  8. Phage display of peptide / major histocompatibility class I complexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vest Hansen, N; Ostergaard Pedersen, L; Stryhn, A

    2001-01-01

    and subsequently that ot the T cell receptor for peptide-MHC-I complex), we have fused a single chain peptide-MHC-I complex to the phage minor coat protein, gpIII, and displayed it on filamentous phage. Expression of peptide-MHC-I complexes was shown with relevant conformation-specific monoclonal antibodies and......, more importantly, with a unique "T cell receptor-like" (i. e. peptide-specific, MHC-I-restricted) antibody. Thus, properly assembled and folded peptide-MHC-I complexes can be displayed on filamentous phage. Despite the successful display, interaction with T cells could not be demonstrated....

  9. Exploring the Secretomes of Microbes and Microbial Communities Using Filamentous Phage Display

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dragana eGagic

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Microbial surface and secreted proteins (the secretome contain a large number of proteins that interact with other microbes, host and/or environment. These proteins are exported by the coordinated activities of the protein secretion machinery present in the cell. A group of phage, called filamentous phage, have the ability to hijack the cellular protein secretion machinery in order to amplify and assemble via a secretion-like process. This ability has been harnessed in the use of filamentous phage of Escherichia coli in biotechnology applications, including screening large libraries of variants for binding to bait of interest, from tissues in vivo to pure proteins or even inorganic substrates. In this review we discuss the roles of secretome proteins in pathogenic and non-pathogenic bacteria and corresponding secretion pathways. We describe the basics of phage display technology and its variants applied to discovery of bacterial proteins that have functions of interest for bacterial colonization and pathogenesis, through filamentous phage display library screening. Published literature also shows that phage display is suitable for secretome protein display as a tool for identification immunogenic peptides and can be used for discovery of vaccine candidates. Secretome selection aided by next-generation sequence analysis can also be used for selective display of the secretome at a microbial community scale, the latter revealing the richness of secretome functions of interest and surprising versatility in filamentous phage display of secretome proteins from large number of Gram-negative as well as Gram-positive bacteria and archaea.

  10. Automated Detection of Conformational Epitopes Using Phage Display Peptide Sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surendra S Negi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Precise determination of conformational epitopes of neutralizing antibodies represents a key step in the rational design of novel vaccines. A powerful experimental method to gain insights on the physical chemical nature of conformational epitopes is the selection of linear peptides that bind with high affinities to a monoclonal antibody of interest by phage display technology. However, the structural characterization of conformational epitopes from these mimotopes is not straightforward, and in the past the interpretation of peptide sequences from phage display experiments focused on linear sequence analysis to find a consensus sequence or common sequence motifs.Results: We present a fully automated search method, EpiSearch that predicts the possible location of conformational epitopes on the surface of an antigen. The algorithm uses peptide sequences from phage display experiments as input, and ranks all surface exposed patches according to the frequency distribution of similar residues in the peptides and in the patch. We have tested the performance of the EpiSearch algorithm for six experimental data sets of phage display experiments, the human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER-2/neu, the antibody mAb Bo2C11 targeting the C2 domain of FVIII, antibodies mAb 17b and mAb b12 of the HIV envelope protein gp120, mAb 13b5 targeting HIV-1 capsid protein and 80R of the SARS coronavirus spike protein. In all these examples the conformational epitopes as determined by the X-ray crystal structures of the antibody-antigen complexes, were found within the highest scoring patches of EpiSearch, covering in most cases more than 50% residues of experimental observed conformational epitopes. Input options of the program include mapping of a single peptide or a set of peptides on the antigen structure, and the results of the calculation can be visualized on our interactive web server.Availability: Users can access the EpiSearch from our web

  11. 12mer Phage Display Peptide Library

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    efficacy in the production of anti-M. leprae antibodies in an animal model. Methods: Blood samples were ... and western blot. anti-leprae antibodies in various dilutions and were found to be serological active. Sequencing of the isolated peptides .... Serial dilutions of phage were prepared in LB broth (1 % Yeast extract, ...

  12. Construction and Selection of Affilin® Phage Display Libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Settele, Florian; Zwarg, Madlen; Fiedler, Sebastian; Koscheinz, Daniel; Bosse-Doenecke, Eva

    2018-01-01

    Affilin ® molecules represent a new class of so-called scaffold proteins. The concept of scaffold proteins is to use stable and versatile protein structures which can be endowed with de novo binding properties and specificities by introducing mutations in surface exposed amino acid residues. Complex variations and combinations are generated by genetic methods of randomization resulting in large cDNA libraries. The selection for candidates binding to a desired target can be executed by display methods, especially the very robust and flexible phage display. Here, we describe the construction of ubiquitin based Affilin ® phage display libraries and their use in biopanning experiments for the identification of novel protein ligands.

  13. Selective posttranslational modification of phage-displayed polypeptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsao, Meng-Lin; Tian, Feng; Schultz, Peter

    2013-02-05

    The invention relates to posttranslational modification of phage-displayed polypeptides. These displayed polypeptides comprise at least one unnatural amino acid, e.g., an aryl-azide amino acid such as p-azido-L-phenylalanine, or an alkynyl-amino acid such as para-propargyloxyphenylalanine, which are incorporated into the phage-displayed fusion polypeptide at a selected position by using an in vivo orthogonal translation system comprising a suitable orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase and a suitable orthogonal tRNA species. These unnatural amino acids advantageously provide targets for posttranslational modifications such as azide-alkyne [3+2]cycloaddition reactions and Staudinger modifications.

  14. Biochemical functionalization of peptide nanotubes with phage displayed peptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swaminathan, Swathi; Cui, Yue

    2016-09-01

    The development of a general approach for the biochemical functionalization of peptide nanotubes (PNTs) could open up existing opportunities in both fundamental studies as well as a variety of applications. PNTs are spontaneously assembled organic nanostructures made from peptides. Phage display has emerged as a powerful approach for identifying selective peptide binding motifs. Here, we demonstrate for the first time the biochemical functionalization of PNTs via peptides identified from a phage display peptide library. The phage-displayed peptides are shown to recognize PNTs. These advances further allow for the development of bifunctional peptides for the capture of bacteria and the self-assembly of silver particles onto PNTs. We anticipate that these results could provide significant opportunities for using PNTs in both fundamental studies and practical applications, including sensors and biosensors nanoelectronics, energy storage devices, drug delivery, and tissue engineering.

  15. Phage display of peptide / major histocompatibility class I complexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vest Hansen, N; Ostergaard Pedersen, L; Stryhn, A

    2001-01-01

    Major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) molecules sample peptides from the intracellular environment and present them to cytotoxic T cells (CTL). To establish a selection system, and, thereby, enable a library approach to identify the specificities involved (that of the MHC-I for peptides...... and subsequently that ot the T cell receptor for peptide-MHC-I complex), we have fused a single chain peptide-MHC-I complex to the phage minor coat protein, gpIII, and displayed it on filamentous phage. Expression of peptide-MHC-I complexes was shown with relevant conformation-specific monoclonal antibodies and......, more importantly, with a unique "T cell receptor-like" (i. e. peptide-specific, MHC-I-restricted) antibody. Thus, properly assembled and folded peptide-MHC-I complexes can be displayed on filamentous phage. Despite the successful display, interaction with T cells could not be demonstrated....

  16. Plasmids and packaging cell lines for use in phage display

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradbury, Andrew M.

    2012-07-24

    The invention relates to a novel phagemid display system for packaging phagemid DNA into phagemid particles which completely avoids the use of helper phage. The system of the invention incorporates the use of bacterial packaging cell lines which have been transformed with helper plasmids containing all required phage proteins but not the packaging signals. The absence of packaging signals in these helper plasmids prevents their DNA from being packaged in the bacterial cell, which provides a number of significant advantages over the use of both standard and modified helper phage. Packaged phagemids expressing a protein or peptide of interest, in fusion with a phage coat protein such as g3p, are generated simply by transfecting phagemid into the packaging cell line.

  17. Identification of Soft Matter Binding Peptide Ligands Using Phage Display.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Günay, Kemal Arda; Klok, Harm-Anton

    2015-10-21

    Phage display is a powerful tool for the selection of highly affine, short peptide ligands. While originally primarily used for the identification of ligands to proteins, the scope of this technique has significantly expanded over the past two decades. Phage display nowadays is also increasingly applied to identify ligands that selectively bind with high affinity to a broad range of other substrates including natural and biological polymers as well as a variety of low-molecular-weight organic molecules. Such peptides are of interest for various reasons. The ability to selectively and with high affinity bind to the substrate of interest allows the conjugation or immobilization of, e.g., nanoparticles or biomolecules, or generally, facilitates interactions at materials interfaces. On the other hand, presentation of peptide ligands that selectively bind to low-molecular-weight organic materials is of interest for the development of sensor surfaces. The aim of this article is to highlight the opportunities provided by phage display for the identification of peptide ligands that bind to synthetic or natural polymer substrates or to small organic molecules. The article will first provide an overview of the different peptide ligands that have been identified by phage display that bind to these "soft matter" targets. The second part of the article will discuss the different characterization techniques that allow the determination of the affinity of the identified ligands to the respective substrates.

  18. Production of a phage-displayed single chain variable fragment ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    IBDV. scFv, the cognate ... residues were in the most favored regions and only 2 % were in the disallowed regions. Due to the lack of .... report on the construction of a monoclonal antibody against IBDV through non-immunized phage display ...

  19. Use of Phage Display technology in development of canine visceral leishmaniasis vaccine using synthetic peptide trapped in sphingomyelin/cholesterol liposomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toledo-Machado, Christina Monerat; Bueno, Lilian Lacerda; Menezes-Souza, Daniel; Machado-de-Avila, Ricardo Andrez; Nguyen, Christophe; Granier, Claude; Bartholomeu, Daniella Castanheira; Chávez-Olórtegui, Carlos; Fujiwara, Ricardo Toshio

    2015-02-28

    Leishmania parasites can cause visceral or cutaneous disease and are found in subtropical and tropical regions of the Old and New World. The pathology of the infection is determined by both host immune factors and species/strain differences of the parasite. Dogs represent the major reservoir of Leishmania infantum (syn. L. chagasi) and vaccines are considered the most cost-effective control tools for canine disease. Selection of immunodominant peptides was performed by Phage Display to identify sequences recognized by L. infantum naturally infected animals. Sera from Leishmania infected animals were used in the biopanning to selection of specific peptides. Serum samples from T. cruzi infected and healthy animals were used as control. After selection, synthetic peptides were produced in membrane (spot-synthesis) in soluble form and blotting and ELISA were performed for validation of serum reactivity. Selected peptide was formulated with aluminum hydroxide and liposomes and immunization was performed in BALB/c mice. Protection was determined by qPCR after challenge infection with virulent L. infantum. We reported the selection of Peptide 5 through Phage Display technique and demonstrate its ability to promote a state of immunity against L. infantum infection in murine model after immunization using liposomes as vaccine carrier. Our results demonstrate that immunization with Peptide 5 when formulated with aluminum hydroxide and liposomes is immunogenic and elicited significant protection associated with the induction of mixed Th1/Th2 immune response against L. infantum infection. Peptide 5 is a promising vaccine candidate and the findings obtained in the present study encourage canine trials to confirm the effectiveness of a vaccine against CVL.

  20. Selection of single chain antibody fragments binding to the extracellular domain of 4-1BB receptor by phage display technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagheri, Salman; Yousefi, Mehdi; Safaie Qamsari, Elmira; Riazi-Rad, Farhad; Abolhassani, Mohsen; Younesi, Vahid; Dorostkar, Ruhollah; Movassaghpour, Ali Akbar; Sharifzadeh, Zahra

    2017-03-01

    The 4-1BB is a surface glycoprotein that pertains to the tumor necrosis factor-receptor family. There is compelling evidence suggesting important roles for 4-1BB in the immune response, including cell activation and proliferation and also cytokine induction. Because of encouraging results of different agonistic monoclonal antibodies against 4-1BB in the treatment of cancer, infectious, and autoimmune diseases, 4-1BB has been suggested as an attractive target for immunotherapy. In this study, single chain variable fragment phage display libraries, Tomlinson I+J, were screened against specific synthetic oligopeptides (peptides I and II) designed from 4-1BB extracellular domain. Five rounds of panning led to selection of four 4-1BB specific single chain variable fragments (PI.12, PI.42, PII.16, and PII.29) which showed specific reaction to relevant peptides in phage enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The selected clones were successfully expressed in Escherichia coli Rosetta-gami 2, and their expression was confirmed by western blot analysis. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay experiments indicated that these antibodies were able to specifically recognize 4-1BB without any cross-reactivity with other antigens. Flow cytometry analysis demonstrated an acceptable specific binding of the single chain variable fragments to 4-1BB expressed on CCRF-CEM cells, while no binding was observed with an irrelevant antibody. Anti-4-1BB single chain variable fragments enhanced surface CD69 expression and interleukin-2 production in stimulated CCRF-CEM cells which confirmed the agonistic effect of the selected single chain variable fragments. The data from this study have provided a rationale for further experiments involving the biological functions of anti-4-1BB single chain variable fragments in future studies.

  1. Raising an Antibody Specific to Breast Cancer Subpopulations Using Phage Display on Tissue Sections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Simon Asbjørn; Meldgaard, Theresa; Fridriksdottir, Agla Jael Rubner

    2016-01-01

    fragments specific against breast cancer subpopulations, aiding the discovery of novel biomarkers. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Recombinant antibody fragments were selected by phage display. A novel shadowstick technology enabled the direct selection using tissue sections of antibody fragments specific against...... small subpopulations of breast cancer cells. Selections were performed against a subpopulation of breast cancer cells expressing CD271(+), as these previously have been indicated to be potential breast cancer stem cells. The selected antibody fragments were screened by phage ELISA on both breast cancer...

  2. Identification of keratinocyte-specific markers using phage display and mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kim Bak; Jensen, Ole Nørregaard; Ravn, Peter

    2003-01-01

    Specific molecular markers for various normal and pathogenic cell states and cell types provide knowledge of basic biological systems and have a direct application in targeted therapy. We describe a proteomic method based on the combination of new and improved phage display antibody technologies...... and mass spectrometry that allows identification of cell type-specific protein markers. The most important features of the method are (i) reduction of experimental noise originating from background binding of phage particles and (ii) isolation of affinity binders after a single round of selection, which...

  3. Probing ADAMTS13 Substrate Specificity using Phage Display

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desch, Karl C.; Kretz, Colin; Yee, Andrew; Gildersleeve, Robert; Metzger, Kristin; Agrawal, Nidhi; Cheng, Jane; Ginsburg, David

    2015-01-01

    Von Willebrand factor (VWF) is a large, multimeric protein that regulates hemostasis by tethering platelets to the subendothelial matrix at sites of vascular damage. The procoagulant activity of plasma VWF correlates with the length of VWF multimers, which is proteolytically controlled by the metalloprotease ADAMTS13. To probe ADAMTS13 substrate specificity, we created phage display libraries containing randomly mutated residues of a minimal ADAMTS13 substrate fragment of VWF, termed VWF73. The libraries were screened for phage particles displaying VWF73 mutant peptides that were resistant to proteolysis by ADAMTS13. These peptides exhibited the greatest mutation frequency near the ADAMTS13 scissile residues. Kinetic assays using mutant and wild-type substrates demonstrated excellent agreement between rates of cleavage for mutant phage particles and the corresponding mutant peptides. Cleavage resistance of selected mutations was tested in vivo using hydrodynamic injection of corresponding full-length expression plasmids into VWF-deficient mice. These studies confirmed the resistance to cleavage resulting from select amino acid substitutions and uncovered evidence of alternate cleavage sites and recognition by other proteases in the circulation of ADAMTS13 deficient mice. Taken together, these studies demonstrate the key role of specific amino acids residues including P3-P2’ and P11’, for substrate specificity and emphasize the importance in flowing blood of other ADAMTS13–VWF exosite interactions outside of VWF73. PMID:25849793

  4. Probing ADAMTS13 substrate specificity using phage display.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karl C Desch

    Full Text Available Von Willebrand factor (VWF is a large, multimeric protein that regulates hemostasis by tethering platelets to the subendothelial matrix at sites of vascular damage. The procoagulant activity of plasma VWF correlates with the length of VWF multimers, which is proteolytically controlled by the metalloprotease ADAMTS13. To probe ADAMTS13 substrate specificity, we created phage display libraries containing randomly mutated residues of a minimal ADAMTS13 substrate fragment of VWF, termed VWF73. The libraries were screened for phage particles displaying VWF73 mutant peptides that were resistant to proteolysis by ADAMTS13. These peptides exhibited the greatest mutation frequency near the ADAMTS13 scissile residues. Kinetic assays using mutant and wild-type substrates demonstrated excellent agreement between rates of cleavage for mutant phage particles and the corresponding mutant peptides. Cleavage resistance of selected mutations was tested in vivo using hydrodynamic injection of corresponding full-length expression plasmids into VWF-deficient mice. These studies confirmed the resistance to cleavage resulting from select amino acid substitutions and uncovered evidence of alternate cleavage sites and recognition by other proteases in the circulation of ADAMTS13 deficient mice. Taken together, these studies demonstrate the key role of specific amino acids residues including P3-P2' and P11', for substrate specificity and emphasize the importance in flowing blood of other ADAMTS13-VWF exosite interactions outside of VWF73.

  5. Construction and use of Plasmodium falciparum phage display libraries to identify host parasite interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coetzer Theresa L

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The development of Plasmodium falciparum within human erythrocytes induces a wide array of changes in the ultrastructure, function and antigenic properties of the host cell. Numerous proteins encoded by the parasite have been shown to interact with the erythrocyte membrane. The identification of new interactions between human erythrocyte and P. falciparum proteins has formed a key area of malaria research. To circumvent the difficulties provided by conventional protein techniques, a novel application of the phage display technology was utilised. Methods P. falciparum phage display libraries were created and biopanned against purified erythrocyte membrane proteins. The identification of interacting and in-frame amino acid sequences was achieved by sequencing parasite cDNA inserts and performing bioinformatic analyses in the PlasmoDB database. Results Following four rounds of biopanning, sequencing and bioinformatic investigations, seven P. falciparum proteins with significant binding specificity toward human erythrocyte spectrin and protein 4.1 were identified. The specificity of these P. falciparum proteins were demonstrated by the marked enrichment of the respective in-frame binding sequences from a fourth round phage display library. Conclusion The construction and biopanning of P. falciparum phage display expression libraries provide a novel approach for the identification of new interactions between the parasite and the erythrocyte membrane.

  6. Recombinant human antibody fragment against tetanus toxoid produced by phage display

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neelakantam, B.; Sridevi, N. V.; Shukra, A. M.; Sugumar, P.; Samuel, S.

    2014-01-01

    Phage display technology is a powerful in vitro method for the identification of specific monoclonal antibodies (antibody fragments) to an antigenic target and allows the rapid generation and selection of high affinity, fully human antibodies directed toward any disease target appropriate for antibody therapy. In the present study, we exploited the phage display technology for the selection of an antigen binding fragment (Fabs) toward tetanus toxoid using human naïve phage antibody library constructed from peripheral blood lymphocytes of naïve human donors. The phages displaying Fab were subjected to three rounds of bio-panning with tetanus toxoid as antigen on a solid phase. The high affinity antibody fragments were expressed in HB2151 strain of Escherichia coli and purified by immobilized metal affinity chromatography. The binding activity and specificity of the antibody fragment was established by its reactivity toward tetanus toxoid and non-reactivity toward other related toxins as determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and immunoblot analysis. The selected Fab fragment forming the antigen-binding complexes with the toxoid in flocculation assay indicates that the Fab may have a potential neutralizing ability toward antigen. PMID:24678405

  7. PHAGE AMPLIFICATION TECHNOLOGY AND ANTI ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conventionally, the proportion method on Lowenstein Jensen (L J) medium is used in most developing countries as the 'gold standard' in the drug susceptibility testing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) and it takes 3-4 weeks to give results from an MTB culture. The use of phage as a diagnostic is fast gaining ground ...

  8. MIMOX: a web tool for phage display based epitope mapping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Honda Wataru

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Phage display is widely used in basic research such as the exploration of protein-protein interaction sites and networks, and applied research such as the development of new drugs, vaccines, and diagnostics. It has also become a promising method for epitope mapping. Research on new algorithms that assist and automate phage display based epitope mapping has attracted many groups. Most of the existing tools have not been implemented as an online service until now however, making it less convenient for the community to access, utilize, and evaluate them. Results We present MIMOX, a free web tool that helps to map the native epitope of an antibody based on one or more user supplied mimotopes and the antigen structure. MIMOX was coded in Perl using modules from the Bioperl project. It has two sections. In the first section, MIMOX provides a simple interface for ClustalW to align a set of mimotopes. It also provides a simple statistical method to derive the consensus sequence and embeds JalView as a Java applet to view and manage the alignment. In the second section, MIMOX can map a single mimotope or a consensus sequence of a set of mimotopes, on to the corresponding antigen structure and search for all of the clusters of residues that could represent the native epitope. NACCESS is used to evaluate the surface accessibility of the candidate clusters; and Jmol is embedded to view them interactively in their 3D context. Initial case studies show that MIMOX can reproduce mappings from existing tools such as FINDMAP and 3DEX, as well as providing novel, rational results. Conclusion A web-based tool called MIMOX has been developed for phage display based epitope mapping. As a publicly available online service in this area, it is convenient for the community to access, utilize, and evaluate, complementing other existing programs. MIMOX is freely available at http://web.kuicr.kyoto-u.ac.jp/~hjian/mimox.

  9. Next-generation phage display: integrating and comparing available molecular tools to enable cost-effective high-throughput analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias-Neto, Emmanuel; Nunes, Diana N; Giordano, Ricardo J; Sun, Jessica; Botz, Gregory H; Yang, Kuan; Setubal, João C; Pasqualini, Renata; Arap, Wadih

    2009-12-17

    Combinatorial phage display has been used in the last 20 years in the identification of protein-ligands and protein-protein interactions, uncovering relevant molecular recognition events. Rate-limiting steps of combinatorial phage display library selection are (i) the counting of transducing units and (ii) the sequencing of the encoded displayed ligands. Here, we adapted emerging genomic technologies to minimize such challenges. We gained efficiency by applying in tandem real-time PCR for rapid quantification to enable bacteria-free phage display library screening, and added phage DNA next-generation sequencing for large-scale ligand analysis, reporting a fully integrated set of high-throughput quantitative and analytical tools. The approach is far less labor-intensive and allows rigorous quantification; for medical applications, including selections in patients, it also represents an advance for quantitative distribution analysis and ligand identification of hundreds of thousands of targeted particles from patient-derived biopsy or autopsy in a longer timeframe post library administration. Additional advantages over current methods include increased sensitivity, less variability, enhanced linearity, scalability, and accuracy at much lower cost. Sequences obtained by qPhage plus pyrosequencing were similar to a dataset produced from conventional Sanger-sequenced transducing-units (TU), with no biases due to GC content, codon usage, and amino acid or peptide frequency. These tools allow phage display selection and ligand analysis at >1,000-fold faster rate, and reduce costs approximately 250-fold for generating 10(6) ligand sequences. Our analyses demonstrates that whereas this approach correlates with the traditional colony-counting, it is also capable of a much larger sampling, allowing a faster, less expensive, more accurate and consistent analysis of phage enrichment. Overall, qPhage plus pyrosequencing is superior to TU-counting plus Sanger sequencing and is

  10. Next-generation phage display: integrating and comparing available molecular tools to enable cost-effective high-throughput analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuel Dias-Neto

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Combinatorial phage display has been used in the last 20 years in the identification of protein-ligands and protein-protein interactions, uncovering relevant molecular recognition events. Rate-limiting steps of combinatorial phage display library selection are (i the counting of transducing units and (ii the sequencing of the encoded displayed ligands. Here, we adapted emerging genomic technologies to minimize such challenges.We gained efficiency by applying in tandem real-time PCR for rapid quantification to enable bacteria-free phage display library screening, and added phage DNA next-generation sequencing for large-scale ligand analysis, reporting a fully integrated set of high-throughput quantitative and analytical tools. The approach is far less labor-intensive and allows rigorous quantification; for medical applications, including selections in patients, it also represents an advance for quantitative distribution analysis and ligand identification of hundreds of thousands of targeted particles from patient-derived biopsy or autopsy in a longer timeframe post library administration. Additional advantages over current methods include increased sensitivity, less variability, enhanced linearity, scalability, and accuracy at much lower cost. Sequences obtained by qPhage plus pyrosequencing were similar to a dataset produced from conventional Sanger-sequenced transducing-units (TU, with no biases due to GC content, codon usage, and amino acid or peptide frequency. These tools allow phage display selection and ligand analysis at >1,000-fold faster rate, and reduce costs approximately 250-fold for generating 10(6 ligand sequences.Our analyses demonstrates that whereas this approach correlates with the traditional colony-counting, it is also capable of a much larger sampling, allowing a faster, less expensive, more accurate and consistent analysis of phage enrichment. Overall, qPhage plus pyrosequencing is superior to TU-counting plus Sanger

  11. Handbook of display technology

    CERN Document Server

    Castellano, Joseph A

    1992-01-01

    This book presents a comprehensive review of technical and commercial aspects of display technology. It provides design engineers with the information needed to select proper technology for new products. The book focuses on flat, thin displays such as light-emitting diodes, plasma display panels, and liquid crystal displays, but it also includes material on cathode ray tubes. Displays include a large number of products from televisions, auto dashboards, radios, and household appliances, to gasoline pumps, heart monitors, microwave ovens, and more.For more information on display tech

  12. Rapid Development of New Protein Biosensors Utilizing Peptides Obtained via Phage Display

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-01

    new sensors is needed. Here we present a platform where short unstructured peptides that bind to a desired target are selected using M13 phage display...ALT), a well-known biomarker of hepatotoxicity. Biopanning of the M13 phage display library over immobilized ALT, led to the rapid identification of a...biosensors utilizing unstructured peptides selected using M13 phage display as the recognition element, QCM as a diagnostic tool during development, and

  13. Dual display: phage selection driven by co-engagement of two targets by two different antibody fragments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagète, Séverine; Botas-Perez, Ledicia; Rossito-Borlat, Irène; Adea, Kenneth; Gueneau, Franck; Ravn, Ulla; Rousseau, François; Kosco-Vilbois, Marie; Fischer, Nicolas; Hartley, Oliver

    2017-09-01

    Antibody phage display technology has supported the emergence of numerous therapeutic antibodies. The development of bispecific antibodies, a promising new frontier in antibody therapy, could be facilitated by new phage display approaches that enable pairs of antibodies to be co-selected based on co-engagement of their respective targets. We describe such an approach, making use of two complementary leucine zipper domains that heterodimerize with high affinity. Phagemids encoding a first antibody fragment (scFv) fused to phage coat protein via the first leucine zipper are rescued in bacteria expressing a second scFv fused to the second leucine zipper as a soluble periplasmic protein, so that it is acquired by phage during assembly. Using a soluble scFv specific for a human CD3-derived peptide, we show that its acquisition by phage displaying an irrelevant antibody is sufficiently robust to drive selection of rare phage (1 in 105) over three rounds of panning. We then set up a model selection experiment using a cell line expressing the chemokine receptor CCR5 fused to the CD3 peptide together with a panel of phage clones capable displaying either an anti-CCR5 scFv or an irrelevant antibody, with or without the capacity to acquire the soluble anti-CD3 scFv. In this experiment we showed that rare phage (1 in 105) capable of displaying the two different scFvs can be specifically enriched over four rounds of panning. This approach has the potential to be applied to the identification of pairs of ligands capable of co-engaging two different user-defined targets, which would facilitate the discovery of novel bispecific antibodies. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. A polystyrene binding target-unrelated peptide isolated in the screening of phage display library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhshinejad, Babak; Sadeghizadeh, Majid

    2016-11-01

    Phage display is a powerful methodology for the identification of peptide ligands binding to any desired target. However, the selection of target-unrelated peptides (TUPs) appears as a huge problem in the screening of phage display libraries through biopanning. The phage-displayed peptide TLHPAAD has been isolated both in our laboratory and by another reserach group on completely different screening targets prompting us to hypothesize that it may be a potential TUP. In the current study, we analyzed the binding characteristics and propagation rate of phage clone displaying TLHPAAD peptide (SW-TUP clone). The results of ELISA experiment and phage recovery assay provided strong support for the notion that SW-TUP phage binds to polystyrene with a significantly higher affinity than control phage clones. Furthermore, this polystyrene binding was demonstrated to occur in a concentration- and pH-dependent mode. Characterization of the propagation profile of phage clones within a specified time course revealed no statistically significant difference between the amplification rate of SW-TUP and control phages. Our findings lead us to the conclusion that SW-TUP phage clone with the displayed peptide TLHPAAD is not a true target binder and its selection in biopanning experiments results from its bidning affinity to the polystyrene surface of the solid phase. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Probing Tumor Microenvironment With In Vivo Phage Display

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    phage DNA is purified, and subjected to emulsion PCR using primers with Ion Torrent adapters for clonal amplification on Ion Sphere Particles. The...particles are isolated, loaded on a chip, and sequenced using an Iron Torrent next generation sequencer. A test run on a naïve phage library yielded...differences in amplification rates of the phage clones. Fig. 3. Phage DNA sequencing with Iron Torrent next generation sequencer. (A) Work flow of the

  16. Automated panning and screening procedure on microplates for antibody generation from phage display libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turunen, Laura; Takkinen, Kristiina; Söderlund, Hans; Pulli, Timo

    2009-03-01

    Antibody phage display technology is well established and widely used for selecting specific antibodies against desired targets. Using conventional manual methods, it is laborious to perform multiple selections with different antigens simultaneously. Furthermore, manual screening of the positive clones requires much effort. The authors describe optimized and automated procedures of these processes using a magnetic bead processor for the selection and a robotic station for the screening step. Both steps are performed in a 96-well microplate format. In addition, adopting the antibody phage display technology to automated platform polyethylene glycol precipitation of the enriched phage pool was unnecessary. For screening, an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay protocol suitable for a robotic station was developed. This system was set up using human gamma-globulin as a model antigen to select antibodies from a VTT naive human single-chain antibody (scFv) library. In total, 161 gamma-globulin-selected clones were screened, and according to fingerprinting analysis, 9 of the 13 analyzed clones were different. The system was further tested using testosterone bovine serum albumin (BSA) and beta-estradiol-BSA as antigens with the same library. In total, 1536 clones were screened from 4 rounds of selection with both antigens, and 29 different testosterone-BSA and 23 beta-estradiol-BSA binding clones were found and verified by sequencing. This automated antibody phage display procedure increases the throughput of generating wide panels of target-binding antibody candidates and allows the selection and screening of antibodies against several different targets in parallel with high efficiency.

  17. Frameshifting in the P6 cDNA Phage Display System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veerle Somers

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Phage display is a powerful technique that enables easy identification of targets for any type of ligand. Targets are displayed at the phage surface as a fusion protein to one of the phage coat proteins. By means of a repeated process of affinity selection on a ligand, specific enrichment of displayed targets will occur. In our studies using C-terminal display of cDNA fragments to phage coat protein p6, we noticed the occasional enrichment of targets that do not contain an open reading frame. This event has previously been described in other phage display studies using N-terminal display of targets to phage coat proteins and was due to uncommon translational events like frameshifting. The aim of this study was to examine if C-terminal display of targets to p6 is also subjected to frameshifting. To this end, an enriched target not containing an open reading frame was selected and an E-tag was coupled at the C-terminus in order to measure target display at the surface of the phage. The tagged construct was subsequently expressed in 3 different reading frames and display of both target and E-tag measured to detect the occurrence of frameshifting. As a result, we were able to demonstrate display of the target both in the 0 and in the +1 reading frame indicating that frameshifting can also take place when C-terminal fusion to minor coat protein p6 is applied.

  18. Purification of phage display-modified bacteriophage T4 by affinity chromatography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Figura Grzegorz

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Affinity chromatography is one of the most efficient protein purification strategies. This technique comprises a one-step procedure with a purification level in the order of several thousand-fold, adaptable for various proteins, differentiated in their size, shape, charge, and other properties. The aim of this work was to verify the possibility of applying affinity chromatography in bacteriophage purification, with the perspective of therapeutic purposes. T4 is a large, icosahedral phage that may serve as an efficient display platform for foreign peptides or proteins. Here we propose a new method of T4 phage purification by affinity chromatography after its modification with affinity tags (GST and Histag by in vivo phage display. As any permanent introduction of extraneous DNA into a phage genome is strongly unfavourable for medical purposes, integration of foreign motifs with the phage genome was not applied. The phage was propagated in bacteria expressing fusions of the phage protein Hoc with affinity tags from bacterial plasmids, independently from the phage expression system. Results Elution profiles of phages modified with the specific affinity motifs (compared to non-specific phages document their binding to the affinity resins and effective elution with standard competitive agents. Non-specific binding was also observed, but was 102-105 times weaker than the specific one. GST-modified bacteriophages were also effectively released from glutathione Sepharose by proteolytic cleavage. The possibility of proteolytic release was designed at the stage of expression vector construction. Decrease in LPS content in phage preparations was dependent on the washing intensity; intensive washing resulted in preparations of 11-40 EU/ml. Conclusions Affinity tags can be successfully incorporated into the T4 phage capsid by the in vivo phage display technique and they strongly elevate bacteriophage affinity to a specific resin. Affinity

  19. Inorganic binding peptides designed by phage display techniques for biotechnology applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Chih-Wei

    Biomacromolecules play an important role in the control of hard tissue structure and function via specific molecular recognition interactions between proteins of the matrix and inorganic species of the biomineral phase. During the construction of the tissue, biomacromolecules are usually folded into a certain comformation, analogous to a "lock" for fitting with other proteins or smaller molecules as a "key". Currently, the rational design of molecular recognition in biomacro-molecules is still hard to accomplish because the protein conformation is too complex to precisely predict based on the existing conformational information of proteins found in biological systems. In the past two decades, the combinatorial approach (e.g. phage display techniques) has been used to select short binding peptides with molecular recognition to an inorganic target material without a prior knowledge of the amino acid sequence required for the specific binding. The technique has been referred to as "biopanning" because bacteriophages are used to "screen" for peptides that exhibit strong binding to a target material of interest. In this study, two diverse applications were chosen to demonstrate the utility of the biopanning approach. In one project, phage display techniques were used to pan for Indium Zinc Oxide (InZnO) binding peptides to serve as linkers between transducer devices and biosensing elements for demonstration of the feasibility of reversibly electro-activated biosensors. The amorphous InZnO, with its homogeneous surface, led to three consensus peptide sequences, AGFPNSTHSSNL, SHAPDSTWFALF, and TNSSSQFVVAIP. In addition, it was demonstrated that some selected phage clones of the InZnO binding peptides were able to be released from the InZnO surface after applying a voltage of 1400 mV on an electro-activated releasing device. In the second project, phage display techniques were used to select phage clones that bind specifically to francolite mineral in order to achieve

  20. Engineering RNA phage MS2 virus-like particles for peptide display

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Sheldon Keith

    Phage display is a powerful and versatile technology that enables the selection of novel binding functions from large populations of randomly generated peptide sequences. Random sequences are genetically fused to a viral structural protein to produce complex peptide libraries. From a sufficiently complex library, phage bearing peptides with practically any desired binding activity can be physically isolated by affinity selection, and, since each particle carries in its genome the genetic information for its own replication, the selectants can be amplified by infection of bacteria. For certain applications however, existing phage display platforms have limitations. One such area is in the field of vaccine development, where the goal is to identify relevant epitopes by affinity-selection against an antibody target, and then to utilize them as immunogens to elicit a desired antibody response. Today, affinity selection is usually conducted using display on filamentous phages like M13. This technology provides an efficient means for epitope identification, but, because filamentous phages do not display peptides in the high-density, multivalent arrays the immune system prefers to recognize, they generally make poor immunogens and are typically useless as vaccines. This makes it necessary to confer immunogenicity by conjugating synthetic versions of the peptides to more immunogenic carriers. Unfortunately, when introduced into these new structural environments, the epitopes often fail to elicit relevant antibody responses. Thus, it would be advantageous to combine the epitope selection and immunogen functions into a single platform where the structural constraints present during affinity selection can be preserved during immunization. This dissertation describes efforts to develop a peptide display system based on the virus-like particles (VLPs) of bacteriophage MS2. Phage display technologies rely on (1) the identification of a site in a viral structural protein that is

  1. Analysis of factor VIII inhibitors in a haemophilia A patient with an Arg(593)-> Cys mutation using phage display

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bril, Wendy S.; Turenhout, Ellen A. M.; Kaijen, Paul H. P.; van den Brink, Edward N.; Koopman, Maria M. W.; Peters, Marjolein; Voorberg, Jan

    2002-01-01

    We characterized anti-factor VIII antibodies in a mild haemophilia A patient with an Arg(593)-->Cys mutation in the A2 domain, using V gene phage-display technology. All isolated single-chain variable-domain antibody fragments were directed against residues Arg(484)-Ile(508), a binding site for

  2. Phage-display libraries of murine and human antibody Fab fragments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engberg, J; Andersen, P S; Nielsen, L K

    1996-01-01

    We provide efficient and detailed procedures for construction, expression, and screening of comprehensive libraries of murine or human antibody Fab fragments displayed on the surface of filamentous phage. In addition, protocols for producing and using ultra-electrocompetent cells, for producing Fab...... phages from libraries, and for selecting antigen binders by panning are presented. The latter protocol includes a procedure for trypsin elution of bound phage....

  3. Phage Displayed Peptides/Antibodies Recognizing Growth Factors and Their Tyrosine Kinase Receptors as Tools for Anti-Cancer Therapeutics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronca, Roberto; Benzoni, Patrizia; De Luca, Angela; Crescini, Elisabetta; Dell’Era, Patrizia

    2012-01-01

    The basic idea of displaying peptides on a phage, introduced by George P. Smith in 1985, was greatly developed and improved by McCafferty and colleagues at the MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology and, later, by Barbas and colleagues at the Scripps Research Institute. Their approach was dedicated to building a system for the production of antibodies, similar to a naïve B cell repertoire, in order to by-pass the standard hybridoma technology that requires animal immunization. Both groups merged the phage display technology with an antibody library to obtain a huge number of phage variants, each of them carrying a specific antibody ready to bind its target molecule, allowing, later on, rare phage (one in a million) to be isolated by affinity chromatography. Here, we will briefly review the basis of the technology and the therapeutic application of phage-derived bioactive molecules when addressed against key players in tumor development and progression: growth factors and their tyrosine kinase receptors. PMID:22606042

  4. Semi-Parametric Bayesian Inference for Phage Display Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    León-Novelo, Luis G.; Müller, Peter; Arap, Wadih; Kolonin, Mikhail; Sun, Jessica; Pasqualini, Renata; Do, Kim-Anh

    2012-01-01

    Summary We discuss inference for a human phage display experiment with three stages. The data are tripeptide counts by tissue and stage. The primary aim of the experiment is to identify ligands that bind with high affinity to a given tissue. We formalize the research question as inference about the monotonicity of mean counts over stages. The inference goal is then to identify a list of peptide-tissue pairs with significant increase over stages. We use a semi-parametric Dirichlet process mixture of Poisson model. The posterior distribution under this model allows the desired inference about the monotonicity of mean counts. However, the desired inference summary as a list of peptide-tissue pairs with significant increase involves a massive multiplicity problem. We consider two alternative approaches to address this multiplicity issue. First we propose an approach based on the control of the posterior expected false discovery rate. We notice that the implied solution ignores the relative size of the increase. This motivates a second approach based on a utility function that includes explicit weights for the size of the increase. PMID:23339534

  5. An efficient method for isolating antibody fragments against small peptides by antibody phage display

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duan, Zhi; Siegumfeldt, Henrik

    2010-01-01

    We generated monoclonal scFv (single chain variable fragment) antibodies from an antibody phage display library towards three small synthetic peptides derived from the sequence of s1-casein. Key difficulties for selection of scFv-phages against small peptides were addressed. Small peptides do...

  6. Design and Screening of M13 Phage Display cDNA Libraries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuliya Georgieva

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The last decade has seen a steady increase in screening of cDNA expression product libraries displayed on the surface of filamentous bacteriophage. At the same time, the range of applications extended from the identification of novel allergens over disease markers to protein-protein interaction studies. However, the generation and selection of cDNA phage display libraries is subjected to intrinsic biological limitations due to their complex nature and heterogeneity, as well as technical difficulties regarding protein presentation on the phage surface. Here, we review the latest developments in this field, discuss a number of strategies and improvements anticipated to overcome these challenges making cDNA and open reading frame (ORF libraries more readily accessible for phage display. Furthermore, future trends combining phage display with next generation sequencing (NGS will be presented.

  7. Deep sequencing of phage-displayed peptide libraries reveals sequence motif that detects norovirus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurwitz, Amy M.; Huang, Wanzhi; Estes, Mary K.; Atmar, Robert L.; Palzkill, Timothy

    2017-01-01

    Norovirus infections are the leading cause of non-bacterial gastroenteritis and result in about 21 million new cases and $2 billion in costs per year in the United States. Existing diagnostics have limited feasibility for point-of-care applications, so there is a clear need for more reliable, rapid, and simple-to-use diagnostic tools in order to contain outbreaks and prevent inappropriate treatments. In this study, a combination of phage display technology, deep sequencing and computational analysis was used to identify 12-mer peptides with specific binding to norovirus genotype GI.1 virus-like particles (VLPs). After biopanning, phage populations were sequenced and analyzed to identify a consensus peptide motif—YRSWXP. Two 12-mer peptides containing this sequence, NV-O-R5-3 and NV-O-R5-6, were further characterized to evaluate the motif's functional ability to detect VLPs and virus. Results indicated that these peptides effectively detect GI.1 VLPs in solid-phase peptide arrays, ELISAs and dot blots. Further, their specificity for the S-domain of the major capsid protein enables them to detect a wide range of GI and GII norovirus genotypes. Both peptides were able to detect virus in norovirus-positive clinical stool samples. Overall, the work reported here demonstrates the application of phage display coupled with next generation sequencing and computational analysis to uncover peptides with specific binding ability to a target protein for diagnostic applications. Further, the reagents characterized here can be integrated into existing diagnostic formats to detect clinically relevant genotypes of norovirus in stool. PMID:28035012

  8. A Novel Heptapeptide with Tyrosinase Inhibitory Activity Identified from a Phage Display Library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Huali; Liu, Lin; Yang, Huiqin; Guo, Hongzhen; Liu, Xiang; Tan, Yuanhao; Wang, Wen; Quan, Jing; Zhu, Limin

    2017-01-01

    Peptidic inhibition of the enzyme tyrosinase, responsible for skin pigmentation and food browning, would be extremely useful for the food, cosmetics, and pharmaceutical industries. In order to identify novel inhibitory peptides, a library of short sequence oligopeptides was screened to reveal direct interaction with the tyrosinase. A phage displaying heptapeptide (IQSPHFF) was found to bind most strongly to tyrosinase. The inhibitory activity of the heptapeptide was evaluated using mushroom tyrosinase. The results showed that the peptide inhibited both the monophenolase and diphenolase activities of mushroom tyrosinase with IC 50 values of 1.7 and 4.0 mM, respectively. The heptapeptide is thought to be a reversible competitive inhibitor of diphenolase with the inhibition constants (Ki) of 0.765 mM. To further investigate how the heptapeptide exerts its inhibitory effect, a docking study between tyrosinase and heptapeptide was performed. The simulation showed that the heptapeptide binds in the active site of the enzyme near the catalytically active Cu ions and forms hydrogen bonds with five histidine residues on the active site. Phage display technology is thus a useful approach for the screening of potential tyrosinase inhibitors and could be widely applicable to a much wider range of enzymes.

  9. Biased selection of propagation-related TUPs from phage display peptide libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zade, Hesam Motaleb; Keshavarz, Reihaneh; Shekarabi, Hosna Sadat Zahed; Bakhshinejad, Babak

    2017-08-01

    Phage display is rapidly advancing as a screening strategy in drug discovery and drug delivery. Phage-encoded combinatorial peptide libraries can be screened through the affinity selection procedure of biopanning to find pharmaceutically relevant cell-specific ligands. However, the unwanted enrichment of target-unrelated peptides (TUPs) with no true affinity for the target presents an important barrier to the successful screening of phage display libraries. Propagation-related TUPs (Pr-TUPs) are an emerging but less-studied category of phage display-derived false-positive hits that are displayed on the surface of clones with faster propagation rates. Despite long regarded as an unbiased selection system, accumulating evidence suggests that biopanning may create biological bias toward selection of phage clones with certain displayed peptides. This bias can be dependent on or independent of the displayed sequence and may act as a major driving force for the isolation of fast-growing clones. Sequence-dependent bias is reflected by censorship or over-representation of some amino acids in the displayed peptide and sequence-independent bias is derived from either point mutations or rare recombination events occurring in the phage genome. It is of utmost interest to clean biopanning data by identifying and removing Pr-TUPs. Experimental and bioinformatic approaches can be exploited for Pr-TUP discovery. With no doubt, obtaining deeper insight into how Pr-TUPs emerge during biopanning and how they could be detected provides a basis for using cell-targeting peptides isolated from phage display screening in the development of disease-specific diagnostic and therapeutic platforms.

  10. Selection of binding targets in parasites using phage-display and aptamer libraries in vivo and in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Rosito Tonelli

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Parasite infections are largely dependent on interactions between pathogen and different host cell populations to guarantee a successful infectious process. This is particularly true for obligatory intracellular parasites as Plasmodium, Toxoplasma, Leishmania, to name a few. Adhesion to and entry into the cell are essential steps requiring specific parasite and host cell molecules. The large amount of possible involved molecules poses additional difficulties for their identification by the classical biochemical approaches. In this respect, the search for alternative techniques should be pursued. Among them two powerful methodologies can be employed, both relying upon the construction of highly diverse combinatorial libraries of peptides or oligonucleotides that randomly bind with high affinity to targets on the cell surface and are selectively displaced by putative ligands. These are, respectively, the peptide-based phage display and the oligonucleotide-based aptamer techniques.The phage display technique has been extensively employed for the identification of novel ligands in vitro and in vivo in different areas such as cancer, vaccine development and epitope mapping. Particularly, phage display has been employed in the investigation of pathogen-host interactions. Although this methodology has been used for some parasites with encouraging results, in trypanosomatids its use is, as yet, scanty. RNA and DNA aptamers, developed by the SELEX process (Systematic Evolution of Ligands by Exponential Enrichment, were described over two decades ago and since then contributed to a large number of structured nucleic acids for diagnostic or therapeutic purposes or for the understanding of the cell biology. Similarly to the phage display technique scarce use of the SELEX process has been used in the probing of parasite-host interaction.In this review, an overall survey on the use of both phage display and aptamer technologies in different pathogenic

  11. In vitro display technologies reveal novel biopharmaceutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothe, Achim; Hosse, Ralf J; Power, Barbara E

    2006-08-01

    Display technologies are fundamental to the isolation of specific high-affinity binding proteins for diagnostic and therapeutic applications in cancer, neurodegenerative, and infectious diseases as well as autoimmune and inflammatory disorders. Applications extend into the broad field of antibody (Ab) engineering, synthetic enzymes, proteomics, and cell-free protein synthesis. Recently, in vitro display technologies have come to prominence due to the isolation of high-affinity human antibodies by phage display, the development of novel scaffolds for ribosome display, and the discovery of novel protein-protein interactions. In vitro display represents an emerging and innovative technology for the rapid isolation and evolution of high-affinity peptides and proteins. So far, only one clinical drug candidate produced by in vitro display technology has been approved by the FDA for use in humans, but several are in clinical or preclinical testing. This review highlights recent advances in various engineered biopharmaceutical products isolated by in vitro display with a focus on the commercial developments.

  12. Development of a renal collecting duct homing peptide using phage display

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svenningsen, Per; Peti-Peterdi, Janos

    Homing peptides are useful for in vivo labeling and nonviral gene transfer to selective tissues and cell types. The aim of this project was to develop a renal collecting duct homing peptide. Using phage display, we identified a phage expressing a cyclic 7 amino acid peptide, which was internalized...... in a collecting duct cell line. Moreover, the phage was internalized in the collecting duct cells after i.v. injection in mice. To test if the peptide could be used for nonviral gene transfer, we synthesized the identified peptide fused to a protamine fragment. The fusion peptide was able to bind plasmid GFP c...

  13. Phage display selects for amylases with improved low pH starch-binding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhaert, RMD; Beekwilder, J; Olsthoorn, R; Quax, WJ; Duin, Jan van

    2002-01-01

    Directed evolution of secreted industrial enzymes is hampered by the lack of powerful selection techniques. We have explored surface display to select for enzyme variants with improved binding performance on complex polymeric substrates. By a combination of saturation mutagenesis and phage display

  14. High throughput discovery of influenza virus neutralizing antibodies from phage-displayed synthetic antibody libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ing-Chien; Chiu, Yi-Kai; Yu, Chung-Ming; Lee, Cheng-Chung; Tung, Chao-Ping; Tsou, Yueh-Liang; Huang, Yi-Jen; Lin, Chia-Lung; Chen, Hong-Sen; Wang, Andrew H-J; Yang, An-Suei

    2017-10-31

    Pandemic and epidemic outbreaks of influenza A virus (IAV) infection pose severe challenges to human society. Passive immunotherapy with recombinant neutralizing antibodies can potentially mitigate the threats of IAV infection. With a high throughput neutralizing antibody discovery platform, we produced artificial anti-hemagglutinin (HA) IAV-neutralizing IgGs from phage-displayed synthetic scFv libraries without necessitating prior memory of antibody-antigen interactions or relying on affinity maturation essential for in vivo immune systems to generate highly specific neutralizing antibodies. At least two thirds of the epitope groups of the artificial anti-HA antibodies resemble those of natural protective anti-HA antibodies, providing alternatives to neutralizing antibodies from natural antibody repertoires. With continuing advancement in designing and constructing synthetic scFv libraries, this technological platform is useful in mitigating not only the threats of IAV pandemics but also those from other newly emerging viral infections.

  15. Phage Fab Display Selection In Vitro and In Vivo: Novel Means to Identify New Breast Cancer Avid Compounds

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Meighan, Mark

    2001-01-01

    .... In this annual report we present preliminary results on the isolation of antibody fragments (Fabs), isolated from phage display libraries, when affinity selected against breast cancer cell lines...

  16. Identification of human embryonic progenitor cell targeting peptides using phage display.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola A Bignone

    Full Text Available Human pluripotent stem (hPS cells are capable of differentiation into derivatives of all three primary embryonic germ layers and can self-renew indefinitely. They therefore offer a potentially scalable source of replacement cells to treat a variety of degenerative diseases. The ability to reprogram adult cells to induced pluripotent stem (iPS cells has now enabled the possibility of patient-specific hPS cells as a source of cells for disease modeling, drug discovery, and potentially, cell replacement therapies. While reprogramming technology has dramatically increased the availability of normal and diseased hPS cell lines for basic research, a major bottleneck is the critical unmet need for more efficient methods of deriving well-defined cell populations from hPS cells. Phage display is a powerful method for selecting affinity ligands that could be used for identifying and potentially purifying a variety of cell types derived from hPS cells. However, identification of specific progenitor cell-binding peptides using phage display may be hindered by the large cellular heterogeneity present in differentiating hPS cell populations. We therefore tested the hypothesis that peptides selected for their ability to bind a clonal cell line derived from hPS cells would bind early progenitor cell types emerging from differentiating hPS cells. The human embryonic stem (hES cell-derived embryonic progenitor cell line, W10, was used and cell-targeting peptides were identified. Competition studies demonstrated specificity of peptide binding to the target cell surface. Efficient peptide targeted cell labeling was accomplished using multivalent peptide-quantum dot complexes as detected by fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry. The cell-binding peptides were selective for differentiated hPS cells, had little or no binding on pluripotent cells, but preferential binding to certain embryonic progenitor cell lines and early endodermal hPS cell derivatives. Taken

  17. Specific and selective probes for Staphylococcus aureus from phage-displayed random peptide libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Plano, Laura M; Carnazza, Santina; Messina, Grazia M L; Rizzo, Maria Giovanna; Marletta, Giovanni; Guglielmino, Salvatore P P

    2017-09-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a major human pathogen causing health care-associated and community-associated infections. Early diagnosis is essential to prevent disease progression and to reduce complications that can be serious. In this study, we selected, from a 9-mer phage peptide library, a phage clone displaying peptide capable of specific binding to S. aureus cell surface, namely St.au9IVS5 (sequence peptide RVRSAPSSS).The ability of the isolated phage clone to interact specifically with S. aureus and the efficacy of its bacteria-binding properties were established by using enzyme linked immune-sorbent assay (ELISA). We also demonstrated by Western blot analysis that the most reactive and selective phage peptide binds a 78KDa protein on the bacterial cell surface. Furthermore, we observed selectivity of phage-bacteria-binding allowing to identify clinical isolates of S. aureus in comparison with a panel of other bacterial species. In order to explore the possibility of realizing a selective bacteria biosensor device, based on immobilization of affinity-selected phage, we have studied the physisorbed phage deposition onto a mica surface. Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) was used to determine the organization of phage on mica surface and then the binding performance of mica-physisorbed phage to bacterial target was evaluated during the time by fluorescent microscopy. The system is able to bind specifically about 50% of S. aureus cells after 15' and 90% after one hour. Due to specificity and rapidness, this biosensing strategy paves the way to the further development of new cheap biosensors to be used in developing countries, as lab-on-chip (LOC) to detect bacterial agents in clinical diagnostics applications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Targeting pancreatic islets with phage display assisted by laser pressure catapult microdissection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Virginia J; Ozawa, Michael G; Trepel, Martin; Arap, Wadih; McDonald, Donald M; Pasqualini, Renata

    2005-02-01

    Heterogeneity of the microvasculature in different organs has been well documented by multiple methods including in vivo phage display. However, less is known about the diversity of blood vessels within functionally distinct regions of organs. Here, we combined in vivo phage display with laser pressure catapult microdissection to identify peptide ligands for vascular receptors in the islets of Langerhans in the murine pancreas. Protein database analyses of the peptides, CVSNPRWKC and CHVLWSTRC, showed sequence identity to two ephrin A-type ligand homologues, A2 and A4. Confocal microscopy confirmed that most immunoreactivity of CVSNPRWKC and CHVLWSTRC phage was associated with blood vessels in pancreatic islets. Antibodies recognizing EphA4, a receptor for ephrin-A ligands, were similarly associated with islet blood vessels. Importantly, binding of both islet-homing phage and anti-EphA4 antibody was strikingly increased in blood vessels of pancreatic islet tumors in RIP-Tag2 transgenic mice. These results indicate that endothelial cells of blood vessels in pancreatic islets preferentially express EphA4 receptors, and this expression is increased in tumors. Our findings show in vivo phage display and laser pressure catapult microdissection can be combined to reveal endothelial cell specialization within focal regions of the microvasculature.

  19. Antibody engineering using phage display with a coiled-coil heterodimeric Fv antibody fragment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinwei Wang

    Full Text Available A Fab-like antibody binding unit, ccFv, in which a pair of heterodimeric coiled-coil domains was fused to V(H and V(L for Fv stabilization, was constructed for an anti-VEGF antibody. The anti-VEGF ccFv showed the same binding affinity as scFv but significantly improved stability and phage display level. Furthermore, phage display libraries in the ccFv format were constructed for humanization and affinity maturation of the anti-VEGF antibody. A panel of V(H frameworks and V(H-CDR3 variants, with a significant improvement in affinity and expressibility in both E. coli and yeast systems, was isolated from the ccFv phage libraries. These results demonstrate the potential application of the ccFv antibody format in antibody engineering.

  20. M13 bacteriophage display framework that allows sortase-mediated modification of surface-accessible phage proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, Gaelen T; Cragnolini, Juan J; Popp, Maximilian W; Allen, Mark A; Dougan, Stephanie K; Spooner, Eric; Ploegh, Hidde L; Belcher, Angela M; Guimaraes, Carla P

    2012-07-18

    We exploit bacterial sortases to attach a variety of moieties to the capsid proteins of M13 bacteriophage. We show that pIII, pIX, and pVIII can be functionalized with entities ranging from small molecules (e.g., fluorophores, biotin) to correctly folded proteins (e.g., GFP, antibodies, streptavidin) in a site-specific manner, and with yields that surpass those of any reported using phage display technology. A case in point is modification of pVIII. While a phage vector limits the size of the insert into pVIII to a few amino acids, a phagemid system limits the number of copies actually displayed at the surface of M13. Using sortase-based reactions, a 100-fold increase in the efficiency of display of GFP onto pVIII is achieved. Taking advantage of orthogonal sortases, we can simultaneously target two distinct capsid proteins in the same phage particle and maintain excellent specificity of labeling. As demonstrated in this work, this is a simple and effective method for creating a variety of structures, thus expanding the use of M13 for materials science applications and as a biological tool.

  1. Binding of phage displayed Bacillus subtilis lipase A to a phosphonate suicide inhibitor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dröge, M.J; Ruggeberg, C.J.; van der Sloot, Almer Martinus; Schimmel, J.; Dijkstra, Durk; Verhaert, R.M D; Reetz, M.T.; Quax, Wim; Droge, MJ; Dijkstra, DS

    2003-01-01

    Phage display can be used as a protein engineering tool to select proteins with desirable binding properties from a library of randomly constructed mutants. Here, we describe the development of this method for the directed evolution of Bacillus subtilis lipase A, an enzyme that has marked properties

  2. Design and Synthesis of Reagents for Phage Display Screening of Dehalogenases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pieters, Roland J.; Fennema, Marko; Kellogg, Richard M.; Janssen, Dick B.

    1999-01-01

    Bifunctional molecules containing both a biotin and a substrate unit have been designed and synthesized for phage display screening of mutant libraries of haloalkane dehalogenase enzymes. The molecules were assembled using a convergent modular synthetic strategy. One molecule was synthesized to

  3. Isolation of llama antibody fragments for prevention of dandruff by phage display in shampoo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dolk, E.; Vaart, M. van der; Lutje Hulsik, D.; Vriend, G.; Haard, H. de; Spinelli, S.; Cambillau, C.; Frenken, L.; Verrips, T.

    As part of research exploring the feasibility of using antibody fragments to inhibit the growth of organisms implicated in dandruff, we isolated antibody fragments that bind to a cell surface protein of Malassezia furfur in the presence of shampoo. We found that phage display of llama

  4. Modular and aggregation resistant Vh antibodies from a phage display library

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friis, Niels Anton; Mandrup, Ole Aalund; Lykkemark, Simon

    2012-01-01

    Directed evolution of antibodies through phage display is a powerful technique for producing binders of various biological targets. One of the recent innovations in the fi eld is the domain antibody, an antibody consisting only of a single variable domain. These anti bodies can be obtained either...

  5. Selection of a breast cancer subpopulation-specific antibody using phage display on tissue sections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Simon Asbjørn; Meldgaard, Theresa; Fridriksdottir, Agla J

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer tumors are composed of heterogeneous cell populations. These populations display a high variance in morphology, growth and metastatic propensity. They respond differently to therapeutic interventions, and some may be more prone to cause recurrence. Studying individual subpopulations...... of breast cancer may provide crucial knowledge for the development of individualized therapy. However, this process is challenged by the availability of biomarkers able to identify subpopulations specifically. Here, we demonstrate an approach for phage display selection of recombinant antibody fragments...

  6. Improvement and efficient display of Bacillus thuringiensis toxins on M13 phages and ribosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacheco, Sabino; Cantón, Emiliano; Zuñiga-Navarrete, Fernando; Pecorari, Frédéric; Bravo, Alejandra; Soberón, Mario

    2015-12-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) produces insecticidal proteins that have been used worldwide in the control of insect-pests in crops and vectors of human diseases. However, different insect species are poorly controlled by the available Bt toxins or have evolved resistance to these toxins. Evolution of Bt toxicity could provide novel toxins to control insect pests. To this aim, efficient display systems to select toxins with increased binding to insect membranes or midgut proteins involved in toxicity are likely to be helpful. Here we describe two display systems, phage display and ribosome display, that allow the efficient display of two non-structurally related Bt toxins, Cry1Ac and Cyt1Aa. Improved display of Cry1Ac and Cyt1Aa on M13 phages was achieved by changing the commonly used peptide leader sequence of the coat pIII-fusion protein, that relies on the Sec translocation pathway, for a peptide leader sequence that relies on the signal recognition particle pathway (SRP) and by using a modified M13 helper phage (Phaberge) that has an amber mutation in its pIII genomic sequence and preferentially assembles using the pIII-fusion protein. Also, both Cry1Ac and Cyt1Aa were efficiently displayed on ribosomes, which could allow the construction of large libraries of variants. Furthermore, Cry1Ac or Cyt1Aa displayed on M13 phages or ribosomes were specifically selected from a mixture of both toxins depending on which antigen was immobilized for binding selection. These improved systems may allow the selection of Cry toxin variants with improved insecticidal activities that could counter insect resistances.

  7. Chaperone-assisted thermostability engineering of a soluble T cell receptor using phage display

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gunnarsen, Kristin S; Kristinsson, Solveig G; Justesen, Sune

    2013-01-01

    We here report a novel phage display selection strategy enabling fast and easy selection of thermostabilized proteins. The approach is illustrated with stabilization of an aggregation-prone soluble single chain T cell receptor (scTCR) characteristic of the murine MOPC315 myeloma model. Random...... mutation scTCR phage libraries were prepared in E. coli over-expressing the periplasmic chaperone FkpA, and such over-expression during library preparation proved crucial for successful downstream selection. The thermostabilized scTCR(mut) variants selected were produced in high yields and isolated...

  8. Differential screening of phage-ab libraries by oligonucleotide microarray technology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Monaci

    Full Text Available A novel and efficient tagArray technology was developed that allows rapid identification of antibodies which bind to receptors with a specific expression profile, in the absence of biological information. This method is based on the cloning of a specific, short nucleotide sequence (tag in the phagemid coding for each phage-displayed antibody fragment (phage-Ab present in a library. In order to set up and validate the method we identified about 10,000 different phage-Abs binding to receptors expressed in their native form on the cell surface (10 k Membranome collection and tagged each individual phage-Ab. The frequency of each phage-Ab in a given population can at this point be inferred by measuring the frequency of its associated tag sequence through standard DNA hybridization methods. Using tiny amounts of biological samples we identified phage-Abs binding to receptors preferentially expressed on primary tumor cells rather than on cells obtained from matched normal tissues. These antibodies inhibited cell proliferation in vitro and tumor development in vivo, thus representing therapeutic lead candidates.

  9. Phage Display: Selecting Straws Instead of a Needle from a Haystack

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mojca Lunder

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available An increasing number of peptides with specific binding affinity to various protein and even non-protein targets are being discovered from phage display libraries. The power of this method lies in its ability to efficiently and rapidly identify ligands with a desired target property from a large population of phage clones displaying diverse surface peptides. However, the search for the needle in the haystack does not always end successfully. False positive results may appear. Thus instead of specific binders phage with no actual affinity toward the target are recovered due to their propagation advantages or binding to other components of the screening system, such as the solid phase, capturing reagents, contaminants in the target sample or blocking agents, rather than the target. Biopanning experiments on different targets performed in our laboratory revealed some previously identified and many new target-unrelated peptide sequences, which have already been frequently described and published, but not yet recognized as target-unrelated. Distinguishing true binders from false positives is an important step toward phage display selections of greater integrity. This article thoroughly reviews and discusses already identified and new target-unrelated peptides and suggests strategies to avoid their isolation.

  10. Development of a renal collecting duct homing peptide using phage display

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svenningsen, Per; Peti-Peterdi, Janos

    Homing peptides are useful for in vivo labeling and nonviral gene transfer to selective tissues and cell types. The aim of this project was to develop a renal collecting duct homing peptide. Using phage display, we identified a phage expressing a cyclic 7 amino acid peptide, which was internalized...... developed a peptide, which can be used to label the collecting duct cells in mice and rats; however, further development is needed in order to use the peptide as a vector for nonviral gene transfer in vivo....... in a collecting duct cell line. Moreover, the phage was internalized in the collecting duct cells after i.v. injection in mice. To test if the peptide could be used for nonviral gene transfer, we synthesized the identified peptide fused to a protamine fragment. The fusion peptide was able to bind plasmid GFP c...

  11. Phage display-derived binders able to distinguish Listeria monocytogenes from other Listeria species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, Josephine; Karoonuthaisiri, Nitsara; Charlermroj, Ratthaphol; Stewart, Linda D; Elliott, Christopher T; Grant, Irene R

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to produce phage display-derived binders with the ability to distinguish Listeria monocytogenes from other Listeria spp., which may have potential utility to enhance detection of Listeria monocytogenes. To obtain binders with the desired binding specificity a series of surface and solution phage-display biopannings were performed. Initially, three rounds of surface biopanning against gamma-irradiated L. monocytogenes serovar 4b cells were performed followed by an additional surface biopanning round against L. monocytogenes 4b which included prior subtraction biopanning against gamma-irradiated L. innocua cells. In an attempt to further enhance binder specificity for L. monocytogenes 4b two rounds of solution biopanning were performed, both rounds included initial subtraction solution biopanning against L. innocua. Subsequent evaluations were performed on the phage clones by phage binding ELISA. All phage clones tested from the second round of solution biopanning had higher specificity for L. monocytogenes 4b than for L. innocua and three other foodborne pathogens (Salmonella spp., Escherichia coli and Campylobacter jejuni). Further evaluation with five other Listeria spp. revealed that one phage clone in particular, expressing peptide GRIADLPPLKPN, was highly specific for L. monocytogenes with at least 43-fold more binding capability to L. monocytogenes 4b than to any other Listeria sp. This proof-of-principle study demonstrates how a combination of surface, solution and subtractive biopanning was used to maximise binder specificity. L. monocytogenes-specific binders were obtained which could have potential application in novel detection tests for L. monocytogenes, benefiting both the food and medical industries.

  12. Phage display-derived binders able to distinguish Listeria monocytogenes from other Listeria species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josephine Morton

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to produce phage display-derived binders with the ability to distinguish Listeria monocytogenes from other Listeria spp., which may have potential utility to enhance detection of Listeria monocytogenes. To obtain binders with the desired binding specificity a series of surface and solution phage-display biopannings were performed. Initially, three rounds of surface biopanning against gamma-irradiated L. monocytogenes serovar 4b cells were performed followed by an additional surface biopanning round against L. monocytogenes 4b which included prior subtraction biopanning against gamma-irradiated L. innocua cells. In an attempt to further enhance binder specificity for L. monocytogenes 4b two rounds of solution biopanning were performed, both rounds included initial subtraction solution biopanning against L. innocua. Subsequent evaluations were performed on the phage clones by phage binding ELISA. All phage clones tested from the second round of solution biopanning had higher specificity for L. monocytogenes 4b than for L. innocua and three other foodborne pathogens (Salmonella spp., Escherichia coli and Campylobacter jejuni. Further evaluation with five other Listeria spp. revealed that one phage clone in particular, expressing peptide GRIADLPPLKPN, was highly specific for L. monocytogenes with at least 43-fold more binding capability to L. monocytogenes 4b than to any other Listeria sp. This proof-of-principle study demonstrates how a combination of surface, solution and subtractive biopanning was used to maximise binder specificity. L. monocytogenes-specific binders were obtained which could have potential application in novel detection tests for L. monocytogenes, benefiting both the food and medical industries.

  13. PuLSE: Quality control and quantification of peptide sequences explored by phage display libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shave, Steven; Mann, Stefan; Koszela, Joanna; Kerr, Alastair; Auer, Manfred

    2018-01-01

    The design of highly diverse phage display libraries is based on assumption that DNA bases are incorporated at similar rates within the randomized sequence. As library complexity increases and expected copy numbers of unique sequences decrease, the exploration of library space becomes sparser and the presence of truly random sequences becomes critical. We present the program PuLSE (Phage Library Sequence Evaluation) as a tool for assessing randomness and therefore diversity of phage display libraries. PuLSE runs on a collection of sequence reads in the fastq file format and generates tables profiling the library in terms of unique DNA sequence counts and positions, translated peptide sequences, and normalized 'expected' occurrences from base to residue codon frequencies. The output allows at-a-glance quantitative quality control of a phage library in terms of sequence coverage both at the DNA base and translated protein residue level, which has been missing from toolsets and literature. The open source program PuLSE is available in two formats, a C++ source code package for compilation and integration into existing bioinformatics pipelines and precompiled binaries for ease of use.

  14. Processing and functional display of the 86 kDa heterodimeric penicillin G acylase on the surface of phage fd

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhaert, R.M D; van Duin, J; Quax, Wim

    1999-01-01

    The large heterodimeric penicillin G acylase from Alcaligenes faecalis was displayed on the surface of phage fd. We fused the coding sequence (alpha subunit-internal peptide-beta subunit) to the gene of a phage coat protein. A modified g3p signal sequence was used to direct the polypeptide to the

  15. Phage Display-Derived Cross-Reactive Neutralizing Antibody against Enterovirus 71 and Coxsackievirus A16.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiao; Sun, Chunyun; Xiao, Xiangqian; Pang, Lin; Shen, Sisi; Zhang, Jie; Cen, Shan; Yang, Burton B; Huang, Yuming; Sheng, Wang; Zeng, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71) and coxsackievirus A16 (CVA16) are members of the Picornaviridae family and are considered the main causative agents of hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD). In recent decades large HFMD outbreaks caused by EV71 and CVA16 have become significant public health concerns in the Asia-Pacific region. Vaccines and antiviral drugs are unavailable to prevent EV71 and CVA16 infection. In the current study, a chimeric antibody targeting a highly conserved peptide in the EV71 VP4 protein was isolated by using a phage display technique. The antibody showed cross-neutralizing capability against EV71 and CVA16 in vitro. The results suggest that this phage display-derived antibody will have great potential as a broad neutralizing antibody against EV71 and CVA16 after affinity maturation and humanization.

  16. A Phage Display Screening Derived Peptide with Affinity for the Adeninyl Moiety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louise Elmlund

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Phage display screening of a surface-immobilized adenine derivative led to the identification of a heptameric peptide with selectivity for adenine as demonstrated through quartz crystal microbalance (QCM studies. The peptide demonstrated a concentration dependent affinity for an adeninyl moiety decorated surface (KD of 968 ± 53.3 μM, which highlights the power of piezoelectric sensing in the study of weak interactions.

  17. Peptide Phage Display as a Tool for Drug Discovery: Targeting Membrane Receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomaz Bratkovic

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Ligands selected from phage-displayed random peptide libraries tend to be directed to biologically relevant sites on the surface of the target protein. Consequently, peptides derived from library screenings often modulate the target protein’s activity in vitro and in vivo and can be used as lead compounds in drug design and as alternatives to antibodies for target validation in both genomics and drug discovery. This review discusses the use of phage display to identify membrane receptor modulators with agonistic or antagonistic activities. Because isolating or producing recombinant membrane proteins for use as target molecules in library screening is often impossible, innovative selection strategies such as panning against whole cells or tissues, recombinant receptor ectodomains, or neutralizing antibodies to endogenous binding partners were devised. Prominent examples from a two-decade history of peptide phage display will be presented, focusing on the design of affinity selection experiments, methods for improving the initial hits, and applications of the identified peptides.

  18. A compact phage display human scFv library for selection of antibodies to a wide variety of antigens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristensen Peter

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Phage display technology is a powerful new tool for making antibodies outside the immune system, thus avoiding the use of experimental animals. In the early days, it was postulated that this technique would eventually replace hybridoma technology and animal immunisations. However, since this technology emerged more than 20 years ago, there have only been a handful reports on the construction and application of phage display antibody libraries world-wide. Results Here we report the simplest and highly efficient method for the construction of a highly useful human single chain variable fragment (scFv library. The least number of oligonucleotide primers, electroporations and ligation reactions were used to generate a library of 1.5 × 108 individual clones, without generation of sub-libraries. All possible combinations of heavy and light chains, among all immunoglobulin isotypes, were included by using a mixture of primers and overlapping extension PCR. The key difference from other similar libraries was the highest diversity of variable gene repertoires, which was derived from 140 non-immunized human donors. A wide variety of antigens were successfully used to affinity select specific binders. These included pure recombinant proteins, a hapten and complex antigens such as viral coat proteins, crude snake venom and cancer cell surface antigens. In particular, we were able to use standard bio-panning method to isolate antibody that can bind to soluble Aflatoxin B1, when using BSA-conjugated toxin as a target, as demonstrated by inhibition ELISA. Conclusion These results suggested that by using an optimized protocol and very high repertoire diversity, a compact and efficient phage antibody library can be generated. This advanced method could be adopted by any molecular biology laboratory to generate both naïve or immunized libraries for particular targets as well as for high-throughput applications.

  19. A 12-residue epitope displayed on phage T7 reacts strongly with antibodies against foot-and-mouth disease virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Chuan Loo; Yong, Chean Yeah; Muhamad, Azira; Syahir, Amir; Omar, Abdul Rahman; Sieo, Chin Chin; Tan, Wen Siang

    2018-05-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) is a major threat to the livestock industry worldwide. Despite constant surveillance and effective vaccination, the perpetual mutations of the foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) pose a huge challenge to FMD diagnosis. The immunodominant region of the FMDV VP1 protein (residues 131-170) displayed on phage T7 has been used to detect anti-FMDV in bovine sera. In the present study, the functional epitope was further delineated using amino acid sequence alignment, homology modelling and phage display. Two highly conserved regions (VP1 145-152 and VP1 159-170 ) were identified among different FMDV serotypes. The coding regions of these two epitopes were fused separately to the T7 genome and displayed on the phage particles. Interestingly, chimeric phage displaying the VP1 159-170 epitope demonstrated a higher antigenicity than that displaying the VP1 131-170 epitope. By contrast, phage T7 displaying the VP1 145-152 epitope did not react significantly with the anti-FMDV antibodies in vaccinated bovine sera. This study has successfully identified a smaller functional epitope, VP1 159-170 , located at the C-terminal end of the structural VP1 protein. The phage T7 displaying this shorter epitope is a promising diagnostic reagent to detect anti-FMDV antibodies in vaccinated animals.

  20. Development of single chain variable fragment (scFv) antibodies against Xylella fastidiosa subsp. pauca by phage display.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Qing; Jordan, Ramon; Brlansky, Ronald H; Istomina, Olga; Hartung, John

    2015-10-01

    Xylella fastidiosa is a member of the gamma proteobacteria. It is fastidious, insect-vectored and xylem-limited and causes a variety of diseases, some severe, on a wide range of economically important perennial crops, including grape and citrus. Antibody based detection assays are commercially available for X. fastidiosa, and are effective at the species, but not at the subspecies level. We have made a library of scFv antibody fragments directed against X. fastidiosa subsp. pauca strain 9a5c (citrus) by using phage display technology. Antibody gene repertoires were PCR-amplified using 23 primers for the heavy chain variable region (V(H)) and 21 primers for the light chain variable region (V(L)). The V(H) and V(L) were joined by overlap extension PCR, and then the genes of the scFv library were ligated into the phage vector pKM19. The library contained 1.2×10(7) independent clones with full-length scFv inserts. In each of 3cycles of affinity-selection with 9a5c, about 1.0×10(12) phage were used for panning with 4.1×10(6), 7.1×10(6), 2.1×10(7) phage recovered after the first, second and third cycles, respectively. Sixty-six percent of clones from the final library bound X. fastidiosa 9a5c in an ELISA. Some of these scFv antibodies recognized strain 9a5c and did not recognize X. fastidiosa strains that cause Pierce's disease of grapevine. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  1. Identification and Characterization of Strychnine-Binding Peptides Using Phage-Display Screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Fang; Wang, Min; Qiu, Zheng; Wang, Xiao-Meng; Xu, Chun-Lei; Zhang, Xia

    2017-01-01

    In drug development, phage display is a high-throughput method for identifying the specific cellular targets of drugs. However, insoluble small chemicals remain intractable to this technique because of the difficulty of presenting molecules to phages without occupying or destroying the limited functional groups. In the present study, we selected Strychnine (Stry) as a model compounda and sought to develope an alternative in vitro biopanning strategy against insoluble suspension. A phage library displaying random sequences of fifteen peptides was employed to screen for interactions between Stry and its cellular selective binding peptides, which are of great value to have a complete understanding of the mechanism of Stry for its antitumor activity. After four rounds of biopanning, a selection of 100 binding clones was randomly picked and subjected to modified proliferation and diffusion assays to evaluate the binding affinity of the clones. Finally, eleven clones were identified as positive binders. The corresponding peptides were synthesized and detected for their binding activities using surface plasmon resonance imaging (SPRi). Our study provides a feasible scheme for confirming the interaction of chemical compounds and cellular binding peptides. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  2. [Phage display selection on MRC-5 cells yield peptides specific for HCMV-binding].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Zhang, Li; Yu, Ping

    2010-01-01

    To screen the special binding peptides to the MRC-5 cells infected by human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) so as to study the progress how HCMV recognizes susceptive host cells. The special binding peptides to MRC-5 cells infected by HCMV rather than normal MRC-5 cells were screened by phage display system, and then identified by ELISA, the sequence of single strand DNA were determined and analyzed. In addition, the amino acid sequence of target protein was compared in protein sequence database from BLAST in GenBank, and then the physico-chemical property was also analyzed by Vector NTI software. The high affinity phage-ligands to MRC-5 infected by HCMV were found, and then sequences of peptides are EVNMSDS, NVSVFET and GQQPTTV respectively. These three peptides sequences were found in HCMV gB and gH protein. The peptides that can special bind HCMV-infected MRC-5 cells has been screened by phage display system. This new finding should bring new ideas for studying the functional domain through which HCMV can recognize and bind host cells.

  3. Phage display of the serpin alpha-1 proteinase inhibitor randomized at consecutive residues in the reactive centre loop and biopanned with or without thrombin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin M Scott

    Full Text Available In spite of the power of phage display technology to identify variant proteins with novel properties in large libraries, it has only been previously applied to one member of the serpin superfamily. Here we describe phage display of human alpha-1 proteinase inhibitor (API in a T7 bacteriophage system. API M358R fused to the C-terminus of T7 capsid protein 10B was directly shown to form denaturation-resistant complexes with thrombin by electrophoresis and immunoblotting following exposure of intact phages to thrombin. We therefore developed a biopanning protocol in which thrombin-reactive phages were selected using biotinylated anti-thrombin antibodies and streptavidin-coated magnetic beads. A library consisting of displayed API randomized at residues 357 and 358 (P2-P1 yielded predominantly Pro-Arg at these positions after five rounds of thrombin selection; in contrast the same degree of mock selection yielded only non-functional variants. A more diverse library of API M358R randomized at residues 352-356 (P7-P3 was also probed, yielding numerous variants fitting a loose consensus of DLTVS as judged by sequencing of the inserts of plaque-purified phages. The thrombin-selected sequences were transferred en masse into bacterial expression plasmids, and lysates from individual colonies were screening for API-thrombin complexing. The most active candidates from this sixth round of screening contained DITMA and AAFVS at P7-P3 and inhibited thrombin 2.1-fold more rapidly than API M358R with no change in reaction stoichiometry. Deep sequencing using the Ion Torrent platform confirmed that over 800 sequences were significantly enriched in the thrombin-panned versus naïve phage display library, including some detected using the combined phage display/bacterial lysate screening approach. Our results show that API joins Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor-1 (PAI-1 as a serpin amenable to phage display and suggest the utility of this approach for the selection

  4. Blocking peptides against HBV: PreS1 protein selected from a phage display library

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Wei; Liu, Yang; Zu, Xiangyang; Jin, Rui; Xiao, Gengfu

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Successfully selected specific PreS1-interacting peptides by using phage displayed library. → Alignment of the positive phage clones revealed a consensus PreS1 binding motif. → A highly enriched peptide named P7 had a strong binding ability for PreS1. → P7 could block PreS1 attachment. -- Abstract: The PreS1 protein is present on the outermost part of the hepatitis B virus (HBV) surface and has been shown to have a pivotal function in viral infectivity and assembly. The development of reagents with high affinity and specificity for PreS1 is of great significance for early diagnosis and treatment of HBV infection. A phage display library of dodecapeptide was screened for interactions with purified PreS1 protein. Alignment of the positive phage clones revealed a putative consensus PreS1 binding motif of HX n HX m HP/R. Moreover, a peptide named P7 (KHMHWHPPALNT) was highly enriched and occurred with a surprisingly high frequency of 72%. A thermodynamic study revealed that P7 has a higher binding affinity to PreS1 than the other peptides. Furthermore, P7 was able to abrogate the binding of HBV virions to the PreS1 antibody, suggesting that P7 covers key functional sites on the native PreS1 protein. This newly isolated peptide may, therefore, be a new therapeutic candidate for the treatment of HBV. The consensus motif could be modified to deliver imaging, diagnostic, and therapeutic agents to tissues affected by HBV.

  5. Blocking peptides against HBV: PreS1 protein selected from a phage display library

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Wei; Liu, Yang; Zu, Xiangyang; Jin, Rui [State Key Laboratory of Virology, Wuhan Institute of Virology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan 430071 (China); Xiao, Gengfu, E-mail: xiaogf@wh.iov.cn [State Key Laboratory of Virology, Wuhan Institute of Virology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan 430071 (China)

    2011-09-09

    Highlights: {yields} Successfully selected specific PreS1-interacting peptides by using phage displayed library. {yields} Alignment of the positive phage clones revealed a consensus PreS1 binding motif. {yields} A highly enriched peptide named P7 had a strong binding ability for PreS1. {yields} P7 could block PreS1 attachment. -- Abstract: The PreS1 protein is present on the outermost part of the hepatitis B virus (HBV) surface and has been shown to have a pivotal function in viral infectivity and assembly. The development of reagents with high affinity and specificity for PreS1 is of great significance for early diagnosis and treatment of HBV infection. A phage display library of dodecapeptide was screened for interactions with purified PreS1 protein. Alignment of the positive phage clones revealed a putative consensus PreS1 binding motif of HX{sub n}HX{sub m}HP/R. Moreover, a peptide named P7 (KHMHWHPPALNT) was highly enriched and occurred with a surprisingly high frequency of 72%. A thermodynamic study revealed that P7 has a higher binding affinity to PreS1 than the other peptides. Furthermore, P7 was able to abrogate the binding of HBV virions to the PreS1 antibody, suggesting that P7 covers key functional sites on the native PreS1 protein. This newly isolated peptide may, therefore, be a new therapeutic candidate for the treatment of HBV. The consensus motif could be modified to deliver imaging, diagnostic, and therapeutic agents to tissues affected by HBV.

  6. [Construction of phage display cDNA library from adult worms of Schistosoma japonicum].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yi; Jia, Ren-chu; Liu, Jin-ming; Yuan, Chun-xiu; Shi, Yao-jun; Lu, Ke; Fu, Zhi-qiang; Sun, Huan; Cai, You-min; Lin, Jiao-jiao

    2007-10-01

    To screen protective antigen genes and construct the T7 phage display library from adult worms of Schistosoma japonicum. Total RNA was extracted from adult worms of S. japonicum by Trizol reagent anti mRNA was isolated from the total RNA. The ds cDNA was synthesized by reverse transcription using random primer. Directional EcoR I/ Hind III linkers were ligated into the ends of ds cDNA and the ds cDNA was digested with EcoR I anti Hind III, which resulted in ds cDNA with EcoR I and Hind III adhering ends. The digested ds cDNA fragments longer than 300 bp in length were fractionated and ligated into T7 Select 10-3b vector. After packaging in citro, the T7 Select 10-3b vector was transformed into BLT5403 to construct the T7 phage display cDNA library. Plaque assay and PCR were used to evaluate the library. Seven known objective genes of S. japonicum were screened by PCR to detect the representation of the library. Primary library capacity was 4.98 x 10(6) pfu, and the titer of amplified library was 3.85 x 10(11) pfu/mL. The PCR identification result of 96 clones picked at random showed that recombination rate was 93.8%, in which 95.6% inserted cDNA fragments were longer than 300 bp in length. All the seven known objective genes of S. japonicum were amplified from the library. The T7 phage display library from adult worms of Schistosoma japonicum was constructed.

  7. Discovery of a polystyrene binding peptide isolated from phage display library and its application in peptide immobilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiang, Xu; Sun, Keyong; Xing, Lijun; Xu, Yifeng; Wang, Hong; Zhou, Zhengpin; Zhang, Juan; Zhang, Fang; Caliskan, Bilgen; Wang, Min; Qiu, Zheng

    2017-06-01

    Phage peptide display is a powerful technique for discovery of various target-specific ligands. However, target-unrelated peptides can often be obtained and cause ambiguous results. Peptide PB-TUP has been isolated repeatedly in our laboratory on different targets and we conducted a research on PB-TUP phage to investigate their binding properties and rate of propagation. ELISA and phage recovery assay demonstrated that PB-TUP phage had a significant superior affinity to polystyrene solid surface compared with control phage clones. In this study, some incidental bindings are excluded like blocking agents and non-specific binding of secondary antibodies. Propagation rate assays of the selected phage clones showed that the growth rate of PB-TUP phage was not superior to the control phages. Furthermore, the binding of PB-TUB to polystyrene was concentration dependent and varied with solution pH. Molecular modeling revealed that stable structures of α-helix and β-turn may contribute to the binding of PB-TUP to polystyrene plate. The PB-TUP sequence was fused to the N-terminus of peptide P2 and the fusion peptide significantly increased the binding affinity to polystyrene. The fusion peptide also enhanced the cell adhesion ability of peptide P2 with human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC). The addition of the polystyrene binding peptide provided a convenient method for peptide immobilization.

  8. Multi-subunit proteins on the surface of filamentous phage: methodologies for displaying antibody (Fab) heavy and light chains.

    OpenAIRE

    Hoogenboom, H R; Griffiths, A D; Johnson, K S; Chiswell, D J; Hudson, P; Winter, G

    1991-01-01

    The display of proteins on the surface of phage offers a powerful means of selecting for rare genes encoding proteins with binding activities. Recently we found that antibody heavy and light chain variable (V) domains fused as a single polypeptide chain to a minor coat protein of filamentous phage fd, could be enriched by successive rounds of phage growth and panning with antigen. This allows the selection of antigen-binding domains directly from diverse libraries of V-genes. Now we show that...

  9. Affinity isolation of antigen-specific circulating B cells for generation of phage display-derived human monoclonal antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ditzel, Henrik

    2009-01-01

    A method is described for affinity isolation of antigen-specific circulating B cells of interest for subsequent generation of immune antibody phage display libraries. This approach should overcome the problem of low yields of monoclonal antibodies of interest in the libraries generated from...... the frequency of antibody phage particles of interest in the library and allow for efficient isolation monoclonal antibodies with the predefined specificity....

  10. Generation of human antibody fragments against Streptococcus mutans using a phage display chain shuffling approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barth Stefan

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Common oral diseases and dental caries can be prevented effectively by passive immunization. In humans, passive immunotherapy may require the use of humanized or human antibodies to prevent adverse immune responses against murine epitopes. Therefore we generated human single chain and diabody antibody derivatives based on the binding characteristics of the murine monoclonal antibody Guy's 13. The murine form of this antibody has been used successfully to prevent Streptococcus mutans colonization and the development of dental caries in non-human primates, and to prevent bacterial colonization in human clinical trials. Results The antibody derivatives were generated using a chain-shuffling approach based on human antibody variable gene phage-display libraries. Like the parent antibody, these derivatives bound specifically to SAI/II, the surface adhesin of the oral pathogen S. mutans. Conclusions Humanization of murine antibodies can be easily achieved using phage display libraries. The human antibody fragments bind the antigen as well as the causative agent of dental caries. In addition the human diabody derivative is capable of aggregating S. mutans in vitro, making it a useful candidate passive immunotherapeutic agent for oral diseases.

  11. Thermal Stability of RNA Phage Virus-Like Particles Displaying Foreign Peptides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peabody David S

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To be useful for genetic display of foreign peptides a viral coat protein must tolerate peptide insertions without major disruption of subunit folding and capsid assembly. The folding of the coat protein of RNA phage MS2 does not normally tolerate insertions in its AB-loop, but an engineered single-chain dimer readily accepts them as long as they are restricted to one of its two halves. Results Here we characterize the effects of peptide insertions on the thermal stabilities of MS2 virus-like particles (VLPs displaying a variety of different peptides in one AB-loop of the coat protein single-chain dimer. These particles typically denature at temperatures around 5-10°C lower than unmodified VLPs. Even so, they are generally stable up to about 50°C. VLPs of the related RNA phage PP7 are cross-linked with intersubunit disulfide bonds and are therefore significantly more stable. An AB-loop insertion also reduces the stability of PP7 VLPs, but they only begin to denature above about 70°C. Conclusions VLPs assembled from MS2 single-chain dimer coat proteins with peptide insertions in one of their AB-loops are somewhat less stable than the wild-type particle, but still resist heating up to about 50°C. Because they possess disulfide cross-links, PP7-derived VLPs provide an alternate platform with even higher stability.

  12. Accelerating phage-display library selection by reversible and site-specific biotinylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koide, Akiko; Wojcik, John; Gilbreth, Ryan N; Reichel, Annett; Piehler, Jacob; Koide, Shohei

    2009-11-01

    Immobilization of a target molecule to a solid support is an indispensable step in phage display library sorting. Here we describe an immobilization method that addresses shortcomings of existing strategies. Our method is based on the use of a polyhistidine-tagged (His-tagged) target molecule and (BT)tris-NTA, a high-affinity capture reagent for His-tags that also contains a biotin moiety. (BT)tris-NTA provides a stable and reversible linkage between a His-tag and a streptavidin-coated solid support. Because His-tags are the de facto standard for recombinant protein purification, this method dramatically simplifies target preparation for phage display library sorting. Here, we demonstrate the utility of this method by selecting high-affinity binding proteins based on the fibronectin type III (FN3) scaffold to two His-tagged protein targets, yeast small ubiquitin-like modifier and maltose-binding protein. Notably, a significant number of FN3 clones binding either targets selected using the new immobilization method exhibited only very weak binding when the same target was immobilized by coating on a polystyrene surface. This suggests that the His-tag-mediated immobilization exposes epitopes that are masked by commonly used passive adsorption methods. Together, these results establish a method with the potential to streamline and enhance many binding-protein engineering experiments.

  13. Phage-Displayed Peptides Selected to Bind Envelope Glycoprotein Show Antiviral Activity against Dengue Virus Serotype 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina de la Guardia

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Dengue virus is a growing public health threat that affects hundreds of million peoples every year and leave huge economic and social damage. The virus is transmitted by mosquitoes and the incidence of the disease is increasing, among other causes, due to the geographical expansion of the vector’s range and the lack of effectiveness in public health interventions in most prevalent countries. So far, no highly effective vaccine or antiviral has been developed for this virus. Here we employed phage display technology to identify peptides able to block the DENV2. A random peptide library presented in M13 phages was screened with recombinant dengue envelope and its fragment domain III. After four rounds of panning, several binding peptides were identified, synthesized, and tested against the virus. Three peptides were able to block the infectivity of the virus while not being toxic to the target cells. Blind docking simulations were done to investigate the possible mode of binding, showing that all peptides appear to bind domain III of the protein and may be mostly stabilized by hydrophobic interactions. These results are relevant to the development of novel therapeutics against this important virus.

  14. Subtractive phage display selection for screening and identification of peptide sequences with potential use in serodiagnosis of paracoccidioidomycosis caused by Paracoccidioides brasiliensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portes, L da Silva; Kioshima, E S; de Camargo, Z P; Batista, W L; Xander, P

    2017-11-01

    Paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM) is a systemic granulomatous disease endemic in Latin America whose aetiologic agents are the thermodimorphic fungi Paracoccidioides brasiliensis and Paracoccidioides lutzii. Despite technological advances, some problems have been reported for the fungal antigens used for serological diagnosis, and inconsistencies among laboratories have been reported. The use of synthetic peptides in the serological diagnosis of infectious diseases has proved to be a valuable strategy because in some cases, the reactions are more specific and sensitive. In this study, we used a subtractive selection with a phage display library against purified polyclonal antibodies for negative and positive PCM sera caused by P. brasiliensis. The binding phages were sequenced and tested in a binding assay to evaluate its interaction with sera from normal individuals and PCM patients. Synthetic peptides derived from these phage clones were tested in a serological assay, and we observed a significant recognition of LP15 by sera from PCM patients infected with P. brasiliensis. Our results demonstrated that subtractive phage display selection may be useful for identifying new epitopes that can be applied to the serodiagnosis of PCM caused by P. brasiliensis. Currently, there is no standardized method for the preparation of paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM) antigens, which has resulted in differences in the antigens used for serological diagnosis. Here, we report a procedure that uses subtractive phage display selection to select and identify new epitopes for the serodiagnosis of PCM caused by Paracoccidioides brasiliensis. A synthetic peptide obtained using this methodology was successfully recognized by sera from PCM patients, thus demonstrating its potential use for improving the serodiagnosis of this mycosis. The development of synthetic peptides for the serodiagnosis of PCM could be a promising alternative for the better standardization of diagnoses among laboratories.

  15. Cellular Internalization Mechanism and Intracellular Trafficking of Filamentous M13 Phages Displaying a Cell-Penetrating Transbody and TAT Peptide

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Aeyung; Shin, Tae-Hwan; Shin, Seung-Min; Pham, Chuong D.; Choi, Dong-Ki; Kwon, Myung-Hee; Kim, Yong-Sung

    2012-01-01

    Cellular internalization of bacteriophage by surface-displayed cell penetrating peptides has been reported, though the underlying mechanism remains elusive. Here we describe in detail the internalization mechanism and intracellular trafficking and stability of filamentous M13 phages, the cellular entry of which is mediated by surface-displayed cell-penetrating light chain variable domain 3D8 VL transbody (3D8 VL-M13) or TAT peptide (TAT-M13). Recombinant 3D8 VL-M13 and TAT-M13 phages were eff...

  16. Construction of genetically engineered M13K07 helper phage for simultaneous phage display of gold binding peptide 1 and nuclear matrix protein 22 ScFv antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatemi, Farnaz; Amini, Seyed Mohammad; Kharrazi, Sharmin; Rasaee, Mohammad Javad; Mazlomi, Mohammad Ali; Asadi-Ghalehni, Majid; Rajabibazl, Masoumeh; Sadroddiny, Esmaeil

    2017-11-01

    The most common techniques of antibody phage display are based on the use of M13 filamentous bacteriophages. This study introduces a new genetically engineered M13K07 helper phage displaying multiple copies of a known gold binding peptide on p8 coat proteins. The recombinant helper phages were used to rescue a phagemid vector encoding the p3 coat protein fused to the nuclear matrix protein 22 (NMP22) ScFv antibody. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM), UV-vis absorbance spectroscopy, and field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) analysis revealed that the expression of gold binding peptide 1 (GBP1) on major coat protein p8 significantly enhances the gold-binding affinity of M13 phages. The recombinant bacteriophages at concentrations above 5×10 4 pfu/ml red-shifted the UV-vis absorbance spectra of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs); however, the surface plasmon resonance of gold nanoparticles was not changed by the wild type bacteriophages at concentrations up to 10 12 pfu/ml. The phage ELISA assay demonstrated the high affinity binding of bifunctional bacteriophages to NMP22 antigen at concentrations of 10 5 and 10 6 pfu/ml. Thus, the p3 end of the bifunctional bacteriophages would be able to bind to specific target antigen, while the AuNPs were assembled along the coat of virus for signal generation. Our results indicated that the complex of antigen-bacteriophages lead to UV-vis spectral changes of AuNPs and NMP22 antigen in concentration range of 10-80μg/ml can be detected by bifunctional bacteriophages at concentration of 10 4 pfu/ml. The ability of bifunctional bacteriophages to bind to antigen and generate signal at the same time, makes this approach applicable for identifying different antigens in immunoassay techniques. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Isolation of Osteosarcoma-Associated Human Antibodies from a Combinatorial Fab Phage Display Library

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmela Dantas-Barbosa

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Osteosarcoma, a highly malignant disease, is the most common primary bone tumor and is frequently found in children and adolescents. In order to isolate antibodies against osteosarcoma antigens, a combinatorial osteosarcoma Fab library displayed on the surface of phages was used. After three rounds of selection on the surface of tumor cells, several osteosarcoma-reactive Fabs were detected. From these Fabs, five were better characterized, and despite having differences in their VH (heavy chain variable domain and Vκ (kappa chain variable domain regions, they all bound to a protein with the same molecular mass. Further analysis by cell ELISA and immunocytochemistry suggested that the Fabs recognize a membrane-associated tumor antigen expressed in higher amounts in neoplasic cells than in normal tissue. These results suggest that the human Fabs selected in this work are a valuable tool for the study of this neoplasia.

  18. Identification of Novel Immunogenic Proteins of Neisseria gonorrhoeae by Phage Display.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel O Connor

    Full Text Available Neisseria gonorrhoeae is one of the most prevalent sexually transmitted diseases worldwide with more than 100 million new infections per year. A lack of intense research over the last decades and increasing resistances to the recommended antibiotics call for a better understanding of gonococcal infection, fast diagnostics and therapeutic measures against N. gonorrhoeae. Therefore, the aim of this work was to identify novel immunogenic proteins as a first step to advance those unresolved problems. For the identification of immunogenic proteins, pHORF oligopeptide phage display libraries of the entire N. gonorrhoeae genome were constructed. Several immunogenic oligopeptides were identified using polyclonal rabbit antibodies against N. gonorrhoeae. Corresponding full-length proteins of the identified oligopeptides were expressed and their immunogenic character was verified by ELISA. The immunogenic character of six proteins was identified for the first time. Additional 13 proteins were verified as immunogenic proteins in N. gonorrhoeae.

  19. Novel ZnO-binding peptides obtained by the screening of a phage display peptide library

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golec, Piotr [Institute of Biochemistry and Biophysics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Laboratory of Molecular Biology (affiliated with the University of Gdansk) (Poland); Karczewska-Golec, Joanna [University of Gdansk and Medical University of Gdansk, Laboratory of Molecular Bacteriology, Intercollegiate Faculty of Biotechnology (Poland); Los, Marcin; Wegrzyn, Grzegorz, E-mail: wegrzyn@biotech.univ.gda.pl [University of Gdansk, Department of Molecular Biology (Poland)

    2012-11-15

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) is a semiconductor compound with a potential for wide use in various applications, including biomaterials and biosensors, particularly as nanoparticles (the size range of ZnO nanoparticles is from 2 to 100 nm, with an average of about 35 nm). Here, we report isolation of novel ZnO-binding peptides, by screening of a phage display library. Interestingly, amino acid sequences of the ZnO-binding peptides reported in this paper and those described previously are significantly different. This suggests that there is a high variability in sequences of peptides which can bind particular inorganic molecules, indicating that different approaches may lead to discovery of different peptides of generally the same activity (e.g., binding of ZnO) but having various detailed properties, perhaps crucial under specific conditions of different applications.

  20. JTEC panel on display technologies in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tannas, Lawrence E., Jr.; Glenn, William E.; Credelle, Thomas; Doane, J. William; Firester, Arthur H.; Thompson, Malcolm

    1992-01-01

    This report is one in a series of reports that describes research and development efforts in Japan in the area of display technologies. The following are included in this report: flat panel displays (technical findings, liquid crystal display development and production, large flat panel displays (FPD's), electroluminescent displays and plasma panels, infrastructure in Japan's FPD industry, market and projected sales, and new a-Si active matrix liquid crystal display (AMLCD) factory); materials for flat panel displays (liquid crystal materials, and light-emissive display materials); manufacturing and infrastructure of active matrix liquid crystal displays (manufacturing logistics and equipment); passive matrix liquid crystal displays (LCD basics, twisted nematics LCD's, supertwisted nematic LCD's, ferroelectric LCD's, and a comparison of passive matrix LCD technology); active matrix technology (basic active matrix technology, investment environment, amorphous silicon, polysilicon, and commercial products and prototypes); and projection displays (comparison of Japanese and U.S. display research, and technical evaluation of work).

  1. Construction of naïve camelids VHH repertoire in phage display-based library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabir, Jamal S M; Atef, Ahmed; El-Domyati, Fotouh M; Edris, Sherif; Hajrah, Nahid; Alzohairy, Ahmed M; Bahieldin, Ahmed

    2014-04-01

    Camelids have unique antibodies, namely HCAbs (VHH) or commercially named Nanobodies(®) (Nb) that are composed only of a heavy-chain homodimer. As libraries based on immunized camelids are time-consuming, costly and likely redundant for certain antigens, we describe the construction of a naïve camelid VHHs library from blood serum of non-immunized camelids with affinity in the subnanomolar range and suitable for standard immune applications. This approach is rapid and recovers VHH repertoire with the advantages of being more diverse, non-specific and devoid of subpopulations of specific antibodies, which allows the identification of binders for any potential antigen (or pathogen). RNAs from a number of camelids from Saudi Arabia were isolated and cDNAs of the diverse vhh gene were amplified; the resulting amplicons were cloned in the phage display pSEX81 vector. The size of the library was found to be within the required range (10(7)) suitable for subsequent applications in disease diagnosis and treatment. Two hundred clones were randomly selected and the inserted gene library was either estimated for redundancy or sequenced and aligned to the reference camelid vhh gene (acc. No. ADE99145). Results indicated complete non-specificity of this small library in which no single event of redundancy was detected. These results indicate the efficacy of following this approach in order to yield a large and diverse enough gene library to secure the presence of the required version encoding the required antibodies for any target antigen. This work is a first step towards the construction of phage display-based biosensors useful in disease (e.g., TB or tuberculosis) diagnosis and treatment. Copyright © 2014 Académie des sciences. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Rapid development of new protein biosensors utilizing peptides obtained via phage display.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Wu

    Full Text Available There is a consistent demand for new biosensors for the detection of protein targets, and a systematic method for the rapid development of new sensors is needed. Here we present a platform where short unstructured peptides that bind to a desired target are selected using M13 phage display. The selected peptides are then chemically synthesized and immobilized on gold, allowing for detection of the target using electrochemical techniques such as electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS. A quartz crystal microbalance (QCM is also used as a diagnostic tool during biosensor development. We demonstrate the utility of this approach by creating a novel peptide-based electrochemical biosensor for the enzyme alanine aminotransferase (ALT, a well-known biomarker of hepatotoxicity. Biopanning of the M13 phage display library over immobilized ALT, led to the rapid identification of a new peptide (ALT5-8 with an amino acid sequence of WHWRNPDFWYLK. Phage particles expressing this peptide exhibited nanomolar affinity for immobilized ALT (K(d,app = 85±20 nM. The newly identified ALT5-8 peptide was then chemically synthesized with a C-terminal cysteine for gold immobilization. The performance of the gold-immobilized peptides was studied with cyclic voltammetry (CV, QCM, and EIS. Using QCM, the sensitivity for ALT detection was 8.9±0.9 Hz/(µg/mL and the limit of detection (LOD was 60 ng/mL. Using EIS measurements, the sensitivity was 142±12 impedance percentage change %/(µg/mL and the LOD was 92 ng/mL. In both cases, the LOD was below the typical concentration of ALT in human blood. Although both QCM and EIS produced similar LODs, EIS is preferable due to a larger linear dynamic range. Using QCM, the immobilized peptide exhibited a nanomolar dissociation constant for ALT (K(d = 20.1±0.6 nM. These results demonstrate a simple and rapid platform for developing and assessing the performance of sensitive, peptide-based biosensors for new protein

  3. Cellular Internalization Mechanism and Intracellular Trafficking of Filamentous M13 Phages Displaying a Cell-Penetrating Transbody and TAT Peptide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Seung-Min; Pham, Chuong D.; Choi, Dong-Ki; Kwon, Myung-Hee; Kim, Yong-Sung

    2012-01-01

    Cellular internalization of bacteriophage by surface-displayed cell penetrating peptides has been reported, though the underlying mechanism remains elusive. Here we describe in detail the internalization mechanism and intracellular trafficking and stability of filamentous M13 phages, the cellular entry of which is mediated by surface-displayed cell-penetrating light chain variable domain 3D8 VL transbody (3D8 VL-M13) or TAT peptide (TAT-M13). Recombinant 3D8 VL-M13 and TAT-M13 phages were efficiently internalized into living mammalian cells via physiologically relevant, energy-dependent endocytosis and were recovered from the cells in their infective form with the yield of 3D8 VL-M13 being higher (0.005∼0.01%) than that of TAT-M13 (0.001∼0.005%). Biochemical and genetic studies revealed that 3D8 VL-M13 was internalized principally by caveolae-mediated endocytosis via interaction with heparan sulfate proteoglycans as cell surface receptors, whereas TAT-M13 was internalized by clathrin- and caveolae-mediated endocytosis utilizing chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans as cell surface receptors, suggesting that phage internalization occurs by physiological endocytotic mechanism through specific cell surface receptors rather than non-specific transcytotic pathways. Internalized 3D8 VL-M13 phages routed to the cytosol and remained stable for more than 18 h without further trafficking to other subcellular compartments, whereas TAT-M13 phages routed to several subcellular compartments before being degraded in lysosomes even after 2 h of internalization. Our results suggest that the internalizing mechanism and intracellular trafficking of filamentous M13 bacteriophages largely follow the attributes of the displayed cell-penetrating moiety. Efficient internalization and cytosolic localization of 3D8 VL transbody-displayed phages will provide a useful tool for intracellular delivery of polar macromolecules such as proteins, peptides, and siRNAs. PMID:23251631

  4. Cellular internalization mechanism and intracellular trafficking of filamentous M13 phages displaying a cell-penetrating transbody and TAT peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Aeyung; Shin, Tae-Hwan; Shin, Seung-Min; Pham, Chuong D; Choi, Dong-Ki; Kwon, Myung-Hee; Kim, Yong-Sung

    2012-01-01

    Cellular internalization of bacteriophage by surface-displayed cell penetrating peptides has been reported, though the underlying mechanism remains elusive. Here we describe in detail the internalization mechanism and intracellular trafficking and stability of filamentous M13 phages, the cellular entry of which is mediated by surface-displayed cell-penetrating light chain variable domain 3D8 VL transbody (3D8 VL-M13) or TAT peptide (TAT-M13). Recombinant 3D8 VL-M13 and TAT-M13 phages were efficiently internalized into living mammalian cells via physiologically relevant, energy-dependent endocytosis and were recovered from the cells in their infective form with the yield of 3D8 VL-M13 being higher (0.005 ≈ 0.01%) than that of TAT-M13 (0.001 ≈ 0.005%). Biochemical and genetic studies revealed that 3D8 VL-M13 was internalized principally by caveolae-mediated endocytosis via interaction with heparan sulfate proteoglycans as cell surface receptors, whereas TAT-M13 was internalized by clathrin- and caveolae-mediated endocytosis utilizing chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans as cell surface receptors, suggesting that phage internalization occurs by physiological endocytotic mechanism through specific cell surface receptors rather than non-specific transcytotic pathways. Internalized 3D8 VL-M13 phages routed to the cytosol and remained stable for more than 18 h without further trafficking to other subcellular compartments, whereas TAT-M13 phages routed to several subcellular compartments before being degraded in lysosomes even after 2 h of internalization. Our results suggest that the internalizing mechanism and intracellular trafficking of filamentous M13 bacteriophages largely follow the attributes of the displayed cell-penetrating moiety. Efficient internalization and cytosolic localization of 3D8 VL transbody-displayed phages will provide a useful tool for intracellular delivery of polar macromolecules such as proteins, peptides, and siRNAs.

  5. Cellular internalization mechanism and intracellular trafficking of filamentous M13 phages displaying a cell-penetrating transbody and TAT peptide.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aeyung Kim

    Full Text Available Cellular internalization of bacteriophage by surface-displayed cell penetrating peptides has been reported, though the underlying mechanism remains elusive. Here we describe in detail the internalization mechanism and intracellular trafficking and stability of filamentous M13 phages, the cellular entry of which is mediated by surface-displayed cell-penetrating light chain variable domain 3D8 VL transbody (3D8 VL-M13 or TAT peptide (TAT-M13. Recombinant 3D8 VL-M13 and TAT-M13 phages were efficiently internalized into living mammalian cells via physiologically relevant, energy-dependent endocytosis and were recovered from the cells in their infective form with the yield of 3D8 VL-M13 being higher (0.005 ≈ 0.01% than that of TAT-M13 (0.001 ≈ 0.005%. Biochemical and genetic studies revealed that 3D8 VL-M13 was internalized principally by caveolae-mediated endocytosis via interaction with heparan sulfate proteoglycans as cell surface receptors, whereas TAT-M13 was internalized by clathrin- and caveolae-mediated endocytosis utilizing chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans as cell surface receptors, suggesting that phage internalization occurs by physiological endocytotic mechanism through specific cell surface receptors rather than non-specific transcytotic pathways. Internalized 3D8 VL-M13 phages routed to the cytosol and remained stable for more than 18 h without further trafficking to other subcellular compartments, whereas TAT-M13 phages routed to several subcellular compartments before being degraded in lysosomes even after 2 h of internalization. Our results suggest that the internalizing mechanism and intracellular trafficking of filamentous M13 bacteriophages largely follow the attributes of the displayed cell-penetrating moiety. Efficient internalization and cytosolic localization of 3D8 VL transbody-displayed phages will provide a useful tool for intracellular delivery of polar macromolecules such as proteins, peptides, and siRNAs.

  6. Identification of the specificity of isolated phage display single-chain antibodies using yeast two-hybrid screens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Nicolaj; Ditzel, Henrik

    2009-01-01

    A method is described for the identification of the antigen recognised by an scFv isolated from an antibody phage display library using selection against a complex mixture of proteins (e.g. intact cells, purified cell surface membranes, and tissue sections). The method takes advantage of a yeast ...

  7. Dual-functioning peptides discovered by phage display increase the magnitude and specificity of BMSC attachment to mineralized biomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramaraju, Harsha; Miller, Sharon J; Kohn, David H

    2017-07-01

    Design of biomaterials for cell-based therapies requires presentation of specific physical and chemical cues to cells, analogous to cues provided by native extracellular matrices (ECM). We previously identified a peptide sequence with high affinity towards apatite (VTKHLNQISQSY, VTK) using phage display. The aims of this study were to identify a human MSC-specific peptide sequence through phage display, combine it with the apatite-specific sequence, and verify the specificity of the combined dual-functioning peptide to both apatite and human bone marrow stromal cells. In this study, a combinatorial phage display identified the cell binding sequence (DPIYALSWSGMA, DPI) which was combined with the mineral binding sequence to generate the dual peptide DPI-VTK. DPI-VTK demonstrated significantly greater binding affinity (1/K D ) to apatite surfaces compared to VTK, phosphorylated VTK (VTK phos ), DPI-VTK phos , RGD-VTK, and peptide-free apatite surfaces (p biomaterial surfaces and subsequently increase cell proliferation and differentiation. These new peptides expand biomaterial design methodology for cell-based regeneration of bone defects. This strategy of combining cell and material binding phage display derived peptides is broadly applicable to a variety of systems requiring targeted adhesion of specific cell populations, and may be generalized to the engineering of any adhesion surface. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. A DsbA-Deficient Periplasm Enables Functional Display of a Protein with Redox-Sensitive Folding on M13 Phage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Minyong; Samuelson, James C

    2016-06-14

    The requirements for target protein folding in M13 phage display are largely underappreciated. Here we chose Fbs1, a carbohydrate binding protein, as a model to address this issue. Importantly, folding of Fbs1 is impaired in an oxidative environment. Fbs1 can be displayed on M13 phage using the SRP or Sec pathway. However, the displayed Fbs1 protein is properly folded only when Fbs1 is translocated via the SRP pathway and displayed using Escherichia coli cells with a DsbA-negative periplasm. This study indicates M13 phage display may be improved using a system specifically designed according to the folding requirements of each target protein.

  9. Phage display used for gene cloning of human recombinant antibody against the erythrocyte surface antigen, rhesus D

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dziegiel, Morten Hanefeld; Nielsen, L K; Andersen, P S

    1995-01-01

    A novel phage display system has been developed for PCR amplification and cloning of the Fab fragments of human immunoglobulin genes. Using this system, we have cloned an antibody from a mouse-human hybridoma cell line directed against the erythrocyte antigen rhesus D. Intact erythrocytes were used...... Fab phages demonstrates that it is possible to by-pass purification of the antigen of interest. Comparison with published germline sequences demonstrated that the immunoglobulin coding regions had the highest homology to the VH 1.9III and V kappa Hum kappa v325 germline genes, respectively....

  10. Performance evaluation of phage-displayed synthetic human single-domain antibody libraries: A retrospective analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Kevin A; Tanha, Jamshid

    2018-05-01

    Fully human synthetic single-domain antibodies (sdAbs) are desirable therapeutic molecules but their development is a considerable challenge. Here, using a retrospective analysis of in-house historical data, we examined the parameters that impact the outcome of screening phage-displayed synthetic human sdAb libraries to discover antigen-specific binders. We found no evidence for a differential effect of domain type (V H or V L ), library randomization strategy, incorporation of a stabilizing disulfide linkage or sdAb display format (monovalent vs. multivalent) on the probability of obtaining any antigen-binding human sdAbs, instead finding that the success of library screens was primarily related to properties of target antigens, especially molecular mass. The solubility and binding affinity of sdAbs isolated from successful screens depended both on properties of the sdAb libraries (primarily domain type) and the target antigens. Taking attrition of sdAbs with major manufacturability concerns (aggregation; low expression) and sdAbs that do not recognize native cell-surface antigens as independent probabilities, we calculate the overall likelihood of obtaining ≥1 antigen-binding human sdAb from a single library-target screen as ~24%. Successful library-target screens should be expected to yield ~1.3 human sdAbs on average, each with average binding affinity of ~2 μM. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Enrichment of an in vivo phage display repertoire by subtraction for easy identification of pathology biomarkers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    karina Vargas Sanchez

    2015-03-01

    Conclusion. This physical subtraction discarded from a complex repertoire the non-specific selected ligands. STRATEGY 1 Three rounds of in vivo phage peptide selection in EAE female Lewis rats ("EAE repertoire" vs controls ("HEALTHY repertoire". 2 DNA subtraction of the most common sequences between «HEALTHY» and «EAE» phage repertoires to obtain a third EAE specific «SUBTRACTION » phage repertoire. 3 Massive sequencing of the three repertoires and bioinformatic analysis to identify the peptides sequences with high EAE specificity. 4 Biological tests of potential EAE specific phage clones with CNS tissues from EAE and Healthy control rats. 5 Biological tests of the EAE specific peptide and phage clones on the BBB in vitro model (hCMEC/D3 cells under inflammatory conditions (IL-1β stimulation. 6 Target separation and identification by cross-link between the selected phage clones and hMEC/D3 endothelial cells targets under IL-1β stimulation vs controls.

  12. Phage display used for gene cloning of human recombinant antibody against the erythrocyte surface antigen, rhesus D

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dziegiel, Morten Hanefeld; Nielsen, L K; Andersen, P S

    1995-01-01

    A novel phage display system has been developed for PCR amplification and cloning of the Fab fragments of human immunoglobulin genes. Using this system, we have cloned an antibody from a mouse-human hybridoma cell line directed against the erythrocyte antigen rhesus D. Intact erythrocytes were used...... for absorption of the Fab phages. Soluble Fab fragments produced from the cloned material showed identical performance to the parental antibody in agglutination assays. Gel filtration confirmed that the Fab fragment consists of a kappa-Fd heterodimer. The successful use of intact cells for selection of specific...... Fab phages demonstrates that it is possible to by-pass purification of the antigen of interest. Comparison with published germline sequences demonstrated that the immunoglobulin coding regions had the highest homology to the VH 1.9III and V kappa Hum kappa v325 germline genes, respectively....

  13. Phage display-derived inhibitor of the essential cell wall biosynthesis enzyme MurF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blewett Ann

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To develop antibacterial agents having novel modes of action against bacterial cell wall biosynthesis, we targeted the essential MurF enzyme of the antibiotic resistant pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. MurF catalyzes the formation of a peptide bond between D-Alanyl-D-Alanine (D-Ala-D-Ala and the cell wall precursor uridine 5'-diphosphoryl N-acetylmuramoyl-L-alanyl-D-glutamyl-meso-diaminopimelic acid (UDP-MurNAc-Ala-Glu-meso-A2pm with the concomitant hydrolysis of ATP to ADP and inorganic phosphate, yielding UDP-N-acetylmuramyl-pentapeptide. As MurF acts on a dipeptide, we exploited a phage display approach to identify peptide ligands having high binding affinities for the enzyme. Results Screening of a phage display 12-mer library using purified P. aeruginosa MurF yielded to the identification of the MurFp1 peptide. The MurF substrate UDP-MurNAc-Ala-Glumeso-A2pm was synthesized and used to develop a sensitive spectrophotometric assay to quantify MurF kinetics and inhibition. MurFp1 acted as a weak, time-dependent inhibitor of MurF activity but was a potent inhibitor when MurF was pre-incubated with UDP-MurNAc-Ala-Glu-meso-A2pm or ATP. In contrast, adding the substrate D-Ala-D-Ala during the pre-incubation nullified the inhibition. The IC50 value of MurFp1 was evaluated at 250 μM, and the Ki was established at 420 μM with respect to the mixed type of inhibition against D-Ala-D-Ala. Conclusion MurFp1 exerts its inhibitory action by interfering with the utilization of D-Ala-D-Ala by the MurF amide ligase enzyme. We propose that MurFp1 exploits UDP-MurNAc-Ala-Glu-meso-A2pm-induced structural changes for better interaction with the enzyme. We present the first peptide inhibitor of MurF, an enzyme that should be exploited as a target for antimicrobial drug development.

  14. Survey on the phage resistance mechanisms displayed by a dairy Lactobacillus helveticus strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zago, Miriam; Orrù, Luigi; Rossetti, Lia; Lamontanara, Antonella; Fornasari, Maria Emanuela; Bonvini, Barbara; Meucci, Aurora; Carminati, Domenico; Cattivelli, Luigi; Giraffa, Giorgio

    2017-09-01

    In this study the presence and functionality of phage defence mechanisms in Lactobacillus helveticus ATCC 10386, a strain of dairy origin which is sensitive to ΦLh56, were investigated. After exposure of ATCC 10386 to ΦLh56, the whole-genome sequences of ATCC 10386 and of a phage-resistant derivative (LhM3) were compared. LhM3 showed deletions in the S-layer protein and a higher expression of the genes involved in the restriction/modification (R/M) system. Genetic data were substantiated by measurements of bacteriophage adsorption rates, efficiency of plaquing, cell wall protein size and by gene expression analysis. In LhM3 two phage resistance mechanisms, the inhibition of phage adsorption and the upregulation of Type I R/M genes, take place and explain its resistance to ΦLh56. Although present in both ATCC 10386 and LhM3 genomes, the CRISPR machinery did not seem to play a role in the phage resistance of LhM3. Overall, the natural selection of phage resistant strains resulted successful in detecting variants carrying multiple phage defence mechanisms in L. helveticus. The concurrent presence of multiple phage-resistance systems should provide starter strains with increased fitness and robustness in dairy ecosystems. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Immunodiagnosis of human neurocysticercosis using a synthetic peptide selected by phage-display.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hell, R C R; Amim, P; de Andrade, H M; de Avila, R A M; Felicori, L; Oliveira, A G; Oliveira, C A; Nascimento, E; Tavares, C A P; Granier, C; Chávez-Olórtegui, C

    2009-04-01

    The usefulness of a synthetic peptide in the serodiagnosis of Taenia solium human neurocysticercosis (NC) has been evaluated. Phage-displayed peptides were screened with human antibodies to scolex protein antigen from cysticercus cellulosae (SPACc). One clone was found to interact specifically with anti-SPACc IgGs. The corresponding synthetic peptide was found to be recognized in ELISA by NC patient's sera. The study was carried out with sera from 28 confirmed NC patients, 13 control sera and 73 sera from patients suffering from other infectious diseases. A 93% sensibility and a 94.3% specificity was achieved. Figures of 89% and 31.4% of sensibility and specificity were obtained in a SPACc-based ELISA. Immunoblotting of SPACc with anti-peptide antibodies revealed a single band of approximately 45 kDa in 1D and four 45 kDa isoforms in 2D-gel electrophoresis. A strong and specific immunostaining in the fibers beneath the suckers, at the base of the rostellum, and in the tissue surrounding the scolex of cysticerci was observed by immunomicroscopy. Our results show that a peptide-based immunodiagnostic of neurocisticercosis can be envisioned.

  16. Brain delivery of NAP with PEG-PLGA nanoparticles modified with phage display peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jingwei; Zhang, Chi; Li, Jing; Fan, Li; Jiang, Xinguo; Chen, Jun; Pang, Zhiqing; Zhang, Qizhi

    2013-07-01

    A phage-displayed peptide TGN was used as a targeting motif to help the delivery of NAP-loaded nanoparticles across the blood-brain barrier (BBB), which sets an obstacle for brain delivery of NAP in vivo. Intracerebroventricular injection of Aβ₁₋₄₀ into mice was used to construct in vivo model of Alzheimer's disease. The water maze task was performed to evaluate the effects of the NAP formulations on learning and memory deficits in mice. The neuroprotective effect was tested by detecting acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) activity and conducting histological assays. Intravenous administration of NAP-loaded TGN modified nanoparticles (TGN-NP/NAP) has shown better improvement in spatial learning than NAP solution and NAP-loaded nanoparticles in Morris water maze experiment. The crossing number of the mice with memory deficits recovered after treatment with TGN-NP/NAP in a dose dependent manner. Similar results were also observed in AChE and ChAT activity. No morphological damage and no detectable Aβ plaques were found in mice hippocampus and cortex treated with TGN-NP/NAP. TGN modified nanoparticles could be a promising drug delivery system for peptide and protein drug such as NAP to enter the brain and play the therapeutic role.

  17. Combination of phage and Gram-positive bacterial display of human antibody repertoires enables isolation of functional high affinity binders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hu, Francis Jingxin; Volk, Anna-Luisa; Persson, Helena

    2017-01-01

    Surface display couples genotype with a surface exposed phenotype and thereby allows screening of gene-encoded protein libraries for desired characteristics. Of the various display systems available, phage display is by far the most popular, mainly thanks to its ability to harbour large size...... nanomolar affinity scFv fragments towards human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2). The ranking and performance of the scFv isolated by flow sorting in surface-immobilised form was retained when expressed as soluble scFv and analysed by biolayer interferometry, as well as after expression as full...

  18. Identification of Specific Hydroxyapatite {001} Binding Heptapeptide by Phage Display and Its Nucleation Effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Mao

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available With recent developments of molecular biomimetics that combine genetic engineering and nanotechnology, peptides can be genetically engineered to bind specifically to inorganic components and execute the task of collagen matrix proteins. In this study, using biogenous tooth enamel as binding substrate, we identified a new heptapeptide (enamel high-affinity binding peptide, EHBP from linear 7-mer peptide phage display library. Through the output/input affinity test, it was found that EHBP has the highest affinity to enamel with an output/input ratio of 14.814 × 10−7, while a random peptide (RP displayed much lower output/input ratio of 0.00035 × 10−7. This binding affinity was also verified by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM analysis. It was found that EHBP absorbing onto the enamel surface exhibits highest normalized fluorescence intensity (5.6 ± 1.2, comparing to the intensity of EHBP to enamel longitudinal section (1.5 ± 0.9 (p < 0.05 as well as to the intensity of a low-affinity binding peptide (ELBP to enamel (1.5 ± 0.5 (p < 0.05. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM, Attenuated total Reflection-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR, and X-ray Diffraction (XRD studies further confirmed that crystallized hydroxyapatite were precipitated in the mineralization solution containing EHBP. To better understand the nucleation effect of EHBP, EHBP was further investigated on its interaction with calcium phosphate clusters through in vitro mineralization model. The calcium and phosphate ion consumption as well as zeta potential survey revealed that EHBP might previously adsorb to phosphate (PO43− groups and then initiate the precipitation of calcium and phosphate groups. This study not only proved the electrostatic interaction of phosphate group and the genetically engineering solid-binding peptide, but also provided a novel nucleation motif for potential applications in guided hard tissue biomineralization and

  19. Epitope mapping porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus by phage display: the nsp2 fragment of the replicase polyprotein contains a cluster of B-cell epitopes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oleksiewicz, M.B.; Bøtner, Anette; Toft, P.

    2001-01-01

    We screened phage display libraries of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) protein fragments with sera from experimentally infected pigs to identify linear B-cell epitopes that are commonly recognized during infection in vivo. We identified 10 linear epitope sites (ES) 11...... high antibody titers against the ORF4 ES, In some animals, sera diluted 1:62,500 still gave weak positive enzyme immunoassay reactivity against the ORF4 ES, This hitherto unrecognized immunodominance likely caused phages displaying the ORF4 ES to outcompete phages displaying other ES during library......-term viremic pigs towards some ES, The implications of these findings for PRRSV diagnostics and immunopathogenesis are discussed....

  20. Random mutagenesis of BoNT/E Hc nanobody to construct a secondary phage-display library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahi, B; Mousavi Gargari, S L; Rasooli, I; Rajabi Bazl, M; Hoseinpoor, R

    2014-08-01

    To construct secondary mutant phage-display library of recombinant single variable domain (VHH) against botulinum neurotoxin E by error-prone PCR. The gene coding for specific VHH derived from the camel immunized with binding domain of botulinum neurotoxin E (BoNT/E) was amplified by error-prone PCR. Several biopanning rounds were used to screen the phage-displaying BoNT/E Hc nanobodies. The final nanobody, SHMR4, with increased affinity recognized BoNT/E toxin with no cross-reactivity with other antigens especially with related BoNT toxins. The constructed nanobody could be a suitable candidate for VHH-based biosensor production to detect the Clostridium botulinum type E. Diagnosis and treatment of botulinum neurotoxins are important. Generation of high-affinity antibodies based on the construction of secondary libraries using affinity maturation step leads to the development of reagents for precise diagnosis and therapy. © 2014 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  1. Discovery of Selective Nanobodies against α-elapitoxin Dpp2c from Black Mamba through Phage Display Screening

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Milbo, Christina; Laustsen, Andreas Hougaard; Lohse, Brian

    Feared for its highly neurotoxic venom and rapid attack technique, the Black mamba (Dendroaspis polylepis) is Africa’s largest venomous snake. The clinical manifestations of a bitefrom D. polylepis include flaccid paralysis leading to respiratory failure and death due to postsynaptic blockade of ......-neurotoxins. Here, we report the discovery of selective nanobodies targeting α-elapitoxin Dpp2c from D. polylepis through phage display screening....

  2. Microcystin-LR nanobody screening from an alpaca phage display nanobody library and its expression and application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Chongxin; Yang, Ying; Liu, Liwen; Li, Jianhong; Liu, Xiaoqin; Zhang, Xiao; Liu, Yuan; Zhang, Cunzheng; Liu, Xianjin

    2018-04-30

    Microcystin-LR (MC-LR) is a type of biotoxin that pollutes the ecological environment and food. The study aimed to obtain new nanobodies from phage nanobody library for determination of MC-LR. The toxin was conjugated to keyhole limpet haemocyanin (KLH) and bovine serum albumin (BSA), respectively, then the conjugates were used as coated antigens for enrichment (coated MC-LR-KLH) and screening (coated MC-LR-BSA) of MC-LR phage nanobodies from an alpaca phage display nanobody library. The antigen-specific phage particles were enriched effectively with four rounds of biopanning. At the last round of enrichment, total 20 positive monoclonal phage nanobodies were obtained from the library, which were analyzed after monoclonal phage enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), colony PCR and DNA sequencing. The most three positive nanobody genes, ANAb12, ANAb9 and ANAb7 were cloned into pET26b vector, then the nanobodies were expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 respectively. After being purified, the molecular weight (M.W.) of all nanobodies were approximate 15kDa with sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). The purified nanobodies, ANAb12, ANAb9 and ANAb7 were used to establish the indirect competitive ELISA (IC-ELISA) for MC-LR, and their half-maximum inhibition concentrations (IC 50 ) were 0.87, 1.17 and 1.47μg/L, their detection limits (IC 10 ) were 0.06, 0.08 and 0.12μg/L, respectively. All of them showed strong cross-reactivity (CRs) of 82.7-116.9% for MC-RR, MC-YR and MC-WR, and weak CRs of less than 4.56% for MC-LW, less than 0.1% for MC-LY and MC-LF. It was found that all the IC-ELISAs for MC-LR spiked in tap water samples detection were with good accuracy, stability and repeatability, their recoveries were 84.0-106.5%, coefficient of variations (CVs) were 3.4-10.6%. These results showed that IC-ELISA based on the nanobodies from the alpaca phage display antibody library were promising for high sensitive determination of multiple

  3. Modern Display Technologies and Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-01-01

    laboratory models of display devices have been demonstrated, such devices are not yet being considered for produccion . It is not apparent that they will...e.g. 1,1’-diheptyl - 4,4’ bipyridil brnmide ( salt with an organic cation-); commonly used in an aqueous solution and subsequently electrochemically

  4. Tetanus Neurotoxin Neutralizing Antibodies Screened from a Human Immune scFv Antibody Phage Display Library

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han Wang

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Tetanus neurotoxin (TeNT produced by Clostridium tetani is one of the most poisonous protein substances. Neutralizing antibodies against TeNT can effectively prevent and cure toxicosis. Using purified Hc fragments of TeNT (TeNT-Hc as an antigen, three specific neutralizing antibody clones recognizing different epitopes were selected from a human immune scFv antibody phage display library. The three antibodies (2-7G, 2-2D, and S-4-7H can effectively inhibit the binding between TeNT-Hc and differentiated PC-12 cells in vitro. Moreover, 2-7G inhibited TeNT-Hc binding to the receptor via carbohydrate-binding sites of the W pocket while 2-2D and S-4-7H inhibited binding of the R pocket. Although no single mAb completely protected mice from the toxin, they could both prolong survival when challenged with 20 LD50s (50% of the lethal dose of TeNT. When used together, the mAbs completely neutralized 1000 LD50s/mg Ab, indicating their high neutralizing potency in vivo. Antibodies recognizing different carbohydrate-binding pockets could have higher synergistic toxin neutralization activities than those that recognize the same pockets. These results could lead to further production of neutralizing antibody drugs against TeNT and indicate that using TeNT-Hc as an antigen for screening human antibodies for TeNT intoxication therapy from human immune antibody library was convenient and effective.

  5. Peptidic inhibitors of insulin-degrading enzyme with potential for dermatological applications discovered via phage display.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caitlin N Suire

    Full Text Available Insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE is an atypical zinc-metalloendopeptidase that hydrolyzes insulin and other intermediate-sized peptide hormones, many of which are implicated in skin health and wound healing. Pharmacological inhibitors of IDE administered internally have been shown to slow the breakdown of insulin and thereby potentiate insulin action. Given the importance of insulin and other IDE substrates for a variety of dermatological processes, pharmacological inhibitors of IDE suitable for topical applications would be expected to hold significant therapeutic and cosmetic potential. Existing IDE inhibitors, however, are prohibitively expensive, difficult to synthesize and of undetermined toxicity. Here we used phage display to discover novel peptidic inhibitors of IDE, which were subsequently characterized in vitro and in cell culture assays. Among several peptide sequences tested, a cyclic dodecapeptide dubbed P12-3A was found to potently inhibit the degradation of insulin (Ki = 2.5 ± 0.31 μM and other substrates by IDE, while also being resistant to degradation, stable in biological milieu, and highly selective for IDE. In cell culture, P12-3A was shown to potentiate several insulin-induced processes, including the transcription, translation and secretion of alpha-1 type I collagen in primary murine skin fibroblasts, and the migration of keratinocytes in a scratch wound migration assay. By virtue of its potency, stability, specificity for IDE, low cost of synthesis, and demonstrated ability to potentiate insulin-induced processes involved in wound healing and skin health, P12-3A holds significant therapeutic and cosmetic potential for topical applications.

  6. TfR Binding Peptide Screened by Phage Display Technology ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    can significantly increase the enrichment of the drug in the target tissue, improve efficacy, and reduce the side effects of drugs [7-9]. The transferrin receptor (TfR) has been reported to be ubiquitously expressed and is over- expressing 100-fold in many tumour cells and brain capillary endothelial cells [10]. Because of.

  7. Uses of Phage Display in Agriculture: A Review of Food-Related Protein-Protein Interactions Discovered by Biopanning over Diverse Baits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rekha Kushwaha

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This review highlights discoveries made using phage display that impact the use of agricultural products. The contribution phage display made to our fundamental understanding of how various protective molecules serve to safeguard plants and seeds from herbivores and microbes is discussed. The utility of phage display for directed evolution of enzymes with enhanced capacities to degrade the complex polymers of the cell wall into molecules useful for biofuel production is surveyed. Food allergies are often directed against components of seeds; this review emphasizes how phage display has been employed to determine the seed component(s contributing most to the allergenic reaction and how it has played a central role in novel approaches to mitigate patient response. Finally, an overview of the use of phage display in identifying the mature seed proteome protection and repair mechanisms is provided. The identification of specific classes of proteins preferentially bound by such protection and repair proteins leads to hypotheses concerning the importance of safeguarding the translational apparatus from damage during seed quiescence and environmental perturbations during germination. These examples, it is hoped, will spur the use of phage display in future plant science examining protein-ligand interactions.

  8. Phage displayed short peptides against cells of Candida albicans demonstrate presence of species, morphology and region specific carbohydrate epitopes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soshee Anandakumar

    Full Text Available Candida albicans is a commensal opportunistic pathogen, which can cause superficial infections as well as systemic infections in immuocompromised hosts. Among nosocomial fungal infections, infections by C. albicans are associated with highest mortality rates even though incidence of infections by other related species is on the rise world over. Since C. albicans and other Candida species differ in their susceptibility to antifungal drug treatment, it is crucial to accurately identify the species for effective drug treatment. Most diagnostic tests that differentiate between C. albicans and other Candida species are time consuming, as they necessarily involve laboratory culturing. Others, which employ highly sensitive PCR based technologies often, yield false positives which is equally dangerous since that leads to unnecessary antifungal treatment. This is the first report of phage display technology based identification of short peptide sequences that can distinguish C. albicans from other closely related species. The peptides also show high degree of specificity towards its different morphological forms. Using fluorescence microscopy, we show that the peptides bind on the surface of these cells and obtained clones that could even specifically bind to only specific regions of cells indicating restricted distribution of the epitopes. What was peculiar and interesting was that the epitopes were carbohydrate in nature. This gives insight into the complexity of the carbohydrate composition of fungal cell walls. In an ELISA format these peptides allow specific detection of relatively small numbers of C. albicans cells. Hence, if used in combination, such a test could help accurate diagnosis and allow physicians to initiate appropriate drug therapy on time.

  9. Monoclonal antibody fragment from combinatorial phage display library neutralizes alpha-latrotoxin activity and abolishes black widow spider venom lethality, in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugli, Francesca; Graffeo, Rosalia; Paroni Sterbini, Francesco; Torelli, Riccardo; Masucci, Luca; Sali, Michela; Grasso, Alfonso; Rufini, Stefano; Ricci, Enzo; Fadda, Giovanni; Pescatori, Mario

    2008-03-15

    Alpha-latrotoxin (alpha-ltx), a component of the venom of black widow spiders (BWSV), binds to higher vertebrates presynaptic nerve terminals, stimulating massive neurotransmitter release. This neurotoxic protein is responsible for most of the symptoms elicited in men by the bite of black widow spider (BWS), i.e. a neurological syndrome named latrodectism. By reasoning that targeting this single component would abrogate most of the effect of BWS envenomation, we took advantage of the antibody phage display technology to generate monoclonal Fab fragments able to bind and neutralize the alpha-ltx. To this aim, we immunized Balb/c mice with purified toxin and cloned their antibody repertoire in the pCombIII phage display vector. By combining a high-stringency affinity selection with a sensitive 45Ca(2+) uptake assay, we isolated a Fab fragment (FM1) able to bind the alpha-ltx in the low nM range and neutralize its ionophore activity, in vitro and in vivo. After the onset of overt symptomatology, administration of FM1 to experimentally envenomed mice induced remission of symptoms and prevented lethality. Since alpha-ltx is the only molecule responsible for the great toxicity of BWS bites in mammals, the FM1 Fab, highly effective in neutralizing the toxin in vivo, represents a promising immunotherapy reagent for treating latrodectic patients.

  10. Monoclonal antibody proteomics: use of antibody mimotope displaying phages and the relevant synthetic peptides for mAb scouting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajdú, István; Flachner, Beáta; Bognár, Melinda; Végh, Barbara M; Dobi, Krisztina; Lőrincz, Zsolt; Lázár, József; Cseh, Sándor; Takács, László; Kurucz, István

    2014-08-01

    Monoclonal antibody proteomics uses nascent libraries or cloned (Plasmascan™, QuantiPlasma™) libraries of mAbs that react with individual epitopes of proteins in the human plasma. At the initial phase of library creation, cognate protein antigen and the epitope interacting with the antibodies are not known. Scouting for monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) with the best binding characteristics is of high importance for mAb based biomarker assay development. However, in the absence of the identity of the cognate antigen the task represents a challenge. We combined phage display, and surface plasmon resonance (Biacore) experiments to test whether specific phages and the respective mimotope peptides obtained from large scale studies are applicable to determine key features of antibodies for scouting. We show here that mAb captured phage-mimotope heterogeneity that is the diversity of the selected peptide sequences, is inversely correlated with an important binding descriptor; the off-rate of the antibodies and that represents clues for driving the selection of useful mAbs for biomarker assay development. Carefully chosen synthetic mimotope peptides are suitable for specificity testing in competitive assays using the target proteome, in our case the human plasma. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Identification of immunogenic proteins in Treponema phagedenis-like strain V1 from digital dermatitis lesions by phage display.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosander, Anna; Guss, Bengt; Frykberg, Lars; Björkman, Camilla; Näslund, Katarina; Pringle, Märit

    2011-12-15

    Digital dermatitis (DD) is a contagious claw disease causing lameness in cattle, affecting both animal welfare and economics. In this study, shotgun phage display was used to identify immunogenic proteins in a strain (V1) of the Treponema phylotype closely related to Treponema phagedenis, indicated as a key agent in the pathogenesis of DD. A genomic phage library was constructed and selected against antibodies from a rabbit immunized with live strain V1 bacteria. A homolog to the immunogenic protein TmpA of Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum was identified, as well as a putative phage tail tape measure protein (Ttm), and a putative proline-rich repeat lipoprotein (PrrA). The complete amino acid sequences of these proteins were predicted from a genomic sequence of strain V1 generated by 454 Sequencing™. The presence of these genes in ten Treponema spp. field isolates was investigated by PCR. The tmpA and ttm genes were detected in all T. phagedenis-like isolates while prrA was detected in four out of seven. None of the genes were detected in the three Treponema pedis isolates investigated. Recombinant proteins were produced and used in indirect ELISAs. For all three proteins, a majority of serum samples from cattle with DD (n=8) showed higher optical density values than samples from cattle without DD (n=7). Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Isolation of phage-display library-derived scFv antibody specific to Listeria monocytogenes by a novel immobilized method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, X-H; Trinh, T-L; Vu, T-B-H; Le, Q-H; To, K-A

    2018-02-01

    To select Listeria monocytogenes-specific single-chain fragment variable (scFv) antibodies from a phage-display library by a novel simple and cost-effective immobilization method. Light expanded clay aggregate (LECA) was used as biomass support matrix for biopanning of a phage-display library to select L. monocytogenes-specific scFv antibody. Four rounds of positive selection against LECA-immobilized L. monocytogenes and an additional subtractive panning against Listeria innocua were performed. The phage clones selected using this panning scheme and LECA-based immobilization method exhibited the ability to bind L. monocytogenes without cross-reactivity toward 10 other non-L. monocytogenes bacteria. One of the selected phage clones was able to specifically recognize three major pathogenic serotypes (1/2a, 1/2b and 4b) of L. monocytogenes and 11 tested L. monocytogenes strains isolated from foods. The LECA-based immobilization method is applicable for isolating species-specific anti-L. monocytogenes scFv antibodies by phage display. The isolated scFv antibody has potential use in development of immunoassay-based methods for rapid detection of L. monocytogenes in food and environmental samples. In addition, the LECA immobilization method described here could feasibly be employed to isolate specific monoclonal antibodies against any given species of pathogenic bacteria from phage-display libraries. © 2017 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  13. Protein trans-splicing on an M13 bacteriophage: towards directed evolution of a semisynthetic split intein by phage display.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garbe, Daniel; Thiel, Ilka V; Mootz, Henning D

    2010-10-01

    Split inteins link their fused peptide or protein sequences with a peptide bond in an autocatalytic reaction called protein trans-splicing. This reaction is becoming increasingly important for a variety of applications in protein semisynthesis, polypeptide circularisation, construction of biosensors, or segmental isotopic labelling of proteins. However, split inteins exhibit greatly varying solubility, efficiency and tolerance towards the nature of the fused sequences as well as reaction conditions. We envisioned that phage display as an in vitro selection technique would provide a powerful tool for the directed evolution of split inteins with improved properties. As a first step towards this goal, we show that presentation of active split inteins on an M13 bacteriophage is feasible. Two different C-terminal intein fragments of the Ssp DnaB intein, artificially split at amino acid positions 104 and 11, were encoded in a phagemid vector in fusion to a truncated gpIII protein. For efficient production of hybrid phages, the presence of a soluble domain tag at their N-termini was necessary. Immunoblot analysis revealed that the hybrid phages supported protein trans-splicing with a protein or a synthetic peptide, respectively, containing the complementary intein fragment. Incorporation of biotin or desthiobiotin by this reaction provides a straightforward strategy for future enrichment of desired mutants from randomised libraries of the C-terminal intein fragments on streptavidin beads. Protein semisynthesis on a phage could also be exploited for the selection of chemically modified proteins with unique properties. © 2010 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Using phage and yeast display to select hundreds of monoclonal antibodies: application to antigen 85, a tuberculosis biomarker.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fortunato Ferrara

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Current diagnostic methods for tuberculosis (TB, a major global health challenge that kills nearly two million people annually, are time-consuming and inadequate. During infection a number of bacterial molecules that play a role in the infective process are released and have been proposed as biomarkers for early TB diagnosis. Antigen 85 (Ag85 is the most abundant secreted TB protein, and a potential target for this diagnostic approach. One of the bottlenecks in the direct detection of such bacterial targets is the availability of robust, sensitive, specific antibodies. METHODS: Using Ag85 as a model, we describe a method to select antibodies against any potential target using a novel combination of phage and yeast display that exploits the advantage of each approach. RESULTS: The efficiency of this approach was attested to by the 111 specific antibodies identified in initial screens. These were assessed for binding to the different Ag85 subunits, affinity, and activity in sandwich assays. CONCLUSIONS: The novelty of this approach lies in the possibility of screening the entire output of a phage antibody selection in a single experiment by yeast display. This can be considered analogous to carrying out a million ELISAs. The monoclonal antibodies (mAbs identified in this way show high binding affinity and selectivity for the antigens and offer an advantage over traditional mAbs produced by relatively expensive and time consuming techniques. This approach has wide applicability, and the affinity of selected antibodies can be significantly improved, if required.

  15. SNS online display technologies for EPICS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasemir, K.U.; Chen, X.; Purcell, J.; Danilova, E.

    2012-01-01

    The ubiquitousness of web clients from personal computers to cell phones results in a growing demand for web-based access to control system data. At the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) we have investigated different technical approaches to provide read access to data in the Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System (EPICS) for a wide variety of web client devices. The core web technology, HTTP, is less than ideal for online control system displays. Appropriate use of Ajax, especially the Long Poll paradigm, can alleviate fundamental HTTP limitations. The SNS Status web uses basic Ajax technology to generate generic displays for a wide audience. The Dashboard uses Long Poll and more client-side Java-Script to offer more customization and faster updates for users that need specialized displays. The Web OPI uses RAP for web access to any BOY display, offering utmost flexibility because users can create their own BOY displays in CSS. These three approaches complement each other. Users can access generic status displays with zero effort, invest time in creating their fully customized displays for the Web OPI, or use the Dashboard as an intermediate solution

  16. Human antibody fragments specific for the epidermal growth factor receptor selected from large non-immunised phage display libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souriau, Christelle; Rothacker, Julie; Hoogenboom, Hennie R; Nice, Edouard

    2004-09-01

    Antibodies to EGFR have been shown to display anti-tumour effects mediated in part by inhibition of cellular proliferation and angiogenesis, and by enhancement of apoptosis. Humanised antibodies are preferred for clinical use to reduce complications with HAMA and HAHA responses frequently seen with murine and chimaeric antibodies. We have used depletion and subtractive selection strategies on cells expressing the EGFR to sample two large antibody fragment phage display libraries for the presence of human antibodies which are specific for the EGFR. Four Fab fragments and six scFv fragments were identified, with affinities of up to 2.2nM as determined by BIAcore analysis using global fitting of the binding curves to obtain the individual rate constants (ka and kd). This overall approach offers a generic screening method for the identification of growth factor specific antibodies and antibody fragments from large expression libraries and has potential for the rapid development of new therapeutic and diagnostic reagents.

  17. Utilization of Multi-Immunization and Multiple Selection Strategies for Isolation of Hapten-Specific Antibodies from Recombinant Antibody Phage Display Libraries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tullila, Antti; Nevanen, Tarja K.

    2017-01-01

    Phage display technology provides a powerful tool for the development of novel recombinant antibodies. In this work, we optimized and streamlined the recombinant antibody discovery process for haptens as an example. A multi-immunization approach was used in order to avoid the need for construction of multiple antibody libraries. Selection methods were developed to utilize the full potential of the recombinant antibody library by applying four different elution conditions simultaneously. High-throughput immunoassays were used to analyse the binding properties of the individual antibody clones. Different carrier proteins were used in the immunization, selection, and screening phases to avoid enrichment of the antibodies for the carrier protein epitopes. Novel recombinant antibodies against mycophenolic acid and ochratoxin A, with affinities up to 39 nM and 34 nM, respectively, were isolated from a multi-immunized fragment antigen-binding (Fab) library. PMID:28561803

  18. Interactive displays natural human-interface technologies

    CERN Document Server

    Bhowmik, Achintya K

    2014-01-01

    One of the first books to provide an in-depth discussion of the technologies, applications and trends in the rapidly emerging field of interactive displays (touch, gesture & voice) The book will cover the technologies, applications and trends in the field of interactive displays, namely interfaces based on touch, gesture and voice and those using a combination of these technologies. The book will be split into 4 main parts with each being dedicated to a specific user interface. Part 1 ''Touch Interfaces'' will provide a review of the currently deployed touch-screen technologies and applications. It will also cover the recent developments towards achieving thinner, lightweight and cost-reduced touch screen panels in the future via integration of touch functionalities. Part 2 ''Gesture Interfaces'' will examine techniques and applications in stereoscopic 3D computer vision, structured-light 3D computer vision and time-of-flight 3D computer vision in gesture interfaces. Part 3 ''Voice Interfaces'' will revie...

  19. Re-engineering of the PAM1 phage display monoclonal antibody to produce a soluble, versatile anti-homogalacturonan scFv

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manfield, I. W.; Bernal Giraldo, Adriana Jimena; Møller, I.

    2006-01-01

    Antibody phage display is an increasingly important alternative method for the production of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) and involves the expression of antibody fragments (scFvs) at the surface of bacteriophage particles. We have previously used this technique to generate a phage mAb (PAM1phage...... of the PAM1 mAb, we describe here the production of a phage-free, soluble scFv version of the PAM1 mAb (PAM1scFv). Using the new PAM1scFv probe, the occurrence of the HG epitope recognized can now be localized with high resolution within micro-domains of plant cell walls....

  20. Chemical Synthesis and In Vitro Evaluation of a Phage Display-Derived Peptide Active against Infectious Salmon Anemia Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojeda, Nicolás; Cárdenas, Constanza; Guzmán, Fanny; Marshall, Sergio H

    2016-04-01

    Infectious salmon anemia virus (ISAV) is the etiological agent of the disease by the same name and causes major losses in the salmon industry worldwide. Epizootic ISAV outbreaks have occurred in Norway and, to a lesser degree, in Canada. In 2007, an ISAV outbreak in Chile destroyed most of the seasonal production and endangered the entire Chilean salmon industry. None of the existing prophylactic approaches have demonstrated efficacy in providing absolute protection from or even a palliative effect on ISAV proliferation. Sanitary control measures for ISAV, based on molecular epidemiology data, have proven insufficient, mainly due to high salmon culture densities and a constant presence of a nonpathogenic strain of the virus. This report describes an alternative treatment approach based on interfering peptides selected from a phage display library. The screening of a phage display heptapeptide library resulted in the selection of a novel peptide with significant in vitro antiviral activity against ISAV. This peptide specifically interacted with the viral hemagglutinin-esterase protein, thereby impairing virus binding, with plaque reduction assays showing a significant reduction in viral yields. The identified peptide acts at micromolar concentrations against at least two different pathogenic strains of the virus, without detectable cytotoxic effects on the tested fish cells. Therefore, antiviral peptides represent a novel alternative for controlling ISAV and, potentially, other fish pathogens. Identifying novel methods for the efficient control of infectious diseases is imperative for the future of global aquaculture. The present study used a phage display heptapeptide library to identify a peptide with interfering activity against a key protein of the infectious salmon anemia virus (ISAV). A piscine orthomyxovirus, ISAV is a continuous threat to the commercial sustainability of cultured salmon production worldwide. The complex epidemiological strategy of this

  1. Detection of constitutive molecules on Histoplasma capsulatum yeasts through single chain variable antibody fragments displayed in M13 phages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero-Martínez, Rafael; Curiel-Quesada, Everardo; Becerril-Luján, Baltazar; Flores-Carreón, Arturo; Pérez-Torres, Armando; Taylor, Maria Lucia

    2007-06-01

    A nonimmune library, containing single chain variable fragments (scFv) of immunoglobulin human genes displayed on the surface of M13 filamentous phages, was used to recognize molecules exposed on Histoplasma capsulatum yeasts' surface, during their growth in synthetic medium. The scFv clones were checked in their consistency by Dot-ELISA using HRP/anti-M13 conjugate, and they were tested to recognize molecules on H. Capsulatum yeasts' surface by ELISA in plates. Three out of 80 scFv cones (C2, C6, and C52) reacted consistently with H. capsulatum molecules, and they recognized molecules from both H. capsulatum morphologic phases. However, C6 and C52 clones reacted better with molecules on the surface of whole yeasts, with molecules from the yeasts' cell-wall extract, and with molecules released to the supernatant of the yeast culture. Mycelial supernatants from other fungi, as well as from a Mycobacterium filtrate, were not recognized by scFv phage monoclones. Monoclones C2, C6, and C52 recognized yeast molecules irrespective of the H. capsulatum strains used; the C6 clone revealed a specific immunohistochemistry reaction when tested against homologous and heterologous fungal infected tissues. The scFv clones isolated will be a useful toll to define the role of their target molecules in the host-parasite relationship of histoplasmosis.

  2. Identification of a GTP-bound Rho specific scFv molecular sensor by phage display selection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chinestra Patrick

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Rho GTPases A, B and C proteins, members of the Rho family whose activity is regulated by GDP/GTP cycling, function in many cellular pathways controlling proliferation and have recently been implicated in tumorigenesis. Although overexpression of Rho GTPases has been correlated with tumorigenesis, only their GTP-bound forms are able to activate the signalling pathways implicated in tumorigenesis. Thus, the focus of much recent research has been to identify biological tools capable of quantifying the level of cellular GTP-bound Rho, or determining the subcellular location of activation. However useful, these tools used to study the mechanism of Rho activation still have limitations. The aim of the present work was to employ phage display to identify a conformationally-specific single chain fragment variable (scFv that recognizes the active, GTP-bound, form of Rho GTPases and is able to discriminate it from the inactive, GDP-bound, Rho in endogenous settings. Results After five rounds of phage selection using a constitutively activated mutant of RhoB (RhoBQ63L, three scFvs (A8, C1 and D11 were selected for subsequent analysis. Further biochemical characterization was pursued for the single clone, C1, exhibiting an scFv structure. C1 was selective for the GTP-bound form of RhoA, RhoB, as well as RhoC, and failed to recognize GTP-loaded Rac1 or Cdc42, two other members of the Rho family. To enhance its production, soluble C1 was expressed in fusion with the N-terminal domain of phage protein pIII (scFv C1-N1N2, it appeared specifically associated with GTP-loaded recombinant RhoA and RhoB via immunoprecipitation, and endogenous activated Rho in HeLa cells as determined by immunofluorescence. Conclusion We identified an antibody, C1-N1N2, specific for the GTP-bound form of RhoB from a phage library, and confirmed its specificity towards GTP-bound RhoA and RhoC, as well as RhoB. The success of C1-N1N2 in discriminating activated

  3. Studying binding specificities of peptide recognition modules by high-throughput phage display selections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Haiming; Sidhu, Sachdev S

    2011-01-01

    Peptide recognition modules (PRMs) play critical roles in cellular processes, including differentiation, proliferation and cytoskeleton organization. PRMs normally bind to short linear motifs in protein ligands, and by so doing recruit proteins into signaling complexes. Based on the binding specificity profile of a PRM, one can predict putative natural interaction partners by searching genome databases. Candidate interaction partners can in turn provide clues to assemble potential in vivo protein complexes that the PRM may be involved with. Combinatorial peptide libraries have proven to be effective tools for profiling the binding specificities of PRMs. Herein, we describe high-throughput methods for the expression and purification of PRM proteins and the use of peptide-phage libraries for PRM specificity profiling. These high-throughput methods greatly expedite the study of PRM families on a genome-wide scale.

  4. Phage display-selected single-chain antibodies confer high levels of resistance against Tomato spotted wilt virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prins, Marcel; Lohuis, Dick; Schots, Arjen; Goldbach, Rob

    2005-07-01

    Rational design of antibodies targeting essential viral proteins can complement the palette of antiviral resistance strategies. Here, stable and high expression of single-chain monoclonal antibodies targeting the nucleoprotein of the economically important plant virus Tomato spotted wilt virus, a protein that is involved in multiple steps in the viral infection cycle, is reported. High cytoplasmic expression levels of three selected phage display-derived anti-viral single-chain antibodies were established. Of these antibodies, two led to high levels of resistance against this plant virus. Protoplast experiments provided evidence that the two resistance-conferring antibodies may have a different mode of action and could be combined for higher durability of resistance in the field.

  5. Analysis of pectic epitopes recognised by hybridoma and phage display monoclonal antibodies using defined oligosaccharides, polysaccharides, and enzymatic degradation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willats, William George Tycho; Limberg, G.; Buchholt, H.C.

    2000-01-01

    The structure of epitopes recognised by anti-pectin monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) has been investigated using a series of model lime-pectin samples with defined degrees and patterns of methyl esterification, a range of defined oligogalacturonides and enzymatic degradation of pectic polysaccharides....... In immuno-dot-assays, the anti-homogalacturonan (HG) mAbs JIM5 and JIM7 both bound to samples with a wide range of degrees of methyl esterification in preference to fully de-esterified samples. In contrast, the anti-HG phage display mAb PAM1 bound most effectively to fully de-esterified pectin...... occurs where specific but undefined methyl-esterification patterns are present on HG domains, although fully de-esterified HG samples contain sub-optimal JIM5 epitopes. The persistence of mAb binding to epitopes in pectic antigens, with 41% blockwise esterification (P41) and 43% random esterification (F...

  6. Utilization of peptide phage display to investigate hotspots on IL-17A and what it means for drug discovery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joey P Ting

    Full Text Available To date, IL-17A antibodies remain the only therapeutic approach to correct the abnormal activation of the IL-17A/IL-17R signaling complex. Why is it that despite the remarkable success of IL-17 antibodies, there is no small molecule antagonist of IL-17A in the clinic? Here we offer a unique approach to address this question. In order to understand the interaction of IL-17A with its receptor, we combined peptide discovery using phage display with HDX, crystallography, and functional assays to map and characterize hot regions that contribute to most of the energetics of the IL-17A/IL-17R interaction. These functional maps are proposed to serve as a guide to aid in the development of small molecules that bind to IL-17A and block its interaction with IL-17RA.

  7. Phage display allows identification of zona pellucida-binding peptides with species-specific properties: novel approach for development of contraceptive vaccines for wildlife.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samoylova, Tatiana I; Cochran, Anna M; Samoylov, Alexandre M; Schemera, Bettina; Breiteneicher, Adam H; Ditchkoff, Stephen S; Petrenko, Valery A; Cox, Nancy R

    2012-12-31

    Multiple phage-peptide constructs, where the peptides mimic sperm epitopes that bind to zona pellucida (ZP) proteins, were generated via selection from a phage display library using a novel approach. Selections were designed to allow for identification of ZP-binding phage clones with potential species-specific properties, an important feature for wildlife oral vaccines as the goal is to control overpopulation of a target species while not affecting non-target species' reproduction. Six phage-peptide antigens were injected intramuscularly into pigs and corresponding immune responses evaluated. Administration of the antigens into pigs stimulated production of anti-peptide antibodies, which were shown to act as anti-sperm antibodies. Potentially, such anti-sperm antibodies could interfere with sperm delivery or function in the male or female genital tract, leading to contraceptive effects. Staining of semen samples collected from different mammalian species, including pig, cat, dog, bull, and mouse, with anti-sera from pigs immunized with ZP-binding phage allowed identification of phage-peptide constructs with different levels of species specificity. Based on the intensity of the immune responses and specificity of these responses in different species, two of the antigens with fusion peptide sequences GEGGYGSHD and GQQGLNGDS were recognized as the most promising candidates for development of contraceptive vaccines for wild pigs. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Application of phage display in selecting Tomato spotted wilt virus - specific single-chain antibodies (scFvs) for sensitive diagnosis in ELISA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Griep, R.A.; Prins, M.; Twisk, van C.; Keller, H.J.H.G.; Kerschbaumer, R.J.; Kormelink, R.; Goldbach, R.W.; Schots, A.

    2000-01-01

    A panel of recombinant single-chain antibodies (scFvs) against structural proteins of Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) was retrieved from a human combinatorial scFv antibody library using the novel phage display technique. After subcloning the encoding DNA sequences in the expression vector pSKAP/S,

  9. An anti-tumor protein produced by Trichinella spiralis and identified by screening a T7 phage display library, induces apoptosis in human hepatoma H7402 cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trichinella spiralis infection confers effective resistance to tumor cell expansion. In this study, a T7 phage cDNA display library was constructed to express genes encoded by T. spiralis. Organic phase multi-cell screening was used to sort through candidate proteins in a transfected human chronic m...

  10. A universal phage display system for the seamless construction of Fab libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Renae S; Valadon, Philippe

    2017-11-01

    The construction of Fab phage libraries requires the cloning of domains from both the light and the heavy chain of antibodies. Despite the advent of powerful strategies such as splicing-by-overlap extension PCR, obtaining high quality libraries with excellent coverage remains challenging. Here, we explored the use of type IIS restriction enzymes for the seamless cloning of Fab libraries. We analyzed human, murine and rabbit germline antibody repertoires and identified combinations of restriction enzymes that exhibit very few or no recognition sites in the antibody sequences. We describe three phagemid vectors, pUP-22Hb, pUP-22Mc and pUP-22Rc, which were employed for cloning the Fab repertoire of these hosts using BsmBI and SapI (human) or SapI alone (mouse and rabbit). Using human serum albumin as a model immunization, we built a mouse/human chimeric Fab library and a mouse Fab library in a single step ligation and successfully panned multiple cognate antibodies. The overall process is highly scalable and faster than PCR-based techniques, with a Fab insertion success rate of around 80%. By using carefully chosen overhangs on each end of the antibody domains, this approach paves the way to the universal, sequence- and vector-independent cloning and reformatting of antibody libraries. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. High-throughput sequencing enhanced phage display identifies peptides that bind mycobacteria

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Ngubane, NAC

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available these clones using both random clone picking and high throughput sequencing. We demonstrate that random clone picking does not necessarily identify highly enriched clones. We further showed that the clone displaying the CPLHARLPC peptide which was identified...

  12. The use of genomic signature distance between bacteriophages and their hosts displays evolutionary relationships and phage growth cycle determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deschavanne, Patrick; DuBow, Michael S; Regeard, Christophe

    2010-07-17

    Bacteriophage classification is mainly based on morphological traits and genome characteristics combined with host information and in some cases on phage growth lifestyle. A lack of molecular tools can impede more precise studies on phylogenetic relationships or even a taxonomic classification. The use of methods to analyze genome sequences without the requirement for homology has allowed advances in classification. Here, we proposed to use genome sequence signature to characterize bacteriophages and to compare them to their host genome signature in order to obtain host-phage relationships and information on their lifestyle. We analyze the host-phage relationships in the four most representative groups of Caudoviridae, the dsDNA group of phages. We demonstrate that the use of phage genomic signature and its comparison with that of the host allows a grouping of phages and is also able to predict the host-phage relationships (lytic vs. temperate). We can thus condense, in relatively simple figures, this phage information dispersed over many publications.

  13. Immune TB Antibody Phage Display Library as a Tool To Study B Cell Immunity in TB Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamidon, Nurul Hamizah; Suraiya, Siti; Sarmiento, Maria E; Acosta, Armando; Norazmi, Mohd Nor; Lim, Theam Soon

    2018-03-01

    B cells and in particular antibodies has always played second fiddle to cellular immunity in regard to tuberculosis (TB). However, recent studies has helped position humoral immunity especially antibodies back into the foray in relation to TB immunity. Therefore, the ability to correlate the natural antibody responses of infected individuals toward TB antigens would help strengthen this concept. Phage display is an intriguing approach that can be utilized to study antibody-mediated responses against a particular infection via harvesting the B cell repertoire from infected individuals. The development of disease-specific antibody libraries or immune libraries is useful to better understand antibody-mediated immune responses against specific disease antigens. This study describes the generation of an immune single-chain variable fragment (scFv) library derived from TB-infected individuals. The immune library with an estimated diversity of 10 9 independent clones was then applied for the identification of monoclonal antibodies against Mycobacterium tuberculosis α-crystalline as a model antigen. Biopanning of the library isolated three monoclonal antibodies with unique gene usage. This strengthens the role of antibodies in TB immunity in addition to the role played by cellular immunity. The developed library can be applied against other TB antigens and aid antibody-derived TB immunity studies in the future.

  14. Development of a T7 Phage Display Library to Detect Sarcoidosis and Tuberculosis by a Panel of Novel Antigens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harvinder Talwar

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Sarcoidosis is a granulomatous inflammatory disease, diagnosed through tissue biopsy of involved organs in the absence of other causes such as tuberculosis (TB. No specific serologic test is available to diagnose and differentiate sarcoidosis from TB. Using a high throughput method, we developed a T7 phage display cDNA library derived from mRNA isolated from bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL cells and leukocytes of sarcoidosis patients. This complex cDNA library was biopanned to obtain 1152 potential sarcoidosis antigens and a microarray was constructed to immunoscreen two different sets of sera from healthy controls and sarcoidosis. Meta-analysis identified 259 discriminating sarcoidosis antigens, and multivariate analysis identified 32 antigens with a sensitivity of 89% and a specificity of 83% to classify sarcoidosis from healthy controls. Additionally, interrogating the same microarray platform with sera from subjects with TB, we identified 50 clones that distinguish between TB, sarcoidosis and healthy controls. The top 10 sarcoidosis and TB specific clones were sequenced and homologies were searched in the public database revealing unique epitopes and mimotopes in each group. Here, we show for the first time that immunoscreenings of a library derived from sarcoidosis tissue differentiates between sarcoidosis and tuberculosis antigens. These novel biomarkers can improve diagnosis of sarcoidosis and TB, and may aid to develop or evaluate a TB vaccine.

  15. SINGLE CHAIN VARIABLE FRAGMENTS OF ANTIBODIES AGAINST DIPHTHERIA TOXIN B-SUBUNIT ISOLATED FROM PHAGE DISPLAY HUMAN ANTIBODY LIBRARY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliinyk O. S.

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Diphtheria toxin is an exoantigen of Corynebacterium diphtheriae that inhibits protein synthesis and kills sensitive cells. The aim of this study was to obtain human recombinant single-chain variable fragment (scFv antibodies against receptor-binding B subunit of diphtheria toxin. 12 specific clones were selected after three rounds of a phage display naїve (unimmunized human antibody library against recombinant B-subunit. scFv DNA inserts from these 12 clones were digested with MvaI, and 6 unique restriction patterns were found. Single-chain antibodies were expressed in Escherichia coli XL1-blue. The recombinant proteins were characterized by immunoblotting of bacterial extracts and detection with an anti-E-tag antibody. The toxin B-subunit-binding function of the single-chain antibody was shown by ELISA. The affinity constants for different clones were found to be from 106 to 108 М–1. Due to the fact, that these antibody fragments recognized epitopes in the receptor-binding Bsubunit of diphtheria toxin, further studies are interesting to evaluate their toxin neutralization properties and potential for therapeutic applications. Obtained scFv-antibodies can also be used for detection and investigation of biological properties of diphtheria toxin.

  16. Isolation of soluble scFv antibody fragments specific for small biomarker molecule, L-Carnitine, using phage display.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abou El-Magd, Rabab M; Vozza, Nicolas F; Tuszynski, Jack A; Wishart, David S

    2016-01-01

    Isolation of single chain antibody fragment (scFv) clones from naïve Tomlinson I+J phage display libraries that specifically bind a small biomarker molecule, L-Carnitine, was performed using iterative affinity selection procedures. L-Carnitine has been described as a conditionally essential nutrient for humans. Abnormally high concentrations of L-Carnitine in urine are related to many health disorders including diabetes mellitus type 2 and lung cancer. ELISA-based affinity characterization results indicate that selectants preferentially bind to L-Carnitine in the presence of key bioselecting component materials and closely related L-Carnitine derivatives. In addition, the affinity results were confirmed using biophysical fluorescence quenching for tyrosine residues in the V segment. Small-scale production of the soluble fragment yielded 1.3mg/L using immunopure-immobilized protein A affinity column. Circular Dichroism data revealed that the antibody fragment (Ab) represents a folded protein that mainly consists of β-sheets. These novel antibody fragments may find utility as molecular affinity interface receptors in various electrochemical biosensor platforms to provide specific L-Carnitine binding capability with potential applications in metabolomic devices for companion diagnostics and personalized medicine applications. It may also be used in any other biomedical application where detection of the L-Carnitine level is important. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Deoxynivalenol-mimic nanobody isolated from a naïve phage display nanobody library and its application in immunoassay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Yu-Lou; He, Qing-Hua; Xu, Yang; Bhunia, Arun K; Tu, Zhui; Chen, Bo; Liu, Yuan-Yuan

    2015-08-05

    In this study, using mycotoxin deoxynivalenol (DON) as a model hapten, we developed a nanobody-based environmental friendly immunoassay for sensitive detection of DON. Two nanobodies (N-28 and N-31) which bind to anti-DON monoclonal antibody (MAb) were isolated from a naive phage display library. These nanobodies are clonable, thermally stable and mycotoxin-free products and can be served as coating antigen mimetics in heterologous immunoassay. The half inhibition concentration (IC50) of the immunoassay developed with N-28 and N-31 was 8.77 ± 0.41 ng mL(-1) and 19.97 ± 0.84 ng mL(-1), respectively, which were 18- and 8-fold more sensitive than the conventional coating antigen (DON-BSA) based immunoassay. In order to better understand the molecular mechanism of antigen mimicry by nanobody, the 3D structure of "nanobody (N-28) - anti-DON MAb" complex was presented and verified by molecular modeling and alanine-scanning mutagenesis. The results showed that hydrogen bond and hydrophobic interaction formed between Thr 102 - Ser 106 of N-28 and CDR H3 residues of anti-DON antibody may contribute to their binding. This novel concept of enhancing sensitivity of immunoassay for DON based on nanobody may provide potential applications in a general method for immunoassay of various food chemical contaminants. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Modular Construction of Large Non-Immune Human Antibody Phage-Display Libraries from Variable Heavy and Light Chain Gene Cassettes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Nam-Kyung; Bidlingmaier, Scott; Su, Yang; Liu, Bin

    2018-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies and antibody-derived therapeutics have emerged as a rapidly growing class of biological drugs for the treatment of cancer, autoimmunity, infection, and neurological diseases. To support the development of human antibodies, various display techniques based on antibody gene repertoires have been constructed over the last two decades. In particular, scFv-antibody phage display has been extensively utilized to select lead antibodies against a variety of target antigens. To construct a scFv phage display that enables efficient antibody discovery, and optimization, it is desirable to develop a system that allows modular assembly of highly diverse variable heavy chain and light chain (Vκ and Vλ) repertoires. Here, we describe modular construction of large non-immune human antibody phage-display libraries built on variable gene cassettes from heavy chain and light chain repertoires (Vκ- and Vλ-light can be made into independent cassettes). We describe utility of such libraries in antibody discovery and optimization through chain shuffling.

  19. Screening a Phage Display Library for Two Novel OmpU-Binding Peptides with Adhesion Antagonistic Activity against Vibrio mimicus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lifang Qi

    Full Text Available Vibrio mimicus is a pathogen that causes ascites disease in fish. We have previously demonstrated that the outer membrane protein U (OmpU is an important adhesin in V. mimicus. Here eight specific OmpU-binding phage clones, which presented three different OmpU-binding peptides (designated P1, P2, P3, were screened from a commercially available phage displayed 12-mer peptide library using rOmpU protein as target. Then, synthetic OmpU-binding peptides were measured for their adhesion antagonistic activity and binding affinity via adhesion inhibition test and non-competitive ELISA, respectively. The results showed that after co-incubated with the mixture of rOmpU and P3, visible green fluorescence could be observed on the epithelioma papulosum cyprinidi (EPC cells surface; while the EPC cells co-incubated with the mixture of rOmpU and P1/P2 exhibited little green fluorescence. The average adhesion number of V. mimicus 04-14 isolate before and after treatment with peptide was 21.4 ± 1.5, 20.8 ± 0.8 (irrelevant peptide, 20.2 ± 0.5 (P3, 5.1 ± 0.7 (P1 and 3.4 ± 0.8 (P2, respectively. There was a significant decrease in the adhesive level of 04-14 isolate treated with P1/ P2 compared to the untreated isolate (p<0.01. The affinity constants of P1 and P2 were (6.17 ± 0.19 × 108 L/mol and (1.24 ± 0.56 × 109 L/mol, respectively. Furthermore, protective effects of P1 and P2 on grass carps challenged with V. mimicus were preliminary detected. It was found there was delayed death of fish in the groups treated with P1/P2, and the survival rate of challenged fish improved with the increase of the dose of adhesion antagonistic peptide. Taken together, two novel OmpU-binding peptides, which possessed adhesion antagonistic activity, high affinity and a certain degree of antibacterial activity against V. mimicus, were screened and identified.

  20. Screening a Phage Display Library for Two Novel OmpU-Binding Peptides with Adhesion Antagonistic Activity against Vibrio mimicus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Lifang; Liu, Yan; Tao, Huizhu; Xiao, Ning; Li, Jinnian; Kong, Lingyan; Hou, Liting

    2016-01-01

    Vibrio mimicus is a pathogen that causes ascites disease in fish. We have previously demonstrated that the outer membrane protein U (OmpU) is an important adhesin in V. mimicus. Here eight specific OmpU-binding phage clones, which presented three different OmpU-binding peptides (designated P1, P2, P3), were screened from a commercially available phage displayed 12-mer peptide library using rOmpU protein as target. Then, synthetic OmpU-binding peptides were measured for their adhesion antagonistic activity and binding affinity via adhesion inhibition test and non-competitive ELISA, respectively. The results showed that after co-incubated with the mixture of rOmpU and P3, visible green fluorescence could be observed on the epithelioma papulosum cyprinidi (EPC) cells surface; while the EPC cells co-incubated with the mixture of rOmpU and P1/P2 exhibited little green fluorescence. The average adhesion number of V. mimicus 04-14 isolate before and after treatment with peptide was 21.4 ± 1.5, 20.8 ± 0.8 (irrelevant peptide), 20.2 ± 0.5 (P3), 5.1 ± 0.7 (P1) and 3.4 ± 0.8 (P2), respectively. There was a significant decrease in the adhesive level of 04-14 isolate treated with P1/ P2 compared to the untreated isolate (p<0.01). The affinity constants of P1 and P2 were (6.17 ± 0.19) × 108 L/mol and (1.24 ± 0.56) × 109 L/mol, respectively. Furthermore, protective effects of P1 and P2 on grass carps challenged with V. mimicus were preliminary detected. It was found there was delayed death of fish in the groups treated with P1/P2, and the survival rate of challenged fish improved with the increase of the dose of adhesion antagonistic peptide. Taken together, two novel OmpU-binding peptides, which possessed adhesion antagonistic activity, high affinity and a certain degree of antibacterial activity against V. mimicus, were screened and identified.

  1. Interrogation of side chain biases for oligomannose recognition by antibody 2G12 via structure-guided phage display libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Tsung-Yi; Lai, Jonathan R

    2017-10-15

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) are essential reagents for deciphering gene or protein function and have been a fruitful source of therapeutic and diagnostic agents. However, developing anticarbohydrate antibodies to target glycans for those purposes has been less successful because the molecular basis for glycan-mAb interactions is poorly understood relative to protein- or peptide-binding mAbs. Here, we report our investigation on glycan-mAb interactions by using the unique architectural scaffold of 2G12, an antibody that targets oligomannoses on the HIV-1 glycoprotein gp120, as the template for engineering highly specific mAbs to target glycans. We first analyzed 24 different X-ray structures of antiglycan mAbs from the Protein Data Bank to determine side chain amino acid distributions in of glycan-mAb interactions. We identified Tyr, Arg, Asn, Ser, Asp, and His as the six most prevalent residues in the glycan-mAb contacts. We then utilized this information to construct two phage display libraries ("Lib1" and "Lib2") in which positions on the heavy chain variable domains of 2G12 were allowed to vary in restricted manner among Tyr, Asp, Ser, His, Asn, Thr, Ala and Pro to interrogate the minimal physicochemical requirements for oligomannose recognition. We analyzed the sequences of 39 variants from Lib1 and 14 variants from Lib2 following selection against gp120, the results showed that there is a high degree of malleability within the 2G12 for glycan recognitions. We further characterized five unique phage clones from both libraries that exhibited a gp120-specific binding profile. Expression of two of these variants as soluble mAbs indicated that, while specificity of gp120-binding was retained, the affinity of these mutants was significantly reduced relative to WT 2G12. Nonetheless, the results indicate these is some malleability in the identity of contact residues and provide a novel insight into the nature of glycan-antibody interactions and how they may differ

  2. Identification of amino acids involved in the Flo11p-mediated adhesion of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to a polystyrene surface using phage display with competitive elution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Henrik Dam; Dupont, Kitt; Jespersen, Lene

    2007-01-01

    Aims: To identify the main amino acids involved in the Flo11p-mediated adhesion of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to the polystyrene surface PolySorp. Methods and Results: Using a combination of phage display and competitive elution revealed that 12-mer peptides of phages from competitive panning with ...

  3. Projection display technologies for the new millennium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahn, Frederic J.

    2000-04-01

    Although analog CRTs continue to enable most of the world's electronic projection displays such as US consumer rear projection televisions, discrete pixel (digital) active matrix LCD and DLP reflective mirror array projectors have rapidly created large nonconsumer markets--primarily for business. Recent advances in image quality, compactness and cost effectiveness of digital projectors have the potential to revolutionize major consumer and entertainment markets as well. Digital penetration of the mainstream consumer projection TV market will begin in the hear 2000. By 2005 digital projection HDTVs could take the major share of the consumer HDTV projection market. Digital projection is expected to dominate both the consumer HDTV and the cinema market by 2010, resulting in potential shipments for all projection markets exceeding 10 M units per year. Digital projection is improving at a rate 10X faster than analog CRT projectors and 5X faster than PDP flat panels. Continued rapid improvement of digital projection is expected due to its relative immaturity and due to the wide diversity of technological improvements being pursued. Key technology enablers are the imaging panels, light sources and micro-optics. Market shares of single panel projectors, MEMs panels, LCOS panels and low T p-Si TFT LCD panel variants are expected to increase.

  4. Identification and immunogenicity of immunodominant mimotopes of outer membrane protein U (OmpU) of Vibrio mimicus from phage display peptide library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cen, Junyu; Liu, Xueqin; Li, Jinnian; Zhang, Ming; Wang, Wei

    2013-01-01

    Vibrio mimicus (V. mimicus) is the causative agent of ascites disease in aquatic animals. Outer membrane protein U (OmpU) is an important antigen of V. mimicus, but its protective epitopes are still unclear. A random 12-mer phage-displayed peptide library was used to screen and identify immunodominant mimotopes of the OmpU protein in V. mimicus by panning against purified OmpU-specific polyclonal antibody. Then the immunogenicity and immunoprotection in fish of these mimotopes was evaluated. Nine positive phage clones presented seven different 12- peptide sequences and more than 50% of them carried a consensus core motif of DSSK-P. These positive clones reacted with the target antibody and this interaction could be blocked, in a dose-dependent manner, by OmpU protein. Intraperitoneal injection of seven positive phage clones into fish induced a specific antibody response to OmpU protein. The fish immunized respectively with the positive phage clones C17, C24, C60 and C66 obtained 100% immunoprotective effect against experimental V. mimicus challenge. Taken together, these mimotopes presented by clone C17, C24, C60 and C66 were immunodominant mimotopes of the OmpU protein and exhibited a more appropriate candidate as epitope-based vaccine against V. mimicus infection in aquatic animals. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Toner display based on particle control technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitamura, Takashi

    2011-03-01

    Toner Display is based on an electrical movement of charged particles. Two types of black toner and white particles charged in the different electric polarity are enclosed between two electrodes. The particle movement is controlled by the external electric field applied between two transparent electrodes. The toner is collected to the electrode by an electrostatic force across the insulating layer to display a black image. The toners can be put back to the counter electrode by applying a reverse electric field, and white solid image is displayed. We have studied on the movement of three color particles independently to display color image in Toner Display. Two positively charged color particles with different amount of charge to mass ratio and negatively charged white particles were enclosed in the toner display cell. Yellow, cyan and white images were displayed by an application of voltage.

  6. Biotin-tagged proteins: Reagents for efficient ELISA-based serodiagnosis and phage display-based affinity selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Vaishali; Kaur, Charanpreet; Grover, Payal; Gupta, Amita; Chaudhary, Vijay K

    2018-01-01

    The high-affinity interaction between biotin and streptavidin has opened avenues for using recombinant proteins with site-specific biotinylation to achieve efficient and directional immobilization. The site-specific biotinylation of proteins carrying a 15 amino acid long Biotin Acceptor Peptide tag (BAP; also known as AviTag) is effected on a specific lysine either by co-expressing the E. coli BirA enzyme in vivo or by using purified recombinant E. coli BirA enzyme in the presence of ATP and biotin in vitro. In this paper, we have designed a T7 promoter-lac operator-based expression vector for rapid and efficient cloning, and high-level cytosolic expression of proteins carrying a C-terminal BAP tag in E. coli with TEV protease cleavable N-terminal deca-histidine tag, useful for initial purification. Furthermore, a robust three-step purification pipeline integrated with well-optimized protocols for TEV protease-based H10 tag removal, and recombinant BirA enzyme-based site-specific in vitro biotinylation is described to obtain highly pure biotinylated proteins. Most importantly, the paper demonstrates superior sensitivities in indirect ELISA with directional and efficient immobilization of biotin-tagged proteins on streptavidin-coated surfaces in comparison to passive immobilization. The use of biotin-tagged proteins through specific immobilization also allows more efficient selection of binders from a phage-displayed naïve antibody library. In addition, for both these applications, specific immobilization requires much less amount of protein as compared to passive immobilization and can be easily multiplexed. The simplified strategy described here for the production of highly pure biotin-tagged proteins will find use in numerous applications, including those, which may require immobilization of multiple proteins simultaneously on a solid surface.

  7. Approach of field-emission display toward technology status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghrayeb, Joseph; Jackson, Timothy W.; Hopper, Darrel G.; Daniels, Reginald

    1998-09-01

    Flat panel display (FPD) technologies have emerged with smaller depth, size, and power than the cathode ray tube technology that now dominates the display market. Liquid crystal displays in general and active matrix liquid crystal displays (AMLCD), in particular, are the FPD technology of choice. The AMLCD technology is well established has undergone dramatic improvements in the past few years, a trend which is likely to continue. In recent years some potential or want-to- be ('wanabe') alternate technologies, such as field emission displays (FED), high gain emissive displays and vacuum fluorescent displays (VFD), have received substantial investments. For example, the VFD knowledge level has reached technology status as segmented displays in automotive and instrumentation applications. Much work has been done to improve FED technology status, resulting in many attempts to build production quality prototypes. However, no FED has actually gone into production. The question still remains: how close to production are these nascent technologies? This paper will examine how fast field emission displays are progressing towards technology status, which is defined as a display technology that is incorporated in products accepted by the market. This paper will provide a status update of where FED companies are and where they may be heading. Current development programs, recent demonstrations, and possible future product offerings will be discussed.

  8. Identification of three novel B-cell epitopes of VMH protein from Vibrio mimicus by screening a phage display peptide library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Ning; Cao, Ji; Zhou, Hao; Ding, Shu-Quan; Kong, Ling-Yan; Li, Jin-Nian

    2016-12-01

    Vibrio mimicus is the causative agent of ascites disease in fish. The heat-labile hemolytic toxin designated VMH is an immunoprotective antigen of V. mimicus. However, its epitopes have not been well characterized. Here, a commercially available phage displayed 12-mer peptide library was used to screen epitopes of VMH protein using polyclonal rabbit anti-rVMH protein antibodies, and then five positive phage clones were identified by sandwich and competitive ELISA. Sequences analysis showed that the motif of DPTLL displayed on phage clone 15 and the consensus motif of SLDDDST displayed on the clone 4/11 corresponded to the residues 134-138 and 238-244 of VMH protein, respectively, and the synthetic motif peptides could also be recognized by anti-rVMH-HD antibody in peptide-ELISA. Thus, both motifs DPTLL and SLDDDST were identified as minimal linear B-cell epitopes of VMH protein. Although no similarity was found between VMH protein and the consensus motif of ADGLVPR displayed on the clone 2/6, the synthetic peptide ADGLVPR could absorb anti-rVMH-HD antibody and inhibit the antibody binding to rVMH protein in enhanced chemoluminescence Western blotting, whereas irrelevant control peptide did not affect the antibody binding with rVMH. These results revealed that the peptide ADGLVPR was a mimotope of VMH protein. Taken together, three novel B-cell epitopes of VMH protein were identified, which provide a foundation for developing epitope-based vaccine against V. mimicus infection in fish. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Selective screening of a large phage display library of plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 mutants to localize interaction sites with either thrombin or the variable region 1 of tissue-type plasminogen activator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Meijer, M; Roelofs, Y; Neels, J; Horrevoets, A J; van Zonneveld, A J; Pannekoek, H

    1996-03-29

    Phage display technology has been exploited to study in detail the interaction between plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1) and either thrombin or an essential positively charged "loop" of tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA), denoted variable region 1 (VR1). For this purpose, a PAI-1 mutant phage library was used that served as a reservoir of PAI-1 proteins potentially deficient in the interaction with either VR1 or thrombin. A stringent two-step selection procedure was developed. (i) A negative selection was performed by incubating the pComb3/PAI-1 mutant library with an excess of a thrombin mutant with its VR1 domain substituted with that of t-PA (thrombin-VR1). (ii) The remaining phages were complexed with t-PA (positive selection) and selected by panning with an immobilized anti-t-PA monoclonal antibody. Four consecutive panning rounds yielded an enrichment of pComb3/PAI-1 mutant phages of approximately 50-fold. Sequence analysis of 16 different cDNAs, encoding PAI-1 mutants that are hampered in the binding to thrombin-VR1, revealed the following mutations. Four independent variants share a mutation of the P4' residue (Glu350 --> Lys). Nine independent PAI-1 variants share a substitution of P1' (Met347 --> Lys), whereas three others share a P2 substitution (Ala345 --> Asp). Kinetic analysis of representative PAI-1 mutants provides evidence that the P4' residue is essential for the interaction with the VR1 domain, consistent with the data of Madison et al. (Madison, E.L., Goldsmith, E.J., Gething, M.J., Sambrook, J.F., and Gerard, R.D. (1990) J. Biol. Chem. 265, 21423-21426), whereas the P1' and P2 residues confer thrombin specificity. Concordant with the design of the selection procedure, mutants were obtained that inhibit thrombin-VR1 at least 100-fold slower than wild-type PAI-1, identifying residues that are central to the interaction with either thrombin or VR1. This study demonstrates that phage technology can be used to analyze large numbers of

  10. Chemical Strategies for the Covalent Modification of Filamentous Phage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew B Francis

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Historically filamentous bacteriophage have been known to be the workhorse of phage display due to their ability to link genotype to phenotype. More recently, the filamentous phage scaffold has proved to be powerful outside the realms of phage display technology in fields such as molecular imaging, cancer research and materials and vaccine development. The ability of the virion to serve as a platform for a variety of applications heavily relies on the functionalization of the phage coat proteins with a wide variety of functionalities. Genetic modification of the coat proteins has been the most widely used strategy for functionalizing the virion; however complementary chemical modification strategies can help to diversify the range of materials that can be developed. This review emphasizes the recent advances that have been made in the chemical modification of filamentous phage as well as some of the challenges that are involved functionalizing the virion.

  11. Isolation of a monoclonal antibody from a phage display library binding the rhesus macaque MHC class I allomorph Mamu-A1*001

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holman, Nathan; Weinfurter, Jason T.; Harsla, Trevor R.; Wiseman, Roger W.; Belli, Aaron J.; Michaels, Anthony J.; Reimann, Keith A.; DeMars, Robert I.

    2017-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies that bind to human leukocyte antigen (HLA) are useful tools for HLA-typing, tracking donor-recipient chimerisms after bone marrow transplants, and characterizing specific major histocompatibility complexes (MHC) on cell surfaces. Unfortunately, equivalent reagents are not available for rhesus macaques, which are commonly used animal as models in organ transplant and infectious disease research. To address this deficiency, we isolated an antibody that recognizes the common Indian rhesus macaque MHC class I molecule, Mamu-A1*001. We induced Mamu-A1*001-binding antibodies by alloimmunizing a female Mamu-A1*001-negative rhesus macaque with peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from a male Mamu-A1*001-positive donor. A Fab phage display library was constructed with PBMC from the alloimmunized macaque and panned to isolate an antibody that binds to Mamu-A1*001 but not to other common rhesus macaque MHC class I molecules. The isolated antibody distinguishes PBMC from Mamu-A1*001-positive and -negative macaques. Additionally, the Mamu-A1*001-specific antibody binds the cynomolgus macaque MHC class I ortholog Mafa-A1*001:01 but not variants Mafa-A1*001:02/03, indicating a high degree of binding specificity. The Mamu-A1*001-specific antibody will be useful for identifying Mamu-A1*001-positive rhesus macaques, for detecting Mamu-A1*001-positive cells in populations of Mamu-A1*001-negative cells, and for examining disease processes that alter expression of Mamu-A1*001 on cell surfaces. Moreover, the alloimmunization process we describe will be useful for isolating additional MHC allomorph-specific monoclonal antibodies or antibodies against other polymorphic host proteins which are difficult to isolate with traditional technologies. PMID:28719653

  12. Phage display aided improvement of a unique prostate-specific antigen (PSA) antibody unreactive with Lys(145)-Lys(146) internally cleaved forms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liton, Md Ferdhos Khan; Peltola, Mari T; Vehniäinen, Markus; Kuusela, Erica; Pettersson, Tiina; Lamminmäki, Urpo; Pettersson, Kim; Brockmann, Eeva-Christine

    2015-07-01

    Prostate specific antigen (PSA) is a commonly used marker of prostate cancer. A panel of four kallikrein immunoassays has been reported to improve the prediction of prostate biopsy outcome (cancer vs benign) in men with elevated PSA in the circulation. Assay of one of the kallikrein forms, intact free PSA (fPSA-I), is based on a unique monoclonal antibody (4D4), which is specific for PSA without the internal cleavage at Lys(145)-Lys(146). Due to high dissociation rate the 4D4 antibody is less than optimal for achieving a highly sensitive robust assay. In this study, we cloned the 4D4 Mab into a recombinant fragment (Fab) format and constructed three mutant libraries with the aim to increase its binding affinity. The libraries contained targeted mutations either in the CDR-H1, CDR-H2 or CDR-L3 region. PSA-I specific antibodies were enriched from the libraries by phage display technology. We identified fourteen unique clones with 1-5 mutated amino acids showing reduced dissociation of the PSA conjugate compared to the wt-4D4 Fab. Five of these mutant antibodies had 2-6 times higher binding affinity compared to the wt-4D4 Fab yet retaining the original specificity for PSA-I. The analytical sensitivity of fPSA-I assay with mutant L3-2 Fab was 0.12 μg/L compared to 4.46 μg/L with the original wt-4D4 Fab. In the method comparison study, the developed assay showed an excellent correlation to the existing fPSA-I assay. The high affinity and specificity of these mutant antibodies have potential to provide sensitive and robust detection of intact and nicked PSA from patient samples in different test formats. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. High-throughput sequencing enhanced phage display enables the identification of patient-specific epitope motifs in serum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Anders; Kringelum, Jens Vindahl; Hansen, Christian Skjødt

    2015-01-01

    of the bioinformatic approach was demonstrated by identifying epitopes of a prominent peanut allergen, Ara h 1, in sera from patients with severe peanut allergy. The identified epitopes were confirmed by high-density peptide micro-arrays. The present study demonstrates that high-throughput sequencing can empower phage...

  14. Effects of an amyloid-beta 1-42 oligomers antibody screened from a phage display library in APP/PS1 transgenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jianping; Li, Nan; Ma, Jun; Gu, Zhiqiang; Yu, Lie; Fu, Xiaojie; Liu, Xi; Wang, Jian

    2016-03-15

    We screened anti-Aβ1-42 antibodies from a human Alzheimer's disease (AD) specific single chain variable fragment (scFv) phage display library and assessed their effects in APP/PS1 transgenic mice. Reverse transcription-PCR was used to construct the scFv phage display library, and screening identified 11A5 as an anti-Aβ1-42 antibody. We mixed 11A5 and the monoclonal antibody 6E10 with Aβ1-42 and administered the mixture to Sprague-Dawley rats via intracerebroventricular injection. After 30 days, rats injected with the antibody/Aβ1-42 mixture and those injected with Aβ1-42 alone were tested on the Morris water maze. We also injected 11A5 and 6E10 into APP/PS1 transgenic mice and assessed the concentrations of Aβ in brain and peripheral blood by ELISA at 1-month intervals for 3 months. Finally we evaluated behavior changes in the Morris water maze. Rats injected with Aβ1-42 and mixed antibodies showed better performance in the Morris water maze than did rats injected with Aβ1-42 alone. In APP/PS1 transgenic mice, Aβ concentration was lower in the brains of the antibody-treated group than in the control group, but higher in the peripheral blood. The antibody-treated mice also exhibited improved behavioral performance in the Morris water maze. In conclusion, anti-Aβ1-42 antibodies (11A5) screened from the human scFv antibody phage display library promoted the efflux or clearance of Aβ1-42 and effectively decreased the cerebral Aβ burden in an AD mouse model. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Flat display panel in liquid crystal technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinbeck, J.; Schiekel, M.; Unbehaun, R.; Herzog, H. J.; Haeberle, G.; Biskupek, R.

    1980-06-01

    Liquid crystal display panels were built using matrix configurations. With predeformed liquid crystal structures, steep electro-optic characteristics, and small on-off switching ratios, electrically controllable birefringence is obtainable. This allows the addressing of projection color matrix displays with up to 90 scanned lines in a two color representation and up to 40 lines in a four color representation at a rate of 50 frames per sec. The same holds for predeformed liquid crystals having the advantage of low operating voltages, such as commercially available CMOS IC's Matrix displays with 32 x 32 and 80 x 80 picture elements with the corresponding electronic addressing devices for projection images with controllable color were assembled. Using these twisted nematic (TN) liquid crystal displays, the possibility of color switching filters in a sequential color selection mode was investigated. An experimental setup consisting of a CRT with two color phosphor screen, a color switching filter with a TN cell, and on electronic addressing device for the synchronized switching of image signals and of the corresponding colors is described.

  16. Selection of scFv Antibody Fragments Binding to Human Blood versus Lymphatic Endothelial Surface Antigens by Direct Cell Phage Display.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Thomas; Kalt, Romana; Raab, Ingrid; Schachner, Helga; Mayrhofer, Corina; Kerjaschki, Dontscho; Hantusch, Brigitte

    2015-01-01

    The identification of marker molecules specific for blood and lymphatic endothelium may provide new diagnostic tools and identify new targets for therapy of immune, microvascular and cancerous diseases. Here, we used a phage display library expressing human randomized single-chain Fv (scFv) antibodies for direct panning against live cultures of blood (BECs) and lymphatic (LECs) endothelial cells in solution. After six panning rounds, out of 944 sequenced antibody clones, we retrieved 166 unique/diverse scFv fragments, as indicated by the V-region sequences. Specificities of these phage clone antibodies for respective compartments were individually tested by direct cell ELISA, indicating that mainly pan-endothelial cell (EC) binders had been selected, but also revealing a subset of BEC-specific scFv antibodies. The specific staining pattern was recapitulated by twelve phage-independently expressed scFv antibodies. Binding capacity to BECs and LECs and differential staining of BEC versus LEC by a subset of eight scFv antibodies was confirmed by immunofluorescence staining. As one antigen, CD146 was identified by immunoprecipitation with phage-independent scFv fragment. This antibody, B6-11, specifically bound to recombinant CD146, and to native CD146 expressed by BECs, melanoma cells and blood vessels. Further, binding capacity of B6-11 to CD146 was fully retained after fusion to a mouse Fc portion, which enabled eukaryotic cell expression. Beyond visualization and diagnosis, this antibody might be used as a functional tool. Overall, our approach provided a method to select antibodies specific for endothelial surface determinants in their native configuration. We successfully selected antibodies that bind to antigens expressed on the human endothelial cell surfaces in situ, showing that BECs and LECs share a majority of surface antigens, which is complemented by cell-type specific, unique markers.

  17. Modern Display Technologies for Airborne Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-04-01

    Deschamps J. What does the Future Hold for Plasma Panel? Proceedings - Eurodisplay’ 81 Munich VDE Verlag GmbH - Berlin 5 Jackson R.N. Gas Discharge...Johnson R.L. Proc. 1976 Biennal Display Conf. Judice C.N. 16 Willis D.R. Large Area Displays. Proceedings - Eurodisplays’ 81 Munich Johnson R.L. VDE ...0. 0𔃺 . - -C 00 z~~~ R.> , I> -o -o pr0 w~C 00 ~ w z Z mo sk i co 00 000 o 0100 ’ 9r 22 0r mr 00 q )mo .or -low "N0~5 50 000 00 A.S. 6) 00 00 I IP 0 ’~ ~oVol do- FILMED

  18. A new DNA band display technology of microsatellite DNA ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study proposes a new DNA band display technology of microsatellite DNA called Fluorescent Imaging Technology. In comparison with Silver Stain Technology, this technology is worth popularizing in the laboratory because of its high resolution, efficiency, simplicity and clear background. Key words: Microsatellite DNA ...

  19. Advanced Display Interface Technology, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — CMC proposes, along with our collaborator, Dr. Mica Endlsey of SA Technologies, to produce a framework from which an Adaptive User Interface (AUI) can be modeled and...

  20. Third-Generation Display Technology: Nominally Transparent Material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles Willow

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Display technology is reshaping the consumer, business, government, and even not-for-profit markets in the midst of the digital convergence, coupled with recent smart phones led by Apple, Inc. First-Generation (1G display technology was dominated by the Cathode Ray Tubes, followed by Liquid Crystal Display and Plasma in 2G. A radically innovative shift as a disruptive technology is expected to follow in 3G to utilize virtually any transparent material, which wirelessly connects to portable access points. This paper studies the feasibility of the 3G Display Technology (DT with Technology S-Curves, and presents possible business models and technology strategies which may be generated from it. Additional subsets of business models may be derived for a wide range of industry applications.

  1. Screening for single-chain variable fragment antibodies against multiple Cry1 toxins from an immunized mouse phage display antibody library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Sa; Bo, Zongyi; Zhang, Cunzheng; Feng, Jianguo; Liu, Xianjin

    2018-04-01

    Single-chain variable fragment (scFv) is a kind of antibody that possess only one chain of the complete antibody while maintaining the antigen-specific binding abilities and can be expressed in prokaryotic system. In this study, scFvs against Cry1 toxins were screened out from an immunized mouse phage displayed antibody library, which was successfully constructed with capacity of 6.25 × 10 7  CFU/mL. Using the mixed and alternative antigen coating strategy and after four rounds of affinity screening, seven positive phage-scFvs against Cry1 toxins were selected and characterized. Among them, clone scFv-3H9 (MG214869) showing relative stable and high binding abilities to six Cry1 toxins was selected for expression and purification. SDS-PAGE indicated that the scFv-3H9 fragments approximately 27 kDa were successfully expressed in Escherichia coli HB2151 strain. The purified scFv-3H9 was used to establish the double antibody sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay method (DAS-ELISA) for detecting six Cry1 toxins, of which the lowest detectable limits (LOD) and the lowest quantitative limits (LOQ) were 3.14-11.07 and 8.22-39.44 ng mL -1 , respectively, with the correlation coefficient higher than 0.997. The average recoveries of Cry1 toxins from spiked rice leaf samples were ranged from 84 to 95%, with coefficient of variation (CV) less than 8.2%, showing good accuracy for the multi-residue determination of six Cry1 toxins in agricultural samples. This research suggested that the constructed phage display antibody library based on the animal which was immunized with the mixture of several antigens under the same category can be used for the quick and effective screening of generic antibodies.

  2. Identification of a novel aFGF-binding peptide with anti-tumor effect on breast cancer from phage display library

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dai, Xiaoyong; Cai, Cuizan [College of Pharmacy, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632, Guangdong (China); Xiao, Fei [Department of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632, Guangdong (China); Xiong, Yaoling [College of Pharmacy, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632, Guangdong (China); Huang, Yadong; Zhang, Qihao [Department of Biopharmaceutical Research and Development Centre, Institute of Biomedicine, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632, Guangdong (China); Xiang, Qi [College of Pharmacy, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632, Guangdong (China); Lou, Guofeng [Department of Biopharmaceutical Research and Development Centre, Institute of Biomedicine, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632, Guangdong (China); Lian, Mengyang [College of Pharmacy, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632, Guangdong (China); Su, Zhijian, E-mail: tjnuszj@jnu.edu.cn [Department of Biopharmaceutical Research and Development Centre, Institute of Biomedicine, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632, Guangdong (China); Zheng, Qing, E-mail: tzhengq@jnu.edu.cn [College of Pharmacy, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632, Guangdong (China)

    2014-03-21

    Highlights: • A specific aFGF-binding peptide AP8 was identified from a phage display library. • AP8 could inhibit aFGF-stimulated cell proliferation in a dose-dependent manner. • AP8 arrested the cell cycle at the G0/G1 phase by suppressing Cyclin D1. • AP8 could block the activation of Erk1/2 and Akt kinase. • AP8 counteracted proliferation and cell cycle via influencing PA2G4 and PCNA. - Abstract: It has been reported that acidic fibroblast growth factor (aFGF) is expressed in breast cancer and via interactions with fibroblast growth factor receptors (FGFRs) to promote the stage and grade of the disease. Thus, aFGF/FGFRs have been considered essential targets in breast cancer therapy. We identified a specific aFGF-binding peptide (AGNWTPI, named AP8) from a phage display heptapeptide library with aFGF after four rounds of biopanning. The peptide AP8 contained two (TP) amino acids identical and showed high homology to the peptides of the 182–188 (GTPNPTL) site of high-affinity aFGF receptor FGFR1. Functional analyses indicated that AP8 specifically competed with the corresponding phage clone A8 for binding to aFGF. In addition, AP8 could inhibit aFGF-stimulated cell proliferation, arrested the cell cycle at the G0/G1 phase by increasing PA2G4 and suppressing Cyclin D1 and PCNA, and blocked the aFGF-induced activation of Erk1/2 and Akt kinase in both breast cancer cells and vascular endothelial cells. Therefore, these results indicate that peptide AP8, acting as an aFGF antagonist, is a promising therapeutic agent for the treatment of breast cancer.

  3. High-content Analysis of Antibody Phage-display Library Selection Outputs Identifies Tumor Selective Macropinocytosis-dependent Rapidly Internalizing Antibodies*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Kevin D.; Bidlingmaier, Scott M.; Zhang, Yafeng; Su, Yang; Liu, Bin

    2014-01-01

    Many forms of antibody-based targeted therapeutics, including antibody drug conjugates, utilize the internalizing function of the targeting antibody to gain intracellular entry into tumor cells. Ideal antibodies for developing such therapeutics should be capable of both tumor-selective binding and efficient endocytosis. The macropinocytosis pathway is capable of both rapid and bulk endocytosis, and recent studies have demonstrated that it is selectively up-regulated by cancer cells. We hypothesize that receptor-dependent macropinocytosis can be achieved using tumor-targeting antibodies that internalize via the macropinocytosis pathway, improving potency and selectivity of the antibody-based targeted therapeutic. Although phage antibody display libraries have been utilized to find antibodies that bind and internalize to target cells, no methods have been described to screen for antibodies that internalize specifically via macropinocytosis. We hereby describe a novel screening strategy to identify phage antibodies that bind and rapidly enter tumor cells via macropinocytosis. We utilized an automated microscopic imaging-based, High Content Analysis platform to identify novel internalizing phage antibodies that colocalize with macropinocytic markers from antibody libraries that we have generated previously by laser capture microdissection-based selection, which are enriched for internalizing antibodies binding to tumor cells in situ residing in their tissue microenvironment (Ruan, W., Sassoon, A., An, F., Simko, J. P., and Liu, B. (2006) Identification of clinically significant tumor antigens by selecting phage antibody library on tumor cells in situ using laser capture microdissection. Mol. Cell. Proteomics. 5, 2364–2373). Full-length human IgG molecules derived from macropinocytosing phage antibodies retained the ability to internalize via macropinocytosis, validating our screening strategy. The target antigen for a cross-species binding antibody with a highly

  4. High-content analysis of antibody phage-display library selection outputs identifies tumor selective macropinocytosis-dependent rapidly internalizing antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Kevin D; Bidlingmaier, Scott M; Zhang, Yafeng; Su, Yang; Liu, Bin

    2014-12-01

    Many forms of antibody-based targeted therapeutics, including antibody drug conjugates, utilize the internalizing function of the targeting antibody to gain intracellular entry into tumor cells. Ideal antibodies for developing such therapeutics should be capable of both tumor-selective binding and efficient endocytosis. The macropinocytosis pathway is capable of both rapid and bulk endocytosis, and recent studies have demonstrated that it is selectively up-regulated by cancer cells. We hypothesize that receptor-dependent macropinocytosis can be achieved using tumor-targeting antibodies that internalize via the macropinocytosis pathway, improving potency and selectivity of the antibody-based targeted therapeutic. Although phage antibody display libraries have been utilized to find antibodies that bind and internalize to target cells, no methods have been described to screen for antibodies that internalize specifically via macropinocytosis. We hereby describe a novel screening strategy to identify phage antibodies that bind and rapidly enter tumor cells via macropinocytosis. We utilized an automated microscopic imaging-based, High Content Analysis platform to identify novel internalizing phage antibodies that colocalize with macropinocytic markers from antibody libraries that we have generated previously by laser capture microdissection-based selection, which are enriched for internalizing antibodies binding to tumor cells in situ residing in their tissue microenvironment (Ruan, W., Sassoon, A., An, F., Simko, J. P., and Liu, B. (2006) Identification of clinically significant tumor antigens by selecting phage antibody library on tumor cells in situ using laser capture microdissection. Mol. Cell. Proteomics. 5, 2364-2373). Full-length human IgG molecules derived from macropinocytosing phage antibodies retained the ability to internalize via macropinocytosis, validating our screening strategy. The target antigen for a cross-species binding antibody with a highly active

  5. Development of sugar chain-binding single-chain variable fragment antibody to adult T-cell leukemia cells using glyco-nanotechnology and phage display method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muchima, Kaname; Todaka, Taro; Shinchi, Hiroyuki; Sato, Ayaka; Tazoe, Arisa; Aramaki, Rikiya; Kakitsubata, Yuhei; Yokoyama, Risa; Arima, Naomichi; Baba, Masanori; Wakao, Masahiro; Ito, Yuji; Suda, Yasuo

    2018-04-01

    Adult T-cell leukemia (ATL) is an intractable blood cancer caused by the infection of human T-cell leukemia virus type-1, and effective medical treatment is required. It is known that the structure and expression levels of cell surface sugar chains vary depending on cell states such as inflammation and cancer. Thus, it is expected that the antibody specific for ATL cell surface sugar chain would be an effective diagnostic tool and a strong candidate for the development of an anti-ATL drug. Here, we developed a stable sugar chain-binding single-chain variable fragment antibody (scFv) that can bind to ATL cells using a fibre-type Sugar Chip and phage display method. The fiber-type Sugar Chips were prepared using O-glycans released from ATL cell lines. The scFv-displaying phages derived from human B cells (diversity: 1.04 × 108) were then screened using the fiber-type Sugar Chips, and an O-glycan-binding scFv was obtained. The flow cytometry analysis revealed that the scFv predominantly bound to ATL cell lines. The sugar chain-binding properties of the scFv was evaluated by array-type Sugar Chip immobilized with a library of synthetic glycosaminoglycan disaccharide structures. Highly sulphated disaccharide structures were found to have high affinity to scFv.

  6. CERN Technology on Display in Nice

    CERN Multimedia

    2000-01-01

    Bob Dobinson (center) and Brian Martin (right) presenting technology transfer from CERN to indus exhibition in Nice. Nice in November was the scene of the EU sponsored Information Science Technologies, IST2000 exhibition, where CERN was invited to present a stand focussing on the benefits to small companies and start-ups from association with CERN and the IST program. Companies from France, Israel and the UK were featured. Network technology standards that CERN has helped to develop have been adopted by the European Space Agency for use in future space vehicles, and these too were on show. The challenges of data acquisition and data handling for the LHC are not insurmountable, but need to be approached with a combination of advanced technology and close industrial collaboration. One important aspect is that of high speed networking, an important component in both on-line and off-line computing (GRIDs). Real time data acquisition systems for the LHC require networks with high throughput, low latency, high rel...

  7. Dendritic Cell-Targeted Phage Vectors for Breast Cancer Vaccine Development

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dewhurst, Stephen

    2002-01-01

    .... During the period covered by this progress report, we have used phage display technology to identify peptide sequences which bind to cellular receptors expressed on dendritic cells, and we have...

  8. Establishment of a sensitive time-resolved fluoroimmunoassay for detection of Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1Ie toxin based nanobody from a phage display library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Chongxin; Liu, Xiaoqin; Zhang, Cunzheng; Zhang, Xiao; Zhong, Jianfeng; Liu, Yuan; Hu, Xiaodan; Lin, Manman; Liu, Xianjin

    2017-02-01

    Cry1Ie toxin was an insect-resistant protein used in genetically modified crops (GMC). In this study, a large human VH gene nanobodies phage displayed library was employed to select anti-Cry1Ie toxin antibody by affinity panning. After 5 rounds of panning, total 12 positive monoclonal phage particles were obtained. One of the identified positive phage nanobody was expressed in E.coli BL21 and the purified protein was indicated as a molecular mass of approximately 20 kDa by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). Then a sensitive indirect competitive time-resolved fluoroimmunoassay (IC-TRFIA) was established for detection of Cry1Ie toxin by the purified protein. The working range of detection for Cry1Ie toxin standards in the IC-TRFIA were 0.08-6.44 ng mL -1 and the medium inhibition of control (IC 50 ) was 0.73 ng mL -1 . It showed a weak cross-reactivity with Cry1Ab toxin (at 5.6%), but did not recognize Cry1B, Cry1C, Cry1F, and Cry2A toxins (were <0.1%). The average recoveries of Cry1Ie toxin from respectively spiked in rice, corn and soil samples were in the range of 83.5%-96.6% and with a coefficient of variation (CV) among 2.0%-8.6%. These results showed the IC-TRFIA was promising for detection of Cry1Ie toxin in agricultural and environmental samples. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Evolution of potent and stable placental-growth-factor-1-targeting CovX-bodies from phage display peptide discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bower, Kristen E; Lam, Son N; Oates, Bryan D; Del Rosario, Joselyn R; Corner, Emily; Osothprarop, Trina F; Kinhikar, Arvind G; Hoye, Julie A; Preston, R Ryan; Murphy, Robert E; Campbell, Lioudmila A; Huang, Hanhua; Jimenez, Judith; Cao, Xia; Chen, Gang; Ainekulu, Zemeda W; Datt, Aakash B; Levin, Nancy J; Doppalapudi, Venkata R; Pirie-Shepherd, Steven R; Bradshaw, Curt; Woodnutt, Gary; Lappe, Rodney W

    2011-03-10

    Novel phage-derived peptides are the first reported molecules specifically targeting human placental growth factor 1 (PlGF-1). Phage data enabled peptide modifications that decreased IC(50) values in PlGF-1/VEGFR-1 competition ELISA from 100 to 1 μM. Peptides exhibiting enhanced potency were bioconjugated to the CovX antibody scaffold 1 (CVX-2000), generating bivalent CovX-Bodies with 2 nM K(D) against PlGF-1. In vitro and in vivo peptide cleavage mapping studies enabled the identification of proteolytic hotspots that were subsequently chemically modified. These changes decreased IC(50) to 0.4 nM and increased compound stability from 5% remaining at 6 h after injection to 35% remaining at 24 h with a β phase half-life of 75 h in mice. In cynomolgus monkey, a 78 h β half-life was observed for lead compound 2. The pharmacological properties of 2 are currently being explored.

  10. Development of human antibody fragments using antibody phage display for the detection and diagnosis of Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hust Michael

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV belongs to the Alphavirus group. Several species of this family are also pathogenic to humans and are recognized as potential agents of biological warfare and terrorism. The objective of this work was the generation of recombinant antibodies for the detection of VEEV after a potential bioterrorism assault or an natural outbreak of VEEV. Results In this work, human anti-VEEV single chain Fragments variable (scFv were isolated for the first time from a human naïve antibody gene library using optimized selection processes. In total eleven different scFvs were identified and their immunological specificity was assessed. The specific detection of the VEEV strains TC83, H12/93 and 230 by the selected antibody fragments was proved. Active as well as formalin inactivated virus particles were recognized by the selected antibody fragments which could be also used for Western blot analysis of VEEV proteins and immunohistochemistry of VEEV infected cells. The anti-VEEV scFv phage clones did not show any cross-reactivity with Alphavirus species of the Western equine encephalitis virus (WEEV and Eastern equine encephalitis virus (EEEV antigenic complex, nor did they react with Chikungunya virus (CHIKV, if they were used as detection reagent. Conclusion For the first time, this study describes the selection of antibodies against a human pathogenic virus from a human naïve scFv antibody gene library using complete, active virus particles as antigen. The broad and sensitive applicability of scFv-presenting phage for the immunological detection and diagnosis of Alphavirus species was demonstrated. The selected antibody fragments will improve the fast identification of VEEV in case of a biological warfare or terroristic attack or a natural outbreak.

  11. A simple and rapid method to isolate purer M13 phage by isoelectric precipitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Dexian; Sutaria, Sanjana; Hwangbo, Je Yeol; Chen, P

    2013-09-01

    M13 virus (phage) has been extensively used in phage display technology and nanomaterial templating. Our research aimed to use M13 phage to template sulfur nanoparticles for making lithium ion batteries. Traditional methods for harvesting M13 phage from Escherichia coli employ polyethylene glycol (PEG)-based precipitation, and the yield is usually measured by plaque counting. With this method, PEG residue is present in the M13 phage pellet and is difficult to eliminate. To resolve this issue, a method based on isoelectric precipitation was introduced and tested. The isoelectric method resulted in the production of purer phage with a higher yield, compared to the traditional PEG-based method. There is no significant variation in infectivity of the phage prepared using isoelectric precipitation, and the dynamic light scattering data indirectly prove that the phage structure is not damaged by pH adjustment. To maximize phage production, a dry-weight yield curve of M13 phage for various culture times was produced. The yield curve is proportional to the growth curve of E. coli. On a 200-mL culture scale, 0.2 g L(-1) M13 phage (dry-weight) was produced by the isoelectric precipitation method.

  12. Mapping of epitopes for autoantibodies to the Type 1 diabetes autoantigen IA-2 by peptide phage display and molecular modelling: Overlap of antibody and T-cell determinants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    A. Dromey, James; Weenink, Sarah M.; Peters, Günther H.J.

    2004-01-01

    IA-2 is a major target of autoimmunity in type 1 diabetes. IA-2 responsive T cells recognize determinants within regions represented by amino acids 787–817 and 841–869 of the molecule. Epitopes for IA-2 autoantibodies are largely conformational and not well defined. In this study, we used peptide......, and aromatic residues and amino acids contributing to the epitope investigated using site-directed mutagenesis. Mutation of each of amino acids Asn858, Glu836, and Trp799 reduced 96/3 Ab binding by >45%. Mutations of these residues also inhibited binding of serum autoantibodies from IA-2 Ab-positive type 1...... phage display and homology modeling to characterize the epitope of a monoclonal IA-2 Ab (96/3) from a human type 1 diabetic patient. This Ab competes for IA-2 binding with Abs from the majority of patients with type 1 diabetes and therefore binds a region close to common autoantibody epitopes. Alignment...

  13. A Conserved Epitope Mapped with a Monoclonal Antibody against the VP3 Protein of Goose Parvovirus by Using Peptide Screening and Phage Display Approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chenxi; Liu, Hongyu; Li, Jinzhe; Liu, Dafei; Meng, Runze; Zhang, Qingshan; Shaozhou, Wulin; Bai, Xiaofei; Zhang, Tingting; Liu, Ming; Zhang, Yun

    2016-01-01

    Waterfowl parvovirus (WPV) infection causes high mortality and morbidity in both geese (Anser anser) and Muscovy ducks (Cairina moschata), resulting in significant losses to the waterfowl industries. The VP3 protein of WPV is a major structural protein that induces neutralizing antibodies in the waterfowl. However, B-cell epitopes on the VP3 protein of WPV have not been characterized. To understand the antigenic determinants of the VP3 protein, we used the monoclonal antibody (mAb) 4A6 to screen a set of eight partially expressed overlapping peptides spanning VP3. Using western blotting and an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), we localized the VP3 epitope between amino acids (aa) 57 and 112. To identify the essential epitope residues, a phage library displaying 12-mer random peptides was screened with mAb 4A6. Phage clone peptides displayed a consensus sequence of YxRFHxH that mimicked the sequence 82Y/FNRFHCH88, which corresponded to amino acid residues 82 to 88 of VP3 protein of WPVs. mAb 4A6 binding to biotinylated fragments corresponding to amino acid residues 82 to 88 of the VP3 protein verified that the 82FxRFHxH88 was the VP3 epitope and that amino acids 82F is necessary to retain maximal binding to mAb 4A6. Parvovirus-positive goose and duck sera reacted with the epitope peptide by dot blotting assay, revealing the importance of these amino acids of the epitope in antibody-epitope binding reactivity. We identified the motif FxRFHxH as a VP3-specific B-cell epitope that is recognized by the neutralizing mAb 4A6. This finding might be valuable in understanding of the antigenic topology of VP3 of WPV.

  14. Isolation of serotype-specific antibodies against dengue virus non-structural protein 1 using phage display and application in a multiplexed serotyping assay.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kebaneilwe Lebani

    Full Text Available The multidimensional nature of dengue virus (DENV infections, which can be caused by four distinct serotypes of the virus, complicates the sensitivity of assays designed for the diagnosis of infection. Different viral markers can be optimally detected at different stages of infection. Of particular clinical importance is the early identification of infection, which is pivotal for disease management and the development of blood screening assays. Non-structural protein 1 (NS1 is an early surrogate marker of infection and its detection in serum coincides with detectable viraemia. The aim of this work was to isolate and characterise serotype-specific monoclonal antibodies that bind to NS1 for each of the four DENV serotypes. This was achieved using phage display and a subtractive biopanning strategy to direct the antibody selection towards serotype-specific epitopes. This antibody isolation strategy has advantages over immunisation techniques where it is difficult to avoid antibody responses to cross-reactive, immunodominant epitopes. Serotype specificity to recombinant antigen for each of the antibodies was confirmed by Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA and Surface Plasmon Resonance. Confirmation of binding to native DENV NS1 was achieved using ELISA and immunofluorescence assay on DENV infected Vero cells. No cross-reactivity with Zika or Kunjin viruses was observed. A previously isolated pan-reactive antibody that binds to an immunodominant epitope was able to pair with each of the serotype-specific antibodies in a sandwich ELISA, indicating that the serotype specific antibodies bind to epitopes which are all spatially distinct from the immunodominant epitope. These antibodies were suitable for use in a multiplexed assay for simultaneous detection and serotyping of DENV NS1 in human serum. This work demonstrates that phage display coupled with novel biopanning strategies is a valuable in vitro methodology for isolation of binders that can

  15. Isolation of serotype-specific antibodies against dengue virus non-structural protein 1 using phage display and application in a multiplexed serotyping assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebani, Kebaneilwe; Jones, Martina L; Watterson, Daniel; Ranzoni, Andrea; Traves, Renee J; Young, Paul R; Mahler, Stephen M

    2017-01-01

    The multidimensional nature of dengue virus (DENV) infections, which can be caused by four distinct serotypes of the virus, complicates the sensitivity of assays designed for the diagnosis of infection. Different viral markers can be optimally detected at different stages of infection. Of particular clinical importance is the early identification of infection, which is pivotal for disease management and the development of blood screening assays. Non-structural protein 1 (NS1) is an early surrogate marker of infection and its detection in serum coincides with detectable viraemia. The aim of this work was to isolate and characterise serotype-specific monoclonal antibodies that bind to NS1 for each of the four DENV serotypes. This was achieved using phage display and a subtractive biopanning strategy to direct the antibody selection towards serotype-specific epitopes. This antibody isolation strategy has advantages over immunisation techniques where it is difficult to avoid antibody responses to cross-reactive, immunodominant epitopes. Serotype specificity to recombinant antigen for each of the antibodies was confirmed by Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA) and Surface Plasmon Resonance. Confirmation of binding to native DENV NS1 was achieved using ELISA and immunofluorescence assay on DENV infected Vero cells. No cross-reactivity with Zika or Kunjin viruses was observed. A previously isolated pan-reactive antibody that binds to an immunodominant epitope was able to pair with each of the serotype-specific antibodies in a sandwich ELISA, indicating that the serotype specific antibodies bind to epitopes which are all spatially distinct from the immunodominant epitope. These antibodies were suitable for use in a multiplexed assay for simultaneous detection and serotyping of DENV NS1 in human serum. This work demonstrates that phage display coupled with novel biopanning strategies is a valuable in vitro methodology for isolation of binders that can discern amongst

  16. A Conserved Epitope Mapped with a Monoclonal Antibody against the VP3 Protein of Goose Parvovirus by Using Peptide Screening and Phage Display Approaches.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chenxi Li

    Full Text Available Waterfowl parvovirus (WPV infection causes high mortality and morbidity in both geese (Anser anser and Muscovy ducks (Cairina moschata, resulting in significant losses to the waterfowl industries. The VP3 protein of WPV is a major structural protein that induces neutralizing antibodies in the waterfowl. However, B-cell epitopes on the VP3 protein of WPV have not been characterized.To understand the antigenic determinants of the VP3 protein, we used the monoclonal antibody (mAb 4A6 to screen a set of eight partially expressed overlapping peptides spanning VP3. Using western blotting and an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA, we localized the VP3 epitope between amino acids (aa 57 and 112. To identify the essential epitope residues, a phage library displaying 12-mer random peptides was screened with mAb 4A6. Phage clone peptides displayed a consensus sequence of YxRFHxH that mimicked the sequence 82Y/FNRFHCH88, which corresponded to amino acid residues 82 to 88 of VP3 protein of WPVs. mAb 4A6 binding to biotinylated fragments corresponding to amino acid residues 82 to 88 of the VP3 protein verified that the 82FxRFHxH88 was the VP3 epitope and that amino acids 82F is necessary to retain maximal binding to mAb 4A6. Parvovirus-positive goose and duck sera reacted with the epitope peptide by dot blotting assay, revealing the importance of these amino acids of the epitope in antibody-epitope binding reactivity.We identified the motif FxRFHxH as a VP3-specific B-cell epitope that is recognized by the neutralizing mAb 4A6. This finding might be valuable in understanding of the antigenic topology of VP3 of WPV.

  17. In vivo phage display screening for tumor vascular targets in glioblastoma identifies a llama nanobody against dynactin-1-p150Glued.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Lith, Sanne A M; Roodink, Ilse; Verhoeff, Joost J C; Mäkinen, Petri I; Lappalainen, Jari P; Ylä-Herttuala, Seppo; Raats, Jos; van Wijk, Erwin; Roepman, Ronald; Letteboer, Stef J; Verrijp, Kiek; Leenders, William P J

    2016-11-01

    Diffuse gliomas are primary brain cancers that are characterised by infiltrative growth. Whereas high-grade glioma characteristically presents with perinecrotic neovascularisation, large tumor areas thrive on pre-existent vasculature as well. Clinical studies have revealed that pharmacological inhibition of the angiogenic process does not improve survival of glioblastoma patients. Direct targeting of tumor vessels may however still be an interesting therapeutic approach as it allows pinching off the blood supply to tumor cells. Such tumor vessel targeting requires the identification of tumor-specific vascular targeting agents (TVTAs).Here we describe a novel TVTA, C-C7, which we identified via in vivo biopanning of a llama nanobody phage display library in an orthotopic mouse model of diffuse glioma. We show that C-C7 recognizes a subpopulation of tumor blood vessels in glioma xenografts and clinical glioma samples. Additionally, C-C7 recognizes macrophages and activated endothelial cells in atherosclerotic lesions. By using C-C7 as bait in yeast-2-hybrid (Y2H) screens we identified dynactin-1-p150Glued as its binding partner. The interaction was confirmed by co-immunostainings with C-C7 and a commercial anti-dynactin-1-p150Glued antibody, and via co-immunoprecipitation/western blot studies. Normal brain vessels do not express dynactin-1-p150Glued and its expression is reduced under anti-VEGF therapy, suggesting that dynactin-1-p150Glued is a marker for activated endothelial cells.In conclusion, we show that in vivo phage display combined with Y2H screenings provides a powerful approach to identify tumor-targeting nanobodies and their binding partners. Using this combination of methods we identify dynactin-1-p150Glued as a novel targetable protein on activated endothelial cells and macrophages.

  18. Single chain variable fragment displaying M13 phage library functionalized magnetic microsphere-based protein equalizer for human serum protein analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Guijie; Zhao, Peng; Deng, Nan; Tao, Dingyin; Sun, Liangliang; Liang, Zhen; Zhang, Lihua; Zhang, Yukui

    2012-09-18

    Single chain variable fragment (scFv) displaying the M13 phage library was covalently immobilized on magnetic microspheres and used as a protein equalizer for the treatment of human serum. First, scFv displaying M13 phage library functionalized magnetic microspheres (scFv@M13@MM) was incubated with a human serum sample. Second, captured proteins on scFv@M13@MM were eluted with 2 M NaCl, 50 mM glycine-hydrochloric acid (Gly-HCl), and 20% (v/v) acetonitrile with 0.5% (v/v) trifluoroacetic acid in sequence. Finally, the tightly bonded proteins were released by the treatment with thrombin. The eluates were first analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) with silver staining. Results indicated that the difference of protein concentration was reduced obviously in NaCl and Gly-HCl fractions compared with untreated human serum sample. The eluates were also digested with trypsin, followed by online 2D-strong cation exchange (SCX)-RPLC-ESI-MS/MS analysis. Results demonstrated that the number of proteins identified from an scFv@M13@MM treated human serum sample was improved 100% compared with that from the untreated sample. In addition, the spectral count of 10 high abundance proteins (serum albumin, serotransferrin, α-2-macroglobulin, α-1-antitrypsin, apolipoprotein B-100, Ig γ-2 chain C region, haptoglobin, hemopexin, α-1-acid glycoprotein 1, and α-2-HS-glycoprotein) decreased evidently after scFv@M13@MM treatment. All these results demonstrate that scFv@M13@MM could efficiently remove high-abundance proteins, reduce the protein concentration difference of human serum, and result in more protein identification.

  19. Screening a phage display library for a novel FGF8b-binding peptide with anti-tumor effect on prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Wenhui; Chen, Xilei; Li, Tao; Li, Yanmei; Wang, Ruixue; He, Dan; Luo, Wu; Li, Xiaokun; Wu, Xiaoping

    2013-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factor 8b (FGF8b) is the major isoform of FGF8 expressed in prostate cancer and it correlates with the stage and grade of the disease. FGF8b has been considered as a potential target for prostate cancer therapy. Here we isolated 12 specific FGF8b-binding phage clones by screening a phage display heptapeptide library with FGF8b. The peptide (HSQAAVP, named as P12) corresponding to one of these clones showed high homology to the immunoglobulin-like (Ig-like) domain II(D2) of high-affinity FGF8b receptor (FGFR3c), contained 3 identical amino acids (AVP) to the authentic FGFR3 D2 sequence aa 163–169 (LLAVPAA) directly participating in ligand binding, carried the same charges as its corresponding motif (aa163–169) in FGFR3c, suggesting that P12 may have a greater potential to interrupt FGF8b binding to its receptors than other identified heptapeptides do. Functional analysis indicated that synthetic P12 peptides mediate significant inhibition of FGF8b-induced cell proliferation, arrest cell cycle at the G0/G1 phase via suppression of Cyclin D1 and PCNA, and blockade of the activations of Erk1/2 and Akt cascades in both prostate cancer cells and vascular endothelial cells. The results demonstrated that the P12 peptide acting as an FGF8b antagonist may have therapeutic potential in prostate cancer. - Highlights: ► A novel FGF8b-binding peptide P12 was isolated from a phage display library. ► The mechanisms for P12 peptide inhibiting cell proliferation were proposed. ► P12 caused cell cycle arrest at G0/G1 phase via suppression of Cyclin D1 and PCNA. ► P12 suppressed FGF8b-induced activations of Akt and MAP kinases. ► P12 acting as an FGF8b antagonist may have therapeutic potential in prostate cancer

  20. Screening a phage display library for a novel FGF8b-binding peptide with anti-tumor effect on prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Wenhui; Chen, Xilei; Li, Tao; Li, Yanmei; Wang, Ruixue; He, Dan; Luo, Wu [Institute of Tissue Transplantation and Immunology, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632 (China); Li, Xiaokun [Institute of Tissue Transplantation and Immunology, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632 (China); School of Pharmaceutical Science, Wenzhou Medical College, Wenzhou 325035 (China); Wu, Xiaoping, E-mail: twxp@jnu.edu.cn [Institute of Tissue Transplantation and Immunology, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632 (China); School of Pharmaceutical Science, Wenzhou Medical College, Wenzhou 325035 (China)

    2013-05-01

    Fibroblast growth factor 8b (FGF8b) is the major isoform of FGF8 expressed in prostate cancer and it correlates with the stage and grade of the disease. FGF8b has been considered as a potential target for prostate cancer therapy. Here we isolated 12 specific FGF8b-binding phage clones by screening a phage display heptapeptide library with FGF8b. The peptide (HSQAAVP, named as P12) corresponding to one of these clones showed high homology to the immunoglobulin-like (Ig-like) domain II(D2) of high-affinity FGF8b receptor (FGFR3c), contained 3 identical amino acids (AVP) to the authentic FGFR3 D2 sequence aa 163–169 (LLAVPAA) directly participating in ligand binding, carried the same charges as its corresponding motif (aa163–169) in FGFR3c, suggesting that P12 may have a greater potential to interrupt FGF8b binding to its receptors than other identified heptapeptides do. Functional analysis indicated that synthetic P12 peptides mediate significant inhibition of FGF8b-induced cell proliferation, arrest cell cycle at the G0/G1 phase via suppression of Cyclin D1 and PCNA, and blockade of the activations of Erk1/2 and Akt cascades in both prostate cancer cells and vascular endothelial cells. The results demonstrated that the P12 peptide acting as an FGF8b antagonist may have therapeutic potential in prostate cancer. - Highlights: ► A novel FGF8b-binding peptide P12 was isolated from a phage display library. ► The mechanisms for P12 peptide inhibiting cell proliferation were proposed. ► P12 caused cell cycle arrest at G0/G1 phase via suppression of Cyclin D1 and PCNA. ► P12 suppressed FGF8b-induced activations of Akt and MAP kinases. ► P12 acting as an FGF8b antagonist may have therapeutic potential in prostate cancer.

  1. Development of exosome surface display technology in living human cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stickney, Zachary, E-mail: zstickney@scu.edu; Losacco, Joseph, E-mail: jlosacco@scu.edu; McDevitt, Sophie, E-mail: smmcdevitt@scu.edu; Zhang, Zhiwen, E-mail: zzhang@scu.edu; Lu, Biao, E-mail: blu2@scu.edu

    2016-03-25

    Surface display technology is an emerging key player in presenting functional proteins for targeted drug delivery and therapy. Although a number of technologies exist, a desirable mammalian surface display system is lacking. Exosomes are extracellular vesicles that facilitate cell–cell communication and can be engineered as nano-shuttles for cell-specific delivery. In this study, we report the development of a novel exosome surface display technology by exploiting mammalian cell secreted nano-vesicles and their trans-membrane protein tetraspanins. By constructing a set of fluorescent reporters for both the inner and outer surface display on exosomes at two selected sites of tetraspanins, we demonstrated the successful exosomal display via gene transfection and monitoring fluorescence in vivo. We subsequently validated our system by demonstrating the expected intracellular partitioning of reporter protein into sub-cellular compartments and secretion of exosomes from human HEK293 cells. Lastly, we established the stable engineered cells to harness the ability of this robust system for continuous production, secretion, and uptake of displayed exosomes with minimal impact on human cell biology. In sum, our work paved the way for potential applications of exosome, including exosome tracking and imaging, targeted drug delivery, as well as exosome-mediated vaccine and therapy.

  2. A phage-displayed chicken single-chain antibody fused to alkaline phosphatase detects Fusarium pathogens and their presence in cereal grains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, Zu-Quan; Li, He-Ping; Zhang, Jing-Bo; Huang, Tao; Liu, Jin-Long; Xue, Sheng; Wu, Ai-Bo; Liao, Yu-Cai

    2013-01-01

    Graphical abstract: A phage-displayed chicken scFv antibody, FvSG7, binds on the surface antigen of conidiospores and the mycelia of F. verticillioides. Its fusion with alkaline phosphatase (AP) through a 218 linker displayed a 4-fold higher affinity compared with the parent scFv antibody and efficiently detected toxigenic Fusarium pathogens in cereal grains. Highlights: ► Generation of a highly reactive scFv antibody against F. verticillioides. ► Localization of the antibody binding to the surface target of F. verticillioides. ► Expression of the antibody–alkaline phosphatase (AP) fusion linked by a 218 linker. ► The antibody–AP fusion has a higher affinity than the parental antibody. ► The antibody–AP fusion detects toxigenic Fusarium pathogens in cereal grains. -- Abstract: Fusarium and its poisonous mycotoxins are distributed worldwide and are of particular interest in agriculture and food safety. A simple analytical method to detect pathogens is essential for forecasting diseases and controlling mycotoxins. This article describes a proposed method for convenient and sensitive detection of Fusarium pathogens that uses the fusion of single-chain variable fragment (scFv) and alkaline phosphatase (AP). A highly reactive scFv antibody specific to soluble cell wall-bound proteins (SCWPs) of F. verticillioides was selected from an immunized chicken phagemid library by phage display. The antibody was verified to bind on the surface of ungerminated conidiospores and mycelia of F. verticillioides. The scFv–AP fusion was constructed, and soluble expression in bacteria was confirmed. Both the antibody properties and enzymatic activity were retained, and the antigen-binding capacity of the fusion was enhanced by the addition of a linker. Surface plasmon resonance measurements confirmed that the fusion displayed 4-fold higher affinity compared with the fusion's parental scFv antibody. Immunoblot analyses showed that the fusion had good binding capacity to

  3. A phage-displayed chicken single-chain antibody fused to alkaline phosphatase detects Fusarium pathogens and their presence in cereal grains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Zu-Quan [Molecular Biotechnology Laboratory of Triticeae Crops, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 (China); Li, He-Ping [Molecular Biotechnology Laboratory of Triticeae Crops, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 (China); College of Life Science and Technology, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 (China); Zhang, Jing-Bo [Molecular Biotechnology Laboratory of Triticeae Crops, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 (China); College of Plant Science and Technology, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 (China); Huang, Tao [Molecular Biotechnology Laboratory of Triticeae Crops, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 (China); College of Life Science and Technology, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 (China); Liu, Jin-Long; Xue, Sheng [Molecular Biotechnology Laboratory of Triticeae Crops, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 (China); Wu, Ai-Bo [Institute for Agri-food Standards and Testing Technology, Laboratory of Quality and Safety Risk Assessment for Agro-products, Ministry of Agriculture, Shanghai Academy of Agricultural Sciences, 1000 Jinqi Road, Shanghai 201403 (China); Liao, Yu-Cai, E-mail: ycliao06@yahoo.com.cn [Molecular Biotechnology Laboratory of Triticeae Crops, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 (China); College of Plant Science and Technology, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 (China); National Center of Plant Gene Research, Wuhan 430070 (China)

    2013-02-18

    Graphical abstract: A phage-displayed chicken scFv antibody, FvSG7, binds on the surface antigen of conidiospores and the mycelia of F. verticillioides. Its fusion with alkaline phosphatase (AP) through a 218 linker displayed a 4-fold higher affinity compared with the parent scFv antibody and efficiently detected toxigenic Fusarium pathogens in cereal grains. Highlights: ► Generation of a highly reactive scFv antibody against F. verticillioides. ► Localization of the antibody binding to the surface target of F. verticillioides. ► Expression of the antibody–alkaline phosphatase (AP) fusion linked by a 218 linker. ► The antibody–AP fusion has a higher affinity than the parental antibody. ► The antibody–AP fusion detects toxigenic Fusarium pathogens in cereal grains. -- Abstract: Fusarium and its poisonous mycotoxins are distributed worldwide and are of particular interest in agriculture and food safety. A simple analytical method to detect pathogens is essential for forecasting diseases and controlling mycotoxins. This article describes a proposed method for convenient and sensitive detection of Fusarium pathogens that uses the fusion of single-chain variable fragment (scFv) and alkaline phosphatase (AP). A highly reactive scFv antibody specific to soluble cell wall-bound proteins (SCWPs) of F. verticillioides was selected from an immunized chicken phagemid library by phage display. The antibody was verified to bind on the surface of ungerminated conidiospores and mycelia of F. verticillioides. The scFv–AP fusion was constructed, and soluble expression in bacteria was confirmed. Both the antibody properties and enzymatic activity were retained, and the antigen-binding capacity of the fusion was enhanced by the addition of a linker. Surface plasmon resonance measurements confirmed that the fusion displayed 4-fold higher affinity compared with the fusion's parental scFv antibody. Immunoblot analyses showed that the fusion had good binding

  4. Identification of two linear B-cell epitopes from West Nile virus NS1 by screening a phage-displayed random peptide library

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qin Yong-Li

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The West Nile virus (WNV nonstructural protein 1 (NS1 is an important antigenic protein that elicits protective antibody responses in animals and can be used for the serological diagnosis of WNV infection. Although previous work has demonstrated the vital role of WNV NS1-specific antibody responses, the specific epitopes in the NS1 have not been identified. Results The present study describes the identification of two linear B-cell epitopes in WNV NS1 through screening a phage-displayed random 12-mer peptide library with two monoclonal antibodies (mAbs 3C7 and 4D1 that directed against the NS1. The mAbs 3C7 and 4D1 recognized phages displaying peptides with the consensus motifs LTATTEK and VVDGPETKEC, respectively. Exact sequences of both motifs were found in the NS1 (895LTATTEK901 and 925VVDGPETKEC934. Further identification of the displayed B cell epitopes were conducted using a set of truncated peptides expressed as MBP fusion proteins. The data indicated that 896TATTEK901 and925VVDGPETKEC934 are minimal determinants of the linear B cell epitopes recognized by the mAbs 3C7 and 4D1, respectively. Antibodies present in the serum of WNV-positive horses recognized the minimal linear epitopes in Western blot analysis, indicating that the two peptides are antigenic in horses during infection. Furthermore, we found that the epitope recognized by 3C7 is conserved only among WNV strains, whereas the epitope recognized by 4D1 is a common motif shared among WNV and other members of Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV serocomplex. Conclusions We identified TATTEK and VVDGPETKEC as NS1-specific linear B-cell epitopes recognized by the mAbs 3C7 and 4D1, respectively. The knowledge and reagents generated in this study may have potential applications in differential diagnosis and the development of epitope-based marker vaccines against WNV and other viruses of JEV serocomplex.

  5. Membrane insertion and assembly of epitope-tagged gp9 at the tip of the M13 phage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuhn Andreas

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Filamentous M13 phage extrude from infected Escherichia coli with a tip structure composed of gp7 and gp9. This tip structure is extended by the assembly of the filament composed of the major coat protein gp8. Finally, gp3 and gp6 terminate the phage structure at the proximal end. Up to now, gp3 has been the primary tool for phage display technology. However, gp7, gp8 and gp9 could also be used for phage display and these phage particles should bind to two different or more surfaces when the modified coat proteins are combined. Therefore, we tested here if the amino-terminal end of gp9 can be modified and whether the modified portion is exposed and detectable on the M13 phage particles. Results The amino-terminal region of gp9 was modified by inserting short sequences that encode antigenic epitopes. We show here that the modified gp9 proteins correctly integrate into the membrane using the membrane insertase YidC exposing the modified epitope into the periplasm. The proteins are then efficiently assembled onto the phage particles. Also extensions up to 36 amino acid residues at the amino-terminal end of gp9 did not interfere with membrane integration and phage assembly. The exposure of the antigenic tags on the phage was visualised with immunogold labelling by electron microscopy and verified by dot blotting with antibodies to the tags. Conclusions Our results suggest that gp9 at the phage tip is suitable for the phage display technology. The modified gp9 can be supplied in trans from a plasmid and fully complements M13 phage with an amber mutation in gene 9. The modified phage tip is very well accessible to antibodies.

  6. Membrane insertion and assembly of epitope-tagged gp9 at the tip of the M13 phage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ploss, Martin; Kuhn, Andreas

    2011-09-26

    Filamentous M13 phage extrude from infected Escherichia coli with a tip structure composed of gp7 and gp9. This tip structure is extended by the assembly of the filament composed of the major coat protein gp8. Finally, gp3 and gp6 terminate the phage structure at the proximal end. Up to now, gp3 has been the primary tool for phage display technology. However, gp7, gp8 and gp9 could also be used for phage display and these phage particles should bind to two different or more surfaces when the modified coat proteins are combined. Therefore, we tested here if the amino-terminal end of gp9 can be modified and whether the modified portion is exposed and detectable on the M13 phage particles. The amino-terminal region of gp9 was modified by inserting short sequences that encode antigenic epitopes. We show here that the modified gp9 proteins correctly integrate into the membrane using the membrane insertase YidC exposing the modified epitope into the periplasm. The proteins are then efficiently assembled onto the phage particles. Also extensions up to 36 amino acid residues at the amino-terminal end of gp9 did not interfere with membrane integration and phage assembly. The exposure of the antigenic tags on the phage was visualised with immunogold labelling by electron microscopy and verified by dot blotting with antibodies to the tags. Our results suggest that gp9 at the phage tip is suitable for the phage display technology. The modified gp9 can be supplied in trans from a plasmid and fully complements M13 phage with an amber mutation in gene 9. The modified phage tip is very well accessible to antibodies.

  7. Solving the technology barriers in flexible AMOLED displays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gelinck, G.H.; Steen, J.L. van der; Tripathi, A.K.; Ellis, T.; Akkerman, H.; Leuken, L. van; Li, F.; Maas, J.; Smits, E.; Rovers, M.; Nag, M.; Myny, K.; Malinowski, P.; Ameys, M.; Ke, T.H.; Schols, S.; Steudel, S.; Genoe, J.; Heremans, P.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we present some of the technology challenges and process temperature trade-offs when realizing AM OLED displays on thin flexible plastic films that can be mechanically bent to a roll radius of ∼1 cm. We furthermore present complementary approaches to realize low-power, high resolution

  8. Phage display technology: a tool to explore the diversity of inhibitors to blood coagulation factor VIII

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voorberg, J.; van den Brink, E. N.

    2000-01-01

    Hemophilia A is a X-linked bleeding disorder that is caused by the functional absence of blood coagulation factor VIII. The bleeding tendency in hemophilia A patients can be corrected by the administration of plasma-derived or recombinant factor VIII concentrates. A serious complication in

  9. Comparative Evaluation of Display Technologies for Collaborative Design Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-04-01

    kinesthetic , force, and tactile feedback using a Pinch glove, joystick, or other input devices (e.g., Dede, Salzman, & Loftmn, 1996; Werkhoven & Groen, 1998...display technologies track and update the visual scene based on an observer’s head or eye movements (Kocian & Task, 1995). These features produce a...pushed exclusively via eye movements , while involving minimal cognitive or physical effort. In some systems, a search must be accomplished using a control

  10. Novel strategy for selection of monoclonal antibodies against highly conserved antigens: phage library panning against ephrin-B2 displayed on yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoling Gu

    Full Text Available Ephrin-B2 is predominately expressed in endothelium of arterial origin, involved in developmental angiogenesis and neovasculature formation through its interaction with EphB4. Despite its importance in physiology and pathological conditions, it has been challenging to produce monoclonal antibodies against ephrin-B2 due to its high conservation in sequence throughout human and rodents. Using a novel approach for antibody selection by panning a phage library of human antibody against antigens displayed in yeast, we have isolated high affinity antibodies against ephrin-B2. The function of one high affinity binder (named as 'EC8' was manifested in its ability to inhibit ephrin-B2 interaction with EphB4, to cross-react with murine ephrin-B2, and to induce internalization into ephrin-B2 expressing cells. EC8 was also compatible with immunoprecipitation and detection of ephrin-B2 expression in the tissue after standard chemical fixation procedure. Consistent with previous reports on ephrin-B2 induction in some epithelial tumors and tumor-associated vasculatures, EC8 specifically detected ephrin-B2 in tumors as well as the vasculature within and outside of the tumors. We envision that monoclonal antibody developed in this study may be used as a reagent to probe ephrin-B2 distribution in normal as well as in pathological conditions and to antagonize ephrin-B2 interaction with EphB4 for basic science and therapeutic applications.

  11. A phage display selected 7-mer peptide inhibitor of the Tannerella forsythia metalloprotease-like enzyme Karilysin can be truncated to Ser-Trp-Phe-Pro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Durand Skottrup

    Full Text Available Tannerella forsythia is a gram-negative bacteria, which is strongly associated with the development of periodontal disease. Karilysin is a newly identified metalloprotease-like enzyme, that is secreted from T. forsythia. Karilysin modulates the host immune response and is therefore considered a likely drug target. In this study peptides were selected towards the catalytic domain from Karilysin (Kly18 by phage display. The peptides were linear with low micromolar binding affinities. The two best binders (peptide14 and peptide15, shared the consensus sequence XWFPXXXGGG. A peptide15 fusion with Maltose Binding protein (MBP was produced with peptide15 fused to the N-terminus of MBP. The peptide15-MBP was expressed in E. coli and the purified fusion-protein was used to verify Kly18 specific binding. Chemically synthesised peptide15 (SWFPLRSGGG could inhibit the enzymatic activity of both Kly18 and intact Karilysin (Kly48. Furthermore, peptide15 could slow down the autoprocessing of intact Kly48 to Kly18. The WFP motif was important for inhibition and a truncation study further demonstrated that the N-terminal serine was also essential for Kly18 inhibition. The SWFP peptide had a Ki value in the low micromolar range, which was similar to the intact peptide15. In conclusion SWFP is the first reported inhibitor of Karilysin and can be used as a valuable tool in structure-function studies of Karilysin.

  12. Identification of a protective B-cell epitope of the Staphylococcus aureus GapC protein by screening a phage-displayed random peptide library.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mengyao Wang

    Full Text Available The impact of epidemic Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus on public health is increasing. Because of the abuse of antibiotics, the antibiotic resistance of S. aureus is increasing. Thus, there is an urgent need to develop new immunotherapies and immunoprophylaxes. Previous studies showed that the GapC protein of S. aureus, which is a surface protein with high glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase activity, transferrin binding activity, and other biological activities, is highly conserved. GapC induces an effective humoral immune response in vivo. However, the B-cell epitopes of S. aureus GapC have not been well identified. Here we used the bioinformatics tools to analyze the sequence of GapC, and we generated protective anti-GapC monoclonal antibodies (mAbs. A protective mAb (1F4 showed strong specificity to GapC and the ability to induce macrophages to phagocytose S. aureus. We screened the motif 272GYTEDEIVSSD282, which was recognized by mAb 1F4, using a phage display system. Then, we used site-directed mutagenesis to identify key amino acids in the motif. Residues G272 D276 E277 I278 and V279 formed the core of the 272GYTEDEIVSSD282 motif. In addition, we showed that this epitope peptide induced a protective humoral immune response against S. aureus infection in immunized mice. Our results will be useful for the further study of epitope-based vaccines against S. aureus infection.

  13. Identification and characterization of epitopes on Plasmodium knowlesi merozoite surface protein-142 (MSP-142) using synthetic peptide library and phage display library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheong, Fei Wen; Fong, Mun Yik; Lau, Yee Ling

    2016-02-01

    Plasmodium knowlesi can cause potentially life threatening human malaria. The Plasmodium merozoite surface protein-142 (MSP-142) is a potential target for malaria blood stage vaccine, and for diagnosis of malaria. Two epitope mapping techniques were used to identify the potential epitopes within P. knowlesi MSP-142. Nine and 14 potential epitopes were identified using overlapping synthetic peptide library and phage display library, respectively. Two regions on P. knowlesi MSP-142 (amino acid residues 37-95 and residues 240-289) were identified to be the potential dominant epitope regions. Two of the prominent epitopes, P10 (TAKDGMEYYNKMGELYKQ) and P31 (RCLLGFKEVGGKCVPASI), were evaluated using mouse model. P10- and P31-immunized mouse sera reacted with recombinant P. knowlesi MSP-142, with the IgG isotype distribution of IgG2b>IgG1>IgG2a>IgG3. Significant higher level of cytokines interferon-gamma and interleukin-2 was detected in P31-immunized mice. Both P10 and P31 could be the suitable epitope candidates to be used in malaria vaccine designs and immunodiagnostic assays, provided further evaluation is needed to validate the potential uses of these epitopes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. A Novel Affinity Tag, ABTAG, and Its Application to the Affinity Screening of Single-Domain Antibodies Selected by Phage Display

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Greg Hussack

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available ABTAG is a camelid single-domain antibody (sdAb that binds to bovine serum albumin (BSA with low picomolar affinity. In surface plasmon resonance (SPR analyses using BSA surfaces, bound ABTAG can be completely dissociated from the BSA surfaces at low pH, over multiple cycles, without any reduction in the capacity of the BSA surfaces to bind ABTAG. A moderate throughput, SPR-based, antibody screening assay exploiting the unique features of ABTAG is described. Anti-carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule 6 (CEACAM6 sdAbs were isolated from a phage-displayed sdAb library derived from the heavy chain antibody repertoire of a llama immunized with CEACAM6. Following one or two rounds of panning, enriched clones were expressed as ABTAG fusions in microtiter plate cultures. The sdAb-ABTAG fusions from culture supernatants were captured on BSA surfaces and CEACAM6 antigen was then bound to the captured molecules. The SPR screening method gives a read-out of relative expression levels of the fusion proteins and kinetic and affinity constants for CEACAM6 binding by the captured molecules. The library was also panned and screened by conventional methods and positive clones were subcloned and expressed for SPR analysis. Compared to conventional panning and screening, the SPR-based ABTAG method yielded a considerably higher diversity of binders, some with affinities that were three orders of magnitude higher affinity than those identified by conventional panning.

  15. Lateral flow assay for rapid detection of white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) using a phage-displayed peptide as bio-recognition probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulabhusan, Prabir Kumar; Rajwade, Jyutika M; Sahul Hameed, A S; Paknikar, Kishore M

    2017-06-01

    White spot disease caused by the white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) has a major socio-economic impact on shrimp farming in India. It has been realized that a field-usable diagnostic capable of rapid detection of WSSV can prevent huge economic losses in disease outbreaks. In this work, we explored the possibility of using a peptide as bio-recognition probe in a field-usable device for the detection of WSSV from infected shrimps and prawns. A commercially available random phage-display library was screened against rVP28 (a major structural protein of WSSV, expressed as a recombinant protein in Escherichia coli). A bacteriophage clone VP28-4L was obtained, and its binding to purified rVP28 protein as well as WSSV from infected shrimp Litopaeneus vannamei tissue was confirmed by ELISA and western blot. The apparent equilibrium dissociation constant (K d ,app) was calculated to be 810 nM. VP28-4L did not show cross-reactivity with any other shrimp viruses. A 12-mer peptide (pep28, with the sequence 'TFQAFDLSPFPS') displayed on the VP28-4L was synthesized, and its diagnostic potential was evaluated in a lateral flow assay (LFA). Visual detection of WSSV could be achieved using biotinylated-pep28 and streptavidin-conjugated gold nanoparticles. In LFA, 12.5 μg/mL of the virus could be detected from L. vannamei gill tissue homogenate within 20 min. Pep28 thus becomes an attractive candidate in bio-recognition of WSSV in field-usable diagnostic platforms benefitting the aquaculture sector.

  16. Applications of aerospace technology in industry: A technology transfer profile. Visual display systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    1972-01-01

    The growth of common as well as emerging visual display technologies are surveyed. The major inference is that contemporary society is rapidly growing evermore reliant on visual display for a variety of purposes. Because of its unique mission requirements, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration has contributed in an important and specific way to the growth of visual display technology. These contributions are characterized by the use of computer-driven visual displays to provide an enormous amount of information concisely, rapidly and accurately.

  17. Antigen discovery in chronic human inflammatory central nervous system disease: panning phage-displayed antigen libraries identifies the targets of central nervous system-derived IgG in subacute sclerosing panencephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgoon, M P; Owens, G P; Carlson, S; Maybach, A L; Gilden, D H

    2001-11-15

    The presence of increased IgG in the brains of humans with infectious and inflammatory CNS diseases of unknown etiology such as multiple sclerosis may be a clue to the cause of disease. For example, the intrathecally synthesized oligoclonal bands in diseases such as subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPE) or cryptococcal meningitis have been shown to represent Ab directed against the causative agents, measles virus (MV), or Cryptococcus neoformans, respectively. Using SSPE as a model system, we developed a strategy to identify the antigenic targets of the intrathecal disease-relevant IgG in chronic human inflammatory and demyelinating diseases of the CNS. Libraries of cDNA Ags were displayed on the surface of T7Select bacteriophage and biopanned on IgG extracted from the brain of an SSPE patient, or on a monospecific recombinant Fab identified from SSPE brain. After three or six rounds of biopanning on either Ab, positive phage-displayed Ags reacting with IgG were enriched to 35-77% of all panned clones. Sequence analysis of the positive clones identified fragments of the nucleocapsid protein of MV, the cause of SSPE. The sensitivity of the system was determined by diluting the positive clones from this SSPE phage-displayed library at a ratio of 10(-6) into another phage-displayed library that did not contain any detectable MV Ags; after six rounds of panning, the positive clones comprised 34% of all phage and were also shown to be MV nucleocapsid specific. This strategy will be useful to identify potentially rare Ags in diseases of unknown cause.

  18. Tumor Targeting with Phage Library

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pai, Jih

    2000-01-01

    I have proposed to identify peptides that bind to the vasculature of prostate cancers by using a technique developed in our laboratory called "in vivo phage display", and then to use these peptides...

  19. Phage Transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goh, Shan

    2016-01-01

    Bacteriophages mediate horizontal gene transfer through a mechanism known as transduction. Phage transduction carried out in the laboratory involves a bacterial donor and a recipient, both of which are susceptible to infection by the phage of interest. Phage is propagated in the donor, concentrated, and exposed transiently to recipient at different multiplicity of infection ratios. Transductants are selected for the desired phenotype by culture on selective medium. Here we describe transduction of ermB conferring resistance to erythromycin by the C. difficile phage ϕC2.

  20. Drug delivery vectors based on filamentous bacteriophages and phage-mimetic nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Zhigang; Sun, Wei

    2017-11-01

    With the development of nanomedicine, a mass of nanocarriers have been exploited and utilized for targeted drug delivery, including liposomes, polymers, nanoparticles, viruses, and stem cells. Due to huge surface bearing capacity and flexible genetic engineering property, filamentous bacteriophage and phage-mimetic nanoparticles are attracting more and more attentions. As a rod-like bio-nanofiber without tropism to mammalian cells, filamentous phage can be easily loaded with drugs and directly delivered to the lesion location. In particular, chemical drugs can be conjugated on phage surface by chemical modification, and gene drugs can also be inserted into the genome of phage by recombinant DNA technology. Meanwhile, specific peptides/proteins displayed on the phage surface are able to conjugate with nanoparticles which will endow them specific-targeting and huge drug-loading capacity. Additionally, phage peptides/proteins can directly self-assemble into phage-mimetic nanoparticles which may be applied for self-navigating drug delivery nanovehicles. In this review, we summarize the production of phage particles, the identification of targeting peptides, and the recent applications of filamentous bacteriophages as well as their protein/peptide for targeting drug delivery in vitro and in vivo. The improvement of our understanding of filamentous bacteriophage and phage-mimetic nanoparticles will supply new tools for biotechnological approaches.

  1. Phage Display Breast Carcinoma cDNA Libraries: Isolation of Clones Which Specifically Bind to Membrane Glycoproteins, Mucins, and Endothelial Cell Surface

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Yamamoto, Fumiichiro

    2000-01-01

    .... Using blood- group H-expressing glycoprotein fraction as bait, we observed enrichment of phage clones expressing sequences from galectin-3, a lectin with an affinity with the blood-group substance...

  2. The isolation of novel phage display-derived human recombinant antibodies against CCR5, the major co-receptor of HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimoni, Moria; Herschhorn, Alon; Britan-Rosich, Yelena; Kotler, Moshe; Benhar, Itai; Hizi, Amnon

    2013-08-01

    Selecting for antibodies against specific cell-surface proteins is a difficult task due to many unrelated proteins that are expressed on the cell surface. Here, we describe a method to screen antibody-presenting phage libraries against native cell-surface proteins. We applied this method to isolate antibodies that selectively recognize CCR5, which is the major co-receptor for HIV entry (consequently, playing a pivotal role in HIV transmission and pathogenesis). We employed a phage screening strategy by using cells that co-express GFP and CCR5, along with an excess of control cells that do not express these proteins (and are otherwise identical to the CCR5-expressing cells). These control cells are intended to remove most of the phages that bind the cells nonspecifically; thus leading to an enrichment of the phages presenting anti-CCR5-specific antibodies. Subsequently, the CCR5-presenting cells were quantitatively sorted by flow cytometry, and the bound phages were eluted, amplified, and used for further successive selection rounds. Several different clones of human single-chain Fv antibodies that interact with CCR5-expressing cells were identified. The most specific monoclonal antibody was converted to a full-length IgG and bound the second extracellular loop of CCR5. The experimental approach presented herein for screening for CCR5-specific antibodies can be applicable to screen antibody-presenting phage libraries against any cell-surface expressed protein of interest.

  3. The Isolation of Novel Phage Display-Derived Human Recombinant Antibodies Against CCR5, the Major Co-Receptor of HIV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimoni, Moria; Herschhorn, Alon; Britan-Rosich, Yelena; Kotler, Moshe; Benhar, Itai

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Selecting for antibodies against specific cell-surface proteins is a difficult task due to many unrelated proteins that are expressed on the cell surface. Here, we describe a method to screen antibody-presenting phage libraries against native cell-surface proteins. We applied this method to isolate antibodies that selectively recognize CCR5, which is the major co-receptor for HIV entry (consequently, playing a pivotal role in HIV transmission and pathogenesis). We employed a phage screening strategy by using cells that co-express GFP and CCR5, along with an excess of control cells that do not express these proteins (and are otherwise identical to the CCR5-expressing cells). These control cells are intended to remove most of the phages that bind the cells nonspecifically; thus leading to an enrichment of the phages presenting anti-CCR5-specific antibodies. Subsequently, the CCR5-presenting cells were quantitatively sorted by flow cytometry, and the bound phages were eluted, amplified, and used for further successive selection rounds. Several different clones of human single-chain Fv antibodies that interact with CCR5-expressing cells were identified. The most specific monoclonal antibody was converted to a full-length IgG and bound the second extracellular loop of CCR5. The experimental approach presented herein for screening for CCR5-specific antibodies can be applicable to screen antibody-presenting phage libraries against any cell-surface expressed protein of interest. PMID:23941674

  4. Phage display-mediated discovery of novel tyrosinase-targeting tetrapeptide inhibitors reveals the significance of N-terminal preference of cysteine residues and their functional sulfur atom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yu-Ching; Hsiao, Nai-Wan; Tseng, Tien-Sheng; Chen, Wang-Chuan; Lin, Hui-Hsiung; Leu, Sy-Jye; Yang, Ei-Wen; Tsai, Keng-Chang

    2015-02-01

    Tyrosinase, a key copper-containing enzyme involved in melanin biosynthesis, is closely associated with hyperpigmentation disorders, cancer, and neurodegenerative diseases, and as such, it is an essential target in medicine and cosmetics. Known tyrosinase inhibitors possess adverse side effects, and there are no safety regulations; therefore, it is necessary to develop new inhibitors with fewer side effects and less toxicity. Peptides are exquisitely specific to their in vivo targets, with high potencies and relatively few off-target side effects. Thus, we systematically and comprehensively investigated the tyrosinase-inhibitory abilities of N- and C-terminal cysteine/tyrosine-containing tetrapeptides by constructing a phage-display random tetrapeptide library and conducting computational molecular docking studies on novel tyrosinase tetrapeptide inhibitors. We found that N-terminal cysteine-containing tetrapeptides exhibited the most potent tyrosinase-inhibitory abilities. The positional preference of cysteine residues at the N terminus in the tetrapeptides significantly contributed to their tyrosinase-inhibitory function. The sulfur atom in cysteine moieties of N- and C-terminal cysteine-containing tetrapeptides coordinated with copper ions, which then tightly blocked substrate-binding sites. N- and C-terminal tyrosine-containing tetrapeptides functioned as competitive inhibitors against mushroom tyrosinase by using the phenol ring of tyrosine to stack with the imidazole ring of His263, thus competing for the substrate-binding site. The N-terminal cysteine-containing tetrapeptide CRVI exhibited the strongest tyrosinase-inhibitory potency (with an IC50 of 2.7 ± 0.5 μM), which was superior to those of the known tyrosinase inhibitors (arbutin and kojic acid) and outperformed kojic acid-tripeptides, mimosine-FFY, and short-sequence oligopeptides at inhibiting mushroom tyrosinase. Copyright © 2014 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental

  5. The phage lytic proteins from the Staphylococcus aureus bacteriophage vB_SauS-phiIPLA88 display multiple active catalytic domains and do not trigger staphylococcal resistance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorena Rodríguez-Rubio

    Full Text Available The increase in antibiotic resistance world-wide revitalized the interest in the use of phage lysins to combat pathogenic bacteria. In this work, we analyzed the specific cleavage sites on the staphylococcal peptidoglycan produced by three phage lytic proteins. The investigated cell wall lytic enzymes were the endolysin LysH5 derived from the S. aureus bacteriophage vB_SauS-phi-IPLA88 (phi-IPLA88 and two fusion proteins between lysostaphin and the virion-associated peptidoglycan hydrolase HydH5 (HydH5SH3b and HydH5Lyso. We determined that all catalytic domains present in these proteins were active. Additionally, we tested for the emergence of resistant Staphylococcus aureus to any of the three phage lytic proteins constructs. Resistant S. aureus could not be identified after 10 cycles of bacterial exposure to phage lytic proteins either in liquid or plate cultures. However, a quick increase in lysostaphin resistance (up to 1000-fold in liquid culture was observed. The lack of resistant development supports the use of phage lytic proteins as future therapeutics to treat staphylococcal infections.

  6. Benefits, limitations, and guidelines for application of stereo 3-D display technology to the cockpit environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Steven P.; Parrish, Russell V.; Busquets, Anthony M.

    1992-01-01

    A survey of research results from a program initiated by NASA Langley Research Center is presented. The program addresses stereo 3-D pictorial displays from a comprehensive standpoint. Human factors issues, display technology aspects, and flight display applications are also considered. Emphasis is placed on the benefits, limitations, and guidelines for application of stereo 3-D display technology to the cockpit environment.

  7. Identification of Novel Breast Cancer Antigens Using Phage Antibody Libraries

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Marks, James

    2002-01-01

    .... Multivalent display of phage antibodies led to more efficient selection of cell binding antibodies, as did recovery of phage from within the cell after binding to an internalizing cell surface receptor...

  8. Identification of Novel Breast Cancer Antigens Using Phage Antibody Libraries

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Marks, James

    2001-01-01

    .... Multivalent display of phage antibodies led to more efficient selection of cell binding antibodies, as did recovery of phage from within the cell after binding to an internalizing cell surface receptor...

  9. A Label-Free Electrochemical Impedance Cytosensor Based on Specific Peptide-Fused Phage Selected from Landscape Phage Library

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Lei; Liu, Pei; Petrenko, Valery A.; Liu, Aihua

    2016-02-01

    One of the major challenges in the design of biosensors for cancer diagnosis is to introduce a low-cost and selective probe that can recognize cancer cells. In this paper, we combined the phage display technology and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) to develop a label-free cytosensor for the detection of cancer cells, without complicated purification of recognition elements. Fabrication steps of the cytosensing interface were monitored by EIS. Due to the high specificity of the displayed octapeptides and avidity effect of their multicopy display on the phage scaffold, good biocompatibility of recombinant phage, the fibrous nanostructure of phage, and the inherent merits of EIS technology, the proposed cytosensor demonstrated a wide linear range (2.0 × 102 - 2.0 × 108 cells mL-1), a low limit of detection (79 cells mL-1, S/N = 3), high specificity, good inter-and intra-assay reproducibility and satisfactory storage stability. This novel cytosensor designing strategy will open a new prospect for rapid and label-free electrochemical platform for tumor diagnosis.

  10. Produção e caracterização da porção Fab do anticorpo anti-digoxina utilizando a tecnologia de phage display.

    OpenAIRE

    Viviane Midori Murata

    2012-01-01

    A digoxina é um medicamento usado para tratar distúrbios cardíacos, com janela terapêutica muito estreita. Para combater seu efeito tóxico, fragmentos Fab do anticorpo policlonal anti-digoxina estão disponíveis comercialmente. Nosso objetivo foi a obtenção de variantes de fragmentos Fab do anticorpo monoclonal anti-digoxina usando a tecnologia phage display, que permite gerar fragmentos de anticorpos de alta afinidade e especificidade. Uma biblioteca combinatória de fragmentos Fab anti-digoxi...

  11. Recent Trends in Salmonella Outbreaks and Emerging Technology for Biocontrol of Salmonella Using Phages in Foods: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Jun-Hyun; Park, Mi-Kyung

    2017-12-28

    Salmonella is one of the principal causes of foodborne outbreaks. As traditional control methods have shown less efficacy against emerging Salmonella serotypes or antimicrobialresistant Salmonella , new approaches have been attempted. The use of lytic phages for the biocontrol of Salmonella in the food industry has become an attractive method owing to the many advantages offered by the use of phages as biocontrol agents. Phages are natural alternatives to traditional antimicrobial agents; they have proven effective in the control of bacterial pathogens in the food industry, which has led to the development of different phage products. The treatment with specific phages in the food industry can prevent the decay of products and the spread of bacterial diseases, and ultimately promotes safe environments for animal and plant food production, processing, and handling. After an extensive investigation of the current literature, this review focuses predominantly on the efficacy of phages for the successful control of Salmonella spp. in foods. This review also addresses the current knowledge on the pathogenic characteristics of Salmonella , the prevalence of emerging Salmonella outbreaks, the isolation and characterization of Salmonella -specific phages, the effectiveness of Salmonella -specific phages as biocontrol agents, and the prospective use of Salmonella -specific phages in the food industry.

  12. New Web Technologies for the LHCb Online Monitoring Displays

    CERN Document Server

    Lagou, Charalampia

    2017-01-01

    The LHCb Online Monitoring Displays is a web application, that gives access to real-time measurements and status information about the LHCb detector and its components, without the need to login. It is hosted at CERN on the computer lbcomet.cern.ch. The system is architecturally complex, based on the Comet technology for the data-transfer and the STOMP protocol for the communication between the clients and the message broker. The application is functional, however concerns are expressed over the future maintenance of the system’s architecture as is. The cause of these concerns are firstly the fact that the STOMP JavaScript client package is outdated and flagged by the original author flagged as non-maintained and secondly that todays modern browsers support real-time bi-directional communication which, at the time of development was not compatible even with some of the major browsers. Therefore, the objective of this project is to investigate modern data-push mechanisms, which could complement or replace...

  13. Self-assembling electroactive hydrogels for flexible display technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, Scott L; Wong, Kok Hou; Ladouceur, Francois [School of Electrical Engineering and Telecommunications, University of NSW, Sydney, NSW, 2052 (Australia); Thordarson, Pall, E-mail: f.ladouceur@unsw.edu.a [School of Chemistry, University of NSW, Sydney, NSW, 2052 (Australia)

    2010-12-15

    We have assessed the potential of self-assembling hydrogels for use in conformal displays. The self-assembling process can be used to alter the transparency of the material to all visible light due to scattering by fibres. The reversible transition is shown to be of low energy by differential scanning calorimetry. For use in technology it is imperative that this transition is controlled electrically. We have thus synthesized novel self-assembling hydrogelator molecules which contain an electroactive group. The well-known redox couple of anthraquinone/anthrahydroquinone has been used as the hydrophobic component for a series of small molecule gelators. They are further functionalized with peptide combinations of L-phenylalanine and glycine to provide the hydrophilic group to complete 'head-tail' models of self-assembling gels. The gelation and electroactive characteristics of the series were assessed. Cyclic voltammetry shows the reversible redox cycle to be only superficially altered by functionalization. Additionally, spectroelectrochemical measurements show a reversible transparency and colour change induced by the redox process.

  14. Self-assembling electroactive hydrogels for flexible display technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, Scott L; Wong, Kok Hou; Ladouceur, Francois; Thordarson, Pall

    2010-01-01

    We have assessed the potential of self-assembling hydrogels for use in conformal displays. The self-assembling process can be used to alter the transparency of the material to all visible light due to scattering by fibres. The reversible transition is shown to be of low energy by differential scanning calorimetry. For use in technology it is imperative that this transition is controlled electrically. We have thus synthesized novel self-assembling hydrogelator molecules which contain an electroactive group. The well-known redox couple of anthraquinone/anthrahydroquinone has been used as the hydrophobic component for a series of small molecule gelators. They are further functionalized with peptide combinations of L-phenylalanine and glycine to provide the hydrophilic group to complete 'head-tail' models of self-assembling gels. The gelation and electroactive characteristics of the series were assessed. Cyclic voltammetry shows the reversible redox cycle to be only superficially altered by functionalization. Additionally, spectroelectrochemical measurements show a reversible transparency and colour change induced by the redox process.

  15. A strategy for high-level expression of a single-chain variable fragment against TNFα by subcloning antibody variable regions from the phage display vector pCANTAB 5E into pBV220.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Tao; Yang, Lijun; Chai, Weiran; Li, Renke; Xie, Jun; Niu, Bo

    2011-03-01

    A phage display single-chain variable fragment (scFv) library against TNFα was constructed using a recombinant phage antibody system (RPAS). The cloned scFv gene was introduced into the phage display vector pCANTAB 5E and expressed in Escherichia coli (E. coli) with a yield of up to 0.15 mg/l of total protein. With the attempt to improve the expression level of TNF-scFv, a strategy was established for subcloning the scFv gene from pCANTAB 5E into the plasmid pBV220. Under the control of a highly efficient tandem P(R)P(L) promoter system, scFv production was increased to 30% of total protein as inclusion bodies. After extraction from the cell pellet by sonication, the inclusion bodies were solubilized and denatured in the presence of 8M urea. Purification of denatured scFv was performed using nickel column chromatography followed by renaturation. The purity and activity of the refolded scFv were confirmed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), Western blotting and by an enzyme-linked immunoabsorbent assay (ELISA). The results reveal that the overall yield of bioactive TNF-scFv from E. coli flask cultures was more than 45 mg/l culture medium and 15 mg/g wet weight cells. The renatured scFv exhibited binding activity similarly to soluble scFv. In conclusion we developed a method to over-express TNF-scFv, which have biological function after purification and renaturation. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. A novel Fc-engineered human ICAM-1/CD54 antibody with potent anti-myeloma activity developed by cellular panning of phage display libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klausz, Katja; Cieker, Michael; Kellner, Christian; Oberg, Hans-Heinrich; Kabelitz, Dieter; Valerius, Thomas; Burger, Renate; Gramatzki, Martin; Peipp, Matthias

    2017-09-29

    To identify antibodies suitable for multiple myeloma (MM) immunotherapy, a cellular screening approach was developed using plasma cell lines JK-6L and INA-6 and human synthetic single-chain fragment variable (scFv) phage libraries. Isolated phage antibodies were screened for myeloma cell surface reactivity. Due to its binding characteristics, phage PIII-15 was selected to generate the scFv-Fc fusion protein TP15-Fc with an Fc domain optimized for FcγRIIIa binding. Various MM cell lines and patient-derived CD138-positive malignant plasma cells, but not granulocytes, B or T lymphocytes from healthy donors were recognized by TP15-Fc. Human intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1/CD54) was identified as target antigen by using transfected Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. Of note, no cross-reactivity of TP15-Fc with mouse ICAM-1 transfected cells was detected. TP15-Fc was capable to induce antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) against different human plasma cell lines and patients' myeloma cells with peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and purified NK cells. Importantly, TP15-Fc showed potent in vivo efficacy and completely prevented growth of human INA-6.Tu1 plasma cells in a xenograft SCID/beige mouse model. Thus, the novel ADCC-optimized TP15-Fc exerts potent anti-myeloma activity and has promising characteristics to be further evaluated for MM immunotherapy.

  17. Recombinant phage probes for Listeria monocytogenes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carnazza, S; Gioffre, G; Felici, F; Guglielmino, S [Department of Microbiological, Genetic and Molecular Sciences, University of Messina, Messina (Italy)

    2007-10-03

    Monitoring of food and environmental samples for biological threats, such as Listeria monocytogenes, requires probes that specifically bind biological agents and ensure their immediate and efficient detection. There is a need for robust and inexpensive affinity probes as an alternative to antibodies. These probes may be recruited from random peptide libraries displayed on filamentous phage. In this study, we selected from two phage peptide libraries phage clones displaying peptides capable of specific and strong binding to the L. monocytogenes cell surface. The ability of isolated phage clones to interact specifically with L. monocytogenes was demonstrated using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and confirmed by co-precipitation assay. We also assessed the sensitivity of phage-bacteria binding by PCR on phage-captured Listeria cells, which could be detected at a concentration of 10{sup 4} cells ml{sup -1}. In addition, as proof-of-concept, we tested the possibility of immobilizing the affinity-selected phages to a putative biosensor surface. The quality of phage deposition was monitored by ELISA and fluorescent microscopy. Phage-bacterial binding was confirmed by high power optical phase contrast microscopy. Overall, the results of this work validate the concept of affinity-selected recombinant filamentous phages as probes for detecting and monitoring bacterial agents under any conditions that warrant their recognition, including in food products.

  18. 68Ga-labeled phage-display selected peptides as tracers for positron emission tomography imaging of Staphylococcus aureus biofilm-associated infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Karin Michaelsen; Kyneb, Majbritt Hauge; Alstrup, Aage Kristian Olsen

    2016-01-01

    combining anatomical with functional data in order to describe and characterize site, extent and activity of the disease. The purpose of the study was to identify and (68)Ga-label peptides with affinity for S. aureus biofilm and evaluate their potential as bacteria-specific positron emission tomography (PET......) imaging agents. METHODS: Phage-displayed dodecapeptides were selected using an in vitro grown S. aureus biofilm as target. One cyclic (A8) and two linear (A9, A11) dodecapeptides were custom synthesized with 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-N,N',N″,N‴-tetraacetic acid (DOTA) conjugated via a lysine linker...... in pigs and mice showed a rapid blood clearance and renal excretion of the (68)Ga-A9-K-DOTA. CONCLUSION: The preliminary in vitro and in vivo studies of the phage-display S. aureus biofilm-selected (68)Ga-A9-K-DOTA showed desirable features for a novel bacteria-specific imaging agent, despite of relative...

  19. Synthetic Phage for Tissue Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    So Young Yoo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Controlling structural organization and signaling motif display is of great importance to design the functional tissue regenerating materials. Synthetic phage, genetically engineered M13 bacteriophage has been recently introduced as novel tissue regeneration materials to display a high density of cell-signaling peptides on their major coat proteins for tissue regeneration purposes. Structural advantages of their long-rod shape and monodispersity can be taken together to construct nanofibrous scaffolds which support cell proliferation and differentiation as well as direct orientation of their growth in two or three dimensions. This review demonstrated how functional synthetic phage is designed and subsequently utilized for tissue regeneration that offers potential cell therapy.

  20. Phage Display Approaches for the Isolation of Monoclonal Antibodies Against Dengue Virus Envelope Domain III from Human and Mouse Derived Libraries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subhash G. Vasudevan

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Domain III of the dengue virus envelope protein (EDIII, aa295-395 has an immunoglobulin fold and is the proposed receptor-binding domain of the virus. Previous studies have shown that monoclonal antibodies against EDIII can be neutralizing and have therapeutic potential. Here, cloned Fab-phage libraries of human and mouse origin were screened for DENV specific antibodies. Firstly, bacterially expressed EDIII or whole virus particles were used as bait in biopanning against a large naïve human Fab-phage library ( > 10 billion independent clones. Multiple panning strategies were employed, and in excess of 1000 clones were screened, but all of the antibodies identified bound the envelope in regions outside EDIII suggesting EDIII antibodies are virtually absent from the naïve human repertoire. Next, a chimeric Fab-phage library was constructed from a panel of EDIII specific mouse hybridomas by pooling the VH and VL chain sequences from the hybridomas and cloning these into the pComb3X phagemid vector with human CH and CL encoding sequences. Biopanning against EDIII identified a unique antibody (C9 that cross-reacts with EDIII from DENV1-3 and, in the IgG format, binds and neutralizes DENV2 in cell-based assays. Sequence analysis and saturation mutagenesis of complementary determining regions (CDR in the C9 light chain suggest an antigen recognition model in which the LCDR3 is a key determinant of EDIII specificity, while modifications in LCDR1 and LCDR2 affect DENV serotype cross-reactivity. Overall, this study supports the current prevailing opinion that neutralizing anti-EDIII monoclonal antibodies can be readily generated in murine systems, but in humans the anti-DENV immune response is directed away from domain III.

  1. Display technologies; Proceedings of the Meeting, National Chiao Tung Univ., Hsinchu, Taiwan, Dec. 17, 18, 1992

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shu-Hsia; Wu, Shin-Tson

    1992-10-01

    A broad range of interdisciplinary subjects related to display technologies is addressed, with emphasis on high-definition displays, CRTs, projection displays, materials for display application, flat-panel displays, display modeling, and polymer-dispersed liquid crystals. Particular attention is given to a CRT approach to high-definition television display, a superhigh-resolution electron gun for color display CRT, a review of active-matrix liquid-crystal displays, color design for LCD parameters in projection and direct-view applications, annealing effects on ZnS:TbF3 electroluminescent devices prepared by RF sputtering, polycrystalline silicon thin film transistors with low-temperature gate dielectrics, refractive index dispersions of liquid crystals, a new rapid-response polymer-dispersed liquid-crystal material, and improved liquid crystals for active-matrix displays using high-tilt-orientation layers. (No individual items are abstracted in this volume)

  2. Generation of human antibody fragments recognizing distinct epitopes of the nucleocapsid (N SARS-CoV protein using a phage display approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grasso Felicia

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS-CoV is a newly emerging virus that causes SARS with high mortality rate in infected people. Successful control of the global SARS epidemic will require rapid and sensitive diagnostic tests to monitor its spread, as well as, the development of vaccines and new antiviral compounds including neutralizing antibodies that effectively prevent or treat this disease. Methods The human synthetic single-chain fragment variable (scFv ETH-2 phage antibody library was used for the isolation of scFvs against the nucleocapsid (N protein of SARS-CoV using a bio panning-based strategy. The selected scFvs were characterized under genetics-molecular aspects and for SARS-CoV N protein detection in ELISA, western blotting and immunocytochemistry. Results Human scFv antibodies to N protein of SARS-CoV can be easily isolated by selecting the ETH-2 phage library on immunotubes coated with antigen. These in vitro selected human scFvs specifically recognize in ELISA and western blotting studies distinct epitopes in N protein domains and detect in immunohistochemistry investigations SARS-CoV particles in infected Vero cells. Conclusion The human scFv antibodies isolated and described in this study represent useful reagents for rapid detection of N SARS-CoV protein and SARS virus particles in infected target cells.

  3. Generation of human antibody fragments recognizing distinct epitopes of the nucleocapsid (N) SARS-CoV protein using a phage display approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flego, Michela; Di Bonito, Paola; Ascione, Alessandro; Zamboni, Silvia; Carattoli, Alessandra; Grasso, Felicia; Cassone, Antonio; Cianfriglia, Maurizio

    2005-01-01

    Background Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS)-CoV is a newly emerging virus that causes SARS with high mortality rate in infected people. Successful control of the global SARS epidemic will require rapid and sensitive diagnostic tests to monitor its spread, as well as, the development of vaccines and new antiviral compounds including neutralizing antibodies that effectively prevent or treat this disease. Methods The human synthetic single-chain fragment variable (scFv) ETH-2 phage antibody library was used for the isolation of scFvs against the nucleocapsid (N) protein of SARS-CoV using a bio panning-based strategy. The selected scFvs were characterized under genetics-molecular aspects and for SARS-CoV N protein detection in ELISA, western blotting and immunocytochemistry. Results Human scFv antibodies to N protein of SARS-CoV can be easily isolated by selecting the ETH-2 phage library on immunotubes coated with antigen. These in vitro selected human scFvs specifically recognize in ELISA and western blotting studies distinct epitopes in N protein domains and detect in immunohistochemistry investigations SARS-CoV particles in infected Vero cells. Conclusion The human scFv antibodies isolated and described in this study represent useful reagents for rapid detection of N SARS-CoV protein and SARS virus particles in infected target cells. PMID:16171519

  4. [Display technologies for augmented reality in medical applications].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eck, Ulrich; Winkler, Alexander

    2018-04-01

    One of the main challenges for modern surgery is the effective use of the many available imaging modalities and diagnostic methods. Augmented reality systems can be used in the future to blend patient and planning information into the view of surgeons, which can improve the efficiency and safety of interventions. In this article we present five visualization methods to integrate augmented reality displays into medical procedures and the advantages and disadvantages are explained. Based on an extensive literature review the various existing approaches for integration of augmented reality displays into medical procedures are divided into five categories and the most important research results for each approach are presented. A large number of mixed and augmented reality solutions for medical interventions have been developed as research prototypes; however, only very few systems have been tested on patients. In order to integrate mixed and augmented reality displays into medical practice, highly specialized solutions need to be developed. Such systems must comply with the requirements with respect to accuracy, fidelity, ergonomics and seamless integration into the surgical workflow.

  5. Toward Understanding Phage:Host Interactions in the Rumen; Complete Genome Sequences of Lytic Phages Infecting Rumen Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosalind A. Gilbert

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The rumen is known to harbor dense populations of bacteriophages (phages predicted to be capable of infecting a diverse range of rumen bacteria. While bacterial genome sequencing projects are revealing the presence of phages which can integrate their DNA into the genome of their host to form stable, lysogenic associations, little is known of the genetics of phages which utilize lytic replication. These phages infect and replicate within the host, culminating in host lysis, and the release of progeny phage particles. While lytic phages for rumen bacteria have been previously isolated, their genomes have remained largely uncharacterized. Here we report the first complete genome sequences of lytic phage isolates specifically infecting three genera of rumen bacteria: Bacteroides, Ruminococcus, and Streptococcus. All phages were classified within the viral order Caudovirales and include two phage morphotypes, representative of the Siphoviridae and Podoviridae families. The phage genomes displayed modular organization and conserved viral genes were identified which enabled further classification and determination of closest phage relatives. Co-examination of bacterial host genomes led to the identification of several genes responsible for modulating phage:host interactions, including CRISPR/Cas elements and restriction-modification phage defense systems. These findings provide new genetic information and insights into how lytic phages may interact with bacteria of the rumen microbiome.

  6. Phages recognizing the Indium Nitride semiconductor surface via their peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estephan, Elias; Saab, Marie-Belle; Martin, Marta; Larroque, Christian; Cuisinier, Frédéric J G; Briot, Olivier; Ruffenach, Sandra; Moret, Matthieu; Gergely, Csilla

    2011-02-01

    Considerable advances in materials science are expected via the use of selected or designed peptides to recognize material, control their growth, or to assemble them into elaborate novel devices. Identifying specific peptides for a number of technologically useful materials has been the challenge of many research groups in recent years. This can be accomplished by using affinity-based bio-panning methods such as phage display technologies. In this work, a combinatorial library including billions of clones of genetically engineered M13 bacteriophage was used to select peptides that could recognize improved indium nitride (InN) semiconductor (SC) material. Several rounds of biopanning were necessary to select the phage with the higher affinity from the low variant library. The DNA of this specific phage was extracted and sequenced to set up the related specific adherent peptide. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is used to demonstrate the real affinity of a selected phage for the InN surface. Due to the possibility of its functionalization with biomolecules and its important physical properties, InN is a promising candidate for developing affinity-based optical and electrical biosensors and/or for biomimetic applications. Copyright © 2010 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. A new DNA band display technology of microsatellite DNA

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    use

    2011-12-21

    Dec 21, 2011 ... al., 2004), etc. It has advantages such as codominant, good repeatability, high polymor-phism, stable amplification results and simple detection. Its bands identification usually adopts polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis with Silver Staining Technology. The steps are trivial, time consuming, background fuzzy ...

  8. Development of large area Multi-coloured Multifunctional Displays (MFA) in liquid crystal technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briegel, J.; Fahrenschon, K.; Keiner, H.; Marzel, O.; Schwedes, W.; Steinbeck, J.; Wiemer, W.

    1983-05-01

    Large area liquid crystal displays for automotive application including corresponding flat illumination systems and methods for integrating the driver IC's on the liquid crystal cell are discussed. Manufacturing technologies applicable for large quantity series production were worked out, and prototypes were delivered to the automotive industry, mainly the dynamic scattering mode and field effect displays (twisted nematic). The twisted nematic displays are preferred for automotive applications.

  9. Geowall: Investigations into low-cost stereo display technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinwand, Daniel R.; Davis, Brian; Weeks, Nathan

    2003-01-01

    Recently, the combination of new projection technology, fast, low-cost graphics cards, and Linux-powered personal computers has made it possible to provide a stereoprojection and stereoviewing system that is much more affordable than previous commercial solutions. These Geowall systems are low-cost visualization systems built with commodity off-the-shelf components, run on open-source (and other) operating systems, and using open-source applications software. In short, they are ?Beowulf-class? visualization systems that provide a cost-effective way for the U. S. Geological Survey to broaden participation in the visualization community and view stereoimagery and three-dimensional models2.

  10. The Magistral Phage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirnay, Jean-Paul; Verbeken, Gilbert; Ceyssens, Pieter-Jan; Huys, Isabelle; De Vos, Daniel; Ameloot, Charlotte; Fauconnier, Alan

    2018-02-06

    Since time immemorial, phages-the viral parasites of bacteria-have been protecting Earth's biosphere against bacterial overgrowth. Today, phages could help address the antibiotic resistance crisis that affects all of society. The greatest hurdle to the introduction of phage therapy in Western medicine is the lack of an appropriate legal and regulatory framework. Belgium is now implementing a pragmatic phage therapy framework that centers on the magistral preparation (compounding pharmacy in the US) of tailor-made phage medicines.

  11. A novel candidate HPV vaccine: MS2 phage VLP displaying a tandem HPV L2 peptide offers similar protection in mice to Gardasil-9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Lukai; Peabody, Julianne; Pang, Yuk-Ying Susana; Schiller, John; Chackerian, Bryce; Tumban, Ebenezer

    2017-11-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) cause approximately 5% of cancer cases worldwide. Fortunately, three prophylactic vaccines have been approved to protect against HPV infections. Gardasil-9, the most recent HPV vaccine, is predicted to offer protection against the HPV types that cause ∼90% of cervical cancer, 86% of HPV-associated penile cancers, and ∼93% of HPV-associated head & neck cancers. As an alternative to Gardasil-9, we developed and tested a novel candidate vaccine targeting conserved epitopes in the HPV minor capsid protein, L2. We displayed a tandem HPV31/16L2 peptide (amino acid 17-31) or consensus peptides from HPV L2 (amino acid 69-86 or 108-122) on the surface of bacteriophage MS2 virus-like particles (VLPs). Mice immunized with the MS2 VLPs displaying the tandem peptide or immunized with a mixture of VLPs (displaying the tandem peptide and consensus peptide 69-86) elicited high titer antibodies against individual L2 epitopes. Moreover, vaccinated mice were protected from cervicovaginal infection with HPV pseudoviruses 16, 31, 45, 58 and sera from immunized mice neutralized HPV pseudoviruses 18 and 33 at levels similar to mice immunized with Gardasil-9. These results suggest that immunization with a tandem, L2 peptide or a low valency mixture of L2 peptide-displaying VLPs can provide broad protection against multiple HPV types. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. Tutorial on the Psychophysics and Technology of Virtual Acoustic Displays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenzel, Elizabeth M.; Null, Cynthia (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    the localization of real and synthesized stimuli are directly compared in psychophysical studies. To this end, the results of psychophysical experiments examining the perceptual validity of the synthesis technique will be reviewed and factors that can enhance perceptual accuracy and realism will be discussed. Of particular interest is the relationship between individual differences in HRTFs and in behavior, the role of reverberant cues in reducing the perceptual errors observed with virtual sound sources, and the importance of developing perceptually valid methods of simplifying the synthesis technique. Recent attempts to implement the synthesis technique in real time systems will also be discussed and an attempt made to interpret their quoted system specifications in terms of perceptual performance. Finally, some critical research and technology development issues for the future will be outlined.

  13. Quantitative PET Imaging with Novel HER3-Targeted Peptides Selected by Phage Display to Predict Androgen-Independent Prostate Cancer Progression

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-12-01

    demonstrated high levels of HER3 in the prostate cancer and not in the breast cancer, consistent with PET imaging (Figure 4B-C). In fact , when the PET...feedback on my research with established prostate cancer specific and imaging specific scientists in my field. I have accomplished this through...research on imaging HER3 in prostate cancer by molecular imaging scientists . Impact on Technology Transfer The technology developed by this grant has led

  14. An advanced programmable/reconfigurable color graphics display system for crew station technology research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montoya, R. J.; England, J. N.; Hatfield, J. J.; Rajala, S. A.

    1981-01-01

    The hardware configuration, software organization, and applications software for the NASA IKONAS color graphics display system are described. The systems were created at the Langley Research Center Display Device Laboratory to develop, evaluate, and demonstrate advanced generic concepts, technology, and systems integration techniques for electronic crew station systems of future civil aircraft. A minicomputer with 64K core memory acts as a host for a raster scan graphics display generator. The architectures of the hardware system and the graphics display system are provided. The applications software features a FORTRAN-based model of an aircraft, a display system, and the utility program for real-time communications. The model accepts inputs from a two-dimensional joystick and outputs a set of aircraft states. Ongoing and planned work for image segmentation/generation, specialized graphics procedures, and higher level language user interface are discussed.

  15. Engineered phages for electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Yue

    2016-11-15

    Phages are traditionally widely studied in biology and chemistry. In recent years, engineered phages have attracted significant attentions for functionalization or construction of electronic devices, due to their specific binding, catalytic, nucleating or electronic properties. To apply the engineered phages in electronics, these are a number of interesting questions: how to engineer phages for electronics? How are the engineered phages characterized? How to assemble materials with engineered phages? How are the engineered phages micro or nanopatterned? What are the strategies to construct electronics devices with engineered phages? This review will highlight the early attempts to address these questions and explore the fundamental and practical aspects of engineered phages in electronics, including the approaches for selection or expression of specific peptides on phage coat proteins, characterization of engineered phages in electronics, assembly of electronic materials, patterning of engineered phages, and construction of electronic devices. It provides the methodologies and opens up ex-cit-ing op-por-tu-ni-ties for the development of a variety of new electronic materials and devices based on engineered phages for future applications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Web data display system based on data segment technology of MDSplus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Rui; Zhang Ming; Wen Chuqiao; Zheng Wei; Zhuang Ge; Yu Kexun

    2014-01-01

    Long pulse operation is the main character of advanced Tokamak, so the technology of data storage and human-data interaction are vital for dealing with the large data generated in long pulse experiment. The Web data display system was designed. The system is based on the ASP. NET architecture, and it reads segmented-record data from MDSplus database by segmented-record technology and displays the data on Web page by using NI Measurement Studio control library. With the segmented-record technology, long pulse data could be divided into many small units, data segments. Users can read the certain data segments from the long pulse data according to their special needs. Also, the system develops an efficient strategy for reading segmented record data, showing the waveforms required by users accurately and quickly. The data display Web system was tested on J-TEXT Tokamak, and was proved to be reliable and efficient to achieve the initial design goal. (authors)

  17. Genome analysis of three novel lytic Vibrio coralliilyticus phages isolated from seawater, Okinawa, Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramphul, Chitra; Casareto, Beatriz Estela; Dohra, Hideo; Suzuki, Tomohiro; Yoshimatsu, Katsuhiko; Yoshinaga, Koichi; Suzuki, Yoshimi

    2017-10-01

    Three novel Vibrio phages were isolated from seawater in Okinawa. The Vibrio phage RYC infected Vibrio coralliilyticus SWA 07, while Vibrio phages CKB-S1 and CKB-S2 infected the coral pathogen V. coralliilyticus P1 (LMG 23696). The Vibrio phages CKB-S1 and CKB-S2 displayed head-tail structures whereas the Vibrio phage RYC showed a tailless non-enveloped capsid. All these Vibrio phages contained linear and double-stranded DNA. The whole genome sequencing revealed that Vibrio phage RYC has a larger genome size compared to Vibrio phages CKB-S1 and CKB-S2, and six tRNAs genes were found only in Vibrio phage RYC. Genome-wide comparison showed that Vibrio phage CKB-S1 was closely related, but was not identical, to Vibrio parahaemolyticus phages VP16T and VP16C. Meanwhile, the Vibrio phages RYC and CKB-S2 did not show high genome-wide similarity to any phages. These results suggest that the Vibrio phages CKB-S1, CKB-S2 and RYC are novel phages, which need further exploration, especially for their potential applications in phage therapy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. An assessment of advanced displays and controls technology applicable to future space transportation systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatfield, Jack J.; Villarreal, Diana

    1990-01-01

    The topic of advanced display and control technology is addressed along with the major objectives of this technology, the current state of the art, major accomplishments, research programs and facilities, future trends, technology issues, space transportation systems applications and projected technology readiness for those applications. The holes that may exist between the technology needs of the transportation systems versus the research that is currently under way are addressed, and cultural changes that might facilitate the incorporation of these advanced technologies into future space transportation systems are recommended. Some of the objectives are to reduce life cycle costs, improve reliability and fault tolerance, use of standards for the incorporation of advancing technology, and reduction of weight, volume and power. Pilot workload can be reduced and the pilot's situational awareness can be improved, which would result in improved flight safety and operating efficiency. This could be accomplished through the use of integrated, electronic pictorial displays, consolidated controls, artificial intelligence, and human centered automation tools. The Orbiter Glass Cockpit Display is an example examined.

  19. 77 FR 5865 - American Unity Investments, Inc., China Display Technologies, Inc., China Wind Energy, Inc., Fuda...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-06

    ... SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION [File No. 500-1] American Unity Investments, Inc., China Display Technologies, Inc., China Wind Energy, Inc., Fuda Faucet Works, Inc., Greater China Media... concerning the securities of China Wind Energy, Inc. because it has not filed any periodic reports since the...

  20. Gaze directed displays as an enabling technology for attention aware systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Toet, A.

    2006-01-01

    Visual information can in principle be dynamically optimised by monitoring the user’s state of attention, e.g. by tracking eye movements. Gaze directed displays are therefore an important enabling technology for attention aware systems. We present a state-of-the-art review of both (1) techniques to

  1. Bacteria, phages and septicemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ausra Gaidelyte

    Full Text Available The use of phages is an attractive option to battle antibiotic resistant bacteria in certain bacterial infections, but the role of phage ecology in bacterial infections is obscure. Here we surveyed the phage ecology in septicemia, the most severe type of bacterial infection. We observed that the majority of the bacterial isolates from septicemia patients spontaneously secreted phages active against other isolates of the same bacterial strain, but not to the strain causing the disease. Such phages were also detected in the initial blood cultures, indicating that phages are circulating in the blood at the onset of sepsis. The fact that most of the septicemic bacterial isolates carry functional prophages suggests an active role of phages in bacterial infections. Apparently, prophages present in sepsis-causing bacterial clones play a role in clonal selection during bacterial invasion.

  2. Progress in Bacillus subtilis Spore Surface Display Technology towards Environment, Vaccine Development, and Biocatalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Huayou; Ullah, Jawad; Jia, Jinru

    2017-01-01

    Spore surface display is the most desirable with enhanced effects, low cost, less time consuming and the most promising technology for environmental, medical, and industrial development. Spores have various applications in industry due to their ability to survive in harsh industrial processes including heat resistance, alkaline tolerance, chemical tolerance, easy recovery, and reusability. Yeast and bacteria, including gram-positive and -negative, are the most frequently used organisms for the display of various proteins (eukaryotic and prokaryotic), but unlike spores, they can rupture easily due to nutritive properties, susceptibility to heat, pH, and chemicals. Hence, spores are the best choice to avoid these problems, and they have various applications over nonspore formers due to amenability for laboratory purposes. Various strains of Clostridium and Bacillus are spore formers, but the most suitable choice for display is Bacillus subtilis because, according to the WHO, it is safe to humans and considered as "GRAS" (generally recognized as safe). This review focuses on the application of spore surface display towards industries, vaccine development, the environment, and peptide library construction, with cell surface display for enhanced protein expression and high enzymatic activity. Different vectors, coat proteins, and statistical analyses can be used for linker selection to obtain greater expression and high activity of the displayed protein. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  3. Molecular Characterization of Three Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus Phages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, Eoghan; Mahony, Jennifer; O'Connell-Motherway, Mary; Bottacini, Francesca; Cornelissen, Anneleen; Neve, Horst; Heller, Knut J.; Noben, Jean-Paul; Dal Bello, Fabio

    2014-01-01

    In this study, three phages infecting Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus, named Ld3, Ld17, and Ld25A, were isolated from whey samples obtained from various industrial fermentations. These phages were further characterized in a multifaceted approach: (i) biological and physical characterization through host range analysis and electron microscopy; (ii) genetic assessment through genome analysis; (iii) mass spectrometry analysis of the structural components of the phages; and (iv), for one phage, transcriptional analysis by Northern hybridization, reverse transcription-PCR, and primer extension. The three obtained phage genomes display high levels of sequence identity to each other and to genomes of the so-called group b L. delbrueckii phages c5, LL-Ku, and phiLdb, where some of the observed differences are believed to be responsible for host range variations. PMID:25002431

  4. Phage Display of Engineered Binding Proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Levisson, M.; Spruijt, R.B.; Winkel, I.N.; Kengen, S.W.M.; Oost, van der J.

    2014-01-01

    In current purification processes optimization of the capture step generally has a large impact on cost reduction. At present, valuable biomolecules are often produced in relatively low concentrations and, consequently, the eventual selective separation from complex mixtures can be rather

  5. Ajax, XSLT and SVG: Displaying ATLAS conditions data with new web technologies

    CERN Document Server

    Roe, S A

    2010-01-01

    The combination of three relatively recent technologies is described which allows an easy path from database retrieval to interactive web display. SQL queries on an Oracle database can be performed in a manner which directly return an XML description of the result, and Ajax techniques (Asynchronous JavaScript And XML) are used to dynamically inject the data into a web display accompanied by an XSLT transform template which determines how the data will be formatted. By tuning the transform to generate SVG (Scalable Vector Graphics) a direct graphical representation can be produced in the web page while retaining the database data as the XML source, allowing dynamic links to be generated in the web representation, but programmatic use of the data when used from a user application. With the release of the SVG 1.2 Tiny draft specification, the display can also be tailored for display on mobile devices. The technologies are described and a sample application demonstrated, showing conditions data from the ATLAS Sem...

  6. Ajax, XSLT and SVG: Displaying ATLAS conditions data with new web technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roe, S A

    2010-01-01

    The combination of three relatively recent technologies is described which allows an easy path from database retrieval to interactive web display. SQL queries on an Oracle database can be performed in a manner which directly return an XML description of the result, and Ajax techniques (Asynchronous JavaScript And XML) are used to dynamically inject the data into a web display accompanied by an XSLT transform template which determines how the data will be formatted. By tuning the transform to generate SVG (Scalable Vector Graphics) a direct graphical representation can be produced in the web page while retaining the database data as the XML source, allowing dynamic links to be generated in the web representation, but programmatic use of the data when used from a user application. With the release of the SVG 1.2 Tiny draft specification, the display can also be tailored for display on mobile devices. The technologies are described and a sample application demonstrated, showing conditions data from the ATLAS Semiconductor Tracker.

  7. Ajax, XSLT and SVG: Displaying ATLAS conditions data with new web technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roe, S. A.; ATLAS Collaboration

    2010-04-01

    The combination of three relatively recent technologies is described which allows an easy path from database retrieval to interactive web display. SQL queries on an Oracle database can be performed in a manner which directly return an XML description of the result, and Ajax techniques (Asynchronous JavaScript And XML) are used to dynamically inject the data into a web display accompanied by an XSLT transform template which determines how the data will be formatted. By tuning the transform to generate SVG (Scalable Vector Graphics) a direct graphical representation can be produced in the web page while retaining the database data as the XML source, allowing dynamic links to be generated in the web representation, but programmatic use of the data when used from a user application. With the release of the SVG 1.2 Tiny draft specification, the display can also be tailored for display on mobile devices. The technologies are described and a sample application demonstrated, showing conditions data from the ATLAS Semiconductor Tracker.

  8. Auditory Display

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    volume. The conference's topics include auditory exploration of data via sonification and audification; real time monitoring of multivariate date; sound in immersive interfaces and teleoperation; perceptual issues in auditory display; sound in generalized computer interfaces; technologies supporting...... auditory display creation; data handling for auditory display systems; applications of auditory display....

  9. [Genetics of Campylobacter phages].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammerl, Jens A; Jäckel, Claudia; Hertwig, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    The application of virulent (lytic) bacteriophages isa promising tool to reduce the number of Campylobacter along the food chain. However, only little is known aboutthe genetics of Campylobacter phages. To date, the nucleotide sequences of nine virulent Campylobacter phages have been published.The analysis of the sequences indicated that at the nucleotide level, phages of the same group (group II or group III) are closely related, but that similarities between the groups only exist at the protein level. Both groups of phages are distantly related to T4-like phages. The genomes of the studied Campylobacter phages contain numerous genes for homing endonucleases and transposases as well as repetitive sequences. These elements could be important for genomic rearrangements.

  10. Rapid enumeration of phage in monodisperse emulsions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tjhung, Katrina F; Burnham, Sean; Anany, Hany; Griffiths, Mansel W; Derda, Ratmir

    2014-06-17

    Phage-based detection assays have been developed for the detection of viable bacteria for applications in clinical diagnosis, monitoring of water quality, and food safety. The majority of these assays deliver a positive readout in the form of newly generated progeny phages by the bacterial host of interest. Progeny phages are often visualized as plaques, or holes, in a lawn of bacteria on an agar-filled Petri dish; however, this rate-limiting step requires up to 12 h of incubation time. We have previously described an amplification of bacteriophages M13 inside droplets of media suspended in perfluorinated oil; a single phage M13 in a droplet yields 10(7) copies in 3-4 h. Here, we describe that encapsulation of reporter phages, both lytic T4-LacZ and nonlytic M13, in monodisperse droplets can also be used for rapid enumeration of phage. Compartmentalization in droplets accelerated the development of the signal from the reporter enzyme; counting of "positive" droplets yields accurate enumeration of phage particles ranging from 10(2) to 10(6) pfu/mL. For enumeration of T4-LacZ phage, the fluorescent signal appeared in as little as 90 min. Unlike bulk assays, quantification in emulsion is robust and insensitive to fluctuations in environmental conditions (e.g., temperature). Power-free emulsification using gravity-driven flow in the absence of syringe pumps and portable fluorescence imaging solutions makes this technology promising for use at the point of care in low-resource environments. This droplet-based phage enumeration method could accelerate and simplify point-of-care detection of the pathogens for which reporter bacteriophages have been developed.

  11. The Magistral Phage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Paul Pirnay

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Since time immemorial, phages—the viral parasites of bacteria—have been protecting Earth’s biosphere against bacterial overgrowth. Today, phages could help address the antibiotic resistance crisis that affects all of society. The greatest hurdle to the introduction of phage therapy in Western medicine is the lack of an appropriate legal and regulatory framework. Belgium is now implementing a pragmatic phage therapy framework that centers on the magistral preparation (compounding pharmacy in the US of tailor-made phage medicines.

  12. Harnessing phages for supramolecular and materials chemistry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marcozzi, Alessio

    2016-01-01

    Het eerste gedeelte van de scriptie betreft het onderzoek naar de toepassing van phage display, om korte aptamers te selecteren voor zeer verschillende moleculen. Door deze techniek te gebruiken hebben we een peptide kunnen selecteren die de bateriele enzym dxs in-vitro verhinderd. Dit soort peptide

  13. Ribosome display for improved biotherapeutic molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothe, Achim; Hosse, Ralf J; Power, Barbara E

    2006-02-01

    Ribosome display presents an innovative in vitro technology for the rapid isolation and evolution of high-affinity peptides or proteins. Displayed proteins are bound to and recovered from target molecules in multiple rounds of selection in order to enrich for specific binding proteins. No transformation step is necessary, which could lead to a loss of library diversity. A cycle of display and selection can be performed in one day, enabling the existing gene repertoire to be rapidly scanned. Proteins isolated from the panning rounds can be further modified through random or directed molecular evolution for affinity maturation, as well as selected for characteristics such as protein stability, folding and functional activity. Recently, the field of display technologies has become more prominent due to the generation of new scaffolds for ribosome display, isolation of high-affinity human antibodies by phage display, and their implementation in the discovery of novel protein-protein interactions. Applications for this technology extend into the broad field of antibody engineering, proteomics, and synthetic enzymes for diagnostics and therapeutics in cancer, autoimmune and infectious diseases, neurodegenerative diseases and inflammatory disorders. This review highlights the role of ribosome display in drug discovery, discusses advantages and disadvantages of the system, and attempts to predict the future impact of ribosome display technology on the development of novel engineered biopharmaceutical products for biological therapies.

  14. Concept of Operations for Integrated Intelligent Flight Deck Displays and Decision Support Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Randall E.; Prinzel, Lawrence J.; Kramer, Lynda J.; Young, Steve D.

    2011-01-01

    The document describes a Concept of Operations for Flight Deck Display and Decision Support technologies which may help enable emerging Next Generation Air Transportation System capabilities while also maintaining, or improving upon, flight safety. This concept of operations is used as the driving function within a spiral program of research, development, test, and evaluation for the Integrated Intelligent Flight Deck (IIFD) project. As such, the concept will be updated at each cycle within the spiral to reflect the latest research results and emerging developments

  15. Phage Therapy Approaches to Reducing Pathogen Persistence and Transmission in Animal Production Environments: Opportunities and Challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colavecchio, Anna; Goodridge, Lawrence D

    2017-06-01

    The era of genomics has allowed for characterization of phages for use as antimicrobials to treat animal infections with a level of precision never before realized. As more research in phage therapy has been conducted, several advantages of phage therapy have been realized, including the ubiquitous nature, specificity, prevalence in the biosphere, and low inherent toxicity of phages, which makes them a safe and sustainable technology for control of animal diseases. These unique qualities of phages have led to several opportunities with respect to emerging trends in infectious disease treatment. However, the opportunities are tempered by several challenges to the successful implementation of phage therapy, such as the fact that an individual phage can only infect one or a few bacterial strains, meaning that large numbers of different phages will likely be needed to treat infections caused by multiple species of bacteria. In addition, phages are only effective if enough of them can reach the site of bacterial colonization, but clearance by the immune system upon introduction to the animal is a reality that must be overcome. Finally, bacterial resistance to the phages may develop, resulting in treatment failure. Even a successful phage infection and lysis of its host has consequences, because large amounts of endotoxin are released upon lysis of Gram-negative bacteria, which can lead to local and systemic complications. Overcoming these challenges will require careful design and development of phage cocktails, including comprehensive characterization of phage host range and assessment of immunological risks associated with phage treatment.

  16. Phage therapy: present and future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolesnikova, S. G.; Tulyakova, E. N.; Moiseeva, I. Y.

    2017-01-01

    In recent years, bacteriophages are known to have become an effective alternative to antibiotic drugs. The article describes the current and potential applications of bacteriophages and phage endolysins. Also of interest is the devastating effect of phages on biofilms. The development of phage resistance is touched upon as well. Furthermore, the authors discuss the issue of laying down the rules of rational phage therapy.

  17. Bridging the gap: adapting advanced display technologies for use in hybrid control rooms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jokstad, Håkon [Inst. for Energy Technology, Halden (Norway); Boring, Ronald [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-02-01

    recently assisted INL in establishing the technical infrastructure for implementation of HSI prototypes from HAMMLAB into the HSSL to demonstrate relevant control room replacement systems in support of the LWRS program. In March, 2014, IFE delivered the first HSI prototype utilizing this infrastructure — a large screen overview display for INL's simulator. The co-operation now continues by developing Procedure Support Displays targeted for operators in hybrid control room settings. These prototypes are being validated with U.S. reactor operators in the HSSL and optimized to enhance their performance. This research serves as a crucial stepping stone toward incorporation of advanced display technologies into conventional main control rooms.

  18. Bridging the gap: adapting advanced display technologies for use in hybrid control rooms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jokstad, Håkon; Boring, Ronald

    2015-01-01

    has recently assisted INL in establishing the technical infrastructure for implementation of HSI prototypes from HAMMLAB into the HSSL to demonstrate relevant control room replacement systems in support of the LWRS program. In March, 2014, IFE delivered the first HSI prototype utilizing this infrastructure - a large screen overview display for INL's simulator. The co-operation now continues by developing Procedure Support Displays targeted for operators in hybrid control room settings. These prototypes are being validated with U.S. reactor operators in the HSSL and optimized to enhance their performance. This research serves as a crucial stepping stone toward incorporation of advanced display technologies into conventional main control rooms.

  19. Characterization of Campylobacter phages including analysis of host range by selected Campylobacter Penner serotypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Vinni; Rosenquist, Hanne; Baggesen, Dorte Lau

    2007-01-01

    size undeterminable in PFGE. The categorization of the phages correlated with the host range patterns displayed by the phages. Six phages were subjected to transmission electron microscopy (TEM). They all belonged to the family of Myoviridae. Conclusion: We have characterized and identified the host......Background: The predominant food borne pathogen in the western world today is Campylobacter. Campylobacter specific bacteriophages (phages) have been proposed as an alternative agent for reducing the burden of Campylobacter in broilers. One concern in relation to phage biocontrol is the narrow host...

  20. Detection of sulfur mustard adducts in human callus by phage antibodies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bikker, F.J.; Mars-Groenendijk, R.H.; Noort, D.; Fidder, A.; Schans, G.P. van der

    2007-01-01

    As part of a research program to develop novel methods for diagnosis of sulfur mustard exposure in the human skin the suitability of phage display was explored. Phage display is a relative new method that enables researchers to quickly evaluate a huge range of potentially useful antibodies, thereby

  1. Optogenetic Stimulation of Peripheral Vagus Nerves using Flexible OLED Display Technology to Treat Chronic Inflammatory Disease and Mental Health Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-31

    transcutaneous VNS OLED ‘bandage’ would be manufactured on a thin plastic substrate using commercial thin - film , flexible-display technology...Flexible displays are fundamentally a very thin , transparent sheet of plastic, approximately the same thickness as a piece of paper, and are constructed...by sequentially layering and patterning a series of nanoscale thin films . This is a technology that we’re extremely familiar with and we’ve already

  2. Prize for Industrial Applications of Physics: Reflective Cholesteric Liquid Crystals - Innovations in Materials, Display Technology, and Commercialization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Asad

    Reflective Cholesteric Liquid Crystals have been the subject of much research, development, and commercialization - in display technology as well as other embodiments, such as sensors, privacy films, etc. The liquid Crystal Institute (LCI) at Kent State University (KSU) served as a hot bed of much of the research and development in this field in the early 1990's. From here, the reflective technology was licensed to Kent Displays (KDI) to further develop and commercialize. The 90's saw some development in flexible technologies, drive scheme, display design, as well as materials. The early part of the century took a turn with a strong effort in encapsulation based flexible display development. In 2006, KDI engineers and technologists started firming up ambitious plans for the world's first roll-to-roll manufacturing line for bistable cholesteric displays. In 2009, this became a reality! In early 2010, the first eWriter product was launched into the consumer market under the brand Boogie Board®. Within months, this became a success forcing the rapid development of the manufacturing process for the flexible displays. Today, the company has two manufacturing lines, 24 hour roll-to-roll production of flexible displays, millions of Boogie Board products in the global market place, and a growing OEM business in the Boogie Board technology. KDI continues to do basic research, development, and exploration in the bistable display field. It also has had to become an expert in the supply chain management of the unique raw materials needed for flexible display manufacturing, while still managing global operations with sales offices in several continents and a growing and diversified group of individuals. In this presentation, we will present the story, research, development, technology, and latest trends in bistable cholesteric liquid crystal materials with a particular emphasis on the eWriter technology and market.

  3. Development of RI-based real-time display technology of apoptotic cell death

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Sang Hyun; Jagn, Beom Su; Hayu, Tyas Utami

    2012-01-15

    Apoptosis, or the programmed cell death, is the generally normal death of a cell in living organisms. Inappropriate apoptosis (either too little or too much) is a factor in many human disease including neurodegenerative diseases, autoimmune disorders and many types of cancer. Therefore, it is one of the most challenging and widely studied topics currently. Development of RI-based real-time display technology of apoptosis can be provided invaluable analysis data for diagnosis and treatment of various diseases. In this study, bifunctional chelator (BFC) for Tc-99m tricarbonyl was synthesized for ML-10 derivative radiolabeling. The formation of complexation of apoptotic cells was developed by combining the ML-10 moiety with the BFC for {sup 99m}Tc-tricarbonyl precursor. The results of this project will be utilized for the development of RI-Biomics Center-based Total Analysis System (TAS) through the optimization of equipment in the RI-Biomics Center.

  4. Restoring logic and data to phage-cures for infectious disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip Serwer

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Antibiotic therapy for infectious disease is being compromised by emergence of multi-drug-resistant bacterial strains, often called superbugs. A response is to use a cocktail of several bacteria-infecting viruses (bacteriophages or phages to supplement antibiotic therapy. Use of such cocktails is called phage therapy, which has the advantage of response to bacterial resistance that is rapid and not exhaustible. A procedure of well-established success is to make cocktails from stockpiles of stored environmental phages. New phages are added to stockpiles when phage therapy becomes thwarted. The scientific subtext includes optimizing the following aspects: (1 procedure for rapidly detecting, purifying, storing and characterizing phages for optimization of phage cocktails, (2 use of directed evolution in the presence of bacteriostatic compounds to obtain phages that can be most efficiently used for therapy in the presence of these compounds, (3 phage genome sequencing technology and informatics to improve the characterization of phages, and (4 database technology to make optimal use of all relevant information and to rapidly retrieve phages for cocktails that will vary with the infection(s involved. The use of phage stockpiles has an established record, including a recent major human-therapy success by the US Navy. However, I conclude that most research is not along this track and, therefore, is not likely to lead to real world success. I find that a strong case exists for action to rectify this situation.

  5. Phage therapy in the food industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endersen, Lorraine; O'Mahony, Jim; Hill, Colin; Ross, R Paul; McAuliffe, Olivia; Coffey, Aidan

    2014-01-01

    Despite advances in modern technologies, the food industry is continuously challenged with the threat of microbial contamination. The overuse of antibiotics has further escalated this problem, resulting in the increasing emergence of antibiotic-resistant foodborne pathogens. Efforts to develop new methods for controlling microbial contamination in food and the food processing environment are extremely important. Accordingly, bacteriophages (phages) and their derivatives have emerged as novel, viable, and safe options for the prevention, treatment, and/or eradication of these contaminants in a range of foods and food processing environments. Whole phages, modified phages, and their derivatives are discussed in terms of current uses and future potential as antimicrobials in the traditional farm-to-fork context, encompassing areas such as primary production, postharvest processing, biosanitation, and biodetection. The review also presents some safety concerns to ensure safe and effective exploitation of bacteriophages in the future.

  6. Phage “delay” towards enhancing bacterial escape from biofilms: a more comprehensive way of viewing resistance to bacteriophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen T. Abedon

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available In exploring bacterial resistance to bacteriophages, emphasis typically is placed on those mechanisms which completely prevent phage replication. Such resistance can be detected as extensive reductions in phage ability to form plaques, that is, reduced efficiency of plating. Mechanisms include restriction-modification systems, CRISPR/Cas systems, and abortive infection systems. Alternatively, phages may be reduced in their “vigor” when infecting certain bacterial hosts, that is, with phages displaying smaller burst sizes or extended latent periods rather than being outright inactivated. It is well known, as well, that most phages poorly infect bacteria that are less metabolically active. Extracellular polymers such as biofilm matrix material also may at least slow phage penetration to bacterial surfaces. Here I suggest that such “less-robust” mechanisms of resistance to bacteriophages could serve bacteria by slowing phage propagation within bacterial biofilms, that is, delaying phage impact on multiple bacteria rather than necessarily outright preventing such impact. Related bacteria, ones that are relatively near to infected bacteria, e.g., roughly 10+ µm away, consequently may be able to escape from biofilms with greater likelihood via standard dissemination-initiating mechanisms including erosion from biofilm surfaces or seeding dispersal/central hollowing. That is, given localized areas of phage infection, so long as phage spread can be reduced in rate from initial points of contact with susceptible bacteria, then bacterial survival may be enhanced due to bacteria metaphorically “running away” to more phage-free locations. Delay mechanisms—to the extent that they are less specific in terms of what phages are targeted—collectively could represent broader bacterial strategies of phage resistance versus outright phage killing, the latter especially as require specific, evolved molecular recognition of phage presence. The

  7. Diversity of phage infection types and associated terminology: the problem with 'Lytic or lysogenic'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobbs, Zack; Abedon, Stephen T

    2016-04-01

    Bacteriophages, or phages, are viruses of members of domain Bacteria. These viruses play numerous roles in shaping the diversity of microbial communities, with impact differing depending on what infection strategies specific phages employ. From an applied perspective, these especially are communities containing undesired or pathogenic bacteria that can be modified through phage-mediated bacterial biocontrol, that is, through phage therapy. Here we seek to categorize phages in terms of their infection strategies as well as review or suggest more descriptive, accurate or distinguishing terminology. Categories can be differentiated in terms of (1) whether or not virion release occurs (productive infections versus lysogeny, pseudolysogeny and/or the phage carrier state), (2) the means of virion release (lytic versus chronic release) and (3) the degree to which phages are genetically equipped to display lysogenic cycles (temperate versus non-temperate phages). We address in particular the use or overuse of what can be a somewhat equivocal phrase, 'Lytic or lysogenic', especially when employed as a means of distinguishing among phages types. We suggest that the implied dichotomy is inconsistent with both modern as well as historical understanding of phage biology. We consider, therefore, less ambiguous terminology for distinguishing between 'Lytic' versus 'Lysogenic' phage types. © FEMS 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Heat tolerance of dairy lactococcal c2 phages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Cecilie Lykke Marvig; Basheer, Aideh; Neve, H.

    2011-01-01

    Nine Lactococcus lactis c2 phages propagated on different hosts were screened for thermal resistance in skimmed milk. Pronounced variations in thermal resistance were found. Three phages displayed high sensitivity towards heat resulting in >8 log reductions after 70 °C for 5 min, whereas the most...... thermal resistant phages required 80 °C for 5 min to obtain the same reduction. Inactivation kinetics were determined for a thermo-sensitive and a thermo-resistant phage at 60–70 °C and 65–78 °C, respectively, using a submerged-coil system with extremely short heating-up times. Inactivation followed first......-order kinetics with correlation coefficients of 0.96–0.99. D70-values of 12 s and 16.6 min were calculated for the most sensitive and resistant phage, respectively. Release of phage DNA from capsids, and disintegration of phage heads and tails were among the first morphological changes observed for moderately...

  9. Comparison of the effects of mobile technology AAC apps on programming visual scene displays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caron, Jessica; Light, Janice; Davidoff, Beth E; Drager, Kathryn D R

    2017-12-01

    Parents and professionals who work with individuals who use augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) face tremendous time pressures, especially when programming vocabulary in AAC technologies. System design (from programming functions to layout options) necessitates a range of skills related to operational competence and can impose intensive training demands for communication partners. In fact, some AAC applications impose considerable learning demands, which can lead to increased time to complete the same programming tasks. A within-subject design was used to investigate the comparative effects of three visual scene display AAC apps (GoTalk Now, AutisMate, EasyVSD) on the programming times for three off-line programming activities, by adults who were novices to programming AAC apps. The results indicated all participants were able to create scenes and add hotspots during off-line programming tasks with minimal self-guided training. The AAC app that had the least number of programming steps, EasyVSD, resulted in the fastest completion times across the three programming tasks. These results suggest that by simplifying the operational requirements of AAC apps the programming time is reduced, which may allow partners to better support individuals who use AAC.

  10. A mimotope peptide of Aβ42 fibril-specific antibodies with Aβ42 fibrillation inhibitory activity induces anti-Aβ42 conformer antibody response by a displayed form on an M13 phage in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Koichi; Nishimura, Masaaki; Yamaguchi, Yuya; Hashiguchi, Shuhei; Takiguchi, Sho; Yamaguchi, Makoto; Tahara, Haruna; Gotanda, Takuma; Abe, Risa; Ito, Yuji; Sugimura, Kazuhisa

    2011-07-01

    In Alzheimer's disease (AD), amyloid-β (Aβ) peptides accumulate in the brain in different forms, including fibrils and oligomers. Recently, we established three distinct conformation-dependent human single-chain Fv (scFv) antibodies, including B6 scFv, which bound to Aβ42 fibril but not to soluble-form Aβ, inhibiting Aβ42 fibril formation. In this study, we determined the mimotopes of these antibodies and found a common mimotope sequence, B6-C15, using the Ph.D.-C7C phage library. The B6-C15 showed weak homology to the C-terminus of Aβ42 containing GXXXG dimerization motifs. We synthesized the peptide of B6-C15 fused with biotinylated TAT at the N-terminus (TAT-B6-C15) and characterized its biochemical features on an Aβ42-fibrillation reaction in vitro. We demonstrated that, first, TAT-B6-C15 inhibited Aβ42 fibril formation; secondly, TAT-B6-C15 bound to prefibril Aβ42 oligomers but not to monomers, trimers, tetramers, fibrils, or ultrasonicated fragments; thirdly, TAT-B6-C15 inhibited Aβ42-induced cytotoxicity against human SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells; and, fourthly, when mice were administered B6-C15-phages dissolved in phosphate-buffered saline, the anti-Aβ42 conformer IgG antibody response was induced. These results suggested that the B6-C15 peptide might provide unique opportunities to analyze the Aβ42 fibrillation pathway and develop a vaccine vehicle for Alzheimer's disease. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Projection displays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, George L.; Yang, Kei H.

    1998-08-01

    Projection display in today's market is dominated by cathode ray tubes (CRTs). Further progress in this mature CRT projector technology will be slow and evolutionary. Liquid crystal based projection displays have gained rapid acceptance in the business market. New technologies are being developed on several fronts: (1) active matrix built from polysilicon or single crystal silicon; (2) electro- optic materials using ferroelectric liquid crystal, polymer dispersed liquid crystals or other liquid crystal modes, (3) micromechanical-based transducers such as digital micromirror devices, and grating light valves, (4) high resolution displays to SXGA and beyond, and (5) high brightness. This article reviews the projection displays from a transducer technology perspective along with a discussion of markets and trends.

  12. The industrial logistic surface: Displaying the impact of energy policy on uptake of new technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathews, John A.; Baroni, Paolo

    2013-01-01

    Two processes are widely viewed as fundamental to the transition from conventional fossil-fuelled energy systems to renewable powered systems that is under way. There is firstly the progressive reduction in costs as investment, or production/energy generating capacity, grows. To see the uptake itself we need a second process, captured as a logistic curve (or S-shaped curve) that depicts the uptake of the new technology as an industrial substitution process unfolding over time. In this paper we put these two processes together, deriving a single expression that depicts uptake as a function of both cumulative investment and time, where the key parameter can be related to the learning coefficient. We display this expression in the form of a 3-dimensional surface that we dub the Logistic Industrial Surface. It is applied to a real case involving cost reduction and logistic uptake of solar PV (photovoltaic) cells. In this specific case, we estimate the learning curve involved and on this basis calculate that (for an initial time period) early in the trajectory a cost reduction of 8.7% would be associated with an increase in investment of 10%, leading to an increase in uptake by 4.35%; whereas a cost reduction of 44% (corresponding to a doubling of investment) would lead to a more rapid uptake of 41.95%. We claim that this is the first demonstration in the literature of a direct connection between investment levels, cost reductions and consequent levels of uptake according to logistic industrial dynamics. - Highlights: • We derive an expression which combines learning curves with logistic uptake. • This expression is termed an ILS (industrial logistic surface). • We illustrate the ILS through different investment schedules. • We apply the new framework to the case of solar PV cost reductions and uptake. • We demonstrate the workings of the ILS with a numerical example

  13. Application of the Ecological Interface Design concept to the development of displays for technological process monitoring and control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tschiesche, Jiri; Svatek, Jan

    2011-01-01

    The new approach to the design and implementation of the displays referred to as Ecological Interface Design (EID) is described. The EID concept is aimed at creating a system that provides plant managers with relevant information for safe and economically feasible technology control in a clear, graphic form in any situation. (orig.)

  14. Binding mechanism and electrochemical properties of M13 phage-sulfur composite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Dexian; Zhang, Yongguang; Sutaria, Sanjana; Konarov, Aishuak; Chen, Pu

    2013-01-01

    Self-assembly of nanostructured materials has been proven a powerful technique in material design and synthesis. By phage display screening, M13 phage was found to strongly bind sulfur particles. Fourier transform infrared and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements indicated that the strong sulfur-binding ability of M13 phage derives from newly generated S-O and C-S bonds. Using this phage assembled sulfur composite in a lithium battery, the first discharge capacity reached 1117 mAh g(-1), which is more than twice that of the sulfur only cathode. Besides, the negative polysulfide shuttle effect in a lithium-sulfur battery was significantly suppressed.

  15. Clostridium difficile phages: still difficult?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine Rose Hargreaves

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Phages that infect Clostridium difficile were first isolated for typing purposes in the 1980s, but their use was short lived. However, the rise of C. difficile epidemics over the last decade has triggered a resurgence of interest in using phages to combat this pathogen. Phage therapy is an attractive treatment option for C. difficile infection, however developing suitable phages is challenging. In this review we summarise the difficulties faced by researchers in this field, and we discuss the solutions and strategies used for the development of C. difficile phages for use as novel therapeutics.Epidemiological data has highlighted the diversity and distribution of C. difficile, and shown that novel strains continue to emerge in clinical settings. In parallel with epidemiological studies, advances in molecular biology have bolstered our understanding of C. difficile biology, and our knowledge of phage-host interactions in other bacterial species. These three fields of biology have therefore paved the way for future work on C. difficile phages to progress and develop. Benefits of using C. difficile phages as therapeutic agents include the fact that they have highly specific interactions with their bacterial hosts. Studies also show that they can reduce bacterial numbers in both in vitro and in vivo systems. Genetic analysis has revealed the genomic diversity among these phages and provided an insight into their taxonomy and evolution.No strictly virulent C. difficile phages have been reported and this contributes to the difficulties with their therapeutic exploitation. Although treatment approaches using the phage-encoded endolysin protein have been explored, the benefits of using whole-phages are such that they remain a major research focus. Whilst we don’t envisage working with C. difficile phages will be problem free, sufficient study should inform future strategies to facilitate their development to combat this problematic pathogen.

  16. Phage Neutralization by Sera of Patients Receiving Phage Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Żaczek, Maciej; Weber-Dąbrowska, Beata; Międzybrodzki, Ryszard; Kłak, Marlena; Fortuna, Wojciech; Letkiewicz, Sławomir; Rogóż, Paweł; Szufnarowski, Krzysztof; Jończyk-Matysiak, Ewa; Owczarek, Barbara; Górski, Andrzej

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The aim of our investigation was to verify whether phage therapy (PT) can induce antiphage antibodies. The antiphage activity was determined in sera from 122 patients from the Phage Therapy Unit in Wrocław with bacterial infections before and during PT, and in sera from 30 healthy volunteers using a neutralization test. Furthermore, levels of antiphage antibodies were investigated in sera of 19 patients receiving staphylococcal phages and sera of 20 healthy volunteers using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The phages were administered orally, locally, orally/locally, intrarectally, or orally/intrarectally. The rate of phage inactivation (K) estimated the level of phages' neutralization by human sera. Low K rates were found in sera of healthy volunteers (K≤1.73). Low K rates were detected before PT (K≤1.64). High antiphage activity of sera K>18 was observed in 12.3% of examined patients (n=15) treated with phages locally (n=13) or locally/orally (n=2) from 15 to 60 days of PT. High K rates were found in patients treated with some Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Enterococcus faecalis phages. Low K rates were observed during PT in sera of patients using phages orally (K≤1.04). Increased inactivation of phages by sera of patients receiving PT decreased after therapy. These results suggest that the antiphage activity in patients' sera depends on the route of phage administration and phage type. The induction of antiphage activity of sera during or after PT does not exclude a favorable result of PT. PMID:24893003

  17. P1-7: Modern Display Technology in Vision Science: Assessment of OLED and LCD Monitors for Visual Experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tobias Elze

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available For many decades, cathode ray tube (CRT monitors have been the dominant display technology in vision science. However, in recent years, most manufacturers stopped their CRT production lines, which enforces the application of alternative display technology in the field of vision science. Here, we analyze liquid crystal displays (LCDs and organic light-emitting diode (OLED monitors for their applicability in vision science experiments. Based on extensive measurements of their photometric output, we compare these technologies and contrast them with classical CRT monitors. Vision scientists aim to accurately present both static and dynamic stimuli on their display devices. As for the presentation of static stimuli, we demonstrate an increased accuracy for LCD and OLED devices compared to CRT monitors, because the former exhibit a higher degree of independence of neighboring pixels. As for dynamic presentations, both CRTs and OLEDs outperform LCD devices in terms of accuracy, because dynamic presentations on LCDs require a reorientation of the liquid crystal molecules, so that successive frames in time depend on each other. Together with widely unknown and uncontrolled technical artifacts, these properties of LCDs may impair visual experiments that require high temporal precision. Therefore, OLED monitors are more suitable for vision science experiments with respect to both their static and their temporal characteristics. However, for certain applications in visual neuroscience, the low duty cycle of some OLED devices may introduce frequencies to the photometric output which fall within the window of visibility of neurons in the visual cortex and therefore interfere with single unit recordings.

  18. Synergy as a rationale for phage therapy using phage cocktails.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmerer, Matthew; Molineux, Ian J; Bull, James J

    2014-01-01

    Where phages are used to treat bacterial contaminations and infections, multiple phages are typically applied at once as a cocktail. When two or more phages in the cocktail attack the same bacterium, the combination may produce better killing than any single phage (synergy) or the combination may be worse than the best single phage (interference). Synergy is of obvious utility, especially if it can be predicted a priori, but it remains poorly documented with few examples known. This study addresses synergy in which one phage improves adsorption by a second phage. It first presents evidence of synergy from an experimental system of two phages and a mucoid E. coli host. The synergy likely stems from a tailspike enzyme produced by one of the phages. We then offer mathematical models and simulations to understand the dynamics of synergy and the enhanced magnitude of bacterial control possible. The models and observations complement each other and suggest that synergy may be of widespread utility and may be predictable from easily observed phenotypes.

  19. Catalytic turnover-based phage selection for engineering the substrate specificity of Sfp phosphopantetheinyl transferase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunbul, Murat; Marshall, Norman J; Zou, Yekui; Zhang, Keya; Yin, Jun

    2009-04-10

    We report a high-throughput phage selection method to identify mutants of Sfp phosphopantetheinyl transferase with altered substrate specificities from a large library of the Sfp enzyme. In this method, Sfp and its peptide substrates are co-displayed on the M13 phage surface as fusions to the phage capsid protein pIII. Phage-displayed Sfp mutants that are active with biotin-conjugated coenzyme A (CoA) analogues would covalently transfer biotin to the peptide substrates anchored on the same phage particle. Affinity selection for biotin-labeled phages would enrich Sfp mutants that recognize CoA analogues for carrier protein modification. We used this method to successfully change the substrate specificity of Sfp and identified mutant enzymes with more than 300-fold increase in catalytic efficiency with 3'-dephospho CoA as the substrate. The method we developed in this study provides a useful platform to display enzymes and their peptide substrates on the phage surface and directly couples phage selection with enzyme catalysis. We envision this method to be applied to engineering the catalytic activities of other protein posttranslational modification enzymes.

  20. Biodiversity and biogeography of phages in modern stromatolites and thrombolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desnues, Christelle; Rodriguez-Brito, Beltran; Rayhawk, Steve; Kelley, Scott; Tran, Tuong; Haynes, Matthew; Liu, Hong; Furlan, Mike; Wegley, Linda; Chau, Betty; Ruan, Yijun; Hall, Dana; Angly, Florent E; Edwards, Robert A; Li, Linlin; Thurber, Rebecca Vega; Reid, R Pamela; Siefert, Janet; Souza, Valeria; Valentine, David L; Swan, Brandon K; Breitbart, Mya; Rohwer, Forest

    2008-03-20

    Viruses, and more particularly phages (viruses that infect bacteria), represent one of the most abundant living entities in aquatic and terrestrial environments. The biogeography of phages has only recently been investigated and so far reveals a cosmopolitan distribution of phage genetic material (or genotypes). Here we address this cosmopolitan distribution through the analysis of phage communities in modern microbialites, the living representatives of one of the most ancient life forms on Earth. On the basis of a comparative metagenomic analysis of viral communities associated with marine (Highborne Cay, Bahamas) and freshwater (Pozas Azules II and Rio Mesquites, Mexico) microbialites, we show that some phage genotypes are geographically restricted. The high percentage of unknown sequences recovered from the three metagenomes (>97%), the low percentage similarities with sequences from other environmental viral (n = 42) and microbial (n = 36) metagenomes, and the absence of viral genotypes shared among microbialites indicate that viruses are genetically unique in these environments. Identifiable sequences in the Highborne Cay metagenome were dominated by single-stranded DNA microphages that were not detected in any other samples examined, including sea water, fresh water, sediment, terrestrial, extreme, metazoan-associated and marine microbial mats. Finally, a marine signature was present in the phage community of the Pozas Azules II microbialites, even though this environment has not been in contact with the ocean for tens of millions of years. Taken together, these results prove that viruses in modern microbialites display biogeographical variability and suggest that they may be derived from an ancient community.

  1. Killing cancer cells by targeted drug-carrying phage nanomedicines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yacoby Iftach

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Systemic administration of chemotherapeutic agents, in addition to its anti-tumor benefits, results in indiscriminate drug distribution and severe toxicity. This shortcoming may be overcome by targeted drug-carrying platforms that ferry the drug to the tumor site while limiting exposure to non-target tissues and organs. Results We present a new form of targeted anti-cancer therapy in the form of targeted drug-carrying phage nanoparticles. Our approach is based on genetically-modified and chemically manipulated filamentous bacteriophages. The genetic manipulation endows the phages with the ability to display a host-specificity-conferring ligand. The phages are loaded with a large payload of a cytotoxic drug by chemical conjugation. In the presented examples we used anti ErbB2 and anti ERGR antibodies as targeting moieties, the drug hygromycin conjugated to the phages by a covalent amide bond, or the drug doxorubicin conjugated to genetically-engineered cathepsin-B sites on the phage coat. We show that targeting of phage nanomedicines via specific antibodies to receptors on cancer cell membranes results in endocytosis, intracellular degradation, and drug release, resulting in growth inhibition of the target cells in vitro with a potentiation factor of >1000 over the corresponding free drugs. Conclusion The results of the proof-of concept study presented here reveal important features regarding the potential of filamentous phages to serve as drug-delivery platform, on the affect of drug solubility or hydrophobicity on the target specificity of the platform and on the effect of drug release mechanism on the potency of the platform. These results define targeted drug-carrying filamentous phage nanoparticles as a unique type of antibody-drug conjugates.

  2. An integrated impact assessment and weighting methodology: evaluation of the environmental consequences of computer display technology substitution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xiaoying; Schoenung, Julie M

    2007-04-01

    Computer display technology is currently in a state of transition, as the traditional technology of cathode ray tubes is being replaced by liquid crystal display flat-panel technology. Technology substitution and process innovation require the evaluation of the trade-offs among environmental impact, cost, and engineering performance attributes. General impact assessment methodologies, decision analysis and management tools, and optimization methods commonly used in engineering cannot efficiently address the issues needed for such evaluation. The conventional Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) process often generates results that can be subject to multiple interpretations, although the advantages of the LCA concept and framework obtain wide recognition. In the present work, the LCA concept is integrated with Quality Function Deployment (QFD), a popular industrial quality management tool, which is used as the framework for the development of our integrated model. The problem of weighting is addressed by using pairwise comparison of stakeholder preferences. Thus, this paper presents a new integrated analytical approach, Integrated Industrial Ecology Function Deployment (I2-EFD), to assess the environmental behavior of alternative technologies in correlation with their performance and economic characteristics. Computer display technology is used as the case study to further develop our methodology through the modification and integration of various quality management tools (e.g., process mapping, prioritization matrix) and statistical methods (e.g., multi-attribute analysis, cluster analysis). Life cycle thinking provides the foundation for our methodology, as we utilize a published LCA report, which stopped at the characterization step, as our starting point. Further, we evaluate the validity and feasibility of our methodology by considering uncertainty and conducting sensitivity analysis.

  3. Directed synthesis of bio-inorganic vanadium oxide composites using genetically modified filamentous phage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Michael; Baik, Seungyun; Jeon, Hojeong; Kim, Yuchan; Kim, Jungtae; Kim, Young Jun

    2015-05-01

    The growth of crystalline vanadium oxide using a filamentous bacteriophage template was investigated using sequential incubation in a V2O5 precursor. Using the genetic modification of the bacteriophage, we displayed two cysteines that constrained the RSTB-1 peptide on the major coat protein P8, resulting in vanadium oxide crystallization. The phage-driven vanadium oxide crystals with different topologies, microstructures, photodegradation and vanadium oxide composites were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), quartz microbalance and dissipation (QCM-D) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Non-specific electrostatic attraction between a wild-type phage (wt-phage) and vanadium cations in the V2O5 precursor caused phage agglomeration and fiber formation along the length of the viral scaffold. As a result, the addition of recombinant phage (re-phage) in V2O5 precursors formed heterogeneous structures, which led to efficient condensation of vanadium oxide crystal formation in lines, shown by QCM-D analysis. Furthermore, re-phage/VxOx composites showed significantly enhanced photodegradation activities compared with the synthesized wt-phage-V2O5 composite under illumination. This study demonstrates that peptide-mediated vanadium oxide mineralization is governed by a complicated interplay of peptide sequence, local structure, kinetics and the presence of a mineralizing aid, such as the two cysteine-constrained peptides on the phage surface, and has potential for use in nanotechnology applications.

  4. ATM Technology Demonstration-1 Phase II Boeing Configurable Graphical Display (CGD) Software Design Description

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilber, George F.

    2017-01-01

    This Software Description Document (SDD) captures the design for developing the Flight Interval Management (FIM) system Configurable Graphics Display (CGD) software. Specifically this SDD describes aspects of the Boeing CGD software and the surrounding context and interfaces. It does not describe the Honeywell components of the CGD system. The SDD provides the system overview, architectural design, and detailed design with all the necessary information to implement the Boeing components of the CGD software and integrate them into the CGD subsystem within the larger FIM system. Overall system and CGD system-level requirements are derived from the CGD SRS (in turn derived from the Boeing System Requirements Design Document (SRDD)). Display and look-and-feel requirements are derived from Human Machine Interface (HMI) design documents and working group recommendations. This Boeing CGD SDD is required to support the upcoming Critical Design Review (CDR).

  5. New Magnetic Microactuator Design Based on PDMS Elastomer and MEMS Technologies for Tactile Display.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streque, Jeremy; Talbi, Abdelkrim; Pernod, Philippe; Preobrazhensky, Vladimir

    2010-01-01

    Highly efficient tactile display devices must fulfill technical requirements for tactile stimulation, all the while preserving the lightness and compactness needed for handheld operation. This paper focuses on the elaboration of highly integrated magnetic microactuators for tactile display devices. FEM simulation, conception, fabrication, and characterization of these microactuators are presented in this paper. The current demonstrator offers a 4 × 4 flexible microactuator array with a resolution of 2 mm. Each actuator is composed of a Poly (Dimethyl-Siloxane) (PDMS) elastomeric membrane, magnetically actuated by coil-magnet interaction. It represents a proof of concept for fully integrated MEMS tactile devices, with fair actuation forces provided for a power consumption up to 100 mW per microactuator. The prototypes are destined to provide both static and dynamic tactile sensations, with an optimized membrane geometry for actuation frequencies between DC and 350 Hz. On the basis of preliminary experiments, this display device can offer skin stimulations for various tactile stimuli for applications in the fields of Virtual Reality or Human-Computer Interaction (HCI). Moreover, the elastomeric material used in this device and its global compactness offer great advantages in matter of comfort of use and capabilities of integration in haptic devices.

  6. In-plane technologies for transflective mobile displays: A Literature Survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Strömer, J.F.

    2007-01-01

    This report discusses the optical design of transflective displaysusing in-plane technologies, such as IPS or FFS. It demonstrates theevolutional develpement of the technology of important companies and Universities that are active in this area. It discusses relevant theoretical studies and

  7. Directed synthesis of bio-inorganic vanadium oxide composites using genetically modified filamentous phage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, Michael; Baik, Seungyun; Jeon, Hojeong; Kim, Yuchan; Kim, Jungtae; Kim, Young Jun

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Phage is an excellent seeding for bio-templates for environmentally benign vanadium oxide nanocomposite synthesis. • The synthesized bio-inorganic vanadium oxide showed photodegradation activities. • The fabricated wt phage/vanadium oxide composite exhibited bundle-like structure. • The fabricated RSTB-phage/vanadium oxide composite exhibited a ball with a fiber-like nanostructure. • The virus/vanadium oxide composite could be applied in photocatalysts, sensors and nanoelectronic applications. - Abstract: The growth of crystalline vanadium oxide using a filamentous bacteriophage template was investigated using sequential incubation in a V 2 O 5 precursor. Using the genetic modification of the bacteriophage, we displayed two cysteines that constrained the RSTB-1 peptide on the major coat protein P8, resulting in vanadium oxide crystallization. The phage-driven vanadium oxide crystals with different topologies, microstructures, photodegradation and vanadium oxide composites were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), quartz microbalance and dissipation (QCM-D) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Non-specific electrostatic attraction between a wild-type phage (wt-phage) and vanadium cations in the V 2 O 5 precursor caused phage agglomeration and fiber formation along the length of the viral scaffold. As a result, the addition of recombinant phage (re-phage) in V 2 O 5 precursors formed heterogeneous structures, which led to efficient condensation of vanadium oxide crystal formation in lines, shown by QCM-D analysis. Furthermore, re-phage/V x O x composites showed significantly enhanced photodegradation activities compared with the synthesized wt-phage-V 2 O 5 composite under illumination. This study demonstrates that peptide-mediated vanadium oxide mineralization is governed by a complicated interplay of peptide sequence, local structure, kinetics and the presence of a mineralizing

  8. From Bits and Pieces to Whole Phage to Nanomachines: Pathogen Detection Using Bacteriophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anany, H; Chou, Y; Cucic, S; Derda, R; Evoy, S; Griffiths, M W

    2017-02-28

    The innate specificity of bacteriophages toward their hosts makes them excellent candidates for the development of detection assays. They can be used in many ways to detect pathogens, and each has its own advantages and disadvantages. Whole bacteriophages can carry reporter genes to alter the phenotype of the target. Bacteriophages can act as staining agents or the progeny of the infection process can be detected, which further increases the sensitivity of the detection assay. Compared with whole-phage particles, use of phage components as probes offers other advantages: for example, smaller probe size to enhance binding activity, phage structures that can be engineered for better affinity, as well as specificity, binding properties, and robustness. When no natural binding with the target exists, phages can be used as vehicles to identify new protein-ligand interactions necessary for diagnostics. This review comprehensively summarizes many uses of phages as detection tools and points the way toward how phage-based technologies may be improved.

  9. All solution processed organic thin film transistor-backplane with printing technology for electrophoretic display

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Myung W.; Song, C.K.

    2012-01-01

    In this study, solution processes were developed for backplane using an organic thin film transistor (OTFT) as a driving device for an electrophoretic display (EPD) panel. The processes covered not only the key device of OTFTs but also interlayer and pixel electrodes. The various materials and printing processes were adopted to achieve the requirements of devices and functioning layers. The performance of OTFT of the backplane was sufficient to drive EPD sheet by producing a mobility of 0.12 cm2/v x sec and on/off current ratio of 10(5).

  10. Construction and screening of vast libraries of natural product-like macrocyclic peptides using in vitro display technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bashiruddin, Nasir K; Suga, Hiroaki

    2015-02-01

    Macrocyclic structure and backbone N-methylation represent characteristic features of peptidic natural products, which play critical roles in their biological activity. Although natural products have been the traditional source of such peptides, recent developments in synthesizing natural product-like macrocyclic peptides using reconstituted translation systems have enabled us to construct vast trillion-member libraries of non-standard macrocyclic peptides. In addition, a method for displaying such libraries on their corresponding mRNA templates allows us to rapidly screen them for potent ligands against various drug targets. This review describes methodologies for the ribosomal synthesis of novel natural product-like macrocyclic peptides and their recent applications in the discovery of bioactive molecules using in vitro display technologies. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  11. Characterization of Campylobacter phages including analysis of host range by selected Campylobacter Penner serotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brown Stanley

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The predominant food borne pathogen in the western world today is Campylobacter. Campylobacter specific bacteriophages (phages have been proposed as an alternative agent for reducing the burden of Campylobacter in broilers. One concern in relation to phage biocontrol is the narrow host range often displayed by phages. To identify the potential of phages as a Campylobacter reducing agent we needed to determine their infectivity on a panel of isolates representing the Campylobacter strains found in broilers as well as humans. Results In this study, Campylobacter phages were isolated from the intestines of broilers and ducks and from abattoir sewage. Twelve phages were investigated to determine their ability to infect the Campylobacter Penner serotypes commonly present in Danish poultry and patients with campylobacteriosis. A total of 89% of the Campylobacter jejuni strains and 14% of the Campylobacter coli strains could be infected by at least one of the bacteriophages. The majority of the phages infected the most common serotypes in Danish broilers (O:1,44; O:2; O:4-complex, but showed limited ability to infect 21 of the less frequent Campylobacter serotypes. Pulse field gel electrophoresis (PFGE and restriction endonuclease analysis (REA were used to characterize the phage genomes. Three categories of bacteriophages were observed. I: a genome size of ~194 kb and refractory to digestion with HhaI; II: a genome size of ~140 kb and digestible by HhaI; and III: a genome size undeterminable in PFGE. The categorization of the phages correlated with the host range patterns displayed by the phages. Six phages were subjected to transmission electron microscopy (TEM. They all belonged to the family of Myoviridae. Conclusion We have characterized and identified the host range of 12 Danish Campylobacter phages. Due to their ability to infect the majority of the common serotypes in Denmark we suggest the phages can become an effective

  12. Characterization of Campylobacter phages including analysis of host range by selected Campylobacter Penner serotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Vinni Mona; Rosenquist, Hanne; Baggesen, Dorte Lau; Brown, Stanley; Christensen, Bjarke Bak

    2007-10-18

    The predominant food borne pathogen in the western world today is Campylobacter. Campylobacter specific bacteriophages (phages) have been proposed as an alternative agent for reducing the burden of Campylobacter in broilers. One concern in relation to phage biocontrol is the narrow host range often displayed by phages. To identify the potential of phages as a Campylobacter reducing agent we needed to determine their infectivity on a panel of isolates representing the Campylobacter strains found in broilers as well as humans. In this study, Campylobacter phages were isolated from the intestines of broilers and ducks and from abattoir sewage. Twelve phages were investigated to determine their ability to infect the Campylobacter Penner serotypes commonly present in Danish poultry and patients with campylobacteriosis. A total of 89% of the Campylobacter jejuni strains and 14% of the Campylobacter coli strains could be infected by at least one of the bacteriophages. The majority of the phages infected the most common serotypes in Danish broilers (O:1,44; O:2; O:4-complex), but showed limited ability to infect 21 of the less frequent Campylobacter serotypes. Pulse field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and restriction endonuclease analysis (REA) were used to characterize the phage genomes. Three categories of bacteriophages were observed. I: a genome size of approximately 194 kb and refractory to digestion with HhaI; II: a genome size of approximately 140 kb and digestible by HhaI; and III: a genome size undeterminable in PFGE. The categorization of the phages correlated with the host range patterns displayed by the phages. Six phages were subjected to transmission electron microscopy (TEM). They all belonged to the family of Myoviridae. We have characterized and identified the host range of 12 Danish Campylobacter phages. Due to their ability to infect the majority of the common serotypes in Denmark we suggest the phages can become an effective agent in the effort to reduce

  13. Application of reutilization technology to waste from liquid crystal display (LCD) industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wei T; Li, Kung C

    2010-01-01

    This investigation studies the recycling utility of two major waste products from the liquid crystal display (LCD) industry, panel glass and calcium fluoride sludge, which remain after the treatment of waste water. Waste panel glass was mixed with calcium fluoride sludge in various ratios and then subject to conditioning and melting treatment in order to yield glass-ceramics. Heavy metal leaching tests indicated that reductive conditions lowered the heavy metal concentrations in the leachate to an order of magnitude below that in the waste glass and sludge. A 5:5 (wt%) mixture of glass and sludge melted at 1200 degrees C for 60 min achieves a specific gravity, water absorption, unit mass, porosity ratio, and soundness that meet the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) standard for fine aggregates. Therefore, waste panel glass can indeed be efficiently recycled into a useful construction material.

  14. Flexible barrier technology for enabling rollable AMOLED displays and upscaling flexible OLED lighting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, F.M.; Unnikrishnan, S.; Weijer, P. van de; Assche, F. van; Shen, J.; Ellis, T.; Manders, W.; Akkerman, H.; Bouten, P.; Mol, A.M.B. van

    2013-01-01

    The availability of a high performance thin-film barrier is the most critical challenge in upscaling and commercializing flexible OLED products. We report a flexible thin-film-barrier technology that meets lifetime specifications for OLED lighting, and demonstrate it in rollable QVGA a-IGZO AMOLED

  15. Radiation visualization in virtual reality: A comparison of flat and topographic map types, presented on four different display technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nystad, Espen; Sebok, Angelia

    2005-08-01

    HWR-734 describes an experiment performed to compare different types of VR display technologies and their effects on learning. In the study, two different ways of presenting radiation information were compared. One was a flat radiation map with different colours for different levels of radiation. The other was a topographic map, where radiation levels were distinguished both by colour and by the elevation of the map. The efficiency of the maps for learning radiation information, and subjective preferences was assessed. The results indicated that the maps were each suited for different kinds of use. It is recommended to follow up this study with further investigation of radiation map efficiency. (Author)

  16. Stumbling across the same phage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kalatzis, Panagiotis; Rørbo, Nanna Iben; Castillo Bermúdez, Daniel Elías

    2017-01-01

    Nineteen Vibrio anguillarum-specific temperate bacteriophages isolated across Europe and Chile from aquaculture and environmental sites were genome sequenced and analyzed for host range, morphology and life cycle characteristics. The phages were classified as Siphoviridae with genome sizes between....... Identification of specific genes, such as N6-adenine methyltransferase and lambda like repressor, as well as the presence of a tRNA(Arg), suggested a both mutualistic and parasitic interaction between phages and hosts. During short term phage exposure experiments, 28% of a V. anguillarum host population...

  17. Information Phage Therapy Research Should Report

    OpenAIRE

    Abedon, Stephen T.

    2017-01-01

    Bacteriophages, or phages, are viruses which infect bacteria. A large subset of phages infect bactericidally and, consequently, for nearly one hundred years have been employed as antibacterial agents both within and outside of medicine. Clinically these applications are described as phage or bacteriophage therapy. Alternatively, and especially in the treatment of environments, this practice instead may be described as a phage-mediated biocontrol of bacteria. Though the history of phage therap...

  18. Technology Evaluation for Paintable Computing and Paintable Displays RF Nixel Seedling

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-04-15

    propagating the values of the distances OX, OY and XY. The Coordinates pfrag watches for posts from the Distance pfrag. Calling P the location of...a given particle, once the Coordinates pfrag sees values for PO, PX, PY, OX, OY , and XY, it uses geometry to calculate its own coordinates. Once...J.Q., Kwon , Y., McDonald, J.F., Cale, T.S. Three-dimensional (3D) ICs: a technology platformfor integratedsystems and opportunities for new polymeric

  19. Kinetics of filamentous phage assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ploss, Martin; Kuhn, Andreas

    2010-12-01

    Filamentous phages release their progeny particles by a secretory process without lysing the bacterial cell. By this process about 6 viral particles per min are secreted from each cell. We show here that when the major coat protein (gp8) is provided from a plasmid we observe a phage progeny production rate depending on the induction of gp8 by IPTG. We also show that a transfection of Escherichia coli lacking F-pili is observed using a mutant of M13 that carries an ampicillin resistance gene, and phage particles are secreted in the absence of an F-plasmid. Extruding phage was visualized by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) using gold-labeled antibodies to the major coat protein.

  20. Drug Discovery for Breast Cancer by Mirror-Image Display

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Blacklow, Stephen

    2003-01-01

    Two limitations inherent in phage display are the relatively small library size (less than 10(9)) and the constraint that the building blocks of the library be restricted to the 20 naturally-occurring amino acids...

  1. Display hardware

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myers, D.R.

    1983-01-01

    To appreciate the limitations and possibilities of computer graphics it is necessary to have some acquaintance with the available technology. The aim of this chapter is to mention briefly the different display types and their 'ball-park' price ranges. It must be stressed that prices change rapidly, and so those quoted here are only intended to give an idea of the cost at the time of writing.

  2. Assessment of Anisotropic Semiconductor Nanorod and Nanoplatelet Heterostructures with Polarized Emission for Liquid Crystal Display Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cunningham, Patrick D.; Souza, João B.; Fedin, Igor; She, Chunxing; Lee, Byeongdu; Talapin, Dmitri V.

    2016-06-28

    Semiconductor nanorods can emit linear-polarized light at efficiencies over 80%. Polarization of light in these systems, confirmed through single-rod spectroscopy, can be explained on the basis of the anisotropy of the transition dipole moment and dielectric confinement effects. Here we report emission polarization in macroscopic semiconductor polymer composite films containing CdSe/CdS nanorods and colloidal CdSe nanoplatelets. Anisotropic nanocrystals dispersed in polymer films of poly butyl-co-isobutyl methacrylate (PBiBMA) can be stretched mechanically in order to obtain unidirectionally aligned arrays. A high degree of alignment, corresponding to an orientation factor of 0.87, was achieved and large areas demonstrated polarized emission, with the contrast ratio I-parallel to/I-perpendicular to= 5.6, making these films viable candidates for use in liquid crystal display (LCD) devices. To some surprise, we observed significant optical anisotropy and emission polarization for 2D CdSe nanoplatelets with the electronic structure of quantum wells. The aligned nanorod arrays serve as optical funnels, absorbing unpolarized light and re-emitting light from deep-green to red with quantum efficiencies over 90% and high degree of linear polarization. Our results conclusively demonstrate the benefits of anisotropic nanostructures for LCD backlighting. The polymer films with aligned CdSe/CdS dot-in-rod and rod-in-rod nanostructures show more than 2-fold enhancement of brightness compared to the emitter layers with randomly oriented nanostructures. This effect can be explained as the combination of linearly polarized luminescence and directional emission from individual nanostructures.

  3. Human Volunteers Receiving Escherichia coli Phage T4 Orally: a Safety Test of Phage Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Bruttin, Anne; Brüssow, Harald

    2005-01-01

    Fifteen healthy adult volunteers received in their drinking water a lower Escherichia coli phage T4 dose (103 PFU/ml), a higher phage dose (105 PFU/ml), and placebo. Fecal coliphage was detected in a dose-dependent way in volunteers orally exposed to phage. All volunteers receiving the higher phage dose showed fecal phage 1 day after exposure; this prevalence was only 50% in subjects receiving the lower phage dose. No fecal phage was detectable a week after a 2-day course of oral phage applic...

  4. Phages in the Human Body.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro, Ferran; Muniesa, Maite

    2017-01-01

    Bacteriophages, viruses that infect bacteria, have re-emerged as powerful regulators of bacterial populations in natural ecosystems. Phages invade the human body, just as they do other natural environments, to such an extent that they are the most numerous group in the human virome. This was only revealed in recent metagenomic studies, despite the fact that the presence of phages in the human body was reported decades ago. The influence of the presence of phages in humans has yet to be evaluated; but as in marine environments, a clear role in the regulation of bacterial populations could be envisaged, that might have an impact on human health. Moreover, phages are excellent vehicles of genetic transfer, and they contribute to the evolution of bacterial cells in the human body by spreading and acquiring DNA horizontally. The abundance of phages in the human body does not pass unnoticed and the immune system reacts to them, although it is not clear to what extent. Finally, the presence of phages in human samples, which most of the time is not considered, can influence and bias microbiological and molecular results; and, in view of the evidences, some studies suggest that more attention needs to be paid to their interference.

  5. M13 bacteriophage displaying DOPA on surfaces: fabrication of various nanostructured inorganic materials without time-consuming screening processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Joseph P; Do, Minjae; Jin, Hyo-Eon; Lee, Seung-Wuk; Lee, Haeshin

    2014-01-01

    M13 bacteriophage (phage) was engineered for the use as a versatile template for preparing various nanostructured materials via genetic engineering coupled to enzymatic chemical conversions. First, we engineered the M13 phage to display TyrGluGluGlu (YEEE) on the pVIII coat protein and then enzymatically converted the Tyr residue to 3,4-dihydroxyl-l-phenylalanine (DOPA). The DOPA-displayed M13 phage could perform two functions: assembly and nucleation. The engineered phage assembles various noble metals, metal oxides, and semiconducting nanoparticles into one-dimensional arrays. Furthermore, the DOPA-displayed phage triggered the nucleation and growth of gold, silver, platinum, bimetallic cobalt-platinum, and bimetallic iron-platinum nanowires. This versatile phage template enables rapid preparation of phage-based prototype devices by eliminating the screening process, thus reducing effort and time.

  6. A novel replicon occurring naturally in Escherichia coli is a phage-plasmid hybrid.

    OpenAIRE

    Seufert, W; Lurz, R; Messer, W

    1988-01-01

    A novel DNA replicon in Escherichia coli was identified. It is the smallest natural isolate (1282 bp) found so far. In the presence of phage M13 it grows as a filamentous single-stranded DNA phage. Contrary to previously identified mini-phages this replicon displays sequence homology only to parts of the M13 viral and complementary strand origin. In the absence of M13 this DNA replicates autonomously. The only gene (arp) of the replicon encodes a 32-kd protein, which is essential for autonomo...

  7. Can teamwork and situational awareness (SA) in ED resuscitations be improved with a technological cognitive aid? Design and a pilot study of a team situation display.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parush, A; Mastoras, G; Bhandari, A; Momtahan, K; Day, K; Weitzman, B; Sohmer, B; Cwinn, A; Hamstra, S J; Calder, L

    2017-12-01

    Effective teamwork in ED resuscitations, including information sharing and situational awareness, could be degraded. Technological cognitive aids can facilitate effective teamwork. This study focused on the design of an ED situation display and pilot test its influence on teamwork and situational awareness during simulated resuscitation scenarios. The display design consisted of a central area showing the critical dynamic parameters of the interventions with an events time-line below it. Static information was placed at the sides of the display. We pilot tested whether the situation display could lead to higher scores on the Clinical Teamwork Scale (CTS), improved scores on a context-specific Situational Awareness Global Assessment Technique (SAGAT) tool, and team communication patterns that reflect teamwork and situational awareness. Resuscitation teamwork, as measured by the CTS, was overall better with the presence of the situation display as compared with no situation display. Team members discussed interventions more with the situation display compared with not having the situation display. Situational awareness was better with the situation display only in the trauma scenario. The situation display could be more effective for certain ED team members and in certain cases. Overall, this pilot study implies that a situation display could facilitate better teamwork and team communication in the resuscitation event. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Bacteriophages displaying anticancer peptides in combined antibacterial and anticancer treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dąbrowska, Krystyna; Kaźmierczak, Zuzanna; Majewska, Joanna; Miernikiewicz, Paulina; Piotrowicz, Agnieszka; Wietrzyk, Joanna; Lecion, Dorota; Hodyra, Katarzyna; Nasulewicz-Goldeman, Anna; Owczarek, Barbara; Górski, Andrzej

    2014-01-01

    Novel anticancer strategies have employed bacteriophages as drug carriers and display platforms for anticancer agents; however, bacteriophage-based platforms maintain their natural antibacterial activity. This study provides the assessment of combined anticancer (engineered) and antibacterial (natural) phage activity in therapies. An in vivo BALB/c mouse model of 4T1 tumor growth accompanied by surgical wound infection was applied. The wounds were located in the areas of tumors. Bacteriophages (T4) were modified with anticancer Tyr-Ile-Gly-Ser-Arg (YIGSR) peptides by phage display and injected intraperitoneally. Tumor growth was decreased in mice treated with YIGSR-displaying phages. The acuteness of wounds, bacterial load and inflammatory markers in phages-treated mice were markedly decreased. Thus, engineered bacteriophages combine antibacterial and anticancer activity.

  9. The Phage Shock Protein Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores-Kim, Josué; Darwin, Andrew J

    2016-09-08

    The phage shock protein (Psp) system was identified as a response to phage infection in Escherichia coli, but rather than being a specific response to a phage, it detects and mitigates various problems that could increase inner-membrane (IM) permeability. Interest in the Psp system has increased significantly in recent years due to appreciation that Psp-like proteins are found in all three domains of life and because the bacterial Psp response has been linked to virulence and other important phenotypes. In this article, we summarize our current understanding of what the Psp system detects and how it detects it, how four core Psp proteins form a signal transduction cascade between the IM and the cytoplasm, and current ideas that explain how the Psp response keeps bacterial cells alive. Although recent studies have significantly improved our understanding of this system, it is an understanding that is still far from complete.

  10. Pitfalls to avoid when using phage display for snake toxins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laustsen, Andreas Hougaard; Lauridsen, Line Præst; Lomonte, Bruno

    2017-01-01

    Antivenoms against bites and stings from snakes, spiders, and scorpions are associated with immunological side effects and high cost of production, since these therapies are still derived from the serum of hyper-immunized production animals. Biotechnological innovations within envenoming therapies...

  11. Identifying bacterial immune evasion proteins using phage display

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fevre, Cindy; Scheepmaker, Lisette; Haas, Pieter Jan

    2017-01-01

    Methods aimed at identification of immune evasion proteins are mainly rely on in silico prediction of sequence, structural homology to known evasion proteins or use a proteomics driven approach. Although proven successful these methods are limited by a low efficiency and or lack of functional

  12. Early events in autoimmunity studied by antibody phage display

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hof, D.

    2007-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases, which affect approximately 2-3% of the world population, are characterized by the occurrence of high titres of autoantibodies. Some of these autoantibodies are disease-specific and their presence is often a valuable diagnostic, and sometimes prognostic, tool for clinicians. For

  13. Probing Tumor Microenvironment with In Vivo Phage Display

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-01

    4T1 tumor lysate. After immobilizing the biotin -peptide onto streptavidin magnetic beads, we eluted the putative receptor by incubating the beads... DNA sequencing. We have identified at least 4 potentially novel CAF/stroma-targeting peptides. One of the peptides, CIS, homed to breast tumor stroma...particles recovered from the tumor tissue were then subjected to DNA sequencing using an Iron Torrent next generation sequencer (the work flow for the

  14. Efficient method to optimize antibodies using avian leukosis virus display and eukaryotic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Changming; Pike, Gennett M; Rinkoski, Tommy A; Correia, Cristina; Kaufmann, Scott H; Federspiel, Mark J

    2015-08-11

    Antibody-based therapeutics have now had success in the clinic. The affinity and specificity of the antibody for the target ligand determines the specificity of therapeutic delivery and off-target side effects. The discovery and optimization of high-affinity antibodies to important therapeutic targets could be significantly improved by the availability of a robust, eukaryotic display technology comparable to phage display that would overcome the protein translation limitations of microorganisms. The use of eukaryotic cells would improve the diversity of the displayed antibodies that can be screened and optimized as well as more seamlessly transition into a large-scale mammalian expression system for clinical production. In this study, we demonstrate that the replication and polypeptide display characteristics of a eukaryotic retrovirus, avian leukosis virus (ALV), offers a robust, eukaryotic version of bacteriophage display. The binding affinity of a model single-chain Fv antibody was optimized by using ALV display, improving affinity >2,000-fold, from micromolar to picomolar levels. We believe ALV display provides an extension to antibody display on microorganisms and offers virus and cell display platforms in a eukaryotic expression system. ALV display should enable an improvement in the diversity of properly processed and functional antibody variants that can be screened and affinity-optimized to improve promising antibody candidates.

  15. Epitope selection from an uncensored peptide library displayed on avian leukosis virus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khare, Pranay D.; Rosales, Ana G.; Bailey, Kent R.; Russell, Stephen J.; Federspiel, Mark J.

    2003-01-01

    Phage display libraries have provided an extraordinarily versatile technology to facilitate the isolation of peptides, growth factors, single chain antibodies, and enzymes with desired binding specificities or enzymatic activities. The overall diversity of peptides in phage display libraries can be significantly limited by Escherichia coli protein folding and processing machinery, which result in sequence censorship. To achieve an optimal diversity of displayed eukaryotic peptides, the library should be produced in the endoplasmic reticulum of eukaryotic cells using a eukaryotic display platform. In the accompanying article, we presented experiments that demonstrate that polypeptides of various sizes could be efficiently displayed on the envelope glycoproteins of a eukaryotic virus, avian leukosis virus (ALV), and the displayed polypeptides could efficiently attach to cognate receptors without interfering with viral attachment and entry into susceptible cells. In this study, methods were developed to construct a model library of randomized eight amino acid peptides using the ALV eukaryotic display platform and screen the library for specific epitopes using immobilized antibodies. A virus library with approximately 2 x 10 6 different members was generated from a plasmid library of approximately 5 x 10 6 diversity. The sequences of the randomized 24 nucleotide/eight amino acid regions of representatives of the plasmid and virus libraries were analyzed. No significant sequence censorship was observed in producing the virus display library from the plasmid library. Different populations of peptide epitopes were selected from the virus library when different monoclonal antibodies were used as the target. The results of these two studies clearly demonstrate the potential of ALV as a eukaryotic platform for the display and selection of eukaryotic polypeptides libraries

  16. A blended learning concept for an engineering course in the field of color representation and display technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vauderwange, Oliver; Wozniak, Peter; Javahiraly, Nicolas; Curticapean, Dan

    2016-09-01

    The Paper presents the design and development of a blended learning concept for an engineering course in the field of color representation and display technologies. A suitable learning environment is crucial for the success of the teaching scenario. A mixture of theoretical lectures and hands-on activities with practical applications and experiments, combined with the advantages of modern digital media is the main topic of the paper. Blended learning describes the didactical change of attendance periods and online periods. The e-learning environment for the online period is designed toward an easy access and interaction. Present digital media extends the established teaching scenarios and enables the presentation of videos, animations and augmented reality (AR). Visualizations are effective tools to impart learning contents with lasting effect. The preparation and evaluation of the theoretical lectures and the hands-on activities are stimulated and affects positively the attendance periods. The tasks and experiments require the students to work independently and to develop individual solution strategies. This engages and motivates the students, deepens the knowledge. The authors will present their experience with the implemented blended learning scenario in this field of optics and photonics. All aspects of the learning environment will be introduced.

  17. The habits of highly effective phages: population dynamics as a framework for identifying therapeutic phages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James J Bull

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The use of bacteriophages as antibacterial agents is being actively researched on a global scale. Typically, the phages used are isolated from the wild by plating on the bacteria of interest, and a far larger set of candidate phages is often available than can be used in any application. When an excess of phages is available, how should the best phages be identified? Here we consider phage-bacterial population dynamics as a basis for evaluating and predicting phage success. A central question is whether the innate dynamical properties of phages are the determinants of success, or instead, whether extrinsic, indirect effects can be responsible. We address the dynamical perspective, motivated in part by the absence of dynamics in previously suggested principles of phage therapy. Current mathematical models of bacterial-phage dynamics do not capture the realities of in vivo dynamics, nor is this likely to change, but they do give insight to qualitative properties that may be generalizable. In particular, phage adsorption rate may be critical to treatment success, so understanding the effects of the in vivo environment on host availability may allow prediction of useful phages prior to in vivo experimentation. Principles for predicting efficacy may be derived by developing a greater understanding of the in vivo system, or such principles could be determined empirically by comparing phages with known differences in their dynamic properties. The comparative approach promises to be a powerful method of discovering the key to phage success. We offer five recommendations for future study: (i compare phages differing in treatment efficacy to identify the phage properties associated with success, (ii assay dynamics in vivo, (iii understand mechanisms of bacterial escape from phages, (iv test phages in model infections that are relevant to the intended clinical applications, and (v develop new classes of models for phage growth in spatially heterogeneous

  18. Phage Therapy: Eco-Physiological Pharmacology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen T. Abedon

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial virus use as antibacterial agents, in the guise of what is commonly known as phage therapy, is an inherently physiological, ecological, and also pharmacological process. Physiologically we can consider metabolic properties of phage infections of bacteria and variation in those properties as a function of preexisting bacterial states. In addition, there are patient responses to pathogenesis, patient responses to phage infections of pathogens, and also patient responses to phage virions alone. Ecologically, we can consider phage propagation, densities, distribution (within bodies, impact on body-associated microbiota (as ecological communities, and modification of the functioning of body “ecosystems” more generally. These ecological and physiological components in many ways represent different perspectives on otherwise equivalent phenomena. Comparable to drugs, one also can view phages during phage therapy in pharmacological terms. The relatively unique status of phages within the context of phage therapy as essentially replicating antimicrobials can therefore result in a confluence of perspectives, many of which can be useful towards gaining a better mechanistic appreciation of phage therapy, as I consider here. Pharmacology more generally may be viewed as a discipline that lies at an interface between organism-associated phenomena, as considered by physiology, and environmental interactions as considered by ecology.

  19. Directed synthesis of bio-inorganic vanadium oxide composites using genetically modified filamentous phage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, Michael; Baik, Seungyun [Environmental Safety Group, Korea Institute of Science and Technology Europe (KIST-Europe) Forschungsgesellschaft mbH, Campus E 7 1, Saarbruecken (Germany); Jeon, Hojeong; Kim, Yuchan [Center for Biomaterials, Biomedical Research Institute Korea Institute of Science and Technology (KIST), Hwarangno 14-gil 5, Seongbuk-gu, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jungtae [Environmental Safety Group, Korea Institute of Science and Technology Europe (KIST-Europe) Forschungsgesellschaft mbH, Campus E 7 1, Saarbruecken (Germany); Kim, Young Jun, E-mail: youngjunkim@kist-europe.de [Environmental Safety Group, Korea Institute of Science and Technology Europe (KIST-Europe) Forschungsgesellschaft mbH, Campus E 7 1, Saarbruecken (Germany)

    2015-05-15

    Highlights: • Phage is an excellent seeding for bio-templates for environmentally benign vanadium oxide nanocomposite synthesis. • The synthesized bio-inorganic vanadium oxide showed photodegradation activities. • The fabricated wt phage/vanadium oxide composite exhibited bundle-like structure. • The fabricated RSTB-phage/vanadium oxide composite exhibited a ball with a fiber-like nanostructure. • The virus/vanadium oxide composite could be applied in photocatalysts, sensors and nanoelectronic applications. - Abstract: The growth of crystalline vanadium oxide using a filamentous bacteriophage template was investigated using sequential incubation in a V{sub 2}O{sub 5} precursor. Using the genetic modification of the bacteriophage, we displayed two cysteines that constrained the RSTB-1 peptide on the major coat protein P8, resulting in vanadium oxide crystallization. The phage-driven vanadium oxide crystals with different topologies, microstructures, photodegradation and vanadium oxide composites were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), quartz microbalance and dissipation (QCM-D) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Non-specific electrostatic attraction between a wild-type phage (wt-phage) and vanadium cations in the V{sub 2}O{sub 5} precursor caused phage agglomeration and fiber formation along the length of the viral scaffold. As a result, the addition of recombinant phage (re-phage) in V{sub 2}O{sub 5} precursors formed heterogeneous structures, which led to efficient condensation of vanadium oxide crystal formation in lines, shown by QCM-D analysis. Furthermore, re-phage/V{sub x}O{sub x} composites showed significantly enhanced photodegradation activities compared with the synthesized wt-phage-V{sub 2}O{sub 5} composite under illumination. This study demonstrates that peptide-mediated vanadium oxide mineralization is governed by a complicated interplay of peptide sequence, local structure

  20. Oral T4-like phage cocktail application to healthy adult volunteers from Bangladesh

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarker, Shafiqul Alam, E-mail: sasarker@icddrb.org [International Centre for Diarrhoeal Diseases Research, Bangladesh (icddr,b), 68 Shaheed Tajuddin Ahmed Sharani, Mohakhali, Dhaka 1212 (Bangladesh); McCallin, Shawna; Barretto, Caroline [Nestle Research Centre, Nestec Ltd., Vers-chez-les-Blanc, CH-1000 Lausanne 26 (Switzerland); Berger, Bernard, E-mail: bernard.berger@rdls.nestle.com [Nestle Research Centre, Nestec Ltd., Vers-chez-les-Blanc, CH-1000 Lausanne 26 (Switzerland); Pittet, Anne-Cecile [Nestle Research Centre, Nestec Ltd., Vers-chez-les-Blanc, CH-1000 Lausanne 26 (Switzerland); Sultana, Shamima, E-mail: shamima@icddrb.org [International Centre for Diarrhoeal Diseases Research, Bangladesh (icddr,b), 68 Shaheed Tajuddin Ahmed Sharani, Mohakhali, Dhaka 1212 (Bangladesh); Krause, Lutz, E-mail: ltz.krause@gmail.com [Nestle Research Centre, Nestec Ltd., Vers-chez-les-Blanc, CH-1000 Lausanne 26 (Switzerland); Huq, Sayeda, E-mail: sayeeda@mail.icddrb.org [International Centre for Diarrhoeal Diseases Research, Bangladesh (icddr,b), 68 Shaheed Tajuddin Ahmed Sharani, Mohakhali, Dhaka 1212 (Bangladesh); Bibiloni, Rodrigo, E-mail: Rodrigo.Bibiloni@agresearch.co.nz [Nestle Research Centre, Nestec Ltd., Vers-chez-les-Blanc, CH-1000 Lausanne 26 (Switzerland); Bruttin, Anne, E-mail: anne.bruttin@rdls.nestle.com [Nestle Research Centre, Nestec Ltd., Vers-chez-les-Blanc, CH-1000 Lausanne 26 (Switzerland); Reuteler, Gloria, E-mail: gloria.reuteler@rdls.nestle.com [Nestle Research Centre, Nestec Ltd., Vers-chez-les-Blanc, CH-1000 Lausanne 26 (Switzerland); Bruessow, Harald, E-mail: harald.bruessow@rdls.nestle.com [Nestle Research Centre, Nestec Ltd., Vers-chez-les-Blanc, CH-1000 Lausanne 26 (Switzerland)

    2012-12-20

    The genomic diversity of 99 T4-like coliphages was investigated by sequencing an equimolar mixture with Illumina technology and screening them against different databases for horizontal gene transfer and undesired genes. A 9-phage cocktail was given to 15 healthy adults from Bangladesh at a dose of 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 9} and 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 7} plaque-forming units and placebo respectively. Phages were detected in 64% of the stool samples when subjects were treated with higher titer phage, compared to 30% and 28% with lower-titer phage and placebo, respectively. No Escherichia coli was present in initial stool samples, and no amplification of phage was observed. One percent of the administered oral phage was recovered from the feces. No adverse events were observed by self-report, clinical examination, or from laboratory tests for liver, kidney, and hematology function. No impact of oral phage was seen on the fecal microbiota composition with respect to bacterial 16S rRNA from stool.

  1. A general insert label for peptide display on chimeric filamentous bacteriophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Gilad; Gershoni, Jonathan M

    2012-01-01

    The foreign insert intended to be displayed via recombinant phage proteins can have a negative effect on protein expression and phage assembly. A typical example is the case of display of peptides longer than 6 amino acid residues on the major coat protein, protein VIII of the filamentous bacteriophages M13 and fd. A solution to this problem has been the use of "two-gene systems" generating chimeric phages that concomitantly express wild-type protein VIII along with recombinant protein VIII. Although the two-gene systems are much more permissive in regard to insert length and composition, some cases can still adversely affect phage assembly. Although these phages genotypically contain the desired DNA of the insert, they appear to be phenotypically wild type. To avoid false-negative results when using chimeric phages in binding studies, it is necessary to confirm that the observed lack of phage recognition is not due to faulty assembly and display of the intended insert. Here we describe a strategy for generating antibodies that specifically recognize recombinant protein VIII regardless of the nature of its foreign insert. These antibodies can be used as a general monitor of the display of recombinant protein VIII into phage particles. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Control of Pierce's Disease by Phage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayukh Das

    Full Text Available Pierce's Disease (PD of grapevines, caused by Xylella fastidiosa subsp. fastidiosa (Xf, is a limiting factor in the cultivation of grapevines in the US. There are presently no effective control methods to prevent or treat PD. The therapeutic and prophylactic efficacy of a phage cocktail composed of four virulent (lytic phages was evaluated for control of PD. Xf levels in grapevines were significantly reduced in therapeutically or prophylactically treated grapevines. PD symptoms ceased to progress one week post-therapeutic treatment and symptoms were not observed in prophylactically treated grapevines. Cocktail phage levels increased in grapevines in the presence of the host. No in planta phage-resistant Xf isolates were obtained. Moreover, Xf mutants selected for phage resistance in vitro did not cause PD symptoms. Our results indicate that phages have great potential for biocontrol of PD and other economically important diseases caused by Xylella.

  3. Targeted delivery of siRNA into breast cancer cells via phage fusion proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedi, Deepa; Gillespie, James W; Petrenko, Vasily A; Ebner, Andreas; Leitner, Michael; Hinterdorfer, Peter; Petrenko, Valery A

    2013-02-04

    Nucleic acids, including antisense oligonucleotides, small interfering RNA (siRNA), aptamers, and rybozymes, emerged as versatile therapeutics due to their ability to interfere in a well-planned manner with the flow of genetic information from DNA to protein. However, a systemic use of NAs is hindered by their instability in physiological liquids and inability of intracellular accumulation in the site of action. We first evaluated the potential of cancer specific phage fusion proteins as targeting ligands that provide encapsulation, protection, and navigation of siRNA to the target cell. The tumor-specific proteins were isolated from phages that were affinity selected from a landscape phage library against target breast cancer cells. It was found that fusion phage coat protein fpVIII displaying cancer-targeting peptides can effectively encapsulate siRNAs and deliver them into the cells leading to specific silencing of the model gene GAPDH. Complexes of siRNA and phage protein form nanoparticles (nanophages), which were characterized by atomic force microscopy and ELISA, and their stability was demonstrated by resistance of encapsulated siRNA to degradation by serum nucleases. The phage protein/siRNA complexes can make a new type of highly selective, stable, active, and physiologically acceptable cancer nanomedicine.

  4. Bacteriophages with potential to inactivate Salmonella Typhimurium: Use of single phage suspensions and phage cocktails.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Carla; Moreirinha, Catarina; Lewicka, Magdalena; Almeida, Paulo; Clemente, Carla; Cunha, Ângela; Delgadillo, Ivonne; Romalde, Jésus L; Nunes, Maria L; Almeida, Adelaide

    2016-07-15

    The aim of this study was to compare the dynamics of three previously isolated bacteriophages (or phages) individually (phSE-1, phSE-2 and phSE-5) or combined in cocktails of two or three phages (phSE-1/phSE-2, phSE-1/phSE-5, phSE-2/phSE-5 and phSE-1/phSE-2/phSE-5) to control Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (Salmonella Typhimurium) in order to evaluate their potential application during depuration. Phages were assigned to the family Siphoviridae and revealed identical restriction digest profiles, although they showed a different phage adsorption, host range, burst size, explosion time and survival in seawater. The three phages were effective against S. Typhimurium (reduction of ∼2.0 log CFU/mL after 4h treatment). The use of cocktails was not significantly more effective than the use of single phages. A big fraction of the remained bacteria are phage-resistant mutants (frequency of phage-resistant mutants 9.19×10(-5)-5.11×10(-4)) but phage- resistant bacterial mutants was lower for the cocktail phages than for the single phage suspensions and the phage phSE-1 presented the highest rate of resistance and phage phSE-5 the lowest one. The spectral changes of S. Typhimurium resistant and phage-sensitive cells were compared and revealed relevant differences for peaks associated to amide I (1620cm(-1)) and amide II (1515cm(-1)) from proteins and from carbohydrates and phosphates region (1080-1000cm(-1)). Despite the similar efficiency of individual phages, the development of lower resistance indicates that phage cocktails might be the most promising choice to be used during the bivalve depuration to control the transmission of salmonellosis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. The Phage Proteomic Tree: a Genome-Based Taxonomy for Phage

    OpenAIRE

    Rohwer, Forest; Edwards, Rob

    2002-01-01

    There are ∼1031 phage in the biosphere, making them the most abundant biological entities on the planet. Despite their great numbers and ubiquitous presence, very little is known about phage biodiversity, biogeography, or phylogeny. Information is limited, in part, because the current ICTV taxonomical system is based on culturing phage and measuring physical parameters of the free virion. No sequence-based taxonomic systems have previously been established for phage. We present here the “Phag...

  6. Identification of tumor associated single-chain Fv by panning and screening antibody phage library using tumor cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Yong-Zhan; He, Feng-Tian; Li, Zhi-Kui; Wu, Kai-Chun; Cao, Yun-Xin; Chen, Bao-Jun; Fan, Dai-Ming

    2002-01-01

    AIM: To study the feasibility of panning and screening phage-displaying recombinant single-chain variable fragment (ScFv) of anti-tumor monoclonal antibodies for fixed whole cells as the carriers of mAb-binding antigens. METHODS: The recombinant phage displaying libraries for anti-colorectal tumor mAb MC3Ab, MC5Ab and anti-gastric tumor mAb MGD1 was constructed. Panning and screening were carried out by means of modified fixation of colorectal and gastric tumor cells expressed the mAb-binding antigens. Concordance of binding specificity to tumor cells between phage clones and parent antibodies was analyzed. The phage of positive clones was identified with competitive ELISA, and infected by E. coli HB2151 to express soluble ScFv. RESULTS: The ratio of positive clones to MC3-ScF-MC5-ScFv and MGD1-ScFv were 60%, 24% and 30%. MC3-ScFv had Mr 32000 confirmed by Western blot. The specificity to antigen had no difference between 4 positive recombinant phage antibodies and MC3Ab. CONCLUSION: The modified process of fixing whole tumor cells is efficient, convenient and feasible to pan and screen the phage-displaying ScFv of anti-tumor monoclonal antibodies. PMID:12174367

  7. Construction of phage antibody repertoires from the blood of West Nile virus-infected donors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Throsby, Mark; de Kruif, John

    2009-01-01

    A method for the construction of West Nile virus immune donor antibody repertoires is described. B cells are harvested from a suitable donor and the antibody variable genes are amplified using polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The PCR fragments are cloned in a phage display vector to construct a repertoire that can be used in panning procedures to identify many unique monoclonal antibodies.

  8. Contemporary Phage Biology: From Classic Models to New Insights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ofir, Gal; Sorek, Rotem

    2018-03-08

    Bacteriophages, discovered about a century ago, have been pivotal as models for understanding the fundamental principles of molecular biology. While interest in phage biology declined after the phage "golden era," key recent developments, including advances in phage genomics, microscopy, and the discovery of the CRISPR-Cas anti-phage defense system, have sparked a renaissance in phage research in the past decade. This review highlights recently discovered unexpected complexities in phage biology, describes a new arsenal of phage genes that help them overcome bacterial defenses, and discusses advances toward documentation of the phage biodiversity on a global scale. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. OLED displays and lighting

    CERN Document Server

    Koden, Mitsuhiro

    2017-01-01

    Organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) have emerged as the leading technology for the new display and lighting market. OLEDs are solid-state devices composed of thin films of organic molecules that create light with the application of electricity. OLEDs can provide brighter, crisper displays on electronic devices and use less power than conventional light-emitting diodes (LEDs) or liquid crystal displays (LCDs) used today. This book covers both the fundamentals and practical applications of flat and flexible OLEDs.

  10. Scalable Resolution Display Walls

    KAUST Repository

    Leigh, Jason

    2013-01-01

    This article will describe the progress since 2000 on research and development in 2-D and 3-D scalable resolution display walls that are built from tiling individual lower resolution flat panel displays. The article will describe approaches and trends in display hardware construction, middleware architecture, and user-interaction design. The article will also highlight examples of use cases and the benefits the technology has brought to their respective disciplines. © 1963-2012 IEEE.

  11. Investigation of Virtual Digital Human and Robotic Device Technology Merger Complimented by Haptics and Autostereoscopic Displays, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed innovations conform precisely to the technology needs described in Subtopic T5.02, Robotics and Virtual Digital Human Technologies. ?Two potential areas...

  12. Three-dimensional visualization and display technologies; Proceedings of the Meeting, Los Angeles, CA, Jan. 18-20, 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robbins, W.E.; Fisher, S.S.

    1989-01-01

    Special attention was given to problems of stereoscopic display devices, such as CAD for enhancement of the design process in visual arts, stereo-TV improvement of remote manipulator performance, a voice-controlled stereographic video camera system, and head-mounted displays and their low-cost design alternatives. Also discussed was a novel approach to chromostereoscopic microscopy, computer-generated barrier-strip autostereography and lenticular stereograms, and parallax barrier three-dimensional TV. Additional topics include processing and user interface isssues and visualization applications, including automated analysis and fliud flow topology, optical tomographic measusrements of mixing fluids, visualization of complex data, visualization environments, and visualization management systems

  13. Phage-Phagocyte Interactions and Their Implications for Phage Application as Therapeutics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jończyk-Matysiak, Ewa; Weber-Dąbrowska, Beata; Owczarek, Barbara; Międzybrodzki, Ryszard; Łusiak-Szelachowska, Marzanna; Łodej, Norbert; Górski, Andrzej

    2017-01-01

    Phagocytes are the main component of innate immunity. They remove pathogens and particles from organisms using their bactericidal tools in the form of both reactive oxygen species and degrading enzymes—contained in granules—that are potentially toxic proteins. Therefore, it is important to investigate the possible interactions between phages and immune cells and avoid any phage side effects on them. Recent progress in knowledge concerning the influence of phages on phagocytes is also important as such interactions may shape the immune response. In this review we have summarized the current knowledge on phage interactions with phagocytes described so far and their potential implications for phage therapy. The data suggesting that phage do not downregulate important phagocyte functions are especially relevant for the concept of phage therapy. PMID:28613272

  14. PHAGE TYPING OF VIBRIO "EL TOR"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. ADIBFAR

    1973-07-01

    Full Text Available 33 Stools from 518 patients suspected of having cholera were examined. From 174 of these patients Vibrio EI Tor was isolated. PO of these strains belonged to phage type IV, 53 to phage type V and one strain was untypable. It is suggested that these strains originated from two different sources.

  15. Characterizing Phage Genomes for Therapeutic Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Casandra W. Philipson

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Multi-drug resistance is increasing at alarming rates. The efficacy of phage therapy, treating bacterial infections with bacteriophages alone or in combination with traditional antibiotics, has been demonstrated in emergency cases in the United States and in other countries, however remains to be approved for wide-spread use in the US. One limiting factor is a lack of guidelines for assessing the genomic safety of phage candidates. We present the phage characterization workflow used by our team to generate data for submitting phages to the Federal Drug Administration (FDA for authorized use. Essential analysis checkpoints and warnings are detailed for obtaining high-quality genomes, excluding undesirable candidates, rigorously assessing a phage genome for safety and evaluating sequencing contamination. This workflow has been developed in accordance with community standards for high-throughput sequencing of viral genomes as well as principles for ideal phages used for therapy. The feasibility and utility of the pipeline is demonstrated on two new phage genomes that meet all safety criteria. We propose these guidelines as a minimum standard for phages being submitted to the FDA for review as investigational new drug candidates.

  16. Flexible displays, rigid designs?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hornbæk, Kasper

    2015-01-01

    Rapid technological progress has enabled a wide range of flexible displays for computing devices, but the user experience--which we're only beginning to understand--will be the key driver for successful designs.......Rapid technological progress has enabled a wide range of flexible displays for computing devices, but the user experience--which we're only beginning to understand--will be the key driver for successful designs....

  17. PHAGE AMPLIFICATION TECHNOLOGY IN THE DIAGNOSIS OF ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Though of global importance, the developing world bears the highest burden of tuberculosis (TB) worldwide and Nigeria has been rated amongst 222 countries where TB prevalence is highest worldwide. In Nigeria, diagnosis is largely by direct smear microscopy using the Ziehl-Neelson method. Studies have shown that ...

  18. Bacteriophages and phage-inspired nanocarriers for targeted delivery of therapeutic cargos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimi, Mahdi; Mirshekari, Hamed; Moosavi Basri, Seyed Masoud; Bahrami, Sajad; Moghoofei, Mohsen; Hamblin, Michael R

    2016-11-15

    The main goal of drug delivery systems is to target therapeutic cargoes to desired cells and to ensure their efficient uptake. Recently a number of studies have focused on designing bio-inspired nanocarriers, such as bacteriophages, and synthetic carriers based on the bacteriophage structure. Bacteriophages are viruses that specifically recognize their bacterial hosts. They can replicate only inside their host cell and can act as natural gene carriers. Each type of phage has a particular shape, a different capacity for loading cargo, a specific production time, and their own mechanisms of supramolecular assembly, that have enabled them to act as tunable carriers. New phage-based technologies have led to the construction of different peptide libraries, and recognition abilities provided by novel targeting ligands. Phage hybridization with non-organic compounds introduces new properties to phages and could be a suitable strategy for construction of bio-inorganic carriers. In this review we try to cover the major phage species that have been used in drug and gene delivery systems, and the biological application of phages as novel targeting ligands and targeted therapeutics. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Development of transient phage resistance in Campylobacter coli against the group II phage CP84.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orquera, Stefanie; Hertwig, Stefan; Alter, Thomas; Hammerl, Jens A; Jirova, Alice; Gölz, Greta

    2015-01-01

    Recently, there is a growing interest in the use of bacteriophages for pre- and post-harvest applications to reduce foodborne pathogens (including Campylobacter) along the food chain. Quantitative Campylobacter reductions of up to three log10 units have been achieved by phage application. However, possible phage resistance might limit this approach. In Campylobacter (C.) jejuni, phage resistance mechanisms have been described in detail but data on these mechanisms in C. coli are still missing. To study phage resistance in C. coli, strain NCTC 12668 was infected with the lytic phage CP84, belonging to group II of Campylobacter phages. Resistant and sensitive clones were analysed using phenotypic and genotypic assays. C. coli clones acquired only transient resistance against CP84. The resistance led to cross-protection to one out of five other group II phages tested. Phage resistance was apparently neither caused by large genomic rearrangements nor by a CRISPR system. Binding assays demonstrated that CP84 could not adsorb to resistant C. coli clones suggesting a bacterial phage receptor to be involved in resistance. However, phage resistant C. coli clones did not reveal an altered motility or modified flaA sequence. Considering the loss of binding capacity and the reversion to a phage sensitive phenotype we hypothesize that acquired resistance depends on temporal phase variable switch-off modifications of the phage receptor genes, even though the resistance mechanism could not be elucidated in detail. We further speculate that even closely related phages of the same group use different bacterial receptors for binding on C. coli.

  20. Therapeutic use of chimeric bacteriophage (phage) lysins in staphylococcal endophthalmitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purpose: Phage endolysins are peptidoglycan hydrolases that are produced at the end of the phage lytic cycle to digest the host bacterial cell wall, facilitating the release of mature phage progeny. The aim of this study is to determine the antimicrobial activity of chimeric phage lysins against cli...

  1. Phage Therapy -- Everything Old Is New again

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew M Kropinski

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The study of bacterial viruses (bacteriophages or phages proved pivotal in the nascence of the disciplines of molecular biology and microbial genetics, providing important information on the central processes of the bacterial cell (DNA replication, transcription and translation and on how DNA can be transferred from one cell to another. As a result of the pioneering genetics studies and modern genomics, it is now known that phages have contributed to the evolution of the microbial cell and to its pathogenic potential. Because of their ability to transmit genes, phages have been exploited to develop cloning vector systems. They also provide a plethora of enzymes for the modern molecular biologist. Until the introduction of antibiotics, phages were used to treat bacterial infections (with variable success. Western science is now having to re-evaluate the application of phage therapy -- a therapeutic modality that never went out of vogue in Eastern Europe -- because of the emergence of an alarming number of antibiotic-resistant bacteria. The present article introduces the reader to phage biology, and the benefits and pitfalls of phage therapy in humans and animals.

  2. Ecological basis for rational phage therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Letarov, A V; Golomidova, A K; Tarasyan, K K

    2010-04-01

    Understanding the mutual interactions of bacterial and phage populations in the environment of a human or animal body is essential in any attempt to influence these complex processes, particularly for rational phage therapy. Current knowledge on the impact of naturally occurring bacteriophages on the populations of their host bacteria, and their role in the homeostasis maintenance of a macro host, is still sketchy. The existing data suggest that different mechanisms stabilize phage-bacteria coexistence in different animal species or different body sites. The defining set of parameters governing phage infection includes specific physical, chemical, and biological conditions, such as pH, nutrient densities, host prevalence, relation to mucosa and other surfaces, the presence of phage inhibiting substances, etc. Phage therapy is also an ecological process that always implies three components that form a complex pattern of interactions: populations of the pathogen, the bacteriophages used as antibacterial agents, and the macroorganism. We present a review of contemporary data on natural bacteriophages occuring in human- and animal-body associated microbial communities, and analyze ecological and physiological considerations that determine the success of phage therapy in mammals.

  3. Investigation of Virtual Digital Human and Robotic Device Technology Merger Complimented by Haptics and Autostereoscopic Displays, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — As expected, the STTR Phase I investigation confirmed that the Digital Virtual Human (DVH) and Robonaut technologies can be merged, and that haptic and...

  4. Research progress of infrared detecting and display integrated device based on infrared-visible up-conversion technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Junfeng; Li, Weile; He, Bo; Wang, Haowei; Song, Yong; Yang, Shengyi; Ni, Guoqiang

    2018-01-01

    Infrared detecting and display device - IR-DDD - is a newly developed optical up-conversion device that integrates the light-emitting diode - LED - onto the infrared - IR - photo-detector, in order to convert IR light into the carriers photo-generated in detection materials and inject them into LED to emit visible light. This IR-DDD can achieve the direct up-conversion from IR ray to visible light, showing the considerable potential in night-vision application. This paper attempts a review of its working principle and current research progresses.

  5. Replication ofVibrio choleraeclassical CTX phage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eun Jin; Yu, Hyun Jin; Lee, Je Hee; Kim, Jae-Ouk; Han, Seung Hyun; Yun, Cheol-Heui; Chun, Jongsik; Nair, G Balakrish; Kim, Dong Wook

    2017-02-28

    The toxigenic classical and El Tor biotype Vibrio cholerae serogroup O1 strains are generated by lysogenization of host-type-specific cholera toxin phages (CTX phages). Experimental evidence of the replication and transmission of an El Tor biotype-specific CTX phage, CTX-1, has explained the evolution of V. cholerae El Tor biotype strains. The generation of classical biotype strains has not been demonstrated in the laboratory, and the classical biotype-specific CTX phage, CTX-cla, is considered to be defective with regard to replication. However, the identification of atypical El Tor strains that contain CTX-cla-like phage, CTX-2, indicates that CTX-cla and CTX-2 replicate and can be transmitted to V. cholerae strains. The replication of CTX-cla and CTX-2 phages and the transduction of El Tor biotype strains by various CTX phages under laboratory conditions are demonstrated in this report. We have established a plasmid-based CTX phage replication system that supports the replication of CTX-1, CTX-cla, CTX-2, and CTX-O139. The replication of CTX-2 from the tandem repeat of lysogenic CTX-2 in Wave 2 El Tor strains is also presented. El Tor biotype strains can be transduced by CTX phages in vitro by introducing a point mutation in toxT , the transcriptional activator of the tcp (toxin coregulated pilus) gene cluster and the cholera toxin gene. This mutation also increases the expression of cholera toxin in El Tor strains in a sample single-phase culture. Our results thus constitute experimental evidence of the genetic mechanism of the evolution of V. cholerae .

  6. Detection of Bacillus anthracis spores from environmental water using bioluminescent reporter phage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, C; Makkar, R; Sharp, N J; Page, M A; Molineux, I J; Schofield, D A

    2017-11-01

    We investigated the ability of a temperate Bacillus anthracis reporter phage (Wβ::luxAB-2), which transduces bioluminescence to infected cells, to detect viable spores from deliberately contaminated environmental water samples. Environmental water was inoculated with spores and assayed with Wβ::luxAB-2. Bioluminescent signals directly correlated with input phage and spore concentrations. A limit of detection of 10 1 and 10 2 CFU per ml within 8 h was achieved from pond and lake water, respectively. Detection was greatly simplified by minimizing sample processing steps without spore extraction. The complex endogenous microbial flora and salt content of brackish water challenged the assay, extending the detection time to 12 h for a sensitivity of 10 2 CFU per ml. Phage-mediated bioluminescence was strictly dependent on bacterial physiology, being significantly reduced in mid/late log phase cells. This was shown to be due to an inability of the phage to adsorb. The reporter phage Wβ::luxAB-2 displays potential for simplified detection of viable spores from contaminated water samples within 12 h. A deliberate aerosol release of spores could lead to widespread contamination, leaving large areas uninhabitable until remediation. An essential requirement of this restoration process is the development of simplified detection assays in different environmental matrices. © 2017 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  7. A Shigella boydii bacteriophage which resembles Salmonella phage ViI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    She Yi-Min

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lytic bacteriophages have been applied successfully to control the growth of various foodborne pathogens. Sequencing of their genomes is considered as an important preliminary step to ensure their safety prior to food applications. Results The lytic bacteriophage, ΦSboM-AG3, targets the important foodborne pathogen, Shigella. It is morphologically similar to phage ViI of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi and a series of phages of Acinetobacter calcoaceticus and Rhizobium meliloti. The complete genome of ΦSboM-AG3 was determined to be 158 kb and was terminally redundant and circularly permuted. Two hundred and sixteen open reading frames (ORFs were identified and annotated, most of which displayed homology to proteins of Salmonella phage ViI. The genome also included four genes specifying tRNAs. Conclusions This is the first time that a Vi-specific phage for Shigella has been described. There is no evidence for the presence of virulence and lysogeny-associated genes. In conclusion, the genome analysis of ΦSboM-AG3 indicates that this phage can be safely used for biocontrol purposes.

  8. Complete genome sequence of Vibrio anguillarum phage CHOED successfully used for phage therapy in aquaculture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Romero, Jaime; Higuera, Gastón; Gajardo, Felipe

    2014-01-01

    Vibrio anguillarum phage CHOED was isolated from Chilean mussels. It is a virulent phage showing effective inhibition of V. anguillarum. CHOED has potential in phage therapy, because it can protect fish from vibriosis in fish farms. Here, we announce the completely sequenced genome of V....... anguillarum phage CHOED....

  9. Complete genome sequence of Vibrio anguillarum phage CHOED successfully used for phage therapy in aquaculture

    OpenAIRE

    Romero, Jaime; Higuera, Gastón; Gajardo, Felipe; Castillo Bermúdez, Daniel Elías; Middelboe, Mathias; García, Katherine; Ramírez, Carolina; Espejo, Romilio T.

    2014-01-01

    Vibrio anguillarum phage CHOED was isolated from Chilean mussels. It is a virulent phage showing effective inhibition of V. anguillarum. CHOED has potential in phage therapy, because it can protect fish from vibriosis in fish farms. Here, we announce the completely sequenced genome of V. anguillarum phage CHOED.

  10. Microlaser-based displays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergstedt, Robert; Fink, Charles G.; Flint, Graham W.; Hargis, David E.; Peppler, Philipp W.

    1997-07-01

    Laser Power Corporation has developed a new type of projection display, based upon microlaser technology and a novel scan architecture, which provides the foundation for bright, extremely high resolution images. A review of projection technologies is presented along with the limitations of each and the difficulties they experience in trying to generate high resolution imagery. The design of the microlaser based projector is discussed along with the advantage of this technology. High power red, green, and blue microlasers have been designed and developed specifically for use in projection displays. These sources, in combination with high resolution, high contrast modulator, produce a 24 bit color gamut, capable of supporting the full range of real world colors. The new scan architecture, which reduces the modulation rate and scan speeds required, is described. This scan architecture, along with the inherent brightness of the laser provides the fundamentals necessary to produce a 5120 by 4096 resolution display. The brightness and color uniformity of the display is excellent, allowing for tiling of the displays with far fewer artifacts than those in a traditionally tiled display. Applications for the display include simulators, command and control centers, and electronic cinema.

  11. Phage-Antibiotic Synergy (PAS: beta-lactam and quinolone antibiotics stimulate virulent phage growth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André M Comeau

    Full Text Available Although the multiplication of bacteriophages (phages has a substantial impact on the biosphere, comparatively little is known about how the external environment affects phage production. Here we report that sub-lethal concentrations of certain antibiotics can substantially stimulate the host bacterial cell's production of some virulent phage. For example, a low dosage of cefotaxime, a cephalosporin, increased an uropathogenic Escherichia coli strain's production of the phage PhiMFP by more than 7-fold. We name this phenomenon Phage-Antibiotic Synergy (PAS. A related effect was observed in diverse host-phage systems, including the T4-like phages, with beta-lactam and quinolone antibiotics, as well as mitomycin C. A common characteristic of these antibiotics is that they inhibit bacterial cell division and trigger the SOS system. We therefore examined the PAS effect within the context of the bacterial SOS and filamentation responses. We found that the PAS effect appears SOS-independent and is primarily a consequence of cellular filamentation; it is mimicked by cells that constitutively filament. The fact that completely unrelated phages manifest this phenomenon suggests that it confers an important and general advantage to the phages.

  12. Three New Escherichia coli Phages from the Human Gut Show Promising Potential for Phage Therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marion Dalmasso

    Full Text Available With the emergence of multi-drug resistant bacteria the use of bacteriophages (phages is gaining renewed interest as promising anti-microbial agents. The aim of this study was to isolate and characterize phages from human fecal samples. Three new coliphages, ɸAPCEc01, ɸAPCEc02 and ɸAPCEc03, were isolated. Their phenotypic and genomic characteristics, and lytic activity against biofilm, and in combination with ciprofloxacin, were investigated. All three phages reduced the growth of E. coli strain DPC6051 at multiplicity of infection (MOI between 10-3 and 105. A cocktail of all three phages completely inhibited the growth of E. coli. The phage cocktail also reduced biofilm formation and prevented the emergence of phage-resistant mutants which occurred with single phage. When combined with ciprofloxacin, phage alone or in cocktail inhibited the growth of E. coli and prevented the emergence of resistant mutants. These three new phages are promising biocontrol agents for E. coli infections.

  13. Typical Toddlers' Participation in “Just-in-Time” Programming of Vocabulary for Visual Scene Display Augmentative and Alternative Communication Apps on Mobile Technology: A Descriptive Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drager, Kathryn; Light, Janice; Caron, Jessica Gosnell

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) promotes communicative participation and language development for young children with complex communication needs. However, the motor, linguistic, and cognitive demands of many AAC technologies restrict young children's operational use of and influence over these technologies. The purpose of the current study is to better understand young children's participation in programming vocabulary “just in time” on an AAC application with minimized demands. Method A descriptive study was implemented to highlight the participation of 10 typically developing toddlers (M age: 16 months, range: 10–22 months) in just-in-time vocabulary programming in an AAC app with visual scene displays. Results All 10 toddlers participated in some capacity in adding new visual scene displays and vocabulary to the app just in time. Differences in participation across steps were observed, suggesting variation in the developmental demands of controls involved in vocabulary programming. Conclusions Results from the current study provide clinical insights toward involving young children in AAC programming just in time and steps that may allow for more independent participation or require more scaffolding. Technology designed to minimize motor, cognitive, and linguistic demands may allow children to participate in programming devices at a younger age. PMID:28586825

  14. Typical Toddlers' Participation in "Just-in-Time" Programming of Vocabulary for Visual Scene Display Augmentative and Alternative Communication Apps on Mobile Technology: A Descriptive Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holyfield, Christine; Drager, Kathryn; Light, Janice; Caron, Jessica Gosnell

    2017-08-15

    Augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) promotes communicative participation and language development for young children with complex communication needs. However, the motor, linguistic, and cognitive demands of many AAC technologies restrict young children's operational use of and influence over these technologies. The purpose of the current study is to better understand young children's participation in programming vocabulary "just in time" on an AAC application with minimized demands. A descriptive study was implemented to highlight the participation of 10 typically developing toddlers (M age: 16 months, range: 10-22 months) in just-in-time vocabulary programming in an AAC app with visual scene displays. All 10 toddlers participated in some capacity in adding new visual scene displays and vocabulary to the app just in time. Differences in participation across steps were observed, suggesting variation in the developmental demands of controls involved in vocabulary programming. Results from the current study provide clinical insights toward involving young children in AAC programming just in time and steps that may allow for more independent participation or require more scaffolding. Technology designed to minimize motor, cognitive, and linguistic demands may allow children to participate in programming devices at a younger age.

  15. Cambridge Healthtech Institute's 5th Annual 'Molecular Display: The Chemistry Set for Proteins and Small Molecules' Conference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coley, Andrew M; Casey, Joanne L

    2003-08-01

    This meeting covered recent advances in the molecular display of peptides, proteins and nucleotides, including selection and mutational technologies. The scientific organisers assembled an impressive array of 'molecular display' heavyweights. It promised to be a stimulating meeting and the events of the following 2 days did not disappoint. The majority of the presentations were concerned with the development of novel display technologies and processes. Antibodies currently represent > 30% of the biopharmaceutical market, but are likely to be superseded by more efficient display frameworks which avoid their inherent drawbacks. In order to generate such novel therapeutics and diagnostics, high affinity reagents must be selected and/or generated from hitherto unexplored nucleic acid sequences and displayed on suitable frameworks. This meeting was concerned with the identification, generation and validation of novel sequences and framework molecules. The keynote addresses were followed by four themed sessions entitled New technologies and target selection, The discovery of small molecules using phage display, Applications in proteomics, and Novel therapeutics and diagnostics. There was a panel discussion after each session.

  16. LookOnX: A new technological approach for the H1 off-line event display

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perus, A.; Arnault, C.

    1994-01-01

    The authors present the re-engineering work achieved on a traditional-fashioned GKS graphical package with new open-quotes event drivenclose quotes concepts required by using workstation interactivity. The Off-line Event Display for the H1 experiment H1look was originally written using a basic kernel package - Look - that provides a uniform control engine for graphical modules based on conventional GKS graphics. The use of powerful UNIX workstations is growing daily and their new graphical functionalities and CPU power are well suited to interactive graphical data analysis. Therefore re-engineering work was needed to put in some new features such as: interactive manipulations of graphical objects; object oriented definitions of the graphical representations and connectivity between graphical objects and physical objects; multi-windowing facility

  17. Supersize me: Cronobacter sakazakii phage GAP32

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abbasifar, Reza; Griffiths, Mansel W. [Canadian Research Institute for Food Safety, University of Guelph, Guelph, ON, Canada N1G 2W1 (Canada); Sabour, Parviz M. [Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Guelph Food Research Centre, Guelph, ON, Canada N1G 5C9 (Canada); Ackermann, Hans-Wolfgang [Department of Microbiology-Infectiology and Immunology, Faculty of Medicine, Université Laval, Quebec, QC (Canada); Vandersteegen, Katrien; Lavigne, Rob [Laboratory of Gene Technology, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Leuven (Belgium); Noben, Jean-Paul [Biomedical Research Institute and Transnational University Limburg, School of Life Sciences, Hasselt University, Diepenbeek (Belgium); Alanis Villa, Argentina; Abbasifar, Arash [Canadian Research Institute for Food Safety, University of Guelph, Guelph, ON, Canada N1G 2W1 (Canada); Nash, John H.E. [Public Health Agency of Canada, Laboratory for Foodborne Zoonoses, Guelph, ON, Canada N1G 3W4 (Canada); Kropinski, Andrew M., E-mail: akropins@uoguelph.ca [Public Health Agency of Canada, Laboratory for Foodborne Zoonoses, Guelph, ON, Canada N1G 3W4 (Canada); Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology, University of Guelph, Guelph, ON, Canada N1G 2W1 (Canada)

    2014-07-15

    Cronobacter sakazakii is a Gram-negative pathogen found in milk-based formulae that causes infant meningitis. Bacteriophages have been proposed to control bacterial pathogens; however, comprehensive knowledge about a phage is required to ensure its safety before clinical application. We have characterized C. sakazakii phage vB{sub C}saM{sub G}AP32 (GAP32), which possesses the second largest sequenced phage genome (358,663 bp). A total of 571 genes including 545 protein coding sequences and 26 tRNAs were identified, thus more genes than in the smallest bacterium, Mycoplasma genitalium G37. BLASTP and HHpred searches, together with proteomic analyses reveal that only 23.9% of the putative proteins have defined functions. Some of the unique features of this phage include: a chromosome condensation protein, two copies of the large subunit terminase, a predicted signal-arrest-release lysin; and an RpoD-like protein, which is possibly involved in the switch from immediate early to delayed early transcription. Its closest relatives are all extremely large myoviruses, namely coliphage PBECO4 and Klebsiella phage vB{sub K}leM-RaK2, with whom it shares approximately 44% homologous proteins. Since the homologs are not evenly distributed, we propose that these three phages belong to a new subfamily. - Highlights: • Cronobacter sakazakii phage vB{sub C}saM{sub G}AP32 has a genome of 358,663 bp. • It encodes 545 proteins which is more than Mycoplasma genitalium G37. • It is a member of the Myoviridae. • It is peripherally related to coliphage PBECO4 and Klebsiella phage vB{sub K}leM-RaK2. • GAP32 encodes a chromosome condensation protein.

  18. The Staphylococci Phages Family: An Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deghorain, Marie; Van Melderen, Laurence

    2012-01-01

    Due to their crucial role in pathogenesis and virulence, phages of Staphylococcus aureus have been extensively studied. Most of them encode and disseminate potent staphylococcal virulence factors. In addition, their movements contribute to the extraordinary versatility and adaptability of this prominent pathogen by improving genome plasticity. In addition to S. aureus, phages from coagulase-negative Staphylococci (CoNS) are gaining increasing interest. Some of these species, such as S. epidermidis, cause nosocomial infections and are therefore problematic for public health. This review provides an overview of the staphylococcal phages family extended to CoNS phages. At the morphological level, all these phages characterized so far belong to the Caudovirales order and are mainly temperate Siphoviridae. At the molecular level, comparative genomics revealed an extensive mosaicism, with genes organized into functional modules that are frequently exchanged between phages. Evolutionary relationships within this family, as well as with other families, have been highlighted. All these aspects are of crucial importance for our understanding of evolution and emergence of pathogens among bacterial species such as Staphylococci. PMID:23342361

  19. Phage Life Cycles Behind Bacterial Biodiversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olszak, Tomasz; Latka, Agnieszka; Roszniowski, Bartosz; Valvano, Miguel A; Drulis-Kawa, Zuzanna

    2017-11-24

    Bacteriophages (phages or bacterial viruses) are the most abundant biological entities in our planet; their influence reaches far beyond the microorganisms they parasitize. Phages are present in every environment and shape up every bacterial population in both active and passive ways. They participate in the circulation of organic matter and drive the evolution of microorganisms by horizontal gene transfer at unprecedented scales. The mass flow of genetic information in the microbial world influences the biosphere and poses challenges for science and medicine. The genetic flow, however, depends on the fate of the viral DNA injected into the bacterial cell. The archetypal notion of phages only engaging in predatorprey relationships is slowly fading. Because of their varied development cycles, environmental conditions, and the diversity of microorganisms they parasitize, phages form a dense and highly complex web of dependencies, which has important consequences for life on Earth. The sophisticated phage-bacteria interplay includes both aggressive action (bacterial lysis) and "diplomatic negotiations" (prophage domestication). Here, we review the most important mechanisms of interactions between phages and bacteria and their evolutionary consequences influencing their biodiversity. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  20. The Staphylococci Phages Family: An Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurence Van Melderen

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Due to their crucial role in pathogenesis and virulence, phages of Staphylococcus aureus have been extensively studied. Most of them encode and disseminate potent staphylococcal virulence factors. In addition, their movements contribute to the extraordinary versatility and adaptability of this prominent pathogen by improving genome plasticity. In addition to S. aureus, phages from coagulase-negative Staphylococci (CoNS are gaining increasing interest. Some of these species, such as S. epidermidis, cause nosocomial infections and are therefore problematic for public health. This review provides an overview of the staphylococcal phages family extended to CoNS phages. At the morphological level, all these phages characterized so far belong to the Caudovirales order and are mainly temperate Siphoviridae. At the molecular level, comparative genomics revealed an extensive mosaicism, with genes organized into functional modules that are frequently exchanged between phages. Evolutionary relationships within this family, as well as with other families, have been highlighted. All these aspects are of crucial importance for our understanding of evolution and emergence of pathogens among bacterial species such as Staphylococci.

  1. MEGASTAR: The meaning of growth. An assessment of systems, technologies, and requirements. [methodology for display and analysis of energy production and consumption

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-01-01

    A methodology for the display and analysis of postulated energy futures for the United States is presented. A systems approach methodology including the methodology of technology assessment is used to examine three energy scenarios--the Westinghouse Nuclear Electric Economy, the Ford Technical Fix Base Case and a MEGASTAR generated Alternate to the Ford Technical Fix Base Case. The three scenarios represent different paths of energy consumption from the present to the year 2000. Associated with these paths are various mixes of fuels, conversion, distribution, conservation and end-use technologies. MEGASTAR presents the estimated times and unit requirements to supply the fuels, conversion and distribution systems for the postulated end uses for the three scenarios and then estimates the aggregate manpower, materials, and capital requirements needed to develop the energy system described by the particular scenario.

  2. Heterogeneity in Induction Level, Infection Ability, and Morphology of Shiga Toxin-Encoding Phages (Stx Phages) from Dairy and Human Shiga Toxin-Producing Escherichia coli O26:H11 Isolates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonanno, Ludivine; Petit, Marie-Agnès; Loukiadis, Estelle; Michel, Valérie

    2016-01-01

    Shiga toxin (Stx)-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) bacteria are foodborne pathogens responsible for diarrhea and hemolytic-uremic syndrome (HUS). Shiga toxin, the main STEC virulence factor, is encoded by the stx gene located in the genome of a bacteriophage inserted into the bacterial chromosome. The O26:H11 serotype is considered to be the second-most-significant HUS-causing serotype worldwide after O157:H7. STEC O26:H11 bacteria and their stx-negative counterparts have been detected in dairy products. They may convert from the one form to the other by loss or acquisition of Stx phages, potentially confounding food microbiological diagnostic methods based on stx gene detection. Here we investigated the diversity and mobility of Stx phages from human and dairy STEC O26:H11 strains. Evaluation of their rate of in vitro induction, occurring either spontaneously or in the presence of mitomycin C, showed that the Stx2 phages were more inducible overall than Stx1 phages. However, no correlation was found between the Stx phage levels produced and the origin of the strains tested or the phage insertion sites. Morphological analysis by electron microscopy showed that Stx phages from STEC O26:H11 displayed various shapes that were unrelated to Stx1 or Stx2 types. Finally, the levels of sensitivity of stx-negative E. coli O26:H11 to six Stx phages differed among the 17 strains tested and our attempts to convert them into STEC were unsuccessful, indicating that their lysogenization was a rare event. PMID:26826235

  3. Resistance gene transfer: induction of transducing phage by sub-inhibitory concentrations of antimicrobials is not correlated to induction of lytic phage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanczak-Mrozek, Kinga I; Laing, Ken G; Lindsay, Jodi A

    2017-06-01

    Horizontal gene transfer of antimicrobial resistance (AMR) genes between clinical isolates via transduction is poorly understood. MRSA are opportunistic pathogens resistant to all classes of antimicrobial agents but currently no strains are fully drug resistant. AMR gene transfer between Staphylococcus aureus isolates is predominantly due to generalized transduction via endogenous bacteriophage, and recent studies have suggested transfer is elevated during host colonization. The aim was to investigate whether exposure to sub-MIC concentrations of antimicrobials triggers bacteriophage induction and/or increased efficiency of AMR gene transfer. Isolates from MRSA carriers were exposed to nine antimicrobials and supernatants were compared for lytic phage particles and ability to transfer an AMR gene. A new technology, droplet digital PCR, was used to measure the concentration of genes in phage particles. All antibiotics tested induced lytic phage and AMR gene transduction, although the ratio of transducing particles to lytic particles differed substantially for each antibiotic. Mupirocin induced the highest ratio of transducing versus lytic particles. Gentamicin and novobiocin reduced UV-induced AMR transduction. The genes carried in phage particles correlated with AMR transfer or lytic particle activity, suggesting antimicrobials influence which DNA sequences are packaged into phage particles. Sub-inhibitory antibiotics induce AMR gene transfer between clinical MRSA, while combination therapy with an inhibiting antibiotic could potentially alter AMR gene packaging into phage particles, reducing AMR transfer. In a continually evolving environment, pathogens have an advantage if they can transfer DNA while lowering the risk of lytic death. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy.

  4. Colonisation of a phage susceptible Campylobacter jejuni population in two phage positive broiler flocks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie Kittler

    Full Text Available The pathogens Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli are commensals in the poultry intestine and campylobacteriosis is one of the most frequent foodborne diseases in developed and developing countries. Phages were identified to be effective in reducing intestinal Campylobacter load and this was evaluated, in the first field trials which were recently carried out. The aim of this study was to further investigate Campylobacter population dynamics during phage application on a commercial broiler farm. This study determines the superiority in colonisation of a Campylobacter type found in a field trial that was susceptible to phages in in vitro tests. The colonisation factors, i.e. motility and gamma glutamyl transferase activity, were increased in this type. The clustering in phylogenetic comparisons of MALDI-TOF spectra did not match the ST, biochemical phenotype and phage susceptibility. Occurrence of Campylobacter jejuni strains and phage susceptibility types with different colonisation potential seem to play a very important role in the success of phage therapy in commercial broiler houses. Thus, mechanisms of both, phage susceptibility and Campylobacter colonisation should be further investigated and considered when composing phage cocktails.

  5. Influence of phage proteins on formation of specific UV DNA photoproducts in phage T7

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fekete, A.; Vink, A.A.; Gaspar, S.; Modos, K.; Berces, A.; Ronto, Gy.; Roza, L.

    1999-01-01

    Phage T7 can be used as a biological UV dosimeter. Its reading is proportional to the inactivation rate expressed in HT7 units. To understand the influence of phage proteins on the formation of DNA UV photoproducts, cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPD) and (6-4)photoproducts ((6-4)PD) were determined

  6. Development of a phage typing system for Staphylococcus hyicus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wegener, Henrik Caspar

    1993-01-01

    Bacteriophages were released by 98% of 100 Staphylococcus hyicus strains studied after treatment with mitomycin C. Twenty-three phages with different lytic spectra were included in a phage typing system and used f or typing S. hyicus. On a test-set of 100 epidemiologically unrelated S. hyicus...... originating from other countries. Although phages were isolated from porcine skin strains exclusively, the system produced phage types in S. hyicus strains of bovine origin. Ten strains of S. aureus and S. chromogenes were not typable by these phages. Strains belonging to one phage type (A/B/C/W) were...

  7. Propionibacterium acnes bacteriophages display limited genetic diversity and broad killing activity against bacterial skin isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinelli, Laura J; Fitz-Gibbon, Sorel; Hayes, Clarmyra; Bowman, Charles; Inkeles, Megan; Loncaric, Anya; Russell, Daniel A; Jacobs-Sera, Deborah; Cokus, Shawn; Pellegrini, Matteo; Kim, Jenny; Miller, Jeff F; Hatfull, Graham F; Modlin, Robert L

    2012-01-01

    Investigation of the human microbiome has revealed diverse and complex microbial communities at distinct anatomic sites. The microbiome of the human sebaceous follicle provides a tractable model in which to study its dominant bacterial inhabitant, Propionibacterium acnes, which is thought to contribute to the pathogenesis of the human disease acne. To explore the diversity of the bacteriophages that infect P. acnes, 11 P. acnes phages were isolated from the sebaceous follicles of donors with healthy skin or acne and their genomes were sequenced. Comparative genomic analysis of the P. acnes phage population, which spans a 30-year temporal period and a broad geographic range, reveals striking similarity in terms of genome length, percent GC content, nucleotide identity (>85%), and gene content. This was unexpected, given the far-ranging diversity observed in virtually all other phage populations. Although the P. acnes phages display a broad host range against clinical isolates of P. acnes, two bacterial isolates were resistant to many of these phages. Moreover, the patterns of phage resistance correlate closely with the presence of clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat elements in the bacteria that target a specific subset of phages, conferring a system of prokaryotic innate immunity. The limited diversity of the P. acnes bacteriophages, which may relate to the unique evolutionary constraints imposed by the lipid-rich anaerobic environment in which their bacterial hosts reside, points to the potential utility of phage-based antimicrobial therapy for acne. Propionibacterium acnes is a dominant member of the skin microflora and has also been implicated in the pathogenesis of acne; however, little is known about the bacteriophages that coexist with and infect this bacterium. Here we present the novel genome sequences of 11 P. acnes phages, thereby substantially increasing the amount of available genomic information about this phage population

  8. Displays: Entering a New Dimension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starkman, Neal

    2007-01-01

    As display technologies prepare to welcome 3-D, the 21st-century classroom will soon bear little resemblance to anything students and teachers have ever seen. In this article, the author presents the latest innovations in the world of digital display technology. These include: (1) Touchlight, an interactive touch screen program that takes a normal…

  9. Identification of cyclic peptides for facilitation of transcellular transport of phages across intestinal epithelium in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Shunsuke; Ito, Shingo; Kurogi-Hirayama, Mio; Ohtsuki, Sumio

    2017-09-28

    Methodology to enhance intestinal absorption of macromolecular drugs is an important challenge for developing next-generation biomedicines. So far, various cationic cell-penetrating peptides have been reported to facilitate uptake of certain bioactive proteins. However, cyclic peptides might be better candidates, as they are more metabolically stable than linear peptides. Accordingly, we hypothesized that suitable cyclic peptides would promote the absorption of macromolecules across intestinal epithelium. To test this idea, we adopted Caco-2 cell permeability assay as an in vitro human intestinal absorption model, and M13 phage as a model of macromolecules. Successive screenings of a phage library displaying cyclic heptapeptides via a short GGGS linker yielded 3 hits. Among them, phage displaying cyclic heptapeptide DNPGNET (DNP-phage) showed the greatest permeability across a Caco-2 cell monolayer and mouse intestinal epithelium. Interestingly, DNPGNET (DNP) does not contain any basic amino acids. Its isoelectric point (pI) was estimated to be 2.72. It did not reduce the viability or tight-junction integrity of Caco-2 cells at concentrations up to 100μM for 24h. Uptake of either DNP-phage or a fluorescence-labeled DNP derivative (AC-DNPGNET-CGGGS modified with 5/6-FAM at the C-terminal; the cysteines serve to generate the cyclic peptide via disulfide bond formation, and GGGS is the phage linker) by Caco-2 cells was inhibited by low temperature, unlabeled AC-DNPGNET-CGGGS and EIPA, a macropinocytosis inhibitor. Thus, DNP appears to facilitate transcellular permeability of phages via macropinocytosis, but not paracellular diffusion. These findings indicate that DNP is a promising candidate as a carrier to promote intestinal absorption of macromolecular drugs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. The revival of Phage Therapy to fight Antimicrobial Resistance – Part II: What about patent protection and alternative incentives?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Minssen, Timo

    2014-01-01

    . Like in Europe, the first door to patentability that phage-related technology would need to pass concerns patent eligibility. In the last years the US Supreme Court has rendered an astonishing number of fundamental patent-decisions, including not less than four (!) landmark judgments on patent...... occurring viruses, such as phages, and the processes in which these are used. Myriad and Prometheus could thus have a fundamental impact on many patent portfolios relating to phage therapy and thus business involvement. In that context, it is important to realize that an important component of proper use...... of antibiotics and phage therapy relates to improved diagnostics, i.e. molecular diagnostics that provide actionable decisions regarding selection of treatment(s) for a sick patient – given the resistance profile of the infection. Research is needed, along with funding and incentives for business to get the job...

  11. The revival of Phage Therapy to fight Antimicrobial Resistance (AMR) – Part III: What about patent protection and alternative incentives?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Minssen, Timo

    2014-01-01

    In Part II of this blog on legal issues relating to the revival of phage therapy I discussed the US Supreme Court’s decisions in Myriad and Prometheus, which might present major obstacles to the patentability of phage-related technology (a more detailed analysis of the Myriad and Prometheus...... to “natural laws”. Thus there still seems to be considerable leeway for patenting within the area of page therapy. One example, mentioned in a recent Nature article, could be the skillful selection and precise combination of different phages in order to attack one specific type of bacteria. Such selections...... features. In his recent paper “New Business Models for Sustainable Antibiotics”, Professor Kevin Outterson delivers an excellent analysis on delinkage options in the fight against AMR. These could also be considered for phage therapy. Finding the right balance of predictable push and pull incentives can...

  12. Immunological basis of M13 phage vaccine: Regulation under MyD88 and TLR9 signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashiguchi, Shuhei; Yamaguchi, Yuya; Takeuchi, Osamu; Akira, Shizuo; Sugimura, Kazuhisa

    2010-11-05

    Peptide-displaying bacteriophages induce mimotope-specific antibody responses, suggesting a novel application of phage-display library as bacteriophage vaccine. We examined the antibody response against M13 phage in mice induced by an i.p. administration of M13 phage in phosphate-buffered saline. We showed here that firstly, mice showed strong IgG antibody responses, particularly, in IgG2b, IgG2c, and IgG3 subclasses even in primary responses. Secondly, IgG production in primary response is totally dependent on MyD88 signaling. These responses were almost comparable, but slightly weaker, in TLR2-, TLR4- and TLR7-deficient mice relative to wild-type mice, suggesting that this enhancing effect is not due to plausible LPS contamination. Thirdly, although primary IgG1 response was not detected in wild-type mice, remarkable IgG1 response was induced in TLR9-deficient mice, suggesting that TLR9 pathway functions as regulatory, but not a simple augmenting signaling cascade, and furthermore, the enhanced IgG1 response was not due to adjuvant effect of single-stranded DNA derived from M13 phage. Thus, innate immunity including TLR regulation is crucial for M13 phage vaccine design. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Morphological evidence for phages in Xylella fastidiosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Civerolo Edwin L

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Presumptive phage particles associated with Xylella fastidiosa strain Temecula-1 grown in PW broth were observed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM in ultrathin sections of bacterial cell-containing low speed centrifugation pellets and in partially purified preparations from CsCl equilibrium centrifugation density gradients. Ultrathin-sectioned cell pellets contained icosahedral particles of about 45 nm in diameter. Samples collected from CsCl density gradients revealed mostly non-tailed icosahedral but also tailed particles. The icosahedral particles could be divided into two types: a large type (about 45 nm and a small type (about 30 nm. Filamentous phage-like particles (17 × 120 to 6,300 nm were also observed. The presence of different types of phage-like particles resembling to those in several bacteriophage families provides new physical evidence, in addition to X. fastidiosa genomic information, that X. fastidiosa possesses active phages. This is the first report of phage particles released in X. fastidiosa cultures.

  14. In Vivo Imaging of Molecularly Targeted Phage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimberly A. Kelly

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Rapid identification of in vivo affinity ligands would have far-reaching applications for imaging specific molecular targets, in vivo systems imaging, and medical use. We have developed a high-throughput method for identifying and optimizing ligands to map and image biologic targets of interest in vivo. We directly labeled viable phage clones with far-red fluorochromes and comparatively imaged them in vivo by multichannel fluorescence ratio imaging. Using Secreted Protein Acidic and Rich in Cysteine (osteonectin and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 as model targets, we show that: 1 fluorescently labeled phage retains target specificity on labeling; 2 in vivo distribution can be quantitated (detection thresholds of ~ 300 phage/mm3 tissue throughout the entire depth of the tumor using fluorescent tomographic imaging; and 3 fluorescently labeled phage itself can serve as a replenishable molecular imaging agent. The described method should find widespread application in the rapid in vivo discovery and validation of affinity ligands and, importantly, in the use of fluorochrome-labeled phage clones as in vivo imaging agents.

  15. Current taxonomy of phages infecting lactic acid bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer eMahony

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Phages infecting lactic acid bacteria have been the focus of significant research attention over the past three decades. Through the isolation and characterization of hundreds of phage isolates, it has been possible to classify phages of the dairy starter and adjunct bacteria Lactococus lactis, Streptococcus thermophilus, Leuconostoc spp. and Lactobacillus spp. Among these, phages of L. lactis have been most thoroughly scrutinized and serve as an excellent model system to address issues that arise when attempting taxonomic classification of phages infecting other LAB species. Here, we present an overview of the current taxonomy of phages infecting LAB genera of industrial significance, the methods employed in these taxonomic efforts and how these may be employed for the taxonomy of phages of currently underrepresented and emerging phage species.

  16. Phages of Listeria offer novel tools for diagnostics and biocontrol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin J Loessner

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Historically, bacteriophages infecting their hosts have perhaps been best known and even notorious for being a nuisance in dairy-fermentation processes. However, with the rapid progress in molecular microbiology and microbial ecology, a new dawn has risen for phages. This review will provide an overview on possible uses and applications of Listeria phages, including phage-typing, reporter phage for bacterial diagnostics, and use of phage as biocontrol agents for food safety. The use of phage-encoded enzymes such as endolysins for the detection and as antimicrobial will also be addressed. Desirable properties of candidate phages for biocontrol will be discussed. While emphasizing the enormous future potential for applications, we will also consider some of the intrinsic limitations dictated by both phage and bacterial ecology.

  17. Laser illuminated flat panel display

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veligdan, J.T.

    1995-12-31

    A 10 inch laser illuminated flat panel Planar Optic Display (POD) screen has been constructed and tested. This POD screen technology is an entirely new concept in display technology. Although the initial display is flat and made of glass, this technology lends itself to applications where a plastic display might be wrapped around the viewer. The display screen is comprised of hundreds of planar optical waveguides where each glass waveguide represents a vertical line of resolution. A black cladding layer, having a lower index of refraction, is placed between each waveguide layer. Since the cladding makes the screen surface black, the contrast is high. The prototype display is 9 inches wide by 5 inches high and approximately I inch thick. A 3 milliwatt HeNe laser is used as the illumination source and a vector scanning technique is employed.

  18. Mapping protease substrates using a biotinylated phage substrate library.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scholle, M. D.; Kriplani, U.; Pabon, A.; Sishtla, K.; Glucksman, M. J.; Kay, B. K.; Biosciences Division; Chicago Medical School

    2005-05-05

    We describe a bacteriophage M13 substrate library encoding the AviTag (BirA substrate) and combinatorial heptamer peptides displayed at the N terminus of the mature form of capsid protein III. Phages are biotinylated efficiently (> or = 50%) when grown in E. coli cells coexpressing BirA, and such viral particles can be immobilized on a streptavidin-coated support and released by protease cleavage within the combinatorial peptide. We have used this library to map the specificity of human Factor Xa and a neuropeptidase, neurolysin (EC3.4.24.16). Validation by analysis of isolated peptide substrates has revealed that neurolysin recognizes the motif hydrophobic-X-Pro-Arg-hydrophobic, where Arg-hydrophobic is the scissile bond.

  19. Recovery of phage lambda from ultraviolet damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devoret, R.; Blanco, M.; George, J.; Radman, M.

    1975-01-01

    Recovery of phage lambda from ultraviolet damage can occur, in the dark, through three types of repair processes as defined by microbiological tests: host-cell reactivation, prophage reactivation, and uv reactivation. This paper reviews the properties of the three repair processes, analyzes their dependence on the functioning of bacterial and phage genes, and discusses their relationship. Progress in the understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying the three repair processes has been relatively slow, particularly for uv reactivation. It has been shown that host-cell reactivation is due to pyrimidine dimer excision and that prophage reactivation is due to genetic recombination (prereplicative). We provide evidence showing that neither of these mechanisms accounts for uv reactivation of phage lambda. Furthermore, uv reactivation differs from the other repair processes in that it is inducible and error-prone. Whether uv-damaged bacterial DNA is subject to a similar repair process is still an open question

  20. Phages of lactic acid bacteria: The role of genetics in understanding phage-host interactions and their co-evolutionary processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahony, Jennifer; Ainsworth, Stuart; Stockdale, Stephen; Sinderen, Douwe van

    2012-01-01

    Dairy fermentations are among the oldest food processing applications, aimed at preservation and shelf-life extension through the use of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) starter cultures, in particular strains of Lactococcus lactis, Streptococcus thermophilus, Lactobacillus spp. and Leuconostoc spp. Traditionally this was performed by continuous passaging of undefined cultures from a finished fermentation to initiate the next fermentation. More recently, consumer demands on consistent and desired flavours and textures of dairy products have led to a more defined approach to such processes. Dairy (starter) companies have responded to the need to define the nature and complexity of the starter culture mixes, and dairy fermentations are now frequently based on defined starter cultures of low complexity, where each starter component imparts specific technological properties that are desirable to the product. Both mixed and defined starter culture approaches create the perfect environment for the proliferation of (bacterio)phages capable of infecting these LAB. The repeated use of the same starter cultures in a single plant, coupled to the drive towards higher and consistent production levels, increases the risk and negative impact of phage infection. In this review we will discuss recent advances in tracking the adaptation of phages to the dairy industry, the advances in understanding LAB phage-host interactions, including evolutionary and genomic aspects.

  1. Phages of lactic acid bacteria: The role of genetics in understanding phage-host interactions and their co-evolutionary processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahony, Jennifer, E-mail: j.mahony@ucc.ie [Department of Microbiology, University College Cork, Western Road, Cork (Ireland); Ainsworth, Stuart; Stockdale, Stephen [Department of Microbiology, University College Cork, Western Road, Cork (Ireland); Sinderen, Douwe van, E-mail: d.vansinderen@ucc.ie [Department of Microbiology, University College Cork, Western Road, Cork (Ireland); Alimentary Pharmabiotic Centre, Biosciences Institute, University College Cork, Western Road, Cork (Ireland)

    2012-12-20

    Dairy fermentations are among the oldest food processing applications, aimed at preservation and shelf-life extension through the use of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) starter cultures, in particular strains of Lactococcus lactis, Streptococcus thermophilus, Lactobacillus spp. and Leuconostoc spp. Traditionally this was performed by continuous passaging of undefined cultures from a finished fermentation to initiate the next fermentation. More recently, consumer demands on consistent and desired flavours and textures of dairy products have led to a more defined approach to such processes. Dairy (starter) companies have responded to the need to define the nature and complexity of the starter culture mixes, and dairy fermentations are now frequently based on defined starter cultures of low complexity, where each starter component imparts specific technological properties that are desirable to the product. Both mixed and defined starter culture approaches create the perfect environment for the proliferation of (bacterio)phages capable of infecting these LAB. The repeated use of the same starter cultures in a single plant, coupled to the drive towards higher and consistent production levels, increases the risk and negative impact of phage infection. In this review we will discuss recent advances in tracking the adaptation of phages to the dairy industry, the advances in understanding LAB phage-host interactions, including evolutionary and genomic aspects.

  2. Phage therapy reduces Campylobacter jejuni colonization in broilers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wagenaar, J.A.; Bergen, van M.A.P.; Mueller, M.A.; Wassenaar, T.M.; Carlton, R.M.

    2005-01-01

    The effect of phage therapy in the control of Campylobacter jejuni colonization in young broilers, either as a preventive or a therapeutic measure, was tested. A prevention group was infected with C. jejuni at day 4 of a 10-day phage treatment. A therapeutic group was phage treated for 6 days,

  3. HostPhinder: A Phage Host Prediction Tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Villarroel

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The current dramatic increase of antibiotic resistant bacteria has revitalised the interest in bacteriophages as alternative antibacterial treatment. Meanwhile, the development of bioinformatics methods for analysing genomic data places high-throughput approaches for phage characterization within reach. Here, we present HostPhinder, a tool aimed at predicting the bacterial host of phages by examining the phage genome sequence. Using a reference database of 2196 phages with known hosts, HostPhinder predicts the host species of a query phage as the host of the most genomically similar reference phages. As a measure of genomic similarity the number of co-occurring k-mers (DNA sequences of length k is used. Using an independent evaluation set, HostPhinder was able to correctly predict host genus and species for 81% and 74% of the phages respectively, giving predictions for more phages than BLAST and significantly outperforming BLAST on phages for which both had predictions. HostPhinder predictions on phage draft genomes from the INTESTI phage cocktail corresponded well with the advertised targets of the cocktail. Our study indicates that for most phages genomic similarity correlates well with related bacterial hosts. HostPhinder is available as an interactive web service [1] and as a stand alone download from the Docker registry [2].

  4. T4 phages against Escherichia coli diarrhea: potential and problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denou, Emmanuel; Bruttin, Anne; Barretto, Caroline; Ngom-Bru, Catherine; Brüssow, Harald; Zuber, Sophie

    2009-05-25

    A combination of in vitro and in vivo experiments with comparative phage genomics was used for the rational design of a phage cocktail against E. coli diarrhea. Orally applied T4 coliphages representing three different subgroups (T4-, RB49- and JS98-like phages) had no negative impact on the murine gut microbiota. T4 phages were found with high titers in the cecum and colon and lower titers in the small intestine, but were not detected in the blood, liver or spleen. No adverse effects were observed after one-month exposure to phage nor were serum anti-T4 antibodies detected. T4 phages belonging to the same subgroup showed closely related genomes that differed by 12 (phage JS10 vs. JS98 reference) to 17 (phage JSE vs. RB49 reference) insertion/deletions mostly representing single small ORFs. Bioinformatic analysis did not reveal undesired genes in the T4 genomes. Sequence variability was seen over the tail fibre genes, but the variability did not correlate with phage host range. The investigated T4 phages were not only species- but also strain-specific, necessitating the use of phage cocktails consisting of 10 and 16 T4 phage isolates to cover half to two thirds of E. coli strains representing the five main pathotypes isolated from diarrhea patients.

  5. An improved plating assay for determination of phage titer

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    RACHEL

    antibiotics to control bacterial infections in swine (Thacker,. 2014). Phage therapy is re-valued by researchers to combat the growing menace of antibiotic-resistant infections (Torres-Barceló and Hochberg, 2016). Determination of phage titer in a sample is a key step in the study of the phage involved. It is very important to.

  6. The Caulobacter crescentus phage phiCbK: genomics of a canonical phage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gill Jason J

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The bacterium Caulobacter crescentus is a popular model for the study of cell cycle regulation and senescence. The large prolate siphophage phiCbK has been an important tool in C. crescentus biology, and has been studied in its own right as a model for viral morphogenesis. Although a system of some interest, to date little genomic information is available on phiCbK or its relatives. Results Five novel phiCbK-like C. crescentus bacteriophages, CcrMagneto, CcrSwift, CcrKarma, CcrRogue and CcrColossus, were isolated from the environment. The genomes of phage phiCbK and these five environmental phage isolates were obtained by 454 pyrosequencing. The phiCbK-like phage genomes range in size from 205 kb encoding 318 proteins (phiCbK to 280 kb encoding 448 proteins (CcrColossus, and were found to contain nonpermuted terminal redundancies of 10 to 17 kb. A novel method of terminal ligation was developed to map genomic termini, which confirmed termini predicted by coverage analysis. This suggests that sequence coverage discontinuities may be useable as predictors of genomic termini in phage genomes. Genomic modules encoding virion morphogenesis, lysis and DNA replication proteins were identified. The phiCbK-like phages were also found to encode a number of intriguing proteins; all contain a clearly T7-like DNA polymerase, and five of the six encode a possible homolog of the C. crescentus cell cycle regulator GcrA, which may allow the phage to alter the host cell’s replicative state. The structural proteome of phage phiCbK was determined, identifying the portal, major and minor capsid proteins, the tail tape measure and possible tail fiber proteins. All six phage genomes are clearly related; phiCbK, CcrMagneto, CcrSwift, CcrKarma and CcrRogue form a group related at the DNA level, while CcrColossus is more diverged but retains significant similarity at the protein level. Conclusions Due to their lack of any apparent relationship to

  7. The Caulobacter crescentus phage phiCbK: genomics of a canonical phage

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background The bacterium Caulobacter crescentus is a popular model for the study of cell cycle regulation and senescence. The large prolate siphophage phiCbK has been an important tool in C. crescentus biology, and has been studied in its own right as a model for viral morphogenesis. Although a system of some interest, to date little genomic information is available on phiCbK or its relatives. Results Five novel phiCbK-like C. crescentus bacteriophages, CcrMagneto, CcrSwift, CcrKarma, CcrRogue and CcrColossus, were isolated from the environment. The genomes of phage phiCbK and these five environmental phage isolates were obtained by 454 pyrosequencing. The phiCbK-like phage genomes range in size from 205 kb encoding 318 proteins (phiCbK) to 280 kb encoding 448 proteins (CcrColossus), and were found to contain nonpermuted terminal redundancies of 10 to 17 kb. A novel method of terminal ligation was developed to map genomic termini, which confirmed termini predicted by coverage analysis. This suggests that sequence coverage discontinuities may be useable as predictors of genomic termini in phage genomes. Genomic modules encoding virion morphogenesis, lysis and DNA replication proteins were identified. The phiCbK-like phages were also found to encode a number of intriguing proteins; all contain a clearly T7-like DNA polymerase, and five of the six encode a possible homolog of the C. crescentus cell cycle regulator GcrA, which may allow the phage to alter the host cell’s replicative state. The structural proteome of phage phiCbK was determined, identifying the portal, major and minor capsid proteins, the tail tape measure and possible tail fiber proteins. All six phage genomes are clearly related; phiCbK, CcrMagneto, CcrSwift, CcrKarma and CcrRogue form a group related at the DNA level, while CcrColossus is more diverged but retains significant similarity at the protein level. Conclusions Due to their lack of any apparent relationship to other described phages, this

  8. SegH and Hef: two novel homing endonucleases whose genes replace the mobC and mobE genes in several T4-related phages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandegren, Linus; Nord, David; Sjöberg, Britt-Marie

    2005-01-01

    T4 contains two groups of genes with similarity to homing endonucleases, the seg-genes (similarity to endonucleases encoded by group I introns) containing GIY-YIG motifs and the mob-genes (similarity to mobile endonucleases) containing H-N-H motifs. The four seg-genes characterized to date encode homing endonucleases with cleavage sites close to their respective gene loci while none of the mob-genes have been shown to cleave DNA. Of 18 phages screened, only T4 was found to have mobC while mobE genes were found in five additional phages. Interestingly, three phages encoded a seg-like gene (hereby called segH) with a GIY-YIG motif in place of mobC. An additional phage has an unrelated gene called hef (homing endonuclease-like function) in place of the mobE gene. The gene products of both novel genes displayed homing endonuclease activity with cleavage site specificity close to their respective genes. In contrast to intron encoded homing endonucleases, both SegH and Hef can cleave their own DNA as well as DNA from phages without the genes. Both segH and mobE (and most likely hef) can home between phages in mixed infections. We discuss why it might be a selective advantage for phage freestanding homing endonucleases to cleave both HEG-containing and HEG-less genomes.

  9. Diversity and geographical distribution of Flavobacterium psychrophilum isolates and their phages: patterns of susceptibility to phage infection and phage host range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo, Daniel; Christiansen, Rói Hammershaimb; Espejo, Romilio; Middelboe, Mathias

    2014-05-01

    Flavobacterium psychrophilum is an important fish pathogen worldwide that causes cold water disease (CWD) or rainbow trout fry syndrome (RTFS). Phage therapy has been suggested as an alternative method for the control of this pathogen in aquaculture. However, effective use of bacteriophages in disease control requires detailed knowledge about the diversity and dynamics of host susceptibility to phage infection. For this reason, we examined the genetic diversity of 49 F. psychrophilum strains isolated in three different areas (Chile, Denmark, and USA) through direct genome restriction enzyme analysis (DGREA) and their susceptibility to 33 bacteriophages isolated in Chile and Denmark, thus covering large geographical (>12,000 km) and temporal (>60 years) scales of isolation. An additional 40 phage-resistant isolates obtained from culture experiments after exposure to specific phages were examined for changes in phage susceptibility against the 33 phages. The F. psychrophilum and phage populations isolated from Chile and Denmark clustered into geographically distinct groups with respect to DGREA profile and host range, respectively. However, cross infection between Chilean phage isolates and Danish host isolates and vice versa was observed. Development of resistance to certain bacteriophages led to susceptibility to other phages suggesting that "enhanced infection" is potentially an important cost of resistance in F. psychrophilum, possibly contributing to the observed co-existence of phage-sensitive F. psychrophilum strains and lytic phages across local and global scales. Overall, our results showed that despite the identification of local communities of phages and hosts, some key properties determining phage infection patterns seem to be globally distributed.

  10. Effect of mobile technology featuring visual scene displays and just-in-time programming on communication turns by preadolescent and adolescent beginning communicators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holyfield, Christine; Caron, Jessica Gosnell; Drager, Kathryn; Light, Janice

    2018-03-05

    Visual scene displays (VSDs) and just-in-time programming supports are augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) technology features with theoretical benefits for beginning communicators of all ages. The goal of the current study was to evaluate the effects of a communication application (app) on mobile technology that supported the just-in-time programming of VSDs on the communication of preadolescents and adolescents who were beginning communicators. A single-subject multiple-baseline across participant design was employed to evaluate the effect of the AAC app with VSDs programmed just-in-time by the researcher on the communication turns expressed by five preadolescents and adolescents (9-18 years old) who were beginning communicators. All five participants demonstrated marked increases in the frequency of their communication turns after the onset intervention. Just-in-time programming support and VSDs are two features that may positively impact communication for beginning communicators in preadolescence and adolescence. Apps with these features allow partners to quickly and easily capture photos of meaningful and motivating events and provide them immediately as VSDs with relevant vocabulary to support communication in response to beginning communicators' interests.

  11. Fully synthetic phage-like system for screening mixtures of small molecules in live cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byk, Gerardo; Partouche, Shirly; Weiss, Aryeh; Margel, Shlomo; Khandadash, Raz

    2010-05-10

    A synthetic "phage-like" system was designed for screening mixtures of small molecules in live cells. The core of the system consists of 2 mum diameter cross-linked monodispersed microspheres bearing a panel of fluorescent tags and peptides or small molecules either directly synthesized or covalently conjugated to the microspheres. The microsphere mixtures were screened for affinity to cell line PC-3 (prostate cancer model) by incubation with live cells, and as was with phage-display peptide methods, unbound microspheres were removed by repeated washings followed by total lysis of cells and analysis of the bound microspheres by flow-cytometry. Similar to phage-display peptide screening, this method can be applied even in the absence of prior information about the cellular targets of the candidate ligands, which makes the system especially interesting for selection of molecules with high affinity for desired cells, tissues, or tumors. The advantage of the proposed system is the possibility of screening synthetic non-natural peptides or small molecules that cannot be expressed and screened using phage display libraries. A library composed of small molecules synthesized by the Ugi reaction was screened, and a small molecule, Rak-2, which strongly binds to PC-3 cells was found. Rak-2 was then individually synthesized and validated in a complementary whole cell-based binding assay, as well as by live cell microscopy. This new system demonstrates that a mixture of molecules bound to subcellular sized microspheres can be screened on plated cells. Together with other methods using subcellular sized particles for cellular multiplexing, this method represents an important milestone toward high throughput screening of mixtures of small molecules in live cells and in vivo with potential applications in the fields of drug delivery and diagnostic imaging.

  12. SNP-PHAGE – High throughput SNP discovery pipeline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cregan Perry B

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs as defined here are single base sequence changes or short insertion/deletions between or within individuals of a given species. As a result of their abundance and the availability of high throughput analysis technologies SNP markers have begun to replace other traditional markers such as restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLPs, amplified fragment length polymorphisms (AFLPs and simple sequence repeats (SSRs or microsatellite markers for fine mapping and association studies in several species. For SNP discovery from chromatogram data, several bioinformatics programs have to be combined to generate an analysis pipeline. Results have to be stored in a relational database to facilitate interrogation through queries or to generate data for further analyses such as determination of linkage disequilibrium and identification of common haplotypes. Although these tasks are routinely performed by several groups, an integrated open source SNP discovery pipeline that can be easily adapted by new groups interested in SNP marker development is currently unavailable. Results We developed SNP-PHAGE (SNP discovery Pipeline with additional features for identification of common haplotypes within a sequence tagged site (Haplotype Analysis and GenBank (-dbSNP submissions. This tool was applied for analyzing sequence traces from diverse soybean genotypes to discover over 10,000 SNPs. This package was developed on UNIX/Linux platform, written in Perl and uses a MySQL database. Scripts to generate a user-friendly web interface are also provided with common queries for preliminary data analysis. A machine learning tool developed by this group for increasing the efficiency of SNP discovery is integrated as a part of this package as an optional feature. The SNP-PHAGE package is being made available open source at http://bfgl.anri.barc.usda.gov/ML/snp-phage/. Conclusion SNP-PHAGE provides a bioinformatics

  13. Bacteriophage prevalence in the genus Azospirillum and analysis of the first genome sequence of an Azospirillum brasilense integrative phage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyer, Mickaël; Haurat, Jacqueline; Samain, Sylvie; Segurens, Béatrice; Gavory, Frédérick; González, Víctor; Mavingui, Patrick; Rohr, René; Bally, René; Wisniewski-Dyé, Florence

    2008-02-01

    The prevalence of bacteriophages was investigated in 24 strains of four species of plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria belonging to the genus Azospirillum. Upon induction by mitomycin C, the release of phage particles was observed in 11 strains from three species. Transmission electron microscopy revealed two distinct sizes of particles, depending on the identity of the Azospirillum species, typical of the Siphoviridae family. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and hybridization experiments carried out on phage-encapsidated DNAs revealed that all phages isolated from A. lipoferum and A. doebereinerae strains had a size of about 10 kb whereas all phages isolated from A. brasilense strains displayed genome sizes ranging from 62 to 65 kb. Strong DNA hybridizing signals were shown for most phages hosted by the same species whereas no homology was found between phages harbored by different species. Moreover, the complete sequence of the A. brasilense Cd bacteriophage (phiAb-Cd) genome was determined as a double-stranded DNA circular molecule of 62,337 pb that encodes 95 predicted proteins. Only 14 of the predicted proteins could be assigned functions, some of which were involved in DNA processing, phage morphogenesis, and bacterial lysis. In addition, the phiAb-Cd complete genome was mapped as a prophage on a 570-kb replicon of strain A. brasilense Cd, and a region of 27.3 kb of phiAb-Cd was found to be duplicated on the 130-kb pRhico plasmid previously sequenced from A. brasilense Sp7, the parental strain of A. brasilense Cd.

  14. Genomics of phages with therapeutic potential

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zschach, Henrike

    D. Chapters 1 - 3 deal with phages, their use in therapy and the nosocomial pathogen Staphylococcus aureus. Following that, Chapter 4 and 5 provide an overview of Next Generation Sequencing as well as commonly employed genomics tools, while Chapter 6 details basics of Machine Learning. The second part...

  15. Phage-bacteria interaction network in human oral microbiome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jinfeng; Gao, Yuan; Zhao, Fangqing

    2016-07-01

    Although increasing knowledge suggests that bacteriophages play important roles in regulating microbial ecosystems, phage-bacteria interaction in human oral cavities remains less understood. Here we performed a metagenomic analysis to explore the composition and variation of oral dsDNA phage populations and potential phage-bacteria interaction. A total of 1,711 contigs assembled with more than 100 Gb shotgun sequencing data were annotated to 104 phages based on their best BLAST matches against the NR database. Bray-Curtis dissimilarities demonstrated that both phage and bacterial composition are highly diverse between periodontally healthy samples but show a trend towards homogenization in diseased gingivae samples. Significantly, according to the CRISPR arrays that record infection relationship between bacteria and phage, we found certain oral phages were able to invade other bacteria besides their putative bacterial hosts. These cross-infective phages were positively correlated with commensal bacteria while were negatively correlated with major periodontal pathogens, suggesting possible connection between these phages and microbial community structure in oral cavities. By characterizing phage-bacteria interaction as networks rather than exclusively pairwise predator-prey relationships, our study provides the first insight into the participation of cross-infective phages in forming human oral microbiota. © 2015 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Optimization of lytic phage manufacturing in bioreactor using monolithic supports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smrekar, Franc; Ciringer, Mateja; Jančar, Janez; Raspor, Peter; Štrancar, Aleš; Podgornik, Aleš

    2011-08-01

    A process for manufacturing large quantities of lytic bacteriophages was developed. Determination of cultivation termination was found to be essential to achieve high phage quantity and purity. When optimal cultivation termination is missed, phage fraction was found to be highly contaminated with deoxyribonucleic acid released from Escherichia coli cells. Besides, an already established method for monitoring of phage cultivation based on optical density, where its peak indicates point when maximal phage titer is achieved, a new indirect chromatographic method using methacrylate monoliths is proposed for on-line estimation of phage titer. It is based on the measurement of released E. coli deoxyribonucleic acid and shows high correlation with phage titer obtained from plaque assay. Its main advantage is that the information is obtained within few minutes. In addition, the same method can also be used to determine purity of a final phage fraction. Two strategies to obtain highly pure phage fractions are proposed: an immediate purification of phage lysate using monolithic columns or an addition of EDTA before chromatographic purification. The developed protocol was shown to give phage purity above 90% and it is completed within one working day including cultivation and phage titer in the final formulation using developed chromatographic method. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. How to Name and Classify Your Phage: An Informal Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adriaenssens, Evelien; Brister, J Rodney

    2017-04-03

    With this informal guide, we try to assist both new and experienced phage researchers through two important stages that follow phage discovery; that is, naming and classification. Providing an appropriate name for a bacteriophage is not as trivial as it sounds, and the effects might be long-lasting in databases and in official taxon names. Phage classification is the responsibility of the Bacterial and Archaeal Viruses Subcommittee (BAVS) of the International Committee on the Taxonomy of Viruses (ICTV). While the BAVS aims at providing a holistic approach to phage taxonomy, for individual researchers who have isolated and sequenced a new phage, this can be a little overwhelming. We are now providing these researchers with an informal guide to phage naming and classification, taking a "bottom-up" approach from the phage isolate level.

  18. How to Name and Classify Your Phage: An Informal Guide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evelien Adriaenssens

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available With this informal guide, we try to assist both new and experienced phage researchers through two important stages that follow phage discovery; that is, naming and classification. Providing an appropriate name for a bacteriophage is not as trivial as it sounds, and the effects might be long-lasting in databases and in official taxon names. Phage classification is the responsibility of the Bacterial and Archaeal Viruses Subcommittee (BAVS of the International Committee on the Taxonomy of Viruses (ICTV. While the BAVS aims at providing a holistic approach to phage taxonomy, for individual researchers who have isolated and sequenced a new phage, this can be a little overwhelming. We are now providing these researchers with an informal guide to phage naming and classification, taking a “bottom-up” approach from the phage isolate level.

  19. One-step production of phage-silicon nanoparticles by PLAL as fluorescent nanoprobes for cell identification

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Plano, Laura M.; Scibilia, Santi; Rizzo, Maria Giovanna; Crea, Sara; Franco, Domenico; Mezzasalma, Angela M.; Guglielmino, Salvatore P. P.

    2018-03-01

    Silicon nanoparticles (SiNPs) are widely used as promising nanoplatform owing to their high specific surface area, optical properties and biocompatibility. Silicon nanoparticles find possible application in biomedical environment for their potential quantum effects and the functionalization with biomaterials, too. In this work, we propose a new approach for bio-functionalization of SiNPs and M13-engineered bacteriophage, displaying specific peptides that selectively recognize peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). The "one-step" functionalization is conducted during the laser ablation of silicon plate in buffer solution with engineered bacteriophages, to obtain SiNPs binding bacteriophages (phage-SiNPs). The interaction between SiNPs and bacteriophage is investigated. Particularly, the optical and morphological characterizations of phage-SiNPs are performed by UV-Vis spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy operating in transmission mode (STEM) and X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). The functionality of phage-SiNPs is investigated through the photoemissive properties in recognition test on PBMC. Our results showed that phage-SiNPs maintain the capability and the activity to bind PBMC within 30 min. The fluorescence of phage-SiNPs allowed to obtain an optical signal on cell type targets. Finally, the proposed strategy demonstrated its potential use in in vitro applications and could be exploited to realize an optical biosensor to detect a specific target.

  20. Stumbling across the Same Phage: Comparative Genomics of Widespread Temperate Phages Infecting the Fish Pathogen Vibrio anguillarum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalatzis, Panos G; Rørbo, Nanna Iben; Castillo, Daniel; Mauritzen, Jesper Juel; Jørgensen, Jóhanna; Kokkari, Constantina; Zhang, Faxing; Katharios, Pantelis; Middelboe, Mathias

    2017-05-20

    Nineteen Vibrio anguillarum-specific temperate bacteriophages isolated across Europe and Chile from aquaculture and environmental sites were genome sequenced and analyzed for host range, morphology and life cycle characteristics. The phages were classified as Siphoviridae with genome sizes between 46,006 and 54,201 bp. All 19 phages showed high genetic similarity, and 13 phages were genetically identical. Apart from sporadically distributed single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), genetic diversifications were located in three variable regions (VR1, VR2 and VR3) in six of the phage genomes. Identification of specific genes, such as N6-adenine methyltransferase and lambda like repressor, as well as the presence of a tRNA Arg , suggested a both mutualistic and parasitic interaction between phages and hosts. During short term phage exposure experiments, 28% of a V. anguillarum host population was lysogenized by the temperate phages and a genomic analysis of a collection of 31 virulent V. anguillarum showed that the isolated phages were present as prophages in >50% of the strains covering large geographical distances. Further, phage sequences were widely distributed among CRISPR-Cas arrays of publicly available sequenced Vibrios. The observed distribution of these specific temperate Vibriophages across large geographical scales may be explained by efficient dispersal of phages and bacteria in the marine environment combined with a mutualistic interaction between temperate phages and their hosts which selects for co-existence rather than arms race dynamics.

  1. Stumbling across the Same Phage: Comparative Genomics of Widespread Temperate Phages Infecting the Fish Pathogen Vibrio anguillarum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panos G. Kalatzis

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Nineteen Vibrio anguillarum-specific temperate bacteriophages isolated across Europe and Chile from aquaculture and environmental sites were genome sequenced and analyzed for host range, morphology and life cycle characteristics. The phages were classified as Siphoviridae with genome sizes between 46,006 and 54,201 bp. All 19 phages showed high genetic similarity, and 13 phages were genetically identical. Apart from sporadically distributed single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs, genetic diversifications were located in three variable regions (VR1, VR2 and VR3 in six of the phage genomes. Identification of specific genes, such as N6-adenine methyltransferase and lambda like repressor, as well as the presence of a tRNAArg, suggested a both mutualistic and parasitic interaction between phages and hosts. During short term phage exposure experiments, 28% of a V. anguillarum host population was lysogenized by the temperate phages and a genomic analysis of a collection of 31 virulent V. anguillarum showed that the isolated phages were present as prophages in >50% of the strains covering large geographical distances. Further, phage sequences were widely distributed among CRISPR-Cas arrays of publicly available sequenced Vibrios. The observed distribution of these specific temperate Vibriophages across large geographical scales may be explained by efficient dispersal of phages and bacteria in the marine environment combined with a mutualistic interaction between temperate phages and their hosts which selects for co-existence rather than arms race dynamics.

  2. Formulation, stabilisation and encapsulation of bacteriophage for phage therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Danish J; Sokolov, Ilya J; Vinner, Gurinder K; Mancuso, Francesco; Cinquerrui, Salvatore; Vladisavljevic, Goran T; Clokie, Martha R J; Garton, Natalie J; Stapley, Andrew G F; Kirpichnikova, Anna

    2017-11-01

    Against a backdrop of global antibiotic resistance and increasing awareness of the importance of the human microbiota, there has been resurgent interest in the potential use of bacteriophages for therapeutic purposes, known as phage therapy. A number of phage therapy phase I and II clinical trials have concluded, and shown phages don't present significant adverse safety concerns. These clinical trials used simple phage suspensions without any formulation and phage stability was of secondary concern. Phages have a limited stability in solution, and undergo a significant drop in phage titre during processing and storage which is unacceptable if phages are to become regulated pharmaceuticals, where stable dosage and well defined pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics are de rigueur. Animal studies have shown that the efficacy of phage therapy outcomes depend on the phage concentration (i.e. the dose) delivered at the site of infection, and their ability to target and kill bacteria, arresting bacterial growth and clearing the infection. In addition, in vitro and animal studies have shown the importance of using phage cocktails rather than single phage preparations to achieve better therapy outcomes. The in vivo reduction of phage concentration due to interactions with host antibodies or other clearance mechanisms may necessitate repeated dosing of phages, or sustained release approaches. Modelling of phage-bacterium population dynamics reinforces these points. Surprisingly little attention has been devoted to the effect of formulation on phage therapy outcomes, given the need for phage cocktails, where each phage within a cocktail may require significantly different formulation to retain a high enough infective dose. This review firstly looks at the clinical needs and challenges (informed through a review of key animal studies evaluating phage therapy) associated with treatment of acute and chronic infections and the drivers for phage encapsulation. An important driver

  3. Report of the results of the fiscal 1997 regional consortium R and D project. Regional consortium energy field/R and D high performance flat panel display technology (first fiscal year); 1997 nendo chiiki consortium kenkyu kaihatsu jigyo. Chiiki consortium energy bun`ya / koseino flat panel display gijutsu no sogo kaihatsu kenkyu (daiichi nendo ) seika hokokusho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-03-01

    One of the subjects in technology supporting the highly information-oriented society which will develop and diversify toward the 21st century is the construction of high grade man/machine interface. For it, high precision/high luminance/energy saving/thin plane displays are strongly requested. This R and D is to indicate models of systematical development in the region of element technology individually existing in the Shikoku area by forming a regional consortium in the industry/universities/government. Creation of new industries by gathering display related enterprises is a first step in a plan to realize `Display Island Shikoku.` As a concrete target, with the use of high-tech diamond semiconducting technology, a development is conducted of the high performance flat panel display using the negative electron affinity (NEA) electron emitter which drastically solves the problems such as luminance, visibility angle and response speed, the subjects on the commercialized liquid crystal flat panel display. 16 refs., 45 figs., 8 tabs.

  4. Filamentous phage as an immunogenic carrier to elicit focused antibody responses against a synthetic peptide

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Houten, N.E.; Zwick, M.B.; Menendez, A.; Scott, J.K.

    2007-01-01

    Filamentous bacteriophage are widely used as immunogenic carriers for “phage-displayed” recombinant peptides. Here we report that they are an effective immunogenic carrier for synthetic peptides. The f1.K phage was engineered to have an additional Lys residue near the N-terminus of the major coat protein, pVIII, so as to enhance access to chemical cross-linking agents. The dimeric synthetic peptide, B2.1, was conjugated to f1.K (f1.K/B2.1) in high copy number and compared as an immunogen to B2.1 conjugated to ovalbumin (OVA/B2.1) and to phage-displayed, recombinant B2.1 peptide. All immunogens were administered without adjuvant. The serum antibody titers were measured against: the peptide, the carrier, and, if appropriate, the cross-linker. All immunogens elicited anti-peptide antibody titers, with those elicited by OVA/B2.1 exceeding those by f1.K/B2.1; both titers were greater than that elicited by recombinant B2.1 phage. Comparison of the anti-peptide and anti-carrier antibody responses showed that f1.K/B2.1 elicited a more focused anti-peptide antibody response than OVA/B2.1. The anti-peptide antibody response against f1.K/B2.1 was optimized for the injection route, dose and adjuvant. Dose and adjuvant did not have a significant effect on anti-peptide antibody titers, but a change in injection route from intraperitoneal (IP) to subcutaneous (SC) enhanced anti-peptide antibody titers after seven immunizations. The optimized anti-peptide antibody response exceeded the anti-carrier one by 21-fold, compared to 0.07-fold elicited by OVA/B2.1. This indicates that phage as a carrier can focus the antibody response against the peptide. The results are discussed with respect to the advantages of phage as an alternative to traditional carrier proteins for synthetic peptides, carbohydrates and haptens, and to further improvements in phage as immunogenic carriers. PMID:16488517

  5. Phage-Host Interactions in Flavobacterium psychrophilum and the Potential for Phage Therapy in Aquaculture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Rói Hammershaimb

    temperatures below 15°C and typically with fry mortality rates of 50-60%. Several attempts of vaccine development against RTFS have been made, but according to my knowledge no commercial vaccine is yet available. Bacterial chemotherapy is still the most effective and used treatment of RTFS today. However......, the increasing problem with antibiotic resistance has led to increased attention to the use of phages for controlling F. psychrophilum infections in aquaculture. In a synopsis and four scientific papers, this PhD project studies the potential and optimizes the use of phage therapy for treatment and prevention...... cells could be maintained at a low level throughout the rest of the experiment. Surprisingly, no difference was observed between infection with single phages or phage cocktails. At the end of incubation phage-sensitive strains dominated in the cultures with low initial phage concentrations and phage-resistant...

  6. Exploration of Phage-Host Interactions in Fish Pathogen Vibrio anguillarum and Anti-Phage Defense Strategies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tan, Demeng

    of bacterial pathogenicity development. Therefore, successful application of phage therapy in the treatment of vibriosis requires a detailed understanding of phage-host interactions, especially with regards to anti-phage defense mechanisms in the host. Part I. As a first approach, 24 V. anguillarum and 13......T to repress ompK expression. It was demonstrated that QS controls the choice of anti-phage defense strategies in the V. anguillarum strain PF430-3, suggesting the presence of dynamic, temporary adaptations to phage infection pressure, while still securing the ability to produce a functional OmpK receptor....... In conclusion, this thesis provides a first insight into the dynamic vibriophage-host interactions, indicating the complexity of phage therapy in the treatment of vibriosis, regarding the evolution of anti-phage defense mechanisms, gene regulation, quorum sensing, biofilm formation, as well as pathogenesis...

  7. Integrated Display & Environmental Awareness System

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The goal of this project is the development of a head mounted display for use in operations here on Earth and in Space. The technology would provide various means of...

  8. New Formation Technology of Plasma Display Panel Barrier-Rib Structure Using Silicone Rubber Mold Transferred from SU-8 Master Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Seung-Hyun; Park, Yong-Suk; Choi, Sie-Young

    2002-06-01

    A new formation technology for a plasma display panel (PDP) barrier-rib structure is presented to realize a barrier rib with a high aspect ratio and reduce the manufacturing cost. In this study, we used an SU-8 50 photoresist, which is sensitive to UV irradiation, instead of polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) which is sensitive to X-ray irradiation, so that the silicone rubber mold could be applicable to a large-area PDP. The first step is to produce an SU-8 master structure using amorphous silicon as an adhesion layer between a glass substrate and SU-8 photoresist. Second, a precise soft mold is manufactured for mass replication of the PDP barrier-rib construction, by molding liquid silicone rubber onto the glass substrate with lithographically defined SU-8 master structures. Third, a PDP barrier-rib structure is formed using the pattern-transferring process with a reusable silicone rubber mold. This is a very simple and inexpensive process consisting with printing of barrier-rib paste, drying, pattern-transferring, and sintering. The pattern-transferring process with a soft mold also demonstrates that the disadvantages of the conventional mold pressing process with a hard mold can be overcome. Consequently, by using the pattern-transferring process with the silicone rubber mold transferred from the SU-8 master structure, the desired barrier-rib shapes can be realized with a high aspect ratio and various dimensions.

  9. Tripartite species interaction: eukaryotic hosts suffer more from phage susceptible than from phage resistant bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendling, Carolin C; Piecyk, Agnes; Refardt, Dominik; Chibani, Cynthia; Hertel, Robert; Liesegang, Heiko; Bunk, Boyke; Overmann, Jörg; Roth, Olivia

    2017-04-11

    Evolutionary shifts in bacterial virulence are often associated with a third biological player, for instance temperate phages, that can act as hyperparasites. By integrating as prophages into the bacterial genome they can contribute accessory genes, which can enhance the fitness of their prokaryotic carrier (lysogenic conversion). Hyperparasitic influence in tripartite biotic interactions has so far been largely neglected in empirical host-parasite studies due to their inherent complexity. Here we experimentally address whether bacterial resistance to phages and bacterial harm to eukaryotic hosts is linked using a natural tri-partite system with bacteria of the genus Vibrio, temperate vibriophages and the pipefish Syngnathus typhle. We induced prophages from all bacterial isolates and constructed a three-fold replicated, fully reciprocal 75 × 75 phage-bacteria infection matrix. According to their resistance to phages, bacteria could be grouped into three distinct categories: highly susceptible (HS-bacteria), intermediate susceptible (IS-bacteria), and resistant (R-bacteria). We experimentally challenged pipefish with three selected bacterial isolates from each of the three categories and determined the amount of viable Vibrio counts from infected pipefish and the expression of pipefish immune genes. While the amount of viable Vibrio counts did not differ between bacterial groups, we observed a significant difference in relative gene expression between pipefish infected with phage susceptible and phage resistant bacteria. These findings suggest that bacteria with a phage-susceptible phenotype are more harmful against a eukaryotic host, and support the importance of hyperparasitism and the need for an integrative view across more than two levels when studying host-parasite evolution.

  10. Convergent evolution of pathogenicity islands in helper cos phage interference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpena, Nuria; Manning, Keith A; Dokland, Terje; Marina, Alberto; Penadés, José R

    2016-11-05

    Staphylococcus aureus pathogenicity islands (SaPIs) are phage satellites that exploit the life cycle of their helper phages for their own benefit. Most SaPIs are packaged by their helper phages using a headful (pac) packaging mechanism. These SaPIs interfere with pac phage reproduction through a variety of strategies, including the redirection of phage capsid assembly to form small capsids, a process that depends on the expression of the SaPI-encoded cpmA and cpmB genes. Another SaPI subfamily is induced and packaged by cos-type phages, and although these cos SaPIs also block the life cycle of their inducing phages, the basis for this mechanism of interference remains to be deciphered. Here we have identified and characterized one mechanism by which the SaPIs interfere with cos phage reproduction. This mechanism depends on a SaPI-encoded gene, ccm, which encodes a protein involved in the production of small isometric capsids, compared with the prolate helper phage capsids. As the Ccm and CpmAB proteins are completely unrelated in sequence, this strategy represents a fascinating example of convergent evolution. Moreover, this result also indicates that the production of SaPI-sized particles is a widespread strategy of phage interference conserved during SaPI evolution.This article is part of the themed issue 'The new bacteriology'. © 2016 The Authors.

  11. Assembling filamentous phage occlude pIV channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marciano, D K; Russel, M; Simon, S M

    2001-07-31

    Filamentous phage f1 is exported from its Escherichia coli host without killing the bacterial cell. Phage-encoded protein pIV, which is required for phage assembly and secretion, forms large highly conductive channels in the outer membrane of E. coli. It has been proposed that the phage are extruded across the bacterial outer membrane through pIV channels. To test this prediction, we developed an in vivo assay by using a mutant pIV that functions in phage export but whose channel opens in the absence of phage extrusion. In E. coli lacking its native maltooligosacharride transporter LamB, this pIV variant allowed oligosaccharide transport across the outer membrane. This entry of oligosaccharide was decreased by phage production and still further decreased by production of phage that cannot be released from the cell surface. Thus, exiting phage block the pIV-dependent entry of oligosaccharide, suggesting that phage occupy the lumen of pIV channels. This study provides the first evidence, to our knowledge, for viral exit through a large aqueous channel.

  12. Scaling Up: Adapting a Phage-Hunting Course to Increase Participation of First-Year Students in Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staub, Nancy L; Poxleitner, Marianne; Braley, Amanda; Smith-Flores, Helen; Pribbenow, Christine M; Jaworski, Leslie; Lopatto, David; Anders, Kirk R

    2016-01-01

    Authentic research experiences are valuable components of effective undergraduate education. Research experiences during the first years of college are especially critical to increase persistence in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics fields. The Science Education Alliance Phage Hunters Advancing Genomics and Evolutionary Science (SEA-PHAGES) model provides a high-impact research experience to first-year students but is usually available to a limited number of students, and its implementation is costly in faculty time and laboratory space. To offer a research experience to all students taking introductory biology at Gonzaga University (n = 350/yr), we modified the traditional two-semester SEA-PHAGES course by streamlining the first-semester Phage Discovery lab and integrating the second SEA-PHAGES semester into other courses in the biology curriculum. Because most students in the introductory course are not biology majors, the Phage Discovery semester may be their only encounter with research. To discover whether students benefit from the first semester alone, we assessed the effects of the one-semester Phage Discovery course on students' understanding of course content. Specifically, students showed improvement in knowledge of bacteriophages, lab math skills, and understanding experimental design and interpretation. They also reported learning gains and benefits comparable with other course-based research experiences. Responses to open-ended questions suggest that students experienced this course as a true undergraduate research experience. © 2016 N. L. Staub et al. CBE—Life Sciences Education © 2016 The American Society for Cell Biology. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). It is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  13. Drivers license display system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prokoski, Francine J.

    1997-01-01

    Carjackings are only one of a growing class of law enforcement problems associated with increasingly violent crimes and accidents involving automobiles plays weapons, drugs and alcohol. Police traffic stops have become increasingly dangerous, with an officer having no information about a vehicle's potentially armed driver until approaching him. There are 15 million alcoholics in the US and 90 percent of them have drivers licenses. Many of them continue driving even after their licenses have ben revoked or suspended. There are thousands of unlicensed truck drivers in the country, and also thousands who routinely exceed safe operating periods without rest; often using drugs in an attempt to stay alert. MIKOS has developed the Drivers License Display Systems to reduce these and other related risks. Although every state requires the continuous display of vehicle registration information on every vehicle using public roads, no state yet requires the display of driver license information. The technology exists to provide that feature as an add-on to current vehicles for nominal cost. An initial voluntary market is expected to include: municipal, rental, and high value vehicles which are most likely to be mis-appropriated. It is anticipated that state regulations will eventually require such systems in the future, beginning with commercial vehicles, and then extending to high risk drivers and eventually all vehicles. The MIKOS system offers a dual-display approach which can be deployed now, and which will utilize all existing state licenses without requiring standardization.

  14. A century of the phage: past, present and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmond, George P C; Fineran, Peter C

    2015-12-01

    Viruses that infect bacteria (bacteriophages; also known as phages) were discovered 100 years ago. Since then, phage research has transformed fundamental and translational biosciences. For example, phages were crucial in establishing the central dogma of molecular biology - information is sequentially passed from DNA to RNA to proteins - and they have been shown to have major roles in ecosystems, and help drive bacterial evolution and virulence. Furthermore, phage research has provided many techniques and reagents that underpin modern biology - from sequencing and genome engineering to the recent discovery and exploitation of CRISPR-Cas phage resistance systems. In this Timeline, we discuss a century of phage research and its impact on basic and applied biology.

  15. Trivalent Cation Induced Bundle Formation of Filamentous fd Phages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korkmaz Zirpel, Nuriye; Park, Eun Jin

    2015-09-01

    Bacteriophages are filamentous polyelectrolyte viral rods infecting only bacteria. In this study, we investigate the bundle formation of fd phages with trivalent cations having different ionic radii (Al(3+) , La(3+) and Y(3+) ) at various phage and counterion concentrations, and at varying bundling times. Aggregated phage bundles were detected at relatively low trivalent counterion concentrations (1 mM). Although 10 mM and 100 mM Y(3+) and La(3+) treatments formed larger and more intertwined phage bundles, Al(3+) and Fe(3+) treatments lead to the formation of networking filaments. Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) analyses confirmed the presence of C, N and O peaks on densely packed phage bundles. Immunofluorescence labelling and ELISA analyses with anti-p8 antibodies showed the presence of phage filaments after bundling. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Delivering phage therapy per os: benefits and barriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelasko, Susan; Gorski, Andrzej; Dabrowska, Krystyna

    2017-02-01

    Multidrug-resistant bacterial infections of the gastrointestinal tract pose a serious public health concern. High levels of antibiotic drug resistance, along with the potential for antibiotics to precipitate disease or alter the gut microbiome has prompted research into alternative treatment methods. Evidence suggests that bacteriophage therapy delivered per os may be well-suited to target such infections. Areas covered: Herein, we discuss the specific advantages and challenges of using orally administered phage therapy. Our literature review encompasses recent works using phages to target various clinically-relevant bacteria in vivo. We also provide insights into methods that aim to overcome the barriers to effective phage transit through the harsh gastrointestinal environment. Expert commentary: Evidence from a number of in vivo animal studies suggests that targeting bacterial infections using phages delivered orally holds potential. Efficacious oral phage therapy depends on the delivery of sufficient phage titers to the infection site, which may be hindered by the host's gastrointestinal tract and immune response.

  17. Pseudomonas predators: understanding and exploiting phage-host interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Smet, Jeroen; Hendrix, Hanne; Blasdel, Bob G; Danis-Wlodarczyk, Katarzyna; Lavigne, Rob

    2017-09-01

    Species in the genus Pseudomonas thrive in a diverse set of ecological niches and include crucial pathogens, such as the human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa and the plant pathogen Pseudomonas syringae. The bacteriophages that infect Pseudomonas spp. mirror the widespread and diverse nature of their hosts. Therefore, Pseudomonas spp. and their phages are an ideal system to study the molecular mechanisms that govern virus-host interactions. Furthermore, phages are principal catalysts of host evolution and diversity, which directly affects the ecological roles of environmental and pathogenic Pseudomonas spp. Understanding these interactions not only provides novel insights into phage biology but also advances the development of phage therapy, phage-derived antimicrobial strategies and innovative biotechnological tools that may be derived from phage-bacteria interactions.

  18. Lysogenic Conversion and Phage Resistance Development in Phage Exposed Escherichia coli Biofilms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abram Aertsen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, three-day old mature biofilms of Escherichia coli were exposed once to either a temperate Shiga-toxin encoding phage (H-19B or an obligatory lytic phage (T7, after which further dynamics in the biofilm were monitored. As such, it was found that a single dose of H-19B could rapidly lead to a near complete lysogenization of the biofilm, with a subsequent continuous release of infectious H-19B particles. On the other hand, a single dose of T7 rapidly led to resistance development in the biofilm population. Together, our data indicates a profound impact of phages on the dynamics within structured bacterial populations.

  19. The human combinatorial antibody library HuCAL GOLD combines diversification of all six CDRs according to the natural immune system with a novel display method for efficient selection of high-affinity antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothe, Christine; Urlinger, Stefanie; Löhning, Corinna; Prassler, Josef; Stark, Yvonne; Jäger, Ute; Hubner, Bernd; Bardroff, Michael; Pradel, Ingrid; Boss, Melanie; Bittlingmaier, Renate; Bataa, Tschimegma; Frisch, Christian; Brocks, Bodo; Honegger, Annemarie; Urban, Margit

    2008-02-29

    This article describes the generation of the Human Combinatorial Antibody Library HuCAL GOLD. HuCAL GOLD is a synthetic human Fab library based on the HuCAL concept with all six complementarity-determining regions (CDRs) diversified according to the sequence and length variability of naturally rearranged human antibodies. The human antibody repertoire was analyzed in-depth, and individual CDR libraries were designed and generated for each CDR and each antibody family. Trinucleotide mixtures were used to synthesize the CDR libraries in order to ensure a high quality within HuCAL GOLD, and a beta-lactamase selection system was employed to eliminate frame-shifted clones after successive cloning of the CDR libraries. With these methods, a large, high-quality library with more than 10 billion functional Fab fragments was achieved. By using CysDisplay, the antibody fragments are displayed on the tip of the phage via a disulfide bridge between the phage coat protein pIII and the heavy chain of the antibody fragment. Efficient elution of specific phages is possible by adding reducing agents. HuCAL GOLD was challenged with a variety of different antigens and proved to be a reliable source of high-affinity human antibodies with best affinities in the picomolar range, thus functioning as an excellent source of antibodies for research, diagnostic, and therapeutic applications. Furthermore, the data presented in this article demonstrate that CysDisplay is a robust and broadly applicable display technology even for high-throughput applications.

  20. Association between phage types and antimicrobial resistance among bovine Staphylococcus aureus from 10 countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vintov, J.; Aarestrup, Frank Møller; Zinn, C. E.

    2003-01-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the diversity of phage types and associations between penicillin resistance and phage types among 815 Staphylococcus aureus isolates from bovine mastitis in nine European countries and USA. All isolates were examined for susceptibility to antimicrobial agents...... and characterised by phage typing. Penicillin resistance was found among strains from all countries with an average occurrence of 32.4% (2-71.4%). A total of 76% of isolates were identifiable by phage typing and 144 different phage types were observed. The most predominant types were phage type 29 (11% of the 815...... isolates), phage type 52 (5%), and phage type 80 (5%). Phage type 95 and 29/52/52A/80 were both distributed within seven countries. In the countries with the highest occurrence of penicillin resistance a reduced diversity of phage types and phage groups was observed. Phage group In was significantly...

  1. Satellite phage TLCφ enables toxigenic conversion by CTX phage through dif site alteration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Faizule; Kamruzzaman, M; Mekalanos, John J; Faruque, Shah M

    2010-10-21

    Bacterial chromosomes often carry integrated genetic elements (for example plasmids, transposons, prophages and islands) whose precise function and contribution to the evolutionary fitness of the host bacterium are unknown. The CTXφ prophage, which encodes cholera toxin in Vibrio cholerae, is known to be adjacent to a chromosomally integrated element of unknown function termed the toxin-linked cryptic (TLC). Here we report the characterization of a TLC-related element that corresponds to the genome of a satellite filamentous phage (TLC-Knφ1), which uses the morphogenesis genes of another filamentous phage (fs2φ) to form infectious TLC-Knφ1 phage particles. The TLC-Knφ1 phage genome carries a sequence similar to the dif recombination sequence, which functions in chromosome dimer resolution using XerC and XerD recombinases. The dif sequence is also exploited by lysogenic filamentous phages (for example CTXφ) for chromosomal integration of their genomes. Bacterial cells defective in the dimer resolution often show an aberrant filamentous cell morphology. We found that acquisition and chromosomal integration of the TLC-Knφ1 genome restored a perfect dif site and normal morphology to V. cholerae wild-type and mutant strains with dif(-) filamentation phenotypes. Furthermore, lysogeny of a dif(-) non-toxigenic V. cholerae with TLC-Knφ1 promoted its subsequent toxigenic conversion through integration of CTXφ into the restored dif site. These results reveal a remarkable level of cooperative interactions between multiple filamentous phages in the emergence of the bacterial pathogen that causes cholera.

  2. Bacteriophages and Phage-Derived Proteins – Application Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drulis-Kawa, Zuzanna; Majkowska-Skrobek, Grazyna; Maciejewska, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Currently, the bacterial resistance, especially to most commonly used antibiotics has proved to be a severe therapeutic problem. Nosocomial and community-acquired infections are usually caused by multidrug resistant strains. Therefore, we are forced to develop an alternative or supportive treatment for successful cure of life-threatening infections. The idea of using natural bacterial pathogens such as bacteriophages is already well known. Many papers have been published proving the high antibacterial efficacy of lytic phages tested in animal models as well as in the clinic. Researchers have also investigated the application of non-lytic phages and temperate phages, with promising results. Moreover, the development of molecular biology and novel generation methods of sequencing has opened up new possibilities in the design of engineered phages and recombinant phage-derived proteins. Encouraging performances were noted especially for phage enzymes involved in the first step of viral infection responsible for bacterial envelope degradation, named depolymerases. There are at least five major groups of such enzymes – peptidoglycan hydrolases, endosialidases, endorhamnosidases, alginate lyases and hyaluronate lyases – that have application potential. There is also much interest in proteins encoded by lysis cassette genes (holins, endolysins, spanins) responsible for progeny release during the phage lytic cycle. In this review, we discuss several issues of phage and phage-derived protein application approaches in therapy, diagnostics and biotechnology in general. PMID:25666799

  3. Bacteriophages and phage-derived proteins--application approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drulis-Kawa, Zuzanna; Majkowska-Skrobek, Grazyna; Maciejewska, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Currently, the bacterial resistance, especially to most commonly used antibiotics has proved to be a severe therapeutic problem. Nosocomial and community-acquired infections are usually caused by multidrug resistant strains. Therefore, we are forced to develop an alternative or supportive treatment for successful cure of life-threatening infections. The idea of using natural bacterial pathogens such as bacteriophages is already well known. Many papers have been published proving the high antibacterial efficacy of lytic phages tested in animal models as well as in the clinic. Researchers have also investigated the application of non-lytic phages and temperate phages, with promising results. Moreover, the development of molecular biology and novel generation methods of sequencing has opened up new possibilities in the design of engineered phages and recombinant phage-derived proteins. Encouraging performances were noted especially for phage enzymes involved in the first step of viral infection responsible for bacterial envelope degradation, named depolymerases. There are at least five major groups of such enzymes - peptidoglycan hydrolases, endosialidases, endorhamnosidases, alginate lyases and hyaluronate lyases - that have application potential. There is also much interest in proteins encoded by lysis cassette genes (holins, endolysins, spanins) responsible for progeny release during the phage lytic cycle. In this review, we discuss several issues of phage and phage-derived protein application approaches in therapy, diagnostics and biotechnology in general.

  4. HostPhinder: A Phage Host Prediction Tool

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villarroel, Julia; Kleinheinz, Kortine Annina; Jurtz, Vanessa Isabell

    2016-01-01

    The current dramatic increase of antibiotic resistant bacteria has revitalised the interest in bacteriophages as alternative antibacterial treatment. Meanwhile, the development of bioinformatics methods for analysing genomic data places high-throughput approaches for phage characterization within...... phages. As a measure of genomic similarity the number of co-occurring k-mers (DNA sequences of length k) is used. Using an independent evaluation set, HostPhinder was able to correctly predict host genus and species for 81% and 74% of the phages respectively, giving predictions for more phages than BLAST...

  5. Isolation and Characterization of Phages Infecting Bacillus subtilis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Krasowska

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacteriophages have been suggested as an alternative approach to reduce the amount of pathogens in various applications. Bacteriophages of various specificity and virulence were isolated as a means of controlling food-borne pathogens. We studied the interaction of bacteriophages with Bacillus species, which are very often persistent in industrial applications such as food production due to their antibiotic resistance and spore formation. A comparative study using electron microscopy, PFGE, and SDS-PAGE as well as determination of host range, pH and temperature resistance, adsorption rate, latent time, and phage burst size was performed on three phages of the Myoviridae family and one phage of the Siphoviridae family which infected Bacillus subtilis strains. The phages are morphologically different and characterized by icosahedral heads and contractile (SIOΦ, SUBω, and SPOσ phages or noncontractile (ARπ phage tails. The genomes of SIOΦ and SUBω are composed of 154 kb. The capsid of SIOΦ is composed of four proteins. Bacteriophages SPOσ and ARπ have genome sizes of 25 kbp and 40 kbp, respectively. Both phages as well as SUBω phage have 14 proteins in their capsids. Phages SIOΦ and SPOσ are resistant to high temperatures and to the acid (4.0 and alkaline (9.0 and 10.0 pH.

  6. Learning from bacteriophages - advantages and limitations of phage and phage-encoded protein applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drulis-Kawa, Zuzanna; Majkowska-Skrobek, Grazyna; Maciejewska, Barbara; Delattre, Anne-Sophie; Lavigne, Rob

    2012-12-01

    The emergence of bacteria resistance to most of the currently available antibiotics has become a critical therapeutic problem. The bacteria causing both hospital and community-acquired infections are most often multidrug resistant. In view of the alarming level of antibiotic resistance between bacterial species and difficulties with treatment, alternative or supportive antibacterial cure has to be developed. The presented review focuses on the major characteristics of bacteriophages and phage-encoded proteins affecting their usefulness as antimicrobial agents. We discuss several issues such as mode of action, pharmacodynamics, pharmacokinetics, resistance and manufacturing aspects of bacteriophages and phage-encoded proteins application.

  7. Learning from Bacteriophages - Advantages and Limitations of Phage and Phage-Encoded Protein Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drulis-Kawa, Zuzanna; Majkowska-Skrobek, Grażyna; Maciejewska, Barbara; Delattre, Anne-Sophie; Lavigne, Rob

    2012-01-01

    The emergence of bacteria resistance to most of the currently available antibiotics has become a critical therapeutic problem. The bacteria causing both hospital and community-acquired infections are most often multidrug resistant. In view of the alarming level of antibiotic resistance between bacterial species and difficulties with treatment, alternative or supportive antibacterial cure has to be developed. The presented review focuses on the major characteristics of bacteriophages and phage-encoded proteins affecting their usefulness as antimicrobial agents. We discuss several issues such as mode of action, pharmacodynamics, pharmacokinetics, resistance and manufacturing aspects of bacteriophages and phage-encoded proteins application. PMID:23305359

  8. Real Time Sonic Boom Display

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haering, Ed

    2014-01-01

    This presentation will provide general information about sonic boom mitigation technology to the public in order to supply information to potential partners and licensees. The technology is a combination of flight data, atmospheric data and terrain information implemented into a control room real time display for flight planning. This research is currently being performed and as such, any results and conclusions are ongoing.

  9. Scaling Up: Adapting a Phage-Hunting Course to Increase Participation of First-Year Students in Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staub, Nancy L.; Poxleitner, Marianne; Braley, Amanda; Smith-Flores, Helen; Pribbenow, Christine M.; Jaworski, Leslie; Lopatto, David; Anders, Kirk R.

    2016-01-01

    Authentic research experiences are valuable components of effective undergraduate education. Research experiences during the first years of college are especially critical to increase persistence in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics fields. The Science Education Alliance Phage Hunters Advancing Genomics and Evolutionary Science…

  10. Incorporation of a lambda phage recombination system and EGFP detection to simplify mutagenesis of Herpes simplex virus bacterial artificial chromosomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weir Jerry P

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Targeted mutagenesis of the herpesvirus genomes has been facilitated by the use of bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC technology. Such modified genomes have potential uses in understanding viral pathogenesis, gene identification and characterization, and the development of new viral vectors and vaccines. We have previously described the construction of a herpes simplex virus 2 (HSV-2 BAC and the use of an allele replacement strategy to construct HSV-2 recombinants. While the BAC mutagenesis procedure is a powerful method to generate HSV-2 recombinants, particularly in the absence of selective marker in eukaryotic culture, the mutagenesis procedure is still difficult and cumbersome. Results Here we describe the incorporation of a phage lambda recombination system into an allele replacement vector. This strategy enables any DNA fragment containing the phage attL recombination sites to be efficiently inserted into the attR sites of the allele replacement vector using phage lambda clonase. We also describe how the incorporation of EGFP into the allele replacement vector can facilitate the selection of the desired cross-over recombinant BACs when the allele replacement reaction is a viral gene deletion. Finally, we incorporate the lambda phage recombination sites directly into an HSV-2 BAC vector for direct recombination of gene cassettes using the phage lambda clonase-driven recombination reaction. Conclusion Together, these improvements to the techniques of HSV BAC mutagenesis will facilitate the construction of recombinant herpes simplex viruses and viral vectors.

  11. Incorporation of a lambda phage recombination system and EGFP detection to simplify mutagenesis of Herpes simplex virus bacterial artificial chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmeisser, Falko; Weir, Jerry P

    2007-05-14

    Targeted mutagenesis of the herpesvirus genomes has been facilitated by the use of bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) technology. Such modified genomes have potential uses in understanding viral pathogenesis, gene identification and characterization, and the development of new viral vectors and vaccines. We have previously described the construction of a herpes simplex virus 2 (HSV-2) BAC and the use of an allele replacement strategy to construct HSV-2 recombinants. While the BAC mutagenesis procedure is a powerful method to generate HSV-2 recombinants, particularly in the absence of selective marker in eukaryotic culture, the mutagenesis procedure is still difficult and cumbersome. Here we describe the incorporation of a phage lambda recombination system into an allele replacement vector. This strategy enables any DNA fragment containing the phage attL recombination sites to be efficiently inserted into the attR sites of the allele replacement vector using phage lambda clonase. We also describe how the incorporation of EGFP into the allele replacement vector can facilitate the selection of the desired cross-over recombinant BACs when the allele replacement reaction is a viral gene deletion. Finally, we incorporate the lambda phage recombination sites directly into an HSV-2 BAC vector for direct recombination of gene cassettes using the phage lambda clonase-driven recombination reaction. Together, these improvements to the techniques of HSV BAC mutagenesis will facilitate the construction of recombinant herpes simplex viruses and viral vectors.

  12. Morphology, serology and biochemical characters of phage CVX-5, isolated from a patient with colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, K; Kidwai, J R; Gupta, B M

    1979-01-01

    Electronmicroscopic observations indicate that bacteriophage CVX-5 has an angular head with long spiral tail which is noncontractile, possibly having 2--3 tail fibres attached at the distal part of the tail. This phage is antigenically unrelated to any of the T-phages. Inhibition of phage CVX-5 multiplication by mitomycin C and incorporation of 3H-thymidine into this phage indicate that phage CVX-5 is a DNA phage.

  13. FK phage for differentiating the classical and El T or groups of Vibrio cholerae.

    OpenAIRE

    Takeya, K; Otohuji, T; Tokiwa, H

    1981-01-01

    A new vibrio-infecting phage (FK phage) isolated from sewage lysed all strains of Vibrio cholerae biovar cholerae, whereas all strains of V. cholerae biovar El Tor were resistant to it. FK phage was entirely different from Mukerjee group IV phage in morphology and antigenicity. In addition to group IV phage, the use of FK phage will be useful in the examination and typing of V. cholerae.

  14. Identification of Bacterial Surface Antigens by Screening Peptide Phage Libraries Using Whole Bacteria Cell-Purified Antisera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yun-Fei; Zhao, Dun; Yu, Xing-Long; Hu, Yu-Li; Li, Run-Cheng; Ge, Meng; Xu, Tian-Qi; Liu, Xiao-Bo; Liao, Hua-Yuan

    2017-01-01

    Bacterial surface proteins can be good vaccine candidates. In the present study, we used polyclonal antibodies purified with intact Erysipelothrix rhusiopthiae to screen phage-displayed random dodecapeptide and loop-constrained heptapeptide libraries, which led to the identification of mimotopes. Homology search of the mimotope sequences against E. rhusiopthiae-encoded ORF sequences revealed 14 new antigens that may localize on the surface of E. rhusiopthiae. When these putative surface proteins were used to immunize mice, 9/11 antigens induced protective immunity. Thus, we have demonstrated that a combination of using the whole bacterial cells to purify antibodies and using the phage-displayed peptide libraries to determine the antigen specificities of the antibodies can lead to the discovery of novel bacterial surface antigens. This can be a general approach for identifying surface antigens for other bacterial species. PMID:28184219

  15. Phage antibodies obtained by competitive selection oil complement-resistant Moraxella (Branhamella) catarrhalis recognize the high-molecular-weight outer membrane protein

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boel, E; Bootsma, E; de Kruif, J; Jansze, M; Klingman, KL; van Dijk, H; Logtenberg, T

    We used competitive panning to select a panel of 10 different human antibodies from a large semisynthetic phage display library that distinguish between serum complement-resistant and complement-sensitive strains of the gram-negative diplococcus Moraxella (Branhamella) catarrhalis. Western blotting

  16. Digital Holography Display (2)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Cheok Peng; Asundi, A.; Yu, Yang; Xiao, Zhen Zhong

    This paper describes the extension work from the last Digital Holography Projector System. From the developed works shows that, some unforeseen factors have created the difficulties for the system alignment. Such factors are the DMD frame rate, light source and diffractive zero order. It is really the challenging development works to achieve the virtual 3D model display on the high speed rotation screen. The three most key factors are emphasizing: 1) The display device's frame rate; 2) The light source orientation angle; and 3) The zero order filtering optic. 1) This device's is the digital micro mirror, in short is DMD. It is the high speed switching device has developed by the most recent technology. The switching frame rate can go up as high as 291fps. At first, the 8 bits depth file must be digitalized and stored for DMD onboard Ram. The digitalized data are transmitting from the PC USB to DMD onboard Ram. Instead of the data are downloading directly from the PC to DVI or VGA during display, this downloading method cause slower down the display speed, which is the common frame rate of 30 Hz. Next, the onboard Ram data then transfer to the DMD mirror's for display, at the 8 bits 291 fps speed. At this frame rate, the display 2D image can almost cover for 10 of out of the 360 0 in 1 revolution. 2) This laser light source must be installed such that free for orientated in any arbitrary angle from 220 to 450. Which is normalized to the DMD mirrors and the brief sketch show on figure (a). The purpose of orientated the light source is ensure that multi diffractive order would be reflected straight from the mirrors. (This multi diffractive order is the phenomenon of the digital micro mirror's characteristic). This mean, the reconstruct images would be followed the DMD normalized direction reflected up to fibre conduit. Moreover, this orientated method install of the laser light source is making space for other optical lenses or device driver/controller. Because, all

  17. The Transmembrane Morphogenesis Protein gp1 of Filamentous Phages Contains Walker A and Walker B Motifs Essential for Phage Assembly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belinda Loh

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available In contrast to lytic phages, filamentous phages are assembled in the inner membrane and secreted across the bacterial envelope without killing the host. For assembly and extrusion of the phage across the host cell wall, filamentous phages code for membrane-embedded morphogenesis proteins. In the outer membrane of Escherichia coli, the protein gp4 forms a pore-like structure, while gp1 and gp11 form a complex in the inner membrane of the host. By comparing sequences with other filamentous phages, we identified putative Walker A and B motifs in gp1 with a conserved lysine in the Walker A motif (K14, and a glutamic and aspartic acid in the Walker B motif (D88, E89. In this work we demonstrate that both, Walker A and Walker B, are essential for phage production. The crucial role of these key residues suggests that gp1 might be a molecular motor driving phage assembly. We further identified essential residues for the function of the assembly complex. Mutations in three out of six cysteine residues abolish phage production. Similarly, two out of six conserved glycine residues are crucial for gp1 function. We hypothesise that the residues represent molecular hinges allowing domain movement for nucleotide binding and phage assembly.

  18. The Transmembrane Morphogenesis Protein gp1 of Filamentous Phages Contains Walker A and Walker B Motifs Essential for Phage Assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loh, Belinda; Haase, Maximilian; Mueller, Lukas; Kuhn, Andreas; Leptihn, Sebastian

    2017-04-09

    In contrast to lytic phages, filamentous phages are assembled in the inner membrane and secreted across the bacterial envelope without killing the host. For assembly and extrusion of the phage across the host cell wall, filamentous phages code for membrane-embedded morphogenesis proteins. In the outer membrane of Escherichia coli, the protein gp4 forms a pore-like structure, while gp1 and gp11 form a complex in the inner membrane of the host. By comparing sequences with other filamentous phages, we identified putative Walker A and B motifs in gp1 with a conserved lysine in the Walker A motif (K14), and a glutamic and aspartic acid in the Walker B motif (D88, E89). In this work we demonstrate that both, Walker A and Walker B, are essential for phage production. The crucial role of these key residues suggests that gp1 might be a molecular motor driving phage assembly. We further identified essential residues for the function of the assembly complex. Mutations in three out of six cysteine residues abolish phage production. Similarly, two out of six conserved glycine residues are crucial for gp1 function. We hypothesise that the residues represent molecular hinges allowing domain movement for nucleotide binding and phage assembly.

  19. A Pilin Region Affecting Host Range of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa RNA Phage, PP7

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eun Sook Kim

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The host range of a phage is determined primarily by phage-receptor interaction. Here, we profiled the host range of an RNA leviphage, PP7 that requires functional type IV pilus (TFP in order to enter into its host bacterium, Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Out of 25 twitching-proficient P. aeruginosa strains, 4 with group I pilin and 7 with group III pilin displayed PP7-resistance. The remaining 14 possessed group II pilin, which included 10 PP7-sensitive and 4 PP7-resistant strains, suggesting that only the strains with TFP consisted of a subset of group II (hence, group IIa pilin were susceptible to PP7. The co-expression of the PAO1 (group IIa pilin rendered all the strains susceptible to PP7, with the exception of the 4 strains with group I pilin. Moreover, the expression of PA14 (group III and PAK (group IIb pilin in the PAO1 pilA mutant restored the twitching motility but not the PP7-suceptibility. Site-directed and random mutation analyses of PAO1 pilin enabled us to identify a pilin mutant (G96S that is fully functional but resistant to PP7 infection. This is due to the lack of any phage-receptor interactions, suggesting the structural properties of the β1-β2 loop in the variable region 2 of the group II pilin might be involved in PP7 infection.

  20. Antibacterial properties of Acinetobacter baumannii phage Abp1 endolysin (PlyAB1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Guangtao; Shen, Xiaodong; Gong, Yali; Dong, Zhiwei; Zhao, Xia; Shen, Wei; Wang, Jing; Hu, Fuquan; Peng, Yizhi

    2014-12-12

    Acinetobacter baumannii has emerged as one of the most important hospital-acquired pathogens in the world, because of its resistance to almost all available antibiotic drugs. Endolysins from phages are attracting increasing interest as potential antimicrobial agents, especially for drug-resistant bacteria. We previously isolated and characterized Abp1, a virulent phage targeting the multidrug-resistant A. baumannii strain, AB1. To evaluate the antimicrobial potential of endolysin from the Abp1 phage, the endolysin gene plyAB1 was cloned and over-expressed in Escherichia coli, and the lytic activity of the recombinant protein (PlyAB1) was tested by turbidity assessment and bacteria counting assays. PlyAB1 exhibits a marked lytic activity against A. baumannii AB1, as shown by a decrease in the number of live bacteria following treatment with the enzyme. Moreover, PlyAB1 displayed a highly specific lytic effect against all of the 48 hospital-derived pandrug-resistant A. baumannii isolates that were tested. These isolates were shown to belong to different ST clones by multilocus sequence typing. The results presented here show that PlyAB1 has potential as an antibiotic against drug-resistant A. baumannii.

  1. Structural investigations of the Bacillus subtilis SPP1 phage G39P helicase inhibitor loading protein

    CERN Document Server

    Bailey, S

    2002-01-01

    The Bacillus subtilis SPPI phage encoded protein G39P is a loader and inhibitor of the phage G40P replicative helicase involved in the initiation of phage DNA replication. The 2.4A crystal structure of a C-terminal truncated variant of G39P was solved using multiple wavelength anomalous dispersion exploiting the anomalous signal of seleno- methionine substituted protein. Inspection of the electron density maps revealed the asymmetric unit contained three independent G39P monomers, composed of 3 alpha-helices and their connecting loops. However, the model only accounted for the first 67 residues of the protein, as there was no interpretable electron density for residues 68 to 112. A preliminary NMR investigation revealed the C-terminal region of the protein had rapid internal motion and formed no well-defined stable fold that involved immobilized side chains. This is consistent with the X-ray analysis that displayed no electron density for these residues. A detailed comparison of NMR spectra from the C-termina...

  2. Augmenting digital displays with computation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jing

    As we inevitably step deeper and deeper into a world connected via the Internet, more and more information will be exchanged digitally. Displays are the interface between digital information and each individual. Naturally, one fundamental goal of displays is to reproduce information as realistically as possible since humans still care a lot about what happens in the real world. Human eyes are the receiving end of such information exchange; therefore it is impossible to study displays without studying the human visual system. In fact, the design of displays is rather closely coupled with what human eyes are capable of perceiving. For example, we are less interested in building displays that emit light in the invisible spectrum. This dissertation explores how we can augment displays with computation, which takes both display hardware and the human visual system into consideration. Four novel projects on display technologies are included in this dissertation: First, we propose a software-based approach to driving multiview autostereoscopic displays. Our display algorithm can dynamically assign views to hardware display zones based on multiple observers' current head positions, substantially reducing crosstalk and stereo inversion. Second, we present a dense projector array that creates a seamless 3D viewing experience for multiple viewers. We smoothly interpolate the set of viewer heights and distances on a per-vertex basis across the arrays field of view, reducing image distortion, crosstalk, and artifacts from tracking errors. Third, we propose a method for high dynamic range display calibration that takes into account the variation of the chrominance error over luminance. We propose a data structure for enabling efficient representation and querying of the calibration function, which also allows user-guided balancing between memory consumption and the amount of computation. Fourth, we present user studies that demonstrate that the ˜ 60 Hz critical flicker fusion

  3. Special Technology Area Review on Displays. Report of Department of Defense Advisory Group on Electron Devices Working Group C (Electro-Optics)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Turnbach, Susan; Yang, Andrew; Hopper, Darrel G

    2004-01-01

    .... Display research spawns whole new fields as a result of its multidisciplinary nature; for example, the cathode ray tube enabled radar and television and the first commercially successful micro-electro-mechanical system (MEMS...

  4. Optical advantages in retinal scanning displays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urey, Hakan

    2000-06-01

    Virtual Retinal DisplayTM technology is a retinal scanning display (RSD) technology being developed at Microvision, Inc., for a variety of applications including microdisplays. An RSD scans a modulated light beam onto a viewer's retina to produce a perceived image. Red, green and blue light sources, such as lasers, laser diodes or LEDs combine with Microvision's proprietary miniaturized scanner designs to make the RSD very well suited for head-worn and helmet-mounted displays (HMD). This paper compares the features of RSD technology to other display technologies such as the cathode ray tubes or matrix-based displays for HMD and other wearable display applications, and notes important performance advantages due to the number of pixel- generating elements. Also discussed are some fundamental optical limitations for virtual displays used in the HMD applications.

  5. Human Factors Military Lexicon: Auditory Displays

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Letowski, Tomasz

    2001-01-01

    .... In addition to definitions specific to auditory displays, speech communication, and audio technology, the lexicon includes several terms unique to military operational environments and human factors...

  6. Transcriptome Analysis of a Bloom-Forming Cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa during Ma-LMM01 Phage Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daichi Morimoto

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Microcystis aeruginosa forms massive blooms in eutrophic freshwaters, where it is constantly exposed to lytic cyanophages. Unlike other marine cyanobacteria, M. aeruginosa possess remarkably abundant and diverse potential antiviral defense genes. Interestingly, T4-like cyanophage Ma-LMM01, which is the sole cultured lytic cyanophage infecting M. aeruginosa, lacks the host-derived genes involved in maintaining host photosynthesis and directing host metabolism that are abundant in other marine cyanophages. Based on genomic comparisons with closely related cyanobacteria and their phages, Ma-LMM01 is predicted to employ a novel infection program that differs from that of other marine cyanophages. Here, we used RNA-seq technology and in silico analysis to examine transcriptional dynamics during Ma-LMM01 infection to reveal host transcriptional responses to phage infection, and to elucidate the infection program used by Ma-LMM01 to avoid the highly abundant host defense systems. Phage-derived reads increased only slightly at 1 h post-infection, but significantly increased from 16% of total cellular reads at 3 h post-infection to 33% of all reads by 6 h post-infection. Strikingly, almost none of the host genes (0.17% showed a significant change in expression during infection. However, like other lytic dsDNA phages, including marine cyanophages, phage gene dynamics revealed three expression classes: early (host-takeover, middle (replication, and late (virion morphogenesis. The early genes were concentrated in a single ∼5.8-kb window spanning 10 open reading frames (gp054–gp063 on the phage genome. None of the early genes showed homology to the early genes of other T4-like phages, including known marine cyanophages. Bacterial RNA polymerase (σ70 recognition sequences were also found in the upstream region of middle and late genes, whereas phage-specific motifs were not found. Our findings suggest that unlike other known T4-like phages, Ma-LMM01

  7. Error Analysis of Deep Sequencing of Phage Libraries: Peptides Censored in Sequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wadim L. Matochko

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Next-generation sequencing techniques empower selection of ligands from phage-display libraries because they can detect low abundant clones and quantify changes in the copy numbers of clones without excessive selection rounds. Identification of errors in deep sequencing data is the most critical step in this process because these techniques have error rates >1%. Mechanisms that yield errors in Illumina and other techniques have been proposed, but no reports to date describe error analysis in phage libraries. Our paper focuses on error analysis of 7-mer peptide libraries sequenced by Illumina method. Low theoretical complexity of this phage library, as compared to complexity of long genetic reads and genomes, allowed us to describe this library using convenient linear vector and operator framework. We describe a phage library as N×1 frequency vector n=ni, where ni is the copy number of the ith sequence and N is the theoretical diversity, that is, the total number of all possible sequences. Any manipulation to the library is an operator acting on n. Selection, amplification, or sequencing could be described as a product of a N×N matrix and a stochastic sampling operator (Sa. The latter is a random diagonal matrix that describes sampling of a library. In this paper, we focus on the properties of Sa and use them to define the sequencing operator (Seq. Sequencing without any bias and errors is Seq=Sa IN, where IN is a N×N unity matrix. Any bias in sequencing changes IN to a nonunity matrix. We identified a diagonal censorship matrix (CEN, which describes elimination or statistically significant downsampling, of specific reads during the sequencing process.

  8. Phages Preying on Bacillus anthracis, Bacillus cereus, and Bacillus thuringiensis: Past, Present and Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillis, Annika; Mahillon, Jacques

    2014-01-01

    Many bacteriophages (phages) have been widely studied due to their major role in virulence evolution of bacterial pathogens. However, less attention has been paid to phages preying on bacteria from the Bacillus cereus group and their contribution to the bacterial genetic pool has been disregarded. Therefore, this review brings together the main information for the B. cereus group phages, from their discovery to their modern biotechnological applications. A special focus is given to phages infecting Bacillus anthracis, B. cereus and Bacillus thuringiensis. These phages belong to the Myoviridae, Siphoviridae, Podoviridae and Tectiviridae families. For the sake of clarity, several phage categories have been made according to significant characteristics such as lifestyles and lysogenic states. The main categories comprise the transducing phages, phages with a chromosomal or plasmidial prophage state, γ-like phages and jumbo-phages. The current genomic characterization of some of these phages is also addressed throughout this work and some promising applications are discussed here. PMID:25010767

  9. Phages Preying on Bacillus anthracis, Bacillus cereus, and Bacillus thuringiensis: Past, Present and Future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annika Gillis

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Many bacteriophages (phages have been widely studied due to their major role in virulence evolution of bacterial pathogens. However, less attention has been paid to phages preying on bacteria from the Bacillus cereus group and their contribution to the bacterial genetic pool has been disregarded. Therefore, this review brings together the main information for the B. cereus group phages, from their discovery to their modern biotechnological applications. A special focus is given to phages infecting Bacillus anthracis, B. cereus and Bacillus thuringiensis. These phages belong to the Myoviridae, Siphoviridae, Podoviridae and Tectiviridae families. For the sake of clarity, several phage categories have been made according to significant characteristics such as lifestyles and lysogenic states. The main categories comprise the transducing phages, phages with a chromosomal or plasmidial prophage state, γ-like phages and jumbo-phages. The current genomic characterization of some of these phages is also addressed throughout this work and some promising applications are discussed here.

  10. Inhibition of phage infection in capsule-producing Streptococcus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SERVER

    2007-10-04

    Oct 4, 2007 ... Lactic cultures that produce capsular polysaccharides are widely used in the dairy industry. However, little information is available on their phage-cell interactions. Concanavalin A (Con A), lysozyme, and saccharides were investigated for their ability to modify phage-cell interactions in such a manner as to.

  11. Popping the cork: mechanisms of phage genome ejection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Molineux, I.J.; Panja, D.

    2013-01-01

    Sixty years after Hershey and Chase showed that nucleic acid is the major component of phage particles that is ejected into cells, we still do not fully understand how the process occurs. Advances in electron microscopy have revealed the structure of the condensed DNA confined in a phage capsid, and

  12. Filamentous phage associated with recent pandemic strains of Vibrio parahaemolyticus.

    OpenAIRE

    Iida, T.; Hattori, A.; Tagomori, K.; Nasu, H.; Naim, R.; Honda, T.

    2001-01-01

    A group of pandemic strains of Vibrio parahaemolyticus has recently appeared in Asia and North America. We demonstrate that a filamentous phage is specifically associated with the pandemic V. parahaemolyticus strains. An open reading frame unique to the phage is a useful genetic marker to identify these strains.

  13. An improved plating assay for determination of phage titer | Yang ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this study, an improved plating assay was developed for detection of the number of recombinant phage Cap-T7 present in a test solution at a certain dilution point by counting the plaque forming units. The data demonstrated that the improved plating assay is fast, useful, and convenient for the determination of the phage ...

  14. Cell-adhesive RGD peptide-displaying M13 bacteriophage/PLGA nanofiber matrices for growth of fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Yong Cheol; Lee, Jong Ho; Jin, Linhua; Kim, Min Jeong; Oh, Jin-Woo; Kim, Tai Wan; Han, Dong-Wook

    2014-01-01

    M13 bacteriophages can be readily fabricated as nanofibers due to non-toxic bacterial virus with a nanofiber-like shape. In the present study, we prepared hybrid nanofiber matrices composed of poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid, PLGA) and M13 bacteriophages which were genetically modified to display the RGD peptide on their surface (RGD-M13 phage). The surface morphology and chemical composition of hybrid nanofiber matrices were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Raman spectroscopy, respectively. Immunofluorescence staining was conducted to investigate the existence of M13 bacteriophages in RGD-M13 phage/PLGA hybrid nanofibers. In addition, the attachment and proliferation of three different types of fibroblasts on RGD-M13 phage/PLGA nanofiber matrices were evaluated to explore how fibroblasts interact with these matrices. SEM images showed that RGD-M13 phage/PLGA hybrid matrices had the non-woven porous structure, quite similar to that of natural extracellular matrices, having an average fiber diameter of about 190 nm. Immunofluorescence images and Raman spectra revealed that RGD-M13 phages were homogeneously distributed in entire matrices. Moreover, the attachment and proliferation of fibroblasts cultured on RGD-M13 phage/PLGA matrices were significantly enhanced due to enriched RGD moieties on hybrid matrices. These results suggest that RGD-M13 phage/PLGA matrices can be efficiently used as biomimetic scaffolds for tissue engineering applications.

  15. Phage-Mediated Immuno-PCR for Ultrasensitive Detection of Cry1Ac Protein Based on Nanobody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yuanyuan; Jiang, Dongjian; Lu, Xin; Wang, Wei; Xu, Yang; He, Qinghua

    2016-10-11

    The widespread use of Cry proteins in transgenic plants for insect control has raised concerns about the environment and food safety in the public. An effective detection method for introduced Cry proteins is of significance for environmental risk assessment and product quality control. This paper describes a novel phage mediated immuno-PCR (iPCR) for the ultrasensitive determination of Cry proteins based on nanobodies. Three nanobodies against Cry1Ac protein were obtained from a naı̈ve phage displayed nanobody library without animal immunization process and were applied to the iPCR assay for Cry1Ac. The phage-mediated iPCR for Cry1Ac based on nanobodies showed a dynamic range of 0.001-100 ng/mL and a limit detection of 0.1 pg/mL. Specific measurement of this established method was performed by testing cross-reativity of other Cry1Ac analogues, and the result showed negligible cross-reactivity with other test Cry proteins (Cry1Ab, Cry1F, Cry3B). Furthermore, the phage-mediated iPCR based on nanobody should be easily applicable to the detection of many other Cry proteins.

  16. Identification of functional interaction sites on proteins using bacteriophage-displayed random epitope libraries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Zonneveld, A. J.; van den Berg, B. M.; van Meijer, M.; Pannekoek, H.

    1995-01-01

    We describe a phage-display-based method to identify epitopes or interaction sites on proteins. DNA encoding the protein of interest is partially degraded with DNase I to generate random fragments of 50-200 bp. These fragments are then cloned into a phagemid vector that has been modified to allow

  17. Staphylococcus aureus phage types and their correlation to antibiotic resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehndiratta P

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Context: Staphylococcus aureus is one of the most devastating human pathogen. The organism has a differential ability to spread and cause outbreak of infections. Characterization of these strains is important to control the spread of infection in the hospitals as well as in the community. Aim: To identify the currently existing phage groups of Staphylococcus aureus, their prevalence and resistance to antibiotics. Materials and Methods: Study was undertaken on 252 Staphylococcus aureus strains isolated from clinical samples. Strains were phage typed and their resistance to antibiotics was determined following standard microbiological procedures. Statistical Analysis: Chi square test was used to compare the antibiotic susceptibility between methicillin resistant Staph. aureus (MRSA and methicillin sensitive S. aureus (MSSA strains. Results: Prevalence of MRSA and MSSA strains was found to be 29.36% and 70.65% respectively. Of these 17.56% of MRSA and 40.44% of MSSA strains were community acquired. All the MSSA strains belonging to phage type 81 from the community were sensitive to all the antibiotics tested including clindamycin and were resistant to penicillin. Forty five percent strains of phage group III and 39% of non-typable MRSA strains from the hospital were resistant to multiple antibiotics. Conclusion: The study revealed that predominant phage group amongst MRSA strains was phage group III and amongst MSSA from the community was phage group NA (phage type 81. MSSA strains isolated from the community differed significantly from hospital strains in their phage type and antibiotic susceptibility. A good correlation was observed between community acquired strains of phage type 81 and sensitivity to gentamycin and clindamycin.