WorldWideScience

Sample records for technology mediated collaboration

  1. Expanding Technological Frames Towards Mediated Collaboration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørn, Pernille; Scupola, Ada; Fitzgerald, Brian

    2006-01-01

    This paper provides an in-depth analysis of technological and social factors leading to the successful adoption of groupware in a virtual team in educational setting. Drawing on a theoretical framework based on the concept of technological frames, we conducted an action research study to analyze...... the chronological sequence of events leading to groupware adoption. We argue that groupware adoption can be conceptualized as a three-step process of expanding and aligning individual technological frames towards groupware: The first step comprises activities facilitating participants in articulation and evaluation...... collaborative practice and use of technology, and that this activity cannot take place at the outset....

  2. Technology-mediated collaborative learning: theoretical contributions based on analysis of educational practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia CASILLAS MARTÍN

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Collaborative learning has been a subject of great interest in the context of educational research, giving rise to many studies emphasizing the potential of the collaboration process in student learning, knowledge building, the development of diverse abilities and improved academic performance. Based on a conceptual review and thorough reflection on this topic, this article presents the results of a case study carried out in different schools in the Autonomous Community of Castile y Leon (Spain in an attempt to identify patterns of common action through the implementation of collaborative learning methods mediated by information and communication technologies (ICT. Among the many outcomes of this study, we conclude by highlighting the need to plan collaborative work very carefully, taking advantage of the opportunities offered by ICT as communicative environments where it is possible to construct joint and shared learning. 

  3. Communication and collaboration technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheeseman, Susan E

    2012-01-01

    This is the third in a series of columns exploring health information technology (HIT) in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). The first column provided background information on the implementation of information technology throughout the health care delivery system, as well as the requisite informatics competencies needed for nurses to fully engage in the digital era of health care. The second column focused on information and resources to master basic computer competencies described by the TIGER initiative (Technology Informatics Guiding Education Reform) as learning about computers, computer networks, and the transfer of data.1 This column will provide additional information related to basic computer competencies, focusing on communication and collaboration technologies. Computers and the Internet have transformed the way we communicate and collaborate. Electronic communication is the ability to exchange information through the use of computer equipment and software.2 Broadly defined, any technology that facilitates linking one or more individuals together is a collaborative tool. Collaboration using technology encompasses an extensive range of applications that enable groups of individuals to work together including e-mail, instant messaging (IM ), and several web applications collectively referred to as Web 2.0 technologies. The term Web 2.0 refers to web applications where users interact and collaborate with each other in a collective exchange of ideas generating content in a virtual community. Examples of Web 2.0 technologies include social networking sites, blogs, wikis, video sharing sites, and mashups. Many organizations are developing collaborative strategies and tools for employees to connect and interact using web-based social media technologies.3.

  4. Digital Technologies and the Mediation of Undergraduate Students' Collaborative Music Compositional Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobson, Elizabeth; Littleton, Karen

    2016-01-01

    Music education is supported by an increasing range of digital technologies that afford a remarkable divergence of opportunities for learning within the classroom. Musical creativities are not, however, limited to classroom situations; all musicians are engaged in work that traverses multiple social and physical settings. Guided by sociocultural…

  5. State Technologies Advancement Collaborative

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David S. Terry

    2012-01-30

    The U. S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Association of State Energy Officials (NASEO), and Association of State Energy Research and Technology Transfer Institutions (ASERTTI) signed an intergovernmental agreement on November 14, 2002, that allowed states and territories and the Federal Government to better collaborate on energy research, development, demonstration and deployment (RDD&D) projects. The agreement established the State Technologies Advancement Collaborative (STAC) which allowed the states and DOE to move RDD&D forward using an innovative competitive project selection and funding process. A cooperative agreement between DOE and NASEO served as the contracting instrument for this innovative federal-state partnership obligating funds from DOE's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy and Office of Fossil Energy to plan, fund, and implement RDD&D projects that were consistent with the common priorities of the states and DOE. DOE's Golden Field Office provided Federal oversight and guidance for the STAC cooperative agreement. The STAC program was built on the foundation of prior Federal-State efforts to collaborate on and engage in joint planning for RDD&D. Although STAC builds on existing, successful programs, it is important to note that it was not intended to replace other successful joint DOE/State initiatives such as the State Energy Program or EERE Special Projects. Overall the STAC process was used to fund, through three competitive solicitations, 35 successful multi-state research, development, deployment, and demonstration projects with an overall average non-federal cost share of 43%. Twenty-two states were awarded at least one prime contract, and organizations in all 50 states and some territories were involved as subcontractors in at least one STAC project. Projects were funded in seven program areas: (1) Building Technologies, (2) Industrial Technologies, (3) Transportation Technologies, (4) Distributed Energy

  6. Collaborative Information Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, William; Casper, Thomas

    1999-11-01

    Significant effort has been expended to provide infrastructure and to facilitate the remote collaborations within the fusion community and out. Through the Office of Fusion Energy Science Information Technology Initiative, communication technologies utilized by the fusion community are being improved. The initial thrust of the initiative has been collaborative seminars and meetings. Under the initiative 23 sites, both laboratory and university, were provided with hardware required to remotely view, or project, documents being presented. The hardware is capable of delivering documents to a web browser, or to compatible hardware, over ESNET in an access controlled manner. The ability also exists for documents to originate from virtually any of the collaborating sites. In addition, RealNetwork servers are being tested to provide audio and/or video, in a non-interactive environment with MBONE providing two-way interaction where needed. Additional effort is directed at remote distributed computing, file systems, security, and standard data storage and retrieval methods. This work supported by DoE contract No. W-7405-ENG-48

  7. Coordination theory and collaboration technology

    CERN Document Server

    Olson, Gary M; Smith, John B

    2001-01-01

    The National Science Foundation funded the first Coordination Theory and Collaboration Technology initiative to look at systems that support collaborations in business and elsewhere. This book explores the global revolution in human interconnectedness. It will discuss the various collaborative workgroups and their use in technology. The initiative focuses on processes of coordination and cooperation among autonomous units in human systems, in computer and communication systems, and in hybrid organizations of both systems. This initiative is motivated by three scientific issues which have been

  8. Technology-Use Mediation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bansler, Jørgen P.; Havn, Erling C.

    2003-01-01

    This study analyzes how a group of ‘mediators’ in a large, multinational company adapted a computer-mediated communication technology (a ‘virtual workspace’) to the organizational context (and vice versa) by modifying features of the technology, providing ongoing support for users, and promoting...... appropriate conventions of use. Our findings corroborate earlier research on technology-use mediation, which suggests that such mediators can exert considerable influence on how a particular technology will be established and used in an organization. However, this study also indicates that the process...... of technology-use mediation is more complex and indeterminate than earlier literature suggests. In particular, we want to draw attention to the fact that advanced computer-mediated communication technologies are equivocal and that technology-use mediation consequently requires ongoing sensemaking (Weick 1995)....

  9. Global Collaboration Enhances Technology Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Linda A.; Bell, Meredith L.; Nugent, Jill; Smith, Walter S.

    2016-01-01

    Today's learners routinely use technology outside of school to communicate, collaborate, and gather information about the world around them. Classroom learning experiences are relevant when they include communication technologies such as social networking, blogging, and video conferencing, and information technologies such as databases, browsers,…

  10. Does the Medium Matter in Collaboration? Using Visually Supported Collaboration Technology in an Interior Design Studio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Ji Young; Cho, Moon-Heum; Kozinets, Nadya

    2016-01-01

    With the recognition of the importance of collaboration in a design studio and the advancement of technology, increasing numbers of design students collaborate with others in a technology-mediated learning environment (TMLE); however, not all students have positive experiences in TMLEs. One possible reason for unsatisfactory collaboration…

  11. Computer-Mediated Collaborative Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beatty, Ken; Nunan, David

    2004-01-01

    The study reported here investigates collaborative learning at the computer. Ten pairs of students were presented with a series of comprehension questions about Mary Shelley's novel "Frankenstein or a Modern Prometheus" along with a CD-ROM, "Frankenstein Illuminated," containing the novel and a variety of source material. Five students worked with…

  12. Remediation Technology Collaboration Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahoney, John; Olsen, Wade

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews programs at NASA aimed at development at Remediation Technology development for removal of environmental pollutants from NASA sites. This is challenging because there are many sites with different environments, and various jurisdictions and regulations. There are also multiple contaminants. There must be different approaches based on location and type of contamination. There are other challenges: such as costs, increased need for resources and the amount of resources available, and a regulatory environment that is increasing.

  13. Technology-Use Mediation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bansler, Jørgen P.; Havn, Erling C.

    2004-01-01

    Implementation of new computer-mediated communication (CMC) systems in organizations is a complex socio-technical endeavour, involving the mutual adaptation of technology and organization over time. Drawing on the analytic concept of sensemaking, this paper provides a theoretical perspective...... that deepens our understanding of how organizations appropriate new electronic communication media. The paper analyzes how a group of mediators in a large, multinational company adapted a new web-based CMC technology (a virtual workspace) to the local organizational context (and vice versa) by modifying...... features of the technology, providing ongoing support for users, and promoting appropriate conventions of use. We found that these mediators exerted considerable influence on how the technology was established and used in the organization. The mediators were not neutral facilitators of a well...

  14. The use of technology in international collaboration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Livonen, Mirja; Sonnenwald, Diane H.

    2000-01-01

    International collaboration is emerging as an essential function for organizations, playing an important role in organizational strategy, performance and knowledge management. Two case studies of international collaboration are discussed in this paper. Participants' perceptions and use...... of technology to collaborate are examined from the perspective of sense of presence, participation, task type, productivity and ease of use. The data suggest that technology compatibility with cultural and work style preferences and technology infrastructure is more important than media richness, in contrast...

  15. SHARING RESOURCES THROUGH COLLABORATION USING TECHNOLOGY

    Science.gov (United States)

    In response to changing social and economic conditions, instant communication, emerging technology, and decreasing resources for libraries, there is a need for librarians to use collaborative methods, strategies, and technologies to solve common problems or produce common produ...

  16. Mixed artefacts as mediators for collaborative learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Ellen Tove; Davidsen, Jacob; Konnerup, Ulla

    2012-01-01

    eLearningLab at Aalborg University conduct teaching and research in the intersection between Human Computer Interaction (technology), Information architecture (organization) and learning and development (human action). Inspired by the lay out of workshops spaces at architecture schools, eLearning...... Work and Computer Supported Collaborative Learning. This paper presents the ideas behind the eLearning Lab‘s DesignLab.......eLearningLab at Aalborg University conduct teaching and research in the intersection between Human Computer Interaction (technology), Information architecture (organization) and learning and development (human action). Inspired by the lay out of workshops spaces at architecture schools, eLearning......-through-construction as part of the Problem Based Learning pedagogy, and to increase students‘ awareness of the role of embodied interaction in learning. Simultaneously the Lab facilitates design of prototypes and exploration of use situations within the fields of Human-Computer Interaction, Computer Supported Cooperative...

  17. International energy technology collaboration: benefits and achievements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    The IEA Energy Technology Collaboration Programme facilitates international collaboration on energy technology research, development and deployment. More than 30 countries are involved in Europe, America, Asia, Australasia and Africa. The aim is to accelerate the development and deployment of new energy technologies to meet energy security, environmental and economic development goals. Costs and resources are shared among participating governments, utilities, corporations and universities. By co-operating, they avoid unproductive duplication and maximize the benefits from research budgets. The IEA Programme results every year in hundreds of publications which disseminate information about the latest energy technology developments and their commercial utilisation. The IEA Energy Technology Collaboration Programme operates through a series of agreements among governments. This report details the activities and achievements of all 41 agreements, covering energy technology information centres and Research and Development projects in fossil fuels, renewable energy efficient end-use, and nuclear fusion technologies. (authors). 58 refs., 9 tabs

  18. Assessment of University- Industry Collaboration and Technology ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Despite the cultural differences between university and industry, the mutual benefits from collaboration between university and industry have long been recognized in the advanced countries. Recently, the issue of technology transfer and collaboration between universities and industries has been receiving attention in the ...

  19. Citizenship, Collaborative Technologies and Regulation | Page 8 ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    The recent rise of a wide range of collaborative information technologies ... and sanitation utilities using web 2.0 applications and/or cellphones (mobile phones). ... Organization for Women in Science for the Developing World (OWSD), IDRC ...

  20. The Uses (and Misuses) of Collaborative Distance Education Technologies Implications for the Debate on Transience in Technology: Implications for the Debate on Transience in Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, YunJeong; Hannafin, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Collaborative learning technologies (tools that are used for facilitating or mediating collaborative learning) have been widely incorporated in distance education as well as broadly adopted in higher education. While a range of collaborative technologies has been incorporated, their implementation has often failed to align with well-established…

  1. Identifying Interdisciplinary Research Collaboration in Instructional Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Yonjoo

    2017-01-01

    Interdisciplinarity is defined as communication and collaboration across academic disciplines. The instructional technology (IT) field has claimed to have an interdisciplinary nature influenced by neighboring fields such as psychology, communication, and management. However, it has been difficult to find outstanding evidence of the field's…

  2. Sonic mediations: body, sound, technology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Birdsall, C.; Enns, A.

    2008-01-01

    Sonic Mediations: Body, Sound, Technology is a collection of original essays that represents an invaluable contribution to the burgeoning field of sound studies. While sound is often posited as having a bridging function, as a passive in-between, this volume invites readers to rethink the concept of

  3. Classic Conversational Norms in Modern Computer-Mediated Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oeberst, Aileen; Moskaliuk, Johannes

    2016-01-01

    This paper examines whether conversational norms that have been observed for face-to-face communication also hold in the context of a specific type of computer-mediated communication: collaboration (such as in Wikipedia). Specifically, we tested adherence to Grice's (1975) maxim of relation--the implicit demand to contribute information that is…

  4. Computer-Mediated Collaborative Projects: Processes for Enhancing Group Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupin-Bryant, Pamela A.

    2008-01-01

    Groups are a fundamental part of the business world. Yet, as companies continue to expand internationally, a major challenge lies in promoting effective communication among employees who work in varying time zones. Global expansion often requires group collaboration through computer systems. Computer-mediated groups lead to different communicative…

  5. Lay Theories Regarding Computer-Mediated Communication in Remote Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parke, Karl; Marsden, Nicola; Connolly, Cornelia

    2017-01-01

    Computer-mediated communication and remote collaboration has become an unexceptional norm as an educational modality for distance and open education, therefore the need to research and analyze students' online learning experience is necessary. This paper seeks to examine the assumptions and expectations held by students in regard to…

  6. Distributed Collaborative Learning Communities Enabled by Information Communication Technology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.L. Alvarez (Heidi Lee)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractHow and why can Information Communication Technology (ICT) contribute to enhancing learning in distributed Collaborative Learning Communities (CLCs)? Drawing from relevant theories concerned with phenomenon of ICT enabled distributed collaborative learning, this book identifies gaps in

  7. Experiencia de un trabajo colaborativo con estudiantes y docentes de diferentes países mediado por las tecnologías de la información y la comunicación. Experience of a collaborative work with students and teachers of diverse latitudes mediated by communication and information technologies. Collaborative interuniversity project, Colombian chapter.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cano Vásquez Lina María

    2011-07-01

    work on the virtual education platform, Moodle”, is a collaborative research held by Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México and Universidad Pontificia Bolivariana of Medellín-Colombia. All participants, including both students and teachers who also live in the countries of origin of each University, made a collaborative work mediated by Information and Communication Technologies, using Moodle platform as the main intergrating element. Nonetheless, other tools such as email, social networks, Messenger and Skype, were also used to support communication moments between members residing in different latitudes and time zones. The main purpose of this research was to understand the options offered by Moodle platform in the development of collaborative projects, and recognize from there, how students use this platform and other ICT tools. The project also identified those roles and relationships waved between teachers and students who settled in the virtual classroom of this experience; there was also an intention of visualizing the elements that needed to be improved in this type of educational processes in similar contexts. Strategies and tools used for communicating, proved that one of the most complex processes to approach this type of projects is the mediational that generates interactions between the participants taking into account that it conforms individual entities or groups according to the purposes of the activities of the project.

  8. Appropriation of technology for collaboration : From mastery to utilisation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Overdijk, M.

    2009-01-01

    Technologies for collaboration in education are designed to alter the interaction of learners with other learners in order to support or facilitate collaboration. The effect of these technologies is often explained from their structuring influence on the learners’ behaviour: the technology provides

  9. Toward a framework for computer-mediated collaborative design in medical informatics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, V L; Kaufman, D R; Allen, V G; Shortliffe, E H; Cimino, J J; Greenes, R A

    1999-09-01

    The development and implementation of enabling tools and methods that provide ready access to knowledge and information are among the central goals of medical informatics. The need for multi-institutional collaboration in the development of such tools and methods is increasingly being recognized. Collaboration involves communication, which typically involves individuals who work together at the same location. With the evolution of electronic modalities for communication, we seek to understand the role that such technologies can play in supporting collaboration, especially when the participants are geographically separated. Using the InterMed Collaboratory as a subject of study, we have analyzed their activities as an exercise in computer- and network-mediated collaborative design. We report on the cognitive, sociocultural, and logistical issues encountered when scientists from diverse organizations and backgrounds use communications technologies while designing and implementing shared products. Results demonstrate that it is important to match carefully the content with the mode of communication, identifying, for example, suitable uses of E-mail, conference calls, and face-to-face meetings. The special role of leaders in guiding and facilitating the group activities can also be seen, regardless of the communication setting in which the interactions occur. Most important is the proper use of technology to support the evolution of a shared vision of group goals and methods, an element that is clearly necessary before successful collaborative designs can proceed.

  10. A Qualitative Descriptive Analysis of Collaboration Technology in the Navy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan Wark

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Collaboration technologies enable people to communicate and use information to make organizational decisions. The United States Navy refers to this concept as information dominance. Various collaboration technologies are used by the Navy to achieve this mission. This qualitative descriptive study objectively examined how a matrix oriented Navy activity perceived an implemented collaboration technology. These insights were used to determine whether a specific collaboration technology achieved a mission of information dominance. The study used six collaboration themes as a foundation to include: (a Cultural intelligence, (b Communication, (c Capability, (d Coordination, (e Cooperation, and (f Convergence. It was concluded that collaboration technology was mostly perceived well and helped to achieve some levels of information dominance. Collaboration technology improvement areas included bringing greater awareness to the collaboration technology, revamping the look and feel of the user interface, centrally paying for user and storage fees, incorporating more process management tools, strategically considering a Continuity of Operations, and incorporating additional industry best practices for data structures. Emerging themes of collaboration were collected to examine common patterns identified in the collected data. Emerging themes included acceptance, awareness, search, scope, content, value, tools, system performance, implementation, training, support, usage, structure, complexity, approach, governance/configuration management/policy, and resourcing.

  11. Patterns of Scaffolding in Computer-Mediated Collaborative Inquiry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakkala, Minna; Muukkonen, Hanni; Hakkarainen, Kai

    2005-01-01

    There is wide agreement on the importance of scaffolding for student learning. Yet, models of individual and face-to-face scaffolding are not necessarily applicable to educational settings in which a group of learners is pursuing a process of inquiry mediated by technology. The scaffolding needed for such a process may be examined from three…

  12. Sensemaking in Technology-Use Mediation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bansler, Jørgen P.; Havn, Erling C.

    2006-01-01

    of advanced CSCW technologies is basically a problem of sensemaking. We analyze how a group of “technology-use mediators” (Orlikowski et al. Org. Sci. (1995) 6(4), 423) in a large, multinational company adapted a groupware technology (a “virtual workspace”) to the local organizational context (and vice versa......) by modifying features of the technology, providing ongoing support for users, and promoting appropriate conventions of use. Our findings corroborate earlier research on technology-use mediation, which suggests that such mediators can exert considerable influence on how a particular technology...... will be established and used in an organization. However, we also find that the process of technology-use mediation is much more complex and indeterminate than prior research suggests. The reason being, we argue, that new, advanced CSCW technologies, such as “virtual workspaces” and other groupware applications...

  13. The Impact of Experience and Technology Change on Task-Technology Fit of a Collaborative Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iversen, Jakob H.; Eierman, Michael A.

    2018-01-01

    This study continues a long running effort to examine collaborative writing and editing tools and the factors that impact Task-Technology Fit and Technology Acceptance. Previous studies found that MS Word/email performed better than technologies such as Twiki, Google Docs, and Office Live. The current study seeks to examine specifically the impact…

  14. Challenges in Virtual Collaboration. Videoconferencing, Audioconferencing, and Computer-Mediated Communications

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wainfan, Lynne

    2004-01-01

    ...) on group processes and outcomes. Virtual collaborations are collaborations in which the people working together are interdependent in their tasks, share responsibility for outcomes, are geographically dispersed, and rely on mediated...

  15. Seven Affordances of Computer-Supported Collaborative Learning: How to Support Collaborative Learning? How Can Technologies Help?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Heisawn; Hmelo-Silver, Cindy E.

    2016-01-01

    This article proposes 7 core affordances of technology for collaborative learning based on theories of collaborative learning and CSCL (Computer-Supported Collaborative Learning) practices. Technology affords learner opportunities to (1) engage in a joint task, (2) communicate, (3) share resources, (4) engage in productive collaborative learning…

  16. Collaborating with EPA through the Federal Technology Transfer Act

    Science.gov (United States)

    Under the Federal Technology Transfer Act (FTTA), EPA can collaborate with external parties on research projects, and share research materials. Learn more about the types of partnerships the EPA offers.

  17. NASA Remediation Technology Collaboration Development Task, Overview and Project Summaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romeo, James G.

    2014-01-01

    An overview presentation of NASA's Remediation Technology Collaboration Development Task including the following project summaries: in situ groundwater monitor, in situ chemical oxidation, in situ bioremediation, horizontal multi-port well, and high resolution site characterization.

  18. International Collaboration Patterns and Effecting Factors of Emerging Technologies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Bai

    Full Text Available With the globalization of the world economy, international innovation collaboration has taken place all over the world. This study selects three emerging technologies (3D printing, big data and carbon nanotubes and graphene technology among 20 countries as the research objects, using three patent-based indicators and network relationship analysis to reflect international collaboration patterns. Then we integrate empirical analyses to show effecting factors of international collaboration degrees by using panel data. The results indicate that while 3D printing technology is associated with a "balanced collaboration" mode, big data technology is more accurately described by a radial pattern, centered on the United States, and carbon nanotubes and graphene technology exhibits "small-world" characteristics in this respect. It also shows that the factors GDP per capita (GPC, R&D expenditure (RDE and the export of global trade value (ETV negatively affect the level of international collaboration. It could be useful for China and other developing countries to make international scientific and technological collaboration strategies and policies in the future.

  19. Gender diversity and motivation in collaborative learning groups : the mediating role of group discussion quality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Curseu, P.L.; Chappin, M.M.H.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304835056; Jansen, Rob J. G.

    Collaborative learning is often used in higher education to help students develop their teamwork skills and acquire curricular knowledge. In this paper we test a mediation model in which the quality of group discussions mediates the impact of gender diversity and group motivation on collaborative

  20. Gender diversity and motivation in collaborative learning groups : The mediating role of group discussion quality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Curseu, Petre; Chappin, M.M.H.; Jansen, R.J.G.

    2018-01-01

    Collaborative learning is often used in higher education to help students develop their teamwork skills and acquire curricular knowledge. In this paper we test a mediation model in which the quality of group discussions mediates the impact of gender diversity and group motivation on collaborative

  1. Collaborative Knowledge Framework for Mediation Information System Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenxin Mu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available With the worldwide interenterprise collaboration and interoperability background, automatic collaborative business process deduction is crucial and imperative researching subject. A methodology of deducing collaborative process is designed by collecting collaborative knowledge. Due to the complexity of deduction methodology, a collaborative knowledge framework is defined to organize abstract and concrete collaborative information. The collaborative knowledge framework contains three dimensions: elements, levels, and life cycle. To better define the framework, the relations in each dimension are explained in detail. They are (i relations among elements, which organize the gathering orders and methods of different collaborative elements, (ii relations among life cycle, which present modeling processes and agility management, and (iii relations among levels, which define relationships among different levels of collaborative processes: strategy, operation, and support. This paper aims to explain the collaborative knowledge framework and the relations inside.

  2. Formulating transgenerational technology critique as conflictual collaboration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chimirri, Niklas Alexander

    2015-01-01

    In the fields of technology design studies and human-computer interaction (HCI), participatory technology design involving children has been on the rise. Particularly studies applying and developing the cooperative inquiry methodology or inspired by it are of growing interest to media technology...... designers. While the underlying impetus of actively involving the intended users in the design process and thereby taking the children as seriously as adult users is laudable, the overarching framing and directionality of the technology design process is rendered unquestionable for the children....... The presentation illustrates that the pristine intention of engaging in intergenerational technology design is potentially helpful for collectively formulating a productive and sustainable technology critique. On the downside the applied methodologies lack viable concepts for meaningfully analyzing its...

  3. International Collaboration Patterns and Effecting Factors of Emerging Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Xu; Liu, Yun

    2016-01-01

    With the globalization of the world economy, international innovation collaboration has taken place all over the world. This study selects three emerging technologies (3D printing, big data and carbon nanotubes and graphene technology) among 20 countries as the research objects, using three patent-based indicators and network relationship analysis to reflect international collaboration patterns. Then we integrate empirical analyses to show effecting factors of international collaboration degrees by using panel data. The results indicate that while 3D printing technology is associated with a “balanced collaboration” mode, big data technology is more accurately described by a radial pattern, centered on the United States, and carbon nanotubes and graphene technology exhibits “small-world” characteristics in this respect. It also shows that the factors GDP per capita (GPC), R&D expenditure (RDE) and the export of global trade value (ETV) negatively affect the level of international collaboration. It could be useful for China and other developing countries to make international scientific and technological collaboration strategies and policies in the future. PMID:27911926

  4. Technologies for Collaborative Business Process Management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sadiq, Shazia; Reichert, M.U.; Schulz, Karsten

    Business process management (BPM) has become an extensive area of research with several specialized aspects. BPM is viewed from highly diverse angles ranging from a management strategy to a software system. It is widely acknowledged that process enforcement technologies hold the potential to provide

  5. Virtual Laboratory Enabling Collaborative Research in Applied Vehicle Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamar, John E.; Cronin, Catherine K.; Scott, Laura E.

    2005-01-01

    The virtual laboratory is a new technology, based on the internet, that has had wide usage in a variety of technical fields because of its inherent ability to allow many users to participate simultaneously in instruction (education) or in the collaborative study of a common problem (real-world application). The leadership in the Applied Vehicle Technology panel has encouraged the utilization of this technology in its task groups for some time and its parent organization, the Research and Technology Agency, has done the same for its own administrative use. This paper outlines the application of the virtual laboratory to those fields important to applied vehicle technologies, gives the status of the effort, and identifies the benefit it can have on collaborative research. The latter is done, in part, through a specific example, i.e. the experience of one task group.

  6. Sharing knowledge, shaping Europe US technological collaboration and nonproliferation

    CERN Document Server

    Krige, John

    2016-01-01

    In the 1950s and the 1960s, U.S. administrations were determined to prevent Western European countries from developing independent national nuclear weapons programs. To do so, the United States attempted to use its technological pre-eminence as a tool of “soft power” to steer Western European technological choices toward the peaceful uses of the atom and of space, encouraging options that fostered collaboration, promoted nonproliferation, and defused challenges to U.S. technological superiority. In Sharing Knowledge, Shaping Europe, John Krige describes these efforts and the varying degrees of success they achieved. Krige explains that the pursuit of scientific and technological leadership, galvanized by America’s Cold War competition with the Soviet Union, was also used for techno-political collaboration with major allies. He examines a series of multinational arrangements involving shared technological platforms and aimed at curbing nuclear proliferation, and he describes the roles of the Department ...

  7. Teaching Responsibly with Technology-Mediated Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veltsos, Jennifer R.; Veltsos, Christophe

    2010-01-01

    Technology-mediated communication, or "new media," such as blogs, Twitter, wikis, and social network sites, can be an endless source of ideas for activities or inspiration for classroom discussion. Many instructors ask students to monitor current events by following keywords and industry leaders on Twitter and reading both corporate and…

  8. Is there a role for social technologies in collaborative healthcare?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacigalupe, Gonzalo

    2011-03-01

    The exponential growth, variety, and sophistication of the information communication technologies (ICTs) plus their growing accessibility are transforming how clinical practitioners, patients, and their families can work together. Social technologies are the ICTs tools that augment the ability of people to communicate and collaborate despite obstacles of geography and time. There is still little empirical research on the impact of social technologies in the case of collaborative health. Defining a set of social technologies with potential for developing, sustaining, and strengthening the collaborative health agenda should prove useful for practitioners and researchers. This paper is based on an extensive review of the literature focusing on emerging technologies and the experience of the author as a consultant to health care professionals learning about social technologies. A note of caution is required: the phenomenon is complex and hard to describe in writing (a medium very different from the technologies themselves). Hardware and software are in continuous development and the iterative adaptation of the emergent social technologies for new forms of virtual communication. (c) 2011 APA, all rights reserved

  9. University Research Collaborations on Nuclear Technology: A Legal Framework

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagakoshi, Y.

    2016-01-01

    Full text: International nuclear research collaborations are becoming increasingly important as the need for environmentally sound and safe energy technology grows. Despite having its risk, the benefits of using nuclear energy cannot be overlooked considering the energy crisis the world is facing. In order to maximize the safety of existing technology and promoting safe ways of taking advantage of nuclear energy, collaborative efforts of all who are involved in nuclear technology is necessary, regardless of national borders or affiliation. Non-conventional use of nuclear energy shall also be sought after in order to reduce greenhouse gas emission and to overcome the energy crisis the world is facing. It is therefore important that international collaborations among research institutes are promoted. Collaboration amongst universities poses a series of legal questions on how to form the framework, how to protect individual and communal inventions and how to share the fruits of the invention. This paper proposes a possible framework of collaboration and elaborates on possible legal issues and solutions. (author

  10. Research on Collaborative Technology in Distributed Virtual Reality System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, ZhenJiang; Huang, JiJie; Li, Zhao; Wang, Lei; Cui, JiSheng; Tang, Zhi

    2018-01-01

    Distributed virtual reality technology applied to the joint training simulation needs the CSCW (Computer Supported Cooperative Work) terminal multicast technology to display and the HLA (high-level architecture) technology to ensure the temporal and spatial consistency of the simulation, in order to achieve collaborative display and collaborative computing. In this paper, the CSCW’s terminal multicast technology has been used to modify and expand the implementation framework of HLA. During the simulation initialization period, this paper has used the HLA statement and object management service interface to establish and manage the CSCW network topology, and used the HLA data filtering mechanism for each federal member to establish the corresponding Mesh tree. During the simulation running period, this paper has added a new thread for the RTI and the CSCW real-time multicast interactive technology into the RTI, so that the RTI can also use the window message mechanism to notify the application update the display screen. Through many applications of submerged simulation training in substation under the operation of large power grid, it is shown that this paper has achieved satisfactory training effect on the collaborative technology used in distributed virtual reality simulation.

  11. Collaborative Dialogue in Synchronous Computer-Mediated Communication and Face-to-Face Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Gang

    2017-01-01

    Previous research has documented that collaborative dialogue promotes L2 learning in both face-to-face (F2F) and synchronous computer-mediated communication (SCMC) modalities. However, relatively little research has explored modality effects on collaborative dialogue. Thus, motivated by sociocultual theory, this study examines how F2F compares…

  12. Enhancing technological innovation in small firms: Role of collaboration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, D; Khamba, J S; Nanda, T

    2014-01-01

    Contribution of Micro-Small and Medium Enterprises (MSMEs) is highly remarkable in the overall industrial economy of the country. In recent years, the MSME sector has consistently registered higher growth rate compared to the overall industrial sector. With its agility and dynamism, the sector has shown admirable innovativeness and adaptability to survive the recent economic downturn and recession. However, MSMEs growth rate is still at low level. Therefore, it becomes essential for organizations to adopt new technologies or upgrade existing setup to meet continuously changing global market and fulfill customer needs. This paper explores the relationships between different collaboration networks and technological innovation of small firms through an extensive review of literature. The study finds that collaboration with larger enterprises, R and D institutions, universities and government agencies play a significant role in enhancing technological innovation in small firms

  13. Essential technologies for developing human and robot collaborative system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishikawa, Nobuyuki; Suzuki, Katsuo

    1997-10-01

    In this study, we aim to develop a concept of new robot system, i.e., 'human and robot collaborative system', for the patrol of nuclear power plants. This paper deals with the two essential technologies developed for the system. One is the autonomous navigation program with human intervention function which is indispensable for human and robot collaboration. The other is the position estimation method by using gyroscope and TV image to make the estimation accuracy much higher for safe navigation. Feasibility of the position estimation method is evaluated by experiment and numerical simulation. (author)

  14. International energy technology collaboration and climate change mitigation. Case study 1. Concentrating Solar Power Technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Philibert, C. [Energy and Environment Division, International Energy Agency IEA, Paris (France)

    2004-07-01

    Mitigating climate change and achieving stabilisation of greenhouse gas atmospheric concentrations will require deep reductions in global emissions of energy-related carbon dioxide emissions. Developing and disseminating new, low-carbon energy technology will thus be needed. Two previous AIXG papers have focused on possible drivers for such a profound technological change: Technology Innovation, Development and Diffusion, released in June 2003, and International Energy Technology Collaboration and Climate Change Mitigation, released in June 2004. The first of these papers assesses a broad range of technical options for reducing energy-related CO2 emissions. It examines how technologies evolve and the role of research and development efforts, alternative policies, and short-term investment decisions in making long-term options available. It considers various policy tools that may induce technological change, some very specific, and others with broader expected effects. Its overall conclusion is that policies specifically designed to promote technical change, or 'technology push', could play a critical role in making available and affordable new energy technologies. However, such policies would not be sufficient to achieve the Convention's objective in the absence of broader policies. First, because there is a large potential for cuts that could be achieved in the short run with existing technologies; and second, the development of new technologies requires a market pull as much as a technology push. The second paper considers the potential advantages and disadvantages of international energy technology collaboration and transfer for promoting technological change. Advantages of collaboration may consist of lowering R and D costs and stimulating other countries to invest in R and D; disadvantage may include free-riding and the inefficiency of reaching agreement between many actors. This paper sets the context for further discussion on the role of

  15. The influence of multiple trials and computer-mediated communication on collaborative and individual semantic recall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinds, Joanne M; Payne, Stephen J

    2018-04-01

    Collaborative inhibition is a phenomenon where collaborating groups experience a decrement in recall when interacting with others. Despite this, collaboration has been found to improve subsequent individual recall. We explore these effects in semantic recall, which is seldom studied in collaborative retrieval. We also examine "parallel CMC", a synchronous form of computer-mediated communication that has previously been found to improve collaborative recall [Hinds, J. M., & Payne, S. J. (2016). Collaborative inhibition and semantic recall: Improving collaboration through computer-mediated communication. Applied Cognitive Psychology, 30(4), 554-565]. Sixty three triads completed a semantic recall task, which involved generating words beginning with "PO" or "HE" across three recall trials, in one of three retrieval conditions: Individual-Individual-Individual (III), Face-to-face-Face-to-Face-Individual (FFI) and Parallel-Parallel-Individual (PPI). Collaborative inhibition was present across both collaborative conditions. Individual recall in Recall 3 was higher when participants had previously collaborated in comparison to recalling three times individually. There was no difference between face-to-face and parallel CMC recall, however subsidiary analyses of instance repetitions and subjective organisation highlighted differences in group members' approaches to recall in terms of organisation and attention to others' contributions. We discuss the implications of these findings in relation to retrieval strategy disruption.

  16. Future Technology Workshop: A Collaborative Method for the Design of New Learning Technologies and Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vavoula, Giasemi N.; Sharples, Mike

    2007-01-01

    We describe the future technology workshop (FTW), a method whereby people with everyday knowledge or experience in a specific area of technology use (such as using digital cameras) envision and design the interactions between current and future technology and activity. Through a series of structured workshop sessions, participants collaborate to…

  17. Instrumental Genesis in Technology-Mediated Learning: From Double Stimulation to Expansive Knowledge Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritella, Giuseppe; Hakkarainen, Kai

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the present paper is to examine the socio-cultural foundations of technology-mediated collaborative learning. Toward that end, we discuss the role of artifacts in knowledge-creating inquiry, relying on the theoretical ideas of Carl Bereiter, Merlin Donald, Pierre Rabardel, Keith Sawyer and L. S. Vygotsky. We argue that epistemic…

  18. Collaboration in Research and Engineering for Advanced Technology.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vrieling, P. Douglas [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-01-01

    SNL/CA proposes the Collaboration in Research and Engineering for Advanced Technology and Education (CREATE) facility to support customer-driven national security mission requirements while demonstrating a fiscally responsible approach to cost-control. SNL/CA realizes that due to the current backlog of capital projects in NNSA that following the normal Line Item process to procure capital funding is unlikely and therefore SNL/CA will be looking at all options including Alternative Financing.

  19. Barriers and Facilitators of Collaborative Management in Technological Innovation Projects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia Regina Hierro Parolin

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Discussions about innovation tend to a more systemic and cooperative approach in which those networks focused on scientific and technological development are considered. This article aims to identify the barriers and facilitators in the collaborative management process of technological innovation projects and a study has been carried out by the cooperation action for innovation with 17 industries in Brazil. The primary evidence refers to the crucial role of project managers when leading the structural demands, and clarity on the relevance of the communication of strategic guidelines among the organizations involved for the achievement of the results in the industries.

  20. Computer-mediated mobile messaging as collaboration support for nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpati, Peter; Toussaint, Pieter Jelle; Nytrø, Oystein

    2009-01-01

    Collaboration in hospitals is coordinated mainly by communication, which currently happens by face-to-face meetings, phone calls, pagers, notes and the electronic patient record. These habits raise problems e.g., delayed notifications and unnecessary interruptions. Dealing with these problems could save time and improve the care. Therefore we designed and prototyped a mobile messaging solution based on two specific scenarios coming from observations at a cardiology department of a Norwegian hospital. The main focus was on supporting the work of nurses. One prototype supported patient management while another one dealt with messages related to medication planning. The evaluation of the prototypes suggested that messaging-based collaboration support is worth to explore and also gave ideas for improvement.

  1. Student Collaboration and School Educational Technology: Technology Integration Practices in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scalise, Kathleen

    2016-01-01

    With the onset of Web 2.0 and 3.0--the social and semantic webs--a next wave for integration of educational technology into the classroom is occurring. The aim of this paper is to show how some teachers are increasingly bringing collaboration and shared meaning-making through technology environments into learning environments (Evergreen Education…

  2. Technological learning through international collaboration: Lessons from the field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Danielle; Weigel, Annalisa

    2013-02-01

    Countries on every continent are making new or renewed commitments to domestic satellite programs. These programs have the potential to address national needs by enhancing access to information, improving infrastructure and providing inspiration to the public. How do countries without local expertise in space technology begin a new satellite program? What is the role of international collaboration in supporting the efforts of a new space fairing country? This paper explores such questions by highlighting outputs from intensive field work in Africa and Asia. Specifically, the study explores case studies of early space activity in these countries to search for lessons about the management of a young space program. The observations from field work are compared to ideas from scholarly literature on technological learning. The findings are organized using principles from systems architecture. The paper presents a model that captures many of the influences and strategic decision areas for a collaborative satellite development project. The paper also highlights the growth of capability among African countries in the area of satellite technology.

  3. Virtual microscopy : Merging of computer mediated collaboration and intuitive interfacing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Ridder, H.; De Ridder-Sluiter, J.G.; Kluin, P.M.; Christiaans, H.H.C.M.

    2009-01-01

    Ubiquitous computing (or Ambient Intelligence) is an upcoming technology that is usually associated with futuristic smart environments in which information is available anytime anywhere and with which humans can interact in a natural, multimodal way. However spectacular the corresponding scenarios

  4. Virtual microscopy: Merging of computer mediated collaboration and intuitive interfacing

    OpenAIRE

    De Ridder, H.; De Ridder-Sluiter, J.G.; Kluin, P.M.; Christiaans, H.H.C.M.

    2009-01-01

    Ubiquitous computing (or Ambient Intelligence) is an upcoming technology that is usually associated with futuristic smart environments in which information is available anytime anywhere and with which humans can interact in a natural, multimodal way. However spectacular the corresponding scenarios may be, it is equally challenging to consider how this technology may enhance existing situations. This is illustrated by a case study from the Dutch medical field: central quality reviewing for pat...

  5. Collaborating to optimize nursing students' agency information technology use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fetter, Marilyn S

    2009-01-01

    As the learning laboratory for gaining actual patient care experience, clinical agencies play an essential role in nursing education. With an information technology revolution transforming healthcare, nursing programs are eager for their students to learn the latest informatics systems and technologies. However, many healthcare institutions are struggling to meet their own information technology needs and report limited resources and other as barriers to nursing student training. In addition, nursing students' information technology access and use raise security and privacy concerns. With the goal of a fully electronic health record by 2014, it is imperative that agencies and educational programs collaborate. They need to establish educationally sound, cost-effective, and secure policies and procedures for managing students' use of information technology systems. Strategies for evaluating options, selecting training methods, and ensuring data security are shared, along with strategies that may reap clinical, economic, and educational benefits. Students' information technology use raises numerous issues that the nursing profession must address to participate in healthcare's transformation into the digital age.

  6. INL - NNL an International Technology Collaboration Case Study - Advanced Fogging Technologies for Decommissioning - 13463

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banford, Anthony; Edwards, Jeremy; Demmer, Rick; Rankin, Richard; Hastings, Jeremy

    2013-01-01

    International collaboration and partnerships have become a reality as markets continue to globalize. This is the case in nuclear sector where over recent years partnerships commonly form to bid for capital projects internationally in the increasingly contractorized world and international consortia regularly bid and lead Management and Operations (M and O) / Parent Body Organization (PBO) site management contracts. International collaboration can also benefit research and technology development. The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and the UK National Nuclear Laboratory (NNL) are internationally recognized organizations delivering leading science and technology development programmes both nationally and internationally. The Laboratories are actively collaborating in several areas with benefits to both the laboratories and their customers. Recent collaborations have focused on fuel cycle separations, systems engineering supporting waste management and decommissioning, the use of misting for decontamination and in-situ waste characterisation. This paper focuses on a case study illustrating how integration of two technologies developed on different sides of the Atlantic are being integrated through international collaboration to address real decommissioning challenges using fogging technology. (authors)

  7. INL - NNL an International Technology Collaboration Case Study - Advanced Fogging Technologies for Decommissioning - 13463

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banford, Anthony; Edwards, Jeremy [National Nuclear Laboratory, 5th Floor Chadwick House, Birchwood Park, Warrington WA3 6AE(United Kingdom); Demmer, Rick; Rankin, Richard [Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID 83401(United States); Hastings, Jeremy [National Nuclear Laboratory, Central Laboratory Sellafield, Seascale, Cumbria CA20 1PG (United Kingdom)

    2013-07-01

    International collaboration and partnerships have become a reality as markets continue to globalize. This is the case in nuclear sector where over recent years partnerships commonly form to bid for capital projects internationally in the increasingly contractorized world and international consortia regularly bid and lead Management and Operations (M and O) / Parent Body Organization (PBO) site management contracts. International collaboration can also benefit research and technology development. The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and the UK National Nuclear Laboratory (NNL) are internationally recognized organizations delivering leading science and technology development programmes both nationally and internationally. The Laboratories are actively collaborating in several areas with benefits to both the laboratories and their customers. Recent collaborations have focused on fuel cycle separations, systems engineering supporting waste management and decommissioning, the use of misting for decontamination and in-situ waste characterisation. This paper focuses on a case study illustrating how integration of two technologies developed on different sides of the Atlantic are being integrated through international collaboration to address real decommissioning challenges using fogging technology. (authors)

  8. The Impact of Virtual Collaboration and Collaboration Technologies on Knowledge Transfer and Team Performance in Distributed Organizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngoma, Ngoma Sylvestre

    2013-01-01

    Virtual teams are increasingly viewed as a powerful determinant of competitive advantage in geographically distributed organizations. This study was designed to provide insights into the interdependencies between virtual collaboration, collaboration technologies, knowledge transfer, and virtual team performance in an effort to understand whether…

  9. A Mediation Model of Interparental Collaboration, Parenting Practices, and Child Externalizing Behavior in a Clinical Sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kjobli, John; Hagen, Kristine Amlund

    2009-01-01

    The present study examined maternal and paternal parenting practices as mediators of the link between interparental collaboration and children's externalizing behavior. Parent gender was tested as a moderator of the associations. A clinical sample consisting of 136 children with externalizing problems and their families participated in the study.…

  10. Material Mediation: Tools and Representations Supporting Collaborative Problem-Solving Discourse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katic, Elvira K.; Hmelo-Silver, Cindy E.; Weber, Keith H.

    2009-01-01

    This study investigates how a variety of resources mediated collaborative problem solving for a group of preservice teachers. The participants in this study completed mathematical, combinatorial tasks and then watched a video of a sixth grader as he exhibited sophisticated reasoning to recognize the isomorphic structure of these problems. The…

  11. Exploring the Technological Collaboration Characteristics of the Global Integrated Circuit Manufacturing Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun Liu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available With the intensification of international competition, there are many international technological collaborations in the integrated circuit manufacturing (ICM industry. The importance of improving the level of international technological collaboration is becoming more and more prominent. Therefore, it is vital for a country, a region, or an institution to understand the international technological collaboration characteristics of the ICM industry and, thus, to know how to enhance its own international technological collaboration. This paper depicts the international technological collaboration characteristics of the ICM industry based on patent analysis. Four aspects, which include collaboration patterns, collaboration networks, collaboration institutions, and collaboration impacts, are analyzed by utilizing patent association analysis and social network analysis. The findings include the following: first, in regard to international technological collaboration, the USA has the highest level, while Germany has great potential for future development; second, Asia and Europe have already formed clusters, respectively, in the cooperative network; last, but not least, research institutions, colleges, and universities should also actively participate in international collaboration. In general, this study provides an objective reference for policy making, competitiveness, and sustainability in the ICM industry. The framework presented in this paper could be applied to examine other industrial international technological collaborations.

  12. ATLAS Experiment: Collaboration at the frontiers of science and technology

    CERN Document Server

    2018-01-01

    ATLAS is run by a collaboration of physicists, engineers, technicians and support staff from around the world. It is one of the largest collaborative efforts ever attempted in science, with over 5000 members and almost 3000 scientific authors. The ATLAS Collaboration welcomes new collaborators for long-term engagement in the experiment.

  13. Energy technologies at the cutting edge: international energy technology collaboration IEA Implementing Agreements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pottinger, C. (ed.)

    2007-05-15

    Ensuring energy security and addressing climate change issues in a cost-effective way are the main challenges of energy policies and in the longer term will be solved only through technology cooperation. To encourage collaborative efforts to meet these energy challenges, the IEA created a legal contract - Implementing Agreement - and a system of standard rules and regulations. This allows interested member and non-member governments or other organisations to pool resources and to foster the research, development and deployment of particular technologies. For more than 30 years, this international technology collaboration has been a fundamental building block in facilitating progress of new or improved energy technologies. There are now 41 Implementing Agreements. This is the third in the series of publications highlighting the recent results and achievements of the IEA Implementing Agreements. This document is arranged in the following sections: Cross-cutting activities (sub-sectioned: Climate technology initiative; Energy Technology Data Eexchange; and Energy technology systems analysis programme); End-use technologies (sub-sectioned: Buildings; Electricity; Industry; and Transport; Fossil fuels (sub-sectioned: Clean Coal Centre; Enhanced oil recovery Fluidized bed conversion; Greenhouse Gas R & D; Multiphase flow sciences); Fusion power; Renewable energies and hydrogen; and For more information (including detail on the IEA energy technology network; IEA Secretariat Implementing Agreement support; and IEA framework. Addresses are given for the Implementing Agreements. The publication is based on core input from the Implementing Agreement Executive Committee.

  14. Mediating spaces acting for the collaboration in the future school

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Teräväinen

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we report the performance and preliminary results of studies carried outduring the years 2007-2008 in a research project called InnoArch, Places and Spaces for Learning.InnoArch is a part of a large trans-disciplinary InnoSchool consortium (1.1.2007- 28.2.2010 aiming todevelop a set of research-based good practices, processes, models and designs for the Future SchoolConcept. InnoArch research has focused partly on “place and mapping”, which includes a place-based approachto pedagogical processes. On the other hand the research has concentrated on “space andexperience”, which includes architectural or spatial analyses of the building and the neighborhood. The spatial experience on each environmental scale is perceived with all senses: sight, hearing, taste, smell,touch and body awareness. Indoor studies are mainly about “creating and experiencing the space”,something that has great bearing on architectural thinking when designing the future school. The non-physical virtual space is seen as a mediator between the physical environment (neighborhoodand the PjBLL (Project Based Learning Lab at Jakomäki School in Helsinki. Places in the physical environment can be located on the commentary map, which will be constructed in the School Forum byteachers and students.The pupils themselves have an opportunity to personalize the room which is here described as a PjBLL.The room provides possibilities to pursue video observation as well as participative observation and participative design research during architectural workshops. These studies were conducted together with teachers, the pedagogical focus being on TSL processes and the architectural view on physicaland virtual spaces. Sustainability is within the focus of both the environmental studies as well as in lifelongand life-wide learning processes. The pedagogical idea based on inquiry-based learning encourages to strengthen pupils´ epistemic agency in the local community

  15. INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY AS A DETERMINANT OF SMES COLLABORATION AND INNOVATIVENESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svetlana Cvetanovic

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Studies of small and medium-sized enterprise (SMEs development around the world show that the most significant factor for increasing their numbers and improving business success is the free enterprise, as exogenous, and innovation as an endogenous variable. At the same time, the dominant view in economic theory is that innovation is a key generator of changes for which the SMEs can be considered as a kind of metaphors for a successful business over the last twenty years in a number of economies. Arguing that cooperation between SMEs is increasingly common generic strategy of their development, the paper first explains the importance of collaboration to increase innovation and competitiveness, and then provides possible models using information technology such as Workflow Management Systems (WfMS, Service Oriented Architecture (SOA and Service-Oriented Cloud Computing Architecture (SOCCA to support the collaboration of these business entities. Solutions provided are aimed at improving the innovativeness of SMEs and fully follow the requirements of the so-called fifth-generation innovation process whose key attributes are integration and flexibility.

  16. Technology collaboration by means of an open source government

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berardi, Steven M.

    2009-05-01

    The idea of open source software originally began in the early 1980s, but it never gained widespread support until recently, largely due to the explosive growth of the Internet. Only the Internet has made this kind of concept possible, bringing together millions of software developers from around the world to pool their knowledge. The tremendous success of open source software has prompted many corporations to adopt the culture of open source and thus share information they previously held secret. The government, and specifically the Department of Defense (DoD), could also benefit from adopting an open source culture. In acquiring satellite systems, the DoD often builds walls between program offices, but installing doors between programs can promote collaboration and information sharing. This paper addresses the challenges and consequences of adopting an open source culture to facilitate technology collaboration for DoD space acquisitions. DISCLAIMER: The views presented here are the views of the author, and do not represent the views of the United States Government, United States Air Force, or the Missile Defense Agency.

  17. International energy technology collaboration: wind power integration into electricity systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Justus, D.

    2006-01-01

    A rapid growth of wind power since the 1990s has led to notable market shares in some electricity markets. This growth is concentrated in a few countries with effective Research, Development and Demonstration (RD and D) programmes and with policies that support its diffusion into the market place. The speed and depth of its penetration in these electricity markets have amplified the need to address grid integration concerns, so as not to impede the further penetration of wind power. Research on technologies, tools and practices for integrating large amounts of wind power into electricity supply systems is attempting to respond to this need. In recent years, existing international collaborative research efforts have expanded their focus to include grid integration of wind power and new consortia have been formed to pool knowledge and resources. Effective results benefit a few countries that already have a significant amount of wind in their electricity supply fuel mix, as well as to the potential large markets worldwide. This paper focuses on the challenge of bringing significant amounts of intermittent generating sources into grids dominated by large central generating units. It provides a brief overview of the growth of wind power, mainly since 1990, the technical and operational issues related to integration and selected collaborative programmes underway to address grid integration concerns. (author)

  18. Technological Mediation and Power: Postphenomenology, Critical Theory, and Autonomist Marxism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bantwal Rao, M.; Jongerden, J.P.; Lemmens, P.C.; Ruivenkamp, G.T.P.

    2015-01-01

    This article focuses on the power of technological mediation from the point of view of autonomist Marxism (Hardt, Negri, Virno, Berardi, Lazzarrato). The first part of the article discusses the theories developed on technological mediation in postphenomenology (Ihde, Verbeek) and critical theory of

  19. Collaborative Action Research on Technology Integration for Science Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chien-Hsing; Ke, Yi-Ting; Wu, Jin-Tong; Hsu, Wen-Hua

    2012-02-01

    This paper briefly reports the outcomes of an action research inquiry on the use of blogs, MS PowerPoint [PPT], and the Internet as learning tools with a science class of sixth graders for project-based learning. Multiple sources of data were essential to triangulate the key findings articulated in this paper. Corresponding to previous studies, the incorporation of technology and project-based learning could motivate students in self-directed exploration. The students were excited about the autonomy over what to learn and the use of PPT to express what they learned. Differing from previous studies, the findings pointed to the lack information literacy among students. The students lacked information evaluation skills, note-taking and information synthesis. All these findings imply the importance of teaching students about information literacy and visual literacy when introducing information technology into the classroom. The authors suggest that further research should focus on how to break the culture of "copy-and-paste" by teaching the skills of note-taking and synthesis through inquiry projects for science learning. Also, further research on teacher professional development should focus on using collaboration action research as a framework for re-designing graduate courses for science teachers in order to enhance classroom technology integration.

  20. The Impact of an Online Collaborative Learning Program on Students' Attitude towards Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magen-Nagar, Noga; Shonfeld, Miri

    2018-01-01

    This quantitative research examined the contribution of an Online Collaborative Learning (OCL) program on attitudes towards technology in terms of technological anxiety, self-confidence and technology orientation among M.Ed. students. The advanced online collaborative program was implemented at two teacher training colleges in Israel for a period…

  1. Impact of Collaborative Work on Technology Acceptance: A Case Study from Virtual Computing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah Konak

    2016-12-01

    Findings\tThe findings of the study supported that collaborative work could improve non-technology students’ acceptance of RVCLs. However, no significant effect of collaborative work on technology acceptance was observed in the case of technology students. Recommendations for Practitioners\tEducators should consider the benefits of collaborative work while introducing a new technology to students who may not have background in the technology introduced. Recommendation for Researchers In this study, student technological background was found to be a significant factor for technology acceptance; hence, it is recommended that technological background is included in TAM studies as an external factor. Future Research\tRepeating similar studies with multiple exercises with varying degrees of challenge is required for a better understanding of how collaborative work and student technological background affect technology acceptance.

  2. Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Michelle L.

    2010-01-01

    This article explores collaboration between library media educators and regular classroom teachers. The article focuses on the context of the issue, positions on the issue, the impact of collaboration, and how to implement effective collaboration into the school system. Various books and professional journals are used to support conclusions…

  3. Virtual collaboration: face-to-face versus videoconference, audioconference, and computer-mediated communications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wainfan, Lynne; Davis, Paul K.

    2004-08-01

    As we increase our reliance on mediated communication, it is important to be aware the media's influence on group processes and outcomes. A review of 40+ years of research shows that all media-videoconference, audioconference, and computer-mediated communication--change the context of the communication to some extent, reducing cues used to regulate and understand conversation, indicate participants' power and status, and move the group towards agreement. Text-based computer-mediated communication, the "leanest" medum, reduces status effects, domination, and consensus. This has been shown useful in broadening the range of inputs and ideas. However, it has also been shown to increase polarization, deindividuation, and disinhibition, and the time to reach a conclusion. For decision-making tasks, computer-mediated communication can increase choice shift and the likelihood of more risky or extreme decisions. In both videoconference and audioconference, participants cooperate less with linked collaborators, and shift their opinions toward extreme options, compared with face-to-face collaboration. In videoconference and audioconference, local coalitions can form where participants tend to agree more with those in the same room than those on the other end of the line. There is also a tendency in audioconference to disagree with those on the other end of the phone. This paper is a summary of a much more extensive forthcoming report; it reviews the research literature and proposes strategies to leverage the benefits of mediated communication while mitigating its adverse effects.

  4. Applying Adaptive Swarm Intelligence Technology with Structuration in Web-Based Collaborative Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yueh-Min; Liu, Chien-Hung

    2009-01-01

    One of the key challenges in the promotion of web-based learning is the development of effective collaborative learning environments. We posit that the structuration process strongly influences the effectiveness of technology used in web-based collaborative learning activities. In this paper, we propose an ant swarm collaborative learning (ASCL)…

  5. Research Funding, Patent Search Training and Technology Transfer: a collaboration

    KAUST Repository

    Tyhurst, Janis

    2016-01-01

    This paper will focus on the collaboration efforts of three different university departments to create, teach and evaluate the benefits of a joint patent training series, as well as the future directions this collaboration will take. KAUST has as one of its goals the diversification of the Saudi economy. There is a strong focus at the university on developing entrepreneurial ideas and commercializing research done. The University Library supports this goal through the provision of electronic resources and introductory patent search training skills. However, the patent training class offered by the University Library is only one step in a process that faculty and students need when starting or taking their research to the next level. In the Fall of 2015, I met with representatives of the two major stakeholders in the patent arena, the office of Sponsored Research (OSR) and the Technology Transfer Office (TTO), to develop a patent training program to meet the needs of researchers. The OSR provides funding to researchers who have demonstrated that their ideas have merit with potential applications, the TTO works with researchers who are at the point of needing IP protection. The resulting discussion led us to collaborate on creating a workshop series that benefit the researcher’s information needs and each of our departments as well. In the first of the series of three 2 hour workshops, the Manager of TTO and the Lead Integrative Specialist from the OSR presented a workshop on an overview of Intellectual Property and the patenting process. These presentations focused on when and how to determine whether research is potentially patentable, why a researcher needs to protect his/her research and how to go about protecting it. The second workshop focused on introductory patent search skills and tools, how to expand a literature search to include the information found in patents, and how this kind of research will improve not only the literature search but the research

  6. Predicting User Acceptance of Collaborative Technologies: An Extension of the Technology Acceptance Model for E-Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Ronnie; Vogel, Doug

    2013-01-01

    Collaborative technologies support group work in project-based environments. In this study, we enhance the technology acceptance model to explain the factors that influence the acceptance of Google Applications for collaborative learning. The enhanced model was empirically evaluated using survey data collected from 136 students enrolled in a…

  7. Reviews of Geospatial Information Technology and Collaborative Data Delivery for Disaster Risk Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroyuki Miyazaki

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Due to the fact that geospatial information technology is considered necessary for disaster risk management (DRM, the need for more effective collaborations between providers and end users in data delivery is increasing. This paper reviews the following: (i schemes of disaster risk management and collaborative data operation in DRM; (ii geospatial information technology in terms of applications to the schemes reviewed; and (iii ongoing practices of collaborative data delivery with the schemes reviewed. This paper concludes by discussing the future of collaborative data delivery and the progress of the technologies.

  8. Effects of Discovery, Iteration, and Collaboration in Laboratory Courses on Undergraduates' Research Career Intentions Fully Mediated by Student Ownership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corwin, Lisa A; Runyon, Christopher R; Ghanem, Eman; Sandy, Moriah; Clark, Greg; Palmer, Gregory C; Reichler, Stuart; Rodenbusch, Stacia E; Dolan, Erin L

    2018-06-01

    Course-based undergraduate research experiences (CUREs) provide a promising avenue to attract a larger and more diverse group of students into research careers. CUREs are thought to be distinctive in offering students opportunities to make discoveries, collaborate, engage in iterative work, and develop a sense of ownership of their lab course work. Yet how these elements affect students' intentions to pursue research-related careers remain unexplored. To address this knowledge gap, we collected data on three design features thought to be distinctive of CUREs (discovery, iteration, collaboration) and on students' levels of ownership and career intentions from ∼800 undergraduates who had completed CURE or inquiry courses, including courses from the Freshman Research Initiative (FRI), which has a demonstrated positive effect on student retention in college and in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics. We used structural equation modeling to test relationships among the design features and student ownership and career intentions. We found that discovery, iteration, and collaboration had small but significant effects on students' intentions; these effects were fully mediated by student ownership. Students in FRI courses reported significantly higher levels of discovery, iteration, and ownership than students in other CUREs. FRI research courses alone had a significant effect on students' career intentions.

  9. Collaborative Professional Development in Higher Education: Developing Knowledge of Technology Enhanced Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaipal-Jamani, Kamini; Figg, Candace; Gallagher, Tiffany; Scott, Ruth McQuirter; Ciampa, Katia

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes a professional development initiative for teacher educators, called the "Digital Pedagogies Collaboration," in which the goal was to build faculty knowledge about technology enhanced teaching (TPACK knowledge), develop a collaborative learning and research community of faculty members around technology enhanced…

  10. Collaborative Project-Based Learning: An Integrative Science and Technological Education Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baser, Derya; Ozden, M. Yasar; Karaarslan, Hasan

    2017-01-01

    Background: Blending collaborative learning and project-based learning (PBL) based on Wolff (2003) design categories, students interacted in a learning environment where they developed their technology integration practices as well as their technological and collaborative skills. Purpose: The study aims to understand how seventh grade students…

  11. Has Research on Collaborative Learning Technologies Addressed Massiveness? A Literature Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manathunga, Kalpani; Hernández-Leo, Davinia

    2015-01-01

    There is a growing interest in understanding to what extent innovative educational technologies can be used to support massive courses. Collaboration is one of the main desired elements in massive learning actions involving large communities of participants. Accumulated research in collaborative learning technologies has proposed and evaluated…

  12. Social Network Analysis of 50 Years of International Collaboration in the Research of Educational Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Shesen; Zhang, Ganzhou; Guo, Yufei

    2016-01-01

    The definition of the field of educational technology has evolved over 50 years. New inventions and economic globalization increasingly facilitate people's communication for exchange of ideas and collaboration. This work attempts to describe international research collaboration in educational technology for the past 50 years. This article intends…

  13. Supporting interoperability of collaborative networks through engineering of a service-based Mediation Information System (MISE 2.0)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benaben, Frederick; Mu, Wenxin; Boissel-Dallier, Nicolas; Barthe-Delanoe, Anne-Marie; Zribi, Sarah; Pingaud, Herve

    2015-08-01

    The Mediation Information System Engineering project is currently finishing its second iteration (MISE 2.0). The main objective of this scientific project is to provide any emerging collaborative situation with methods and tools to deploy a Mediation Information System (MIS). MISE 2.0 aims at defining and designing a service-based platform, dedicated to initiating and supporting the interoperability of collaborative situations among potential partners. This MISE 2.0 platform implements a model-driven engineering approach to the design of a service-oriented MIS dedicated to supporting the collaborative situation. This approach is structured in three layers, each providing their own key innovative points: (i) the gathering of individual and collaborative knowledge to provide appropriate collaborative business behaviour (key point: knowledge management, including semantics, exploitation and capitalisation), (ii) deployment of a mediation information system able to computerise the previously deduced collaborative processes (key point: the automatic generation of collaborative workflows, including connection with existing devices or services) (iii) the management of the agility of the obtained collaborative network of organisations (key point: supervision of collaborative situations and relevant exploitation of the gathered data). MISE covers business issues (through BPM), technical issues (through an SOA) and agility issues of collaborative situations (through EDA).

  14. Incorporating Collaborative Technologies into University Curricula: Lessons Learned

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, C. Steven; Smith, Lola B.; Chen, Minder

    2010-01-01

    Web-based collaboration tools and groupware are uniquely qualified to address the emerging business opportunities heretofore hindered by location barriers, constraints of time, and expensive travel costs. Global business enterprises are implementing online collaboration software to augment their face-to-face meetings and group decision making in…

  15. Tangible Technology-Enhanced Learning for Improvement of Student Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barneva, Reneta P.; Gelsomini, Federico; Kanev, Kamen; Bottoni, Paolo

    2018-01-01

    Collaboration among students in the course of learning plays an important role in developing communication skills. In particular, it helps for team building and brainstorming on solutions of complex problems. While an effective group organization is critical for the success of such collaborative learning, many instructors would make arbitrary…

  16. Associated technologies ensures complete loop mediated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Loop Mediated Isothermal Amplification (LAMP) assay could be a useful adjunct diagnostic assay along with the conventional methods that would preclude the requirement of continuous maintenance of pure cultures. Moreover, LAMP assay is simple, rapid, specific and sensitive for the detection of pathogens. Having ...

  17. Students' Perceptions of Self-Directed Learning and Collaborative Learning with and without Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, K.; Tsai, P.-S.; Chai, C. S.; Koh, J. H. L.

    2014-01-01

    This study explored students' perceptions of self-directed learning (SDL) and collaborative learning (CL) with/without technology in an information and communications technology-supported classroom environment. The factors include SDL, CL, SDL supported by technology, and CL supported by technology. Based on the literature review, this study…

  18. Investigating the role of socially mediated metacognition during collaborative troubleshooting of electric circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van De Bogart, Kevin L.; Dounas-Frazer, Dimitri R.; Lewandowski, H. J.; Stetzer, MacKenzie R.

    2017-12-01

    Developing students' ability to troubleshoot is an important learning outcome for many undergraduate physics lab courses, especially electronics courses. In other work, metacognition has been identified as an important feature of troubleshooting. However, that work has focused primarily on individual students' metacognitive processes or troubleshooting abilities. In contrast, electronics courses often require students to work in pairs, and hence students' in-class experiences likely have significant social dimensions that are not well understood. In this work, we use an existing framework for socially mediated metacognition to analyze audiovisual data from think-aloud activities in which eight pairs of students from two institutions attempted to diagnose and repair a malfunctioning electric circuit. In doing so, we provide insight into some of the social metacognitive dynamics that arise during collaborative troubleshooting. We find that students engaged in socially mediated metacognition at multiple key transitions during the troubleshooting process. Reciprocated metacognitive dialogue arose when students were collectively strategizing about which measurements to perform, or reaching a shared understanding of the circuit's behavior. Our research demonstrates the value of the framework of socially mediated metacognition in providing insight into the nature of collaborative student troubleshooting in the context of electronics. As such, this framework may be a useful resource for future efforts to examine and support the development of student troubleshooting skills in other upper-division laboratory courses.

  19. Investigating the role of socially mediated metacognition during collaborative troubleshooting of electric circuits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin L. Van De Bogart

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Developing students’ ability to troubleshoot is an important learning outcome for many undergraduate physics lab courses, especially electronics courses. In other work, metacognition has been identified as an important feature of troubleshooting. However, that work has focused primarily on individual students’ metacognitive processes or troubleshooting abilities. In contrast, electronics courses often require students to work in pairs, and hence students’ in-class experiences likely have significant social dimensions that are not well understood. In this work, we use an existing framework for socially mediated metacognition to analyze audiovisual data from think-aloud activities in which eight pairs of students from two institutions attempted to diagnose and repair a malfunctioning electric circuit. In doing so, we provide insight into some of the social metacognitive dynamics that arise during collaborative troubleshooting. We find that students engaged in socially mediated metacognition at multiple key transitions during the troubleshooting process. Reciprocated metacognitive dialogue arose when students were collectively strategizing about which measurements to perform, or reaching a shared understanding of the circuit’s behavior. Our research demonstrates the value of the framework of socially mediated metacognition in providing insight into the nature of collaborative student troubleshooting in the context of electronics. As such, this framework may be a useful resource for future efforts to examine and support the development of student troubleshooting skills in other upper-division laboratory courses.

  20. Materializing morality. Design ethics and technological mediation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verbeek, Peter P.C.C.

    2006-01-01

    During the past decade, the "script" concept, indicating how technologies prescribe human actions, has acquired a central place in STS. Until now, the concept has mainly functioned in descriptive settings. This article will deploy it in a normative setting. When technologies coshape human actions,

  1. Ensino-aprendizagem colaborativo mediado pelo Wiki do Moodle Collaborative learning-teaching mediated by Wiki Moodle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilse Abegg

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Mediados pela ferramenta Wiki do Moodle, desenvolvemos atividades a distância no Curso de Física da UFSM com o intuito de produzir um objeto escolar hipermídia tematizado pelo Tema Estruturador do Ensino de Física 2: Calor, Ambiente e usos de Energia (oriundo dos PCN+ , locando o diálogo-problematizador na transversalidade curricular "Meio Ambiente". Problematizamos esta atividade, caracterizada como uma produção colaborativa de hipermídia de divulgação científico-tecnológica, ao longo do período letivo da disciplina Didática I da Física da instância curricular integradora. O trabalho em grupo mediado pelo wiki do Moodle tem sido implementado através do PEA (Planejamento, Execução e Avaliação de forma cíclico-espiralada, estudando os casos. Os resultados indicam boa potencialidade da mediação tecnológica, no âmbito do diálogo-problematizador e empowerment, para este tipo de trabalho escolar colaborativo a distância.Through the wiki Moodle, we developed distance education activities in the Physics Course at UFSM, aiming at producing a hypermedia school subject related to the discipline Physics 2 structuring teaching theme: Heat, Environment and uses of Energy (coming from the PCN+, placing the problematic dialogue in the transversal theme "Environment". We designed this activity, described as a collaborative production of hypermedia for scientific-technological dissemination, over the period of school discipline Didactic I from the Physics Course. The working group mediated by the wiki Moodle has been implemented through the PEA (Planning, Execution, and Assessment. The results are positive on the use of technology mediation concerning problematic dialogue and empowerment, in this type of collaborative and distance education.

  2. Supporting collaborative discussions on asynchronous time: a technological perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Caballé, Santi

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to report on an experience of using an innovative on-line learning tool to support real, collaborative learning through discussion in asynchronous time. While asynchronous interaction gives rise to unique opportunities that support active, collaborative learning, unique problems also arise, such as frustration, caused by waiting for other peoples' reactions and feedback and the consequent loss of motivation, which has a negative impact on learning outcomes. In order t...

  3. Managing collaboration across boundaries in health information technology projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrety, Karin; Dalley, Andrew; McLoughlin, Ian; Wilson, Rob; Yu, Ping

    2012-01-01

    One reason that it is so difficult to build electronic systems for collecting and sharing health information is that their design and implementation requires clear goals and a great deal of collaboration among people from diverse social and occupational worlds. This paper uses empirical examples from two Australian health informatics projects to illustrate the importance of boundary objects and boundary spanning activities in facilitating the high degree of collaboration required for the design and implementation of workable systems.

  4. An Analysis of Collaborative Problem-Solving Activities Mediated by Individual-Based and Collaborative Computer Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, C.-J.; Chang, M.-H.; Liu, C.-C.; Chiu, B.-C.; Fan Chiang, S.-H.; Wen, C.-T.; Hwang, F.-K.; Chao, P.-Y.; Chen, Y.-L.; Chai, C.-S.

    2017-01-01

    Researchers have indicated that the collaborative problem-solving space afforded by the collaborative systems significantly impact the problem-solving process. However, recent investigations into collaborative simulations, which allow a group of students to jointly manipulate a problem in a shared problem space, have yielded divergent results…

  5. Improving collaboration between primary care research networks using Access Grid technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zsolt Nagykaldi

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Access Grid (AG is an Internet2-driven, high performance audio_visual conferencing technology used worldwide by academic and government organisations to enhance communication, human interaction and group collaboration. AG technology is particularly promising for improving academic multi-centre research collaborations. This manuscript describes how the AG technology was utilised by the electronic Primary Care Research Network (ePCRN that is part of the National Institutes of Health (NIH Roadmap initiative to improve primary care research and collaboration among practice- based research networks (PBRNs in the USA. It discusses the design, installation and use of AG implementations, potential future applications, barriers to adoption, and suggested solutions.

  6. Emergent collaboration infrastructures technology design for inter-organizational crisis management

    CERN Document Server

    Reuter, Christian

    2015-01-01

    ​Using the domain of crisis management, Christian Reuter explores challenges and opportunities for technology design in emergent environments. He therefore empirically analyzes collaborative work in inter-organizational crisis - such as the police, fire departments, energy network operators and citizens - in order to identify collaboration practices that reveal work infrastructure limitations. He also designs, implements and evaluates novel concepts and ICT artifacts towards the support of emergent collaboration. Besides the discovery of potential organizational effects on the ability to deal

  7. Technology-Mediated Learning for Resilience

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandvik, Kjetil; Majchrzak, Tim; Busch, Peter André

    , such as the successive outbreak of a pandemic. Due to the novelty of the topic, research particularly exists on theoretical aspects of resilience. Targeting learning – and thereby the local population – is a rather new emergence. To effectively reach, involve, and engage citizens, technology can play a key role. Based...... on four actual cases from communities we analyse the impact technology has on learning about resilience. We then scrutinize the effectiveness and propose future steps. Thereby, we seek to provide practical advice to local governments and to enrich the theory at the same time....

  8. Technology Trends in Mobile Computer Supported Collaborative Learning in Elementary Education from 2009 to 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carapina, Mia; Boticki, Ivica

    2015-01-01

    This paper analyses mobile computer supported collaborative learning in elementary education worldwide focusing on technology trends for the period from 2009 to 2014. The results present representation of device types used to support collaborative activities, their distribution per users (1:1 or 1:m) and if students are learning through or around…

  9. Examination of Studies on Technology-Assisted Collaborative Learning Published between 2010-2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnavut, Ahmet; Özdamli, Fezile

    2016-01-01

    This study is a content analysis of the articles about technology-assisted collaborative learning published in Science Direct database between the years of 2010 and 2014. Developing technology has become a topic that we encounter in every aspect of our lives. Educators deal with the contribution and integration of technology into education.…

  10. Impact of Collaborative Work on Technology Acceptance: A Case Study from Virtual Computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konak, Abdullah; Kulturel-Konak, Sadan; Nasereddin, Mahdi; Bartolacci, Michael R.

    2017-01-01

    Aim/Purpose: This paper utilizes the Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) to examine the extent to which acceptance of Remote Virtual Computer Laboratories (RVCLs) is affected by students' technological backgrounds and the role of collaborative work. Background: RVCLs are widely used in information technology and cyber security education to provide…

  11. Federal Laboratory Consortium Recognizes Unituxin Collaborators with Excellence in Technology Transfer Awards | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Federal Laboratory Consortium (FLC) presented an Excellence in Technology Transfer award to the group that collaborated to bring Unituxin (dinutuximab, also known as ch14.18), an immunotherapy for neuroblastoma, to licensure.

  12. Collaboration Technology for Education of the Young People with Special Needs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lavendels, Jurijs; Sitikovs, Vjaceslavs; Latisheva, Eleonora

    2006-01-01

    Please, cite this publication as: Lavendels, J., Sitikovs, V., & Latisheva, E. (2006). Collaboration Technology for Education of the Young People with Special Needs. Proceedings of International Workshop in Learning Networks for Lifelong Competence Development, TENCompetence Conference. March

  13. Authoring and Enactment of Mobile Pyramid-Based Collaborative Learning Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manathunga, Kalpani; Hernández-Leo, Davinia

    2018-01-01

    Collaborative learning flow patterns (CLFPs) formulate best practices for the orchestration of activity sequences and collaboration mechanisms that can elicit fruitful social interactions. Mobile technology features offer opportunities to support interaction mediation and content accessibility. However, existing mobile collaborative learning…

  14. The identity of functional diversity in communication mediated by technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Montalba-Ocaña

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The subject matter of the research presented below gravitates on the ontological change imposed by technology in humans. In particular, development of assistive technologies applied to alternative communication systems represents an interesting example of how this technology works on the social relationships, communication, and how this mediation modifies the self-image and social image of the users. This study focuses on people with cerebral palsy or neuronal degenerative disease and the identity transformation suffering to be able to communicate with autonomous tech support. In this way, the hypotheses to be faced in this study are: technology (paradoxically humanizes.

  15. Maturing Pump Technology for EVA Applications in a Collaborative Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodgson, Edward; Dionne, Steven; Gervais, Edward; Anchondo, Ian

    2012-01-01

    The transition from low earth orbit Extravehicular Activity (EVA) for construction and maintenance activities to planetary surface EVA on asteroids, moons, and, ultimately, Mars demands a new spacesuit system. NASA's development of that system has resulted in dramatically different pumping requirements from those in the current spacesuit system. Hamilton Sundstrand, Cascon, and NASA are collaborating to develop and mature a pump that will reliably meet those new requirements in space environments and within the design constraints imposed by spacesuit system integration. That collaboration, which began in the NASA purchase of a pump prototype for test evaluation, is now entering a new phase of development. A second generation pump reflecting the lessons learned in NASA's testing of the original prototype will be developed under Hamilton Sundstrand internal research funding and ultimately tested in an integrated Advanced Portable Life Support System (APLSS) in NASA laboratories at the Johnson Space Center. This partnership is providing benefit to both industry and NASA by supplying a custom component for EVA integrated testing at no cost to the government while providing test data for industry that would otherwise be difficult or impossible to duplicate in industry laboratories. This paper discusses the evolving collaborative process, component requirements and design development based on early NASA test experience, component stand alone test results, and near term plans for integrated testing at JSCs.

  16. Examination of studies on technology-assisted collaborative learning published between 2010-2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet Arnavut

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This study is a content analysis of the articles about technology-assisted collaborative learning published in Science Direct database between the years of 2010 and 2014. Developing technology has become a topic that we encounter in every aspect of our lives. Educators deal with the contribution and integration of technology into education. Therefore, in this study it was aimed to examine how integration of collaborative learning into technology would contribute to education or it would contribute to education or not. According to the results of the studies obtained from Science Direct database, there are many research related with technology-assisted collaborative learning. However, since all of the studies did not fulfill our search criteria for content analysis, a total number of 58 articles published between the years of 2010 and 2014 were used in this study.

  17. Student Views of Technology-Mediated Written Corrective Feedback

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærgaard, Hanne Wacher

    2017-01-01

    and practices concerning the specific – and time-consuming – language-teacher activity of providing WCF and 2) potential changes in student attitudes when technology is used to mediate the feedback. At the core of the study is an eight-month intervention which was carried out with three teachers of English...

  18. Lifelong Learning in Artistic Context Mediated by Advanced Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, Mirella

    2016-01-01

    This research starts by analysing the current state of artistic heritage in Italy and studying some examples in Europe: we try to investigate the scope of non-formal learning in artistic context, mediated by advanced technology. The framework within which we have placed our investigation is that of lifelong learning and lifedeep learning. The…

  19. Developing Course Materials for Technology-Mediated Chinese Language Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubler, Cornelius C.

    2018-01-01

    This article discusses principles involved in developing course materials for technology-mediated Chinese language learning, with examples from a new course designed to take into account the needs of distance and independent learners. Which learning environment is most efficient for a given learning activity needs to be carefully considered. It…

  20. Comparative, collaborative, and integrative risk governance for emerging technologies

    OpenAIRE

    LINKOV IGOR; TRUMP BENJAMIN D.; ANKLAM ELKE; BERBUBE DAVID; BOISSEAU PATRICK; CUMMINGS CHRISTOPHER; FERSON SCOTT; FLORIN MARIE-VALENTINE; GOLDSTEIN BERNARD; HRISTOZOV DANAIL; JENSEN KELD ASTRUP; KATALAGARIANAKIS GEORGIOS; KUZMA JENNIFER; LAMBERT JAMES H.; MALLOY TIMOTHY

    2018-01-01

    Various emerging technologies challenge existing governance processes to identify, assess, and manage risk. Though the existing risk-based paradigm has been essential for assessment of many chemical, biological, radiological, and nuclear technologies, a complementary approach may be warranted for the early-stage assessment and management challenges of high uncertainty technologies ranging from nanotechnology to synthetic biology to artificial intelligence, among many others. This ...

  1. U.S. Collaborative-Engagement with China: Using Strategic Technological Collaborative Leadership (STCL)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-03-01

    Red Rock Tech., Seagate, Sony Storage Devices Lantronix, SBE Terminal Server Technologies Table 1. COTS Suppliers and Components in the Aegis...million Singapore $711 China $622 Australia $471 Taiwan $363 Malaysia $301 South Korea $246 74

  2. Virtual team learning: The role of collaboration process and technology affordance in team decision making

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean Cordes

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The study examines two dimensions that impact virtual team decision making. One is the influence of collaboration process structure: the sequences, patterns, and routines participants use to interact and solve problems. The other is technology affordance: the strengths and weaknesses of technologies in terms of the usefulness they offer to teams when performing tasks. Some teams used a structured collaboration process with monitoring, coordination, and backup functions during a decision-making discussion. Other teams had no discussion process instructions. In addition, some teams possessed stronger technology affordance including both chat and an editable document. Other teams used chat technology alone, which offered fewer collaboration possibilities. The collaboration process and technology affordance factors were tested in an experiment in which four-person online teams worked as a personnel hiring committee. Information about four job candidates was distributed to create a hidden profile in which some information was shared across all team members, while other information was visible only to specific members. Two hundred and eight students, comprising fifty-two teams completed the study. Teams using the structured collaboration process made more accurate and higher-quality decisions. In addition, scores were higher when technology affordance included both chat and editable document tools, but this influence was not significant.

  3. Impact of information and communication technology on interprofessional collaboration for chronic disease management: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, Neil; Vania, Diana; Randall, Glen; Mulvale, Gillian

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Information and communication technology is often lauded as the key to enhancing communication among health care providers. However, its impact on interprofessional collaboration is unclear. The objective of this study was to determine the extent to which it improves communication and, subsequently, enhances interprofessional collaboration in chronic disease management. Methods A systematic review of academic literature using two electronic platforms: HealthSTAR and Web of Science (core collection and MEDLINE). To be eligible for inclusion in the review, articles needed to be peer-reviewed; accessible in English and focused on how technology supports, or might support, collaboration (through enhanced communication) in chronic disease management. Studies were assessed for quality and a narrative synthesis conducted. Results The searches identified 289 articles of which six were included in the final analysis (three used qualitative methods, two were descriptive and one used mixed methods). Various forms of information and communication technology were described including electronic health records, online communities/learning resources and telehealth/telecare. Three themes emerged from the studies that may provide insights into how communication that facilitates collaboration in chronic disease management might be enhanced: professional conflict, collective engagement and continuous learning. Conclusions The success of technology in enhancing collaboration for chronic disease management depends upon supporting the social relationships and organization in which the technology will be placed. Decision-makers should take into account and work toward balancing the impact of technology together with the professional and cultural characteristics of health care teams.

  4. A filter-mediated communication model for design collaboration in building construction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jaewook; Jeong, Yongwook; Oh, Minho; Hong, Seung Wan

    2014-01-01

    Multidisciplinary collaboration is an important aspect of modern engineering activities, arising from the growing complexity of artifacts whose design and construction require knowledge and skills that exceed the capacities of any one professional. However, current collaboration in the architecture, engineering, and construction industries often fails due to lack of shared understanding between different participants and limitations of their supporting tools. To achieve a high level of shared understanding, this study proposes a filter-mediated communication model. In the proposed model, participants retain their own data in the form most appropriate for their needs with domain-specific filters that transform the neutral representations into semantically rich ones, as needed by the participants. Conversely, the filters can translate semantically rich, domain-specific data into a neutral representation that can be accessed by other domain-specific filters. To validate the feasibility of the proposed model, we computationally implement the filter mechanism and apply it to a hypothetical test case. The result acknowledges that the filter mechanism can let the participants know ahead of time what will be the implications of their proposed actions, as seen from other participants' points of view.

  5. Efficiency of the supply chain collaborative technological innovation in China: An empirical study based on DEA analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huaping Zhang

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: This paper is an attempt to investigate the current issues and development of the supply chain collaborative technological innovation in China. Design/methodology/approach: DEA is employed to measure the efficiency of the supply chain collaborative technological innovation. Findings: From the results of this research, we can get the conclusion that there are big spaces for improvement for the selected companies in terms of supply chain collaborative technological innovation, especially in the collaborative benefit aspect. The efficiencies of the supply chain collaborative technological innovation in the selected companies vary a lot. Research limitations: More industries are needed to generalize the conclusions. Practical implications: Our practical recommendations for improving supply chain companies in terms of improving their collaborative technological innovation efficiency are: (1 expanding the cooperative scope; (2 optimizing the collaboration operations; (3 improving the compactness in supply chain; (4 increasing the innovation input; and (5 improving the knowledge exchange capacity. Originality/value: The evaluation and the measure of the efficiency of performance of the collaborative technological innovation both in theory and in practice have been proven to be very important and quite complex, and there have been limited researches in the current literature. From observations, however, the efficiency of supply chain collaborative technological innovation is relatively low. This research investigates the current issues and development of the supply chain collaborative technological innovation in China, and provides the guideline in terms of improving the efficiency of supply chain collaborative technological innovation.

  6. Harbin Institute of Technology collaborative base project at APS of Argonne

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, H.; Liu, L. L.

    2013-05-01

    In this paper, the progress of Harbin Institute of Technology (HIT) collaborative base project, which was launched at Argonne National Laboratory in 2010, will be presented. The staff and students from HIT involved in advanced technological developments, which included tomography, high energy PDF, diffraction and scattering, and inelastic scattering techniques in APS to study structures changes of minerals and materials under high pressure conditions.

  7. How Technology and Collaboration Promote Formative Feedback: A Role for CSCL Research in Active Learning Interventions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Sally P. W.; Rau, Martina A.

    2017-01-01

    Recent evidence for the effectiveness of active learning interventions has led educators to advocate for widespread adoption of active learning in undergraduate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics courses. Active learning interventions implement technology and collaboration to engage students actively with the content. Yet, it is…

  8. Mediating Dynamic Supply Chain Formation by Collaborative Single Machine Earliness/Tardiness Agents in Supply Mesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hang Yang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, a trend of forming dynamic supply chains with different trading partners over different e-marketplaces has emerged. These supply chains, which are called “supply mesh,” generally refer to heterogeneous electronic marketplaces in which dynamic supply chains, as per project (often make-to-order, are formed across different parties. Conceptually, in a supply mesh a dynamic supply chain is formed vertically, mediating several companies for a project. Companies that are on the same level horizontally are either competitors or cohorts. A complex scenario such as this makes it challenging to find the right group of members for a dynamic supply chain. Earlier on, a multiagent model called the collaborative single machine earliness/tardiness (CSET model was proposed for the optimal formation of make-to-order supply chains. This paper contributes the particular agent designs, for enabling the mediation of CSET in a supply mesh, and the possibilities are discussed. It is demonstrated via a computer simulation, based on samples from the U.S. textile industry, that by using intelligent agents under the CSET model it is possible to automatically find an ideal group of trading partners from a supply mesh.

  9. How do dynamic capabilities transform external technologies into firms’ renewed technological resources? – A mediation model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li-Ying, Jason; Wang, Yuandi; Ning, Lutao

    2016-01-01

    microfoundations of dynamic technological capabilities, mediate the relationship between external technology breadth and firms’ technological innovation performance, based on the resource-based view and dynamic capability view. Using a sample of listed Chinese licensee firms, we find that firms must broadly......How externally acquired resources may become valuable, rare, hard-to-imitate, and non-substitute resource bundles through the development of dynamic capabilities? This study proposes and tests a mediation model of how firms’ internal technological diversification and R&D, as two distinctive...... explore external technologies to ignite the dynamism in internal technological diversity and in-house R&D, which play their crucial roles differently to transform and reconfigure firms’ technological resources....

  10. Using Collaborative Technology in CS Education to facilitate Cross-Site Software Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie Devlin

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available With offshore computing becoming more prevalent, it is essential that we increase our students' employability by providing new and relevant experiences in software development and project management; giving them valuable skills that are essential in an ever-increasing and changing global market. What is new about the work we discuss here is how collaborative technologies have facilitated a year-long cross-site software engineering project between Durham University and Newcastle University students. Our use of various collaboration technologies such as online discussion forums, video-conferencing, company repositories, version control software etc., as part of the collaborative team project has not only encouraged students to develop technical 'transferable' skills but also gain an understanding, through realistic experiences, of how the use of these technologies involves more than just learning their technical aspects and operation, but that it is essential to develop and implement the soft processes and skills required to use them successfully and effectively and hence optimize their cross-site working partnerships and productivity. In this paper we describe the project, the technologies employed by the student teams and the results and anecdotal evidence of staff and students that show the successes and, it must be admitted, occasional failures of this work. We discuss how we have tried to manage the expectations of the students throughout the project, how the technologies we have provided have affected the students' experience of cross-site collaboration and the impact of crosssite collaboration on our assessment strategies and curriculum design.

  11. 3D medical collaboration technology to enhance emergency healthcare

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Welch, Gregory F; Sonnenwald, Diane H.; Fuchs, Henry

    2009-01-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) videoconferencing has been explored widely in the past 15-20 years to support collaboration in healthcare. Two issues that arise in most evaluations of 2D videoconferencing in telemedicine are the difficulty obtaining optimal camera views and poor depth perception. To address...... these problems, we are exploring the use of a small array of cameras to reconstruct dynamic three-dimensional (3D) views of a remote environment and of events taking place within. The 3D views could be sent across wired or wireless networks to remote healthcare professionals equipped with fixed displays...... or with mobile devices such as personal digital assistants (PDAs). The remote professionals' viewpoints could be specified manually or automatically (continuously) via user head or PDA tracking, giving the remote viewers head-slaved or hand-slaved virtual cameras for monoscopic or stereoscopic viewing...

  12. Healthcare technology: physician collaboration in reducing the surgical cost.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Steven A; Obremskey, William T; Bozic, Kevin J

    2013-06-01

    The increasing cost of providing health care is a national concern. Healthcare spending related to providing hospital care is one of the primary drivers of healthcare spending in the United States. Adoption of advanced medical technologies accounts for the largest percentage of growth in healthcare spending in the United States when compared with other developed countries. Within the specialty of orthopaedic surgery, a variety of implants can result in similar outcomes for patients in several areas of clinical care. However, surgeons often do not know the cost of implants used in a specific procedure or how the use of an implant or technology affects the overall cost of the episode of care. The purposes of this study were (1) to describe physician-led processes for introduction of new surgical products and technologies; and (2) to inform physicians of potential cost savings of physician-led product contract negotiations and approval of new technology. We performed a detailed review of the steps taken by two centers that have implemented surgeon-led programs to demonstrate responsibility in technology acquisition and product procurement decision-making. Each program has developed a physician peer review process in technology and new product acquisition that has resulted in a substantial reduction in spending for the respective hospitals in regard to surgical implants. Implant costs have decreased between 3% and 38% using different negotiating strategies. At the same time, new product requests by physicians have been approved in greater than 90% of instances. Hospitals need physicians to be engaged and informed in discussions concerning current and new technology and products. Surgeons can provide leadership for these efforts to reduce the cost of high-quality care.

  13. Signing of a collaboration agreement between Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU) and CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2099575

    2017-01-01

    Pro-Rector for Innovation Toril A. Nagelhus Hernes, NTNU, and Director for Accelerators and Technology Frédérick Bordry, CERN, signed on the 19th October 2017 a collaboration agreement between their respective institutions. NTNU and CERN have worked closely together for many years already. With this agreement in place, the collaboration and exchange between the two institutions is expected to become even tighter.

  14. Linking Effectively: Learning Lessons from Successful Collaboration in Science and Technology

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wagner, Caroline S

    2002-01-01

    .... It is presented in a format that draws lessons from the case studies and then presents key questions that emerged from the cases that can serve as a guide to others seeking to formulate similar collaborative programs. The first section discusses the growing role that international collaboration is playing in science and technology (S&T). Here we also discuss the case study methodology used for this study. The second section presents a framework of.

  15. Collaborative Affordances of Hybrid Patient Record Technologies in Medical Work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Houben, Steven; Frost, Mads; Bardram, Jakob E

    2015-01-01

    explored the integration of paper and digital technology, there are still a wide range of open issues in the design of technologies that integrate digital and paper-based medical records. This paper studies the use of one such novel technology, called the Hybrid Patient Record (HyPR), that is designed......The medical record is a central artifact used to organize, communicate and coordinate information related to patient care. Despite recent deployments of electronic health records (EHR), paper medical records are still widely used because of the affordances of paper. Although a number of approaches...... to digitally augment a paper medical record. We report on two studies: a field study in which we describe the benefits and challenges of using a combination of electronic and paper-based medical records in a large university hospital and a deployment study in which we analyze how 8 clinicians used the Hy...

  16. Building Collaborative Structures for Teachers' Autonomy and Self-Efficacy: The Mediating Role of Participative Management and Learning Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jiafang; Jiang, Xinhui; Yu, Huen; Li, Dongyu

    2015-01-01

    This study focused on the collaborative structure-building behavior of school principals and examined how such behavior affects teacher empowerment. More important, it tested the mediating effects of participative management and learning culture. By collecting nested data from 104 schools in Hong Kong and adopting multilevel structural equation…

  17. Exploring gender differences in perceptions of 3D telepresence collaboration technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maurin, Hanna; Sonnenwald, Diane H.; Cairns, Bruce

    2006-01-01

    Previous research on gender differences and collaboration technology illustrate the need to investigate gender issues as early as possible in the development cycle in order to avoid any negative consequences the technology may impose. Therefore we are investigating the potential of 3D telepresence....... The results show several gender differences that imply male paramedics may inherently receive more benefits from use of the 3D telepresence technology than female paramedics....

  18. The Application of Collaborative Business Intelligence Technology in the Hospital SPD Logistics Management Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    LIU, Tongzhu; SHEN, Aizong; HU, Xiaojian; TONG, Guixian; GU, Wei

    2017-01-01

    Background: We aimed to apply collaborative business intelligence (BI) system to hospital supply, processing and distribution (SPD) logistics management model. Methods: We searched Engineering Village database, China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI) and Google for articles (Published from 2011 to 2016), books, Web pages, etc., to understand SPD and BI related theories and recent research status. For the application of collaborative BI technology in the hospital SPD logistics management model, we realized this by leveraging data mining techniques to discover knowledge from complex data and collaborative techniques to improve the theories of business process. Results: For the application of BI system, we: (i) proposed a layered structure of collaborative BI system for intelligent management in hospital logistics; (ii) built data warehouse for the collaborative BI system; (iii) improved data mining techniques such as supporting vector machines (SVM) and swarm intelligence firefly algorithm to solve key problems in hospital logistics collaborative BI system; (iv) researched the collaborative techniques oriented to data and business process optimization to improve the business processes of hospital logistics management. Conclusion: Proper combination of SPD model and BI system will improve the management of logistics in the hospitals. The successful implementation of the study requires: (i) to innovate and improve the traditional SPD model and make appropriate implement plans and schedules for the application of BI system according to the actual situations of hospitals; (ii) the collaborative participation of internal departments in hospital including the department of information, logistics, nursing, medical and financial; (iii) timely response of external suppliers. PMID:28828316

  19. The Application of Collaborative Business Intelligence Technology in the Hospital SPD Logistics Management Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tongzhu; Shen, Aizong; Hu, Xiaojian; Tong, Guixian; Gu, Wei

    2017-06-01

    We aimed to apply collaborative business intelligence (BI) system to hospital supply, processing and distribution (SPD) logistics management model. We searched Engineering Village database, China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI) and Google for articles (Published from 2011 to 2016), books, Web pages, etc., to understand SPD and BI related theories and recent research status. For the application of collaborative BI technology in the hospital SPD logistics management model, we realized this by leveraging data mining techniques to discover knowledge from complex data and collaborative techniques to improve the theories of business process. For the application of BI system, we: (i) proposed a layered structure of collaborative BI system for intelligent management in hospital logistics; (ii) built data warehouse for the collaborative BI system; (iii) improved data mining techniques such as supporting vector machines (SVM) and swarm intelligence firefly algorithm to solve key problems in hospital logistics collaborative BI system; (iv) researched the collaborative techniques oriented to data and business process optimization to improve the business processes of hospital logistics management. Proper combination of SPD model and BI system will improve the management of logistics in the hospitals. The successful implementation of the study requires: (i) to innovate and improve the traditional SPD model and make appropriate implement plans and schedules for the application of BI system according to the actual situations of hospitals; (ii) the collaborative participation of internal departments in hospital including the department of information, logistics, nursing, medical and financial; (iii) timely response of external suppliers.

  20. Student Affairs and Information Technology: Collaborating in the Cloud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbatis, Peter Reyes

    2014-01-01

    Student affairs and information technology have opportunities to partner in order to increase student satisfaction and retention rates and to assist institutions to comply with federal educational regulations. This chapter contains four examples of emerging best practices and future initiatives including: (a) the admissions pipeline, (b)…

  1. NASA Centers and Universities Collaborate Through Smallsat Technology Partnerships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cockrell, James

    2018-01-01

    The Small Spacecraft Technology (SST) Program within the NASA Space Technology Mission Directorate is chartered develop and demonstrate the capabilities that enable small spacecraft to achieve science and exploration missions in "unique" and "more affordable" ways. Specifically, the SST program seeks to enable new mission architectures through the use of small spacecraft, to expand the reach of small spacecraft to new destinations, and to make possible the augmentation existing assets and future missions with supporting small spacecraft. The SST program sponsors smallsat technology development partnerships between universities and NASA Centers in order to engage the unique talents and fresh perspectives of the university community and to share NASA experience and expertise in relevant university projects to develop new technologies and capabilities for small spacecraft. These partnerships also engage NASA personnel in the rapid, agile and cost-conscious small spacecraft approaches that have evolved in the university community, as well as increase support to university efforts and foster a new generation of innovators for NASA and the nation.

  2. ACTT Now: A Collaboration Reshaping Teacher Technology Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curry-Corcoran, Daniel E.; O'Shea, Patrick M.

    2003-01-01

    Describes the ACTT Now (Aligning Certification with Technology Training) project in Brunswick County Public Schools (Virginia) that, in partnership with Old Dominion University (Norfolk, VA), has created a Field-Based Master's Program to help overcome the disadvantages of a small, rural district in providing teacher training for technology…

  3. Grid computing and collaboration technology in support of fusion energy sciences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schissel, D.P.

    2005-01-01

    Science research in general and magnetic fusion research in particular continue to grow in size and complexity resulting in a concurrent growth in collaborations between experimental sites and laboratories worldwide. The simultaneous increase in wide area network speeds has made it practical to envision distributed working environments that are as productive as traditionally collocated work. In computing power, it has become reasonable to decouple production and consumption resulting in the ability to construct computing grids in a similar manner as the electrical power grid. Grid computing, the secure integration of computer systems over high speed networks to provide on-demand access to data analysis capabilities and related functions, is being deployed as an alternative to traditional resource sharing among institutions. For human interaction, advanced collaborative environments are being researched and deployed to have distributed group work that is as productive as traditional meetings. The DOE Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing Program initiative has sponsored several collaboratory projects, including the National Fusion Collaboratory Project, to utilize recent advances in grid computing and advanced collaborative environments to further research in several specific scientific domains. For fusion, the collaborative technology being deployed is being used in present day research and is also scalable to future research, in particular, to the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor experiment that will require extensive collaboration capability worldwide. This paper briefly reviews the concepts of grid computing and advanced collaborative environments and gives specific examples of how these technologies are being used in fusion research today

  4. Deployed Virtual Consulting: The Fusion of Wearable Computing, Collaborative Technology, Augmented Reality and Intelligent Agents to Support Fleet Aviation Maintenance

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nasman, James

    2004-01-01

    .... By implementing wireless technology in combination with advanced software allowing the virtual collaboration of parties widely separated by geographical distance the Navy can establish a "virUal...

  5. Technological, mediatic and cultural hybridisation: Cultural mediations in the context of globalisation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laan Mendes de Barros

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available We live in a context of borders that are dissolving in many senses, of the convergence and hybridisation of technologies, mass media and cultures. The context is the resizing of practical time, of movements and links between the local and the global. In these times of interculturality, communication plays a very important role; not so much in its technological media dimension, but particularly in the dynamics of cultural mediations that are dividing off from mediatised relations. This article aims to reflect on the transformations in present-day communication processes, marked by strong movements of hybridisation, as well as examining how to consider interculturality in the context of cultural mediations, based on dialogue between Latin American and French authors. Also, using media material, the article presents illustrations of the Brazilian cultural scene, which is marked by a long history of hybridisation that is filled with intercultural dynamics.

  6. Sustainability of University Technology Transfer: Mediating Effect of Inventor’s Technology Service

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang Li

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Based on the perspective of knowledge transfer and the technology acceptance model (TAM, this paper constructs a university technology transfer sustainable development model that considers the inventor’s technology service from the perspective of the long-term cooperation of enterprise, and analyzes the mediating effect of the inventor’s technology service on university technology transfer sustainability. By using 270 questionnaires as survey data, it is found that the availability of an inventor’s technology service has a significant positive impact on the attitude tendency and practice tendency of enterprise long-term technological cooperation; enterprise technology absorption capacity and trust between a university and an enterprise also have significant influence on an inventor’s technical service availability. Therefore, the inventor’s technology service acts as a mediator in the relationship between university technology transfer sustainability and influence factors. Universities ought to establish the technology transfer model, which focuses on the inventor’s tacit knowledge transfer service, and promotes the sustainable development of the university.

  7. Digital and Collaborative Technologies for Smarter Distance Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    OLIVEIRA, E. A

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available With the integration of web 2.0 and social technologies into educational practices, researchers have been faced with the challenge of providing better online virtual learning environments, that engage students in the learning processes. This challenge entails using the massive amounts of knowledge we generate in our digital footprints to provide personalized learning contents. In our research group, we have tried to tackle this challenge by answering two questions: (i How to share, at the same time, the knowledge of a virtual course in a decentralized way in Social Networks, MOOC, VLE and others? (ii How to provide pedagogical practices in virtual learning environments that allow students to build their knowledge in an autonomous and reflective way? In this article we present the work we have carried out to answer both questions.

  8. Harnessing the Power of Technologies to Manage Collaborative e-Learning Projects in Dispersed Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gosper, Maree Veroncia; McNeill, Margot Anne; Woo, Karen

    2010-01-01

    "The impact of web-based lecture technologies on current and future practice in learning and teaching" was a collaborative project across four Australian universities, funded by the Australian Learning and Teaching Council (ALTC). The project was both exploratory and developmental in nature and according to the project's external…

  9. A Study on planning of the international collaboration foundation for the Advanced Nuclear Technology Development Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Moon Hee; Kim, H. R.; Kim, H. J. and others

    2005-03-15

    Korea has participated in the international collaboration programs for the development of future nuclear energy systems driven by the countries holding advanced nuclear technology and Korea and U.S. have cooperated in the INERI. This study aimed mainly at developing the plan for participation in the collaborative development of the Gen IV, searching the participation strategy for INERI and the INPRO, and the international cooperation in these programs. Contents and scope of the study for successful achievement are as follows; Investigation and analysis of international and domestic trends related to advanced nuclear technologies, Development of the plan for collaborative development of the Gen IV and conducting the international cooperation activities, Support for the activities related to I-NERI between Korea and U.S. and conducting the international cooperation, International cooperation activities for the INPRO. This study can be useful for planning the research plan and setting up of the strategy of integrating the results of the international collaboration and the domestic R and D results by combining the Gen IV and the domestic R and D in the field of future nuclear technology. Futhermore, this study can contribute to establishing the effective foundation and broadening the cooperation activities not only with the advanced countries for acquisition of the advanced technologies but also with the developing countries for the export of the domestic nuclear energy systems.

  10. Learning Technologies: Affective and Social Issues in Computer-Supported Collaborative Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Ann; Issroff, Kim

    2005-01-01

    This paper is concerned with "affective" issues in learning technologies in a collaborative context. Traditionally in learning there has been a division between cognition and affect: where cognition is concerned with skills and processes such as thinking and problem-solving and affect with emotional areas such as motivation, attitudes, feelings.…

  11. Students’ Views about the Problem Based Collaborative Learning Environment Supported By Dynamic Web Technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erhan ÜNAL

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to design a problem based collaborative learning environment supported by dynamic web technologies and examine students’ views about this learning environment. The study was designed as a qualitative research. 36 students who took Object Oriented Programming I-II course from a public university at the department of computer programming participated in the study. During the research process, the Object Oriented Programming I-II course was designed with incorporating different dynamic web technologies (Edmodo, Google Services, and Mind42 and Nelson (1999’s collaborative problem solving method. At the end of the course, there were focus group interviews in regards to the students’ views on a learning environment supported by dynamic web technologies and collaborative problem solving method. At the end of the focus group interviews, 4 themes were obtained from the students’ views, including positive aspects of the learning environment, difficulties faced in the learning environment, advantages of the learning environment, and skills gained as a result of the project. The results suggest that problem based collaborative learning methods and dynamic web technologies can be used in learning environments in community colleges.

  12. Social Media and Networking Technologies: An Analysis of Collaborative Work and Team Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okoro, Ephraim A.; Hausman, Angela; Washington, Melvin C.

    2012-01-01

    Digital communication increases students' learning outcomes in higher education. Web 2.0 technologies encourages students' active engagement, collaboration, and participation in class activities, facilitates group work, and encourages information sharing among students. Familiarity with organizational use and sharing in social networks aids…

  13. Collaborating across Time Zones: How 2.0 Technology Can Bring Your Global Team Together

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hastings, Robin

    2008-01-01

    The Web 2.0 tools and services that are making socializing, networking, and communicating in general so easy are also making group projects seriously simple. With the judicious use of a few of the popular tools that use Web 2.0 technologies and philosophies, one can collaboratively create documents, spreadsheets, presentations, websites, project…

  14. A Study on planning of the international collaboration foundation for the Advanced Nuclear Technology Development Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Moon Hee; Kim, H. R.; Kim, H. J. and others

    2005-03-01

    Korea has participated in the international collaboration programs for the development of future nuclear energy systems driven by the countries holding advanced nuclear technology and Korea and U.S. have cooperated in the INERI. This study aimed mainly at developing the plan for participation in the collaborative development of the Gen IV, searching the participation strategy for INERI and the INPRO, and the international cooperation in these programs. Contents and scope of the study for successful achievement are as follows; Investigation and analysis of international and domestic trends related to advanced nuclear technologies, Development of the plan for collaborative development of the Gen IV and conducting the international cooperation activities, Support for the activities related to I-NERI between Korea and U.S. and conducting the international cooperation, International cooperation activities for the INPRO. This study can be useful for planning the research plan and setting up of the strategy of integrating the results of the international collaboration and the domestic R and D results by combining the Gen IV and the domestic R and D in the field of future nuclear technology. Futhermore, this study can contribute to establishing the effective foundation and broadening the cooperation activities not only with the advanced countries for acquisition of the advanced technologies but also with the developing countries for the export of the domestic nuclear energy systems

  15. Students' Views about the Problem Based Collaborative Learning Environment Supported by Dynamic Web Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ünal, Erhan; Çakir, Hasan

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to design a problem based collaborative learning environment supported by dynamic web technologies and to examine students' views about this learning environment. The study was designed as a qualitative research. Some 36 students who took an Object Oriented Programming I-II course at the department of computer…

  16. Learning about the past with new technologies : Fostering historical reasoning in computer-supported collaborative learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drie, J.P. van

    2005-01-01

    Recent technological developments have provided new environments for learning, giving rise to the question of how characteristics of such new learning environments can facilitate the process of learning in specific domains. The focus of this thesis is on computer-supported collaborative learning

  17. Pre-Service Teachers' Learning Styles and Preferences towards Instructional Technology Activities and Collaborative Works

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusop, Farrah Dina; Sumari, Melati

    2015-01-01

    The main purpose of this exploratory study was to investigate pre-service teachers' learning styles and their preferences with respect to 15 technology-based instructional activities and collaborative work tasks. Felder and Silverman's online Index of Learning Style (ILS) and a questionnaire were used to measure students' learning styles and…

  18. Deep Learning: Enriching Teacher Training through Mobile Technology and International Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naylor, Amanda; Gibbs, Janet

    2018-01-01

    This article presents results from an international collaboration between college students and pre-service teachers in Norway and the UK. This research is part of a large, international project exploring and developing the interrelationship between mobile technology and teachers' perceptions of teaching and learning. Data was collected for this…

  19. Information technology and collaboration tools within the e-supply chain management of the aviation industry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nucciarelli, A.; Gastaldi, M.

    2008-01-01

    This paper investigates strategic actions and grand strategies in the aviation industry. To address this purpose, a review of main strategic change is conducted and information technology is considered as a key factor to identify behaviours of main players. In this context, collaboration emerges as

  20. Collaborative Design of Technology-Enhanced Learning: What Can We Learn from Teacher Talk?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenney, Susan; Boschman, Ferry; Pieters, Jules; Voogt, Joke

    2016-01-01

    The collaborative design of technology-enhanced learning is seen as a practical and effective professional development strategy, especially because teachers learn from each other as they share and apply knowledge. But how teacher design team participants draw on and develop their knowledge has not yet been investigated. This qualitative…

  1. Online Collaborative Mentoring for Technology Integration in Pre-Service Teacher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorner, Helga; Kumar, Swapna

    2016-01-01

    The Mentored Innovation Model is an online collaborative mentoring model developed in Hungary to help teachers integrate technology in their classrooms in meaningful ways. It combines an online modular approach of formal pedagogical ICT training with an informal online community experience of sharing, developing and critiquing of shared learning…

  2. Impact of Antecedent Factors on Collaborative Technologies Usage among Academic Researchers in Malaysian Research Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohd Daud, Norzaidi; Zakaria, Halimi

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to investigate the impact of antecedent factors on collaborative technologies usage among academic researchers in Malaysian research universities. Design/methodology/approach: Data analysis was conducted on data collected from 156 academic researchers from five Malaysian research universities. This study…

  3. Virtual Teaming and Collaboration Technology: A Study of Influences on Virtual Project Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broils, Gary C.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this quantitative correlational study was to explore the relationships between the independent variables, contextual factors for virtual teams and collaboration technology, and the dependent variable, virtual project outcomes. The problem leading to the need for the study is a lower success rate for virtual projects compared to…

  4. Enhancing Classroom Performance: A Technology Design to Support the Integration of Collaborative Learning and Participative Teams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, Michael T.; Taylor, Ronald; Holoviak, Stephen J.

    2008-01-01

    Integral components of today's successful business models frequently include information technology, effective collaboration, and participative teamwork among employees. It is in the best interest of students for educators to provide classrooms that reflect a profitable practitioner's environment. Students studying for careers in business should…

  5. Collaborative technologies for distributed science: fusion energy and high-energy physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schissel, D P; Gottschalk, E E; Greenwald, M J; McCune, D

    2006-01-01

    This paper outlines a strategy to significantly enhance scientific collaborations in both Fusion Energy Sciences and in High-Energy Physics through the development and deployment of new tools and technologies into working environments. This strategy is divided into two main elements, collaborative workspaces and secure computational services. Experimental and theory/computational programs will greatly benefit through the provision of a flexible, standards-based collaboration space, which includes advanced tools for ad hoc and structured communications, shared applications and displays, enhanced interactivity for remote data access applications, high performance computational services and an improved security environment. The technologies developed should be prototyped and tested on the current generation of experiments and numerical simulation projects. At the same time, such work should maintain a strong focus on the needs of the next generation of mega-projects, ITER and the ILC. Such an effort needs to leverage existing computer science technology and take full advantage of commercial software wherever possible. This paper compares the requirements of FES and HEP, discuss today's solutions, examine areas where more functionality is required, and discuss those areas with sufficient overlap in requirements that joint research into collaborative technologies will increase the benefit to both

  6. A Collaboration-Mediated Exploration of Nonnative L2 Teachers' Cognition of Language Teaching Methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tajeddin, Zia; Aryaeian, Nafeeseh

    2017-01-01

    The present study sought to investigate nonnative L2 teachers' cognition of teaching methodology based on their collaborative talks. Participants were 12 nonnative EFL teachers categorized into three collaborative discussion groups by their teaching experience. Collaborative discussions were aimed at exploring the participants' cognition of…

  7. Theoretical Propositions for the Citizen Formation Mediated by Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tania Margarita Martínez de Padrón

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The research presented emerges from the connotations concerning the formation of the citizenship by the information technology and communication. Be part of the conception of the current citizen and the influence that has emerged through the utility of the various social networks, as well as Canaima education project and the guidance provided to schoolchildren in this sense. The general objective was to generate propositions theoretical that guide the formation of citizenship mediated by ICT in the primary schools of Santa Teresa del Tuy. The methodology used was the qualitative paradigm, based on the interpretative phenomenological approach of Heidegger, which is interested in discovering and understanding the meanings, habits and practices of the human being. Castle (2000: 5. The researcher approached the field object of study to observe, describe and interpret a reality. As an instrument used the interview in depth. The information obtained was recorded in pictures which allowed to comply with the development of specific objectives through triangulation. On whose findings prevailed deviating from the use of technological tools and how these have formed the formation of citizenship in school children in their behavior and actions. At the same time, allowed know from educational technological approach, that sparing the teacher provides guidance that redirect the formation of citizenship. Also was the stated objective as it was the theoretical propositions that guide the formation of citizens ICT-mediated.

  8. In Silico Medicine: Social, Technological and Symbolic Mediation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annamaria Carusi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In silico medicine is still forging a road for itself in the current biomedical landscape. Discursively and rhetorically, it is using a three-way positioning, first, deploying discourses of personalised medicine, second, extending the 3Rs from animal to clinical research, and third, aligning its methods with experimental methods. The discursive and rhetorical positioning in promotions and statements of the programme gives us insight into the sociability of the scientific labour of advancing the programme. Its progress depends on complex social, institutional and technological conditions which are not external to its epistemology, but intricately interwoven with it. This article sets out to show that this is the case through an analysis of the process of computational modelling that is at the core of its epistemology. In this paper I show that the very notion of ‘model’ needs to be re-thought for in silico medicine (as indeed, for most forms of computational modelling, and propose a replacement, in the form of the ‘Model-Simulation-Experiment-System’ or MSE-system, which is simultaneously an epistemological, social and technological system. I argue that the MSE-system is radically mediated by social relations, technologies and symbolic systems. We need now to understand how such mediations operate effectively in the construction of robust MSE-systems.

  9. Art-Science-Technology collaboration through immersive, interactive 3D visualization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellogg, L. H.

    2014-12-01

    At the W. M. Keck Center for Active Visualization in Earth Sciences (KeckCAVES), a group of geoscientists and computer scientists collaborate to develop and use of interactive, immersive, 3D visualization technology to view, manipulate, and interpret data for scientific research. The visual impact of immersion in a CAVE environment can be extremely compelling, and from the outset KeckCAVES scientists have collaborated with artists to bring this technology to creative works, including theater and dance performance, installations, and gamification. The first full-fledged collaboration designed and produced a performance called "Collapse: Suddenly falling down", choreographed by Della Davidson, which investigated the human and cultural response to natural and man-made disasters. Scientific data (lidar scans of disaster sites, such as landslides and mine collapses) were fully integrated into the performance by the Sideshow Physical Theatre. This presentation will discuss both the technological and creative characteristics of, and lessons learned from the collaboration. Many parallels between the artistic and scientific process emerged. We observed that both artists and scientists set out to investigate a topic, solve a problem, or answer a question. Refining that question or problem is an essential part of both the creative and scientific workflow. Both artists and scientists seek understanding (in this case understanding of natural disasters). Differences also emerged; the group noted that the scientists sought clarity (including but not limited to quantitative measurements) as a means to understanding, while the artists embraced ambiguity, also as a means to understanding. Subsequent art-science-technology collaborations have responded to evolving technology for visualization and include gamification as a means to explore data, and use of augmented reality for informal learning in museum settings.

  10. Integrative Technologies Complicate Communication during Development Work Context: Industry-Academy Collaboration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pauliina Mansikkamäki

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available A competition in the electronics industry is hard. For most companies, strong technological know-how will be a competitiveness factor in the future. The future technologies will be increasingly based on a combination of innovations from several branches of science. Also, many innovations are based on external technology integration. The days are over when one company could internally create all of the technology it needs to maintain its competitiveness. One approach of promising framework for the development of a new integrative technology is an industrial R&D network combined with industrial-academic collaboration. However, this kind of collaboration is a challenging undertaking. Companies in a value network might have very different expectations regarding a new technology due to differences in their position in the value network or their company strategy. One of the main challenges in an R&D network is to translate the expectations of all parties involved into new technology solutions so that all in the R&D network feel they have obtained benefit. One of key factors on creating successful industrial-academic collaboration is open and trustful communication. But, there are communication challenges, intellectual property sharing problems, and discussions regarding the sharing of cost and benefits. Developing a new integrative technology structure requires seamless teamwork, holistic and interdisciplinary understanding, and open communication throughout the R&D team and the industrial-academic network. The focus of this paper is on network communication, knowledge communication and team communication. The results of this study indicate that successful communication in an industrial-academic R&D network to develop a new integrative technology improves knowledge creation and accelerates commercialization of the technology.

  11. Effect of R&D Collaboration with Research Organizations on Innovation: The Mediation Effect of Environmental Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gun Jea Yu

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to advance our understanding of corporate environmental performance by linking its antecedents and consequences. This study examined how collaboration with research organizations, as a proactive strategic decision, influences the environmental performance of firms, which in turn leads to innovation performance. Using the data collected from 597 Korean firms representing a cross-section of industries, we found that a firm’s collaboration with research organizations positively affected the firm’s environmental performance, which positively influenced its innovation performance. Furthermore, the results indicated a full mediation effect of environmental performance on the relationship between collaboration with research organizations and innovation performance. This study offers a more comprehensive understanding of corporate environmental performance and discusses implications for innovation performance. Limitations and future research directions are also discussed.

  12. Validation of the Impact of Health Information Technology (I-HIT) Scale: an international collaborative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dykes, Patricia C; Hurley, Ann C; Brown, Suzanne; Carr, Robyn; Cashen, Margaret; Collins, Rita; Cook, Robyn; Currie, Leanne; Docherty, Charles; Ensio, Anneli; Foster, Joanne; Hardiker, Nicholas R; Honey, Michelle L L; Killalea, Rosaleen; Murphy, Judy; Saranto, Kaija; Sensmeier, Joyce; Weaver, Charlotte

    2009-01-01

    In 2005, the Healthcare Information Management Systems Society (HIMSS) Nursing Informatics Community developed a survey to measure the impact of health information technology (HIT), the I-HIT Scale, on the role of nurses and interdisciplinary communication in hospital settings. In 2007, nursing informatics colleagues from Australia, England, Finland, Ireland, New Zealand, Scotland and the United States formed a research collaborative to validate the I-HIT across countries. All teams have completed construct and face validation in their countries. Five out of six teams have initiated reliability testing by practicing nurses. This paper reports the international collaborative's validation of the I-HIT Scale completed to date.

  13. Harnessing collaborative technology to accelerate achievement of chronic disease management objectives for Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Leslee J; Healey, Lindsay; Falk, Will

    2007-01-01

    Morgan and colleagues put forth a call to action for the transformation of the Canadian healthcare system through the adoption of a national chronic disease prevention and management (CDPM) strategy. They offer examples of best practices and national solutions including investment in clinical information technologies to help support improved care and outcomes. Although we acknowledge that the authors propose CDPM solutions that are headed in the right direction, more rapid deployment of solutions that harness the potential of advanced collaborative technologies is required. We provide examples of how technologies that exist today can help to accelerate the achievement of some key CDPM objectives.

  14. Identity Orientation, Social Exchange, and Information Technology Use in Interorganizational Collaborations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gal, Uri; Jensen, Tina Blegind; Lyytinen, Kalle

    2014-01-01

    Advances in information technologies (IT) are creating unprecedented opportunities for interorganizational collaboration, particularly in large-scale distributed projects. The use of advanced IT in such projects can foster new forms of social exchange among organizations and change the way...... identity orientations. To address this gap, we conduct multiple case studies that describe the changing use of two-dimensional computer-aided design technology and new three-dimensional modeling technologies by a leading metal fabrication company in the architecture, engineering, and construction industry...

  15. Adherence to technology-mediated insomnia treatment: a meta-analysis, interviews, and focus groups

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horsch, C.; Lancee, J.; Beun, R.J.; Neerincx, M.A.; Brinkman, W.-P.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Several technologies have been proposed to support the reduction of insomnia complaints. A user-centered assessment of these technologies could provide insight into underlying factors related to treatment adherence. Objective: Gaining insight into adherence to technology-mediated

  16. Technological mediation as a learning tool for writing and reading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gladys Molano Caro

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This article disclosed the progress a technological mediation has built to the adquisition, use and development of reading and writing from Cognitive Affective Method for Learning -MACPA-. A development like the one being proposed, is an option for children and young people to, activate, promote, develop and / or enhance the learning of reading and writing. Likewise, it is an option to consider the results achieved in the PISA test and case reports, done by teachers by teachers, showing that that elementary students do not perform production of texts so spontaneous or directed; and they fail to make progress in reading comprehension levels. Given this context, the partial results achieved in the second phase of the research aims to implement a technology platform based mediation MACPA as an educational resource to enhance the processes of reading and writing among students from first to fourth grades of primary education. Accordingly, through Article basis be found in a software for reading and writing that takes into account the particularities of learning of students with intellectual disabilities, learning disabilities in students who have not evidenced difficulties in academic learning processes, though they require a new method to accelerate learning.

  17. URBAN CHILDHOOD ROUTINES MEDIATED BY TECHNOLOGY: A VISUAL ANALYSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    González-Patiño, Javier

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available With the goal of documenting routines in which a technological component had some type of impact and observe the influences of immediate environments, exploring meaning and sense, interviews and some observations and, especially, a series of photographs taken by a young girl about her daily life were collected. The purpose of this article is to foster a critical debate about the social and developmental consequences that have been attributed to changes in the living conditions of contemporary Western urban children. For the analytical approach and the analysis of the data, it was especially important to take into consideration the characteristics of the case study participant, a high social class 12 year old pre-adolescent who lives in a home where a large variety of information and communication technology equipment is at her disposal. The conclusions that are presented mainly revolve around two issues. First, related to the emergence of multimodal communication situations, of increasingly semiotic complexity, promoted by digital practices visible in different styles of mediation in the uses of technologies identified as: "convergence", "divergence" and "accessibility". Second, that these technological practices facilitate transformations in space, whether public, private or virtual, altering the importance that traditionally held by other places in the processes of socialization of urban children. This article is published in Spanish.

  18. An Integrated Framework Of Web 2.0 Technology And A Collaborative Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Madar

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This paper contributes to the suitability of web 2.0 technology in implementing collaborative learning and proposes an integrated framework of Web 2.0 tools and collaborative learning activities. This paper is also identifying the mismatch between adopting web 2.0 technologies and the delivery of the curriculum on the cloud or via the Internet. It is found that Web 2.0 and a collaborative learning are two platforms to be easily synchronized due to their common attributes that enable their complementariness. This paper argues that integrated framework of Web 2.0 and CL allow users exploit teachinglearning materials maximally and at the same upsurges learners understanding in the subject knowledge. Suitable of Web 2.0 in implementing curriculum was also encouraged since the proposed framework consists of both components of Web 2.0 functions and activities of collaborative learning environment. Pedagogically there has been a mismatch between E-learning technologies and mode of delivery for instance E-learning platforms are widely used to increase content accessibility only while now this framework introduces that Web 2.0 technology of E-learning can also be used to create share knowledge among users. The proposed framework if efficiently exploited will also allow users at all levels create personalized learning environment which suits perspective teachinglearning styles of the users. Apart from academic achievement or enhancements of the teaching and learning processes the proposed framework also would help learners develop generic skills which are very important in the workplaces. As a result of this fast and independent learning technically depend on technology based pedagogy and in this case this proposed model has two dimensions which are very crucial to the enrichment of students learning activities.

  19. Mediated Effects of Technology Competencies and Experiences on Relations among Attitudes Towards Technology Use, Technology Ownership, and Self Efficacy about Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yerdelen-Damar, Sevda; Boz, Yezdan; Aydın-Günbatar, Sevgi

    2017-08-01

    This study examined the relations of preservice science teachers' attitudes towards technology use, technology ownership, technology competencies, and experiences to their self-efficacy beliefs about technological pedagogical content knowledge (TPACK). The present study also investigated interrelations among preservice teachers' attitudes towards technology use, technology ownership, technology competencies, and experiences. The participants of study were 665 elementary preservice science teachers (467 females, 198 males) from 7 colleges in Turkey. The proposed model based on educational technology literature was tested using structural equation modeling. The model testing results revealed that preservice teachers' technology competencies and experiences mediated the relation of technology ownership to their TPACK self efficacy beliefs. The direct relation of their possession of technology to their TPACK self efficacy beliefs was insignificant while the indirect relation through their technology competencies and experiences was significant. The results also indicated there were significant direct effects of preservice teachers' attitudes towards technology use, technology competencies, and experiences on their TPACK self efficacy beliefs.

  20. Social Support, a Mediator in Collaborative Depression Care for Cancer Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Hyunsung; Ell, Kathleen

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This study assessed whether perceived social support (PSS) is a factor in improving physical and functional well-being observed among cancer patients receiving collaborative depression care. Methods: A secondary analysis was conducted of data collected in a randomized clinical trial testing the effectiveness of collaborative depression…

  1. Changing stress while stressing change: the role of interprofessional education in mediating stress in the introduction of a transformative technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillan, Caitlin; Wiljer, David; Harnett, Nicole; Briggs, Kaleigh; Catton, Pamela

    2010-11-01

    The introduction of a transformative technology into practice settings can affect the functioning of interprofessional teams, placing stress on interprofessional relationships, thus slowing adoption and change. This study explored the potential of an interprofessional education (IPE) approach to mediate this stress and facilitate the adoption of a transformative technology- Image Guided Radiation Therapy (IGRT). Oncologists, physicists, and therapists in radiation medicine who attended an interprofessional IGRT Education Course were interviewed about perceived benefits and stressors to IPE and to interprofessional practice (IPP) in the IGRT context. A modified grounded theory approach was used to conduct 14 interviews, with 200 minutes of interview time recorded. In introducing IGRT, participants noted interprofessional stress in understanding and adopting new technology. IPE offered common terminology, appreciation for others' knowledge, and a holistic framework for practice. Outcomes were thought to foster collaboration, efficiency, and improved professional role definition. Time constraints and power relations were noted to be residual stressors exacerbated by IPE, but were thought to be transient. IPE can thus be of benefit in the implementation of transformative technologies such as IGRT, through mediation of interprofessional stress inherent in change. Interprofessional knowledge, collaboration, and efficiency in practice facilitate the development and adoption of a new practice model.

  2. Occupational Therapy and assistive technology: thoughts about the experience with collaborative school consulting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Ramos Baleotti

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This study presents thoughts and ideas based on the experience developed in the project entitled Assistive Technology for Inclusion of Students with Physical Disorders: Resources and Procedures, in development since 2009. This project aims to help in the process of school inclusion of students with physical disorder in Early Childhood Education in the city of Marilia, Brazil, through the collaboration between Health and Education departments. Health professionals contribute through the implementation of the Assistive Technology by means of school consulting. The project has been developed in six different stages, namely: Gaining access and establishing goals for the team; Identifying the problem; Interventions/Recommendations; Implementation; Evaluation and further actions. This working model, seeks to insert occupational therapy in the school environment. This project showed the importance of occupational therapists as team members in school settings, and the importance of a collaborative work between Education and Health departments.

  3. Technology-Mediated Interventions and Quality of Life for Persons Living with HIV/AIDS. A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Hwayoung; Iribarren, Sarah; Schnall, Rebecca

    2017-04-12

    As HIV/AIDS is considered a chronic disease; quality of life (QoL) has become an important focus for researchers and healthcare providers. Technology-mediated interventions have demonstrated improved clinical effectiveness in outcomes, such as viral suppression, for persons living with HIV/AIDS (PLWH). However, the evidence to support the impact of these interventions on QoL is lacking. The aim of this paper was to assess the impact of technology-mediated interventions on QoL and to identify the instruments used to measure the QoL of PLWH. For this review we followed the PRISMA guidelines. A literature search was conducted in PubMed, CINAHL, Cochrane, and EMBASE databases in April 2016. Inclusion criteria limited articles to those with technology-mediated interventions as compared to usual care; articles with the population defined as HIV-infected patients; and articles with QoL measured as a health outcome in randomized controlled trials. The Cochrane Collaboration Risk of Bias Tool was used to assess study quality. Of the 1,554 peer-reviewed articles returned in the searches, 10 met the inclusion criteria. This systematic review identified four types of technology-mediated interventions and two types of QoL instruments used to examine the impact of technology-mediated interventions on PLWH. Four studies of technology-mediated interventions resulted in improvement in QoL. Four studies considered QoL as a secondary outcome and resulted in a negative or neutral impact on QoL. Overall, four studies had a low risk of bias, one study had a moderate risk of bias, and the other five studies had a high risk of bias. The evidence to support the improvement of QoL using technology-mediated interventions is insufficient. This lack of research highlights the need for increased study of QoL as an outcome measure and the need for consistent measures to better understand the role of technology-mediated interventions in improving QoL for PLWH.

  4. Science and Technology (S and T) Roadmap Collaboration between SMC, NASA, and Government Partners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betser, Joseph; Ewart, Roberta; Chandler, Faith

    2016-01-01

    National Security Space (NSS) presents multi-faceted S and T challenges. We must continually innovate enterprise and information management; provide decision support; develop advanced materials; enhance sensor technology; transform communication technology; develop advanced propulsion and resilient space architectures and capabilities; and enhance multiple additional S and T domains. These challenges are best met by leveraging advanced S and T research and technology development from a number of DoD agencies and civil agencies such as NASA. The authors of this paper have engaged in these activities since 2006 and over the past decade developed multiple strategic S and T relationships. This paper highlights the Office of the Space Missile Systems Center (SMC) Chief Scientist (SMC/ST) collaboration with the NASA Office of Chief Technologist (NASA OCT), which has multiple S and T activities that are relevant to NSS. In particular we discuss the development of the Technology Roadmaps that benefit both Civil Space and NSS. Our collaboration with NASA OCT has been of mutual benefit to multiple participants. Some of the other DoD components include the Defense Advanced Research Projects agency (DARPA), Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL), Naval Research Laboratory (NRL), The USAF Office of Chief Scientist, the USAF Science Advisory Board (SAB), Space and Naval Warfare Systems Command (SPAWAR), and a number of other services and agencies. In addition, the human talent is a key enabler of advanced S and T activities; it is absolutely critical to have a strong supply of talent in the fields of Science Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM). Consequently, we continually collaborate with the USAF Institute of Technology (AFIT), other service academies and graduate schools, and other universities and colleges. This paper highlights the benefits that result from such strategic S and T partnerships and recommends a way forward that will continually build upon these

  5. The Radical Flank Effect and Cross-occupational Collaboration for Technology Development during a Power Shift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truelove, Emily; Kellogg, Katherine C.

    2016-01-01

    This 12-month ethnographic study of an early entrant into the U.S. car-sharing industry demonstrates that when an organization shifts its focus from developing radical new technology to incrementally improving this technology, the shift may spark an internal power struggle between the dominant engineering group and a challenger occupational group such as the marketing group. Analyzing 42 projects in two time periods that required collaboration between engineering and marketing during such a shift, we show how cross-occupational collaboration under these conditions can be facilitated by a radical flank threat, through which the bargaining power of moderates is strengthened by the presence of a more-radical group. In the face of a strong threat by radical members of a challenger occupational group, moderate members of the dominant engineering group may change their perceptions of their power to resist challengers’ demands and begin to distinguish between the goals of radical versus more-moderate challengers. To maintain as much power as possible and prevent the more-dramatic change in engineering occupational goals demanded by radical challengers, moderate engineers may build a coalition with moderate challengers and collaborate for incremental technology development. PMID:28424533

  6. Collaborative Visualization Project: shared-technology learning environments for science learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pea, Roy D.; Gomez, Louis M.

    1993-01-01

    Project-enhanced science learning (PESL) provides students with opportunities for `cognitive apprenticeships' in authentic scientific inquiry using computers for data-collection and analysis. Student teams work on projects with teacher guidance to develop and apply their understanding of science concepts and skills. We are applying advanced computing and communications technologies to augment and transform PESL at-a-distance (beyond the boundaries of the individual school), which is limited today to asynchronous, text-only networking and unsuitable for collaborative science learning involving shared access to multimedia resources such as data, graphs, tables, pictures, and audio-video communication. Our work creates user technology (a Collaborative Science Workbench providing PESL design support and shared synchronous document views, program, and data access; a Science Learning Resource Directory for easy access to resources including two-way video links to collaborators, mentors, museum exhibits, media-rich resources such as scientific visualization graphics), and refine enabling technologies (audiovisual and shared-data telephony, networking) for this PESL niche. We characterize participation scenarios for using these resources and we discuss national networked access to science education expertise.

  7. The Radical Flank Effect and Cross-occupational Collaboration for Technology Development during a Power Shift.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truelove, Emily; Kellogg, Katherine C

    2016-12-01

    This 12-month ethnographic study of an early entrant into the U.S. car-sharing industry demonstrates that when an organization shifts its focus from developing radical new technology to incrementally improving this technology, the shift may spark an internal power struggle between the dominant engineering group and a challenger occupational group such as the marketing group. Analyzing 42 projects in two time periods that required collaboration between engineering and marketing during such a shift, we show how cross-occupational collaboration under these conditions can be facilitated by a radical flank threat, through which the bargaining power of moderates is strengthened by the presence of a more-radical group. In the face of a strong threat by radical members of a challenger occupational group, moderate members of the dominant engineering group may change their perceptions of their power to resist challengers' demands and begin to distinguish between the goals of radical versus more-moderate challengers. To maintain as much power as possible and prevent the more-dramatic change in engineering occupational goals demanded by radical challengers, moderate engineers may build a coalition with moderate challengers and collaborate for incremental technology development.

  8. A study on technology development strategy and collaborative relationships using patent information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakaoka, Iori; Fujino, Hayato; Chen, Yunju; Park, Yousin; Matsuno, Seigo

    2017-10-01

    Japanese economy has fallen into a long downturn called "The Lost Two Decades" after the collapse of bubble economy in early 1990s. Many companies could not gain competitive advantages although they conducted various management reforms to restore their competitiveness. The companies that have played the main role of the Japanese economy growth until then have lost the sustained competitive advantage. Moreover, they have struggled in the global market even now. On the other hand, Japanese automobile companies have high competitiveness and market share due to their advanced technology development. It is considered that personnel groups engaged in research and development of their companies cannot turn into core rigidity and the structure also hinders new core capabilities. In addition, there is a hypothesis that the close relationships with many suppliers contribute to acquisition of competitive advantage. Therefore, this paper focuses on the collaboration relationships with suppliers and core rigidity of human resources related to research and development as the analysis factors. First, we analyze the composition and core rigidity degree of human resources involved in technology development by social network analysis using patent information, which represents the research and development capability. Second, we analyze the degree of collaboration among companies based on the hypothesis that advanced technology development can be executed by joint research and developments with many kinds of suppliers. As a result, features of close collaboration with suppliers and high core rigidity rate in the Japanese automobile industry are clarified.

  9. Using Multitouch Collaboration Technology to Enhance Social Interaction of Children with High-Functioning Autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gal, Eynat; Lamash, Liron; Bauminger-Zviely, Nirit; Zancanaro, Massimo; Weiss, Patrice L Tamar

    2016-01-01

    Children with high-functioning Autism Spectrum Disorder (HFASD) have major difficulties in social communication skills, which may impact their performance and participation in everyday life. The goal of this study was to examine whether the StoryTable, an intervention paradigm based on a collaborative narrative, multitouch tabletop interface, enhanced social interaction for children with HFASD, and to determine whether the acquired abilities were transferred to behaviors during other tasks. Fourteen boys with HFASD, aged 7-12 years, participated in a 3-week, 11-session intervention. Social interactions during two nonintervention tasks were videotaped at three points in time, one prior to the intervention (pre), a second immediately following the intervention (post) and a third three weeks after the intervention (follow-up). The video-recorded files were coded using the Friendship Observation Scale to ascertain the frequencies of positive and negative social interactions and collaborative play. Differences in these behaviors were tested for significance using nonparametric statistical tests. There were significantly higher rates of positive social interactions and collaborative play, and lower rates of negative social interactions following the intervention suggesting generalization of the social skills learned during the intervention. Improvement was maintained when tested three weeks later. These findings provide support for the use of collaborative technology-based interventions within educational settings to enhance social interaction of children with HFASD.

  10. An APF and MPC combined collaborative driving controller using vehicular communication technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Zichao; Wu, Qing; Ma, Jie; Fan, Shiqi

    2016-01-01

    Collaborative driving is a growing domain of Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS) which aim to navigate traffic both efficiently and safely. Cooperation between vehicles heavily rely on the comprehensive information collected. With the development of vehicular communication technologies, information can be shared between vehicles or infrastructures through Vehicle-to-Vehicle (V2V)/Vehicle-to-Infrastructure (V2I) data exchange. By taking advantage of data sharing between vehicles, this paper proposes an Artificial Potential Field (APF) and Model Predictive Control (MPC) combined controller to implement collaborative driving in complex environments. Firstly, an APF model ​containing three components is developed to describe the mutual effect and collaboration properties between vehicles and surrounding environments. Afterwards, a MPC cost function for optimized control, considering both kinematic characteristics and environmental effect conveyed by APF, is presented to address the problem of collaborative driving. Such controller is designed from the perspective of multi-objective and multi-constraint optimization which takes the vehicle motion constraints, safety and comfort requirements into consideration. The prominent advantage of the proposed approach is that it can deal with the problems of route planning and manipulating simultaneously. To validate the proposed approach, a variety of scenario simulations are conducted in MATLAB, and the performance of the proposed method are verified.

  11. Canonical correlation analysis between collaborative networks and innovation: A case study in information technology companies in province of Tehran, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Jafar Nejad

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The increase competitions as well as technological advancements have created motivation among business owners to look for more innovative ideas from outside their organizations. Many enterprises collaborate with other organizations to empower themselves through innovative ideas. These kinds of collaborations can be observed as a concept called Regional Innovation System. These collaborations include inter-firm collaborations, research organizations, intermediary institutions and governmental agencies. The primary objective of this paper is to evaluate relationships between Collaborative Networks and Innovation in information technology business units located in province of Tehran, Iran. The research method utilized for the present study is descriptive-correlation. To evaluate the relationships between independent and dependent variables, canonical correlation analysis (CCA is used. The results confirm the previous findings regarding the relationship between Collaborative Networks and Innovation. Among various dimensions of Collaboration, Collaboration with governmental agencies had a very small impact on the relationship between collaboration networks and innovation. In addition, the results show that in addition to affecting product innovation and process innovation, collaboration networks also affected management innovation.

  12. Exploring teachers' use of TPACK in design talk: The collaborative design of technology-rich early literacy activities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boschman, F.B.; McKenney, Susan; Voogt, Joke

    2015-01-01

    Research shows the benefits of collaborative design activity by teachers are that in their conversations (design talk) they develop technological pedagogical content knowledge (TPACK). While more and more teachers engage in collaborative design, little is known about how they use TPACK during

  13. Exploring teachers' use of TPACK in design talk: The collaborative design of technology-rich early literacy activities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boschman, Ferry; McKenney, Susan; Voogt, Joke

    2016-01-01

    Research shows the benefits of collaborative design activity by teachers are that in their conversations (design talk) they develop technological pedagogical content knowledge (TPACK). While more and more teachers engage in collaborative design, little is known about how they use TPACK during

  14. Determinants of Teachers' Collaborative Use of Information and Communications Technology for Teaching and Learning: A European Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drossel, Kerstin; Eickelmann, Birgit; Schulz-Zander, Renate

    2017-01-01

    Collaboration between teachers constitutes an important predictor for the successful implementation of digital media in schools and teaching. The present contribution examines the supporting conditions of ICT (information and communications technology)-related teacher collaboration as a feature of school quality in six selected European…

  15. "Old Wine in Even Newer Bottles": The Uneasy Relationship between Web 2.0 Technologies and European School Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouseti, Anastasia

    2013-01-01

    The idea of using digital technologies and in particular web 2.0 tools to enhance school collaboration has recently been received with great enthusiasm and a range of new collaborative initiatives has emerged. Through a comparative qualitative case study of four schools in the UK and Greece, this article analyses how online tools are supporting…

  16. Knowledge Incubation and Collaboration for Science, Technology Adoption, Resourcing and Transfer (KIC-START)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ugbor, U.; Cilliers, A.; Kurwitz, R. C.

    2016-01-01

    Full text: In order to address the effectiveness of national networks in Member States, and to implement regional and national strategies, it is important to understand the necessary conditions that ensure successful creation and sharing of knowledge, including, effective policy and programme incentives, promoting collaboration, innovation and networking. Furthermore, Member States with aspirations to develop their nuclear programmes (power and non-power applications in agriculture, industry and health sector), need to develop their own capabilities if they are to fully benefit from the social and economic opportunities from nuclear science and technology. Ultimately nuclear innovation programmes that take into account the role of universities, education and industry would lead to a robust nuclear programme that maximizes social and economic benefit. This paper a presents an initiative for capturing best practices in the areas of university collaboration and innovation, which are driven by learning, research and entrepreneurship. The initiative covers Knowledge (creation), Innovation and Collaboration for Science and Technology Adoption, Resourcing and Transfer (KIC-START). (author

  17. 7 February 2012 - Signature of the Memorandum of Understanding between Suranaree University of Technology represented by Rector P. Suebka and the ALICE Collaboration represented by Collaboration Spokesperson P. Giubellino; Adviser E. Tsesmelis is present.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2012-01-01

    7 February 2012 - Signature of the Memorandum of Understanding between Suranaree University of Technology represented by Rector P. Suebka and the ALICE Collaboration represented by Collaboration Spokesperson P. Giubellino; Adviser E. Tsesmelis is present.

  18. 11th October 2011 - Chinese University of Science and Technology President J. Hou signing the guest book with Adviser R. Voss; in the ATLAS visitor centre with Former Collaboration Spokesperson P. Jenni and Members of the ATLAS Chinese Collaboration.

    CERN Multimedia

    2011-01-01

    11th October 2011 - Chinese University of Science and Technology President J. Hou signing the guest book with Adviser R. Voss; in the ATLAS visitor centre with Former Collaboration Spokesperson P. Jenni and Members of the ATLAS Chinese Collaboration.

  19. Triglyceride-mediated pathways and coronary disease: collaborative analysis of 101 studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sarwar, Nadeem; Sandhu, Manjinder S; Ricketts, Sally L

    2010-01-01

    Whether triglyceride-mediated pathways are causally relevant to coronary heart disease is uncertain. We studied a genetic variant that regulates triglyceride concentration to help judge likelihood of causality.......Whether triglyceride-mediated pathways are causally relevant to coronary heart disease is uncertain. We studied a genetic variant that regulates triglyceride concentration to help judge likelihood of causality....

  20. Governance and control as mediating instruments in an inter-firm relationship : Towards collaboration or transactions?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zahir-Ul-Hassan, Muhammad Kaleem; Minnaar, Reinald A.; Vosselman, E.G.J.

    2016-01-01

    This paper explores the mediation of governance and control structures in an inter-firm relationship between a semiconductor producer and its contractor. As mediating instruments the contract and the control structures are not just pre-given results of distanced managerial decision-making, but are

  1. Governance and control as mediating instruments in an inter-firm relationship: towards collaboration or transactions?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zahir-ul-Hassan, M.K.; Minnaar, R.A.; Vosselman, E.G.J.

    2016-01-01

    This paper explores the mediation of governance and control structures in an inter-firm relationship between a semiconductor producer and its contractor. As mediating instruments the contract and the control structures are not just pre-given results of distanced managerial decision-making, but are

  2. The influence of audio communications technology on computer-supported collaborative learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise Whitelock

    1996-12-01

    Full Text Available In recent years there has been an appreciation of the benefits that can be obtained by students working in groups or teams using computers (Eraut and Hoyles, 1988. But there is a difference in opinion as to how a partner enhances learning, and in particular how well adult learners do in the collaborative setting. In order to capitalize on the opportunities offered by new technologies, we need to understand more fully how the process of collaboration is effected by different communication technologies, and how the technologies themselves might be used to best advantage for the benefit of distance learners. However, another factor, apart from the technology itself, which is thought to influence computer-supported collaborative learning is in the gender distribution of the group. A number of classroom studies have shown gender differences when children work together with computers, and these have been reported from a number of subject-domains including science (Scanlon et al, 1993; Littleton et al, 1992. Since our own expertise is in the area of science learning, we selected a non-trivial physics task for the subjects to work with, and that is in the area of elastic collisions. Previous studies (Villani and Pacca, 1990; Whitelock et al, 1993 have shown that both adults and school-children have difficulty in predicting the subsequent motion of balls or ice pucks after they collide. Villani's study stresses that even postgraduate students tend to revert to their informal commonsense notions unless they are cued to use formal representations of these types of problem. These studies have demonstrated that the topic of elastic collisions is a complex yet fruitful one in which to engage students in group work.

  3. Innovations in technology and the online learning environment: A case study of inter-university collaboration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jansen ZANETTA

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a case study of online learning. It is based on the researcher’s participation in an inter-university collaborative module at two higher education institutions in South Africa and the United States from August to December 2001. The paper addresses the advantages and disadvantages of the online learning environment and learning in a Virtual Classroom. It provides a critical interpretation of the virtual classroom experienced in this collaboration between institutions. It finds that there are benefits from applying this technology in educational practices and programs particularly in the African context where a large majority of school-leaving learners have little or no access to higher education. However, it also expounds the NEPAD (New Partnership for Africa’s Development initiative to produce ICT in schools throughout Africa to fulfil the Millennium Development Goals on education in developing countries.

  4. A network collaboration implementing technology to improve medication dispensing and administration in critical access hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakefield, Douglas S; Ward, Marcia M; Loes, Jean L; O'Brien, John

    2010-01-01

    We report how seven independent critical access hospitals collaborated with a rural referral hospital to standardize workflow policies and procedures while jointly implementing the same health information technologies (HITs) to enhance medication care processes. The study hospitals implemented the same electronic health record, computerized provider order entry, pharmacy information systems, automated dispensing cabinets (ADC), and barcode medication administration systems. We conducted interviews and examined project documents to explore factors underlying the successful implementation of ADC and barcode medication administration across the network hospitals. These included a shared culture of collaboration; strategic sequencing of HIT component implementation; interface among HIT components; strategic placement of ADCs; disciplined use and sharing of workflow analyses linked with HIT applications; planning for workflow efficiencies; acquisition of adequate supply of HIT-related devices; and establishing metrics to monitor HIT use and outcomes.

  5. Investigating the Relationship between Learning Style Preferences and Teaching Collaboration Skills and Technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kim, Seung L.; Sonnenwald, Diane H.

    2002-01-01

    This paper reports on an exploratory study that investigates the relationship between participants' learning style preferences and their perceptions of a professional workshop on collaboration and technology to support collaboration. The Learning Preference Scale-Students (LPSS) (Owens & Barnes...... style, and Group 2 showed a strong preference for competitive and cooperative learning styles. Group 1 rated the workshop more positively than Group 2. However, Group 2 reported a larger increase in self-efficacy compared to those in Group 1 (18.9% vs. 6.0%). Both groups provided different suggestions...... regarding the content of the workshop. Group 1 suggested adding more discussions and group exercises, whereas Group 2 suggested adding explicit theory or rules to govern behavior. These findings indicate that learning styles should be considered as a potential variable that influences learning outcomes...

  6. The Relationship between Environmental Turbulence, Management Support, Organizational Collaboration, Information Technology Solution Realization, and Process Performance, in Healthcare Provider Organizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muglia, Victor O.

    2010-01-01

    The Problem: The purpose of this study was to investigate relationships between environmental turbulence, management support, organizational collaboration, information technology solution realization, and process performance in healthcare provider organizations. Method: A descriptive/correlational study of Hospital medical services process…

  7. Review & Analysis: Technological Impact on Future Air Force Personnel & Training: Distributed Collaborative Decision-Making, Volume I

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Palmer, Barbara

    1997-01-01

    ..., compared to that of a single individual. (2) The greatest detriment to collaborative distributed decision making is that we must rely on technology rather than face to face interactions, and subtleties of human communication may be lost. (3...

  8. Using collaborative technology to enhance pre-service teachers' pedagogical content knowledge in Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnelly, Dermot Francis; Hume, Anne

    2015-01-01

    Background:Supporting pre-service teacher (PT) collaboration as a means of professional learning is a challenging but essential task for effective practice. However, teacher placements or practicums in schools, which is common practice within teacher education programmes, can often isolate PTs from sharing their experiences with each other. Further, the articulation of effective pedagogical practices by high-quality teachers is limited, restricting PTs' ability to access such professional knowledge. Purpose:This study investigates how the introduction of a collaborative technology, a wiki, may enhance existing and new opportunities for pre-service teachers' (PTs) to develop pedagogical content knowledge (PCK). Sample:Seven PT chemistry teachers of varied backgrounds participated in this study. Design and method:The PTs were learning to collaboratively formulate and document their early topic-specific teaching knowledge using a pedagogical tool known as Content Representation (CoRe) design. Once scaffolded into this process, the PTs continued and extended this collaborative work online through the introduction of a wiki. Data were collected for qualitative analysis through the CoRe artefacts, a semi-structured focus group interview, and PTs' reflective essays about their collaborative experiences representing their teaching knowledge in CoRes through the wiki. Results:Data analysis highlighted that while wiki use showed some potential for collaborative representation when participants were not face-to-face, the PTs were hesitant in critiquing each other's work. As such, the online representations remained relatively static without face-to-face interaction. However, developing artefacts online was favoured over established practice and the access to artefacts of their peers on the wiki enhanced PTs' consideration for their own PCK. Conclusion:Wikis show some potential in the hosting of CoRes, but issues in simultaneous posting and lack of chat functionality may

  9. Using collaborative technologies in remote lab delivery systems for topics in automation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashby, Joe E.

    Lab exercises are a pedagogically essential component of engineering and technology education. Distance education remote labs are being developed which enable students to access lab facilities via the Internet. Collaboration, students working in teams, enhances learning activity through the development of communication skills, sharing observations and problem solving. Web meeting communication tools are currently used in remote labs. The problem identified for investigation was that no standards of practice or paradigms exist to guide remote lab designers in the selection of collaboration tools that best support learning achievement. The goal of this work was to add to the body of knowledge involving the selection and use of remote lab collaboration tools. Experimental research was conducted where the participants were randomly assigned to three communication treatments and learning achievement was measured via assessments at the completion of each of six remote lab based lessons. Quantitative instruments used for assessing learning achievement were implemented, along with a survey to correlate user preference with collaboration treatments. A total of 53 undergraduate technology students worked in two-person teams, where each team was assigned one of the treatments, namely (a) text messaging chat, (b) voice chat, or (c) webcam video with voice chat. Each had little experience with the subject matter involving automation, but possessed the necessary technical background. Analysis of the assessment score data included mean and standard deviation, confirmation of the homogeneity of variance, a one-way ANOVA test and post hoc comparisons. The quantitative and qualitative data indicated that text messaging chat negatively impacted learning achievement and that text messaging chat was not preferred. The data also suggested that the subjects were equally divided on preference to voice chat verses webcam video with voice chat. To the end of designing collaborative

  10. Explaining technological change of wind power in China and the United States: Roles of energy policies, technological learning, and collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Tian

    The following dissertation explains how technological change of wind power, in terms of cost reduction and performance improvement, is achieved in China and the US through energy policies, technological learning, and collaboration. The objective of this dissertation is to understand how energy policies affect key actors in the power sector to promote renewable energy and achieve cost reductions for climate change mitigation in different institutional arrangements. The dissertation consists of three essays. The first essay examines the learning processes and technological change of wind power in China. I integrate collaboration and technological learning theories to model how wind technologies are acquired and diffused among various wind project participants in China through the Clean Development Mechanism (CDM)--an international carbon trade program, and empirically test whether different learning channels lead to cost reduction of wind power. Using pooled cross-sectional data of Chinese CDM wind projects and spatial econometric models, I find that a wind project developer's previous experience (learning-by-doing) and industrywide wind project experience (spillover effect) significantly reduce the costs of wind power. The spillover effect provides justification for subsidizing users of wind technologies so as to offset wind farm investors' incentive to free-ride on knowledge spillovers from other wind energy investors. The CDM has played such a role in China. Most importantly, this essay provides the first empirical evidence of "learning-by-interacting": CDM also drives wind power cost reduction and performance improvement by facilitating technology transfer through collaboration between foreign turbine manufacturers and local wind farm developers. The second essay extends this learning framework to the US wind power sector, where I examine how state energy policies, restructuring of the electricity market, and learning among actors in wind industry lead to

  11. Adherence to Technology-Mediated Insomnia Treatment: A Meta-Analysis, Interviews, and Focus Groups

    OpenAIRE

    Horsch, Corine; Lancee, Jaap; Beun, Robbert Jan; Neerincx, Mark A; Brinkman, Willem-Paul

    2015-01-01

    Background: Several technologies have been proposed to support the reduction of insomnia complaints. A user-centered assessment of these technologies could provide insight into underlying factors related to treatment adherence. Objective: Gaining insight into adherence to technology-mediated insomnia treatment as a solid base for improving those adherence rates by applying adherence-enhancing strategies. Methods: Adherence to technology-mediated sleep products was studied in three ways. First...

  12. Supporting Problem Solving with Case-Stories Learning Scenario and Video-based Collaborative Learning Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun Hu

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we suggest that case-based resources, which are used for assisting cognition during problem solving, can be structured around the work of narratives in social cultural psychology. Theories and other research methods have proposed structures within narratives and stories which may be useful to the design of case-based resources. Moreover, embedded within cases are stories which are contextually rich, supporting the epistemological groundings of situated cognition. Therefore the purposes of this paper are to discuss possible frameworks of case-stories; derive design principles as to “what” constitutes a good case story or narrative; and suggest how technology can support story-based learning. We adopt video-based Computer-Supported Collaborative Learning (CSCL technology to support problem solving with case-stories learning scenarios. Our hypothesis in this paper is that well-designed case-based resources are able to aid in the cognitive processes undergirding problem solving and meaning making. We also suggest the use of an emerging video-based collaborative learning technology to support such an instructional strategy.

  13. A Study on intensifying efficiency for international collaborative development of Advanced Nuclear Energy Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Moon Hee; Kim, H. R.; Kim, H. J.; Chang, J. H.; Hahn, D. H.; Bae, Y. Y.; Kim, W. W.; Jeong, I.; Lee, D. S.; Lee, J. H. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-06-15

    Generation IV International Forum(GIF), where 13 countries including Korea collaborate to develop future nuclear energy systems, put into force 'Generation IV International Forum Project Arrangement' in 2007 for the international research and development of Gen IV Systems, following the entry into force of Framework Agreement in 2005. The International Nuclear Research Initiative(I-NERI) between Korea and United States and the International Project on Innovative Nuclear Energy Systems and Fuel Cycles(INPRO) of IAEA are continued in this year, produced lots of visible outcomes. These international activities have a common goal of the collaborative development of advanced nuclear system technologies but differ in the main focusing areas and aspects, so Korea needs to establish the integrated strategy based on the distinguished and complementary approach for the participation of each international programs, as examples the GIF for the advanced system technology development, INPRO for the set-up of institution and infra-structure, and I-NERI for the access of the core technologies and acquisition of the transparency of nuclear R and D.

  14. A Study on intensifying efficiency for international collaborative development of Advanced Nuclear Energy Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Moon Hee; Kim, H. R.; Kim, H. J.; Chang, J. H.; Hahn, D. H.; Bae, Y. Y.; Kim, W. W.; Jeong, I.; Lee, D. S.; Lee, J. H.

    2008-06-01

    Generation IV International Forum(GIF), where 13 countries including Korea collaborate to develop future nuclear energy systems, put into force 'Generation IV International Forum Project Arrangement' in 2007 for the international research and development of Gen IV Systems, following the entry into force of Framework Agreement in 2005. The International Nuclear Research Initiative(I-NERI) between Korea and United States and the International Project on Innovative Nuclear Energy Systems and Fuel Cycles(INPRO) of IAEA are continued in this year, produced lots of visible outcomes. These international activities have a common goal of the collaborative development of advanced nuclear system technologies but differ in the main focusing areas and aspects, so Korea needs to establish the integrated strategy based on the distinguished and complementary approach for the participation of each international programs, as examples the GIF for the advanced system technology development, INPRO for the set-up of institution and infra-structure, and I-NERI for the access of the core technologies and acquisition of the transparency of nuclear R and D

  15. [Health-related scientific and technological capabilities and university-industry research collaboration].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britto, Jorge; Vargas, Marco Antônio; Gadelha, Carlos Augusto Grabois; Costa, Laís Silveira

    2012-12-01

    To examine recent developments in health-related scientific capabilities, the impact of lines of incentives on reducing regional scientific imbalances, and university-industry research collaboration in Brazil. Data were obtained from the Conselho Nacional de Desenvolvimento Científico e Tecnológico (Brazilian National Council for Scientific and Technological Development) databases for the years 2000 to 2010. There were assessed indicators of resource mobilization, research network structuring, and knowledge transfer between science and industry initiatives. Based on the regional distribution map of health-related scientific and technological capabilities there were identified patterns of scientific capabilities and science-industry collaboration. There was relative spatial deconcentration of health research groups and more than 6% of them worked in six areas of knowledge areas: medicine, collective health, dentistry, veterinary medicine, ecology and physical education. Lines of incentives that were adopted from 2000 to 2009 contributed to reducing regional scientific imbalances and improving preexisting capabilities or, alternatively, encouraging spatial decentralization of these capabilities. Health-related scientific and technological capabilities remain highly spatially concentrated in Brazil and incentive policies have contributed to reduce to some extent these imbalances.

  16. Study of Collaborative Management for Transportation Construction Project Based on BIM Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jianhua, Liu; Genchuan, Luo; Daiquan, Liu; Wenlei, Li; Bowen, Feng

    2018-03-01

    Abstract. Building Information Modeling(BIM) is a building modeling technology based on the relevant information data of the construction project. It is an advanced technology and management concept, which is widely used in the whole life cycle process of planning, design, construction and operation. Based on BIM technology, transportation construction project collaborative management can have better communication through authenticity simulation and architectural visualization and can obtain the basic and real-time information such as project schedule, engineering quality, cost and environmental impact etc. The main services of highway construction management are integrated on the unified BIM platform for collaborative management to realize information intercommunication and exchange, to change the isolated situation of information in the past, and improve the level of information management. The final BIM model is integrated not only for the information management of project and the integration of preliminary documents and design drawings, but also for the automatic generation of completion data and final accounts, which covers the whole life cycle of traffic construction projects and lays a good foundation for smart highway construction.

  17. Elearn: A Collaborative Educational Virtual Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michailidou, Anna; Economides, Anastasios A.

    Virtual Learning Environments (VLEs) that support collaboration are one of the new technologies that have attracted great interest. VLEs are learning management software systems composed of computer-mediated communication software and online methods of delivering course material. This paper presents ELearn, a collaborative VLE for teaching…

  18. Grounded in Theory: Immersing Preservice Teachers in Technology-Mediated Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeGennaro, Donna

    2010-01-01

    The integration of technology into preservice teacher education continues to be emphasized as important. The hope is that if future teachers obtain technology skills they will design meaningful technology-mediated learning experiences for their students. However, gaining technology skills alone does not ensure the ability to envision and employ…

  19. NASA Technology Evaluation for Environmental Risk Mitigation Remediation Technology Collaboration Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romeo, James

    2013-01-01

    NASA is committed to finding solutions to agency cleanup problems that are better, cheaper, and more effective than the status quo. Unfortunately, some potential solutions involve innovative technologies for which NASA remediation managers may not have a high level of understanding or confidence. Since 2004, NASA's Stennis Space Center (SSC) in Mississippi has been pumping groundwater contaminated with trichloroethylene (TCE) and other halogenated volatile organic compounds (HVOC) from their cleanup location designated "Area G" through extraction wells to an aboveground treatment system. Over time, however, the effectiveness of this treatment strategy has diminished and an alternative approach is needed. In 2012, professionals from NASA's Principal Center for Technology Evaluation for Environmental Risk Mitigation (TEERM) introduced SSC managers to an innovative technology for enhancing the performance of SSC's existing pump and treat system. The technology, generally referred to as in situ chemical oxidation (ISCO), involves slowly and continuously injecting a strong but safe chemical oxidant into the groundwater. Treatment is enhanced by a "surfactant-type effect" which causes residual contamination from saturated soil to be released into the dissolved-phase where it can be readily oxidized. Any dissolved-phase contamination that was not oxidized can be collected by the extraction well network and treated aboveground. SSC was not familiar with the technology so to increase their confidence, TEERM identified a contractor who was willing to demonstrate their product and process at a significantly reduced price. An initial, small-scale demonstration of ISCO began at sse in March 2012 and completed in August 2012. This successful demonstration was followed by three larger-scale ISCO demonstrations between August and December 2012. The contractor's innovative Continuous Injection System (CIS) incorporated "green" and sustainable technologies and practices. A slow

  20. Design and evaluation of virtual environments mechanisms to support remote collaboration on complex process diagrams

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poppe, E.; Brown, R.; Recker, J.; Johnson, D.; Vanderfeesten, I.T.P.

    2017-01-01

    Many organizational analysis tasks are solved by collaborating teams. In technology-mediated collaborations, enabling relevant visual cues is a core issue with existing technology. We explore whether avatars can provide relevant cues in collaborative virtual environments. To do so, we develop a

  1. Information technology as a facilitator of suppliers’ collaborative communication, network governance and relationship longevity in supply chains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Chinomona

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available There is an increasing awareness about the paramount importance of information technology within business in the context of large businesses. However, research about the investigation of the role of information technology resources in fostering collaborative communication, network governance and relationship longevity in the small and medium enterprise sector has remained scant. The primary objective of this study was to investigate the influence of information technology on collaborative communication, network governance and relationship longevity in Zimbabwe’s SME sector. Five research hypotheses were posited and sample data from 162 small and medium enterprise suppliers were collected and used to empirically test the hypotheses. The results of this study showed that information technology resources positively influenced small and medium enterprise suppliers’ collaborative communication, network governance and consequential relationship longevity with their buyers in a significant way. Overall, the current study findings provided tentative support to the proposition that information technology resources, collaborative communication and network governance should be recognised as significant antecedents for improved relationship longevity between suppliers and their buyers in the SME setting. Therefore, managers in the small and medium enterprise sector and small and medium enterprise owners need to pay attention to both collaborative communication and network governance in order to optimise information technology resource impact on their relationship longevity with their business counterparts. Limitations and future research directions were also indicated.

  2. Collaborative Digital Games as Mediation Tool to Foster Intercultural Integration in Primary Dutch Schools

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de la Hera Conde-Pumpido, T.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/331869063; Paz Aléncar, Amanda

    2015-01-01

    The use of digital games has found to be an effective tool to reinforce teaching/learning practices. Several studies have already shown the benefits of the use of digital games in educational contexts. However, most of these studies are focused on how digital games can be used as a mediation tool in

  3. A Collaborative Approach to Helping Teacher Education Faculty Model Technology Integration in Their Courses: An Informal Case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zachariades, Iacovos; Roberts, Sherron Killingsworth

    1995-01-01

    Describes an innovative and collaborative approach to helping teacher educators better prepare preservice teachers to utilize technology for effective instruction. A mentoring program that paired graduate students in instructional technology with interested faculty members is discussed, and attitudes of the mentors and the faculty members are…

  4. Collaborative strategies in the event of technological discontinuities : the case of Nokia in the mobile telecommunication Industry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sadowski, B.M.; Dittrich, K.; Duysters, G.M.

    2003-01-01

    The paper examines the extent to which collaboration between large and small companies has been able to deal with the effects of discontinuous technological change. In applying an evolutionary perspective, the paper examines the process by which technological competencies and resources of large

  5. Technological progress and effects of (supra) regional innovation and production collaboration. An agent-based model simulation study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermeulen, B.; Pyka, A.; Serguieva, A.; Maringer, D.; Palade, V.; Almeida, R.J.

    2014-01-01

    We provide a novel technology development model in which economic agents search for transformations to build artifacts. Using this technology development model, we conduct an agent-based model simulation study on the effect of (supra-)regional collaboration in production and innovation on

  6. It Takes a Village to Raise an Information Technology Project: Suggestions on Collaboration from Our 10-Community-College Consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grandgenett, Neal; Thiele, Levi; Pensabene, Tom; McPeak, Brad

    2015-01-01

    This article describes the collaborative evolution of the Midwest Center for Information Technology (MCIT)--which is a consortium of 10 different community colleges across the four states of Nebraska, Iowa, North Dakota, and South Dakota--that was established to improve information technology (IT) education across the region. MCIT has been funded…

  7. Exploring the Factors That Affect the Intention to Use Collaborative Technologies: The Differing Perspectives of Sequential/Global Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yong-Ming

    2015-01-01

    The use of collaborative technologies in learning has received considerable attention in recent years, but few studies to date have examined the factors that affect sequential and global learners' intention to use such technologies. Previous studies have shown that the learners of different learning styles have different needs for educational…

  8. The Circle of Prosperity: Tribal Colleges, Tradition, and Technology -- Building Synergistic Cross-Community Collaborations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billy, C. L.

    2003-12-01

    For more than three decades, American Indian Tribal Colleges and Universities have been working to sustain what is ours: our land, our language, our communities, and our culture. Tribal Colleges have achieved success by helping our communities, located in some of the poorest and most geographically remote areas of the country, develop systems for higher education, research, and economic development that are accessible, culturally responsive, and place-based. American Indian higher education is holistic, focused on the mind, body, spirit, and family. Research is respectful of culture, mindful of community values, and essential to community well-being. Economic development strategies are based on national and international trends, but focused on relationships between local people and their land. In this environment, applied research flourishes and new knowledge, integrating traditional ways of knowing with western science, is created and used. In the 1990s, the American Indian Higher Education Consortium, which is composed of 35 Tribal Colleges and Universities in the U.S. and Canada, launched a major initiative to expand and enhance this capacity through new collaborations and state-of-the-art information and communications technologies. Through a multi-phase effort, the Tribal Colleges developed and are currently implementing a dynamic and broad-based strategic plan. The goal: to reach a "Circle of Prosperity," a place where tribal traditions and new technologies are woven together to build stronger and more sustainable communities through enhanced STEM education and research programs. Our plan, the "Tribal College Framework for Community Technology," is a framework of strategic partnerships, resources, and tools that is helping us create locally based economic and social opportunities through information and communications technology and use of the Internet. During this presentation, we will: (a) discuss the innovative collaborative process we are using to build

  9. Synthesis of Collaborative Learning Processes with Technology Based Education to Enhance Classroom Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Sumit

    2016-07-01

    A major hurdle in school education in India is the presence of large number of teachers who are inexperienced and have merely taken up the profession of teaching only after exhausting all avenues or getting rejected from all quarters. Empowering and training such teachers with information is a herculean task. Students tend to pay attention and show enthusiasm in learning when they view the class as relevant to themselves and connected to their interests. The current teaching-learning methods for teaching science and astronomy have become obsolete and require a major overhaul. A teaching-learning process which concentrates on an explorative-collaborative-comprehending methodology with simultaneous combination of technology has been developed with the objective to reignite the scientific temper among the future budding scientists. Attaining this goal will be possible when instructors adopt a bottom-up approach, which involves understanding the student's needs, designing flexible course content and synchronizing teaching techniques that focus on increasing student engagement by making the learning experience meaningful and purposeful. The International Year of Light (IYL 2015) is a global initiative that highlights to the citizens of the world the importance of light and optical technologies in their lives, for their futures, and for the development of society. One of the strong legacies left by the 2009 International Year of Astronomy was to use Astronomy in making the world a better place. On the eve of IYL 2015, an Optical Society funded outreach program, 'Spark of Light' was organised for under-privileged school children by using the explorative-collaborative-technology based mechanism and make them understand the nature and properties of light with emphasis on how Astronomy has been crucial for the evolution of sophisticated technology. A major paradigm shift from our previous program was the engagement of such untrained teachers in each and every aspect of

  10. Varicose and cheerio collaborate with pebble to mediate semaphorin-1a reverse signaling in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Sangyun; Yang, Da-Som; Hong, Young Gi; Mitchell, Sarah P; Brown, Matthew P; Kolodkin, Alex L

    2017-09-26

    The transmembrane semaphorin Sema-1a acts as both a ligand and a receptor to regulate axon-axon repulsion during neural development. Pebble (Pbl), a Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factor, mediates Sema-1a reverse signaling through association with the N-terminal region of the Sema-1a intracellular domain (ICD), resulting in cytoskeletal reorganization. Here, we uncover two additional Sema-1a interacting proteins, varicose (Vari) and cheerio (Cher), each with neuronal functions required for motor axon pathfinding. Vari is a member of the membrane-associated guanylate kinase (MAGUK) family of proteins, members of which can serve as scaffolds to organize signaling complexes. Cher is related to actin filament cross-linking proteins that regulate actin cytoskeleton dynamics. The PDZ domain binding motif found in the most C-terminal region of the Sema-1a ICD is necessary for interaction with Vari, but not Cher, indicative of distinct binding modalities. Pbl/Sema-1a-mediated repulsive guidance is potentiated by both vari and cher Genetic analyses further suggest that scaffolding functions of Vari and Cher play an important role in Pbl-mediated Sema-1a reverse signaling. These results define intracellular components critical for signal transduction from the Sema-1a receptor to the cytoskeleton and provide insight into mechanisms underlying semaphorin-induced localized changes in cytoskeletal organization.

  11. Technology-Mediation and Tutoring: How Do They Shape Progressive Inquiry Discourse?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muukkonen, Hanni; Lakkala, Minna; Hakkarainen, Kai

    2005-01-01

    In higher education, there is a challenge to gain the full benefit of the potentials of learning technology for collaborative knowledge advancement and for scaffolding practices of academic literacy and scientific argumentation. The technology, ideally, would be used to provide support that enables students to deal with more demanding tasks than…

  12. The State-of-the-Art of Collaborative Technologies for Initial Vocational Education: A Systematic Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beat A. Schwendimann

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Future workplaces require collaboration skills in which members of different work communities use technologies to solve complex problems. Vocational education and training (VET programs need to meet the challenge to prepare students to be part of a competent workforce. Particularly initial vocational education is under pressure to develop learners’ collaboration skills and abilities. To date, however, no attempt has been made to perform a comprehensive review of the use of computer-supported collaborative learning (CSCL technologies across different vocational education settings to account for contextual factors of VET. In this systematic review, 26 published studies were analyzed with respect to their demographics, research methodology, use of technology, and measured outcomes. This review illuminates that research on CSCL still leaves the vocational learning context as an under-represented field of study. At the same time, technologies offer a range of new types of learning possibilities for vocational education. As the direct result of that development, vocational education is increasingly taking place in new technology-enhanced learning settings. Education can benefit from the opportunities of CSCL technologies, but on the other hand, such technologies create new challenges for facilitating vocational learning. Therefore, this review also identifies three topic areas specific to vocational learning (collaborative writing-to-learn, simulations and game-like solutions, and tangible objects and enumerates desirable lines for future research.

  13. Parental Emotion Socialization and Child Psychological Adjustment among Chinese Urban Families: Mediation through Child Emotion Regulation and Moderation through Dyadic Collaboration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhuyun Jin

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The theoretical model of emotion regulation and many empirical findings have suggested that children’s emotion regulation may mediate the association between parents’ emotion socialization and children’s psychological adjustment. However, limited research has been conducted on moderators of these relations, despite the argument that the associations between parenting practices and children’s psychological adjustment are probabilistic rather than deterministic. This study examined the mediating role of children’s emotion regulation in linking parents’ emotion socialization and children’s psychological adjustment, and whether dyadic collaboration could moderate the proposed mediation model in a sample of Chinese parents and their children in their middle childhood. Participants were 150 Chinese children (87 boys and 63 girls, Mage = 8.54, SD = 1.67 and their parents (Mage = 39.22, SD = 4.07. Parent–child dyadic collaboration was videotaped and coded from an interaction task. Parents reported on their emotion socialization, children’s emotion regulation and psychopathological symptoms. Results indicated that child emotion regulation mediated the links between parental emotion socialization and child’s psychopathological symptoms. Evidence of moderated mediation was also found: supportive emotion socialization and child emotion regulation were positively correlated only at high and medium levels of dyadic collaboration, with child’s psychopathological symptoms as the dependent variables. Our findings suggested that higher-level parent–child collaboration might further potentiate the protective effect of parental supportive emotion socialization practices against child psychopathological symptoms.

  14. Parental Emotion Socialization and Child Psychological Adjustment among Chinese Urban Families: Mediation through Child Emotion Regulation and Moderation through Dyadic Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Zhuyun; Zhang, Xutong; Han, Zhuo Rachel

    2017-01-01

    The theoretical model of emotion regulation and many empirical findings have suggested that children’s emotion regulation may mediate the association between parents’ emotion socialization and children’s psychological adjustment. However, limited research has been conducted on moderators of these relations, despite the argument that the associations between parenting practices and children’s psychological adjustment are probabilistic rather than deterministic. This study examined the mediating role of children’s emotion regulation in linking parents’ emotion socialization and children’s psychological adjustment, and whether dyadic collaboration could moderate the proposed mediation model in a sample of Chinese parents and their children in their middle childhood. Participants were 150 Chinese children (87 boys and 63 girls, Mage = 8.54, SD = 1.67) and their parents (Mage = 39.22, SD = 4.07). Parent–child dyadic collaboration was videotaped and coded from an interaction task. Parents reported on their emotion socialization, children’s emotion regulation and psychopathological symptoms. Results indicated that child emotion regulation mediated the links between parental emotion socialization and child’s psychopathological symptoms. Evidence of moderated mediation was also found: supportive emotion socialization and child emotion regulation were positively correlated only at high and medium levels of dyadic collaboration, with child’s psychopathological symptoms as the dependent variables. Our findings suggested that higher-level parent–child collaboration might further potentiate the protective effect of parental supportive emotion socialization practices against child psychopathological symptoms. PMID:29326629

  15. Collaborative technologies, higher order thinking and self-sufficient learning: A case study of adult learners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clare S. Johnson

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The inclusion of online elements in learning environments is becoming commonplace in Post Compulsory Education. A variety of research into the value of such elements is available, and this study aims to add further evidence by looking specifically at the use of collaborative technologies such as online discussion forums and wikis to encourage higher order thinking and self-sufficient learning. In particular, the research examines existing pedagogical models including Salmon’s five-stage model, along with other relevant literature. A case study of adult learners in community-based learning centres forms the basis of the research, and as a result of the findings, an arrow model is suggested as a framework for online collaboration that emphasises the learner, mentions pre-course preparation and then includes three main phases of activity: post, interact and critique. This builds on Salmon’s five-stage model and has the benefit of being flexible and responsive, as well as allowing for further development beyond the model, particularly in a blended learning environment.

  16. A study on intensifying efficiency for international collaborative development of advanced nuclear energy technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, J. H.; Hahn, D. H.; Song, K. C.; Chang, J. H.; Kim, H. J.; Kim, H. J.; Lim, C. Y.; Lee, D. S.; Lee, Y. J. [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-03-15

    The objective of the study was to participate the GIF for the efficient propulsion of future nuclear system development. For achieving the objective of this study, the followings were carried out. {Omicron} Analyze the international/domestic trends in the future nuclear energy system {Omicron} Analyze the domestic long-term R and D program for the future nuclear system and assist its implementation - Review the agenda of the executive committee, the technical committee, and sub-technical committee - Assist the committee meetings and workshops related to the future nuclear energy system {Omicron} Develop the participation strategy for the collaborative development of Gen-IV technology and conducting the international cooperation activities - Support the delegation by reviewing the agenda of GIF meetings in the technical and legal perspective - Research the system R and D arrangement and report its progress - Participate in the SFR SIA PA negotiation meeting and report its progress {Omicron} Support the activities related to I-NERI between Korea and U.S. - Support a delegation by reviewing the agenda in the technical/legal point of view - Participate in the BINERIC meetings and Support the related activities The result of this study may be used for 1) contribution to establishing the effective foundation and broadening the cooperation activities between the advanced countries and Korea and 2) contribution effective management of Gen IV international collaboration by technical/legal supporting

  17. A study on intensifying efficiency for international collaborative development of advanced nuclear energy technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, J. H.; Hahn, D. H.; Song, K. C.; Chang, J. H.; Kim, H. J.; Kim, H. J.; Lim, C. Y.; Lee, D. S.; Lee, Y. J.

    2011-03-01

    The objective of the study was to participate the GIF for the efficient propulsion of future nuclear system development. For achieving the objective of this study, the followings were carried out. Ο Analyze the international/domestic trends in the future nuclear energy system Ο Analyze the domestic long-term R and D program for the future nuclear system and assist its implementation - Review the agenda of the executive committee, the technical committee, and sub-technical committee - Assist the committee meetings and workshops related to the future nuclear energy system Ο Develop the participation strategy for the collaborative development of Gen-IV technology and conducting the international cooperation activities - Support the delegation by reviewing the agenda of GIF meetings in the technical and legal perspective - Research the system R and D arrangement and report its progress - Participate in the SFR SIA PA negotiation meeting and report its progress Ο Support the activities related to I-NERI between Korea and U.S. - Support a delegation by reviewing the agenda in the technical/legal point of view - Participate in the BINERIC meetings and Support the related activities The result of this study may be used for 1) contribution to establishing the effective foundation and broadening the cooperation activities between the advanced countries and Korea and 2) contribution effective management of Gen IV international collaboration by technical/legal supporting

  18. Engaging Foreign Language Learners in a Web 2.0-Mediated Collaborative Learning Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Eduardo Cote Parra

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this action research was to explore the types of interactions that foreign language learners experience while using a wiki as a supporting tool for a face-to-face research course. This design allowed me to play a dual role: first, I studied my own classroom setting and students. Second, I implemented a pedagogical intervention based on a collaborative online learning interaction. The data were gathered from participants’ posts, and the findings revealed that class tasks promoted an asynchronous voluntary interaction among participants in which they shared knowledge and experiences while expressing the opinions and points of view that enabled them to actively participate in the face-to-face class.

  19. Mediated transitions between CPD-activities & teaching and collaboration at local schools

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Birgitte Lund

    sampling: school size, town/rural etc.). Likert-scale questions were analysed by frequency, and open-ended reflections, and the qualitative data, were categorized/coded through an iterative data based process (Cohen, Manion, & Morrison, 2007). To answer the first two research questions teachers’ reports...... methods (Creswell & Clark, 2007). Quantitative and qualitative data were retrieved during and after each of the course-modules. One part of data was a repeated questionnaire with 5 point Likert-scale questions and open-ended categories focused on teachers’ experiences from the seminars, from trials in own...... classrooms, and from collaborative activities at their schools. Qualitative data also included observations at the seminar days, interviews with students, teachers and school leaders at the local schools, observation from PLC-meetings, and repeated observations in classrooms at five schools (diversity...

  20. Exploring relational regulation in computer-mediated (collaborative) learning interaction: a developmental perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Puil, Chiel; Andriessen, Jerry; Kanselaar, Gellof

    2004-04-01

    This article presents a qualitative analysis showing the dependency of effective collaborative argumentation on interpersonal relational aspects that develop during synchronous interaction. Four regulatory principles are proposed as propelling the interaction, and of these, autoregulation, or the conservative restraints within the existing relation, appears to be the dominant force. When using a structured dialogue system (SDS), instead of free chat, via roles and sentence-openers, the social dimension of the relation between participants disappears from the surface interaction. Even though using the SDS seems to foster a more focused and task-functional approach, argumentation appears to affect the relations between participants in a negative way, since after an argumentative sequence, repair of the relationship takes place. It might even be argued that, because of relational stress, in many cases, argumentation is momentarily suspended.

  1. Creation of medicinal chemistry learning communities through enhanced technology and interdisciplinary collaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriksen, Brian; Roche, Victoria

    2012-10-12

    Objectives. To build an integrated medicinal chemistry learning community of campus and distance pharmacy students though the use of innovative technology and interdisciplinary teaching.Design. Mechanisms were implemented to bring distance students into campus-based medicinal chemistry classrooms in real time, stimulate interaction between instructors and various student cohorts, and promote group work during class. Also, pharmacy clinician colleagues were recruited to contribute to the teaching of the 3 medicinal chemistry courses.Assessment. Student perceptions on the value of technology to build community and advance learning were gleaned from course evaluations, in class feedback, and conversations with class officers and student groups. Responses on a survey of second-year students confirmed the benefits of interdisciplinary content integration on engagement and awareness of the connection between drug chemistry and pharmacy practice. A survey of clinician colleagues who contributed to teaching the 3 medicinal chemistry courses found their views were similar to those of students.Conclusions. The purposeful use of technology united learners, fostered communication, and advanced content comprehension in 3 medicinal chemistry courses taught to campus and distance students. Teaching collaboration with pharmacy clinicians enhanced learner interest in course content and provided insight into the integrated nature of the profession of pharmacy.

  2. Informatics technology mimics ecology: dense, mutualistic collaboration networks are associated with higher publication rates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco D Sorani

    Full Text Available Information technology (IT adoption enables biomedical research. Publications are an accepted measure of research output, and network models can describe the collaborative nature of publication. In particular, ecological networks can serve as analogies for publication and technology adoption. We constructed network models of adoption of bioinformatics programming languages and health IT (HIT from the literature.We selected seven programming languages and four types of HIT. We performed PubMed searches to identify publications since 2001. We calculated summary statistics and analyzed spatiotemporal relationships. Then, we assessed ecological models of specialization, cooperativity, competition, evolution, biodiversity, and stability associated with publications.Adoption of HIT has been variable, while scripting languages have experienced rapid adoption. Hospital systems had the largest HIT research corpus, while Perl had the largest language corpus. Scripting languages represented the largest connected network components. The relationship between edges and nodes was linear, though Bioconductor had more edges than expected and Perl had fewer. Spatiotemporal relationships were weak. Most languages shared a bioinformatics specialization and appeared mutualistic or competitive. HIT specializations varied. Specialization was highest for Bioconductor and radiology systems. Specialization and cooperativity were positively correlated among languages but negatively correlated among HIT. Rates of language evolution were similar. Biodiversity among languages grew in the first half of the decade and stabilized, while diversity among HIT was variable but flat. Compared with publications in 2001, correlation with publications one year later was positive while correlation after ten years was weak and negative.Adoption of new technologies can be unpredictable. Spatiotemporal relationships facilitate adoption but are not sufficient. As with ecosystems, dense

  3. Informatics technology mimics ecology: dense, mutualistic collaboration networks are associated with higher publication rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorani, Marco D

    2012-01-01

    Information technology (IT) adoption enables biomedical research. Publications are an accepted measure of research output, and network models can describe the collaborative nature of publication. In particular, ecological networks can serve as analogies for publication and technology adoption. We constructed network models of adoption of bioinformatics programming languages and health IT (HIT) from the literature.We selected seven programming languages and four types of HIT. We performed PubMed searches to identify publications since 2001. We calculated summary statistics and analyzed spatiotemporal relationships. Then, we assessed ecological models of specialization, cooperativity, competition, evolution, biodiversity, and stability associated with publications.Adoption of HIT has been variable, while scripting languages have experienced rapid adoption. Hospital systems had the largest HIT research corpus, while Perl had the largest language corpus. Scripting languages represented the largest connected network components. The relationship between edges and nodes was linear, though Bioconductor had more edges than expected and Perl had fewer. Spatiotemporal relationships were weak. Most languages shared a bioinformatics specialization and appeared mutualistic or competitive. HIT specializations varied. Specialization was highest for Bioconductor and radiology systems. Specialization and cooperativity were positively correlated among languages but negatively correlated among HIT. Rates of language evolution were similar. Biodiversity among languages grew in the first half of the decade and stabilized, while diversity among HIT was variable but flat. Compared with publications in 2001, correlation with publications one year later was positive while correlation after ten years was weak and negative.Adoption of new technologies can be unpredictable. Spatiotemporal relationships facilitate adoption but are not sufficient. As with ecosystems, dense, mutualistic

  4. Ubuntunet Alliance: A Collaborative Research Platform for Sharing of Technological Tools for Eradication of Brain Drain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jameson Mbale

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The UbuntuNet Alliance Alliance is well-placed to facilitate interaction between education and research institutions and the African academic and researcher in the Diaspora so that together they can strengthen research that will exploit new technological tools and increase the industrial base. It is envisaged that the Alliance will become an important vehicle for linkages that will facilitate repatriation of scientific knowledge and skills to Africa and even help reduce and eventually eradicate the brain drain which has taken so many excellent intellectuals to the developed world. As organisational vehicles for inter-institutional collaboration both established and emerging NRENs can play a critical role in reversing these trends and in mitigating what appears to be the negative impact of the brain drain.

  5. Supporting primary-level mathematics teachers’ collaboration in designing and using technology-based scenarios

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Misfeldt, Morten; Zacho, Lis

    2016-01-01

    development and testing through qualitative means, aiming to describe the teachers’ appropriation of (1) GeoGebra as a tool for doing and teaching mathematics, and (2) game as a metaphor supporting open-ended projects addressing creativity and innovation in the classroom. The data from the project suggest......In this article, we address how the design of educational scenarios can support teachers’ adoption of both technology and open-ended projects indorsing creativity and innovation. We do that by describing how groups of teachers develop digital learning environments supporting using a combination...... of GeoGebra and Google sites. Both teachers and pupils work with the concept of “game” as something they design, and furthermore, the pupils immerse themselves into the scenarios that the teachers create in a way similar to “playing a game.” We investigate teachers participation in collaborative...

  6. Study of cognitive and technological prerequisites for virtual laboratories and collaborative virtual environments for radiopharmacy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melo, Roberto Correia de

    2009-01-01

    This academic work explains a general view of virtual laboratories (VL) and collaborative virtual environments (CVE) (called, together, a VL/CVE set), focusing their technological features and analyzing the common cognitive features of their users. Also is presented a detailed description of VL/CVE VirRAD (Virtual Radiopharmacy), created specially to connect and support the international radiopharmacy community around the world, and is explained an analysis of their users' cognitive profile, under the perspective of two of the most important cognitive theories of the 20th century: multiple intelligences, by Howard Gardner, and mindful learning, by Ellen Langer. Conclusions from this study has been incorporated, as feature enhancements, to a software prototype created based upon VirRAD software solution, and the hardcopy of their screens is exposed at the end of this work. It is also an essential idea that the conclusions of this work are relevant to any VL/CVE environment. (author)

  7. Review of the Strategic Plan for International Collaboration on Fusion Science and Technology Research. Fusion Energy Sciences Advisory Committee (FESAC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    The United States Government has employed international collaborations in magnetic fusion energy research since the program was declassified in 1958. These collaborations have been successful not only in producing high quality scientific results that have contributed to the advancement of fusion science and technology, they have also allowed us to highly leverage our funding. Thus, in the 1980s, when the funding situation made it necessary to reduce the technical breadth of the U.S. domestic program, these highly leveraged collaborations became key strategic elements of the U.S. program, allowing us to maintain some degree of technical breadth. With the recent, nearly complete declassification of inertial confinement fusion, the use of some international collaboration is expected to be introduced in the related inertial fusion energy research activities as well. The United States has been a leader in establishing and fostering collaborations that have involved scientific and technological exchanges, joint planning, and joint work at fusion facilities in the U.S. and worldwide. These collaborative efforts have proven mutually beneficial to the United States and our partners. International collaborations are a tool that allows us to meet fusion program goals in the most effective way possible. Working with highly qualified people from other countries and other cultures provides the collaborators with an opportunity to see problems from new and different perspectives, allows solutions to arise from the diversity of the participants, and promotes both collaboration and friendly competition. In short, it provides an exciting and stimulating environment resulting in a synergistic effect that is good for science and good for the people of the world.

  8. Advancing Geospatial Technologies in Science and Social Science: A Case Study in Collaborative Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, N. A.; Morris, J. N.; Simms, M. L.; Metoyer, S.

    2007-12-01

    The Advancing Geospatial Skills in Science and Social Sciences (AGSSS) program, funded by NSF, provides middle and high school teacher-partners with access to graduate student scientists for classroom collaboration and curriculum adaptation to incorporate and advance skills in spatial thinking. AGSSS Fellows aid in the delivery of geospatially-enhanced activities utilizing technology such as geographic information systems, remote sensing, and virtual globes. The partnership also provides advanced professional development for both participating teachers and fellows. The AGSSS program is mutually beneficial to all parties involved. This successful collaboration of scientists, teachers, and students results in greater understanding and enthusiasm for the use of spatial thinking strategies and geospatial technologies. In addition, the partnership produces measurable improvements in student efficacy and attitudes toward processes of spatial thinking. The teacher partner training and classroom resources provided by AGSSS will continue the integration of geospatial activities into the curriculum after the project concludes. Time and resources are the main costs in implementing this partnership. Graduate fellows invest considerable time and energy, outside of academic responsibilities, to develop materials for the classroom. Fellows are required to be available during K-12 school hours, which necessitates forethought in scheduling other graduate duties. However, the benefits far outweigh the costs. Graduate fellows gain experience in working in classrooms. In exchange, students gain exposure to working scientists and their research. This affords graduate fellows the opportunity to hone their communication skills, and specifically allows them to address the issue of translating technical information for a novice audience. Teacher-partners and students benefit by having scientific expertise readily available. In summation, these experiences result in changes in teacher

  9. The best I can be: how self-accountability impacts product choice in technology mediated environments

    OpenAIRE

    Rowe, Zoe O.; Wilson, Hugh; Dimitriu, Radu; Breiter, Katja; Charnley, Fiona

    2017-01-01

    Technology-mediated environments are important not only as the location for an increasing proportion of purchases, but also as an even more pervasive part of the purchase journey. While most research into online consumer behavior focuses on attitudes as an antecedent of product choice, this article focuses on an important but hardly explored variable that may be impacted by technology-mediated environments: self-accountability. Laboratory experiments suggest that self-accountability may influ...

  10. The teacher acting as mediator in new technologies use: a case study in physics teaching

    OpenAIRE

    Almeida Valiati, Eliane Regina de; Heineck, Renato

    2005-01-01

    Nowadays, the new technologies challenge the educational practices. When teachers face this new teaching and learning pattern they need to adopt a different attitude: of a mediator, in which one its main role is to experience and mediate processes of learning construction proportioned and encouraged by the increasing inclusion of New Communication and Information Technologies (NCTIs) at schools. This paper presents the results obtained in a research which objective was to evaluate the use of ...

  11. A Novel Collaborative Protocol for Successful Management of Penile Pain Mediated by Radiculitis of Sacral Spinal Nerve Roots From Tarlov Cysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irwin Goldstein, MD

    2017-09-01

    Goldstein I, Komisaruk BR, Rubin RS, et al. A Novel Collaborative Protocol for Successful Management of Penile Pain Mediated by Radiculitis of Sacral Spinal Nerve Roots From Tarlov Cysts. Sex Med 2017;5:e203–e211.

  12. ComPLuS Model: A New Insight in Pupils' Collaborative Talk, Actions and Balance during a Computer-Mediated Music Task

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolaidou, Georgia N.

    2012-01-01

    This exploratory work describes and analyses the collaborative interactions that emerge during computer-based music composition in the primary school. The study draws on socio-cultural theories of learning, originated within Vygotsky's theoretical context, and proposes a new model, namely Computer-mediated Praxis and Logos under Synergy (ComPLuS).…

  13. Improving collaborative play between children with autism spectrum disorders and their siblings : the effectiveness of a robot-mediated intervention based on lego (R) therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huskens, Bibi; Palmen, Annemiek; Van der Werff, Marije; Lourens, Tino; Barakova, Emilia

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the effectiveness of a brief robot-mediated intervention based on Lego(A (R)) therapy on improving collaborative behaviors (i.e., interaction initiations, responses, and play together) between children with ASD and their siblings during play sessions, in a

  14. Improving Collaborative Play between Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders and Their Siblings: The Effectiveness of a Robot-Mediated Intervention Based on Lego® Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huskens, Bibi; Palmen, Annemiek; Van der Werff, Marije; Lourens, Tino; Barakova, Emilia

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the effectiveness of a brief robot-mediated intervention based on Lego® therapy on improving collaborative behaviors (i.e., interaction initiations, responses, and play together) between children with ASD and their siblings during play sessions, in a therapeutic setting. A concurrent multiple baseline design…

  15. Collaboration for Technological Innovation: Choices and Decisions that Make Partnerships Excel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia Regina Mangiavacchi Tuccori

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to understand the relationship between strategies and collaborative organizational arrangements and the defining of their position within the corporate power structure. The strategic approach employed herein is that of case studies so as to comprehend the peculiarities and the value proposition of the management model of innovation networks at a Brazilian company that operates in the personal hygiene, perfumery and cosmetics segment. To excel within an environment marked by increased global competition, companies have to develop and learn with an innovative work structure and culture. This derives from the rapid shortening of product life cycles which drives the need to innovate at more frequent intervals and to develop technologies, processes, products and/or services more efficiently. Furthermore, given increased product, technologies and processes complexity, attention is drawn to the expansion of costs and risks to innovate to the extent of enhancing uncertainties and pressure on R&D+i (Research, Development and Innovation budgets. Meanwhile, the need for interdisciplinarity by means of cooperation likewise comes to light.

  16. A mediated modelling approach to promote collaborative learning in Andean rural micro-catchments in Colombia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gowing, John; Dominguez, Isabel

    2013-04-01

    In rural catchments of developing countries water-related diseases, due to land use patterns (agriculture and livestock), microbial pollution, inadequate sanitation systems, access to water of poor quality, and lack of institutional support are common problems which disproportionally affect poor and vulnerable people. This research aims at developing a system dynamic model to improve the understanding of the macro and micro factors that influence human health and environmental health in rural micro-catchments in Valle del Cauca, Colombia. In this catchment livelihoods for most people depend on agriculture, particularly coffee. The research uses a mediated modeling approach, in which different stakeholders in modeling sessions, develop a STELLA model that allows them to identify relations between the economic, social and environmental factors and driving forces over the performance of their system. Stakeholders jointly develop the model structure in sessions facilitated by the researcher and the data required is gathered using secondary information from the different relevant institutions and primary information from field surveys that cover socioeconomic and environmental aspects that has not been previously collected by any institution or organization (i.e. household survey, stream water survey, and drinking water survey). Representation and understanding of their system will allow the stakeholders to test the effect of different management strategies in the micro-catchment and their associated socioeconomic, environmental and human health outcomes.

  17. Collaboration and E-collaboration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Razmerita, Liana; Kirchner, Kathrin

    2015-01-01

    Understanding student’s perception of collaboration and how collaboration is supported by ICT is important for its efficient use in the classroom. This article aims to investigate how students perceive collaboration and how they use new technologies in collaborative group work. Furthermore......, it tries to measure the impact of technology on students’ satisfaction with collaboration outcomes. In particular, the study aims to address the following research questions: Which demographic information (e.g. gender and place of origin) is significant for collaboration and ecollaboration? and Which...... are the perceived factors that influence the students’ group performance? The findings of this study emphasize that there are gender and cultural differences with respect to the perception of e-collaboration. Furthermore, the article summarizes in a model the most significant factors influencing group performance....

  18. Collaborative Technologies for Distributed Science - Fusion Energy and High-Energy Physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schissel, D.P.; Abla, G.; Burruss, J.R.; Gottschalk, E.

    2006-01-01

    variety of remote participation methods, on improving interoperability between the different approaches, on ease of use, and on improved security. This paper will compare the requirements of FES and HEP, discuss today's solutions, examine areas where more functionality is required, and discuss those areas with sufficient overlap in requirements that joint research into collaborative technologies will increase the benefit to both. (author)

  19. How space design and technology can support the Pharmacy Practice Model Initiative through interprofessional collaboration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lindsay Hahn

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The Pharmacy Practice Model Initiative (PPMI calls pharmacists to more direct patient care and increased responsibility for medication-related outcomes, as a means of achieving greater safety, improving outcomes and reducing costs. This article acknowledges the value of interprofessional collaboration to the PPMI and identifies the implications of the Initiative for space design and technology, both of which stand to help the Initiative gather additional support. Summary: The profession of pharmacy has for some time now become increasingly vocal about its desire to take on greater responsibility for patient outcomes. With drug costs representing the largest portion of a hospital's pharmacy budget and reimbursements becoming more contingent on readmission avoidance, the pharmacy's influence on a hospital's bottom line is significant. More importantly, study after study is showing that with greater pharmacist intervention, patient outcomes improve. This article addresses the ways in which developments in the fields of technology and facility design can assist in the deployment of the PPMI. Conclusion: As the PPMI achieves a critical level of support from inside and outside the pharmacy, and more empirical research emerges regarding the improved outcomes and cost savings of increasing the roles of both clinical pharmacists and pharmacy technicians, the industry sectors of healthcare technology and healthcare design stand ready to assist in the execution of this new model. By encouraging pharmacists, doctors and nurses to work together - and all caregivers to work with facility designers, biomedical engineers and IT specialists, there is the increased likelihood of these fields turning to each other to problem-solve together, all for the ultimate benefit to patients and their families.   Type: Commentary

  20. Enabling all young Australians to grow up safe, happy, healthy and resilient: a Collaboration for Young People, Technology and Wellbeing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-01

    This paper describes a framework for a multi-disciplinary collaboration to investigate the role of technology for improving young Australians' mental health and wellbeing. The poor mental health of young Australians poses a significant challenge to Australia's future. Half of all Australians will experience a mental health difficulty in their lifetime and 75% of mental illness has its onset before age 25. Cross-sectoral collaboration is critical for meeting this challenge. In order to establish a world-first multi-partner collaboration, leading researchers and institutes, commercial, non-profit and end-user organization and young people were identified and invited to participate. Together we have developed an international research framework that explores the role of technologies in young people's lives, their potential and how this can be harnessed to address challenges facing young people. This research framework will: (i) conduct empirical research that tests the utility of technology across mental health promotion, prevention, early intervention and treatment and, (ii) translate existing and new knowledge into products and services that help create a generation of safe, happy, healthy and resilient young people. Research undertaken by the Collaboration will be the most comprehensive investigation of technologies' potential to improve the wellbeing of young people ever conducted, leading to significant benefits for Australian young people and their mental health.

  1. Technology Support for Discussion Based Learning: From Computer Supported Collaborative Learning to the Future of Massive Open Online Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosé, Carolyn Penstein; Ferschke, Oliver

    2016-01-01

    This article offers a vision for technology supported collaborative and discussion-based learning at scale. It begins with historical work in the area of tutorial dialogue systems. It traces the history of that area of the field of Artificial Intelligence in Education as it has made an impact on the field of Computer-Supported Collaborative…

  2. Supporting teachers’ collaboration in design teams to develop Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge: the case of science teachers in Tanzania

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kafyulilo, Ayoub; Fisser, Petra; Voogt, Joke; McBride, R.; Searson, M.

    2013-01-01

    This study assessed the effect of support on the teachers’ collaboration in design teams and development of Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge (TPACK). The study was carried out in two secondary schools in Tanzania: Chang’ombe and Jitegemee secondary schools. From each school 10 teachers

  3. Technology as Mediation Tool for Improving Teaching Profession in Higher Education Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altinay-Gazi, Zehra; Altinay-Aksal, Fahriye

    2017-01-01

    Technology became a mediation tool for forming information and developing skills is teacher education programs of higher education institutions because technological tools can be used for self-reflection of prospective teachers' teaching performances. Practical implementation of teacher education programmes is a part of quality indicator in higher…

  4. A Collaborative Education Network for Advancing Climate Literacy using Data Visualization Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDougall, C.; Russell, E. L.; Murray, M.; Bendel, W. B.

    2013-12-01

    One of the more difficult issues in engaging broad audiences with scientific research is to present it in a way that is intuitive, captivating and up-to-date. Over the past ten years, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has made significant progress in this area through Science On a Sphere(R) (SOS). SOS is a room-sized, global display system that uses computers and video projectors to display Earth systems data onto a six-foot diameter sphere, analogous to a giant animated globe. This well-crafted data visualization system serves as a way to integrate and display global change phenomena; including polar ice melt, projected sea level rise, ocean acidification and global climate models. Beyond a display for individual data sets, SOS provides a holistic global perspective that highlights the interconnectedness of Earth systems, nations and communities. SOS is now a featured exhibit at more than 100 science centers, museums, universities, aquariums and other institutions around the world reaching more than 33 million visitors every year. To facilitate the development of how this data visualization technology and these visualizations could be used with public audiences, we recognized the need for the exchange of information among the users. To accomplish this, we established the SOS Users Collaborative Network. This network consists of the institutions that have an SOS system or partners who are creating content and educational programming for SOS. When we began the Network in 2005, many museums had limited capacity to both incorporate real-time, authentic scientific data about the Earth system and interpret global change visualizations. They needed not only the visualization platform and the scientific content, but also assistance with methods of approach. We needed feedback from these users on how to craft understandable visualizations and how to further develop the SOS platform to support learning. Through this Network and the collaboration

  5. Harnessing the power of mobile technologies for collaborating, crowdsourcing, and creating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crompton, H.

    2015-12-01

    Today's digital technologies can have a powerful influence on teaching and learning. M-learning and u-learning in particular are changing pedagogical practice. Sub categories are rapidly emerging, such as context-aware ubiquitous learning, that involve students learning subject content while immersed in authentic and relevant surroundings. Learning cultures are a nebulous blend of traditions, values, beliefs, and rituals built up over time. For a long time, education has long been conceived as classroom-based and predominantly sedentary (Merchant, 2012). Recent mobile technologies are disrupting this culture in favor of learning that is contextualized, personalized, on demand, and ubiquitous (Crompton, 2013). 21st century students are a different breed than past generations (Prensky, 2001). These students have grown up in a time that has not only altered their perceptions and practices but modified the wiring of the brain through neuroplasticity (Crompton, 2012). Students now cognitively receive information quickly through non-linear methods (Gross, 2003, Oblinger & Oblinger, 2005). They think differently. They also seem to be attached to mobile devices 24/7, although the content of the lesson does not match what they seem to be doing on the mobile devices. This presentation will showcase how to get your students to harness the power of mobile devices for educational purposes. For example, students in your classes will be using devices to collaborate on activities with Google Forms, crowdsourcing the best class questions in Slido, and screencasting thoughts and ideas to share with others with Educreations. These are examples of free apps or Web 2.0 tools that can be used on all the major mobile platforms. Crompton, H. (2013). Mobile learning: New approach, new theory. In Z. L. Berge & L. Y. Muilenburg (Eds.), Handbook of mobile learning (pp. 47-57). Prensky, M. (2001). Digital natives, digital immigrants. Mcb University Press, 9(5). Oblinger, D., & Oblinger, J

  6. Convenience Matters: A Qualitative Study on the Impact of Use of Social Media and Collaboration Technologies on Learning Experience and Performance in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Yeona

    2015-01-01

    Social media and collaboration technologies are viewed as valuable tools for creating a new reality of collaborative learning, particularly in higher education facing millennials growing up with various technologies in their daily lives. Using the example of an undergraduate course taught on-campus, this study examines how millennial students in…

  7. AIR Louisville: Addressing Asthma With Technology, Crowdsourcing, Cross-Sector Collaboration, And Policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Meredith; Combs, Veronica; Su, Jason G; Henderson, Kelly; Tuffli, Michael

    2018-04-01

    Cross-sector partnerships benefit public health by leveraging ideas, resources, and expertise from a wide range of partners. In this study we documented the process and impact of AIR Louisville (a collaboration forged among the Louisville Metro Government, a nonprofit institute, and a technology company) in successfully tackling a complex public health challenge: asthma. We enrolled residents of Louisville, Kentucky, with asthma and used electronic inhaler sensors to monitor where and when they used medication. We found that the use of the digital health platform achieved positive clinical outcomes, including a 78 percent reduction in rescue inhaler use and a 48 percent improvement in symptom-free days. Moreover, the crowdsourced real-world data on inhaler use, combined with environmental data, led to policy recommendations including enhancing tree canopy, tree removal mitigation, zoning for air pollution emission buffers, recommended truck routes, and developing a community asthma notification system. AIR Louisville represents a model that can be replicated to address many public health challenges by simultaneously guiding individual, clinical, and policy decisions.

  8. Collaboration Technology in Military Operations: Lessons Learned from the Corporate Domain

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Scott, Stacey D; Cummings, Mary L; Graeber, David A; Nelson, W. T; Bolia, Robert S

    2006-01-01

    .... However, research in corporate environments has shown that explicit communication, while an important aspect of collaboration, is often used together with more subtle interactions to help teams...

  9. AAV Vectorization of DSB-mediated Gene Editing Technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moser, Rachel J; Hirsch, Matthew L

    2016-01-01

    Recent work both at the bench and the bedside demonstrate zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs), CRISPR/Cas9, and other programmable site-specific endonuclease technologies are being successfully utilized within and alongside AAV vectors to induce therapeutically relevant levels of directed gene editing within the human chromosome. Studies from past decades acknowledge that AAV vector genomes are enhanced substrates for homology-directed repair in the presence or absence of targeted DNA damage within the host genome. Additionally, AAV vectors are currently the most efficient format for in vivo gene delivery with no vector related complications in >100 clinical trials for diverse diseases. At the same time, advancements in the design of custom-engineered site-specific endonucleases and the utilization of elucidated endonuclease formats have resulted in efficient and facile genetic engineering for basic science and for clinical therapies. AAV vectors and gene editing technologies are an obvious marriage, using AAV for the delivery of repair substrate and/or a gene encoding a designer endonuclease; however, while efficient delivery and enhanced gene targeting by vector genomes are advantageous, other attributes of AAV vectors are less desirable for gene editing technologies. This review summarizes the various roles that AAV vectors play in gene editing technologies and provides insight into its trending applications for the treatment of genetic diseases.

  10. Developing Multiliteracies in a Technology-Mediated Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Natalie; Lockyer, Lori; Brown, Ian

    2013-01-01

    Evolving technologies and globalisation presents educators with the challenge of creating learning experiences to help students develop competencies to enable them to function successfully in a dynamic society. Today's learner is expected to be multiliterate--able to analyse and construct multi-modal texts. A qualitative embedded multi-case study…

  11. From Mediatized Emotion to Digital Affect Cultures: New Technologies and Global Flows of Emotion

    OpenAIRE

    Katrin Döveling; Anu A. Harju; Denise Sommer

    2018-01-01

    Research on the processes of mediatization aims to explore the mutual shaping of media and social life and how new media technologies influence and infiltrate social practices and cultural life. We extend this discussion of media’s role in transforming the everyday by including in the discussion the mediatization of emotion and discuss what we conceptualize as digital affect culture(s). We understand these as relational, contextual, globally emergent spaces in the digital environment where af...

  12. Adherence to Technology-Mediated Insomnia Treatment: A Meta-Analysis, Interviews, and Focus Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horsch, Corine; Lancee, Jaap; Beun, Robbert Jan; Neerincx, Mark A; Brinkman, Willem-Paul

    2015-09-04

    Several technologies have been proposed to support the reduction of insomnia complaints. A user-centered assessment of these technologies could provide insight into underlying factors related to treatment adherence. Gaining insight into adherence to technology-mediated insomnia treatment as a solid base for improving those adherence rates by applying adherence-enhancing strategies. Adherence to technology-mediated sleep products was studied in three ways. First, a meta-analysis was performed to investigate adherence rates in technology-mediated insomnia therapy. Several databases were queried for technology-mediated insomnia treatments. After inclusion and exclusion steps, data from 18 studies were retrieved and aggregated to find an average adherence rate. Next, 15 semistructured interviews about sleep-support technologies were conducted to investigate perceived adherence. Lastly, several scenarios were written about the usage of a virtual sleep coach that could support adherence rates. The scenarios were discussed in six different focus groups consisting of potential users (n=15), sleep experts (n=7), and coaches (n=9). From the meta-analysis, average treatment adherence appeared to be approximately 52% (95% CI 43%-61%) for technology-mediated insomnia treatments. This means that, on average, half of the treatment exercises were not executed, suggesting there is a substantial need for adherence and room for improvement in this area. However, the users in the interviews believed they adhered quite well to their sleep products. Users mentioned relying on personal commitment (ie, willpower) for therapy adherence. Participants of the focus groups reconfirmed their belief in the effectiveness of personal commitment, which they regarded as more effective than adherence-enhancing strategies. Although adherence rates for insomnia interventions indicate extensive room for improvement, users might not consider adherence to be a problem; they believe willpower to be an

  13. Learning Circles: A Collaborative Technology-Mediated Peer-Teaching Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Kevin; Marshall, Kevin; Tangney, Brendan

    2015-01-01

    This research study explores peer teaching and learning without a domain expert teacher, within the context of an activity where teams of second level students (~16 years old) are required to create a learning experience for their peers. The study looks at how participants would like to be taught and how they would teach their peers if given the…

  14. TECHNOLOGIES AND PEDAGOGICAL MEDIATION IN DISTANCE HIGHER EDUCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vilma Geni Slomsk

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated of the limits and possibilities of the pedagogical use of technologies in distance higher education according to the perceptions of professors working um a regular accounting course. Qualitative-descriptive research was done, with data collected by means of an online questionnaire with open-questions and then analyzed by means of content analysis. The following benefits of Distance Higher Education, according to the professors, were found: “the access to higher education”, “flexibility of time and physical space”, “student´s self-discipline and self-learning”. As critical points, they mentioned “lack of an online educational background of professors and students” and the “difficulty promoting professor/student interaction”. As a challenge, the professors mentioned “dealing with the absence of a direct relationship professor/student”, that is, the “face-toface situation", which is common in a classroom; the use of strategies and resources that promote the exchange of experiences and interaction”, the “student´s profile”, “lack of student´s maturity”, “self-discipline”. Therefore, it is concluded that digital media are also regarded by professors as mere instructional tools, which a fact that makes a more critical understanding of technologies and the use of their full potential, especially as a way of cultural expression and production.

  15. An Investigation into the Role of Mobile Technology in Collaborative Disease Management for Persons Living with Type 2 Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Sultan

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes and other chronic non-communicable diseases represent a leading threat to health care and human development. The authors discusses how mobile technology can achieve collaborative disease management (CDM within a population living with Type 2 diabetes. We introduces a framework for CDM using mobile technologies. While it can be applied to the management of any disease, we describe a specific instance for diabetes peer-support. In this paper, we validate the framework through the development and testing of a Mobile Health initiative called Mobile Diabetes Self-Management Support (DSMS. It allows persons living with diabetes to learn from each others’ experiences through a virtual support group. The paper presents two user studies conducted. The first study captured the participants’ initial perceptions of the application in a controlled environment and the second study investigated system usage and collaboration when the application was used in their personal settings.

  16. Progress of cereal transformation technology mediated by Agrobacterium tumefaciens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiei, Yukoh; Ishida, Yuji; Komari, Toshihiko

    2014-01-01

    Monocotyledonous plants were believed to be not transformable by the soil bacterium Agrobacterium tumefaciens until two decades ago, although convenient protocols for infection of leaf disks and subsequent regeneration of transgenic plants had been well established in a number of dicotyledonous species by then. This belief was reinforced by the fact that monocotyledons are mostly outside the host range of crown gall disease caused by the bacterium and by the failures in trials in monocotyledons to mimic the transformation protocols for dicotyledons. However, a key reason for the failure could have been the lack of active cell divisions at the wound sites in monocotyledons. The complexity and narrow optimal windows of critical factors, such as genotypes of plants, conditions of the plants from which explants are prepared, tissue culture methods and culture media, pre-treatments of explants, strains of A. tumefaciens, inducers of virulence genes, transformation vectors, selection marker genes and selective agents, kept technical hurdles high. Eventually it was demonstrated that rice and maize could be transformed by co-cultivating cells of callus cultures or immature embryos, which are actively dividing or about to divide, with A. tumefaciens. Subsequently, these initial difficulties were resolved one by one by many research groups, and the major cereals are now transformed quite efficiently. As many as 15 independent transgenic events may be regenerated from a single piece of immature embryo of rice. Maize transformation protocols are well established, and almost all transgenic events deregulated for commercialization after 2003 were generated by Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. Wheat, barley, and sorghum are also among those plants that can be efficiently transformed by A. tumefaciens.

  17. Progress of cereal transformation technology mediated by Agrobacterium tumefaciens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiei, Yukoh; Ishida, Yuji; Komari, Toshihiko

    2014-01-01

    Monocotyledonous plants were believed to be not transformable by the soil bacterium Agrobacterium tumefaciens until two decades ago, although convenient protocols for infection of leaf disks and subsequent regeneration of transgenic plants had been well established in a number of dicotyledonous species by then. This belief was reinforced by the fact that monocotyledons are mostly outside the host range of crown gall disease caused by the bacterium and by the failures in trials in monocotyledons to mimic the transformation protocols for dicotyledons. However, a key reason for the failure could have been the lack of active cell divisions at the wound sites in monocotyledons. The complexity and narrow optimal windows of critical factors, such as genotypes of plants, conditions of the plants from which explants are prepared, tissue culture methods and culture media, pre-treatments of explants, strains of A. tumefaciens, inducers of virulence genes, transformation vectors, selection marker genes and selective agents, kept technical hurdles high. Eventually it was demonstrated that rice and maize could be transformed by co-cultivating cells of callus cultures or immature embryos, which are actively dividing or about to divide, with A. tumefaciens. Subsequently, these initial difficulties were resolved one by one by many research groups, and the major cereals are now transformed quite efficiently. As many as 15 independent transgenic events may be regenerated from a single piece of immature embryo of rice. Maize transformation protocols are well established, and almost all transgenic events deregulated for commercialization after 2003 were generated by Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. Wheat, barley, and sorghum are also among those plants that can be efficiently transformed by A. tumefaciens. PMID:25426132

  18. Progress of cereal transformation technology mediated by Agrobacterium tumefaciens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yukoh eHiei

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Monocotyledonous plants were believed to be not transformable by the soil bacterium Agrobacterium tumefaciens until two decades ago, although convenient protocols for infection of leaf disks and subsequent regeneration of transgenic plants had been well established in a number of dicotyledonous species by then. This belief was reinforced by the fact that monocotyledons are mostly outside the host range of crown gall disease caused by the bacterium and by the failures in trials in monocotyledons to mimic the transformation protocols for dicotyledons. However, a key reason for the failure could have been the lack of active cell divisions at the wound sites, which are the basis of tissue culture and transformation in dicotyledons, in monocotyledons. The complexity and narrow optimal windows of critical factors, such as genotypes of plants, conditions of the plants from which explants are prepared, tissue culture methods and culture media, pre-treatments of explants, strains of A. tumefaciens, inducers of virulence genes, transformation vectors, selection marker genes and selective agents, kept technical hurdles high. Eventually it was determined that rice and maize could be transformed by co-cultivating cells of callus cultures or immature embryos, which are actively dividing or about to divide, with A. tumefaciens. Subsequently, these initial difficulties were resolved one by one by many research groups, and the major cereals are now transformed quite efficiently. As many as 15 independent transgenic events may be regenerated from a single piece of immature embryo of rice. Maize transformation protocols are well established, and almost all transgenic events deregulated for commercialization after 2003 were generated by Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. Wheat, barley and sorghum are also among those plants that can be efficiently transformed by A. tumefaciens.

  19. Mediated collaborative learning as a strategy for the development of skills: an experience with residents of Teachers of Mathematics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa Rita MAENZA

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available 0 0 1 126 693 Instituto Universitario de Ciencias de la Educación 5 1 818 14.0 Normal 0 21 false false false ES JA X-NONE /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Tabla normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin-top:0cm; mso-para-margin-right:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:10.0pt; mso-para-margin-left:0cm; line-height:115%; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-ansi-language:ES; mso-fareast-language:EN-US;} The implementation of technologies as teaching resources used in education involves the development of different skills among which are: meeting new models of communication, knowing different ways to manipulate information, to use various content delivery formats and work interacting collaboratively. This need to demand the teaching to updated, but in turn, is essential to incorporate these activities in teacher training courses. Trying to provide an experience in this line, this paper presents a novel variant applied of residence of Teachers of Mathematics, Faculty of Sciences, Engineering and Surveying of the Universidad Nacional de Rosario. This is the realization of a shared task involving an area of knowledge management, socialization, and use of technology and virtual space using the tools of Web 2.0.

  20. Measuring the Impact of a Moving Target: Towards a Dynamic Framework for Evaluating Collaborative Adaptive Interactive Technologies

    OpenAIRE

    O?Grady, Laura; Witteman, Holly; Bender, Jacqueline L; Urowitz, Sara; Wiljer, David; Jadad, Alejandro R

    2009-01-01

    Background Website evaluation is a key issue for researchers, organizations, and others responsible for designing, maintaining, endorsing, approving, and/or assessing the use and impact of interventions designed to influence health and health services. Traditionally, these evaluations have included elements such as content credibility, interface usability, and overall design aesthetics. With the emergence of collaborative, adaptive, and interactive ("Web 2.0") technologies such as wikis and o...

  1. Collaborative and distributed e-research: innovations in technologies, strategies, and applications

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Juan, Angel A

    2012-01-01

    "This book offers insight into practical and methodological issues related to collaborative e-research and furthers readers understanding of current and future trends in online research and the types...

  2. Culture's Impact on Technology Mediated Learning: The Role of Horizontal and Vertical Individualism and Collectivism

    OpenAIRE

    Steven Hornik; Anna Tupchiy

    2006-01-01

    The horizontal and vertical dimensions of individualism and collectivism are an important characteristic of cultures. These dimensions have many implications for the ways in which individual learners use and respond to interactive technologies. This article reports on a study that investigated the impact of culture, specifically horizontal individualism (HI), vertical individualism (VI), horizontal collectivism (HC), and vertical collectivism (VC) on the effectiveness of technology mediated l...

  3. Grandma's Games Project: Bridging Tradition and Technology Mediated Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Vasileva

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available This article presents a project entitled "Grandma’s games", following a research idea to enrich the educational process of K9 students by introducing the traditional children games of our ancestors in the learning environment, revived and adapted for modern students with the aid of information and communication technology. While creating a strong connection between our heritage and the modern educational trends, the project’s intention goes beyond mere fulfilment of educational goals, striving to increase the interest and motivation of primary education students to develop their creativity and originality while learning, with respect of their own personal preferences and cultural heritage. The "Grandma’s games" research project engaged twelve traditional games in the educational activities at primary schools from both rural and non-rural environments in Republic of Macedonia. Descriptive statistics was applied on the data set sampled from the extensive survey conducted among teachers in these schools, to illustrate the benefits from the application of the Grandma’s games in educational process.

  4. Technology Mediated Instruction and its Effect on Cognitive Scaffolding, motivation and Academic Performance in EFL Context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sepideh Berenji

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Technology mediated learning brings together the users with shared interests. This method makes learners informally engaged in language learning. This study intended to investigate the effect of technology mediated instruction on cognitive scaffolding, academic performance and motivation. Employing a quasi-experimental research, 80 learners from two intact classes at Islamic Azad University, Osku Branch were selected as the experimental and control groups. Telegram as a tool was used in the experimental group, while the control group received traditional way of instruction. Critical ethnography approach was implemented to consider the amount of cognitive scaffolding. To measure the students’ motivational level in both groups, Course Interest Survey (CIS was administered at the end of the semester. The total average score for each group was calculated. To compare students’ academic achievement, their average scores in the final academic test were considered. An Independent samples t-test in was used to compare the mean scores. The results indicated that technology mediated learning brought about cognitive scaffolding and the students in the experimental group outperformed the control group in terms of motivation and academic achievement. The results of the study suggest that to bring about academically successful students, practitioners should use technology mediated instruction.

  5. The Technological Mediation of Morality - A Post-Phenomenological Approach to Moral Subjectivity and Moral Objectivity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verbeek, Peter P.C.C.

    2007-01-01

    This paper analyzes the moral relevance of technological artifacts and its possible role in ethical theory, by taking the postphenomenological approach that has developed around the work of Don Ihde into the domain of ethics. By elaborating a postphenomenological analysis of the mediating role of

  6. Swift Guanxi in online marketplace : The role of computer-mediated-communication technologies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ou, C.X.J.; Pavlou, P.A.; Davison, R.M.

    2014-01-01

    The concept of guanxi (i.e., a close and pervasive interpersonal relationship) has received little attention in the literature on online marketplaces, perhaps due to their impersonal nature. However, we propose that computer-mediated communication (CMC) technologies can mimic traditional interactive

  7. Exploring How Technology Mediates the Types of Relationships Formed in Sociotechnical Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Kar-Hai

    2012-01-01

    This work presents an exploratory study of how technology mediates the different types of relationships that are formed in sociotechnical systems. More people each day are connecting with each other through social networks, online communities, and other forms of virtual environments. Whether for education, information seeking, friendship,…

  8. Internet-Mediated Technologies and Mixed Methods Research: Problems and Prospects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesse-Biber, Sharlene; Griffin, Amy J.

    2013-01-01

    This article provides an examination of a range of mixed methods research projects that employ Internet-mediated technologies (IMT) for data collection. Using a case study approach, this article allows for the uncovering of a process by which IMT are used as a data collection medium in mixed methods praxis. Under the theoretical position of medium…

  9. Between Assessments, Digital Technologies and Big Data: The Growing Influence of "Hidden" Data Mediators in Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartong, Sigrid

    2016-01-01

    The past few decades have witnessed a global enforcement of "governance by data" in education policy, including a significant increase of assessments and quantified evaluation. Within this context, this article focuses particularly on the intensifying evolvement of new (digital) information technologies and "mediated"…

  10. Rawls's Wide Reflective Equilibrium as a Method for Engaged Interdisciplinary Collaboration: Potentials and Limitations for the Context of Technological Risks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doorn, Neelke; Taebi, Behnam

    2018-05-01

    The introduction of new technologies in society is sometimes met with public resistance. Supported by public policy calls for "upstream engagement" and "responsible innovation," recent years have seen a notable rise in attempts to attune research and innovation processes to societal needs, so that stakeholders' concerns are taken into account in the design phase of technology. Both within the social sciences and in the ethics of technology, we see many interdisciplinary collaborations being initiated that aim to address tensions between various normative expectations about science and engineering and the actual outcomes. However, despite pleas to integrate social science research into the ethics of technology, effective normative models for assessing technologies are still scarce. Rawls's wide reflective equilibrium (WRE) is often mentioned as a promising approach to integrate insights from the social sciences in the normative analysis of concrete cases, but an in-depth discussion of how this would work in practice is still lacking. In this article, we explore to what extent the WRE method can be used in the context of technology development. Using cases in engineering and technology development, we discuss three issues that are currently neglected in the applied ethics literature on WRE. The first issue concerns the operationalization of abstract background theories to moral principles. The second issue concerns the inclusiveness of the method and the demand for openness. The third issue is how to establish whether or not an equilibrium has been reached. These issues should be taken into account when applying the methods to real-world cases involving technological risks. Applying the WRE method in the context of engaged interdisciplinary collaboration requires sensitivity for issues of power and representativeness to properly deal with the dynamics between the technical and normative researchers involved as well as society at large.

  11. Collaboration Among Institutions to Bring Geospatial Technology to an Underserved Rural Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, T.

    2012-12-01

    The University of Maine at Machias and Washington County Community College, the two smallest and most remote public institutions in Maine, provide important education and workforce development services in a rural and economically-challenged region. Through an innovative collaboration supported by the National Science Foundation, the two institutions have developed geospatial technology (GST) programs designed to meet the specific workforce needs of the region, affording students with the opportunity to pursue degrees, certificates and minors. Prior to this effort, neither school had the resources to maintain a GST laboratory or to offer courses consistently. The region had almost no GST capacity with which to manage critical environmental resources and grapple with economic, public safety, and public health challenges. Several statewide studies had shown a growing need for more GST technicians and training for incumbent workers. The new programs are designed to produce a small number of specialist technicians with associate's degrees and a large number of ancillary users with significant GST expertise from courses, certificates or minors. Course content is shaped by workforce research in Maine and elsewhere, and all courses are offered in either blended, online or short-term intensive formats to provide access to incumbent workers and extend the geographic reach of the programs. Through the university's Geographic Information Systems (GIS) Service Center, students from both institutions engage in real-world projects, and are linked with employers via internships. This has the added plus of providing low-cost and no-cost GIS services to area clients, generating demand. Many of these projects and internships lead to work for graduates, even through the economic downturn. By creating courses that serve multiple audiences, each contributing a small number to the total enrollment, the programs constitute a sustainable model that serves the growing needs of the region

  12. Unbalanced international collaboration affects adversely the usefulness of countries' scientific output as well as their technological and social impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanotto, Sonia R; Haeffner, Cristina; Guimarães, Jorge A

    The unbalanced international scientific collaboration as cause of misleading information on the country's contribution to the scientific world output was analyzed. ESI Data Base (Thomson Reuters' InCites), covering the scientific production of 217 active countries in the period 2010-2014 was used. International collaboration implicates in a high percentage (33.1 %) of double-counted world articles, thus impacting qualitative data as citations, impact and impact relative to word. The countries were divided into three groups, according to their individual contribution to the world publications: Group I (24 countries, at least 1 %) representing 83.9 % of the total double-counted world articles. Group II (40 countries, 0.1-0.99 % each). Group III, 153 countries (70.5 %) with international collaboration were: Group I, 43.0 %; Group II, 55.8 % and Group III, 85.2 %. We concluded that very high and unbalanced international collaboration, as presented by many countries, misrepresent the importance of their scientific production, technological and social outputs. Furthermore, it jeopardizes qualitative outputs of the countries themselves, artificially increasing their scientific impact, affecting all fields and therefore, the whole world. The data confirm that when dealing with the qualitative contribution of countries, it is necessary to take in consideration the level of international cooperation because, as seen here, it can and in fact it does create false impression of the real contribution of countries.

  13. The Mediating Role of Knowledge Sharing on Information Technology and Innovation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Onwika Kaewchur

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to investigate the relationship between information technology, knowledge sharing, and a firm’s innovation. Knowledge sharing as a mediating effect is also simultaneously investigated with regard to the relationship between information technology and a firm’s innovation. In this research, the quantitative method was mainly employed. The data was collected with a survey. A total of 224 respondents from herbal manufacturing companies were included in the research. The results presented in this paper demonstrate that knowledge sharing and information technology can critically influence the organization’s innovation and can play a vital role as a significant success factor in this process.

  14. International energy technology collaboration and climate change mitigation. Case study 2. Cooperation in Agriculture. R and D on High-Yielding Crop Varieties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gagnon-Lebrun, F. [Global and Structural Policies Division, Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development OECD, Paris (France)

    2004-07-01

    Mitigating climate change and achieving stabilisation of greenhouse gas atmospheric concentrations will require deep reductions in global emissions of energy-related carbon dioxide emissions. Developing and disseminating new, low-carbon energy technology will thus be needed. Two previous AIXG papers have focused on possible drivers for such a profound technological change: Technology Innovation, Development and Diffusion, released in June 2003, and International Energy Technology Collaboration and Climate Change Mitigation, released in June 2004. The first of these papers assesses a broad range of technical options for reducing energy-related CO2 emissions. It examines how technologies evolve and the role of research and development efforts, alternative policies, and short-term investment decisions in making long-term options available. It considers various policy tools that may induce technological change, some very specific, and others with broader expected effects. Its overall conclusion is that policies specifically designed to promote technical change, or 'technology push', could play a critical role in making available and affordable new energy technologies. However, such policies would not be sufficient to achieve the Convention's objective in the absence of broader policies. First, because there is a large potential for cuts that could be achieved in the short run with existing technologies; and second, the development of new technologies requires a market pull as much as a technology push. The second paper considers the potential advantages and disadvantages of international energy technology collaboration and transfer for promoting technological change. Advantages of collaboration may consist of lowering R and D costs and stimulating other countries to invest in R and D; disadvantage may include free-riding and the inefficiency of reaching agreement between many actors. This paper sets the context for further discussion on the role of

  15. Tapping into Graduate Students' Collaborative Technology Experience in a Research Methods Class: Insights on Teaching Research Methods in a Malaysian and American Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasquez-Colina, Maria D.; Maslin-Ostrowski, Pat; Baba, Suria

    2017-01-01

    This case study used qualitative and quantitative methods to investigate challenges of learning and teaching research methods by examining graduate students' use of collaborative technology (i.e., digital tools that enable collaboration and information seeking such as software and social media) and students' computer self-efficacy. We conducted…

  16. A Technology-Neutral Role-Based Collaboration Model for Software Ecosystems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stanciulescu, Stefan; Rabiser, Daniela; Seidl, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    by contributing a role-based collaboration model for software ecosystems to make such implicit similarities explicit and to raise awareness among developers during their ongoing efforts. We extract this model based on realization artifacts in a specific programming language located in a particular source code......In large-scale software ecosystems, many developers contribute extensions to a common software platform. Due to the independent development efforts and the lack of a central steering mechanism, similar functionality may be developed multiple times by different developers. We tackle this problem...... efforts and information of ongoing development efforts. Finally, using the collaborations defined in the formalism we model real artifacts from Marlin, a firmware for 3D printers, and we show that for the selected scenarios, the five collaborations were sufficient to raise awareness and make implicit...

  17. Strategic alliance for environmental restoration -- An innovative approach to government and industry collaboration for decontamination and decommissioning technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aker, R.E.

    1997-01-01

    The world's largest environmental cleanup effort is focused upon the DOE weapons complex. These cleanup efforts parallel those which will be required as the commercial nuclear industry reaches the end of licensed life. The Strategic Alliance for Environmental Restoration (Strategic Alliance), reflects the cooperative interest of industry, commercial nuclear utilities, university and national laboratory team members to bring a collaborative best-in-class approach to finding, and providing effective delivery of innovative environmental remediation technologies to the DOE Complex and subsequently to industry. The collaborative team of the Strategic Alliance includes ComEd, Duke Engineering and Services, 3M, ICF Kaiser, Florida International University, Argonne National Laboratory in concert with DOE. The Strategic Alliance approach to technology qualification and deployment provides DOE, through a Cooperative Agreement, with a new way of bringing industry principles to technology research and developed activities. This paper will describe the approach and activities the Strategic Alliance is taking to provide cost effective technology solutions to DOE/Industry needs for decontamination and decommissioning needs

  18. Mediatization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjarvard, Stig

    2017-01-01

    Mediatization research shares media effects studies' ambition of answering the difficult questions with regard to whether and how media matter and influence contemporary culture and society. The two approaches nevertheless differ fundamentally in that mediatization research seeks answers...... to these general questions by distinguishing between two concepts: mediation and mediatization. The media effects tradition generally considers the effects of the media to be a result of individuals being exposed to media content, i.e. effects are seen as an outcome of mediated communication. Mediatization...... research is concerned with long-term structural changes involving media, culture, and society, i.e. the influences of the media are understood in relation to how media are implicated in social and cultural changes and how these processes come to create new conditions for human communication and interaction...

  19. Review & Analysis: Technological Impact on Future Air Force Personnel & Training: Distributed Collaborative Decision-Making, Volume II. Non-Copyrighted Literature Search

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Palmer, Barbara

    1997-01-01

    ..., compared to that of a single individual. (2) The greatest detriment to collaborative distributed decision making is that we must rely on technology rather than face to face interactions, and subtleties of human communication may be lost. (3...

  20. Mobile Technology in Science Classrooms: Using iPad-Enabled Constructivist Learning to Promote Collaborative Problem Solving and Chemistry Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ting, Melodie Mirth G.

    Most recently, there has been a noticeable rise in the push for use of technology in the classroom. The advancement in digital science has increased greatly the capacity to explore animations, models, and interesting apps. that should substantially enhance science cognition. At the same time, there is a great need to increase collaboration in the science classroom. There is a concern that the collaborative experience will be lost with the use of technology in the classroom. This study seeks to explore the use of iPads in conjunction with a constructivist learning approach to promote student collaboration. The participants in this study included two sections of 11 th grade AP Chemistry students. Data was generated from different sources such as teacher observations of classroom interactions patterned after Gilles (2004). In order to gauge student perception of working in groups with the use of the iPad, survey questions adapted from Knezek, Mills and Wakefield (2012) and group interviews were used (Galleta, 2013). Learning outcomes were assessed using methods adapted from a study by Lord and Baviskar (2007). Findings of this study showed high percentages of evidence for increased community, productive student group communication, effective feedback through use of the iPads, and value of the interactive apps., but it also showed that students still preferred face-to-face interactions over virtual interactions for certain learning situations. The study showed good content learning outcomes, as well as favorable opinions among the students for the effectiveness of the use of iPads in collaborative settings in the classroom.

  1. The Benefits of Social Technology Use Among Older Adults Are Mediated by Reduced Loneliness

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Technology has the ability to enhance and enrich the lives of older adults by facilitating better interpersonal relationships. However, few studies have directly examined associations between technology use for social reasons and physical and psychological health among older adults. The current study examines the benefits of technology use in 591 older adults from the 2012 wave of the Health and Retirement Study (Mage = 68.18, SD = 10.75; 55.5% female). Social technology use was assessed through five technology-based behaviors (i.e., using e-mail, social networking sites, online video/phone calls, online chatting/instant messaging, using a smartphone). Attitudes toward the usability and benefits of technology use were also assessed. Older adults had generally positive attitudes toward technology. Higher social technology use was associated with better self-rated health, fewer chronic illnesses, higher subjective well-being, and fewer depressive symptoms. Furthermore, each of the links between social technology use and physical and psychological health was mediated by reduced loneliness. Close relationships are a large determinant of physical health and well-being, and technology has the potential to cultivate successful relationships among older adults. PMID:27541746

  2. The Benefits of Social Technology Use Among Older Adults Are Mediated by Reduced Loneliness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chopik, William J

    2016-09-01

    Technology has the ability to enhance and enrich the lives of older adults by facilitating better interpersonal relationships. However, few studies have directly examined associations between technology use for social reasons and physical and psychological health among older adults. The current study examines the benefits of technology use in 591 older adults from the 2012 wave of the Health and Retirement Study (Mage = 68.18, SD = 10.75; 55.5% female). Social technology use was assessed through five technology-based behaviors (i.e., using e-mail, social networking sites, online video/phone calls, online chatting/instant messaging, using a smartphone). Attitudes toward the usability and benefits of technology use were also assessed. Older adults had generally positive attitudes toward technology. Higher social technology use was associated with better self-rated health, fewer chronic illnesses, higher subjective well-being, and fewer depressive symptoms. Furthermore, each of the links between social technology use and physical and psychological health was mediated by reduced loneliness. Close relationships are a large determinant of physical health and well-being, and technology has the potential to cultivate successful relationships among older adults.

  3. Creating Joint Representations of Collaborative Problem Solving with Multi-Touch Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercier, E.; Higgins, S.

    2014-01-01

    Multi-touch surfaces have the potential to change the nature of computer-supported collaborative learning, allowing more equitable access to shared digital content. In this paper, we explore how large multi-touch tables can be used by groups of students as an external representation of their group interaction processes. Video data from 24 groups…

  4. Educational Technology Research Journals: "International Journal of Computer-Supported Collaborative Learning," 2006-2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howland, Shiloh M. J.; Martin, M. Troy; Bodily, Robert; Faulconer, Christian; West, Richard E.

    2015-01-01

    The authors analyzed all research articles from the first issue of the "International Journal of Computer-Supported Collaborative Learning" in 2006 until the second issue of 2014. They determined the research methodologies, most frequently used author-supplied keywords as well as two- and three-word phrases, and most frequently published…

  5. PhD students at Science & Technology exploring student learning in a collaborative video-circle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Birgitte Lund; Hougaard, Rikke F.

    examined using video, audio and questionnaires. The TAs reported a high level of outcomes and referred to the importance of the video as evidence supporting the discussions. The importance of the collaboration between peers and staff (educational developers) was emphasized: highlighting the benefit...

  6. Vygotsky Meets Technology: A Reinvention of Collaboration in the Early Childhood Mathematics Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cicconi, Megan

    2014-01-01

    With the advent of Web 2.0, Vygotsky's traditional role of the more knowledgeable other (MKO) has been transformed. This transformation shifts the power of a facilitator of learning from an elite group of MKOs to all students. Such a transformation possesses significant value in the early childhood mathematics classroom where collaboration is…

  7. Distance Education Faculty and Librarian Collaboration: Developing Technological Skills of School Librarian Candidates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrott, Deborah J.; Anderson, Joanna M.

    2015-01-01

    LibGuides, as a method of creating pathfinders for instruction of information literacy and content management has long been used by academic libraries, but has not been widely used by school libraries. This article describes a collaborative plan between a distance education librarian and a professor of school library media using LibGuides to…

  8. One Screen, Many Fingers: Young Children's Collaborative Literacy Play with Digital Puppetry Apps and Touchscreen Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wohlwend, Karen E.

    2015-01-01

    This article examines the digital literacy practices that emerge when young children play together with digital apps on touchscreen devices. Children's collaborative composing with a digital puppetry app on a touchscreen--with many hands all busy dragging, resizing, and animating puppet characters, and many voices making sound effects, narrating,…

  9. Collaborative Environments. Considerations Concerning Some Collaborative Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihaela I. MUNTEAN

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available It is obvious, that all collaborative environments (workgroups, communities of practice, collaborative enterprises are based on knowledge and between collaboration and knowledge management there is a strong interdependence. The evolution of information systems in these collaborative environments led to the sudden necessity to adopt, for maintaining the virtual activities and processes, the latest technologies/systems, which are capable to support integrated collaboration in business services. In these environments, portal-based IT platforms will integrate multi-agent collaborative systems, collaborative tools, different enterprise applications and other useful information systems.

  10. Ship Technology Workshop Materials from Collaboration with Mexico to Reduce Emissions from Ships

    Science.gov (United States)

    On September 26, 2012, a ship technology seminar was held to provide Mexican stakeholders with information about some of the ship technologies needed to meet the requirements of MARPOL Annex VI and an ECA.

  11. Collaborative Middle School Geometry through Blogs and Other Web 2.0 Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossain, Mokter; Wiest, Lynda R.

    2013-01-01

    This paper explores the use of blogs, a simple application of Web 2.0 technologies, in middle school geometry instruction. Specifically, it provides an overview of the interactive features of Web 2.0 technologies and the feasibility of using Web 2.0 technologies in geometry teaching and learning, as well as a proposed model for creating a…

  12. A Study to Promote a Collaboration of R and D for Nuclear Energy Technology Development between Korea and Kazakhstan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryh, Sipyo; Kim, Cheoljung; Yoo, Bungduk; Lee, Yongjoo; Kim, Hansoo; Yoon, Sungwon; Jeong, Hwansam; Jeong, Gijung

    2005-01-15

    The ultimate goal of this investigation to promote a collaboration of R and D for Nuclear Energy Technology Development between Korea and Kazakhstan. To understand the research power of the Kazakhstan, we visited the INP(Institute of Nuclear Physics) which is one of the branch of Nation Cuclear Center-Repunlic Kazakhstan. We presented the present status of the nuclear energy related research in KAERI. The director of international cooperation in the ministry of Mineral resources, the director of INP and vice director of IAE had visited KAERI, KIRAM and discussed about potential cooperation in nuclear research related field.

  13. AN EVALUATION AND IMPLEMENTATION OF COLLABORATIVE AND SOCIAL NETWORKING TECHNOLOGIES FOR COMPUTER EDUCATION

    OpenAIRE

    Ronnie Cheung; Calvin Wan

    2011-01-01

    We have developed a collaborative and social networking environment that integrates the knowledge and skills in communication and computing studies with a multimedia development project. The outcomes of the students’ projects show that computer literacy can be enhanced through a cluster of communication, social, and digital skills. Experience in implementing a web-based social networking environment shows that the new media is an effective means of enriching knowledge by sharing in computer l...

  14. Learners perceptions of technology for design of a collaborative mLearning module

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorothy Dewitt, Saedah Siraj

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available In Malaysian schools the learning of science does not reflect the nature of science. An instructional module which could address the need for teaching science through a process of scientific discovery and collaboration is required. A developmental research approach with three phases was used to design a collaborative m-Learning module for a topic in s c i e n c e . I n t h e f i r s t p h a s e o f a n a l y s i s , a s u r v e y o f 1 5 8 s t u d e n t s ’ u s e o f t e c h n o l o g y a n d t h e p e r c e p t i o n o f t h e u s e o f computers and mobile phones was completed. Data from the analysis phase indicated the students’ readiness in using online tools such as discussion forums and text messaging with mobiles for learning. Computers were perceived to be useful for learning, but mobile phones were not. The findings from the first phase were used to determine the learning tools to utilize in the design of the module in the second phase. The online learning tools used are wikis and discussion forums. In addition, text messaging using the mobile phone was also employed for individualized quizzes. The collaborative m-Learning module designed, was evaluated by experts for further improvements. The findings indicate that the experts agree that a collaborative Learning module with a variety of learning tools such as wikis, discussion forum and text messaging, could be used for teaching science. In addition, this module could also be used for teaching other subjects.

  15. Islet Transplantation without Borders Enabling islet transplantation in Greece with international collaboration and innovative technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papas, Klearchos K; Karatzas, Theodore; Berney, Thierry; Minor, Thomas; Pappas, Paris; Pattou, François; Shaw, James; Toso, Christian; Schuurman, Henk-Jan

    2012-01-01

    Recently, initiatives have been undertaken to establish an islet transplantation program in Athens, Greece. A major hurtle is the high cost associated with the establishment and maintenance of a clinical-grade islet manufacturing center. A collaboration was established with the University Hospitals of Geneva, Switzerland, to enable remote islet cell manufacturing with an established and validated fully operational team. However, remote islet manufacturing requires shipment of the pancreas from the procurement to the islet manufacturing site (in this case from anywhere in Greece to Geneva) and then shipment of the islets from the manufacturing site to the transplant site (from Geneva to Athens). To address challenges related to cold ischemia time of the pancreas and shipment time of islets, a collaboration was initiated with the University of Arizona, Tucson, USA. An international workshop was held in Athens, December 2011, to mark the start of this collaborative project. Experts in the field presented in three main sessions: [1] Islet transplantation: state-of-the-art, and the “network approach”; [2] Technical aspects of clinical islet transplantation and outcomes; and [3] Islet manufacturing – from the donated pancreas to the islet product. This manuscript presents a summary of the workshop. PMID:23330863

  16. AN EVALUATION AND IMPLEMENTATION OF COLLABORATIVE AND SOCIAL NETWORKING TECHNOLOGIES FOR COMPUTER EDUCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronnie Cheung

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available We have developed a collaborative and social networking environment that integrates the knowledge and skills in communication and computing studies with a multimedia development project. The outcomes of the students’ projects show that computer literacy can be enhanced through a cluster of communication, social, and digital skills. Experience in implementing a web-based social networking environment shows that the new media is an effective means of enriching knowledge by sharing in computer literacy projects. The completed assignments, projects, and self-reflection reports demonstrate that the students were able to achieve the learning outcomes of a computer literacy course in multimedia development. The students were able to assess the effectiveness of a variety of media through the development of media presentations in a web-based, social-networking environment. In the collaborative and social-networking environment, students were able to collaborate and communicate with their team members to solve problems, resolve conflicts, make decisions, and work as a team to complete tasks. Our experience has shown that social networking environments are effective for computer literacy education, and the development of the new media is emerging as the core knowledge for computer literacy education.

  17. Process is king: Evaluating the performance of technology-mediated learning in vocational software training

    OpenAIRE

    Söllner, Matthias; Bitzer, Philipp; Janson, Andreas; Leimeister, Jan Marco

    2017-01-01

    Technology-mediated learning (TML) is a major trend in education, since it allows to integrate the strengths of traditional- and IT-based learning activities. However, TML providers still struggle in identifying areas for improvement in their TML offerings. One reason for their struggles is inconsistencies in the literature regarding drivers of TML performance. Prior research suggests that these inconsistencies in TML literature might stem from neglecting the importance of considering the pro...

  18. Digital technologies and their impact on Higher Education. The new mediations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan de Pablos Pons

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available This work proposes a reflection on the evolution of media in the digital age, requires us to advance in knowledge about mediation and remediation processes, favored by technologies, differentiating them from those generated so far by traditional analogue media (printed book, film, television. Digitization has given rise to new realities and proposals, such as video games, social networks or augmented reality applications. The next step in our media culture is the multiplication and continuous diversification of formats, but also new forms of mediated interaction. The mediation processes generated contribute to the modification of communication models and teaching methods. And this has an impact on educational institutions, and also on higher education. As a contribution to its analysis, the concept of technological remediation is provided and defined. The new information and communication technologies (ICT represent, under the considerations formulated here, an opportunity for change some forms and procedures of main areas of the higher education: teaching, research and management. Being proactive in this new reality is relevant, since the adaptation effort is linked to the survival of the university itself.

  19. Music Technology-Mediated Teaching and Learning Approach for Music Education: A Case Study from an Elementary School in South Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eunjin

    2013-01-01

    This study aims to show how music technology mediated (or music software mediated) music teaching and learning can provide an effective pedagogy in music education. It also seeks to demonstrate that music technology mediated teaching is in accordance with socio-educational trends for both postmodern values and IT mediated learning. The new…

  20. Methods, strategies and technologies used to conduct a scoping literature review of collaboration between primary care and public health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valaitis, Ruta; Martin-Misener, Ruth; Wong, Sabrina T; MacDonald, Marjorie; Meagher-Stewart, Donna; Austin, Patricia; Kaczorowski, Janusz; O-Mara, Linda; Savage, Rachel

    2012-07-01

    This paper describes the methods, strategies and technologies used to conduct a scoping literature review examining primary care (PC) and public health (PH) collaboration. It presents challenges encountered as well as recommendations and 'lessons learned' from conducting the review with a large geographically distributed team comprised of researchers and decision-makers using an integrated knowledge translation approach. Scoping studies comprehensively map literature in a specific area guided by general research questions. This methodology is especially useful in researching complex topics. Thus, their popularity is growing. Stakeholder consultations are an important strategy to enhance study results. Therefore, information about how best to involve stakeholders throughout the process is necessary to improve quality and uptake of reviews. This review followed Arksey and O'Malley's five stages: identifying research questions; identifying relevant studies; study selection; charting the data; and collating, summarizing and reporting results. Technological tools and strategies included: citation management software (Reference Manager®), qualitative data analysis software (NVivo 8), web conferencing (Elluminate Live!) and a PH portal (eHealthOntario), teleconferences, email and face-to-face meetings. Of 6125 papers identified, 114 were retained as relevant. Most papers originated in the United Kingdom (38%), the United States (34%) and Canada (19%). Of 80 papers that reported on specific collaborations, most were descriptive reports (51.3%). Research studies represented 34 papers: 31% were program evaluations, 9% were literature reviews and 9% were discussion papers. Key strategies to ensure rigor in conducting a scoping literature review while engaging a large geographically dispersed team are presented for each stage. The use of enabling technologies was essential to managing the process. Leadership in championing the use of technologies and a clear governance

  1. Leveraging 3D Technology for Students with Autism: An innovative university-community collaboration for skill development and vocational exploration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheryl A Wright

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This article describes a university-community collaboration in which an inter-professional team partnered to provide students with autism spectrum disorder (ASD a paid job opportunity to apply 3D modelling skills for a local construction company. Providing meaningful vocational opportunities to improve the transition to adulthood for individuals with ASD is imperative, as individuals with ASD have unemployment rates that are some of the highest of all disabilities. This novel evidence-supported educational program was designed to develop 3D technology skills, explore vocational careers and promote social engagement through shared interests for transition-age youth with ASD. Both parents and students reported many successful outcomes, including increase in student self-confidence, social and technology skill development and the opportunity for vocational exploration by these young people. Implications of the case study are reported in relation to university-community partnerships and the critical role of community collaboration in addressing the high rates of unemployment in individuals with autism.

  2. Developing technological pedagogical content knowledge in pre-service mathematics teachers through collaborative design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Agyei, D.D.; Voogt, Joke

    2012-01-01

    Although many studies have shown the need to pay attention to teachers' preparation for the integration of technology in classroom practice, most teachers in Ghana have not had any preparation that develops their technological pedagogical content knowledge (TPCK).This paper presents a case study of

  3. The Right Tools for the Job--Technology Options for Adult Online Learning and Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regional Educational Laboratory, 2014

    2014-01-01

    Many options exist for using technology as a tool for adult learning, and each day, it becomes easier to share information online than it ever has been. Online learning technology has grown from one-sided communications to numerous options for audience engagement and interactivity. This guide introduces a variety of tools, online platforms, and…

  4. A Novel Collaborative Protocol for Successful Management of Penile Pain Mediated by Radiculitis of Sacral Spinal Nerve Roots From Tarlov Cysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Irwin; Komisaruk, Barry R; Rubin, Rachel S; Goldstein, Sue W; Elliott, Stacy; Kissee, Jennifer; Kim, Choll W

    2017-09-01

    Since 14 years of age, the patient had experienced extreme penile pain within seconds of initial sexual arousal through masturbation. Penile pain was so severe that he rarely proceeded to orgasm or ejaculation. After 7 years of undergoing multiple unsuccessful treatments, he was concerned for his long-term mental health and for his future ability to have relationships. To describe a novel collaboration among specialists in sexual medicine, neurophysiology, and spine surgery that led to successful management. Collaborating health care providers conferred with the referring physician, patient, and parents and included a review of all medical records. Elimination of postpubertal intense penile pain during sexual arousal. The patient presented to our sexual medicine facility at 21 years of age. The sexual medicine physician identifying the sexual health complaint noted a pelvic magnetic resonance imaging report of an incidental sacral Tarlov cyst. A subsequent sacral magnetic resonance image showed four sacral Tarlov cysts, with the largest measuring 18 mm. Neuro-genital testing result were abnormal. The neurophysiologist hypothesized the patient's pain at erection was produced by Tarlov cyst-induced neuropathic irritation of sensory fibers that course within the pelvic nerve. The spine surgeon directed a diagnostic injection of bupivacaine to the sacral nerve roots and subsequently morphine to the conus medullaris of the spinal cord. The bupivacaine produced general penile numbness; the morphine selectively decreased penile pain symptoms during sexual arousal without blocking penile skin sensation. The collaboration among specialties led to the conclusion that the Tarlov cysts were pathophysiologically mediating the penile pain symptoms during arousal. Long-term follow-up after surgical repair showed complete symptom elimination at 18 months after treatment. This case provides evidence that (i) Tarlov cysts can cause sacral spinal nerve root radiculitis through

  5. A Study on intensifying efficiency for international collaborative development of Advanced Nuclear Energy Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Moon Hee; Kim, H. R.; Kim, H. J.

    2009-08-01

    The objective of the study was to participate the GIF for the efficient propulsion of future nuclear system development. For achieving the objective of this study, the followings were carried out. · Investigation and analysis of the international and domestic trends related to future nuclear system · To maximize the national interests by the strategic participation of GIF meeting - To participate of GIF meeting and to support of relative work - To investigate the System R and D Arrangement and to inform its progress situation · To maximize the propulsion results of Korea/U.S nuclear energy joint research(I-NERI) - To support a delegation by the review of agenda in aspect of the technical/legal point - To participate of BINERIC meeting and to support of relative work · Streamline the nuclear energy R and D due to the effective connection between domestic R and D and international collaboration The result of this study may be used for 1) contribution to establishing the effective foundation and broadening the cooperation activities between the advanced countries and Korea and 2) contribution effective management of Gen IV international collaboration by technical/legal supporting

  6. Supporting Teachers Learning Through the Collaborative Design of Technology-Enhanced Science Lessons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kafyulilo, A.C.; Fisser, P.; Voogt, J.

    2015-01-01

    This study used the Interconnected Model of Professional Growth (Clarke & Hollingsworth in Teaching and Teacher Education, 18, 947-967, 2002) to unravel how science teachers’ technology integration knowledge and skills developed in a professional development arrangement. The professional development

  7. Incorporating Wiki Technology in a Traditional Biostatistics Course: Effects on University Students’ Collaborative Learning, Approaches to Learning and Course Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shirley S.M. Fong

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Aim/Purpose: To investigate the effectiveness of incorporating wiki technology in an under-graduate biostatistics course for improving university students’ collaborative learning, approaches to learning, and course performance. Methodology: During a three year longitudinal study, twenty-one and twenty-four undergraduate students were recruited by convenience sampling and assigned to a wiki group (2014-2015 and a control group (2013-2014 and 2015-2016, respectively. The students in the wiki group attended face-to-face lectures and used a wiki (PBworks weekly for online- group discussion, and the students in the control group had no access to the wiki and interacted face-to-face only. The students’ collaborative learning, approaches to learning, and course performance were evaluated using the Group Process Questionnaire (GPQ, Revised Study Process Questionnaire (R-SPQ-2F and course results, respectively, after testing. Findings: Multivariate analysis of variance results revealed that the R-SPQ-2F surface approach score, surface motive and strategy subscores were lower in the wiki group than in the control group (p < 0.05. The GPQ individual accountability and equal opportunity scores (components of collaboration were higher in the wiki group than in the control group (p < 0.001. No significant between-groups differences were found in any of the other outcome variables (i.e., overall course result, R-SPQ-2F deep approach score and subscores, GPQ positive interdependence score, social skills score, and composite score. Looking at the Wiki Questionnaire results, the subscale and composite scores we obtained were 31.5% to 37.7% lower than the norm. The wiki was used at a frequency of about 0.7 times per week per student. Recommendations for Practitioners: Using wiki technology in conjunction with the traditional face-to-face teaching method in a biostatistics course can enhance some aspects of undergraduate students’ collaborative learning

  8. Is co-invention expediting technological catch up? A study of collaboration between emerging country firms

    OpenAIRE

    Giuliani, Elisa; Martinelli, Arianna; Rabellotti, Roberta

    2015-01-01

    Firms from emerging countries such as Brazil, India, and China (BIC) are going global, and Europe is attracting around one-third of their direct outward investments. Growing internationalization constitutes an opportunity for technological catch up. In this paper we analyze BIC firms' cross-border inventions with European Union (EU-27) actors, during the period 1990-2012. Our results suggest that cross-border inventions represent an opportunity for BIC firms to accumulate technological capabi...

  9. Dialectic Antidotes to Critics of the Technology Acceptance Model: Conceptual, Methodological, and Replication Treatments for Behavioural Modelling in Technology-Mediated Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weng Marc Lim

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The technology acceptance model (TAM is a prominent and parsimonious conceptual lens that is often applied for behavioural modelling in technology-mediated environments. However, TAM has received a great deal of criticism in recent years. This article aims to address some of the most pertinent issues confronting TAM through a rejoinder that offers dialectic antidotes—in the form of conceptual, methodological, and replication treatments—to support the continued use of TAM to understand the peculiarities of user interactions with technology in technology-mediated environments. In doing so, this article offers a useful response to a common but often inadequately answered question about how TAM can continue to be relevant for behavioural modelling in contemporary technology-mediated environments.

  10. Collaborative Appropriation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muller, Michael; Neureiter, Katja; Verdezoto, Nervo

    2016-01-01

    Previous workshops and papers have examined how individual users adopt and adapt technologies to meet their own local needs, by “completing design through use.” However, there has been little systematic study of how groups of people engage collaboratively in these activities. This workshop opens ...

  11. Summary of Industry-Academia Collaboration Projects on Cluster Ion Beam Process Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Isao; Toyoda, Noriaki; Matsuo, Jiro

    2008-01-01

    Processes employing clusters of ions comprised of a few hundred to many thousand atoms are now being developed into a new field of ion beam technology. Cluster-surface collisions produce important non-linear effects which are being applied to shallow junction formation, to etching and smoothing of semiconductors, metals, and dielectrics, to assisted formation of thin films with nano-scale accuracy, and to other surface modification applications. In 2000, a four year R and D project for development of industrial technology began in Japan under funding from the New Energy and Industrial Technology Development Organization (NEDO). Subjects of the projects are in areas of equipment development, semiconductor surface processing, high accuracy surface processing and high-quality film formation. In 2002, another major cluster ion beam project which emphasized nano-technology applications has started under a contract from the Ministry of Economy and Technology for Industry (METI). This METI project involved development related to size-selected cluster ion beam equipment and processes, and development of GCIB processes for very high rate etching and for zero damage etching of magnetic materials and compound semiconductor materials. This paper describes summery of the results.

  12. CBM collaboration : PTAC bringing companies together to jumpstart complex well technology advance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, M.

    2008-03-15

    This article discussed a joint industry project (JIP) established by the Petroleum Technology Alliance Canada (PTAC) to develop technology applications for coalbed methane (CBM) complexes. A minimum of 8 companies will be needed to initiate the JIP when changes to the royalty regime by the Alberta government are expected to take place. It is expected that the CBM JIP will develop and transfer best practices for optimized CBM exploitation through the use of non-vertical well technology. Three tasks have also been outlined for the project's first year: (1) the creation of a website with public and private access modules; (2) the development of a library of detailed well histories that document field experiences; and (3) launching studies into coal fines-contaminated production streams. The development of horizontal drilling techniques is expected to result in improved environmental benefits due to accelerated production procedures and improved pad configurations. The well history library will act as a primary field data source. It is estimated that approximately 20 trillion cubic feet of CBM reserves are available for recovery using known technologies. However, the development of new technologies is expected to result in an estimated 200 Tcf of recoverable CBM reserves. 1 fig.

  13. A social-technological epistemology of clinical decision-making as mediated by imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Baalen, Sophie; Carusi, Annamaria; Sabroe, Ian; Kiely, David G

    2017-10-01

    In recent years there has been growing attention to the epistemology of clinical decision-making, but most studies have taken the individual physicians as the central object of analysis. In this paper we argue that knowing in current medical practice has an inherently social character and that imaging plays a mediating role in these practices. We have analyzed clinical decision-making within a medical expert team involved in diagnosis and treatment of patients with pulmonary hypertension (PH), a rare disease requiring multidisciplinary team involvement in diagnosis and management. Within our field study, we conducted observations, interviews, video tasks, and a panel discussion. Decision-making in the PH clinic involves combining evidence from heterogeneous sources into a cohesive framing of a patient, in which interpretations of the different sources can be made consistent with each other. Because pieces of evidence are generated by people with different expertise and interpretation and adjustments take place in interaction between different experts, we argue that this process is socially distributed. Multidisciplinary team meetings are an important place where information is shared, discussed, interpreted, and adjusted, allowing for a collective way of seeing and a shared language to be developed. We demonstrate this with an example of image processing in the PH service, an instance in which knowledge is distributed over multiple people who play a crucial role in generating an evaluation of right heart function. Finally, we argue that images fulfill a mediating role in distributed knowing in 3 ways: first, as enablers or tools in acquiring information; second, as communication facilitators; and third, as pervasively framing the epistemic domain. With this study of clinical decision-making in diagnosis and treatment of PH, we have shown that clinical decision-making is highly social and mediated by technologies. The epistemology of clinical decision-making needs

  14. Exploring the potential of video technologies for collaboration in emergency medical care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sonnenwald, Diane H.; Söderholm, Hanna M.; Manning, James E.

    2008-01-01

    videoconferencing techniques. This may be of benefit in diagnosing and treating patients in emergency situations where specialized medical expertise is not locally available. The 3D telepresence technology does not yet exist, and there is a need to understand its potential before resources are spent on its...

  15. Media Culture 2020: Collaborative Teaching and Blended Learning Using Social Media and Cloud-Based Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vickers, Richard; Field, James; Melakoski, Cai

    2015-01-01

    In 2013 five universities from across Europe undertook an innovative project "Media Culture 2020", combining skills and forces to develop new practices that would face the challenge of the convergence of digital media, taking full advantage of social media and cloud-based technologies. The aim of the Media Culture 2020 project was to…

  16. Exploring the Capability of Evaluating Technical Solutions: A Collaborative Study into the Primary Technology Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Björkholm, Eva

    2014-01-01

    Within the field of technology education, evaluating technical solutions is considered as an important topic. Research indicates that pupils have difficulties in evaluating technical solutions in terms of fitness for purpose, i.e. how effective a technical solution supports its intended function. By using the learning study, which is an iterative…

  17. Study on collaborative optimization control of ventilation and radon reduction system based on multi-agent technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dai Jianyong; Meng Lingcong; Zou Shuliang

    2015-01-01

    According to the radioactive safety features such as radon and its progeny, combined with the theory of ventilation system, structure of multi-agent system for ventilation and radon reduction system is constructed with the application of multi agent technology. The function attribute of the key agent and the connection between the nodes in the multi-agent system are analyzed to establish the distributed autonomous logic structure and negotiation mechanism of multi agent system of ventilation and radon reduction system, and thus to implement the coordination optimization control of the multi-agent system. The example analysis shows that the system structure of the multi-agent system of ventilation and reducing radon system and its collaborative mechanism can improve and optimize the radioactive pollutants control, which provides a theoretical basis and important application prospect. (authors)

  18. Technology transfer at CERN a study on inter-organizational knowledge transfer within multi-national R&D collaborations

    CERN Document Server

    Huuse, H; Streit-Bianchi, M

    2004-01-01

    This study focus on the knowledge aspect of inter-organizational technology transfer projects. We have studied two large R&D collaborations where CERN is involved as one of several participating organizations, in order to reveal the causalities related to the knowledge transfer processes within these projects. The objective of the study is to understand how knowledge transfer happens, identify influencing factors to the process, and finally investigate the outcome of such processes. The study is founded on a thorough literature review where we examine different aspects of inter-organizational knowledge transfer. Based on the theory, we develop an analytic framework and establish different elements in the knowledge transfer process to study in more detail. This framework illustrates the relation between the different elements in a knowledge transfer process and provides the structure for our empirical foundation. We perform an explanatory embedded multiple case study and analyze our findings in terms of th...

  19. Telementoring Physics: University-Community After-school Collaborations and the Mediation of the Formal/Informal Divide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecusay, Robert A.

    For several decades improvement of science education has been a major concern of policy makers concerned that the U.S. is a "nation at risk" owing to the dearth of students pursing careers in science. Recent policy proposals have argued that provision of broadband digital connectivity to organizations in the informal sector would increase the reach of the formal, academic sector to raise the overall level of science literacy in the country. This dissertation reports on a longitudinal study of a physics telementoring activity jointly run by a university-community collaborative at a community learning center. The activity implemented a digital infrastructure that exceeds the technical and social-institutional arrangements promoted by policy makers. In addition to broadband internet access (for tele-conferencing between students at the community center and physicists at a university), supplemented by digital software designed to promote physics education, the activity included the presence of a collaborating researcher/tutor at the community learning center to coordinate and document the instructional activities. The current research revealed a fundamental contradiction between the logic, goals, and practices of the physics instructors, and the corresponding logic, goals, and practices of the participants at the community learning center. This contradiction revolves around a contrast between the physicists' formal, logocentric ways of understanding expressed in the ability to explain the scientific rules underlying physical phenomena and the informal, pragmatic orientation of the youth and adults at the learning center. The observations in this dissertation should remind techno-enthusiasts, especially in the arena of public education policy, that there are no turnkey solutions in "distance" science education. Technically "connecting" people is not equivalent to creating conditions that expand opportunities to learn and a functioning socio-technical system that

  20. Collaboration, Participation and Technology: The San Joaquin Valley Cumulative Health Impacts Project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan K. London

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Community-university partnerships have been shown to produce significant value for both sets of partners by providing reciprocal learning opportunities, (rebuilding bonds of trust, and creating unique venues to formulate and apply research that responds to community interests and informs collaborative solutions to community problems. For such partnerships to be mutually empowering, certain design characteristics are necessary. These include mutual respect for different modes and expressions of knowledge, capacity-building for all parties, and an environment that promotes honest and constructive dialogue about the inevitable tensions associated with the interplay of power/knowledge. This article explores an innovative case of community-university partnerships through participatory action research involving a coalition of environmental justice and health advocates, the San Joaquin Valley Cumulative Health Impacts Project, and researchers affiliated with the University of California, Davis. In particular, we examine how participatory GIS and community mapping can promote co-learning and interdependent science. Keywords Community-based participatory research, environmental justice, Public Participation Geographic Information System

  1. Collaborative Learning with Application of Screen-based Technology in Physical Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Luptáková

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Collaborative learning has been shown to be a useful tool for improving several social skills in students; however, it is very difficult to set up the initial conditions that guarantee its effectiveness. Since group projects are made for students and, most importantly, by students, we should not forget to take their opinions based on previous experience into consideration, which might increase the efficiency of their own learning. Therefore, the aim of the study was to investigate what secondary school students learn from and think about group projects in Physical Education. A total of 94 secondary school students (46 girls and 48 boys participated in the study carried out in the 2015/2016 school year. The participants were given the assignment to create a video exercise, which they were working on in small groups in PE. A questionnaire was designed to investigate students’ learning outcomes, participation, evaluation, and attitudes towards the project. Differences for selected categorical variables were determined using the Chi-square test. The majority of the students reported improvement in selected social skills and better relationships with their teammates. In addition, several significant differences in students’ opinions with respect to age and gender were found.

  2. Establishment of Collaboration System for SFR Technology Development between Korea and France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoo, Jae Woon; Kim, Yeong Il; Choi, Jong Hyeun; Seong, Seung Hwan; Eoh, Jae Hyuk; Jeong, Hae Yong; Hahn, Do Hee; Lee, Yong Bum; Chang, Jin Wook; Lee, Dong Uk

    2010-03-01

    1) Review of the technical status and plane associated with STCs on the SFR R and D · The objective of the study was accomplished by constructing an human network and investigating the status on the following 5 STCs - Analysis of BFS -73 -1 and 75-1 critical experiments using ERANOS. - SFR : Elector-magnetic pumps or mechanical pumps; criteria for selection, description and modeling - Phenix end of life tests - SC-CO2 Brayton cycle : Investigation of sodium-carbon dioxide interactions; potential consequences on reactor operation - Evaluation of lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE) coolant for SFR intermediate loop 2) Holding KAERI-CEA SFR technical meeting on STCs - Final investigation at SFR technical meeting held at CEA Cadarache from Jan. 5 to Jan. 7 in 2010. - Agreement on further action plan for completing the STC - Deduction of future collaboration topics and agreed to submit into the next JCCNE - Agreed to hold next SFR technical meeting in Korea on around October 2010

  3. Research on engineering-oriented constraints conflict detection in collaborative design of wire harness technology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Xiaoping; HE Honglin; XU Benzhu

    2012-01-01

    Engineering-oriented constraint of harness technology has much information and project information presents progressive changes along with the design. Therefore, how to handle conflict resolution quickly is a problem to be solved. Process model of con- flict detection is put forward according to characteristics of harness technology design engineering-oriented constraint, and then two problems of how to conduct conflict positioning and judgment of constraint rules are introduced in this paper. Afterwards in this pa- per, constraint information directed acyclic graph is established by classified project constraint information to solve the conflict posi- tioning problem; solution of constraint satisfaction problem is applied to realize judgment problem of constraint rules. Finally, exam- ple is used to analyze the method in this paper to further verify the correctness and effectiveness of this method.

  4. Collaboration on technological innovation in Danish fashion chains: A network perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tambo, Torben

    2014-01-01

    and departments stores, technology and service providers, ownership structures and local level supply chain facilities. This paper analyses theoretical and empirical views of innovation in international retail networks using lead actors in the (Danish) fashion industry as a case to highlight how this industry...... in business networks. The network comprises an innovation system that focuses on organisational learning and iterative development of the intended technologies. Implications of the current study are suggestions to brand owners, network partners and retailers on how to identify, understand, support and promote......With brand owners struggling to compete with new products, physical production processes and sourcing logistics, innovation taking place in retail networks is often overlooked. Networks in retailing are comprised by the brand owner, the varieties of single- and multi-brand stores, chains...

  5. Towards a Pragmatic Model for Group-Based, Technology-Mediated, Project-Oriented Learning - An Overview of the B2C Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawlor, John; Conneely, Claire; Tangney, Brendan

    The poor assimilation of ICT in formal education is firmly rooted in models of learning prevalent in the classroom which are largely teacher-led, individualistic and reproductive, with little connection between theory and practice and poor linkages across the curriculum. A new model of classroom practice is required to allow for creativity, peer-learning, thematic learning, collaboration and problem solving, i.e. the skills commonly deemed necessary for the knowledge-based society of the 21st century. This paper describes the B2C model for group-based, technology-mediated, project-oriented learning which, while being developed as part of an out of school programme, offers a pragmatic alternative to traditional classroom pedagogy.

  6. TANK FARM REMEDIATION TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT PROJECT AN EXERCISE IN TECHNICAL & REGULATORY COLLABORATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    JARAYSI, M.N.

    2007-01-08

    The Tank Farm Remediation Technology Development Project at the Hanford Site focuses on waste storage tanks, pipelines and associated ancillary equipment that are part of the C-200 single-shell tank (SST) farm system located in the C Tank Farm. The purpose of the project is to obtain information on the implementation of a variety of closure activities and to answer questions on technical, operational and regulatory issues associated with closure.

  7. An Exponential Increase in Regional Health Information Exchange With Collaborative Policies and Technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downing, N Lance; Lane, Steven; Eisenberg, Mathew; Sharp, Christopher; Palma, Jonathan; Longhurst, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    In the United States, the ability to securely exchange health information between organization has been limited by technical interoperability, patient identity matching, and variable institutional policies. Here, we examine the regional experience in a national health information exchange network by examining clinical data sharing between eleven Northern California organizations using the same health information exchange (HIE) platform between 2013-2014. We identify key policies and technologies that have led to a dramatic increase in health information exchange.

  8. Multi-actor decision making using mixed reality technologies Urban projects and multi-actor collaboration

    OpenAIRE

    Basile,, Maria; Ozdirlik, Burcu; Terrin,, Jean-Jacques

    2009-01-01

    International audience; This paper is based on the results of an ongoing research project, IPCity, on the application of mixed reality technologies in urban environments. It questions the relevance of traditional language and communication medium such as drawings, perspectives and 3D models in the co-production of urban projects in multi-actor working environments. It then discusses the possible use of “mixed reality technologies” as alternative medium through five workshops organised within ...

  9. TANK FARM REMEDIATION TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT PROJECT AN EXERCISE IN TECHNICAL and REGULATORY COLLABORATION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    JARAYSI, M.N.

    2007-01-01

    The Tank Farm Remediation Technology Development Project at the Hanford Site focuses on waste storage tanks, pipelines and associated ancillary equipment that are part of the C-200 single-shell tank (SST) farm system located in the C Tank Farm. The purpose of the project is to obtain information on the implementation of a variety of closure activities and to answer questions on technical, operational and regulatory issues associated with closure

  10. Using Web 2.0 technologies and collaborative work in teaching academic writing

    OpenAIRE

    Jekiel, Mateusz

    2014-01-01

    Paper presented at YLMP 2014 Teaching academic writing to ESL learners can be a difficult task: students are usually unfamiliar with academic style, have difficulties in producing a structured piece of writing and get easily discouraged by an exam­oriented approach, having to use old school pen and paper with no access to technology. Indeed, the gap between everyday writing tasks and the exam is significant: access to online dictionaries, linguistic corpora and academic articles, as well a...

  11. On the Convergence of Affective and Persuasive Technologies in Computer- Mediated Health-Care Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebeca I. García-Betances

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper offers a portrayal of how affective computing and persuasive technologies can converge into an effective tool for interfacing biomedical engineering with behavioral sciences and medicine. We describe the characteristics, features, applications, present state of the art, perspectives, and trends of both streams of research. In particular, these streams are analyzed in light of the potential contribution of their convergence for improving computer-mediated health-care systems, by facilitating the modification of patients’ attitudes and behaviors, such as engagement and compliance. We propose a framework for future research in this emerging area, highlighting how key constructs and intervening variables should be considered. Some specific implications and challenges posed by the convergence of these two technologies in health care, such as paradigm change, multimodality, patients’ attitude improvement, and cost reduction, are also briefly addressed and discussed.

  12. Sense or Sensibility?: How Commitment Mediates the Role of Self-Service Technology on Loyalty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Sangeeta; Olsen, Line Lervik

    It has been well documented that employing self-service technology (SST) results in considerable cost savings but few studies have examined its impact on consumers’ behavior. We apply a well-recognized model from the field of services marketing in an SST context. We examine how the established relationships between satisfaction, affective and calculative commitments, and loyalty are affected when the service is provided through a technology interface as opposed to service personnel. We then present two alternative perspectives on the role of SST. The first is based on the predominant assumption that SST is a moderator of the relationship between customer loyalty and its drivers, while the other rests on the assumption that SST is just another context and that its role in affecting customer loyalty is mediated by drivers of loyalty. A cross-sectional study conducted in the banking industry shows that SST does not change everything. The classical model of how customers evaluate services and the predictors of loyalty are replicated in the SST setting. Interestingly, SST does not have a direct influence on loyalty by itself but its effects are mediated by commitment. However, it is the affective commitment that is more important in forming loyalty toward the service provider.

  13. Collaborative models for the joint production of core health technology assessments: negative and positive aspects for the joint work of different European agencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo Scalzo, Alessandra; Vicari, Nicola; Corio, Mirella; Perrini, Maria Rosaria; Jefferson, Tom; Gillespie, Francesca; Cerbo, Marina

    2014-11-01

    The purpose of the European network for Health Technology Assessment (EUnetHTA) is to make HTA agencies collaborate sharing methods and tools thus avoiding duplication of evaluative efforts and allowing resource savings. From 2010 to 2012, the activities of the network were carried out through EUnetHTA Joint Action 1 and Work Package 4 Strand B aimed at producing two Core HTAs with two main objectives: to test the Web based Core model and the collaborative working models. Our objective in this article is to give an historical record of the Work Package activities highlighting what worked and what did not in the collaboration of researchers' groups coming from different agencies. A retrospective description of all the steps for the joint production of the two Core HTAs is provided starting from the first step of selecting technologies of common interest. Primary researchers' views on the whole process have been collected through a semi-structured telephonic interview supported by a questionnaire. Coordinators views were gathered during internal meetings and validated. Majority of respondents thought topic selection procedure was not clear and well managed. About collaborative models, small groups were seen to enable more exchange, whatever the model. According to coordinators, loss of expertise and experience during the production process, different languages, and novelty of the Online Tool were main barriers. Lessons learned from this first experience in Joint Action 1 paved the path for the collaboration in Joint Action 2, as it allowed enhancements and changes in models of collaborations and coordination.

  14. The Marine Technology Liguria District, an opportunity for Collaboration and Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmisciano, C.; Tivegna, P.; Sgherri, R. G.; Gambetta, M.; Caratori Tontini, F.; Stefanelli, P.; Cocchi, L.

    2008-05-01

    This work focus on the newly born DLTM, namely the Distretto Ligure delle Tecnologie Marine, based in La Spezia, Liguria Region (IT). The main involved partners are: Ministries, Regione Liguria Council, Spedia SpA Company, Industries, SMEs (SMBs), Universities and National Research Institutes. The DLTM has been created as an answer to the local versus global needs of marine products innovation, technology and science. In order to provide, both the local and international community, effective solutions the DLTM aims to: - promote Innovation and pre-competitiveness of activities related to industrial research; - enhance the value and visibility of excellence areas existing in the Ligurian region (in the big enterprises as well as in SMEs) concerning marine technology; - enhance the value of academic activities focusing their R&D on industrial products/processes, assuring, evaluating and preventing environmental sustainability also in case of extreme events; - harmonize/make sustainable the economy and the society promoting scientific innovation and technological development, by means of Universities, Public and Private Research Institutes (at regional, national and EU level); - help the exchange of ideas and realization of projects aimed at developing the District objectives; - increase the dissemination and valorisation of District results and achievements, build capacity in the sectors of interest to the District. The DLTM is characterized by two main macro-themes. The first concerns infrastructures, materials and processes, while the second is committed to eco-compatible solutions for harbours, ships and coastal scenarios, security and control management of human activities, risky operations and extreme natural events. The former macro-theme is expected to provide the community with innovative solutions, technologies, materials, processes applied to marine sectors, shipyard and related subsystems and components, in a wide sense such as leisure, commercial, navy

  15. A Study on intensifying efficiency for international collaborative development of Advanced Nuclear Energy Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hahn, Dohee; Park, Seongwon; Chang, Moonhee

    2013-08-15

    All the countries of the world are promoting the use of atomic energy to provide against high oil prices, climatic changes, and energy security initiative. A domestic and foreign environment for nuclear energy is changing rapidly and 13 leading countries including Korea are trying to develop advanced technologies on Gen IV nuclear energy system through Gen IV International Forum (GIF). To enhance the effectiveness of the future nuclear energy system development plan, a strategic approach is necessary for GIF program and the connection process with the 4th Nuclear Energy Promotion Program and Nuclear Energy R and D Medium and Long Term 5 year Plan for 2012 ∼ 2016 needs to be prepared. This study was to analyze the global nuclear trends of 2012 and the status of GIF program which is international cooperation activities. Also we examined the domestic R and D status of future nuclear energy systems for developing core technology and commercialization of Gen-IV nuclear energy system. A successful performance of this project enables the effective national cooperation with GIF and promotes the public acceptance by suggesting the technical alternatives for the nuclear safety and the spent fuel management.

  16. A Radar-Enabled Collaborative Sensor Network Integrating COTS Technology for Surveillance and Tracking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Murat Demirer

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The feasibility of using Commercial Off-The-Shelf (COTS sensor nodes is studied in a distributed network, aiming at dynamic surveillance and tracking of ground targets. Data acquisition by low-cost ( < $50 US miniature low-power radar through a wireless mote is described. We demonstrate the detection, ranging and velocity estimation, classification and tracking capabilities of the mini-radar, and compare results to simulations and manual measurements. Furthermore, we supplement the radar output with other sensor modalities, such as acoustic and vibration sensors. This method provides innovative solutions for detecting, identifying, and tracking vehicles and dismounts over a wide area in noisy conditions. This study presents a step towards distributed intelligent decision support and demonstrates effectiveness of small cheap sensors, which can complement advanced technologies in certain real-life scenarios.

  17. A radar-enabled collaborative sensor network integrating COTS technology for surveillance and tracking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozma, Robert; Wang, Lan; Iftekharuddin, Khan; McCracken, Ernest; Khan, Muhammad; Islam, Khandakar; Bhurtel, Sushil R; Demirer, R Murat

    2012-01-01

    The feasibility of using Commercial Off-The-Shelf (COTS) sensor nodes is studied in a distributed network, aiming at dynamic surveillance and tracking of ground targets. Data acquisition by low-cost (wireless mote is described. We demonstrate the detection, ranging and velocity estimation, classification and tracking capabilities of the mini-radar, and compare results to simulations and manual measurements. Furthermore, we supplement the radar output with other sensor modalities, such as acoustic and vibration sensors. This method provides innovative solutions for detecting, identifying, and tracking vehicles and dismounts over a wide area in noisy conditions. This study presents a step towards distributed intelligent decision support and demonstrates effectiveness of small cheap sensors, which can complement advanced technologies in certain real-life scenarios.

  18. University of Tennessee - Industry collaborative research and development in preventive maintenance technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Upadhyaya, B.R.

    1992-01-01

    The Preventive Maintenance Engineering Laboratory (PMEL) was inaugurated at the University of Tennessee Nuclear Engineering Department in September 1989. The startup funding was provided by Gilbert/Commonwealth, Inc. The purpose of PMEL is to identify maintenance-related problems in the power and process industries and to find their solutions through the development and application of emerging technologies. These include advanced digital signal processing, applied artificial intelligence (AI), artificial neural networks, and reliability based methods. The Laboratory activities are being expanded by the formation of an industrial consortium within the Measurement and Control Engineering Center at the University of Tennessee. Several research and development projects in preventive maintenance are being carried out. These include condition monitoring of air operated valves, automated diagnostics of motor operated valves, instrument calibration, verification, and estimation of expected residual life of electric motors using applied AI technology and reliability-based methods. The new methodology will be applied to other industrial subsystems. A long-term research and development project is being sponsored by the T.V.A. Nuclear Maintenance Department. The overall objective of the research program is to develop and apply advanced artificial intelligence and information processing methods to the problems of plant performance monitoring and preventive maintenance. The program includes the development of a workstation/PC-based, networking of plant information for easy access to operational and management personnel, implementation of a sensor verification system, monitoring of feedwater flow venturi fouling and heat rate balance, and integration of signal validation, command validation, and fault-tolerant control strategies

  19. The Effect of Dynamic Web Technologies on Student Academic Achievement in Problem-Based Collaborative Learning Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korucu, Agâh Tugrul; Cakir, Hasan

    2018-01-01

    Some of the 21st century proficiencies expected from people are determined as collaborative working and problem solving. One way to gain these proficiencies is by using collaborative problem solving based on social constructivism theory. Collaborative problem solving is one of the methods allowing for social constructivism in the class. In…

  20. The Role of Executive Functioning and Technological Anxiety (FOMO in College Course Performance as Mediated by Technology Usage and Multitasking Habits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larry D. Rosen

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated how technology use impacts academic performance. A proposed model postulated that academic performance could be predicted by a cognitive independent variable-executive functioning problems-and an affective independent variable-technological anxiety or FOMO (fear of missing out-mediated by how students choose to use technology. An unobtrusive smartphone application called “Instant Quantified Self” monitored daily smartphone unlocks and daily minutes of use. Other mediators included self-reported smartphone use, self-observed studying attention, self-reported multitasking preference, and a classroom digital metacognition tool that assessed the student’s ability to understand the ramifications of technology use in the classroom that is not relevant to the learning process. Two hundred sixteen participants collected an average of 56 days of “Instant” application data, demonstrating that their smartphone was unlocked more than 60 times a day for three to four minutes each time for a total of 220 daily minutes of use. Results indicated that executive functioning problems predicted academic course performance mediated by studying attention and a single classroom digital metacognition subscale concerning availability of strategies of when to use mobile phones during lectures. FOMO predicted performance directly as well as mediated by a second classroom digital metacognition concerning attitudes toward mobile phone use during lectures. Implications for college students and professors include increasing metacognition about technology use in the classroom and taking “tech breaks” to reduce technology anxiety.

  1. Global Collaborative STEM Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meabh Kelly, Susan; Smith, Walter

    2016-04-01

    Global Collaborative STEM Education, as the name suggests, simultaneously supports two sets of knowledge and skills. The first set is STEM -- science, technology, engineering and math. The other set of content knowledge and skills is that of global collaboration. Successful global partnerships require awareness of one's own culture, the biases embedded within that culture, as well as developing awareness of the collaborators' culture. Workforce skills fostered include open-mindedness, perseverance when faced with obstacles, and resourceful use of technological "bridges" to facilitate and sustain communication. In respect for the 2016 GIFT Workshop focus, Global Collaborative STEM Education projects dedicated to astronomy research will be presented. The projects represent different benchmarks within the Global Collaborative STEM Education continuum, culminating in an astronomy research experience that fully reflects how the global STEM workforce collaborates. To facilitate wider engagement in Global Collaborative STEM Education, project summaries, classroom resources and contact information for established international collaborative astronomy research projects will be disseminated.

  2. Evaluation of the Technology Acceptance of a Collaborative Documentation System for Addiction Therapists and Clients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perlich, Anja; Meinel, Christoph; Zeis, Daniel

    2018-01-01

    Addiction treatment outcomes are strongly determined by relational factors. We present the interactive documentation system Tele-Board MED (TBM) developed as an adjunct to therapy sessions aimed at enhancing the therapeutic alliance and patient empowerment. The objective of this work is to find factors that predict the acceptance of TBM in face-to-face addiction treatment sessions. We combined the methodologies of survey and focus group and based the data collection and analysis on the Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology. The studies, which involved therapists (n=13) and clients (n=33), were conducted in an addiction counselling center in Germany. Therapists see a flexible, context-dependent usage as a basic condition for TBM acceptance and its greatest benefit in providing a discussion framework and quick access to worksheets-in both individual and group sessions. Clients are inclined to use the system with the expectation of improved communication and better recall of the discussed topics based on a personal copy of the session notes.

  3. Learning Specific Content in Technology Education: Learning Study as a Collaborative Method in Swedish Preschool Class Using Hands-On Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilbrink, Nina; Bjurulf, Veronica; Blomberg, Ingela; Heidkamp, Anja; Hollsten, Ann-Christin

    2014-01-01

    This article describes the process of a learning study conducted in technology education in a Swedish preschool class. The learning study method used in this study is a collaborative method, where researchers and teachers work together as a team concerning teaching and learning about a specific learning object. The object of learning in this study…

  4. The Use of Collaboration, Authentic Learning, Linking Material to Personal Knowledge, and Technology in the Constructivist Classroom: Interviews with Community College Faculty Members

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zielinski, Dianne E.

    2017-01-01

    This study explored how faculty members implemented constructivist teaching methods after training. The student-centered teaching methods were interactions and collaborations, authentic learning and real-world experiences, linking material to previously learned information, and using technology in the classroom. Seven faculty members trained in…

  5. The Lived Experiences of Leading Edge Certified Elementary School Teachers Who Use Instructional Technology to Foster Critical Thinking, Collaboration, Creativity, and Communication in Their Classrooms: A Phenomenological Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruddell, Natalie

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this phenomenological study was to describe the perceptions of current and former Leading Edge Certified (LEC) elementary school teachers regarding instructional technology practices that facilitate students' development of critical thinking, collaboration, communication, and creativity (4Cs) in one-to-one computer…

  6. Analyzing the effects of information technology on supply chain integration: The role of ERP success mediator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samaneh Alimohamadian

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This research analyzes the effects of Information Technology (IT on Supply Chain Integration (SCI through ERP mediator by proposing a conceptual model among these components. We also hypothesize that three constructs of IT influence on enterprise resource planning (ERP success and one construct of ERP success influences on SCI. To clarify the relationships among the constructs, structural equation model (SEM is conducted to examine the model fit and seven hypotheses. The data was collected from three Iranian firms through questionnaire with 23 questions adopted by past researches. The results confirmed that top management support of IT and employees’ general IT skills factors of IT enhance ERP success, and ERP success positively influences on Supply Chain Integration, so these two IT factors influence Supply Chain Integration through ERP success. Our data unsupported negative impact of satisfaction with legacy IT system on ERP success.

  7. Preparing undergraduates for the future of scientific collaboration: Benefits, challenges and technological solutions in Distributed REU Sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubenthal, M.; Anagnos, T.

    2012-12-01

    As research problems increasingly require multi-disciplinary approaches they naturally foster scientific collaborations between geographically distributed colleagues. This increasing trend in scientific research, the rapid evolution of communication technology, cognitive research into distance education, and the current generation of undergraduate students' eagerness to embrace and use technology, increases the relevance of distributed REU sites. Like traditional REU sites that host a cohort of students in one geographic location, distributed REU sites also seek to attract, nurture, and retain students in a STEM career pipeline. Distributed REU sites are unique in that some or all of the interns are geographically distributed during the research period. This arrangement allows the REU site to capitalize on distributed scientific resources such as field sites, research facilities, or human capital. At their core, distributed REU sites are fundamentally constructed of elements that have proven to be effective components of any undergraduate research experience. They also strive to develop and employ specialized programming that leverages collaboration tools through a cyberinfrastructure to enable interns to develop meaningful social and academic relationships with one another. Since 2006 the IRIS Consortium and NEES have facilitated separate, NSF funded, distributed REU Sites. Implementation and evaluations of these programs have revealed a number of successes and benefits. Longitudinal tracking indicates that distributed REU Sites are at least as successful as traditional sites in attracting, nurturing, and retaining students in a STEM career pipeline. A distributed arrangement also offers benefits over a traditional REU site, such as the flexibility to place interns at a variety of institutions with mentors making only an annual commitment to participate. This ensures that all mentors are eager to participate and are concerned with their intern's growth. It also

  8. Green Component Procurement Collaboration for Improving Supply Chain Management in the High Technology Industries: A Case Study from the Systems Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min-Ren Yan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The impacts of high technology industries have been growing increasingly to technological innovations and global economic developments, while the concerns in sustainability are calling for facilitating green materials and cleaner production in the industrial value chains. Today’s manufacturing companies are not striving for individual capacities but for the effective working with green supply chains. However, in addition to environmental and social objectives, cost and economic feasibility has become one of the most critical success factors for improving supply chain management with green component procurement collaboration, especially for the electronics OEM (original equipment manufacturing companies whose procurement costs often make up a very high proportion of final product prices. This paper presents a case study from the systems perspective by using System Dynamics simulation analysis and statistical validations with empirical data. Empirical data were collected from Taiwanese manufacturing chains—among the world’s largest manufacturing clusters of high technology components and products—and their global green suppliers to examine the benefits of green component procurement collaborations in terms of shared costs and improved shipping time performance. Two different supply chain collaboration models, from multi-layer ceramic capacitor (MLCC and universal serial bus 3.0 (USB 3.0 cable procurements, were benchmarked and statistically validated. The results suggest that the practices of collaborative planning for procurement quantity and accurate fulfillment by suppliers are significantly related to cost effectiveness and shipping time efficiency. Although the price negotiation of upstream raw materials for the collaborative suppliers has no statistically significant benefit to the shipping time efficiency, the shared cost reduction of component procurement is significantly positive for supply chain collaboration among green

  9. Collaborative Learning in the Cloud

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirchner, Kathrin; Razmerita, Liana

    2015-01-01

    This present study aims to investigate how students perceive collaboration and identifies associated technologies used to collaborate. In particular we aim to address the following research questions: What are the factors that impact satisfaction with collaboration? How do these factors differ in...... in different collaborative settings? Based on data from 75 students from Denmark and Germany, the article identifies collaborative practices and factors that impact positively and negatively satisfaction with collaboration....

  10. SLICEIT and TAHMO Partnerships: Students Local and International Collaboration for Climate and Environmental Monitoring, Technology Development, Education, Adaptation and Mitigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aishlin, P. S.; Selker, J. S.

    2015-12-01

    Climate change understanding and impacts vary by community, yet the global nature of climate change requires international collaboration to address education, monitoring, adaptation and mitigation needs. We propose that effective climate change monitoring and education can be accomplished via student-led local and international community partnerships. By empowering students as community leaders in climate-environmental monitoring and education, as well as exploration of adaptation/mitigation needs, well-informed communities and young leadership are developed to support climate change science moving forward. Piloted 2013-2015, the SLICEIT1 program partnered with TAHMO2 to connect student leaders in North America, Europe and Africa. At the international level, schools in the U.S.A and Netherlands were partnered with schools in Ghana, Kenya, and Uganda for science and cultural exchange. Each school was equipped with a climate or other environmental sensing system, real-time data publication and curricula for both formal and informal science, technology, engineering and math education and skill development. African counterparts in TAHMO's School-2-School program collect critically important data for enhanced on-the-ground monitoring of weather conditions in data-scarce regions of Africa. In Idaho, student designed, constructed and installed weather stations provide real time data for classroom and community use. Student-designed formal educational activities are disseminated to project partners, increasing hands-on technology education and peer-based learning. At the local level, schools are partnered with a local agency, research institute, nonprofit organization, industry and/or community partner that supplies a climate science expert mentor to SLICEIT program leaders and teachers. Mentor engagement is facilitated and secured by program components that directly benefit the mentor's organization and local community via climate/environment monitoring, student workforce

  11. INTERACTIONS MEDIATED BY TECHNOLOGY IN THE CLASSROOM: THE USE OF SOCIAL NETWORKS AND THE DIGITAL DIVIDE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ranice Hoehr Pedrazzi Pozzer

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The National Program for Access to Secondary Education and Employment (Pronatec, created by the federal government has offered, in recent years, training in technical courses at post-secondary level for young people and adults inserted in the educational system and who were attending or finishing high school, including the Youth and Adult Education system (EJA. Thus, some classes of technical courses presented a varied profile of students from teenagers who attend public schools and even older adults who are returning to school after years of absence from the education system. The present study analyzed four groups of students aged between 15 and 63 years. This age difference, how the oldest students use or not technology and the kind of relationship between the students in the classroom raised questions about their relationship on social networks. This network usage by the students significantly influenced the pedagogical practice during the course, considering that the students asked the teacher to use it as a teaching and learning resource. The students transit from reality to virtual world with the naturalness of people who were born inserted in this context of interactions mediated by technology.

  12. Assessing the relationship between technology readiness and continuance intention in an E-appointment system: relationship quality as a mediator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shih-Chih; Jong, Din; Lai, Min-Tsai

    2014-09-01

    Numerous types of self-service technologies have prevailed due to innovations in network and information technology. To hospitals, patient intentions to continue to use the e-appointment system are crucial. Previous investigations discussed only the relationships between the technology readiness of users and their continuance intentions, and ignored the most important mediator, relationship quality. This study explored the relationships among technology readiness, relationship quality, and continuance intention. The research results demonstrated that both optimism and innovativeness significantly and positively influenced continuance intention through the mediating effect of relationship quality. However, discomfort and insecurity hid not significantly influence relationship quality or continuance intention. Finally, theoretical contributions, managerial implications and future research directions were discussed.

  13. Collaboration 'Engineerability'

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kolfschoten, Gwendolyn L.; de Vreede, Gert-Jan; Briggs, Robert O.; Sol, Henk G.

    Collaboration Engineering is an approach to create sustained collaboration support by designing collaborative work practices for high-value recurring tasks, and transferring those designs to practitioners to execute for themselves without ongoing support from collaboration professionals. A key

  14. The Collaborative Future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Marlowe

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Collaboration has become an important goal in modern ventures, across the spectrum of commercial, social, and intellectual activities, sometimes as a mediating factor, and sometimes as a driving, foundational principle. Research, development, social programs, and ongoing ventures of all sorts benefit from interactions between teams, groups, and organizations, across intellectual disciplines and across facets and features of the inquiry, product, entity, or activity under consideration. We present a survey of the state of collaboration and collaborative enterprise, in the context of papers and presentations at the International Symposium on Collaborative Enterprises 2011 (CENT 2011, and the extended papers appearing in this special issue.

  15. Collaborative Learning in the Scottish Curriculum for Excellence: The Challenges of Assessment and Potential of Multi-Touch Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKechan, Sandra; Ellis, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    Scottish educational policy advocates the benefits of collaborative learning as a way of developing critical life skills, across the primary curriculum. In this paper, the rationale for collaborative learning, and specifically the Critical Skills (CS) approach, is considered along with an account of the perspectives of primary teachers…

  16. Technologies for Augmented Collaboration

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pierce, Linda; Sutton, Janet; Foltz, Peter; Lavoie, Noelle; Scott-Nash, Shelly; Lauper, Ursula

    2006-01-01

    Teams have always been important in military operations, but the nature of military teamwork is changing to accommodate an increasing number of missions in stability, security, transition, and reconstruction (SSTR...

  17. Building on a national health information technology strategic plan for long-term and post-acute care: comments by the Long Term Post Acute Care Health Information Technology Collaborative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Gregory L; Alwan, Majd; Batshon, Lynne; Bloom, Shawn M; Brennan, Richard D; Derr, John F; Dougherty, Michelle; Gruhn, Peter; Kirby, Annessa; Manard, Barbara; Raiford, Robin; Serio, Ingrid Johnson

    2011-07-01

    The LTPAC (Long Term Post Acute Care) Health Information Technology (HIT) Collaborative consists of an alliance of long-term services and post-acute care stakeholders. Members of the collaborative are actively promoting HIT innovations in long-term care settings because IT adoption for health care institutions in the United States has become a high priority. One method used to actively promote HIT is providing expert comments on important documents addressing HIT adoption. Recently, the Office of the National Coordinator for HIT released a draft of the Federal Health Information Technology Strategic Plan 2011-2015 for public comment. The following brief is intended to inform about recommendations and comments made by the Collaborative on the strategic plan. Copyright 2011, SLACK Incorporated.

  18. The Mediator Effect of Career Development between Personality Traits and Organizational Commitment: The Example of Sport Communication Technology Talents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Hung-Jen; Lin, Chun-Hung; Tung-Hsing, Lin; Tu, Peng-Fei

    2014-01-01

    This paper explored the relationships among career development, personality trait, and organizational commitment and examines whether career development mediates the relationship between personality trait and organizational commitment. The sample was 275 sport communication technology talents in Taiwan. The instrument included the Personality…

  19. Exploration of new perspectives and limitations in Agrobacterium mediated gene transfer technology. Progress report, [June 1, 1992-- May 31, 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marton, L.

    1994-12-31

    This report describes progress aimed at constructing gene-transfer technology for Nicotiana plumbaginifolia. Most actual effort as described herein has so far been directed at exploring new perspectives and limitations in Agrobacterium mediated gene transfer. Accomplishments are described using a core homologous gene targeting vector.

  20. Technology-Enhanced Science: Using an Online Blog to Share a Collaborative Field Study for Research and Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mccann, A. R.; Cardace, D.; Carnevale, D.

    2011-12-01

    The role of technology is an increasingly important resource in preparing students for the future. The Internet is a widely accessible tool. Technology has also made us more connected, allowing constant communication and instantaneous data sharing. Public utilities such as those found on the web, including blogs, are a means to convey scientific research in rapid, useful ways. This tool is ideal for newly emerging fields, allowing up-to-date collaboration and referencing of ongoing studies, as well as bringing students virtually into the field or laboratory through videos, pictures, and records of project work. Astrobiology is a high interest topic, integrating geology, chemistry, biology, and physics. Terrestrial Mars analog environments are compelling in that they shed light on unusual opportunities for diverse life in settings beyond Earth. For this study, the analog site locality is at the University of California-Davis McLaughlin Natural Reserve in the Coast Range Ophiolite, a portion of actively serpentinizing, uplifted oceanic material in northern California (see companion poster, McCann et al., Mineralogy of Surface Serpentinite Outcrops in the Coast Range Ophiolite: Implications for the Deep Biosphere and Astrobiology). Our research objective is to monitor the activity taking place within the subsurface biosphere through an interdisciplinary approach involving biogeochemists, microbiologists, organic geochemists, and geologists. The study of serpentinization with astrobiological ground-truthing is a relatively new and promising field. Scientific field procedures are constantly being modified as they are applied. In order to better collaborate study efforts, a daily field journal is being written, recording ideas, discussions, procedures, problems, solutions, and results. It serves as an informal report, including pictures and video clips of the field activity. The journal is maintained as an online blog for ease of use and accessibility, as well as public

  1. Partnerships for clinical learning: A collaborative initiative to support medical imaging technology students and their supervisors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, A.; Smythe, L.; Jones, M.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The involvement of practitioners in the teaching and supervision of medical imaging technology students is central to students' learning. This article presents an overview of a learning partnership initiative, reinforced by an online platform to support students' learning and their medical imaging technologist supervisors' (MITs) teaching within a clinical learning environment in a New Zealand context. Methodology: Data were generated through a series of fourteen collaborative action research focus group meetings with MITs and student MITs. Results: The findings revealed that a robust relationship between a student and their MIT partner gave students an ‘anchor’ for learning and a sense of belonging. The online platform supported the relationship and provided an effective means for communication between students and their MIT partners. The relationship was not one-directional as it also supported the enhancement of MITs' practice. Conclusions: The recommendations from the study suggest learning partnerships between MITs and student MITs will be valuable in supporting teaching and learning respectively. MITs need to be better supported in their teaching role to enable them to make a greater investment in students' learning. A redistribution of funding for clinical education needs to be considered to support the MITs' central role in teaching medical imaging students. - Highlights: • Learning partnerships within a clinical setting support students' learning. • An online platform can provide online support when face-to-face support is not possible. • Learning partnerships can enhance MITs' practice.

  2. Using Web 2.0 Technologies for Collaborative Learning in Distance Education—Case Studies from an  Australian University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Lloyd

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores the use of Web 2.0 technologies for collaborative learning in a higher education context. A review of the literature exploring the strengths and weaknesses of Web 2.0 technology is presented, and a conceptual model of a Web 2.0 community of inquiry is introduced. Two Australian case studies are described, with an ex-poste evaluation of the use of Web 2.0 tools. Conclusions are drawn as to the potential for the use of Web 2.0 tools for collaborative e-learning in higher education. In particular, design and integration of Web 2.0 tools should be closely related to curriculum intent and pedagogical requirements, care must be taken to provide clear guidance on both expected student activity and learning expectations, and there is a clear need to develop, support and encourage strong interaction both between teachers and students, and amongst the students themselves.

  3. Learning a specific content in technology education : Learning Study as collaborative method in Swedish preschool class using hands-on material 

    OpenAIRE

    Kilbrink, Nina; Bjurulf, Veronica; Blomberg, Ingela; Heidkamp, Anja; Hollsten, Ann-Christin

    2014-01-01

    This article describes the process of a learning study conducted in technology education in a Swedish preschool class. The learning study method used in this study is a collaborative method, where researchers and teachers work together as a team concerning teaching and learning about a specific learning object. The object of learning in this study concerns strong constructions and framed structures. This article describes how this learning study was conducted and discusses reflections made du...

  4. A Multi-Case Study of University Students' Language-Learning Experience Mediated by Mobile Technologies: A Socio-Cultural Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Qing

    2017-01-01

    Emerging mobile technologies can be considered a new form of social and cultural artefact that mediates people's language learning. This multi-case study investigates how mobile technologies mediate a group of Hong Kong university students' L2 learning, which serves as a lens with which to capture the personalised, unique, contextual and…

  5. The Effect of Individualized Technology-Mediated Feedback on EFL Learners’ Argumentative Essays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Soltanpour

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available This quantitative quasi-experimental study, which followed a pretest-posttest-delayed posttest design, was aimed at investigating the effect of individualized technology-mediated feedback (henceforth, ITMF on the overall quality of Iranian EFL learners’ argumentative essays. The effect of ITMF, as the experimental treatment, was compared with the common written corrective feedback (henceforth, CWCF strategies as the control treatment. 57 learners, studying at general EFL courses at upper-intermediate level, formed the participants. They were assigned to two groups: ITMF and CWCF, which, in this study, is meant as the pen-and-paper form of direct and indirect feedback. Each group received six sessions of treatment. The writing tasks and tests were all of argumentative type. First, whether there was any significant difference between the ITMF and CWCF in the overall quality of the essays was investigated. The ITMF group significantly outperformed the CWCF one. Then, whether the difference between the groups varied over time was explored, and it was revealed that the ITMF was still significantly superior over the CWCF. Next, whether there would be any significant change in the ITMF in the long term was examined, and no change was seen. The study supports the advocates of screencasting feedback, revision and teacher-learner negotiation following the feedback.

  6. Development and Validation of Protein Microarray Technology for Simultaneous Inflammatory Mediator Detection in Human Sera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Senthooran Selvarajah

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Biomarkers, including cytokines, can help in the diagnosis, prognosis, and prediction of treatment response across a wide range of disease settings. Consequently, the recent emergence of protein microarray technology, which is able to quantify a range of inflammatory mediators in a large number of samples simultaneously, has become highly desirable. However, the cost of commercial systems remains somewhat prohibitive. Here we show the development, validation, and implementation of an in-house microarray platform which enables the simultaneous quantitative analysis of multiple protein biomarkers. The accuracy and precision of the in-house microarray system were investigated according to the Food and Drug Administration (FDA guidelines for pharmacokinetic assay validation. The assay fell within these limits for all but the very low-abundant cytokines, such as interleukin- (IL- 10. Additionally, there were no significant differences between cytokine detection using our microarray system and the “gold standard” ELISA format. Crucially, future biomarker detection need not be limited to the 16 cytokines shown here but could be expanded as required. In conclusion, we detail a bespoke protein microarray system, utilizing well-validated ELISA reagents, that allows accurate, precise, and reproducible multiplexed biomarker quantification, comparable with commercial ELISA, and allowing customization beyond that of similar commercial microarrays.

  7. Loop-Mediated Isothermal Amplification (LAMP): Emergence As an Alternative Technology for Herbal Medicine Identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jing-Jian; Xiong, Chao; Liu, Yue; Liang, Jun-Song; Zhou, Xing-Wen

    2016-01-01

    Correct identification of medicinal plant ingredients is essential for their safe use and for the regulation of herbal drug supply chain. Loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) is a recently developed approach to identify herbal medicine species. This novel molecular biology technique enables timely and accurate testing, especially in settings where infrastructures to support polymerase chain reaction facilities are lacking. Studies that used this method have altered our view on the extent and complexity of herbal medicine identification. In this review, we give an introduction into LAMP analysis, covers the basic principles and important aspects in the development of LAMP analysis method. Then we presented a critical review of the application of LAMP-based methods in detecting and identifying raw medicinal plant materials and their processed products. We also provide a practical standard operating procedure (SOP) for the utilization of the LAMP protocol in herbal authentication, and consider the prospects of LAMP technology in the future developments of herbal medicine identification and the challenges associated with its application.

  8. Training Students in Distributed Collaboration: Experiences from Two Pilot Projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munkvold, Bjorn Erik; Line, Lars

    Distributed collaboration supported by different forms of information and communication technologies (ICT) is becoming increasingly widespread. Effective realization of technology supported, distributed collaboration requires learning and careful attention to both technological and organizational aspects of the collaboration. Despite increasing…

  9. Experimental comparison of 2D and 3D technology mediated paramedic-physician collaboration in remote emergency medical situations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sonnenwald, Diane H.; Maurin, Hanna; Cairns, Bruce

    2006-01-01

    techniques. This may be of benefit in diagnosing and treating patients in emergency situations where specialized medical expertise is not locally available. We conducted an experimental evaluation, simulating an emergency medical situation and examining the interaction between the attending paramedic...

  10. 24 February 2012 - Polish Vice-Rectors AGH University of Science and Technology Cracow visiting the ATLAS underground experimental area with Former Collaboration Spokesperson P. Jenni; Vice Rector J. Lis signs a collaboration agreement with A. Unnervik; Adviser T. Kurtyka and A. Siemko accompany the delegation throughout.

    CERN Multimedia

    Jean-Claude Gadmer

    2012-01-01

    24 February 2012 - Polish Vice-Rectors AGH University of Science and Technology Cracow visiting the ATLAS underground experimental area with Former Collaboration Spokesperson P. Jenni; Vice Rector J. Lis signs a collaboration agreement with A. Unnervik; Adviser T. Kurtyka and A. Siemko accompany the delegation throughout.

  11. Real-time Control Mediation in Agile Distributed Software Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Persson, John Stouby; Aaen, Ivan; Mathiassen, Lars

    2008-01-01

    Agile distributed environments pose particular challenges related to control of quality and collaboration in software development. Moreover, while face-to-face interaction is fundamental in agile development, distributed environments must rely extensively on mediated interactions. On this backdrop...... control was mediated over distance by technology through real-time exchanges. Contrary to previous research, the analysis suggests that both formal and informal elements of real-time mediated control were used; that evolving goals and adjustment of expectations were two of the main issues in real......-time mediated control exchanges; and, that the actors, despite distances in space and culture, developed a clan-like pattern mediated by technology to help control quality and collaboration in software development....

  12. Enabling distributed collaborative science

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hudson, T.; Sonnenwald, Diane H.; Maglaughlin, K.

    2000-01-01

    To enable collaboration over distance, a collaborative environment that uses a specialized scientific instrument called a nanoManipulator is evaluated. The nanoManipulator incorporates visualization and force feedback technology to allow scientists to see, feel, and modify biological samples bein...

  13. Progress of the research and development on the geological disposal technology of HLW with aid of the industry/university collaboration system and fixed term researcher system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Fumitaka; Sonobe, Hitoshi; Igarashi, Hiroshi

    2008-02-01

    In Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), various systems associated with the collaboration with industries and universities on the Nuclear Fuel Cycle and the Postdoctoral Fellow system, etc. are enacted. These systems have been operated considering the needs of JAEA's program, industry and academia, resultantly contributed, for example, to basic research and the project development. The activities under these collaboration systems contain personal exchanges, the publication of the accomplishments and utilization of those, in research and development concerning geological disposal technology of high-level radioactive waste (HLW). These activities have progressed in Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation (PNC) and Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute (JNC), which are the successive predecessors of JAEA, through JAEA. The accomplishments from these systems have been not only published as papers in journals and individual technical reports but also integrated into the project reports, accordingly contributed to the advancement of the national program on the geological disposal of HLW. In this report, the progress of the research and development under these systems was investigated from the beginning of the operation of the systems. The contribution to the research and development on geological disposal technology of HLW was also studied. On the basis of these studies, the future utilization of the systems of the collaboration was also discussed from the view point of the management of research and development program. A CD-ROM is attached as an appendix. (J.P.N.)

  14. High-throughput screening platform for engineered nanoparticle-mediated genotoxicity using CometChip technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Christa; Ge, Jing; Cohen, Joel; Pyrgiotakis, Georgios; Engelward, Bevin P; Demokritou, Philip

    2014-03-25

    The likelihood of intentional and unintentional engineered nanoparticle (ENP) exposure has dramatically increased due to the use of nanoenabled products. Indeed, ENPs have been incorporated in many useful products and have enhanced our way of life. However, there are many unanswered questions about the consequences of nanoparticle exposures, in particular, with regard to their potential to damage the genome and thus potentially promote cancer. In this study, we present a high-throughput screening assay based upon the recently developed CometChip technology, which enables evaluation of single-stranded DNA breaks, abasic sites, and alkali-sensitive sites in cells exposed to ENPs. The strategic microfabricated, 96-well design and automated processing improves efficiency, reduces processing time, and suppresses user bias in comparison to the standard comet assay. We evaluated the versatility of this assay by screening five industrially relevant ENP exposures (SiO2, ZnO, Fe2O3, Ag, and CeO2) on both suspension human lymphoblastoid (TK6) and adherent Chinese hamster ovary (H9T3) cell lines. MTT and CyQuant NF assays were employed to assess cellular viability and proliferation after ENP exposure. Exposure to ENPs at a dose range of 5, 10, and 20 μg/mL induced dose-dependent increases in DNA damage and cytotoxicity. Genotoxicity profiles of ZnO>Ag>Fe2O3>CeO2>SiO2 in TK6 cells at 4 h and Ag>Fe2O3>ZnO>CeO2>SiO2 in H9T3 cells at 24 h were observed. The presented CometChip platform enabled efficient and reliable measurement of ENP-mediated DNA damage, therefore demonstrating the efficacy of this powerful tool in nanogenotoxicity studies.

  15. Psychotherapy mediated by remote communication technologies: a meta-analytic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richards David

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Access to psychotherapy is limited by psychopathology (e.g. agoraphobia, physical disability, occupational or social constraints and/or residency in under-served areas. For these populations, interventions delivered via remote communication technologies (e.g. telephone, internet may be more appropriate. However, there are concerns that such delivery may influence the therapeutic relationship and thus reduce therapy effectiveness. This review aimed to determine the clinical effectiveness of remotely communicated, therapist-delivered psychotherapy. Methods Systematic review (including electronic database searching and correspondence with authors of randomised trials of individual remote psychotherapy. Electronic databases searched included MEDLINE (1966–2006, PsycInfo (1967–2006, EMBASE (1980–2006 and CINAHL databases (1982–2006. The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL and the Cochrane Collaboration Depression, Anxiety and Neurosis Controlled Trials Register (CCDAN-CTR. All searches were conducted to include studies with a publication date to July 2006. Results Thirteen studies were identified, ten assessing psychotherapy by telephone, two by internet and one by videoconference. Pooled effect sizes for remote therapy versus control conditions were 0.44 for depression (95%CI 0.29 to 0.59, 7 comparisons, n = 726 and 1.15 for anxiety-related disorders (95%CI 0.81 to 1.49, 3 comparisons, n = 168. There were few comparisons of remote versus face-to-face psychotherapy. Conclusion Remote therapy has the potential to overcome some of the barriers to conventional psychological therapy services. Telephone-based interventions are a particularly popular research focus and as a means of therapeutic communication may confer specific advantages in terms of their widespread availability and ease of operation. However, the available evidence is limited in quantity and quality. More rigorous trials are required to

  16. The use of ICT tools to support collaborative product development activities: evidences from Brazilian industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daisy Valle Enrique

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Paper aims This paper aims to understand the relationship between Information & Communication Technology (ICT, collaborative New Product Development (NPD and customer satisfaction (NPD performance. Originality We target the relationship between ICT, collaborative NPD and NPD performance. ICT is assessed as a set of specific tools adopted by the companies. Research method We test the mediating role of collaborative practices in the effect of ICT tools on customer satisfaction (as NPD performance by means of a survey of 105 Brazilian firms. Main findings Collaboration with customers and suppliers has an important role for customer satisfaction and the use of ICT has significant effect on NPD performance through the mediating role of collaborative practices. Implications for theory and practice Implementing only ICT tools is not enough to achieve higher level of success in NPD. Managers should first strength the relationship between stakeholders and then adopt ICT tools to support the cooperation.

  17. Proposal to negotiate a collaboration agreement related to the application of novel cavity fabrication techniques and Nb/Cu sputter coating technology in the field of superconducting RF for the Future Circular Collider (FCC) study

    CERN Document Server

    2015-01-01

    Proposal to negotiate a collaboration agreement related to the application of novel cavity fabrication techniques and Nb/Cu sputter coating technology in the field of superconducting RF for the Future Circular Collider (FCC) study

  18. 28 October 2013- Former US Vice President A. Gore signing the guest book with Technology Department Head F. Bordry, Head of International Relations R. Voss, Director for Research and Scientific Computing S. Bertolucci and CMS Collaboration Spokesperson J. Incandela.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2013-01-01

    28 October 2013- Former US Vice President A. Gore signing the guest book with Technology Department Head F. Bordry, Head of International Relations R. Voss, Director for Research and Scientific Computing S. Bertolucci and CMS Collaboration Spokesperson J. Incandela.

  19. Japanese Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology (MEXT) representative H. Ikukawa visiting ATLAS experiment with Collaboration Spokesperson P. Jenni, KEK representative T. Kondo and Advisor to CERN DG J. Ellis on 15 May 2007.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2007-01-01

    Japanese Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology (MEXT) representative H. Ikukawa visiting ATLAS experiment with Collaboration Spokesperson P. Jenni, KEK representative T. Kondo and Advisor to CERN DG J. Ellis on 15 May 2007.

  20. Signature of the CERN – EGO (European Gravitational Observatory) Agreement concerning Collaboration in Scientific, Technological, Educational and other Domains of Mutual Interest, by R. Heuer, Director-General and Prof. F. Ferrini.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2012-01-01

    Signature of the CERN – EGO (European Gravitational Observatory) Agreement concerning Collaboration in Scientific, Technological, Educational and other Domains of Mutual Interest, by R. Heuer, Director-General and Prof. F. Ferrini.

  1. 25 November 2008 - State Councilor in charge of Science, Technology and Education Y. Liu, People's Repblic of China, visiting AMS experiment with CERN Director-General R. Aymar and AMS Collaborator Y. Yang.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2008-01-01

    25 November 2008 - State Councilor in charge of Science, Technology and Education Y. Liu, People's Repblic of China, visiting AMS experiment with CERN Director-General R. Aymar and AMS Collaborator Y. Yang.

  2. 17 September 2013 - Polish Members of Parliament visiting the Tunnel at Point 2 with Senior Engineer, Technology Department A. Siemko and visiting the ALICE cavern with ALICE Collaboration, B. Erazmus

    CERN Multimedia

    Anna Pantelia

    2013-01-01

    17 September 2013 - Polish Members of Parliament visiting the Tunnel at Point 2 with Senior Engineer, Technology Department A. Siemko and visiting the ALICE cavern with ALICE Collaboration, B. Erazmus

  3. Virtual Teams and E-Collaboration Technology: A Case Study Investigating the Dynamics of Virtual Team Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattison, Theresa

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine to what extent the use of e-collaboration tools when used as a primary channel of communication affected virtual team members' trust and motivation, in a spatially dispersed environment. Structured interviews were conducted with 18 project managers, who were responsible for leading virtual projects…

  4. Wikis and Collaborative Learning in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Binbin; Niiya, Melissa; Warschauer, Mark

    2015-01-01

    While collaborative learning and collaborative writing can be of great value to student learning, the implementation of a technology-supported collaborative learning environment is a challenge. With their built-in features for supporting collaborative writing and social communication, wikis are a promising platform for collaborative learning;…

  5. Teacher Verbal Aggressiveness and Credibility Mediate the Relationship between Teacher Technology Policies and Perceived Student Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finn, Amber N.; Ledbetter, Andrew M.

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we extend previous work on teacher technology policies by refining the teacher technology policies instrument to account for the technology purpose (social, academic) and type (cell phone, laptop/tablet), and examine a model of teacher technology policies and perceived learning. We found that students are more sensitive to policies…

  6. A research model for architectural meetings to support the impementation of new building technologies through collaboration of brainpower

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gassel, van F.J.M.; Maas, G.J.; Bronswijk, van J.E.M.H.; Caldas, C.H.; O'Brien, W.J.; Chi, S.; Gong, J.; Luo, X.

    2009-01-01

    Implementing new technologies in the domain of "Robotics and Automation in Construction" is necessary to enhance the values for clients and society. The technologies are available but implementing them is the coming challenge. Building technologies are not used exhaustively or intelligently. In the

  7. Visioning future emergency healthcare collaboration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Söderholm, Hanna M.; Sonnenwald, Diane H.

    2010-01-01

    physicians, nurses, administrators, and information technology (IT) professionals working at large and small medical centers, and asked them to share their perspectives regarding 3DMC's potential benefits and disadvantages in emergency healthcare and its compatibility and/or lack thereof......New video technologies are emerging to facilitate collaboration in emergency healthcare. One such technology is 3D telepresence technology for medical consultation (3DMC) that may provide richer visual information to support collaboration between medical professionals to, ideally, enhance patient......, and resources. Both common and unique perceptions regarding 3DMC emerged,illustrating the need for 3DMC, and other collaboration technologies,to support interwoven situational awareness across different technological frames....

  8. CROSS-DISCIPLINARY PHYSICS AND RELATED AREAS OF SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY: Diffusion-Based Recommendation in Collaborative Tagging Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Ming-Sheng; Zhang, Zi-Ke

    2009-11-01

    Recently, collaborative tagging systems have attracted more and more attention and have been widely applied in web systems. Tags provide highly abstracted information about personal preferences and item content, and therefore have the potential to help in improving better personalized recommendations. We propose a diffusion-based recommendation algorithm considering the personal vocabulary and evaluate it in a real-world dataset: Del.icio.us. Experimental results demonstrate that the usage of tag information can significantly improve the accuracy of personalized recommendations.

  9. International workshop: islet transplantation without borders enabling islet transplantation in Greece with international collaboration and innovative technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papas, Klearchos K; Karatzas, Theodore; Berney, Thierry; Minor, Thomas; Pappas, Paris; Pattou, François; Shaw, James; Toso, Christian; Schuurman, Henk-Jan

    2013-01-01

    Recently, initiatives have been undertaken to establish an islet transplantation program in Athens, Greece. A major hurdle is the high cost associated with the establishment and maintenance of a clinical-grade islet manufacturing center. A collaboration was established with the University Hospitals of Geneva, Switzerland, to enable remote islet cell manufacturing with an established and validated fully operational team. However, remote islet manufacturing requires shipment of the pancreas from the procurement to the islet manufacturing site (in this case from anywhere in Greece to Geneva) and then shipment of the islets from the manufacturing site to the transplant site (from Geneva to Athens). To address challenges related to cold ischemia time of the pancreas and shipment time of islets, a collaboration was initiated with the University of Arizona, Tucson, USA. An international workshop was held in Athens, December 2011, to mark the start of this collaborative project. Experts in the field presented in three main sessions: (i) islet transplantation: state-of-the-art and the "network approach"; (ii) technical aspects of clinical islet transplantation and outcomes; and (iii) islet manufacturing - from the donated pancreas to the islet product. This manuscript presents a summary of the workshop. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  10. NanoJapan: international research experience for undergraduates program: fostering U.S.-Japan research collaborations in terahertz science and technology of nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Sarah R.; Matherly, Cheryl A.; Kono, Junichiro

    2014-09-01

    The international nature of science and engineering research demands that students have the skillsets necessary to collaborate internationally. However, limited options exist for science and engineering undergraduates who want to pursue research abroad. The NanoJapan International Research Experience for Undergraduates Program is an innovative response to this need. Developed to foster research and international engagement among young undergraduate students, it is funded by a National Science Foundation Partnerships for International Research and Education (PIRE) grant. Each summer, NanoJapan sends 12 U.S. students to Japan to conduct research internships with world leaders in terahertz (THz) spectroscopy, nanophotonics, and ultrafast optics. The students participate in cutting-edge research projects managed within the framework of the U.S-Japan NSF-PIRE collaboration. One of our focus topics is THz science and technology of nanosystems (or `TeraNano'), which investigates the physics and applications of THz dynamics of carriers and phonons in nanostructures and nanomaterials. In this article, we will introduce the program model, with specific emphasis on designing high-quality international student research experiences. We will specifically address the program curriculum that introduces students to THz research, Japanese language, and intercultural communications, in preparation for work in their labs. Ultimately, the program aims to increase the number of U.S. students who choose to pursue graduate study in this field, while cultivating a generation of globally aware engineers and scientists who are prepared for international research collaboration.

  11. Collaborative Economy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    collaborative economy and tourism Dianne Dredge and Szilvia Gyimóthy PART I - Theoretical explorations 2.Definitions and mapping the landscape in the collaborative economy Szilvia Gyimóthy and Dianne Dredge 3.Business models of the collaborative economy Szilvia Gyimóthy 4.Responsibility and care...... in the collaborative economy Dianne Dredge 5.Networked cultures in the collaborative economy Szilvia Gyimóthy 6.Policy and regulatory perspectives in the collaborative economy Dianne Dredge PART II - Disruptions, innovations and transformations 7.Regulating innovation in the collaborative economy: An examination...... localities of tourism Greg Richards 11.Collaborative economy and destination marketing organizations: A systems approach Jonathan Day 12.Working within the Collaborative Tourist Economy: The complex crafting of work and meaning Jane Widtfeldt Meged and Mathilde Dissing Christensen PART - III Encounters...

  12. eHealth Technology Competencies for Health Professionals Working in Home Care to Support Older Adults to Age in Place: Outcomes of a Two-Day Collaborative Workshop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barakat, Ansam; Woolrych, Ryan D; Sixsmith, Andrew; Kearns, William D; Kort, Helianthe S M

    2013-01-01

    The demand for care is increasing, whereas in the near future the number of people working in professional care will not match with the demand for care. eHealth technology can help to meet the growing demand for care. Despite the apparent positive effects of eHealth technology, there are still barriers to technology adoption related to the absence of a composite set of knowledge and skills among health care professionals regarding the use of eHealth technology. The objective of this paper is to discuss the competencies required by health care professionals working in home care, with eHealth technologies such as remote telecare and ambient assisted living (AAL), mobile health, and fall detection systems. A two-day collaborative workshop was undertaken with academics across multiple disciplines with experience in working on funded research regarding the application and development of technologies to support older people. The findings revealed that health care professionals working in home care require a subset of composite skills as well as technology-specific competencies to develop the necessary aptitude in eHealth care. This paper argues that eHealth care technology skills must be instilled in health care professionals to ensure that technologies become integral components of future care delivery, especially to support older adults to age in place. Educating health care professionals with the necessary skill training in eHealth care will improve service delivery and optimise the eHealth care potential to reduce costs by improving efficiency. Moreover, embedding eHealth care competencies within training and education for health care professionals ensures that the benefits of new technologies are realized by casting them in the context of the larger system of care. These care improvements will potentially support the independent living of older persons at home. This paper describes the health care professionals' competencies and requirements needed for the use of e

  13. The relationship between the external environment and physician e-mail communication: The mediating role of health information technology availability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazurenko, Olena; Hearld, Larry R; Menachemi, Nir

    Physician e-mail communication, with patients and other providers, is one of the cornerstones of effective care coordination but varies significantly across physicians. A physician's external environment may contribute to such variations by enabling or constraining a physician's ability to adopt innovations such as health information technology (HIT) that can be used to support e-mail communication. The aim of the study was to examine whether the relationship of the external environment and physician e-mail communication with patients and other providers is mediated by the practice's HIT availability. The data were obtained from the Health Tracking Physician Survey (2008) and the Area Resource File (2008). Cross-sectional multivariable subgroup path analysis was used to investigate the mediating role of HIT availability across 2,850 U.S. physicians. Solo physicians' perceptions about malpractice were associated with 0.97 lower odds (p communication with patients and other providers, as compared to group and hospital practices, even when mediated by HIT availability. Subgroup analyses indicated that different types of practices are responsive to the different dimensions of the external environment. Specifically, solo practitioners were more responsive to the availability of resources in their environment, with per capita income associated with lower likelihood of physician e-mail communication (OR = 0.99, p information technology availability, which in turn was associated with a greater likelihood of communicating via e-mail with patients (OR = 1.02, p communication and the external environment is mediated by the practice's HIT availability. Efforts to improve physician e-mail communication and HIT adoption may need to reflect the varied perceptions of different types of practices.

  14. Literacy Integration of Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge (TPACK) in Elementary Schools: A Case Study of Collaborative Leadership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Charlene A.

    2016-01-01

    Integration of educational technology in the context of e-books has experienced slow implementation in elementary schools, specifically in early literacy instruction. Technological pedagogical content knowledge (TPACK) is a framework for metacognitive reflection on how the learning of subject matter can be facilitated through the use of…

  15. Collaboration through Flickr & Skype: Can Web 2.0 Technology Substitute the Traditional Design Studio in Higher Design Education?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleischmann, Katja

    2014-01-01

    Technology has not only changed the work practice of designers but also how design is taught and learned. The emergence of digital technology has made computer labs a central learning space for design students. Since this change, studio-based learning in its traditional sense appears to be in decline in higher education institutions. This is in…

  16. Contradictory directionalities of digital learning technology and its implications for the scope of imaginable possibilities for collaborating

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chimirri, Niklas Alexander

    Contradictory learning directionalities are immanent to digital learning technology: Any technology suggests a limited multiplicity of situated uses in a learning practice, of understandings of how to learn and of what learning should be about. Herewith any technology offers a scope of imaginable...... possibilities for acting through it. Sociomaterially maintained learning directionalities – among others through the intended uses of learning technology in educational arrangements – afford the enactment of a delimited ensemble of experiential modes, sensualities, epistemologies, knowledges, and future hopes....... Next to offering opportunities to expand the learners’ scope of possibilities for transforming these learning directionalities together, digital learning technology thus also promotes the taken for grantedness of particular understandings of (most often instrumental) learning. They may consequently...

  17. Collaborative Economy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    that are emerging from them, and how governments are responding to these new challenges. In doing so, the book provides both theoretical and practical insights into the future of tourism in a world that is, paradoxically, becoming both increasingly collaborative and individualized. Table of Contents Preface 1.The...... collaborative economy and tourism Dianne Dredge and Szilvia Gyimóthy PART I - Theoretical explorations 2.Definitions and mapping the landscape in the collaborative economy Szilvia Gyimóthy and Dianne Dredge 3.Business models of the collaborative economy Szilvia Gyimóthy 4.Responsibility and care...... in the collaborative economy Dianne Dredge 5.Networked cultures in the collaborative economy Szilvia Gyimóthy 6.Policy and regulatory perspectives in the collaborative economy Dianne Dredge PART II - Disruptions, innovations and transformations 7.Regulating innovation in the collaborative economy: An examination...

  18. Working Collaboratively

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holder, Anna; Lovett, George

    2009-01-01

    identified as a transformative global force of the last decade, most notably in knowledge and information publishing, communication and creation. This paper presents a structured conversation on changing understandings of collaboration, and the realities of collaborative methodology in architectural work...

  19. Mediation of young children’s digital technology use: The parents’ perspective

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šmahelová, M.; Juhová, D.; Čermák, Ivo; Šmahel, D.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 11, č. 3 (2017), č. článku 4. ISSN 1802-7962 Institutional support: RVO:68081740 Keywords : mediation strategies * online opportunities * online risks * thematic analysis * children Subject RIV: AN - Psychology OBOR OECD: Psychology (including human - machine relations) https://cyberpsychology.eu/article/view/8561/7732

  20. Accelerating technology transfer from federal laboratories to the private sector by industrial R and D collaborations - A new business model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LOMBANA,CESAR A.; ROMIG JR.,ALTON D.; LINTON,JONATHAN D.; MARTINEZ,J. LEONARD

    2000-04-13

    Many important products and technologies were developed in federal laboratories and were driven initially by national needs and for federal applications. For example, the clean room technology that enhanced the growth of the semiconductor industry was developed at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) decades ago. Similarly, advances in micro-electro-mechanical-systems (MEMS)--an important set of process technologies vital for product miniaturization--are occurring at SNL. Each of the more than 500 federal laboratories in the US, are sources of R and D that contributes to America's economic vitality, productivity growth and, technological innovation. However, only a fraction of the science and technology available at the federal laboratories is being utilized by industry. Also, federal laboratories have not been applying all the business development processes necessary to work effectively with industry in technology commercialization. This paper addresses important factors that federal laboratories, federal agencies, and industry must address to translate these under utilized technologies into profitable products in the industrial sector.

  1. Critical collaborative research: focus on the meaning of collaboration and on mediational tools Pesquisa crítica de colaboração: foco no significado de colaboração e nas ferramentas mediacionais

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Cecília Camargo Magalhães

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This text aims at discussing the concept of collaboration based on Applied Linguistics (MAGALHÃES, 1990, 1994, 2007 and on a socio-culturalhistorical perspective - SCHAT (VYGOTSKY, 1934, LEONTIEV, 1977. Situated within a critical framework, collaboration is first focused from its methodological viewpoint, and later by its socio-historical and political empowering characteristics. The text shows examples from four different historical moments of the construction of the concept of collaboration.Este texto tem por objetivo discutir o conceito de colaboração com base na Linguística Aplicada (MAGALHÃES, 1990, 1994, 2007 e em uma perspectiva sócio-histórico-cultural - TASHC (VYGOTSKY, 1934, LEONTIEV, 1977. Situada em um quadro crítico, a colaboração é enfocada, em primeiro lugar, por seu viés metodológico e, em seguida, por sua característica de empoderamento a partir das relações sócio-históricas e políticas. O texto traz exemplos de quatro momentos de construção do conceito de colaboração.

  2. Technical Mediation and Subjectivation: Tracing and Extending Foucault's Philosophy of Technology.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dorrestijn, Steven

    2012-01-01

    This article focuses on tracing and extending Michel Foucault’s contributions to the philosophy of technology. At first sight his work on power seems the most relevant. In his later work on subjectivation and ethics technology is absent. However, notably by recombining Foucault’s work on power with

  3. On thinging things and serving services: technological mediation and inseparable goods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pieters, Wolter

    In our high-tech society, the design process involves profound questions about the effects of the resulting goods, and the responsibilities of designers. In the philosophy of technology, effects of “things‿ on user experience and behaviour have been discussed in terms of the concept of technological

  4. Characterizing Learning Mediated by Mobile Technologies: A Cultural-Historical Activity Theoretical Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nouri, Jalal; Cerratto-Pargman, Teresa

    2015-01-01

    Mobile technologies have not yet triggered the knowledge revolution in schools anticipated, in particular, by the telecommunications industry. On the contrary, mobile technologies remain extensively used outside the frontiers of formal education. The reasons for this are many and varied. In this paper, we concentrate on those associated with the…

  5. XD Metrics on Demand Value Analytics: Visualizing the Impact of Internal Information Technology Investments on External Funding, Publications, and Collaboration Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Scrivner

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Many universities invest substantial resources in the design, deployment, and maintenance of campus-based cyberinfrastructure (CI. To justify the expense, it is important that university administrators and others understand and communicate the value of these internal investments in terms of scholarly impact. This paper introduces two visualizations and their usage in the Value Analytics (VA module for Open XD metrics on demand (XDMoD, which enable analysis of external grant funding income, scholarly publications, and collaboration networks. The VA module was developed by Indiana University’s (IU Research Technologies division, Pervasive Technology Institute, and the CI for Network Science Center (CNS, in conjunction with the University at Buffalo’s Center for Computational Research. It provides diverse visualizations of measures of information technology (IT usage, external funding, and publications in support of IT strategic decision-making. This paper details the data, analysis workflows, and visual mappings used in two VA visualizations that aim to communicate the value of different IT usage in terms of NSF and NIH funding, resulting publications, and associated research collaborations. To illustrate the feasibility of measuring IT values on research, we measured its financial and academic impact from the period between 2012 and 2017 for IU. The financial return on investment (ROI is measured in terms of IU funding, totaling $339,013,365 for 885 NIH and NSF projects associated with IT usage, and the academic ROI constitutes 968 publications associated with 83 of these NSF and NIH awards. In addition, the results show that Medical Specialties, Brain Research, and Infectious Diseases are the top three scientific disciplines ranked by the number of publications during the given time period.

  6. CMS Collaboration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faridah Mohammad Idris; Wan Ahmad Tajuddin Wan Abdullah; Zainol Abidin Ibrahim

    2013-01-01

    Full-text: CMS Collaboration is an international scientific collaboration located at European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Switzerland, dedicated in carried out research on experimental particle physics. Consisting of 179 institutions from 41 countries from all around the word, CMS Collaboration host a general purpose detector for example the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) for members in CMS Collaboration to conduct experiment from the collision of two proton beams accelerated to a speed of 8 TeV in the LHC ring. In this paper, we described how the CMS detector is used by the scientist in CMS Collaboration to reconstruct the most basic building of matter. (author)

  7. Beyond knowledge and skills: the use of a Delphi study to develop a technology-mediated teaching strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowe, Michael; Frantz, Jose; Bozalek, Vivienne

    2013-04-10

    While there is evidence to suggest that teaching practices in clinical education should include activities that more accurately reflect the real world, many educators base their teaching on transmission models that encourage the rote learning of knowledge and technical skills. Technology-mediated instruction may facilitate the development of professional attributes that go beyond "having" knowledge and skills, but there is limited evidence for how to integrate technology into these innovative teaching approaches. This study used a modified Delphi method to help identify the professional attributes of capable practitioners, the approaches to teaching that may facilitate the development of these attributes, and finally, how technology could be integrated with those teaching strategies in order to develop capable practitioners. Open-ended questions were used to gather data from three different expert panels, and results were thematically analysed. Clinical educators should not view knowledge, skills and attitudes as a set of products of learning, but rather as a set of attributes that are developed during a learning process. Participants highlighted the importance of continuing personal and professional development that emphasised the role of values and emotional response to the clinical context. To develop these attributes, clinical educators should use teaching activities that are learner-centred, interactive, integrated, reflective and that promote engagement. When technology-mediated teaching activities are considered, they should promote the discussion of clinical encounters, facilitate the sharing of resources and experiences, encourage reflection on the learning process and be used to access content outside the classroom. In addition, educational outcomes must drive the integration of technology into teaching practice, rather than the features of the technology. There is a need for a cultural change in clinical education, in which those involved with the

  8. Technology Trust and E-Banking Adoption: The Mediating Effect of Customer Relationship Management Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samsudin Wahab

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The electronic revolution in the Malaysian banking sector has started in the 1970's. The first visible form of electronic innovation in the Malaysian banking industry was the introduction of Automated Teller Machines in 1981. Finally, on June 1, 2000, the Malaysian Central Bank gave the green light for locally owned commercial banks to offer Internet banking services. Due to the drastic changes in the business environment, it leads financial institutions to revise their marketing strategies to stress long-lasting relationships with customers. Relationships is important criteria in the selection of private bank. In many conditions, customer satisfaction mediates the relationship between antecedent’s factors and marketing performance. Hence, CRM performance is about maintaining good relationship and repurchases behavior, word-of-mouth and customer retention. Trust has been studied in traditional physical commercial environments. In the marketing and management literatures, trust is strongly associated with attitudes toward products, services, and purchasing behaviors. So that, the main objective of this research paper is to investigate the role of CRM performance as the mediator in the relationship between trust and E-Banking adoption. Hence, this empirical paper confirmed the role of customer relationship management performance as the mediators in the relationship between trust and electronic banking adoption.Key words: Trust, Customer Relationship Management Performance, E-Banking Adoption

  9. CALL from an Ecological Perspective: How a Teacher Perceives Affordance and Fosters Learner Agency in a Technology-Mediated Language Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qian; Chao, Chin-Chi

    2018-01-01

    The possibility of exploiting technology for more robust and meaningful learning and teaching has invoked messianic responses from the language education community. Yet to be explored are teachers' pedagogical choices based on the perceived technological affordances as well as interactions between teacher and student agency mediated by these…

  10. Information Technology as the Paradigm High-Speed Management Support Tool: The Uses of Computer Mediated Communication, Virtual Realism, and Telepresence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newby, Gregory B.

    Information technologies such as computer mediated communication (CMC), virtual reality, and telepresence can provide the communication flow required by high-speed management techniques that high-technology industries have adopted in response to changes in the climate of competition. Intra-corporate CMC might be used for a variety of purposes…

  11. Collaborative Economy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    collaborative economy and tourism Dianne Dredge and Szilvia Gyimóthy PART I - Theoretical explorations 2.Definitions and mapping the landscape in the collaborative economy Szilvia Gyimóthy and Dianne Dredge 3.Business models of the collaborative economy Szilvia Gyimóthy 4.Responsibility and care...... and similar phenomena are among these collective innovations in tourism that are shaking the very bedrock of an industrial system that has been traditionally sustained along commercial value chains. To date there has been very little investigation of these trends, which have been inspired by, amongst other...... in the collaborative economy Dianne Dredge 5.Networked cultures in the collaborative economy Szilvia Gyimóthy 6.Policy and regulatory perspectives in the collaborative economy Dianne Dredge PART II - Disruptions, innovations and transformations 7.Regulating innovation in the collaborative economy: An examination...

  12. CO2 CAPTURE PROJECT - AN INTEGRATED, COLLABORATIVE TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT PROJECT FOR NEXT GENERATION CO2 SEPARATION, CAPTURE AND GEOLOGIC SEQUESTRATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Helen Kerr

    2003-08-01

    The CO{sub 2} Capture Project (CCP) is a joint industry project, funded by eight energy companies (BP, ChevronTexaco, EnCana, Eni, Norsk Hydro, Shell, Statoil, and Suncor) and three government agencies (1) European Union (DG Res & DG Tren), (2) Norway (Klimatek) and (3) the U.S.A. (Department of Energy). The project objective is to develop new technologies, which could reduce the cost of CO{sub 2} capture and geologic storage by 50% for retrofit to existing plants and 75% for new-build plants. Technologies are to be developed to ''proof of concept'' stage by the end of 2003. The project budget is approximately $24 million over 3 years and the work program is divided into eight major activity areas: (1) Baseline Design and Cost Estimation--defined the uncontrolled emissions from each facility and estimate the cost of abatement in $/tonne CO{sub 2}. (2) Capture Technology, Post Combustion: technologies, which can remove CO{sub 2} from exhaust gases after combustion. (3) Capture Technology, Oxyfuel: where oxygen is separated from the air and then burned with hydrocarbons to produce an exhaust with high CO{sub 2} for storage. (4) Capture Technology, Pre -Combustion: in which, natural gas and petroleum coke are converted to hydrogen and CO{sub 2} in a reformer/gasifier. (5) Common Economic Model/Technology Screening: analysis and evaluation of each technology applied to the scenarios to provide meaningful and consistent comparison. (6) New Technology Cost Estimation: on a consistent basis with the baseline above, to demonstrate cost reductions. (7) Geologic Storage, Monitoring and Verification (SMV): providing assurance that CO{sub 2} can be safely stored in geologic formations over the long term. (8) Non-Technical: project management, communication of results and a review of current policies and incentives governing CO{sub 2} capture and storage. Technology development work dominated the past six months of the project. Numerous studies are making

  13. MODELO DE VIGILANCIA TECNOLÓGICA APOYADO POR RECOMENDACIONES BASADAS EN EL FILTRADO COLABORATIVO / TECHNOLOGY SURVEILLANCE MODEL SUPPORTED BY RECOMMENDATIONS BASED ON COLLABORATIVE FILTERING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoel Abreu-Lee

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available La vigilancia tecnológica en centros de investigación y universidades está enfocada a realizar un seguimiento sistemático sobre el desarrollo de líneas de investigación, investigadores líderes, posibilidades de colaboración científico-tecnológica y también al conocimiento de las tendencias actuales desde la investigación. Todo lo anteriormente expresado permite guiar las investigaciones y apoyar la estrategia científico-tecnológica. El presente trabajo propone un modelo de vigilancia tecnológica apoyado de un sistema de recomendaciones, como una aplicación que está centrada en las preferencias de los investigadores en universidades y centros de investigación. Para proponer las recomendaciones se emplea el filtrado colaborativo, técnica que utiliza información del comportamiento pasado de los investigadores y de las opiniones o valoraciones de la comunidad científica a la que pertenecen. Este nuevo enfoque permite realizar propuestas de colaboración y temas de interés que se discuten en la comunidad científica en la que tiene lugar, de manera automática y proactiva.AbstractTechnology surveillance has a special place nowadays, in the success and development of R+D+i process, in research centers and academic environment. Technology surveillance in universities and research centers is focused in the constant analysis of the research lines, research leaders, collaborations chances and current trends in specific research fields. This paper presents a technology surveillance model supported by recommendations by an application that takes into account the preferences of the researchers in the academic environment. The recommender system uses the collaborative filtering technique in order to compute the behavior and past user interactions and infer the recommendations. This approach allows recommending useful, automatic and proactive collaboration possibilities and topics of interest which are discussed within the scientific

  14. Pilot research project of risk communication on nuclear technology and its utilization. Toward communication and collaboration with community

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuchiya, Tomoko

    2003-01-01

    Although the importance of risk communication has been pointed out over the last decade in nuclear community, both public authorities and nuclear industry have not conducted the definite actions yet. It will be reflected in the public eye that nuclear community's attitude toward communication and consultation with the public about risk issues is half-hearted, comparing with chemical and food safety fields which recently launched their risk communication activities. In this study, we conduct risk communication experiments on some risk issues associated with nuclear technology and its utilization in Tokai village, for the purpose of establishment of risk communication in our society that might be one of the new relationships between science and technology and society. The outcomes of FY2002 study are the following threefold; 1) preparation of risk communication experiments on nuclear technology and its utilization, 2) assessment of social effects of risk communication activities, 3) preparation of practical guidebook for risk communication experiments. (J.P.N.)

  15. Simulating care: technology-mediated learning in twenty-first century nursing education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diener, Elizabeth; Hobbs, Nelda

    2012-01-01

    The increased reliance on simulation classrooms has proven successful in learning skills. Questions persist concerning the ability of technology-driven robotic devices to form and cultivate caring behaviors, or sufficiently develop interactive nurse-client communication necessary in the context of nursing. This article examines the disconnects created by use of simulation technology in nursing education, raising the question: "Can learning of caring-as-being, be facilitated in simulation classrooms?" We propose that unless time is spent with human beings in the earliest stages of nursing education, transpersonal caring relationships do not have space to develop. Learning, crafting, and maturation of caring behaviors threatens to become a serendipitous event or is no longer perceived as an essential characteristic of nursing. Technology does not negate caring-the isolation it fosters makes transpersonal caring all the more important. We are called to create a new paradigm for nursing education that merges Nightingale's vision with technology's promise. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. An epidemiological study of cancer incidence and mortality among nuclear industry workers at Lucas Heights Science and Technology centre in collaboration with IARC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Habib, R.R.; Kaldor, J.

    1999-01-01

    An epidemiological study is being undertaken at Lucas Heights Science and Technology Centre (LHSTC) where the only nuclear reactor in Australia has been in operation since 1958. The study is part of an international collaborative study coordinated by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC), and has dual objectives, first to assess whether workers at LHSTC have had different levels of mortality or cancer incidence from the New South Wales and the Australian populations, and second, as part of the IARC study, to estimate as precisely as possible, through collaboration with IARC, the risk of contracting cancer from low-level, long-term exposure to ionising radiation. The research project is a retrospective cohort study based on records of employment and exposure to radiation kept at LHSTC since 1957. Electronic linkage of all the available dosimetry and employment information with national registers of cancer incidence and mortality is being undertaken for the cohort of LHSTC workers, to allow for a passive follow-up of more than 7000 workers employed from 1957 onwards

  17. Collaborative Action Research Approach Promoting Professional Development for Teachers of Students with Visual Impairment in Assistive Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argyropoulos, Vassilios; Nikolaraizi, Magda; Tsiakali, Thomai; Kountrias, Polychronis; Koutsogiorgou, Sofia-Marina; Martos, Aineias

    2014-01-01

    This paper highlights the framework and discusses the results of an action research project which aimed to facilitate the adoption of assistive technology devices and specialized software by teachers of students with visual impairment via a digital educational game, developed specifically for this project. The persons involved in this…

  18. Collaboration in Science and Technology. An Inter-American Perspective. Issues in International Education Report No. 4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, K. N.

    Political events in Latin America in recent years have caused universities to re-examine their goals and external relationships, especially in terms of science and technology. The reexamination has led to a renewed stress on basic science education and an explosive growth of graduate education. In view of these structural changes, almost every…

  19. Fostering Learner Autonomy in English for Science: A Collaborative Digital Video Project in a Technological Learning Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafner, Christoph A.; Miller, Lindsay

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports on the syllabus design and implementation of an English for Science and Technology (EST) course at an English-medium university in Hong Kong. The course combined elements of project-based learning and a "pedagogy for multiliteracies" (New London Group, 1996) to produce a strong learner autonomy focus. A major component…

  20. Technology Training for Older Job-Seeking Adults: The Efficacy of a Program Offered through a University-Community Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taha, Jessica; Czaja, Sara J.; Sharit, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Many older adults who lose their jobs face challenges in finding new employment due to fundamental limitations in their technology skills. While training could give them the skills they need, older workers often have less access to training programs than younger workers. This study examined the feasibility of using an e-learning training program…

  1. Petroleum R and D collaboration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kerr, R.

    1995-01-01

    Conditions for collaboration in research and development (R and D) were developed based on a decision-tree analysis. A key requirement for effective R and D collaboration was stated to be the company's ability to internalize a significant portion of the benefits. This was seen as the principal factor that determined good collaborators and good industries for collaboration. It was noted that collaboration benefits can also be improved through R and D exchanges in collaborative associations. Simple decision-tree analysis tended to understate the advantages of collaboration. Portfolio risk reduction and inter-project synergies were significant additional advantages. Collaborative R and D was said to be the preferred route for the development of a broad base of petroleum-related technologies. 5 tabs., 2 figs

  2. Collaborative experience

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Thomas Bøtker

    -Doerr, 1996) and has been shown to have a positive effect to the outcome of collaborative R&D (Sampson, 2005). Anand & Khanna (2000), furthermore, hypothesized that research joint ventures are more ambiguous than marketing joint ventures and even more the licensing and showed that the effect of collaborative......Literature review: Collaborative experience has been shown to have a positive effect on the collaborative outcome in general (Anand & Khanna, 2000; Kale, Dyer & Singh, 2002). Furthermore, it has been linked to the ability to exploit the network of the firm for learning (Powell, Koput and Smith...... experience was largest the higher the hypothesized ambiguity. Theoretically contribution: This research project aims at contributing to existing literature by arguing, that collaborative experience is a moderating variable which moderates the effects on collaborative outcome from the level of complexity...

  3. The Los Alamos, Sandia, and Livermore Laboratories: Integration and collaboration solving science and technology problems for the nation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-12-01

    More than 40 years ago, three laboratories were established to take on scientific responsibility for the nation`s nuclear weapons - Los Alamos, Sandia, and Livermore. This triad of laboratories has provided the state-of-the-art science and technology to create America`s nuclear deterrent and to ensure that the weapons are safe, secure, and to ensure that the weapons are safe, secure, and reliable. These national security laboratories carried out their responsibilities through intense efforts involving almost every field of science, engineering, and technology. Today, they are recognized as three of the world`s premier research and development laboratories. This report sketches the history of the laboratories and their evolution to an integrated three-laboratory system. The characteristics that make them unique are described and some of the major contributions they have made over the years are highlighted.

  4. A Novel Collaborative Protocol for Successful Management of Penile Pain Mediated by Radiculitis of Sacral Spinal Nerve Roots From Tarlov Cysts

    OpenAIRE

    Goldstein, Irwin; Komisaruk, Barry R.; Rubin, Rachel S.; Goldstein, Sue W.; Elliott, Stacy; Kissee, Jennifer; Kim, Choll W.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Since 14 years of age, the patient had experienced extreme penile pain within seconds of initial sexual arousal through masturbation. Penile pain was so severe that he rarely proceeded to orgasm or ejaculation. After 7 years of undergoing multiple unsuccessful treatments, he was concerned for his long-term mental health and for his future ability to have relationships. Aim: To describe a novel collaboration among specialists in sexual medicine, neurophysiology, and spine surg...

  5. Internet Self-Efficacy Does Not Predict Student Use of Internet-Mediated Educational Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchanan, Tom; Joban, Sanjay; Porter, Alan

    2014-01-01

    Two studies tested the hypothesis that use of learning technologies among undergraduate psychology students was associated with higher Internet self-efficacy (ISE). In Study 1, the ISE scores of 86 students were found not to be associated with either attitudes towards, or measured use of, blogs and wikis as part of an IT skills course. ISE was…

  6. Training and the Commitment of Outsourced Information Technologies' Workers: Psychological Contract Fulfillment as a Mediator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontinha, Rita; Chambel, Maria José; De Cuyper, Nele

    2014-01-01

    Outsourced workers in information technologies (IT) generally have high skills and a high value on the job market. Their IT outsourcing organizations are likely to provide them with training, in the first place for skill development, but perhaps also as a way to bind the workers to them. This can be understood along the role of the psychological…

  7. Designing the public sphere: information technologies and the politics of mediation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verbeek, Peter P.C.C.; Floridi, Luciano

    2014-01-01

    After a few decades of living with Information and Communication Technologies, we have got so much used to their presence in our daily lives, that we hardly realize that the societal and cultural revolution they are causing has only just begun. While most discussions still focus on privacy issues

  8. Designing a good life: a matrix for the technological mediation of morality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swierstra, Tsjalling; Waelbers, Katinka

    2012-03-01

    Technologies fulfill a social role in the sense that they influence the moral actions of people, often in unintended and unforeseen ways. Scientists and engineers are already accepting much responsibility for the technological, economical and environmental aspects of their work. This article asks them to take an extra step, and now also consider the social role of their products. The aim is to enable engineers to take a prospective responsibility for the future social roles of their technologies by providing them with a matrix that helps to explore in advance how emerging technologies might plausibly affect the reasons behind people's (moral) actions. On the horizontal axis of the matrix, we distinguished the three basic types of reasons that play a role in practical judgment: what is the case, what can be done and what should be done. On the vertical axis we distinguished the morally relevant classes of issues: stakeholders, consequences and the good life. To illustrate how this matrix may work in practice, the final section applies the matrix to the case of the Google PowerMeter. © The Author(s) 2010. This article is published with open access at Springerlink.com

  9. Beyond Rational Choice: How Teacher Engagement with Technology Is Mediated by Culture and Emotions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrotta, Carlo

    2017-01-01

    This paper focuses on the relationship between rational beliefs, culture and agency in formal school settings. This relationship is analysed in the context of the adoption of technological innovations. Interviews and focus groups with 39 secondary teachers from England and other European countries were carried out. The analysis highlights a number…

  10. Collaborations in fusion research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnes, D.; Davis, S.; Roney, P.

    1995-01-01

    This paper reviews current experimental collaborative efforts in the fusion community and extrapolates to operational scenarios for the Tokamak Physics Experiment (TPX) and the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). Current requirements, available technologies and tools, and problems, issues and concerns are discussed. This paper specifically focuses on the issues that apply to experimental operational collaborations. Special requirements for other types of collaborations, such as theoretical or design and construction efforts, will not be addressed. Our current collaborative efforts have been highly successful, even though the tools in use will be viewed as primitive by tomorrow's standards. An overview of the tools and technologies in today's collaborations can be found in the first section of this paper. The next generation of fusion devices will not be primarily institutionally based, but will be national (TPX) and international (ITER) in funding, management, operation and in ownership of scientific results. The TPX will present the initial challenge of real-time remotely distributed experimental data analysis for a steady state device. The ITER will present new challenges with the possibility of several remote control rooms all participating in the real-time operation of the experimental device. A view to the future of remote collaborations is provided in the second section of this paper

  11. Wiring Role Taking in Collaborative Learning Environments. SNA and Semantic Web can improve CSCL script?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola Capuano

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Over the past years the concept of role in distance education has become a promising construct for analysing and facilitating collaborative processes and outcomes. Designing effective collaborative learning processes is a complex task that can be supported by existing good practices formulated as pedagogical patterns or scripts. Over the past years, the research on technology enhanced learning has shown that collaborative scripts for learning act as mediating artefacts not only designing educational scenarios but also structuring and prescribing roles and activities. Conversely, existing learning systems are not able to provide dynamic role management in the definition and execution of collaborative scripts. This work proposes the application of Social Network Analysis in order to evaluate the expertise level of a learner when he/she is acting, with an assigned role, within the execution of a collaborative script. Semantic extensions to both IMS Learning Design and Information Packaging specifications are also proposed to support roles management.

  12. Development of advanced technology for stable support of Korean style space foods by the collaboration with an industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Ju Woon; Byun, Myung Woo; Kim, Jae Hun; Song, Beom Suk; Choi, Jong Il; Park, Jin Kyu; Park, Jae Nam

    2007-06-01

    Keeping pace with the space era of 21 century, Korea gets an opportunity to participate in a project in which the manned spaceship and the international space station will be developed. The Korean astronaut program is so the first step to open a new field of space development project that needs many researches and experiments to implement the mission successfully. Because food is an important part of life, it is imperative that the space food system is the best it can be. The supply of food must be nourishing and tasty so astronauts maintain their health during their important stays in space. Therefore, this study was conducted to develop space foods maintaining microbial safety and sensory characteristics, and the objective is to produce basic information about the processing technology of space foods. The results showed that combination treatment of radiation technology might be helpful for extending the space foods such as space Kimchi. And the development of a new herbal preparation (HemoHIM) for immune and hematopoiesis modulation as well as oxidative damage inhibition in space environment might be helpful for improving the astronaut's health

  13. Development of advanced technology for stable support of Korean style space foods by the collaboration with an industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ju Woon; Byun, Myung Woo; Kim, Jae Hun; Song, Beom Suk; Choi, Jong Il; Park, Jin Kyu; Park, Jae Nam

    2007-06-15

    Keeping pace with the space era of 21 century, Korea gets an opportunity to participate in a project in which the manned spaceship and the international space station will be developed. The Korean astronaut program is so the first step to open a new field of space development project that needs many researches and experiments to implement the mission successfully. Because food is an important part of life, it is imperative that the space food system is the best it can be. The supply of food must be nourishing and tasty so astronauts maintain their health during their important stays in space. Therefore, this study was conducted to develop space foods maintaining microbial safety and sensory characteristics, and the objective is to produce basic information about the processing technology of space foods. The results showed that combination treatment of radiation technology might be helpful for extending the space foods such as space Kimchi. And the development of a new herbal preparation (HemoHIM) for immune and hematopoiesis modulation as well as oxidative damage inhibition in space environment might be helpful for improving the astronaut's health.

  14. Collaborative Economy and Tourism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dredge, Dianne; Gyimóthy, Szilvia

    2017-01-01

    The digital collaborative economy is one of the most fascinating developments to have claimed our attention in the last decade. Not only does it defy clear definition, but its historical links back to non-monetised sharing and gift economies and its contemporary foundations in monetising idling...... or spare capacity make it difficult to theorise. In this chapter, we lay the foundation for a social science approach to the exploration of the collaborative economy and its relationship with tourism. We argue that “collaborative” and “economy” should be conceptualised in a broad and inclusive manner...... in order to avoid narrow theorisations and blinkered accounts that focus only on digitally-mediated, monetised transactions. A balance between individual and collective dimensions of the collaborative economy is also necessary if we are to understand its societal implications....

  15. Technologically-mediated communication: student expectations and experiences in a FOMO society

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela T. Ragusa

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract While technology enables a wider section of society to access higher education, accessing, as a process, fundamentally differs from acquiring the individual and systemic skills required for online learning. This study presents primary data about perceptions of, and experiences with, online learning in an Australian university from a survey of 289 distance education (DE students. Epistemologically, it prioritises giving agency and voice to an increasingly disempowered collective, online learners, who often are institutionally pursued for economic advantage, rather than pedagogical interest in serving students’ unique, individual needs/preferences. Participants’ comparison of face-to-face and online learning experiences allowed for benefits and disadvantages of online learning to emerge from lived-experiences. While a key benefit of online learning was its perceived ‘flexibility’, findings revealed difference between students’ conceptualisation of flexibility and institutional realities. Although DE students longed for non-technologically-medicated communication with peers and lecturers, the process of learning how to become a DE student failed to address students’ needs/concerns beyond technical skill acquisition and subject content mastery. Students’ ‘fear they were missing out’ (FOMO on ‘better’ internal classroom and learning experiences was a key limitation 85% perceived about DE. Whereas traditional classroom experiences generally were recalled favourably, online learning was described by its shortcomings. Findings demonstrate need for deeper investigation of how/why educational technologies are implemented. Conclusions suggest critical research investigating whether embedded technologies meet student and/or institutional needs and aspirations in globally competitive learning environments may assuage DE’s stigma, realign expectations and improve teaching/learning experiences.

  16. ASSESSMENT TECHNIQUES OF ENGLISH READING COMPREHENSION MEDIATED BY TECHNOLOGIES TO IMPROVE COLLEGE STUDENT’S ACHIEVEMENT.

    OpenAIRE

    Ochoa-Vásquez, Miguel A.; Ramírez-Montoya, María S.

    2016-01-01

    Improving reading comprehension skills is fundamental to those students willing to enroll in undergraduate studies. This sequential-explanatory mixed methods research design attempted to measure the impact that English reading comprehension assessment had on 96 college students’ school performance, after receiving a 15-hour instruction on reading evaluating techniques in technological-enriched environments. The data was collected through reading comprehension pre/post-tests and a semi-structu...

  17. Towards a Phenomenology of Technologically Mediated Moral Change: Or, What Could Mark Zuckerberg Learn from Caregivers in the Southern Netherlands?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharon, Tamar

    2017-01-01

    Kamphof offers an illuminating depiction of the technological mediation of morality. Her case serves as the basis for a plea for modesty up and against the somewhat heroic conceptualizations of techno-moral change to date-less logos, less autos, more practice, more relationality. Rather than a displacement of these conceptualizations, I question whether Kamphof's art of living offers only a different perspective: in scale (as a micro-event of techno-moral change), and in unit of analysis (as an art of living oriented to relations with others rather than the relation to the self). As a supplement and not an alternative, this modest art has nonetheless audacious implications for the ethics of surveillance.

  18. FOOD PROCESSING TECHNOLOGY AS A MEDIATOR OF FUNCTIONALITY. STRUCTURE-PROPERTY-PROCESS RELATIONSHIPS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ester Betoret

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available During the last years, the food industry has been facing technical and economic changes both in society and in the food processing practices, paying high attention to food products that meet the consumers´ demands. In this direction, the study areas in food process and products have evolved mainly from safety to other topics such as quality, environment or health. The improvement of the food products is now directed towards ensuring nutritional and specific functional benefits. Regarding the processes evolution, they are directed to ensure the quality and safety of environmentally friendly food products produced optimizing the use of resources, minimally affecting or even enhancing their nutritional and beneficial characteristics. The product structure both in its raw form and after processing plays an important role maintaining, enhancing and delivering the bioactive compounds in the appropriate target within the organism. The aim of this review is to make an overview on some synergistic technologies that can constitute a technological process to develop functional foods, enhancing the technological and/or nutritional functionality of the food products in which they are applied. More concretely, the effect of homogenization, vacuum impregnation and drying operations on bioactive compounds have been reviewed, focusing on the structure changes produced and its relationship on the product functionality, as well as on the parameters and the strategies used to quantify and increase the achieved functionality.

  19. Collaborative engagement experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullens, Katherine; Troyer, Bradley; Wade, Robert; Skibba, Brian; Dunn, Michael

    2006-05-01

    Unmanned ground and air systems operating in collaboration have the potential to provide future Joint Forces a significant capability for operations in complex terrain. Collaborative Engagement Experiment (CEE) is a consolidation of separate Air Force, Army and Navy collaborative efforts within the Joint Robotics Program (JRP) to provide a picture of the future of unmanned warfare. The Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL), Material and Manufacturing Directorate, Aerospace Expeditionary Force Division, Force Protection Branch (AFRL/MLQF), The Army Aviation and Missile Research, Development and Engineering Center (AMRDEC) Joint Technology Center (JTC)/Systems Integration Laboratory (SIL), and the Space and Naval Warfare Systems Center - San Diego (SSC San Diego) are conducting technical research and proof of principle experiments for an envisioned operational concept for extended range, three dimensional, collaborative operations between unmanned systems, with enhanced situational awareness for lethal operations in complex terrain. This paper describes the work by these organizations to date and outlines some of the plans for future work.

  20. Collaborative Hierarchy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maris, Mariann

    The University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee writing program is collaborative, not divisionary, as some, such as Jeanne Gunner, have suggested. Three terms are useful in understanding the relationships and ethics governing operations at Wisconsin-Milwaukee: (1) authority and collaboration; (2) hierarchical difference; (3) professional respect.…

  1. Research collaboration 2011: a joint publication highlighting the research partnerships between Tshwane University of Technology, University of Johannesburg, University of the Witwatersrand and the CSIR

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    CSIR

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available to be productive during 2011. The three Universities collaborated with the CSIR through research projects, teaching and supervision of the student research, exchange of staff and the use of facilities. Collaborative projects and supervised student research have...

  2. Distance collaborations with industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peskin, A.; Swyler, K.

    1998-06-01

    The college industry relationship has been identified as a key policy issue in Engineering Education. Collaborations between academic institutions and the industrial sector have a long history and a bright future. For Engineering and Engineering Technology programs in particular, industry has played a crucial role in many areas including advisement, financial support, and practical training of both faculty and students. Among the most important and intimate interactions are collaborative projects and formal cooperative education arrangements. Most recently, such collaborations have taken on a new dimension, as advances in technology have made possible meaningful technical collaboration at a distance. There are several obvious technology areas that have contributed significantly to this trend. Foremost is the ubiquitous presence of the Internet. Perhaps almost as important are advances in computer based imaging. Because visual images offer a compelling user experience, it affords greater knowledge transfer efficiency than other modes of delivery. Furthermore, the quality of the image appears to have a strongly correlated effect on insight. A good visualization facility offers both a means for communication and a shared information space for the subjects, which are among the essential features of both peer collaboration and distance learning.

  3. Collaborative Prototyping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bogers, Marcel; Horst, Willem

    2014-01-01

    of the prototyping process, the actual prototype was used as a tool for communication or development, thus serving as a platform for the cross-fertilization of knowledge. In this way, collaborative prototyping leads to a better balance between functionality and usability; it translates usability problems into design......This paper presents an inductive study that shows how collaborative prototyping across functional, hierarchical, and organizational boundaries can improve the overall prototyping process. Our combined action research and case study approach provides new insights into how collaborative prototyping...... can provide a platform for prototype-driven problem solving in early new product development (NPD). Our findings have important implications for how to facilitate multistakeholder collaboration in prototyping and problem solving, and more generally for how to organize collaborative and open innovation...

  4. A Study to Promote a Collaboration of R and D for Nuclear Energy Technology Development between Korea and Central Asia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rho, Si Pyo; Kim, Cheol Jung; Yoo, Bung Duk; Kim, Jae Woo; Lee, Myung Ho; Kim, Kyung Pyo

    2006-02-15

    The goal of this research work is to promote the cooperation in the field of nuclear related works with Kazakhstan and Uzbekistan which are main countries in the central Asia. To make a basis on exchanging researchers, a staff in KAERI had visited INP NNC RK, touring research reactors, and make a discussion with the staffs in INP. With this, there is a efforts to make an arrangement between KAERI and NNC RK, signing will be made in near futures. To understand the level of nuclear technology in Uzbekistan, Dr. Rho had made a trip to INP. He visited the Gamma-radiation facility, a research reactor. In Nov. 2005, the chairman of Science Academy visited Korea to discuss the future cooperation in the field of peaceful use of the nuclear energy. By doing so, Korea will make an effort to cooperate with countries in the Central Asia.

  5. A Study to Promote a Collaboration of R and D for Nuclear Energy Technology Development between Korea and Central Asia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rho, Si Pyo; Kim, Cheol Jung; Yoo, Bung Duk; Kim, Jae Woo; Lee, Myung Ho; Kim, Kyung Pyo

    2006-02-01

    The goal of this research work is to promote the cooperation in the field of nuclear related works with Kazakhstan and Uzbekistan which are main countries in the central Asia. To make a basis on exchanging researchers, a staff in KAERI had visited INP NNC RK, touring research reactors, and make a discussion with the staffs in INP. With this, there is a efforts to make an arrangement between KAERI and NNC RK, signing will be made in near futures. To understand the level of nuclear technology in Uzbekistan, Dr. Rho had made a trip to INP. He visited the Gamma-radiation facility, a research reactor. In Nov. 2005, the chairman of Science Academy visited Korea to discuss the future cooperation in the field of peaceful use of the nuclear energy. By doing so, Korea will make an effort to cooperate with countries in the Central Asia

  6. Illuminating collaboration in emergency health care situations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sonnenwald, Diane H.; Söderholm, Hanna Maurin; Welch, Gregory F.

    2014-01-01

    reported the technology would require additional training, changes to existing financial models used in emergency health care, and increased access to physicians. Conclusions. Teaching collaboration skills and strategies to physicians and paramedics could benefit their collaboration today, and increase...

  7. El trabajo colaborativo a través de la historia de las TIC Collaborative Work Throughout the History of Information and Communication Technologies (ICT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vega Adriana

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available La evolución de las tecnologías de información y comunicación (TIC posibilitó el avance y consolidación de la economía globalizada propia del poscapitalismo. La historia del computador personal y de Internet está ligada al aporte de múltiples personas, que desde diversas partes del mundo dieron pasos con una serie de inventos, en medio de relaciones tejidas por consensos y disensos, desencadenando un trabajo en red y construcción colectiva. Si el proceso de desarrollo de las TIC muestra una profunda relación con el trabajo colaborativo, el nuevo modo de producción revolucionó las estructuras organizativas de empresas y organizaciones, que pasaron de jerarquías verticales a modelos horizontales, flexibles y en red. De ahí que el encuentro del desarrollo de las TIC con las nuevas necesidades organizativas haya provocado una convergencia que potencia el trabajo colaborativo en la sociedad de la información y el conocimiento, generando un gran impacto en todo tipo de relaciones. The evolution of Information and Communication Technologies (ICT has enabled progress and consolidation of a global economy, a distinctive trait of post-capitalism. The history of the personal computer and the worldwide web are linked to the contribution of multiple individuals who, from diverse world locations, stepped forward with a number of inventions amidst the relationships built by agreements and disagreements, thus giving birth to networks and collective work. As development of the ICT is deeply related to collaborative work, the new modus operandi revolutionized the structure of organizations and corporations, which evolved from vertical hierarchies to flexible horizontal model networks. Therefore, the convergence in the development of the ICT with the new organizational needs has enabled collaborative work in a society bound by information and knowledge, thus causing a significant impact in all sorts of relationships.

  8. California Earthquake Clearinghouse: Advocating for, and Advancing, Collaboration and Technology Interoperability, Between the Scientific and Emergency Response Communities, to Produce Actionable Intelligence for Situational Awareness, and Decision Support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosinski, A.; Beilin, P.; Colwell, J.; Hornick, M.; Glasscoe, M. T.; Morentz, J.; Smorodinsky, S.; Millington, A.; Hudnut, K. W.; Penn, P.; Ortiz, M.; Kennedy, M.; Long, K.; Miller, K.; Stromberg, M.

    2015-12-01

    The Clearinghouse provides emergency management and response professionals, scientific and engineering communities with prompt information on ground failure, structural damage, and other consequences from significant seismic events such as earthquakes or tsunamis. Clearinghouse activations include participation from Federal, State and local government, law enforcement, fire, EMS, emergency management, public health, environmental protection, the military, public and non-governmental organizations, and private sector. For the August 24, 2014 S. Napa earthquake, over 100 people from 40 different organizations participated during the 3-day Clearinghouse activation. Every organization has its own role and responsibility in disaster response; however all require authoritative data about the disaster for rapid hazard assessment and situational awareness. The Clearinghouse has been proactive in fostering collaboration and sharing Essential Elements of Information across disciplines. The Clearinghouse-led collaborative promotes the use of standard formats and protocols to allow existing technology to transform data into meaningful incident-related content and to enable data to be used by the largest number of participating Clearinghouse partners, thus providing responding personnel with enhanced real-time situational awareness, rapid hazard assessment, and more informed decision-making in support of response and recovery. The Clearinghouse efforts address national priorities outlined in USGS Circular 1242, Plan to Coordinate NEHRP post-earthquake investigations and S. 740-Geospatial Data Act of 2015, Sen. Orrin Hatch (R-UT), to streamline and coordinate geospatial data infrastructure, maximizing geospatial data in support of the Robert T. Stafford Act. Finally, the US Dept. of Homeland Security, Geospatial Management Office, recognized Clearinghouse's data sharing efforts as a Best Practice to be included in the forthcoming 2015 HLS Geospatial Concept of Operations.

  9. The role of information and communication technology in community outreach, academic and research collaboration, and education and support services (IT-CARES).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Ashish; Meza, Jane; Costa, Sergio; Puricelli Perin, Douglas Marcel; Trout, Kate; Rayamajih, Atul

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the role of information and communication technology (ICT) in enhancing community outreach, academic and research collaboration, and education and support services (IT-CARES) in an academic setting. A survey was deployed to assess the ICT needs in an academic setting. The survey was developed using the Delphi methodology. Questionnaire development was initiated by asking key stakeholders involved in community outreach, academic, research, education, and support to provide feedback on current ICT issues and future recommendations for relevant ICT tools that would be beneficial to them in their job, and to capture current ICT issues. Participants were asked to rate the level of importance of each ICT question on five-point Likert scales. The survey was sent to 359 participants, including faculty, staff, and students. The total number of respondents was 96, for a 27 percent response rate. The majority of the participants (54.1 percent, n = 46) placed a high importance on learning the available research capabilities of the college. The majority of the participants placed moderate (43.5 percent, n = 37) to high importance (40 percent, n = 34) on having an intranet that could support collaborative grant writing. A majority of the participants attributed high importance to learning to interact with the online learning management system Blackboard. A majority of the participants agreed that social media should being more actively utilized for diverse activities for academic and research purposes. The study helped to identify the current needs and challenges faced by professionals and students when interacting with ICT. More research is needed in order to effectively integrate the use of ICT in the field of higher education, especially related to the modern global public health context.

  10. Let's Go to the Zoo: Guiding Elementary Students through Research; Ladders of Collaboration; Information Literacy and Assessment: Web Resources Too Good To Miss; Top Secret: Collaborative Efforts Really Do Make a Difference; What Is Collaboration to You?; Volunteering for Information Literacy; Getting an Early Start on Using Technology for Research; Collaborations: Working with Restrictions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Futch, Lynn; Asper, Vicki; Repman, Judi; Tschamler, Addie; Thomas, Melody; Kearns, Jodi; Farmer, Lesley S. J.; Buzzeo, Toni

    2002-01-01

    Includes eight articles that address the role of the elementary school librarian in developing information literacy, focusing on collaboration between media specialists and classroom teachers. Highlights include student research, including a research planning sheet; Web resources on information literacy and assessment; and helping students use…

  11. Enhancing Science Literacy and Art History Engagement at Princeton Through Collaboration Between the University Art Museum and the Council on Science and Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riihimaki, C. A.; White, V. M.

    2016-12-01

    The importance of innovative science education for social science and humanities students is often under-appreciated by science departments, because these students typically do not take science courses beyond general education requirements, nor do they contribute to faculty research programs. However, these students are vitally important in society—for example as business leaders or consultants, and especially as voters. In these roles, they will be confronted with decisions related to science in their professional and personal lives. The Council on Science and Technology at Princeton University aims to fill this education gap by developing and supporting innovative programs that bring science to cross-disciplinary audiences. One of our most fruitful collaborations has been with the Princeton University Art Museum, which has an encyclopedic collection of over 92,000 works of art, ranging from antiquity to the contemporary. Our work includes 1) bringing introductory environmental science courses to the Museum to explore how original works of art of different ages can serve as paleo-environmental proxies, thereby providing a means for discussing broader concepts in development of proxies and validation of reconstructions; 2) sponsoring a panel aimed at the general public and composed of science faculty and art historians who discussed the scientific and art historical contexts behind Albert Bierstadt's Mount Adams, Washington, 1875 (oil on canvas, gift of Mrs. Jacob N. Beam, accession number y1940-430), including the landscape's subjects, materials, technique, and style; and 3) collaborating on an installation of photographs relevant to a freshman GIS course, with an essay about the artwork written by the students. This first-hand study of works of art encourages critical thinking and an empathetic approach to different historical periods and cultures, as well as to the environment. Our collaboration additionally provides an opportunity to engage more students in

  12. Collaboration rules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Philip; Wolf, Bob

    2005-01-01

    Corporate leaders seeking to boost growth, learning, and innovation may find the answer in a surprising place: the Linux open-source software community. Linux is developed by an essentially volunteer, self-organizing community of thousands of programmers. Most leaders would sell their grandmothers for workforces that collaborate as efficiently, frictionlessly, and creatively as the self-styled Linux hackers. But Linux is software, and software is hardly a model for mainstream business. The authors have, nonetheless, found surprising parallels between the anarchistic, caffeinated, hirsute world of Linux hackers and the disciplined, tea-sipping, clean-cut world of Toyota engineering. Specifically, Toyota and Linux operate by rules that blend the self-organizing advantages of markets with the low transaction costs of hierarchies. In place of markets' cash and contracts and hierarchies' authority are rules about how individuals and groups work together (with rigorous discipline); how they communicate (widely and with granularity); and how leaders guide them toward a common goal (through example). Those rules, augmented by simple communication technologies and a lack of legal barriers to sharing information, create rich common knowledge, the ability to organize teams modularly, extraordinary motivation, and high levels of trust, which radically lowers transaction costs. Low transaction costs, in turn, make it profitable for organizations to perform more and smaller transactions--and so increase the pace and flexibility typical of high-performance organizations. Once the system achieves critical mass, it feeds on itself. The larger the system, the more broadly shared the knowledge, language, and work style. The greater individuals' reputational capital, the louder the applause and the stronger the motivation. The success of Linux is evidence of the power of that virtuous circle. Toyota's success is evidence that it is also powerful in conventional companies.

  13. Parental Emotion Socialization and Child Psychological Adjustment among Chinese Urban Families: Mediation through Child Emotion Regulation and Moderation through Dyadic Collaboration

    OpenAIRE

    Zhuyun Jin; Xutong Zhang; Zhuo Rachel Han

    2017-01-01

    The theoretical model of emotion regulation and many empirical findings have suggested that children’s emotion regulation may mediate the association between parents’ emotion socialization and children’s psychological adjustment. However, limited research has been conducted on moderators of these relations, despite the argument that the associations between parenting practices and children’s psychological adjustment are probabilistic rather than deterministic. This study examined the mediatin...

  14. Collaboration in Augmented Reality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lukosch, S.; Billinghurst, M.; Alem, L.; Kiyokawa, K.

    2015-01-01

    Augmented Reality (AR) is a technology that allows users to view and interact in real time with virtual images seamlessly superimposed over the real world. AR systems can be used to create unique collaborative experiences. For example, co-located users can see shared 3D virtual objects that they

  15. The effects of information technology based retail channels integration on retail stores performance: mediating role of organizational Ambidexterity (case study: Rasht stores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamadrahim Ramazanian

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Information technology is a critical tool for companies to achieve the competitive advantage and organizational innovation. IT capability provides an appropriate opportunity for retailers to improve their relationships with customers and progress firms’ performance. Comes with advances in technology, retail industry by using Information technology has changed its business process from traditional to online channels. This paper, investigates the effects of IT based retail channel integration on retail stores performance, furthermore the mediating role of organizational ambidexterity as organizational capability in exploitation and exploration of growth opportunities has been examined. Research data has been collected from the retailer sales chains in Rasht city. Data was collected through questionnaires and analyzed by structural equation modeling and partial least squares algorithm. Findings show that retail channel integration based on information technology by mediated organizational ambidexterity influence on performance.

  16. Technification as an approach to realization of The child-friendly justice concept in terms of technologies of mediation and restorative justice: theory and practice questions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadovnikova M. N.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Author of the article describes the "Technification", and report about its role in resolving the conflicts that appears in a process of working with children. The article reports about social Technologies that can effect the problem of juvenile delinquency and prevent manifestation of deviation in children’s behavior. Author focuses on the special role of restorative approach and technology of mediation in process of working of specialists involved in prevention of delinquency of children. The article is devoted to the working problems of specialists involved in prevention of delinquency of children. The Author highlights the special role of "Technification" of key branches of the child-friendly justice concept as more effective approach. On the example of using restorative-mediation technologies the author proves the algorithm of technification and possibilities of its realization in practice. The author draws attention to the "Shire krug" technology as a way for correcting of juvenile delinquency problem.

  17. Investments in information systems and technology in the healthcare: Project management mediation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Gomes

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Healthcare organisations must improve their business practices and internal procedures in order to answer the increasing demand of health professionals and the general public for more and better information. Hospitals invest massively in information systems and technology (IS/IT in the hope that these investments will improve healthcare and meet patients’ demands. The main objective of our research is to study how organisational maturity, enhanced by investments in IS/IT, project management and best practices, leads to successful projects in public healthcare organisations. The rational of our model is that organisational maturity has a positive effect on IS/IT project success, and that this success is also positively enhanced by the use of project management practices. We emphasise that this combination of approaches can increase the effectiveness of projects. Furthermore, it can also improve the confidence that the results of investments will meet stakeholders’ expectations.

  18. THE SPANISH LANGUAGE TEACHING MEDIATED BY NEW TECHNOLOGIES: THE CLASSROOM TO FACEBOOK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elaine Teixeira da Silva

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This article aims to describe the possibilities provided by the use of new digital Information and Communication Technologies (ICT, aided by Web 2.0, on Spanish teaching both inside and outside classroom. We analyzed the social network Facebook because it has a large number of users who spend a significant amount of time on the site chatting with friends, posting comments, liking photos and profiles and participating in groups. This social network also provides teaching tools that will help students to develop their autonomy to (re learn how to think. It is shown that Facebook presents EaD characteristics and therefore can be considered an additional tool on language teaching and education.

  19. Coproduction as an Approach to Technology-Mediated Citizen Participation in Emergency Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paloma Díaz

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Social and mobile computing open up new possibilities for integrating citizens’ information, knowledge, and social capital in emergency management (EM. This participation can improve the capacity of local agencies to respond to unexpected events by involving citizens not only as first line informants, but also as first responders. This participation could contribute to build resilient communities aware of the risks they are threatened by and able to mobilize their social capital to cope with them and, in turn, decrease the impact of threats and hazards. However for this participation to be possible organizations in charge of EM need to realize that involving citizens does not interfere with their protocols and that citizens are a valuable asset that can contribute to the EM process with specific skills and capabilities. In this paper we discuss the design challenges of using social and mobile computing to move to a more participatory EM process that starts by empowering both citizens and organizations in a coproduction service envisioned as a partnership effort. As an example, we describe a case study of a participatory design approach that involved professional EM workers and decision makers in an effort to understand the challenges of using technology-based solutions to integrate citizen skills and capabilities in their operation protocols. The case study made it possible to identify specific roles that citizens might play in a crisis or disaster and to envision scenarios were technologies could be used to integrate their skills into the EM process. In this way the paper contributes to the roles and the scenarios of theory-building about coproduction in EM services.

  20. Knowing who to trust: exploring the role of 'ethical metadata' in mediating risk of harm in collaborative genomics research in Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vries, Jantina; Williams, Thomas N; Bojang, Kalifa; Kwiatkowski, Dominic P; Fitzpatrick, Raymond; Parker, Michael

    2014-08-13

    The practice of making datasets publicly available for use by the wider scientific community has become firmly integrated in genomic science. One significant gap in literature around data sharing concerns how it impacts on scientists' ability to preserve values and ethical standards that form an essential component of scientific collaborations. We conducted a qualitative sociological study examining the potential for harm to ethnic groups, and implications of such ethical concerns for data sharing. We focused our empirical work on the MalariaGEN Consortium, one of the first international collaborative genomics research projects in Africa. We conducted a study in three MalariaGEN project sites in Kenya, the Gambia, and the United Kingdom. The study entailed analysis of project documents and 49 semi-structured interviews with fieldworkers, researchers and ethics committee members. Concerns about how best to address the potential for harm to ethnic groups in MalariaGEN crystallised in discussions about the development of a data sharing policy. Particularly concerning for researchers was how best to manage the sharing of genomic data outside of the original collaboration. Within MalariaGEN, genomic data is accompanied by information about the locations of sample collection, the limitations of consent and ethics approval, and the values and relations that accompanied sample collection. For interviewees, this information and context were of important ethical value in safeguarding against harmful uses of data, but is not customarily shared with secondary data users. This challenged the ability of primary researchers to protect against harmful uses of 'their' data. We identified three protective mechanisms--trust, the existence of a shared morality, and detailed contextual understanding--which together might play an important role in preventing the use of genomic data in ways that could harm the ethnic groups included in the study. We suggest that the current practice of

  1. Geo-collaboration under stress

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Looije, R.; Brake, G.M. te; Neerincx, M.A.

    2007-01-01

    “Most of the science and decision making involved in geo-information is the product of collaborative teams. Current geospatial technologies are a limiting factor because they do not provide any direct support for group efforts. In this paper we present a method to enhance geo-collaboration by

  2. E-Commerce Audit Judgment Expertise: Does Expertise in System Change Management and Information Technology Auditing Mediate E-Commerce Audit Judgment Expertise?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jagdish PATHAK

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A global survey of 203 E-commerce auditors was conducted to investigate the perceptions about the potential determinants of expertise in E-commerce audits. We hypothesize and find evidence indicating that information technology and communication expertise are positively related to expertise in E-commerce audit judgment. We also find that system change management expertise and information technology audit expertise mediate this relationship.

  3. Collaborative Consumption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjerdrum Pedersen, Esben Rahbek; Netter, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to explore barriers and opportunities for business models based on the ideas of collaborative consumption within the fashion industry. Design/methodology/approach – The analysis is based on a multiple-case study of Scandinavian fashion libraries – a new...... to the new phenomenon of fashion libraries and does not cover other types of collaborative consumption within the fashion industry (Swap-parties, etc.). Originality/value – The paper is one of the first attempts to examine new business models of collaborative consumption in general and the fashion library...... concept in particular. The study contributes to the discussions of whether and how fashion sharing and collaboration holds promise as a viable business model and as a means to promote sustainability....

  4. Collaborative Consumption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjerdrum Pedersen, Esben Rahbek; Netter, Sarah

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to explore barriers and opportunities for business models based on the ideas of collaborative consumption within the fashion industry. Design/methodology/approach: The analysis is based on a multiple-­‐‑case study of Scandinavian fashion libraries – a new...... to the new phenomenon of fashion libraries and does not cover other types of collaborative consumption within the fashion industry (Swap-­‐‑parties, etc.). Originality/value: The paper is one of the first attempts to examine new business models of collaborative consumption in general and the fashion library...... concept in particular. The study contributes to the discussions of whether and how fashion sharing and collaboration holds promise as a viable business model and as a means to promote sustainability....

  5. 14 November 2013 - Director of Indian Institute of Technology Indore P. Mathur with members of the Indian community working at CERN; visiting the LHC tunnel at Point 2, the ALICE experimental area and SM18 with ALICE Collaboration Spokesperson, Istituto Nazionale Fisica Nucleare P. Giubellino and Technology Department, Accelerator Beam Transfer Group Leader V. Mertens

    CERN Multimedia

    Jean-Claude Gadmer

    2013-01-01

    14 November 2013 - Director of Indian Institute of Technology Indore P. Mathur with members of the Indian community working at CERN; visiting the LHC tunnel at Point 2, the ALICE experimental area and SM18 with ALICE Collaboration Spokesperson, Istituto Nazionale Fisica Nucleare P. Giubellino and Technology Department, Accelerator Beam Transfer Group Leader V. Mertens

  6. 20th May 2010 - Malaysian Minister for Science, Technology and Innovation H. F: B. H. Yusof signing the guest book with Coordinator for External Relations F. Pauss and CMS Collaboration Deputy Spokesperson A. De Roeck; visiting the LHC superconducting magnet test hall with Technology Department Head F. Bordry; throughout accompanied by CERN Advisers J. Ellis and E. Tsesmelis.

    CERN Document Server

    Maximilien brice

    2010-01-01

    20th May 2010 - Malaysian Minister for Science, Technology and Innovation H. F: B. H. Yusof signing the guest book with Coordinator for External Relations F. Pauss and CMS Collaboration Deputy Spokesperson A. De Roeck; visiting the LHC superconducting magnet test hall with Technology Department Head F. Bordry; throughout accompanied by CERN Advisers J. Ellis and E. Tsesmelis.

  7. Activating social strategies: Face-to-face interaction in technology-mediated citizen science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cappa, Francesco; Laut, Jeffrey; Nov, Oded; Giustiniano, Luca; Porfiri, Maurizio

    2016-11-01

    The use of crowds in research activities by public and private organizations is growing under different forms. Citizen science is a popular means of engaging the general public in research activities led by professional scientists. By involving a large number of amateur scientists, citizen science enables distributed data collection and analysis on a scale that would be otherwise difficult and costly to achieve. While advancements in information technology in the past few decades have fostered the growth of citizen science through online participation, several projects continue to fail due to limited participation. Such web-based projects may isolate the citizen scientists from the researchers. By adopting the perspective of social strategy, we investigate within a measure-manipulate-measure experiment if motivations to participate in a citizen science project can be positively influenced by a face-to-face interaction with the scientists leading the project. Such an interaction provides the participants with the possibility of asking questions on the spot and obtaining a detailed explanation of the citizen science project, its scientific merit, and environmental relevance. Social and cultural factors that moderate the effect brought about by face-to-face interactions on the motivations are also dissected and analyzed. Our findings provide an exploratory insight into a means for motivating crowds to participate in online environmental monitoring projects, also offering possible selection criteria of target audience. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Technological mediations in the city: from a notion of augmented urban space to the construction of a sense of connectedness by the collective experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julieta M. de V. LEITE

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a contribution to the research on Information and Communication Technologies (ICT for the construction and share of urban experience. We illustrate our considerations with examples that combine dynamics of urban and virtual spaces according to a notion of augmented urban space. In this dynamics ICT function as mediators of the perception of space and social relations.

  9. Collaborative Windows – A User Interface Concept for Distributed Collaboration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Esbensen, Morten

    2016-01-01

    where close collaboration and frequent meetings drive the work. One way to achieve this way of working is to implement the Scrum software development framework. Implementing Scrum in globalized context however, requires transforming the Scrum development methods to a distributed setup and extensive use...... of collaboration technologies. In this dissertation, I explore how novel collaboration technologies can support closely coupled distributed work such as that in distributed Scrum. This research is based on three different studies: an ethnographic field study of distributed Scrum between Danish and Indian software...

  10. A Technology-Mediated Behavioral Weight Gain Prevention Intervention for College Students: Controlled, Quasi-Experimental Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Delia Smith; Monroe, Courtney M; Turner-McGrievy, Gabrielle; Sundstrom, Beth; Larsen, Chelsea; Magradey, Karen; Wilcox, Sara; Brandt, Heather M

    2016-06-13

    Both men and women are vulnerable to weight gain during the college years, and this phenomenon is linked to an increased risk of several chronic diseases and mortality. Technology represents an attractive medium for the delivery of weight control interventions focused on college students, given its reach and appeal among this population. However, few technology-mediated weight gain prevention interventions have been evaluated for college students. This study examined a new technology-based, social media-facilitated weight gain prevention intervention for college students. Undergraduates (n =58) in two sections of a public university course were allocated to either a behavioral weight gain prevention intervention (Healthy Weight, HW; N=29) or a human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination awareness intervention (control; N=29). All students were enrolled, regardless of initial body weight or expressed interest in weight management. The interventions delivered 8 lessons via electronic newsletters and Facebook postings over 9 weeks, which were designed to foster social support and introduce relevant educational content. The HW intervention targeted behavioral strategies to prevent weight gain and provided participants with a Wi-Fi-enabled scale and an electronic physical activity tracker to facilitate weight regulation. A repeated-measures analysis of variance was conducted to examine within- and between-group differences in measures of self-reported weight control practices and objectively measured weight. Use of each intervention medium and device was objectively tracked, and intervention satisfaction measures were obtained. Students remained weight stable (HW: -0.48+1.9 kg; control: -0.45+1.4 kg), with no significant difference between groups over 9 weeks (P =.94). However, HW students reported a significantly greater increase in the number of appropriate weight control strategies than did controls (2.1+4.5 vs -1.1+3.4, respectively; P =.003) and there was no increase in

  11. The Strategic Mediator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rossignoli, Cecilia; Carugati, Andrea; Mola, Lapo

    2009-01-01

    process. Through the study of services evolving over time we show that, as marketplaces support increasingly complex business processes, the market participants begin to privilege the well connected small number to the convenience of the openness to the entire market. The participants see the marketplace......The last 10 years have witnessed the emergence of electronic marketplaces as players that leverage new technologies to facilitate B2B internet-mediated collaborative business. Nowadays these players are augmenting their services from simple intermediation to include new inter......-organizational relationships. The interest of this paper is to investigate the shift in the role and evolution of services proposed by e-marketplaces in response to the demands of the market participants. We carried out a longitudinal qualitative field study of an e-marketplace providing the outsourcing of the procurement...

  12. Understanding nomadic collaborative learning groups

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ryberg, Thomas; Davidsen, Jacob; Hodgson, Vivien

    2018-01-01

    -term collaborations within the frame of Problem and Project Based Learning. By analysing the patterns of nomadic collaborative learning we identify and discuss how the two groups of students incorporate mobile and digital technologies as well as physical and/or non-digital technologies into their group work......The paper builds on the work of Rossitto et al. on collaborative nomadic work to develop three categories of practice of nomadic collaborative learning groups. Our study is based on interviews, workshops and observations of two undergraduate student's group practices engaged in self-organised, long....... Specifically, we identify the following categories of nomadic collaborative learning practices: “orchestration of work phases, spaces and activities,” “the orchestration of multiple technologies” and “orchestration of togetherness.” We found that for both groups of students there was a fluidity, situatedness...

  13. Collaborative Economy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    things, de-industrialization processes and post-capitalist forms of production and consumption, postmaterialism, the rise of the third sector and collaborative governance. Addressing that gap, this book explores the character, depth and breadth of these disruptions, the creative opportunities for tourism...... that are emerging from them, and how governments are responding to these new challenges. In doing so, the book provides both theoretical and practical insights into the future of tourism in a world that is, paradoxically, becoming both increasingly collaborative and individualized. Table of Contents Preface 1.The......This book employs an interdisciplinary, cross-sectoral lens to explore the collaborative dynamics that are currently disrupting, re-creating and transforming the production and consumption of tourism. House swapping, ridesharing, voluntourism, couchsurfing, dinner hosting, social enterprise...

  14. Collaborative Improvement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaltoft, Rasmus

    The thesis data have been collected in the EU-sponsored project: Collaborative Improvement Tool for the Extended Manufacturing Enterprise, CO-IMPROVE. In this project four universities (Denmark, Ireland, Italy, and The Netherlands), two software vendors (Greece and Sweden) and three companies...... (Denmark, Italy and The Netherlands) each with three to five suppliers were involved. The CO-IMPROVE project and the thesis is based on “action research” and “action learning”. The main aim of the whole project is through actual involvement and actions make the researchers, companies and selected suppliers...... learn how to improve operations in (hopefully) a win-win like manner through collaboration....

  15. Collaborative Improvement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaltoft, Rasmus

    -organisational continuous improvement of their performance, relative to that of other EMEs. Developing a collaborative improvement relationship between companies is a protracted and complex process and, according to some surveys, the failure rate is as low as one to three. This failure rate is affected by a whole range...... of factors. The research presented in this thesis was aimed at identifying these factors and investigating their interplay and influence on the progress and success of the development of the collaborative improvement. This thesis presents our findings regarding the factors found, their interplay...

  16. Studying Research Collaboration Patterns via Co-authorship Analysis in the Field of TeL: The Case of "Educational Technology & Society" Journal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zervas, Panagiotis; Tsitmidelli, Asimenia; Sampson, Demetrios G.; Chen, Nian-Shing; Kinshuk

    2014-01-01

    Research collaboration is studied in different research areas, so as to provide useful insights on how researchers combine existing distributed scientific knowledge and transform it into new knowledge. Commonly used metrics for measuring research collaborative activity include, among others, the co-authored publications (concerned with who works…

  17. Technology-enabled academic detailing: computer-mediated education between pharmacists and physicians for evidence-based prescribing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Kendall; Nguyen, Anne; Jarvis-Selinger, Sandra; Novak Lauscher, Helen; Cressman, Céline; Zibrik, Lindsay

    2013-09-01

    Academic detailing (AD) is the practice of specially trained pharmacists with detailed medication knowledge meeting with physicians to share best practices of prescribing. AD has demonstrated efficacy in positively influencing physicians' prescribing behavior. Nevertheless, a key challenge has been that physicians in rural and remote locations, or physicians who are time challenged, have limited ability to participate in face-to-face meetings with academic detailers, as these specially trained academic detailers are primarily urban-based and limited in numbers. To determine the feasibility of using information technologies to facilitate communication between academic detailers and physicians (known as Technology-Enabled Academic Detailing or TEAD) through a comparison to traditional face-to-face academic detailing (AD). Specifically, TEAD is compared to AD in terms of the ability to aid physicians in acquiring evidence-informed prescribing information on diabetes-related medications, measured in terms of time efficiency, satisfaction of both physicians and pharmacists, and quality of knowledge exchange. General Practitioner Physicians (n=105) and pharmacists (n=12) were recruited from across British Columbia. Pharmacists were trained to be academic detailers on diabetes medication usage. Physicians were assigned to one of four intervention groups to receive four academic detailing sessions from trained pharmacists. Intervention groups included: (1) AD only, (2) TEAD only, (3) TEAD crossed over to AD at midpoint, and (4) AD crossed over to TEAD at midpoint. Evaluation included physician-completed surveys before and after each session, pharmacist logs after each detailing session, interviews and focus groups with physicians and pharmacists at study completion, as well as a technical support log to record all phone calls and emails from physicians and pharmacists regarding any technical challenges during the TEAD sessions, or usage of the web portal. Because

  18. Publics in the making: mediating different methods of engagement and the publics these construct : commentary on: "Technologies of democracy: experiments and demonstrations".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohr, Alison

    2011-12-01

    The potential for public engagement to democratise science has come under increasing scrutiny amid concerns that conflicting motivations have led to confusion about what engagement means to those who mediate science and publics. This raises important yet relatively unexplored questions regarding how publics are constituted by different forms of engagement used by intermediary scholars and other actors. It is possible to identify at least two possible 'rationalities of mediation' that mobilise different versions of the public and the roles they are assumed to play, as 'citizens' or 'users', in discussions around technology. However, combinations of rationalities are found in practice and these have significant implications for the 'new' scientific democracy.

  19. Collaborative engagement experiment (CEE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wade, Robert L.; Reames, Joseph M.

    2005-05-01

    Unmanned ground and air systems operating in collaboration have the potential to provide future Joint Forces a significant capability for operations in complex terrain. Ground and air collaborative engagements potentially offer force conservation, perform timely acquisition and dissemination of essential combat information, and can eliminate high value and time critical targets. These engagements can also add considerably to force survivability by reducing soldier and equipment exposure during critical operations. The Office of the Secretary of Defense, Joint Robotics Program (JRP) sponsored Collaborative Engagement Experiment (CEE) is a consolidation of separate Air Force, Army and Navy collaborative efforts to provide a Joint capability. The Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL), Material and Manufacturing Directorate, Aerospace Expeditionary Force Division, Force Protection Branch (AFRLMLQF), The Army Aviation and Missile Research, Development and Engineering Center (AMRDEC) Joint Technology Center (JTC)/Systems Integration Laboratory (SIL), and the Space and Naval Warfare Systems Center-San Diego (SSC San Diego) are conducting technical research and proof of principle for an envisioned operational concept for extended range, three dimensional, collaborative operations between unmanned systems, with enhanced situational awareness for lethal operations in complex terrain. This program will assess information requirements and conduct experiments to identify and resolve technical risks for collaborative engagements using Unmanned Ground Vehicles (UGVs) and Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs). It will research, develop and physically integrate multiple unmanned systems and conduct live collaborative experiments. Modeling and Simulation systems will be upgraded to reflect engineering fidelity levels to greater understand technical challenges to operate as a team. This paper will provide an update of a multi-year program and will concentrate primarily on the JTC

  20. Contested collaboration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sonnenwald, Diane H.

    1995-01-01

    . The model describes design phases, roles, themes, and intergroup communication networks as they evolve throughout the design process and characterizes design as a process of "contested collaboration". It is a first step towards a predictive design model that suggests strategies which may help participants...