WorldWideScience

Sample records for technology education students

  1. Marginalized Student Access to Technology Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurtcu, Wanda M.

    The purpose of this paper is to investigate how a teacher can disrupt an established curriculum that continues the cycle of inequity of access to science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) curriculum by students in alternative education. For this paper, I will focus on the technology components of the STEM curriculum. Technology in the United States, if not the world economy, is developing at a rapid pace. Many areas of day to day living, from applying for a job to checking one's bank account online, involve a component of science and technology. The 'gap' in technology education is emphasized between the 'haves and have-nots', which is delineated along socio-economic lines. Marginalized students in alternative education programs use this equipment for little else than remedial programs and credit recovery. This level of inequity further widens in alternative education programs and affects the achievement of marginalized students in credit recovery or alternative education classes instead of participation technology classes. For the purposes of this paper I focus on how can I decrease the inequity of student access to 21st century technology education in an alternative education program by addressing the established curriculum of the program and modifying structural barriers of marginalized student access to a technology focused curriculum.

  2. Social Adjustment of At-Risk Technology Education Students

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    Ernst, Jeremy V.; Moye, Johnny J.

    2013-01-01

    Individual technology education students' subgroup dynamic informs progressions of research while apprising technology teacher educators and classroom technology education teachers of intricate differences between students. Recognition of these differences help educators realize that classroom structure, instruction, and activities must be…

  3. Marginalized Student Access to Technology Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurtcu, Wanda M.

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to investigate how a teacher can disrupt an established curriculum that continues the cycle of inequity of access to science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) curriculum by students in alternative education. For this paper, I will focus on the technology components of the STEM curriculum. Technology in the…

  4. Educational technologies for the benefit of students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yngve Nordkvelle

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available By Yngve Troye NordkvelleEditorThis issue of Seminar.net offers four different experiences on how students can gain from using educational technologies. In the article "Adopting digital skills in an international project in teacher education", associate professor Hugo Nordseth of Nord-Trøndelag University College present the aims of a project aimed at making students in teacher training able to collaborate across national borders and contexts. The project demonstrates the feasibility of training students to use new technologies that offer opportunities for learning. Nordseth emphasizes the importance of proper training in the selected tools.Professor Ragnhild Nilsen, of the University of Tromsø, presents her article "Digital Network as a Learning Tool for Health Sciences Students", as an example from studies in health. She presents how an online learning module for health sciences students with different educational backgrounds was implemented at the University of Tromsø (UiT. The intention was to improve communication and cooperation abilities across professional boundaries. The purpose of this article is to examine how participation in a joint, web-based course can be a didactic tool that helps health sciences students learn from one another by means of collaboration. Yvonne Fritze and Yngve Troye Nordkvelle, both editors of the journal present their article "Online dating and education". The research was carried out in their home institution, Lillehammer University College.Taking its inspiration from Luhmann's communication theory, this article looks at online dating from the perspective of teaching and education. The findings of this project indicate that students do use netdating as an experience and that quite a few of them find this valuable for their own communicative skills. The article explores those features of online dating characteristic of distance dialogue, and discusses the extent to which these can be transferred to

  5. Science Student Teachers and Educational Technology: Experience, Intentions, and Value

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    Efe, Rifat

    2011-01-01

    The primary purpose of this study is to examine science student teachers' experience with educational technology, their intentions for their own use, their intentions for their students' use, and their beliefs in the value of educational technology in science instruction. Four hundred-forty-eight science student teachers of different disciplines…

  6. Taking Part in Technology Education: Elements in Students' Motivation

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    Autio, Ossi; Hietanoro, Jenni; Ruismaki, Heikki

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the elements motivating comprehensive school students to study technology education. In addition, we tried to discover how students' motivation towards technology education developed over the period leading up to their school experience and the effect this might have on their future involvement with…

  7. STUDENTS READINESS TO USE INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY IN UNIVERSITIES EDUCATIONAL PROCESS

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    V. Denysenko

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The article analyzes the problem of readiness of students of different specialties to use information technology in the educational process of higher education. Particular attention is paid to contemporary processes of globalization and informatization of higher education as a priority trends of modern Ukrainian society. Experimental data provided in the publication are comparative characteristics of the students using different specialty areas and preparation of information technologies in education. Computerization of the educational process - one of the main priorities in the development of higher education, a new stage for the entire higher education system, promising improvements in the direction of learning in higher education

  8. Engaging Students Regarding Special Needs in Technology and Engineering Education

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    White, David W.

    2015-01-01

    In 1984, James Buffer and Michael Scott produced the book "Special Needs Guide for Technology Education" (Buffer and Scott, 1984). This was a pivotal offering insofar as it set the stage for technology education educators, at the time, to think about and be provided with information regarding students with special needs in their…

  9. Usage of innovative technologies in physical education of students

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    Voronov N.P.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Health influence of physical drills is considered on forming correct carriage for students. 40 students of task medical force took part in an experiment. The individual programs of making healthy are presented. Application of modern technologies allows students to get the picture of level of health, about susceptibility to the risk of diseases, about basic pathological syndromes. The prospects of the use of modern computer technologies are rotined in physical education of students with violation of locomotorium.

  10. The Educational Technology of Ethical Development for Students

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    Song, Ting; Ustin, Pavel N.; Popov, Leonid M.; Mudarisov, Marat M.

    2017-01-01

    The relevance of this work was connected with the problem of ethical competencies forming among future psychologists during their learning in university. The first task of research was to work out the technology of ethical development for students-psychologists. The structure of this technology included four main educational components:…

  11. The Nature of Primary Students' Conversation in Technology Education

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    Fox-Turnbull, Wendy H.

    2016-01-01

    Classroom conversations are core to establishing successful learning for students. This research explores the nature of conversation in technology education in the primary classroom and the implications for teaching and learning. Over a year, two units of work in technology were taught in two primary classrooms. Most data was gathered in Round 2…

  12. Students' Perceptions of and Experiences With Educational Technology: A Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royal, Kenneth; Hedgpeth, Mari-Wells; McWhorter, Dan

    2016-05-18

    It is generally assumed that incoming students in medical education programs will be better equipped for the "digital age" given their younger age and an educational upbringing in which technology was seemingly omnipresent. In particular, many assume that today's medical students are more likely to hold positive attitudes and increased comfortability with technology and possess greater information technology (IT) skills. The purpose of this study was to compare responses of incoming veterinary medical students to a series of IT-related questions contained in a common questionnaire over the course of a 10-year period (2005-2015) to discern whether students' attitudes have improved and uses and comfortability with technology have increased as anticipated. A survey measuring attitudes and preferences, computing experience, and technology ownership was administered each year for the past 10 years to incoming veterinary medical students at a large veterinary school in the United States. Students' responses to survey items were compared at 3 data points (2005, 2010, and 2015). Today's incoming veterinary medical students tend to indicate the same desire to improve skills using spreadsheets and web page design as incoming students from 10 years ago. It seems that despite technological advances and increased exposure to such applications and skills, there remains a challenge for students to "keep up" with the ever evolving technology. Moreover, although students continue to report they are very comfortable with using a computer (and related devices), many use their computers as typewriters or word processors, as opposed to a means for performing more advanced computing functions. In general, today's medical students are not expert computer users as many assume. Despite an upbringing in a digitized world, many students still lack many basic computing skills.

  13. Assistive technology applied to education of students with visual impairment.

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    Alves, Cássia Cristiane de Freitas; Monteiro, Gelse Beatriz Martins; Rabello, Suzana; Gasparetto, Maria Elisabete Rodrigues Freire; de Carvalho, Keila Monteiro

    2009-08-01

    Verify the application of assistive technology, especially information technology in the education of blind and low-vision students from the perceptions of their teachers. Descriptive survey study in public schools in three municipalities of the state of São Paulo, Brazil. The sample comprised 134 teachers. According to the teachers' opinions, there are differences in the specificities and applicability of assistive technology for blind and low-vision students, for whom specific computer programs are important. Information technology enhances reading and writing skills, as well as communication with the world on an equal basis, thereby improving quality of life and facilitating the learning process. The main reason for not using information technology is the lack of planning courses. The main requirements for the use of information technology in schools are enough computers for all students, advisers to help teachers, and pedagogical support. Assistive technology is applied to education of students with visual impairment; however, teachers indicate the need for infrastructure and pedagogical support. Information technology is an important tool in the inclusion process and can promote independence and autonomy of students with visual impairment.

  14. Physical education of students from sports-oriented technologies

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    U.A. Dolinnyj

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available In theory grounded and experimentally tested the efficiency of employments on physical education of students on the basis of sporting oriented technologies. In experiment participated 30 students of 3 courses. The improvement of growth of most physical indexes rate is marked: speed qualities (at run on 100 m, power (bending, unbending of hands in support lying, speed-power (broad jump from a place, flexibility (inclination in before from position sitting on the floor. Recommendations are resulted on education of student youth a sense of collectivism; to the persistence, decision, purposefulness; attention and speed of thought; perfections of ability to manage the emotions, to development of physical qualities. It is proved that physical education of students on the basis of sporting oriented technologies positively influences on development of physical qualities, skills and abilities that is necessary for the future specialist.

  15. Students' Perception of Technology Use in Nursing Education.

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    Williamson, Kathleen M; Muckle, Janelle

    2018-02-01

    Technology is an integral part of a nurse's practice; therefore, it is necessary for technology to be integrated into the nursing curriculum for students. Nursing schools are shifting paradigms by integrating technology into the teaching environment to foster active and meaningful learning experiences. Factors related to external influences on individual beliefs, attitudes, and intention to use need to be studied so nurse educators can support the integration of technology into pedagogy. The Technology Acceptance Model was used to evaluate student perceptions of usefulness and ease of use of technology, while matriculated in a baccalaureate level nursing program. Quantitative and qualitative data were collected to uncover how nursing students (N = 375) perceived the usefulness and ease of use of technology while in nursing school. Almost every student (99.7%) owned a smartphone, and 95% were reasonably comfortable using various technologies. Selecting and incorporating technological tools to successfully support learning is essential to overcome challenges and support the innovative delivery of content and use of technology by students.

  16. Teaching Mathematical Problem Solving to Middle School Students in Math, Technology Education, and Special Education Classrooms

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    Bottge, Brian A.; Heinrichs, Mary; Mehta, Zara Dee; Rueda, Enrique; Hung, Ya-Hui; Danneker, Jeanne

    2004-01-01

    This study compared two approaches for teaching sixth-grade middle school students to solve math problems in math, technology education, and special education classrooms. A total of 17 students with disabilities and 76 students without disabilities were taught using either enhanced anchored instruction (EAI) or text-based instruction coupled with…

  17. Virtual Classroom Instruction and Academic Performance of Educational Technology Students in Distance Education, Enugu State

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    Akpan, Sylvester J.; Etim, Paulinus J.; Udom, Stella Ogechi

    2016-01-01

    The virtual classroom and distance education have created new teaching pedagogy. This study was carried out to investigate Virtual Classroom Instruction on Academic Performance of Educational Technology Students in Distance Education, Enugu State. The population for this study was limited to the Students in National Open University, Enugu study…

  18. Technology Management Education for Students with Educational Background of Engineering

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    Aoyama, Atsushi; Abe, Atsushi

    Japanese industry has been encouraged to transform from a mode of ‘recovery’ to one of 'front-runner' in effective innovation and creation of new businesses and markets based in accomplishments of basic research. Graduate School of Technology Management at Ritsumeikan University strives to not only offer knowledge and skills, but also business experiences to its students so that they may acquire the abilities to discover and solve practical problems logically, analytically and systematically. To achieve these aims, it has inaugurated the Ritsumeikan University Practicum Program by enhancing existing internship programs. Under the guidance of its faculties, this program will allow its students a chance to set and solve actual problems in real world business environments.

  19. Student Disengagement in Higher Education : Two Trends in Technology

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    Eric Main

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available As internet-based technologies increasingly colonize learning environments in higher education, they allow purposes contrary to learning to have direct access to students. The internet as a governing metaphor for transparent connectivity and equal access is a red herring because the power relations across the connections are unequal. The internet also functions as a mechanism for the operant conditioning of students by commercial interests and for surveillance and control by political authorities, purposes which can, if not restrained, undermine the intentions of teachers using technology.Teachers should resist fully automating their course management, especially grading and assessment because too much mechanization can only produce reductive thinking.A related trend is the gradual replacement of liberal studies by vocational courses that feature technology as the subject. This cooperates with the aforementioned trend to effectively censor the creative and critical thinking that instructors strive to teach.

  20. Simulation technology achievement of students in physical education classes.

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    Тіmoshenko A.V.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Technology of evaluation of progress was studied during employments by physical exercises. Possibility of the use of design method was probed in an educational process during determination of progress of students. The value of mathematical models in pedagogical activity in the field of physical culture and sport is certain. Mathematical models are offered for the evaluation of success of student young people during employments swimming. Possibility of development of models of evaluation of success is rotined on sporting games, track-and-field, gymnastics.

  1. Understanding student participation and choice in science and technology education

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    Dillon, Justin; Ryder, Jim

    2015-01-01

    Drawing on data generated by the EU’s Interests and Recruitment in Science (IRIS) project, this volume examines the issue of young people’s participation in science, technology, engineering and mathematics education. With an especial focus on female participation, the chapters offer analysis deploying varied theoretical frameworks, including sociology, social psychology and gender studies. The material also includes reviews of relevant research in science education and summaries of empirical data concerning student choices in STEM disciplines in five European countries. Featuring both quantitative and qualitative analyses, the book makes a substantial contribution to the developing theoretical agenda in STEM education. It augments available empirical data and identifies strategies in policy-making that could lead to improved participation—and gender balance—in STEM disciplines. The majority of the chapter authors are IRIS project members, with additional chapters written by specially invited contribu...

  2. Modern technology of physical education of disabled students in conditions of inclusive education

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    S.G. Adyrkhaev

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available There is a problem of physical education of disabled students during period of their study in higher educational establishments. Insufficiency of this problem’s studying conditioned fulfillment of research of perfection of physical education and sports system. Purpose: substantiation of physical education pedagogic technology for disabled students. Material: in experiment students with following nosologies participated: hearing, eyesight, muscular-skeletal apparatus, after effects of cerebral palsy, somatic diseases and diabetes. In total 664 students of 18-24 years’ age took part in experiment. They were 337 boys and 307 girls. Results: we have worked out organizational-methodic algorithm, which permits to combine theoretical, scientific-methodic and practical training. Its basis is current information about students’ psychic-physiological condition. We determined levels of health and physical condition, physical workability and physical fitness as well as psychic state of students. Demand in optimization of students’ motor functioning during all period of study was substantiated as well as effective means of physical education and pulse regimes, considering peculiarities of nosologies. Students’ orientation on sport style of life was formed. Conclusions: implementation of physical education pedagogic technology for students with different nosologies in the process of their studying stipulates solution of training, health-related and educational tasks. It is possible through creation of conditions for motor actions’ training and intensification of motor functioning during all period of study. Practical application of the technology and received results points at integration of disabled students in students’ medium.

  3. Student Teachers' Perceptions on Educational Technologies' Past, Present and Future

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    Orhan Goksun, Derya; Filiz, Ozan; Kurt, Adile Askim

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this study is to reveal Computer Education and Instructional Technologies student teachers', who are in a distance teacher education program, perceptions on past, present and educational technologies of future via infographics. In this study, 54 infographics, which were created by student teachers who were enrolled in Special Teaching…

  4. Formation of a New Entity to Support Effective Use of Technology in Medical Education: The Student Technology Committee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shenson, Jared Andrew; Adams, Ryan Christopher; Ahmed, S Toufeeq; Spickard, Anderson

    2015-09-17

    As technology in medical education expands from teaching tool to crucial component of curricular programming, new demands arise to innovate and optimize educational technology. While the expectations of today's digital native students are significant, their experience and unique insights breed new opportunities to involve them as stakeholders in tackling educational technology challenges. The objective of this paper is to present our experience with a novel medical student-led and faculty-supported technology committee that was developed at Vanderbilt University School of Medicine to harness students' valuable input in a comprehensive fashion. Key lessons learned through the initial successes and challenges of implementing our model are also discussed. A committee was established with cooperation of school administration, a faculty advisor with experience launching educational technologies, and a group of students passionate about this domain. Committee membership is sustained through annual selective recruitment of interested students. The committee serves 4 key functions: acting as liaisons between students and administration; advising development of institutional educational technologies; developing, piloting, and assessing new student-led educational technologies; and promoting biomedical and educational informatics within the school community. Participating students develop personally and professionally, contribute to program implementation, and extend the field's understanding by pursuing research initiatives. The institution benefits from rapid improvements to educational technologies that meet students' needs and enhance learning opportunities. Students and the institution also gain from fostering a campus culture of awareness and innovation in informatics and medical education. The committee's success hinges on member composition, school leadership buy-in, active involvement in institutional activities, and support for committee initiatives. Students

  5. The Relationship between Selected Educational Technologies and Student-Centered versus Teacher-Centered Instruction

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    Kollmer, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    Not all teachers and students have equal access to technology. This inequality of access creates an uneven instructional practice that may result in varied student learning. By and large, students have limited access to technology within the confines of the classroom. New educational technologies provide schools with an opportunity to broaden and…

  6. Technology and College Students: What Faculty Members Think About the Use of Technology in Higher Education

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    Omer Faruk ISLIM

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Tablet PCs especially iPads are one of the most commonly used devices that most educational institutions from elementary school to colleges have been using as a main or supplementary part of their educational system. This article aims at investigating faculty members’ personal and educational use of technology especially iPads, their opinions on educational use of technology, and their students’ technology competency. This study was conducted at a college of education in the Southwestern United States where a technology initiative was carried out and iPads were distributed. In this qualitative research, case study research was utilized as a research method and a purposeful sampling method was employed. The data were obtained from eight faculty members via semi structured interviews. Results of the study show that faculty members own a variety of devices in addition to iPad, and they are using many apps based on the class needs. Almost all faculty members define themselves and their current students as technology competent, and they stated that experience, socioeconomic status and willingness to use the technology are the main factors affecting technology competence.

  7. Modern Educational Technology: Educational Usages of Cell Phone as Perceived by Students of Education Faculties

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    Harba, Ali Moneer

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the educational use of cell phones at two Syrian education establishments. The research sample consisted of (n = 184) students from the Department of Teacher Education at Tishreen and Damascus Universities. During the study, students filled in a self-report 17-item questionnaire. Survey results imply that cell phone use…

  8. Utilization of Information and Communication Technologies as a Predictor of Educational Stress on Secondary School Students

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    Eskicumali, Ahmet; Arslan, Serhat; Demirtas, Zeynep

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the relationship between utilization of information and communication technologies and educational stress. Participants were 411 secondary school students. Educational Stress Scale and Utilization of Information and Communication Technologies Scale were used as measures. The relationships between students'…

  9. Familiarity with Technology among First-Year Students in Rwandan Tertiary Education

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    Byungura, Jean Claude; Hansson, Henrik; Muparasi, Mugabe; Ruhinda, Ben

    2018-01-01

    The more the students get experienced with technologies, the more the need for tertiary education systems to adopt innovative pedagogical strategies for accommodating different learning needs. Depending on students' prior experience with computer-based tools, they may have different degrees of familiarity with new technologies. At University of…

  10. Impact of Information Technologies on Faculty and Students in Distance Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jensen J.; Alexander, Melody W.; Perreault, Heidi; Waldman, Lila

    2003-01-01

    A survey of distance education technologies received responses from 81 business faculty and 153 students, who indicated that e-mail, Internet lectures/assignments, and discussion groups were most frequently used. There were few differences between teachers and students. A technology's frequent usage and positive impact on productivity did not…

  11. Technologies of Student Testing for Learning Quality Evaluation in the System of Higher Education

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    Bayukova, Nadezhda Olegovna; Kareva, Ludmila Alexandrovna; Rudometova, Liliya Tarasovna; Shlangman, Marina Konstantinovna; Yarantseva, Natalia Vladislavovna

    2015-01-01

    The paper deals with technology of students' achievement in the area of educational activities, methods, techniques, forms and conditions of monitoring knowledge quality in accordance with the requirements of Russian higher education system modernization. The authors propose methodic techniques of students' training for testing based on innovative…

  12. The Impact of Assessing Technology Competencies of Incoming Teacher Education Students

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    Vannatta, Rachel A.; Banister, Savilla

    2008-01-01

    In an effort to establish a baseline of technology competency among our entering education students, our College of Education began implementing the Assessment of Technology Competencies (ATC) in Fall 2003. This performance-based assessment evaluates word-processing, presentation, spreadsheet, graphic/drawing, and Internet skills. Although…

  13. Understanding the Use of Educational Technology among Faculty, Staff, and Students at a Medical University

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    Kazley, Abby Swanson; Annan, Dustin L.; Carson, Nancy E.; Freeland, Melissa; Hodge, Ashley B.; Seif, Gretchen A.; Zoller, James S.

    2013-01-01

    A college of health professions at a medical university located in the southeastern United States is striving to increase the use of educational technology among faculty, staff, and students. A strategic planning group was formed and charged with enhancing the use of educational technology within the college. In order to understand the current…

  14. IMPROVEMENT OF EDUCATIONAL COGNITIVE ACTIVITY STUDENTS IN THE PROFESSIONAL EDUCATIONAL ORGANIZATION ON THE BASIS OF VISUALIZATION TECHNOLOGY OF EDUCATIONAL INFORMATION

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    Liliya A. Kolmakova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study is to consider the problem of improving the quality of education in the professional educational organizations.Methods. The scientific and pedagogical analyses of the concepts forming a terminological field of a problem are used. The system, competence-based and personal approaches are used for development of models of cognitive visualization. Questioning of students was carried out to establish the level of development of their informative activity.Results. The constituent parts of the modern educational process and the need to create specific conditions for its implementation are identified and described. The author gives a generalized characteristic of visualization technology of educational information. The application of cognitive visualization models using information and communication technologies are proved. The results showing the evolution of motivational indicators of students’ activity before and after application of LSM and the «Metaplan» in the educational process are presented.Scientific novelty. The pedagogical conditions that allow using information and communication technologies as means of the trainees’ educational informative activity improvement in the professional educational organization are defined. Features of the directed application of methods of cognitive visualization of educational information, both for improvement of educational cognitive activity, and for formation of professional competences of students by profession «A chef, a confectioner» are noted.Practical importance. Use of methods of cognitive visualization in educational process on the example of studying of Chemistry and Biology in the professional educational organization is considered in details. The teaching package providing application of methods of cognitive visualization of educational information for the purpose of improvement of educational cognitive activity of students in the professional educational organization

  15. Educational technology for millennial dental hygiene students: a survey of U.S. dental hygiene programs.

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    Beebe, Catherine R R; Gurenlian, JoAnn R; Rogo, Ellen J

    2014-06-01

    A growing body of literature suggests that today's learners have changed and education must change as well since Millennial generation students expect technology to be used in their coursework. This study sought to determine what educational technology is being used in U.S. dental hygiene programs, what student and faculty perceptions are of the effectiveness of technology, and what barriers exist to implementing educational technology. A stratified random sample of 120 entry-level dental hygiene programs nationwide were invited to participate in a survey. Fourteen programs participated, yielding a pool of 415 potential individual participants; out of those, eighty-four student and thirty-eight faculty respondents were included in the analysis, a total of 122. Results were analyzed using descriptive statistics and a Mann-Whitney U test (ptechnology in all areas except clickers and wikis. The faculty members tended to rate the effectiveness of educational technology higher than did the students. The greatest perceived barrier to implementing technology was technical difficulties. This study suggests that support services should be available to faculty and students to ensure successful implementation of technology. Dental hygiene educators have adopted many types of educational technology, but more data are needed to determine best practices.

  16. PhD Year 1 Students' Experience with the Educational Technology and Innovation Course

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    Asamoah, Moses Kumi; Mackin, Eva Esi

    2016-01-01

    The advent of information, communication and new technologies, globalisation and rising costs has prompted rethinking what we teach, how we teach and even where teaching and learning take place. The Educational Technology and Innovation Course (Adlt704) was designed to enable students to create, use and manage appropriate technological processes…

  17. Teaching foreign languages to technical students by means of educational online technologies

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    Ivleva, Natalia V.; Fibikh, Ekaterina V.

    2015-01-01

    The article reveals new methods of effectiveness increase in teaching foreign languages to technical students using information and communication technologies and their practical implementation at the premises of the Foreign Languages Resource Center of Siberian State Aerospace University. Adoption of information and communication technologies to the educational process is based on students' independent language learning that encourages more productive development of language competences mastered by students and future specialists in a special area of technical knowledge as a whole.

  18. Enhancing Self-Directed Learning through Educational Technology: When Students Resist the Change.

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    Akerlind, Gerlese S.; Trevitt, A. Chris

    1999-01-01

    Discusses why the introduction of new technologies (or other educational innovations) as a means to greater learner autonomy is likely to produce some student resistance. Considers factors involved in determining the strength of resistance, and ways teachers can assist students to recognize and overcome associated problems. Presents the authors'…

  19. APA Summit on Medical Student Education Task Force on Informatics and Technology: learning about computers and applying computer technology to education and practice.

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    Hilty, Donald M; Hales, Deborah J; Briscoe, Greg; Benjamin, Sheldon; Boland, Robert J; Luo, John S; Chan, Carlyle H; Kennedy, Robert S; Karlinsky, Harry; Gordon, Daniel B; Yager, Joel; Yellowlees, Peter M

    2006-01-01

    This article provides a brief overview of important issues for educators regarding medical education and technology. The literature describes key concepts, prototypical technology tools, and model programs. A work group of psychiatric educators was convened three times by phone conference to discuss the literature. Findings were presented to and input was received from the 2005 Summit on Medical Student Education by APA and the American Directors of Medical Student Education in Psychiatry. Knowledge of, skills in, and attitudes toward medical informatics are important to life-long learning and modern medical practice. A needs assessment is a starting place, since student, faculty, institution, and societal factors bear consideration. Technology needs to "fit" into a curriculum in order to facilitate learning and teaching. Learning about computers and applying computer technology to education and clinical care are key steps in computer literacy for physicians.

  20. Views of Students on Learning with Technologies in Dutch Education and Training

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    Jeroen Bottema; Pieter Swager

    2012-01-01

    The integrated use of technologies in learning in formal education and training in The Netherlands is far from realized, and there is still a long way to go to reach that goal. But what are the views of students and early career teachers about learning with technologies? This chapter focuses on

  1. The Attitudes of Physical Education and Sport Students towards Information and Communication Technologies

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    Goktas, Zekeriya

    2012-01-01

    Studies that examine the attitudes toward information and communication technologies (ICT) among physical education and sport students, pre-service teachers and teachers are fairly limited, even though the investments in information and communication technologies at schools and universities have reached an efficient level. This study investigates…

  2. A Comparative Analysis of Spatial Visualization Ability and Drafting Models for Industrial and Technology Education Students

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    Katsioloudis, Petros; Jovanovic, Vukica; Jones, Mildred

    2014-01-01

    The main purpose of this study was to determine significant positive effects among the use of three different types of drafting models, and to identify whether any differences exist towards promotion of spatial visualization ability for students in Industrial Technology and Technology Education courses. In particular, the study compared the use of…

  3. Technology and College Students: What Faculty Members Think about the Use of Technology in Higher Education

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    Islim, Omer Faruk; Sevim Cirak, Nese

    2017-01-01

    Tablet PCs especially iPads are one of the most commonly used devices that most educational institutions from elementary school to colleges have been using as a main or supplementary part of their educational system. This article aims at investigating faculty members' personal and educational use of technology especially iPads, their opinions on…

  4. Education Technology Transformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Mike

    2012-01-01

    Years ago, as personal computers and other technological advancements began to find their way into classrooms and other educational settings, teachers and administrators sought ways to use new technology to benefit students. The potential for improving education was clear, but the limitations of the available education technology made it difficult…

  5. Student Readiness for Technology Enhanced History Education in Turkish High Schools

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    İbrahim Turan

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available This study examined whether the Turkish high school social sciences major students would feel adequate and fit in atechnology-enhanced educational environment, particularly in history classrooms. To this extent, this study investigated highschool students’ level of proficiency in technology-use and their attitudes toward the use of educational technologies inclassrooms. The data for this study was collected using Kolb’s Learning Style Inventory (LSI Version-3 and a 27-item TechnologyQuestionnaire. The results revealed that from the point of proficiency and attitude Turkish high school social sciences majorstudents have the essential technology skills and knowledge to feel adequate in a technology-enhanced learning environment.They also have positive attitudes toward use of educational technologies in history classrooms. Therefore they seem to beready for technology-enhanced instruction.

  6. LEARNING TECHNOLOGIES FOR STUDENTS IN THE CLOUD ORIENTED LEARNING ENVIRONMENT OF COMPREHENSIVE EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svitlana G. Lytvynova

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper analyzes the «flipped» learning and «Web Quest» technologies. The features of the «flipped» learning technology are generalized, as well as compared with traditional learning, clarified the benefits of the technology for teachers and students, described the features of the technology used by teacher and students, developed a teacher’s and student’s flow chart for preparation to the lesson, generalized control and motivation components for activating learning activities of students, found out that a component of cloud oriented learning environment (COLE – Lync (Skype Pro can be used to develop video clips and support «flipped» learning technology. The author defines the concept of «Web Quest» technology, generalizes the «Web Quest» structure components. In the article the functions, features of this technology, the types of problems that can be solved with the help of this technology, as well as «Web Quest» classification are presented. It has been found out that the cloud oriented learning environment gives all the possibilities for «Web Quest» technology implementation in teaching of different subjects of all branches of science. With the help of «flipped» technology training and «Web Quest» a number of important problems of education can be solved – providing the continuous communication intensive training beyond general educational establishment and activation of learning activities of students.

  7. Dynamic Educational Process Efficiency Improvement for Students of Computer Production Technologies Support Subject

    OpenAIRE

    Ivana Kleinedlerová; Alexander Janáč; Peter Kleinedler; Ivan Buranský

    2013-01-01

    Engineering industry is besides fabrication innovations by progressive production technologies, focused also on qualification improvement and how to achieve perfect rank of employees working in this type of industry. Considering that engineering industry operators adopt basics of engineering production already by college education, many universities are aware of the importance of their educational system and are implementing modern educational techniques for students qualification increase. T...

  8. Student Collaboration and School Educational Technology: Technology Integration Practices in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scalise, Kathleen

    2016-01-01

    With the onset of Web 2.0 and 3.0--the social and semantic webs--a next wave for integration of educational technology into the classroom is occurring. The aim of this paper is to show how some teachers are increasingly bringing collaboration and shared meaning-making through technology environments into learning environments (Evergreen Education…

  9. The role of self-dependence in modern health improvemental technologies of physical students' education.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shumakov O.V.

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available A normative base is considered on the problems of physical education, physical culture and independent work of students. An analysis is conducted scientifically-methodical and special literature on issue of research. Basic features and modern going are selected near independent work in health technologies of physical education of students. A concept «Independent work» is examined as activity of man and as a teaching method. A teaching method plugs in itself independent employments by physical exercises. During correct organization they can substantially increase motive activity of students.

  10. Undergraduate Student Perceptions Regarding the Use of Educational Technology--A Case Study in a Statistics Service Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolan, Verena T.; Swart, Arthur J.

    2015-01-01

    Integrating theory with practice has become a mandatory requirement for universities of technology. Using educational technology to supplement traditional pedagogical approaches has contributed significantly to achieving this mandate. However, which educational technologies could help improve the educational experience of students in a statistical…

  11. Using systems approach to build education process based on technologies of interactive support and students identification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexey I. Komarov

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In the article systems approach to build educational complex with using IT and didactic methods is discussed. Technologies for each level of educational system are determined. Such kind of system supports interactivity and dual-identification (teaching materials – students due to systems approach offered by authors and optimizes reaching of educational goalsIn the article systems approach to build educational complex with using IT and didactic methods is discussed. Technologies for each level of educational system are determined. Such kind of system supports interactivity and dual-identification (teaching materials – students due to systems approach offered by authors and optimizes reaching of educational goals. Different combinations of technologies are possible to use depending on education form, but main idea of systematic data processing remains unchanged. One of the main contentions of this research consists in the possibility to use the learning time as criterion of student preparedness and quality of training material. Time analysis is important part of whole system which is designed to increase the efficiency of the learning process.

  12. USAGE OF MULTIMEDIA TECHNOLOGIES IN TRAINING OF HIGHER EDUCATIONAL STUDENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svitlana S. Ryzhenko

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the sensibility of multimedia means of education usage in different types of classes (lectures, practical, seminars and laboratory work. Recommendations as for the giving lectures on the basis of multimedia means of education are given. The article also presents the analysis of the students’ level comprehension of the material presented in a multimedia format.

  13. CLOUD SERVICES IN THE EDUCATIONAL PROCESS OF TECHNOLOGICAL COLLEGES’ STUDENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svitlana M. Konovalenko

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available In the article the prospects for "cloud services" use in the educational process in higher educational institutions I-II levels of accreditation are considered. There are analyzed the literature relating to the concept of "cloud services" and their use in the educational process, as well as some advantages and disadvantages of using cloud services at distant data processing. The advantages and disadvantages of cloud service Google Cloud Platform are presented. On the basis of the research it is proposed G Suite for Education service as a Google cloud environment to work with all applications. There are considered new features of Google Docs in cloud services G Suite for Education and showed by the example the solution to problems using new features of Google Docs in Excel application.

  14. Evaluating Web 2.0 Technologies in Higher Education Using Students' Perceptions and Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karvounidis, T.; Chimos, K.; Bersimis, S.; Douligeris, C.

    2014-01-01

    In this work, Web 2.0 technologies in higher education are evaluated using students' perceptions, satisfaction, performance and behaviour. The study evaluates the Web 2.0 tools as stand-alone entities as well in terms of their cross-operability and integration (confluence) to synergistic contributions towards the enhancement of student…

  15. Improving Students' Educational Experience by Harnessing Digital Technology: elgg in the ODL Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tung, Lai Cheng

    2013-01-01

    Given the rising popularity of both open and distance learning (ODL) and social networking tools, it seems logical to merge and harness these two popular technologies with the goal of improving student educational experience. The integration seems to hold tremendous promise for the open and distance learning mode. To reduce the gap in the…

  16. Utilizing Technology Effectively to Improve Millennials' Educational Performance: An Exploratory Look at Business Students' Perceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aviles, Maria; Eastman, Jacqueline K.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to discuss how technological tools, such as Web 2.0 and online learning management systems, can be utilized to improve Millennials' educational performance. Design/methodology/approach: An exploratory survey of Millennial business students was conducted to measure their self-reported use and perceived…

  17. New Zealand Management Students' Perceptions of Communication Technologies in Correspondence Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostman, Ronald E.; Wagner, Graham A.

    1987-01-01

    Describes a survey of 724 management students in New Zealand's Technical Correspondence Institute which was conducted to determine whether the introduction of educational technologies could decrease the dropout rate. The multiple linear regression model that was used to analyze the questionnaire responses is presented, and predictor variables are…

  18. A Qualitative Study of Information Technology Students' Learning Outcomes during a Cooperative Education Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krejci, Katherine T.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative descriptive study was to describe the learning outcomes of the cooperative-education experience from an Information Technology student's perspective at a large Fortune 500 manufacturing/sales company located in the Midwest United States. Open-ended interview questions were developed based on the four-component model…

  19. Effect of self-directed learning process on multimedia competencies of educational technology students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohsen Bagheri

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The current study employed to investigate the effectiveness of the Self-directed learning (SDL process on multimedia competencies of educational technology students of Arak university in Iran. The population of the study consisted of all educational technology students of Arak university. The sample included students who selected project course in the second semester of academic year 2014-2015. The quasi-experimental research, pre-test, post-test design was applied. Before the treatment, the pretest of multimedia competencies was employed, then students in project course educated through SDL process. the Period was 13 weeks, then the post-test was conducted. In this study to data collection, the researcher-made questionnaire of multimedia competencies with three subscales (multimedia instructional design, multimedia production skills, and multimedia production tools was employed. The validity of the questionnaire was confirmed by experts in the field of Educational Technology and Cronbach's alpha coefficient was obtained as a reliability (0.90. To analyze data, independent and paired-samples t-test was used. The results showed that: 1 there was a significant difference between students scores in pre-test and post-test. 2 there was no significant difference between male and female in terms of multimedia competencies.

  20. Understanding Student Participation and Choice in Science and Technology Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ryder, Jim; Ulriksen, Lars; Bøe, Maria Vetleseter

    2015-01-01

    Many of the chapters in this volume provide reviews of the existing research literature. In this chapter we focus on what the research studies presented in this book have contributed to our understanding of students’ educational choices. The nature of these contributions is varied. Many findings...... corroborate existing research insights, or explore existing perspectives in new educational contexts or across distinct geographical and cultural settings. In some cases our work challenges prevalent accounts of students’ educational choices. This chapter has five themes: theoretical perspectives; choice...

  1. Effects of Educational Blogging on Perceptions of Science and Technology Education Students toward Web as a Learning Tool

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    Erkan Tekinarslan

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to investigate effects of educational blogging on perceptions (e.g., attitude, self-efficacy of undergraduate students in Science and Technology Education program toward Web as a learning tool. In addition, this study examines opinions of the Science and Technology Education students about contribution of educational blogging to the students’ perceptions toward Web as a learning tool, knowledge in the field, and advantages and disadvantages of educational blogging. The methodological frame of this study is based on both one group pre-test and post-test design, and qualitative approaches including observations, interviews and document analyses. A total of 32 undergraduate students voluntarily participated in the pre-test and post-test sections, and 25 students participated in the interviews. The findings indicate that educational blogging have positive effects over the students’ attitudes on the usability, selfefficacy, affective and Web-based learning subscales. In addition, the qualitative findings reveal positive contributions of educational blogging to the students’ knowledge in the field, and to the perceptions and thoughts of the students toward Web as a learning tool

  2. Medical student attitudes toward video games and related new media technologies in medical education

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    Kron Frederick W

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Studies in K-12 and college students show that their learning preferences have been strongly shaped by new media technologies like video games, virtual reality environments, the Internet, and social networks. However, there is no known research on medical students' game experiences or attitudes towards new media technologies in medical education. This investigation seeks to elucidate medical student experiences and attitudes, to see whether they warrant the development of new media teaching methods in medicine. Methods Medical students from two American universities participated. An anonymous, 30-item, cross-sectional survey addressed demographics, game play experience and attitudes on using new media technologies in medical education. Statistical analysis identified: 1 demographic characteristics; 2 differences between the two universities; 3 how video game play differs across gender, age, degree program and familiarity with computers; and 4 characteristics of students who play most frequently. Results 217 medical students participated. About half were female (53%. Respondents liked the idea of using technology to enhance healthcare education (98%, felt that education should make better use of new media technologies (96%, and believed that video games can have educational value (80%. A majority (77% would use a multiplayer online healthcare simulation on their own time, provided that it helped them to accomplish an important goal. Men and women agreed that they were most inclined to use multiplayer simulations if they were fun (97%, and if they helped to develop skill in patient interactions (90%. However, there was significant gender dissonance over types of favorite games, the educational value of video games, and the desire to participate in games that realistically replicated the experience of clinical practice. Conclusions Overall, medical student respondents, including many who do not play video games, held highly

  3. Medical student attitudes toward video games and related new media technologies in medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kron, Frederick W; Gjerde, Craig L; Sen, Ananda; Fetters, Michael D

    2010-06-24

    Studies in K-12 and college students show that their learning preferences have been strongly shaped by new media technologies like video games, virtual reality environments, the Internet, and social networks. However, there is no known research on medical students' game experiences or attitudes towards new media technologies in medical education. This investigation seeks to elucidate medical student experiences and attitudes, to see whether they warrant the development of new media teaching methods in medicine. Medical students from two American universities participated. An anonymous, 30-item, cross-sectional survey addressed demographics, game play experience and attitudes on using new media technologies in medical education. Statistical analysis identified: 1) demographic characteristics; 2) differences between the two universities; 3) how video game play differs across gender, age, degree program and familiarity with computers; and 4) characteristics of students who play most frequently. 217 medical students participated. About half were female (53%). Respondents liked the idea of using technology to enhance healthcare education (98%), felt that education should make better use of new media technologies (96%), and believed that video games can have educational value (80%). A majority (77%) would use a multiplayer online healthcare simulation on their own time, provided that it helped them to accomplish an important goal. Men and women agreed that they were most inclined to use multiplayer simulations if they were fun (97%), and if they helped to develop skill in patient interactions (90%). However, there was significant gender dissonance over types of favorite games, the educational value of video games, and the desire to participate in games that realistically replicated the experience of clinical practice. Overall, medical student respondents, including many who do not play video games, held highly favorable views about the use of video games and related new

  4. Medical student attitudes toward video games and related new media technologies in medical education

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background Studies in K-12 and college students show that their learning preferences have been strongly shaped by new media technologies like video games, virtual reality environments, the Internet, and social networks. However, there is no known research on medical students' game experiences or attitudes towards new media technologies in medical education. This investigation seeks to elucidate medical student experiences and attitudes, to see whether they warrant the development of new media teaching methods in medicine. Methods Medical students from two American universities participated. An anonymous, 30-item, cross-sectional survey addressed demographics, game play experience and attitudes on using new media technologies in medical education. Statistical analysis identified: 1) demographic characteristics; 2) differences between the two universities; 3) how video game play differs across gender, age, degree program and familiarity with computers; and 4) characteristics of students who play most frequently. Results 217 medical students participated. About half were female (53%). Respondents liked the idea of using technology to enhance healthcare education (98%), felt that education should make better use of new media technologies (96%), and believed that video games can have educational value (80%). A majority (77%) would use a multiplayer online healthcare simulation on their own time, provided that it helped them to accomplish an important goal. Men and women agreed that they were most inclined to use multiplayer simulations if they were fun (97%), and if they helped to develop skill in patient interactions (90%). However, there was significant gender dissonance over types of favorite games, the educational value of video games, and the desire to participate in games that realistically replicated the experience of clinical practice. Conclusions Overall, medical student respondents, including many who do not play video games, held highly favorable views about

  5. Educational Technology Decision-Making: Technology Acquisition for 746,000 Ontario Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Jason

    2016-01-01

    The author explores the technology procurement process in Ontario's publicly funded school districts to determine if it is aligned with relevant research, is grounded in best practices, and enhances student learning. Using a qualitative approach, 10 senior leaders (i.e., chief information officers, superintendents, etc.) were interviewed to reveal…

  6. Teacher educators' competences in fostering student teachers' proficiency in teaching and learning with technology : An overview of relevant research literature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dana Uerz; Monique Volman; Marijke Kral

    2018-01-01

    Teacher educators play an important role in preparing student teachers to integrate technology into their classrooms. This article presents an overview of research literature on teacher educators' competences in preparing their students to teach with technology. A literature search yielded 26

  7. A qualitative study of student perspectives and experiences in an information technology education program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Heekyung

    2009-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to learn about students' perspectives of an undergraduate level information technology (IT) education program. The IT program is a recent effort to create a new educational opportunity for computing in college, with recognition that the recent IT developments have had a greater influence on various aspects of people's lives than ever. Students' perspectives are a necessary piece of information to develop this innovative IT education program into a sound educational opportunity. Data were gathered through qualitative in-depth interviews conducted with 28 undergraduate students, most of whom have taken one or more IT classes before. The interview data were analyzed using the grounded theory approach. The analysis found that college students perceived that they were very competent in dealing with IT primarily due to their continued exposure to computers since youth. However, this perceived competency was not very stable. Students felt that they did not have sufficient IT competency when technical skills of dealing with IT came to attention. They also felt so when comparing their IT competency with that of their peers, examining it in a class context, and confronting a transition from education to the real world. In spite of their preference for and confidence in self-guided learning, students wanted to receive a formal instruction in IT when they needed to learn something difficult, something that they were not very interested in, and something important for their future lives. They also expressed a desire to gain a comprehensive understanding of computers without needing to learn fundamental computing principles. Students' various interests in IT education were dispersed around learning practical technical skills and understanding social implications of IT. Many participants' focus was a mix of the two factors, which was often expressed as an area that dealt with "how humans and computers interact." This blended interest suggested a

  8. Technology-Enhanced Pathology Education: Nigerian Medical Students Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vhriterhire, Raymond A.; Orkuma, Joseph A.; Jegede, Olushola O.; Omotosho, Ayodele J.; Adekwu, Amali

    2016-01-01

    The delivery of pathology education traditionally through instructor centred didactic lectures, small group tutorials, and practical demonstrations using microscope glass slides, gross pot specimens and autopsy sessions, is paving way for electronic learner-centred methods. Successful adoption and implementation of rapidly advancing educational…

  9. USE OF INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGIES FOR ASSESSMENT LEVEL EDUCATIONAL ACHIEVEMENTS OF UNIVERSITY STUDENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tetiana O. Oliinyk

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The article proves the necessity of internal (formative evaluation, the purpose of which is to intensify and optimize the process of the formation of digital citizenship of future specialists. Implementation of competence-based approach and informatization of education allows increasing efficiency of existing evaluation models, requires deep changes in all components of the education system. The attention is focused on a new generation of educational standards through improvement of innovative technologies of evaluation, providing open educational process (transparency of monitoring procedures and equal opportunities of students to achieve educational goals, help the student as a personality of learning activities to solve the problem of self-determination, self-control, self-realization.

  10. A Comparative Analysis of Preferred Learning and Teaching Styles for Engineering, Industrial, and Technology Education Students and Faculty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsioloudis, Petros; Fantz, Todd D.

    2012-01-01

    In the spring semester of 2010, a materials process course was selected as a means to perform a preferred learning style research study. This course was selected because it contained three groups of students: technology education, engineering technology, and industrial technology. The researchers believed that the differences in the students'…

  11. Information and Communication Technology Skills of Students Using the Distant Education Management System to Complete Their Theology Undergraduate Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yalman, Murat; Basaran, Bulent; Gonen, Selehattin

    2016-01-01

    Considering several variables, the present study aimed at examining the information and communication technology skills of university students taking their courses with the distant education system. In the study, the singular and relational survey model, one of general survey models, was used. The research sample was made up of 381 students…

  12. Learning analytics in practice: The effects of adaptive educational technology Snappet on students' arithmetic skills

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Molenaar, I.; Knoop-van Campen, C.A.N.

    2016-01-01

    Even though the recent influx of tablets in primary education goes together with the vision that educational technology empowered with learning analytics will revolutionize education, empirical results supporting this claim are scares. Adaptive educational technology Snappet combines extracted and

  13. What Is Educational Technology?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingle, Henry T.

    1975-01-01

    Featured in this issue are the English translations of two speeches delivered to graduate students in educational technology at Pontificia Universidade, Porto Alegre, Brazil. Henry Ingle defines educational technology in the traditional as well as modern sense, describes its essential elements, and discusses situations in which the use of…

  14. An Approach for Doctoral Students Conducting Context-Specific Review of Literature in IT, ICT, and Educational Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pretto, Gabriella; Curró, Gina

    2017-01-01

    Since 1980s the rate of technological change has been phenomenal, creating an impact on the information-seeking behaviors of doctoral students and other researchers. When searching the three fields of Information Technology (IT), Information and Communication Technology (ICT), and Educational Technology (EdTech), it is like opening a Pandora's…

  15. EFFECTS OF EDUCATIONAL TECHNOLOGY APPLICATIONS ON STUDENT ACHIEVEMENT FOR DISADVANTAGED STUDENTS: WHAT FORTY YEARS OF RESEARCH TELLS US

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan Cheung

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this review is to examine the effectiveness of educational technology applications and how features of using technology programs and characteristics of these evaluations affect achievement outcomes for disadvantaged students in grades K-12. The review applies consistent inclusion standards to focus on studies that met high methodological standards. A total of 154 qualifying studies were included in the final analysis. The findings of the review suggest that educational technology applications generally produced a positive, though modest, effect (ES=+0.16 in comparison to traditional methods. A marginally significant difference was found among four types of educational technology applications. Larger effect sizes were found with comprehensive models (ES=+0.23 and innovative technology applications (ES=+0.20. Effect sizes for supplemental programs and computer-managed learning were +0.15 and +0.12, respectively. The findings provide some suggestive evidence that approaches that integrated computer and non-computer instruction in the classrooms and innovative approaches are effective in improving student achievement. Differential impacts were also found by both substantive and methodological features.

  16. Problem-based learning in photonics technology education: assessing student learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massa, Nicholas; Dischino, Michele; Donnelly, Judith; Hanes, Fenna

    2009-06-01

    Problem-based learning (PBL) is an instructional approach whereby students learn course content by collaboratively solving complex real-world problems and reflecting on their experience. Research shows that PBL improves student knowledge and retention, motivation, problem-solving skills, and the ability to skillfully apply knowledge in new situations. One of the challenges with PBL, however, is that real-world problems are typically open-ended with more than one possible solution, which poses a challenge to educators with regard to assessing student performance. In this paper, we describe an approach to assessing student performance in PBL developed by the Photon PBL Project, a three-year National Science Foundation Advanced Technological Education (NSF-ATE) project in which eight interdisciplinary multimedia PBL "Challenges" were created in collaboration with photonics industry and university partners for use in high school and college math, science and technology courses. Assessment included measures of content knowledge, conceptual knowledge, problem-solving skills, motivation, self-efficacy, and metacognitive ability. Results from pilot testing at four community college photonics technology programs are presented.

  17. The Growing Reliance of Ontario Colleges of Applied Arts and Technology on Educational Agents for the Recruitment of International Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legusov, Oleg

    2017-01-01

    The number of international students seeking educational opportunities at Ontario colleges of applied arts and technology (CAATs) has grown at an unprecedented rate in the past 10 years. It appears that as the number of the international college students has increased, colleges have also been relying more heavily on educational agents to recruit…

  18. Influence of Educational Technology Centres on Students' Skill Acquisition for Self Employment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eze, P. I.

    2016-01-01

    Educational technology is a core course of study in Nigerian teacher education institutions, such as Colleges of Education, Institutes of Education and Facilities of Education. The aim of educational technology is to improve the competence of teachers by producing teachers that can back theory with practice in teaching-learning situation. The…

  19. Influence of information technologies on technical fitness of students in sport-oriented physical education

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    Zh.L. Kozina

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to determine influence of information technologies in sport-oriented physical education on technical fitness of students, practicing football indoors. Material: in the researches students (boys - n=40 of 18-20 years’ age participated. Standard tests on physical condition were used. For determination of motor skills and abilities we used: juggling with ball; kick in pre-set sector of goal; shuttle run 4 x 10 meters with dribbling; kick for distance. Results: structural model of sport-oriented students’ physical education with application of information technologies has been formed. In the model all students are trained in sport-oriented academic groups by chosen kinds of sports (motor functioning. Such approach envisages holistic form of program material construction and unified algorithm of students’ progress assessment. Conclusions: the wholeness of sport-oriented physical education’s functioning is ensured at the account of application of information technologies. It permits to optimize motor skills’ training process. In this case single form of building of program material is created.

  20. [Evaluation of digital educational student-technology interaction in neonatal nursing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Fernanda Salim Ferreira de; Dias, Danielle Monteiro Vilela; Higarashi, Ieda Harumi; Scochi, Carmen Gracinda Silvan; Fonseca, Luciana Mara Monti

    2015-02-01

    To assess the digital educational technology interface Caring for the sensory environment in the neonatal unit: noise, lighting and handling based on ergonomic criteria. Descriptive study, in which we used the guidelines and ergonomic criteria established by ISO 9241-11 and an online Likert scale instrument to identify problems and interface qualities. The instrument was built based on Ergolist, which follows the criteria of ISO 9141-11. There were 58 undergraduate study participants from the School of Nursing of Ribeirao Preto, University of Sao Paulo, who attended the classes about neonatal nursing content. All items were positively evaluated by more than 70% of the sample. Educational technology is appropriate according to the ergonomic criteria and can be made available for teaching nursing students.

  1. Towards Building a Computer Aided Education System for Special Students Using Wearable Sensor Technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raja Majid Mehmood

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Human computer interaction is a growing field in terms of helping people in their daily life to improve their living. Especially, people with some disability may need an interface which is more appropriate and compatible with their needs. Our research is focused on similar kinds of problems, such as students with some mental disorder or mood disruption problems. To improve their learning process, an intelligent emotion recognition system is essential which has an ability to recognize the current emotional state of the brain. Nowadays, in special schools, instructors are commonly use some conventional methods for managing special students for educational purposes. In this paper, we proposed a novel computer aided method for instructors at special schools where they can teach special students with the support of our system using wearable technologies.

  2. Towards Building a Computer Aided Education System for Special Students Using Wearable Sensor Technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehmood, Raja Majid; Lee, Hyo Jong

    2017-02-08

    Human computer interaction is a growing field in terms of helping people in their daily life to improve their living. Especially, people with some disability may need an interface which is more appropriate and compatible with their needs. Our research is focused on similar kinds of problems, such as students with some mental disorder or mood disruption problems. To improve their learning process, an intelligent emotion recognition system is essential which has an ability to recognize the current emotional state of the brain. Nowadays, in special schools, instructors are commonly use some conventional methods for managing special students for educational purposes. In this paper, we proposed a novel computer aided method for instructors at special schools where they can teach special students with the support of our system using wearable technologies.

  3. INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGY IN ORGANIZATION OF EXTRACURRICULAR WORK WITH GIFTED STUDENTS IN THE SYSTEM OF THE LITERARY EDUCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ольга Петрович

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the issue of features of the use of information and communication technology in organizing extra-curricular activities with the literary gifted students. Main attention is drawn on the effective forms and methods of information and communication technology for the successful conduction of extracurricular activities with gifted high school students in literary education system, in particular such as: web quests, QR-codes, QR-quests, Google Groups, multimedia presentations, blogging, virtual tours, use of interactive whiteboards, educational forums, databases educational resources, virtual libraries, creating the electronic portfolio, media library of educational material, comics, doodles, clouds of words etc.

  4. Learning characteristics of veterinary technology students in a distance-education and an on-campus program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varnhagen, Connie K; Wright, David L

    2008-01-01

    Distance-education programs have the potential to greatly increase the number of veterinary technicians. The demographic characteristics, readiness for independent and online learning, learning styles, and academic locus of control of a group of distance-education and on-campus veterinary technology students were examined. Distance-education students preferred independent learning and were more internally motivated to learn. Distance-education students with greater degrees of independence and internal motivation participated more fully, were more satisfied with their learning, and achieved higher grades. Students who preferred problem solving and active experimentation were particularly successful in distance education. These findings could have important implications for advising students interested in distance-education programs.

  5. THE PERSPECTIVES OF INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGY OF EDUCATION OF STUDENTS IN HIGHER EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTIONS OF UKRAINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oleksii Voronkin

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the results of the expert survey conducted to determine the perspective of development of information and communication technology of education of students in higher educational institutions of Ukraine. The lines of ICT development are forming four generalized sections (organizational, psychological and pedagogical, hardware and software, methodological sections. On the basis of an expert assessment are identified perspectives of 68 lines. The ranking of priority's lines of development of ICT are presented. It was determined that the greatest prospects will be: blended learning; research teaching method and heuristic teaching method; student-centered approach; increasing the role of informal education; the formation of students' abilities to independently acquire knowledge; short-term distance learning programs; portable computing devices; the new human machine interfaces; free and open-source software; cloud computing; artificial intelligence technology (search computing with elements of semantics, linguistic systems, decision support system; integrated, multidisciplinary and interdisciplinary training of teachers. Actualized question concerning the need to develop a system of standards in ICT environment.

  6. Mathematics Education for Engineering Technology Students – A Bridge Too Far?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noraishiyah Abdullah

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Trying to decide what is best suited for someone or something is an ever enduring task let alone trying to prepare students with the right engineering mind. So ‘how do you build an engineer?’ if that is the right word. What is the right ingredient? Mathematics has been said as the most important foundation in engineers’ life. Curriculum has been developed and reviewed over the years to meet this target. This work explores how much or lack of it has the curriculum prepares the future technologist to face the world of engineering technology as far as mathematics is concerned. Analysis of mathematics lectures, interviews of engineering technologist students and engineering technology subject lecturer is undertaken. Understand what each contributes help in understanding the picture that the current education is painting. Based on the theory of learning, APOS theory helps in explaining how students bridge their knowledge of mathematics when it comes to solving engineering technology problems. The question is, is it a bridge too far? 

  7. Educational Technology and Student Voice: Examining Teacher Candidates' Perceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byker, Erik Jon; Putman, S. Michael; Handler, Laura; Polly, Drew

    2017-01-01

    Student Voice is a term that honors the participatory roles that students have when they enter learning spaces like classrooms. Student Voice is the recognition of students' choice, creativity, and freedom. Seminal educationists--like Dewey and Montessori--centered the purposes of education in the flourishing and valuing of Student Voice. This…

  8. Study on Distance Education to Adult Students in New Media Background based on Computer Technology

    OpenAIRE

    Pan Ying

    2016-01-01

    In the context of new media, traditional adult students’ distance education has been an unprecedented challenge to the current distance education of adult students to fully understand the importance of the use of new media, necessity, and through new media the student population is widely popular media to develop and strengthen distance education of adult students, so as to continuously improve the effectiveness of distance education, and improve the quality of personnel training. In this pap...

  9. INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY AS A MEANS TO CAPTURE THE STUDENTS OF THE COURSE "METHODS OF "MATHEMATICS" EDUCATIONAL TEACHING FIELD"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Skvortsova S.

    2014-11-01

    "Methods of teaching educational sector" Mathematics "" using computers, the authors use the term "information technology", follow the definition of information technologies M. Zhaldak, IT training Zakharova I. and see their possible implementation in class presentations through the use of lectures; at workshops – by presentations prepared by the teacher and presentations prepared by the students, and through the use of computer control tests; during independent work possible use of teaching aids in electronic media and educational computer tests.

  10. Traditional Craft or Technology Education: Development of Students' Technical Abilities in Finnish Comprehensive School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Autio, Ossi

    2016-01-01

    Changes in the economy, nature, production and society together with increasing scientific and technological knowledge make demands of transforming school teaching in the field of technology education. The aim of the article is briefly to explore the integration between science, technology and traditional craft education by analyzing the current…

  11. Educational technology improves ECG interpretation of acute myocardial infarction among medical students and emergency medicine residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pourmand, Ali; Tanski, Mary; Davis, Steven; Shokoohi, Hamid; Lucas, Raymond; Zaver, Fareen

    2015-01-01

    Asynchronous online training has become an increasingly popular educational format in the new era of technology-based professional development. We sought to evaluate the impact of an online asynchronous training module on the ability of medical students and emergency medicine (EM) residents to detect electrocardiogram (ECG) abnormalities of an acute myocardial infarction (AMI). We developed an online ECG training and testing module on AMI, with emphasis on recognizing ST elevation myocardial infarction (MI) and early activation of cardiac catheterization resources. Study participants included senior medical students and EM residents at all post-graduate levels rotating in our emergency department (ED). Participants were given a baseline set of ECGs for interpretation. This was followed by a brief interactive online training module on normal ECGs as well as abnormal ECGs representing an acute MI. Participants then underwent a post-test with a set of ECGs in which they had to interpret and decide appropriate intervention including catheterization lab activation. 148 students and 35 EM residents participated in this training in the 2012-2013 academic year. Students and EM residents showed significant improvements in recognizing ECG abnormalities after taking the asynchronous online training module. The mean score on the testing module for students improved from 5.9 (95% CI [5.7-6.1]) to 7.3 (95% CI [7.1-7.5]), with a mean difference of 1.4 (95% CI [1.12-1.68]) (p<0.0001). The mean score for residents improved significantly from 6.5 (95% CI [6.2-6.9]) to 7.8 (95% CI [7.4-8.2]) (p<0.0001). An online interactive module of training improved the ability of medical students and EM residents to correctly recognize the ECG evidence of an acute MI.

  12. Students' Age Difference of Confidence in Using Technology for Learning in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yau, Hon Keung; Cheng, Alison Lai Fong

    2012-01-01

    Some past studies find that older students have more confidence in using technology for learning than younger students but some other studies find the opposite result. However, it is found that there are a few researches studying on the age difference in the perception of using technology for learning in Hong Kong. Therefore, the aim of the study…

  13. Key Interactions for Online Programs between Faculty, Students, Technologies, and Educational Institutions: A Holistic Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Jomon Aliyas; Cochran, Justin Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Online education is becoming increasingly popular among both traditional and nontraditional students. Students gravitate to the flexibility of online courses, which allows them to work around jobs, family, and other responsibilities. While online program growth continues, these programs present several new challenges to educational institutions…

  14. Technology Revolution = Education Evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLafferty, Charles L., Jr.

    2000-01-01

    Outlines one attempt to infuse technology into an educational psychology course, discussing commonly available tools and techniques (e.g., online syllabus, e-mail, World Wide Web, presentation packages, and use of learning teams and electronic discussion groups). The paper examines obstacles, student responses, application in the K-12 classroom,…

  15. Preparing Special Education Teachers to Use Educational Technology to Enhance Student Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Teresa; Georgina, David

    2014-01-01

    New standards require teachers to integrate the use of technology in their teaching and preparing teachers at the preservice level to integrate technology into the classroom is key. The way in which this is accomplished varies across institutions though often a technology tools course stands as an individual course with the hope professors are…

  16. Infographic Development by Accelerated Bachelor of Science in Nursing Students: An Innovative Technology-Based Approach to Public Health Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falk, Nancy L

    Health communications and baccalaureate nursing education are increasingly impacted by new technological tools. This article describes how an Accelerated Bachelor of Science in Nursing program incorporates an infographic assignment into a graduate-level online health information and technology course. Students create colorful, engaging infographics using words and visuals to communicate public health information. The assignment, which incorporates the use of data and evidence, provides students the opportunity to acquire new research and technology skills while gaining confidence creating and innovating. The finished products may be disseminated, serving as vehicles to influence public health and well-being.

  17. Adoption of Mobile Technology in Higher Education: Students Perceptions of English Language Learning Using Smart Phones

    OpenAIRE

    Gunadevi K. Jeevi Subramaniam; Raja Nor Safinas Raja Harun

    2013-01-01

    A change in technology is something that keeps on happening in learning and it creates new challenges for pedagogy. The purpose of this study is to explore students? perceptions of using smart phones and the use of the smart phone during English oral communication activity as a tool to find information by the students. This paper includes the preliminary results of a study on students? perceptions of using smart phones in the English language learning classroom. In total, 150 students using s...

  18. Comparative Study on the Performance of Bachelor of Secondary Education (BSE) Students in Educational Technology Using Blended Learning Strategy and Traditional Face-to-Face Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzo, Arnold R.

    2017-01-01

    Technology offers various tools of improving the teaching -- learning process. It revolutionizes teaching from traditional face-to-face to distance and online learning. This study described and compared the performance of BSE II students in educational technology using the traditional face-to-face classroom interaction and the blended learning…

  19. Development of the Learning Result of Innovation and Information Technology in Education Using CIPPA, for Third Year Students in the Bachelor of Education Program, Nakhon Phanom University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanrin, Chanwit

    2014-01-01

    This research proposes (1) to develop the learning management plan for the Innovation and Information Technology in Education of the 3rd year students of the Bachelor of Education Program by using CIPPA effectively according to the criteria 75/75; (2) to study the effectiveness index of the learning management plan for the Innovation and…

  20. Transformative learning : the use of learning technologies by postgraduate education students

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    M.Ed. (ICT in Education) Marc Prensky (2009) described the future as being “unimaginably complex”. The rapid development of technology contributes to this complexity of the future and is an integral part of the changing world. Learning technologies should therefore be a vital part of education that is aimed to prepare and equip learners, regardless their age, for the world and the future. I am of the opinion that education should therefore co-evolve with Information and Communication Techn...

  1. Validating a measure to assess factors that affect assistive technology use by students with disabilities in elementary and secondary education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zapf, Susan A; Scherer, Marcia J; Baxter, Mary F; H Rintala, Diana

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to measure the predictive validity, internal consistency and clinical utility of the Matching Assistive Technology to Child & Augmentative Communication Evaluation Simplified (MATCH-ACES) assessment. Twenty-three assistive technology team evaluators assessed 35 children using the MATCH-ACES assessment. This quasi-experimental study examined the internal consistency, predictive validity and clinical utility of the MATCH-ACES assessment. The MATCH-ACES assessment predisposition scales had good internal consistency across all three scales. A significant relationship was found between (a) high student perseverance and need for assistive technology and (b) high teacher comfort and interest in technology use (p = (0).002). Study results indicate that the MATCH-ACES assessment has good internal consistency and validity. Predisposition characteristics of student and teacher combined can influence the level of assistive technology use; therefore, assistive technology teams should assess predisposition factors of the user when recommending assistive technology. Implications for Rehabilitation Educational and medical professionals should be educated on evidence-based assistive technology assessments. Personal experience and psychosocial factors can influence the outcome use of assistive technology. Assistive technology assessments must include an intervention plan for assistive technology service delivery to measure effective outcome use.

  2. Physical Education Student Teachers' Technology Integration Self-Efficacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, Jennifer M.

    2017-01-01

    Pre- and in-service physical education teachers have evaluated themselves as not being very well prepared or proficient in technology use. Thus, better preparation of PE teachers to integrate technology is necessary. In this study, I examined the effects of technology-related mastery experiences, vicarious experiences, and social persuasion on…

  3. Ordered Effects of Technology Education Units on Higher-Order Critical Thinking Skills of Middle School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mojica, Kern D.

    2010-01-01

    In this quasi-experimental quantitative study, 105 eighth grade students at a suburban middle school in New York State participated in a seven month-long project involving the ordered effects of the technology education units of Lego[R] Mindstorms(TM) NXT Robotics System, Digital Storytelling with Microsoft Windows Movie Maker, and the Marble Maze…

  4. To What Extent Does Information and Communication Technology Support Inclusion in Education of Students with Learning Difficulties?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mølster, Terje; Nes, Kari

    2018-01-01

    The main intention of this study is to explore the relationship between information and communication technology (ICT) and inclusion. The target group is students who are conceived as having learning difficulties or special educational needs. To illuminate this issue, we draw on data collected in a recent national research project about the…

  5. Perceptions of Students from the Department of Computer Education and Instructional Technologies Regarding the Concept of Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uyar, Melis Yesilpinar

    2017-01-01

    In the study, the purpose was to determine the perceptions of students from the department of Computer Education and Instructional Technologies regarding the concept of curriculum. The participants of the study conducted with the phenomenology research design were 212 preservice teachers. The research data were collected via document analysis and…

  6. Information and Communication Technology: Students' Health Education in 1st- to 6th-Grade South Korea Elementary Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Eunjoo; Park, Hyejin; Whyte, James; Jeong, Eunhoe

    2013-01-01

    Background: The purposes of this study were to (1) identify school nurses' awareness of information and communication technology (ICT) use in students' health education and (2) explore the barriers or reasons for the adoption of ICT in school nursing practice, while (3) presenting strategies to speed ICT diffusion and dissemination into practice.…

  7. iMidwife: midwifery students' use of smartphone technology as a mediated educational tool in clinical environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLeo, Annemarie; Geraghty, Sadie

    2017-12-18

    The increasing use of smartphone technology in health care provides midwifery students with unprecedented access to online resources that facilitates the optimal care of women and supports ongoing learning. A small pilot study was conducted in Western Australia, with 29 undergraduate and postgraduate midwifery students to explore the use of smartphone technology whilst in clinical practice. This study aimed to define the impact of smartphones in clinical decision-making and learning whilst in clinical areas, by midwifery students at the point of care. An online survey was used to collect data. Five consistent themes were identified from the results. Smartphone technology encourages self-directed learning, consolidation of theory, engagement through blended learning, complements online education in clinical practice and is a trend in the future of midwifery curriculum. Smartphones enhance the learning and mobility of supportive resources that consolidate midwifery students' clinical experience in workplace environments.

  8. ICT Use: Educational Technology and Library and Information Science Students' Perspectives--An Exploratory Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aharony, Noa; Shonfeld, Miri

    2015-01-01

    This study seeks to explore what factors influence students' ICT use and web technology competence. The objectives of this study are the following: (a) To what extent do certain elements of Rogers' (2003) Diffusion of Innovations Theory (DOI) explain students' ICT use, (b) To what extent do personality characteristics derived from the Big Five…

  9. Using Mobile Apps to Entice General Education Students into Technology Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Michelle; Murphy, Diane

    2013-01-01

    It is of national importance to increase the number of college students pursuing degrees in information systems/information technology (IT/IS) subjects. The primary focus at many institutions is renovating or enhancing existing IT/IS programs and the target audience is the students who have selected to major in IT/IS subjects. This paper looks at…

  10. Internet Self-Efficacy Does Not Predict Student Use of Internet-Mediated Educational Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchanan, Tom; Joban, Sanjay; Porter, Alan

    2014-01-01

    Two studies tested the hypothesis that use of learning technologies among undergraduate psychology students was associated with higher Internet self-efficacy (ISE). In Study 1, the ISE scores of 86 students were found not to be associated with either attitudes towards, or measured use of, blogs and wikis as part of an IT skills course. ISE was…

  11. SLICEIT and TAHMO Partnerships: Students Local and International Collaboration for Climate and Environmental Monitoring, Technology Development, Education, Adaptation and Mitigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aishlin, P. S.; Selker, J. S.

    2015-12-01

    Climate change understanding and impacts vary by community, yet the global nature of climate change requires international collaboration to address education, monitoring, adaptation and mitigation needs. We propose that effective climate change monitoring and education can be accomplished via student-led local and international community partnerships. By empowering students as community leaders in climate-environmental monitoring and education, as well as exploration of adaptation/mitigation needs, well-informed communities and young leadership are developed to support climate change science moving forward. Piloted 2013-2015, the SLICEIT1 program partnered with TAHMO2 to connect student leaders in North America, Europe and Africa. At the international level, schools in the U.S.A and Netherlands were partnered with schools in Ghana, Kenya, and Uganda for science and cultural exchange. Each school was equipped with a climate or other environmental sensing system, real-time data publication and curricula for both formal and informal science, technology, engineering and math education and skill development. African counterparts in TAHMO's School-2-School program collect critically important data for enhanced on-the-ground monitoring of weather conditions in data-scarce regions of Africa. In Idaho, student designed, constructed and installed weather stations provide real time data for classroom and community use. Student-designed formal educational activities are disseminated to project partners, increasing hands-on technology education and peer-based learning. At the local level, schools are partnered with a local agency, research institute, nonprofit organization, industry and/or community partner that supplies a climate science expert mentor to SLICEIT program leaders and teachers. Mentor engagement is facilitated and secured by program components that directly benefit the mentor's organization and local community via climate/environment monitoring, student workforce

  12. Investigating Students' Perceptions on Laptop Initiative in Higher Education: An Extension of the Technology Acceptance Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elwood, Susan; Changchit, Chuleeporn; Cutshall, Robert

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: This study aims to examine students' perceptions and their acceptance towards implementing a laptop program. Design/methodology/approach: Extensive research has been carried out on the technology acceptance model (TAM) to better understand the behavioral intention of individuals to accept and use technology. Therefore, the TAM was adopted…

  13. Teaching in a Digital Age: How Educators Use Technology to Improve Student Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKnight, Katherine; O'Malley, Kimberly; Ruzic, Roxanne; Horsley, Maria Kelly; Franey, John J.; Bassett, Katherine

    2016-01-01

    A successful digital conversion for classrooms, districts, and states is not determined by the technology, but by how technology enables teaching and learning. The purpose of our multisite case study was to document digital instructional strategies teachers use to enhance and transform student learning, and align that use with learning research.…

  14. Adequate Funding for Educational Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angle, Jason B.

    2010-01-01

    Public schools are currently operating in a pressure-cooker of accountability systems in which they must teach students to high standards and meet ever increasing targets for student proficiency, or face increasingly severe sanctions. Into this mix is thrown educational technology and the funding for that technology. The literature espouses the…

  15. Students with Special Educational Needs and Assistive Technologies: A Literature Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdem, Raziye

    2017-01-01

    The term "assistive technologies" refers to the equipment, devices and apparatus, and the services, systems, processes and adaptations made to the environment that support and facilitate their functions, used by persons with special education needs. This study is a literature review of the use of assistive technologies in the education…

  16. Keeping up with Our Students: The Evolution of Technology and Standards in Art Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patton, Ryan M.; Buffington, Melanie L.

    2016-01-01

    This article addresses the standards of technology in the visual arts, arguing the standards function as de facto policy, the guidelines that shape what teachers teach. In this study, we investigate how art education standards approach technology as a teaching tool and artmaking medium, analyzing the current National Visual Arts Standards, the…

  17. Digital Teaching Platforms: Customizing Classroom Learning for Each Student. Technology & Education, Connections (TEC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dede, Chris, Ed.; Richards, John, Ed.

    2012-01-01

    The Digital Teaching Platform (DTP) brings the power of interactive technology to teaching and learning in classrooms. In this authoritative book, top researchers in the field of learning science and educational technology examine the current state of design and research on DTPs, the principles for evaluating them, and their likely evolution as a…

  18. Perception by French Students of the Gendered Nature of Material Artifacts Studied in Technology Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colette, Andreucci; Marjolaine, Chatoney

    2017-01-01

    Many studies have shown the importance of the socio-cultural factors that lead girls to desert scientific and technological courses. Over a long period, the contents of the French technology education (TE) college curricula may well have contributed to strengthening the feeling among girls that this discipline was better suited to boys. The choice…

  19. Technology Education and the Arts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roman, Harry T.

    2009-01-01

    One hears quite frequently how the arts continually suffer in the academic day. Many long-time technology education champions certainly know what this is all about; but there may be some ways to use technology education to bring the arts into the classroom. This article offers a series of activities and suggestions that will help students better…

  20. Teaching Strategies in Technology Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwaller, Anthony E.

    Teachers of technology education need to relate their teaching strategies to learning theory, student needs, and Bloom's taxonomy. In learning, students take in information and apply it to the real world through accommodation. Teaching strategies must allow for this process of accommodation. Student needs involve sustenance (physiological needs),…

  1. Educational technology in medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Heeyoung; Resch, David S; Kovach, Regina A

    2013-01-01

    This article aims to review the past practices of educational technology and envision future directions for medical education. The discussion starts with a historical review of definitions and perspectives of educational technology, in which the authors propose that educators adopt a broader process-oriented understanding of educational technology. Future directions of e-learning, simulation, and health information technology are discussed based on a systems view of the technological process. As new technologies continue to arise, this process-oriented understanding and outcome-based expectations of educational technology should be embraced. With this view, educational technology should be valued in terms of how well the technological process informs and facilitates learning, and the acquisition and maintenance of clinical expertise.

  2. Design Skills Education for Students of Advanced Course in College of Technology in Cooperation with the Support Program for Contemporary Educational Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, Naoyuki; Sakabe, Toshiya; Koshiba, Takashi; Ishitobi, Manabu

    Since 2004, Nara National College of Technology has been conducting “The Super Science Teacher Delivery Lecture Project”, in which the staff of our college visit elementary or junior high schools to provide special classes on science, technology or other subjects. This project was adopted as part of the Support Program for Contemporary Educational Needs by the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology. To provide education on design skills for students in the advanced mechanical engineering course and advanced electronic and information engineering course of the faculty of advanced engineering of our college, Problem Based Learning (PBL) has been conducted with the cooperation of the Super Science Teacher Delivery Lecture Project. In the PBL, students developed the teaching materials and experiments for science and technology lessons of elementary or junior high school students. In addition, the design skills of the students were evaluated by the reports on design skills, the demonstration of the delivery lecture and the records of the their efforts. From the results of the student questionnaire on this PBL, it is clear that most of the students understood “what are the design skills?” and acquired design skills.

  3. Educational Technology in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meifeng, Liu; Jinjiao, Lv; Cui, Kang

    2010-01-01

    This paper elaborates the two different academic views of the identity of educational technology in China at the current time--advanced-technology-oriented cognition, known as Electrifying Education, and problem-solving-oriented cognition, known as Educational Technology. It addresses five main modes of educational technology in China: as a…

  4. Enhancing student engagement through the affordances of mobile technology: a 21st century learning perspective on Realistic Mathematics Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bray, Aibhín; Tangney, Brendan

    2016-03-01

    Several recent curriculum reforms aim to address the shortfalls traditionally associated with mathematics education through increased emphasis on higher-order-thinking and collaborative skills. Some stakeholders, such as the US National Council of Teachers of Mathematics and the UK Joint Mathematical Council, advocate harnessing the affordances of digital technology in conjunction with social constructivist pedagogies, contextual scenarios, and/or approaches aligned with Realistic Mathematics Education (RME). However, it can be difficult to create technology-mediated, collaborative and contextual activities within a conventional classroom setting. This paper explores how a combination of a transformative, mobile technology-mediated approach, RME, and a particular model of 21st century learning facilitates the development of mathematics learning activities with the potential to increase student engagement and confidence. An explanatory case study with multiple embedded units and a pre-experimental design was conducted with a total of 54 students in 3 schools over 25 hours of class time. Results from student interviews, along with pre-test/post-test analysis of questionnaires, suggest that the approach has the potential to increase student engagement with, and confidence in, mathematics. This paper expands on these results, proposing connections between aspects of the activity design and their impact on student attitudes and behaviours.

  5. Attracting students and professionals into math, science, and technology education at the elementary and middle grades: Annual report, September 1, 1992--August 31, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flick, L.B.

    1995-12-31

    This report describes the progress of a project to encourage students and professionals to participate in math, science, and technology education at the elementary and middle grades. The topics of the report include developing a model laboratory/classroom for teacher education, providing financial incentives for students with technical majors to complete the program, and emphasizing issues of equity and minority participation in mathematics, science and technology education through recruitment procedures and in course content.

  6. Information and communication technology: students' health education in 1st- to 6th-grade South Korea elementary schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Eunjoo; Park, Hyejin; Whyte, James; Jeong, Eunhoe

    2013-09-01

    The purposes of this study were to (1) identify school nurses' awareness of information and communication technology (ICT) use in students' health education and (2) explore the barriers or reasons for the adoption of ICT in school nursing practice, while (3) presenting strategies to speed ICT diffusion and dissemination into practice. For data collection, 209 primary school nurses in K province of Korea were selected and e-mailed the questionnaires. Collected data were analyzed as frequency, percentages, and chi-square tests. The major reasons to adopt ICT were increasing school nurses' confidence in providing health education and improving teaching methods using diverse multimedia. The major barriers to utilization of ICT were lack of time for preparation of educational materials, lack of software availability, and lack of computer skills of school nurses and students. Several strategies were suggested to speed the diffusion of ICT into students' health education, such as integrating a health education course into regular curriculum. It is important to identify barriers and reasons for adoption of ICT in school nursing. In addition, strategies should be emphasized that result in more rapid diffusion of these technologies in school nursing practice. © 2013, American School Health Association.

  7. Urban Environmental Education: Leveraging Technology and Ecology to Engage Students in Studying the Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, Michael; Vaughn, Meredith Houle; Strauss, Eric; Cotter, Lindsey

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we describe the outcomes of the first year of an intensive, urban ecology focused, summer program for urban high school youth. Students in our program conduct scientific investigations of their urban ecosystems while exploring potential career options in science and technology fields. In conducting their investigations, the students…

  8. Teacher Effectiveness as Correlate of Students' Cognitive Achievement at Upper Basic Education in Basic Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owoh, Titus M.

    2016-01-01

    This study sought to find out the relationship between students perception of their teacher effectiveness and academic achievement in Basic Technology. Teacher's personality, teaching techniques/classroom management strategy and appearance, all integrate to make for teacher effectiveness. To carry out this research, two research questions and one…

  9. The Case for Using SMS Technologies to Support Distance Education Students in South Africa: Conversations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viljoen, Jeanne-Marie; Du Preez, Carl; Cook, Antoinette

    2005-01-01

    The rate of adoption of mobile technologies in Africa's developing countries is amongst the highest in the world and by 2005 there may be almost 100 billion mobile users in Africa (Keegan, 2002; Brown, 2005). This is just one of the reasons why servicing distance students in this country through m-learning support tools should enjoy…

  10. A Computer Oriented Problem Solving Unit, Consume. Student Guide. Computer Technology Program Environmental Education Units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Northwest Regional Educational Lab., Portland, OR.

    This is the student guide in a set of five computer-oriented environmental/energy education units. Contents are organized into the following parts or lessons: (1) introduction to power and energy; (2) energy consumption and supply; (3) energy conservation and distribution; (4) energy flow and the question of transportation; and (5) computer models…

  11. The Impact of Video Technology on Student Performance in Physical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palao, Jose Manuel; Hastie, Peter Andrew; Guerrero Cruz, Prudencia; Ortega, Enrique

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the effectiveness of the use of video feedback on student learning in physical education, while also examining the teacher's responses to the innovation. Three classes from one Spanish high school participated in different conditions for learning hurdles in a track and field unit. These conditions compared…

  12. Mobile Learning Technology Based on iOS Devices to Support Students with Special Education Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Lopez, Alvaro; Rodriguez-Fortiz, Maria Jose; Rodriguez-Almendros, Maria Luisa; Martinez-Segura, Maria Jose

    2013-01-01

    Students with special education have difficulties to develop cognitive abilities and acquire new knowledge. They could also need to improve their behavior, communication and relationships with their environment. The development of customizable and adaptable applications tailored to them provides many benefits as it helps mold the learning process…

  13. Multi-Disciplinary Type Creativity Education for Students from 15 years old to Bachelor Level in College of Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yotsuyanagi, Takao; Ikeda, Senri; Suzuki, Katsuhiko; Kobayashi, Hiroshi; Sakuraba, Hiroshi; Shoji, Akira; Itoh, Masahiko

    Creativity is the most fundamental keyword for engineers to solve the various problems in manufacturing products. This engineering “learning” cannot be achieved without the real experiences, especially by the teens who have the curiosity to know everything. New educational program has been innovated in Miyagi National College of Technology. This new curriculum started as “03C” in 2003. It involves two laboratories for mixed-departments type grouping, which intend to cultivate the creative ability for the 2nd year students in College Course and the 1st year students in Advanced Course as Engineering Design. This paper presents the trial of the new educational program on the cultivating creative ability designed for teen-agers, and discusses the processes in detail, results and further problems. This program will progress still more with continuous improvement of manufacturing subjects in cooperative with educational-industrial complex.

  14. APPLICATION OF INNOVETIVE TECHNOLOGIES AS A WAY OF TEACHING STUDENTS TO IMPROVE THE QUALITY OF EDUCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruzan E. Mirzahanyan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In the educational environment developedmany unique teaching methods withinnovative technology. The author has applied an integrated approachto the course «Operations Researchand Optimization Techniques». Theharmonious development of thecompetency model is advisable to use avariety of activities: reports, role-playingand simulation games, case study.

  15. Educational Leadership in an Online World: Connecting Students to Technology Responsibly, Safely, and Ethically

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribble, Mike; Miller, Teresa Northern

    2013-01-01

    The current gap in technology knowledge and lack of leadership preparation related to digital literacy for school environments can cause serious problems, as school leaders, parents, and broader social communities are currently realizing. The authors describe strategies for educational leaders to prepare their stakeholder groups for a digital…

  16. E-education in Refrigeration Technologies for Students and Technicians in the Workplace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenaerts, Marnik; Schreurs, Marc; Reulens, Walter

    2011-01-01

    The demand for broadly educated engineers, installers and service technicians is growing because of the strong growth in refrigeration, air conditioning and heating. The rapid technological evolution makes it impossible for a school or training centre to invest in all HVAC (heating ventilation and air conditioning) and refrigeration fields. It is…

  17. Integrating technology into radiologic science education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wertz, Christopher Ira; Hobbs, Dan L; Mickelsen, Wendy

    2014-01-01

    To review the existing literature pertaining to the current learning technologies available in radiologic science education and how to implement those technologies. Only articles from peer-reviewed journals and scholarly reports were used in the research for this review. The material was further restricted to those articles that emphasized using new learning technologies in education, with a focus on radiologic science education. Teaching in higher education is shifting from a traditional classroom-based lecture format to one that incorporates new technologies that allow for more varied and diverse educational models. Radiologic technology educators must adapt traditional education delivery methods to incorporate current technologies. Doing so will help engage the modern student in education in ways in which they are already familiar. As students' learning methods change, so must the methods of educational delivery. The use of new technologies has profound implications for education. If implemented properly, these technologies can be effective tools to help educators.

  18. Information and communication technology and community-based health sciences training in Uganda: perceptions and experiences of educators and students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Larry W; Mwanika, Andrew; Kaye, Dan; Muhwezi, Wilson W; Nabirye, Rose C; Mbalinda, Scovia; Okullo, Isaac; Kennedy, Caitlin E; Groves, Sara; Sisson, Stephen D; Burnham, Gilbert; Bollinger, Robert C

    2012-01-01

    Information and communication technology (ICT) has been advocated as a powerful tool for improving health education in low-resource settings. However, few evaluations have been performed of ICT perceptions and user experiences in low-resource settings. During late 2009, an internet-based survey on ICT was administered to students, tutors, and faculty members associated with a Community-Based Education and Service (COBES) program in Uganda. 255 surveys were completed. Response rates varied (students, 188/684, 27.5%; tutors, 14/27, 51.9%; faculty, 53/335, 15.8%). Most respondents owned mobile phones (98%). Students were less likely (p communication purposes. In summary, ICT penetration in this population is primarily manifest by extensive mobile phone ownership. Internet access in rural educational sites is still lacking, but students and educators appear eager to utilize this resource if availability improves. ICT may offer a unique opportunity to improve the quality of teaching and learning for COBES participants.

  19. Development of health inter-professional telemedicine practice through simulation scenario training with students of physiotherapy-, occupational therapy-, medical laboratory technology-, and nursing education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nortvig, Anne-Mette; Vestergaard*, Kitt

    technology-, and nursing education. •to motivate and retain male students by the use of simulation training that involves technology. Methodology: The project was settled as a cross-professional telemedicine course on health educations. Nursing students (N=20) and physiotherapy students (N=34) participated...... must take place in an inter-professional context. Aims: The purpose of the project was •to develop practice oriented competences related to telemedicine in an inter-professional and a cross-sectoral context among health professional students of physiotherapy-, occupational therapy-, medical laboratory...... and motivation. Results: Evaluations and follow-up research showed that students developed competences equivalent to novice level through simulation training (3). The project gave rise to wide project on Occupational Therapy education and medical laboratory technology education too. Follow-up research concludes...

  20. Influence of informational technologies on physical background of students engaged futsal in sport-oriented physical education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir Temchenko

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to determine the influence of usage informational technologies in sport-oriented physical education on physical background level of students engaged futsal. Material and Methods: in the research students (young man – n=40 of 18–20 year old were engaged. Methods: Analysis of literature sources formatted pedagogical experiment, maths statistics. Results: upon sum of two terms experiment with purposeful usage of informational technologies in sport-oriented physical education proved true improvement (р<0,05–р<0,001 of test result that characterize strengths development (“Horizontal bar pull-ups ” – by 33,3%, “Sitting-ups of the body per 1 min” – by 21,1%, flexibility (“Sitting bend forward” – by 26,8%, speed and speed-and-strengths qualities (“100 m race” – by 4,6%, “Standing long-jump” – by 4,8%. Conclusion: the results confirm the arguments and prove the feasibility of the use of information technology in the sports-oriented physical training of students in universities.

  1. Education, Technology and Health Literacy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindgren, Kurt; Sølling, Ina Koldkjær; Carøe, Per

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The purpose of this study is to develop an interdisciplinary learning environment between education in technology, business, and nursing. This collaboration contributes to the creation of a natural interest and motivation for welfare technology. The aim of establishing an interaction...... as a theoretical and practical learning center. The mission of the Student Academy is to support and facilitate education in order to maintain and upgrade knowledge and skills in information technology and information management in relation to e-health and Health Literacy. The Student Academy inspires students...... between the 3 areas of expertise is to create an understanding for each other's skills and cultural differences. Futhermore enabling future talents to gain knowledge and skills to improve Health Literacy among senior citizens. Based on a holistic view on welfare technology a Student Academy was created...

  2. Education, Technology and Health Literacy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindgren, Kurt; Sølling, Ina Koldkjær; Carøe, Per

    The purpose of this study is to develop an interdisciplinary learning environment between education in technology, business, and nursing. This collaboration contributes to the creation of a natural interest and motivation for welfare technology. The aim of establishing an interaction between the 3...... as a theoretical and practical learning center. The mission of the Student Academy is to support and facilitate education in order to maintain and upgrade knowledge and skills in information technology and information management in relation to e-health and Health Literacy. The Student Academy inspires students...... areas of expertise is to create an understanding for each other's skills and cultural differences. Futhermore enabling future talents to gain knowledge and skills to improve Health Literacy among senior citizens. Based on a holistic view on welfare technology a Student Academy was created...

  3. Technology Education Reform in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Lung-Sheng Steven

    Technology education in Taiwan, presently called living technology (LT), is a new area that has evolved from handicraft, industrial arts, and other areas. LT is offered mainly at the secondary school level, although it is required for all students in grades 1-11. In response to calls for curriculum reform, the present elementary and junior high…

  4. Mobile Technology in Educational Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jueming; Kinshuk

    2005-01-01

    The use of computers and the Internet has successfully enabled educational institutions to provide their students and staff members with various online educational services. With the recent developments in mobile technology, further possibilities are emerging to provide such services through mobile devices such as mobile phones and PDAs. By…

  5. Art Education Technology: Digital Storytelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Sheng Kuan

    2007-01-01

    The application of digital storytelling to art education is an interdisciplinary, inquiry-based, hands-on project that integrates the arts, education, local communities, technology, and storytelling. Through digital storytelling, students develop and apply multiliteracy skills, aesthetic sensitivities, and critical faculties to address greater…

  6. The reported preparedness and disposition by students in a Nigerian university towards the use of information technology for medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fadeyi, A; Desalu, O O; Ameen, A; Adeboye, A N Muhammed

    2010-01-01

    The computer and information technology (IT) revolution have transformed modern health care systems in the areas of communication, storage, retrieval of medical information and teaching, but little is known about IT skill and use in most developing nations. The aim of this study has been to evaluate the reported preparedness and disposition by medical students in a Nigerian university toward the use of IT for medical education. A self-administered structured questionnaire containing 24 items was used to obtain information from medical students in the University of Ilorin, Nigeria on their level of computer usage, knowledge of computer software and hardware, availability and access to computer, possession of personal computer and e-mail address, preferred method of medical education and the use of computer as a supplement to medical education. Out of 479 medical students, 179 (37.4%) had basic computer skills, 209 (43.6%) had intermediate skills and 58(12.1%) had advanced computer skills. Three hundred and thirty (68.9%) have access to computer and 451(94.2%) have e-mail addresses. For medical teaching, majority (83.09%), preferred live lecture, 56.78% lecture videos, 35.1% lecture handout on web site and 410 (85.6%) wants computer as a supplement to live lectures. Less than half (39.5%) wants laptop acquisition to be mandatory. Students with advanced computer skills were well prepared and disposed to IT than those with basic computer skill. The findings revealed that the medical students with advanced computer skills were well prepared and disposed to IT based medical education. Therefore, high level of computer skill is required for them to be prepared and favorably disposed to IT based medical education.

  7. Survey of Education, Engineering, and Information Technology Students Knowledge of Green Computing in Nigerian University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tajudeen Ahmed Shittu

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The use of computer system is growing rapidly and there is growing concern on the environmental hazard associated with its use. Thus, the need for every user’s to possess the knowledge of using computer in an environmental friendly manner.  This study therefore, investigated the knowledge of green computing possessed by university students in Nigeria. To achieve this, survey method was employed to carry out the study. The study involved students from three schools (Computer Science, Engineering, and Education. Purposive sampling method was used to draw three hundred (300 respondents that volunteer to answer the questionnaire administered for gathering the data of the study. The instrument used was adapted but modify and subjected to pilot testing to ascertain its validity and internal consistency. The reliability of the instrument showed a .75 Cronbach alpha level.  The first research question was answer with descriptive statistic (perecentage.  T-test and ANOVA was used to answer question two and three. The findings showed that the students do not possess adequate knowledge on conscious use of computing system. Also, the study showed that there is no significant difference in the green computing knowledge possesses among male and female as well as among student from the three schools. Based on these findings, the study suggested among other an aggressive campaign on green computing among university communities.

  8. Overview of Instructional Technology Used in the Education of Occupational Therapy Students: A Survey Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryan M. Gee

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to explore the type of instructional technology (IT master’s degree level occupational therapy educational programs routinely use as a part of their lecture- and laboratory-based instruction. Surveying the administrators of 121 graduate occupational therapy programs in the United States, we found that the majority of the respondents identified their program as using IT in some form for lecturebased courses, with less inclusion of IT for laboratory-based courses. Hybrid instruction, with the majority of the content being delivered face-to-face and the remainder via online, were the trends among the respondents. The findings also indicated that the respondents’ programs avoid certain IT, including synchronous online chat rooms or instant messaging, digital image collections, blogs or online journaling, Wikis, and audio/video podcasting. Few of the respondents said their programs had made a significant leap into implementing a larger online presence with instructional technology

  9. A Meta-Analysis of the Impact of Universal and Indicated Preventive Technology-Delivered Interventions for Higher Education Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conley, Colleen S; Durlak, Joseph A; Shapiro, Jenna B; Kirsch, Alexandra C; Zahniser, Evan

    2016-08-01

    The uses of technology-delivered mental health treatment options, such as interventions delivered via computer, smart phone, or other communication or information devices, as opposed to primarily face-to-face interventions, are proliferating. However, the literature is unclear about their effectiveness as preventive interventions for higher education students, a population for whom technology-delivered interventions (TDIs) might be particularly fitting and beneficial. This meta-analytic review examines technological mental health prevention programs targeting higher education students either without any presenting problems (universal prevention) or with mild to moderate subclinical problems (indicated prevention). A systematic literature search identified 22 universal and 26 indicated controlled interventions, both published and unpublished, involving 4763 college, graduate, or professional students. As hypothesized, the overall mean effect sizes (ESs) for both universal (0.19) and indicated interventions (0.37) were statistically significant and differed significantly from each other favoring indicated interventions. Skill-training interventions, both universal (0.21) and indicated (0.31), were significant, whereas non-skill-training interventions were only significant among indicated (0.25) programs. For indicated interventions, better outcomes were obtained in those cases in which participants had access to support during the course of the intervention, either in person or through technology (e.g., email, online contact). The positive findings for both universal and indicated prevention are qualified by limitations of the current literature. To improve experimental rigor, future research should provide detailed information on the level of achieved implementation, describe participant characteristics and intervention content, explore the impact of potential moderators and mechanisms of success, collect post-intervention and follow-up data regardless of

  10. Teacher Use of Instructional Technology in a Special Education School for Students with Intellectual Disabilities: A Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Canan Sola Özgüç

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate use of Instructional Technology (IT by special education teachers in a school for students with moderate to severe intellectual disability (ID. Research questions were a Which IT do teachers use during class time? b What are the ways of providing IT? (c What are the problems that teachers encountered while using IT? (d What are the results and effects of the encountered problems? (e Is there any use of assistive technology (AT devices? This is a case study based on collecting and analyzing qualitative data. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with nine teachers; students with moderate to severe ID in the first, second, fifth, and seventh grade were observed in social studies lessons, as were eight teachers of those students. The study showed that use of IT is limited in a special school for children with ID and this situation is affecting teachers and students in a negative way. Also, use of AT is lacking

  11. Disruptive technologies in higher education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Flavin

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyses the role of “disruptive” innovative technologies in higher education. In this country and elsewhere, Higher Education Institutions (HEIs have invested significant sums in learning technologies, with Virtual Learning Environments (VLEs being more or less universal, but these technologies have not been universally adopted and used by students and staff. Instead, other technologies not owned or controlled by HEIs are widely used to support learning and teaching. According to Christensen's theory of Disruptive Innovation, these disruptive technologies are not designed explicitly to support learning and teaching in higher education, but have educational potential. This study uses Activity Theory and Expansive Learning to analyse data regarding the impact of disruptive technologies. The data were obtained through a questionnaire survey about awareness and use of technologies, and through observation and interviews, exploring participants’ actual practice. The survey answers tended to endorse Disruptive Innovation theory, with participants establishing meanings for technologies through their use of them, rather than in keeping with a designer's intentions. Observation revealed that learners use a narrow range of technologies to support learning, but with a tendency to use resources other than those supplied by their HEIs. Interviews showed that participants use simple and convenient technologies to support their learning and teaching. This study identifies a contradiction between learning technologies made available by HEIs, and technologies used in practice. There is no evidence to suggest that a wide range of technologies is being used to support learning and teaching. Instead, a small range of technologies is being used for a wide range of tasks. Students and lecturers are not dependent on their HEIs to support learning and teaching. Instead, they self-select technologies, with use weighted towards established brands. The

  12. The development of entrepreneurial capacity and business activity of students of educational establishments using information and communication technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. A. Danchenok

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to problems of organizational and methodical process modeling of the entrepreneurial potential and business activity of students of educational institutions through the use of Smart-technologies. It is noted that the successful implementation of enterprise and business projects are the basis of economic development of society, with the main factor for the development of entrepreneurship in the country in the long term is to develop the entrepreneurial mindset of young people. Entrepreneurial younger generation reserve created for the period of study, will provide the subsequent decades of business operation, incomenot only to the owner, but also the composition of personnel of the company and, in general, the country. The specifics of perception of the new generation of knowledge, learning and the formation of professional skills is that their effectiveness depends, sometimes completely determined by the degree of use of information and communication technologies, not only in the preparation and implementation of knowledge by the learners, but also in the work themselves teachers. Therefore, an effective and modern instrument for achieving the development goals of the business potential and business students to provide such forms of work with students, which would stimulate their interest in entrepreneurship through the active use of information technologies. The organizational and methodological training model and a set of measures aimed at developing the entrepreneurial potential and business activity of the young generation. To a large extent the elements of our model successfully implemented in REU them. GV Plekhanov at the Faculty of “Marketing Business School and Entrepreneurship”, to carry out training business technologies in relevant areas of knowledge for the information society and the modern state of the economy – business intelligence, innovation and creative business, crisis and risk management

  13. Exploring Technology Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Duzer, Eric

    Modular middle school technology programs, generically called Exploring Technology Education (ETE) courses, are described and analyzed to determine their strengths and weaknesses and their appropriate role in middle school curricula. Interviews were conducted with teachers, officers of the Exploring Technology Educators Association, vendors and…

  14. Technology in Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roden, Kasi

    2011-01-01

    This paper was written to support a position on using technology in education. The purpose of this study was to support the use of technology in education by synthesizing previous research. A variety of sources including books and journal articles were studied in order to compile an overview of the benefits of using technology in elementary,…

  15. Education Technology Success Stories

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Darrell M.; Bleiberg, Joshua

    2013-01-01

    Advances in technology are enabling dramatic changes in education content, delivery, and accessibility. Throughout history, new technologies have facilitated the exponential growth of human knowledge. In the early twentieth century, the focus was on the use of radios in education. But since then, innovators have seen technology as a way to improve…

  16. A Study of Students' Learning Styles, Discipline Attitudes and Knowledge Acquisition in Technology-Enhanced Probability and Statistics Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christou, Nicolas; Dinov, Ivo D

    2010-09-01

    Many modern technological advances have direct impact on the format, style and efficacy of delivery and consumption of educational content. For example, various novel communication and information technology tools and resources enable efficient, timely, interactive and graphical demonstrations of diverse scientific concepts. In this manuscript, we report on a meta-study of 3 controlled experiments of using the Statistics Online Computational Resources in probability and statistics courses. Web-accessible SOCR applets, demonstrations, simulations and virtual experiments were used in different courses as treatment and compared to matched control classes utilizing traditional pedagogical approaches. Qualitative and quantitative data we collected for all courses included Felder-Silverman-Soloman index of learning styles, background assessment, pre and post surveys of attitude towards the subject, end-point satisfaction survey, and varieties of quiz, laboratory and test scores. Our findings indicate that students' learning styles and attitudes towards a discipline may be important confounds of their final quantitative performance. The observed positive effects of integrating information technology with established pedagogical techniques may be valid across disciplines within the broader spectrum courses in the science education curriculum. The two critical components of improving science education via blended instruction include instructor training, and development of appropriate activities, simulations and interactive resources.

  17. Educational Uses of Virtual Reality Technology

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Youngblut, Christine

    1998-01-01

    ... addressed. Educational uses of the technology are broadly distinguished as those where students interact with pre-developed VR applications and those where students develop their own virtual worlds...

  18. Modifying the Sleep Treatment Education Program for Students to include technology use (STEPS-TECH): Intervention effects on objective and subjective sleep outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber, Larissa K; Cucalon, Maria S

    2017-12-01

    University students often have sleep issues that arise from poor sleep hygiene practices and technology use patterns. Yet, technology-related behaviors are often neglected in sleep hygiene education. This study examined whether the Sleep Treatment Education Program for Students-modified to include information regarding managing technology use (STEPS-TECH)-helps improve both subjective and objective sleep outcomes among university students. Results of an experimental study among 78 university students showed improvements in objective indicators of sleep quantity (total sleep time) and sleep quality (less awakenings) during the subsequent week for students in the STEPS-TECH intervention group compared to a control group. Exploratory analyses indicated that effects were driven by improvements in weekend days immediately following the intervention. There were also no intervention effects on subjective sleep quality or quantity outcomes. In terms of self-reported behavioral responses to educational content in the intervention, there were no group differences in sleep hygiene practices or technology use before bedtime. However, the intervention group reported less technology use during sleep periods than the control group. These preliminary findings suggest that STEPS-TECH may be a useful educational tool to help improve objective sleep and reduce technology use during sleep periods among university students. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. INVESTIGATING THE MOST NEGLECTED STUDENT LEARNING DOMAIN IN HIGHER EDUCATION: A CASE STUDY ON THE IMPACT OF TECHNOLOGY ON STUDENT BEHAVIOUR AND EMOTIONS IN UNIVERSITY MATHEMATICS LEARNING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel Olugbenga King

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Do students’ emotions and behaviours influence their learning in mathematics classes, and if yes, how and why? Based on a qualitative research design, evidence on how the use of Electronic Voting Systems (EVS has influenced students’ emotional and behavioural engagement with university mathematics learning is presented. The results show that the use of EVS enables students to diagnose their level of understanding of learning material, relative to the rest of the class. EVS use also helps, in real time, to stimulate, maintain, and re-focus student attention during mathematics instruction. A favourable perception of the learning environment as being altruistic appears to have influenced students to emotionally identify and align themselves with mathematics learning goals. There is enhanced interactivity in EVS-facilitated lectures, including positive student competitiveness, while the EVS anonymity utility also enhances increased student participation rates. However, a major disincentive to student engagement is the use of EVS-based mathematics questions with low cognitive demand. This research is a contribution to how specific educational technology-based interventions influence student engagement.

  20. An Educational Technology Tool That Developed in the Natural Flow of Life among Students: WhatsApp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cetinkaya, Levent

    2017-01-01

    This study was carried out to identify the benefits and drawbacks of using mobile social network application WhatsApp in the education of Secondary Education students. In this research, survey model was used and open-ended question form to 145 students together with semi-structured interview technique to 6 students were employed and answer to the…

  1. Educational technology and academic performance of students in basic English in selected higher education institutions in Davao del Sur

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noel Sobejana

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Use of e-learning strategies and its relationship on academic performance of 252 college students in Basic English of UM Digos College (UMDC, Cor Jesu College (CJC, Polytechnic College of Davao del Sur (PCDS, South Philippines Adventist College (SPAC, Southern Philippines Agri-Business and Marine and Aquatic School of Technology (SPAMAST, and Holy Cross of Bansalan College (HCBC is presented. A non-experimental quantitative research design following descriptive and correlation methods was used Results revealed that most of the second year Bachelor of Science in Information Technology female respondents ages 18-20 years old are average in terms of their academic performance. The overall level of use of e-learning strategies was found to be high. Among of the five indicators of e-learning, only learner-faculty interaction was found to be significantly correlated with academic performance.

  2. Online Experiential Education for Technological Entrepreneurs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ermolovich, Thomas R.

    2011-01-01

    Technological Entrepreneurship is both an art and a science. As such, the education of a technological entrepreneur requires both an academic and an experiential component. One form of experiential education is creating real new ventures with student teams. When these ventures are created in an online modality, students work in virtual teams and…

  3. Technology Education in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murata, Shoji; Stern, Sam

    1993-01-01

    Describes the history, current status, and future direction of technology education in Japan, including the process of curriculum transition, secondary and postsecondary structure, and lack of resources. (SK)

  4. Impact of School Technology on Student Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Larry Douglas, Jr.

    2012-01-01

    This study provides an overview of the impact of school technology on elementary students in grades three through five attending public schools in Indiana. The investigation focused on the impact of various technologies on student achievement as measured on Indiana Statewide Testing for Educational Progress-Plus (ISTEP+). Various comparisons were…

  5. Medical students' online learning technology needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Heeyoung; Nelson, Erica; Wetter, Nathan

    2014-02-01

    This study investigated medical students' online learning technology needs at a medical school. The study aimed to provide evidence-based guidance for technology selection and online learning design in medical education. The authors developed a 120-item survey in collaboration with the New Technology in Medical Education (NTIME) committee at the Southern Illinois University School of Medicine (SIUSOM). Overall, 123 of 290 medical students (42%) at the medical school participated in the survey. The survey focused on five major areas: students' hardware and software use; perception of educational technology (ET) in general; online behaviours; perception of ET use at the school; and demographic information. Students perceived multimedia tools, scheduling tools, communication tools, collaborative authoring tools, learning management systems and electronic health records useful educational technologies for their learning. They did not consider social networking tools useful for their learning, despite their frequent use. Third-year students were less satisfied with current technology integration in the curriculum, information sharing and collaborative learning than other years. Students in clerkships perceived mobile devices as useful for their learning. Students using a mobile device (i.e. a smartphone) go online, text message, visit social networking sites and are online during classes more frequently than non-users. Medical students' ET needs differ between preclinical and clinical years. Technology supporting ubiquitous mobile learning and health information technology (HIT) systems at hospitals and out-patient clinics can be integrated into clerkship curricula. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Development of e-Learning Courses for Promoting Student's Global Competency-Basic Courses as a Guide to ESP Education in Advanced Science and Technology-

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishikawa, Mikako; Nakajima, Mikio; Iwai, Chiharu; Ogasawara, Fumie; Kishino, Fumio; Fukui, Kiichi

    Osaka University has been chosen for the FY2005's “Selected Efforts of the Distinctive University Education Support Program (Gendai GP/Good Practice) ”by the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology (MEXT) . The aim of this project is to improve English proficiency of undergraduate students with scientific backgrounds. Under this strategic fund, e-Learning course contents were developed for instructing basic, yet practical English for Biotechnology during FY2005. Throughout the project, e-Learning contents will be developed for five other selected subjects of science i.e., 1) biotechnology, 2) information technology, 3) nano-technology, 4) environmental technology and 5) robotics technology, for undergraduate students as guiding courses to ESP education in graduate (higher) level.

  7. Introducing Mobile Technology in Graduate Professional Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anand, Gopesh; Chhajed, Dilip; Hong, Seung Won; Scagnoli, Norma

    2014-01-01

    The insertion of mobile technology in educational settings is becoming more prevalent, making it important to understand the effectiveness of such technology in enhancing students' learning and engagement. This article is based on research conducted to study the effects of the use of mobile technology--specifically iPads--by students in a graduate…

  8. Technology Activities for Life Skills Support Students. [and] CNC for Lower-Achieving Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ressel, Michael J.; Smith, Clayton

    1995-01-01

    Ressel shows how providing technology education to special needs students can reaffirm belief in technology education and revitalize desire to teach. Smith suggests that breaking down processes into special steps allows these students to be successful. (JOW)

  9. Bring Your Own Device Technology: Preliminary Results from a Mixed Methods Study to Explore Student Experience of In-Class Response Systems in Post-Secondary Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Numer

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available This research examines the effectiveness of Bring Your Own Device (BYOD technology in a postsecondary classroom. Despite recent advances in the technological tools available to educators, there is a significant gap in the literature regarding student efficacy, engagement and contribution to learning. This paper will present the preliminary findings of the first phases of an evaluation project measuring student interaction with BYOD technology in a large group setting. Employing a mixed methods design, the findings from two focus groups and two online surveys will be discussed. This project involved students in the Winter and Fall 2014 semesters of a fourth year Human Sexuality course which has enrolment of approximately 400 per semester. The findings suggest that BYOD technology contributes to student engagement and participation in the classroom setting. Further, the findings suggest that students are comfortable in using this tool, and perceived the experience as enjoyable.

  10. Educational Technology in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakamoto, Takashi

    1987-01-01

    This overview of the current state of educational technology in Japan includes discussions of professional associations; academic and popular journals; diffusion of media and the budget in elementary and secondary schools; recent trends in government policies; educational technology research; a literature review; and suggestions of future trends.…

  11. Franchising Technology Education: Issues and Implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel, Dan; Newcomer, Cynthia

    1993-01-01

    Describes educational technology franchises that sell services to students, either through schools or directly through retail centers, to educate them about and with technology. Topics addressed include the emphasis on personalized instruction; cooperative learning; curriculum; cost effectiveness; site-based management in public education; and…

  12. Development of health inter-professional telemedicine practice through simulation scenario training with students of physiotherapy-, occupational therapy-, medical laboratory technology, and nursing education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nortvig, Anne-Mette; Vestergaard, Kitt

    ;46[7]:657-667 6. Dieckmann P, Friis SM, Lippert A, Østergaard D. Goals, Success Factors, and Barriers for Simulation-Based Learning A Qualitative Interview Study in Health Care. Simulation & Gaming 2012;43[5]:627-647. 7. Dreyfus, Stuart E.; Dreyfus, Hubert L. (February 1980). A Five-Stage Model of the Mental...... and retain male students by the use of simulation training that involves technology. Methodology: The project was settled as a cross-professional telemedicine course on health educations. Nursing students (N=20) and physiotherapy students (N=34) participated actively and the scenarios were filmed and enacted...... showed that students developed competences equivalent to novice level through simulation training (3). The project gave rise to wide project on Occupational Therapy education and medical laboratory technology education too. Follow-up research concludes that the boys who participated in the project...

  13. A Student View of Technology in the Classroom: Does It Enhance the Seven Principles of Good Practice in Undergraduate Education?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCabe, Deborah Brown; Meuter, Matthew L.

    2011-01-01

    There has been an explosion of classroom technologies, yet there is a lack of research investigating the connection between classroom technology and student learning. This research project explores faculty usage of classroom-based course management software, student usage and opinions of these software tools, and an exploration of whether or not…

  14. Connected Education: Teachers' Attitudes towards Student Learning in a 1:1 Technology Middle School Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Tian; Murray, Alexander

    2018-01-01

    Online and blended forms of learning has been increasingly common in K-12 settings, along with the technological advancement with always-on and connected devices. The study purports to understand teachers' attitudes towards the middle school's one-laptop-per-student (1:1) policy and students' frequent use of always-on and connected technology, as…

  15. New Technology in Health Education: Nursing Students' Application of Mobile Technology in the Classroom in Ghana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buabeng-Andoh, Charles

    2018-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to investigate undergraduate nursing students' use of mobile learning (m-learning) and the factors contributing to their use of m-learning. Design/methodology/approach: In total, 586 nursing students from three universities in Ghana participated in this study. Survey questionnaires were used to collect data.…

  16. Educational technology, reimagined.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenberg, Michael

    2010-01-01

    "Educational technology" is often equated in the popular imagination with "computers in the schools." But technology is much more than merely computers, and education is much more than mere schooling. The landscape of child-accessible technologies is blossoming in all sorts of directions: tools for communication, for physical construction and fabrication, and for human-computer interaction. These new systems and artifacts allow educational designers to think much more creatively about when and where learning takes place in children's lives, both within and outside the classroom.

  17. Science, Technology, Engineering, Math (STEM) in Higher Education from the Perspective of Female Students: An Institutional Ethnography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parson, Laura J.

    A persistent disadvantage for females is systemically embedded in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM) education in postsecondary institutions. As a result, undergraduate women majoring in STEM fields face a uniquely difficult path; yet, for the most part, recommendations made and supported in the literature have focused on recruitment of women to STEM fields or on ways to make women more successful and comfortable in their STEM major. These recommendations have so far proved to be insufficient to remedy a gender gap and serve to replicate the existing male hierarchy. In order to truly make the STEM classroom one in which women are welcome and comfortable and to challenge the existing social and scientific systems, it is necessary to explore and understand the social and political implications embedded within teaching and learning choices. This institutional ethnography addresses that gap. The purpose of this study was to uncover and describe the institutional practices of STEM education at a Midwest research university (MRU) from the standpoint of female undergraduate students. Using the framework of feminist standpoint theory, this study explored the everyday "work" of female undergraduate STEM students to provide a unique perspective on the STEM education teaching and learning environment. Data collection began with in-depth interviews with female undergraduate math and physics students. As the institutional processes shaping undergraduate participant experiences were identified, subsequent data collection included classroom observations, additional interviews with students and faculty, and analysis of the texts that mediate these processes (e.g., syllabi and student handbooks). Data analysis followed Carspecken's process of ethnographic data analysis that began with low-level coding, followed by high-level coding, and concluded by pulling codes together through the creation of themes. Analysis of data led to three key findings. First, undergraduate

  18. The Technology Adoption Process Model and Self-Efficacy of Distance Education Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Joel D.; Appunn, Frank D.

    2017-01-01

    The technology adoption process model (TAPM) is applied to a new synchronous conference technology with 27 asynchronous courses involving 520 participants and 17 instructors. The TAPM resulted from a qualitative study reviewing webcam conference technology adoption. The TAPM is now tested using self-efficacy as the dependent variable. The…

  19. The Effects of Science, Technology, Society and Environment (STSE) Education on Students' Career Planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoruk, Nuray; Morgil, Inci; Secken, Nilgun

    2009-01-01

    The leakages in secondary level education brought forward the necessity to restructure the educational system so as to address the social and individual needs and meet the requirements of Turkey; therefore, a "reformation" study became an obligation. The formal education in Turkey starts at the age of 6, when the individual is shaped…

  20. Effect of Entrepreneurship Education on Self-Employment Initiatives among Nigerian Science & Technology Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afolabi, Michael Oluseye; Kareem, Fatai Adebayo; Okubanjo, Idowu Olulanu; Ogunbanjo, Olufunmilola Adesola; Aninkan, Olubukola Omonike

    2017-01-01

    Entrepreneurship education is introduced into Nigeria educational system to provide the necessary skills, competence, understanding, and prepare the Nigerian graduate for self-reliant, thereby contributing in nation building. This paper examines the effect of entrepreneurship education on self-employment initiatives among science and technology…

  1. Ubiquitous Mobile Educational Data Management by Teachers, Students and Parents: Does Technology Change School-Family Communication and Parental Involvement?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blau, Ina; Hameiri, Mira

    2017-01-01

    Digital educational data management has become an integral part of school practices. Accessing school database by teachers, students, and parents from mobile devices promotes data-driven educational interactions based on real-time information. This paper analyses mobile access of educational database in a large sample of 429 schools during an…

  2. Technology based Education System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kant Hiran, Kamal; Doshi, Ruchi; Henten, Anders

    2016-01-01

    Abstract - Education plays a very important role for the development of the country. Education has multiple dimensions from schooling to higher education and research. In all these domains, there is invariably a need for technology based teaching and learning tools are highly demanded in the acad......Abstract - Education plays a very important role for the development of the country. Education has multiple dimensions from schooling to higher education and research. In all these domains, there is invariably a need for technology based teaching and learning tools are highly demanded...... and operational data that is used within a university for daily routine work. This paper presents a hybrid cloud computing model for higher education institutions to share intellectual data. Moreover, it proposes, the strategies for the implementation of the cloud computing in the academic institutions. Keywords...

  3. Lecture-Recording Technology in Higher Education: Exploring Lecturer and Student Views across the Disciplines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dona, Kulari Lokuge; Gregory, Janet; Pechenkina, Ekaterina

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents findings of an institutional case study investigating how students and lecturers experienced a new opt-out, fully integrated lecture-recording system which enabled audio and presentation screen capture. The study's focus is on how "traditional" students (generally characterised as young, enrolled full-time and…

  4. TECHNOLOGY OF EDUCATIONAL EVENTS DESIGNING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. V. Volkova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the article is to prove and disclose the essence of the author’s technology of educational events designing.Methodology and methods of research. Methodological basis of work is humanitarian approach. The method of pedagogical modeling was used for the model development of educational events influence on pedagogical activity formation. The content analysis of texts descriptions, case-study method, expert estimations of event projects were applied as the main methods of efficiency confirmation of the technology of educational events design.Results and scientific novelty. The characteristics of an educational event are emphasized by means of an empirical way: opening (what a person opens for himself; generation (a result of a personal action; and participation in creation of something "new" (new communications, relations and experience. The structure of technology of educational events design including work with concepts (an educational event, substantial and procedural components is presented. The technology of educational events designing is considered as the process of the well-grounded choice of designing technologies, mutual activity, pedagogical communication, components of educational activity: contents, methods, means, and organizational forms depending on educational aims due to age-specific peculiarities of participants of the educational event. The main conditions providing successful use of the technology are the involvement into joint cognitive activity of all its participants and importance of the events for each of them that qualitatively change the nature of a cognitive process and generate real transformations of the reality.Practical significance. The author’s experience in teaching testifies to introduction of the module «Technology of Design of Educational Events» into the basic educational subject-module «Design Competence of the Teacher» (degree program «Pedagogical Education», considering this module as

  5. Student Incivility in Radiography Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Kevin R

    2017-07-01

    To examine student incivility in radiography classrooms by exploring the prevalence of uncivil behaviors along with the classroom management strategies educators use to manage and prevent classroom disruptions. A survey was designed to collect data on the severity and frequency of uncivil student behaviors, classroom management strategies used to address minor and major behavioral issues, and techniques to prevent student incivility. The participants were educators in radiography programs accredited by the Joint Review Committee on Education in Radiologic Technology. Findings indicated that severe uncivil student behaviors in radiography classrooms do not occur as often as behaviors classified as less severe. Radiography educators in this study used a variety of strategies and techniques to manage and prevent student incivility; however, radiography educators who received formal training in classroom management reported fewer incidents of student incivility than those who had not received formal training. The participants in this study took a proactive approach to addressing severe behavioral issues in the classroom. Many radiography educators transition from the clinical environment to the classroom setting with little to no formal training in classroom management. Radiography educators are encouraged to attend formal training sessions to learn how to manage the higher education classroom effectively. Student incivility is present in radiography classrooms. This study provides a foundation for future research on incivility. ©2017 American Society of Radiologic Technologists.

  6. Distance Education in Technological Age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R .C. SHARMA

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Distance Education in Technological AgeRomesh Verma (Editor, New Delhi: Anmol Publications, 2005, ISBN 81-261-2210-2, pp. 419 Reviewed by R C SHARMARegional DirectorIndira Gandhi National Open University-INDIA The advancements in information and communication technologies have brought significant changes in the way the open and distance learning are provided to the learners. The impact of such changes is quite visible in both developed and developing countries. Switching over to online mode, joining hands with private initiatives and making a presence in foreign waters, are some of the hallmarks of the open and distance education (ODE institutions in developing countries. The compilation of twenty six essays on themes as applicable to ODE has resulted in the book, “Distance Education in Technological Age”. These essays follow a progressive style of narration, starting from describing conceptual framework of distance education, how the distance education was emerged on the global scene and in India, and then goes on to discuss emergence of online distance education and research aspects in ODE. The initial four chapters provide a detailed account of historical development and growth of distance education in India and State Open University and National Open University Model in India . Student support services are pivot to any distance education and much of its success depends on how well the support services are provided. These are discussed from national and international perspective. The issues of collaborative learning, learning on demand, life long learning, learning-unlearning and re-learning model and strategic alliances have also given due space by the authors. An assortment of technologies like communication technology, domestic technology, information technology, mass media and entertainment technology, media technology and educational technology give an idea of how these technologies are being adopted in the open universities. The study

  7. Technological Knowledge and Reasoning in Finnish and Estonian Technology Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Autio, Ossi; Soobik, Mart

    2017-01-01

    The main idea of this research was to find out if there is a relationship between students' undertakings within Craft and Technology education and their ability to understand technological concepts. Study participants' technological knowledge and reasoning was measured with a questionnaire regarding mechanical systems connected with simple…

  8. College Students' Technology Arc: A Model for Understanding Progress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langer, Arthur; Knefelkamp, L. Lee

    2008-01-01

    This article introduces the Student Technology Arc, a model that evaluates college students 'technology literacy, or how they operate within an education system influenced by new technologies. Student progress is monitored through the Arc's 5 interdependent stages, which reflect growing technological maturity through levels of increasing cognitive…

  9. What Are Education Students' Perceptions of the Role of Technology in Social Studies Pedagogy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Susan; Moline, Teddy; Dyck, Brenda

    2011-01-01

    Preservice teachers need both awareness of and skill with the latest digital technologies in order to use these tools effectively in their teaching. Historically in our university, this preparation has been reserved for a stand-alone information technology course focused on learning how to use various computer-based programs. However, more direct…

  10. Software Piracy among Technology Education Students: Investigating Property Rights in a Culture of Innovation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teston, George

    2008-01-01

    When asked about individual perceptions of "technology," 68% of Americans primarily equate the term to the computer. Although this perception under represents the true breadth of the field, the statistic does speak to the ubiquitous role the computer plays across many technology disciplines. Software has become the building block of all major…

  11. Mixed Methods Evaluation of Statewide Implementation of Mathematics Education Technology for K-12 Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brasiel, Sarah; Martin, Taylor; Jeong, Soojeong; Yuan, Min

    2016-01-01

    An extensive body of research has demonstrated that the use in a K-12 classroom of technology, such as the Internet, computers, and software programs, enhances the learning of mathematics (Cheung & Slavin, 2013; Cohen & Hollebrands, 2011). In particular, growing empirical evidence supports that certain types of technology, such as…

  12. Technology and Educational Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boocock, Sarane S.

    2012-01-01

    Most current debate on instructional technology is characterized either by grandiose speculation on the salvation of education through automation (without specification of "what" and "how" technological innovations will actually be introduced in specific classroom situations, and how the changes will be financed), or by jargon-filled hairsplitting…

  13. Leveraging Digital Technology in Social Studies Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundy, Sarah Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    Today's K-12 classrooms are increasingly comprised of students who accomplish much of their informal learning through digital media and technology. In response, a growing number of educators are considering how they might draw upon these informal learning experiences to support student engagement and learning in the classroom through technology.…

  14. Online Learners and Technology: A Gap in Higher Education and Student Affairs Professional Preparation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calhoun, Daniel W.; Green, Lucy Santos; Burke, Panne

    2017-01-01

    Online learning, an essential component of the higher education landscape on a global scale, has become a lucrative operation for colleges and universities. Enrollment in online programs continues to outpace enrollment in higher education overall, particularly in the North American market. Even so, there is little evidence that graduates of North…

  15. Push or Pull Students into Blended Education A Case Study at Delft University of Technology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cervone, A.; Melkert, J.A.; Mebus, L.F.M.; Saunders, G.N.

    2016-01-01

    Blended education, or “flipping the classroom” is rapidly becoming a mainstream form of teaching within universities. Within Engineering Education, it is popular as it allows more time in-class to focus on hands on activities such as demonstrations and solving complex problems. This paper discusses

  16. The Educational Technology Myth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stansfield, David

    2012-01-01

    If one wants to teach youth to think, one has to restrain himself from doing all their thinking for them. One has to refrain from specifying in advance what they are going to think. Yet, this is just what educational technologists are consistently guilty of doing. Educational technology is committed to excluding the possibility of anything new or…

  17. New Technologies and Education: Challenging Disappointment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenorio, Encarnacion Hidalgo

    2003-01-01

    Examines information and communication technologies and their use in education, including advantages and disadvantages. Highlights include gains made by students who were given computers to use, Internet use in Spain, new attitudes toward education; the teacher's role, necessary student characteristics, and factors influencing the success of an…

  18. KSC Education Technology Research and Development Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odell, Michael R. L.

    2003-01-01

    Educational technology is facilitating new approaches to teaching and learning science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) education. Cognitive research is beginning to inform educators about how students learn providing a basis for design of more effective learning environments incorporating technology. At the same time, access to computers, the Internet and other technology tools are becoming common features in K-20 classrooms. Encouraged by these developments, STEM educators are transforming traditional STEM education into active learning environments that hold the promise of enhancing learning. This document illustrates the use of technology in STEM education today, identifies possible areas of development, links this development to the NASA Strategic Plan, and makes recommendations for the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Education Office for consideration in the research, development, and design of new educational technologies and applications.

  19. Perceptions of Blended Learning Competencies and Obstacles among Educational Technology Students in Light of Different Anxiety Levels and Locus of Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldalalah, Osamah Ahmad; Gasaymeh, Al-Mothana M.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of locus of control and anxiety level on the Jordanian educational technology students' perceived blended learning competencies and obstacles. The independent variables were the locus of control (Internal, External) and anxiety level (Low, Moderate, High). The dependent variables were the…

  20. Perceived Quality of Educational Technology Matters: A Secondary Analysis of Students' ICT Use, ICT-Related Attitudes, and PISA 2012 Test Scores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petko, Dominik; Cantieni, Andrea; Prasse, Doreen

    2017-01-01

    In large-scale international assessments such as the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA), the Trends in International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS), or the Progress in International Reading Study (PISA), research has struggled to find positive associations between the frequency of educational technology use in schools and…

  1. A Teacher Action Research Study: Enhancing Student Critical Thinking Knowledge, Skills, Dispositions, Application and Transfer in a Higher Education Technology Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phelan, Jack Gordon

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the effects of a critical thinking instructional intervention in a higher education technology course with the purpose of determining the extent to which the intervention enhanced student critical thinking knowledge, skills, dispositions, application and transfer abilities. Historically, critical thinking has been considered…

  2. An Investigation of Technology Avoidance Effect into Higher Education Environments: Some Empirical Evidence of Marketing Students' Background and Their Use of Personal Computers Outside the Academic Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spais, George S.; Vasileiou, Konstantinos Z.

    2008-01-01

    The major objective of this study was to test a research hypothesis in order to explain the technology avoidance effect in higher educational environments. We addressed the core research themes of our study using a survey. Our intention was to test marketing students' perceptions in order to investigate the potent influence of a climate of…

  3. The Extent of Al-Balqa Applied University's Students' Perception of the Importance of Means of Information and Communication Technology in High Education in Jordan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Zou'bi, Abdallah S.; Al-Onizat, Sabah

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to identify the effectiveness of using information technology and communications' means in the academic education from the perspective of Al-Balqa Applied University's students. And to achieve this goal, the researchers prepared and developed a questionnaire as a tool of the study including 26 items. The population of the study,…

  4. Development of Analytical Thinking Ability and Attitudes towards Science Learning of Grade-11 Students through Science Technology Engineering and Mathematics (STEM Education) in the Study of Stoichiometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chonkaew, Patcharee; Sukhummek, Boonnak; Faikhamta, Chatree

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the analytical thinking abilities and attitudes towards science learning of grade-11 students through science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) education integrated with a problem-based learning in the study of stoichiometry. The research tools consisted of a pre- and post-analytical…

  5. Engaging Students in Modeling as an Epistemic Practice of Science: An Introduction to the Special Issue of the Journal of Science Education and Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Todd; Oh, Phil Seok

    2015-04-01

    This article provides an introduction for the special issue of the Journal of Science Education and Technology focused on science teaching and learning with models. The article provides initial framing for questions that guided the special issue. Additionally, based on our careful review of each of these articles, some discussion of how selected articles within the issue informed these questions. Specifically, when considering key facets of modeling instruction or design features of modeling curriculum, the studies in the special issue provided insight into productive ways in which teachers engaged students in modeling practices. Further, modeling pedagogies—pedagogies for transforming scientific practices of modeling into students' experience—were reified so that how these pedagogies could be coordinated into classroom instruction was revealed. When characteristic features of students' engagement in modeling were considered, research offered insight into productive model-based learning sequences for K-6 modelers and how students' development of productive epistemologies can evolve differently. Finally, the special issue considered how technology facilitated cognitive processes and/or instructional practices by examining learners' interactions with technology within modeling contexts. In this, instructional sequences using agent-based modeling (ABM) as a central technology are shared. These include the role of ABM in scaling student-modeling experiences beyond individuals to classroom experiences and how ABM can support student investigations of complex phenomenon that is not directly observable, among other affordances. Other articles also investigated some aspects of learners' interactions with technology to inform how technology-enhanced science teaching and learning with models.

  6. Enhancing Metacognitive Practices in Science Education Students ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Enhancing Metacognitive Practices in Science Education Students Using the Intelligencies for Nation Building. ... AFRREV STECH: An International Journal of Science and Technology ... Three experts from Measurement and Evaluation (2) and one from Science Education scrutinized the instrument to ensure validity.

  7. Relationships between Teacher Characteristics and Educational Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulze, Kurt Ronald

    2014-01-01

    Too often, teachers are using educational technology resources for administrative purposes instead of using these resources in a constructivist manner to enhance student learning. The study site was well behind the national average in overall educational technology use categories. The purpose of this explanatory correlational research was to…

  8. Historiography in Graduate Technology Teacher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flowers, Jim; Hunt, Brian

    2012-01-01

    A proposal is made suggesting the inclusion of historiography (i.e., historical research and the writing of history) into graduate technology teacher education. In particular, a strategy is forwarded to have graduate students in technology teacher education, who are working at schools in different locations, conduct historical research and write…

  9. Push or Pull Students into Blended Education A Case Study at Delft University of Technology

    OpenAIRE

    Cervone, A.; Melkert, J.A.; Mebus, L.F.M.; Saunders, G.N.

    2016-01-01

    Blended education, or “flipping the classroom” is rapidly becoming a mainstream form of teaching within universities. Within Engineering Education, it is popular as it allows more time in-class to focus on hands on activities such as demonstrations and solving complex problems. This paper discusses the effort conducted to restructure, according to the blended learning principles, the “Propulsion and Power” course of the Aerospace Engineering Bachelor degree programme at Delft University of Te...

  10. Factors Affecting ICT Adoption among Distance Education Students Based on the Technology Acceptance Model--A Case Study at a Distance Education University in Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dastjerdi, Negin Barat

    2016-01-01

    The incorporation of Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) into education systems is an active program and movement in education that illustrates modern education and enables an all-encompassing presence in the third millennium; however, prior to applying ICT, the factors affecting the adoption and use of these technologies should be…

  11. Assessment of Computer Technology Availability, Accessibility and Usage by Agricultural Education Student Teachers in Secondary Schools in Botswana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulela, K.; Rammolai, M.; Mpatane, W.

    2014-01-01

    This study examines the availability, accessibility and usability of computer as a form of information and communication technologies (ICTs) by student teachers in secondary schools. 44 out of 51 student teachers of Agriculture responded to the questionnaire. Means and percentages were used to analyze the data to establish the availability,…

  12. Distance education in nursing: an integrated review of online nursing students' experiences with technology-delivered instruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancuso-Murphy, Josephine

    2007-06-01

    One proposed solution to educating more nurses to decrease and eventually eliminate the nursing shortage is distance education. But what are nursing students' experiences with distance education? Answering this question can assist in the development of effective teaching and learning strategies to provide for the development of quality distance education programs. This article provides an integrative review of the nursing literature to ascertain the student perspective of distance education. A review of nursing literature was completed using a number of databases and specific criteria to locate research studies specific to this topic. The studies were analyzed for validity and reliability, and limitations were mentioned. Student perceptions garnered from the research studies analyzed are summarized with the acronym DISTANCE ED. Implications, recommendations, and needs for future research are discussed. A supplementary review of the literature is used to augment the findings.

  13. EDUCATIONAL TECHNOLOGIES TO EMPOWER HIGHER EDUCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. C.V. Garzón

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction and objectives: The New Media Consortium (NMC Horizon Project defines educational technology in a broad sense as tools and resources that are used to improve teaching, learning, and creative inquiry. Each technology has been carefully researched and framed in the context of its potential impact on higher education. Within the Horizon Project there are currently seven categories of technologies, tools, and strategies for their use that the NMC monitors continuously. All they have the potential to foster real changes in education, particularly in the development of progressive pedagogies and learning strategies; the organization of teachers’ work; and the arrangement and delivery of content. Following the recommendations of NMC experts panel, we design an application named Augmented Reality Metabolic Pathways (ARMET in order to improve motivation and to promote student interactivity to the development of skills needed to learn the metabolic pathways. Materials and methods: The ARMET app was developed using Unity, 3D molecules obtained from Protein Data Bank and ChemSpider-chemical structure database, the usage data are stored into a database (MySQL and are analyzed using the statistical software R. Results and conclusions: ARMET mixes several technologies out of seven categories recommend in the NMC Horizon Report: Mobile app, Bring Your Own Device, Flipped Classroom, Learning Analytics and Augmented Reality. The principal criterion for the inclusion of those technologies into the app was its potential relevance to teaching and learning biochemistry. ARMET is available for iOS and Android platforms, and includes PDF files with a set of cards, the game board and classroom worksheet’s. The students and teachers can register for free. Teachers can create classes and track student performance. ARMET collects data for personalizing learning experiences addressing the challenge to build better pedagogical tools to establish effective

  14. Photobioreactor: Biotechnology for the Technology Education Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunham, Trey; Wells, John; White, Karissa

    2002-01-01

    Describes a problem scenario involving photobioreactors and presents materials and resources, student project activities, and teaching and evaluation methods for use in the technology education classroom. (Contains 14 references.) (SK)

  15. Educating College Students of the Net Generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worley, Karen

    2011-01-01

    Faculty and administrators of higher education today face a challenge with their student populations, many of whom are part of what is known as the net generation. As students become more technologically advanced, faculty must be technologically ready to meet the needs of students. Many college faculty and administrators are from earlier…

  16. Technologies for Inclusive Education: Beyond Traditional Integration Approaches. Advances in Educational Technologies and Instructional Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barres, David Griol; Carrion, Zoraida Callejas; Lopez-Cozar Delgado, Ramon

    2013-01-01

    By providing students with the opportunities to receive a high quality education regardless of their social or cultural background, inclusive education is a new area that goes beyond traditional integration approaches. These approaches hope to provide the educative system with the ability to adapt to the diversity of its students. Technologies for…

  17. Investigating Distance Education Students' Study Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poyraz, Cengiz

    2013-01-01

    Distance education, which is a planned way of teaching in which students and instructors are brought face to face in a classroom environment in several different ways by means of technology, has started to become widespread in many fields today. In distance education, students and instructors reside in different locations. Students can learn at…

  18. Effects of Project-Based Learning Strategy on Self-Directed Learning Skills of Educational Technology Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagheri, Mohsen; Ali, Wan Zah Wan; Abdullah, Maria Chong Binti; Daud, Shaffe Mohd

    2013-01-01

    Given the importance of globalization as well as the need to train skilled and knowledgeable employees for the 21st century workforce, higher education needs to take a more critical look at the educational practices and instructional methods which lead to improvements in students' essential skills such as self-directed learning. This study sought…

  19. Teletandem language learning in a technological context of education: interactions between Brazilian and German students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suelene Vaz da SILVA

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT This paper presents data from a computer-mediated communication study conducted between a group of Brazilian university students - from Instituto Federal de Educação, Ciência e Tecnologia do Estado de Goiás, Campus Goiânia, Goiás, Brazil - who wanted to learn English, and a group of German university students - from the University of Worms, in Germany - who wanted to learn Portuguese. The cross-cultural bilingual communication was conducted in the second semester of 2010 and involved discussions on environmental issues. Adopting a qualitative perspective in the analysis, the data were derived from conversation sessions through a webconferencing software known as Openmeetings and through e-mails and some written activities developed by the students. All these were analyzed by means of sociocultural theory. Among the conclusions we reached, we observed that the participants used the software features to help them in their language learning process, discussed issues related to environmental science, as well as topics related to their personal and academic life. Regarding the languages used, the participants used English during the teletandem sessions as an anchoring language to assist their partners in learning English itself and Portuguese, as well as introduced the German language in the interaction sessions.

  20. Technology in Adult Education ESOL Classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, Nancy

    2011-01-01

    Today's world is filled with technology resources such as cellphones, iPods, laptops and the internet. By using these technological resources, adult education ESOL teachers can improve instruction, boost learning and better prepare students for real world English use. This article examines advantages of technology use and offers examples of…

  1. Educational Data Mining Acceptance among Undergraduate Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wook, Muslihah; Yusof, Zawiyah M.; Nazri, Mohd Zakree Ahmad

    2017-01-01

    The acceptance of Educational Data Mining (EDM) technology is on the rise due to, its ability to extract new knowledge from large amounts of students' data. This knowledge is important for educational stakeholders, such as policy makers, educators, and students themselves to enhance efficiency and achievements. However, previous studies on EDM…

  2. Business and Technology Educators: Practices for Inclusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donne, Vicki; Hansen, Mary A.

    2013-01-01

    Business educators face the challenge of operationalizing the global converging initiatives of technology integration and inclusion of students with a disability in K-12 education. A survey of business educators was conducted to ascertain how they were implementing these initiatives in the United States. Results indicated that business educators…

  3. How Music Technology Can Make Sound and Music Worlds Accessible to Student Composers in Further Education Colleges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kardos, Leah

    2012-01-01

    I am a composer, producer, pianist and part-time music lecturer at a Further Education college where I teach composing on Music Technology courses at levels 3 (equivalent to A-level) and 4 (Undergraduate/Foundation Degree). A "Music Technology" course, distinct from a "Music" course, often attracts applicants from diverse musical backgrounds; it…

  4. Effect of Web Assisted Education Supported by Six Thinking Hats on Students' Academic Achievement in Science and Technology Classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ercan, Orhan; Bilen, Kadir

    2014-01-01

    Advances in computer technologies and adoption of related methods and techniques in education have developed parallel to each other. This study focuses on the need to utilize more than one teaching method and technique in education rather than focusing on a single teaching method. By using the pre-test post-test and control group semi-experimental…

  5. The Relationship Between Teachers' Self-efficacy Perception of Application-Based Educational Technology and Material Development Skills and Their Students' Level Certifying Exam Scores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    İlhan Varank

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the study is to investigate the relationship between 6th., 7th., and 8th grade Turkish, math, science and technology, social sciences and foreign language teachers' self-efficacy perception of application-based educational technology and material development skills and their students' Level Certifying Exam scores. A total of 256 Turkish, math, science and technology, social sciences and foreign language teachers and their students from 48 elementary schools located in a city and one of its close districts in Inner Aegean area participated in the study. The significance levels of the models established to explain students' Level Certifying Exam performance show differences from subject to subject and from grade to grade. Similar results were found for the significance levels of the variables used in the models

  6. Astronomy Education for Physics Students

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-01-27

    Jan 27, 2016 ... Now, astrophysics has become a key subject in Guangdong Province, and the Astronomy Science and Technology Research Laboratory one of the key laboratories of the Department of Education of the Guangdong Province. Many undergraduate students, working under the tutorship of faculty members ...

  7. Bring Your Own Technology (BYOT to Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph M. Woodside

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In an effort to reduce costs and increase worker satisfaction, many businesses have implemented a concept known as Bring Your Own Device (BYOD or Bring Your Own Technology (BYOT. Similarly, many school districts are beginning to implement BYOT policies and programs to improve educational learning opportunities for students who have a wide variety of technology devices. BYOT allow districts with limited budgets enable usage of technology while improving student engagement. This paper explores the technology devices, and educational implications of policies, device management, security and included components.

  8. Multicultural awareness and technology in higher education: global perspectives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Issa, Tomayess; Isaias, Pedro; Kommers, Petrus A.M.

    2014-01-01

    This book encompasses information on the effects of international students' exchanges in higher education through e-learning technologies, providing the latest teaching and learning methods, technologies, and approaches in the higher education sector worldwide

  9. NASA Earth Systems, Technology and Energy Education for Minority University and Research Education Program Promotes Climate Literacy by Engaging Students at Minority Serving Institutions in STEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, B.; Alston, E. J.; Chambers, L. H.; Bynum, A.; Montgomery, C.; Blue, S.; Kowalczak, C.; Leighton, A.; Bosman, L.

    2017-12-01

    NASA Earth Systems, Technology and Energy Education for Minority University Research & Education Program - MUREP (ESTEEM) activities enhance institutional capacity of minority serving institutions (MSIs) related to Earth System Science, Technology and energy education; in turn, increasing access of underrepresented groups to science careers and opportunities. ESTEEM is a competitive portfolio that has been providing funding to institutions across the United States for 10 years. Over that time 76 separate activities have been funded. Beginning in 2011 ESTEEM awards focused on MSIs and public-school districts with high under-represented enrollment. Today ESTEEM awards focus on American Indian/Alaska Native serving institutions (Tribal Colleges and Universities), the very communities most severely in need of ability to deal with climate adaptation and resiliency. ESTEEM engages a multi-faceted approach to address economic and cultural challenges facing MSI communities. PIs (Principal Investigators) receive support from a management team at NASA, and are supported by a larger network, the ESTEEM Cohort, which connects regularly through video calls, virtual video series and in-person meetings. The cohort acts as a collective unit to foster interconnectivity and knowledge sharing in both physical and virtual settings. ESTEEM partners with NASA's Digital Learning Network (DLNTM) in a unique non-traditional model to leverage technical expertise. DLN services over 10,000 participants each year through interactive web-based synchronous and asynchronous events. These events allow for cost effective (no travel) engagement of multiple, geographically dispersed audiences to share local experiences with one another. Events allow PIs to grow their networks, technical base, professional connections, and develop a sense of community, encouraging expansion into larger and broader interactions. Over 256 connections, beyond the 76 individual members, exist within the cohort. PIs report

  10. Partnership for Environmental Technology Education

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dickinson, Paul R.; Fosse, Richard

    1992-01-01

    The need for broad cooperative effort directed toward the enhancement of science and mathematics education, including environmental science and technology has been recognized as a national priority by government, industry, and the academic community alike. In an effort to address this need, the Partnership for Environmental Technology Education (PETE) has been established in the five western states of Arizona, California, Hawaii, Nevada and Utah. PETE'S overall objectives are to link the technical resources of the DOE, ERA, and NASA Laboratories and private industry with participating community colleges to assist in the development and presentation of curricula for training environmental-Hazardous Materials Technicians and to encourage more transfer students to pursue studies in environmental science at four-year institutions. The program is co-sponsored by DOE and EPA. DoD participation is proposed. PETE is being evaluated by its sponsors as a regional pilot with potential for extension nationally. (author)

  11. Technological transfer to the education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrique Melamed-Varela

    2016-12-01

    . It is undeniable that the role of technology in a society has been a motivating element of downsizing of social coexistence, which promotes  knowledge through the easy access to information and knowledge  This principle is supported in education, by evidences such as: curricular content virtualization or the educational offer. The teaching practice in classroom supported with multimedia resources and the disruptive in [H1] teaching-learning methodologies, based on an integrating framework of information technologies with teaching and research (Sandoval, 2011. It is valid that the organization of classrooms in different levels of training, must be related to the technological component,  before the scenarios for education represented by the twenty-first century; the new generations have already so almost innate skills for the use of the technology, so that interaction with this component is increasingly simple based on Prensky (2001; In addition, to the academic processes and collaborative work in classroom facilitation, this fact allows the educational projects in the institutions planning and direction  (Corner, 2015. It can be said, the  degree of technology incorporation in education has also strengthened the pedagogical models by which the students knowledge is transferred and assesses, this principle generates different spaces of learning characterized by promoting the critical skill, thought disruptive and collaborative work, as well as empowerment with the educational process, encouraging self-management and commitment in the students   Based on education and humanism journal in its 18 years of academic career and research through the academic praxis and research activities of the scientists who believe that a space of transcendent knowledge sharing has  been co-created in order to facilitate an adequate transfer of universal knowledge resulting from the science, technology and innovation activities,  generated and implemented in the institutions of

  12. Technology Education Teacher Supply and Demand--A Critical Situation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moye, Johnny J.

    2009-01-01

    Technology education is an excellent format to integrate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) studies by employing problem-based learning activities. However, the benefits of technology education are still generally "misunderstood by the public." The effects of technology education on increased student mathematics…

  13. Navigating the science, technology, engineering, and mathematics pipeline: How social capital impacts the educational attainment of college-bound female students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Rebecca Elizabeth

    Despite the proliferation of women in higher education and the workforce, they have yet to achieve parity with men in many of the science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) majors and careers. The gap is even greater in the representation of women from lower socioeconomic backgrounds. This study examined pre-college intervention strategies provided by the University of Southern California's Math, Engineering, Science Achievement (MESA) program, as well as the relationships and experiences that contributed to the success of underrepresented female high school students in the STEM pipeline. A social capital framework provided the backdrop to the study. This qualitative study takes an ethnographic approach, incorporating 11 interviews, 42 hours of observation, and document analysis to address the research questions: How does involvement in the MESA program impact female students' decisions to pursue a mathematics or science major in college? What is the role of significant others in supporting and encouraging student success? The findings revealed a continuous cycle of support for these students. The cycle started in the home environment, where parents were integral in the early influence on the students' decisions to pursue higher education. Relationships with teachers, counselors, and peers provided critical networks of support in helping these students to achieve their academic goals. Participation in the MESA program empowered the students and provided additional connections to knowledge-based resources. This study highlights the interplay among family, school, and the MESA program in the overall support of underrepresented female students in the STEM pipeline.

  14. "Technohesion": Engaging Students of Higher Education through Digital Technology and Interactive Marketing--A Research Agenda and Theoretical Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorpe, Anthony; Lim, Lynn L. K.

    2013-01-01

    This article examines how the development of techno-marketing campaigns might facilitate the engagement of university students in voluntary activities on campus which promote active citizenship and community cohesion where there is a concern about a low take up of such opportunities. The increasing influence of technology upon the forms of social…

  15. President’s Message: Advancing the TIDE of Technology Education

    OpenAIRE

    Lipton, Ethan B.

    2005-01-01

    The article presents information relating to the field of technology education. Vigorous change continues in the study of technology and the delivery of technology education because of the integrating nature of technology and the need to prepare students for developing technological world to meet changing human needs. Significant strides have been made in the evolution of technology education of which we should all be very proud. In the last decade alone, the International Technology Educatio...

  16. Staying connected: online education engagement and retention using educational technology tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salazar, Jose

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this article is to inform educators about the use of currently available educational technology tools to promote student retention, engagement and interaction in online courses. Educational technology tools include content management systems, podcasts, video lecture capture technology and electronic discussion boards. Successful use of educational technology tools requires planning, organization and use of effective learning strategies.

  17. Increasing Impact of Technology in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utah System of Higher Education, 2016

    2016-01-01

    For Fall 2016, of the 175,509 students enrolled in the Utah System of Higher Education at third week, 69,535 (39.6 %) are participating in some form of technology delivered instruction. Of that total, 54,269 (30.9%) enrolled in at least one online class. Despite availability of online courses and degrees, students prefer using online courses to…

  18. Students Computer Skills in Faculty of Education

    OpenAIRE

    Mehmet Caglar; Mukaddes Sakalli Demirok

    2010-01-01

    Nowadays; the usage of technology is not a privilege but an obligation. Technological developments influence structures andfunctions of educational institutions. It is also expected from the teachers that they integrate technology in their lessons inorder to educate the individuals of information society. This research has covered 145(68 female, 78 male) students, studying inNear East University Faculty of Education. The Computer Skills Scale developed by Güçlü (2010) was used as a data colle...

  19. The Technological Enframing of Mathematics Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornton, Steve

    2014-01-01

    In this paper I seek to critique pervasive notions of what counts in mathematics education using Heidegger's notion of the technological enframing. I suggest that early childhood and schooling have become technologies in themselves, casting students and teachers as part of the standing reserve within the inexorable drive for economic advancement.…

  20. Introducing Technology Education at the Elementary Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKnight, Sean

    2012-01-01

    Many school districts are seeing a need to introduce technology education to students at the elementary level. Pennsylvania's Penn Manor School District is one of them. Pennsylvania has updated science and technology standards for grades 3-8, and after several conversations the author had with elementary principals and the assistant superintendent…

  1. Student Technology Assistant Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Eck, Rick; Marvin, Eric; Burr-McNeal, Blake; Jones, Marshall; Lowther, Deborah

    Schools face significant challenges in implementing computing technology within their curriculum. When technology support falters, the integrity of a school district's entire technology program is at risk. Teachers who have invested time to develop lesson plans using technology, especially those who are still newcomers, are less likely to continue…

  2. Game-Like Technology Innovation Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnussen, Rikke

    2011-01-01

    This paper examines the methodological challenges and perspectives of designing game-like scenarios for the implementation of innovation processes in school science education. This paper presents a design-based research study of a game-like innovation scenario designed for technology education for Danish public school students aged 13-15. Students…

  3. New Achievements in Technology Education and Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soomro, Safeeullah, Ed.

    2010-01-01

    Since many decades Education Science and Technology has an achieved tremendous recognition and has been applied to variety of disciplines, mainly Curriculum development, methodology to develop e-learning systems and education management. Many efforts have been taken to improve knowledge of students, researchers, educationists in the field of…

  4. Getting Your Counselor to Support Technology Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preble, Brian C.

    2016-01-01

    Is there a disconnect between counselors and educators in technology and vocational education? What is counseling, and what is a school counselor's role in a secondary school setting? How can one work with his or her guidance staff to ensure that students better understand your course offerings? The development of relationships, knowledge, and…

  5. Lateral Thinking and Technology Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waks, Shlomo

    1997-01-01

    Presents an analysis of technology education and its relevance to lateral thinking. Discusses prospects for utilizing technology education as a platform and a contextual domain for nurturing lateral thinking. Argues that technology education is an appropriate environment for developing complementary incorporation of vertical and lateral thinking.…

  6. Research on Technology and Physics Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonham, Scott

    2010-10-01

    From Facebook to smart phones, technology is an integral part of our student's lives. For better or for worse, technology has become nearly inescapable in the classroom, enhancing instruction, distracting students, or simply complicating life. As good teachers we want to harness the power we have available to impact our students, but it is getting harder as the pace of technological change accelerates. How can we make good choices in which technologies to invest time and resources in to use effectively? Do some technologies make more of a difference in student learning? In this talk we will look at research studies looking at technology use in the physics classroom---both my work and that of others---and their impact on student learning. Examples will include computers in the laboratory, web-based homework, and different forms of electronic communication. From these examples, I will draw some general principles for effective educational technology and physics education. Technology is simply a tool; the key is how we use those tools to help our students develop their abilities and understanding.

  7. Successful Student Recruitment Using Direct Marketing and Information Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merante, Joseph A.

    1982-01-01

    Educational marketing--which uses marketing methods unique to education institutions, including segmentation, direct mail, and information technology--is discussed. A model for student recruitment developed by the University of Pittsburgh is described. (Author/MLW)

  8. A Review of Technology Education in Ireland; a Changing Technological Environment Promoting Design Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leahy, Keelin; Phelan, Pat

    2014-01-01

    In Ireland, Technology Education's structure and organisation across the levels of education is not delivered or governed in a coherent manner. Technology Education in primary level education, for students between 5 and 12 years of age, does not explicitly exist as a separate subject. In primary level education, Social, Environmental and…

  9. Integrating Educational Technologies into Teacher Education: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawlins, Peter; Kehrwald, Benjamin

    2014-01-01

    This article is a case study of an integrated, experiential approach to improving pre-service teachers' understanding and use of educational technologies in one New Zealand teacher education programme. The study examines the context, design and implementation of a learning activity which integrated student-centred approaches, experiential…

  10. CLOUD TECHNOLOGY IN EDUCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander N. Dukkardt

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This article is devoted to the review of main features of cloud computing that can be used in education. Particular attention is paid to those learning and supportive tasks, that can be greatly improved in the case of the using of cloud services. Several ways to implement this approach are proposed, based on widely accepted models of providing cloud services. Nevertheless, the authors have not ignored currently existing problems of cloud technologies , identifying the most dangerous risks and their impact on the core business processes of the university. 

  11. Medical education and information and communication technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houshyari, Asefeh Badiey; Bahadorani, Mahnaz; Tootoonchi, Mina; Gardiner, John Jacob Zucker; Peña, Roberto A; Adibi, Peyman

    2012-01-01

    Information and communication technology (ICT) has brought many changes in medical education and practice in the last couple of decades. Teaching and learning medicine particularly has gone under profound changes due to computer technologies, and medical schools around the world have invested heavily either in new computer technologies or in the process of adapting to this technological revolution. In order to catch up with the rest of the world, developing countries need to research their options in adapting to new computer technologies. This descriptive survey study was designed to assess medical students' computer and Internet skills and their attitude toward ICT. Research findings showed that the mean score of self-perceived computer knowledge for male students in general was greater than for female students. Also, students who had participated in various prior computer workshops, had access to computer, Internet, and e-mail, and frequently checked their e-mail had higher mean of self-perceived knowledge and skill score. Finally, students with positive attitude toward ICT scored their computer knowledge higher than those who had no opinion. The results have confirmed that the medical schools, particularly in developing countries, need to bring fundamental changes such as curriculum modification in order to integrate ICT into medical education, creating essential infrastructure for ICT use in medical education and practice, and structured computer training for faculty and students.

  12. Integrating technology in STEM education

    OpenAIRE

    Chacko, Priya; Appelbaum, Sarah; Kim, Heejoo; Zhao, Jinhui; Montclare, Jin Kim

    2015-01-01

    Students have access to the Internet at their fingertips via e-tablets and smart phones. However, the STEM fields are struggling to remain relevant in students' lives outside the classroom. In an effort to improve high school science curricula and to keep students engaged in the classroom, we developed a technology-rich bioengineering summer program for high school students in grades 9-12. The program utilized touch screen technology in conjunction with hands-on experiments and traditional le...

  13. INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY AND COMMUNICATION IN NURSING EDUCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. R. B. Costa

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The use of information and communication technologies in education, transforms not only the way we communicate, but also work, decide and think, as well as allows you to create rich, complex and diversified learning situations, through sharing the tasks between teachers and students , providing an interactive, continuous and lifelong learning. The paper aims to reflect on the importance of the use of information and communication technologies in higher education and show the potential in promoting changes and challenges for teachers of undergraduate nursing course. This is a literary review concerning the issue at hand, in the period from February to March 2014. The result indicates that the resources of information and communication technologies are strategies for the education of future nurses and promote the changing process for teachers , providing quality education to students and understanding that we must seek new opportunities to build a new style of training.

  14. Hydrogen Technology Education Workshop Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2002-12-01

    This document outlines activities for educating key target audiences, as suggested by workshop participants. Held December 4-5, 2002, the Hydrogen Technology Education Workshop kicked off a new education effort coordinated by the Hydrogen, Fuel Cells, & Infrastructure Technologies Program of the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy.

  15. The New Technology of Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apter, Michael J.

    A guide to the field of educational technology in Britain is presented with reference to the increasing use of media in education due to the "explosions" of information and population. Descriptions of the major developments in educational technology at the present time (1968) include the use of television (both broadcast and closed…

  16. THE DEVELOPMENT OF COMPUTER TECHNOLOGY OF EDUCATION OF STUDENTS IN HIGHER EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTIONS OF UKRAINE (THE SECOND HALF OF 50S – EARLY OF 90S XX CENTURY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oleksii S. Voronkin

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The article presents results of a synthesis study of the evolution of computer technologies to support students studying at the universities of Ukraine since the second half of 50th to the early of 90th of the twentieth century. Research was conducted on the basis of a wide range of sources and materials. There are four historical stages highlighted: 1 the emergence of algorithms of programmed learning; 2 the emergence of automated technologies to support studying; 3 the birth of the first computer training systems and the development of learning environment; 4 an integrated development of computer technology, the development of intelligent tutoring systems and virtual reality systems.

  17. Educational technology and the new technologies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhagen, Pleunes Willem; Plomp, T.

    1989-01-01

    Like everywhere in our culture, new technologies gradually penetrate the field of education. This may be seen as a problem area, which asks for appropriate, actions by teachers, curriculum experts, instructional designers and others. As "technology" seems to be the main issue,one may quation whether

  18. THE SPAСE OF EDUCATIONAL RESEARCH ACTIVITY OF STUDENTS BASED ON ASSOCIATION ONTOLOGICALLY INTERFACE AND GIS-TECHNOLOGIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryna A. Popova

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses the ontologies and ontological computer interface use as an effective means of integration, aggregation and visualization of distributed information resources and systems through the use of semantic properties to create and use of information space in education and research activities of students. The approach of combining ontologies features and geospatial analytical tools functions of GIS is described. The technique of ontological interface applying by creating a thematic map layers in GIS environment based on thematic ontology is presented.

  19. A mixed-method research to investigate the adoption of mobile devices and Web2.0 technologies among medical students and educators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Si; Radford, Jan; Fabian, Debbie

    2016-04-19

    The past decade has witnessed the increasing adoption of Web 2.0 technologies in medical education. Recently, the notion of digital habitats, Web 2.0 supported learning environments, has also come onto the scene. While there has been initial research on the use of digital habitats for educational purposes, very limited research has examined the adoption of digital habitats by medical students and educators on mobile devices. This paper reports the Stage 1 findings of a two-staged study. The whole study aimed to develop and implement a personal digital habitat, namely digiMe, for medical students and educators at an Australian university. The first stage, however, examined the types of Web 2.0 tools and mobile devices that are being used by potential digiMe users, and reasons for their adoption. In this first stage of research, data were collected through a questionnaire and semi-structured interviews. Questionnaire data collected from 104 participants were analysed using the Predictive Analytics SoftWare (PASW). Frequencies, median and mean values were pursued. Kruskal Wallis tests were then performed to examine variations between views of different participant groups. Notes from the 6 interviews, together with responses to the open-ended section of the questionnaire, were analysed using the constructivist grounded theory approach, to generate key themes relevant to the adoption of Web 2.0 tools and mobile devices. The findings reflected the wide use of mobile devices, including both smart phones and computing tablets, by medical students and educators for learning, teaching and professional development purposes. Among the 22 types of Web 2.0 tools investigated, less than half of these tools were frequently used by the participants, this reflects the mismatch between users' desires and their actual practice. Age and occupation appeared to be the influential factors for their adoption. Easy access to information and improved communication are main purposes. This

  20. Information Technologies (ITs) in Medical Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masic, Izet; Pandza, Haris; Toromanovic, Selim; Masic, Fedja; Sivic, Suad; Zunic, Lejla; Masic, Zlatan

    2011-09-01

    Advances in medicine in recent decades are in significant correlation with the advances in the information technology. Modern information technologies (IT) have enabled faster, more reliable and comprehensive data collection. These technologies have started to create a large number of irrelevant information, which represents a limiting factor and a real growing gap, between the medical knowledge on one hand, and the ability of doctors to follow its growth on the other. Furthermore, in our environment, the term technology is generally reserved for its technical component. Education means, learning, teaching, or the process of acquiring skills or behavior modification through various exercises. Traditionally, medical education meant the oral, practical and more passive transferring of knowledge and skills from the educators to students and health professionals. For the clinical disciplines, of special importance are the principles, such as, "learning at bedside," aided by the medical literature. In doing so, these techniques enable students to contact with their teachers, and to refer to the appropriate literature. The disadvantage of these educational methods is in the fact, that teachers often do not have enough time. Additionally they are not very convenient to the horizontal and vertical integration of teaching, create weak or almost no self education, as well as, low skill levels and poor integration of education with a real social environment. In this paper authors describe application of modern IT in medical education - their advantages and disadvantages comparing with traditional ways of education.

  1. Searching for Educational Technology Faculty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrow, Lloyd H.

    2003-01-01

    Identifies the types of positions available at domestic four-year institutions of higher education for faculty whose specialty is educational technology. Analyzes educational job postings listed in the "Chronicle of Higher Education" from August, 2000, through July, 2001. (Author/SOE)

  2. Career Educational Program at Anan College of Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okumoto, Yoshihiro

    The career educational program of Anan College of Technology was adopted in 2006 by the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology in Japan as the Support Program for Distinctive University Education (Good Practice in Modern Educational Needs) . The original program of career education is operated for students in lower grades and the support system is provided for the recruiting activity of students in the higher grades. Students can be instilled with a sense of purpose by receiving education regarding the structure of industrial society as an early step of the curriculum.

  3. Java Bluetooth wireless technology for evaluating student performance in classroom

    OpenAIRE

    Davidrajuh, Reggie

    2005-01-01

    This paper focuses on the use of Java Bluetooth wireless technology for evaluation of student performance in classroom. First, an introduction to Bluetooth wireless technology is given. Second, use of Java technology for developing wireless applications is explored. Third, a framework is given for identifying the processes involved in education that can make use of mobile technology. Finally, a case study is presented on wireless classroom application for student evaluation.

  4. Trends of Students of the College of Basic Science towards Teaching the Course of Athletics and Health by Using Computer Technology in the World Islamic Sciences and Education University (WISE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salameh, Ibrahim Abdul Ghani; Khawaldeh, Mohammad Falah Ali

    2014-01-01

    The Study aimed at identifying the trends of the students of basic sciences College in the World Islamic Sciences and Education University towards teaching health and sport course by using computer technology as a teaching method, and to identify also the impact of the variables of academic level and the gender on the students' trends. The study…

  5. Students' Attitudes towards Craft and Technology in Iceland and Finland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorsteinsson, Gísli; Ólafsson, Brynjar; Autio, Ossi

    2012-01-01

    Craft education in both Finland and Iceland originated over 140 years ago and was influenced by the Scandinavian Sloyd pedagogy. Since then, the subject has moved away from craft and towards technology, with the aim being to increase students' technological abilities. In the beginning, the subject largely focused on the students copying artefacts,…

  6. Technology Education Professional Enhancement Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Thomas A., Jr.

    1996-01-01

    The two goals of this project are: the use of integrative field of aerospace technology to enhance the content and instruction delivered by math, science, and technology teachers through the development of a new publication entitled NASA Technology Today, and to develop a rationale and structure for the study of technology, which establishes the foundation for developing technology education standards and programs of the future.

  7. Automotive Technology Student Learning Styles and Their Implications for Faculty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Threeton, Mark D.; Walter, Richard A.

    2009-01-01

    In an effort to provide Career and Technical Education (CTE) professionals with additional insight on how to better meet the educational needs of the learner, this study sought to identify the preference for learning of postsecondary automotive technology students. While it might appear logical to naturally classify auto-tech students as primarily…

  8. Parents\\' Education And Students\\' Performance In Educational ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper critically examined the influence of parental level of education on the performance of their children in educational statistics at a higher level of education. The population consist of all higher education students studying education statistics and resident at the FederalCapitalTerritory (FCT) Abuja, Nigeria.

  9. Emerging Technologies in Physics Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krusberg, Zosia A. C.

    2007-01-01

    Three emerging technologies in physics education are evaluated from the interdisciplinary perspective of cognitive science and physics education research. The technologies--Physlet Physics, the Andes Intelligent Tutoring System (ITS), and Microcomputer-Based Laboratory (MBL) Tools--are assessed particularly in terms of their potential at promoting…

  10. Health Educational Potentials of Technologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Magnussen, Rikke; Aagaard-Hansen, Jens

    2012-01-01

    The field of health promotion technology has been in an exponential growth in recent years and smart phone applications, exer-games and self-monitoring devices has become part of fitness activities and health education. In this work-in-progress-paper theoretical perspectives for categorising...... and analysing health educational potentials of technologies are presented....

  11. Health Educational Potentials of Technologies.

    OpenAIRE

    Magnussen, Rikke; Aagaard-Hansen, Jens

    2012-01-01

    The field of health promotion technology has been in an exponential growth in recent years and smart phone applications, exer-games and self-monitoring devices has become part of fitness activities and health education. In this work-in-progress-paper theoretical perspectives for categorising and analysing health educational potentials of technologies are presented.

  12. Technology for Education and Learning

    CERN Document Server

    2012 international conference on Technology for Education and Learning (ICTEL 2012)

    2012-01-01

    This volume contains 108 selected papers presented at the 2012 international conference on Technology for Education and Learning (ICTEL 2012), Macau, China, March 1-2, 2012. The conference brought together researchers working in various different areas of Technology for Education and Learning with a main emphasis on technology for business and economy in order to foster international collaborations and exchange of new ideas. This proceedings book has its focus on Technology for Economy, Finance and Education representing some of the major subareas presented at the conference.

  13. Emerging Technologies in Physics Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krusberg, Zosia A. C.

    2007-10-01

    Three emerging technologies in physics education are evaluated from the interdisciplinary perspective of cognitive science and physics education research. The technologies—Physlet Physics, the Andes Intelligent Tutoring System (ITS), and Microcomputer-Based Laboratory (MBL) Tools—are assessed particularly in terms of their potential at promoting conceptual change, developing expert-like problem-solving skills, and achieving the goals of the traditional physics laboratory. Pedagogical methods to maximize the potential of each educational technology are suggested.

  14. Governmentality, student autonomy and nurse education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darbyshire, Chris; Fleming, Valerie E M

    2008-04-01

    This paper is a report of a study to explore how governmental practices operated in nurse education. Background. Since the 1980s nurse education internationally has been strongly influenced by educational theories that aim to promote student autonomy by encouraging self-direction and critical thinking. Newer curriculum models advocate transformative approaches leading to greater emancipation, social equity and inclusion. Although these changes have been positively evaluated there had been limited critical research on how student behaviour is governed. A discourse analytic study was conducted from 2000 to 2004 using interviews (n = 30) with a purposive sample students and teachers in one United Kingdom university. Data were also collated from the course curriculum and student handbook for the students' programme. Data were analysed to identify how student behaviour is governed. Two governing practices are described: control and technologies of the self. These practices contribute to an overall system of governing student behaviour that creates tension between the avowed progressive empowerment discourse and taken for granted everyday educational practices. Students are subjected to a range of governmental and disciplinary strategies and, through a process of normalization, ultimately become their own supervisors within the system. The tensions between the demands of a professional outcome-based nursing programme and notions of empowerment and student autonomy have not been resolved. Instead, present educational practice is characterized by normalizing discursive practices that aim to produce a specific version of a student subject as autonomous learner. Thus, discourses of both empowerment and professional behaviour govern students.

  15. The role of Educational Technology in Medical Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZAHRA SAFFARI

    2014-10-01

    currently, while the faculty members have to learn most of the new means of teaching, for most of their students, these new means of education such as computers and other associated applications are not really consider technology since they are not only completely familiar with but also very capable of utilizing them. Therefore, while faculties are trying to learn these new methods of transferring information, students’ expectations are getting higher each day, Hence it seems that educational technology mastery is an important neglected competency in faculties which mandates an especial training program for the universities’ upgrading and improvement.

  16. A research project with students of Information and Communication Technology in obligatory secondary education: virtual reconstruction of the thermal area of the roman villa of Balazote (Albacete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pilar Mediano Serrano

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The optional subject Information and Communication Technology (ICT in obligatory secondary education is fundamentally about how to use applications. The software related to this subject is based on: photo editing programs, 3D constructions, sound editing and video editing. These can be viewed in isolation and independently or as a part of a comprehensive project in which students have to handle all of them at once. This article will explain a project with students: the virtual reconstruction of the thermal area of the roman villa of Balazote (Albacete. The goal was to improve student motivation and get actively involved in their learning process. Students used computers and classes of the course to conduct such research. First, the necessary information was sought, and then, based on that information and using different software about virtual reconstruction and recording and editing films: Gimp, SketchUP, Movie Maker, etc., our film was made. The result of this work is a film consisting of a virtual tour inside the roman villa.

  17. The impact of assistive technology services in post-secondary education for students with disabilities: Intervention outcomes, use-profiles, and user-experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malcolm, Matthew P; Roll, Marla C

    2017-01-01

    The outcomes of assistive technology (AT) support services for post-secondary education students with disabilities are under-reported, and little is known about use-profiles and user experiences when AT interventions are applied to this rapidly growing population. We examined AT service outcomes related to performance and satisfaction of common academic tasks (using the Canadian Occupational Performance Measure [COPM]), as well as how students with disabilities use and experience AT and AT services (employing an AT-use survey). Three-hundred fifty-three students with disabilities completed the AT-use survey, with a subset of these (n = 216) also participating with pre-post AT intervention COPM assessment. COPM performance and satisfaction ratings significantly increased from pre- to post-AT intervention in all academic task categories (reading, writing, note-taking, test-taking, and studying; p impacted their academic success, and believed they would continue using AT post-graduation. The study findings contribute to evidence-base for AT services with a hope we may improve AT services to best meet the changing needs of the growing number of college students with disabilities.

  18. Informational technologies in modern educational structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedyanin, A. B.

    2017-01-01

    The article represents the structure of informational technologies complex that is applied in modern school education, describes the most important educational methods, shows the results of their implementation. It represents the forms and methods of educational process informative support usage, examined in respects of different aspects of their using that take into account also the psychological features of students. A range of anxious facts and dangerous trends connected with the usage and distribution of the informational technologies that are to be taken into account in the educational process of informatization is also indicated in the article. Materials of the article are based on the experience of many years in operation and development of the informational educational sphere on the basis of secondary school of the physics and mathematics specialization.

  19. Examining Educational Climate Change Technology: How Group Inquiry Work with Realistic Scientific Technology Alters Classroom Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bush, Drew; Sieber, Renee; Seiler, Gale; Chandler, Mark

    2018-01-01

    This study with 79 students in Montreal, Quebec, compared the educational use of a National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) global climate model (GCM) to climate education technologies developed for classroom use that included simpler interfaces and processes. The goal was to show how differing climate education technologies succeed…

  20. Technological literacy and innovation education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansbøl, Mikala

    , and a heavy digitization of the health care sector. These developments have actualized the fundamental question of how new technologies change and challenge the professions and their professional relationships? As one way to deal with this question, health education programmes have begun to focus...... on innovation education and educational activities fostering technological literacy. While focus on technological literacy has often (historically) taken a functionalist direction, and mainly been related to ICT and development of non- vocational curricula, more recent developments of approaches...... education approaches. This paper inscribes itself in these latter movements, and contributes to opening up the question of how health education programmes can deal with the ways new technologies change and challenge the professions and their professional relationships. The paper presents and discusses three...

  1. Teen Culture, Technology and Literacy Instruction: Urban Adolescent Students' Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jia; Snow, Catherine; White, Claire

    2015-01-01

    Modern teens have pervasively integrated new technologies into their lives, and technology has become an important component of teen popular culture. Educators have pointed out the promise of exploiting technology to enhance students' language and literacy skills and general academic success. However, there is no consensus on the effect of…

  2. Implementing Educational Technology in Higher Education: A Strategic Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cynthia C. Roberts

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Although the move toward implementing technology in higher education is driven by an increasing number of competitors as well as student demand, there is still considerable resistance to embracing it. Adoption of technology requires more that merely installing a product. This paper outlines a framework for a strategic change process that can be utilized by educators for the purpose of the selection as well as successful implementation of educational technologies within their setting, in particular, online course management systems. The four steps of this process include strategic analysis, strategy making, strategic plan design, and strategic plan implementation. The choice to embrace a new system and the extent and speed of its implementation depends upon internal factors such as resources, organizational culture, faculty readiness, anticipated degree of resistance, and the degree of variance from the status quo. A case from the author’s experience provides one example of how the use of distance learning technology was strategically implemented.

  3. Examining Educational Climate Change Technology: How Group Inquiry Work with Realistic Scientific Technology Alters Classroom Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bush, Drew; Sieber, Renee; Seiler, Gale; Chandler, Mark

    2018-04-01

    This study with 79 students in Montreal, Quebec, compared the educational use of a National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) global climate model (GCM) to climate education technologies developed for classroom use that included simpler interfaces and processes. The goal was to show how differing climate education technologies succeed and fail at getting students to evolve in their understanding of anthropogenic global climate change (AGCC). Many available climate education technologies aim to convey key AGCC concepts or Earth systems processes; the educational GCM used here aims to teach students the methods and processes of global climate modeling. We hypothesized that challenges to learning about AGCC make authentic technology-enabled inquiry important in developing accurate understandings of not just the issue but how scientists research it. The goal was to determine if student learning trajectories differed between the comparison and treatment groups based on whether each climate education technology allowed authentic scientific research. We trace learning trajectories using pre/post exams, practice quizzes, and written student reflections. To examine the reasons for differing learning trajectories, we discuss student pre/post questionnaires, student exit interviews, and 535 min of recorded classroom video. Students who worked with a GCM demonstrated learning trajectories with larger gains, higher levels of engagement, and a better idea of how climate scientists conduct research. Students who worked with simpler climate education technologies scored lower in the course because of lower levels of engagement with inquiry processes that were perceived to not actually resemble the work of climate scientists.

  4. Examining Educational Climate Change Technology: How Group Inquiry Work with Realistic Scientific Technology Alters Classroom Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bush, Drew; Sieber, Renee; Seiler, Gale; Chandler, Mark

    2017-10-01

    This study with 79 students in Montreal, Quebec, compared the educational use of a National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) global climate model (GCM) to climate education technologies developed for classroom use that included simpler interfaces and processes. The goal was to show how differing climate education technologies succeed and fail at getting students to evolve in their understanding of anthropogenic global climate change (AGCC). Many available climate education technologies aim to convey key AGCC concepts or Earth systems processes; the educational GCM used here aims to teach students the methods and processes of global climate modeling. We hypothesized that challenges to learning about AGCC make authentic technology-enabled inquiry important in developing accurate understandings of not just the issue but how scientists research it. The goal was to determine if student learning trajectories differed between the comparison and treatment groups based on whether each climate education technology allowed authentic scientific research. We trace learning trajectories using pre/post exams, practice quizzes, and written student reflections. To examine the reasons for differing learning trajectories, we discuss student pre/post questionnaires, student exit interviews, and 535 min of recorded classroom video. Students who worked with a GCM demonstrated learning trajectories with larger gains, higher levels of engagement, and a better idea of how climate scientists conduct research. Students who worked with simpler climate education technologies scored lower in the course because of lower levels of engagement with inquiry processes that were perceived to not actually resemble the work of climate scientists.

  5. Motion sensor technologies in education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Bratitsis

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper attempts to raise a discussion regarding motion sensor technologies, mainly seen as peripherals of contemporary video game consoles, by examining their exploitation within educational context. An overview of the existing literature is presented, while attempting to categorize the educational approaches which involve motion sensor technologies, in two parts. The first one concerns the education of people with special needs. The utilization of motion sensor technologies, incorporated by game consoles, in the education of such people is examined. The second one refers to various educational approaches in regular education, under which not so many research approaches, but many teaching ideas can be found. The aim of the paper is to serve as a reference point for every individual/group, willing to explore the Sensor-Based Games Based Learning (SBGBL research area, by providing a complete and structured literature review.

  6. Active Learning Methods and Technology: Strategies for Design Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coorey, Jillian

    2016-01-01

    The demands in higher education are on the rise. Charged with teaching more content, increased class sizes and engaging students, educators face numerous challenges. In design education, educators are often torn between the teaching of technology and the teaching of theory. Learning the formal concepts of hierarchy, contrast and space provide the…

  7. Geospatial Technology in Geography Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeMers, Michael N.

    2016-01-01

    Depending on how you determine the starting point for the technology driving geographic information systems (GIS) and remote sensing, it is well over fifty years old now. During the first years of its existence in the early 1960s, the new technology benefited relatively few students who attended the handful of college programs that were actually…

  8. Integrating Technology in STEM Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priya Chacko

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Students have access to the Internet at their fingertips via e-tablets and smart phones. However, the STEM fields are struggling to remain relevant in students’ lives outside the classroom. In an effort to improve high school science curricula and to keep students engaged in the classroom, we developed a technology-rich bioengineering summer program for high school students in grades 9-12. The program utilized touch screen technology in conjunction with hands-on experiments and traditional lecturing to create an entertaining, relevant, and effective classroom experience.

  9. Computers: Educational Technology Paradox?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashim, Hajah Rugayah Hj.; Mustapha, Wan Narita

    2005-01-01

    As we move further into the new millennium, the need to involve and adapt learners with new technology have been the main aim of many institutions of higher learning in Malaysia. The involvement of the government in huge technology-based projects like the Multimedia Super Corridor Highway (MSC) and one of its flagships, the Smart Schools have…

  10. Educational Technology: Integration?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Dean L.; Tennyson, Robert D.

    This paper presents a perspective of the current state of technology-assisted instruction integrating computer language, artificial intelligence (AI), and a review of cognitive science applied to instruction. The following topics are briefly discussed: (1) the language of instructional technology, i.e., programming languages, including authoring…

  11. Students as Learning Designers in Innovation Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Magnussen, Rikke; Sørensen, Birgitte Holm

    2014-01-01

    and testing new forms of technology-enhanced innovation education as part of the establishment of an EduTechLab at the school. Established in new facilities at the school, the lab contained learning technologies such as Nao robots, sensor kits, and 3D visualisation and printing facilities. The goal of the Edu......-changing landscape of new technologies and how co-designer roles can be integrated in innovation education.......This paper, which concerns criteria for developing technology-enhanced innovation education, discusses how teacher and student relationships change in these learning spaces. The case study in this paper involves a school in Denmark where teachers and students, aged 6-14, were involved in developing...

  12. BIM technology and experience of their introduction into educational process for training bachelor students of major 08.03.01 «Construction»

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Л. А. Голдобина

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with issues of necessity of training and development of working staff for construction industry of Russian Federation for creation of competitive construction industry, meeting the high quality and efficiency standards, working in basis of modern financial and economic, technical and management mechanisms. One of the ways to solve this task of innovative development is modernization of architectural and building design, in particular implementation of BIM technology enabling making efficient decisions at all stages of building and structures life cycle – from investment concept till operation and even demolition. In relation to this the industry demands highly qualified workers and engineers (bachelor students being able not only to get new knowledge but to use them for solving practical tasks of modern construction industry and market.The article present a concept of designing educational programme for training students with major 08.03.01 «Construction» (bachelor degree focusing on systematized knowledge, skills and tools for training, in particular, through interconnection and continuity during course and diploma papers based on BIM technology.

  13. A Technology-Enriched Active Learning Space for a New Gateway Education Programme in Hong Kong: A Platform for Nurturing Student Innovations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Pit Ho Patrio

    2016-01-01

    A Gateway Education Programme is established in Hong Kong that aims to broaden students' interdisciplinary knowledge and nurture student innovations under the Discovery-enriched Curriculum. To support the initiative, a novel idea was proposed for the creation of a Gateway Education Laboratory (GE Lab) with a highly configurable layout equipped…

  14. Engaging Students in the Ethics of Engineering and Technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keiko, Yasukawa

    This paper argues that education for engineers and technologists should focus on the ethics of technology and engineering, and not just ethics in technology and engineering projects. It argues that one's expression of their ethical position is linked closely to their identity formation......, and is different to other "competencies" that are emphasised in engineering and technology education. Principles of sustainable development are proposed as a framework for engaging students in reflecting on their ethical positions and practices....

  15. Students as Technology Leaders: The New Collaborative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shasek, Judy

    2000-01-01

    Describes a student mentoring project that helped integrate technology into middle school classrooms. Discusses students mentoring teachers and peers; online mentoring training; scheduling; media specialist/teacher collaboration; student entrepreneurship; and guidelines. Lists related Web sites for further information. (LRW)

  16. Gaming Research for Technology Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Aaron C.; Ernst, Jeremy

    2009-01-01

    This study assesses the use of gaming to teach Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) in public education. The intent of the investigation was to identify attitudes about gaming and its use in education, as well as the need to utilize gaming as a platform to serve as an integrator of STEM subject matter. Participants included…

  17. Educational Technology Policy in Israel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slakmon, Benzi

    2017-01-01

    The study examines Israel's educational technology policy in light of the coming-of-age of ICT. The study shows the ways it has been developing, and identifies two major shifts which have occurred in recent years: the introduction of the national educational cloud, and the enabling of the "bring your own device" (BYOD) policy. The way…

  18. Legal Issues in Educational Technology: Implications for School Leaders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, David M.

    2003-01-01

    Discusses several legal issues involving the use of educational technology: Freedom of speech, regulation of Internet material harmful to minors, student-developed Web pages, harassment and hostile work environment, staff and student privacy, special education, plagiarism, and copyright issues. Includes recommendations for addressing technology…

  19. Gaming in Technology Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Aaron C.; Ernst, Jeremy V.

    2009-01-01

    The authors have devoted a considerable amount of time evaluating the role that gaming and game development plays in the form of curricula integration and as a future career focus for students interested in this field. From the research conducted through the completed National Science Foundation (NSF) project, VisTE: Visualization in Technology…

  20. Challenges and Opportunities for International Students in Graduate Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Xinya

    2015-01-01

    International students pursuing graduate education in U.S. institutes have been rapidly increasing in recent years. Students from all over the world remarkably contribute to the advancement of U.S. economy and technology. This article addresses the challenges and opportunities international students face during and after graduate education. The…

  1. Adapting to Student Learning Styles: Engaging Students with Cell Phone Technology in Organic Chemistry Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pursell, David P.

    2009-01-01

    Students of organic chemistry traditionally make 3 x 5 in. flash cards to assist learning nomenclature, structures, and reactions. Advances in educational technology have enabled flash cards to be viewed on computers, offering an endless array of drilling and feedback for students. The current generation of students is less inclined to use…

  2. New Digital Technologies: Educational Opportunities for Australian Indigenous Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Shalini

    2013-01-01

    This article presents a number of possibilities that digital technologies can offer to increase access for Indigenous people to higher education in Australia. Such technologies can assist Indigenous high school students acquire the knowledge and skills they require to be accepted into higher education courses. They can also assist Indigenous…

  3. New Rules, New Roles: Technology Standards and Teacher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasco, Becky; Adcock, Phyllis G.

    2007-01-01

    The digital age is infiltrating colleges of education around the country, but while some faculty are jumping on the bandwagon and working hard to improve their own technological literacy and that of their students, other faculty are resistant, afraid that technology may "dehumanize" education. School districts around the country are investing…

  4. Challenges and Opportunities Facing Technology Education in Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Lung-Sheng Steven

    2009-01-01

    The technology education in Taiwan is prescribed in the national curriculum and provided to all students in grades 1-12. However, it faces the following challenges: (1) Lack of worthy image, (2) Inadequate teachers in elementary schools, (3) Deficient teaching vitality in secondary schools, and (4) Diluted technology teacher education programs. In…

  5. Curriculum Consonance and Dissonance in Technology Education Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Ryan A.

    2009-01-01

    In a time of increased accountability, a tightened curriculum, and fewer curricular choices for students, technology education in the United States is in the position of defending itself by "carving a niche" in the school curriculum. Justifying the place of technology education is becoming increasingly difficult, as there has been little…

  6. Investigating How Digital Technologies Can Support a Triad-Approach for Student Assessment in Higher Education / Étude des technologies numériques comme appuis à l’évaluation tripartite des étudiants universitaires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norm Vaughan

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this research study was to investigate if and how digital technologies could be used to support a triad-approach for student assessment in higher education. This triad-approach consisted of self-reflection, peer feedback, and instructor assessment practices in a pre-service teacher education course at a Canadian university. Through online surveys, journal postings, and post-course interviews the study participants indicated that digital technologies could be used to effectively support such a triad-approach only if students were more actively involved in the assessment process and the course instructor placed a greater emphasis on formative assessment practices. Le but de cette recherche était d’étudier dans quelle mesure les technologies numériques pouvaient être utilisées pour soutenir une approche triadique de l’évaluation des étudiants universitaires. Cette approche tripartite consistait dans l’autoréflexion, la rétroaction par les pairs et les pratiques d’évaluation de l’enseignant dans un cours de formation des futurs enseignants au sein d’une université canadienne. À l’aide de sondages en ligne, d’annonces de journaux et d’entrevues post-formation, les participants à l’étude ont indiqué que les technologies numériques pouvaient être utilisées pour soutenir efficacement une telle approche triadique, à condition que les étudiants soient impliqués plus activement dans le processus d’évaluation et que l’enseignant mette davantage l’accent sur les pratiques d’évaluation formative.

  7. Education Technology Survey, 1995.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quality Education Data, Inc., Denver, CO.

    Primary research (in-depth telephone interviews) was conducted among elementary and secondary school educators in Spring 1995 to determine usage, attitudes, and barriers to usage for five electronic in-school services: Cable in the Classroom; computers, laserdisc or CD-ROM; Internet; online computer services such as America Online and Prodigy; and…

  8. Teaching Science in the early years of primary education from the perspective STS: a work proposal facing the technological artifacts that guide the daily lives of students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabiane Fabri

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available This article presents the results of a study with sixteen students of 2nd year 2nd cycle of the early years of the School Municipal Network of the city of Ponta Grossa in relation to the technological artifacts of everyday life. The study objective was to provide students with a scientific and technological literacy, an approach STS (Science, Technology and Society, starting from the main theme proposed by Resources Technology proposed by the National Curriculum in Sciences. The methodological approach was qualitative interpretative with participant observation. Among the organized activities can be mentioned: a visit to a recycling cooperative, interview with a scientist, presentations, mini-lessons for students, making folders, written productions, as well as a Technology Fair where students made presentations to the community school and parents. At the end of the study, it was noticed that students already could make reflections on social issues of scientific and technological development, but we emphasize the need to continue these discussions taking place during their school life, since it is believed that only this way the reflective stance on Science and Technology will be internalized. Please note that these are data of a dissertation in the Graduate Program in Teaching Science and Technology of the Technological Federal University of Paraná, Campus Ponta Grossa (UTFPR, Brazil.

  9. Evaluating Technology Resistance and Technology Satisfaction on Students' Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norzaidi, Mohd Daud; Salwani, Mohamed Intan

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Using the extended task-technology fit (TTF) model, this paper aims to examine technology resistance, technology satisfaction and internet usage on students' performance. Design/methodology/approach: The study was conducted at Universiti Teknologi MARA, Johor, Malaysia and questionnaires were distributed to 354 undergraduate students.…

  10. 'Net Generation' medical students: technological experiences of pre-clinical and clinical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Gregor; Gray, Kathleen; Tse, Justin

    2008-02-01

    While institutions have been keen to integrate information and communication technologies into medical education, little is known about the technological experiences of the current cohort of so-called 'Net Generation' students. This study investigated the technological experiences of medical students and determined whether there were differences between pre-clinical and clinical students. In 2006, 207 pre-clinical and 161 clinical students studying medicine at a major Australian university were surveyed. The questionnaire asked students about their access to, use of and skills with an array of technologies and technology-based tools. The results show that access to mobile phones, memory sticks, desktop computers, and broadband Internet connections was high while technologies such as PDAs were used in very low numbers. A factor analysis of students' use of 39 technology-based tools revealed nine clear activity types, including the 'standard' use of computers and mobile-phones, and the use of the Internet as a pastime activity, for podcasting and for accessing services. A comparison of pre-clinical and clinical students revealed a number of significant differences in terms of the frequency and skill with which these students use distinct technology-based tools. The findings inform current technology-based teaching and learning activities and shed light on potential areas of educational technology development.

  11. Supporting Student Research with Semantic Technologies and Digital Archives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Garcia, Agustina; Corti, Louise

    2012-01-01

    This article discusses how the idea of higher education students as producers of knowledge rather than consumers can be operationalised by means of student research projects, in which processes of research archiving and analysis are enabled through the use of semantic technologies. It discusses how existing digital repository frameworks can be…

  12. university students` perception and utilization of technology for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2018-02-01

    Feb 1, 2018 ... university students` perceptions and utilization of technology for learning at Haramaya University in. Ethiopia (as a case). The researcher used survey research design and questionnaire (students=298) ... access online learning materials, doing assignments, projects and sharing personal and educational.

  13. Student Affairs and Information Technology: Collaborating in the Cloud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbatis, Peter Reyes

    2014-01-01

    Student affairs and information technology have opportunities to partner in order to increase student satisfaction and retention rates and to assist institutions to comply with federal educational regulations. This chapter contains four examples of emerging best practices and future initiatives including: (a) the admissions pipeline, (b)…

  14. Persuasive Technology in Nursing Education About Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, Ana Graziela; Dal Sasso, Grace T M; Iyengar, Sriram

    2016-01-01

    Mobile devices, as persuasive technologies, represent an important platform to promote changes in attitudes and behaviors. They are not only understood as tools, but as a learning process that provides different opportunities to learn how to learn. The objectives of the study were to measure the quality of a virtual mobile learning object, to measure the mental workload of the educational intervention, and to evaluate the learning results. This is a technological production study with a mixed method, quasi-experimental approach. Three simulated clinical scenarios comprise the m-OVADor@, allowing for a simulated evaluation of acute pain through interactive tools. The technology met the quality criteria for educational software, with low mental workload, demonstrating a significant strategy for learning about pain among nursing students.

  15. How Is the Relationship between Entrepreneurship Potential and Student Personality in the Implementation of Science and Technology for Entrepreneurship in Higher Education?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuliana

    2017-01-01

    Entrepreneurship learning and training are tedious and rising educated unemployment of higher education graduates. For this reason, an alternative solution is done by higher education through Science and Technology Program for Entrepreneurship. This research aims to explore and describe the correlation analysis between entrepreneurial potential…

  16. Improving K-12 STEM Education Outcomes through Technological Integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urban, Michael J., Ed.; Falvo, David A., Ed.

    2016-01-01

    The application of technology in classroom settings has equipped educators with innovative tools and techniques for effective teaching practice. Integrating digital technologies at the elementary and secondary levels helps to enrich the students' learning experience and maximize competency in the areas of science, technology, engineering, and…

  17. Are Special Education Students Happy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uusitalo-Malmivaara, Lotta; Kankaanpaa, Paula; Makinen, Tuula; Raeluoto, Tiina; Rauttu, Karoliina; Tarhala, Veera; Lehto, Juhani E.

    2012-01-01

    This study compared the subjective and school-related happiness of 75 11- to 16-year-old special education students to 77 age- and gender-matched mainstream students using two quantitative measures. Additionally, the respondents chose from a list of 12 putative happy makers what they felt increased their happiness. Ten special education students…

  18. Technology, Education and Copyright Harmonization Act Best Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaver, Marc S.

    2017-01-01

    Educational institutions continually work to balance between providing students with access to data and protecting copyright owner's exclusive rights. The Copyright Act of 1976, effective in 1978, provided exemptions for live and distance education. As digital technology grew in capability, its capabilities were incorporated in distance education,…

  19. Use of Computer Technology To Help Students with Special Needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasselbring, Ted S.; Glaser, Candyce H. Williams

    2000-01-01

    Reviews the role of computer technology in promoting the education of children with special needs within regular classrooms, discussing: technologies for students with mild learning and behavioral disorders, speech and language disorders, hearing impairments, visual impairments, and severe physical disabilities. Examines barriers to effective…

  20. Building Multicultural Awareness in University Students Using Synchronous Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stork, Michele Garabedian; Zhang, Jingshun; Wang, Charles Xiaoxue

    2018-01-01

    To explore the potential for building multicultural awareness in university students using synchronous technology, faculty members from an American regional state university and a Chinese regional university collaborated to find appropriate ways to integrate synchronous technology (e.g., Adobe Connect) into a teacher education program in the…

  1. Student Disability and Experiential Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Gerald D.

    2009-01-01

    As a significant percentage of students in higher education today have one or more disabilities, it is important for instructors to be aware of what disabilities, and how disabilities, impact student performance. Students with a wide range of disabilities can encounter significant obstacles when experiential instructional methods are implemented…

  2. Toward Sustainable Practices in Technology Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elshof, Leo

    2009-01-01

    This paper discusses the problematic relationship between technology education, consumption and environmental sustainability. The emerging global sustainability crisis demands an educational response that moves beyond mere "tinkering" with classroom practices, toward technology education which embraces life cycle thinking and…

  3. Constructivism, Education, Science, and Technology

    OpenAIRE

    Moses A. Boudourides

    2003-01-01

    Abstract: The purpose of this paper is to present a brief review of the various streams of constructivism in studies of education, society, science and technology. It is intended to present a number of answers to the question (what really is constructivism?) in the context of various disciplines from the humanities and the sciences (both natural and social). In particular the discussion will focus on four varieties of constructivism: philosophical, cybernetic, educational, and sociological co...

  4. Constructivism, Education, Science, and Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moses A. Boudourides

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: The purpose of this paper is to present a brief review of the various streams of constructivism in studies of education, society, science and technology. It is intended to present a number of answers to the question (what really is constructivism? in the context of various disciplines from the humanities and the sciences (both natural and social. In particular the discussion will focus on four varieties of constructivism: philosophical, cybernetic, educational, and sociological constructivism.

  5. The Learning Edge: What Technology Can Do to Educate All Children. Technology, Education--Connections (TEC) Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bain, Alan; Weston, Mark E.

    2011-01-01

    After billions of dollars, thousands of studies, and immeasurable effort by educators at all levels, why is the performance of students and teachers so unaffected by technology? Moreover, what should be done to extract genuine benefit from the information and communication technology (ICT) revolution? In this groundbreaking book, technology and…

  6. The Impact of Technology on Hispanic Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelsey, Cheryl; Mata-Claflin, Guadalupe; Holland, Glenda; Castillo, Jose Eduardo

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine if elementary teachers use technology as a tool to enhance classroom strategies for improving student achievement among Hispanic students. The following research questions were utilized: a) Are computers available for classroom teachers and Hispanic students? b) Has the available technology contributed to…

  7. Digital Technology and Student Cognitive Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavanaugh, J. Michael; Giapponi, Catherine C.; Golden, Timothy D.

    2016-01-01

    Digital technology has proven a beguiling, some even venture addictive, presence in the lives of our 21st century (millennial) students. And while screen technology may offer select cognitive benefits, there is mounting evidence in the cognitive neuroscience literature that digital technology is restructuring the way our students read and think,…

  8. A Comparison of Undergraduate Faculty and Millennial Students regarding the Utilization of Weblog and Podcast Technology in a Teacher Education Department

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ennis, Leslie Sturdivant; Gambrell, Elizabeth Anne

    2010-01-01

    The main objective of the study was to compare the utilization of weblog and podcast technology by undergraduate university faculty and Millennial college students. The study was conducted to test the hypothesis, formed from existing literature, that there might be a difference in the utilization of weblog and podcast technology between faculty…

  9. The Impact of 1:1 Laptops on Teaching and Learning: How Seven Secondary Educators Perceive Technology Having Enhanced Their Teaching and Their Students' Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, Andrew G.

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative study is to investigate how teachers who have been identified as high level integrators of technology (specifically laptop technology) perceive their journey to integration, the impact of it on their teaching pedagogy, and the impact of it on student learning. Constructivist Theory informed the interpretations of…

  10. Wilberforce Power Technology in Education Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Edward M.; Buffinger, D. R.; Hehemann, D. G.; Breen, M. L.; Raffaelle, R. P.

    1999-01-01

    The Wilberforce Power Technology in Education Program is a multipart program. Three key parts of this program will be described. They are: (1) WISE-The Wilberforce Summer Intensive Experience. This annual offering is an educational program which is designed to provide both background reinforcement and a focus on study skills to give the participants a boost in their academic performance throughout their academic careers. It is offered to entering Wilberforce students. Those students who take advantage of WISE learn to improve important skills which enable them to work at higher levels in mathematics, science and engineering courses throughout their college careers, but most notably in the first year of college study. (2) Apply technology to reaming. This is being done in several ways including creating an electronic chemistry text with hypertext links to a glossary to help the students deal with the large new vocabulary required to describe and understand chemistry. It is also being done by converting lecture materials for the Biochemistry class to PowerPoint format. Technology is also being applied to learning by exploring simulation software of scientific instrumentation. (3) Wilberforce participation in collaborative research with NASA's John H. Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field. This research has focused on two areas in the past year. The first of these is the deposition of solar cell materials. A second area involves the development of polymeric materials for incorporation into thin film batteries.

  11. The Extent of Educational Technology's Influence on Contemporary Educational Practices

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Bradford-Watts

    2005-01-01

    This paper investigates how advances in educational technologies have influenced contemporary educational practices.It discusses the nature of educational technology, the limitations imposed by the digital divide and other factors of uptake, and the factors leading to successful implementation of educational technologies.The extent of influence is then discussed,together with the probable implications for educational sites for the future.

  12. Visualizations to support self regulated learning based on data from adaptive education technologies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Molenaar, I.

    2017-01-01

    Many students in primary education regularly learn using adaptive educational technologies (AET) on tablets. Driven by developments in the emerging field of learning analytics, these technologies successfully adjust instructional events (instructional texts, assignments, tools) to learners’

  13. Into the Black Box: Using Data Mining of In-Game Actions to Draw Inferences from Educational Technology about Students' Math Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerr, Deirdre Song

    2014-01-01

    Educational video games have the potential to be used as assessments of student understanding of complex concepts. However, the interpretation of the rich stream of complex data that results from the tracking of in-game actions is so difficult that it is one of the most serious blockades to the use of educational video games or simulations to…

  14. Sociological Support for the Job Placement of Students and Graduates of Higher Educational Institutions: The Experience of the Moscow Institute of Aviation and Technology (MATI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolotin, I. S.; Basalai, S. I.; Pugach, V. F.; Mikhailov, A. A.

    2013-01-01

    The weak connection between Russia's system of higher education and the labor market in Russia requires that greater attention be paid to preparing students for successful, employment. This will require more careful research into best practices, and the development of more effective links between employers and educational institutions.

  15. Reforming Technical and Technological Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, David N.

    1993-01-01

    Review of technical and technological educational reform in Brazil, Canada, Germany, Great Britain, Indonesia, Malaysia, Singapore, and Sweden shows that reform takes time to complete effectively, long-term approaches are needed, and reform is linked to industrial development, regional cooperation, and decentralized decision making. (SK)

  16. Geospatial Technology in Geography Education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muniz Solari, Osvaldo; Demirci, A.; van der Schee, J.A.

    2015-01-01

    The book is presented as an important starting point for new research in Geography Education (GE) related to the use and application of geospatial technologies (GSTs). For this purpose, the selection of topics was based on central ideas to GE in its relationship with GSTs. The process of geospatial

  17. Constructivism, Education, Science, and Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boudourides, Moses A.

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present a brief review of the various streams of constructivism in studies of education, society, science and technology. It is intended to present a number of answers to the question (what really is constructivism?) in the context of various disciplines from the humanities and the sciences (both natural and…

  18. Linking information technology in education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Humberto Jaime Pérez Gutierrez

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available It is attempted in this paper, show a clear and concise point involved the new technologies of computer science in education, and how these affect the preparation of teachers, overcoming the wide and deep stretch that separates computer specialists teachers of any subject, learners and the interaction between them.

  19. The Tribe of Educational Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Lily, Abdulrahman Essa

    2014-01-01

    This article looks into the claim that the international academic community of educational technologies seems to have functioned in a "tribal" way, having formed themselves around tribe-like patterns. It therefore addresses the research question: What are these claimed tribe-like practices that such a community exhibits? This question is…

  20. Virtual Technologies Trends in Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-Gutiérrez, Jorge; Mora, Carlos Efrén; Añorbe-Díaz, Beatriz; González-Marrero, Antonio

    2017-01-01

    Virtual reality captures people's attention. This technology has been applied in many sectors such as medicine, industry, education, video games, or tourism. Perhaps its biggest area of interest has been leisure and entertainment. Regardless the sector, the introduction of virtual or augmented reality had several constraints: it was expensive, it…

  1. Mobile Technology and Liberal Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossing, Jonathan P.

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the author offers reflections on the impact of mobile technology for liberal education. These reflections are based on his own experience of incorporating iPads in his communication courses during the 2010-2011 academic year. As a member of an interdisciplinary faculty learning community on the use of mobile tablets, he explored…

  2. Brain Activities and Educational Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riza, Emel

    2002-01-01

    There are close relationships between brain activities and educational technology. Brain is very important and so complicated part in our bodies. From long time scientists pay attention to that part and did many experiments, but they just reached little information like a drop in the sea. However from time to time they gave us some light to…

  3. Advanced Technology for Engineering Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noor, Ahmed K. (Compiler); Malone, John B. (Compiler)

    1998-01-01

    This document contains the proceedings of the Workshop on Advanced Technology for Engineering Education, held at the Peninsula Graduate Engineering Center, Hampton, Virginia, February 24-25, 1998. The workshop was jointly sponsored by the University of Virginia's Center for Advanced Computational Technology and NASA. Workshop attendees came from NASA, other government agencies, industry and universities. The objectives of the workshop were to assess the status of advanced technologies for engineering education and to explore the possibility of forming a consortium of interested individuals/universities for curriculum reform and development using advanced technologies. The presentations covered novel delivery systems and several implementations of new technologies for engineering education. Certain materials and products are identified in this publication in order to specify adequately the materials and products that were investigated in the research effort. In no case does such identification imply recommendation or endorsement of products by NASA, nor does it imply that the materials and products are the only ones or the best ones available for this purpose. In many cases equivalent materials and products are available and would probably produce equivalent results.

  4. Primary School Students' Views about Science, Technology and Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pekmez, Esin

    2018-01-01

    Some of the main goals of science education are to increase students' knowledge about the technology and engineering design process, and to train students as scientifically and technologically literate individuals. The main purpose of this study is to find out primary students' views about science, technology and engineering. For this aim and in…

  5. Affordable Integrated Technology Projects Science Education towards New Horizons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paoletti, Franco; Carlucci, Lisa Marie

    2009-03-01

    The new-era concept of education supports a type of instruction whereby technology directly acts as a conduit of change, fundamentally altering what is learned, how it is learned, and the role of the educator in the classroom. In our current world, the learning about technology itself has become a goal and a means to successful participation in today's society. Efficient integration of technology to enhance and support the educational process will: 1) provide educators with the resources and the freedom to actualize innovative educational programs; 2) allow educators to be successful in challenging each student to reach his/her highest potential to ultimately increase academic achievement. This study analyzes what technology integration into education means identifying the benefits and the challenges that educators need to meet in order to be successful in their efforts while providing examples of how to successfully implement effective programs under budgetary constraints.

  6. Technology Adoption in K-12 Education: A Qualitative Study Using TAM3 to Explore Why Technology Is Underutilized

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosley, Victoria V. W.

    2012-01-01

    Educators, researchers, and the government speculate that technology can reform education and contribute to increased student learning. Despite extensive efforts to equip the K-12 schools with technology, the challenge is more than just getting technology into classrooms; it is getting teachers to use the technologies. The goal of this…

  7. Technology of interdisciplinary open-ended designing in engineering education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaev, A. P.; Plotnikov, L. V.; Fomin, N. I.

    2017-11-01

    Author’s technology of interdisciplinary open-ended engineering is presented in this article. This technology is an integrated teaching method that significantly increases the practical component in the educational program. Author’s technology creates the conditions to overcome the shortcomings in the engineering education. The basic ideas of the technology of open-ended engineering, experience of their implementation in higher education and the author’s vision of the teaching technology are examined in the article. The main stages of development process of the author’s technology of open-ended engineering to prepare students (bachelor) of technical profile are presented in the article. Complex of the methodological tools and procedures is shown in the article. This complex is the basis of the developed training technology that is used in educational process in higher school of engineering (UrFU). The organizational model of the technology of open-ended engineering is presented. Organizational model integrates the functions in the creation and implementation of all educational program. Analysis of the characteristics of educational activity of students working on author’s technology of interdisciplinary open-ended engineering is presented. Intermediate results of the application of author’s technology in the educational process of the engineering undergraduate are shown.

  8. Educational technology in transnational higher education in South East Asia: the cultural politics of flexible learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Ziguras

    2001-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines appropriateness of using educational technologies to increase the flexibility of learning in transnational higher education in South East Asia. It considers the argument that while interactive educational technologies may be appropriate in countries in which self-directed study and student autonomy are emphasised, the same uses of technology may not be as appropriate in South East Asian countries in which education has traditionally been more tightly structured and teacher-directed. This paper examines government policies toward the use of educational technologies in higher education in Singapore, Malaysia and Vietnam, and considers the experiences of five transnational institutions in these countries. The paper concludes that transnational educators are inevitably caught up in tensions between global modernising trends and local traditional practices. It argues that it is important for educators to recognise how their actions relate to local social changes in countries in which their students are located.

  9. Continuing education for Physical Education teachers: Assistive Technology in inclusive education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Luiza Salzani Fiorini

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed at describing the development of continuing education for physical education teachers towards the incorporation of Assistive Technology and the creation of favorable conditions to an inclusive school. The methodology employed was reflective and collaborative research. Two teachers who were facing difficulties to include a physically disabled student and one student with global developmental delay took part in the study. The continuing education plan comprised three steps: 1 reflecting on their own practice after watching a video and planning one lesson, together with the researcher, seeking to incorporate Assistive Technology and favor inclusion; 2 videoing the lesson; 3 evaluating and reflecting on what was planned and what was executed and planning a new lesson. Some factors were seen to be essential to the development of continuing education: considering the teacher’s demand, developing collaborative work, promoting reflection on the practices and having Assistive Technology as a support to the human element.

  10. Current Trends In Educational Technology: Implication On ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper presents the current trends in educational technology and the implication on educational managers in Nigeria. The current trends in the field of educational technology are centred on the influence of information and communication technology on the development of educational management. Various challenges ...

  11. Improving the Use of Technology Enhanced Learning Environments in Higher Education in the UK: A Qualitative Visualization of Students' Views

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Mark; Dunn, Thomas J.

    2018-01-01

    In recent years, the use of Technology Enhanced Learning (TEL) has risen exponentially throughout higher education in the UK. Whilst TEL is an umbrella term for a range of technologies, evidence suggests that in the UK, TEL is usually delivered via the medium of Virtual Learning Environments (VLEs) for the provision of lecture materials and…

  12. Student Teachers’ Perceptions on Educational Technologies’ Past, Present and Future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derya ORHAN GOKSUN

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to reveal Computer Education and Instructional Technologies student teachers’, who are in a distance teacher education program, perceptions on past, present and educational technologies of future via infographics. In this study, 54 infographics, which were created by student teachers who were enrolled in Special Teaching Methods II course at spring semester of 2013-2014 academic years, were analyzed. The infographics were analyzed via document review technique. These themes are “Educational technologies of past” (f=241, “Educational technologies of present” (f=240 and “Educational technologies of future” (f=158. Student teachers mentioned the most frequently “CD” (f=34 and “Television” (f=32 oriented to educational technologies of past. The most frequent views on educational technologies of present were “Smartboard” (f=24 and “Online Courses” (f=23. The most frequent opinion of student teachers about the educational technologies of future is “Holograms” (f=26 and “Virtual classroom” (f=22.

  13. A pilot project in distance education: nurse practitioner students' experience of personal video capture technology as an assessment method of clinical skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strand, Haakan; Fox-Young, Stephanie; Long, Phil; Bogossian, Fiona

    2013-03-01

    This paper reports on a pilot project aimed at exploring postgraduate distance students' experiences using personal video capture technology to complete competency assessments in physical examination. A pre-intervention survey gathered demographic data from nurse practitioner students (n=31) and measured their information communication technology fluency. Subsequently, thirteen (13) students were allocated a hand held video camera to use in their clinical setting. Those participating in the trial completed a post-intervention survey and further data were gathered using semi-structured interviews. Data were analysed by descriptive statistics and deductive content analysis, and the Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology (Venkatesh et al., 2003) were used to guide the project. Uptake of the intervention was high (93%) as students recognised the potential benefit. Students were video recorded while performing physical examinations. They described high level of stress and some anxiety, which decreased rapidly while assessment was underway. Barriers experienced were in the areas of facilitating conditions (technical character e.g. upload of files) and social influence (e.g. local ethical approval). Students valued the opportunity to reflect on their recorded performance with their clinical mentors and by themselves. This project highlights the demands and difficulties of introducing technology to support work-based learning. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. [Medical technology and medical education].

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Mallek, D; Biersack, H-J; Mull, R; Wilhelm, K; Heinz, B; Mellert, F

    2010-08-01

    The education of medical professionals is divided into medical studies, postgraduate training leading to the qualification as a specialist, and continuing professional development. During education, all scientific knowledge and practical skills are to be acquired, which enable the physician to practice responsibly in a specialized medical area. In the present article, relevant curricula are analyzed regarding the consideration of medical device-related topics, as the clinical application of medical technology has reached a central position in modern patient care. Due to the enormous scientific and technical progress, this area has become as important as pharmacotherapy. Our evaluation shows that medical device-related topics are currently underrepresented in the course of medical education and training and should be given greater consideration in all areas of medical education. Possible solutions are presented.

  15. Potential of information technology in dental education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattheos, N; Stefanovic, N; Apse, P; Attstrom, R; Buchanan, J; Brown, P; Camilleri, A; Care, R; Fabrikant, E; Gundersen, S; Honkala, S; Johnson, L; Jonas, I; Kavadella, A; Moreira, J; Peroz, I; Perryer, D G; Seemann, R; Tansy, M; Thomas, H F; Tsuruta, J; Uribe, S; Urtane, I; Walsh, T F; Zimmerman, J; Walmsley, A D

    2008-02-01

    The use of information technology (IT) in dentistry is far ranging. In order to produce a working document for the dental educator, this paper focuses on those methods where IT can assist in the education and competence development of dental students and dentists (e.g. e-learning, distance learning, simulations and computer-based assessment). Web pages and other information-gathering devices have become an essential part of our daily life, as they provide extensive information on all aspects of our society. This is mirrored in dental education where there are many different tools available, as listed in this report. IT offers added value to traditional teaching methods and examples are provided. In spite of the continuing debate on the learning effectiveness of e-learning applications, students request such approaches as an adjunct to the traditional delivery of learning materials. Faculty require support to enable them to effectively use the technology to the benefit of their students. This support should be provided by the institution and it is suggested that, where possible, institutions should appoint an e-learning champion with good interpersonal skills to support and encourage faculty change. From a global prospective, all students and faculty should have access to e-learning tools. This report encourages open access to e-learning material, platforms and programs. The quality of such learning materials must have well defined learning objectives and involve peer review to ensure content validity, accuracy, currency, the use of evidence-based data and the use of best practices. To ensure that the developers' intellectual rights are protected, the original content needs to be secure from unauthorized changes. Strategies and recommendations on how to improve the quality of e-learning are outlined. In the area of assessment, traditional examination schemes can be enriched by IT, whilst the Internet can provide many innovative approaches. Future trends in IT will

  16. THE FEATURES OF TRAINING OF TEACHERS AND STUDENTS TO THE USE OF INFORMATION TECHNOLOGIES TRAINING OF MATHEMATICS IN HIGHER EDUCATIONAL ESTABLISHMENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. I. Sinko

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the current issues to improve the educational process at higher school on the basis of introduction of information and communication technologies training. The main attention was paid to the problem of determining the conditions, psychological and pedagogical features of application of existing pedagogical software systems for teaching mathematics in higher educational establishments. Teachers’ and students’ appropriate training to the use of information technologies training should be considered one of the conditions for increasing of efficiency of the process of informatization of education.

  17. Student Teachers' Intentions and Actions on Integrating Technology into Their Classrooms during Student Teaching: A Singapore Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choy, Doris; Wong, Angela F. L.; Gao, Ping

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to explore student teachers' intentions and actions in technology integration in their classrooms. A postgraduate teacher education cohort of 118 Singapore student teachers participated in the study. The results suggested that student teachers in Singapore showed positive intentions to integrate technology to facilitate…

  18. Distance Education at Silesian University of Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piotr Klosowski

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents Distance Learning Platform used by Silesian University of Technology. Distance Learning Platform is based on modular object-oriented dynamic learning environment, represents LMS (Learning Management Systems technology, a software package designed to help educators create quality online courses. Currently on Distance Learning Platform at Silesian University of Technology are available over 520 online courses created for students of twelve University's faculties. Number of Distance Learning Platform users exceeds 12000. Distance Learning Platform works as typically asynchronous e-learning service, but in the future more synchronous e-learning services will be added. Distance Learning Platform has great potential to create a successful elearning experience by providing a plethora of excellent tools that can be used to enhance conventional classroom instruction, in hybrid courses, or any distance learning arrangements.

  19. Distance Education Students Moving Towards Collaborative Learning - A Field Study of Australian Distance Education Students and Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva R Fåhræus

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Distance education has been offered to young students in Australia for about 100 years. Recently, information and communication technology has been introduced as a means to improve communication, but not all remote students have access to this new technology. This has made it difficult to arrange collaborative learning for distance-education students. In this student-focused study, more than 40 students as well as teachers and other important persons have been interviewed and observed in schools and on remote farms. Using Activity Theory for the analysis, different contradictions were identified. Lack of technology and access were not the only obstacles. The education was built on a tradition of individual learning, and the technology at hand was not supporting collaboration. However, contradictions may result in ‘expansive learning’ among students and teachers, leading to more of a development towards collaborative learning.

  20. Potential of Social Networking Sites for Distance Education Student Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lester, Jaime; Perini, Michael

    2010-01-01

    This chapter explores the potential of social networking sites for increasing student engagement for distance education learners. The authors present a modified student engagement model with a focus on the integration of technology, specifically social networking sites for community college distance education learners. The chapter concludes with…

  1. The Impact of Technology on Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagowski, J. J.

    1995-08-01

    Near the top of the list of critical issues in education is the appropriate use of technology in the educational process. It is clear that some type of investment in educational technology, specifically interactive computing, is essential for nearly all institutions, and indeed, many have made some purchases already. Despite that fact, the leadership of educational institutions face a complex set of problems in this regard. What portion of a (probably) shrinking budget should be allocated to this expanding area? Which options from a growing array of technological choices are the most appropriate for a particular environment? Which of these options are essentials, and which are luxuries? What sorts of technology will benefit students the most? What is needed now in order to keep from falling (even further) behind a few years hence? The pressure to do something is great, and it is often exacerbated by arguments of efficiency that have little foundation in fact. For example, suggestions are often made that an investment in educational technology will help handle more students. This point of view may ultimately prevail, but little evidence on this point is currently available. Indeed, it appears that more faculty/staff effort is required to bring interactive technology into students' hands in a meaningful way. Often ignored is the amount of training necessary for a spectrum of novice users. Another argument often made is that empowering students with interactive technology will somehow lessen pressure on the current (classical) library operation. Presumably, this effect will come about through access to the Internet resources. As currently constituted, the Internet carries information of widely varying quality, ranging from the systematic holdings of many of the fine libraries of the world to outright garbage (from an intellectual point of view). Information on the Internet (other than that from libraries) is often unedited or unorganized to the extent that potential

  2. Use of Educational Technologies to assist Academics in their ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    r.poonoosamy

    the integration of educational technologies in their curriculum can assist them in their teaching. Data was gathered through a survey where 169 students ... interaction, fosters view of learning as a continuous research process and finally highlights student learning strengths and difficulties. ACOT 2012 study confirms.

  3. Educating Students in Foster Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heffernan, Karen

    2010-01-01

    Students who are in foster care need principals who are informed about policy, aware of their needs, and willing to be advocates for them. Multiple school placements often result in significant gaps in the education of students in foster care. If they also have disabilities, they may lose special programs and services when they change placements.…

  4. Student Loans for Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simons, Charlene Wear

    2008-01-01

    Student loans are a rapidly growing $85 billion a year industry fueled by the substantial higher economic returns associated with a college education, increased demand from students and their parents, and grant and scholarship funds that have not kept pace with rising school tuition and fees. This report describes federally subsidized and…

  5. [INFORMATION AWARENESS OF STUDENTS--FUTURE TECHNOLOGY FOR HEALTHY LIFESTYLES TEACHERS AND TRAINING IN THEIR EDUCATIONAL ACTIVITIES IN AREA OF HUMAN HEALTH PRESERVATION].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalinina, I A

    2015-01-01

    In the article there are presented results of the questionnaire survey of students--future technology for healthy lifestyles teachers on issues of shaping of health and a healthy lifestyle. There is given an estimation of the degree of the formedness in students adjustment for healthy lifestyle, including eating behavior and nutrition ration. There were determined basic directions of the shaping of the health-saving competence of the school teacher.

  6. Life Imitates Pokemon: The Virtues and Necessities of Technology-Based Peer Education in Today's Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloomfield, David

    1999-01-01

    As the Pokemon game craze illustrates, the combination of peer education and technology makes for powerful educational experiences. Educators need to accept technology-based peer education as a help rather than a hindrance to improve educational outcomes for students. (SLD)

  7. Contextual Factors Related to Stereotype Threat and Student Success in Science Technology Engineering Mathematics Education: A Mixed Methods Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leker, Lindsey Beth

    Stereotype threat is a widely researched phenomenon shown to impact performance in testing and evaluation situations (Katz, Roberts, & Robinson, 1965; Steele & Aronson, 1995). When related to gender, stereotype threat can lead women to score lower than men on standardized math exams (Spencer, Steele, & Quinn, 1999). Stereotype threat may be one reason women have lower enrollment in most science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) majors, hold a smaller number of STEM careers than men, and have a higher attrition rate in STEM professions (Hill, Corbet, & Rose, 2010; Picho & Brown 2011; Sorby & Baartmans, 2000). Most research has investigated stereotype threat using experiments yielding mixed results (Stoet & Geary, 2012). Thus, there is a need to explore stereotype threat using quantitative surveys and qualitative methods to examine other contextual factors that contribute to gender difference in STEM fields. This dissertation outlined a mixed methods study designed to, first, qualitatively explore stereotype threat and contextual factors related to high achieving women in STEM fields, as well as women who have failed and/or avoided STEM fields. Then, the quantitative portion of the study used the themes from the qualitative phase to create a survey that measured stereotype threat and other contextual variables related to STEM success and failure/avoidance. Fifteen participants were interviewed for the qualitative phase of the study and six themes emerged. The quantitative survey was completed 242 undergraduate participants. T-tests, correlations, regressions, and mediation analyses were used to analyze the data. There were significant relationships between stereotype threat and STEM confidence, STEM anxiety, giving up in STEM, and STEM achievement. Overall, this mixed methods study advanced qualitative research on stereotype threat, developed a much-needed scale for the measurement of stereotype threat, and tested the developed scale.

  8. Students today…educators tomorrow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Keri; Vaughan, Brett

    2017-10-01

    The article describes the use of the mini clinical examination (mini-CEX) in a pilot study to introduce peer assessment in one allied health programme to explore students' capacity as clinical educators. Preparing today's pre-professional health students to be clinical educators by engaging them in peer teaching, learning and assessment may encourage them to become tomorrow's clinical educators. Peer assessment is common among many undergraduate medical and allied health programmes, and is typically used as a means of providing students with feedback on their clinical skill development. We argue that peer assessment ought to be focused not only on the development of learners' clinical skills and knowledge, but also on preparing learners for their responsibilities as clinical educators. Final-year Australian osteopathy students in our on-campus university clinic undertook, without training, peer assessment and provision of feedback related to clinical performance using a discipline-specific adaptation of the mini-CEX. The current study suggests that students are able to judge another's consultation skills and case management in that they identify what we know are common learning issues for students at this level. Peer assessment ought to be focused on preparing learners for their responsibilities as clinical educators IMPLICATION: Students may be willing to engage in peer assessment if they see the exercise as a way to improve patient care and to develop their skills as educators - potentially encouraging them to become clinical educators in the future. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd and The Association for the Study of Medical Education.

  9. Science Fiction in Social Education: Exploring Consequences of Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Lance E.

    2013-01-01

    An NCSS Technology Position Statement and Guidelines, published in 2006 (an updated version is published in this issue of "Social Education"), affirms that social studies students should critically examine relations between technology and society. This article describes how teachers can use science fiction to introduce critical questions…

  10. Augmenting a Child's Reality: Using Educational Tablet Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanner, Patricia; Karas, Carly; Schofield, Damian

    2014-01-01

    This study investigates the classroom integration of an innovative technology, augmented reality. Although the process of adding new technologies into a classroom setting can be daunting, the concept of augmented reality has demonstrated the ability to educate students and to assist with their comprehension of a procedural task. One half of the…

  11. Trajectories of Mathematics and Technology Education Pointing to Engineering Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daugherty, Jenny L.; Reese, George C.; Merrill, Chris

    2010-01-01

    A brief examination and comparison of mathematics and technology education provides the background for a discussion of integration. In particular, members of each field have responded to the increasing pressures to better prepare students for the technologically rich, globally competitive future. Approaches based within each discipline are varied…

  12. Building Innovation: Learning with Technologies. Australian Education Review Number 56

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moyle, Kathryn

    2010-01-01

    Australian Education Review (AER) 56 explores national and international policy priorities for building students' innovation capabilities through information and communication technologies (ICT) in Australian schools. Section 1 sets out the Australian policy context for digital education and highlights some of the emerging challenges. It provides…

  13. Pre-Service Teachers' Conclusive Principles for Teaching Technology Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snape, Paul

    2016-01-01

    What enduring knowledge and understanding from tertiary education study will learners remember most that will contribute to their on-going performance and understanding for effective teaching? This paper is based on research undertaken to identify what third-year initial teacher education students in a course including Technology Education…

  14. Affordances of Learning Technologies in Higher Education Multicultural Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arenas, Edilson

    2015-01-01

    A cluster of research has been conducted in higher education to investigate the affordances (action possibilities) and the influence information and communication technologies (ICT) may have on students' learning experiences and outcomes. Such studies have given rise to the implementation of a wide range of educational frameworks with a great deal…

  15. Mobile Technologies and Augmented Reality in Open Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurubacak, Gulsun, Ed.; Altinpulluk, Hakan, Ed.

    2017-01-01

    Novel trends and innovations have enhanced contemporary educational environments. When applied properly, these computing advances can create enriched learning opportunities for students. "Mobile Technologies and Augmented Reality in Open Education" is a pivotal reference source for the latest academic research on the integration of…

  16. Educational Games and Virtual Reality as Disruptive Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Psotka, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    New technologies often have the potential for disrupting existing established practices, but nowhere is this so pertinent as in education and training today. And yet, education has been glacially slow to adopt these changes in a large scale way, and innovations seem to be imposed mainly by students' and their changing social lifestyles than…

  17. European pharmacy students' experience with virtual patient technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavaco, Afonso Miguel; Madeira, Filipe

    2012-08-10

    To describe how virtual patients are being used to simulate real-life clinical scenarios in undergraduate pharmacy education in Europe. One hundred ninety-four participants at the 2011 Congress of the European Pharmaceutical Students Association (EPSA) completed an exploratory cross-sectional survey instrument. Of the 46 universities and 23 countries represented at the EPSA Congress, only 12 students from 6 universities in 6 different countries reported having experience with virtual patient technology. The students were satisfied with the virtual patient technology and considered it more useful as a teaching and learning tool than an assessment tool. Respondents who had not used virtual patient technology expressed support regarding its potential benefits in pharmacy education. French and Dutch students were significantly less interested in virtual patient technology than were their counterparts from other European countries. The limited use of virtual patients in pharmacy education in Europe suggests the need for initiatives to increase the use of virtual patient technology and the benefits of computer-assisted learning in pharmacy education.

  18. CLOUD TECHNOLOGY AS A WAY OF UKRAINIAN EDUCATION DEVELOPMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Zaytseva

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This article is devoted to defining the forms and the required components cloud technology usage during studying of subject teachers. In order to improve the learning process it’s necessary to use such powerful technology as ‘cloud computing’. They support traditional forms of education and also are a new step in the development of education. Cloud technologies are-effective, efficient and flexible way to satisfy the needs of students during getting of new knowledge. Nowadays a characteristic feature of our time is rapid growing of using cloud technology. That is why we are spectators of implementation of cloud technologies and services in the system of higher and secondary education, too. A common information space in education using mostly cloud technologies that provide Microsoft and Google is creating now. Google Apps for Education containing free tools that allows teachers and students to communicate, teach and learn more effectively and efficiently. Significant advantage of using cloud services is providing application development and storage of large amounts of data on servers in distributed information processing centers via the Internet. That is why cloud technology is a powerful tool to activate students' self-guidance work. Surely, growing demand for professionals who knows the technology of cloud computing will increase slowly.

  19. Thesaurus Dataset of Educational Technology in Chinese

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Linjing; Liu, Qingtang; Zhao, Gang; Huang, Huan; Huang, Tao

    2015-01-01

    The thesaurus dataset of educational technology is a knowledge description of educational technology in Chinese. The aims of this thesaurus were to collect the subject terms in the domain of educational technology, facilitate the standardization of terminology and promote the communication between Chinese researchers and scholars from various…

  20. Digital Technologies as Education Innovation at Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kryukov, Vladimir; Gorin, Alexey

    2017-01-01

    This paper analyses the use of digital technology-based education innovations in higher education. It demonstrated that extensive implementation of digital technologies in universities is the main factor conditioning the acceleration of innovative changes in educational processes, while digital technologies themselves become one of the key…

  1. The promises of educational technology: a reassessment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ely, Donald P.; Plomp, T.

    1986-01-01

    The claims made for educational technology have not always been realized. Many programmes in education based on media and technology have produced useful documentation and supportive research; others have failed. The current, comprehensive definition of educational technology is a helpful key to

  2. The role of technology and digital gaming in nurse education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Brian; Boyle, Liz; MacArthur, Ewan; Manion, Baltasar Fernandez

    2013-03-13

    There is growing evidence that using e-learning and digital gaming technology can support students in their learning. An international project, Continuing/Higher Education in Research Methods Using Games, funded by the European Commission's Lifelong Learning Programme and led by a team at the University of the West of Scotland, aims to develop interactive activities and games to support nursing and social science students. This article looks at the scope of the project in helping to deliver nurse education.

  3. Technological Middle Level Education in Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Cruz Prieto

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Technological middle level education in Mexico trains young people between 15 to 18 years old to continue higher studies or to enter the labor market. It serves about 807,433 students through its 755 campuses with an educational model that has a focus on developing competences. High School Educational Reform, in operation since 2008, has initiated some programs to serve students, with the aim of reducing dropout rates. It also has implemented innovative management and information systems. In 2013, an educational reform was begun with an orientation to working conditions, focusing on the evaluation of school administrators and teachers. Received: 25/09/2013 / Accepted: 03/10/2013How to reference this articleCruz Prieto, S., Egido, I. (2014. La Educación Tecnológica de Nivel Medio Superior en México. Foro de Educación, 12(16, pp. 99-121. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.14516/fde.2014.012.016.004

  4. ICT (Information Communication Technologies) in mathematics education: Exploring students' learning experiences when using a Dynamic geometry Software (DGS) tool in geometry class

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mehdiyev, R.; Vos, P.

    2010-01-01

    Traditional approaches in teaching geometry are pedagogically authoritative in nature and thus, students are not encouraged to question the validity or construction of geometrical entities. The use of technological resources with a variety of learning activities is usually limited. This book,

  5. Integration of Education: Using Social Media Networks to Engage Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Risa Blair

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Any educator today will tell you that the strategies used in the classroom have evolved and changed with the access everyone has to technology. In a world with constant changes and shifts because of immediate access to information, the way course content is delivered must evolve and adjust to the new ways students learn. Engagement of students in course content and reaching learning objectives are the key elements educators strive for in every course. Enter social media networks and the ability to leverage the user activity with these applications in education. Now, educators can provide content which engages students and meets learning objectives the way students want to learn. By reviewing social media networks: Facebook, Pinterest, Instagram, Blogs, Twitter, and Evernote, educators can position themselves to be as technology-savvy as today's students.

  6. Critical Thinking and Education in College of Technology

    OpenAIRE

    上村,崇; 木原,滋哉; 宮田,健一

    2011-01-01

    We have tried to introduce critical thinking into the education in Kure National College of Technology. This article deals with significance of introduction of critical thinking into education in College of Technology. We think that the ability to think critically consists of the sum of various skills of critical thinking. We built a map of critical thinking skills and taught these skills in the classes, and most students understood these skills. We will introduce critical thinking skills int...

  7. The Effective of Using 5 Simple Steps (QSCCS) Learning Activities on Facebook to Promote Self-Learning in the 21st Century in Technology Printing and Advertising Course for Undergraduate Students in Education Technology and Communications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sittiwong, Tipparat; Wongnam, Thanet

    2015-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to: 1) study the result of implementing QSCCS with Facebook; 2) study students' opinions concerning the implementation of QSCCS with Facebook. The samples were 38 Technology and Communications undergraduates who attended Printing and Advertising Technology course in academic year of 2013. The information was…

  8. AFRA Network for Education in Nuclear Science and Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashim, O.N.; Wanjala, F.

    2017-01-01

    The Africa Regional Cooperative Agreement for Research Development and Training related to Science and Technology (AFRA) established the AFRA Network for Education in Nuclear Science and Technology (AFRA-NEST) in order to implement AFRA strategy on Human Resource Development (HRD) and Nuclear Knowledge Management (NKM). The strategies for implementing the objectives are: to use ICT for web-based education and training; recognition of Regional Designated Centres (RDCs) for professional nuclear education in nuclear science and technology, and organization of harmonized and accredited programs at tertiary levels and awarding of fellowships/scholarships to young and brilliant students for teaching and research in the various nuclear disciplines

  9. Research Students' Satisfaction in Jamshoro Education City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jagul Huma Lashari

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This study is performed to identify and examine research students? satisfaction in three universities; SU (University of Sindh, MUET (Mehran University of Engineering & Technology and LUMHS (Liaquat University of Medical & Health Sciences at Jamshoro Education City. Different service factors required for research students are identified and examined by using a triangulation technique (interviews and quantitative (survey questionnaire. Data is analyzed by using descriptive analysis and chi-square test to obtain the required results. In total, 27 service factors related to research students? satisfaction, identified by interviews & literature review have been organized under three clusters: ?University policies?; ?University Services? and ?Role of Supervisor?. The survey analysis revealed that all identified factors are positively related to research students? satisfaction. Result identifies difference in the research students? experiences with respect to their characteristics including (enrolled university, financial resources, employment status. The comparison of different service factors also shows differences in three clusters within the universities. The satisfaction of research students associated with ?role of supervisor? were identified as most satisfying experience in comparison to ?university policies? and ?university services? of Jamshoro Education City. In the end, research has derived a new framework of SDC (Satisfaction for Degree Completion framework to identify and examine the research students satisfaction

  10. Towards Empowering Hearing Impaired Students' Skills in Computing and Technology

    OpenAIRE

    Nihal Esam Abuzinadah; Areej Abbas Malibari; Paul Krause

    2017-01-01

    Studies have shown that deaf and hearing-impaired students have many difficulties in learning applied disciplines such as Medicine, Engineering, and Computer Programming. This study aims to investigate the readiness of deaf students to pursue higher education in applied sciences, more specifically in computer science. This involves investigating their capabilities in computer skills and applications. Computer programming is an integral component in the technological field that can facilitate ...

  11. Diesel Technology: Introduction. Teacher Edition [and] Student Edition. Second Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joerschke, John D.; Eichhorn, Lane

    This complete teacher edition of a diesel technology course consists of introductory pages, teacher pages, and the student edition. The introductory pages provide these tools: training and competency profile; National Automotive Technicians Education Foundation Crosswalk; instructional/task analysis; basic skills icons and classifications; basic…

  12. Diesel Technology: Engines. Second Edition. Teacher Edition [and] Student Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbieri, Dave; Miller, Roger; Kellum, Mary

    This diesel technology series offers secondary and postsecondary students an opportunity for learning required skills in the diesel industry. It aligns with the medium/heavy duty truck task list developed by the National Automotive Technicians Education Foundation and used by the National Institute for Automotive Service Excellence in…

  13. A Financial Technology Entrepreneurship Program for Computer Science Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawler, James P.; Joseph, Anthony

    2011-01-01

    Education in entrepreneurship is becoming a critical area of curricula for computer science students. Few schools of computer science have a concentration in entrepreneurship in the computing curricula. The paper presents Technology Entrepreneurship in the curricula at a leading school of computer science and information systems, in which students…

  14. Satellite education: The national technological university

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waugh, J.D.

    1989-01-01

    National Technological University (NTU) was founded to address the wide-ranging educational needs of the employed technical professional. A state-of-the-art satellite delivery system allows nationwide coverage by participating engineering colleges. Established in 1984, NTU is now a nonprofit effort of 24 engineering colleges. The NTU network grew rapidly to its present configuration, and enrollment patterns clearly demonstrate the need and acceptance of the concept. Each member school teaches its own courses (with on-campus students enrolled) over the network and awards its own grades. Receiving sites at NTU are operated by a sponsoring organization (i.e., the employer) in accordance with NTU guidelines. Masters degrees are offered in electrical engineering, computer engineering, computer science, engineering management, and manufacturing engineering. Several certificate programs are also available. Typically, NTU telecasts 80 credit courses each term. Over 50,000 attend continuing education courses, tutorials, and research teleconferences each year. Newly acquired channels will enable further expansion

  15. Study habits and technology use in Italian university students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poscia, Andrea; Frisicale, Emanuela Maria; Parente, Paolo; de Waure, Chiara; La Milia, Daniele Ignazio; Di Pietro, Maria Luisa

    2015-01-01

    Students' ability of learning is influenced by study habits. Among these, the use of technologies has assumed a controversial role. The aim of this paper is to analyse studying approach, the use of technologies and how they affect study habits in a population of university students addressed by the "Sportello Salute Giovani" ("Youth Health Information Desk") questionnaire. 16 questions referred to the approach to studying and the use of technologies (number 77-93) were analyzed. Absolute and relative frequencies were calculated. Stratification for sex, age and socio-economic status were performed and Chi square test was used to test the difference between sex, age class and socio-economic groups. 99.7% of students declared to have at least one mobile phone and 68.7% to use smartphones, i-phones and i-pads. Males (20.9% vs 14.9% female, p students (31.7% among 25-30 years old students vs 21.3% among 18-21 years old, p students with the highest socio-economic level (87.8% vs 54.2% of the lowest) seem more likely to use digital technologies/Internet for educational purposes. Our survey revealed that most college students still prefer approach the study using books instead of digital tools, but this attitude is conflicting with how many hours they use computers and surf Internet per weeks. Therefore, further studies are needed to understand better technology influence on study habits and its implication on health.

  16. Academic versus Non-Academic Emerging Adult College Student Technology Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanson, Joan Ann; Walker, Erica

    2014-01-01

    Emerging adult college students have developmental and educational needs which are unique to their phase of life. The purpose of this study was to examine academic and non-academic technology use by emerging adult college students. Survey results (N = 235) provided insights into emerging adult college student technology preferences and frequency…

  17. Fostering Entrepreneurship: an Empirical study of Entrepreneurial mind set of Engineering and Technology students in Pakistan

    OpenAIRE

    Aslam, Tahseen Mahmood; Asghar, Muhammad Zaheer; Liñán, Francisco (Coordinador); Guzmán Cuevas, Joaquín J. (Coordinador)

    2011-01-01

    Purpose- Entrepreneurship is usually considered only subject of business students. Due to lack of knowledge of entrepreneurship and entrepreneurial skills engineering and technology education students are left behind in entrepreneurial activities. In order to add to literature on forecasting entrepreneurial intentions this research paper aims to examine levels of Entrepreneurial Intentions amongst Engineering and Technology students in Pakistan. Theoretical Framework- This research is bas...

  18. Determining Science Teachers' Levels of Motivation and Self-Regulation Regarding Use of Education Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efe, Hülya Aslan; Baysal, Yunus Emre

    2017-01-01

    In line with the growing importance of use of education technologies in the field of education, teachers are increasingly expected to use education technologies in class environment and to provide students with appropriate environments and opportunities to use these technologies. This situation makes it necessary to investigate teachers'…

  19. Students' Engagement with Learning Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larkin, Derek; Huett, Kim C.

    2013-01-01

    This paper seeks to add to the discussion surrounding young adults' relationship and engagement with learning technologies, exploring whether they naturally engage with these technologies when the use of them is either compulsory or optional. We discuss our findings in relation to whether young people are truly engaging with technologies or…

  20. A Delphi forecast of technology in education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, B. E.

    1973-01-01

    The results are reported of a Delphi forecast of the utilization and social impacts of large-scale educational telecommunications technology. The focus is on both forecasting methodology and educational technology. The various methods of forecasting used by futurists are analyzed from the perspective of the most appropriate method for a prognosticator of educational technology, and review and critical analysis are presented of previous forecasts and studies. Graphic responses, summarized comments, and a scenario of education in 1990 are presented.

  1. Use of assistive technology devices in mainstream schools: students' perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemmingsson, Helena; Lidström, Helene; Nygård, Louise

    2009-01-01

    The use and nonuse of assistive technology devices in school by students with physical disabilities was investigated, and the students' experiences in using these devices is described. We used a mixed-methods approach with predominantly qualitative methods to collect and analyze data, which included observations of and interviews with 20 students with physical disabilities and the number and type of assistive technology devices provided. It is vital that devices be integrated into educational practice and that students experience immediate benefits for their function in everyday school activities without detrimental effects on their social participation. The latter was often more important than being able to perform activities independently. The students adopted both a functional and a psychosocial perspective of their devices, and providers should neglect neither. Children and youth need both verbal information and practical experience using devices to be able to make informed decisions.

  2. Educational technologies in the system of managerial staff mentoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. P. Gancharik

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Investigations related to educational technologies, ensuring the Investigations are related to the educational technologies, ensuring the formation and support of a system of mentoring of managerial staff on the basis of the «cascade» technology training. A new form of cascade training – academic cascade training when the educational institutions create a large-scale information and educational environment on the basis of telecommunication technologies to provide the institute mentoring support in the state bodies and organizations.In comparison with the traditional mentoring (personal experience, students and graduates of the retraining system of educational institutions can transmit the knowledge and skills, acquired by them in the course of training, to the young managers and specialists of their organizations, thereby promoting further innovative educational potential of educational institutions through a system of cascading mentoring. For this purpose, in educational institutions an interactive educational environment is created based on telecommunication technologies, which allows you to create and develop a common information space, to simplify the procedure for communicating the mentors and trainees, to provide a wide access to the content. Telecommunication information technologies are not only a powerful tool, intelligent instrument and means of creating a cascade learning environment, but also an important factor in improving the entire methodical system of mentoring.It is proposed the creation of a large-scale information and educational environment on the basis of telecommunication technologies for cascade training when the educational institutions may become a part of the mentoring institution. On the one hand, they prepare students, including both potential mentors, and on the other hand, using modern telecommunication educational technologies, they participate together with the students-mentors in mentoring activity in

  3. Current Trends in Higher Education Technology: Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damewood, Andrea M.

    2016-01-01

    This paper is focused on how technology in use changes over time, and the current trend of simulation technology as a supported classroom technology. Simulation-based training as a learning tool is discussed within the context of adult learning theories, as is the technology used and how today's higher education technology administrators support…

  4. Technological Preferences, Levels of Utilization and Attitude of Students Towards Mobile Learning Technologies in Chartered Universities, Kenya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Gitumu Mugo

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The affordances of mobile technologies are being felt in many sectors of world’s economy including university education. By solving the limitations of fixed instructional technologies, mobile technologies have received ready acceptance in the education place. The purpose of the study was to investigate the student technological preferences, their levels of utilization as well as attitudes toward mobile technologies. The target population was 30,752 third year undergraduate students in Kenyan Universities. The participants (n = 375 were selected by systematic random sampling. They provided data using self-fill questionnaires. Results indicated that the smartphone was the most popular mobile device; Tecno was the most preferred handset brand; and Android was the most popular operating system. Safaricom was the dominant service provider amongst the student population. Regarding the levels of utilization of mobile technologies by students, it was concluded that though students use their mobile devices sufficiently, the use of the devices for accessing teaching and learning content was considerably low. On the attitude of students towards mobile technologies, it was observed that a sizeable number of students preferred to use the technologies over other existing instructional technologies. The findings of this study will be useful to instructional technologists, education policy makers, mobile handset manufacturers, mobile service providers and university managers as they partner to roll out digital learning infrastructure for Kenyan tertiary education.

  5. How Undergraduate Students Use Social Media Technologies to Support Group Project Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAliney, Peter J.

    2013-01-01

    Technology continues to evolve and become accessible to students in higher education. Concurrently, teamwork has become an important skill in academia and the workplace and students have adopted established technologies to support their learning in both individual and team project work. Given the emergence of social media technologies, I examined…

  6. Validation of an Instrument to Measure Students' Motivation and Self-Regulation towards Technology Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liou, Pey-Yan; Kuo, Pei-Jung

    2014-01-01

    Background: Few studies have examined students' attitudinal perceptions of technology. There is no appropriate instrument to measure senior high school students' motivation and self-regulation toward technology learning among the current existing instruments in the field of technology education. Purpose: The present study is to validate an…

  7. New Technological Trend in Educational Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florin Postolache

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The authors aim to highlight, after using the LMS based Sakai from implementation, the perceptionof both sides (professors and students over the use of the implementation of information and communicationtechnology (ITC in the education process. In the academic year 2007 – 2008, the leadership of DanubiusUniversity from Galati adopted the strategic decision to develop an integrated information system, which toincorporate the Student Information System (UMS, an e-learning platform, management system, researchand administrative management. In the months April – May 2010, at Danubius University from Galati it wasmade a survey organized by MISI 2010, at which 28 universities attended from around the world who useSakai, of the professors and students regarding the use in their activity of the ITC and in general of theplatform Danubius Online. At the university Danubius from Galati answered to the survey 24 professors and177 students. The participants responded to questions about both their views concerning the use of theinformation technology in the superior education in general, and at specific questions concerning theDanubius Online portal. After the experience gained in the pilot phase, developed in the academic year 2009-2010 and taking into account by the results of the survey, it was decided that starting with 1 October 2010 toproceed to the stage production. To this end, it was installed the Sakai version 2.7.1 and significantlyincreased the number of course sites that are operating on the Danubius Online portal, the tendency being togeneralize at all the university courses, taking into account by the trends of the both sides. There have beenintroduced more extensive indications of use, both for students and for professors. The article aims tohighlight the reactions of both sides: professors and students, on the implementation of the Danubius onlineplatform, through a survey that took place during May – June 2010. This is a clear example

  8. Educational Scholarship and Technology: Resources for a Changing Undergraduate Medical Education Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyle, Brandon N; Corral, Irma; John, Nadyah Janine; Shelton, P G

    2017-06-01

    Returning to the original emphasis of higher education, universities have increasingly recognized the value and scholarship of teaching, and medical schools have been part of this educational scholarship movement. At the same time, the preferred learning styles of a new generation of medical students and advancements in technology have driven a need to incorporate technology into psychiatry undergraduate medical education (UGME). Educators need to understand how to find, access, and utilize such educational technology. This article provides a brief historical context for the return to education as scholarship, along with a discussion of some of the advantages to this approach, as well as several recent examples. Next, the educational needs of the current generation of medical students, particularly their preference to have technology incorporated into their education, will be discussed. Following this, we briefly review the educational scholarship of two newer approaches to psychiatry UGME that incorporate technology. We also offer the reader some resources for accessing up-to-date educational scholarship for psychiatry UGME, many of which take advantage of technology themselves. We conclude by discussing the need for promotion of educational scholarship.

  9. Problems attendance in physical education students of technical specialties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladymyr Petrenko

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to examine the relevant aspects of motivation attendance in physical education students of technical specialties and make adjustments to the process of improving the quality of teaching. Material and Methods: during the study used the following methods: general scientific – analysis, comparison, generalization; sociological, questionnaire, interview; Mathematics and statistics. The study involved students of ICT Zhytomyr State Technological University, only 238 people. Results: the tendency changes of success in physical education and physical training of students of ICT. Conclusions: pedagogical experiment confirmed the positive impact of physical education classes in which students choose their maintenance is carried out on a competitive basis in accordance with personal interests and needs.

  10. Using Technology in Gifted and Talented Education Classrooms: The Teachers' Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimlich, Susan L.

    2015-01-01

    Technology skills are assumed to be a necessity for college and career success, but technology is constantly evolving. Thus, development of students' technology skills is an on-going and persistent issue. Standards from the Partnership for 21st Century Skills and the International Society for Technology in Education encourage educators to teach…

  11. A Future-Focus for Teaching and Learning: Technology Education in Two New Zealand Secondary Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinsfield, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    Technology education has been a part of the New Zealand curriculum in many forms since its inception as a craft subject. With a global push towards technological innovation and an increased awareness of the impact of technology on society, it is reasonable to assume that technology education has an established role in student learning around the…

  12. Model of Providing Assistive Technologies in Special Education Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lersilp, Suchitporn; Putthinoi, Supawadee; Chakpitak, Nopasit

    2015-05-14

    Most students diagnosed with disabilities in Thai special education schools received assistive technologies, but this did not guarantee the greatest benefits. The purpose of this study was to survey the provision, use and needs of assistive technologies, as well as the perspectives of key informants regarding a model of providing them in special education schools. The participants were selected by the purposive sampling method, and they comprised 120 students with visual, physical, hearing or intellectual disabilities from four special education schools in Chiang Mai, Thailand; and 24 key informants such as parents or caregivers, teachers, school principals and school therapists. The instruments consisted of an assistive technology checklist and a semi-structured interview. Results showed that a category of assistive technologies was provided for students with disabilities, with the highest being "services", followed by "media" and then "facilities". Furthermore, mostly students with physical disabilities were provided with assistive technologies, but those with visual disabilities needed it more. Finally, the model of providing assistive technologies was composed of 5 components: Collaboration; Holistic perspective; Independent management of schools; Learning systems and a production manual for users; and Development of an assistive technology center, driven by 3 major sources such as Government and Private organizations, and Schools.

  13. Educational Technologies in Health Science Libraries: Teaching Technology Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurst, Emily J.

    2014-01-01

    As technology rapidly changes, libraries remain go-to points for education and technology skill development. In academic health sciences libraries, trends suggest librarians provide more training on technology topics than ever before. While education and training have always been roles for librarians, providing technology training on new mobile devices and emerging systems requires class creation and training capabilities that are new to many. To appeal to their users, many health sciences librarians are interested in developing technology-based classes. This column explores the question: what skills are necessary for developing and teaching technology in an academic health sciences library setting? PMID:24528269

  14. Educational technologies in health sciences libraries: teaching technology skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurst, Emily J

    2014-01-01

    As technology rapidly changes, libraries remain go-to points for education and technology skill development. In academic health sciences libraries, trends suggest librarians provide more training on technology topics than ever before. While education and training have always been roles for librarians, providing technology training on new mobile devices and emerging systems requires class creation and training capabilities that are new to many librarians. To appeal to their users, many health sciences librarians are interested in developing technology-based classes. This column explores the question: what skills are necessary for developing and teaching technology in an academic health sciences library setting?

  15. Educating Homeless Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berliner, BethAnn

    2002-01-01

    Over the past decade, the number of homeless children in America has more than doubled. Educators, however, are still legally obligated to enroll and support them, because of the passage of the "No Child Left Behind" Act of 2001, which reauthorized the McKinney-Vento Homeless Assistance Act. Although schools cannot solve homelessness,…

  16. Change Requires Change! Information Technology, Student Preparedness and Industry Collaboration: Supporting the Bridging Process between Education and Training with Innovative Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jill Anne O'Sullivan

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper, Change Requires Change: will relate that bridging the gap between education: of what we teach and training: of what industry looks for in prepared skills for students, needs to be relevant to today's situations. We need to re-evaluate traditional industry academic partnerships which have been relatively successful including; internships, work-study programs, curriculum advisory boards, guest lectures and capstone courses, to identify gaps and opportunities for what is needed to support our future. Do we want to continue with the status-quo or enhance education? Should we be cognizant of emerging trends? What could be the implications on changing academic-industry partnerships? How can we improve? This paper proposes several new approaches to academics and industry practitioner's towards greater successful collaborations towards student preparation.

  17. New Theoretical Approach Integrated Education and Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Gang

    2010-01-01

    The paper focuses on exploring new theoretical approach in education with development of online learning technology, from e-learning to u-learning and virtual reality technology, and points out possibilities such as constructing a new teaching ecological system, ubiquitous educational awareness with ubiquitous technology, and changing the…

  18. Early Learning and Educational Technology Policy Brief

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Joan

    2016-01-01

    Recognizing the growth of technology use in early learning settings, the U.S. Department of Education and U.S. Department of Health and Human Services collaborated in the development of the "Early Learning and Educational Technology Policy Brief" to promote developmentally appropriate use of technology in homes and early learning…

  19. The Multistability of Technological Breakdowns in Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Bjarke Lindsø; Tafdrup, Oliver Alexander

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Everyone who is involved with modern technological artefacts such as computers, software and tablets has experienced situations where the artefacts suddenly cease to function properly. This is commonly known as a technological breakdown. Within education and the praxis of teaching...... technological breakdowns become a more and more ubiquitous phenomenon due to the rapid increase of technological artefacts utilized for educational purposes (Riis, 2012). The breakdowns impact the educational practice with consequences ranging from creating small obstacles to rendering it impossible to conduct...... successful teaching. Thus, knowing how to cope with technological breakdowns is a pivotal part of being a technological literate....

  20. Educational Technology: Effective Leadership and Current Initiatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courville, Keith

    2011-01-01

    (Purpose) This article describes the basis for effective educational technology leadership and a few of the current initiatives and impacts that are a result of the aforementioned effective leadership. (Findings) Topics addressed in this paper include: (1) the role of the educational technology leader in an educational setting; (2) an examination…

  1. Technology and Education: Friends or Foes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelton, Joseph N.

    The population explosion and developments in information technology have created a powerful need for technological advancement on a global scale. Such advancement must come through education, and such education, given the size and breadth of the need, is best realized through multimedia instruction and distance education. Communications…

  2. Studying Innovation Technologies in Modern Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stukalenko, Nina M.; Zhakhina, Bariya B.; Kukubaeva, Asiya K.; Smagulova, Nurgul K.; Kazhibaeva, Gulden K.

    2016-01-01

    In modern society, innovation technologies expand to almost every field of human activity, including such wide field as education. Due to integrating innovation technologies into the educational process practice, this phenomenon gained special significance within improvement and modernization of the established educational system. Currently, the…

  3. A Contemporary Preservice Technology Education Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flanigan, Rod; Becker, Kurt; Stewardson, Gary

    2012-01-01

    In order to teach engineering education, today's engineering and technology education teachers must be equipped with lesson plans to teach engineering design, among other principles, to the 6th-12th grade levels. At Utah State University (USU), curriculum has been developed for preservice engineering and technology education teachers that…

  4. Information Technology Diffusion: Impact on Student Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Gregory M.; Lind, Mary L.

    2011-01-01

    For student achievement, the diffusion and adoption of information technology (IT) infrastructure enabled by special funding was posited to have a positive impact on student achievement. Four urban school districts provided the context for this study to assess the impact of IT adoption on standardized test scores.

  5. Students' Ethical Decision-Making in an Information Technology Context: A Theory of Planned Behavior Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riemenschneider, Cynthia K.; Leonard, Lori N. K.; Manly, Tracy S.

    2011-01-01

    Business educators have increased the focus on ethics in the classroom. In order for students to become ethical professionals, they must first be held to an ethical standard as students. As information technology continues to permeate every aspect of students' lives, it becomes increasingly important to understand student decision-making in this…

  6. Study of the attitude of students towards new technological contexts and neuroscience progress

    OpenAIRE

    Llamas Salguero, Fátima; Martín Lobo, Pilar; Pradas Montilla, Silvia; Gil Nájera, Marta

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Technology and Neuroscience have formed a strong collaboration to improve education. The effective use of information and communication technologies (ict) in education practice requires that both students and teachers maintain a positive attitude towards these technologies, and develop their use in educational contexts to update teaching methodologies based on educational neuroscience and neuropsychology. Thus, the use of ict requires a positive attitude when using these tools d...

  7. Baccalaureate nursing students' information technology competence--agency perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fetter, Marilyn S

    2009-01-01

    Baccalaureate nurses must meet information technology (IT) competencies expectations for employment and future professional development. Unfortunately, educational programs and accrediting groups have not identified specific outcomes, and IT is not integrated formally into many undergraduate program curricula. Meanwhile, nursing students and faculty are practicing in clinical agencies undergoing an informatics and technology revolution. Adding courses and content, hardware, software, and strategies such as distance learning and simulation have been recommended to improve competency development. However, little is known regarding nursing students' experiences with IT in clinical practice. Agencies used as sites for one undergraduate program were surveyed and asked to identify barriers and facilitators to students' IT competencies attainment. Ten agency, program, and policy factors affecting the quality of the learning experience in clinical agencies were identified. Results underscored that leadership to improve collaboration and communication between nursing practice, education, and policy groups is necessary to improve clinical environments for IT learning.

  8. Pursuit of nuclear science and technology education

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rangacharyulu, C.

    2009-01-01

    While it is quite encouraging to note that there is a nuclear renaissance underway around the world, there is a growing concern that the knowledge-base of nuclear technologies will be lost. Several international organizations are making concerted efforts to avert this situation by establishing collaborative workshops etc. In Western Canada, our challenges and opportunities are many-fold. As a uranium mining region, we can engage our economy in the full life-cycle of the nuclear energy industry. It is also important that we maintain and augment nuclear technologies. We need to develop the infrastructure to jump-start the education and training of the youth. We are taking a multi-prong approach to this end. We are initiating specializations in undergraduate programs which emphasize nuclear radiation physics and technology. We are collaborating with Canadian organizations such as University Network of Excellence in Nuclear Engineering (UNENE) and University of Ontario Institute of Technology (UOIT). We are organizing collaborations with our colleagues at foreign institutions in Europe and Asia to provide an international component. We are also working with local industry and health organizations to provide a wide-range of learning opportunities to students by engaging them in research projects of immediate interest to professionals. My presentation will focus on these developments and we will also seek thoughts and suggestions for future collaborations.

  9. Interprofessional Education in Allied Health Using Virtual Technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnelly, Amber D; Mukherjee, Maheswari S; Koth, Jana; Bartenhagen, Lisa

    2017-01-01

    Interprofessional education (IPE) is becoming increasingly prevalent in health science education, with the goal of preparing students to work collaboratively in teams within the healthcare environment. Students in our cytotechnology and radiation therapy (RT) programs used virtual technologies to demonstrate their professions using case studies. The purpose of this activity was to see if our students' knowledge of each other's professions and educational technologies increased and if the students had a better understanding of how they would work together in a healthcare team. Participants included four cytotechnology students and five RT students. All were given a presurvey to determine their level of knowledge about each other's profession. The cytotechnology students presented cases involving gynecologic and lung cancers using virtual microscopy and explained how they screen slides and interpret cellular changes. The RT students explained how they would treat these same patients using the Virtual Environment Radiotherapy Training system (VERT), showing the cytotechnology students how the beam is guided to the exact spot for treatment. After the IPE activity, all participants were given a post-survey to determine their levels of understanding. The results indicated that the IPE activity increased the level of understanding regarding each other's professions and how they each fit together in the role of patient care. IPE activities, even on a small scale with two professions in the same college, can improve knowledge and collaboration between professions. More of these activities should be conducted for effective healthcare teams and improved patient outcomes.

  10. Strategies for Developing a Community of Practice: Nine Years of Lessons Learned in a Hybrid Technology Education Master's Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowan, John E.

    2012-01-01

    Between 2000 and 2009, 243 students in 11 cohort groups participated in the Internet-Based Masters in Educational Technology (iMet) Program. iMet is a hybrid masters program in education with an emphasis in educational technology. Students in the program work collaboratively in a problem-based approach to the integration of technology into…

  11. TECHNOLOGY AND SOCIETY EDUCATION: JOINT PROPOSALS IN THE INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY COURSES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Luiz França Batista

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Through a brief literature review we situate the information technology, especially mobile devices (smartphones and tablets in our society highlighting the importance of teaching and education in this field. The IT education rarely deals with contemporary social issues dealing only with the technical aspect of the training. We highlight the merit of addressing social issues in the modern educational environment especially in courses of technical and technological training in IT. On the one hand the IT education, and other contemporary social issues. This paper presents proposals to connect and articulate these two distinctly opposite points. Considering the importance of a mobile programming course, we present some suggestions that seem timely and relevant on how to perform this connection and at the same time bring out an orientation, a window to discuss with the students about the humanitarian and social problems that are all around us today. Keywords: Teaching resources, Teaching Information technology, Contemporary social issues, Technological education.

  12. College Students' Attitude towards Computer Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Njagi, K. O.; Havice, W. L.

    2011-01-01

    Recent advances in the contemporary world, especially in the area of computer technology, have heralded the development and implementation of new and innovative teaching strategies and particularly with the Internet revolution. This study assessed students' attitude towards computer technology. Specifically, the study assessed differences in…

  13. Students' vulnerability in educational research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sykes, L M; Dullabh, H

    2012-06-01

    Dental teaching institutions in South Africa recently implemented "learner-centred" curricula and expected educators to alter their teaching styles accordingly, but perhaps without providing adequate training in this paedagogical philosophy. At the same time, the lecturers were required to conduct evidence-based research to evaluate the outcomes. Thus, clinicians/lecturers also became researchers, using their own students or student material for assessment purposes. Previously, this form of educational research, which was carried out in normal academic settings, was not subject to review by Institutional Review Boards (IRB). However, concerns have risen that learners may be a vulnerable population due to their position in the academic institution, and the power and knowledge differentials that exist between them and the lecturer/researcher. This raises ethical concerns regarding their autonomy and ability to provide free, voluntary, informed consent to be research participants. This paper questions whether educational research may lead to student vulnerability, and proposes some recommendations for educators and institutions involved in educational research.

  14. The Influence of Interactive Multimedia Technology to Enhance Achievement Students on Practice Skills in Mechanical Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Made Rajendra, I.; Made Sudana, I.

    2018-01-01

    Interactive multimedia technology empowers the educational process by means of increased interaction between teachers and the students. The utilization of technology in the instructional media development has an important role in the increase of the quality of teaching and learning achievements of students. The application of multimedia technology in the instructional media development is able to integrate aspects of knowledge and skills. The success of multimedia technology has revolutionized teaching and learning methods. The design of the study was quasi-experimental with pre and post. The instrument used is the form of questionnaires and tests This study reports research findings indicated that there is a significance difference between the mean performances of students in the experimental group than those students in the control group. The students in the experimental group performed better in mechanical technology practice and in retention test than those in the control group. The study recommended that multimedia instructional tool is an effective tool to enhance achievement students on practice skills in mechanical Technology.

  15. Educational technologies in problem-based learning in health sciences education: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Jun; Bridges, Susan M

    2014-12-10

    As a modern pedagogical philosophy, problem-based learning (PBL) is increasingly being recognized as a major research area in student learning and pedagogical innovation in health sciences education. A new area of research interest has been the role of emerging educational technologies in PBL. Although this field is growing, no systematic reviews of studies of the usage and effects of educational technologies in PBL in health sciences education have been conducted to date. The aim of this paper is to review new and emerging educational technologies in problem-based curricula, with a specific focus on 3 cognate clinical disciplines: medicine, dentistry, and speech and hearing sciences. Analysis of the studies reviewed focused on the effects of educational technologies in PBL contexts while addressing the particular issue of scaffolding of student learning. A comprehensive computerized database search of full-text articles published in English from 1996 to 2014 was carried out using 3 databases: ProQuest, Scopus, and EBSCOhost. Eligibility criteria for selection of studies for review were also determined in light of the population, intervention, comparison, and outcomes (PICO) guidelines. The population was limited to postsecondary education, specifically in dentistry, medicine, and speech and hearing sciences, in which PBL was the key educational pedagogy and curriculum design. Three types of educational technologies were identified as interventions used to support student inquiry: learning software and digital learning objects; interactive whiteboards (IWBs) and plasma screens; and learning management systems (LMSs). Of 470 studies, 28 were selected for analysis. Most studies examined the effects of learning software and digital learning objects (n=20) with integration of IWB (n=5) and LMS (n=3) for PBL receiving relatively less attention. The educational technologies examined in these studies were seen as potentially fit for problem-based health sciences education

  16. Internationalizing undergraduate psychology education: Trends, techniques, and technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takooshian, Harold; Gielen, Uwe P; Plous, Scott; Rich, Grant J; Velayo, Richard S

    2016-01-01

    How can we best internationalize undergraduate psychology education in the United States and elsewhere? This question is more timely than ever, for at least 2 reasons: Within the United States, educators and students seek greater contact with psychology programs abroad, and outside the United States, psychology is growing apace, with educators and students in other nations often looking to U.S. curricula and practices as models. In this article, we outline international developments in undergraduate psychology education both in the United States and abroad, and analyze the dramatic rise of online courses and Internet-based technologies from an instructional and international point of view. Building on the recommendations of the 2005 APA Working Group on Internationalizing the Undergraduate Psychology Curriculum, we then advance 14 recommendations on internationalizing undergraduate psychology education--for students, faculty, and institutions. (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  17. Incorporating Student Activities into Climate Change Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, H.; Kelly, K.; Klein, D.; Cadavid, A. C.

    2013-12-01

    Under a NASA grant, Mathematical and Geospatial Pathways to Climate Change Education, students at California State University, Northridge integrated Geographic Information Systems (GIS), remote sensing, satellite data technologies, and climate modelling into the study of global climate change under a Pathway for studying the Mathematics of Climate Change (PMCC). The PMCC, which is an interdisciplinary option within the BS in Applied Mathematical Sciences, consists of courses offered by the departments of Mathematics, Physics, and Geography and is designed to prepare students for careers and Ph.D. programs in technical fields relevant to global climate change. Under this option students are exposed to the science, mathematics, and applications of climate change science through a variety of methods including hands-on experience with computer modeling and image processing software. In the Geography component of the program, ESRI's ArcGIS and ERDAS Imagine mapping, spatial analysis and image processing software were used to explore NASA satellite data to examine the earth's atmosphere, hydrosphere and biosphere in areas that are affected by climate change or affect climate. These technology tools were incorporated into climate change and remote sensing courses to enhance students' knowledge and understanding of climate change through hands-on application of image processing techniques to NASA data. Several sets of exercises were developed with specific learning objectives in mind. These were (1) to increase student understanding of climate change and climate change processes; (2) to develop student skills in understanding, downloading and processing satellite data; (3) to teach remote sensing technology and GIS through applications to climate change; (4) to expose students to climate data and methods they can apply to solve real world problems and incorporate in future research projects. In the Math and Physics components of the course, students learned about

  18. Rebuilding Haiti's Educational Access: A Phenomenological Study of Technology Use in Education Delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandiford, Gladwyn A.

    2013-01-01

    There is a lack of access to technology blended with face-to-face instruction and learning in Haiti. Despite this lack of access, some Haitian college students have nevertheless leveraged technology to overcome the obstacles of poverty and obtain a higher education. This phenomenological study explored the lived experiences of 20 adult…

  19. Cutting-Edge Technologies and Social Media Use in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, Vladlena, Ed.; Morgan, Stephanie

    2014-01-01

    The inclusion of social media in higher education has transformed the way instructors teach and students learn. In order to effectively reach their students in this networked world, teachers must learn to utilize the latest technologies in their classrooms. "Cutting-Edge Technologies and Social Media Use in Higher Education" brings…

  20. Promising Practices in Higher Education: Art Education and Human Rights Using Information, Communication Technologies (ICT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Joanna; Cap, Orest

    2014-01-01

    Promising pedagogical practices is described in relation to incorporating ICT (Information, Communication and Technologies) with the study of Human Rights issues in Visual Arts Education for teacher candidates. As part of a course, "Senior Years Art," students at the Faculty of Education, University of Manitoba during 2013-2014…

  1. Developing an instrument for assessing students' concepts of the nature of technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liou, Pey-Yan

    2015-05-01

    instrument. This study provides a useful questionnaire for educational researchers and practitioners for measuring students' concepts of the nature of technology.

  2. Utilization of Educational Technology in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakamoto, Takashi

    1980-01-01

    Gives an overview of the development of educational technology in Japan evident in the increase of publications, the diffusion of technological innovations, and the organization of research pertaining to the field. (Author/MER)

  3. The Technological Dimension of Educational Technology in Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitriadis, Yannis

    2012-01-01

    This article describes some of the main technological trends and issues of the European landscape of research and innovation in educational technology. Although several innovative technologies (tools, architectures, platforms, or approaches) emerge, such as intelligent support to personalization, collaboration or adaptation in mobile, game-based,…

  4. Technology and Technique: An Educational Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isman, Aytekin

    2012-01-01

    Today, technology is developing very fast around the world. This technological development (hardware and software) affects our life. There is a relationship among technology, society, culture, organization, machines, technical operation, and technical phenomenon. Educators should know this relationship because technology begins to affect teaching…

  5. Students' Risk Perceptions of Nanotechnology Applications: Implications for Science Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Grant; Jones, Gail; Taylor, Amy; Forrester, Jennifer; Robertson, Laura

    2010-01-01

    Scientific literacy as a goal of a science education reform remains an important discourse in the research literature and is a key component of students' understanding and acceptance of emergent technologies like nanotechnology. This manuscript focuses on undergraduate engineering students' perceptions of the risks and benefits posed by…

  6. Understanding Student Learning: The Need for Education Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slaven, Chip

    2015-01-01

    Schools have long collected information about students, from basic emergency contact details to daily attendance statistics. But only recently have schools used education technology to collect solid, reliable information (or data) about how students learn--as well as details about their strengths, challenges, and individual traits that impact…

  7. Higher Education Beyond Faculties: Interdisciplinary Education in Care and Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sponselee, Anne-Mie A G; Van Hoof, Joost

    2017-01-01

    A Centre of Healthcare and Technology of a Dutch University of Applied Sciences, is presented - and illustrated by project examples - to show how the transitions in the sectors of health care and technology can result in interdisciplinary education in care and technology by means of higher education beyond faculties.

  8. [Exploration of Recent Mobile Technologies Applied in Nursing Education].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ting-Ting; Lu, Yi-Chen; Chang, Lei

    2017-12-01

    The development of science and technology has fundamentally changed people's lives and the way that medical systems function. Increasingly, mobile technologies are being introduced and integrated into classroom teaching and clinical applications, resulting in healthcare providers introducing innovative applications into health education. These applications enhance the clinical, education, and research expertise of medical staffs and nurses, while improving quality of care and providing new experiences for patients. In order to understand the current situation and trends in nursing education, the present study adopted literature analysis to explore the influence and effect of mobile technologies that have been introduced into nursing education from the school and clinical environments. The results found that students hold positive attitudes toward introducing these technologies into their curricula. Although these technologies may increase the work efficiency of nurses in the workplace, questions remain user perceptions and professional expression. Therefore, securing patient agreement and healthcare system approval were major turning points in the introduction of mobile technologies into nursing education. In the future, adapting mobile technologies for use in teaching materials and courses may be further developed. Moreover, empirical studies may be used in future research in order to facilitate the increasingly successful integration of relevant technologies into nursing education.

  9. University Student Perceptions of Technology Use in Mathematics Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bashar Zogheib

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Although most universities and educators are relying on implementing various technological tools in the curriculum, acceptance of such tools among students is still not sufficient. The Technology Acceptance Model (TAM has been widely used by researchers to test user’s acceptance of technology in business, education and other domains. This research study is an attempt that tests the integration of TAM and user satisfaction in the educational field. It particularly investigates students’ acceptance to use MyMathLab, a technological tool, in university math classes in the Middle East. Structural equation modelling with various constructs was used. Findings support the theoretical model showing the great influence of user satisfaction on perceived ease of use and subjective norm on behavioural intention. The findings of this study also demonstrate that self-efficacy, user satisfaction, subjective norms, perceived usefulness, perceived ease of use, and students’ attitude constructs all have a positive impact on students’ behavioural intentions to adopt and use technological tools in a mathematics class room. Findings of this research have greater implications for educators and students worldwide.

  10. Physical Education Teacher's Attitudes towards Philosophy of Education and Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turkeli, Anil; Senel, Omer

    2016-01-01

    The current study was carried out to find out the attitudes of physical education teachers towards educational philosophy and technology, and to determine the relationship between the philosophy of education that they adopt and their attitudes toward technology. With this aim, the study was conducted on 22 female and 69 male physical education…

  11. Women Technology Leaders: Gender Issues in Higher Education Information Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drury, Marilyn

    2011-01-01

    Women working in higher education information technology (IT) organizations and those seeking leadership positions in these organizations face a double challenge in overcoming the traditionally male-dominated environments of higher education and IT. Three women higher education chief information officers (CIOs) provided their perspectives,…

  12. Exploring student engagement and transfer in technology mediated environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Suparna

    Exploring student engagement and transfer of mechanistic reasoning skills in computer-supported learning environments by SUPARNA SINHA Dissertation Director: Cindy Hmelo-Silver Computer-supported environments designed on learning science principles aim to provide a rich learning experience for students. Students are given opportunities to collaborate, model their understanding, have access to real-time data and engage in hypotheses testing to solve authentic problems. That is to say that affordances of technologies make it possible for students to engage in mechanistic reasoning, a complex inquiry-oriented practice (Machamer, Craver & Darden, 2000; Russ et al., 2008). However, we have limited understanding of the quality of engagement fostered in these contexts. This calls for close observations of the activity systems that the students participate in. The situative perspective focuses on analyzing interactions of individuals (students) with other people, tools and materials within activity systems (Greeno, 2006). Importantly, as the central goal of education is to provide learning experiences that are useful beyond the specific conditions of initial learning, analysis of such interactions sheds light on key experiences that lead to transfer of mechanistic reasoning skills. This is made possible, as computer-supported contexts are activity systems that bring forth trends in students' engagement. From a curriculum design perspective, observing student engagement can be a useful tool to identify features of interactions (with technological tools, peers, curriculum materials) that lead to successful learning. Therefore, the purpose of the present studies is to explore the extent to which technological affordances influence students' engagement and subsequent transfer of reasoning skills. Specifically, the goal of this research is to address the following research questions: How do learners generalize understanding of mechanistic reasoning in computer

  13. Nutrition Students Enhance School Health Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotugna, Nancy; Vickery, Connie E.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of the Nutrition Education Students and Teachers (NEST) project was to develop a model of collaboration between University of Delaware dietetics students and elementary teachers to promote nutrition education in the classroom. Design/methodology/approach: Junior and senior level students in a nutrition education course…

  14. Student Volunteers as Birth Control Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Raymond S.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    A one-year project on birth control education that used students as birth control educators was initiated to increase student awareness of the need for contraception. Support for this method of disseminating information was demonstrated. The project facilitated student use of the Gynecological Clinic of the Student Health Center. (Author)

  15. Multilingual education of students on a global scale and perspective-international networking on the example of bioindication and biomonitoring (B&B technologies).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markert, Bernd; Baltrėnaitė, Edita; Chudzińska, Ewa; De Marco, Silvia; Diatta, Jean; Ghaffari, Zahra; Gorelova, Svetlana; Marcovecchio, Jorge; Tabors, Guntis; Wang, Meie; Yousef, Naglaa; Fraenzle, Stefan; Wuenschmann, Simone

    2014-04-01

    Living or formerly living organisms are being used to obtain information on the quality of the general health status of our environment by bioindication and biomonitoring methods for many decades. Thus, different roads toward this common scientific goal were developed by a lot of different international research groups. Global cooperation in between various scientific teams throughout the world has produced common ideas, scientific definitions, and highly innovative results of this extremely attractive working field. The transdisciplinary approach of different and multifaceted scientific areas-starting from biology, analytical chemistry, via health physics, up to social and economic issues-have surpassed mental barriers of individual scientists, so that "production" of straightforward common results related to the influence of material and immaterial environmental factors to the well-being of organisms and human life has now reached the forefront of international thinking. For the further sustainable development of our common scientific "hobby" of bioindication and biomonitoring, highest personal energy has to be given by us, being teachers to our students and to convince strategically decision makers as politicians to invest (financially) into the development of education and research of this innovative technique. Young people have to be intensively convinced on the "meaning" of our scientific doing, e.g., by extended forms of education. One example of multilingual education of students on a global scale and perspective is given here, which we started about 3 years ago.

  16. Teaching Using New Technologies and Students Resilience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onofrei, Smaranda Gabriela

    2015-01-01

    Under the conditions of a digital age, new technologies undergo various interpretations, approaches and usages. Education reaches new dimensions at all its levels, by adopting new technologies in order to deeper support modern possibilities of learning that define the new generations: a high degree of digital capabilities, the capacity to…

  17. Student demographics as a predictor of use of an educational ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nearly ten years after the first democratic elections in South Africa, educators are still concerned about the needs of disadvantaged students, particularly when introducing computer technology into the educational process. This article reports on the findings of a research project, which explored the use of a Computer ...

  18. Students valuation of the use of computers in education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doornekamp, B.G.

    1993-01-01

    Two schools for general secondary education in Enschede, The Netherlands took part in a 4-yr Technology-enriched Schools project. One of the research questions in this project was the valuation by the students of the use of computers in education. It was hypothesized that this valuation would be

  19. Determination of nursing students' attitudes towards the use of technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terkes, Nurten; Celik, Ferya; Bektas, Hicran

    2018-03-11

    The use of technology is increasingly important in nursing education and practice. For this reason, it is necessary to determine the attitudes of nursing students towards technology. This study was conducted with 508 nursing students. A personal information form that was prepared by the researchers and the Attitudes Toward Technology Scale were used as the data collection tools. The mean score that was obtained by the nursing students from the Attitudes Toward Technology Scale was 61.53 ± 1.13. The Cronbach's alpha coefficient was found to be 0.90. There was a statistically significant difference between the sexes, using a computer, tablet, or laptop, using technology to reach health-related information, and for professional development, using mobile applications related to drug information. There was also a statistical difference between using the Periscope and Scorpio accounts from social media and using Excel and PowerPoint from Microsoft programs. Nursing students are capable of technology-based teaching, which can be expanded as a result. © 2018 Japan Academy of Nursing Science.

  20. From Innovation Clusters to Datapalooza: Accelerating Innovation in Educational Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culatta, Richard

    2012-01-01

    Education in the United States is entering a very exciting moment. For the first time, all of the digital stars are aligning n such a way that the technology is available to design truly transformational learning experiences. The ubiquity of inexpensive and powerful mobile devices is creating the potential for all students to learn at any time and…

  1. Desktop Simulation: Towards a New Strategy for Arts Technology Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eidsheim, Nina Sun

    2009-01-01

    For arts departments in many institutions, technology education entails prohibitive equipment costs, maintenance requirements and administrative demands. There are also inherent pedagogical challenges: for example, recording studio classes where, due to space and time constraints, only a few students in what might be a large class can properly…

  2. PRODUCTIVE EDUCATIONAL TECHNOLOGIES IN TEACHING FOREGN LANGUAGE AND CULTURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svetlana Vladimirovna Sannikova

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available This article is devoted to looking for productive educational technologies in learning a foreign language and culture with the use of ICT-based on the student-centered strategy that implements the method of projects.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.12731/2218-7405-2013-7-47

  3. Application of Virtual Reality Technology in Biology Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, Kew-Cheol; Park, Jong-Seok; Kim, Hyun-Sup; Kim, Jae-Hyun; Park, Young-Chul; Ryu, Hai-Il

    2003-01-01

    Reports on the findings of a study designed to develop three-dimensional virtual reality technology (VRT) learning programs for middle school students and evaluate the program's educational value. Focuses on the topic of structure and function of the eye. Concludes that VRT simulations allow comfortable interaction with computers and increase the…

  4. The evaluations of facebook as an educational technology tools in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Entrepreneurship is integrated into the curriculum structure designed for students studying subjects other than Business. The aim of this study was to evaluate the usage of Facebook as an educational technology tool in entrepreneurship course in TVET institution particularly in Polytechnic Malaysia. The 400 sample was ...

  5. Using Cluster Analysis for Data Mining in Educational Technology Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonenko, Pavlo D.; Toy, Serkan; Niederhauser, Dale S.

    2012-01-01

    Cluster analysis is a group of statistical methods that has great potential for analyzing the vast amounts of web server-log data to understand student learning from hyperlinked information resources. In this methodological paper we provide an introduction to cluster analysis for educational technology researchers and illustrate its use through…

  6. Research Needs for Technology Education: A U.S. Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Gene; Ritz, John

    2012-01-01

    This study was conducted for the purpose of identifying research needs for technology education by generating a rank-ordered list of research topics that the profession's members might wish to explore individually or in collaboration with colleagues and students. The researchers' goal was to provide a concise list of topics that could be used by…

  7. Educational Technology: A Review of the Integration, Resources, and Effectiveness of Technology in K-12 Classrooms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adolph Delgado

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available There is no questioning that the way people live, interact, communicate, and conduct business is undergoing a profound, rapid change. This change is often referred to as the “digital revolution,” which is the advancement of technology from analog, electronic and mechanical tools to the digital tools available today. Moreover, technology has begun to change education, affecting how students acquire the skill sets needed to prepare for college and a career and how educators integrate digital technological instructional strategies to teach. Numerous studies have been published discussing the barriers of integrating technology, the estimated amount of investment that is needed in order to fully support educational technology, and, of course, the effectiveness of technology in the classroom. As such, this article presents a critical review of the transitions that technology integration has made over the years; the amount of resources and funding that has been allocated to immerse school with technology; and the conflicting results presented on effectiveness of using is technology in education. Through synthesis of selected themes, we found a plethora of technological instructional strategies being used to integrate technology into K-12 classrooms. Also, though there have been large investments made to integrate technology into K-12 classrooms to equip students with the skills needed to prepare for college and a career, the practical use of this investment has not been impressive. Lastly, several meta-analyses showed promising results of effectiveness of technology in the classroom. However, several inherent methodological and study design issues dampen the amount of variance that technology accounts for.

  8. Using Communication Technology to Enhance Interprofessional Education Simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrader, Sarah; Kostoff, Matthew; Shin, Tiffany; Heble, Annie; Kempin, Brian; Miller, Astyn; Patykiewicz, Nick

    2016-02-25

    To determine the impact of simulations using an alternative method of communication on students' satisfaction, attitudes, confidence, and performance related to interprofessional communication. One hundred sixty-three pharmacy students participated in a required applications-based capstone course. Students were randomly assigned to one of three interprofessional education (IPE) simulations with other health professions students using communication methods such as telephone, e-mail, and video conferencing. Pharmacy students completed a validated survey instrument, Attitude Toward Healthcare Teams Scale (ATHCTS) prior to and after course participation. Significant positive changes occurred for 5 out of 20 items. Written reflection papers and student satisfaction surveys completed after participation showed positive themes and satisfaction. Course instructors evaluated student performance using rubrics for formative feedback. Implementation of IPE simulations using various methods of communication technology is an effective way for pharmacy schools to incorporate IPE into their curriculum.

  9. What dental educators need to understand about emerging technologies to incorporate them effectively into the educational process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Corey D; Eisenberg, Elise S; O'Donnell, Jean A; Spallek, Heiko

    2014-04-01

    Many dental schools are currently struggling with the adoption of emerging technologies and the incorporation of these technologies into the educational process. Dental students exhibit an increasing degree of digital comfort when using social networking, mobile devices, search engines, or e-textbooks. Although the majority of students might consider themselves to be very skilled at using information technology, many faculty members would claim the opposite when evaluating their own knowledge and skills in the use of technology. As the use of technology, both formally and informally, continues to increase, dental educators are faced with many questions, such as: Does students' digital comfort disguise a lack of information literacy? What is the appropriate path of implementing technology into teaching and learning, and how can institutions support such an implementation? This article surveys a series of myths that exist about the use of technology in education and raises questions about their validity and how dental educators can avoid being misled by them.

  10. The effect of technology on student science achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilton, June Kraft

    2003-10-01

    Prior research indicates that technology has had little effect on raising student achievement. Little empirical research exists, however, studying the effects of technology as a tool to improve student achievement through development of higher order thinking skills. Also, prior studies have not focused on the manner in which technology is being used in the classroom and at home to enhance teaching and learning. Empirical data from a secondary school representative of those in California were analyzed to determine the effects of technology on student science achievement. The quantitative analysis methods for the school data study included a multiple linear path analysis, using final course grade as the ultimate exogenous variable. In addition, empirical data from a nationwide survey on how Americans use the Internet were disaggregated by age and analyzed to determine the relationships between computer and Internet experience and (a) Internet use at home for school assignments and (b) more general computer use at home for school assignments for school age children. Analysis of data collected from the a "A Nation Online" Survey conducted by the United States Census Bureau assessed these relationships via correlations and cross-tabulations. Finally, results from these data analyses were assessed in conjunction with systemic reform efforts from 12 states designed to address improvements in science and mathematics education in light of the Third International Mathematics and Science Survey (TIMSS). Examination of the technology efforts in those states provided a more nuanced understanding of the impact technology has on student achievement. Key findings included evidence that technology training for teachers increased their use of the computer for instruction but students' final science course grade did not improve; school age children across the country did not use the computer at home for such higher-order cognitive activities as graphics and design or spreadsheets

  11. Future Ready Learning: Reimagining the Role of Technology in Education. 2016 National Education Technology Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Susan

    2016-01-01

    The National Education Technology Plan is the flagship educational technology policy document for the United States. The 2016 Plan, "Future Ready Learning: Reimagining the Role of Technology in Education," articulates a vision of equity, active use, and collaborative leadership to make everywhere, all-the-time learning possible. While…

  12. Evaluation of National School for Professional Technology Education in Mexico

    OpenAIRE

    Lopez-Acevedo, Gladys

    2005-01-01

    The National School for Professional Technology Education (CONALEP) is Mexico's largest and oldest technical education system. CONALEP serves low-income students at the upper-secondary school level in Mexico. The labor market performance of CONALEP graduates has been evaluated four times in the past. These evaluations have yielded encouraging results, showing that CONALEP's graduates find jobs faster and earn higher wages than similar "control" groups. In contrast, using non-experimental meth...

  13. Leading Technology-Rich Schools. Technology & Education, Connections (TEC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Barbara B.; Schrum, Lynne

    2012-01-01

    This timely book shows how award-winning secondary schools and districts are successfully using technology and making systemic changes to increase student engagement, improve achievement, and re-invigorate the teaching and learning process. Through in-depth case studies, we see how experienced school and district leaders use technology in…

  14. Best Practices of Leadership in Educational Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Loren

    2014-01-01

    Leadership in Educational Technology is a relatively new field that is changing as fast as technology itself. Success for an educational leader includes maintaining a firm grasp of how to diagnose the needs of a district, a school, or a classroom while aligning policies, procedures, and protocols into a format that will empower the individual…

  15. The Changing Nature of Educational Technology Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spector, J. Michael

    2015-01-01

    The many changes in educational technologies have been well documented in both the professional and popular literature. What is less well documented is the changing nature of programs that prepare individuals for careers in the broad multi-disciplinary field of educational technology. This article is a first attempt to look at how educational…

  16. Dehumanization: An Overview of Educational Technology's Critics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewitt, Geoff

    Almost since its inception, the word "dehumanization" has caused apprehension, especially as the words relate to educational technology. This paper is a brief analysis of educational technology's critics from the late 1950s through present time; it also serves as a study of how their rhetoric has affected the structure of elementary and…

  17. A Model Technology Educator: Thomas A. Edison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pretzer, William S.; Rogers, George E.; Bush, Jeffery

    2007-01-01

    Reflecting back over a century ago to the small village of Menlo Park, New Jersey provides insight into a remarkable visionary and an exceptional role model for today's problem-solving and design-focused technology educator: Thomas A. Edison, inventor, innovator, and model technology educator. Since Edison could not simply apply existing knowledge…

  18. Aligning Technology Education Teaching with Brain Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsioloudis, Petros

    2015-01-01

    This exploratory study was designed to determine if there is a level of alignment between technology education curriculum and theories of intellectual development. The researcher compared Epstein's Brain Growth Theory and Piaget's Status of Intellectual Development with technology education curriculum from Australia, England, and the United…

  19. Journal of Technology and Education in Nigeria

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Journal of Technology and Education in Nigeria focuses on the following areas: Agriculture, Food Science, Technology/Engineering, Science and Applied Science, Vocational/Technical Education. Vol 17, No 2 (2012). DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT Open Access DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT Subscription or Fee Access ...

  20. SCIENTIFIC EDUCATIONAL ELECTRONIC LIBRARIES IN EDUCATING INFORMATIONAL SYSTEMS AND TECHNOLOGIES OF FUTURE MANAGERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nataliia S. Prilutska

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the main principles of electronic libraries. It analyzes primary types of digital scientific and educational resources, presented in electronic libraries and defines the techniques of effective structuring of the learning content by means of informational technologies in the conditions of the informational processes intensification. The scientific fundamentals of choice of educational material are determined and the structure of the educational subject ''Informational Systems and Technologies'' under the credit and module system are designated. The declared structure of educational subject is taught for the students of the social-pedagogical department, referral courses ''Management''.

  1. Transition from Realistic to Real World Problems with the Use of Technology in Elementary Mathematical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budinski, Natalija; Milinkovic, Dragica

    2017-01-01

    The availability of technology has a big impact on education, and that is the main reason for discussing the use of technologies in mathematical education in our paper. The availability of technology influences how mathematical contents could be presented to students. We present the benefits of learning mathematical concepts through real life…

  2. Competences of Technology Teachers within Education Paradigm Change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nijolė Bankauskienė

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In the 21st century, when technologies change and the knowledge society develops, the requirements for the activity of profession teachers have increased. It is particularly because that the change of education paradigms from teaching and impact paradigms towards learning paradigm. Teacher’s roles change, new functions in the activity technologies’ teachers emerge. The aim of the article – is to find out in what competences a teacher of technologies should distinguish when education paradigm changes. The article consists of three parts. The first part discusses three education paradigms and their peculiarities by stressing the activity of a teacher and pupil. The second part distinguishes the competences characteristic for a teacher of technologies in the context of long-life and sustainable development education by considering the Competencies of European Qualification Structure and the Inventory of Teacher’s Profession Competences (2007. The third part presents the results of the empirical research: the final projects of six teachers-students (respondents, who in 2011 graduated from the non-degree study programme ‘Pedagogy’ at the Department of Educational Systems, Faculty of Social Sciences, Kaunas University of Technology, were analysed. These teachers already possessing the diploma of the bachelor in technologies wanted to acquire the certificate of technology teacher’s qualification. Beside theoretical study subjects the teachers–students, when studying at one-year programme, prepared and defended their final and qualification project by applying action research in order to get the certificate of a technology teacher. In the project they presented the inventory of acquired and developed competences as well as analysed their pedagogical activity. The research results showed what competences the teachers-students who graduated from the study programme ‘Pedagogy’ possess and what competences they lack. Referring to

  3. The Opinions of Nursing Students Regarding the First Implementation of Distance Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozturk, Deniz; Eyikara, Evrim; Baykara, Zehra Gocmen

    2017-01-01

    With rapid developments being made in science and technology, there is also an increasing need for different educational methods. Distance education allows increased access to education and more flexibility for the students. This descriptive study was conducted to establish the opinions of nursing students about distance education being adopted…

  4. Student Academic Freedom in Egypt: Perceptions of University Education Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zain-Al-Dien, Muhammad M.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate student academic freedom from the university education students' point of view in Egypt. This study adopted a survey research design in which the questionnaire was the main data collection instrument. The study participants comprised 800 university education students in Egypt. The result of the…

  5. General Education Students' Changing Perceptions of Students with Special Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novak, Ashley D.; Bartelheim, Frederick J.

    2012-01-01

    Schools are becoming more inclusive and more students with special needs are accessing general education classrooms than ever. This action research study investigated general education students changing perceptions of students with special needs through the use of various interventions (e.g., classroom discussions, organized games, buddy reads,…

  6. PHOTON PBL: problem-based learning in photonics technology education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massa, Nicholas; Audet, Richard; Donnelly, Judith; Hanes, Fenna; Kehrhahn, Marijke

    2007-06-01

    Problem-based learning (PBL) is an educational approach whereby students learn course content by actively and collaboratively solving real-world problems presented in a context similar to that in which the learning is to be applied. Research shows that PBL improves student learning and retention, critical thinking and problem-solving skills, and the ability to skillfully apply knowledge to new situations - skills deemed critical to lifelong learning. Used extensively in medical education since the 1970's, and widely adopted in other fields including business, law, and education, PBL is emerging as an alternative to traditional lecture-based courses in engineering and technology education. In today's ever-changing global economy where photonics technicians are required to work productively in teams to solve complex problems across disciplines as well as cultures, PBL represents an exciting alternative to traditional lecture-based photonics education. In this paper we present the PHOTON PBL project, a National Science Foundation Advanced Technology Education (NSF-ATE) project aimed at creating, in partnership with the photonics industry and university research labs from across the US, a comprehensive series of multimedia-based PBL instructional resource materials and offering faculty professional development in the use of PBL in photonics technology education. Quantitative and qualitative research will be conducted on the effectiveness of PBL in photonics technician education.

  7. Game-like Technology Innovation Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Magnussen, Rikke

    2011-01-01

      The aim of this paper is to discuss the first results and methodological challenges and perspectives of designing game-inspired scenarios for implementation of innovation processes into schools' science education. This paper comprises and report on a case study of a game-inspired innovation...... scenario designed for technology education in grades 7 - 9 in Danish schools. In the paper, methodological challenges of doing design-based research into technology innovation education are discussed. The preliminary results from the first studies of a game-inspired technology innovation camp are also...... presented, along with discussions of the future of development of these educational spaces....

  8. THE USE OF CASE TECHNOLOGIES IN TEACHING STUDENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuliya M. Tsarapkina

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Аbstract. The aim of the article is to consider the possibilities of use of case technologies in educational process of the university; to prove the efficiency and perspectivity of the given method while training the future expertsprofessionalsMethods. Retrospective and abstract analyses of the scientific-theoretical and practical literature are used while describing the history of development of case-study technology and its didactic possibilities. Test materials are used as the measuring tool of dynamics of informative activity of students, changes of level of their knowledge and abilities in the process of skilled-experimental work.Results and scientific novelty. The way of formation of concept «case technology» is shown; examples of various approaches to understanding of the given method are given; author's experience of research of the given problem is described; stages of work with case technology are allocated. It is experimentally proved that case technologies not only help to fix subject knowledge, to find professional the competence, but also promote development of creative thinking, and form skills of behaviour in a group: abilities to operate in a team, to state and defend the point of view, to listen, to carry on dialogue, to ask questions, to operate with the knowledge, building logic schemes of the problem solution. Besides, during the training period using a case technology students study independent ways of knowledge acquisition which are necessary for the modern professional in constantly ever-changing economic and social realities.The case method reveals creative potential, learns to think and operate differently not only students, but also teachers. This method promotes democratisation of educational process, formation of teachers’ progressive thinking, raises motivation of pedagogical activity.Practical significance. The article provides conclusions and recommendations for the use of case technologies in the

  9. Whatever became of educational technology? the implications for teacher education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colin Latchem

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper explores the reasons for educational technology principles and practices not being more widely accepted and successfully applied in everyday teaching and learning. It argues that these are: an over-emphasis on new technology; a failure to learn from the lessons of the past; and a lack of meta-analysis and collaborative research to evidence the benefits. The paper also brings out the point that the literature fails to acknowledge the important role of educational technology in informal learning and non-formal education. It concludes with recommendations for future research into the broader aspects of educational technology and the employment of more longitudinal and collaborative action research and the nature of pre- service, in-service and postgraduate teacher education in educational technology.

  10. Situated Learning: The Feasibility of an Experimental Learning of Information Technology for Academic Nursing Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonen, Ayala; Lev-Ari, Lilac; Sharon, Dganit; Amzalag, Meital

    2016-01-01

    As part of the Bachelor's degree of nursing education, nursing students are exposed to the increasingly complex world of Information Technology. Aim: To evaluate the feasibility of a situated learning approach for Information Technology course by assessing students' perceptions at the end of the course. Methods: Course participants completed a pre…

  11. Technological Developments in Networking, Education and Automation

    CERN Document Server

    Elleithy, Khaled; Iskander, Magued; Kapila, Vikram; Karim, Mohammad A; Mahmood, Ausif

    2010-01-01

    "Technological Developments in Networking, Education and Automation" includes a set of rigorously reviewed world-class manuscripts addressing and detailing state-of-the-art research projects in the following areas: Computer Networks: Access Technologies, Medium Access Control, Network architectures and Equipment, Optical Networks and Switching, Telecommunication Technology, and Ultra Wideband Communications. Engineering Education and Online Learning: including development of courses and systems for engineering, technical and liberal studies programs; online laboratories; intelligent

  12. Students Computer Skills in Faculty of Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Caglar

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays; the usage of technology is not a privilege but an obligation. Technological developments influence structures andfunctions of educational institutions. It is also expected from the teachers that they integrate technology in their lessons inorder to educate the individuals of information society. This research has covered 145(68 female, 78 male students, studying inNear East University Faculty of Education. The Computer Skills Scale developed by Güçlü (2010 was used as a data collectingtool. Data were analysed using SPSS software program. In this study, students’ computer skills were investigated; the variationsin the relationships between computer skills and (a gender, (b family’s net monthly income, (c presence of computers athome, (d presence of a computer laboratory at school and (e parents’ computer skills were examined. Frequency analysis,percentage and mean calculations were used. In addition, t-test and multi-variate analysis were used to look at the relationshipbetween different variables. As a result of this study, a statistically significant relationship between computer skills of studentswho had a computer at home and computer skills of those who didn’t have a computer at home were found.

  13. Students’ attitude to the possibility of applying modern information and communication technologies in the educational process in physical education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.S. Ilnitskaya

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to analyze the problem of the formation of students’ attitudes toward physical education classes and the application of information and communication technologies in physical education in higher education institutions. Material: in the survey participated 245 students. Results: it was found that according to students in physical education classes with the use of modern technologies are more efficient than traditional occupations (52% are more emotional nature, help to improve mood (28%, helps to provide students the latest up to date information relative health (26 % contribute to increased power consumption of an organism (8%. Conclusion: the need for the development and application of information and communication technologies and non-traditional forms of physical education to improve the effectiveness of the educational process in physical education in higher education institutions.

  14. Technology and Online Education: Models for Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Catherine W.; Sonnenberg, Christian

    2014-01-01

    This paper contends that technology changes advance online education. A number of mobile computing and transformative technologies will be examined and incorporated into a descriptive study. The object of the study will be to design innovative mobile awareness models seeking to understand technology changes for mobile devices and how they can be…

  15. The influence of interactive technology on student performance in an Oklahoma secondary Biology I program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feltman, Vallery

    Over the last decade growth in technologies available to teach students and enhance curriculum has become an important consideration in the educational system. The profile of today's secondary students have also been found to be quite different than those of the past. Their learning styles and preferences are issues that should be addressed by educators. With the growth and availability of new technologies students are increasingly expecting to use these as learning tools in their classrooms. This study investigates how interactive technology may impact student performance. This study specifically focuses on the use of the Apple Ipad in 4 Biology I classrooms. This study used an experimental mixed method design to examine how using Ipads for learning impacted student achievement, motivation to learn, and learning strategies. Qualitatively the study examined observed student behaviors and student perceptions regarding the use of interactive technologies. Data was analyzed using descriptive statistics, t-tests, 2-way ANOVAs, and qualitative analysis. Quantitatively the results revealed no significant difference between students who used the interactive technology to learn and those who did not. Qualitative data revealed behaviors indicative of being highly engaged with the subject matter and the development of critical thinking skills which may improve student performance. Student perceptions also revealed overall positive experiences with using interactive technology in the classroom. It is recommended that further studies be done to look at using interactive technologies for a longer period of time using multiple subjects areas. This would provide a more in-depth exploration of interactive technologies on student achievement.

  16. Study habits and technology use in Italian university students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Poscia

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Students' ability of learning is influenced by study habits. Among these, the use of technologies has assumed a controversial role. The aim of this paper is to analyse studying approach, the use of technologies and how they affect study habits in a population of university students addressed by the "Sportello Salute Giovani" ("Youth Health Information Desk" questionnaire. METHODS: 16 questions referred to the approach to studying and the use of technologies (number 77-93 were analyzed. Absolute and relative frequencies were calculated. Stratification for sex, age and socio-economic status were performed and Chi square test was used to test the difference between sex, age class and socio-economic groups. RESULTS: 99.7% of students declared to have at least one mobile phone and 68.7% to use smartphones, i-phones and i-pads. Males (20.9% vs 14.9% female, p < 0.05, older students (31.7% among 25-30 years old students vs 21.3% among 18-21 years old, p < 0.05 and students with the highest socio-economic level (87.8% vs 54.2% of the lowest seem more likely to use digital technologies/Internet for educational purposes. CONCLUSION: Our survey revealed that most college students still prefer approach the study using books instead of digital tools, but this attitude is conflicting with how many hours they use computers and surf Internet per weeks. Therefore, further studies are needed to understand better technology influence on study habits and its implication on health.

  17. Discovering Interdisciplinary Uses of Online Technologies in Higher Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Caton-Rosser

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Recent research shows both students and professors rushing to adapt learning and teaching activities accessing ever-upgrading digital and social media formats like Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, Pinterest and Prezi. Many institutions of higher education are embracing social media as viable, student-centered-classroom communication tools in a full range of subject disciplines, as well as in emerging interdisciplinary activities that prepare students for current trends in the job force. The new communication channels offer students a direct voice in discussion of topics of subject matter and current events, avenues for expedited exchange of information, and also introduction to skills needed to operate mobile computing devices, such as tablets and portable hand-held devices. The advancing tools of online technology are also being used creatively in general communication across college campuses in higher education following standardized-use policies. The use of social media, for example, is effective in recruiting and interacting with prospective students and their parents or in expedited sharing of news or updated policies and procedures. The current endorsement of new technologies in various higher-education settings aligns with historical enthusiasm in education for interactive classroom dialogue. Over the years, progressive and pragmatic educators, such as John Dewey, Paulo Freire, Elliot Eisner and Larry Cuban have promoted interactive, inclusive pedagogical communication and experiential education since the early 1900s to the present. For the past year-and-a-half, three faculty members at Black Hills State University have been conducting qualitative and quantitative research on the use of digital and social media in higher education. Since the beginning, the central goal has been to create awareness of digital technologies and social media as inter-subjective tools. More recently, the focus has become measurement of the learning experience and

  18. Strategy for Nuclear Technology Education at Uppsala University

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osterlund, M.; Hakansson, A.; Tengborn, E.

    2010-01-01

    After the TMI accident 1979, and later the Tjernobyl accident, the future of nuclear power was vividly debated in Sweden. The negative public opinion governed a number of political decisions that marked an ambition to out-phase nuclear power prior to 2010. Due to this, the student's interest in nuclear technology ceased and together with the fact that public funding to nuclear technology was withdrawn, academic research and education within the field were effectively dismounted. In the beginning of 1990 it became clear to the society that nuclear power could not easily be closed down and the issue of the future competence supply to the nuclear industry was initiated. In the mid-nineties the situation became acute due to the fact that personnel in the nuclear industry started to retire in an increasing pace necessitating measures to be taken in order to secure the future operation of the nuclear power plants. In the year 2000, the Swedish nuclear power plants, Westinghouse Electric Sweden and the Swedish Radiation Safety Authority embarked a project together with the three major universities in the field, Uppsala University, The Royal Institute of Technology and Chalmers University of Technology. The aim of this project was to define a financial platform for reconstructing the Swedish research and education in nuclear technology. The project, named the Swedish Centre for Nuclear Technology (SKC), has during a decade been the major financier to nuclear technology research and education. Using funding from SKC, Uppsala University formulated a strategy along two tracks: 1) Instead of creating ambitious master programs in nuclear technology, the already existing engineering programs in a wide range of fields were utilized to expose as many students as possible to nuclear technology. 2) A program was initiated together with the nuclear industry aiming at educating newly employed personnel. The result is encouraging; starting from essentially zero, typically 100

  19. Female Technology Education Teachers' Experiences of Finnish Craft Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niiranen, Sonja; Hilmola, Antti

    2016-01-01

    In order to introduce a more equitable gender balance in education and consequently in the labour market, it is highly relevant to continue to expand our knowledge of technology education and to give attention to gender related issues. The ultimate purpose of this study was to contribute to efforts to get more women to study technology and pursue…

  20. Educational Technology and Distance Supervision in Counselor Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlisle, Robert Milton; Hays, Danica G.; Pribesh, Shana L.; Wood, Chris T.

    2017-01-01

    The authors used a nonexperimental descriptive design to examine the prevalence of distance supervision in counselor education programs, educational technology used in supervision, training on technology in supervision, and participants' (N = 673) perceptions of legal and ethical compliance. Program policies are recommended to guide the training…