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Sample records for technology laboratory ohio

  1. Distributed Energy Technology Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Distributed Energy Technologies Laboratory (DETL) is an extension of the power electronics testing capabilities of the Photovoltaic System Evaluation Laboratory...

  2. Acoustic Technology Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This laboratory contains an electro-magnetic worldwide data collection and field measurement capability in the area of acoustic technology. Outfitted by NASA Langley...

  3. Change Agent Strategies: A Study of the Michigan-Ohio Regional Educational Laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Peggy Lynne

    This dissertation reports on a study of the planning and development activities of the Michigan-Ohio Regional Educational Laboratory (MOREL). The study attempted to assess (1) whether MOREL has accepted a change agent role, and (2) whether it has taken action that indicates recognition of what is known through the literature and research about…

  4. Education and research at the Ohio State University nuclear reactor laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, D.W.; Myser, R.D.; Talnagi, J.W.

    1989-01-01

    The educational and research activities at the Ohio State University Nuclear Reactor Laboratory (OSUNRL) are discussed in this paper. A brief description of an OSUNRL facility improvement program and its expected impact on research is presented. The overall long-term goal of the OSUNRL is to support the comprehensive education, research, and service mission of OSU

  5. A Quantitative Examination of the Educational Technology Characteristics of Ohio Schools and Their Blue Ribbon Status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goon, Dean A.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze data from Ohio schools and the frequency of use of educational technology, a teacher's comfort level using technology, and a teacher's beliefs about the effect of educational technology on teaching and learning based upon the school's Blue Ribbon award status. The study used an ex-post facto, quantitative…

  6. Applied Neuroscience Laboratory Complex

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Located at WPAFB, Ohio, the Applied Neuroscience lab researches and develops technologies to optimize Airmen individual and team performance across all AF domains....

  7. Derivation of uranium residual radioactive material guidelines for the former Alba Craft Laboratory site, Oxford, Ohio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nimmagadda, M.; Faillace, E.; Yu, C.

    1994-01-01

    Residual radioactive material guidelines for uranium were derived for the former Alba Craft Laboratory site in Oxford, Ohio. This site has been identified for remedial action under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) of the US Department of Energy (DOE). Single nuclide and total uranium guidelines were derived on the basis of the requirement that the 50-year committed effective dose equivalent to a hypothetical individual who lives or works in the immediate vicinity of the former Alba Craft Laboratory site should not exceed a dose of 30 mrem/yr following remedial action for the current use and likely future use scenarios or a dose of 100 mrem/yr for less likely future use scenarios (Yu et al. 1993). The DOE residual radioactive material guideline computer code, RESRAD, which implements the methodology described in the DOE manual for implementing residual radioactive material guidelines, was used in this evaluation

  8. Results of the radiological survey at the former Alba Craft Laboratory site properties, Oxford, Ohio (OXO001)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murray, M.E.; Brown, K.S.; Mathis, R.A.

    1993-03-01

    At the request of the US Department of Energy (DOE), a team from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducted a radiological survey at the former Alba Craft Laboratory Site Properties, Oxford, Ohio. The survey was performed in July and September of 1992. The purpose of the survey was to determine whether the property was contaminated with radioactive residues, primarily 238 U, from uranium machining operations conducted for National Lead of Ohio, a prime Atomic Energy Commission contractor. The survey included scan measurement of direct radiation levels inside and outside the former laboratory, outdoors on eight properties adjoining the former laboratory, and the city right-of-way adjacent to the surveyed properties. Radionuclide concentrations were determined in outdoor surface and subsurface soil samples taken from each property and the exterior of the laboratory. Fixed surface residual radioactivity was measured inside the laboratory and outside the building. Air samples were collected, direct exposure was measured, and samples were collected to measure transferable radioactivity inside the building. Results of the survey indicate areas where surface and soil contamination level s are above the DOE guidelines for uncontrolled areas

  9. Postremediation dose assessment for the former Alba Craft Laboratory site, Oxford, Ohio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamboj, S.; Nimmagadda, M.; Yu, C.

    1996-04-01

    Potential maximum radiation dose rates were calculated for the former Alba Craft Laboratory site in Oxford, Ohio, which was involved in machining of uranium metal in the 1950s for the U.S. atomic energy program. The site is not currently being used. The residual radioactive material guidelines (RESRAD) computer code, which implements the methodology described in the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) manual for establishing residual radioactive material guidelines, was sued in this evaluation. Three potential land use scenarios were considered for the former Alba Craft site; the scenarios vary with regard to the type of site use, time spent at the site by the exposed individual, and sources of food consumed. Scenario A (a possible land use scenario) assumed industrial use of the site; Scenario B (a likely future land use scenario) assumed residential use of the site; and Scenario C (a possible but unlikely land use scenario) assumed the presence of a resident farmer. For scenario A, it was assumed that any water used for domestic or industrial activities would be from uncontaminated off-site municipal sources. The water used for drinking, household purposes, and irrigation was assumed to be from uncontaminated municipal sources in Scenario B; groundwater drawn from a well located at the downgradient edge of the contaminated zone would be the only source of water for drinking, irrigation, and raising livestock in Scenario C. The results of the evaluation indicated that the DOE dose limit of 100 mrem/yr would not be exceeded for any of the scenarios analyzed. The potential maximum dose rates for Scenarios A, B, and C are 0.64, 2.0, and 11 mrem/yr, respectively

  10. US Department of Energy interim mixed waste inventory report: Waste streams, treatment capacities and technologies: Volume 4, Site specific---Ohio through South Carolina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-04-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared this report to provide an inventory of its mixed wastes and treatment capacities and technologies in response to Section 105(a) of the Federal Facility Compliance Act (FFCAct) of 1992 (Pub. L. No. 102-386). As required by the FFCAct-1992, this report provides site-specific information on DOE's mixed waste streams and a general review of available and planned treatment facilities for mixed wastes at the following five Ohio facilities: Battelle Columbus Laboratories; Fernald Environmental Management Project; Mound Plant; Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant; and RMI, Titanium Company

  11. [Laboratory of technology of biopreparations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datsenko, Z M

    1995-01-01

    The main scientific direction of the Laboratory is the development of new biochemical technologies for obtaining various biopreparations based on animal and plant raw materials, especially on that of the sea organisms. Fundamental investigations of the preparations of animal and microorganism hydrolysis have enabled the researchers to develop technologies for obtaining Str. griseus and Ceph. acremonium proteolytic complexes and to study their properties for the latter could be used as reagents in chemistry of proteins. Immobilized polyenzyme systems of proteases with silicagel and activated carbon fibre material as a matrix were created on the basis of investigations of immobilized enzymes. The advantages of immobilized biocatalysts possessing highest stability and a possibility of repeated application are described. Biotechnological isolation of bioactive preparations (BAP) of lipid-protein nature that are the structure components of cells membranes is the key problem at present. Biochemical principles of BAP metabolisms regulation in cell membranes and the role of the obtained biopreparations in correction of pathological conditions are also studied. These investigations promoted development of technologies for two new biopreparations from sea organisms (Calmar's gonades) for medicine. The first one is a set of surface active phospholipids and the second one is a set of nucleopeptides affecting the secretion of sex hormones. It has been found that surface active preparations show an antioxidative and membrane-stabilizing properties as well. It has also been shown that the preparation corrects the effect of pathology conditions in case of experimental hepatitis-induced by CCl4. The preparation influences the antioxidative system and thus the rate of lipid peroxidation.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  12. Sandia National Laboratories: Microsystems Science & Technology Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Environmental Management System Pollution Prevention History 60 impacts Diversity Locations Facts & Figures Programs Nuclear Weapons About Nuclear Weapons Safety & Security Weapons Science & Technology Robotics R&D 100 Awards Laboratory Directed Research & Development Technology Deployment Centers

  13. Arctic Energy Technology Development Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sukumar Bandopadhyay; Charles Chamberlin; Robert Chaney; Gang Chen; Godwin Chukwu; James Clough; Steve Colt; Anthony Covescek; Robert Crosby; Abhijit Dandekar; Paul Decker; Brandon Galloway; Rajive Ganguli; Catherine Hanks; Rich Haut; Kristie Hilton; Larry Hinzman; Gwen Holdman; Kristie Holland; Robert Hunter; Ron Johnson; Thomas Johnson; Doug Kame; Mikhail Kaneveskly; Tristan Kenny; Santanu Khataniar; Abhijeet Kulkami; Peter Lehman; Mary Beth Leigh; Jenn-Tai Liang; Michael Lilly; Chuen-Sen Lin; Paul Martin; Pete McGrail; Dan Miller; Debasmita Misra; Nagendra Nagabhushana; David Ogbe; Amanda Osborne; Antoinette Owen; Sharish Patil; Rocky Reifenstuhl; Doug Reynolds; Eric Robertson; Todd Schaef; Jack Schmid; Yuri Shur; Arion Tussing; Jack Walker; Katey Walter; Shannon Watson; Daniel White; Gregory White; Mark White; Richard Wies; Tom Williams; Dennis Witmer; Craig Wollard; Tao Zhu

    2008-12-31

    The Arctic Energy Technology Development Laboratory was created by the University of Alaska Fairbanks in response to a congressionally mandated funding opportunity through the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), specifically to encourage research partnerships between the university, the Alaskan energy industry, and the DOE. The enabling legislation permitted research in a broad variety of topics particularly of interest to Alaska, including providing more efficient and economical electrical power generation in rural villages, as well as research in coal, oil, and gas. The contract was managed as a cooperative research agreement, with active project monitoring and management from the DOE. In the eight years of this partnership, approximately 30 projects were funded and completed. These projects, which were selected using an industry panel of Alaskan energy industry engineers and managers, cover a wide range of topics, such as diesel engine efficiency, fuel cells, coal combustion, methane gas hydrates, heavy oil recovery, and water issues associated with ice road construction in the oil fields of the North Slope. Each project was managed as a separate DOE contract, and the final technical report for each completed project is included with this final report. The intent of this process was to address the energy research needs of Alaska and to develop research capability at the university. As such, the intent from the beginning of this process was to encourage development of partnerships and skills that would permit a transition to direct competitive funding opportunities managed from funding sources. This project has succeeded at both the individual project level and at the institutional development level, as many of the researchers at the university are currently submitting proposals to funding agencies, with some success.

  14. National Laboratory of Synchrotron Radiation: technologic potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, C.E.T.G. da; Rodrigues, A.R.D.

    1987-01-01

    The technological or industrial developments based on the accumulated experience by research group of condensed matter physics, in Brazil, are described. The potential of a National Laboratory of Synchrotron Radiation for personnel training, absorption and adaptation of economically important technologies for Brazil, is presented. Examples of cooperations between the Laboratory and some national interprises, and some industrial applications of the synchrotron radiation are done. (M.C.K.) [pt

  15. A Laboratory Course in Technological Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiseman, P.

    1986-01-01

    Describes a laboratory course taught at the University of Manchester Institute of Science and Technology (United Kingdom) which focuses on the preparation, properties, and applications of end-use products of the chemical industry. Outlines laboratory experiments on dyes, fibers, herbicides, performance testing, antioxidants, and surface active…

  16. Proceedings of symposium on technology in laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-03-01

    The Symposium on Technology in Laboratories was held on both 10th and 11th March 2008 at Ceratopia Toki in Toki city, Gifu Prefecture, Japan, which hosted by the National Institute for Fusion Science (NIFS). 287 people participated and 97 papers were presented from many universities, national laboratories, technical colleges, and some industries in Japan. Technical experience and new techniques were reported and discussed in four fields: technology of fabrication and cryogenics', 'device technology', 'diagnostic and control system', and 'computer and processing'. The 37 of the presented papers are indexed individually. (J.P.N.)

  17. Laboratory automation: trajectory, technology, and tactics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markin, R S; Whalen, S A

    2000-05-01

    Laboratory automation is in its infancy, following a path parallel to the development of laboratory information systems in the late 1970s and early 1980s. Changes on the horizon in healthcare and clinical laboratory service that affect the delivery of laboratory results include the increasing age of the population in North America, the implementation of the Balanced Budget Act (1997), and the creation of disease management companies. Major technology drivers include outcomes optimization and phenotypically targeted drugs. Constant cost pressures in the clinical laboratory have forced diagnostic manufacturers into less than optimal profitability states. Laboratory automation can be a tool for the improvement of laboratory services and may decrease costs. The key to improvement of laboratory services is implementation of the correct automation technology. The design of this technology should be driven by required functionality. Automation design issues should be centered on the understanding of the laboratory and its relationship to healthcare delivery and the business and operational processes in the clinical laboratory. Automation design philosophy has evolved from a hardware-based approach to a software-based approach. Process control software to support repeat testing, reflex testing, and transportation management, and overall computer-integrated manufacturing approaches to laboratory automation implementation are rapidly expanding areas. It is clear that hardware and software are functionally interdependent and that the interface between the laboratory automation system and the laboratory information system is a key component. The cost-effectiveness of automation solutions suggested by vendors, however, has been difficult to evaluate because the number of automation installations are few and the precision with which operational data have been collected to determine payback is suboptimal. The trend in automation has moved from total laboratory automation to a

  18. Technology evaluation: adalimumab, Abbott laboratories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenz, Hanns M

    2002-04-01

    Adalimumab (D2E7), a human monoclonal antibody that binds to and neutralizes TNFa, is being developed by Abbott (formerly Knoll), under license from Cambridge Antibody Technology (CAT), for the potential treatment of inflammatory disorders such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and Crohn's disease. It is also being investigated for the potential treatment of coronary heart disease. Phase II studies for Crohn's disease and phase III for RA were ongoing throughout 2001. Limited data are only available for RA. In January 2002, it was reported that phase III trials of adalimumab for RA had been completed, but details have not been published in the primary literature so far. At this time CAT and Abbott expected to file for US approval in the second quarter of 2002 with a launch date anticipated for 2003. Phase III data are expected to be presented at the European League Against Rheumatism meeting in June 2002. In November 2000, Lehman Brothers predicted a US launch in June 2002 with peak US sales of $600 million in 2007 and a launch in non-US markets in 2003 with peak sales in these markets of $300 million in 2008. In December 2000, Merrill Lynch predicted regulatory clearance in the second half of 2003. The probability of adalimumab reaching the market is estimated to be 70%. In December 2000, Merrill Lynch predicted a 2003 launch, with estimated sales of pounds sterling 3.65 million in that year rising to pounds sterling 30.14 million in 2010. In March 2001, ABN AMRO predicted sales of $73 million in 2003 rising to $392 million in 2007.

  19. Cab technology integration laboratory demonstration with moving map technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-31

    A human performance study was conducted at the John A. Volpe National Transportation Systems Center (Volpe Center) using a locomotive research simulatorthe Cab Technology Integration Laboratory (CTIL)that was acquired by the Federal Railroad Ad...

  20. Dig-face monitoring during excavation of a radioactive plume at Mound Laboratory, Ohio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Josten, N.E.; Gehrke, R.J.; Carpenter, M.V.

    1995-12-01

    A dig-face monitoring system consists of onsite hardware for collecting information on changing chemical, radiological, and physical conditions in the subsurface soil during the hazardous site excavation. A prototype dig-face system was take to Mount Laboratory for a first trial. Mound Area 7 was the site of historical disposals of 232 Th, 227 Ac, and assorted debris. The system was used to monitor a deep excavation aimed at removing 227 Ac-contaminated soils. Radiological, geophysical, and topographic sensors were used to scan across the excavation dig-face at four successive depths as soil was removed. A 3-D image of the contamination plumes was developed; the radiation sensor data indicated that only a small portion of the excavated soil volume was contaminated. The spatial information produced by the dig-face system was used to direct the excavation activities into the area containing the 227 Ac and to evaluate options for handling the separate 232 Th plume

  1. Technology transfer in the national laboratories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yonas, G.

    1991-08-01

    The title of this paper might unfairly provoke readers if it conjures up visions of vast stores of high-tech gadgets in several hundred technology warehouses'' (also known as federal laboratories) around the country, open for browsing by those in search of a bargain. That vision, unfortunately, is a mirage. The term technology transfer'' is not really as accurate as is the term technology team-work,'' a process of sharing ideas and knowledge rather than widgets. In addition, instead of discussing the efforts of more than 700 federal labs in the US, I mean to address only those nine government-owned, contractor-operated multiprogram labs run by the Department of Energy. Nevertheless, the topic of technology team-work opportunities with DOE multiprogram national lab is of significance to those concerned with increasing economic competitiveness and finding technological solutions to a host of national problems. A significant fraction of US R D capabilities rests in the nine DOE multiprogram national laboratories -- and these labs have only just begun to join the other federal laboratories in these efforts due to the passage and recent implementation of the National Competitiveness Technology Transfer Act of 1989.

  2. Oak Ridge National Laboratory Technology Logic Diagram

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-09-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory Technology Logic Diagram (TLD) was developed to provide a decision support tool that relates environmental restoration (ER) and waste management (WM) problems at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to potential technologies that can remediate these problems. The TLD identifies the research, development, demonstration testing, and evaluation needed to develop these technologies to a state that allows technology transfer and application to decontamination and decommissioning (D ampersand D), remedial action (RA), and WM activities. The TLD consists of three fundamentally separate volumes: Vol. 1, Technology Evaluation; Vol. 2, Technology Logic Diagram and Vol. 3, Technology EvaLuation Data Sheets. Part A of Vols. 1 and 2 focuses on RA. Part B of Vols. 1 and 2 focuses on the D ampersand D of contaminated facilities. Part C of Vols. 1 and 2 focuses on WM. Each part of Vol. 1 contains an overview of the TM, an explanation of the problems facing the volume-specific program, a review of identified technologies, and rankings of technologies applicable to the site. Volume 2 (Pts. A. B. and C) contains the logic linkages among EM goals, environmental problems, and the various technologies that have the potential to solve these problems. Volume 3 (Pts. A. B, and C) contains the TLD data sheets. This volume provides the technology evaluation data sheets (TEDS) for ER/WM activities (D ampersand D, RA and WM) that are referenced by a TEDS code number in Vol. 2 of the TLD. Each of these sheets represents a single logic trace across the TLD. These sheets contain more detail than is given for the technologies in Vol. 2

  3. Incorporating the International Polar Year Into Introductory Geology Laboratories at Ohio State University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Judge, S. A.; Wilson, T. J.

    2005-12-01

    The International Polar Year (IPY) provides an excellent opportunity for highlighting polar research in education. The ultimate goal of our outreach and education program is to develop a series of modules that are focused on societally-relevant topics being investigated in Antarctic earth science, while teaching basic geologic concepts that are standard elements of school curricula. For example, we envision a university-level, undergraduate, introductory earth science class with the entire semester/quarter laboratory program focused on polar earth science research during the period of the International Polar Year. To attain this goal, a series of modules will be developed, including inquiry-based exercises founded on imagery (video, digital photos, digital core scans), GIS data layers, maps, and data sets available from OSU research groups. Modules that highlight polar research are also suitable for the K-12 audience. Scaleable/grade appropriate modules that use some of the same data sets as the undergraduate modules can be outlined for elementary through high school earth science classes. An initial module is being developed that focuses on paleoclimate data. The module provides a hands-on investigation of the climate history archived in both ice cores and sedimentary rock cores in order to understand time scales, drivers, and processes of global climate change. The paleoclimate module also demonstrates the types of polar research that are ongoing at OSU, allowing students to observe what research the faculty are undertaking in their respective fields. This will link faculty research with student education in the classroom, enhancing learning outcomes. Finally, this module will provide a direct link to U.S. Antarctic Program research related to the International Polar Year, when new ice and sedimentary rock cores will be obtained and analyzed. As a result of this laboratory exercise, the students will be able to: (1) Define an ice core and a sedimentary rock core

  4. THE IDAHO NATIONAL LABORATORY BERYLLIUM TECHNOLOGY UPDATE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glen R. Longhurst

    2007-01-01

    A Beryllium Technology Update meeting was held at the Idaho National Laboratory on July 18, 2007. Participants came from the U.S., Japan, and Russia. There were two main objectives of this meeting. One was a discussion of current technologies for beryllium in fission reactors, particularly the Advanced Test Reactor and the Japan Materials Test Reactor, and prospects for material availability in the coming years. The second objective of the meeting was a discussion of a project of the International Science and Technology Center regarding treatment of irradiated beryllium for disposal. This paper highlights discussions held during that meeting and major conclusions reached

  5. MUSICAL-COMPUTER TECHNOLOGY: THE LABORATORY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gorbunova Irina B.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with musically-computer technology in the educational system on example of the Educational and Methodical Laboratory Music & Computer Technologies at the Herzen State Pedagogical University of Russia, St. Petersburg. Interdisciplinary field of professional activities relates to the creation and application of specialized music software and hardware tools and the knowledges in music and informatics. A realization of the concept of musical-computer education in preparing music teachers is through basic educational programs of vocational training, supplementary education, professional development of teachers and methodical support via Internet. In addition, the laboratory Music & Computer Technologies engaged in scientific activity: it is, above all, specialized researches in the field of pedagogy and international conferences.

  6. Technology transfer from Canadian nuclear laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacDonald, R.D.; Evans, W.; MacEwan, J.R.; Melvin, J.G.

    1985-09-01

    Canada has developed a unique nuclear power system, the CANDU reactor. AECL - Research Company (AECL-RC) has played a key role in the CANDU program by supplying its technology to the reactor's designers, constructors and operators. This technology was transferred from our laboratories to our sister AECL companies and to domestic industries and utilities. As CANDUs were built overseas, AECL-RC made its technology available to foreign utilities and agencies. Recently the company has embarked on a new transfer program, commercial R and D for nuclear and non-nuclear customers. During the years of CANDU development, AECL-RC has acquired the skills and technology that are especially valuable to other countries embarking on their own nuclear programs. This report describes AECL-RC's thirty years' experience with the transfer of technology

  7. Oak Ridge National Laboratory Technology Logic Diagram

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-09-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory Technology Logic Diagram (TLD) was developed to provide a decision-support tool that relates environmental restoration (ER) and waste management (WM) problems at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to potential technologies that can remediate these problems. The TLD identifies the research, development, demonstration, testing, and evaluation needed to develop these technologies to a state that allows technology transfer and application to decontamination and decommissioning (D ampersand D), remedial action (RA), and WM activities. The TLD consists of three fundamentally separate volumes: Vol. 1 (Technology Evaluation), Vol. 2 (Technology Logic Diagram), and Vol. 3 (Technology Evaluation Data Sheets). Part A of Vols. 1 and 2 focuses on D ampersand D. Part B of Vols. 1 and 2 focuses on RA of contaminated facilities. Part C of Vols. 1 and 2 focuses on WM. Each part of Vol. 1 contains an overview of the TLD, an explanation of the program-specific responsibilities, a review of identified technologies, and the ranking os remedial technologies. Volume 2 (Pts. A, B, and C) contains the logic linkages among EM goals, environmental problems, and the various technologies that have the potential to solve these problems. Volume 3 (Pts. A, B, and C) contains the TLD data sheets. The focus of Vol. 1, Pt. B, is RA, and it has been divided into six chapters. The first chapter is an introduction, which defines problems specific to the ER Program for ORNL. Chapter 2 provides a general overview of the TLD. Chapters 3 through 5 are organized into necessary subelement categories: RA, characterization, and robotics and automation. The final chapter contains regulatory compliance information concerning RA

  8. Technology integration project: Environmental Restoration Technologies Department Sandia National Laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, C.V.; Burford, T.D.

    1996-08-01

    Sandia National Laboratories Environmental Restoration Technologies Department is developing environmental restoration technologies through funding form the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) Office of Science and Technology. Initially, this technology development has been through the Mixed Waste Landfill Integrated Demonstration (MWLID). It is currently being developed through the Contaminant Plume containment and Remediation Focus Area, the Landfill Stabilization Focus Area, and the Characterization, Monitoring, and Sensor Cross-Cutting Program. This Technology Integration Project (TIP) was responsible for transferring MWLID-developed technologies for routine use by environmental restoration groups throughout the DOE complex and commercializing these technologies to the private sector. The MWLID's technology transfer/commercialization successes were achieved by involving private industry in development, demonstration, and technology transfer/commercialization activities; gathering and disseminating information about MWLID activities and technologies; and promoting stakeholder and regulatory involvement. From FY91 through FY95, 30 Technical Task Plans (TTPs) were funded. From these TTPs, the MWLID can claim 15 technology transfer/commercialization successes. Another seven technology transfer/commercialization successes are expected. With the changeover to the focus areas, the TIP continued the technology transfer/commercialization efforts begun under the MWLID

  9. Technology integration project: Environmental Restoration Technologies Department Sandia National Laboratories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, C.V.; Burford, T.D. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Environmental Restoration Technologies; Allen, C.A. [Tech Reps, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1996-08-01

    Sandia National Laboratories Environmental Restoration Technologies Department is developing environmental restoration technologies through funding form the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Office of Science and Technology. Initially, this technology development has been through the Mixed Waste Landfill Integrated Demonstration (MWLID). It is currently being developed through the Contaminant Plume containment and Remediation Focus Area, the Landfill Stabilization Focus Area, and the Characterization, Monitoring, and Sensor Cross-Cutting Program. This Technology Integration Project (TIP) was responsible for transferring MWLID-developed technologies for routine use by environmental restoration groups throughout the DOE complex and commercializing these technologies to the private sector. The MWLID`s technology transfer/commercialization successes were achieved by involving private industry in development, demonstration, and technology transfer/commercialization activities; gathering and disseminating information about MWLID activities and technologies; and promoting stakeholder and regulatory involvement. From FY91 through FY95, 30 Technical Task Plans (TTPs) were funded. From these TTPs, the MWLID can claim 15 technology transfer/commercialization successes. Another seven technology transfer/commercialization successes are expected. With the changeover to the focus areas, the TIP continued the technology transfer/commercialization efforts begun under the MWLID.

  10. Results of the independent radiological verification survey of the remedial action performed at the former Alba Craft Laboratory site, Oxford, Ohio, (OXO001)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kleinhans, K.R.; Murray, M.E.; Carrier, R.F.

    1996-04-01

    Between October 1952 and February 1957, National Lead of Ohio (NLO), a primary contractor for the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC), subcontracted certain uranium machining operations to Alba Craft Laboratory, Incorporated, located at 10-14 West Rose Avenue, Oxford, Ohio. In 1992, personnel from Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) confirmed the presence of residual radioactive materials from the AEC-related operations in and around the facility in amounts exceeding the applicable Department of Energy (DOE) guidelines. Although the amount of uranium found on the property posed little health hazard if left undisturbed, the levels were sufficient to require remediation to bring radiological conditions into compliance with current guidelines, thus ensuring that the public and the environment are protected. A team from ORNL conducted a radiological verification survey of the former Alba Craft Laboratory property between December 1994 and February 1995. The survey was conducted at the request of DOE and included directly measured radiation levels, the collection and analysis of soil samples to determine concentrations of uranium and certain other radionuclides, and comparison of these data to the guidelines. This document reports the findings of this survey. The results of the independent verification survey of the former Alba Craft Laboratory property demonstrate that all contaminated areas have been remediated to radionuclide concentrations and activity levels below the applicable guideline limits set by DOE

  11. Emerging Technologies for the Clinical Microbiology Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchan, Blake W.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY In this review we examine the literature related to emerging technologies that will help to reshape the clinical microbiology laboratory. These topics include nucleic acid amplification tests such as isothermal and point-of-care molecular diagnostics, multiplexed panels for syndromic diagnosis, digital PCR, next-generation sequencing, and automation of molecular tests. We also review matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization–time of flight (MALDI-TOF) and electrospray ionization (ESI) mass spectrometry methods and their role in identification of microorganisms. Lastly, we review the shift to liquid-based microbiology and the integration of partial and full laboratory automation that are beginning to impact the clinical microbiology laboratory. PMID:25278575

  12. Three-dimensional printing physiology laboratory technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulkin, Matthew S; Widder, Emily; Shao, Connie; Holzem, Katherine M; Gloschat, Christopher; Gutbrod, Sarah R; Efimov, Igor R

    2013-12-01

    Since its inception in 19th-century Germany, the physiology laboratory has been a complex and expensive research enterprise involving experts in various fields of science and engineering. Physiology research has been critically dependent on cutting-edge technological support of mechanical, electrical, optical, and more recently computer engineers. Evolution of modern experimental equipment is constrained by lack of direct communication between the physiological community and industry producing this equipment. Fortunately, recent advances in open source technologies, including three-dimensional printing, open source hardware and software, present an exciting opportunity to bring the design and development of research instrumentation to the end user, i.e., life scientists. Here we provide an overview on how to develop customized, cost-effective experimental equipment for physiology laboratories.

  13. Computer technology forecasting at the National Laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peskin, A.M.

    1980-01-01

    The DOE Office of ADP Management organized a group of scientists and computer professionals, mostly from their own national laboratories, to prepare an annually updated technology forecast to accompany the Department's five-year ADP Plan. The activities of the task force were originally reported in an informal presentation made at the ACM Conference in 1978. This presentation represents an update of that report. It also deals with the process of applying the results obtained at a particular computing center, Brookhaven National Laboratory. Computer technology forecasting is a difficult and hazardous endeavor, but it can reap considerable advantage. The forecast performed on an industry-wide basis can be applied to the particular needs of a given installation, and thus give installation managers considerable guidance in planning. A beneficial side effect of this process is that it forces installation managers, who might otherwise tend to preoccupy themselves with immediate problems, to focus on longer term goals and means to their ends

  14. An aerial radiological survey of the EG ampersand G Mound Applied Technologies and surrounding area, Miamisburg, Ohio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-11-01

    An aerial radiological survey was conducted over EG ampersand G Mound Applied Technologies, Miamisburg, Ohio, during the period of June 9--24, 1989. The purpose of the 41-square-kilometer (16-square-mile) survey was to document the terrestrial gamma environment of the plant and surrounding area. In addition, ground-based exposure rate measurements and soil samples were obtained to support the aerial data. An exposure rate contour map at 1 meter above ground level was.constructed from the gamma data and overlaid on an aerial photograph and map of the area. Exposure rates measured in the area typically ranged from 9 to 11 microroentgens per hour (μR/h)

  15. Push technology at Argonne National Laboratory.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noel, R. E.; Woell, Y. N.

    1999-04-06

    Selective dissemination of information (SDI) services, also referred to as current awareness searches, are usually provided by periodically running computer programs (personal profiles) against a cumulative database or databases. This concept of pushing relevant content to users has long been integral to librarianship. Librarians traditionally turned to information companies to implement these searches for their users in business, academia, and the science community. This paper describes how a push technology was implemented on a large scale for scientists and engineers at Argonne National Laboratory, explains some of the challenges to designers/maintainers, and identifies the positive effects that SDI seems to be having on users. Argonne purchases the Institute for Scientific Information (ISI) Current Contents data (all subject areas except Humanities), and scientists no longer need to turn to outside companies for reliable SDI service. Argonne's database and its customized services are known as ACCESS (Argonne-University of Chicago Current Contents Electronic Search Service).

  16. Ohio CVISN business plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-03-01

    Ohio has aggressively initiated and participated in a variety of ITS/CVO initiatives in recent years. The successes of these projects provide the impetus and enthusiasm to pursue higher forms of technology in addressing issues relating to CVO. This d...

  17. Demonstration of Airborne Wide Area Assessment Technologies at the Toussaint River, Ohio

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Foley, Jack; Wright, David

    2007-01-01

    ...) technology, a wide area assessment technology, to assist in the characterization of the shore and shallow areas in and around the Toussaint River relative to munitions contamination from historical...

  18. Sandia National Laboratories: CRISPR genome-editing technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Environmental Management System Pollution Prevention History 60 impacts Diversity Locations Facts & Figures Programs Nuclear Weapons About Nuclear Weapons Safety & Security Weapons Science & Technology Robotics R&D 100 Awards Laboratory Directed Research & Development Technology Deployment Centers

  19. Ohio Water Resources Council

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohio.gov State Agencies | Online Services Twitter YouTube EPA IMAGE Ohio Water Resources Committee Ohio enjoys abundant water resources. Few states enjoy as many streams, rivers, lakes and wetlands as Ohio. Numerous agencies and organizations are involved in protecting Ohio's valuable water resources

  20. Radiation and Health Technology Laboratory Capabilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goles, Ronald W.; Johnson, Michelle Lynn; Piper, Roman K.; Peters, Jerry D.; Murphy, Mark K.; Mercado, Mike S.; Bihl, Donald E.; Lynch, Timothy P.

    2003-07-15

    The Radiological Standards and Calibrations Laboratory, a part of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)(a) performs calibrations and upholds reference standards necessary to maintain traceability to national standards. The facility supports U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) programs at the Hanford Site, programs sponsored by DOE Headquarters and other federal agencies, radiological protection programs at other DOE and commercial nuclear sites and research and characterization programs sponsored through the commercial sector. The laboratory is located in the 318 Building of the Hanford Site's 300 Area. The facility contains five major exposure rooms and several laboratories used for exposure work preparation, low-activity instrument calibrations, instrument performance evaluations, instrument maintenance, instrument design and fabrication work, thermoluminescent and radiochromic Dosimetry, and calibration of measurement and test equipment (M&TE). The major exposure facilities are a low-scatter room used for neutron and photon exposures, a source well room used for high-volume instrument calibration work, an x-ray facility used for energy response studies, a high-exposure facility used for high-rate photon calibration work, a beta standards laboratory used for beta energy response studies and beta reference calibrations and M&TE laboratories. Calibrations are routinely performed for personnel dosimeters, health physics instrumentation, photon and neutron transfer standards alpha, beta, and gamma field sources used throughout the Hanford Site, and a wide variety of M&TE. This report describes the standards and calibrations laboratory.

  1. Environmental control technology survey of selected US strip mining sites. Volume 2A: Ohio: water quality impacts and overburden chemistry of Ohio study site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bogner, J E; Henricks, J D; Olsen, R D; Schubert, J P; Sobek, A A; Wilkey, M L; Johnson, D O

    1979-05-01

    An intensive study of water, overburden, and coal chemistry was conducted at a large surface mine in Ohio from May 1976 through July 1977. Sampling sites were chosen to include the final mine effluent at the outflow of a large settling pond and chemically-treated drainage from a coal storage pile. Samples were collected semimonthly and analyzed for total dissolved solids, total suspended solids, alkalinity, acidity, sulfate, chloride, and 16 metals. Field measurements included pH, flow rate, dissolved oxygen, and specific conductance. The final effluent, where sampled, generally complied with Office of Surface Mining reclamation standards for pH, iron, and total suspended solids. Comparison of the final effluent with water quality of an unnamed tributary above the mine suggested that elevated values for specific conductance, total dissolved solids, sulfate, calcium, magnesium, manganese, and zinc were attributable to the mine operation. In general, there were observable seasonal variations in flow rates that correlated positively to suspended solids concentrations and negatively to concentrations of dissolved constituents in the final effluent. Drainage from the coal storage pile contained elevated levels of acidity and dissolved metals which were not reduced significantly by the soda ash treatment. The storage pile drainage was diluted, however, by large volumes of alkaline water in the settling pond. Analysis of overburden and coal indicated that the major impact of mine drainage was pyrite oxidation and hydrolysis in the Middle Kittanning Coal and in the Lower Freeport Shale overlying the coal. However, the presence of a calcite-cemented section in the Upper Freeport Sandstone contributed substantial self-neutralizing capacity to the overburden section, resulting in generally alkaline drainage at this site.

  2. Technology transfer from accelerator laboratories (challenges and opportunities)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verma, V.K.; Gardner, P.L.

    1994-06-01

    It is becoming increasingly evident that technology transfer from research laboratories must be a key element of their comprehensive strategic plans. Technology transfer involves using a verified and organized knowledge and research to develop commercially viable products. Management of technology transfer is the art of organizing and motivating a team of scientists, engineers and manufacturers and dealing intelligently with uncertainties. Concurrent engineering is one of the most effective approaches to optimize the process of technology transfer. The challenges, importance, opportunities and techniques of transferring technology from accelerator laboratories are discussed. (author)

  3. Materials technology at Argonne National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Betten, P.

    1989-01-01

    Argonne is actively involved in the research and development of new materials research and development (R ampersand D). Five new materials technologies have been identified for commercial potential and are presented in this paper as follows: (1) nanophase materials, (2) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging of ceramics, (3) superconductivity developments and technology transfer mechanisms, and (4) COMMIX computer code modeling for metal castings, and (5) tribology using ion-assisted deposition (IAB). 4 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab

  4. Brookhaven National Laboratory technology transfer report, fiscal year 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    An increase in the activities of the Office of Research and Technology Applications (ORTA) is reported. Most of the additional effort has been directed to the regional electric utility initiative, but intensive efforts have been applied to the commercialization of a compact synchrotron storage ring for x-ray lithography applications. At least six laboratory technologies are reported as having been transferred or being in the process of transfer. Laboratory accelerator technology is being applied to study radiation effects, and reactor technology is being applied for designing space reactors. Technologies being transferred and emerging technologies are described. The role of the ORTA and the technology transfer process are briefly described, and application assessment records are given for a number of technologies. A mini-incubator facility is also described

  5. Brookhaven National Laboratory technology transfer report, fiscal year 1986

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1986-01-01

    An increase in the activities of the Office of Research and Technology Applications (ORTA) is reported. Most of the additional effort has been directed to the regional electric utility initiative, but intensive efforts have been applied to the commercialization of a compact synchrotron storage ring for x-ray lithography applications. At least six laboratory technologies are reported as having been transferred or being in the process of transfer. Laboratory accelerator technology is being applied to study radiation effects, and reactor technology is being applied for designing space reactors. Technologies being transferred and emerging technologies are described. The role of the ORTA and the technology transfer process are briefly described, and application assessment records are given for a number of technologies. A mini-incubator facility is also described. (LEW)

  6. Ohio Advanced Energy Manufacturing Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kimberly Gibson; Mark Norfolk

    2012-07-30

    The program goal of the Ohio Advanced Energy Manufacturing Center (OAEMC) is to support advanced energy manufacturing and to create responsive manufacturing clusters that will support the production of advanced energy and energy-efficient products to help ensure the nation's energy and environmental security. This goal cuts across a number of existing industry segments critical to the nation's future. Many of the advanced energy businesses are starting to make the transition from technology development to commercial production. Historically, this transition from laboratory prototypes through initial production for early adopters to full production for mass markets has taken several years. Developing and implementing manufacturing technology to enable production at a price point the market will accept is a key step. Since these start-up operations are configured to advance the technology readiness of the core energy technology, they have neither the expertise nor the resources to address manufacturing readiness issues they encounter as the technology advances toward market entry. Given the economic realities of today's business environment, finding ways to accelerate this transition can make the difference between success and failure for a new product or business. The advanced energy industry touches a wide range of industry segments that are not accustomed to working together in complex supply chains to serve large markets such as automotive and construction. During its first three years, the Center has catalyzed the communication between companies and industry groups that serve the wide range of advanced energy markets. The Center has also found areas of common concern, and worked to help companies address these concerns on a segment or industry basis rather than having each company work to solve common problems individually. EWI worked with three industries through public-private partnerships to sew together disparate segments helping to promote

  7. Proceedings of the symposium on technology in laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-10-01

    The Symposium on Technology in Laboratories was held on March 29 and 30, 1988 at Toyota Auditorium in Nagoya University. This symposium was hosted by Institute of Plasma Physics. Participants were about 210 and 54 papers were presented from many of Japanese universities and laboratories. Technical experience and new technics were reported and discussed divided into five sessions; technologies of manufacture, cryogenic, diagonostic and control system, computer and experimental apparatus. (author)

  8. Technological advances in the hemostasis laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lippi, Giuseppe; Plebani, Mario; Favaloro, Emmanuel J

    2014-03-01

    Automation is conventionally defined as the use of machines, control systems, and information technologies to optimize productivity. Although automation is now commonplace in several areas of diagnostic testing, especially in clinical chemistry and immunochemistry, the concept of extending this process to hemostasis testing has only recently been advanced. The leading drawbacks are still represented by the almost unique biological matrix because citrated plasma can only be used for clotting assays and few other notable exceptions, and by the highly specific pretreatment of samples, which is particularly distinct to other test systems. Despite these important limitations, a certain degree of automation is also now embracing hemostasis testing. The more relevant developments include the growing integration of routine hemostasis analyzers with track line systems and workcells, the development of specific instrumentation tools to enhance reliability of testing (i.e., signal detection with different technologies to increase test panels, plasma indices for preanalytical check of interfering substances, failure patterns sensors for identifying insufficient volume, clots or bubbles, cap-piercing for enhancing operator safety, automatic reflex testing, automatic redilution of samples, and laser barcode readers), preanalytical features (e.g., positive identification, automatic systems for tube(s) labeling, transillumination devices), and postphlebotomy tools (pneumatic tube systems for reducing turnaround time, sample transport boxes for ensuring stability of specimens, monitoring systems for identifying unsuitable conditions of transport). Regardless of these important innovations, coagulation/hemostasis testing still requires specific technical and clinical expertise, not only in terms of measurement procedures but also for interpreting and then appropriately utilizing the derived information. Thus, additional and special caution has to be used when designing projects of

  9. Virtual Laboratory Enabling Collaborative Research in Applied Vehicle Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamar, John E.; Cronin, Catherine K.; Scott, Laura E.

    2005-01-01

    The virtual laboratory is a new technology, based on the internet, that has had wide usage in a variety of technical fields because of its inherent ability to allow many users to participate simultaneously in instruction (education) or in the collaborative study of a common problem (real-world application). The leadership in the Applied Vehicle Technology panel has encouraged the utilization of this technology in its task groups for some time and its parent organization, the Research and Technology Agency, has done the same for its own administrative use. This paper outlines the application of the virtual laboratory to those fields important to applied vehicle technologies, gives the status of the effort, and identifies the benefit it can have on collaborative research. The latter is done, in part, through a specific example, i.e. the experience of one task group.

  10. Dental laboratory technology education in China: current situation and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Liwei; Yue, Li; Zhou, Min; Yu, Haiyang

    2013-03-01

    Modern dentistry and dental education in China were first introduced from abroad by Dr. Lindsay in 1907. However, advancements in the field of dental laboratory technology did not occur to the same degree in specialties such as prosthodontics and orthodontics. Since the 1990s, orders from abroad demanding dental appliances surged as the image of China as the "world's factory" strengthened. The assembly line model, in which technicians work like simple procedure workers, was rapidly applied to denture production, while the traditional education system and apprenticeship systems demonstrated little progress in these years. The lack of advancement in dental laboratory technology education caused insufficient development in China's dental technology industry. In order to alter the situation, a four-year dental laboratory technology undergraduate educational program was established in 2005 by West China School of Stomatology, Sichuan University (WCSS, SCU). This program was based on SCU's undergraduate education and WCSS's junior college education systems. The program introduced scientific methods in relevant subjects into laboratory technicians' training and made many improvements in the availability of trained faculty, textbooks, laboratory facilities, and curriculum.

  11. Better Buildings NW Ohio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moyer, Kevin [Toledo-Lucas County Port Authority, Toledo, OH (United States)

    2015-03-04

    When the Toledo Lucas County Port Authority (TLCPA) filed for the Department of Energy EECBG grant in late 2009, it was part of a strategic and Board backed objective to expand the organization’s economic development and financing programs into alternative energy and energy efficiency. This plan was filed with the knowledge and support of the areas key economic development agencies. The City of Toledo was also a key partner with the Mayor designating a committee to develop a Strategic Energy Policy for the City. This would later give rise to a Community Sustainability Strategic Plan for Toledo, Lucas County and the surrounding region with energy efficiency as a key pillar. When the TLCPA signed the grant documents with the DOE in June of 2010, the geographic area was severely distressed economically, in the early stages of a recovery from over a 30% drop in business activity and high unemployment. The TLCPA and its partners began identifying potential project areas well before the filing of the application, continuing to work diligently before the formal award and signing of the grant documents. Strong implementation and actions plans and business and financing models were developed and revised throughout the 3 year grant period with the long term goal of creating a sustainable program. The TLCPA and the City of Toledo demonstrated early leadership by forming the energy improvement district and evaluating buildings under their control including transportation infrastructure and logistics, government services buildings and buildings which housed several for profit and not for profit tenants while completing significant energy efficiency projects that created public awareness and confidence and solid examples of various technologies and energy savings. As was stated in the DOE Award Summary, the undertaking was focused as a commercial program delving into Alternative Energy Utility Districts; what are referred to in Ohio Statute as Energy Special Improvement

  12. Occurrence of 3 Bordetella species during an outbreak of cough illness in Ohio: epidemiology, clinical features, laboratory findings and antimicrobial susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spicer, Kevin B; Salamon, Doug; Cummins, Carol; Leber, Amy; Rodgers, Loren E; Marcon, Mario J

    2014-07-01

    An increase in laboratory diagnosis of pertussis was noted in central Ohio during 2010. Diagnosis was made using a polymerase chain reaction assay targeting the multicopy insertion sequence IS481, which is found in both Bordetella pertussis (Bp) and Bordetella holmesii (Bh). An increase in specimens testing positive for Bordetella parapertussis (Bpp) using insertion sequence IS1001 was also noted. Nasopharyngeal swab specimens submitted April 1, 2010, to March 31, 2011, were tested using a multiplex polymerase chain reaction assay for Bp/Bh (IS481) and Bpp followed by singleplex assays for Bp and Bh. A subgroup of specimens was also cultured for Bordetella species, and antimicrobial susceptibility testing was performed on recovered organisms. Demographic and clinical features were compared for patients with Bp, Bh and Bpp. Of 520 IS481-positive specimens, 214 (41.1%) were positive for Bp, 79 (15.2%) were positive for Bh and 5 (1.0%) were positive for both Bp and Bh; 222 (42.7%) were negative for both targets. An additional 220 specimens were positive for Bpp. Among a sample of 155 IS481-positive specimens, 40, 15 and 0 were culture positive for Bp, Bh and Bpp, respectively. Among a sample of 55 BparaIS1001-positive (Bpp) specimens, 22, 0 and 0 were culture positive for Bpp, Bp and Bh, respectively. All Bordetella species were susceptible to macrolide antibiotics. Patients with Bh were older than patients with Bp, who were older than those positive for Bpp (mean ages: 12.0, 8.0 and 4.2 years, respectively; P Bpp and 100 negative for Bordetella species), but did not differ statistically among the groups (χ = 5.1, P = 0.17). All 3 Bordetella species, Bp, Bh and Bpp, were detected during on outbreak of pertussis-like cough illness. There were noted differences in age and seasonality, but clinical features at the time of presentation did not allow clear differentiation of these infections. All Bordetella species recovered from culture and tested were susceptible in

  13. Laboratory Technology Research: Abstracts of FY 1996 projects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-12-31

    The Laboratory Technology Research (LTR) program supports high-risk, multidisciplinary research partnerships to investigate challenging scientific problems whose solutions have promising commercial potential. These partnerships capitalize on two great strengths of this country: the world-class basic research capability of the DOE Energy Research (ER) multi-program national laboratories and the unparalleled entrepreneurial spirit of American industry. Projects supported by the LTR program are conducted by the five ER multi-program laboratories: Argonne, Brookhaven, Lawrence Berkeley, Oak Ridge, and Pacific Northwest National Laboratories. These projects explore the applications of basic research advances relevant to Department of Energy`s (DOE) mission over a full range of scientific disciplines. The program presently emphasizes three critical areas of mission-related research: advanced materials, intelligent processing/manufacturing research, and sustainable environments.

  14. [Guidelines for blood transfusion teaching to medical laboratory technology students].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moncharmont, P; Tourlourat, M; Fourcade, C; Julien, E; Peyrard, T; Cabaud, J-J

    2012-02-01

    The new French law about clinical laboratory medicine, the requirements of the ISO/CEI 15189 standard, the numerous abilities expected from the medical laboratory technologists and their involvement in blood bank management has led the working group "Recherche et démarche qualité" of the French Society of Blood Transfusion to initiate an inventory of blood transfusion teaching syllabus for medical laboratory technology students and to propose transfusion medicine teaching guidelines. Seven worksheets have been established for that purpose including red blood cell antigen typing and antibody screening, blood sampling in immunohaematology, automation, clinical practices, blood products, blood delivery and haemovigilance. These guidelines aim at contributing to the harmonization of transfusion medicine teaching and at providing objective elements to the medical laboratory managers regarding the practical and theoretical skills of theirs collaborators. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Laboratory 3.0: Manufacturing Technologies Laboratory Virtualization with a Student-Centred Methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabregat-Sanjuan, Albert; Pàmies-Vilà, Rosa; Ferrando Piera, Francesc; De la Flor López, Silvia

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a blended-learning strategy for improving the teaching method applied in the laboratory subject Manufacturing Technologies. The teaching method has been changed from a predominantly teacher-centred to an active learning system with a student-centred focus and e-learning activities. In face-to-face classes, a game-based learning…

  16. Laboratory technology research - abstracts of FY 1997 projects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-11-01

    The Laboratory Technology Research (LTR) program supports high-risk, multidisciplinary research partnerships to investigate challenging scientific problems whose solutions have promising commercial potential. These partnerships capitalize on two great strengths of this country: the world-class basic research capability of the DOE Energy Research (ER) multi-program national laboratories and the unparalleled entrepreneurial spirit of American industry. A distinguishing feature of the ER multi-program national laboratories is their ability to integrate broad areas of science and engineering in support of national research and development goals. The LTR program leverages this strength for the Nation`s benefit by fostering partnerships with US industry. The partners jointly bring technology research to a point where industry or the Department`s technology development programs can pursue final development and commercialization. Projects supported by the LTR program are conducted by the five ER multi-program laboratories. These projects explore the applications of basic research advances relevant to DOE`s mission over a full range of scientific disciplines. The program presently emphasizes three critical areas of mission-related research: advanced materials; intelligent processing/manufacturing research; and sustainable environments.

  17. SANDIA NATIONAL LABORATORIES IN SITU ELECTROKINETIC EXTRACTION TECHNOLOGY; INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGY EVALUATION REPORT

    Science.gov (United States)

    As a part of the Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) Program, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency evaluated the In-Situ Electrokinetic Extraction (ISEE) system at Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico.The SITE demonstration results show ...

  18. Renewable energy technology development at Sandia National Laboratories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimas, P. C.

    1994-02-01

    The use of renewable energy technologies is typically thought of as an integral part of creating and sustaining an environment that maximizes the overall quality of life of the Earth's present inhabitants and does not leave an undue burden on future generations. Sandia National Laboratories has been a leader in developing many of these technologies over the last two decades. This paper describes innovative solar, wind and geothermal energy systems and components that Sandia is helping to bring to the marketplace. A common but special aspect of all of these activities is that they are conducted in partnership with non-federal government entities. A number of these partners are from New Mexico.

  19. Load Disaggregation Technologies: Real World and Laboratory Performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayhorn, Ebony T.; Sullivan, Greg P.; Petersen, Joseph M.; Butner, Ryan S.; Johnson, Erica M.

    2016-09-28

    Low cost interval metering and communication technology improvements over the past ten years have enabled the maturity of load disaggregation (or non-intrusive load monitoring) technologies to better estimate and report energy consumption of individual end-use loads. With the appropriate performance characteristics, these technologies have the potential to enable many utility and customer facing applications such as billing transparency, itemized demand and energy consumption, appliance diagnostics, commissioning, energy efficiency savings verification, load shape research, and demand response measurement. However, there has been much skepticism concerning the ability of load disaggregation products to accurately identify and estimate energy consumption of end-uses; which has hindered wide-spread market adoption. A contributing factor is that common test methods and metrics are not available to evaluate performance without having to perform large scale field demonstrations and pilots, which can be costly when developing such products. Without common and cost-effective methods of evaluation, more developed disaggregation technologies will continue to be slow to market and potential users will remain uncertain about their capabilities. This paper reviews recent field studies and laboratory tests of disaggregation technologies. Several factors are identified that are important to consider in test protocols, so that the results reflect real world performance. Potential metrics are examined to highlight their effectiveness in quantifying disaggregation performance. This analysis is then used to suggest performance metrics that are meaningful and of value to potential users and that will enable researchers/developers to identify beneficial ways to improve their technologies.

  20. Remote participation technologies in the EFDA Laboratories - status and prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, V.; How, J.A.

    2003-01-01

    More than 25 laboratories of the European Fusion Development Agreement (EFDA) have been increasingly using remote participation (RP) technologies for collaborative work on several experiments. We present an overview of the technologies that are employed to provide remote data access, remote computer access, and tele-conference. We also deal with computer network requirements, and support and documentation needs. The biggest application of these tools has been the joint scientific exploitation of the JET Facilities. Increasingly other experiments are operated as shared facilities, and the RP tools are being used in this context. For remote data access there is a clear trend towards MDSplus as common data access layer for multi-experiment data access. Secure Remote Computer access is converging on two different solutions. Video-conference is also converging on two partially inter-operable solutions, whereas the sharing of presentation material is converging on one solution. Remote Control Room participation is being used in two laboratories. Network monitoring has been developed and is now in routine use. The RP work is being done at many laboratories and is co-ordinated by EFDA. A number of items in several fields need still to be tackled and an overview of these is presented. (authors)

  1. Remote participation technologies in the EFDA Laboratories - status and prospects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, V. [Associazione EURATOM-ENEA sulla Fusione, Consorzio RFX, Padova (Italy); How, J.A. [Association Euratom-CEA Cadarache, 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France). Dept. de Recherches sur la Fusion Controlee

    2003-07-01

    More than 25 laboratories of the European Fusion Development Agreement (EFDA) have been increasingly using remote participation (RP) technologies for collaborative work on several experiments. We present an overview of the technologies that are employed to provide remote data access, remote computer access, and tele-conference. We also deal with computer network requirements, and support and documentation needs. The biggest application of these tools has been the joint scientific exploitation of the JET Facilities. Increasingly other experiments are operated as shared facilities, and the RP tools are being used in this context. For remote data access there is a clear trend towards MDSplus as common data access layer for multi-experiment data access. Secure Remote Computer access is converging on two different solutions. Video-conference is also converging on two partially inter-operable solutions, whereas the sharing of presentation material is converging on one solution. Remote Control Room participation is being used in two laboratories. Network monitoring has been developed and is now in routine use. The RP work is being done at many laboratories and is co-ordinated by EFDA. A number of items in several fields need still to be tackled and an overview of these is presented. (authors)

  2. Patient and tissue identification in the assisted reproductive technology laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomeroy, Kimball O; Racowsky, Catherine

    2012-06-01

    Several high-profile cases involving in vitro fertilization have recently received considerable media attention and highlight the importance of assuring patient and tissue identification. Within the assisted reproductive technology (ART) laboratory, there are many steps where wrong patient or tissue identity could have drastic results. Erroneous identity can result in tragic consequences for the patient, the laboratory, and for those working in the program as a whole. Such errors can result in enormous psychological and financial costs, as well as a loss in confidence. There are several critical steps that should be taken every single time and for each specific procedure performed in the ART laboratory to ensure the correct identification of patients and their tissue. These steps should be detailed in protocols that include the method of identification, the two unique identifiers that will be used, the sources of these identifiers, and often a system in which more than one person is involved in the identification. Each protocol should ideally include a checklist that is actively used for the implementation of each procedure. The protocol should also indicate what to do if the identification does not match up, including rapid handling and notification of the patient involved in the error. All ART laboratories should instill in their employees an atmosphere of full and open disclosure for cases where mistakes are made. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  3. Ohio-Based NREL Subcontractor Wins Major Small Business Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohio-Based NREL Subcontractor Wins Major Small Business Award For more information contact: e:mail alternative fuel vehicles has won a major award from the U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA). Automotive Testing Laboratories, Inc. (ATL) of East Liberty, Ohio was named the SBA's Midwest Regional Small Business

  4. Laboratory technology research: Abstracts of FY 1998 projects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-11-01

    The Laboratory Technology Research (LTR) program supports high-risk, multidisciplinary research partnerships to investigate challenging scientific problems whose solutions have promising commercial potential. These partnerships capitalize on two great strengths of the country: the world-class basic research capability of the DOE Office of Science (SC) national laboratories and the unparalleled entrepreneurial spirit of American industry. Projects supported by the LTR program in FY 1998 explore the applications of basic research advances relevant to DOE`s mission over a full range of scientific disciplines. The program presently emphasizes three critical areas of mission-related research: advanced materials, intelligent processing and manufacturing research, and environmental and biomedical research. Abstracts for 85 projects are contained in this report.

  5. Environmental assessment for the Processing and Environmental Technology Laboratory (PETL)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-09-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an environmental assessment (EA) on the proposed Processing and Environmental Technology Laboratory (PETC) at Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico (SNL/NM). This facility is needed to integrate, consolidate, and enhance the materials science and materials process research and development (R ampersand D) currently in progress at SNL/NM. Based on the analyses in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. Therefore, an environmental impact statement is not required, and DOE is issuing this Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI)

  6. Environmental assessment for the Processing and Environmental Technology Laboratory (PETL)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-09-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an environmental assessment (EA) on the proposed Processing and Environmental Technology Laboratory (PETC) at Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico (SNL/NM). This facility is needed to integrate, consolidate, and enhance the materials science and materials process research and development (R&D) currently in progress at SNL/NM. Based on the analyses in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. Therefore, an environmental impact statement is not required, and DOE is issuing this Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI).

  7. Laboratory 3.0: Manufacturing technologies laboratory virtualization with a student-centred methodology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albert Fabregat-Sanjuan

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a blended-learning strategy for improving the teaching method applied in the laboratory subject Manufacturing Technologies. The teaching method has been changed from a predominantly teacher-centred to an active learning system with a student-centred focus and e-learning activities. In face-to-face classes, a game-based learning platform has been used. This methodology ensured engaging classes at the same time that provided a useful live feedback for students and teachers. The virtualization of the laboratory was achieved by two different e-learning activities, self-assessment tasks and video clips. These e-learning tools have been used not only to improve the students’ learning but also to enhance their motivation. The results from academic outputs show a significant improvement after the new blended learning method is applied. Moreover, a student satisfaction survey shows the positive impact of the methodology on the students’ engagement and motivation.

  8. 78 FR 32637 - Science and Technology Reinvention Laboratory Personnel Management Demonstration Project...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-31

    ..., Science and Technology Reinvention Laboratory Personnel Management Demonstration Project, Department of... DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Office of the Secretary Science and Technology Reinvention Laboratory Personnel Management Demonstration Project, Department of the Army, Army Research, Development and...

  9. Oak Ridge National Laboratory Technology Logic Diagram. Volume 2, Technology Logic Diagram: Part B, Remedial Action

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-09-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory Technology Logic Diagram (TLD) was developed to provide a decision support tool that relates environmental restoration (ER) and waste management (WM) problems at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to potential technologies that can remediate these problems. The TLD identifies the research, development, demonstration, testing, and evaluation needed to develop these technologies to a state that allows technology transfer and application to decontamination and decommissioning (D&D), remedial action (RA), and WM activities. The TLD consists of three fundamentally separate volumes: Vol. 1 (Technology Evaluation), Vol. 2 (Technology Logic Diagram), and Vol. 3 (Technology Evaluation Data Sheets). Part A of Vols. 1. and 2 focuses on D&D. Part B of Vols. 1 and 2 focuses on the RA of contaminated facilities. Part C of Vols. 1 and 2 focuses on WM. Each part of Vol. 1 contains an overview of the TLD, an explanation of the program-specific responsibilities, a review of identified technologies, and the rankings of remedial technologies. Volume 2 (Pts. A, B, and C) contains the logic linkages among EM goals, environmental problems, and the various technologies that have the potential to solve these problems. Volume 3 (Pts. A, B, and C) contains the TLD data sheets. Remedial action is the focus of Vol. 2, Pt. B, which has been divided into the three necessary subelements of the RA: characterization, RA, and robotics and automation. Each of these sections address general ORNL problems, which are then broken down by problem area/constituents and linked to potential remedial technologies. The diagrams also contain summary information about a technology`s status, its science and technology needs, and its implementation needs.

  10. A Review of Research on Technology-Assisted School Science Laboratories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chia-Yu; Wu, Hsin-Ka; Lee, Silvia Wen-Yu; Hwang, Fu-Kwun; Chang, Hsin-Yi; Wu, Ying-Tien; Chiou, Guo-Li; Chen, Sufen; Liang, Jyh-Chong; Lin, Jing-Wen; Lo, Hao-Chang; Tsai, Chin-Chung

    2014-01-01

    Studies that incorporate technologies into school science laboratories have proliferated in the recent two decades. A total of 42 studies published from 1990 to 2011 that incorporated technologies to support school science laboratories are reviewed here. Simulations, microcomputer-based laboratories (MBLs), and virtual laboratories are commonly…

  11. Avanços tecnológicos em hematologia laboratorial Technological advances in laboratorial haematology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo C. Naoum

    2001-08-01

    Full Text Available O recente avanço científico e tecnológico direcionado à identificação imuno-hematológica de produtos celulares (ex.: citocinas, interleucinas, interferons, entre outros sintetizados por determinadas células sanguíneas, bem como na identificação de antígenos de membrana de leucócitos e células progenitoras hematopoiéticas, promoveram excepcional desenvolvimento no diagnóstico laboratorial de diversas doenças hematológicas. Somam-se a esse fato as aplicações das técnicas de biologia molecular que se tornam cada vez mais instrumentos laboratoriais de grande definição no diagnóstico e na prevenção de doenças hematológicas, notadamente aquelas de origem hereditária. O presente artigo teve o objetivo de expor as principais aplicações de novas tecnologias que deverão ser adotadas rapidamente pela moderna hematologia laboratorial, bem como a de sensibilizar os profissionais hematologistas, clínicos e laboratoriais, para a necessidade de se atualizarem numa nova ciência, a dos produtos celulares.Recent progress towards the identification of products synthesised by some blood cells (ex.: cytokines, interleukins, interferons, etc as well as the identification of white blood cell and stem cell membrane antigens, has aided the exceptional development of laboratory diagnostics of several haematological diseases. In addition to this there has been a great development in the use of molecular biology techniques which have become instrumentals of high definition in the diagnosis and prevention of haematological diseases, specifically those of hereditary origin. This article has the aim of disclosing the main applications of the new technologies that will soon be used widely in laboratory haematology.

  12. Monsanto Mound Laboratory tritium waste control technology development program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bixel, J.C.; Kershner, C.J.; Rhinehammer, T.B.

    1975-01-01

    Over the past four years, implementation of tritium waste control programs has resulted in a 30-fold reduction in the gaseous tritium effluents from Mound Laboratory. However, to reduce tritium waste levels to the ''as low as practicable'' guideline poses problems that are beyond ready solution with state-of-the-art tritium control technology. To meet this advanced technology need, a tritium waste control technology program was initiated. Although the initial thrust of the work under this program was oriented toward development of gaseous effluent treatment systems, its natural evolution has been toward the liquid waste problem. It is thought that, of all the possible approaches to disposal of tritiated liquid wastes, recovery offers the greatest advantages. End products of the recovery processes would be water detritiated to a level below the Radioactivity Concentration Guide (RCG) or detritiated to a level that would permit safe recycle in a closed loop operation and enriched tritium. The detritiated water effluent could be either recycled in a closed loop operation such as in a fuel reprocessing plant or safely released to the biosphere, and the recovered tritium could be recycled for use in fusion reactor studies or other applications

  13. Technological capability at the Brazilian official pharmaceutical laboratories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Vitor Bomtempo Martins

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper studies the technological capability in the Brazilian Official Pharmaceutical Laboratories [OPL]. The technological capability analysis could contribute to organization strategies and governmental actions in order to improve OPL basic tasks as well to incorporate new ones, particularly concerning the innovation management. Inspired in Figueiredo (2000, 2003a, 2003b and Figueiredo and Ariffin (2003, a framework was drawn and adapted to pharmaceutical industry characteristics and current sanitary and health legislation. The framework allows to map different dimensions of the technological capability (installations, processes, products, equipments, organizational capability and knowledge management and the level attained by OPL (ordinary or innovating capability. OPL show a good development of ordinary capabilities, particularly in Product and Processes. Concerning the other dimensions, OPL are quite diverse. In general, innovating capabilities are not much developed. In the short term, it was identified a dispersion in the capacitating efforts. Considering their present level and the absorption efforts, good perspectives can be found in Installations, Processes and Organizational Capability. A lower level of efforts in Products and Knowledge Management could undermine these capabilities in the future.

  14. Aerospace Materials and Process Technology Reinvestment Workshop Held in Dayton, Ohio on 18-19 May 1993.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-05-19

    The Laboratories Theory, Modeling and Simulation , • ATP Characterization J Education and Human Resources • MTC Facilities -- NBSR and CNRF MISSION...34 Automiated System for Composite Analysis (ASCA).Y -Basis for usefri(eadly numerical methods to describe composite laminates and predict ?heir response

  15. Tungsten alloy research at the US Army Materials Technology Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dowding, R.J.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports that recent research into tungsten heavy alloys at the U. S. Army Materials Technology Laboratory (MTL) has explored many areas of processing and process development. The recrystallization and respheroidization of tungsten grains in a heavily cold worked heavy alloy has been examined and resulted in the identification of a method of grain refinement. Another area of investigation has been lightly cold worked. It was determined that it was possible to increase the strength and hardness of the tungsten grains by proper hat treatment. MTL has been involved in the Army's small business innovative research (SBIR) program and several programs have been funded. Included among these are a method of coating the tungsten powders with the alloying elements and the development of techniques of powder injection molding of heavy alloys

  16. Simulation Technology Laboratory Building 970 hazards assessment document

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wood, C.L.; Starr, M.D.

    1994-11-01

    The Department of Energy Order 5500.3A requires facility-specific hazards assessments be prepared, maintained, and used for emergency planning purposes. This hazards assessment document describes the chemical and radiological hazards associated with the Simulation Technology Laboratory, Building 970. The entire inventory was screened according to the potential airborne impact to onsite and offsite individuals. The air dispersion model, ALOHA, estimated pollutant concentrations downwind from the source of a release, taking into consideration the toxicological and physical characteristics of the release site, the atmospheric conditions, and the circumstances of the release. The greatest distances at which a postulated facility event will produce consequences exceeding the ERPG-2 and Early Severe Health Effects thresholds are 78 and 46 meters, respectively. The highest emergency classification is a Site Area Emergency. The Emergency Planning Zone is 100 meters

  17. Oak Ridge National Laboratory Technology Logic Diagram. Volume 1, Technology Evaluation: Part B, Remedial Action

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-09-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory Technology Logic Diagram (TLD) was developed to provide a decision-support tool that relates environmental restoration (ER) and waste management (WM) problems at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to potential technologies that can remediate these problems. The TLD identifies the research, development, demonstration, testing, and evaluation needed to develop these technologies to a state that allows technology transfer and application to decontamination and decommissioning (D&D), remedial action (RA), and WM activities. The TLD consists of three fundamentally separate volumes: Vol. 1 (Technology Evaluation), Vol. 2 (Technology Logic Diagram), and Vol. 3 (Technology Evaluation Data Sheets). Part A of Vols. 1 and 2 focuses on D&D. Part B of Vols. 1 and 2 focuses on RA of contaminated facilities. Part C of Vols. 1 and 2 focuses on WM. Each part of Vol. 1 contains an overview of the TLD, an explanation of the program-specific responsibilities, a review of identified technologies, and the ranking os remedial technologies. Volume 2 (Pts. A, B, and C) contains the logic linkages among EM goals, environmental problems, and the various technologies that have the potential to solve these problems. Volume 3 (Pts. A, B, and C) contains the TLD data sheets. The focus of Vol. 1, Pt. B, is RA, and it has been divided into six chapters. The first chapter is an introduction, which defines problems specific to the ER Program for ORNL. Chapter 2 provides a general overview of the TLD. Chapters 3 through 5 are organized into necessary subelement categories: RA, characterization, and robotics and automation. The final chapter contains regulatory compliance information concerning RA.

  18. Development of excavation technologies at the Canadian underground research laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuzyk, Gregory W.; Martino, Jason B.

    2008-01-01

    Several countries, Canada being among them, are developing concepts for disposal of used fuel from power generating nuclear reactors. As in underground mining operations, the disposal facilities will require excavation of many kilometres of shafts and tunnels through the host rock mass. The need to maintain the stability of excavations and safety of workers will be of paramount importance. Also, excavations required for many radioactive waste repositories will ultimately need to be backfilled and sealed to maintain stability and minimize any potential for migration of radionuclides, should they escape their disposal containers. The method used to excavate the tunnels and shafts, and the rock damage that occurs due to excavation, will greatly affect the performance characteristics of repository sealing systems. The underground rock mechanics and geotechnical engineering work performed at the Canadian Underground Research Laboratory (URL) has led to the development of excavation technologies that reduce rock damage in subsurface excavations. This paper discusses the excavation methods used to construct the URL and their application in planning for the construction of similar underground laboratories and repositories for radioactive wastes. (author)

  19. Education, Technology, and Media: A Peak into My Summer Internship at NASA Glenn Research Center in Cleveland, Ohio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, James

    2004-01-01

    My name is James Moon and I am a senor at Tennessee State University where my major is Aeronautical and Industrial Technology with a concentration in industrial electronics. I am currently serving my internship in the Engineering and Technical Services Directorate at the Glenn Research Center (GRC). The Engineering and Technical Service Directorate provides the services and infrastructure for the Glenn Research Center to take research concepts to reality. They provide a full range of integrated services including engineering, advanced prototyping and testing, facility management, and information technology for NASA, industry, and academia. Engineering and Technical Services contains the core knowledge in Information Technology (IT). This includes data systems and analysis, inter and intranet based systems design and data security. Including the design and development of embedded real-time sohare applications for flight and supporting ground systems, Engineering and Technical Services provide a wide range of IT services and products specific to the Glenn Research Center research and engineering community.

  20. Environmental Audit at Santa Barbara Operations, Special Technologies Laboratory, Remote Sensing Laboratory, North Las Vegas Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-03-01

    This report documents the results of the Environmental Audit of selected facilities under the jurisdiction of the DOE Nevada Operations Office (NV) that are operated by EG and G Energy Measurements, Incorporated (EG and G/EM). The facilities included in this Audit are those of Santa Barbara Operation (SBO) at Goleta, California; the Special Technologies Laboratory (STL) at Santa Barbara, California; and Las Vegas Area Operations (LVAO) including the Remote Sensing Laboratory (RSL) at Nellis Air Force Base in Nevada, and the North Las Vegas Facilities (NLVF) at North Las Vegas, Nevada. The Environmental Audit was conducted by the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Environmental Audit, commencing on January 28, 1991 and ending on February 15, 1991. The scope of the Audit was comprehensive, addressing environmental activities in the technical areas of air, surface water/drinking water, groundwater, waste management, toxic and chemical materials, quality assurance, radiation, inactive waste sites, and environmental management. Also assessed was compliance with applicable Federal, state, and local regulations and requirements; internal operating requirements; DOE Orders; and best management practices. 8 tabs

  1. Advanced robotic technologies for transfer at Sandia National Laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bennett, P.C.

    1994-01-01

    Hazardous operations which have in the past been completed by technicians are under increased scrutiny due to high costs and low productivity associated with providing protective clothing and environments. As a result, remote systems are needed to accomplish many hazardous materials handling tasks such as the clean-up of waste sites in which the exposure of personnel to radiation, chemical, explosive and other hazardous constituents is unacceptable. Computer models augmented by sensing, and structured, modular computing environments are proving effective in automating many unstructured hazardous tasks. Work at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) has focused on applying flexible automation (robotics) to meet the needs of the U.S. Department of Energy (USDOE). Dismantling facilities, environmental remediation, and materials handling in changing, hazardous environments lead to many technical challenges. Computer planning, monitoring and operator assistance shorten training cycles, reduce errors, and speed execution of operations. Robotic systems that re-use well-understood generic technologies can be much better characterized than robotic systems developed for a particular application, leading to a more reliable and safer systems. Further safety in robotic operations results from use of environmental sensors and knowledge of the task and environment. Collision detection and avoidance is achieved from such sensor integration and model-based control. This paper discusses selected technologies developed at SNL for use within the USDOE complex that have been or are ready for transfer to government and industrial suppliers. These technologies include sensors, sub-systems, and the design philosophy applied to quickly integrate them into a working robotic system. This paper represents the work of many people at the Intelligent Systems and Robotics Center at SNL, to whom the credit belongs

  2. Geometry Laboratory (GEOLAB) surface modeling and grid generation technology and services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerr, Patricia A.; Smith, Robert E.; Posenau, Mary-Anne K.

    1995-01-01

    The facilities and services of the GEOmetry LABoratory (GEOLAB) at the NASA Langley Research Center are described. Included in this description are the laboratory functions, the surface modeling and grid generation technologies used in the laboratory, and examples of the tasks performed in the laboratory.

  3. Thermal treatment technology at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hillary, J.M.

    1994-01-01

    Recent surveys of mixed wastes in interim storage throughout the 30-site Department of Energy complex indicate that only 12 of those sites account for 98% of such wastes by volume. Current inventories at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) account for 38% of total DOE wastes in interim storage, the largest of any single site. For a large percentage of these waste volumes, as well as the substantial amounts of buried and currently generated wastes, thermal treatment processes have been designated as the technologies of choice. Current facilities and a number of proposed strategies exist for thermal treatment of wastes of this nature at the INEL. High-level radioactive waste is solidified in the Waste Calciner Facility at the Idaho Central Processing Plant. Low-level solid wastes until recently have been processed at the Waste Experimental Reduction Facility (WERF), a compaction, size reduction, and controlled air incineration facility. WERF is currently undergoing process upgrading and RCRA Part B permitting. Recent systems studies have defined effective strategies, in the form of thermal process sequences, for treatment of wastes of the complex and heterogeneous nature in the INEL inventory. This presentation reviews the current status of operating facilities, active studies in this area, and proposed strategies for thermal treatment of INEL wastes

  4. Innovative technology summary report: Road Transportable Analytical Laboratory (RTAL)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-10-01

    The Road Transportable Analytical Laboratory (RTAL) has been used in support of US Department of Energy (DOE) site and waste characterization and remediation planning at Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP) and is being considered for implementation at other DOE sites, including the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant. The RTAL laboratory system consists of a set of individual laboratory modules deployable independently or as an interconnected group to meet each DOE site's specific analysis needs. The prototype RTAL, deployed at FEMP Operable Unit 1 Waste Pits, has been designed to be synergistic with existing analytical laboratory capabilities, thereby reducing the occurrence of unplanned rush samples that are disruptive to efficient laboratory operations

  5. Integration of tablet technologies in the e-laboratory of cytology: a health technology assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giansanti, Daniele; Pochini, Marco; Giovagnoli, Maria Rosaria

    2014-10-01

    Although tablet systems are becoming a powerful technology, particularly useful in every application of medical imaging, to date no one has investigated the acceptance and performance of this technology in digital cytology. The specific aims of the work were (1) to design a health technology assessment (HTA) tool to assess, in terms of performance and acceptance, the introduction of tablet technologies (wearable, portable, and non portable) in the e-laboratories of cytology and (2) to test the tool in a first significant application of digital cytology. An HTA tool was proposed operating on a domain of five dimensions of investigation comprising the basic information of the product of digital cytology, the perceived subjective quality of images, the assessment of the virtual navigation on the e-slide, the assessment of the information and communication technologies features, and the diagnostic power. Six e-slides regarding studies of cervicovaginal cytology digitalized by means of an Aperio ( www.aperio.com ) scanner and uploaded onto the www.digitalslide.it Web site were used for testing the methodology on three different network connections. Three experts of cytology successfully tested the methodology on seven tablets found suitable for the study in their own standard configuration. Specific indexes furnished by the tool indicated both a high degree of performance and subjective acceptance of the investigated technology. The HTA tool thus could be useful to investigate new tablet technologies in digital cytology and furnish stakeholders with useful information that may help them make decisions involving the healthcare system. From a global point of view the study demonstrates the feasibility of using the tablet technology in digital cytology.

  6. Oak Ridge National Laboratory Technology Logic Diagram. Volume 1, Technology Evaluation: Part A, Decontamination and Decommissioning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-09-01

    The Strategic Roadmap for the Oak Ridge Reservation is a generalized planning document that identifies broad categories of issues that keep ORNL outside full compliance with the law and other legally binding agreements. Possible generic paths to compliance, issues, and the schedule for resolution of the issues one identified. The role of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Technology Logic Diagram (TLD) is then to identify specific site issues (problems), identify specific technologies that can be brought to bear on the issues, and assess the current status and readiness of these remediation technologies within the constraints of the schedule commitment. Regulatory requirements and commitments contained in the Strategic Roadmap for the Oak Ridge Reservation are also included in the TLD as constraints to the application of immature technological solutions. Some otherwise attractive technological solutions may not be employed because they may not be deployable on the schedule enumerated in the regulatory agreements. The roadmap for ORNL includes a list of 46 comprehensive logic diagrams for WM of low-level, radioactive-mixed, hazardous, sanitary and industrial. and TRU waste. The roadmapping process gives comparisons of the installation as it exists to the way the installation should exist under full compliance. The identification of the issues is the goal of roadmapping. This allows accurate and timely formulation of activities.

  7. Technical support for the Ohio Clean Coal Technology Program. Volume 2, Baseline of knowledge concerning process modification opportunities, research needs, by-product market potential, and regulatory requirements: Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olfenbuttel, R.; Clark, S.; Helper, E.; Hinchee, R.; Kuntz, C.; Means, J.; Oxley, J.; Paisley, M.; Rogers, C.; Sheppard, W.; Smolak, L. [Battelle, Columbus, OH (United States)

    1989-08-28

    This report was prepared for the Ohio Coal Development Office (OCDO) under Grant Agreement No. CDO/R-88-LR1 and comprises two volumes. Volume 1 presents data on the chemical, physical, and leaching characteristics of by-products from a wide variety of clean coal combustion processes. Volume 2 consists of a discussion of (a) process modification waste minimization opportunities and stabilization considerations; (b) research and development needs and issues relating to clean coal combustion technologies and by-products; (c) the market potential for reusing or recycling by-product materials; and (d) regulatory considerations relating to by-product disposal or reuse.

  8. Secondary calibration laboratory for ionizing radiation laboratory accreitation program National Institute of Standards and Technology National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, P.R.

    1993-12-31

    This paper presents an overview of the procedures and requirements for accreditation under the Secondary Calibration Laboratory for Ionizing Radiation Program (SCLIR LAP). The requirements for a quality system, proficiency testing and the onsite assessment are discussed. The purpose of the accreditation program is to establish a network of secondary calibration laboratories that can provide calibrations traceable to the primary national standards.

  9. Secondary calibration laboratory for ionizing radiation laboratory accreitation program National Institute of Standards and Technology National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, P.R.

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of the procedures and requirements for accreditation under the Secondary Calibration Laboratory for Ionizing Radiation Program (SCLIR LAP). The requirements for a quality system, proficiency testing and the onsite assessment are discussed. The purpose of the accreditation program is to establish a network of secondary calibration laboratories that can provide calibrations traceable to the primary national standards

  10. Project Quality Assurance Plan for research and development services provided by Oak Ridge National Laboratory in support of the Westinghouse Materials Company of Ohio Operable Unit 1 Stabilization Development and Treatability Studies Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilliam, T.M.

    1991-05-01

    This Project Quality Assurance Plan (PQAP) sets forth the quality assurance (QA) requirements that are applied to those elements of the Westinghouse Materials Company of Ohio (WMCO) Operable Unit 1 support at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) project that involve research and development (R D) performed at ORNL. This is in compliance with the applicable criteria of 10 CFR Part 50, Appendix B, ANSI/ASME NQA-1, as specified by Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Operations (ORO) Order 5700.6B. For this application, NQA-1 is the core QA Program requirements document. QA policy, normally found in the requirements document, is contained herein. The requirements of this PQAP apply to project activities that affect the quality and reliability/credibility of research, development, and investigative data and documentation. These activities include the functions of attaining quality objectives and assuring that an appropriate QA program scope is established. The scope of activities affecting quality includes organization; personnel training and qualifications; design control; procurement; material handling and storage; operating procedures; testing, surveillance, and auditing; R D investigative activities and documentation; deficiencies; corrective actions; and QA record keeping. 12 figs.

  11. Review and Identification of DOE Laboratory Technologies for Countermine/Unexploded Ordnance Detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, C.M.

    2002-04-03

    Several Department of Energy (DOE) laboratories have worked and/or are working on technologies that are applicable to the detection of landmines and/or unexploded ordnance. This report is a compilation of technical summaries for many of these technologies. For additional information on any technology, appropriate points of contact are provided for each technology.

  12. THE EMPLOYMENT OF COMPUTER TECHNOLOGIES IN LABORATORY COURSE ON PHYSICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liudmyla M. Nakonechna

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Present paper considers the questions on development of conceptually new virtual physical laboratory, the employment of which into secondary education schools will allow to check the theoretical knowledge of students before laboratory work and to acquire the modern methods and skills of experiment.

  13. Laboratory and Field Investigations of Small Crater Repair Technologies

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Priddy, Lucy P; Tingle, Jeb S; McCaffrey, Timothy J; Rollings, Ray S

    2007-01-01

    .... This airfield damage repair (ADR) investigation consisted of laboratory testing of selected crater fill and capping materials, as well as full-scale field testing of small crater repairs to evaluate field mixing methods, installation...

  14. Energy and Technology Review, July 1984: state of the Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-01-01

    Each year, Director Roger Batzel addresses the LLNL staff on the state of the Laboratory and the achievements of the past year. On May 17, 1984, Dr. Batzel reported on the estimated budget for fiscal year 1985, which includes an 8.5% increase in operating funds, and on recent progress in our major programs. In this issue, we summarize Dr. Batzel's address and present a sampling of Laboratory achievements

  15. Energy and Technology Review, July 1984: state of the Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1984-01-01

    Each year, Director Roger Batzel addresses the LLNL staff on the state of the Laboratory and the achievements of the past year. On May 17, 1984, Dr. Batzel reported on the estimated budget for fiscal year 1985, which includes an 8.5% increase in operating funds, and on recent progress in our major programs. In this issue, we summarize Dr. Batzel's address and present a sampling of Laboratory achievements.

  16. Idaho National Engineering Laboratory waste area groups 1--7 and 10 Technology Logic Diagram

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Brien, M.C.; Meservey, R.H.; Little, M.; Ferguson, J.S.; Gilmore, M.C.

    1993-09-01

    The Technology Logic Diagram was developed to provide technical alternatives for environmental restoration projects at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The diagram (three volumes) documents suggested solutions to the characterization, retrieval, and treatment phases of cleanup activities at contaminated sites within 8 of the laboratory's 10 waste area groups. Contaminated sites at the laboratory's Naval Reactor Facility and Argonne National Laboratory-West are not included in this diagram

  17. Science teachers' perceptions of the effectiveness of technology in the laboratories: Implications for science education leadership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaseen, Niveen K.

    2011-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify science teachers' perceptions concerning the use of technology in science laboratories and identify teachers' concerns and recommendations for improving students' learning. Survey methodology with electronic delivery was used to gather data from 164 science teachers representing Texas public schools. The data confirmed that weaknesses identified in the 1990s still exist. Lack of equipment, classroom space, and technology access, as well as large numbers of students, were reported as major barriers to the implementation of technology in science laboratories. Significant differences were found based on gender, grade level, certification type, years of experience, and technology proficiency. Females, elementary teachers, traditionally trained teachers, and less experienced teachers revealed a more positive attitude toward the use of technology in science laboratories. Participants in this study preferred using science software simulations to support rather than replace traditional science laboratories. Teachers in this study recommended professional development programs that focused on strategies for a technology integrated classroom.

  18. Ohio Career Resource.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohio State Dept. of Education, Columbus. Div. of Career-Technical and Adult Education.

    This resource is designed to provide Ohio labor market information for use with advisory committees to stimulate and inform dialogue about the current evaluation and future planning of programs. It provides reports for 23 career fields in 6 career clusters. Each report highlights careers and occupations in the field and answers these questions:…

  19. 2015 Ohio Remediation Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohio Department of Higher Education, 2015

    2015-01-01

    In fulfillment of Ohio Revised Code 3333.041 (A) (1), the Chancellor of the Department of Higher Education has published a listing by school district of the number of the 2014 high school graduates who subsequently attended a state institution of higher education in academic year 2014-2015. The listing provides the percentage of each district's…

  20. 2014 Ohio Remediation Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohio Board of Regents, 2014

    2014-01-01

    In fulfillment of Ohio Revised Code 3333.041 (A) (1) the Chancellor has published a listing by school district of the number of the 2013 high school graduates who attended a state institution of higher education in academic year 2013-2014 and the percentage of each district's graduates required by the institution to enroll in a remedial course in…

  1. Heavy liquid metal technologies at KArlsruhe Lead LAboratory KALLA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knebel, J.U.; Mueller, G.; Konys, J.

    2002-01-01

    The objectives of the research cover: lead-bismuth technologies; corrosion mechanism and corrosion protection; thermal hydraulics; kinetics of oxygen control systems. Detailed experimental results are presented

  2. Treatment of Laboratory Wastewater by Sequence Batch reactor technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imtiaz, N.; Butt, M.; Khan, R.A.; Saeed, M.T.; Irfan, M.

    2012-01-01

    These studies were conducted on the characterization and treatment of sewage mixed with waste -water of research and testing laboratory (PCSIR Laboratories Lahore). In this study all the parameters COD, BOD and TSS etc of influent (untreated waste-water) and effluent (treated waste-water) were characterized using the standard methods of examination for water and waste-water. All the results of the analyzed waste-water parameters were above the National Environmental Quality Standards (NEQS) set at National level. Treatment of waste-water was carried out by conventional sequencing batch reactor technique (SBR) using aeration and settling technique in the same treatment reactor at laboratory scale. The results of COD after treatment were reduced from (90-95 %), BOD (95-97 %) and TSS (96-99 %) and the reclaimed effluent quality was suitable for gardening purposes. (author)

  3. Commercialization of Los Alamos National Laboratory technologies via small businesses. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brice, R.; Carton, D.; Rhyne, T. [and others

    1997-06-01

    Appendices are presented from a study performed on a concept model system for the commercialization of Los Alamos National Laboratory technologies via small businesses. Topics include a summary of information from the joint MCC/Los Alamos technology conference; a comparison of New Mexico infrastructure to other areas; a typical licensing agreement; technology screening guides; summaries of specific DOE/UC/Los Alamos documents; a bibliography; the Oak Ridge National Laboratory TCRD; The Ames Center for Advanced Technology Development; Los Alamos licensing procedures; presentation of slides from monthly MCC/Los Alamos review meetings; generalized entrepreneurship model; and a discussion on receiving equity for technology.

  4. Safety and Liability in the New Technology Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haynie, W. J., III

    2009-01-01

    All laboratories, even modern high-tech ones, have some degree of hazard potential. It is the teacher's responsibility to make the lab as safe as possible and to do all that is reasonable and prudent to prevent accidents. The teacher's goal should be to insure the safety of every student. This goal is met best via well-planned instruction and…

  5. Correct coding for laboratory procedures during assisted reproductive technology cycles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-01

    This document provides updated coding information for services related to assisted reproductive technology procedures. This document replaces the 2012 ASRM document of the same name. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Technology Innovation at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (Text

    Science.gov (United States)

    the Technology Innovation at NREL video. [intro music] The video opens with a blue background and the scientific discoveries that are coming out of the lab and transfer them to industry to get products on the screen. [exit music

  7. 75 FR 65572 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Ohio; Ohio Ambient Air Quality...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-26

    ... Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Ohio; Ohio Ambient Air Quality Standards AGENCY... Ohio Administrative Code (OAC) relating to the consolidation of Ohio's Ambient Air Quality Standards... apply to Ohio's SIP. Incorporating the air quality standards into Ohio's SIP helps assure that...

  8. Federal Laboratory Consortium Recognizes Unituxin Collaborators with Excellence in Technology Transfer Awards | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Federal Laboratory Consortium (FLC) presented an Excellence in Technology Transfer award to the group that collaborated to bring Unituxin (dinutuximab, also known as ch14.18), an immunotherapy for neuroblastoma, to licensure.

  9. 76 FR 56406 - Science and Technology Reinvention Laboratory Demonstration Project; Department of the Army; Army...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-13

    ... DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Office of the Secretary Science and Technology Reinvention Laboratory Demonstration Project; Department of the Army; Army Research, Development and Engineering Command; Tank... personnel management demonstration project for eligible TARDEC employees. Within that notice the table...

  10. Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory Environmental Technologies Proof-of-Concepts. Final report FY-96

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barrie, S.L.; Carpenter, G.S.; Crockett, A.B. [and others

    1997-04-01

    The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory Environmental Technologies Proof-of-Concept Project was initiated for the expedited development of new or conceptual technologies in support of groundwater fate, transport, and remediation; buried waste characterization, retrieval, and treatment; waste minimization/pollution prevention; and spent fuel handling and storage. In Fiscal Year 1996, The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory proposed 40 development projects and the Department of Energy funded 15. The projects proved the concepts of the various technologies, and all the technologies contribute to successful environmental management.

  11. Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory Environmental Technologies Proof-of-Concepts. Final report FY-96

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barrie, S.L.; Carpenter, G.S.; Crockett, A.B.

    1997-04-01

    The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory Environmental Technologies Proof-of-Concept Project was initiated for the expedited development of new or conceptual technologies in support of groundwater fate, transport, and remediation; buried waste characterization, retrieval, and treatment; waste minimization/pollution prevention; and spent fuel handling and storage. In Fiscal Year 1996, The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory proposed 40 development projects and the Department of Energy funded 15. The projects proved the concepts of the various technologies, and all the technologies contribute to successful environmental management

  12. Timber resources of Ohio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neal P. Kingsley; Carl E. Mayer

    1970-01-01

    Under the authority of the McSweeney-McNary Forest Research Act of May 22, 1928, and subsequent amendments, the Forest Service, U. S. Department of Agriculture, conducts a series of continuing forest surveys of all states to provide up-to-date information about the forest resources of the Nation. A resurvey of the timber resources of Ohio was made in 1966 and 1967 by...

  13. Pacific Northwest Laboratory environmental technologies available for deployment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slate, S.C.

    1994-07-01

    The Department of Energy created the Office of Environmental Management (EM) to conduct a 30-year plus, multi-billion dollar program to manage the wastes and cleanup the legacy from over fifty years of nuclear material production. Across the DOE System there are thousands of sites containing millions of metric tons of buried wastes and contaminated soils and groundwater. Additionally, there are nearly 400,000 m 3 of highly radioactive wastes in underground storage tanks, over 1,400 different mixed-waste streams, and thousands of contaminated surplus facilities, some exceeding 200,000 m 2 in size. Costs to remediate all these problems have been estimated to be as much as several hundred billion dollars. The tremendous technical challenges with some of the problems and the high costs of using existing technologies has led the Department to create the Office of Technology Development (TD) to lead an aggressive, integrated national program to develop and deploy the needed advanced, cost-effective technologies. This program is developing technologies for all major cleanup steps: assessment, characterization, retrieval, treatment, final stabilization, and disposal. Work is focused on the Department's five major problem areas: High-Level Waste Tank Remediation; Contaminant Plume Containment and Remediation; Mixed Waste Characterization, Treatment, and Disposal; Contaminated Soils and Buried Wastes Facility Transitioning, Decommissioning, and Final Disposal

  14. MIT Lincoln Laboratory: Technology in Support of National Security

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    technologies that could be uti - lized in future Landsat satellites to achieve significant economies of mass, size, power consumption, and cost, and...epitomized by the pregnancy test kit. However, immunoassays are typically based on anti bodies removed from their host cells and placed on substrates

  15. Electromagnetic wiggler technology development at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deis, G.A.; Burns, M.J.; Christensen, T.C.; Coffield, F.E.; Kulke, B.; Prosnitz, D.; Scharlemann, E.T.; Halbach, K.

    1987-01-01

    As a part of the program at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in induction-linac free-electron laser (IFEL) research, we are conducting a variety of activities addressing the unique requirements imposed on IFEL wiggler systems. We are actively developing improved dc iron-core electromagnetic wiggler designs to attain higher peak fields, greater tunability, and lower random error levels. We are pursuing specialized control systems, such as magnetic-field and beam-position controllers, which can relax requirements on the wiggler itself. We are also pursuing basic studies to establish the effect of radiation on permanent magnets

  16. Energy and technology review, January--February 1995. State of the laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bookless, W.A.; Stull, S.; Cassady, C.; Kaiper, G.; Ledbetter, G.; McElroy, L.; Parker, A. [eds.

    1995-02-01

    This issue of Energy and Technology Review highlights the Laboratory`s 1994 accomplishments in their mission areas and core programs--economic competitiveness, national security, lasers, energy, the environment, biology and biotechnology, engineering, physics and space science, chemistry and materials science, computations, and science and math education. LLNL is a major national resource of science and technology expertise, and they are committed to applying this expertise to meet vital national needs.

  17. Assessment of Application Technology of Natural User Interfaces in the Creation of a Virtual Chemical Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagodzinski, Piotr; Wolski, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Natural User Interfaces (NUI) are now widely used in electronic devices such as smartphones, tablets and gaming consoles. We have tried to apply this technology in the teaching of chemistry in middle school and high school. A virtual chemical laboratory was developed in which students can simulate the performance of laboratory activities similar…

  18. Developments of Spent Nuclear Fuel Pyroprocessing Technology at Idaho National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michael F. Simpson

    2012-03-01

    This paper summarizes research in used fuel pyroprocessing that has been published by Idaho National Laboratory over the last decade. It includes work done both on treatment of Experimental Breeder Reactor-II and development of advanced technology for potential scale-up and commercialization. Collaborations with universities and other laboratories is included in the cited work.

  19. Energy technologies at Sandia National Laboratories: Past, Present, Future

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-08-01

    We at Sandia first became involved with developing energy technology when the nation initiated its push toward energy independence in the early 1970s. That involvement continues to be strong. In shaping Sandia's energy programs for the 1990s, we will build on our track record from the 70s and 80s, a record outlined in this publication. It contains reprints of three issues of Sandia's Lab News that were devoted to our non-nuclear energy programs. Together, they summarize the history, current activities, and future of Sandia's diverse energy concerns; hence my desire to see them in one volume. Written in the fall of 1988, the articles cover Sandia's extremely broad range of energy technologies -- coal, oil and gas, geothermal, solar thermal, photovoltaics, wind, rechargeable batteries, and combustion.

  20. Science and Technology Teachers' Views about the Causes of Laboratory Accidents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydogdu, Cemil

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine science and technology teachers' views about the causes of the problems encountered in laboratories. In this research, phenomenology, a qualitative research design, was used. 21 science and technology teachers who were working in elementary schools in Eskisehir during the 2010-2011 spring semester were the…

  1. EXPERIENCE OF THE ORGANIZATION OF VIRTUAL LABORATORIES ON THE BASIS OF TECHNOLOGIES OF CLOUD COMPUTING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Oleksyuk

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The article investigated the concept of «virtual laboratory». This paper describes models of deploying of cloud technologies in IT infrastructure. The hybrid model is most recent for higher educational institution. The author suggests private cloud platforms to deploying the virtual laboratory. This paper describes the experience of the deployment enterprise cloud in IT infrastructure of Department of Physics and Mathematics of Ternopil V. Hnatyuk National Pedagogical University. The object of the research are virtual laboratories as components of IT infrastructure of higher education. The subject of the research are clouds as base of deployment of the virtual laboratories. Conclusions. The use of cloud technologies in the development virtual laboratories of the is an actual and need of the development. The hybrid model is the most appropriate in the deployment of cloud infrastructure of higher educational institution. It is reasonable to use the private (Cloudstack, Eucalyptus, OpenStack cloud platform in the universities.

  2. Proceedings of symposium on technology in laboratories by department of engineering and technical services

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-06-01

    The Symposium on Technology in Laboratories was held on March 14 and 15 at Ceratopia Toki in Toki City, Gifu Prefecture, Japan. This symposium was hosted by National Institute for Fusion Science (NIFS). There were 407 participants from many Japanese universities, national laboratories, technical colleges and from some Japanese Industrial world. One hundred and thirty one papers were presented in the symposium. Technical experience and new techniques were reported and discussed being divided into five sessions; technology of fabrication, device technology, diagnostic and control system, cryogenics, computer and data processing. (author)

  3. The national laboratory business role in energy technology research and development. Panel Discussion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sackett, John; Sullivan, Charles J.; Aumeier, Steve; Sanders, Tom; Johnson, Shane; Bennett, Ralph

    2001-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: Energy issues will play a pivotal role in the economic and political future of the United States. For reasons of both available supply and environmental concerns, development and deployment of new energy technologies is critical. Nuclear technology is important, but economic, political, and technical challenges must be overcome if it is to play a significant role. This session will address business opportunities for national laboratories to contribute to the development and implementation of a national energy strategy, concentrating on the role of nuclear technology. Panelists have been selected from the national laboratories, the U.S. Department of Energy, and state regulators. (authors)

  4. TECHNOLOGICAL COMPETENCE OF FUTURE ENGINEER: FORMATION AND DEVELOPMENT IN COMPUTER INTEGRATED LABORATORY WORKSHOP ON PHYSICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ihor S. Chernetskyi

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The article examines the category «technological competence» and the definition of its components according to the educational process. A structural and functional model of technological competence of future engineers through forms, means, methods and technologies of computer oriented laboratory work. Selected blocks and elements of the model in the course of a typical student laboratory work on the course of general physics. We consider the possibility of using some type of digital labs «Phywe», «Fourier» and modern electronic media (flash books to optimize laboratory work at the Technical University. The analysis of the future research of structural elements model of technological competence.

  5. Virtual Cultural Landscape Laboratory Based on Internet GIS Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bill, R.

    2012-07-01

    In recent years the transfer of old documents (books, paintings, maps etc.) from analogue to digital form has gained enormous importance. Numerous interventions are concentrated in the digitalisation of library collections, but also commercial companies like Microsoft or Google try to convert large analogue stocks such as books, paintings, etc. in digital form. Data in digital form can be much easier made accessible to a large user community, especially to the interested scientific community. The aim of the described research project is to set up a virtual research environment for interdisciplinary research focusing on the landscape of the historical Mecklenburg in the north-east of Germany. Georeferenced old maps from 1786 and 1890 covering complete Mecklenburg should be combined with current geo-information, satellite and aerial imagery to support spatio-temporal research aspects in different scales in space (regional 1:200,000 to local 1:25.000) and time (nearly 250 years in three time steps, the last 30 years also in three time slices). The Virtual Laboratory for Cultural Landscape Research (VKLandLab) is designed and developed by the Chair of Geodesy and Geoinformatics, hosted at the Computing Centre (ITMZ) and linked to the Digital Library (UB) at Rostock University. VKLandLab includes new developments such as wikis, blogs, data tagging, etc. and proven components already integrated in various data-related infrastructures such as InternetGIS, data repositories and authentication structures. The focus is to build a data-related infrastructure and a work platform that supports students as well as researchers from different disciplines in their research in space and time.

  6. VIRTUAL CULTURAL LANDSCAPE LABORATORY BASED ON INTERNET GIS TECHNOLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Bill

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available In recent years the transfer of old documents (books, paintings, maps etc. from analogue to digital form has gained enormous importance. Numerous interventions are concentrated in the digitalisation of library collections, but also commercial companies like Microsoft or Google try to convert large analogue stocks such as books, paintings, etc. in digital form. Data in digital form can be much easier made accessible to a large user community, especially to the interested scientific community. The aim of the described research project is to set up a virtual research environment for interdisciplinary research focusing on the landscape of the historical Mecklenburg in the north-east of Germany. Georeferenced old maps from 1786 and 1890 covering complete Mecklenburg should be combined with current geo-information, satellite and aerial imagery to support spatio-temporal research aspects in different scales in space (regional 1:200,000 to local 1:25.000 and time (nearly 250 years in three time steps, the last 30 years also in three time slices. The Virtual Laboratory for Cultural Landscape Research (VKLandLab is designed and developed by the Chair of Geodesy and Geoinformatics, hosted at the Computing Centre (ITMZ and linked to the Digital Library (UB at Rostock University. VKLandLab includes new developments such as wikis, blogs, data tagging, etc. and proven components already integrated in various data-related infrastructures such as InternetGIS, data repositories and authentication structures. The focus is to build a data-related infrastructure and a work platform that supports students as well as researchers from different disciplines in their research in space and time.

  7. X-231B technology demonstration for in situ treatment of contaminated soil: Laboratory evaluation of chemical oxidation using hydrogen peroxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gates, D.D.; Siegrist, R.L.

    1993-09-01

    Treatability studies were conducted as part of a comprehensive research project initiated to demonstrate as well as evaluate in situ treatment technologies for volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and radioactive substances in wet, slowly permeable soils. The site of interest for this project was the X-231B Oil Biodegradation unit at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, a US Department of Energy (DOE) facility in southern Ohio. This report describes the treatability studies that investigated the feasibility of the application of low-strength hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ) solutions to treat trichloroethylene (TCE)-contaminated soil

  8. Coastal Ohio Wind Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gorsevski, Peter [Bowling Green State Univ., OH (United States); Afjeh, Abdollah [Univ. of Toledo, OH (United States); Jamali, Mohsin [Univ. of Toledo, OH (United States); Bingman, Verner [Bowling Green State Univ., OH (United States)

    2014-04-04

    The Coastal Ohio Wind Project intends to address problems that impede deployment of wind turbines in the coastal and offshore regions of Northern Ohio. The project evaluates different wind turbine designs and the potential impact of offshore turbines on migratory and resident birds by developing multidisciplinary research, which involves wildlife biology, electrical and mechanical engineering, and geospatial science. Firstly, the project conducts cost and performance studies of two- and three-blade wind turbines using a turbine design suited for the Great Lakes. The numerical studies comprised an analysis and evaluation of the annual energy production of two- and three-blade wind turbines to determine the levelized cost of energy. This task also involved wind tunnel studies of model wind turbines to quantify the wake flow field of upwind and downwind wind turbine-tower arrangements. The experimental work included a study of a scaled model of an offshore wind turbine platform in a water tunnel. The levelized cost of energy work consisted of the development and application of a cost model to predict the cost of energy produced by a wind turbine system placed offshore. The analysis found that a floating two-blade wind turbine presents the most cost effective alternative for the Great Lakes. The load effects studies showed that the two-blade wind turbine model experiences less torque under all IEC Standard design load cases considered. Other load effects did not show this trend and depending on the design load cases, the two-bladed wind turbine showed higher or lower load effects. The experimental studies of the wake were conducted using smoke flow visualization and hot wire anemometry. Flow visualization studies showed that in the downwind turbine configuration the wake flow was insensitive to the presence of the blade and was very similar to that of the tower alone. On the other hand, in the upwind turbine configuration, increasing the rotor blade angle of attack

  9. Aeronautics Learning Laboratory for Science, Technology, and Research (ALLSTAR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Cesar; Ebadian, M. A.

    1998-01-01

    converted to an on-line discussion forum with a unique section on Blacks in Aviation, Prime Technologies coordinated with NASA LaRC and the Teacher Resource Centers (TRCs) for scale-up of ALLSTAR and performed live demonstrations of the software in schools and at conventions.

  10. Oak Ridge National Laboratory Technology Logic Diagram. Volume 3, Technology evaluation data sheets: Part B, Dismantlement, Remedial action

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-09-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory Technology Logic Diagram (TLD) was developed to provide a decision support tool that relates environmental restoration (ER) and waste management (WM) problems at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to potential technologies that can remediate these problems. The TLD identifies the research, development, demonstration testing, and evaluation needed to develop these technologies to a state that allows technology transfer and application to decontamination and decommissioning (D&D), remedial action (RA), and WM activities. The TLD consists of three fundamentally separate volumes: Vol. 1, Technology Evaluation; Vol. 2, Technology Logic Diagram and Vol. 3, Technology EvaLuation Data Sheets. Part A of Vols. 1 and 2 focuses on RA. Part B of Vols. 1 and 2 focuses on the D&D of contaminated facilities. Part C of Vols. 1 and 2 focuses on WM. Each part of Vol. 1 contains an overview of the TM, an explanation of the problems facing the volume-specific program, a review of identified technologies, and rankings of technologies applicable to the site. Volume 2 (Pts. A. B. and C) contains the logic linkages among EM goals, environmental problems, and the various technologies that have the potential to solve these problems. Volume 3 (Pts. A. B, and C) contains the TLD data sheets. This volume provides the technology evaluation data sheets (TEDS) for ER/WM activities (D&D, RA and WM) that are referenced by a TEDS code number in Vol. 2 of the TLD. Each of these sheets represents a single logic trace across the TLD. These sheets contain more detail than is given for the technologies in Vol. 2.

  11. Oak Ridge National Laboratory Technology Logic Diagram. Volume 3, Technology evaluation data sheets: Part C, Robotics/automation, Waste management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-09-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory Technology Logic Diagram (TLD) was developed to provide a decision support tool that relates environmental restoration (ER) and waste management (WM) problems at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to potential technologies that can remediate these problems. The TLD identifies the research, development, demonstration testing, and evaluation needed to develop these technologies to a state that allows technology transfer and application to decontamination and decommissioning (D&D), remedial action (RA), and WM activities. The TLD consists of three fundamentally separate volumes: Vol. 1, Technology Evaluation; Vol. 2, Technology Logic Diagram and Vol. 3, Technology EvaLuation Data Sheets. Part A of Vols. 1 and 2 focuses on RA. Part B of Vols. 1 and 2 focuses on the D&D of contaminated facilities. Part C of Vols. 1 and 2 focuses on WM. Each part of Vol. 1 contains an overview of the TM, an explanation of the problems facing the volume-specific program, a review of identified technologies, and rankings of technologies applicable to the site. Volume 2 (Pts. A. B. and C) contains the logic linkages among EM goals, environmental problems, and the various technologies that have the potential to solve these problems. Volume 3 (Pts. A. B, and C) contains the TLD data sheets. This volume provides the technology evaluation data sheets (TEDS) for ER/WM activities (D&D, RA and WM) that are referenced by a TEDS code number in Vol. 2 of the TLD. Each of these sheets represents a single logic trace across the TLD. These sheets contain more detail than is given for the technologies in Vol. 2.

  12. 75 FR 65594 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Ohio; Ohio Ambient Air Quality...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-26

    ... Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Ohio; Ohio Ambient Air Quality Standards AGENCY... the Ohio Administrative Code (OAC) relating to the consolidation of Ohio's Ambient Air Quality Standards (AAQS) into Ohio's State Implementation Plan (SIP) under the Clean Air Act. On April 8, 2009, and...

  13. The evolution of interior intrusion detection technology at Sandia National Laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graham, R.H.; Workhoven, R.M.

    1987-07-01

    Interior Intrusion Detection Technology began at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) in 1975 as part of the Fixed Facilities Physical Protection Research and Development program sponsored by the US Department of Energy in connection with their nuclear safeguards effort. This paper describes the evolution of Interior Intrusion Detection Technology at Sandia National Laboratories from the beginning of the Interior Sensor Laboratory to the present. This Laboratory was established in 1976 to evaluate commercial interior intrusion sensors and to assist in site-specific intrusion detection system designs. Examples of special test techniques and new test equipment that were developed at the Lab are presented, including the Sandia Intruder Motion Simulator (SIMS), the Sensor and Environment Monitor (SEM), and the Sandia Interior Robot (SIR). We also discuss new sensors and unique sensor combination developed when commercial sensors were unavailable and the future application of expert systems. 5 refs

  14. The evolution of Interior Intrusion Detection Technology at Sandia National Laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graham, R.H.; Workhoven, R.M.

    1987-07-01

    Interior Intrusion Detection Technology began at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) in 1975 as part of the Fixed Facilities Physical Protection Research and Development program sponsored by the US Department of Energy in connection with their nuclear safeguards effort. This paper describes the evolution of Interior Intrusion Detection Technology at Sandia National Laboratories from the beginning of the Interior Sensor Laboratory to the present. This Laboratory was established in 1976 to evaluate commercial interior intrusion sensors and to assist in site-specific intrusion detection system designs. Examples of special test techniques and new test equipment that were developed at the Lab are presented, including the Sandia Intruder Motion Simulator (SIMS), the Sensor and Environment Monitor (SEM), and the Sandia Interior Robot (SIR). We also discuss new sensors and unique sensor combinations developed when commercial sensors were unavailable and the future application of expert systems

  15. The evolution of interior intrusion detection technology at Sandia National Laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graham, R.H.; Workhoven, R.M.

    1987-01-01

    Interior Intrusion Detection Technology began at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) in 1975 as part of the Fixed Facilities Physical Protection Research and Development program sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy in connection with their nuclear safeguards effort. This paper describes the evolution of Interior Intrusion Detection Technology at Sandia National Laboratories from the beginning of the Interior Sensor Laboratory to the present. This Laboratory was established in 1976 to evaluate commercial interior intrusion sensors and to assist in site-specific intrusion detection system designs. Examples of special test techniques and new test equipment that were developed at the Lab are presented, including the Sandia Intruder Motion Simulator (SIMS), the Sensor and Environment Monitor (SEM), and the Sandia Interior Robot (SIR). The authors also discuss new sensors and unique sensor combinations developed when commercial sensors were unavailable and the future application of expert systems

  16. Cost comparison of laboratory methods and four field screening technologies for uranium-contaminated soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Douthat, D.M.; Armstrong, A.Q.

    1994-01-01

    To address the problem of characterizing uranium-contaminated surface soil at federal facilities, the Department of Energy has the development of four uranium field screening technologies, under the direction of the Uranium-in-Soils Integrated Demonstration (USID) Program. These four technologies include: a long-range alpha detector a beta scintillation detector, an in situ gamma detector, and a mobile laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma/atomic emission spectrometry (LA-ICP/AES) laboratory. As part of the performance assessment for these field screening technologies, cost estimates for the development and operation of each technology were created. A cost study was conducted to compare three of the USID field screening technologies to the use of traditional field surveying equipment to adequately characterize surface soils of a one-acre site. The results indicate that the use of traditional equipment costs more than the in situ gamma detector, but less than the beta scintillation detector and LRAD. The use of traditional field surveying equipment results in cost savings of 4% and 34% over the use of the beta scintillation and LRAD technologies, respectively. A study of single-point surface soil sampling and laboratory analysis costs was also conducted. Operational costs of the mobile LA-ICP/AES laboratory were compared with operational costs of traditional sampling and analysis, which consists of collecting soil samples and conducting analysis in a radiochemical laboratory. The cost study indicates that the use of the mobile LA-ICP/AES laboratory results in cost savings of 23% and 40% over traditional field sampling and laboratory analysis conducted by characterization groups at two DOE facilities

  17. Quality assurance consideration for cement-based grout technology programs at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDaniel, E.W.; Tallent, O.K.; Sams, T.L.; Delzer, D.B.

    1987-01-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory has developed and is continuing to refine a method of immobilizing low-level radioactive liquid wastes by mixing them with cementitious dry-solid blends. A quality assurance program is vital to the project because Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and state environmental regulations must be demonstrably met (the work must be defensible in a court of law). The end result of quality assurance (QA) is, by definition, a product of demonstrable quality. In the laboratory, this entails traceability, repeatability, and credibility. This paper describes the application of QA in grout technology development at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

  18. Proceedings of symposium on technology in laboratories by department of engineering and technical services

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-07-01

    The Symposium on Technology in Laboratories was held on March 23 and 24 at Ceratopia Toki, and Toki Chamber of Commerce and Industry in Toki city, Gifu Prefecture, Japan. This symposium was hosted by National Institute for Fusion Science (NIFS). There were 273 participants from many Japanese universities and laboratories, from some Japanese industrial world. Seventy eight papers were presented in the symposium. Technical experience and new techniques were reported and discussed being divided into five sessions; technologies of fabrication, cryogenics, diagnostic and control system, computer and experimental apparatus. (author)

  19. Research and development of superconductivity for energy technology in electrotechnical laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koyama, K.

    1984-01-01

    Superconductivity is a physical effect wherein the electrical resistivity disappears at cryogenic temperatures. Superconductivity has the advantage of following large current densities and high magnetic fields, which are stable and homogeneous. There are many applications of superconductivity which take advantage of these merits. It is of special importance to apply superconductors to alternative energy and energy saving technology. This paper presents briefly some of the research and development efforts to apply superconductivity to energy technology in the Electrotechnical Laboratory

  20. Annual Technology Baseline (Including Supporting Data); NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blair, Nate; Cory, Karlynn; Hand, Maureen; Parkhill, Linda; Speer, Bethany; Stehly, Tyler; Feldman, David; Lantz, Eric; Augusting, Chad; Turchi, Craig; O' Connor, Patrick

    2015-07-08

    Consistent cost and performance data for various electricity generation technologies can be difficult to find and may change frequently for certain technologies. With the Annual Technology Baseline (ATB), National Renewable Energy Laboratory provides an organized and centralized dataset that was reviewed by internal and external experts. It uses the best information from the Department of Energy laboratory's renewable energy analysts and Energy Information Administration information for conventional technologies. The ATB will be updated annually in order to provide an up-to-date repository of current and future cost and performance data. Going forward, we plan to revise and refine the values using best available information. The ATB includes both a presentation with notes (PDF) and an associated Excel Workbook. The ATB includes the following electricity generation technologies: land-based wind; offshore wind; utility-scale solar PV; concentrating solar power; geothermal power; hydropower plants (upgrades to existing facilities, powering non-powered dams, and new stream-reach development); conventional coal; coal with carbon capture and sequestration; integrated gasification combined cycle coal; natural gas combustion turbines; natural gas combined cycle; conventional biopower. Nuclear laboratory's renewable energy analysts and Energy Information Administration information for conventional technologies. The ATB will be updated annually in order to provide an up-to-date repository of current and future cost and performance data. Going forward, we plan to revise and refine the values using best available information.

  1. Meet the best Award-winning technologies from Pacific Northwest Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-09-01

    The Battelle Memorial Institute has managed the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for the US Department of Energy for 25 years. During this time, numerous new technologies have been discovered and developed at PNL as a result of our research programs. This document will introduce you to some of the more significant discoveries and newly commercialized technologies. Each of the technologies described has received an award from Research Development magazine or the Federal Laboratory Consortium--sometimes both Each technology is available to you through PNL's technology transfer program or one of our licensees. Similarly, our award-winning scientists and engineers are available to assist you as you search for innovative technologies to solve your technical problems. These researchers are familiar with current problems confronting industry, government agencies, and the academic community. They are happy to apply their skills and PNL's resources to your problems. PNL encourages its researchers to work with government agencies, universities, and US industries. PNL technology transfer programs address the nation's drive toward increased competitiveness by being flexible and aggressive, and are designed to tailor results to fit your needs and those of your clients. If you are in search of a new technology or increased competitiveness, consider collaborative efforts with our award-winning staff, whose accomplishments are synopsized in this booklet.

  2. Use and Acceptance of Information and Communication Technology Among Laboratory Science Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Brenda C.

    Online and blended learning platforms are being promoted within laboratory science education under the assumption that students have the necessary skills to navigate online and blended learning environments. Yet little research has examined the use of information and communication technology (ICT) among the laboratory science student population. The purpose of this correlational, survey research study was to explore factors that affect use and acceptance of ICT among laboratory science students through the theoretical lens of the unified theory of acceptance and use of technology (UTAUT) model. An electronically delivered survey drew upon current students and recent graduates (within 2 years) of accredited laboratory science training programs. During the 4 week data collection period, 168 responses were received. Results showed that the UTAUT model did not perform well within this study, explaining 25.2% of the variance in use behavior. A new model incorporating attitudes toward technology and computer anxiety as two of the top variables, a model significantly different from the original UTAUT model, was developed that explained 37.0% of the variance in use behavior. The significance of this study may affect curriculum design of laboratory science training programs wanting to incorporate more teaching techniques that use ICT-based educational delivery, and provide more options for potential students who may not currently have access to this type of training.

  3. Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory waste management technology development activities. Summary progress report, 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, L.J.

    1980-10-01

    Summary reports on the Department of Energy's Nuclear Energy-sponsored waste management technology development projects at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory describe progress for calendar year 1979. Activities in airborne, low-level, and transuranic waste management areas are discussed. Work progress on waste assay, treatment, disposal, and environmental monitoring is reviewed

  4. Advanced methods for teaching electronic-nose technologies to diagnosticians and clinical laboratory technicians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alphus D. Wilson

    2012-01-01

    Electronic-detection technologies and instruments increasingly are being utilized in the biomedical field to perform a wide variety of clinical operations and laboratory analyses to facilitate the delivery of health care to patients. The introduction of improved electronic instruments for diagnosing diseases and for administering treatments has required new training of...

  5. Theoretical and practical considerations for teaching diagnostic electronic-nose technologies to clinical laboratory technicians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alphus D. Wilson

    2012-01-01

    The rapid development of new electronic technologies and instruments, utilized to perform many current clinical operations in the biomedical field, is changing the way medical health care is delivered to patients. The majority of test results from laboratory analyses, performed with these analytical instruments often prior to clinical examinations, are frequently used...

  6. 75 FR 60091 - Science and Technology Reinvention Laboratory Personnel Management Demonstration Project...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-29

    ... DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Office of the Secretary Science and Technology Reinvention Laboratory Personnel Management Demonstration Project, Department of the Army, Army Research, Development and... project; correction. SUMMARY: On September 9, 2010 (75 FR 55199), DoD published a notice concerning the...

  7. Vertical and Horizontal Integration of Laboratory Curricula and Course Projects across the Electronic Engineering Technology Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Wei; Goulart, Ana; Morgan, Joseph A.; Porter, Jay R.

    2011-01-01

    This paper discusses the details of the curricular development effort with a focus on the vertical and horizontal integration of laboratory curricula and course projects within the Electronic Engineering Technology (EET) program at Texas A&M University. Both software and hardware aspects are addressed. A common set of software tools are…

  8. Nanotechnology Laboratory Continues Partnership with FDA and National Institute of Standards and Technology | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    The NCI-funded Nanotechnology Characterization Laboratory (NCL)—a leader in evaluating promising nanomedicines to fight cancer—recently renewed its collaboration with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) to continue its groundbreaking work on characterizing nanomedicines and moving them toward the clinic. In

  9. Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory waste management technology development activities. Summary progress report, 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, L.J. (comp.)

    1980-10-01

    Summary reports on the Department of Energy's Nuclear Energy-sponsored waste management technology development projects at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory describe progress for calendar year 1979. Activities in airborne, low-level, and transuranic waste management areas are discussed. Work progress on waste assay, treatment, disposal, and environmental monitoring is reviewed.

  10. 76 FR 67154 - Science and Technology Reinvention Laboratory Personnel Management Demonstration Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-31

    ... to eight legacy Science and Technology Reinvention Laboratory (STRL) Personnel Management Demonstration (demo) Project Plans resulting from section 1107(c) of the National Defense Authorization Act... flexibilities, modifying demo project plans, or executing Federal Register Notices has identified some areas for...

  11. Regulatory facility guide for Ohio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, S.S.; Bock, R.E.; Francis, M.W.; Gove, R.M.; Johnson, P.E.; Kovac, F.M.; Mynatt, J.O. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Rymer, A.C. [Transportation Consulting Services, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    1994-02-28

    The Regulatory Facility Guide (RFG) has been developed for the DOE and contractor facilities located in the state of Ohio. It provides detailed compilations of international, federal, and state transportation-related regulations applicable to shipments originating at destined to Ohio facilities. This RFG was developed as an additional resource tool for use both by traffic managers who must ensure that transportation operations are in full compliance with all applicable regulatory requirements and by oversight personnel who must verify compliance activities.

  12. Retrospect over past 25 years at Research Laboratory for Nuclear Reactors, Tokyo Institute of Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aoki, Shigebumi

    1983-01-01

    Research Laboratory for Nuclear Reactors, Tokyo Institute of Technology, was established on April 1, 1956, with the aims of the investigation on the peaceful use of nuclear energy and of the education of scientists and engineers in this field. This report reviews the history of the Laboratory during 25 years and traces the process of growth concerning research divisions, buildings, large-scale experimental facilities and the education in the graduate course for nuclear engineering. In addition, considering what the Laboratory has to be and what the future plan will be, it is mentioned that the research interest should be extended to the field of nuclear fusion reactor, especially the blanket engineering, as a long-term future project of the Research Laboratory. (author)

  13. The Ohio River Valley CO2 Storage Project AEP Mountaineer Plan, West Virginia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neeraj Gupta

    2009-01-07

    This report includes an evaluation of deep rock formations with the objective of providing practical maps, data, and some of the issues considered for carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) storage projects in the Ohio River Valley. Injection and storage of CO{sub 2} into deep rock formations represents a feasible option for reducing greenhouse gas emissions from coal-burning power plants concentrated along the Ohio River Valley area. This study is sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), American Electric Power (AEP), BP, Ohio Coal Development Office, Schlumberger, and Battelle along with its Pacific Northwest Division. An extensive program of drilling, sampling, and testing of a deep well combined with a seismic survey was used to characterize the local and regional geologic features at AEP's 1300-megawatt (MW) Mountaineer Power Plant. Site characterization information has been used as part of a systematic design feasibility assessment for a first-of-a-kind integrated capture and storage facility at an existing coal-fired power plant in the Ohio River Valley region--an area with a large concentration of power plants and other emission sources. Subsurface characterization data have been used for reservoir simulations and to support the review of the issues relating to injection, monitoring, strategy, risk assessment, and regulatory permitting. The high-sulfur coal samples from the region have been tested in a capture test facility to evaluate and optimize basic design for a small-scale capture system and eventually to prepare a detailed design for a capture, local transport, and injection facility. The Ohio River Valley CO{sub 2} Storage Project was conducted in phases with the ultimate objectives of demonstrating both the technical aspects of CO{sub 2} storage and the testing, logistical, regulatory, and outreach issues related to conducting such a project at a large point source under realistic constraints. The site

  14. C-TEC: Ohio's First All-Green School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krall, Angie

    2009-01-01

    In Ohio's Licking County, the Career and Technology Education Centers (C-TEC) is a leader in the green movement. This eco-friendly school incorporates environmental sustainability in all aspects of its programming and is the first Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED)-certified public building in the state. While eco-friendly…

  15. Incorporating spectroscopy and measurement technology into the high school chemistry laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harbert, Emily Ann

    Science and technology are becoming increasingly important in maintaining a healthy economy at home and a competitive edge on the world stage, though that is just one facet affected by inadequate science education in the United States. Engaging students in the pursuit of knowledge and giving them the skills to think critically are paramount. One small way to assist in achieving these goals is to increase the quality and variety of technology-rich activities conducted in high school classrooms. Incorporating more laboratory measurement technology into high schools may incite more student interest in the processes and practices of science and may allow students to learn to think more critically about their data and what it represents. The first objective of the work described herein was to determine what measurement technology is being used in schools and to what extent, as well as to determine other teacher needs and preferences. Second, the objective was to develop a new program to provide incoming freshmen (or rising seniors) with measurement technology training they did not receive in high school, and expose them to new research and career opportunities in science. The final objective was to create a technology-rich classroom laboratory activity for use in high schools.

  16. Technology study of Gunite tank sludge mobilization at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeVore, J.R.; Herrick, T.J.; Lott, K.E.

    1994-12-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Gunite Tank Sludge Mobilization Technology Study was initiated to support the Gunite Tank Treatability Study effort. The technology study surveyed the methods and technologies available for tank cleaning and sludge mobilization in a radioactive environment. Technologies were identified and considered for applicability to the Gunite and Associated Tanks (GAAT) problems. These were then either accepted for further study or rejected as not applicable. Technologies deemed applicable to the GAAT sludge removal project were grouped for evaluation according to (1) deployment method, (2) types of remotely operated end effector equipment applicable to removal of sludge, (3) methods for removing wastes from the tanks, and (4) methods for concrete removal. There were three major groups of deployment technologies: ``past practice`` technologies, mechanical arm-based technologies, and vehicle-based technologies. The different technologies were then combined into logical sequences of deployment platform, problem, end effector, conveyance, post-removal treatment required (if any), and disposition of the waste. Many waste removal options are available, but the best technology in one set of circumstances at one site might not be the best type to use at a different site. No single technology is capable of treating the entire spectrum of wastes that will be encountered in GAAT. None of the systems used in other industries appears to be suitable, primarily because of the nature of the sludges in the GAAT Operable Unit (OU), their radiation levels, and tank geometries. Other commercial technologies were investigated but rejected because the authors did not believe them to be applicable.

  17. Technology study of Gunite tank sludge mobilization at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeVore, J.R.; Herrick, T.J.; Lott, K.E.

    1994-12-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Gunite Tank Sludge Mobilization Technology Study was initiated to support the Gunite Tank Treatability Study effort. The technology study surveyed the methods and technologies available for tank cleaning and sludge mobilization in a radioactive environment. Technologies were identified and considered for applicability to the Gunite and Associated Tanks (GAAT) problems. These were then either accepted for further study or rejected as not applicable. Technologies deemed applicable to the GAAT sludge removal project were grouped for evaluation according to (1) deployment method, (2) types of remotely operated end effector equipment applicable to removal of sludge, (3) methods for removing wastes from the tanks, and (4) methods for concrete removal. There were three major groups of deployment technologies: ''past practice'' technologies, mechanical arm-based technologies, and vehicle-based technologies. The different technologies were then combined into logical sequences of deployment platform, problem, end effector, conveyance, post-removal treatment required (if any), and disposition of the waste. Many waste removal options are available, but the best technology in one set of circumstances at one site might not be the best type to use at a different site. No single technology is capable of treating the entire spectrum of wastes that will be encountered in GAAT. None of the systems used in other industries appears to be suitable, primarily because of the nature of the sludges in the GAAT Operable Unit (OU), their radiation levels, and tank geometries. Other commercial technologies were investigated but rejected because the authors did not believe them to be applicable

  18. Accelerator laboratories: development centers for experimental physics and technology in Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazari, M.

    1989-01-01

    Three years ago in this Nuclear Center the author and Professor Graef expounded the inception and development of experimental physics and new techniques centered about laboratories and equipped in our country with positive ion accelerators. Extracted here is the information on the laboratories that have allowed professional training as well as the furtherance of scientific productivity in each group. An additional proposal as to how the technical groups knowledgeable in advanced technology might contribute significantly to adequate preparation of youth at the intermediate level able to generate innocuous micro industries in their own neighbourhood. (Author). 5 refs, 2 figs, 2 tabs

  19. Solid oxide cell R&D at Riso National Laboratory-and its transfer to technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linderoth, Søren

    2009-01-01

    Risø National Laboratory has conducted R&D on solid oxide cells for almost 20 years—all the time together with industries with interest in deploying the technology when mature. Risø National Laboratory (Risø) and Topsoe Fuel Cell A/S (TOFC) have for several years jointly carried out a development...... programme focusing on low cost manufacturing of flat planar anode-supported cells and stacks employing metallic interconnects. The consortium of Risø and TOFC has up-scaled its production capacity of anode-supported cells to about 1,100 per week. New generations of SOFCs are being developed...

  20. Commercialization of Los Alamos National Laboratory technologies via small businesses. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brice, R.; Cartron, D.; Rhyne, T.; Schulze, M.; Welty, L.

    1997-06-01

    Over the past decade, numerous companies have been formed to commercialize research results from leading U.S. academic and research institutions. Emerging small businesses in areas such as Silicon Valley, Boston`s Route 128 corridor, and North Carolina`s Research Triangle have been especially effective in moving promising technologies from the laboratory bench to the commercial marketplace--creating new jobs and economic expansion in the process. Unfortunately, many of the U.S. national laboratories have not been major participants in this technology/commercialization activity, a result of a wide variety of factors which, until recently, acted against successful commercialization. This {open_quotes}commercialization gap{close_quotes} exists partly due to a lack, within Los Alamos in particular and the DOE in general, of in-depth expertise and experience in such business areas as new business development, securities regulation, market research and the determination of commercial potential, the identification of entrepreneurial management, marketing and distribution, and venture capital sources. The immediate consequence of these factors is the disappointingly small number of start-up companies based on technologies from Los Alamos National Laboratory that have been attempted, the modest financial return Los Alamos has received from these start-ups, and the lack of significant national recognition that Los Alamos has received for creating and commercializing these technologies.

  1. Assessment of Application Technology of Natural User Interfaces in the Creation of a Virtual Chemical Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagodziński, Piotr; Wolski, Robert

    2015-02-01

    Natural User Interfaces (NUI) are now widely used in electronic devices such as smartphones, tablets and gaming consoles. We have tried to apply this technology in the teaching of chemistry in middle school and high school. A virtual chemical laboratory was developed in which students can simulate the performance of laboratory activities similar to those that they perform in a real laboratory. Kinect sensor was used for the detection and analysis of the student's hand movements, which is an example of NUI. The studies conducted found the effectiveness of educational virtual laboratory. The extent to which the use of a teaching aid increased the students' progress in learning chemistry was examined. The results indicate that the use of NUI creates opportunities to both enhance and improve the quality of the chemistry education. Working in a virtual laboratory using the Kinect interface results in greater emotional involvement and an increased sense of self-efficacy in the laboratory work among students. As a consequence, students are getting higher marks and are more interested in the subject of chemistry.

  2. Development of strategic enterprise architecture design for the Ohio Department of Transportation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    In order for the Ohio Department of Transportation (ODOT) to successfully carry out its mission, it is essential to : appropriately incorporate and utilize technology. Information management systems are vital to maintaining the states : transporta...

  3. Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Waste Area Groups 1-7 and 10 Technology Logic Diagram

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Brien, M.C.; Meservey, R.H.; Little, M.; Ferguson, J.S.; Gilmore, M.C.

    1993-09-01

    The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) Technology Logic Diagram (TLD) was developed to provide a decision support tool that relates Environmental Restoration (ER) and Waste Management (WM) problems at the INEL to potential technologies that can remediate these problems. The TLD identifies the research, development, demonstration, testing, and evaluation needed to develop these technologies to a state that allows technology transfer and application to an environmental restoration need. It is essential that follow-on engineering and system studies be conducted to build on the output of this project. These studies will begin by selecting the most promising technologies identified in this TLD and finding an optimum mix of technologies that will provide a socially acceptable balance between cost and risk to meet the site windows of opportunity. The TLD consists of three separate volumes: Volume I includes the purpose and scope of the TLD, a brief history of the INEL Waste Area Groups, and environmental problems they represent. A description of the TLD, definitions of terms, a description of the technology evaluation process, and a summary of each subelement, is presented. Volume II (this volume) describes the overall layout and development of the TLD in logic diagram format. This section addresses the environmental restoration of contaminated INEL sites. Specific INEL problem areas/contaminants are identified along with technology solutions, the status of the technologies, precise science and technology needs, and implementation requirements. Volume III provides the Technology Evaluation Data Sheets (TEDS) for Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM) activities that are referenced by a TEDS codenumber in Volume II. Each of these sheets represents a single logic trace across the TLD. These sheets contain more detail than provided for technologies in Volume II

  4. Survey of subsurface treatment technologies for environmental restoration sites at Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGrath, Lucas K.; Ho, Clifford Kuofei; Wright, Jerome L.

    2003-08-01

    This report provides a survey of remediation and treatment technologies for contaminants of concern at environmental restoration (ER) sites at Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico. The sites that were evaluated include the Tijeras Arroyo Groundwater, Technical Area V, and Canyons sites. The primary contaminants of concern at these sites include trichloroethylene (TCE), tetrachloroethylene (PCE), and nitrate in groundwater. Due to the low contaminant concentrations (close to regulatory limits) and significant depths to groundwater ({approx}500 feet) at these sites, few in-situ remediation technologies are applicable. The most applicable treatment technologies include monitored natural attenuation and enhanced bioremediation/denitrification to reduce the concentrations of TCE, PCE, and nitrate in the groundwater. Stripping technologies to remove chlorinated solvents and other volatile organic compounds from the vadose zone can also be implemented, if needed.

  5. 78 FR 19990 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Ohio; Ohio Ambient Air Quality...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-03

    ... Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Ohio; Ohio Ambient Air Quality Standards; Correction AGENCY... approved revisions to Ohio regulations that consolidated air quality standards in a new chapter of rules... State's air quality standards into Ohio Administrative Code (OAC) 3745-25 and modifying an assortment of...

  6. The Chemical Technology Division at Argonne National Laboratory: Applying chemical innovation to environmental problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    The Chemical Technology Division is one of the largest technical divisions at Argonne National Laboratory, a leading center for research and development related to energy and environmental issues. Since its inception in 1948, the Division has pioneered in developing separations processes for the nuclear industry. The current scope of activities includes R ampersand D on methods for disposing of radioactive and hazardous wastes and on energy conversion processes with improved efficiencies, lower costs, and reduced environmental impact. Many of the technologies developed by CMT can be applied to solve manufacturing as well as environmental problems of industry

  7. Laboratory open-quotes proof of principleclose quotes investigation for the acoustically enhanced remediation technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iovenitti, J.L.; Spencer, J.W.; Hill, D.G.

    1995-01-01

    This document describes a three phase program of Weiss Associates which investigates the systematics of using acoustic excitation fields (AEFs) to enhance the in-situ remediation of contaminated soil and ground water under both saturated and unsaturated conditions. The focus in this particular paper is a laboratory proof of principle investigation. The field deployment and engineering viability of acoustically enhanced remediation technology is also examined

  8. Argonne National Laboratory contributions to the International Symposium on Fusion Nuclear Technology (ISFNT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-10-01

    A total of sixteen papers with authors from Argonne National Laboratory were presented at the First International Symposium on Fusion Nuclear Technology (ISFNT), held in Tokyo, Japan, in April 1988. The papers cover the results of recent investigations in blanket design and analysis, fusion neutronics, materials experiments in liquid metal corrosion and solid breeders, tritium recovery analysis, experiments and analysis for liquid metal MHD, reactor safety and economic analysis, and transient electromagnetic analysis

  9. Argonne National Laboratory contributions to the International Symposium on Fusion Nuclear Technology (ISFNT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-10-01

    A total of sixteen papers with authors from Argonne National Laboratory were presented at the First International Symposium on Fusion Nuclear Technology (ISFNT), held in Tokyo, Japan, in April 1988. The papers cover the results of recent investigations in blanket design and analysis, fusion neutronics, materials experiments in liquid metal corrosion and solid breeders, tritium recovery analysis, experiments and analysis for liquid metal MHD, reactor safety and economic analysis, and transient electromagnetic analysis.

  10. Tritium technology development in EEC laboratories contributions to design goals for NET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dinner, P.; Chazalon, M.; Leger, D.; Rohrig, H.D.; Penzhorn, R.D.

    1988-01-01

    An overview is given of the tritium technology activities carried out in the European national laboratories associated with the European Fusion Programme and in the European Joint Research Center. The relationship of these activities to the Next European Torus (NET) design priorities is discussed, and the current status of the research is summarised. Future developments, required for NET, which will be addressed in the definition of the next 5-year programme are also presented

  11. Establishment of an Environmental Control Technology Laboratory with a Circulating Fluidized-Bed Combustion System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wei-Ping Pan; Yan Cao; John Smith

    2008-05-31

    On February 14, 2002, President Bush announced the Clear Skies Initiative, a legislative proposal to control the emissions of nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}), sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}), and mercury from power plants. In response to this initiative, the National Energy Technology Laboratory organized a Combustion Technology University Alliance and hosted a Solid Fuel Combustion Technology Alliance Workshop. The workshop identified multi-pollutant control; improved sorbents and catalysts; mercury monitoring and capture; and improved understanding of the underlying reaction chemistry occurring during combustion as the most pressing research needs related to controlling environmental emissions from fossil-fueled power plants. The Environmental Control Technology Laboratory will help meet these challenges and offer solutions for problems associated with emissions from fossil-fueled power plants. The goal of this project was to develop the capability and technology database needed to support municipal, regional, and national electric power generating facilities to improve the efficiency of operation and solve operational and environmental problems. In order to effectively provide the scientific data and the methodologies required to address these issues, the project included the following aspects: (1) Establishing an Environmental Control Technology Laboratory using a laboratory-scale, simulated fluidized-bed combustion (FBC) system; (2) Designing, constructing, and operating a bench-scale (0.6 MW{sub th}), circulating fluidized-bed combustion (CFBC) system as the main component of the Environmental Control Technology Laboratory; (3) Developing a combustion technology for co-firing municipal solid waste (MSW), agricultural waste, and refuse-derived fuel (RDF) with high sulfur coals; (4) Developing a control strategy for gaseous emissions, including NO{sub x}, SO{sub 2}, organic compounds, and heavy metals; and (5) Developing new mercury capturing sorbents and new

  12. Emerging technologies in education and training: applications for the laboratory animal science community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ketelhut, Diane Jass; Niemi, Steven M

    2007-01-01

    This article examines several new and exciting communication technologies. Many of the technologies were developed by the entertainment industry; however, other industries are adopting and modifying them for their own needs. These new technologies allow people to collaborate across distance and time and to learn in simulated work contexts. The article explores the potential utility of these technologies for advancing laboratory animal care and use through better education and training. Descriptions include emerging technologies such as augmented reality and multi-user virtual environments, which offer new approaches with different capabilities. Augmented reality interfaces, characterized by the use of handheld computers to infuse the virtual world into the real one, result in deeply immersive simulations. In these simulations, users can access virtual resources and communicate with real and virtual participants. Multi-user virtual environments enable multiple participants to simultaneously access computer-based three-dimensional virtual spaces, called "worlds," and to interact with digital tools. They allow for authentic experiences that promote collaboration, mentoring, and communication. Because individuals may learn or train differently, it is advantageous to combine the capabilities of these technologies and applications with more traditional methods to increase the number of students who are served by using current methods alone. The use of these technologies in animal care and use programs can create detailed training and education environments that allow students to learn the procedures more effectively, teachers to assess their progress more objectively, and researchers to gain insights into animal care.

  13. Developing linear-alpha-olefins technology. From laboratory to a commercial plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meiswinkel, A.; Woehl, A.; Mueller, W.; Boelt, H. [Linde AG, Pullach (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    Linear {alpha}-Olefins (LAOs) are used in several applications in chemical industry. Together with SABIC (Saudi Basic Industries Corporation) Linde jointly developed the {alpha}-SABLIN technology for a full range LAO plant as well as a 1-Hexene selective ''On Purpose'' technology (LAO OP) to cover the rapidly increasing demand for this specific comonomer. The {alpha}-SABLIN as well as the OP technology are both homogenously catalyzed systems. This is raising special challenges concerning process and reactor design compared to much more established heterogeneous systems in chemical industry. E.g., the reactor concept is a bubble-column which allows efficient mixing as well as cooling of the reaction mixture. The development of the process was based on laboratory experiments which - based on an initial conceptual design for a large scale technical process - were first transformed into a pilot device before the commercial plant was designed, engineered and successfully started up and declared as commercialized. Today the {alpha}-SABLIN technology is the only LAO technology with a commercial reference which is free for licensing. A lot of experience and knowledge from the {alpha}-SABLIN development and commercial operation was gained. Although newly developed OP technology is based on a different catalytic system, this experience is now utilized and transformed within the commercialization of this new technological development. (orig.)

  14. Science and Math Lesson Plans to Meet the Ohio Revised Science Standards and the Next Generation of Standards for Today; Technology (Excel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzanne Lunsford

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Pre-service teachers (K-12 developed and taught lesson plans that met the state and national science and technology standards by integrating Excel and PowerPoint into their lesson. A sample of 74 pre-service teachers in our science education program were required to integrate technology (Excel as they developed science and math lesson plans with graphing as a requirement. These students took pre-test and post-test (n=74 to determine their understanding of Excel in relation to the need of current technology for todays' science classroom. The test results showed that students obtained content gains in Excel graphing in all the inquiry-based lab experiments. They also gained experience in developing math skills, inquiry-based science lesson plans, and communication and presentation skills.

  15. Liquid Chromatography-Tandem Mass Spectrometry: An Emerging Technology in the Toxicology Laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yan Victoria; Wei, Bin; Zhu, Yu; Zhang, Yanhua; Bluth, Martin H

    2016-12-01

    In the last decade, liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) has seen enormous growth in routine toxicology laboratories. LC-MS/MS offers significant advantages over other traditional testing, such as immunoassay and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry methodologies. Major strengths of LC-MS/MS include improvement in specificity, flexibility, and sample throughput when compared with other technologies. Here, the basic principles of LC-MS/MS technology are reviewed, followed by advantages and disadvantages of this technology compared with other traditional techniques. In addition, toxicology applications of LC-MS/MS for simultaneous detection of large panels of analytes are presented. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Final-Independent Confirmatory Survey Report For The Reactor Building, Hot Laboratory, Primary Pump House, And Land Areas At The Plum Brook Reactor Facility, Sandusky, Ohio DCN:2036-SR-01-10

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bailey, Erika N.

    2011-01-01

    In 1941, the War Department acquired approximately 9,000 acres of land near Sandusky, Ohio and constructed a munitions plant. The Plum Brook Ordnance Works Plant produced munitions, such as TNT, until the end of World War II. Following the war, the land remained idle until the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics later called the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) obtained 500 acres to construct a nuclear research reactor designed to study the effects of radiation on materials used in space flight. The research reactor was put into operation in 1961 and was the first of fifteen test facilities eventually built by NASA at the Plum Brook Station. By 1963, NASA had acquired the remaining land at Plum Brook for these additional test facilities

  17. Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Waste Area Groups 1-7 and 10 Technology Logic Diagram

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Brien, M.C.; Meservey, R.H.; Little, M.; Ferguson, J.S.; Gilmore, M.C.

    1993-09-01

    The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) Technology Logic Diagram (TLD) was developed to provide a decision support tool that relates Environmental Restoration (ER) and Waste Management (WM) problems at the INEL to potential technologies that can remediate these problems. The TLD identifies the research, development, demonstration, testing, and evaluation needed to develop these technologies to a state that allows technology transfer and application to an environmental restoration need. It is essential that follow-on engineering and system studies be conducted to build on the output of this project. These studies will begin by selecting the most promising technologies identified in this TLD and finding an optimum mix of technologies that will provide a socially acceptable balance between cost and risk to meet the site windows of opportunity. The TLD consists of three separate volumes: Volume I includes the purpose and scope of the TLD, a brief history of the INEL Waste Area Groups, and environmental problems they represent. A description of the TLD, definitions of terms, a description of the technology evaluation process, and a summary of each subelement, is presented. Volume II describes the overall layout and development of the TLD in logic diagram format. This section addresses the environmental restoration of contaminated INEL sites. Volume III (this volume) provides the Technology Evaluation Data Sheets (TEDS) for Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM) activities that are reference by a TEDS code number in Volume II. Each of these sheets represents a single logic trace across the TLD. These sheets contain more detail than provided for technologies in Volume II. Data sheets are arranged alphanumerically by the TEDS code number in the upper right corner of each sheet

  18. Precise turnaround time measurement of laboratory processes using radiofrequency identification technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Horst; Brümmer, Jens; Brinkmann, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    To implement Lean Six Sigma in our central laboratory we conducted a project to measure single pre-analytical steps influencing turnaround time (TAT) of emergency department (ED) serum samples. The traditional approach of extracting data from the Laboratory Information System (LIS) for a retrospective calculation of a mean TAT is not suitable. Therefore, we used radiofrequency identification (RFID) chips for real time tracking of individual samples at any pre-analytical step. 1,200 serum tubes were labelled with RFID chips and were provided to the emergency department. 3 RFID receivers were installed in the laboratory: at the outlet of the pneumatic tube system, at the centrifuge, and in the analyser area. In addition, time stamps of sample entry at the automated sample distributor and communication of results from the analyser were collected from LIS. 1,023 labelled serum tubes arrived at our laboratory. 899 RFID tags were used for TAT calculation. The following transfer times were determined (median 95th percentile in min:sec): pneumatic tube system --> centrifuge (01:25/04:48), centrifuge --> sample distributor (14:06/5:33), sample distributor --> analysis system zone (02:39/15:07), analysis system zone --> result communication (12:42/22:21). Total TAT was calculated at 33:19/57:40 min:sec. Manual processes around centrifugation were identified as a major part of TAT with 44%/60% (median/95th percentile). RFID is a robust, easy to use, and error-free technology and not susceptible to interferences in the laboratory environment. With this study design we were able to measure significant variations in a single manual sample transfer process. We showed that TAT is mainly influenced by manual steps around the centrifugation process and we concluded that centrifugation should be integrated in solutions for total laboratory automation.

  19. Application of failure mode and effect analysis in an assisted reproduction technology laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Intra, Giulia; Alteri, Alessandra; Corti, Laura; Rabellotti, Elisa; Papaleo, Enrico; Restelli, Liliana; Biondo, Stefania; Garancini, Maria Paola; Candiani, Massimo; Viganò, Paola

    2016-08-01

    Assisted reproduction technology laboratories have a very high degree of complexity. Mismatches of gametes or embryos can occur, with catastrophic consequences for patients. To minimize the risk of error, a multi-institutional working group applied failure mode and effects analysis (FMEA) to each critical activity/step as a method of risk assessment. This analysis led to the identification of the potential failure modes, together with their causes and effects, using the risk priority number (RPN) scoring system. In total, 11 individual steps and 68 different potential failure modes were identified. The highest ranked failure modes, with an RPN score of 25, encompassed 17 failures and pertained to "patient mismatch" and "biological sample mismatch". The maximum reduction in risk, with RPN reduced from 25 to 5, was mostly related to the introduction of witnessing. The critical failure modes in sample processing were improved by 50% in the RPN by focusing on staff training. Three indicators of FMEA success, based on technical skill, competence and traceability, have been evaluated after FMEA implementation. Witnessing by a second human operator should be introduced in the laboratory to avoid sample mix-ups. These findings confirm that FMEA can effectively reduce errors in assisted reproduction technology laboratories. Copyright © 2016 Reproductive Healthcare Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Overview and challenges of molecular technologies in the veterinary microbiology laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunha, Mónica V; Inácio, João

    2015-01-01

    Terrestrial, aquatic, and aerial animals, either domestic or wild, humans, and plants all face similar health threats caused by infectious agents. Multifaceted anthropic pressure caused by an increasingly growing and resource-demanding human population has affected biodiversity at all scales, from the DNA molecule to the pathogen, to the ecosystem level, leading to species declines and extinctions and, also, to host-pathogen coevolution processes. Technological developments over the last century have also led to quantic jumps in laboratorial testing that have highly impacted animal health and welfare, ameliorated animal management and animal trade, safeguarded public health, and ultimately helped to "secure" biodiversity. In particular, the field of molecular diagnostics experienced tremendous technical progresses over the last two decades that significantly have contributed to our ability to study microbial pathogens in the clinical and research laboratories. This chapter highlights the strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats (or challenges) of molecular technologies in the framework of a veterinary microbiology laboratory, in view of the latest advances.

  1. Aerosol in selected laboratories at Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Opole University of Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olszowski, Tomasz

    2017-10-01

    The paper contains the results of a study into mass concentration of the dispersed aerosol fraction with the aerodynamic diameter of up to 2.5 and 10 micrometers. The study was conducted during classes with students participating in them in two laboratories located at Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Opole University of Technology as well as outdoor outside the building. It was demonstrated that the values of the mass concentration of PM2.5 and PM10 measured in the laboratories differ considerably from the levels measured in the ambient air in the outdoor areas surrounding the faculty building. It was concluded that the diversity of PM2.5/PM10 ratio was greater in the laboratories. Direct correlation was not established between the concentrations of the particular PM fractions in the two investigated environments. It was demonstrated that there is a statistically significant relation between the concentration of PM2.5 and PM10 and the number of people present in the laboratory. The conducted cluster analysis led to the detection of the existence of dominant structures determining air quality parameters. For the analyzed case, endogenic factors are responsible for the aerosanitary condition. The study demonstrated that the evaluation of air quality needs to be performed individually for the specific rooms.

  2. Ohio Special Education Profile, 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohio Coalition for the Education of Children with Disabilities, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This report provides a brief, but substantive, profile of the special needs student population in Ohio, including academic performance and graduation trends and an overview of special education funding and related policy issues. The report's central message is that investments in students with special educational needs produce substantial results…

  3. Ohio Department of Health Home

    Science.gov (United States)

    Business Award Flu Season Media button unselected Media button selected Data Stats button unselected Data unselected Contact Us button selected Start Talking Help Me Grow WIC (Women, Infants & Children) Office , sleep-related deaths and birth defects. Makes it easier for Ohio families to identify lead-safe homes

  4. Residential Energy Efficiency Potential: Ohio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, Eric J [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2017-11-02

    Energy used by Ohio single-family homes that can be saved through cost-effective improvements. Prepared by Eric Wilson and Noel Merket, NREL, and Erin Boyd, U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Policy and Systems Analysis.

  5. The path to the future: The role of science and technology at Argonne National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reck, R.A.

    1996-04-30

    Today some scientists are concerned that present budget considerations in Washington will make it impossible for the US to maintain its preeminence in important areas of science and technology. In the private sector there has been a demise of substantive R & D efforts through most of the major industries. For DOE a lack of future support for science and technology would be an important issue because this could impact DOE`s abilities to solve problems in its major areas of concern, national security, energy, environment. In fact some scientists maintain that were the present trend to continue unabated it could lead to a national security issue. Preeminence in science and technology plays a critical role in our nation`s position as the leader of world democracy. In contrast with this point of view of gloom and doom, however, in this presentation I hope to bring to you what I see as an exciting message of good news. Today I will list the important opportunities and challenges for the future that I note for ANL, the leadership role that I believe ANL can play and the qualities that will help our laboratory to maintain its status as an outstanding DOE National Laboratory.

  6. Technology roadmap for development of SiC sensors at plasma processes laboratory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Amorim Fraga

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Recognizing the need to consolidate the research and development (R&D activities in microelectronics fields in a strategic manner, the Plasma Processes Laboratory of the Technological Institute of Aeronautics (LPP-ITA has established a technology roadmap to serve as a guide for activities related to development of sensors based on silicon carbide (SiC thin films. These sensors have also potential interest to the aerospace field due to their ability to operate in harsh environment such as high temperatures and intense radiation. In the present paper, this roadmap is described and presented in four main sections: i introduction, ii what we have already done in the past, iii what we are doing in this moment, and iv our targets up to 2015. The critical technological issues were evaluated for different categories: SiC deposition techniques, SiC processing techniques for sensors fabrication and sensors characterization. This roadmap also presents a shared vision of how R&D activities in microelectronics should develop over the next five years in our laboratory.

  7. ESTABLISHMENT OF AN ENVIRONMENTAL CONTROL TECHNOLOGY LABORATORY WITH A CIRCULATING FLUIDIZED-BED COMBUSTION SYSTEM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wei-Ping Pan; Andy Wu; John T. Riley

    2004-10-30

    This report is to present the progress made on the project ''Establishment of an Environmental Control Technology Laboratory (ECTL) with a Circulating Fluidized-Bed Combustion (CFBC) System'' during the period July 1, 2004 through September 30, 2004. The following tasks have been completed. First, renovation of the new Combustion Laboratory and the construction of the Circulating Fluidized-Bed (CFB) Combustor Building have started. Second, the design if the component parts of the CFBC system have been reviewed and finalized so that the drawings may be released to the manufacturers during the next quarter. Third, the experiments for solid waste (chicken litter) incineration have been conducted using a Thermogravimetric Analyzer (TGA). This is in preparation for testing in the simulated fluidized-bed combustor. The experimental results from this study are presented in this report. Finally, the proposed work for the next quarter has been outlined in this report.

  8. Establishing benchmarks and metrics for disruptive technologies, inappropriate and obsolete tests in the clinical laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiechle, Frederick L; Arcenas, Rodney C; Rogers, Linda C

    2014-01-01

    Benchmarks and metrics related to laboratory test utilization are based on evidence-based medical literature that may suffer from a positive publication bias. Guidelines are only as good as the data reviewed to create them. Disruptive technologies require time for appropriate use to be established before utilization review will be meaningful. Metrics include monitoring the use of obsolete tests and the inappropriate use of lab tests. Test utilization by clients in a hospital outreach program can be used to monitor the impact of new clients on lab workload. A multi-disciplinary laboratory utilization committee is the most effective tool for modifying bad habits, and reviewing and approving new tests for the lab formulary or by sending them out to a reference lab. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. FEATURES OF TECHNOLOGIES CREATE INTERACTIVE ELECTRONIC DOCUMENT FOR SUPPORT OF LABORATORY PRACTICAL PHYSICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mykola A. Meleshko

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The article discusses the content of the «flash-book» construct, defining its properties and possible components. There are presented some examples of components programming steps of “authoring flash – book”, considered the possibility of using such an electronic document to optimize the learning process at the Technical University in the performance of laboratory training on general physics. The technique of its using to provide individualized approach to learning and the use of various experimental base from classical to digital equipment laboratories is proposed. It was carried out the analysis of ways to improve such interactive electronic document for the development of information technology competence of engineering students.

  10. National Research Council Research Associateships Program with Methane Hydrates Fellowships Program/National Energy Technology Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basques, Eric O. [National Academy of Sciences, Washington, DC (United States)

    2014-03-20

    This report summarizes work carried out over the period from July 5, 2005-January 31, 2014. The work was carried out by the National Research Council Research Associateships Program of the National Academies, under the US Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) program. This Technical Report consists of a description of activity from 2005 through 2014, broken out within yearly timeframes, for NRC/NETL Associateships researchers at NETL laboratories which includes individual tenure reports from Associates over this time period. The report also includes individual tenure reports from associates over this time period. The report also includes descriptions of program promotion efforts, a breakdown of the review competitions, awards offered, and Associate's activities during their tenure.

  11. Accelerating technology transfer from federal laboratories to the private sector by industrial R and D collaborations - A new business model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LOMBANA,CESAR A.; ROMIG JR.,ALTON D.; LINTON,JONATHAN D.; MARTINEZ,J. LEONARD

    2000-04-13

    Many important products and technologies were developed in federal laboratories and were driven initially by national needs and for federal applications. For example, the clean room technology that enhanced the growth of the semiconductor industry was developed at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) decades ago. Similarly, advances in micro-electro-mechanical-systems (MEMS)--an important set of process technologies vital for product miniaturization--are occurring at SNL. Each of the more than 500 federal laboratories in the US, are sources of R and D that contributes to America's economic vitality, productivity growth and, technological innovation. However, only a fraction of the science and technology available at the federal laboratories is being utilized by industry. Also, federal laboratories have not been applying all the business development processes necessary to work effectively with industry in technology commercialization. This paper addresses important factors that federal laboratories, federal agencies, and industry must address to translate these under utilized technologies into profitable products in the industrial sector.

  12. Pacific Northwest Laboratory tasks supporting the Office of Technology Development national program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slate, S.C.

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to provide a concise summary of the Pacific Northwest Laboratory's (PNL) tasks being conducted for the Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Technology Development (OTD). The summaries are useful to principal investigators who want to link their work to others doing similar work, to staff in DOE operating programs who are looking for better solutions to current problems, and to private industry which may be interested in teaming with PNL to commercialize the technology. The tasks are organized within Hanford's overall Work Breakdown Structure (WBS), which is a hierarchical organization of the Hanford mission into subordinate missions. The technology development tasks are all in WBS 3.2. The first subordinate steps under WBS 3.2 are general categories of technology development, such as Soils and Groundwater Cleanup. The next level is the Integrated Program (IP) and Integrated Demonstration (ID) level. An IP is a centrally managed series of projects which explore and develop a particular technology, such as characterization, for application to a wide spectrum of problems. An ID brings multiple technology systems to bear on an actual problem; for example, a carbon tetrachloride plume migrating through the soil is being remediated with biological agents, heating the soil, and destruction of the contamination in vapor removed from the soil. IDs and IPs are identified by an alphanumeric code: GSO2 is the second ID under Groundwater and Soils Cleanup. The final step in the breakout is the Technical Task Plan (TTP). These are individual tasks which support the ID/IP. They are identified by a six-digit number in the format 3211-01. The WBS structure for Technology Development down to the ID/IP level is shown

  13. The Los Alamos, Sandia, and Livermore Laboratories: Integration and collaboration solving science and technology problems for the nation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-12-01

    More than 40 years ago, three laboratories were established to take on scientific responsibility for the nation`s nuclear weapons - Los Alamos, Sandia, and Livermore. This triad of laboratories has provided the state-of-the-art science and technology to create America`s nuclear deterrent and to ensure that the weapons are safe, secure, and to ensure that the weapons are safe, secure, and reliable. These national security laboratories carried out their responsibilities through intense efforts involving almost every field of science, engineering, and technology. Today, they are recognized as three of the world`s premier research and development laboratories. This report sketches the history of the laboratories and their evolution to an integrated three-laboratory system. The characteristics that make them unique are described and some of the major contributions they have made over the years are highlighted.

  14. Advanced technologies related to a high temperature superconductor for small laboratory experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogawa, Yuichi; Mito, Toshiyuki; Yanagi, Nagato

    2006-01-01

    Advanced technologies related to a high temperature superconductor materials and small refrigerator are reviewed. Mini-RT/RT-1 is designed and constructed as a plasma examination device. The element technology of low temperature apparatus, the results of performance tests and application examples are explained. The superconductors such as Bi 2 Sr 2 CaCu 2 O 8 (Bi-2212) for the low temperature phase, Bi 2 Sr 2 Ca 2 Cu 3 O 10 (Bi-2223) for the high temperature phase, and YBa 2 Cu 3 O y (YBCO or Y123) are described. Advanced 4K-Giford-Mcmahon (GM) refrigerator on the market put superconductor coil made of low temperature superconductor metals to practical use and extends its application field. Small laboratory is able to experiment on the high temperature superconductor materials. (S.Y.)

  15. Innovative environmental restoration and waste management technologies at Argonne National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helt, J.E.

    1993-01-01

    Cleanup of contaminated sites and management of wastes have become major efforts of the US Department of Energy. Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) is developing several new technologies to meet the needs of this national effort. Some of these efforts are being done in collaboration with private sector firms. An overview of the ANL and private sector efforts will be presented. The following four specific technologies will be discussed in detail: (1) a minimum additive waste stabilization (MAWS) system for treating actinide-contaminated soil and groundwater; (2) a magnetic separation system, also for cleanup of actinide-contaminated soil and groundwater; (3) a mobile evaporator/concentrator system for processing aqueous radioactive and mixed waste; and (4) a continuous emission monitor for ensuring that waste incineration meets environmental goals

  16. Energy Saving Separations Technologies for the Petroleum Industry: An Industry-University-National Laboratory Research Partnership

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dorgan, John R.; Stewart, Frederick F.; Way, J. Douglas

    2003-03-28

    This project works to develop technologies capable of replacing traditional energy-intensive distillations so that a 20% improvement in energy efficiency can be realized. Consistent with the DOE sponsored report, Technology Roadmap for the Petroleum Industry, the approach undertaken is to develop and implement entirely new technology to replace existing energy intensive practices. The project directly addresses the top priority issue of developing membranes for hydrocarbon separations. The project is organized to rapidly and effectively advance the state-of-the-art in membranes for hydrocarbon separations. The project team includes ChevronTexaco and BP, major industrial petroleum refiners, who will lead the effort by providing matching resources and real world management perspective. Academic expertise in separation sciences and polymer materials found in the Chemical Engineering and Petroleum Refining Department of the Colorado School of Mines is used to invent, develop, and test new membrane materials. Additional expertise and special facilities available at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) are also exploited in order to effectively meet the goals of the project. The proposed project is truly unique in terms of the strength of the team it brings to bear on the development and commercialization of the proposed technologies.

  17. Studies on engineering technologies in the Mizunami Underground Research Laboratory. FY 2007 (Contract research)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noda, Masaru; Suyama, Yasuhiro; Nobuto, Jun; Ijiri, Yuji; Mikake, Shinichiro; Matsui, Hiroya

    2009-07-01

    The Mizunami Underground Research Laboratory (MIU) of the Japan Atomic Energy Agency is a major site for geoscientific research to advance the scientific and technological basis for geological disposal of high-level radioactive waste in crystalline rock. Studies on relevant engineering technologies in the MIU consist of a) research on design and construction technology for very deep underground applications, and b) research on engineering technology as a basis of geological disposal. In the Second Phase of the MIU project (the construction phase), engineering studies have focused on research into design and construction technologies for deep underground. The main subjects in the study of very deep underground structures consist of the following: 'Demonstration of the design methodology', 'Demonstration of existing and supplementary excavation methods', 'Demonstration of countermeasures during excavation' and 'Demonstration of safe construction'. In the FY 2007 studies, identification and evaluation of the subjects for study of engineering technologies in the construction phase were carried out to optimize future research work. Specific studies included: validation of the existing design methodology based on data obtained during construction; validation of existing and supplementary rock excavation methods for very deep shafts; estimation of rock stability under high differential water pressures, methodology on long-term maintenance of underground excavations and risk management systems for construction of underground structures have been performed. Based on these studies, future research focused on the four subject areas, which are 'Demonstration of the design methodology', 'Demonstration of existing and supplementary excavation methods', 'Demonstration of countermeasures during excavation' and 'Demonstration of safe construction', has been identified. The design methodology in the first phase of the MIU Project (surface-based investigation phase) was verified to

  18. ESTABLISHMENT OF AN ENVIRONMENTAL CONTROL TECHNOLOGY LABORATORY WITH A CIRCULATING FLUIDIZED-BED COMBUSTION SYSTEM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wei-Ping Pan; Andy Wu; John T. Riley

    2005-04-30

    This report is to present the progress made on the project ''Establishment of an Environmental Control Technology Laboratory (ECTL) with a Circulating Fluidized-Bed Combustion (CFBC) System'' during the period January 1, 2005 through March 31, 2005. The following tasks have been completed. First, the renovation of the new Combustion Laboratory is nearly complete, and the construction of the Circulating Fluidized-Bed (CFB) Combustor Building is in the final stages. Second, the fabrication and manufacture of the CFBC Facility is being discussed with a potential contractor. Discussions with potential contactor regarding the availability of materials and current machining capabilities have resulted in the modification of the original designs. The selection of the fabrication contractor for the CFBC Facility is expected during the next quarter. Third, co-firing experiments conducted with coal and chicken waste have been initiated in the laboratory-scale simulated fluidized-bed facility. The experimental results from this study are presented in this report. Finally, the proposed work for the next quarter is described in this report.

  19. Critical appraisal of the Vienna consensus: performance indicators for assisted reproductive technology laboratories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Regalado, María Luisa; Martínez-Granados, Luis; González-Utor, Antonio; Ortiz, Nereyda; Iglesias, Miriam; Ardoy, Manuel; Castilla, Jose A

    2018-05-24

    The Vienna consensus, based on the recommendations of an expert panel, has identified 19 performance indicators for assisted reproductive technology (ART) laboratories. Two levels of reference values are established for these performance indicators: competence and benchmark. For over 10 years, the Spanish embryology association (ASEBIR) has participated in the definition and design of ART performance indicators, seeking to establish specific guidelines for ART laboratories to enhance quality, safety and patient welfare. Four years ago, ASEBIR took part in an initiative by AENOR, the Spanish Association for Standardization and Certification, to develop a national standard in this field (UNE 17900:2013 System of quality management for assisted reproduction laboratories), extending the former requirements, based on ISO 9001, to include performance indicators. Considering the experience acquired, we discuss various aspects of the Vienna consensus and consider certain discrepancies in performance indicators between the consensus and UNE 179007:2013, and analyse the definitions, methodology and reference values used. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  20. Reducing cognitive load in the chemistry laboratory by using technology-driven guided inquiry experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubacz, Frank, Jr.

    The chemistry laboratory is an integral component of the learning experience for students enrolled in college-level general chemistry courses. Science education research has shown that guided inquiry investigations provide students with an optimum learning environment within the laboratory. These investigations reflect the basic tenets of constructivism by engaging students in a learning environment that allows them to experience what they learn and to then construct, in their own minds, a meaningful understanding of the ideas and concepts investigated. However, educational research also indicates that the physical plant of the laboratory environment combined with the procedural requirements of the investigation itself often produces a great demand upon a student's working memory. This demand, which is often superfluous to the chemical concept under investigation, creates a sensory overload or extraneous cognitive load within the working memory and becomes a significant obstacle to student learning. Extraneous cognitive load inhibits necessary schema formation within the learner's working memory thereby impeding the transfer of ideas to the learner's long-term memory. Cognitive Load Theory suggests that instructional material developed to reduce extraneous cognitive load leads to an improved learning environment for the student which better allows for schema formation. This study first compared the cognitive load demand, as measured by mental effort, experienced by 33 participants enrolled in a first-year general chemistry course in which the treatment group, using technology based investigations, and the non-treatment group, using traditional labware, investigated identical chemical concepts on five different exercises. Mental effort was measured via a mental effort survey, a statistical comparison of individual survey results to a procedural step count, and an analysis of fourteen post-treatment interviews. Next, a statistical analysis of achievement was

  1. Image noise reduction technology reduces radiation in a radial-first cardiac catheterization laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gunja, Ateka; Pandey, Yagya [Department of Veterans Affairs, Jesse Brown VA Medical Center, Chicago, IL (United States); Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL (United States); Xie, Hui [Division of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL (United States); Faculty of Health Sciences, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, BC (Canada); Wolska, Beata M. [Department of Physiology and Biophysics, Center for Cardiovascular Research, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL (United States); Shroff, Adhir R.; Ardati, Amer K. [Department of Veterans Affairs, Jesse Brown VA Medical Center, Chicago, IL (United States); Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL (United States); Vidovich, Mladen I., E-mail: miv@uic.edu [Department of Veterans Affairs, Jesse Brown VA Medical Center, Chicago, IL (United States); Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2017-04-15

    Background: Transradial coronary angiography (TRA) has been associated with increased radiation doses. We hypothesized that contemporary image noise reduction technology would reduce radiation doses in the cardiac catheterization laboratory in a typical clinical setting. Methods and results: We performed a single-center, retrospective analysis of 400 consecutive patients who underwent diagnostic and interventional cardiac catheterizations in a predominantly TRA laboratory with traditional fluoroscopy (N = 200) and a new image noise reduction fluoroscopy system (N = 200). The primary endpoint was radiation dose (mGy cm{sup 2}). Secondary endpoints were contrast dose, fluoroscopy times, number of cineangiograms, and radiation dose by operator between the two study periods. Radiation was reduced by 44.7% between the old and new cardiac catheterization laboratory (75.8 mGy cm{sup 2} ± 74.0 vs. 41.9 mGy cm{sup 2} ± 40.7, p < 0.0001). Radiation was reduced for both diagnostic procedures (45.9%, p < 0.0001) and interventional procedures (37.7%, p < 0.0001). There was no statistically significant difference in radiation dose between individual operators (p = 0.84). In multivariate analysis, radiation dose remained significantly decreased with the use of the new system (p < 0.0001) and was associated with weight (p < 0.0001), previous coronary artery bypass grafting (p < 0.0007) and greater than 3 stents used (p < 0.0004). TRA was used in 90% of all cases in both periods. Compared with a transfemoral approach (TFA), TRA was not associated with higher radiation doses (p = 0.20). Conclusions: Image noise reduction technology significantly reduces radiation dose in a contemporary radial-first cardiac catheterization clinical practice. - Highlights: • Radial arterial access has been associated with higher doses compared to femoral access. • In a radial-first cardiac catheterization laboratory (90% radial) we examined radiation doses reduction with a contemporary image

  2. Image noise reduction technology reduces radiation in a radial-first cardiac catheterization laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gunja, Ateka; Pandey, Yagya; Xie, Hui; Wolska, Beata M.; Shroff, Adhir R.; Ardati, Amer K.; Vidovich, Mladen I.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Transradial coronary angiography (TRA) has been associated with increased radiation doses. We hypothesized that contemporary image noise reduction technology would reduce radiation doses in the cardiac catheterization laboratory in a typical clinical setting. Methods and results: We performed a single-center, retrospective analysis of 400 consecutive patients who underwent diagnostic and interventional cardiac catheterizations in a predominantly TRA laboratory with traditional fluoroscopy (N = 200) and a new image noise reduction fluoroscopy system (N = 200). The primary endpoint was radiation dose (mGy cm"2). Secondary endpoints were contrast dose, fluoroscopy times, number of cineangiograms, and radiation dose by operator between the two study periods. Radiation was reduced by 44.7% between the old and new cardiac catheterization laboratory (75.8 mGy cm"2 ± 74.0 vs. 41.9 mGy cm"2 ± 40.7, p < 0.0001). Radiation was reduced for both diagnostic procedures (45.9%, p < 0.0001) and interventional procedures (37.7%, p < 0.0001). There was no statistically significant difference in radiation dose between individual operators (p = 0.84). In multivariate analysis, radiation dose remained significantly decreased with the use of the new system (p < 0.0001) and was associated with weight (p < 0.0001), previous coronary artery bypass grafting (p < 0.0007) and greater than 3 stents used (p < 0.0004). TRA was used in 90% of all cases in both periods. Compared with a transfemoral approach (TFA), TRA was not associated with higher radiation doses (p = 0.20). Conclusions: Image noise reduction technology significantly reduces radiation dose in a contemporary radial-first cardiac catheterization clinical practice. - Highlights: • Radial arterial access has been associated with higher doses compared to femoral access. • In a radial-first cardiac catheterization laboratory (90% radial) we examined radiation doses reduction with a contemporary image-noise compared to

  3. NASA's Corrosion Technology Laboratory at the Kennedy Space Center: Anticipating, Managing, and Preventing Corrosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calle, Luz Marina

    2014-01-01

    Corrosion is the degradation of a material that results from its interaction with the environment. The marine environment at NASAs Kennedy Space Center (KSC) has been documented by ASM International (formerly American Society for Metals) as the most corrosive in the United States. With the introduction of the Space Shuttle in 1981, the already highly corrosive conditions at the launch pads were rendered even more severe by the 70 tons of highly corrosive hydrochloric acid that were generated by the solid rocket boosters. Numerous failures at the launch pads are caused by corrosion.The structural integrity of ground infrastructure and flight hardware is critical to the success, safety, cost, and sustainability of space missions. As a result of fifty years of experience with launch and ground operations in a natural marine environment that is highly corrosive, NASAs Corrosion Technology Laboratory at KSC is a major source of corrosion control expertise in the launch and other environments. Throughout its history, the Laboratory has evolved from what started as an atmospheric exposure facility near NASAs launch pads into a world-wide recognized capability that provides technical innovations and engineering services in all areas of corrosion for NASA and external customers.This presentation will provide a historical overview of the role of NASAs Corrosion Technology in anticipating, managing, and preventing corrosion. One important challenge in managing and preventing corrosion involves the detrimental impact on humans and the environment of what have been very effective corrosion control strategies. This challenge has motivated the development of new corrosion control technologies that are more effective and environmentally friendly. Strategies for improved corrosion protection and durability can have a huge impact on the economic sustainability of human spaceflight operations.

  4. Assessing the effectiveness of technology transfer from U.S. government R&D laboratories: impact of market orientation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozeman, Barry; Coker, Karen

    1992-05-01

    This study, based on a national survey of U.S. government laboratories, assesses the degree of success laboratories have had in transferring technology to industry, taking into account the laboratories' differing receptivity to market influences. Three success criteria are considered here, two based on self-evaluations and a third based on the number of technology licenses issued from the laboratory. The two self-evaluations are rooted in different types of effectiveness, `getting technology out the door,' in one case, and, in the other, having a demonstrable commercial impact. A core hypothesis of the study is that the two types of effectiveness will be responsive to different factors and, in particular, the laboratories with a clearer market orientation will have a higher degree of success on the commercial impact and technology license criteria. Overall, the results seem to suggest that multifaceted, multimission laboratories are likely to enjoy the most success in technology transfer, especially if they have relatively low levels of bureaucratization and either ties to industry (particularly direct financial ties) or a commercial orientation in the selection of projects.

  5. Development and enhancement of grouting technologies in the Mizunami Underground Research Laboratory (Contract research)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nobuto, Jun; Mikake, Shinichiro

    2008-03-01

    In the Tono Geoscience Center of Japan Atomic Energy Agency (hereafter, JAEA), Mizunami Underground Research Laboratory project is being advanced to develop a scientific and technological basis for geological disposal. The concept of geological disposal is based on a multi-barrier system which combines a stable geological environment with an engineered barrier system (EBS). In order to develop a engineering basis for the construction of disposal system, the enhancement of grouting technologies among engineering technologies is needed. In this study, the comprehensive performance of suspension type grouting materials to seal rock fractures encountered in excavation works at deep underground has been checked, and the clogging phenomenon at the entrance of rock fractures has been investigated following the previous year. Research issues are as follows; Study on grouting concept to secure high-level water sealing, study on the test method to check grout clogging under high injection pressure, study on grouting material which can penetrate into finer fractures. Among these, in the study on penetrability test method, prototype test instruments were made and a series of preliminary tests were conducted. (author)

  6. 78 FR 69337 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Ohio; Ohio SO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-19

    ... ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY 40 CFR Part 52 [EPA-R05-OAR-2011-0672; FRL-9902-02-Region 5] Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Ohio; Ohio SO2 Air Quality Rule Revisions AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Proposed rule. SUMMARY: On June 24, 2011, Ohio...

  7. 78 FR 69299 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Ohio; Ohio SO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-19

    ... ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY 40 CFR Part 52 [EPA-R05-OAR-2011-0672; FRL-9902-03-Region 5] Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Ohio; Ohio SO2 Air Quality Rule Revisions AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Direct final rule. SUMMARY: On June 24, 2011, Ohio...

  8. Evaluation of technologies for remediation of disposed radioactive and hazardous wastes in a facility at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reno, H.W.; Martin, D.D.; Rasmussen, T.L.

    1989-01-01

    For the past twenty years the US Department of Energy has been investigating and evaluating technologies for the long term management of disposed transuranic contaminated wastes at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. More than fifty technologies have been investigated and evaluated and three technologies have been selected for feasibility study demonstration at the complex. This paper discusses the evaluation of those technologies and describes the three technologies selected for demonstration. The paper further suggests that future actions under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act should build from previous evaluations completed heretofore. 18 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab

  9. The National Energy Technology Laboratory Annual Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    National Energy Technology Laboratory

    2001-01-01

    This Site Environmental Report was prepared by the Environment, Safety, and Health Division at the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) for the U.S. Department of Energy. The purpose of this report is to inform the public and Department of Energy stakeholders of the environmental conditions at the NETL sites in Morgantown, West Virginia, and Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. This report contains the most accurate information that could be collected during the period between January 1, 2000, through December 31, 2000. As stated in DOE Orders 5400.1 and 231.1, the purpose of the report is to: Characterize site environmental management performance; Confirm compliance with environmental standards and requirements and Highlight significant facility programs and efforts

  10. The National Energy Technology Laboratory Annual Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    National Energy Technology Laboratory

    2001-11-27

    This Site Environmental Report was prepared by the Environment, Safety, and Health Division at the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) for the U.S. Department of Energy. The purpose of this report is to inform the public and Department of Energy stakeholders of the environmental conditions at the NETL sites in Morgantown, West Virginia, and Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. This report contains the most accurate information that could be collected during the period between January 1, 2000, through December 31, 2000. As stated in DOE Orders 5400.1 and 231.1, the purpose of the report is to: Characterize site environmental management performance; Confirm compliance with environmental standards and requirements and Highlight significant facility programs and efforts.

  11. Integrating Safety with Science,Technology and Innovation at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rich, Bethany M [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-04-02

    The mission of Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is to develop and apply science, technology and engineering solutions to ensure the safety, security, and reliability of the U.S. nuclear deterrent; reduce global threats; and solve emerging national security challenges. The most important responsibility is to direct and conduct efforts to meet the mission with an emphasis on safety, security, and quality. In this article, LANL Environmental, Safety, and Health (ESH) trainers discuss how their application and use of a kinetic learning module (learn by doing) with a unique fall arrest system is helping to address one the most common industrial safety challenges: slips and falls. A unique integration of Human Performance Improvement (HPI), Behavior Based Safety (BBS) and elements of the Voluntary Protection Program (VPP) combined with an interactive simulator experience is being used to address slip and fall events at Los Alamos.

  12. The National Energy Technology Laboratory Annual Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 2002

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    National Energy Technology Laboratory

    2003-01-01

    This Site Environmental Report was prepared by the Environmental, Safety, and Health Division at the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) for the U.S. Department of Energy. The purpose of this report is to inform the public and Department of Energy stakeholders of the environmental conditions at NETL sites in Morgantown (MGN), West Virginia, Pittsburgh (PGH), Pennsylvania, Tulsa, Oklahoma, and Fairbanks, Alaska. This report contains the most accurate information that could be collected during the period between January 1, 2002, and December 31, 2002. As stated in DOE Orders 450.1 and 231.1, the purpose of the report is to: (1) Characterize site environmental management performance. (2) Confirm compliance with environmental standards and requirements. (3) Highlight significant facility programs and efforts

  13. Quality management system and accreditation of the in vivo monitoring laboratory at Karslruhe Institute of Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breustedt, B; Mohr, U; Biegard, N; Cordes, G

    2011-03-01

    The in vivo monitoring laboratory (IVM) at Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), with one whole body counter and three partial-body counters, is an approved lab for individual monitoring according to German regulation. These approved labs are required to prove their competencies by accreditation to ISO/IEC 17025:2005. In 2007 a quality management system (QMS), which was successfully audited and granted accreditation, was set up at the IVM. The system is based on the ISO 9001 certified QMS of the central safety department of the Research Centre Karlsruhe the IVM belonged to at that time. The system itself was set up to be flexible and could be adapted to the recent organisational changes (e.g. founding of KIT and an institute for radiation research) with only minor effort.

  14. Study of cognitive and technological prerequisites for virtual laboratories and collaborative virtual environments for radiopharmacy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melo, Roberto Correia de

    2009-01-01

    This academic work explains a general view of virtual laboratories (VL) and collaborative virtual environments (CVE) (called, together, a VL/CVE set), focusing their technological features and analyzing the common cognitive features of their users. Also is presented a detailed description of VL/CVE VirRAD (Virtual Radiopharmacy), created specially to connect and support the international radiopharmacy community around the world, and is explained an analysis of their users' cognitive profile, under the perspective of two of the most important cognitive theories of the 20th century: multiple intelligences, by Howard Gardner, and mindful learning, by Ellen Langer. Conclusions from this study has been incorporated, as feature enhancements, to a software prototype created based upon VirRAD software solution, and the hardcopy of their screens is exposed at the end of this work. It is also an essential idea that the conclusions of this work are relevant to any VL/CVE environment. (author)

  15. The National Energy Technology Laboratory Annual Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 2002

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    National Energy Technology Laboratory

    2003-10-30

    This Site Environmental Report was prepared by the Environmental, Safety, and Health Division at the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) for the U.S. Department of Energy. The purpose of this report is to inform the public and Department of Energy stakeholders of the environmental conditions at NETL sites in Morgantown (MGN), West Virginia, Pittsburgh (PGH), Pennsylvania, Tulsa, Oklahoma, and Fairbanks, Alaska. This report contains the most accurate information that could be collected during the period between January 1, 2002, and December 31, 2002. As stated in DOE Orders 450.1 and 231.1, the purpose of the report is to: (1) Characterize site environmental management performance. (2) Confirm compliance with environmental standards and requirements. (3) Highlight significant facility programs and efforts.

  16. KfK Laboratory for Isotope Technology. Progress report on research and development activities in 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-03-01

    The R and D work done by the laboratory for isotope technology (LIT) in 1990 under the project of pollutant control in the environment, concentrated on thermal waste treatment processes, above all on the classical refuse incineration, for which closed-circuit pollutant balances were established, and process engineering studies were made aimed at reducing pollutants in waste gas. The central research facility of the LIT is the semi-technical pilot plant TAMARA (test plant for refuse incineration, waste gas purification, residue recycling, waste water treatment) with a throughput of 200 kg/hour of refuse. It was put into operation in 1986. The annex lists the publications by the LIT staff. (BBR) [de

  17. Culture media influenced laboratory outcomes but not neonatal birth weight in assisted reproductive technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Tai-lang; Zhang, Yi; Li, Sai-jiao; Zhao, Meng; Ding, Jin-li; Xu, Wang-ming; Yang, Jing

    2015-12-01

    Whether the type of culture media utilized in assisted reproductive technology has impacts on laboratory outcomes and birth weight of newborns in in-vitro fertilization (IVF)/intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) was investigated. A total of 673 patients undergoing IVF/ICSI and giving birth to live singletons after fresh embryo transfer on day 3 from Jan. 1, 2010 to Dec. 31, 2012 were included. Three types of culture media were used during this period: Quinn's Advantage (QA), Single Step Medium (SSM), and Continuous Single Culture medium (CSC). Fertilization rate (FR), normal fertilization rate (NFR), cleavage rate (CR), normal cleavage rate (NCR), good-quality embryo rate (GQER) and neonatal birth weight were compared using one-way ANOVA and χ (2) tests. Multiple linear regression analysis was performed to determine the impact of culture media on laboratory outcomes and birth weight. In IVF cycles, GQER was significantly decreased in SSM medium group as compared with QA or CSC media groups (63.6% vs. 69.0% in QA; vs. 71.3% in CSC, P=0.011). In ICSI cycles, FR, NFR and CR were significantly lower in CSC medium group than in other two media groups. No significant difference was observed in neonatal birthweight among the three groups (P=0.759). Multiple linear regression analyses confirmed that the type of culture medium was correlated with FR, NFR, CR and GQER, but not with neonatal birth weight. The type of culture media had potential influences on laboratory outcomes but did not exhibit an impact on the birth weight of singletons in ART.

  18. MicroArray Facility: a laboratory information management system with extended support for Nylon based technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beaudoing Emmanuel

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background High throughput gene expression profiling (GEP is becoming a routine technique in life science laboratories. With experimental designs that repeatedly span thousands of genes and hundreds of samples, relying on a dedicated database infrastructure is no longer an option. GEP technology is a fast moving target, with new approaches constantly broadening the field diversity. This technology heterogeneity, compounded by the informatics complexity of GEP databases, means that software developments have so far focused on mainstream techniques, leaving less typical yet established techniques such as Nylon microarrays at best partially supported. Results MAF (MicroArray Facility is the laboratory database system we have developed for managing the design, production and hybridization of spotted microarrays. Although it can support the widely used glass microarrays and oligo-chips, MAF was designed with the specific idiosyncrasies of Nylon based microarrays in mind. Notably single channel radioactive probes, microarray stripping and reuse, vector control hybridizations and spike-in controls are all natively supported by the software suite. MicroArray Facility is MIAME supportive and dynamically provides feedback on missing annotations to help users estimate effective MIAME compliance. Genomic data such as clone identifiers and gene symbols are also directly annotated by MAF software using standard public resources. The MAGE-ML data format is implemented for full data export. Journalized database operations (audit tracking, data anonymization, material traceability and user/project level confidentiality policies are also managed by MAF. Conclusion MicroArray Facility is a complete data management system for microarray producers and end-users. Particular care has been devoted to adequately model Nylon based microarrays. The MAF system, developed and implemented in both private and academic environments, has proved a robust solution for

  19. Communication and computing technology in biocontainment laboratories using the NEIDL as a model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCall, John; Hardcastle, Kath

    2014-07-01

    The National Emerging Infectious Diseases Laboratories (NEIDL), Boston University, is a globally unique biocontainment research facility housing biosafety level 2 (BSL-2), BSL-3, and BSL-4 laboratories. Located in the BioSquare area at the University's Medical Campus, it is part of a national network of secure facilities constructed to study infectious diseases of major public health concern. The NEIDL allows for basic, translational, and clinical phases of research to be carried out in a single facility with the overall goal of accelerating understanding, treatment, and prevention of infectious diseases. The NEIDL will also act as a center of excellence providing training and education in all aspects of biocontainment research. Within every detail of NEIDL operations is a primary emphasis on safety and security. The ultramodern NEIDL has required a new approach to communications technology solutions in order to ensure safety and security and meet the needs of investigators working in this complex building. This article discusses the implementation of secure wireless networks and private cloud computing to promote operational efficiency, biosecurity, and biosafety with additional energy-saving advantages. The utilization of a dedicated data center, virtualized servers, virtualized desktop integration, multichannel secure wireless networks, and a NEIDL-dedicated Voice over Internet Protocol (VoIP) network are all discussed. © 2014 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Description of the Sandia National Laboratories science, technology & engineering metrics process.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jordan, Gretchen B.; Watkins, Randall D.; Trucano, Timothy Guy; Burns, Alan Richard; Oelschlaeger, Peter

    2010-04-01

    There has been a concerted effort since 2007 to establish a dashboard of metrics for the Science, Technology, and Engineering (ST&E) work at Sandia National Laboratories. These metrics are to provide a self assessment mechanism for the ST&E Strategic Management Unit (SMU) to complement external expert review and advice and various internal self assessment processes. The data and analysis will help ST&E Managers plan, implement, and track strategies and work in order to support the critical success factors of nurturing core science and enabling laboratory missions. The purpose of this SAND report is to provide a guide for those who want to understand the ST&E SMU metrics process. This report provides an overview of why the ST&E SMU wants a dashboard of metrics, some background on metrics for ST&E programs from existing literature and past Sandia metrics efforts, a summary of work completed to date, specifics on the portfolio of metrics that have been chosen and the implementation process that has been followed, and plans for the coming year to improve the ST&E SMU metrics process.

  1. Survey of Laboratories and Implementation of the Federal Defense Laboratory Diversification Program. Annex B. Department of the Navy Domestic Technology Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-10-01

    overseas laboratories. Dental capabilities include oral microbiology, manufacturing technology for unique (dental prosthetic ) items, dental materials...with the National Center of Excellence in Metalworking to rectify production problems in manufacturing low loss, high pressure valves used in...34 Proceedings of the ASTE Fifth Symposium on Composite Materials: Fatigue and Fracture , May 1993. Chen, J. S. J., T. J. Praisner, L. A. Fields, R. T. Norhold and

  2. Establishing Ebola Virus Disease (EVD diagnostics using GeneXpert technology at a mobile laboratory in Liberia: Impact on outbreak response, case management and laboratory systems strengthening.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philomena Raftery

    2018-01-01

    costs and can be integrated into other national diagnostic algorithms. The technology has on average a 2-hour sample-to-result time and allows for single specimen testing to overcome potential delays of batching. This model of a mobile laboratory equipped with Xpert Ebola test, staffed by local laboratory technicians, could serve to strengthen outbreak preparedness and response for future outbreaks of EVD in Liberia and the region.

  3. Establishing Ebola Virus Disease (EVD) diagnostics using GeneXpert technology at a mobile laboratory in Liberia: Impact on outbreak response, case management and laboratory systems strengthening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Condell, Orla; Wasunna, Christine; Kpaka, Jonathan; Zwizwai, Ruth; Nuha, Mahmood; Fallah, Mosoka; Freeman, Maxwell; Harris, Victoria; Miller, Mark; Baller, April; Massaquoi, Moses; Katawera, Victoria; Saindon, John; Bemah, Philip; Hamblion, Esther; Castle, Evelyn; Williams, Desmond; Gasasira, Alex; Nyenswah, Tolbert

    2018-01-01

    be integrated into other national diagnostic algorithms. The technology has on average a 2-hour sample-to-result time and allows for single specimen testing to overcome potential delays of batching. This model of a mobile laboratory equipped with Xpert Ebola test, staffed by local laboratory technicians, could serve to strengthen outbreak preparedness and response for future outbreaks of EVD in Liberia and the region. PMID:29304039

  4. Establishing Ebola Virus Disease (EVD) diagnostics using GeneXpert technology at a mobile laboratory in Liberia: Impact on outbreak response, case management and laboratory systems strengthening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raftery, Philomena; Condell, Orla; Wasunna, Christine; Kpaka, Jonathan; Zwizwai, Ruth; Nuha, Mahmood; Fallah, Mosoka; Freeman, Maxwell; Harris, Victoria; Miller, Mark; Baller, April; Massaquoi, Moses; Katawera, Victoria; Saindon, John; Bemah, Philip; Hamblion, Esther; Castle, Evelyn; Williams, Desmond; Gasasira, Alex; Nyenswah, Tolbert

    2018-01-01

    integrated into other national diagnostic algorithms. The technology has on average a 2-hour sample-to-result time and allows for single specimen testing to overcome potential delays of batching. This model of a mobile laboratory equipped with Xpert Ebola test, staffed by local laboratory technicians, could serve to strengthen outbreak preparedness and response for future outbreaks of EVD in Liberia and the region.

  5. Economic effects of Ohio's smoke-free law on Kentucky and Ohio border counties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyles, Mark K; Hahn, Ellen J

    2011-01-01

    To determine if the Ohio statewide smoke-free law is associated with economic activity in Ohio or Kentucky counties that lie on the border between the two states. In November 2006, Ohio implemented a comprehensive statewide smoke-free law for all indoor workplaces. A feasible generalised least squares (FLGS) time series design to estimate the impact of the Ohio smoke-free law on Kentucky and Ohio border counties. Six Kentucky and six Ohio counties that lie on the border between the two states. All reporting hospitality and accommodation establishments in all Kentucky and Ohio counties including but not limited to food and drinking establishments, hotels and casinos. Total number of employees, total wages paid and number of reported establishments in all hospitality and accommodation services, 6 years before Ohio's law and 1 year after. There is no evidence of a disproportionate change in economic activity in Ohio or Kentucky border counties relative to their non-border counterparts. There was no evidence of a relation between Ohio's smoke-free law and economic activity in Kentucky border counties. The law generated a positive influence on wages and number of establishments in Ohio border counties. The null result cannot be explained by low test power, as minimum changes necessary in the dependent variables to detect a significant influence are very reasonable in size. Our data add to the large body of evidence that smoke-free laws are neutral with respect to the hospitality business across jurisdictions with and without laws.

  6. Using tablet technology and instructional videos to enhance preclinical dental laboratory learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadbury-Amyot, Cynthia C; Purk, John H; Williams, Brian Joseph; Van Ness, Christopher J

    2014-02-01

    The purpose of this pilot study was to examine if tablet technology with accompanying instructional videos enhanced the teaching and learning outcomes in a preclinical dental laboratory setting. Two procedures deemed most challenging in Operative Dentistry II were chosen for the development of instructional videos. A random sample of thirty students was chosen to participate in the pilot. Comparison of faculty evaluations of the procedures between the experimental (tablet) and control (no tablet) groups resulted in no significant differences; however, there was a trend toward fewer failures in the experimental group. Examination of the ability to accurately self-assess was compared by exploring correlations between faculty and student evaluations. While correlations were stronger in the experimental group, the control group had significant correlations for all three procedures, while the experimental group had significant correlations on only two of the procedures. Students strongly perceived that the tablets and videos helped them perform better and more accurately self-assess their work products. Students did not support requiring that they purchase/obtain a specific brand of technology. As a result of this pilot study, further development of ideal and non-ideal videos are in progress, and the school will be implementing a "Bring Your Own Device" policy with incoming students.

  7. NASA's Corrosion Technology Laboratory at the Kennedy Space Center: Anticipating, Managing, and Preventing Corrosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calle, Luz Marina

    2015-01-01

    The marine environment at NASAs Kennedy Space Center (KSC) has been documented by ASM International (formerly American Society for Metals) as the most corrosive in North America. With the introduction of the Space Shuttle in 1981, the already highly corrosive conditions at the launch pads were rendered even more severe by the highly corrosive hydrochloric acid (HCl) generated by the solid rocket boosters (SRBs). Numerous failures at the launch pads are caused by corrosion. The structural integrity of ground infrastructure and flight hardware is critical to the success, safety, cost, and sustainability of space missions. NASA has over fifty years of experience dealing with unexpected failures caused by corrosion and has developed expertise in corrosion control in the launch and other environments. The Corrosion Technology Laboratory at KSC evolved, from what started as an atmospheric exposure test site near NASAs launch pads, into a capability that provides technical innovations and engineering services in all areas of corrosion for NASA, external partners, and customers.This paper provides a chronological overview of NASAs role in anticipating, managing, and preventing corrosion in highly corrosive environments. One important challenge in managing and preventing corrosion involves the detrimental impact on humans and the environment of what have been very effective corrosion control strategies. This challenge has motivated the development of new corrosion control technologies that are more effective and environmentally friendly. Strategies for improved corrosion protection and durability can have a huge impact on the economic sustainability of human spaceflight operations.

  8. Evaluating a technology supported interactive response system during the laboratory section of a histology course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinaldi, Vera D; Lorr, Nancy A; Williams, Kimberly

    2017-07-01

    Monitoring of student learning through systematic formative assessment is important for adjusting pedagogical strategies. However, traditional formative assessments, such as quizzes and written assignments, may not be sufficiently timely for making adjustments to a learning process. Technology supported formative assessment tools assess student knowledge, allow for immediate feedback, facilitate classroom dialogues, and have the potential to modify student learning strategies. As an attempt to integrate technology supported formative assessment in the laboratory section of an upper-level histology course, the interactive application Learning Catalytics TM , a cloud-based assessment system, was used. This study conducted during the 2015 Histology courses at Cornell University concluded that this application is helpful for identifying student misconceptions "on-the-go," engaging otherwise marginalized students, and forming a new communication venue between students and instructors. There was no overall difference between grades from topics that used the application and grades from those that did not, and students reported that it only slightly helped improve their understanding of the topic (3.8 ± 0.99 on a five-point Likert scale). However, they highly recommended using it (4.2 ± 0.71). The major limitation was regarding the image display and graphical resolution of this application. Even though students embrace the use of technology, 39% reported benefits of having the traditional light microscope available. This cohort of students led instructors to conclude that the newest tools are not always better, but rather can complement traditional instruction methods. Anat Sci Educ 10: 328-338. © 2016 American Association of Anatomists. © 2016 American Association of Anatomists.

  9. Technology applications bulletins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koncinski, W. Jr.

    1989-02-01

    Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. (Energy Systems), operates five facilities for the US Department of Energy (DOE): the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), which is a large, multidisciplinary research and development (R and D) center whose primary mission is energy research; the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, which engages in defense research, development, and production; and the uranium-enrichment plants at Oak Ridge; Paducah, Kentucky; and Portsmouth, Ohio. Much of the research carried out at these facilities is of interest to industry and to state or local governments. To make information about this research available, the Energy Systems Office of Technology Applications publishes brief descriptions of selected technologies and reports. These technology applications bulletins describe the new technology and inform the reader about how to obtain further information, gain access to technical resources, and initiate direct contact with Energy Systems researchers

  10. Biomass resources for energy in Ohio: The OH-MARKAL modeling framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakya, Bibhakar

    consequences of alternative energy scenarios for the future. The model can also be used to estimate the relative merits of various energy technologies. By developing OH-MARKAL as an empirical model, this study evaluates the prospects of biomass cofiring in Ohio to generate commercial electricity. As cofiring utilizes the existing infrastructure, it is an attractive option for utilizing biomass energy resources, with the objective of replacing non-renewable fuel (coal) with renewable and cleaner fuel (biomass). It addresses two key issues: first, the importance of diversifying the fuel resource base for the power industry; and second, the need to increase the use of biomass or renewable resources in Ohio. The results of the various model scenarios developed in this study indicate that policy interventions are necessary to make biomass co-firing competitive with coal, and that about 7 percent of electricity can be generated by using biomass feedstock in Ohio. This study recommends mandating an optimal level of a renewable portfolio standard (RPS) for Ohio to increase renewable electricity generation in the state. To set a higher goal of RPS than 7 percent level, Ohio needs to include other renewable sources such as wind, solar or hydro in its electricity generation portfolio. The results also indicate that the marginal price of electricity must increase by four fold to mitigate CO2 emissions 15 percent below the 2002 level, suggesting Ohio will also need to consider and invest in clean coal technologies and examine the option of carbon sequestration. Hence, Ohio's energy strategy should include a mix of domestic renewable energy options, energy efficiency, energy conservation, clean coal technology, and carbon sequestration options. It would seem prudent for Ohio to become proactive in reducing CO2 emissions so that it will be ready to deal with any future federal mandates, otherwise the consequences could be detrimental to the state's economy.

  11. KfK Laboratory for Aerosol Physics and Filter Technology. Progress report and development activities in 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-03-01

    The activities undertaken by the laboratory for aerosol physics and filter technology (LAF) in 1990 under the following projects are described: (1) nuclear safety research (safety and material problems of fast breeders, IWR-oriented safety research); (2) pollutant control in the environment (communal waste management, emission-reducing processes, climate research - pollutants' behaviour in the atmosphere), and (3) radioactive waste management (basic work on reprocessing technologies). The annex lists the publications by the LAF staff. (BBR) [de

  12. Best available technology for the Los Alamos National Laboratory Radioactive Liquid Waste Treatment Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Midkiff, W.S.; Romero, R.L.; Suazo, I.L.; Garcia, R.; Parsons, R.M.

    1993-01-01

    The existing Los Alamos National Laboratory TA-50 liquid radioactive waste treatment plant RLWP has been in service for over thirty years, during this period many technical, regulatory, and processing changes have occurred. The existing facility can no longer comply with the demands and requirements for continued operation, and would not be able to comply with anticipated stringent future contaminant discharge limitations. Either a major upgrading or replacement of the existing facility is required. In order to assess the most appropriate means of providing an adequate facility to comply with predicted requirements for Ta-50, this Best Available Technology (BAT) Study was conducted to compare feasible technical and economic alternatives in order to define the most favorable technology configuration. This report consists of eleven sections. Section 1 provides a general introduction and background of the TA-50 operations and the basis for this study. Section 2 provides a technical discussion of the unit processes at TA-50 and several other comparable operations at other DOE sites. Section 3 addresses the evaluation and selection of appropriate treatment processes. Section 4 provides an analysis of environmental issues and concerns. Section 5 presents the rationale for the selection of preferred process configurations. Section 6 is the evaluation of operational issues. Section 7 addresses energy and resource use topics. Section 8 provides an economic analysis, and Section 9 summarizes the evaluation and the identification of the BAT. These sections are augmented by appendices. The report identifies the construction of a new radioactive liquid waste treatment facility as the BAT. Based on the information analyzed for this study, this option appears to provide the best combination of environmental compliance, operability, and economic value

  13. OhioLINK: Implementing Integrated Library Services across Institutional Boundaries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawks, Carol Pitts

    1995-01-01

    Discusses the implementation of the OhioLINK (Ohio Library and Information Network) system, an integrated library system linking 23 public and private academic institutions and the Ohio State Library. Topics include a history of OhioLINK; organizational structure; decision-making procedures; public relations strategies; cooperative circulation;…

  14. Use of High-Definition Audiovisual Technology in a Gross Anatomy Laboratory: Effect on Dental Students' Learning Outcomes and Satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Maha; Sleiman, Naama H; Thomas, Maureen; Kashani, Nahid; Ditmyer, Marcia M

    2016-02-01

    Laboratory cadaver dissection is essential for three-dimensional understanding of anatomical structures and variability, but there are many challenges to teaching gross anatomy in medical and dental schools, including a lack of available space and qualified anatomy faculty. The aim of this study was to determine the efficacy of high-definition audiovisual educational technology in the gross anatomy laboratory in improving dental students' learning outcomes and satisfaction. Exam scores were compared for two classes of first-year students at one U.S. dental school: 2012-13 (no audiovisual technology) and 2013-14 (audiovisual technology), and section exams were used to compare differences between semesters. Additionally, an online survey was used to assess the satisfaction of students who used the technology. All 284 first-year students in the two years (2012-13 N=144; 2013-14 N=140) participated in the exams. Of the 140 students in the 2013-14 class, 63 completed the survey (45% response rate). The results showed that those students who used the technology had higher scores on the laboratory exams than those who did not use it, and students in the winter semester scored higher (90.17±0.56) than in the fall semester (82.10±0.68). More than 87% of those surveyed strongly agreed or agreed that the audiovisual devices represented anatomical structures clearly in the gross anatomy laboratory. These students reported an improved experience in learning and understanding anatomical structures, found the laboratory to be less overwhelming, and said they were better able to follow dissection instructions and understand details of anatomical structures with the new technology. Based on these results, the study concluded that the ability to provide the students a clear view of anatomical structures and high-quality imaging had improved their learning experience.

  15. Ohio University tandem Van de Graaff accelerator. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lane, R.O.

    1977-11-01

    A summary is given of the work carried out at the John Edwards Tandem Accelerator Laboratory of Ohio University during the period 1970 to 1977 on studies of neutron-nucleus interactions and nuclear structure using neutrons as probes. This work utilizes the main and unique characteristic of the accelerator: high current, high voltage tandem. Certain applied areas were also studied, such as the production of short-lived isotopes for use in medical diagnoses, production of very high neutron intensity to observe possible sputtering effects, and proton induced x-ray emission with a microprobe beam

  16. Short-Term and Long-Term Technology Needs/Matching Status at Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Claggett, S.L.

    1999-01-01

    This report identifies potential technology deployment opportunities for the Environmental Management (EM) programs at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The focus is on identifying candidates for Accelerated Site Technology Deployment (ASTD) proposals within the Environmental Restoration and Waste Management areas. The 86 technology needs on the Site Technology Coordination Group list were verified in the field. Six additional needs were found, and one listed need was no longer required. Potential technology matches were identified and then investigated for applicability, maturity, cost, and performance. Where promising, information on the technologies was provided to INEEL managers for evaluation. Eleven potential ASTD projected were identified, seven for near-term application and four for application within the next five years

  17. Overview of the Defense Programs Research and Technology Development Program for fiscal year 1993. Appendix II research laboratories and facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-09-30

    This document contains summaries of the research facilities that support the Defense Programs Research and Technology Development Program for FY 1993. The nine program elements are aggregated into three program clusters as follows: (1) Advanced materials sciences and technologies; chemistry and materials, explosives, special nuclear materials (SNM), and tritium. (2) Design sciences and advanced computation; physics, conceptual design and assessment, and computation and modeling. (3) Advanced manufacturing technologies and capabilities; system engineering science and technology, and electronics, photonics, sensors, and mechanical components. Section I gives a brief summary of 23 major defense program (DP) research and technology facilities and shows how these major facilities are organized by program elements. Section II gives a more detailed breakdown of the over 200 research and technology facilities being used at the Laboratories to support the Defense Programs mission.

  18. Technology and organization behavior: the relationship between the tools of technology and the structure and functioning of high-energy physics research laboratories. (Volumes I and II)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kernaghan, J.A.

    1983-01-01

    This dissertation focuses upon the changes at the intraorganizational level - the institutionalization of organization behavior - at five high-energy physics laboratories in the United States. Institutionalization was defined as a shift from a Gemeinschaft (or Community) type social system and methods of control to a system characterized by a Gesellschaft (or Industrialized) approach to organizing and controlling social relationships and activities in basic research. It was hypothesized that this type of control strategy was implemented by the administration of the laboratories in order to cope with the problems imposed on the organization by an increase in the inertia of the technology on which the laboratories depend for their output. Data were collected at five high-energy physics laboratories over a three-year period. It was found that as the technology employed by the laboratories became more costly, larger in scale, and more complex, automated, and scarce, the management of the laboratories increased the degree of institutional control over the behavior of organizational members to compensate for management's lack of control over the technical element in the socio-technical system

  19. Arid-site SLB technology development at the Los Alamos National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DePoorter, G.L.

    1981-01-01

    The program goal for shallow land burial (SLB) Technology Development at the Los Alamos National Laboratory is to field test new disposal concepts and strategies for all aspects of arid SLB on an accelerated basis and on a reasonable scale. The major accomplishments during FY-1981 were the development of the Los Alamos Experimental Engineered Test Facility, the emplacement of the biointrusion barrier testing experiments, the design and emplacement of the moisture cycling experiments, the design and construction of the experiment clusters, and the planning for the experiments to be emplaced in these units. This paper will describe the site development work, the design and construction of the experiment clusters, and the experiments planned for these units. The experimental Engineered Test Facility was brought from idea to reality and two experiments were emplaced (biointrusion barrier and moisture cycling). The experiment clusters were designed and constructed, and are now available for experimentation. These units are reusable. After an experiment is complete it can be removed and another experiment put in its place. Several of the experiments were planned and designed while some of the other experiments are still in the planning stage. Based on the work done in FY-1981, significant progress toward Milestones, C, D, and E should be made in FY-1982

  20. A new ion-beam laboratory for materials research at the Slovak University of Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noga, Pavol; Dobrovodský, Jozef; Vaňa, Dušan; Beňo, Matúš; Závacká, Anna; Muška, Martin; Halgaš, Radoslav; Minárik, Stanislav; Riedlmajer, Róbert

    2017-10-01

    An ion beam laboratory (IBL) for materials research has been commissioned recently at the Slovak University of Technology within the University Science Park CAMBO located in Trnava. The facility will support research in the field of materials science, physical engineering and nanotechnology. Ion-beam materials modification (IBMM) as well as ion-beam analysis (IBA) are covered and deliverable ion energies are in the range from tens of keV up to tens of MeV. Two systems have been put into operation. First, a high current version of the HVEE 6 MV Tandetron electrostatic tandem accelerator with duoplasmatron and cesium sputtering ion sources, equipped with two end-stations: a high-energy ion implantation and IBA end-station which includes RBS, PIXE and ERDA analytical systems. Second, a 500 kV implanter equipped with a Bernas type ion source and two experimental wafer processing end-stations. The facility itself, operational experience and first IBMM and IBA experiments are presented together with near-future plans and ongoing development of the IBL.

  1. Applied laboratory research of high-level waste denitration and calcination technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Napravnik, J.

    1977-01-01

    Denitration and calcination processes are assessed for model solutions of high-level radioactive wastes. The kinetics was studied of the reaction of HNO 3 with HCOOH with respect to the final composition of the gaseous product. A survey is presented of used denitration agents and of reaction processes. Calcination was studied both as associated with denitration in a single technological step and separately. Also studied was the pyrolysis and chemical decomposition of sodium nitrate which forms an indecomposable melt in the temperature region of 320 to 850 degC under normal conditions. Based on the experiments a laboratory unit was designed and produced for the denitration and calcination of model solutions of high-level radioactive wastes operating in a temperature range of 100 to 550 degC with a capacity of 1000 ml/h. A boiler type stirred evaporator with electric heating (3 kW) was chosen for the denitration unit while a vertical calcinator modified from a film evaporator with a thermal input of 4 kW was chosen for the calcination unit. (B.S.)

  2. Perceptions of a mobile technology on learning strategies in the anatomy laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayfield, Chandler H; Ohara, Peter T; O'Sullivan, Patricia S

    2013-01-01

    Mobile technologies offer new opportunities to improve dissection learning. This study examined the effect of using an iPad-based multimedia dissection manual during anatomy laboratory instruction on learner's perception of anatomy dissection activities and use of time. Three experimental dissection tables used iPads and three tables served as a control for two identical sessions. Trained, non-medical school anatomy faculty observers recorded use of resources at two-minute intervals for 20 observations per table. Students completed pre- and post-perception questionnaires. We used descriptive and inferential analyses. Twenty-one control and 22 experimental students participated. Compared with controls, experimental students reported significantly (P learning anatomy. Experimental students indicated that the iPad helped them in dissection. We observed experimental students more on task (93% vs. 83% of the time) and less likely to be seeking an instructor (2% vs. 32%). The groups received similar attention from instructors (33% vs. 37%). Fifty-nine percent of the time at least one student was looking at the iPad. Groups clustered around the iPad a third of their time. We conclude that the iPad-manual aided learner engagement, achieved instructional objectives, and enhanced the effectiveness and efficiency of dissection education. Copyright © 2012 American Association of Anatomists.

  3. Pacific Northwest Laboratory report on controlled thermonuclear reactor technology, January 1975--September 1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-10-01

    The PNL staff has been studying fusion technology in areas such as economics, fusion-fission hybrid concepts, materials, neutronics, environment and safety. These studies have been scoped to make efficient use of ERDA resources, and to complement and support efforts at other laboratories. The effect the plasma and associated radiation and emission will have upon the surfaces of the first wall are being studied. Neutron sputtering experiments were made on niobium and gold and the results were evaluated for absolute neutron yields. Molybdenum and vanadium were studied for effects of ion bombardment under various conditions of helium injection. Graphite cloth is being irradiated for examination of radiation effects because it is suggested for use in several CTR concepts as a shield between the plasma and the first wall. Helium effects are being studied to characterize degradation of structural metal properties. Work is progressing on absolute measurement of the electrical resistivity of insulators and the demonstration of the feasibility of producing insulating coatings by sputter deposition

  4. Eighteenth annual risk reduction engineering laboratory research symposium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1992-01-01

    The Eighteenth Annual Risk Reduction Engineering Laboratory Research Symposium was held in Cincinnati, Ohio, April 14-16, 1992. The purpose of this Symposium was to present the latest significant research findings from ongoing and recently completed projects funded by the Risk Reduction Engineering Laboratory (RREL). These Proceedings are organized into two sections. Sessions A and B, which contain extended abstracts of the paper presentations. A list of poster displays is also included. Subjects include remedial action, treatment, and control technologies for waste disposal, landfill liner and cover systems, underground storage tanks, and demonstration and development of innovative/alternative treatment technologies for hazardous waste. Alternative technology subjects include thermal destruction of hazardous wastes, field evaluations, existing treatment options, emerging treatment processes, waste minimization, and biosystems for hazardous waste destruction

  5. UK Transfusion Laboratory Collaborative: minimum standards for staff qualifications, training, competency and the use of information technology in hospital transfusion laboratories 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaffe, B; Glencross, H; Jones, J; Staves, J; Capps-Jenner, A; Mistry, H; Bolton-Maggs, P; McQuade, M; Asher, D

    2014-12-01

    The SHOT Adverse Incident Reporting Scheme has consistently reported an unacceptably high level of errors originating in the laboratory setting. In 2006 an initiative was launched in conjunction with the IBMS, SHOT, RCPath, BBTS, UK NEQAS, the NHSE NBTC and the equivalents in Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland that led to the formation of the UK TLC. The UK TLC in considering the nature and spread of the errors documented by SHOT concluded that a significant proportion of these errors were most likely to be related to either the use of information technology or staff education, staffing levels, skill mix, training and competency issues. In the absence of any formal guidance on these matters, the UK TLC developed a series of recommendations using the results of two laboratory surveys conducted in 2007 and 2008.

  6. Vitrification development and experiences at Fernald, Ohio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gimpel, R.F.; Paine, D.; Roberts, J.L.; Akgunduz, N.

    1998-01-01

    Vitrification of radioactive wastes products have proven to produce an extremely stable waste form. Vitrification involves the melting of wastes with a mixture of glass-forming additives at high temperatures; when cooled, the wastes are incorporated into a glass that is analogous to obsidian. Obsidian is a volcanic glass-like rock, commonly found in nature. A one-metric ton/day Vitrification Pilot Plant (VITPP) at Fernald, Ohio, simulated the vitrification of radium and radon bearing silo residues using representative non-radioactive surrogates. These non-radioactive surrogates contained high concentrations of lead, sulfates, and phosphates. The vitrification process was carried out at temperatures of 1150 to 1350 C. Laboratory and bench-scale treatability studies were conducted before initiation of the VITPP. Development of the glass formulas, containing up to 90% waste, will be discussed in the paper. The VITPP processed glass for seven months, until a breach of the melter containment vessel suspended operations. More than 70,000 pounds of good surrogate glass were produced by the VITPP. Experiences, lessons learned, and the planned path forward will be presented

  7. Exploring Technology-Enhanced Learning Using Google Glass to Offer Students a Unique Instructor's Point of View Live Laboratory Demonstration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Man, Fung Fun

    2016-01-01

    Technology-enhanced learning (TEL) is fast gaining momentum among educational institutions all over the world. The usual way in which laboratory instructional videos are filmed takes the third-person view. However, such videos are not as realistic and sensorial. With the advent of Google Glass and GoPro cameras, a more personal and effective way…

  8. Validating the Technology Acceptance Model in the Context of the Laboratory Information System-Electronic Health Record Interface System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aquino, Cesar A.

    2014-01-01

    This study represents a research validating the efficacy of Davis' Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) by pairing it with the Organizational Change Readiness Theory (OCRT) to develop another extension to the TAM, using the medical Laboratory Information Systems (LIS)--Electronic Health Records (EHR) interface as the medium. The TAM posits that it is…

  9. Raising H2 and Fuel Cell Awareness in Ohio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valente, Patrick R. [Ohio Fuel Cell Coalition, Elyria, OH (United States)

    2013-03-31

    The Ohio Fuel Cell Coalition was tasked with raising the awareness and understanding of Fuel Cells and the Hydrogen economy. This was done by increasing the understanding of hydrogen and fuel cell technologies among state and local governments using a target of more than 10% compared to 2004 baseline. We were also to target key populations by 20 percent compared to 2004 baseline. There are many barriers to an educated fuel cell population, including: a)Lack of Readily Available, Objective and Technical Accurate Information b)Mixed Messages c)Disconnect Between Hydrogen Information and Dissemination Networks d)Lack of Educated Trainers and Training Opportunities e)Regional Differences f)Difficulty of Measuring Success The approach we used for all the Community Leaders Forums were presentations by the Ohio Fuel Cell Coalition in conjunction with regional leaders. The presentations were followed by question and answers periods followed up by informal discussions on Fuel Cells and the Hydrogen Economy. This project held a total of 53 events with the following breakdown: From Aug 2009 through June 2010, the Ohio Fuel Cell Coalition held 19 community leaders forums and educated over 845 individuals, both from the State of Ohio and across the country: From July 2010 to June 2011 the OFCC held 23 community forum events and educated 915 individuals; From August 2011 to June 2012 there were 11 community forums educating 670 individuals. This report details each of those events, their date, location, purpose, and pertinent details to this report. In summary, as you see the Community Leader Forums have been very successful over the period of the grant with over 2,000 people being drawn to the forums. As always, we followed up the forums with a survey and the survey results were very positive in that the participants had a significant increase in knowledge and awareness of Fuel Cells and the Hydrogen Economy.

  10. INFORMATION TECHNOLOGIES AS THE TOOL OF EFFICIENCY IMPROVING OF FUTURE PHYSICS TEACHERS TRAINING TO LABORATORY SESSION IN OPTICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goncharenko T.

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The analysis of the problem of the use of information technologies implementation as the tool of the efficiency improving of future physics teachers training to execution of laboratory session in Optics is considered in the article. The problems and contradictions concerning ICT tools use in higher education institutions, the work of which is aimed at future physics teachers training are described. Due to the specifics of future teachers training in higher education institutions, labor market requirements and public procurement, the main ICT tools are identified, that are effective in students’ self-activity work to laboratory session execution. The developed list of electronic resources is divided into blocks according to the topics of laboratory works in Optics. The methodology of using of ICT tools at future students training for laboratory session on the example of individual topics is considered.

  11. Standardized UXO Technology Demonstration Site Open Field Scoring Record Number 673 (Naval Research Laboratories)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Overbay, Larry; Robitaille, George

    2005-01-01

    ...) utilizing the APG standardized UXO Technology Demonstration Site Open Field. Scoring Records have been coordinate by Larry Overbay and the Standardized UXO Technology Demonstration Site Scoring Committee...

  12. Laboratory testing of glasses for Lockheed Idaho Technology Co. - fiscal year 1994 report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ellison, A.J.G.; Wolf, S.F.; Bates, J.K.

    1995-04-01

    The purpose of this project is to measure the intermediate and long-term durability of vitrified waste forms developed by Lockheed Idaho Technology Co. (LITCO) for the immobilization of calcined radioactive wastes at Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Two vitreous materials referred to as Formula 127 and Formula 532, have been subjected to accelerated durability tests to measure their long-term performance. Formula 127 consists of a glass matrix containing 5-10 vol % fluorite (CaF 2 ) as a primary crystalline phase. It shows low releases of glass components to solution in 7-, 28-, 70-, and 140-day Product Consistency Tests performed at 2000 m -1 at 90 degrees C. In these tests, release rates for glass-forming components were similar to those found for durable waste glasses. The Ca and F released by the glass as it corrodes appear to reprecipitate as fluorite. Formula 532 consists of a glass matrix containing 5-10 vol % of an Al-Si-rich primary crystalline phase. The release rates for components other than aluminum are relatively low, but aluminum is released at a much higher rate than is typical for durable waste glasses. Secondary crystalline phases form relatively early during the corrosion of Formula 532 and appear to consist almost entirely of the Al-Si-rich primary phase (or a crystal with the same Al:Si ratio) and a sodium-bearing zeolite. Future test results are expected to highlight the relative importance of primary and secondary crystalline phases to the rate of corrosion of Formula 127 and Formula 532

  13. Laboratory testing of glasses for Lockheed Idaho Technology Company: Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ellison, A.J.G.; Buck, E.C.; Dietz, N.L.; Ebert, W.L.; Luo, J.S.; Wolf, S.F.; Bates, J.K.

    1997-06-01

    Tests have been conducted at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) in support of the efforts of Lockheed Idaho Technology Company (LITCO) to vitrify high-level waste calcines. Tests were conducted with three classes of LITCO glass formulations: Formula 127 (fluorine-bearing), Formula 532 (fluorine-free), and 630 series (both single- and mixed-alkali) glasses. The test matrices included, as appropriate, the Product Consistency Test Method B (PCT-B), the Materials Characterization Center Test 1 (MCC-1), and the Argonne vapor hydration test (VHT). Test durations ranged from 7 to 183 d. In 7-d PCT-Bs, normalized mass losses of major glass-forming elements for the LITCO glasses are similar to, or lower than, normalized mass losses obtained for other domestic candidate waste glasses. Formula 532 glasses form zeolite alteration phases relatively early in their reaction with water. The formation of those phases increased the dissolution rate. In contrast, the Formula 127 glass is highly durable and forms alteration phases only after prolonged exposure to water in tests with very high surface area to volume ratios; these alteration phases have a relatively small effect on the rate of glass corrosion. No alteration phases formed within the maximum test duration of 183 d in PCT-Bs with the 630 series glasses. The corrosion behavior of the mixed-alkali 630 series glasses is similar to that of 630 series glasses containing sodium alone. In VHTs, both single- and mixed-alkali glasses form zeolite phases that increase the rate of glass reaction. The original 630 series glasses and those based on a revised surrogate calcine formulation react at the same rate in PCT-Bs and form the same major alteration phases in VHTs

  14. Introducing sequential managed aquifer recharge technology (SMART) - From laboratory to full-scale application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regnery, Julia; Wing, Alexandre D; Kautz, Jessica; Drewes, Jörg E

    2016-07-01

    Previous lab-scale studies demonstrated that stimulating the indigenous soil microbial community of groundwater recharge systems by manipulating the availability of biodegradable organic carbon (BDOC) and establishing sequential redox conditions in the subsurface resulted in enhanced removal of compounds with redox-dependent removal behavior such as trace organic chemicals. The aim of this study is to advance this concept from laboratory to full-scale application by introducing sequential managed aquifer recharge technology (SMART). To validate the concept of SMART, a full-scale managed aquifer recharge (MAR) facility in Colorado was studied for three years that featured the proposed sequential configuration: A short riverbank filtration passage followed by subsequent re-aeration and artificial recharge and recovery. Our findings demonstrate that sequential subsurface treatment zones characterized by carbon-rich (>3 mg/L BDOC) to carbon-depleted (≤1 mg/L BDOC) and predominant oxic redox conditions can be established at full-scale MAR facilities adopting the SMART concept. The sequential configuration resulted in substantially improved trace organic chemical removal (i.e. higher biodegradation rate coefficients) for moderately biodegradable compounds compared to conventional MAR systems with extended travel times in an anoxic aquifer. Furthermore, sorption batch experiments with clay materials dispersed in the subsurface implied that sorptive processes might also play a role in the attenuation and retardation of chlorinated flame retardants during MAR. Hence, understanding key factors controlling trace organic chemical removal performance during SMART allows for systems to be engineered for optimal efficiency, resulting in improved removal of constituents at shorter subsurface travel times and a potentially reduced physical footprint of MAR installations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Geotechnical characterization of mined clay from Appalachian Ohio: challenges and implications for the clay mining industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Anthony R; Hettiarachchi, Hiroshan

    2011-07-01

    Clayey soil found in coal mines in Appalachian Ohio is often sold to landfills for constructing Recompacted Soil Liners (RSL) in landfills. Since clayey soils possess low hydraulic conductivity, the suitability of mined clay for RSL in Ohio is first assessed by determining its clay content. When soil samples are tested in a laboratory, the same engineering properties are typically expected for the soils originated from the same source, provided that the testing techniques applied are standard, but mined clay from Appalachian Ohio has shown drastic differences in particle size distribution depending on the sampling and/or laboratory processing methods. Sometimes more than a 10 percent decrease in the clay content is observed in the samples collected at the stockpiles, compared to those collected through reverse circulation drilling. This discrepancy poses a challenge to geotechnical engineers who work on the prequalification process of RSL material as it can result in misleading estimates of the hydraulic conductivity of the samples. This paper describes a laboratory investigation conducted on mined clay from Appalachian Ohio to determine how and why the standard sampling and/or processing methods can affect the grain-size distributions. The variation in the clay content was determined to be due to heavy concentrations of shale fragments in the clayey soils. It was also concluded that, in order to obtain reliable grain size distributions from the samples collected at a stockpile of mined clay, the material needs to be processed using a soil grinder. Otherwise, the samples should be collected through drilling.

  16. Study on engineering technologies in the Mizunami Underground Research Laboratory. FY 2014. Development of recovery and mitigation technology on excavation damage (Contract research)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukaya, Masaaki; Hata, Koji; Akiyoshi, Kenji; Sato, Shin; Takeda, Nobufumi; Miura, Norihiko; Uyama, Masao; Kanata, Tsutomu; Ueda, Tadashi; Hara, Akira; Torisu, Seda; Ishida, Tomoko; Sato, Toshinori; Mikake, Shinichiro; Aoyagi, Yoshiaki

    2016-03-01

    The researches on engineering technology in the Mizunami Underground Research Laboratory (MIU) project consist of (1) development of design and construction planning technologies, (2) development of construction technology, (3) development of countermeasure technology, (4) development of technology for security and (5) development of technologies for restoration and/or reduction of the excavation damage. As a part of the second phase of the MIU project, research has been focused on the evaluation of engineering technologies including the initial design based on the data obtained during construction. In this research, examination of the plug applied to the future reflood test was conducted as a part of (5) development of technologies for restoration and/or reduction of the excavation damage relating to the engineering technology in the MIU (2014), specifically focused on (1) plug examination (e.g. functions, structure and material) and the quality control methods and (2) analytical evaluation of rock mass behavior around the plug through the reflood test. As a result, specifications of the plug were determined. These specifications should be able to meet requirements for the safety structure and surrounding rock mass against predicted maximum water pressure, temperature stress and seismic force, and for controlling the groundwater inflow, ensuring the access into the reflood gallery and the penetration performance of measurement cable. Also preliminary knowledge regarding the rock mass behavior around the plug after flooding the reflood gallery by installed plug was obtained. A CD-ROM is attached as an appendix. (J.P.N.)

  17. Study on engineering technologies in the Mizunami Underground Research Laboratory (FY 2015). Development of design and construction planning and countermeasure technologies (Contract research)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toguri, Satohito; Kobayashi, Shinji; Tsuji, Masakuni; Yahagi, Ryoji; Yamada, Toshiko; Matsui, Hiroya; Mikake, Shinichiro; Aoyagi, Yoshiaki; Sato, Toshinori

    2017-03-01

    The study on engineering technology in the Mizunami Underground Research Laboratory (MIU) project roughly consists of (1)development of design and construction planning technologies, (2)development of construction technology, (3)development of countermeasure technology, (4)development of technology for security, and (5) development of technologies regarding restoration and mitigating of the excavation effect. So far, the verification of the initial design based on the data obtained during excavation was mainly conducted as a research in the Construction Phase, also the countermeasure technologies to control groundwater inflow were examined as a research in the Operation Phase. In FY2015, as a part of the important issues on the research program, “Development of countermeasure technologies for reducing groundwater inflow” in the Japan Atomic Energy Agency 3rd Midterm Plan, water-tight grouting method has been developed. Grouting methods utilized in the MIU were evaluated and the post-excavation grouting at the -500m Access/Research Gallery-South was planned based on these evaluation results. Also, technology development from the viewpoint of geological disposal was summarized, and information on the alternative method to the grouting method was collected and organized. (author)

  18. Improved dissection efficiency in the human gross anatomy laboratory by the integration of computers and modern technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeves, Rustin E; Aschenbrenner, John E; Wordinger, Robert J; Roque, Rouel S; Sheedlo, Harold J

    2004-05-01

    The need to increase the efficiency of dissection in the gross anatomy laboratory has been the driving force behind the technologic changes we have recently implemented. With the introduction of an integrated systems-based medical curriculum and a reduction in laboratory teaching hours, anatomy faculty at the University of North Texas Health Science Center (UNTHSC) developed a computer-based dissection manual to adjust to these curricular changes and time constraints. At each cadaver workstation, Apple iMac computers were added and a new dissection manual, running in a browser-based format, was installed. Within the text of the manual, anatomical structures required for dissection were linked to digital images from prosected materials; in addition, for each body system, the dissection manual included images from cross sections, radiographs, CT scans, and histology. Although we have placed a high priority on computerization of the anatomy laboratory, we remain strong advocates of the importance of cadaver dissection. It is our belief that the utilization of computers for dissection is a natural evolution of technology and fosters creative teaching strategies adapted for anatomy laboratories in the 21st century. Our strategy has significantly enhanced the independence and proficiency of our students, the efficiency of their dissection time, and the quality of laboratory instruction by the faculty. Copyright 2004 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  19. Self-instructional "virtual pathology" laboratories using web-based technology enhance medical school teaching of pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchevsky, Alberto M; Relan, Anju; Baillie, Susan

    2003-05-01

    Second-year medical students have traditionally been taught pulmonary pathophysiology at the University of California-Los Angeles (UCLA) School of Medicine using lectures, discussion groups, and laboratory sessions. Since 1998, the laboratory sessions have been replaced by 4 interactive, self-instructional sessions using web-based technology and case-based instruction. This article addresses nature of transformation that occurred from within the course in response to the infusion of new technologies. The vast majority of the course content has been digitized and incorporated into the website of the Pathophysiology of Disease course. The teaching histological slides have been photographed digitally and organized into "cases" with clinical information, digital images and text, and audio descriptions. The students study the materials from these cases at their own pace in 2 "virtual pathology" laboratory, with a few instructors supervising the on-site sessions. The students discuss additional cases available on the website in 2 other laboratory sessions supervised by a pulmonologist and a pathologist. Marked improvement in student participation and satisfaction was seen with the use of web-based instruction. Attendance at laboratory sessions, where the students had previously been required to bring their own microscopes to study histological slides at their own pace, increased from approximately 30% to 40% of the class in previous years to almost 100%. Satisfaction surveys showed progressive improvement over the past 4 years, as various suggestions were implemented. The value of web-based instruction of pathology at the UCLA School of Medicine is discussed.

  20. An Investigative Laboratory Course in Human Physiology Using Computer Technology and Collaborative Writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    FitzPatrick, Kathleen A.

    2004-01-01

    Active investigative student-directed experiences in laboratory science are being encouraged by national science organizations. A growing body of evidence from classroom assessment supports their effectiveness. This study describes four years of implementation and assessment of an investigative laboratory course in human physiology for 65…

  1. 75 FR 27865 - Science and Technology Reinvention Laboratory Personnel Management Demonstration Project...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-18

    ... contributors;'' and (d) increased employee satisfaction with the Laboratory. D. Participating Employees and.... This disrupts the R&D process and reduces the Laboratory's ability to serve its customers. Under the... simply defined as the measure of the demonstrated value of what an employee did in terms of accomplishing...

  2. Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Waste Area Groups 1-7 and 10 Technology Logic Diagram. Volume 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O`Brien, M.C.; Meservey, R.H.; Little, M.; Ferguson, J.S.; Gilmore, M.C.

    1993-09-01

    The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) Technology Logic Diagram (TLD) was developed to provide a decision support tool that relates Environmental Restoration (ER) and Waste Management (WM) problems at the INEL to potential technologies that can remediate these problems. The TLD identifies the research, development, demonstration, testing, and evaluation needed to develop these technologies to a state that allows technology transfer and application to an environmental restoration need. It is essential that follow-on engineering and system studies be conducted to build on the output of this project. These studies will begin by selecting the most promising technologies identified in this TLD and finding an optimum mix of technologies that will provide a socially acceptable balance between cost and risk to meet the site windows of opportunity. The TLD consists of three separate volumes: Volume I includes the purpose and scope of the TLD, a brief history of the INEL Waste Area Groups, and environmental problems they represent. A description of the TLD, definitions of terms, a description of the technology evaluation process, and a summary of each subelement, is presented. Volume II (this volume) describes the overall layout and development of the TLD in logic diagram format. This section addresses the environmental restoration of contaminated INEL sites. Specific INEL problem areas/contaminants are identified along with technology solutions, the status of the technologies, precise science and technology needs, and implementation requirements. Volume III provides the Technology Evaluation Data Sheets (TEDS) for Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM) activities that are referenced by a TEDS codenumber in Volume II. Each of these sheets represents a single logic trace across the TLD. These sheets contain more detail than provided for technologies in Volume II.

  3. The National Energy Technology Laboratory Annual Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 2001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    National Energy Technology Laboratory

    2002-10-01

    No significant environmental problems were identified at the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) sites in Morgantown (MGN), Pittsburgh (PGH), Tulsa (NPTO) and Fairbanks (AEO) during 2001. No radionuclides were released from the sites during 2001. The sites maintain two major environmental programs: waste management, and environmental media and release management. These two programs encompass waste handling, storage, and disposal, waste minimization and pollution prevention, air quality emissions, surface-water discharges, groundwater impacts, industrial wastewater discharges, and spill control procedures. The Morgantown and Pittsburgh sites currently maintain complete monitoring programs for groundwater, stormwater discharge, laboratory wastewater discharge, and meteorological data. In addition, an annual air emissions inventory is prepared. A comprehensive Directives Program aimed at managing environmental, safety, health requirements, and risks was initiated in 1997, continued through subsequent years, and will be completed in 2003. The primary objective of the program is to identify and implement standards that will protect the health and safety of workers, public, and the environment. This program started with a careful and thorough analysis of risks confronting workers and the communities surrounding NETL sites. Following this analysis, requirements and best management practices were evaluated to determine how requirements could best be used to advance the mission of NETL. Teams of subject-matter experts analyzed the work assigned to determine potential hazards and identify ways to remove or control those hazards. In 2001, NETL developed or revised a series of directives in two major areas: safety analysis and review (SAR) processes, and integrated safety management (ISM) directives. SAR directives were issued for research and development (R&D) operations, support operations, and facilities. ISM directives were released on management processes, such

  4. The National Energy Technology Laboratory Annual Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 2001

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    National Energy Technology Laboratory

    2002-01-01

    No significant environmental problems were identified at the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) sites in Morgantown (MGN), Pittsburgh (PGH), Tulsa (NPTO) and Fairbanks (AEO) during 2001. No radionuclides were released from the sites during 2001. The sites maintain two major environmental programs: waste management, and environmental media and release management. These two programs encompass waste handling, storage, and disposal, waste minimization and pollution prevention, air quality emissions, surface-water discharges, groundwater impacts, industrial wastewater discharges, and spill control procedures. The Morgantown and Pittsburgh sites currently maintain complete monitoring programs for groundwater, stormwater discharge, laboratory wastewater discharge, and meteorological data. In addition, an annual air emissions inventory is prepared. A comprehensive Directives Program aimed at managing environmental, safety, health requirements, and risks was initiated in 1997, continued through subsequent years, and will be completed in 2003. The primary objective of the program is to identify and implement standards that will protect the health and safety of workers, public, and the environment. This program started with a careful and thorough analysis of risks confronting workers and the communities surrounding NETL sites. Following this analysis, requirements and best management practices were evaluated to determine how requirements could best be used to advance the mission of NETL. Teams of subject-matter experts analyzed the work assigned to determine potential hazards and identify ways to remove or control those hazards. In 2001, NETL developed or revised a series of directives in two major areas: safety analysis and review (SAR) processes, and integrated safety management (ISM) directives. SAR directives were issued for research and development (R andD) operations, support operations, and facilities. ISM directives were released on management processes

  5. Laboratory study on the cooling effect of flash water evaporative cooling technology for ventilation and air-conditioning of buildings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fang, Lei; Yuan, Shu; Yang, Jianrong

    2016-01-01

    in warm/hot and dry environment where dehumidification of outdoor air is not needed. A laboratory experiment was designed and conducted to evaluate the cooling effectiveness of this technology. The experiment was conducted in a twin-climate chamber. One chamber simulated warm/hot and dry outdoor...... evaporation. Two outdoor summer climates were simulated in the study, i.e. the design summer climate of Las Vegas and the extreme summer climate of Copenhagen represented hot/dry and warm/dry climates. The results showed that the flash evaporative cooling technology, a simple and green cooling technology......, is effective for ventilation and air-conditioning in warm/hot and dry climate zones. The technology can provide fresh outdoor air with a temperature of 4 to 7 °C lower than room air temperature....

  6. An evaluation of alternative reactor vessel cutting technologies for the experimental boiling water reactor at Argonne National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boing, L.E.; Henley, D.R.; Manion, W.J.; Gordon, J.W.

    1989-12-01

    Metal cutting techniques that can be used to segment the reactor pressure vessel of the Experimental Boiling Water Reactor (EBWR) at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) have been evaluated by Nuclear Energy Services. Twelve cutting technologies are described in terms of their ability to perform the required task, their performance characteristics, environmental and radiological impacts, and cost and schedule considerations. Specific recommendations regarding which technology should ultimately be used by ANL are included. The selection of a cutting method was the responsibility of the decommissioning staff at ANL, who included a relative weighting of the parameters described in this document in their evaluation process. 73 refs., 26 figs., 69 tabs

  7. An evaluation of alternative reactor vessel cutting technologies for the experimental boiling water reactor at Argonne National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boing, L.E.; Henley, D.R. (Argonne National Lab., IL (USA)); Manion, W.J.; Gordon, J.W. (Nuclear Energy Services, Inc., Danbury, CT (USA))

    1989-12-01

    Metal cutting techniques that can be used to segment the reactor pressure vessel of the Experimental Boiling Water Reactor (EBWR) at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) have been evaluated by Nuclear Energy Services. Twelve cutting technologies are described in terms of their ability to perform the required task, their performance characteristics, environmental and radiological impacts, and cost and schedule considerations. Specific recommendations regarding which technology should ultimately be used by ANL are included. The selection of a cutting method was the responsibility of the decommissioning staff at ANL, who included a relative weighting of the parameters described in this document in their evaluation process. 73 refs., 26 figs., 69 tabs.

  8. Comparison of semen quality between university-based and private assisted reproductive technology laboratories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Christian Fuglesang S; Khan, Omar; Sønksen, Jens

    2018-01-01

    laboratory, the first at each laboratory was selected for analysis. Comparison of major semen parameters was performed using descriptive statistics and Bland-Altman plots, with differences tested using Wilcoxon-signed rank test. RESULTS: Twenty-eight men aged 33 ± 5 (mean ± SD) years were included......OBJECTIVE: Obtaining a semen analysis (SA) is an essential step in evaluating infertile men. Despite using standardized procedures for analysis semen quality in the same individual often varies on repeated tests. The objective of this study was to investigate inter-laboratory variation in semen...

  9. Buried Transuranic Waste Studies Program at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory: Annual technology assessment and progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Low, J.O.; Allman, D.W.; Shaw, P.G.; Sill, C.W.

    1987-01-01

    In-situ grouting, an improved-confinement technology that could be applied to the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) shallow-land-buried transuranic (TRU) waste, is being investigated by EG and G Idaho, Inc. In situ grouting has been demonstrated as the culmination of a two-year engineering feasibility test at the INEL. In situ stabilization and hydrologic isolation of a simulated buried TRU waste trench at an arid site were performed using an experimental dynamic compaction in situ grouting process developed by Rockwell Hanford Operations (RHO). A series of laboratory evaluations relative to the grout permeation characteristics of microfine particulate cements with INEL-type soil was performed prior to the grouting operations. In addition, an extensive pre-grouting hydrologic assessment of the test trench was performed to support the performance assessment analysis. Laboratory testing of various chemical materials yielded a suitable hydrologic tracer for use in the hydrologic monitoring phase of the experiment. Various plutonium transport laboratory evaluations were performed to assess the plutonium retention capabilities of a microfine grout/INEL-soil waste product similar to that expected to result if the grout is injected in situ into the INEL test trench. The test trench will be hydrologically assessed in FY 1987 to determine if the RHO grouting system attained the performance acceptance criteria of the experiment. The report includes a technology assessment of buried waste technologies developed by other DOE sites. Field demonstrations at ORNL and Hanford are reported under this technology assessment. Also included is information on activities related to buried waste management at the INEL. These include environmental surveillance of the Radioactive Waste Management Complex and the Subsurface Migration Studies Program

  10. Water Resources Data. Ohio - Water Year 1992. Volume 1. Ohio River Basin excluding project data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    H.L. Shindel; J.H. Klingler; J.P. Mangus; L.E. Trimble

    1993-03-01

    Water-resources data for the 1992 water year for Ohio consist of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage and contents of lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water quality of ground-water wells. This report, in two volumes, contains records for water discharge at 121 gaging stations, 336 wells, and 72 partial-record sites; and water levels at 312 observation wells. Also included are data from miscellaneous sites. Additional water data were collected at various sites not involved in the systematic data-collection program and are published as miscellaneous measurements and analyses. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System collected by the US Geological Survey and cooperating State and Federal agencies in Ohio. Volume 1 covers the central and southern parts of Ohio, emphasizing the Ohio River Basin. (See Order Number DE95010451 for Volume 2 covering the northern part of Ohio.)

  11. Guide for Keeping Laboratory Records: Do's & Don't | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Science.gov (United States)

    it is important that the scientist captures his/her ideas/conception of an invention in written format. Laboratory notebooks, if used properly, can serve as the basis of conception for proving inventorship.

  12. Idaho National Laboratory Technology to Market (T2M) Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, Christopher Todd [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Bush, Jason William [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Gentle, Jake Paul [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Hill, Porter Jack [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Myers, Kurt Steven [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Williams, Christopher Luke [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this project is to establish a tiered Technology to Market (T2M) curriculum for basic researchers to project leads to measure the effect of technology transfer skills on project success and impact. The plan will train five researchers in basic technology transfer principles where success will be measured by assessing improvements in T2M skills and knowledge after the training is complete, likely using before and after surveys.

  13. Advancing adaptive optics technology: Laboratory turbulence simulation and optimization of laser guide stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rampy, Rachel A.

    Since Galileo's first telescope some 400 years ago, astronomers have been building ever-larger instruments. Yet only within the last two decades has it become possible to realize the potential angular resolutions of large ground-based telescopes, by using adaptive optics (AO) technology to counter the blurring effects of Earth's atmosphere. And only within the past decade have the development of laser guide stars (LGS) extended AO capabilities to observe science targets nearly anywhere in the sky. Improving turbulence simulation strategies and LGS are the two main topics of my research. In the first part of this thesis, I report on the development of a technique for manufacturing phase plates for simulating atmospheric turbulence in the laboratory. The process involves strategic application of clear acrylic paint onto a transparent substrate. Results of interferometric characterization of the plates are described and compared to Kolmogorov statistics. The range of r0 (Fried's parameter) achieved thus far is 0.2--1.2 mm at 650 nm measurement wavelength, with a Kolmogorov power law. These plates proved valuable at the Laboratory for Adaptive Optics at University of California, Santa Cruz, where they have been used in the Multi-Conjugate Adaptive Optics testbed, during integration and testing of the Gemini Planet Imager, and as part of the calibration system of the on-sky AO testbed named ViLLaGEs (Visible Light Laser Guidestar Experiments). I present a comparison of measurements taken by ViLLaGEs of the power spectrum of a plate and the real sky turbulence. The plate is demonstrated to follow Kolmogorov theory well, while the sky power spectrum does so in a third of the data. This method of fabricating phase plates has been established as an effective and low-cost means of creating simulated turbulence. Due to the demand for such devices, they are now being distributed to other members of the AO community. The second topic of this thesis pertains to understanding and

  14. Development of an in vitro laboratory manual for nuclear medicine technology students

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyers, A.

    1989-01-01

    This study evaluated existing in vitro education materials in qualitative and quantitative parameters that currently exist to educate potential clinicians of nationally accredited nuclear medicine programs. A review of over 300 articles, texts, and manuals pertaining to in vitro nuclear medicine procedures clearly demonstrated that no in vitro laboratory manual for undergraduate students presently exited. Every nuclear medicine program director in the United States was surveyed. They were asked for their overall philosophy in terms of developing an in vitro manual and requested to evaluate the significant of 22 general principles/concepts and 34 specific laboratory testing procedures. From the response to the survey, an in vitro nuclear medicine manual was created and appended to the study. The manual consists of lecture and study material, chapter reviews, and laboratory assignments and exercises

  15. Bibliography: Sandia Laboratories hybrid microcircuit and related thin film technology (revised)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oswalt, J.A.

    1975-12-01

    Sandia originated documents (94) describing aspects of technology development related to hybrid microcircuits and thin films are summarized. Authors, titles, and abstracts are given for each unclassified document. The papers are categorized according to the various technologies involved in hybrid microcircuit production

  16. Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Waste Area Groups 1-7 and 10 Technology Logic Diagram. Volume 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O`Brien, M.C.; Meservey, R.H.; Little, M.; Ferguson, J.S.; Gilmore, M.C.

    1993-09-01

    The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) Technology Logic Diagram (TLD) was developed to provide a decision support tool that relates Environmental Restoration (ER) and Waste Management (WM) problems at the INEL to potential technologies that can remediate these problems. The TLD identifies the research, development, demonstration, testing, and evaluation needed to develop these technologies to a state that allows technology transfer and application to an environmental restoration need. It is essential that follow-on engineering and system studies be conducted to build on the output of this project. These studies will begin by selecting the most promising technologies identified in this TLD and finding an optimum mix of technologies that will provide a socially acceptable balance between cost and risk to meet the site windows of opportunity. The TLD consists of three separate volumes: Volume I includes the purpose and scope of the TLD, a brief history of the INEL Waste Area Groups, and environmental problems they represent. A description of the TLD, definitions of terms, a description of the technology evaluation process, and a summary of each subelement, is presented. Volume II describes the overall layout and development of the TLD in logic diagram format. This section addresses the environmental restoration of contaminated INEL sites. Volume III (this volume) provides the Technology Evaluation Data Sheets (TEDS) for Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM) activities that are reference by a TEDS code number in Volume II. Each of these sheets represents a single logic trace across the TLD. These sheets contain more detail than provided for technologies in Volume II. Data sheets are arranged alphanumerically by the TEDS code number in the upper right corner of each sheet.

  17. EVALUATION OF THE EMISSION, TRANSPORT, AND DEPOSITION OF MERCURY, FINE PARTICULATE MATTER, AND ARSENIC FROM COAL-BASED POWER PLANTS IN THE OHIO RIVER VALLEY REGION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kevin Crist

    2004-10-02

    Ohio University, in collaboration with CONSOL Energy, Advanced Technology Systems, Inc (ATS) and Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc. (AER) as subcontractors, is evaluating the impact of emissions from coal-fired power plants in the Ohio River Valley region as they relate to the transport and deposition of mercury, arsenic, and associated fine particulate matter. This evaluation will involve two interrelated areas of effort: ambient air monitoring and regional-scale modeling analysis. The scope of work for the ambient air monitoring will include the deployment of a surface air monitoring (SAM) station in southeastern Ohio. The SAM station will contain sampling equipment to collect and measure mercury (including speciated forms of mercury and wet and dry deposited mercury), arsenic, particulate matter (PM) mass, PM composition, and gaseous criteria pollutants (CO, NOx, SO{sub 2}, O{sub 3}, etc.). Laboratory analysis of time-integrated samples will be used to obtain chemical speciation of ambient PM composition and mercury in precipitation. Near-real-time measurements will be used to measure the ambient concentrations of PM mass and all gaseous species including Hg{sup 0} and RGM. Approximately of 18 months of field data will be collected at the SAM site to validate the proposed regional model simulations for episodic and seasonal model runs. The ambient air quality data will also provide mercury, arsenic, and fine particulate matter data that can be used by Ohio Valley industries to assess performance on multi-pollutant control systems. The scope of work for the modeling analysis will include (1) development of updated inventories of mercury and arsenic emissions from coal plants and other important sources in the modeled domain; (2) adapting an existing 3-D atmospheric chemical transport model to incorporate recent advancements in the understanding of mercury transformations in the atmosphere; (3) analyses of the flux of Hg{sup 0}, RGM, arsenic, and fine

  18. Evaluation of the Emission, Transport, and Deposition of Mercury, Fine Particulate Matter, and Arsenic from Coal-Based Power Plants in the Ohio River Valley Region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kevin Crist

    2006-04-02

    As stated in the proposal: Ohio University, in collaboration with CONSOL Energy, Advanced Technology Systems, Inc (ATS) and Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc. (AER) as subcontractors, is evaluating the impact of emissions from coal-fired power plants in the Ohio River Valley region as they relate to the transport and deposition of mercury, arsenic, and associated fine particulate matter. This evaluation will involve two interrelated areas of effort: ambient air monitoring and regional-scale modeling analysis. The scope of work for the ambient air monitoring will include the deployment of a surface air monitoring (SAM) station in southeastern Ohio. The SAM station will contain sampling equipment to collect and measure mercury (including speciated forms of mercury and wet and dry deposited mercury), arsenic, particulate matter (PM) mass, PM composition, and gaseous criteria pollutants (CO, NO{sub x}, SO{sub 2}, O{sub 3}, etc.). Laboratory analysis of time-integrated samples will be used to obtain chemical speciation of ambient PM composition and mercury in precipitation. Near-real-time measurements will be used to measure the ambient concentrations of PM mass and all gaseous species including Hg0 and RGM. Approximately 18 months of field data will be collected at the SAM site to validate the proposed regional model simulations for episodic and seasonal model runs. The ambient air quality data will also provide mercury, arsenic, and fine particulate matter data that can be used by Ohio Valley industries to assess performance on multi-pollutant control systems. The scope of work for the modeling analysis will include (1) development of updated inventories of mercury and arsenic emissions from coal plants and other important sources in the modeled domain; (2) adapting an existing 3-D atmospheric chemical transport model to incorporate recent advancements in the understanding of mercury transformations in the atmosphere; (3) analyses of the flux of Hg{sup 0

  19. Evaluation of the Emission, Transport, and Deposition of Mercury, Fine Particulate Matter, and Arsenic from Coal-Based Power Plants in the Ohio River Valley Region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kevin Crist

    2005-10-02

    Ohio University, in collaboration with CONSOL Energy, Advanced Technology Systems, Inc (ATS) and Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc. (AER) as subcontractors, is evaluating the impact of emissions from coal-fired power plants in the Ohio River Valley region as they relate to the transport and deposition of mercury, arsenic, and associated fine particulate matter. This evaluation will involve two interrelated areas of effort: ambient air monitoring and regional-scale modeling analysis. The scope of work for the ambient air monitoring will include the deployment of a surface air monitoring (SAM) station in southeastern Ohio. The SAM station will contain sampling equipment to collect and measure mercury (including speciated forms of mercury and wet and dry deposited mercury), arsenic, particulate matter (PM) mass, PM composition, and gaseous criteria pollutants (CO, NOx, SO{sub 2}, O{sub 3}, etc.). Laboratory analysis of time-integrated samples will be used to obtain chemical speciation of ambient PM composition and mercury in precipitation. Near-real-time measurements will be used to measure the ambient concentrations of PM mass and all gaseous species including Hg{sup 0} and RGM. Approximately of 18 months of field data will be collected at the SAM site to validate the proposed regional model simulations for episodic and seasonal model runs. The ambient air quality data will also provide mercury, arsenic, and fine particulate matter data that can be used by Ohio Valley industries to assess performance on multi-pollutant control systems. The scope of work for the modeling analysis will include (1) development of updated inventories of mercury and arsenic emissions from coal plants and other important sources in the modeled domain; (2) adapting an existing 3-D atmospheric chemical transport model to incorporate recent advancements in the understanding of mercury transformations in the atmosphere; (3) analyses of the flux of Hg0, RGM, arsenic, and fine

  20. Artificial Intelligence Research at the Artificial Intelligence Laboratory, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    OpenAIRE

    Winston, Patrick H.

    1983-01-01

    The primary goal of the Artificial Intelligence Laboratory is to understand how computers can be made to exhibit intelligence. Two corollary goals are to make computers more useful and to understand certain aspects of human intelligence. Current research includes work on computer robotics and vision, expert systems, learning and commonsense reasoning, natural language understanding, and computer architecture.

  1. E3 Success Story - Working Together: E3 Ohio and the Ohio By-Product Synergy Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Mid-Ohio Regional Planning Commission (MORPC) received funding to support the integration of the national E3 sustainability initiative with the Ohio By-Product Synergy (BPS) Network to create an efficient and replicable model for reducing GHGs.

  2. Applying Systems Thinking to Improve Special Education in Ohio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levenson, Nathan

    2012-01-01

    This report was written at the request of the Thomas B. Fordham Institute and the Educational Service Center of Central Ohio, to inform the discussion of state-level policy makers and other stakeholders on how to improve the quality and cost-effectiveness of services provided to Ohio's students with special needs. It is critical for Ohio to find…

  3. Exploring Ohio's Private Education Sector. School Survey Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catt, Andrew D.

    2014-01-01

    Exploring Ohio's Private Education Sector is the second entry in the Friedman Foundation for Educational Choice's "School Survey Series." This report synthesizes information on Ohio's private schools collected by the U.S. Department of Education and the Ohio Department of Education (ODE). Two appendices provide supplementary tables and…

  4. Field and laboratory notes on instream research - Research and Development of New Marking and Monitoring Technologies

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This project addresses how to expand the current fish-tracking technologies to enable the fisheries community to successfully carry out the actions, research, and...

  5. Bibliography: Sandia Laboratories hybrid microcircuits and related thin film technology (revised)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oswalt, J.A.

    1975-12-01

    Hybrid circuit applications for nuclear weapons have been considered at Sandia since the mid-60's. However a major commitment was made in 1970 to develop a limited but well understood set of technologies for weapon applications. Development of these technologies and related studies have been documented in a number of publications. This bibliography lists the publications from 1968 to mid-1977 for reference by hybrid designers, users, or technologists

  6. Assessment Report Sandia National Laboratories Fuel Cycle Technologies Quality Assurance Evaluation of FY15 SNL FCT M2 Milestone Deliverables

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Appel, Gordon John [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2016-05-01

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) Fuel Cycle Technologies (FCT) program activities are conducted in accordance with FCT Quality Assurance Program Document (FCT-QAPD) requirements. The FCT-QAPD interfaces with SNL approved Quality Assurance Program Description (SNL-QAPD) as explained in the Sandia National Laboratories QA Program Interface Document for FCT Activities (Interface Document). This plan describes SNL's FY16 assessment of SNL's FY15 FCT M2 milestone deliverable's compliance with program QA requirements, including SNL R&A requirements. The assessment is intended to confirm that SNL's FY15 milestone deliverables contain the appropriate authenticated review documentation and that there is a copy marked with SNL R&A numbers.

  7. Assessment Report Sandia National Laboratories Fuel Cycle Technologies Quality Assurance Evaluation of FY15 SNL FCT M2 Milestone Deliverables

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Appel, Gordon John

    2016-01-01

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) Fuel Cycle Technologies (FCT) program activities are conducted in accordance with FCT Quality Assurance Program Document (FCT-QAPD) requirements. The FCT-QAPD interfaces with SNL approved Quality Assurance Program Description (SNL-QAPD) as explained in the Sandia National Laboratories QA Program Interface Document for FCT Activities (Interface Document). This plan describes SNL's FY16 assessment of SNL's FY15 FCT M2 milestone deliverable's compliance with program QA requirements, including SNL R&A requirements. The assessment is intended to confirm that SNL's FY15 milestone deliverables contain the appropriate authenticated review documentation and that there is a copy marked with SNL R&A numbers.

  8. Robotics research at Electrotechnical Laboratory-R and D program for advanced robot technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wakamatsu, S; Akahori, H; Shirai, Y; Kakikura, M

    1983-01-01

    The purposes of this paper are both to introduce the outline of robotics researches at Electrotechnical Laboratory and to describe the relation between those researches and the national project so called robotics for critical work. The authors first describe the robotics researches and related topics historically which have been continued from the latter half of 1960s as a part of researches on artificial intelligence at Electrotechnical Laboratory. Secondly, they mention the present aspects of our researches, its relation with past results, and changes of basic concepts on robotics systems. Finally, as an extension of our researches, they propose some approaches to establish the following techniques which make very important roles for the success of the national project; (1) manipulation techniques, (2) sensor techniques, (3) autonomous robot control techniques, (4) advanced tele-operation techniques and, (5) system totalizing techniques. 15 references.

  9. ACCELERATED SITE TECHNOLOGY DEPLOYMENT COST AND PERFORMANCE REPORT COMPARABILITY OF ISOCS INSTRUMENT IN RADIONUCLIDE CHARACTERICATION AT BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    KALB,P.; LUCKETT,L.; MILLER,K.; GOGOLAK,C.; MILIAN,L.

    2001-03-01

    This report describes a DOE Accelerated Site Technology Deployment project being conducted at Brookhaven National Laboratory to deploy innovative, radiological, in situ analytical techniques. The technologies are being deployed in support of efforts to characterize the Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor (BGRR) facility, which is currently undergoing decontamination and decommissioning. This report focuses on the deployment of the Canberra Industries In Situ Object Counting System (ISOCS) and assesses its data comparability to baseline methods of sampling and laboratory analysis. The battery-operated, field deployable gamma spectrometer provides traditional spectra of counts as a function of gamma energy. The spectra are then converted to radionuclide concentration by applying innovative efficiency calculations using monte carlo statistical methods and pre-defined geometry templates in the analysis software. Measurement of gamma emitting radionuclides has been accomplished during characterization of several BGRR components including the Pile Fan Sump, Above Ground Ducts, contaminated cooling fans, and graphite pile internals. Cs-137 is the predominant gamma-emitting radionuclide identified, with smaller quantities of Co-60 and Am-241 detected. The Project used the Multi-Agency Radiation Survey and Site Investigation Manual guidance and the Data Quality Objectives process to provide direction for survey planning and data quality assessment. Analytical results have been used to calculate data quality indicators (DQI) for the ISOCS measurements. Among the DQIs assessed in the report are sensitivity, accuracy, precision, bias, and minimum detectable concentration. The assessment of the in situ data quality using the DQIs demonstrates that the ISOCS data quality can be comparable to definitive level laboratory analysis when the field instrument is supported by an appropriate Quality Assurance Project Plan. A discussion of the results obtained by ISOCS analysis of

  10. ACCELERATED SITE TECHNOLOGY DEPLOYMENT COST AND PERFORMANCE REPORT COMPARABILITY OF ISOCS INSTRUMENT IN RADIONUCLIDE CHARACTERICATION AT BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    KALB, P.; LUCKETT, L.; MILLER, K.; GOGOLAK, C.; MILIAN, L.

    2001-01-01

    This report describes a DOE Accelerated Site Technology Deployment project being conducted at Brookhaven National Laboratory to deploy innovative, radiological, in situ analytical techniques. The technologies are being deployed in support of efforts to characterize the Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor (BGRR) facility, which is currently undergoing decontamination and decommissioning. This report focuses on the deployment of the Canberra Industries In Situ Object Counting System (ISOCS) and assesses its data comparability to baseline methods of sampling and laboratory analysis. The battery-operated, field deployable gamma spectrometer provides traditional spectra of counts as a function of gamma energy. The spectra are then converted to radionuclide concentration by applying innovative efficiency calculations using monte carlo statistical methods and pre-defined geometry templates in the analysis software. Measurement of gamma emitting radionuclides has been accomplished during characterization of several BGRR components including the Pile Fan Sump, Above Ground Ducts, contaminated cooling fans, and graphite pile internals. Cs-137 is the predominant gamma-emitting radionuclide identified, with smaller quantities of Co-60 and Am-241 detected. The Project used the Multi-Agency Radiation Survey and Site Investigation Manual guidance and the Data Quality Objectives process to provide direction for survey planning and data quality assessment. Analytical results have been used to calculate data quality indicators (DQI) for the ISOCS measurements. Among the DQIs assessed in the report are sensitivity, accuracy, precision, bias, and minimum detectable concentration. The assessment of the in situ data quality using the DQIs demonstrates that the ISOCS data quality can be comparable to definitive level laboratory analysis when the field instrument is supported by an appropriate Quality Assurance Project Plan. A discussion of the results obtained by ISOCS analysis of

  11. Oak Ridge National Laboratory Annual Progress Report for the Electric Drive Technologies Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozpineci, Burak [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-10-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) announced in May 2011 a new cooperative research effort comprising DOE, the US Council for Automotive Research (composed of automakers Ford Motor Company, General Motors Company, and Chrysler Group), Tesla Motors, and representatives of the electric utility and petroleum industries. Known as U.S. DRIVE (Driving Research and Innovation for Vehicle efficiency and Energy sustainability), it represents DOE’s commitment to developing public–private partnerships to fund high-risk–high-reward research into advanced automotive technologies. The new partnership replaces and builds upon the partnership known as FreedomCAR (derived from “Freedom” and “Cooperative Automotive Research”) that ran from 2002 through 2010 and the Partnership for a New Generation of Vehicles initiative that ran from 1993 through 2001. Oak Ridge National Laboratory’s (ORNL’s) Electric Drive Technologies (EDT) subprogram within the DOE Vehicle Technologies Office (VTO) provides support and guidance for many cutting-edge automotive technologies now under development. Research is focused on developing revolutionary new power electronics (PE), electric motor (EM), and traction drive system (TDS) technologies that will leapfrog current on-the-road technologies, leading to lower cost and better efficiency in transforming battery energy to useful work. The research and development (R&D) is also aimed at achieving a greater understanding of and improvements in the way the various new components of tomorrow’s automobiles will function as a unified system to improve fuel efficiency through research in more efficient TDSs. In supporting the development of advanced vehicle propulsion systems, the EDT subprogram fosters the development of technologies that will significantly improve efficiency, costs, and fuel economy

  12. Hydrocephalus shunt technology: 20 years of experience from the Cambridge Shunt Evaluation Laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chari, Aswin; Czosnyka, Marek; Richards, Hugh K; Pickard, John D; Czosnyka, Zofia H

    2014-03-01

    The Cambridge Shunt Evaluation Laboratory was established 20 years ago. This paper summarizes the findings of that laboratory for the clinician. Twenty-six models of valves have been tested long-term in the shunt laboratory according to the expanded International Organization for Standardization 7197 standard protocol. The majority of the valves had a nonphysiologically low hydrodynamic resistance (from 1.5 to 3 mm Hg/[ml/min]), which may result in overdrainage related to posture and during nocturnal cerebral vasogenic waves. A long distal catheter increases the resistance of these valves by 100%-200%. Drainage through valves without a siphon-preventing mechanism is very sensitive to body posture, which may result in grossly negative intracranial pressure. Siphon-preventing accessories offer a reasonable resistance to negative outlet pressure; however, accessories with membrane devices may be blocked by raised subcutaneous pressure. In adjustable valves, the settings may be changed by external magnetic fields of intensity above 40 mT (exceptions: ProGAV, Polaris, and Certas). Most of the magnetically adjustable valves produce large distortions on MRI studies. The behavior of a valve revealed during testing is of relevance to the surgeon and may not be adequately described in the manufacturer's product information. The results of shunt testing are helpful in many circumstances, such as the initial choice of shunt and the evaluation of the shunt when its dysfunction is suspected.

  13. Annual technology assessment and progress report for the Buried Transuranic Waste Program at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Low, J.O.

    1985-12-01

    An improved-confinement technology as applied to the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) shallow-land-buried transuranic (TRU) waste is being investigated. An improved-confinement technology, in situ grouting, is being demonstrated in a 2-year engineering feasibility test at the INEL. Grout formulation and development were completed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory in Tennessee to support the in situ grouting test. Three grout formulations have been adapted to the arid, unsaturated soil conditions at the INEL: ordinary particulate grout; microfine penetration grout; soil grout. Three test trenches were constructed north of the INEL's Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA). Nonradioactive waste forms closely resembling TRU waste buried at the INEL have been fabricated and are ready for emplacement into these test trenches. A literature search for a simulated (analog) TRU tracer was completed as well as a chemical characterization of the INEL soil. Data developed from the chemistry characterization and literature search have been inputed into the selection and laboratory testing of the TRU analog tracers. Simulated TRU tracers will be loaded into waste forms prior to emplacement into the test trenches. Test trench data acquisition instrumentation will be installed during waste form emplacement. Instrumentation will monitor for moisture movement and tracer detection. Plans for test completion in FY-1986 are also shown. Various buried waste improved-confinement technologies performed by other Department of Energy sites were assessed for applicability to the INEL buried TRU waste. Primary demonstrations were performed at the Hanford site in Washington and at ORNL. This report also includes information on accomplishments of related activities at the INEL such as the program for Environmental Surveillance of the Radioactive Waste Management complex as well as the Subsurface Migration Studies. 18 refs., 11 figs., 12 tabs

  14. Measurement of cAMP in an undergraduate teaching laboratory, using ALPHAscreen technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartho, Joseph D; Ly, Kien; Hay, Debbie L

    2012-02-14

    Adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate (cAMP) is a cellular second messenger with central relevance to pharmacology, cell biology, and biochemistry teaching programs. cAMP is produced from adenosine triphosphate by adenylate cyclase, and its production is reduced or enhanced upon activation of many G protein-coupled receptors. Therefore, the measurement of cAMP serves as an indicator of receptor activity. Although there are many assays available for measuring cAMP, few are suitable for large class teaching, and even fewer seem to have been adapted for this purpose. Here, we describe the use of bead-based ALPHAscreen (Amplified Luminescent Proximity Homogenous Assay) technology for teaching a class of more than 300 students the practical aspects of detecting signal transduction. This technology is applicable to the measurement of many different signaling pathways. This resource is designed to provide a practical guide for instructors and a useful model for developing other classes using similar technologies.

  15. Science and technology for a sustainable energy future: Accomplishments of the Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, M.A.; Vaughan, K.H.

    1995-03-01

    Accomplishments of the Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Program at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory are presented. Included are activities performed in the utilities, transportation, industrial, and buildings technology areas.

  16. An Undergraduate Laboratory Class Using CRISPR/Cas9 Technology to Mutate Drosophila Genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adame, Vanesa; Chapapas, Holly; Cisneros, Marilyn; Deaton, Carol; Deichmann, Sophia; Gadek, Chauncey; Lovato, TyAnna L.; Chechenova, Maria B.; Guerin, Paul; Cripps, Richard M.

    2016-01-01

    CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing technology is used in the manipulation of genome sequences and gene expression. Because of the ease and rapidity with which genes can be mutated using CRISPR/Cas9, we sought to determine if a single-semester undergraduate class could be successfully taught, wherein students isolate mutants for specific genes using…

  17. NEW MEDIA TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT TO ENHANCE AND IMPROVE COMMUNICATIONS AT USEPA'S NATIONAL RISK MANAGEMENT RESEARCH LABORATORY

    Science.gov (United States)

    New media technology (NT) interactive applications are currently being developed in house at ORD/NRMRL to enhance and improve communication of NRMRL's 1) research projects, 2) workshops/conferences and 3) specialized training. NT is an exciting mix of cutting-edge information tec...

  18. The importance of the technologically able social innovators and entrepreneurs : A US National Laboratory Perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chavez, Victor; Stinnett, Regan; Tierney, Robert; Walsh, Steven Thomas

    A country's National Innovation Policies (NIP) often center on military, energy or other national security missions. Yet many countries' NIPs have resulted in tremendous societal benefit through both planned and unplanned action not associated with these goals. Socially important technology product

  19. Moving out of the Laboratory: Deploying Pervasive Technologies in a Hospital

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Thomas Riisgaard; Bardram, Jakob; Søgaard, Mads

    2006-01-01

    The authors deployed a distributed system containing a location-tracking system, a context-awareness system, wall-sized displays, and mobile phones in a Danish hospital's operating ward. This article presents the lessons they learned from deploying these pervasive computing technologies...

  20. From the Laboratory to the Classroom: A Technology-Intensive Curriculum for Functions and Graphs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magidson, Susan

    1992-01-01

    Addresses the challenges, risks, and rewards of teaching about linear functions in a technology-rich environment from a constructivist perspective. Describes an algebra class designed for junior high school students that focuses of the representations and real-world applications of linear functions. (MDH)

  1. Evaluating a Technology Supported Interactive Response System during the Laboratory Section of a Histology Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinaldi, Vera D.; Lorr, Nancy A.; Williams, Kimberly

    2017-01-01

    Monitoring of student learning through systematic formative assessment is important for adjusting pedagogical strategies. However, traditional formative assessments, such as quizzes and written assignments, may not be sufficiently timely for making adjustments to a learning process. Technology supported formative assessment tools assess student…

  2. Request for Information from entities interested in commercializing Laboratory-developed advanced in vitro assessment technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Intrator, Miranda Huang [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2016-03-30

    Los Alamos National Security, LLC (LANS) is the manager and operator of Los Alamos National Laboratory (Los Alamos) for the U.S. Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC52- 06NA25396. Los Alamos is a mission-centric Federally Funded Research and Development Center focused on solving critical national security challenges through science and engineering for both government and private customers. LANS is opening this formal Request for Information (RFI) to gauge interest in engaging as an industry partner to LANS for collaboration in advancing the bio-assessment platform described below. Please see last section for details on submitting a Letter of Interest.

  3. Ohio River navigation investment model: Requirements and model design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bronzini, M.S.; Curlee, T.R.; Leiby, P.N.; Southworth, F.; Summers, M.S.

    1998-01-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory is assisting the US Army Corps of Engineers in improving its economic analysis procedures for evaluation of inland waterway investment projects along the Ohio River System. This paper describes the context and design of an integrated approach to calculating the system-wide benefits from alternative combinations of lock and channel improvements, providing an ability to project the cost savings from proposed waterway improvements in capacity and reliability for up to fifty years into the future. The design contains an in-depth treatment of the levels of risk and uncertainty associated with different multi-year lock and channel improvement plans, including the uncertainty that results from a high degree of interaction between the many different waterway system components.

  4. Poultry Producer. Ohio's Competency Analysis Profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Vocational Instructional Materials Lab.

    This Ohio Competency Analysis Profile (OCAP), derived from a modified Developing a Curriculum (DACUM) process, is a comprehensive and verified employer competency list for a poultry producer program. It contains units (with or without subunits), competencies, and competency builders that identify the occupational, academic, and employability…

  5. Preliminary Findings on Rural Homelessness in Ohio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    First, Richard J.; And Others

    This report is designed to present preliminary findings from the first comprehensive study of rural homelessness in the United States. The study was conducted during the first 6 months of 1990, and data were collected from interviews with 921 homeless adults in 21 randomly selected rural counties in Ohio. The sample counties represent 26% of the…

  6. Energy Drink Use Among Ohio Appalachian Smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davison, Genevieve; Shoben, Abigail; Pasch, Keryn E; Klein, Elizabeth G

    2016-10-01

    Caffeine-containing energy drinks have emerged as a public health concern due to their association with caffeine toxicity and alcohol use. Despite the fact that previous research has linked caffeine use in the form of coffee drinking to smoking, there is little research examining the association between energy drinks and smoking. The present study examines demographic and behavioral factors associated with energy drink use among a sample of rural Ohio Appalachian smokers. It was hypothesized that male gender, young age (21-30 years.) and alcohol use would be associated with energy drink use. A sample of adult smokers (n = 298) from Ohio Appalachian counties were interviewed regarding demographic and behavioral factors. Logistic regression analysis was used to assess the association between these factors and energy drink use. Seventy percent of Ohio Appalachian smokers studied had ever used an energy drink and 40 % had used an energy drink in the past month. Young age, male gender, and single marital status were associated with higher odds of ever having used an energy drink. Young age, and binge drinking were associated with higher odds of past 30-day use while abstinence from drinking was associated with lower odds of past 30-day use. Ohio Appalachian adult smokers had higher rates of energy drink use compared to previous estimates of ever or past month use found in other studies. The combined use of caffeine, nicotine, and alcohol warrants attention due to potential for health risk.

  7. Venture Capital Initiative: Ohio's School Improvement Effort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Soonhwa; Loadman, William E.

    In 1994 the Ohio State Legislature established Venture Capital to support school restructuring. The Venture Capital school initiative is a concept borrowed from the business community in which the corporate entity provides risk capital to parts of the organization to stimulate creative ideas and to provide opportunities for local entities to try…

  8. 33 CFR 117.417 - Ohio River.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ....417 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Kentucky § 117.417 Ohio River. The draw of the Southern Railway railroad bridge, mile 607.4 at New Albany, Indiana, need not be opened for the passage of vessels. [CGD 82...

  9. 50 CFR 32.54 - Ohio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Game Bird Hunting. [Reserved] B. Upland Game Hunting. [Reserved] C. Big Game Hunting. [Reserved] D.... [Reserved] C. Big Game Hunting. We allow hunting of white-tailed deer on designated areas of the refuge in... WILDLIFE REFUGE SYSTEM HUNTING AND FISHING Refuge-Specific Regulations for Hunting and Fishing § 32.54 Ohio...

  10. Waste management technology development and demonstration programs at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalb, Paul D.; Colombo, Peter

    1991-01-01

    Two thermoplastic processes for improved treatment of radioactive, hazardous, and mixed wastes were developed from bench scale through technology demonstration: polyethylene encapsulation and modified sulfur cement encapsulation. The steps required to bring technologies from the research and development stage through full scale implementation are described. Both systems result in durable waste forms that meet current Nuclear Regulatory Commission and Environmental Protection Agency regulatory criteria and provide significant improvements over conventional solidification systems such as hydraulic cement. For example, the polyethylene process can encapsulate up to 70 wt pct. nitrate salt, compared with a maximum of about 20 wt pct. for the best hydraulic cement formulation. Modified sulfur cement waste forms containing as much as 43 wt pct. incinerator fly ash were formulated, whereas the maximum quantity of this waste in hydraulic cement is 16 wt pct.

  11. Linking field and laboratory studies to investigate nitrate removal using permeable reactive barrier technology during managed recharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorski, G.; Beganskas, S.; Weir, W. B.; Redford, K.; Saltikov, C.; Fisher, A. T.

    2017-12-01

    We present data from a series of field and laboratory studies investigating mechanisms for the enhanced removal of nitrate during infiltration as a part of managed recharge. These studies combine physical, geochemical, and microbiological data collected during controlled infiltration experiments at both a plot and a laboratory scale using permeable reactive barrier (PRB) technology. The presence of a PRB, made of wood chips or biochar, enhances nitrate removal by stimulating the growth and productivity of native soil microbes to process nitrate via denitrification. Earlier work has shown that unamended soil can remove up to 50% of nitrate during infiltration at rates microbiological data show significant population changes below the PRB where most of the cycling occurs. Coupled with isotopic analyses, these results suggest that a PRB expands the range of infiltration rates at which significant nitrate can be removed by microbial activity. Further, nitrate removal occurs at different depths below the biochar and redwood chips, suggesting different mechanisms of nitrate removal in the presence of different PRB materials. In laboratory studies we flowed artificial groundwater through intact sediment cores collected at the same field site where we also ran infiltration tests. These experiments show that the fluid flow rate and the presence of a PRB exhibit primary control on nitrate removal during infiltration, and that the relationship between flow rate and nitrate removal is fundamentally different in the presence of a PRB. These data from multiple scales and flow regimes are combined to offer a deeper understanding how the use of PRB technology during infiltration can help address a significant non-point source issue at the surface-subsurface interface.

  12. HYDRAULICS, PIKE COUNTY, OHIO, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — "Recent developments in digital terrain and geospatial database management technology make is possible to protect this investment for existing and future projects to...

  13. Potential Electrokinetic Remediation Technologies of Laboratory Scale into Field Application- Methodology Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayuni Suied, Anis; Tajudin, Saiful Azhar Ahmad; Nizam Zakaria, Muhammad; Madun, Aziman

    2018-04-01

    Heavy metal in soil possesses high contribution towards soil contamination which causes to unbalance ecosystem. There are many ways and procedures to make the electrokinetic remediation (EKR) method to be efficient, effective, and potential as a low cost soil treatment. Electrode compartment for electrolyte is expected to treat the contaminated soil through electromigration and enhance metal ions movement. The electrokinetic is applicable for many approaches such as electrokinetic remediation (EKR), electrokinetic stabilization (EKS), electrokinetic bioremediation and many more. This paper presents a critical review on comparison of laboratory scale between EKR, EKS and EK bioremediation treatment by removing the heavy metal contaminants. It is expected to propose one framework of contaminated soil mapping. Electrical Resistivity Method (ERM) is one of famous indirect geophysical tools for surface mapping and subsurface profiling. Hence, ERM is used to mapping the migration of heavy metal ions by electrokinetic.

  14. Evaluation of the Emission, Transport, and Deposition of Mercury and Fine Particulate Matter from Coal-Based Power Plants in the Ohio River Valley Region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kevin Crist

    2008-12-31

    As stated in the proposal: Ohio University, in collaboration with CONSOL Energy, Advanced Technology Systems, Inc (ATS) and Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc. (AER) as subcontractors, evaluated the impact of emissions from coal-fired power plants in the Ohio River Valley region as they relate to the transport and deposition of mercury and associated fine particulate matter. This evaluation involved two interrelated areas of effort: ambient air monitoring and regional-scale modeling analysis. The scope of work for the ambient air monitoring included the deployment of a surface air monitoring (SAM) station in southeastern Ohio. The SAM station contains sampling equipment to collect and measure mercury (including speciated forms of mercury and wet and dry deposited mercury), particulate matter (PM) mass, PM composition, and gaseous criteria pollutants (CO, NOx, SO2, O3, etc.). Laboratory analyses of time-integrated samples were used to obtain chemical speciation of ambient PM composition and mercury in precipitation. Nearreal- time measurements were used to measure the ambient concentrations of PM mass and all gaseous species including Hg0 and RGM. Approximately 30 months of field data were collected at the SAM site to validate the proposed regional model simulations for episodic and seasonal model runs. The ambient air quality data provides mercury, and fine particulate matter data that can be used by Ohio Valley industries to assess performance on multi-pollutant control systems. The scope of work for the modeling analysis includes (1) development of updated inventories of mercury emissions from coal plants and other important sources in the modeled domain; (2) adapting an existing 3-D atmospheric chemical transport model to incorporate recent advancements in the understanding of mercury transformations in the atmosphere; (3) analyses of the flux of Hg0, RGM, and fine particulate matter in the different sectors of the study region to identify key transport

  15. Sandia National Laboratories

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — For more than 60 years, Sandia has delivered essential science and technology to resolve the nation's most challenging security issues.Sandia National Laboratories...

  16. Research Combustion Laboratory (RCL)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Research Combustion Laboratory (RCL) develops aerospace propulsion technology by performing tests on propulsion components and materials. Altitudes up to 137,000...

  17. A Different Approach to Have Science and Technology Student-Teachers Gain Varied Methods in Laboratory Applications: A Sample of Computer Assisted POE Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saka, Arzu

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop a new approach and assess the application for the science and technology student-teachers to gain varied laboratory methods in science and technology teaching. It is also aimed to describe the computer-assisted POE application in the subject of "Photosynthesis-Light" developed in the context of…

  18. Geotechnical Characterization of Mined Clay from Appalachian Ohio: Challenges and Implications for the Clay Mining Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Anthony R.; Hettiarachchi, Hiroshan

    2011-01-01

    Clayey soil found in coal mines in Appalachian Ohio is often sold to landfills for constructing Recompacted Soil Liners (RSL) in landfills. Since clayey soils possess low hydraulic conductivity, the suitability of mined clay for RSL in Ohio is first assessed by determining its clay content. When soil samples are tested in a laboratory, the same engineering properties are typically expected for the soils originated from the same source, provided that the testing techniques applied are standard, but mined clay from Appalachian Ohio has shown drastic differences in particle size distribution depending on the sampling and/or laboratory processing methods. Sometimes more than a 10 percent decrease in the clay content is observed in the samples collected at the stockpiles, compared to those collected through reverse circulation drilling. This discrepancy poses a challenge to geotechnical engineers who work on the prequalification process of RSL material as it can result in misleading estimates of the hydraulic conductivity of the samples. This paper describes a laboratory investigation conducted on mined clay from Appalachian Ohio to determine how and why the standard sampling and/or processing methods can affect the grain-size distributions. The variation in the clay content was determined to be due to heavy concentrations of shale fragments in the clayey soils. It was also concluded that, in order to obtain reliable grain size distributions from the samples collected at a stockpile of mined clay, the material needs to be processed using a soil grinder. Otherwise, the samples should be collected through drilling. PMID:21845150

  19. Geotechnical Characterization of Mined Clay from Appalachian Ohio: Challenges and Implications for the Clay Mining Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony R. Moran

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Clayey soil found in coal mines in Appalachian Ohio is often sold to landfills for constructing Recompacted Soil Liners (RSL in landfills. Since clayey soils possess low hydraulic conductivity, the suitability of mined clay for RSL in Ohio is first assessed by determining its clay content. When soil samples are tested in a laboratory, the same engineering properties are typically expected for the soils originated from the same source, provided that the testing techniques applied are standard, but mined clay from Appalachian Ohio has shown drastic differences in particle size distribution depending on the sampling and/or laboratory processing methods. Sometimes more than a 10 percent decrease in the clay content is observed in the samples collected at the stockpiles, compared to those collected through reverse circulation drilling. This discrepancy poses a challenge to geotechnical engineers who work on the prequalification process of RSL material as it can result in misleading estimates of the hydraulic conductivity of the samples. This paper describes a laboratory investigation conducted on mined clay from Appalachian Ohio to determine how and why the standard sampling and/or processing methods can affect the grain-size distributions. The variation in the clay content was determined to be due to heavy concentrations of shale fragments in the clayey soils. It was also concluded that, in order to obtain reliable grain size distributions from the samples collected at a stockpile of mined clay, the material needs to be processed using a soil grinder. Otherwise, the samples should be collected through drilling.

  20. Present status of mechanical testing technology at the Research Hot Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kizaki, M.; Tobita, T.; Koya, T.; Kikuchi, T.

    1993-01-01

    Mechanical tests of irradiated metallic materials at the Research Hot Laboratory(RHL) have been carried out for 30 years to support material research in JAERI and to evaluate the irradiation integrity of pressure vessel steel in commercial power plant. Two tensile testing machines and one Charpy impact testing machine are available for the examinations. One of the tensile testing machines has 1000 kgf load capacity under the vacuum of ∼ 10 -7 torr at the temperature of 1300degC max.. The other one has 10 tonf load capacity, and is utilized for the multi-purpose tests such as tensile and compressive tests in air atmosphere at the temperature between -160 and 900degC. Examinations cover tensile test, bending test, J ic fracture toughness test, low cycle fatigue test and so on. Charpy impact testing machine with notched-bar specimen is instrumented with 30 kgf-m capacity in the temperature range of -140 - 240 degC. To support these mechanical tests in RHL, special jigs, devices and instruments have been developed. (author)

  1. Pacific Northwest Laboratory report on controlled thermonuclear reactor technology, October 1975--December 1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    Survey calculations are being made on three blanket configurations for a conceptual hybrid design based on a Two Component Torus (TCT) in a cooperative effort between Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) and PNL. Other studies are underway to provide background data in the design of a minimum thickness shield and a convertor region for the TCT hybrid. The effect the plasma and associated radiation and emission will have upon the surfaces of the first wall are being studied. A variety of metal targets were prepared for neutron irradiation and were evaluated. Radioactive recoil sputtering ratios are summarized with complete results being prepared for separate publication. The development and testing of the ion blistering equipment is continuing with the design and installation of a special differential pumping stage. Analysis of the molybdenum specimens irradiated for the initial BCC ion correlation experiment is completed and data from the participants have been compared. Graphite cloth and fibers irradiated in EBR-II to approximately 3 x 10 21 cm -2 at approximately 500 0 C are being evaluated for radiation damage effects. Helium effects are being studied on five alloys specified in CTR conceptual designs. Tests were designed to determine the effects of oxidation potential on low-level contaminant/metal interactions. Niobium and vanadium are being studied for mechanical property effects after injection of helium by the tritium trick method. An advanced state-of-the-art Acoustics Emission Event Energy Analyzer (AEEEA) has been developed and tested

  2. Separation technologies for the treatment of Idaho National Engineering Laboratory wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Todd, T.A. [Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    1997-10-01

    Currently about 6.8 million L of acidic, radioactive liquid waste that is not amenable to calcination, and about 3800 m{sup 3} of calcine exist at the ICPP. Legal drivers (court orders) and agreements between the state of Idaho, the U.S. Navy, and DOE exist that obligate INEL to develop, demonstrate, and implement technologies for treatment and interim storage of the radioactive liquid and calcine wastes. Per these agreements, all tank waste must be removed from the underground liquid storage tanks by the year 2012, and high-level radioactive waste must be treated and removed from INEL by 2035. Separation of the radionuclides from the wastes, followed by immobilization of the high-activity and low-activity fractions in glass and grout, respectively, is the approach preferred by INEL. Technologies to remove actinides (U, Np, Pu, and Am), Cs, Sr, and possibly Tc from highly acidic solutions are required to process INEL wastes. Decontamination of the wastes to NRC Class A low-level waste (LLW) is planned. Separation and isolation of Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) metals (Hg, Pb, Cd, and Cr) from the highly radioactive waste streams may also be required. Remediation efforts will begin in FY 1997 to remove volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and radionuclides (Cs and Sr) from groundwater located at the Test Area North facility at INEL. A plume of VOCs and radionuclides has spread from the former TSF-05 injection well, and a Comprehensive Environmental Response, Conservation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) remediation action is under way. A Record of Decision was signed in August 1995 that commits INEL to remediate the plume from TSF-05. Removal of Sr and Cs from the groundwater using commercially available ion-exchange resins has been unsuccessful at meeting maximum contaminant levels, which are 119 pCi/L and 8 pCi/L for Cs and Sr, respectively. Cesium and Sr are the major contaminants that must be removed from the groundwater.

  3. Active shield technology for space craft protection revisited in new laboratory results and analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bamford, R.; Gibson, K. J.; Thornton, A. T.; Bradford, J.; Bingham, R.; Gargate, L.; Silva, L. O.; Fonseca, R. A.; Hapgood, M.; Norberg, C.; Todd, T.; Stamper, R.

    2009-04-01

    Energetic ions in the solar wind plasma are a known hazard to both spacecraft electronics and to astronaut's health. Of primary concern is the exposure to keV--MeV protons on manned space flights to the Moon and Mars that extend over long periods of time. Attempts to protect the spacecraft include active shields that are reminiscent of Star Trek "deflector" shields. Here we describe a new experiment to test the shielding concept of a dipole-like magnetic field and plasma, surrounding the spacecraft forming a "mini magnetosphere". Initial laboratory experiments have been conducted to determine the effectiveness of a magnetized plasma barrier to be able to expel an impacting, low beta, supersonic flowing energetic plasma representing the Solar Wind. Optical and Langmuir probe data of the plasma density, the plasma flow velocity, and the intensity of the dipole field clearly show the creation of a narrow transport barrier region and diamagnetic cavity virtually devoid of energetic plasma particles. This demonstrates the potential viability of being able to create a small "hole" in a Solar Wind plasma, of the order of the ion Larmor orbit width, in which an inhabited spacecraft could reside in relative safety. The experimental results have been quantitatively compared to a 3D particle-in-cell ‘hybrid' code simulation that uses kinetic ions and fluid electrons, showing good qualitative agreement and excellent quantitative agreement. Together the results demonstrate the pivotal role of particle kinetics in determining generic plasma transport barriers. [1] [1] R Bamford et al., "The interaction of a flowing plasma with a dipole magnetic field: measurements and modelling of a diamagnetic cavity relevant to spacecraft protection." 2008 Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 50 124025 (11pp) doi: 10.1088/0741-3335/50/12/124025

  4. Hanford High-Level Waste Vitrification Program at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory: technology development - annotated bibliography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larson, D.E.

    1996-09-01

    This report provides a collection of annotated bibliographies for documents prepared under the Hanford High-Level Waste Vitrification (Plant) Program. The bibliographies are for documents from Fiscal Year 1983 through Fiscal Year 1995, and include work conducted at or under the direction of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The bibliographies included focus on the technology developed over the specified time period for vitrifying Hanford pretreated high-level waste. The following subject areas are included: General Documentation; Program Documentation; High-Level Waste Characterization; Glass Formulation and Characterization; Feed Preparation; Radioactive Feed Preparation and Glass Properties Testing; Full-Scale Feed Preparation Testing; Equipment Materials Testing; Melter Performance Assessment and Evaluations; Liquid-Fed Ceramic Melter; Cold Crucible Melter; Stirred Melter; High-Temperature Melter; Melter Off-Gas Treatment; Vitrification Waste Treatment; Process, Product Control and Modeling; Analytical; and Canister Closure, Decontamination, and Handling

  5. Some Recent Technology Developments From The Uk's National Nuclear Laboratory To Enable Hazard Characterisation For Nuclear Decommissioning Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farfan, E.; Foley, T.

    2010-01-01

    Under its programme of self investment Internal Research and Development (IR and D), the UK's National Nuclear Laboratory (NNL) is addressing the requirement for development in technology to enable hazard characterisation for nuclear decommissioning applications. Three such examples are described here: (1) RadBall developed by the NNL (patent pending) is a deployable baseball-sized radiation mapping device which can, from a single location, locate and quantify radiation hazards. RadBall offers a means to collect information regarding the magnitude and distribution of radiation in a given cell, glovebox or room to support the development of a safe, cost effective decontamination strategy. RadBall requires no electrical supplies and is relatively small, making it easy to be deployed and used to map radiation hazards in hard to reach areas. Recent work conducted in partnership with the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) is presented. (2) HiRAD (patent pending) has been developed by the NNL in partnership with Tracerco Ltd (UK). HiRAD is a real-time, remotely deployed, radiation detection device designed to operate in elevated levels of radiation (i.e. thousands and tens of thousands of Gray) as seen in parts of the nuclear industry. Like the RadBall technology, the HiRAD system does not require any electrical components, the small dimensions and flexibility of the device allow it to be positioned in difficult to access areas (such as pipe work). HiRAD can be deployed as a single detector, a chain, or as an array giving the ability to monitor large process areas. Results during the development and deployment of the technology are presented. (3) Wireless Sensor Network is a NNL supported development project led by the University of Manchester (UK) in partnership with Oxford University (UK). The project is concerned with the development of wireless sensor network technology to enable the underwater deployment and communication of miniaturised probes allowing pond

  6. Research of geological technologic condition in laboratory about the ore of 501 deposits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma Guoxiang; Yu Baoli; Gao Yuyou; Li Changhua

    2009-01-01

    501 deposits of uranium ore grade is 0.052%. The radio of U +6 /U 4+ is 1.7-4.6. there is less content of sarbonate, such as sulfide and organic matter which disservice baptist uranium geological process, and the uranium and oxygen with a high level in the water of seam. The content of [HCO 3 ] - is lower. By conducting the static leaching test, the important technical parameters of uranium ore extraction are determined: with 7.91 g/L H 2 SO 4 , to soak uranium ore which the grade is between 0.007% and 0.216% for 48 hours, the uranium extraction rate of 64.69-99.17%, and extract uranium concentration 9.51-427.6 mg/L; the formula of infusion solution is obtained by using percolation leaching test: 6-8 g/L H 2 SO 4 , the rate of uranium extraction is 95.71%-96.33%, an average of leaching solution uranium concentration of 88.33-111.32 mg/L, leaching liquid-solid ratio of 4.46-5.66, ore tons of sulfuric acid consumption to 27.58-29.83 kg/t, extraction of uranium 1 kg of sulfuric acid consumption to 55.17-60.06 kg. That indicate the geological technologic conditions which the leaching of uranium ore deposits is better. (authors)

  7. Evaluation of the Radar Stage Sensor manufactured by Forest Technology Systems—Results of laboratory and field testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunkle, Gerald A.

    2018-01-31

    Two identical Radar Stage Sensors from Forest Technology Systems were evaluated to determine if they are suitable for U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) hydrologic data collection. The sensors were evaluated in laboratory conditions to evaluate the distance accuracy of the sensor over the manufacturer’s specified operating temperatures and distance to water ranges. Laboratory results were compared to the manufacturer’s accuracy specification of ±0.007 foot (ft) and the USGS Office of Surface Water (OSW) policy requirement that water-level sensors have a measurement uncertainty of no more than 0.01 ft or 0.20 percent of the indicated reading. Both of the sensors tested were within the OSW policy requirement in both laboratory tests and within the manufacturer’s specification in the distance to water test over tested distances from 3 to 15 ft. In the temperature chamber test, both sensors were within the manufacturer’s specification for more than 90 percent of the data points collected over a temperature range of –40 to +60 degrees Celsius at a fixed distance of 8 ft. One sensor was subjected to an SDI-12 communication test, which it passed. A field test was conducted on one sensor at a USGS field site near Landon, Mississippi, from February 5 to March 29, 2016. Water-level measurements made by the radar during the field test were in agreement with those made by the Sutron Accubar Constant Flow Bubble Gauge.Upon the manufacturer’s release of updated firmware version 1.09, additional SDI-12 and temperature testing was performed to evaluate added SDI-12 functions and verify that performance was unaffected by the update. At this time, an Axiom data logger is required to perform a firmware update on this sensor. The data confirmed the results of the original test. Based on the test results, the Radar Stage Sensor is a suitable choice for USGS hydrologic data collection.

  8. Changes, disruption and innovation: An investigation of the introduction of new health information technology in a microbiology laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toouli, George; Georgiou, Andrew; Westbrook, Johanna

    2012-01-01

    It is expected that health information technology (HIT) will deliver a safer, more efficient and effective health care system. The aim of this study was to undertake a qualitative and video-ethnographic examination of the impact of information technologies on work processes in the reception area of a Microbiology Department, to ascertain what changed, how it changed and the impact of the change. The setting for this study was the microbiology laboratory of a large tertiary hospital in Sydney. The study consisted of qualitative (interview and focus group) data and observation sessions for the period August 2005 to October 2006 along with video footage shot in three sessions covering the original system and the two stages of the Cerner implementation. Data analysis was assisted by NVivo software and process maps were produced from the video footage. There were two laboratory information systems observed in the video footage with computerized provider order entry introduced four months later. Process maps highlighted the large number of pre data entry steps with the original system whilst the newer system incorporated many of these steps in to the data entry stage. However, any time saved with the new system was offset by the requirement to complete some data entry of patient information not previously required. Other changes noted included the change of responsibilities for the reception staff and the physical changes required to accommodate the increased activity around the data entry area. Implementing a new HIT is always an exciting time for any environment but ensuring that the implementation goes smoothly and with minimal trouble requires the administrator and their team to plan well in advance for staff training, physical layout and possible staff resource reallocation.

  9. Brain-wave measures of workload in advanced cockpits: The transition of technology from laboratory to cockpit simulator, phase 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horst, Richard L.; Mahaffey, David L.; Munson, Robert C.

    1989-01-01

    The present Phase 2 small business innovation research study was designed to address issues related to scalp-recorded event-related potential (ERP) indices of mental workload and to transition this technology from the laboratory to cockpit simulator environments for use as a systems engineering tool. The project involved five main tasks: (1) Two laboratory studies confirmed the generality of the ERP indices of workload obtained in the Phase 1 study and revealed two additional ERP components related to workload. (2) A task analysis' of flight scenarios and pilot tasks in the Advanced Concepts Flight Simulator (ACFS) defined cockpit events (i.e., displays, messages, alarms) that would be expected to elicit ERPs related to workload. (3) Software was developed to support ERP data analysis. An existing ARD-proprietary package of ERP data analysis routines was upgraded, new graphics routines were developed to enhance interactive data analysis, and routines were developed to compare alternative single-trial analysis techniques using simulated ERP data. (4) Working in conjunction with NASA Langley research scientists and simulator engineers, preparations were made for an ACFS validation study of ERP measures of workload. (5) A design specification was developed for a general purpose, computerized, workload assessment system that can function in simulators such as the ACFS.

  10. The urban heat island in Akron, Ohio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank P. Martin; Grace L. Powell

    1977-01-01

    Data gathered by automobile traverse were used to describe the urban heat of Akron, Ohio. Observations were made at 2100 or 2200 EST on four nights-17 April, 11 July, 10 October, and 2 January. Weather conditions not conducive to heat-island development were avoided. Temperatures in the center of the heat island were 6 to 14?F warmer than rural areas outside the city....

  11. Design of metrology laboratory and microfab center against vibration from shakers laboratory of the new Hong Kong University of Science and Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Westwood K. W.; Boulter, Nicholas

    1992-02-01

    The design of vibration-sensitive laboratories normally requires the protection of these areas from incoming vibration generated by plant, road traffic and footfall impacts. The compact nature of the new HKUST campus requires a more exact design than one would find for a spacious campus with laboratory buildings nicely separated. The HKUST user required a centralized laboratory service with easy access to the major testing facilities. This resulted in the location of vibration sensitive areas (micro-fabrication center and metrology laboratory) close to a Structural Laboratory housing large shakers. These were to be used for seismic and modal testing of structural elements and prototypes. The design of the support structure for the shakers, known as the reaction floor, was critical to the success of the building. Particular attention was paid to the design and construction of the foundations for the reaction floor. For controlling the vibration generated by 10-ton-force rated shakers, a massive structure with caisson supports was designed for the reaction floor and reaction wall. Finite element models were employed to calculate the response of the laboratory floors located above the reaction floor in other parts of the building. The metrology laboratory structure and the foundation design of the reaction floor and a wafer fab built in the U.K. will be presented.

  12. Climatological aspects of drought in Ohio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogers, J.C.

    1993-01-01

    Precipitation and Palmer hydrological drought index (PHDI) data have been used to identify past occurrences of Ohio drought, to illustrate the temporal variability occurring statewide within dry periods, and to compare some of the key dry spells to those of 1987-88 and 1991-92. Periods of hydrologic drought and low precipitation generally persist for 2 to 5 years and tend to cluster in time, such as occurred from 1930-1966. It is not uncommon for precipitation to return to normal or near normal conditions while short-term drought persists in terms of streamflow, ground water supply, and runoff, as measured by the PHDI. The period April 1930 to March 1931 is the driest on record in Ohio although longer periods of low precipitation have occurred from 1893-1896, 1952-1955, and 1963-1965. The temporal clusters of droughts are separated by prolonged wet periods, including those extending roughly from 1875-1893, 1905-1924, and 1966-1987. Correlations between Ohio monthly precipitation and mean air temperature suggest that drought is linked to unusually high summer temperatures through mechanisms such as increased evapotranspiration, leading to increased fluxes of sensible heat from dry soil surfaces. In winter, warm conditions tend to favor higher precipitation, soil recharge, and runoff. Variations in mean temperature and atmospheric circulation may also be linked to other observed climatic features such as long-term trends in soil-water recharge season (October-March) precipitation

  13. AEP Ohio gridSMART Demonstration Project Real-Time Pricing Demonstration Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Widergren, Steven E.; Subbarao, Krishnappa; Fuller, Jason C.; Chassin, David P.; Somani, Abhishek; Marinovici, Maria C.; Hammerstrom, Janelle L.

    2014-02-01

    This report contributes initial findings from an analysis of significant aspects of the gridSMART® Real-Time Pricing (RTP) – Double Auction demonstration project. Over the course of four years, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) worked with American Electric Power (AEP), Ohio and Battelle Memorial Institute to design, build, and operate an innovative system to engage residential consumers and their end-use resources in a participatory approach to electric system operations, an incentive-based approach that has the promise of providing greater efficiency under normal operating conditions and greater flexibility to react under situations of system stress. The material contained in this report supplements the findings documented by AEP Ohio in the main body of the gridSMART report. It delves into three main areas: impacts on system operations, impacts on households, and observations about the sensitivity of load to price changes.

  14. Technology Evaluations Related to Mercury, Technetium, and Chloride in Treatment of Wastes at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center of the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnes, C.M.; Taylor, D.D.; Ashworth, S.C.; Bosley, J.B.; Haefner, D.R.

    1999-01-01

    The Idaho High-Level Waste and Facility Disposition Environmental Impact Statement defines alternative for treating and disposing of wastes stored at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center. Development is required for several technologies under consideration for treatment of these wastes. This report contains evaluations of whether specific treatment is needed and if so, by what methods, to remove mercury, technetium, and chlorides in proposed Environmental Impact Statement treatment processes. The evaluations of mercury include a review of regulatory requirements that would apply to mercury wastes in separations processes, an evaluation of the sensitivity of mercury flowrates and concentrations to changes in separations processing schemes and conditions, test results from laboratory-scale experiments of precipitation of mercury by sulfide precipitation agents from the TRUEX carbonate wash effluent, and evaluations of methods to remove mercury from New Waste Calcining Facility liquid and gaseous streams. The evaluation of technetium relates to the need for technetium removal and alternative methods to remove technetium from streams in separations processes. The need for removal of chlorides from New Waste Calcining Facility scrub solution is also evaluated

  15. Technology Evaluations Related to Mercury, Technetium, and Chloride in Treatment of Wastes at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center of the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C. M. Barnes; D. D. Taylor; S. C. Ashworth; J. B. Bosley; D. R. Haefner

    1999-10-01

    The Idaho High-Level Waste and Facility Disposition Environmental Impact Statement defines alternative for treating and disposing of wastes stored at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center. Development is required for several technologies under consideration for treatment of these wastes. This report contains evaluations of whether specific treatment is needed and if so, by what methods, to remove mercury, technetium, and chlorides in proposed Environmental Impact Statement treatment processes. The evaluations of mercury include a review of regulatory requirements that would apply to mercury wastes in separations processes, an evaluation of the sensitivity of mercury flowrates and concentrations to changes in separations processing schemes and conditions, test results from laboratory-scale experiments of precipitation of mercury by sulfide precipitation agents from the TRUEX carbonate wash effluent, and evaluations of methods to remove mercury from New Waste Calcining Facility liquid and gaseous streams. The evaluation of technetium relates to the need for technetium removal and alternative methods to remove technetium from streams in separations processes. The need for removal of chlorides from New Waste Calcining Facility scrub solution is also evaluated.

  16. Final Report to the National Energy Technology Laboratory on FY09-FY13 Cooperative Research with the Consortium for Electric Reliability Technology Solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vittal, Vijay [Arizona State Univ., Mesa, AZ (United States)

    2015-11-04

    The Consortium for Electric Reliability Technology Solutions (CERTS) was formed in 1999 in response to a call from U.S. Congress to restart a federal transmission reliability R&D program to address concerns about the reliability of the U.S. electric power grid. CERTS is a partnership between industry, universities, national laboratories, and government agencies. It researches, develops, and disseminates new methods, tools, and technologies to protect and enhance the reliability of the U.S. electric power system and the efficiency of competitive electricity markets. It is funded by the U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (OE). This report provides an overview of PSERC and CERTS, of the overall objectives and scope of the research, a summary of the major research accomplishments, highlights of the work done under the various elements of the NETL cooperative agreement, and brief reports written by the PSERC researchers on their accomplishments, including research results, publications, and software tools.

  17. NASA Allstar Project Aeronautics Learning Laboratory for Science,Technology, and Research (Allstar)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Cesar; Ebadian M. A.

    1998-01-01

    converted to an on-line discussion forum with a unique section on Blacks in Aviation. Prime Technologies coordinated with NASA LARC and the Teacher Resource Centers (TRCs) for scale-up of ALLSTAR and performed live demonstrations of the software in schools and at conventions.

  18. Annual technology assessment and progress report for the buried transuranic waste program at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berreth, P.D.

    1984-11-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) is responsible for developing and implementing methods for the safe and environmentally acceptable disposal of radioactive waste. In 1983, DOE formulated a comprehensive plan to manage transuranic (TRU) defense waste. The DOE plan for buried TRU waste is to monitor it, take remedial actions as necessary, and reevaluate its safety periodically. The DOE strategy reflects concern that, based on present technology, retrieval and processing of buried waste may be risky and costly. To implement the DOE plan, EG and G Idaho, Inc., prime contractor at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), has developed a strategy for long-term management of the 2 million cubic feet of INEL buried TRU waste. That strategy involves four main activities: (a) environmental monitoring, (b) remedial action if necessary, (c) assimilation of data from both special studies and ongoing waste management activities, and (d) selection of a long-term management alternative in 1995. This report, submitted as the first in a series of annual reports, summarizes the buried TRU waste activities performed in fiscal year (FY) 1984 at the INEL in response to the DOE plan. Specifically, technologies applicable to buried waste confinement, retrieval, certification, and processing have been assessed, a long-range plan to conduct buried wasted studies over the next ten years has been prepared, and retrieval and soil management alternatives have been evaluated. 17 references, 7 figures, 1 table

  19. Technologies and Methods Used at the Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics (LASP) to Serve Solar Irradiance Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pankratz, Chris; Beland, Stephane; Craft, James; Baltzer, Thomas; Wilson, Anne; Lindholm, Doug; Snow, Martin; Woods, Thomas; Woodraska, Don

    2018-01-01

    The Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics (LASP) at the University of Colorado in Boulder, USA operates the Solar Radiation and Climate Experiment (SORCE) NASA mission, as well as several other NASA spacecraft and instruments. Dozens of Solar Irradiance data sets are produced, managed, and disseminated to the science community. Data are made freely available to the scientific immediately after they are produced using a variety of data access interfaces, including the LASP Interactive Solar Irradiance Datacenter (LISIRD), which provides centralized access to a variety of solar irradiance data sets using both interactive and scriptable/programmatic methods. This poster highlights the key technological elements used for the NASA SORCE mission ground system to produce, manage, and disseminate data to the scientific community and facilitate long-term data stewardship. The poster presentation will convey designs, technological elements, practices and procedures, and software management processes used for SORCE and their relationship to data quality and data management standards, interoperability, NASA data policy, and community expectations.

  20. Analyzing the Effect of Technology-Based Intervention in Language Laboratory to Improve Listening Skills of First Year Engineering Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pasupathi Madhumathi

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available First year students pursuing engineering education face problems with their listening skills. Most of the Indian schools use a bilingual method for teaching subjects from primary school through high school. Nonetheless, students entering university education develop anxiety in listening to classroomlectures in English. This article reports an exploratory study that aimed to find out whether the listening competences of students improved when technology was deployed in language laboratory. It also investigated the opinions of the students about using teacher-suggested websites for acquiring listening skills. The results of the study indicated that the use of technology in a language laboratory for training students in listening competences had reduced the anxiety of the students when listening to English. Further, there was a significant improvement on the part of students in acquiring listening skills through technology-based intervention.Muchos estudiantes de ingeniería de primer año en India tienen problemas con sus habilidades de escucha en inglés; experimentan ansiedad al momento de escuchar conferencias en inglés, pese a que provienen de colegios donde se sigue un modelo bilingüe para enseñar materias desde la primariahasta la secundaria. Con el objetivo de averiguar si las competencias de escucha de los estudiantes mejoran cuando se introduce la tecnología en el laboratorio de idiomas, se realizó un estudio exploratorio en el que se tuvieron en cuenta las opiniones de los estudiantes acerca del uso de sitios web sugeridos por el docente para adquirir habilidades de escucha. Los resultados indican que el uso de la tecnología en el laboratorio de idiomas reduce la ansiedad de los estudiantes al momento de escuchar conferencias en inglés y que progresan significativamente en sus habilidades de escucha.

  1. Large-scale laboratory testing of bedload-monitoring technologies: overview of the StreamLab06 Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marr, Jeffrey D.G.; Gray, John R.; Davis, Broderick E.; Ellis, Chris; Johnson, Sara; Gray, John R.; Laronne, Jonathan B.; Marr, Jeffrey D.G.

    2010-01-01

    A 3-month-long, large-scale flume experiment involving research and testing of selected conventional and surrogate bedload-monitoring technologies was conducted in the Main Channel at the St. Anthony Falls Laboratory under the auspices of the National Center for Earth-surface Dynamics. These experiments, dubbed StreamLab06, involved 25 researchers and volunteers from academia, government, and the private sector. The research channel was equipped with a sediment-recirculation system and a sediment-flux monitoring system that allowed continuous measurement of sediment flux in the flume and provided a data set by which samplers were evaluated. Selected bedload-measurement technologies were tested under a range of flow and sediment-transport conditions. The experiment was conducted in two phases. The bed material in phase I was well-sorted siliceous sand (0.6-1.8 mm median diameter). A gravel mixture (1-32 mm median diameter) composed the bed material in phase II. Four conventional bedload samplers – a standard Helley-Smith, Elwha, BLH-84, and Toutle River II (TR-2) sampler – were manually deployed as part of both experiment phases. Bedload traps were deployed in study Phase II. Two surrogate bedload samplers – stationarymounted down-looking 600 kHz and 1200 kHz acoustic Doppler current profilers – were deployed in experiment phase II. This paper presents an overview of the experiment including the specific data-collection technologies used and the ambient hydraulic, sediment-transport and environmental conditions measured as part of the experiment. All data collected as part of the StreamLab06 experiments are, or will be available to the research community.

  2. Laboratory for Calibration of Gamma Radiation Measurement Instruments (LabCal) of Institute of Chemical, Biological, Radiological and Nuclear Defense (IDQBRN) from Brazilian Army Technology Center (CTEx)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amorim, Aneuri de; Balthar, Mario Cesar V.; Santos, Avelino; Vilela, Paulo Ricardo T. de; Oliveira, Luciano Santa Rita; Penha, Paulo Eduardo C. de Oliveira; Gonzaga, Roberto Neves; Andrade, Edson Ramos de; Oliveira, Celio Jorge Vasques de; Fagundes, Luiz Cesar S.

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes the calibration laboratory deployment steps (LABCAL) gamma ionizing radiation measuring instruments in the Army Technology Center, CTEx. Initially the calibration of radiation monitors will be held in the dosimetric quantity air kerma and operational quantity ambient dose equivalent H*(d). The LABCAL / CTEx has not yet authorized by CASEC / CNEN. This laboratory aims to calibrate the ionizing radiation instruments used by the Brazilian Army. (author)

  3. Effect of Cooperative Learning and Traditional Methods on Students' Achievements and Identifications of Laboratory Equipments in Science-Technology Laboratory Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydin, Suleyman

    2011-01-01

    Science lessons taught via experiments motivate the students, and make them more insistent on learning science. This study aims to examine the effects of cooperative learning on students' academic achievements and their skills in identifying laboratory equipments. The sample for the study consisted of a total of 43 sophomore students in primary…

  4. [The historical meaning of serological surveys as a laboratory technology applied to the immunization campaigns. The case of poliomyelitis in Spain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballester, Rosa; Porras, María-Isabel

    2009-01-01

    The aim of the paper is to analyse the introduction, use and diffusion of the serological surveys, a public health technology on the borderline between epidemiology and laboratory, in connection with poliomyelitis in Spain during the Francoism period. Within the framework of the "new history" of medical technologies and innovations, the serological surveys played an important role both in the improvement of knowledge on socio-demographic distribution and the health politics arena.

  5. The Ohio Schools Pest Management Survey: A Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001

    In 2001, the Environmental Studies Senior Capstone Seminar class at Denison University helped the state of Ohio work to prevent harmful pesticide use in schools. In cooperation with Ohio State University's Integrated Pest Management (IPM) in Schools Program, Denison conducted a statewide survey of school districts to determine current pest…

  6. Ohio Department of Transportation : 2008-2009 Business Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-01

    On behalf of the new Administration of Governor Ted Strickland and the more than 6,000 hard working men and women of the Ohio Department of Transportation, I am pleased to submit the Ohio Department of Transportation 2008-2009 Business Plan. : This b...

  7. 76 FR 47221 - Ohio; Major Disaster and Related Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-04

    ... determined that the damage in certain areas of the State of Ohio resulting from severe storms and flooding... apply for assistance under the Hazard Mitigation Grant Program. (The following Catalog of Federal... of a major disaster for the State of Ohio (FEMA-4002-DR), dated July 13, 2011, and related...

  8. Roundwood markets and utilization in West Virginia and Ohio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shawn T. Grushecky; Jan Wiedenbeck; Ben. Spong

    2011-01-01

    West Virginia and Ohio have similar forest resources and extensive forest-based economies. Roundwood is harvested throughout this central Appalachian region and supports a diverse primary and secondary forest products sector. The objective of this research was to investigate the utilization of the forest resource harvested in West Virginia and Ohio. Utilization and...

  9. GED® Collapse: Ohio Needs Launch Pads, Not Barricades. Executive Summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halbert, Hannah

    2016-01-01

    The number of people attempting and passing the GED has plummeted. The Ohio economy is tough on low-wage workers with limited formal education. Without a high school diploma, it is virtually impossible to get a family-supporting job. But the GED has become a barricade, blocking Ohio workers from career goals, instead of a launching pad. Employers…

  10. Music Education in the Curriculum of Ohio Charter Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedgecoth, David M.

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of the current investigation is to examine the extent to which music education is present in the curriculum of Ohio charter schools. These community schools, as they are identified within the state, enroll over 120,000 students across Ohio. While the mission and focus of these schools are easily found in promotional literature and…

  11. Charging Electric Vehicles in Smart Cities: An EVI-Pro Analysis of Columbus, Ohio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wood, Eric W. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Rames, Clement L. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Muratori, Matteo [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Srinivasa Raghavan, Sesha [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Young, Stanley E. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2018-02-09

    With the support of the U.S. Department of Energy's Vehicle Technologies Office, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) worked with the City of Columbus, Ohio, to develop a plan for the expansion of the region's network of charging stations to support increased adoption of plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs) in the local market. NREL's Electric Vehicle Infrastructure Projection (EVI-Pro) model was used to generate scenarios of regional charging infrastructure to support consumer PEV adoption. Results indicate that approximately 400 Level 2 plugs at multi-unit dwellings and 350 Level 2 plugs at non-residential locations are required to support Columbus' primary PEV goal of 5,300 PEVs on the road by the end of 2019. This analysis finds that while consumer demand for fast charging is expected to remain low (due to modest anticipated adoption of short-range battery electric vehicles), a minimum level of fast charging coverage across the city is required to ease consumer range anxiety concerns by providing a safety net for unexpected charging events. Sensitivity analyses around some key assumptions have also been performed; of these, consumer preference for PHEV versus BEV and for their electric driving range, ambient conditions, and availability of residential charging at multi-unit dwellings were identified as key determinants of the non-residential PEV charging infrastructure required to support PEV adoption. The results discussed in this report can be leveraged by similar U.S. cities as part of a strategy to accelerate PEV adoption in the light-duty vehicle market.

  12. Vitrification pilot plant experiences at Fernald, Ohio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akgunduz, N.; Gimpel, R.F.; Paine, D.; Pierce, V.H.

    1997-01-01

    A one metric ton/day Vitrification Pilot Plant (VITPP) at Fernald, Ohio, simulated the vitrification of radium and radon bearing silo residues using representative non-radioactive surrogates containing high concentrations of lead, sulfates, and phosphates. The vitrification process was carried out at temperatures of 1,150 to 1,350 C. The VITPP processed glass for seven months, until a breach of the melter containment vessel suspended operations. More than 70,000 pounds of surrogate glass were produced by the VITPP. Experiences, lessons learned, and path forward will be presented

  13. PIE technology on mechanical tests for HTTR core component and structural materials developed at Research Hot Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kizaki, Minoru; Honda, Junichi; Usami, Kouji; Ouchi, Asao; Oeda, Etsuro; Matsumoto, Seiichiro

    2001-02-01

    The high temperature engineering test reactor (HTTR) with the target operation temperature of 950degC established the first criticality on November, 1998 based on a large amount of R and D results on fuel and materials. In such R and D works, the development of reactor materials are one of the key issues from the view point of reactor environments such as extremely high temperature, neutron irradiation and so on for the HTTR. The Research Hot Laboratory (RHL) had carried out much kind of post irradiation examinations (PIEs) on core component and pressure vessel materials for during more than a quarter century. And obtained data played an important role in development, characterization and licensing of those materials for the HTTR. This paper describes the PIE technology developed at RHL and typical results on mechanical tests such as elevated temperature tensile and creep rupture tests for Hasteloy-X, Incolloy 800H and so on, and Charpy impact, J IC fracture toughness, K Id fracture toughness and small punch tests for normalized and tempered 2 1/4Cr-1Mo steel from historical view. In addition, an electrochemical test technique established for investigating the irradiation embrittlement mechanism on 2 1/4Cr-1Mo steel is also mentioned. (author)

  14. Opinion: redefining the role of the physician in laboratory medicine in the context of emerging technologies, personalised medicine and patient autonomy ('4P medicine').

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orth, Matthias; Averina, Maria; Chatzipanagiotou, Stylianos; Faure, Gilbert; Haushofer, Alexander; Kusec, Vesna; Machado, Augusto; Misbah, Siraj A; Oosterhuis, Wytze; Pulkki, Kari; Twomey, Patrick J; Wieland, Eberhard

    2017-12-22

    The role of clinical pathologists or laboratory-based physicians is being challenged on several fronts-exponential advances in technology, increasing patient autonomy exercised in the right to directly request tests and the use of non-medical specialists as substitutes. In response, clinical pathologists have focused their energies on the pre-analytical and postanalytical phases of Laboratory Medicine thus emphasising their essential role in individualised medical interpretation of complex laboratory results. Across the European Union, the role of medical doctors is enshrined in the Medical Act. This paper highlights the relevance of this act to patient welfare and the need to strengthen training programmes to prevent an erosion in the quality of Laboratory Medicine provided to patients and their physicians. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  15. Investigation into the effects of trace coal syn gas species on the performance of solid oxide fuel cell anodes, PhD. thesis, Russ College of Engineering and Technology of Ohio University

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trembly, Jason P. [Ohio Univ., Athens, OH (United States). Russ College of Engineering and Technology

    2007-06-01

    Coal is the United States’ most widely used fossil fuel for the production of electric power. Coal’s availability and cost dictates that it will be used for many years to come in the United States for power production. As a result of the environmental impact of burning coal for power production more efficient and environmentally benign power production processes using coal are sought. Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) combined with gasification technologies represent a potential methodology to produce electric power using coal in a much more efficient and cleaner manner. It has been shown in the past that trace species contained in coal, such as sulfur, severely degrade the performance of solid oxide fuel cells rendering them useless. Coal derived syngas cleanup technologies have been developed that efficiently remove sulfur to levels that do not cause any performance losses in solid oxide fuel cells. The ability of these systems to clean other trace species contained in syngas is not known nor is the effect of these trace species on the performance of solid oxide fuel cells. This works presents the thermodynamic and diffusion transport simulations that were combined with experimental testing to evaluate the effects of the trace species on the performance of solid oxide fuel cells. The results show that some trace species contained in coal will interact with the SOFC anode. In addition to the transport and thermodynamic simulations that were completed experimental tests were completed investigating the effect of HCl and AsH3 on the performance of SOFCs.

  16. Decree-Law No. 361/79 of 8 August 1979 determining the structure and competence of the National Laboratory of Industrial Engineering and Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    This Decree-Law determines the structure and scope of the National Laboratory of Industrial Engineering and Technology (LNETI) which now includes the Nuclear Physics and Engineering Laboratory of the Junta de Energia Nuclear and its central services. The nuclear activities of the LNETI are divided into three sectors: the Department for Radiological Protection and Safety, responsible for radiation protection in nuclear installations and for the safety of nuclear equipment; the Department for Energy and Nuclear Engineering, responsible for R and D in nuclear engineering and for nuclear energy production; and finally, the Department for Nuclear Science and Technology, in charge of R and D in nuclear science and of promoting the application of nuclear technology for peaceful purposes. (NEA) [fr

  17. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Central Ohio Turns Trash Into Natural Gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Central Ohio Turns Trash Into Natural Gas to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center : Central Ohio Turns Trash Into Natural Gas on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Central Ohio Turns Trash Into Natural Gas on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Central Ohio Turns

  18. The impact of carbon taxes or allowances on the electric generation market in the Ohio and ECAR region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hadley, S.W.

    1998-07-01

    The North American electricity grid is separated into 11 regional reliability councils, collectively called the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC). The East Central Area Reliability Coordination Agreement (ECAR) is the reliability council that covers Ohio and Indiana, along with parts of Kentucky, Illinois, Maryland, Michigan, Pennsylvania, Virginia, and West Virginia. Ohio and the rest of the ECAR region rely more heavily on coal-fired generation than any other US region. The purpose of this report is to study the effect of carbon reduction policies on the cost and price of generation in the ECAR region, with an emphasis on Ohio. In order to do that, the author modeled the possible electric generation system for the ECAR and Ohio region for the year 2010 using a model developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory called the Oak Ridge Competitive Electric Dispatch model (ORCED). He let the model optimize the system based on various factors and carbon reduction policies to understand their impact. He then used the electricity prices and assumed demand elasticities to change the demands while also requiring all power plants to be profitable. The author discusses the different potential policies for carbon reduction and issues involving a restructured market; describes the model used for this analysis, the ECAR electricity sector, and the establishment of a base case; and describes the results of applying various carbon emission reduction approaches to the region. 14 figs., 5 tabs

  19. Sandia National Laboratories: Sandia National Laboratories: Missions:

    Science.gov (United States)

    Defense Systems & Assessments: About Us Sandia National Laboratories Exceptional service in ; Security Weapons Science & Technology Defense Systems & Assessments About Defense Systems & Information Construction & Facilities Contract Audit Sandia's Economic Impact Licensing & Technology

  20. Results of the radiological survey at Diebold Safe Company, 1550 Grand Boulevard, Hamilton, Ohio (HO001)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foley, R.D.; Floyd, L.M.

    1990-02-01

    At the request of the US Department of Energy (DOE), a group from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducted investigative radiological surveys at Diebold Safe Company, 1550 Grand Boulevard, Hamilton, Ohio in 1988 and 1989. The purpose of the surveys was to determine whether the property was contaminated with radioactive residues, principally 238 U. The surveys included gamma scans; direct and transferable measurements of alpha, beta, and gamma radiation levels; and dust, debris, air, and soil sampling for radionuclide analyses. 6 refs., 6 figs., 5 tabs

  1. Identification of remediation needs and technology development focus areas for the Environmental Restoration (ER) Project at Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico (SNL/NM)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tucker, M.D.

    1995-06-01

    The Environmental Restoration (ER) Project has been tasked with the characterization, assessment, remediation and long-term monitoring of contaminated waste sites at Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico (SNL/NM). Many of these sites will require remediation which will involve the use of baseline technologies, innovative technologies that are currently under development, and new methods which will be developed in the near future. The Technology Applications Program (TAP) supports the ER Project and is responsible for development of new technologies for use at the contaminated waste sites, including technologies that will be used for remediation and restoration of these sites. The purpose of this report is to define the remediation needs of the ER Project and to identify those remediation needs for which the baseline technologies and the current development efforts are inadequate. The area between the remediation needs and the existing baseline/innovative technology base represents a technology gap which must be filled in order to remediate contaminated waste sites at SNL/NM economically and efficiently. In the first part of this report, the remediation needs of the ER Project are defined by both the ER Project task leaders and by TAP personnel. The next section outlines the baseline technologies, including EPA defined Best Demonstrated Available Technologies (BDATs), that are applicable at SNL/NM ER sites. This is followed by recommendations of innovative technologies that are currently being developed that may also be applicable at SNL/NM ER sites. Finally, the gap between the existing baseline/innovative technology base and the remediation needs is identified. This technology gap will help define the future direction of technology development for the ER Project

  2. Water resources data, Ohio: Water year 1991. Volume 1, Ohio River Basin excluding project data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shindel, H.L.; Klingler, J.H.; Mangus, J.P.; Trimble, L.E.

    1992-03-01

    Water-resources data for the 1991 water year for Ohio consist of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage and contents of lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water quality of ground-water wells. This report, in two volumes, contains records for water discharge at 131 gaging stations, 378 wells, and 74 partial-record sites; and water levels at 431 observation wells. Also included are data from miscellaneous sites. Additional water data were collected at various sites not involved in the systematic data-collection program and are published as miscellaneous measurements and analyses. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System collected by the US Geological Survey and cooperating State and Federal agencies in Ohio.

  3. Survey of Laboratories and Implementation of the Federal Defense Laboratory Diversification Program. Annex A. Department of the Army Domestic Technology Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-11-01

    infrared Collective Protection Systems - based on pressure swing adsorption, reactive bed plasma , catalytic oxidation, and improved sorbents. Chemical...commercialized A waterproofbre able, solvent-phobic menbrane technology developed under cotMAct with Tempo-Shain, is planned to be commercialized by Tempo-Shain...epitaxy systems, an elect=on-cyclatron resonance plasma -etched chemical vapor deposition and etching system, a magnetron-enhanced reactive-ion etching

  4. Water Resources Data Ohio: Water year 1994. Volume 1, Ohio River Basin excluding Project Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-12-31

    The Water Resources Division of the US Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with State agencies, obtains a large amount of data each water year (a water year is the 12-month period from October 1 through September 30 and is identified by the calendar year in which it ends) pertaining to the water resources of Ohio. These data, accumulated during many years, constitute a valuable data base for developing an improved understanding of the water resources of the State. To make these data readily available to interested parties outside the USGS, they are published annually in this report series entitled ``Water Resources Data--Ohio.`` This report (in two volumes) includes records on surface water and ground water in the State. Specifically, it contains: (1) Discharge records for streamflow-gaging stations, miscellaneous sites, and crest-stage stations; (2) stage and content records for streams, lakes, and reservoirs; (3) water-quality data for streamflow-gaging stations, wells, synoptic sites, and partial-record sit -aid (4) water-level data for observation wells. Locations of lake-and streamflow-gaging stations, water-quality stations, and observation wells for which data are presented in this volume are shown in figures 8a through 8b. The data in this report represent that part of the National Water Data System collected by the USGS and cooperating State and Federal agencies in Ohio. This series of annual reports for Ohio began with the 1961 water year with a report that contained only data relating to the quantities of surface water. For the 1964 water year, a similar report was introduced that contained only data relating to water quality. Beginning with the 1975 water year, the report was changed to present (in two or three volumes) data on quantities of surface water, quality of surface and ground water, and ground-water levels.

  5. Final Report to the National Energy Technology Laboratory on FY14- FY15 Cooperative Research with the Consortium for Electric Reliability Technology Solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vittal, Vijay [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States); Lampis, Anna Rosa [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States)

    2018-01-16

    The Power System Engineering Research Center (PSERC) engages in technological, market, and policy research for an efficient, secure, resilient, adaptable, and economic U.S. electric power system. PSERC, as a founding partner of the Consortium for Electric Reliability Technology Solutions (CERTS), conducted a multi-year program of research for U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (OE) to develop new methods, tools, and technologies to protect and enhance the reliability and efficiency of the U.S. electric power system as competitive electricity market structures evolve, and as the grid moves toward wide-scale use of decentralized generation (such as renewable energy sources) and demand-response programs. Phase I of OE’s funding for PSERC, under cooperative agreement DE-FC26-09NT43321, started in fiscal year (FY) 2009 and ended in FY2013. It was administered by DOE’s National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) through a cooperative agreement with Arizona State University (ASU). ASU provided sub-awards to the participating PSERC universities. This document is PSERC’s final report to NETL on the activities for OE, conducted through CERTS, from September 2015 through September 2017 utilizing FY 2014 to FY 2015 funding under cooperative agreement DE-OE0000670. PSERC is a thirteen-university consortium with over 30 industry members. Since 1996, PSERC has been engaged in research and education efforts with the mission of “empowering minds to engineer the future electric energy system.” Its work is focused on achieving: • An efficient, secure, resilient, adaptable, and economic electric power infrastructure serving society • A new generation of educated technical professionals in electric power • Knowledgeable decision-makers on critical energy policy issues • Sustained, quality university programs in electric power engineering. PSERC core research is funded by industry, with a budget supporting

  6. Product and market study for Los Alamos National Laboratory. Building resources for technology commercialization: The SciBus Analytical, Inc. paradigm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-02-01

    The study project was undertaken to investigate how entrepreneurial small businesses with technology licenses can develop product and market strategies sufficiently persuasive to attract resources and exploit commercialization opportunities. The study attempts to answer two primary questions: (1) What key business development strategies are likely to make technology transfers successful, and (2) How should the plan best be presented in order to attract resources (e.g., personnel, funding, channels of distribution)? In the opinion of the investigator, Calidex Corporation, if the business strategies later prove to be successful, then the plan model has relevance for any technology licensee attempting to accumulate resources and bridge from technology resident in government laboratories to the commercial marketplace. The study utilized SciBus Analytical, Inc. (SciBus), a Los Alamos National Laboratory CRADA participant, as the paradigm small business technology licensee. The investigator concluded that the optimum value of the study lay in the preparation of an actual business development plan for SciBus that might then have, hopefully, broader relevance and merit for other private sector technology transfer licensees working with various Government agencies.

  7. Highlighting High Performance: National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Thermal Test Facility, Golden, Colorado. Office of Building Technology State and Community Programs (BTS) Brochure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burgert, S.

    2001-01-01

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Thermal Test Facility in Golden, Colorado, was designed using a whole-building approach-looking at the way the building's systems worked together most efficiently. Researchers monitor the performance of the 11,000-square-foot building, which boasts an energy cost savings of 63% for heating, cooling, and lighting. The basic plan of the building can be adapted to many needs, including retail and warehouse space. The Thermal Test Facility contains office and laboratory space; research focuses on the development of energy-efficiency and renewable energy technologies that are cost-effective and environmentally friendly

  8. Feasibility of Key Star Wars Technology at Center of Debate over Information a Cal. Laboratory Gave Government.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Kim

    1988-01-01

    The question of whether a university is responsible for the technical accuracy of information released by senior administrators of a laboratory it is charged with overseeing is examined in the case involving a dispute at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory that is overseen by the University of California. (MLW)

  9. Balancing Enthusiasm for Innovative Technologies with Optimizing Value: An Approach to Adopt New Laboratory Tests for Infectious Diseases Using Bloodstream Infections as Exemplar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culbreath, Karissa; Petti, Cathy A

    2015-04-01

    A number of exciting new technologies have emerged to detect infectious diseases with greater accuracy and provide faster times to result in hopes of improving the provision of care and patient outcomes. However, the challenge in evaluating new methods lies not in the technical performance of tests but in (1) defining the specific advantages of new methods over the present gold standards in a practicable way and (2) understanding how advanced technologies will prompt changes in medical and public health decisions. With rising costs to deliver care, enthusiasm for innovative technologies should be balanced with a comprehensive understanding of clinical and laboratory ecosystems and how such factors influence the success or failure of test implementation. Selecting bloodstream infections as an exemplar, we provide a 6-step model for test adoption that will help clinicians and laboratorians better define the value of a new technology specific to their clinical practices.

  10. Results of the independent radiological verification survey at the former Associate Aircraft Tool and Manufacturing Company site, Fairfield, Ohio (FOH001)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rice, D.E.; Murray, M.E.; Brown, K.S.

    1996-01-01

    The former Associate Aircraft Tool and Manufacturing Company site is located at 3550 Dixie Highway, Fairfield, Ohio. Associate Aircraft Tool and Manufacturing Company produced hollow uranium slugs in a machine shop at the site in 1956. The work was performed for National Lead of Ohio in a contract with the Atomic Energy Commission to augment the capacity of the Feed Materials Production Center at Fernald in the development of nuclear energy for defense-related projects. The current occupant of the building, Force Control, operates a multipurpose machine shop. At the request of the US Department of Energy (DOE), a team from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducted an independent radiological verification survey at the former Associate Aircraft Tool and Manufacturing Company Site, Fairfield, Ohio. The survey was performed from February to May of 1995. The purpose of the survey was to verify that radioactivity from residues of 238 U was remediated to a level below acceptable DOE guidelines levels

  11. Mechanical Components and Tribology Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This laboratory evaluates fundamental friction, wear, and lubrication technologies for improved, robust, and power-dense vehicle transmissions. The facility explores...

  12. A review of radio frequency identification technology for the anatomic pathology or biorepository laboratory: Much promise, some progress, and more work needed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lou, Jerry J; Andrechak, Gary; Riben, Michael; Yong, William H

    2011-01-01

    Patient safety initiatives throughout the anatomic laboratory and in biorepository laboratories have mandated increasing emphasis on the need for accurately identifying and tracking biospecimen assets throughout their production lifecycle and for archiving/retrieval purposes. However, increasing production volume along with complex workflow characteristics, reliance on manual production processes, and required asset movement to disparate destinations throughout asset lifecycles continue to challenge laboratory efforts. Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) technology, use of radio waves to communicate data between electronic tags attached to objects and a reader, shows significant potential to facilitate and overcome these hurdles. Advantages over traditional barcode labeling include readability without direct line-of-sight alignment to the reader, ability to read multiple tags simultaneously, higher data storage capacity, faster data transmission rate, and capacity to perform multiple read-writes of data to the tag. Most importantly, use of radio waves decreases the need to manually scan each asset, and at each step, identification or tracking event is needed. Temperature monitoring by on-board sensors and three-dimensional position tracking are additional potential benefits of using RFID technology. To date, barriers to implementation of RFID systems in the anatomic laboratory include increased associated costs of tags and readers, system software, data security concerns, lack of specific data standards for stored information, and potential for technological obsolescence during decades of specimen storage. Novel RFID production techniques and increased production capacity are projected to lower costs of some tags to a few cents each. Potentially, information security concerns can be addressed by techniques such as shielding, data encryption, and tag pseudonyms. Commitment by stakeholder groups to develop RFID tag data standards for anatomic pathology and

  13. A review of radio frequency identification technology for the anatomic pathology or biorepository laboratory: Much promise, some progress, and more work needed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerry J Lou

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Patient safety initiatives throughout the anatomic laboratory and in biorepository laboratories have mandated increasing emphasis on the need for accurately identifying and tracking biospecimen assets throughout their production lifecycle and for archiving/retrieval purposes. However, increasing production volume along with complex workflow characteristics, reliance on manual production processes, and required asset movement to disparate destinations throughout asset lifecycles continue to challenge laboratory efforts. Radio Frequency Identification (RFID technology, use of radio waves to communicate data between electronic tags attached to objects and a reader, shows significant potential to facilitate and overcome these hurdles. Advantages over traditional barcode labeling include readability without direct line-of-sight alignment to the reader, ability to read multiple tags simultaneously, higher data storage capacity, faster data transmission rate, and capacity to perform multiple read-writes of data to the tag. Most importantly, use of radio waves decreases the need to manually scan each asset, and at each step, identification or tracking event is needed. Temperature monitoring by on-board sensors and three-dimensional position tracking are additional potential benefits of using RFID technology. To date, barriers to implementation of RFID systems in the anatomic laboratory include increased associated costs of tags and readers, system software, data security concerns, lack of specific data standards for stored information, and potential for technological obsolescence during decades of specimen storage. Novel RFID production techniques and increased production capacity are projected to lower costs of some tags to a few cents each. Potentially, information security concerns can be addressed by techniques such as shielding, data encryption, and tag pseudonyms. Commitment by stakeholder groups to develop RFID tag data standards for anatomic

  14. Oak Ridge National Laboratory Support of Non-light Water Reactor Technologies: Capabilities Assessment for NRC Near-term Implementation Action Plans for Non-light Water Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belles, Randy [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Jain, Prashant K. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Powers, Jeffrey J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-04-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has a rich history of support for light water reactor (LWR) and non-LWR technologies. The ORNL history involves operation of 13 reactors at ORNL including the graphite reactor dating back to World War II, two aqueous homogeneous reactors, two molten salt reactors (MSRs), a fast-burst health physics reactor, and seven LWRs. Operation of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) has been ongoing since 1965. Expertise exists amongst the ORNL staff to provide non-LWR training; support evaluation of non-LWR licensing and safety issues; perform modeling and simulation using advanced computational tools; run laboratory experiments using equipment such as the liquid salt component test facility; and perform in-depth fuel performance and thermal-hydraulic technology reviews using a vast suite of computer codes and tools. Summaries of this expertise are included in this paper.

  15. Development of health inter-professional telemedicine practice through simulation scenario training with students of physiotherapy-, occupational therapy-, medical laboratory technology, and nursing education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nortvig, Anne-Mette; Vestergaard, Kitt

    . Aims: The purpose of the project was • to develop practice oriented competences related to telemedicine in an inter-professional and a cross-sectoral context among health professional students of physiotherapy-, occupational therapy-, medical laboratory technology-, and nursing education. • to motivate...... and retain male students by the use of simulation training that involves technology. Methodology: The project was settled as a cross-professional telemedicine course on health educations. Nursing students (N=20) and physiotherapy students (N=34) participated actively and the scenarios were filmed and enacted...

  16. Practical Environmental Education and Local Contribution in the Environmental Science Laboratory Circle in the College of Science and Technology in Nihon University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taniai, Tetsuyuki; Ito, Ken-Ichi; Sakamaki, Hiroshi

    In this paper, we presented a method and knowledge about a practical and project management education and local contribution obtained through the student activities of “Environmental science laboratory circle in the College of Science and technology in Nihon University” from 1991 to 2001. In this circle, four major projects were acted such as research, protection, clean up and enlightenment projects. Due to some problems from inside or outside of this circle, this circle projects have been stopped. The diffusion and popularization of the internet technology will help to resolve some of these problems.

  17. From the High Energy Physics Laboratory to the hospital -some experiences of the application of MWPC [multiwire proportional counter] technology to medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bateman, J.E.

    1989-01-01

    In this talk I wish to briefly review the experience we have obtained at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory over the past decade in the adaptation of MWPC (multiwire proportional counter) technology to diagnostic imaging applications in medicine. A cursory glance at the history of science and technology quickly shows the often intimate and mutually beneficial relationship between ''pure'' science (and scientists) and practical applications. The following talk traces some of the principal features of the situation which have been brought to my attention in the course of the last decade. (author)

  18. Evaluation of Ohio work zone speed zones process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-01

    This report describes the methodology and results of analyses performed to determine the effectiveness of Ohio Department of Transportation processes for establishing work zone speed zones. Researchers observed motorists speed choice upstream of a...

  19. Selenium content of foods purchased or produced in Ohio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snook, J T; Kinsey, D; Palmquist, D L; DeLany, J P; Vivian, V M; Moxon, A L

    1987-06-01

    Approximately 450 samples of about 100 types of foods consumed by rural and urban Ohioans were analyzed for selenium. Meat, dairy products, eggs, and grain products produced in Ohio have considerably lower selenium content than corresponding products produced in high selenium areas, such as South Dakota. Retail Ohio foods with interregional distribution tended to be higher in selenium content than corresponding foods produced in Ohio. Best sources of selenium in Ohio foods commonly consumed were meat and pasta products. Poor sources of selenium were fruits, most vegetables, candies, sweeteners, and alcoholic and nonalcoholic beverages. Establishment of an accurate data base for selenium depends on knowledge of the interregional distribution of foods, the selenium content of foods at their production site, and the selenium content of foods with wide local distribution.

  20. Shiitake mushroom production on small diameter oak logs in Ohio

    Science.gov (United States)

    S.M. Bratkovich

    1991-01-01

    Yields of different strains of shiitake mushrooms (Lentinus edodes) were evaluated when produced on small diameter oak logs in Ohio. Logs averaging between 3-4 inches in diameter were inoculated with four spawn strains in 1985.

  1. Ohio Department of Transportation Financial & Statistical Report : Fiscal Year 2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    On behalf of the dedicated men and women of the Ohio Department of Transportation, I share with : you this Financial and Statistical Report for State Fiscal Year 2007, documenting the state and : federal dollars invested by ODOT into preserving, main...

  2. Dedolomitization and Alkali Reactions in Ohio-sourced Dolstone Aggregates

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-11-01

    Concrete samples produced using NW-Ohio sourced aggregates were evaluated for susceptibility to degradation and premature failure due to cracks formed by the volume expansion during hydration of silica gels produced by alkali-silica reactions between...

  3. Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Lab has a proud history and heritage of almost 70 years of science and innovation. The people at the Laboratory work on advanced technologies to provide the best...

  4. Protective Systems Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This laboratory is a 40 by 28 by 9 foot facility that is equipped with tools for the development of various items of control technology related to the transmission...

  5. Cost analysis of the Ohio nursing home industry.

    OpenAIRE

    Caswell, R J; Cleverley, W O

    1983-01-01

    This study was part of a major review of long-term care policy in the state of Ohio. The authors analyzed 1532 cost reports filed by nursing homes in 1975-1976 with the Ohio Medical Assistance (Medicaid) program. The objective was to guide policy on size (economies of scale), ownership, certification status, and reimbursement. Economies of scale were not found important: skilled nursing facilities (SNFs) offered the only evidence of operation below optimal scale, and the savings attributable ...

  6. Educational area for learning of optics and technologies: union of open laboratories of ideas, methods and practices (OLIMP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivashchenko, Maksim; Bodrov, Kirill; Tolstoba, Nadezhda

    2016-09-01

    The paper deals with the concept of creating the union of Open Laboratories of Ideas, Methods and Practices (OLIMP). It describes the structure designed to simplify the relationship, such as business incubators, start-up accelerators, small innovative enterprises, fabrication laboratories and student centers. We consider their advantages and disadvantages for the specific audience of students and enthusiasts who do not have funding for their own projects. The experience of interaction between the Open Laboratories of Ideas, Methods and Practices and the Student Research Laboratory for Optical Engineering shows the relative impact of structures on each other and the value of using such interaction in the learning process. The paper also addresses issues such as: the motivation of students, enthusiasm for the direction the lab participants identify and maintain the initiatives, profiling in the design, scientific, commercial, social sphere.

  7. Pushing the Horizon. Seventy-Five Years of High Stakes Science and Technology at the Naval Research Laboratory

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Amato, Ivan

    2001-01-01

    .... Tracing the Laboratory from its small and often inauspicious origins of today's large, multi disciplinary research center, Amato sets in context many of the important research events and fronts...

  8. Factors influencing smokeless tobacco use in rural Ohio Appalachia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemeth, Julianna M; Liu, Sherry T; Klein, Elizabeth G; Ferketich, Amy K; Kwan, Mei-Po; Wewers, Mary Ellen

    2012-12-01

    The burden of smokeless tobacco (ST) use disproportionally impacts males in rural Ohio Appalachia. The purpose of this study was to describe the cultural factors contributing to this disparity and to articulate the way in which culture, through interpersonal factors (i.e. social norms and social networks) and community factors (i.e. marketing and availability), impacts ST initiation and use of ST among boys and men in Ohio Appalachia. Fifteen focus groups and 23 individual qualitative interviews were conducted with adult (n = 63) and adolescent (n = 53) residents in Ohio Appalachian counties to ascertain factors associated with ST use and the impact of ST marketing. Transcriptions were independently coded according to questions and themes. ST use appears to be a rite of passage in the development of masculine identity in Ohio Appalachian culture. Interpersonal factors had the greatest influence on initiation and continued use of ST. Ohio Appalachian boys either emulated current ST users or were actively encouraged to use ST through male family and peer networks. Users perceived their acceptance into the male social network as predicated on ST use. Community factors, including ST advertisement and access to ST, reinforced and normalized underlying cultural values. In addition to policy aimed at reducing tobacco marketing and access, interventions designed to reduce ST use in Ohio Appalachia should incorporate efforts to (1) shift the perception of cultural norms regarding ST use and (2) address male social networks as vehicles in ST initiation.

  9. Factors Influencing Smokeless Tobacco Use in Rural Ohio Appalachia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemeth, Julianna M.; Liu, Sherry T.; Klein, Elizabeth G.; Ferketich, Amy K.; Kwan, Mei-Po; Wewers, Mary Ellen

    2015-01-01

    Background The burden of smokeless tobacco (ST) use disproportionally impacts males in rural Ohio Appalachia. The purpose of this study was to describe the cultural factors contributing to this disparity and to articulate the way in which culture, through interpersonal factors (i.e. social norms and social networks) and community factors (i.e. marketing and availability), impacts ST initiation and use of ST among boys and men in Ohio Appalachia. Methods Fifteen focus groups and twenty-three individual qualitative interviews were conducted with adult (n=63) and adolescent (n=53) residents in Ohio Appalachian counties to ascertain factors associated with ST use and the impact of ST marketing. Transcriptions were independently coded according to questions and themes. Results ST use appears to be a rite of passage in the development of masculine identity in Ohio Appalachian culture. Interpersonal factors had the greatest influence on initiation and continued use of ST. Ohio Appalachian boys either emulated current ST users or were actively encouraged to use ST through male family and peer networks. Users perceived their acceptance into the male social network as predicated on ST use. Community factors, including ST advertisement and access to ST, reinforced and normalized underlying cultural values. Conclusions In addition to policy aimed at reducing tobacco marketing and access, interventions designed to reduce ST use in Ohio Appalachia should incorporate efforts to 1) shift the perception of cultural norms regarding ST use and 2) address male social networks as vehicles in ST initiation. PMID:22427033

  10. Communications and Information Sharing (CIS) Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — TheCommunications and Information Sharing (CIS) Laboratory is a Public Safety interoperable communications technology laboratory with analog and digital radios, and...

  11. Radiological characterization survey results for Gaskill Hall, Miami University, Oxford, Ohio (OXO015)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kleinhans, K.R.; Murray, M.E.; Carrier, R.F.

    1996-04-01

    Between October 1952 and February 1957, National Lead of Ohio (NLO), a primary contractor for the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC), subcontracted certain uranium machining operations to Alba Craft Laboratory, Incorporated, located at 10-14 West Rose Avenue, Oxford, Ohio. In 1992, personnel from Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) confirmed the presence of residual radioactive materials from the AEC-related operations in and around the facility in amounts exceeding the applicable Department of Energy (DOE) guidelines. Although the amount of uranium found on the property posed little health hazard if left undisturbed, the levels were sufficient to require remediation to bring radiological conditions into compliance with current guidelines, thus ensuring that the public and the environment are protected. Because it was suspected that uranium may have been used in the past in the immediate vicinity of Alba Craft in a Miami University building a team from ORNL, performed a radiological characterization survey of that structure in January 1994. The survey was conducted at the request of DOE as a precautionary measure to ensure that no radioactive residuals were present at levels exceeding guidelines. The survey included the determination of directly measured radiation levels and the collection of smear samples to detect possible removable alpha and beta-gamma activity levels, and comparison of these data to the guidelines. Results of the survey showed that all measurements were below the applicable guideline limits set by DOE

  12. Can technical laboratory skills be taught at a distance? An analysis of a semiconductor course taught at a distance via interactive technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Lalita

    2000-10-01

    This study investigated extending synchronous distance learning to teaching courses in the psychomotor domain in real-time, with immediate, direct feedback on technical skills performance from an instructor at a remote site via interactive technologies such as videoconferencing. This study focused on two research questions (1) can interactive distance learning technologies be used to teach technical and/or trouble shooting skills that fall under psychomotor domain? and, (2) to what degree can psychomotor skills be taught at a distance? A technical course, "RF Power PC 211L" from a technical and vocational institute was selected and the instructor who had no prior experience in teaching a distance learning course taught the course. Data on cognitive skills, psychomotor technical skills, attitudes and perceptions, demographics as well as boundary conditions on teaching psychomotor skills was gathered from both remote and the main campus. Instruments used for data gathering were final course grades, total points in laboratory exercise, pre and post course surveys, demographic survey and open-ended interviews with the instructor, student and review of instructor journal were used to address the two research questions. The main campus course was taught to the remote campus via distance learning technology in a distance learning format. The main technology used was videoconferencing. Both campus classrooms had the RF Trainer equipment. The rooms were set up to facilitate distance learning in the classroom. The instructor was present only at the main campus. The students on the remote campus were the experimental group. The experimental group participated in all course activities such as demonstrations, laboratory exercises, learning conceptual skills and tests only via distance. These students only had the benefit of laboratory assistant. The role of the laboratory assistant was to assist students/instructor as needed, ensure the safety of students and equipment and

  13. Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant expansion, Piketon, Ohio. Volume 1. Draft environmental statement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-06-01

    Subject to authorizing legislation and funding, ERDA will proceed with steps for additional uranium enrichment capacity at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant near Piketon, Ohio. This environmental statement was prepared by ERDA to cover this action. The statement was prepared in accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969, and ERDA's implementing regulations, 10 CFR Chapter III, Part 711. The statement describes the reasonably foreseeable environmental, social, economic and technological costs and benefits of the construction and operation of the expanded enrichment plant and its reasonably available alternatives and their anticipated effects

  14. Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant expansion, Piketon, Ohio. Volume 1. Draft environmental statement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1976-06-01

    Subject to authorizing legislation and funding, ERDA will proceed with steps for additional uranium enrichment capacity at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant near Piketon, Ohio. This environmental statement was prepared by ERDA to cover this action. The statement was prepared in accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969, and ERDA's implementing regulations, 10 CFR Chapter III, Part 711. The statement describes the reasonably foreseeable environmental, social, economic and technological costs and benefits of the construction and operation of the expanded enrichment plant and its reasonably available alternatives and their anticipated effects.

  15. Los Alamos National Laboratory: Request for Information (RFI) – Call for Commercialization Partners on behalf of the Department of Energy’s Fuel Cell Technologies Office (FCTO) L’Innovator Pilot Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barber, Laura Jeaneen [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-01-19

    The purpose of the L’Innovator is to assemble unique, state-of-the-art IP bundles developed at the national labs that aggregate synergistic technologies in furtherance of the emerging hydrogen and fuel cell market. The first L’Innovator IP bundle consists of Oxygen Reduction Reaction (ORR) Catalyst technology developed at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), combined with Membrane Electrode Assembly (MEA) technology developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL).

  16. Laboratory Experiments on the Effects of Blade Strike from Hydrokinetic Energy Technologies on Larval and Juvenile Freshwater Fishes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schweizer, Peter E [ORNL; Cada, Glenn F [ORNL; Bevelhimer, Mark S [ORNL

    2012-03-01

    concern that small, fragile fish early life stages may be unable to avoid being struck by the blades of hydrokinetic turbines, we found no empirical data in the published literature that document survival of earliest life-stage fish in passage by rotor blades. In addition to blade strike, research on passage of fish through conventional hydropower turbines suggested that fish mortalities from passage through the rotor swept area could also occur due to shear stresses and pressure chances in the water column (Cada et al. 1997, Turnpenny 1998). However, for most of the proposed HK turbine designs the rotors are projected to operate a lower RPM (revolutions per minute) than observed from conventional reaction turbines; the associated shear stress and pressure changes are expected to be lower and pose a smaller threat to fish survival (DOE 2009). Only a limited number of studies have been conducted to examine the risk of blade strike from hydrokinetic technologies to fish (Turnpenny et al. 1992, Normandeau et al. 2009, Seitz et al. 2011, EPRI 2011); the survival of drifting or weakly swimming fish (especially early life stages) that encounter rotor blades from hydrokinetic (HK) devices is currently unknown. Our study addressed this knowledge gap by testing how fish larvae and juveniles encountered different blade profiles of hydrokinetic devices and how such encounters influenced survivorship. We carried out a laboratory study designed to improve our understanding of how fish larvae and juvenile fish may be affected by encounters with rotor blades from HK turbines in the water column of river and ocean currents. (For convenience, these early life stages will be referred to as young of the year, YOY). The experiments developed information needed to quantify the risk (both probability and consequences) of rotor-blade strike to YOY fish. In particular, this study attempted to determine whether YOY drifting in a high-velocity flow directly in the path of the blade leading edge

  17. GSPEL - Fuel Cell Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Fuel Cell Lab (FCL)Established to investigate, integrate, testand verifyperformance and technology readiness offuel cell systems and fuel reformers for use with...

  18. Head Impact Laboratory (HIL)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The HIL uses testing devices to evaluate vehicle interior energy attenuating (EA) technologies for mitigating head injuries resulting from head impacts during mine/...

  19. Practical development of laboratory of biologics technology of the Palladin Institute of Biochemistry of NAS of Ukraine for the period 1991-2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. G. Lugovska

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the results of inventive activity of the Laboratory of Biologics Technology of the Palladin Institute of Biochemistry, NAS of Ukraine, under the leadership of Z.M.Datsenko, Cand.Sc. (Biol., during 1991-2010. The laboratory researchers have developed new technologies for production of medicines of lipid-protein nature, which are based on endogenous complexes of biologically active substances included in the composition of biomembranes of different origin. The researchers have created new technologies for drug PANTOCRINE (for injections and oral administration from antlers of deers and horns of farm animals that have significantly higher biological activity compared with the commercial drug. They have also created new biologically active drugs from antlers with a specific action: HIPPOCAMP, reducing blood pressure in various forms of hypertension, and PANTERON – biological regulator of synthesis of steroid hormones. Further the researchers have developed technologies for obtaining biologically active complexes of various specific action from marine organisms (calamari, clams mussels, shellfish: CALMOFIL and MOLUFIL, therapeutic agents for replacement therapy of surfactant system of the lungs; FILOMEK, the agent for prophylaxis and treatment of a human reproductive system disorders; MOLUSTERON, the glicolipopeptide complex, three individual physiologically active compositions being differentially obtained from the latter: lipopeptide composition – for treatment of hypertension, nucleopeptide one – for treatment of hormonal disorders, and phospholipid – for treatment of lung diseases under the surfactant shortage.

  20. Overdose Deaths Related to Fentanyl and Its Analogs - Ohio, January-February 2017.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniulaityte, Raminta; Juhascik, Matthew P; Strayer, Kraig E; Sizemore, Ioana E; Harshbarger, Kent E; Antonides, Heather M; Carlson, Robert R

    2017-09-01

    Ohio is experiencing unprecedented loss of life caused by unintentional drug overdoses (1), with illicitly manufactured fentanyl (IMF) emerging as a significant threat to public health (2,3). IMF is structurally similar to pharmaceutical fentanyl, but is produced in clandestine laboratories and includes fentanyl analogs that display wide variability in potency (2); variations in chemical composition of these drugs make detection more difficult. During 2010-2015, unintentional drug overdose deaths in Ohio increased 98%, from 1,544 to 3,050.* In Montgomery County (county seat: Dayton), one of the epicenters of the opioid epidemic in the state, unintentional drug overdose deaths increased 40% in 1 year, from 249 in 2015 to 349 in 2016 (estimated unadjusted mortality rate = 57.7 per 100,000) (4). IMFs have not been part of routine toxicology testing at the coroner's offices and other types of medical and criminal justice settings across the country (2,3). Thus, data on IMF test results in the current outbreak have been limited. The Wright State University and the Montgomery County Coroner's Office/Miami Valley Regional Crime Laboratory (MCCO/MVRCL) collaborated on a National Institutes of Health study of fentanyl analogs and metabolites and other drugs identified in 281 unintentional overdose fatalities in 24 Ohio counties during January-February 2017. Approximately 90% of all decedents tested positive for fentanyl, 48% for acryl fentanyl, 31% for furanyl fentanyl, and 8% for carfentanil. Pharmaceutical opioids were identified in 23% of cases, and heroin in 6%, with higher proportions of heroin-related deaths in Appalachian counties. The majority of decedents tested positive for more than one type of fentanyl. Evidence suggests the growing role of IMFs, and the declining presence of heroin and pharmaceutical opioids in unintentional overdose fatalities, compared with 2014-2016 data from Ohio and other states (3-5). There is a need to include testing for IMFs as part

  1. Engineering Related Technology: A Laboratory and Curriculum Design for the Newly Emerging Technology of Pollution-Corrosion Measurement and Control. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shields, F. K.; And Others

    In order to meet the educational needs for a separate curriculum at the secondary level for technological training related to pollution and corrosion measurement and control, a 3-year, 1080-hour vocational program was developed for use in an area vocational high school. As one of four programs in the technology careers area, this curriculum design…

  2. Fundamental Research on Percussion Drilling: Improved rock mechanics analysis, advanced simulation technology, and full-scale laboratory investigations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michael S. Bruno

    2005-12-31

    This report summarizes the research efforts on the DOE supported research project Percussion Drilling (DE-FC26-03NT41999), which is to significantly advance the fundamental understandings of the physical mechanisms involved in combined percussion and rotary drilling, and thereby facilitate more efficient and lower cost drilling and exploration of hard-rock reservoirs. The project has been divided into multiple tasks: literature reviews, analytical and numerical modeling, full scale laboratory testing and model validation, and final report delivery. Literature reviews document the history, pros and cons, and rock failure physics of percussion drilling in oil and gas industries. Based on the current understandings, a conceptual drilling model is proposed for modeling efforts. Both analytical and numerical approaches are deployed to investigate drilling processes such as drillbit penetration with compression, rotation and percussion, rock response with stress propagation, damage accumulation and failure, and debris transportation inside the annulus after disintegrated from rock. For rock mechanics modeling, a dynamic numerical tool has been developed to describe rock damage and failure, including rock crushing by compressive bit load, rock fracturing by both shearing and tensile forces, and rock weakening by repetitive compression-tension loading. Besides multiple failure criteria, the tool also includes a damping algorithm to dissipate oscillation energy and a fatigue/damage algorithm to update rock properties during each impact. From the model, Rate of Penetration (ROP) and rock failure history can be estimated. For cuttings transport in annulus, a 3D numerical particle flowing model has been developed with aid of analytical approaches. The tool can simulate cuttings movement at particle scale under laminar or turbulent fluid flow conditions and evaluate the efficiency of cutting removal. To calibrate the modeling efforts, a series of full-scale fluid hammer

  3. Deployable Laboratory Applications of Nano- and Bio-Technology (Applications de nanotechnologie et biotechnologie destinees a un laboratoire deployable)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    specialists in hygiene, microbiology , epidemiology or veterinary epidemiology; 3 laboratory technicians and 4 engineers. Designation of special...Transportable Microbiology Laboratory 3-1 3.1 Challenges and Issues 3-1 3.2 Objectives 3-1 3.3 Responses 3-1 3.3.1 Constitution 3-1 3.3.2 Deployment 3-3 3.4...Bundeswehr Institute of Microbiology Neuherbergstrasse 11 80937 Munich GERMANY Email: Romanwoelfel@bundeswehr.org viii STO-TR-HFM-177

  4. Real time Intelligent Control Laboratory (RT-ICL) of PowerLabDK for smart grid technology development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ostergaard, Jacob; Wu, Qiuwei; Garcia-Valle, Rodrigo

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the Intelligent Control Laboratory (ICL) of the PowerLabDK and describes examples of ongoing research work utilizing the ICL. The ICL is comprised of a real time digital simulator (RTDS) with 5 racks, a full scale SCADA system and experimental control room with a link to the B......This paper presents the Intelligent Control Laboratory (ICL) of the PowerLabDK and describes examples of ongoing research work utilizing the ICL. The ICL is comprised of a real time digital simulator (RTDS) with 5 racks, a full scale SCADA system and experimental control room with a link...

  5. Culham Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-06-01

    The report contains summaries of work carried out under the following headings: fusion research experiments; U.K. contribution to the JET project; supporting studies; theoretical plasma physics, computational physics and computing; fusion reactor studies; engineering and technology; contract research; external relations; staff, finance and services. Appendices cover main characteristics of Culham fusion experiments, staff, extra-mural projects supported by Culham Laboratory, and a list of papers written by Culham staff. (U.K.)

  6. Sandia National Laboratories:

    Science.gov (United States)

    Environmental Management System Pollution Prevention History 60 impacts Diversity Locations Facts & Figures Programs Nuclear Weapons About Nuclear Weapons Safety & Security Weapons Science & Technology Robotics R&D 100 Awards Laboratory Directed Research & Development Technology Deployment Centers

  7. Technical assistance to Ohio closure sites; Recommendations toaddress contaminated soils, concrete, and corrective action managementunit/groundwater contamination at Ashtabula, Ohio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Charoglu, Emily; Eddy-Dilek, Carol; Gombert, Dirk; Hazen, Terry; Johnson, Bob; Looney, Brian; Krstich, Michael A.; Rautman, Chris; Tripp,Julia; Whitmill, Larry

    2002-08-26

    The Ashtabula Environmental Management Project (AEMP) at Department of Energy-Ohio (DOE-OH) requested technical assistance from the EM-50 Lead Lab to aid in defining new cost and time effective approaches in the following problem areas: soils, concrete, and groundwater/Corrective Action Management Unit (CAMU) at RMIES in Ashtabula, Ohio. Attachment 1 provides the site request for assistance. The technical assistance team assembled for this request is provided in Attachment 2. These individuals reviewed key site information prior to convening with DOE and contractor personnel (RMIES and Earthline) for a three-and-a-half-day meeting to better understand baseline technologies, limitations, and site-specific issues. After listening to presentations about the nature and extent of known contamination, the team broke out into several groups to brainstorm ideas and develop viable solutions. This executive summary details unresolved issues requiring management attention as well as recommendations to address soils, concrete, and groundwater/CAMU. It also provides a summary of additional technical assistance that could be provided to the site. More details are presented in the body of this report.

  8. Recovery of 241Am/Be neutron sources, Wooster, Ohio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tompkins, J.A.; Wannigman, D.; Hatler, V.

    1998-07-01

    In August 1997, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) submitted to the US Department of Energy (DOE) a partial list of licensed radioactive sealed sources to be recovered under a pilot project initiating Radioactive Source Recovery Program (RSRP) operations. The first of the pilot project recoveries was scheduled for September 1997 at Eastern Well Surveys in Wooster, Ohio, a company with five unwanted sealed sources on the NRC list. The sources were neutron emitters, each containing 241 Am/Be with activities ranging from 2.49 to 3.0 Ci. A prior radiological survey had established that one of these sources, a Gulf Nuclear Model 71-1 containing 3 Ci of 241 Am, was contaminated with 241 Am and might be leaking. The other four sources were obsolete and could no longer be used by Eastern Well Surveys for their intended application in well-logging applications due to NRC decertification of these sources. All of the sources exceeded the limits established for Class C waste under 10 CFR 61.55 and, as a result, are the ultimate responsibility of the DOE under the provisions of PL 99-240. This report describes the cooperative effort between the DOE and NRC to recover the sources and transport them to Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) for deactivation under the RSRP. This operation alleviated any potential risk to the public health and safety from the site which might result from the leaking neutron sources or the potential mismanagement of unwanted sources. The on-site recovery occurred on September 23, 1997, and was performed by personnel from LANL and its contractor and was observed by staff from the Region III office of the NRC. All aspects of the recovery were successfully accomplished, and the sources were received at LANL on September 29, 1997. Experience gained during this operation will be used to formulate operational poilicies and procedures which will contribute to the eventual routine recovery operations of a full-scale RSRP

  9. Deployment of Phytotechnology in the 317/319 Area at Argonne National Laboratory-East, Innovative Technology Evaluation Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hybrid poplar and hybrid willow trees were planted for several environmental objectives at the Argonne National Laboratory - East, near Chicago, IL. Some trees were planted to clean TCE and other solvents from soil, some were planted to control surface water flow on a landfill, a...

  10. Chemical Technology Division progress report for the period April 1, 1981-March 31, 1983. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1983-09-01

    Separate abstracts were prepared for eight sections of the report: nuclear waste management; fossil energy; basic science and technology; biotechnology and environmental programs; transuranium-element processing; Nuclear Regulatory Commission programs; Three Mile Island support studies; and miscellaneous programs.

  11. Argonne National Laboratory papers presented at third ANS topical meeting on the technology of controlled nuclear fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    The 9 papers included in this Technical Memorandum were presented at the Third ANS Topical Meeting on the Technology of Controlled Nuclear Fusion that was held in Santa Fe, New Mexico on May 9-11, 1978

  12. Regulating the unknown: Managing the occupational health risks of nanomedical technologies and nanopharmaceuticals in the research laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ersin, Ozlem Hacer

    Novel technologies and their resultant products demand fresh ways of thinking about pre-market risk analysis and post-market surveillance. A regulatory framework that is responsive to emerging knowledge about the hazards of novel technologies offers repeatable and transparent processes and remains economically and socially feasible. Workers are an especially vulnerable population who are exposed to unknown hazards of novel technologies and serve often as unwitting sentinels of impending risks. This Grounded Theory-based case study identifies gaps in our current ability to regulate novel technologies so as to minimize occupational health risks and offers necessary modifications for an environment that is conducive to proper regulation. Nanopharmaceuticals and the nano-based technologies at their base are used by way of exemplar technologies that are currently taxing the ability of the regulatory system to provide adequate oversight. Ambiguities of definition, absence of a tracking system (of who is doing nanotechnology research), and the paucity of scientific evidence to support risk management efforts are among the findings of the study and need to be addressed as ameliorative steps toward an effective regulatory structure.

  13. Research on Heat Recovery Technology for Reducing the Energy Consumption of Dedicated Ventilation Systems: An Application to the Operating Model of a Laboratory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lian Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this research, the application of heat pipes in the air handler dedicated to decoupling dehumidification from cooling to reduce energy consumption was simulated and investigated by simulations and experimental studies. The cooling load profiles and heat pipes with effectiveness of 0.45 and 0.6, respectively, were evaluated in achieving the desired space conditions and calculated hour by hour. The results demonstrated that for all examined cases, a heat pipe heat exchanger (HPHX can be used to save over 80% of the energy during the hours of operation of air conditioning. The overall energy reduction rate was from 3.2% to 4.5% under air conditioning system conditions. It was found that the energy saving potential of a laboratory was higher than for other kinds of buildings. Therefore, the dedicated ventilation system combined with heat recovery technology can be efficiently applied to buildings, especially for laboratories in subtropical areas.

  14. Implementation of the Gamma Monitor Calibration Laboratory (LABCAL) of the Institute of Chemical, Biological, Radiological and Nuclear Defense (IDQBRN) of the Technology Center of the Brazilian Army (CTEx)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balthar, Mario Cesar V.; Amorim, Aneuri de; Santos, Avelino dos and others, E-mail: mariobalthar@gmail.com [Centro Tecnológico do Exército (IDQBRN/CTEx), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Instituto de Defesa Química, Biológica, Radiológica e Nuclear

    2017-07-01

    The objective of this work is to describe the implementation and adaptation stages of the Gamma Monitor Calibration Laboratory (Laboratório de Calibração de Monitores Gama - LABCAL) of the Institute of Chemical, Biological, Radiological and Nuclear Defense (Instituto de Defesa Química, Biológica, Radiológica e Nuclear - IDQBRN) of the Technology Center of the Brazilian Army (Centro Tecnológico do Exército - CTEx). Calibration of the radiation monitors used by the Brazilian Army will be performed by quantitatively measuring the ambient dose equivalent, in compliance with national legislation. LABCAL still seeks licensing from CNEN and INMETRO. The laboratory in intended to supply the total demand for calibration of ionizing radiation devices from the Brazilian Army. (author)

  15. Implementation of the Gamma Monitor Calibration Laboratory (LABCAL) of the Institute of Chemical, Biological, Radiological and Nuclear Defense (IDQBRN) of the Technology Center of the Brazilian Army (CTEx)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balthar, Mario Cesar V.; Amorim, Aneuri de; Santos, Avelino dos and others

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this work is to describe the implementation and adaptation stages of the Gamma Monitor Calibration Laboratory (Laboratório de Calibração de Monitores Gama - LABCAL) of the Institute of Chemical, Biological, Radiological and Nuclear Defense (Instituto de Defesa Química, Biológica, Radiológica e Nuclear - IDQBRN) of the Technology Center of the Brazilian Army (Centro Tecnológico do Exército - CTEx). Calibration of the radiation monitors used by the Brazilian Army will be performed by quantitatively measuring the ambient dose equivalent, in compliance with national legislation. LABCAL still seeks licensing from CNEN and INMETRO. The laboratory in intended to supply the total demand for calibration of ionizing radiation devices from the Brazilian Army. (author)

  16. Real-Time Soils Characterization and Analyses Systems Used at Ohio Closure Sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roybal, Lyle Gene; Carpenter, Michael Vance; Giles, John Robert; Hartwell, John Kelvin; Danahy, R.

    2003-01-01

    The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) and the Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP) have jointly developed a field-deployed analytical system to rapidly scan, characterize, and analyze surface soil contamination. The basic system consists of a sodium iodide (NaI) spectrometer and global positioning system (GPS) hardware. This hardware can be deployed from any of four different platforms depending on the scope of the survey at hand. These platforms range from a large tractor-based unit (the RTRAK) used to survey large, relatively flat areas to a hand-pushed unit where maneuverability is important, to an excavator mounted system used to scan pits and trenches. The mobile sodium iodide concept was initially developed by the FEMP to provide pre-screening analyses for soils contaminated with uranium, thorium, and radium. The initial study is documented in the RTRAK Applicability Study and provides analyses supporting the field usage of the concept. The RTRAK system produced data that required several days of post-processing and analyses to generate an estimation of field coverage and activity levels. The INEEL has provided integrated engineering, computer hardware and software support to greatly streamline the data acquisition and analysis process to the point where real-time activity and coverage maps are available to the field technicians. On-line analyses have been added to automatically convert GPS data to Ohio State-Plane coordinates, examine and correct collected spectra for energy calibration drifts common to NaI spectrometers, and strip spectra in regions of interest to provide moisture corrected activity levels for total uranium, thorium-232, and radium-226. Additionally, the software provides a number of checks and alarms to alert operators that a hand-examination of spectral data in a particular area may be required. The FEMP has estimated that this technology has produced projected site savings in excess of $34M

  17. URBAN SPRAWL MODELING, AIR QUALITY MONITORING AND RISK COMMUNICATION: THE NORTHEAST OHIO PROJECT

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Northeast Ohio Urban Sprawl, Air Quality Monitoring, and Communications Project (hereafter called the Northeast Ohio Project) provides local environmental and health information useful to residents, local officials, community planners, and others in a 15 county region in the ...

  18. Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of the Residential Provisions of the 2015 IECC for Ohio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendon, Vrushali V. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Zhao, Mingjie [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Taylor, Zachary T. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Poehlman, Eric A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-02-15

    The 2015 IECC provides cost-effective savings for residential buildings in Ohio. Moving to the 2015 IECC from the 2009 IECC base code is cost-effective for residential buildings in all climate zones in Ohio.

  19. OhioHealth web site wins awards. Draws leadership recognition for outstanding redesign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rees, Tom

    2004-01-01

    OhioHealth, Columbus, Ohio, has redesigned its web site, making it especially useful and appealing to women. For the collaborative effort, which included the Mayo Clinic and The VIA Group, Portland Maine, it has received numerous awards.

  20. Sandia National Laboratories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilliom, Laura R.

    1992-01-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has identified technology transfer to U.S. industry as a laboratory mission which complements our national security mission and as a key component of the Laboratory's future. A number of technology transfer mechanisms - such as CRADA's, licenses, work-for-others, and consortia - are identified and specific examples are given. Sandia's experience with the Specialty Metals Processing Consortium is highlighted with a focus on the elements which have made it successful. A brief discussion of Sandia's potential interactions with NASA under the Space Exploration Initiative was included as an example of laboratory-to-NASA technology transfer. Viewgraphs are provided.

  1. Laboratory study on the cooling effect of flash water evaporative cooling technology for ventilation and air-conditioning of buildings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fang, Lei; Yuan, Shu; Yang, Jianrong

    environments and the other simulated an air-conditioned indoor environment. The flash water evaporation cooling device was installed in the chamber that simulated indoor environment. The air from the chamber simulating outdoor environment was introduced into the cooling device and cooled by the flash water......, is effective for ventilation and air-conditioning in warm/hot and dry climate zones. The technology can provide fresh outdoor air with a temperature of 4 to 7 °C lower than room air temperature.......This paper presents a simple cooling technology using flash water evaporation. The technology combines a water atomizer with a plate heat exchanger used for heat recovery of a ventilation system. It is mainly used to cool the ventilation airflow from outdoors and is particularly suitable to be used...

  2. Living laboratory for Nikola Tesla. Living laboratories, Tesla, Second Life, sustainable construction technologies and renewable energy sources; Wohnlabor fuer Nikola Tesla. Ueber Wohnlabors, Tesla, Second Life, nachhaltige Bautechnologien und erneuerbare Energie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Redi, Ivan; Redi, Andrea; Jovanovic, Branimir (and others)

    2008-07-01

    Adventure is the opposite of conventional teaching. Adventure is the moment when experience alone is not enough. Sometimes, courageous people challenge the nature of things, helping us to get new insights and achieve a new viewpoint. The experience-oriented ''work in progress'' university is an adventure of this kind. The book looks into the Tesla laboratory and the Wardenclyffe Tower, both of which could not be completed for financial reasons, and addresses them from today's state of technology. The conceptional section is based on the ''Tesla doctrine'' which comprises fundamental philosophical statements on civilisatory progress. The book presents the results of the investigation. The 16 architectural projects presented here were developed live on the online platform. Second Life, ORTLOS Sim. (orig.)

  3. Application of virtual reality technology to activities for offering information to the general public in the Mizunami Underground Research Laboratory Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, Hiroshi; Kawase, Keiichi; Sugihara, Kozo; Yamamoto, Junta

    2000-01-01

    The Tono Geoscience Center is carrying out the Mizunami Underground Research Laboratory Project (MIU Project), as part of its scientific research program, in Mizunami City, Gifu Prefecture. We believe that the public and especially the local residents should have a precise understanding of the MIU project. Therefore, to provide information we have used virtual reality (VR) technology in the project since 1996. Software to introduce both the MIU Project and the geology of the Tono district has been completed. The Tono district is characterized by uranium ore deposits, and by clay deposits which are used by the pottery industry. Software with some amusement value, such as hot spring drilling, has also been completed. We plan further software development of VR technology to increase the feeling of realism. (author)

  4. 75 FR 65696 - Ohio Disaster #OH-00025 Declaration of Economic Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-26

    ... Counties: Auglaize, Mercer. Contiguous Counties: Ohio: Allen, Darke, Hardin, Logan, Shelby, Van Wert... SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION [Disaster Declaration 12359] Ohio Disaster OH-00025 Declaration of... Economic Injury Disaster Loan (EIDL) declaration for the State of Ohio, dated 10/19/2010. Incident: Toxic...

  5. Fire history in the Ohio River Valley and its relation to climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel A. Yaussy; Elaine Kennedy. Sutherland

    1994-01-01

    Annual wildfire records (1926-77) from the national forests in states bordering the Ohio River (lllinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Missouri, Ohio, and West Virginia) were compared to climate records to assess relationships. Summaries of spring and fall fire seasons obtained for the Daniel Boone National Forest in Kentucky (1970-92) and for the State of Ohio (1969-84,...

  6. 75 FR 17281 - Changes in Hourly Fee Rates for Science and Technology Laboratory Services-Fiscal Years 2010-2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-06

    ... mathematical formula used to calculate the apportioned rate for each fee charge category for fiscal year 2010... procedures which must be exhausted prior to any judicial challenge to this rule or the application of its... 20250-0270. (7) Statistics Branch Office. The Statistics Branch office of Science and Technology...

  7. Science to support the understanding of Ohio's water resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaffer, Kimberly; Kula, Stephanie; Bambach, Phil; Runkle, Donna

    2012-01-01

    Ohio’s water resources support a complex web of human activities and nature—clean and abundant water is needed for drinking, recreation, farming, and industry, as well as for fish and wildlife needs. The distribution of rainfall can cause floods and droughts, which affects streamflow, groundwater, water availability, water quality, recreation, and aquatic habitats. Ohio is bordered by the Ohio River and Lake Erie and has over 44,000 miles of streams and more than 60,000 lakes and ponds (State of Ohio, 1994). Nearly all the rural population obtain drinking water from groundwater sources. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) works in cooperation with local, State, and other Federal agencies, as well as universities, to furnish decisionmakers, policymakers, USGS scientists, and the general public with reliable scientific information and tools to assist them in management, stewardship, and use of Ohio’s natural resources. The diversity of scientific expertise among USGS personnel enables them to carry out large- and small-scale multidisciplinary studies. The USGS is unique among government organizations because it has neither regulatory nor developmental authority—its sole product is reliable, impartial, credible, relevant, and timely scientific information, equally accessible and available to everyone. The USGS Ohio Water Science Center provides reliable hydrologic and water-related ecological information to aid in the understanding of use and management of the Nation’s water resources, in general, and Ohio’s water resources, in particular. This fact sheet provides an overview of current (2012) or recently completed USGS studies and data activities pertaining to water resources in Ohio. More information regarding projects of the USGS Ohio Water Science Center is available at http://oh.water.usgs.gov/.

  8. Count Data On Cancer Death In Ohio A Bayesian Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walaa Hamdi

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper considers statistical modeling of count data on cancer death in Ohio State. We obtained count data on male and female from a website of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and used Bayesian analyses to find suitable models which help us to do inferences and predictions for next year. To assist us in selecting appropriate models we use criteria such as the DIC. In this paper we analyze the data to spatial longitudinal so we can capture possible correlations. Using our analyses we make predictions of the numbers of people who will die with cancer in a future year in Ohio State.

  9. Blending technology in teaching advanced health assessment in a family nurse practitioner program: using personal digital assistants in a simulation laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Lydia; DeCristofaro, Claire; Carpenter, Alesia

    2012-09-01

    This article describes the development and implementation of integrated use of personal handheld devices (personal digital assistants, PDAs) and high-fidelity simulation in an advanced health assessment course in a graduate family nurse practitioner (NP) program. A teaching tool was developed that can be utilized as a template for clinical case scenarios blending these separate technologies. Review of the evidence-based literature, including peer-reviewed articles and reviews. Blending the technologies of high-fidelity simulation and handheld devices (PDAs) provided a positive learning experience for graduate NP students in a teaching laboratory setting. Combining both technologies in clinical case scenarios offered a more real-world learning experience, with a focus on point-of-care service and integration of interview and physical assessment skills with existing standards of care and external clinical resources. Faculty modeling and advance training with PDA technology was crucial to success. Faculty developed a general template tool and systems-based clinical scenarios integrating PDA and high-fidelity simulation. Faculty observations, the general template tool, and one scenario example are included in this article. ©2012 The Author(s) Journal compilation ©2012 American Academy of Nurse Practitioners.

  10. Waste management and technologies analytical database project for Los Alamos National Laboratory/Department of Energy. Final report, June 7, 1993--June 15, 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    The Waste Management and Technologies Analytical Database System (WMTADS) supported by the Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Environmental Management (EM), Office of Technology Development (EM-50), was developed and based at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Los Alamos, New Mexico, to collect, identify, organize, track, update, and maintain information related to existing/available/developing and planned technologies to characterize, treat, and handle mixed, hazardous and radioactive waste for storage and disposal in support of EM strategies and goals and to focus area projects. WMTADS was developed as a centralized source of on-line information regarding technologies for environmental management processes that can be accessed by a computer, modem, phone line, and communications software through a Local Area Network (LAN), and server connectivity on the Internet, the world's largest computer network, and with file transfer protocol (FTP) can also be used to globally transfer files from the server to the user's computer through Internet and World Wide Web (WWW) using Mosaic

  11. In situ technology evaluation and functional and operational guidelines for treatability studies at the radioactive waste management complex at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hyde, R.A.; Donehey, A.J.; Piper, R.B.; Roy, M.W.; Rubert, A.L.; Walker, S.

    1991-07-01

    The purpose of this document is to provide EG ampersand G Idaho's Waste Technology Development Department with a basis for selection of in situ technologies for demonstration at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) and to provide information for Feasibility Studies to be performed according to the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA). The demonstrations will aid in meeting Environmental Restoration/Waste Management (ER/WM) schedules for remediation of waste at Waste Area Group (WAG) 7. This report is organized in six sections. Section 1, summarizes background information on the sites to be remediated at WAG-7, specifically, the acid pit, soil vaults, and low-level pits and trenches. Section 2 discusses the identification and screening of in situ buried waste remediation technologies for these sites. Section 3 outlines the design requirements. Section 4 discusses the schedule [in accordance with Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration (BWID) scoping]. Section 5 includes recommendations for the acid pit, soil vaults, and low-level pits and trenches. A listing of references used to compile the report is given in Section 6. Detailed technology information is included in the Appendix section of this report

  12. Biological restoration of major transportation facilities domestic demonstration and application project (DDAP): technology development at Sandia National Laboratories.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramsey, James L., Jr. (.,; .); Melton, Brad; Finley, Patrick; Brockman, John; Peyton, Chad E.; Tucker, Mark David; Einfeld, Wayne; Griffith, Richard O.; Brown, Gary Stephen; Lucero, Daniel A.; Betty, Rita G.; McKenna, Sean Andrew; Knowlton, Robert G.; Ho, Pauline

    2006-06-01

    The Bio-Restoration of Major Transportation Facilities Domestic Demonstration and Application Program (DDAP) is a designed to accelerate the restoration of transportation nodes following an attack with a biological warfare agent. This report documents the technology development work done at SNL for this DDAP, which include development of the BROOM tool, an investigation of surface sample collection efficiency, and a flow cytometry study of chlorine dioxide effects on Bacillus anthracis spore viability.

  13. Utica Shale Energy and Environment Laboratory (USEEL)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, D. R.

    2017-12-01

    Despite the rapid growth of the UOG industry in the Appalachian Basin of Pennsylvania and neighboring states, there are still fundamental concerns regarding the environmentally sound and cost efficient extraction of this unique asset. To address these concerns, Ohio State University has established the Department of Energy-funded Utica Shale Energy and Environment Laboratory, a dedicated research program where scientists from the university will work with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), academia, industry, and regulatory partners, to measure and monitor reservoir response to UOG development and any associated environmental concerns. The USEEL site will be located in Greene County, Pennsylvania, in the heart of the deep Utica-Pt. Pleasant Shale play of the Appalachian Basin. The USEEL project team will characterize and quantify the gas-producing attributes of one of the deepest portions of the Utica-Pt. Pleasant formations in the Appalachian Basin via a multi-disciplinary collaboration that leverages state-of-the-art capabilities in geochemistry, core assessment, well design and logging, 3-D and micro-seismic, DTS and DAS fiber optics, and reservoir modelling. Fracture and rock strength analyses will be complemented by a comprehensive suite of geophysical and geochemical logs, water and chip samples, and cores (pressure sidewall and whole core) to evaluate fluids, mineral alteration, microbes, pore structure, and hydrocarbon formation and alteration in the shale pore space. Located on an existing Marcellus drill pads in southwestern Pennsylvania, USEEL will provide an unprecedented opportunity to evaluate the economic and environmental effects of Marcellus pad expansion on the integrity of near-by existing production wells, ground disruption and slope stability, and ultimate efforts to conduct site reclamation. Combined with the overall goal of an improved understanding of the Utica-Pt. Pleasant system, USEEL

  14. Practical problems in the transfer of the food irradiation technology from the laboratory to the industry and trade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henon, Y.

    1986-09-01

    Not all applications of food irradiation developed in laboratories appear feasible at the commercial level. Without taking into account the social and economic factors, some of the obstacles regarding the commodities themselves and some practical aspects of a commercial irradiator are reviewed. The dose distribution found in most facilities make it almost impossible to irradiate products with a narrow dose range tolerance. Treatment of perishable commodities may turn to be difficult, especially in contract facilities, as it is not easy to plan. Similarly, combination of processes will not always be achievable. Applications to products for which the production is both seasonal and scattered do not appear feasible. Some progress is still needed in fields such as, packaging to avoid insect reinfestation after irradiation routine dosimetry and irradiators design

  15. Laboratory testing results of kinetics and processing technology of the polymetallic sulphide concentrate Blagojev Kamen – Serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milorad Ćirković

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This work presents the laboratory testing results of kinetics the oxidation process and sample processing of the sulphide polymetallic concentrate Blagojev Kamen. The aim of investigation is recovery of these types of raw material, present in large quantities in the peripheral parts of already used primary mineral deposits of copper, because of their high economic potential due to the content of a large number of metals and especially precious metals. Characterization of this raw material is based on the chemical analyses, XRD results, DTA analysis, etc. For these investigations, the sulphide concentrate with the following content was used in %: Cu – 2.3; Fe – 19.8; S – 27.19; Zn – 9.13; As – 0.167; Pb – 15.63; SiO2 – 17.93; CaO – 0.97; Al2O3 – 1.43; Ag – 480 g/t; Au – 659 g/t. Kinetic investigations of oxidation processes were carried out under the isothermal conditions within the temperature range of 400 to 625 oC. The Sharp's model was used for determination the kinetics parameters, and determined values of activation energy are 67 kJ/mole for the first period, and 47 kJ/mole for the second period. Pyrometallurgical treatment of this type of polymetallic concentrate, in the laboratory conditions, was carried out using the oxidative roasting and, then the reduction smelting was done in the Taman's furnace. Gold from 90.5 to 97.95% and silver from 77.28 to 93.37% are moved into the raw lead (smelting product. Gold from 1.1 to 3.92% and silver from 4.35 to 8.42% are moved into the polymetallic copper matte. Gold from 0.58 to 1.6% and silver from 2.45 to 6.82% are moved into the slag.

  16. Bioassay Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Bioassay Laboratory is an accredited laboratory capable of conducting standardized and innovative environmental testing in the area of aquatic ecotoxicology. The...

  17. HYDROMECHANICS LABORATORY

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Naval Academy Hydromechanics LaboratoryThe Naval Academy Hydromechanics Laboratory (NAHL) began operations in Rickover Hall in September 1976. The primary purpose of...

  18. Marketing Technology. FasTrak Specialization Integrated Technical and Academic Competency (ITAC). Revised.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohio State Dept. of Education, Columbus. Div. of Career-Technical and Adult Education.

    This document presents the Ohio Integrated Technical and Academic Competency profile for marketing technology. The profile is to serve as the basis for curriculum development in Ohio's secondary, adult, and postsecondary programs. The profile includes a comprehensive listing of 580 specialty and foundation key indicators for evaluating mastery of…

  19. Cost and emissions impacts of plug-in hybrid vehicles on the Ohio power system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sioshansi, Ramteen; Fagiani, Riccardo; Marano, Vincenzo

    2010-01-01

    Plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs) have been promoted as a potential technology that can reduce vehicles' fuel consumption, decreasing transportation-related emissions and dependence on imported oil. The net emission and cost impacts of PHEV use are intimately connected with the electricity generator mix used for PHEV charging, which will in turn depend on when during the day PHEVs are recharged. This paper analyzes the effects of a PHEV fleet in the state of Ohio. The analysis considers two different charging scenarios-a controlled and an uncontrolled scenario-which offer the grid operator different levels of control over the timing of PHEV charging. The analysis shows that PHEV use could result in major reductions in gasoline consumption of close to 70% per vehicle compared to a conventional vehicle (CV) under both charging scenarios. Moreover, despite the high penetrations of coal in the Ohio power system, net CO 2 emissions from a PHEV could be up to 24% lower than that of a CV in the uncontrolled case, however, CO 2 and NO x emissions would increase in both scenarios.

  20. Computational and Genomic Analysis of Mycobacteriophage: A Longitudinal Study of Technology Engineered Biology Courses That Implemented an Inquiry Based Laboratory Practice Designed to Enhance, Encourage, and Empower Student Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollowell, Gail P.; Osler, James E.; Hester, April L.

    2015-01-01

    This paper provides an applied research rational for a longitudinal investigation that involved teaching a "Technology Engineered Science Education Course" via an Interactive Laboratory Based Genomics Curriculum. The Technology st Engineering [TE] methodology was first introduced at the SAPES: South Atlantic Philosophy of Education…

  1. Communication Supports in Congregate Residential Care Settings in Ohio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Pamela R.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Communication skills are important to the pursuit of increased self-determination in individuals with disabilities. The aim of this investigation was to gather information about communication supports in state-run residential care facilities in Ohio, and to compare findings with a previous investigation on this topic examining such…

  2. Ohio Financial Services and Risk Management. Technical Competency Profile (TCP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Gayl M.; Wilson, Nick; Mangini, Rick

    This document describes the essential competencies from secondary through post-secondary associate degree programs for a career in financial services and risk management. Ohio College Tech Prep Program standards are described, and a key to profile codes is provided. Sample occupations in this career area, such as financial accountant, loan…

  3. Operation and Maintence, Vermilion Harbor, Erie County, Ohio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-03-01

    Aphanozomenon flos- aguae . The Ohio EPA reports that on a yearly average, Cyclotella, Stephanodiscus and pennate diatoms are predominant, particularly during the...for both recre- ational and potable water uses (71). For recreational uses (swimming, boating, skiing, etc.), the number of total coliforms per 100 ml

  4. Travel and Tourism Marketing. Ohio's Competency Analysis Profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Vocational Instructional Materials Lab.

    Developed through a modified DACUM (Developing a Curriculum) process involving business, industry, labor, and community agency representatives in Ohio, this document is a comprehensive and verified employer competency profile for travel and tourism occupations. The list contains units (with and without subunits), competencies, and competency…

  5. An Analysis of the Charter School Facility Landscape in Ohio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesla, Kevin; Johnson, Jessica M.; Chambers, Darlene; Truett, Jesse; Conry, Julie; Hatt, Trint; Holliman, RaShaun; Ziebarth, Todd

    2016-01-01

    In the spring of 2015, the National Charter School Resource Center (NCSRC), the Colorado League of Charter Schools (the League), the Ohio Alliance for Public Charter Schools (OAPCS), and the National Alliance for Public Charter Schools (the Alliance) collaborated to collect data and information about charter school facilities and facilities…

  6. Ohio Legal Office Managment. Technical Competency Profile (TCP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Gayl M.; Wilson, Nick; Mangini, Rick

    This document, which lists core business and legal office management competencies identified by representatives from education and business and industry throughout Ohio, is intended to assist individuals and organizations in developing college tech prep programs that will prepare students from secondary through post-secondary associate degree…

  7. CONSULT-I Reading. Ohio Project. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Anabel; And Others

    A study examined the effectiveness of the 1991-1992 implementation of the CONSULT-I(R) program (which uses artificial intelligence with statistical pattern recognition in constructing a diagnosis and recommending treatment of reading difficulties) at five cities in Ohio (Akron, Cincinnati, Cleveland, Columbus, and Toledo). A total of 30 teachers…

  8. Profiles of Merit Pay Provisions in Ohio School Districts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, Chris; Ingle, W. Kyle

    2018-01-01

    A small number of districts in Ohio from a variety of locales have adopted merit pay provisions. Using Springer's (2009) taxonomy of teacher compensation, we analyzed compensation provisions of these districts. We asked: What are the characteristics of these districts? What criteria are used to determine merit? Who is determining who receives…

  9. How Primary Teacher Teams Understand the Team Protocol in Ohio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willoughby, Julie

    2016-01-01

    Teacher teams can be more effective when protocols are used in their entirety; and because of this, use of and understanding Ohio's five-step process is important (Gallimore, Ermeling, Saunders & Goldenberg, 2009, Saunders, Goldenberg & Gallimore, 2009, and Schwaenberger & Ahearn, 2013). This study explored the understanding of…

  10. Graphic Communications--Commercial Photography. Ohio's Competency Analysis Profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Vocational Instructional Materials Lab.

    This Ohio Competency Analysis Profile (OCAP), derived from a modified Developing a Curriculum (DACUM) process, is a current comprehensive and verified employer competency program list for graphic communications--commercial photography. Each unit (with or without subunits) contains competencies and competency builders that identify the…

  11. Digital Learning Compass: Distance Education State Almanac 2017. Ohio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seaman, Julia E.; Seaman, Jeff

    2017-01-01

    This brief report uses data collected under the U.S. Department of Education's National Center for Educational Statistics (NCES) Integrated Postsecondary Education Data System (IPEDS) Fall Enrollment survey to highlight distance education data in the state of Ohio. The sample for this analysis is comprised of all active, degree-granting…

  12. Hospitality and Facility Care Services. Ohio's Competency Analysis Profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Vocational Instructional Materials Lab.

    Developed through a modified DACUM (Developing a Curriculum) process involving business, industry, labor, and community agency representatives in Ohio, this document is a comprehensive and verified employer competency profile for hospitality and facility care occupations. The list contains units (with and without subunits), competencies, and…

  13. Evaluating the Impact of Performance Funding in Ohio and Tennessee

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillman, Nicholas W.; Hicklin Fryar, Alisa; Crespín-Trujillo, Valerie

    2018-01-01

    Today, 35 states use performance-based funding models tying appropriations directly to educational outcomes. Financial incentives should induce colleges to improve performance, but there are several well-documented reasons why this is unlikely to occur. We examine how two of the most robust performance funding states--Tennessee and Ohio--responded…

  14. Seasonal influence on Ohio hardwood stumpage price trends

    Science.gov (United States)

    T. Eric. McConnell

    2014-01-01

    The average annual percentage rates of change in real sawtimber stumpage prices from 1978 through 2012 (dollars per thousand board feet, Doyle) for the 10 commercial hardwood species of Ohio were determined. Each species was then further examined for differing trend lines between the spring and fall reporting periods. Annual real rates of change ranged from -1.10...

  15. The Use of Institutional Repositories: The Ohio State University Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connell, Tschera Harkness

    2011-01-01

    In this paper the author compares the use of digital materials that have been deposited in The Ohio State University (OSU) Knowledge Bank (KB). Comparisons are made for content considered in scope of the university archives and those considered out of scope, for materials originating from different campus sources, and for different types of…

  16. Factors influencing smokeless tobacco use in rural Ohio Appalachia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nemeth, J.M.; Liu, S.-T.; Klein, E.G.; Ferketich, A.K.; Kwan, M.P.; Wewers, M.E.

    2012-01-01

    The burden of smokeless tobacco (ST) use disproportionally impacts males in rural Ohio Appalachia. The purpose of this study was to describe the cultural factors contributing to this disparity and to articulate the way in which culture, through interpersonal factors (i.e. social norms and

  17. 78 FR 27853 - Asian Longhorned Beetle; Quarantined Areas in Ohio

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-13

    ...-0004] Asian Longhorned Beetle; Quarantined Areas in Ohio AGENCY: Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, USDA. ACTION: Interim rule and request for comments. SUMMARY: We are amending the Asian... to prevent the artificial spread of the Asian longhorned beetle to noninfested areas of the United...

  18. Clustering of multiple sclerosis in Galion, Ohio, 1982-1985

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ingalls, T.H. (Boston Univ. School of Medicine, MA (USA))

    1989-09-01

    Epidemiologic evidence indicates that the outbreak of 30-40 cases of multiple sclerosis and other demyelinating syndromes in Galion, Ohio, USA, during 1982-1985 was related to an excess concentration of heavy-metal wastes, especially of cadmium and chromium in sewage and river water. Both multiple sclerosis and myasthenia gravis were diagnosed by board-certified neurologists.

  19. Effects of Teacher Evaluation on Teacher Job Satisfaction in Ohio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downing, Pamela R.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this quantitative study was to explore whether or not increased accountability measures found in the Ohio Teacher Evaluation System (OTES) impacted teacher job satisfaction. Student growth measures required by the OTES increased teacher accountability. Today, teachers are largely evaluated based on the results of what they do in the…

  20. Ohio Marketing Management and Research. Technical Competency Profile (TCP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Gayl M.; Wilson, Nick; Mangini, Rick

    This document provides a framework for a broad-based secondary and postsecondary curriculum to prepare students for employment in marketing management and research (MMR). The first part of the technical competency profile (TCP) contains the following items: an explanation of the purpose and scope of Ohio's TCPs; college tech prep program…

  1. Ohio's Resource Guide to Reduce Chronic Absenteeism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohio Department of Education, 2017

    2017-01-01

    It is important for every student in Ohio to attend school every day. Missing too much school has longterm, negative effects on students, such as lower achievement and graduation rates. There are many reasons students miss school, but districts often can directly impact their students' attendance. By using data to identify and support students who…

  2. 78 FR 5476 - Ohio; Major Disaster and Related Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-25

    ... flooding due to the remnants of Hurricane Sandy during the period October 29-30, 2012, is of sufficient... following areas of the State of Ohio have been designated as adversely affected by this major disaster... Unemployment Assistance (DUA); 97.046, Fire Management Assistance Grant; 97.048, Disaster Housing Assistance to...

  3. Annual technology assessment and progress report for the Buried Transuranic Waste Studies Program at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (1987)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loomis, G.G.; Low, J.O.

    1988-01-01

    This report presents FY-87 activities for the Buried Transuranic (TRU) Waste Studies Program at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). This program investigates techniques to provide long-term confinement of buried TRU waste, as well as methods of retrieval. The confinement method of in situ grouting was examined in a simulated shallow-land buried TRU waste pit constructed adjacent to the RWMC TRU waste burial pits. The in situ grouting technique involved an experimental dyanmic compaction process which simultaneously grouts and compacts the waste. The simulated waste pit consisted of regions of randomly dumped drums, stacked boxes, and stacked drums, thus representing the various conditions of buried waste at the RWMC. Simulated waste and airborne tracers were loaded into the various simulated buried waste containers. Pregrouting and post-grouting data, such as hydraulic conductivity, were obtained to assess the hydrological integrity of the grouted waste material. In addition, post-grouting destructive examinations were performed and the results analyzed. Retrieval and processing of the TRU buried waste is also being examined at the INEL. At a conceptual level, retrieval of TRU buried waste involves a movable containment building to confine airborne particulate, heavy equipment to remove the waste, processing equipment, and equipment to control the air quality within the building. Studies were performed in FY-87 to identify containment building requirements such as type, mobility, and ventilation. An experimental program to demonstrate the retrieval technique using existing INEL heavy equipment has also been identified. 11 refs., 17 figs., 11 tabs

  4. Space power technology for the twenty-first century (SPT21)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borger, W.U.; Massie, L.D.

    1988-01-01

    During the spring and summer months of 1987, the Aero Propulsion Laboratory of the Air Force Wright Aeronautical Laboratories, Wright-Patterson AFB, Ohio in cooperation with the Air Force Space Technology Center at Kirtland AFB, New Mexico, undertook an initiative to develop a Strategic Plan for Space Power Technology Development. The initiative was called SPT21, Space Power Technology for the Twenty-First Century. The planning process involved the participation of other Government organizations (U.S. Army, Navy, DOE and NASA) along with major aerospace companies and universities. Following an SPT21 kickoff meeting on 28 May 1987, detailed strategic planning was accomplished through seven (7) Space Power Technology Discipline Workshops commencing in June 1987 and concluding in August 1987. Technology Discipline Workshops were conducted in the following areas: (1) Solar Thermal Dynamic Power Systems (2) Solar Photovoltaic Cells and Arrays (3) Thermal Management Technology (4) Energy Storage Technology (5) Nuclear Power Systems Technology (6) Power Conditioning, Distribution and Control and (7) Systems Technology/Advanced Concepts. This technical paper summarizes the planning process and describes the salient findings and conclusions of the workshops

  5. Proceedings of the second milestone meeting of European laboratories on the development of ferritic/martensitic steels for fusion technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daum, E.; Ehrlich, K.; Schirra, M.

    1997-05-01

    In the frame of the European Fusion Technology Program a series of ferritic/martensitic developmental alloys, the composition of which had been optimized towards low long-term activation, was investigated and compared with conventional 9-12%CrMoVNb steels. It could be shown that by these chemical modifications neither the physical metallurgy nor the transformation behavior was changed markedly. Tensile-, creep-rupture- and fatigue properties are somewhat reduced, whereas the fracture toughness and impact data are far superior to conventional materials. This is an important advantage, especially if the expected detrimental effect of neutron irradiation on the latter properties is taken into account. First results of low-fluence irradiations indicate that the new alloys are less prone to irradiation-induced DBTT shifts. (orig./HM) [de

  6. Ohio dentists' awareness and incorporation of the dental home concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammersmith, Kimberly J; Siegal, Mark D; Casamassimo, Paul S; Amini, Homa

    2013-06-01

    The authors measured the awareness of the dental home concept among pediatric dentists (PDs) and general practice dentists (GPs) in Ohio and determined whether they included dental home characteristics for children 5 years and younger into their practices. The authors sent a pretested 20-question survey to all Ohio PDs and to a random sample of approximately 20 percent of GPs in Ohio. The authors designed the survey to elicit information about dental home awareness and the extent to which dental home characteristics were incorporated into dental practices. More than 90 percent of both GPs and PDs incorporated or intended to incorporate into their dental practices the specific dental home characteristics mentioned in 20 of 41 items related to dental home characteristics. Of the respondents who did not already incorporate dental home characteristics into their practices, however, most did not intend to do so. Less than 50 percent of respondents in both groups responded positively to some items in the culturally effective group, and GPs were less likely than were PDs to provide a range of behavior management services and to provide treatment for patients with complex medical and dental treatment needs. PDs were more likely than were GPs to accept Ohio Medicaid (64 versus 33 percent). PDs were more likely than were GPs (78 versus 18 percent) to be familiar with the term "dental home." More recent dental school graduates were more familiar with the term. Most Ohio PDs' and GPs' practices included characteristics found in the definition of dental home, despite a general lack of concept awareness on the part of GPs. Research is needed to provide an evidence base for the dental home. Practical Implications. Once an evidence base is developed for the important aspects of the dental home and the definition is revised, efforts should be made to incorporate these aspects more broadly into dental practice.

  7. 78 FR 12049 - The East Ohio Gas Company d/b/a Dominion East Ohio; Dominion Transmission, Inc.; Notice of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-21

    ... Gas Company d/b/a Dominion East Ohio; Dominion Transmission, Inc.; Notice of Abbreviated Application for Limited Amendment to Certificate of Public Convenience and Necessity On February 11, 2013, The...''), filed an abbreviated application for limited amendment to certificate of public convenience and...

  8. DCS Hydraulic Submission for Medina County, Ohio

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Recent developments in digital terrain and geospatial database management technology make it possible to protect this investment for existing and future projects to...

  9. DCS Hydraulic Submission for Hamilton County, Ohio

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Recent developments in digital terrain and geospatial database management technology make it possible to protect this investment for existing and future projects to...

  10. DCS Hydraulic Submission for Morgan County, Ohio

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Recent developments in digital terrain and geospatial database management technology make it possible to protect this investment for existing and future projects to...

  11. DCS Hydraulic Submission for Washington County, Ohio

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Recent developments in digital terrain and geospatial database management technology make it possible to protect this investment for existing and future projects to...

  12. DCS Hydraulic Submission for Lawrence County, Ohio

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Recent developments in digital terrain and geospatial database management technology make it possible to protect this investment for existing and future projects to...

  13. DCS Hydraulics Submission for Gallia County, Ohio

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Recent developments in digital terrain and geospatial database management technology make it possible to protect this investment for existing and future projects to...

  14. DCS Hydraulics Submission for Fairfield County, Ohio

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Recent developments in digital terrain and geospatial database management technology make it possible to protect this investment for existing and future projects to...

  15. DCS Hydraulics Submission for Noble County, Ohio

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Recent developments in digital terrain and geospatial database management technology make it possible to protect this investment for existing and future projects to...

  16. DCS Hydraulics Submission for Brown County, Ohio

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Recent developments in digital terrain and geospatial database management technology make it possible to protect this investment for existing and future projects to...

  17. DCS Hydraulics Submission for Perry County, Ohio

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Recent developments in digital terrain and geospatial database management technology make it possible to protect this investment for existing and future projects to...

  18. DCS Hydraulics Submission for Madison County, Ohio

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Recent developments in digital terrain and geospatial database management technology make it possible to protect this investment for existing and future projects to...

  19. DCS Hydraulics Submission for Clark County, Ohio

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Recent developments in digital terrain and geospatial database management technology make it possible to protect this investment for existing and future projects to...

  20. National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Topic 2 Final Report: End-to-End Communication and Control System to Support Clean Energy Technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hudgins, Andrew P. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Carrillo, Ismael M. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Jin, Xin [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Simmins, John [Electric Power Research Inst. (EPRI), Palo Alto, CA (United States)

    2018-02-21

    This document is the final report of a two-year development, test, and demonstration project, 'Cohesive Application of Standards- Based Connected Devices to Enable Clean Energy Technologies.' The project was part of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL's) Integrated Network Testbed for Energy Grid Research and Technology (INTEGRATE) initiative hosted at Energy Systems Integration Facility (ESIF). This project demonstrated techniques to control distribution grid events using the coordination of traditional distribution grid devices and high-penetration renewable resources and demand response. Using standard communication protocols and semantic standards, the project examined the use cases of high/low distribution voltage, requests for volt-ampere-reactive (VAR) power support, and transactive energy strategies using Volttron. Open source software, written by EPRI to control distributed energy resources (DER) and demand response (DR), was used by an advanced distribution management system (ADMS) to abstract the resources reporting to a collection of capabilities rather than needing to know specific resource types. This architecture allows for scaling both horizontally and vertically. Several new technologies were developed and tested. Messages from the ADMS based on the common information model (CIM) were developed to control the DER and DR management systems. The OpenADR standard was used to help manage grid events by turning loads off and on. Volttron technology was used to simulate a homeowner choosing the price at which to enter the demand response market. Finally, the ADMS used newly developed algorithms to coordinate these resources with a capacitor bank and voltage regulator to respond to grid events.

  1. SOME RECENT TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENTS FROM THE UK'S NATIONAL NUCLEAR LABORATORY TO ENABLE HAZARD CHARACTERISATION FOR NUCLEAR DECOMMISSIONING APPLICATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farfan, E.; Foley, T.

    2010-02-11

    Under its programme of self investment Internal Research and Development (IR&D), the UK's National Nuclear Laboratory (NNL) is addressing the requirement for development in technology to enable hazard characterisation for nuclear decommissioning applications. Three such examples are described here: (1) RadBall developed by the NNL (patent pending) is a deployable baseball-sized radiation mapping device which can, from a single location, locate and quantify radiation hazards. RadBall offers a means to collect information regarding the magnitude and distribution of radiation in a given cell, glovebox or room to support the development of a safe, cost effective decontamination strategy. RadBall requires no electrical supplies and is relatively small, making it easy to be deployed and used to map radiation hazards in hard to reach areas. Recent work conducted in partnership with the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) is presented. (2) HiRAD (patent pending) has been developed by the NNL in partnership with Tracerco Ltd (UK). HiRAD is a real-time, remotely deployed, radiation detection device designed to operate in elevated levels of radiation (i.e. thousands and tens of thousands of Gray) as seen in parts of the nuclear industry. Like the RadBall technology, the HiRAD system does not require any electrical components, the small dimensions and flexibility of the device allow it to be positioned in difficult to access areas (such as pipe work). HiRAD can be deployed as a single detector, a chain, or as an array giving the ability to monitor large process areas. Results during the development and deployment of the technology are presented. (3) Wireless Sensor Network is a NNL supported development project led by the University of Manchester (UK) in partnership with Oxford University (UK). The project is concerned with the development of wireless sensor network technology to enable the underwater deployment and communication of miniaturised probes allowing pond

  2. Superconductivity program for electric systems, Superconductivity Technology Center, Los Alamos National Laboratory, annual progress report for fiscal year 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Willis, J.O.; Newnam, B.E. [eds.; Peterson, D.E.

    1999-03-01

    Development of high-temperature superconductors (HTS) has undergone tremendous progress during the past year. Kilometer tape lengths and associated magnets based on BSCCO materials are now commercially available from several industrial partners. Superconducting properties in the exciting YBCO coated conductors continue to be improved over longer lengths. The Superconducting Partnership Initiative (SPI) projects to develop HTS fault current limiters and transmission cables have demonstrated that HTS prototype applications can be produced successfully with properties appropriate for commercial applications. Research and development activities at LANL related to the HTS program for Fiscal Year 1997 are collected in this report. LANL continues to support further development of Bi2223 and Bi2212 tapes in collaboration with American Superconductor Corporation (ASC) and Oxford Superconductivity Technology, Inc. (OSTI), respectively. The tape processing studies involving novel thermal treatments and microstructural characterization have assisted these companies in commercializing these materials. The research on second-generation YBCO-coated conductors produced by pulsed-laser deposition (PLD) over buffer template layers produced by ion beam-assisted deposition (IBAD) continues to lead the world. The applied physics studies of magnetic flux pinning by proton and heavy ion bombardment of BSCCO and YBCO tapes have provided many insights into improving the behavior of these materials in magnetic fields. Sections 4 to 7 of this report contain a list of 29 referred publications and 15 conference abstracts, a list of patent and license activities, and a comprehensive list of collaborative agreements in progress and completed.

  3. Spectral range calculation inside the Research Irradiating Facility Army Technology Center using code MCNPX and comparison with the spectra of energy Caesium 137 raised in laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomes, Renato G.; Rebello, Wilson F.; Cavaliere, Marcos Paulo; Vellozo, Sergio O.; Moreira Junior, Luis; Vital, Helio C.; Silva, Ademir X.

    2013-01-01

    Using the MCNPX code, the objective was to calculate by means of computer simulation spectroscopy range inside the irradiation chamber upper radiator gamma research irradiating facility Army Technology Center (CTEx). The calculations were performed in the spectral range usual 2 points for research purposes irradiating the energy spectra of gamma rays from the source of Cesium chloride 137. Sought the discretization of the spectrum in 100 channels at points of upper bound of 1cm higher and lower dose rates previously known. It was also conducted in the laboratory lifting the spectrum of Cesium-137 source using NaI scintillator detector and multichannel analyzer. With the source spectrum Cesium-137 contained in the literature and raised in the laboratory, both used as reference for comparison and analysis in terms of probability of emission maximum of 0.661 MeV The spectra were quite consistent in terms of the behavior of the energy distributions with scores. The position of maximum dose rate showed absorption detection almost maximum energy of 0.661 MeV photopeak In the spectrum of the position of minimum dosage rate, it was found that due to the removal of the source point of interest, some loss detection were caused by Compton scattering. (author)

  4. Intellectual Freedom and the National Laboratories : 2000 Sigma Xi Forum New Ethical Challenges in Science and Technology, November 9-10, 2000, Albuquerque, New Mexico"

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Browne, John C.

    2001-01-01

    scientific realm. It really does not permit them the freedom to roam at will outside of their areas of technical expertise into the realm of policy without clearly stating that their remarks are those of a private citizen and must be handled, therefore, outside of the laboratory business. This is a major issue within our laboratories, and I think one that we try to nurture very carefully, because without it, we think that there would be a closing up of laboratories because of the type of classified work that we do. The issues that I hope we might explore in this session include, (1) how do you give technical advice to a policymaker? Where do you draw the line with respect to your judgment, your advice versus your opinion, which can change how government attacks very significant societal problems: (2) The issue of security and classification. How does that affect the intellectual freedom of our staff? (3) Dealing with the public on matters of risk. I am going to add to that, also, dealing with our employees on matters of risk, because one of the things that we're finding as we get better with our detection technology and our screening technologies, we now find out about how employees might be susceptible to illnesses, such as berylliosis, problems with beryllium sensitivity. What ethical issues arise when you now have the ability to learn more about impacts on, not only the public, but your employees as well? We share similar types of problems that Bob Dynes mentioned: conflict of interest, intellectual property questions. And we also have the conflict of interest as an institution. And I'll just mention one--perhaps it could come up in the discussion-is in the past year we had an issue with respect to how the Congress and the Administration handled the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty. What kind of eihical issues arise in testing on our technical judgment regarding the CTBT versus institutional conflict of interest? Questions were raised. Were the laboratory directors

  5. Jobs: Ohio's Future. Creating a High Performance Workforce for Ohio. A Comprehensive Workforce Development Strategy Developed by the Governor's Human Resources Advisory Council. Revised.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohio State Bureau of Employment Services, Columbus.

    For a competitive advantage, Ohio must be sensitive to three national trends that will reshape its work force: the growing gap between the skill requirements of jobs and workers' capabilities, the slow growth of the labor force, and demands of a global economy. The future competitiveness of Ohio's economy will depend on its capacity to support the…

  6. 300 Area Treatability Test: Laboratory Development of Polyphosphate Remediation Technology for In Situ Treatment of Uranium Contamination in the Vadose Zone and Capillary Fringe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wellman, Dawn M.; Pierce, Eric M.; Bacon, Diana H.; Oostrom, Martinus; Gunderson, Katie M.; Webb, Samuel M.; Bovaird, Chase C.; Cordova, Elsa A.; Clayton, Eric T.; Parker, Kent E.; Ermi, Ruby M.; Baum, Steven R.; Vermeul, Vincent R.; Fruchter, Jonathan S.

    2008-09-30

    This report presents results from bench-scale treatability studies conducted under site-specific conditions to optimize the polyphosphate amendment for implementation of a field-scale technology demonstration to stabilize uranium within the 300 Area vadose and smear zones of the Hanford Site. The general treatability testing approach consisted of conducting studies with site sediment and under site conditions, to develop an effective chemical formulation and infiltration approach for the polyphosphate amendment under site conditions. Laboratory-scale dynamic column tests were used to 1) quantify the retardation of polyphosphate and its degradation products as a function of water content, 2) determine the rate of polyphosphate degradation under unsaturated conditions, 3) develop an understanding of the mechanism of autunite formation via the reaction of solid phase calcite-bound uranium and aqueous polyphosphate remediation technology, 4) develop an understanding of the transformation mechanism, the identity of secondary phases, and the kinetics of the reaction between uranyl-carbonate and -silicate minerals with the polyphosphate remedy under solubility-limiting conditions, and 5) quantify the extent and rate of uranium released and immobilized based on the infiltration rate of the polyphosphate remedy and the effect of and periodic wet-dry cycling on the efficacy of polyphosphate remediation for uranium in the vadose zone and smear zone.

  7. Fiscal year 1996 decontamination and decommissioning activities photobriefing book for the Argonne National Laboratory-East Site, Technology Development Division, Waste Management Program, Decontamination and Decommissioning Projects Department

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    The Photobriefing Book describes the Decontamination and Decommissioning (D and D) Program at the Argonne National Laboratory-East Site (ANL-E) near Lemont, Illinois. This book summarizes current D and D projects, reviews fiscal year (FY) 1996 accomplishments, and outlines FY 1997 goals. A section on D and D Technology Development provides insight on new technologies for D and D developed or demonstrated at ANL-E. Past projects are recapped and upcoming projects are described as Argonne works to accomplish its commitment to, ''Close the Circle on the Splitting of the Atom.'' Finally, a comprehensive review of the status and goals of the D and D Program is provided to give a snap-shot view of the program and the direction it's taking as it moves into FY 1997. The D and D projects completed to date include: Plutonium Fuel Fabrication Facility; East Area Surplus Facilities; Experimental Boiling Water Reactor; M-Wing Hot Cell Facilities; Plutonium Gloveboxes; and Fast Neutron Generator

  8. The historical meaning of serological surveys as a laboratory technology applied to the inmunization campaigns. The case of poliomyelitis in Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ballester, Rosa

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the paper is to analyse the introduction, use and diffusion of the serological surveys, a public health technology on the borderline between epidemiology and laboratory, in connection with poliomyelitis in Spain during the Francoism period. Within the framework of the «new history » of medical technologies and innovations, the serological surveys played an important role both in the improvement of knowledge on socio-demographic distribution and the health politics arena.

    Utilizando algunos de los análisis historiográficos de la denominada «nueva historia» dentro de la historia de las tecnologías médicas y del estudio de las innovaciones en la práctica clínica y sanitaria, en el presente trabajo se analizan la introducción, uso y difusión de las encuestas de seroprevalencia —una tecnología en salud pública a caballo entre la epidemiología y el laboratorio— que abrió caminos insospechados para un mejor conocimiento de la distribución socio-demográfica de la enfermedad y de la intervención a través de políticas de salud-, con motivo de la presencia epidémica de la polio en España durante el franquismo.

  9. Laboratory of minerals purification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    The laboratory of minerals purification was organized in 1962 where with application of modern physical and chemical methods were investigated the mechanism of flotation reagents interaction with minerals' surface, was elaborated technologies on rising complexity of using of republic's minerals

  10. Key Management Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Provides a secure environment to research and develop advanced electronic key management and networked key distribution technologies for the Navy and DoD....

  11. Lawrence and his laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hellbron, J.L.; Seidel, R.W.

    1989-01-01

    The birthplace of nuclear chemistry and nuclear medicine is the subject of this study of the Radiation Laboratory in Berkeley, California, where Ernest Lawrence used local and national technological, economic, and manpower resources to build the cyclotron

  12. Energy Management of Hybrid Electric Vehicles: 15 years of development at the Ohio State University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rizzoni Giorgio

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to document 15 years of hybrid electric vehicle energy management research at The Ohio State University Center for Automotive Research (OSUCAR. Hybrid Electric Vehicle (HEV technology encompasses many diverse aspects. In this paper we focus exclusively on the evolution of supervisory control strategies for on-board energy management in HEV. We present a series of control algorithms that have been developed in simulation and implemented in prototype vehicles for charge-sustaining HEVs at OSU-CAR. These solutions span from fuzzy-logic control algorithms to more sophisticated model-based optimal control methods. Finally, methods developed for plug-in HEVs energy management are also discussed

  13. CRADA with Teledyne Electronic Technologies and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNL-096): The Exposure-to-Risk monitoring system. Final letter report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thrall, K.D.

    1996-10-01

    The purpose of this project was to demonstrate the ``Exposure-to- Risk`` monitoring system in an actual occupational environment. The system is a unique combination of existing hardware with proprietary software to create an integrated means of assessing occupational exposures to volatile organic compounds. One component of this system utilizes a portable mass spectrometer developed by Teledyne Electronic Technologies. Integration of the system was accomplished under Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) funding. Commercialization of the system will take place following demonstration in an actual occupational environment, and will include, in part, Teledyne Electronic Technologies. The Exposure-to-Risk monitoring system will benefit DOE by overcoming present-day limitations in worker health protection monitoring. There are numerous sites within the` DOE complex where many different hazardous chemicals are used on a routine basis. These chemicals range from paint stripers and cleaning solvents to chemical warfare agents, each having its own degree of potential adverse health risk to a worker. Thus, a real concern for DOE is to ensure that a worker is properly monitored to assess any adverse health risk from exposure to potentially hazardous chemicals. With current industrial hygiene technologies, this is an arduous task. The Exposure-to-Risk monitoring system integrates a patented breath-inlet device connecting a subject`s exhaled breath directly with a field-portable mass spectrometer with physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling to estimate the target tissue dose following a chemical exposure. Estimation of the adverse health risk prediction follows from the exposure/dose calculation based on currently accepted methodologies. This new system can determine, in the field, the possible adverse health risks on a daily basis to an individual worker.

  14. Model for acquiring innovative waste immobilization technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dole, L.R.; Singh, S.P.N.

    1988-01-01

    The US Department of Energy's (DOE's) Oak Ridge Operations (ORO) has established the Waste Management Technology Center (WMTC) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory to assist in meeting the environmental requirements for federal facilities as stated in the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA). The WMTC will bring innovative mixed chemical and radioactive waste treatment and site closure technologies to bear on the many mixed chemical and radioactive waste problems at the DOE-ORO facilities located in Tennessee, Kentucky, and Ohio. The WMTC seeks innovative technologies through a phased procurement cycle that encourages the teaming of emerging technologies with experienced contractors in order to comply with on-site requirements of DOE orders concerning protection of the environment. This three-phase procurement cycle includes: (1) a feasibility study and implementation plan, (2) an on-site pilot demonstration, and (3) full-scale implementation. This paper describes the statements of work for some related demonstrations and remedial actions

  15. NVLAP calibration laboratory program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cigler, J.L.

    1993-12-31

    This paper presents an overview of the progress up to April 1993 in the development of the Calibration Laboratories Accreditation Program within the framework of the National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Program (NVLAP) at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST).

  16. NVLAP calibration laboratory program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cigler, J.L.

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of the progress up to April 1993 in the development of the Calibration Laboratories Accreditation Program within the framework of the National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Program (NVLAP) at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST)

  17. Data report: Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Tennessee, and Ohio. National Uranium Resource Evaluation Program. Hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sargent, K.A.; Cook, J.R.; Fay, W.M.

    1982-02-01

    This report presents the results of ground water, stream water, and stream sediment reconnaissance in Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Tennessee, and Ohio. The following sample types were collected in each state: Illinois - 716 stream sediment, 1046 ground water, 337 stream water; Indiana - 126 stream sediment, 443 ground water, 111 stream water; Kentucky - 4901 stream sediment, 6408 ground water, 3966 stream water; Tennessee - 3309 stream sediment, 3574 ground water, 1584 stream water; Ohio - 1214 stream sediment, 2049 ground water, 1205 stream water. Neutron activation analyses are given for U, Br, Cl, F, Mn, Na, Al, V, and Dy in ground water and stream water, and for U, Th, Hf, Ce, Fe, Mn, Na, Sc, Ti, V, Al, Dy, Eu, La, Sm, Yb, and Lu in sediments. Supplementary analyses by other techniques are reported for U (extractable), Ag, As, Ba, Be, Ca, Co, Cr, Cu, K, Li, Mg, Mo, Nb, Ni, P, Pb, Se, Sn, Sr, W, Y, and Zn. These analyses were made on 248 sediment samples from Tennessee. Field measurements and observations are reported for each site. Oak Ridge National Laboratory analyzed sediment samples which were not analyzed by Savannah River Laboratory neutron activation

  18. Results of the preliminary radiological survey at the former Diamond Magnesium Company site, Luckey, Ohio (DML001)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foley, R.D.; Crutcher, J.W.

    1990-02-01

    As part of the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program, the US Department of Energy (DOE) is implementing a radiological survey program to determine the radiological conditions at sites that were used by the department's predecessor agencies. One such site is the former Diamond Magnesium Company facility in Luckey, Ohio. The preliminary radiological survey discussed in this report was conducted at the request of DOE by members of the Measurement Applications and Development group of Oak Ridge National Laboratory in December 1988. The former Diamond Magnesium Company site in Luckey, Ohio, was used as a magnesium reduction plant during World War 2. It was closed in 1945 and reopened in 1949 as a beryllium production facility, operated by Brush Wellman for the US Atomic Energy Commission. The preliminary radiological survey included: a surface gamma scan of part of the property outdoors, collection of surface and subsurface soil samples, and collection of water samples. Laboratory analysis of soil samples showed concentrations of 226 Ra in excess of applicable DOE guidelines. A follow-up, detailed survey is recommended. 9 refs., 10 figs., 4 tabs

  19. Lessons learned from the management of a national outbreak of Salmonella ohio linked to pork meat processing and distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertrand, Sophie; Dierick, Katelijne; Heylen, Kim; De Baere, Thierry; Pochet, Brigitte; Robesyn, Emmanuel; Lokietek, Sophie; Van Meervenne, Eva; Imberechts, Hein; De Zutter, Lieven; Collard, Jean-Marc

    2010-03-01

    During the summer of 2005, an increase in reports of human cases of Salmonella enterica serovar Ohio infection was observed in Belgium. During 11 weeks, between 1 July and 13 September, 60 cases of laboratory-confirmed Salmonella Ohio infection were reported to the National Reference Centre for Salmonella, with a peak onset of symptoms in the third week of July. All clinical isolates caused self-limiting gastroenteritis; both genders (32 males and 28 females) and all age groups (three children 65 years of age) were affected. The isolates were distributed throughout Belgium but a cluster of several cases was observed around Brussels. At the same time, an increase in the incidence of this serovar was observed in the Salmonella isolates originating from the official surveillance campaign conducted by the Federal Agency for the Safety of the Food Chain, which identified pork as a likely source of the outbreak strain. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis typing confirmed the clonal relationship between the human isolates, the isolates from samples collected in the cutting plants, and the isolates from pork meat in distribution. Further epidemiological investigations indicated that one particular slaughterhouse was involved. In that slaughterhouse, the carcasses were contaminated during the evisceration process because of contaminated equipment and uncontrolled environmental conditions. This study highlights the importance of a centralized surveillance laboratory in the management of outbreaks and the need of strict implementation of hygienic rules to avoid this type of outbreak.

  20. Atlas of Ohio Aquatic Insects: Volume II, Plecoptera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeWalt, R Edward; Grubbs, Scott A; Armitage, Brian J; Baumann, Richard W; Clark, Shawn M; Bolton, Michael J

    2016-01-01

    We provide volume II of a distributional atlas of aquatic insects for the eastern USA state of Ohio. This treatment of stoneflies (Plecoptera) is companion to Armitage et al. (2011) on caddisflies (Trichoptera). We build on a recent analysis of Ohio stonefly diversity patterns based on large drainages (DeWalt et al. 2012), but add 3717 new records to the data set. We base most analyses on the United States Geological Survey Hierarchical Unit Code eight (HUC8) drainage scale. In addition to distributional maps for each species, we provide analyses of species richness versus HUC8 drainage area and the number of unique locations in a HUC8 drainage, species richness versus Ohio counties, analyze adult presence phenology throughout the year, and demonstrate stream size range affiliation for each species. This work is based on a total of 7797 specimen records gathered from 21 regional museums, agency data, personal collections, and from the literature Table 1. To our knowledge this is the largest stonefly data set available for a similarly sized geopolitical area anywhere in the world. These data are made available as a Darwin Core Archive supported by the Pensoft Integrated Publishing Toolkit (DeWalt et al. 2016b). All known published papers reporting stoneflies from Ohio are detailed in Suppl. material 1. We recovered 102 species from Ohio, including all nine Nearctic families Table 2​. Two species were removed from the DeWalt et al. (2012) list and two new state records added. Perlidae (32 spp.) was most speciose, compared to the low diversity Pteronarcyidae (2 spp.) and Peltoperlidae (1 sp.). The richest HUC8 drainages occurred in northeastern, south-central, and southern regions of the state where drainages were heavily forested, had the highest slopes, and were contained within or adjacent to the unglaciated Allegheny and Appalachian Plateaus. Species poor drainages occurred mainly in the northwestern region where Wisconsinan aged lake plains climaxed to an