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Sample records for technologies phoenix az

  1. EnviroAtlas - Phoenix, AZ - Block Groups

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas dataset is the base layer for the Phoenix, AZ EnviroAtlas area. The block groups are from the US Census Bureau and are included/excluded based on...

  2. EnviroAtlas - Phoenix, AZ - Atlas Area Boundary

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas dataset shows the boundary of the Phoenix, AZ Atlas Area. It represents the outside edge of all the block groups included in the EnviroAtlas Area....

  3. 78 FR 78298 - Proposed Establishment of Class E Airspace; Phoenix, AZ

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-26

    ... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 71 Proposed Establishment of Class E Airspace; Phoenix, AZ... proposed rulemaking (NPRM). SUMMARY: This action proposes to establish Class E airspace at the Phoenix VHF Omni-Directional Radio Range Tactical Air Navigation Aid (VORTAC), Phoenix, AZ, to facilitate...

  4. 76 FR 23787 - Voluntary Termination of Foreign-Trade Subzone 75D, STMicroelectronics, Inc., Phoenix, AZ

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-28

    ...., Phoenix, AZ Pursuant to its authority under the Foreign-Trade Zones Act of June 18, 1934, as amended (19 U... issued a grant of authority to the City of Phoenix (grantee of FTZ 75) authorizing the establishment of Foreign-Trade Subzone 75D at the STMicroelectronics, Inc., facility in Phoenix, Arizona (Board Order...

  5. EnviroAtlas - Phoenix, AZ - BenMAP Results by Block Group

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas dataset demonstrates the effect of changes in pollution concentration on local populations in 2,434 block groups in Phoenix, AZ. The US EPA's...

  6. EnviroAtlas - Phoenix, AZ- One Meter Resolution Urban Land Cover Data (2010) Web Service

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas web service supports research and online mapping activities related to EnviroAtlas (https://www.epa.gov/enviroatlas). The EnviroAtlas Phoenix, AZ...

  7. EnviroAtlas - Phoenix, AZ - Meter-Scale Urban Land Cover (MULC) Data (2010)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The EnviroAtlas Phoenix, AZ Meter-Scale Urban Land Cover (MULC) data and map were generated from USDA NAIP (National Agricultural Imagery Program) four band (red,...

  8. EnviroAtlas - Phoenix, AZ - One Meter Resolution Urban Land Cover Data (2010)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The EnviroAtlas Phoenix, AZ land cover (LC) data and map were generated from USDA NAIP (National Agricultural Imagery Program) four band (red, green, blue and...

  9. 75 FR 64708 - Reorganization of Foreign-Trade Zone 75 under Alternative Site Framework; Phoenix, AZ

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-20

    ...; Phoenix, AZ Pursuant to its authority under the Foreign-Trade Zones Act of June 18, 1934, as amended (19 U...; Whereas, the City of Phoenix, grantee of Foreign-Trade Zone 75, submitted an application to the Board (FTZ... Maricopa County and portions of Pinal and Yavapai Counties, Arizona, within and adjacent to the...

  10. EnviroAtlas - Phoenix, AZ - Ecosystem Services by Block Group

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This dataset presents environmental benefits of the urban forest in 2,434 block groups in Phoenix, Arizona. Carbon attributes, pollution removal and value, and...

  11. A comprehensive sustainability appraisal of water governance in Phoenix, AZ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Kelli L; Wiek, Arnim; Withycombe Keeler, Lauren

    2013-02-15

    In Phoenix, Arizona and other metropolitan areas, water governance challenges include variable climate conditions, growing demands, and continued groundwater overdraft. Based on an actor-oriented examination of who does what with water and why, along with how people interact with hydro-ecological systems and man-made infrastructure, we present a sustainability appraisal of water governance for the Phoenix region. Broadly applicable to other areas, our systems approach to sustainable water governance overcomes prevailing limitations to research and management by: employing a comprehensive and integrative perspective on water systems; highlighting the activities, intentions, and rules that govern various actors, along with the values and goals driving decisions; and, establishing a holistic set of principles for social-ecological system integrity and interconnectivity, resource efficiency and maintenance, livelihood sufficiency and opportunity, civility and democratic governance, intra- and inter-generational equity, and finally, precaution and adaptive capacity. This study also contributes to reforming and innovating governance regimes by illuminating how these principles are being met, or not, in the study area. What is most needed in metropolitan Phoenix is enhanced attention to ecosystem functions and resource maintenance as well as social equity and public engagement in water governance. Overall, key recommendations entail: addressing interconnections across hydrologic units and sub-systems (e.g., land and water), increasing decentralized initiatives for multiple purposes (e.g., ecological and societal benefits of green infrastructure), incorporating justice goals into decisions (e.g., fair allocations and involvement), and building capacity through collaborations and social learning with diverse interests (e.g., scientists, policymakers, and the broader public).

  12. Geologie study off gravels of the Agua Fria River, Phoenix, AZ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langer, W.H.; Dewitt, E.; Adams, D.T.; O'Briens, T.

    2010-01-01

    The annual consumption of sand and gravel aggregate in 2006 in the Phoenix, AZ metropolitan area was about 76 Mt (84 million st) (USGS, 2009), or about 18 t (20 st) per capita. Quaternary alluvial deposits in the modern stream channel of the Agua Fria River west of Phoenix are mined and processed to provide some of this aggregate to the greater Phoenix area. The Agua Fria drainage basin (Fig. 1) is characterized by rugged mountains with high elevations and steep stream gradients in the north, and by broad alluvial filled basins separated by elongated faultblock mountain ranges in the south. The Agua Fria River, the basin’s main drainage, flows south from Prescott, AZ and west of Phoenix to the Gila River. The Waddel Dam impounds Lake Pleasant and greatly limits the flow of the Agua Fria River south of the lake. The southern portion of the watershed, south of Lake Pleasant, opens out into a broad valley where the river flows through urban and agricultural lands to its confluence with the Gila River, a tributary of the Colorado River.

  13. Transit fare prepayment demonstrations in Austin, TX and Phoenix, AZ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bloomfield, P.; Crain, J.

    1979-06-01

    Two matched demonstration projects testing transit fare prepayment innovations in Austin, Texas and Phoenix, Arizona were conducted. The innovations consisted of two consecutive sales of prepaid tickets and passes at discounts of 20% and 40%, accompanied by expansion of sales outlet networks and intensive advertising and promotional campaigns. The demonstrations measured the impacts of these innovations on: (1) the volume and mix of sales of the various transit fare prepayment instruments, (2) transit-riding levels, and (3) transit costs and operations. In addition, special attention was to be given to evaluating the relative cost-effectiveness of the special advertising and promotional campaigns conducted in both sites. Although beyond the scope of the demonstrations, some evaluation information was obtained on the cost and effectiveness of regular transit fare prepayment programs, in their role as adjuncts to transit service.

  14. Study on Bamboo Treatment Technology with CuAz Preservative

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    In order to research the effect of preservative penetrability, CuAz (copper azole) was used for the preservative, and pieces of Moso bamboo (Phyllostachys pubescens) were used for the experimental materials in this study. The vacuum pressure process was used to treat bamboo pieces. The results showed as follows: 1) Main treatment factors were preservative concentration and applied pressure; 2) In the same technology, both the retention and the weight proportion gain of the samples without node were less tha...

  15. Industrial Design: A Phoenix Reborn from the Ashes of Technology Education--A Case History

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenwald, Martin; Feigler, Denis

    2009-01-01

    Like the "phoenix," technology education (TE) can, under the right circumstances, give life to new programs--curricula with different emphases and directions from technology education, yet sharing a common heritage: the belief that applied technology will continue to shape the world. How that shaping process takes place--and the problems that it…

  16. Industrial Design: A Phoenix Reborn from the Ashes of Technology Education--A Case History

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenwald, Martin; Feigler, Denis

    2009-01-01

    Like the "phoenix," technology education (TE) can, under the right circumstances, give life to new programs--curricula with different emphases and directions from technology education, yet sharing a common heritage: the belief that applied technology will continue to shape the world. How that shaping process takes place--and the problems that it…

  17. 76 FR 58035 - Notice of Inventory Completion: U.S. Department of the Interior, Bureau of Reclamation, Phoenix...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-19

    ... Reclamation, Phoenix Area Office, Phoenix, AZ and Arizona State Museum, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Bureau of Reclamation, Phoenix Area... culturally affiliated with the human remain may contact the Bureau of Reclamation, Phoenix Area...

  18. Surface modification technologies; Proceedings of the First International Conference, Phoenix, AZ, Jan. 25-28, 1988

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudarshan, T. S.; Bhat, D. G.

    1988-12-01

    Recent advances in surface treatments for metals are discussed in reviews and reports, with an emphasis on industrial applications. Topics examined include chemical-vapor deposition, physical vapor deposition, electron-beam techniques, plasma surface treatments, ion implantation and ion-assisted coatings, and microanalysis of hard coatings. Consideration is given to microstructural characterization of wear-resistant coatings, electrospark deposition, electroless coatings, laser application techniques, diffusion metallizing, ceramic coatings for high-temperature engine applications, process modeling in thermal laser deposition and etching, and thermochemical modeling of CDV processes.

  19. Phoenix well director{sup R}-rotary steerable tool technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buker, M. [Phoenix Technology Services Ltd., Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2000-06-01

    This paper presented a new technology developed to replace steerable mud motor drilling used in horizontal or directional drilling. The rotary steerable tool (RTS) called the Well Director{sup R} Automatic Directional Drilling System will be marketed and serviced by Phoenix Technology Services Ltd. RTS technology is more efficient and is becoming an economically viable and good alternative to steerable mud motor drilling. The benefits include enhanced rate of penetration, improved hole cleaning, plus the ability to drill extended reach wells. It also offers time and cost savings for oil well operators. In RTS technology, the drill string is continually rotating while steering the bit toward a pre-determined target. Over the past fifteen years, the tool has been in operation in more than 100 wells for the mining industry in Europe. Recent advances in the technology has rendered it commercially viable for the oil and gas industry. The Well Director{sup R} is made up a rotating mandrel which is in constant rotation, and a non-rotating sleeve which stays stationary in the well bore when the tool is functioning. A measurement while drilling (MWD) system with a positive pulser is also included in the non-rotative sleeve. The tool is totally computer controlled. The Well Director{sup R} always knows the orientation of its' four steering ribs in the hole so it can continually monitor which rib has to have pressure applied. Two well tests were successfully completed in the winter of 1999. 1 fig.

  20. Phoenix Production

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Agency for International Development — Phoenix is a commercial off-the-shelf, web-based financial management system configured for USAID. Phoenix provides information about commitments, obligations, and...

  1. Wood Polymer Composites Technology Supporting the Recovery and Protection of Tropical Forests: The Amazonian Phoenix Project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio D. Nobre

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The Amazon Rain Forest has attracted worldwide attention due its large scale services to climate and also due to the green house gas emissions arising from deforestation. Contributing to the later and detrimental to the former, timber logging in the region has very low efficiency (only 16% in the production chain. Such timber extraction, often referred to as selective logging, has been claimed as a sustainable extractive industry, because the forest is said to restore itself through regenerative growth. But forest regeneration in the Amazon occurs naturally only in a very limited scale, resulting that large scale, low efficiency logging poses a big treat to the functional integrity of the biome, supplying to the market only a fraction of what it could if done differently. So, instead of extracting big centennial logs from the forests, the Amazonian Phoenix project proposes that large expanses of degraded lands be reforested using pioneer plants species from the forest itself. These plants have the capacity to heal gaps in the canopy, being able to grow and produce woody biomass in very extreme conditions. The idea is to mimic the regenerative dynamics of the natural ecosystem in short cycle agrosilvicultural production areas, utilizing a variety of technologies to transform raw fibers from these fast growth native plants into a variety of materials with high aggregated value. This communication presents the research on natural fibers by the Polymeric Composites Group within the Amazonian Phoenix Project. Sustainable technologies employing materials with good and responsible ecological footprints are important and necessary stimulus for a change in the destructive economical activities present in the Amazon frontiers. The relatively well established wood polymer composites technology, for example, is a good candidate solution. Two research and development fields are proposed: the first one considers production systems with simple and cheap

  2. Research on Thermal Deep-drawing Technology of Magnesium Alloy(AZ31B) Sheets

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sfihong ZHANG; Kun ZHANG; Zhongtang WANG; Chuanfu YU; Yi XU; Qiang WANG

    2004-01-01

    Forming technology of Mg alloy (AZ31B) sheets can be investigated by thermal deep drawing experiments. In the experiments,the blank holder and die contacting with the blank were heated to the same temperature as the blank by using the heating facility. The circular blank heated in an oven is formed at a temperature range of 100~400℃ to obtain the optimum forming temperature range and the effects of major technical parameters on the workpiece quality. It is found that the blank is brittle at temperatures lower than 200℃. Temperatures higher than 400℃ are not suitable for forming of the sheets because of severe oxidation and wrinkling. AZ31B shows an excellent formability at temperatures from 300 to 350℃ and can be formed into a workpiece with good quality. When the blank holder force is 99 Kn, extruded sheets with a thickness of 1 mm can be formed into cups without wrinkling. Workpieces show strong anisotropic deformation behavior on the flanges.

  3. Processing Technology and Mechanical Properties of Die-Cast Magnesium Alloy AZ91D

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Yan'gai(刘艳改); LIU Wenhui(刘文辉); XIONG Shoumei(熊守美); LIU Baicheng(柳百成); Wang Gang (王罡); MATSUMOTO Yoshihide; MURAKAMI Masayuki

    2004-01-01

    The mechanical properties of magnesium die-casting components can be improved with improved die-casting processing technology. An orthogonal experiment with four factors and three levels (Lq, 34) was used to evaluate the effect of various die-casting processing parameters on the quality and mechanical properties of an AZ91D magnesium alloy cylinder head cover component. The results show that the injection speed and casting and die temperatures all influence the component quality, with the influence of the casting pressure being the smallest. The injection speed and casting pressure are the two most important factors influencing the tensile strength. The best die-casting parameters for the magnesium alloy cylinder head cover component were determined to be a casting temperature of 660℃, a die temperature of 200℃, an injection speed of 70 ms(1, and a casting pressure of 65 MPa. The porosity is one of the most important parameters influencing the casting strength.

  4. Research status and development tendency of welding technology of AZ31B magnesium alloy%AZ31B镁合金焊接技术研究现状及发展方向

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘奋军; 王憨鹰

    2013-01-01

    Welding characteristics of magnesium alloy are analyzed,and welding processes of AZ31B magnesium alloy are introduced,including laser welding,brazing,diffusion welding,friction stir welding,TIG,electron beam welding and so on. The future directions of welding technology of AZ31B magnesium alloy are pointed out.%分析镁合金的焊接特点,综述了近年来AZ31B镁合金的焊接方法,包括激光焊、钎焊、扩散焊、搅拌摩擦焊、TIG焊、电子束焊等,展望了AZ31B镁合金的焊接研究方向。

  5. Phoenix Study

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Phoenix Traffic and Mobile Data. This dataset is associated with the following publication: Baldauf , R., V. Isakov , P. Deshmukh, and A. Venkatram. Influence of...

  6. EnviroAtlas - Metrics for Phoenix, AZ

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — These EnviroAtlas web services support research and online mapping activities related to EnviroAtlas (https://www.epa.gov/enviroatlas). The layers in these web...

  7. Phoenix Robotic Arm

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    A vital instrument on NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander is the robotic arm, which will dig into the icy soil and bring samples back to the science deck of the spacecraft for analysis. In September 2006 at a Lockheed Martin Space Systems clean room facility near Denver, spacecraft technician Billy Jones inspects the arm during the assembly phase of the mission. Using the robotic arm -- built by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena -- the Phoenix mission will study the history of water and search for complex organic molecules in the ice-rich soil. The Phoenix mission is led by Principal Investigator Peter H. Smith of the University of Arizona, Tucson, with project management at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory and development partnership with Lockheed Martin Space Systems. International contributions for Phoenix are provided by the Canadian Space Agency, the University of Neuchatel (Switzerland), the University of Copenhagen, and the Max Planck Institute in Germany. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  8. Phoenix Trenches

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Annotated Version [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Left-eye view of a stereo pair [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Right-eye view of a stereo pair This image is a stereo, panoramic view of various trenches dug by NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander. The images that make up this panorama were taken by Phoenix's Surface Stereo Imager at about 4 p.m., local solar time at the landing site, on the 131st, Martian day, or sol, of the mission (Oct. 7, 2008). In figure 1, the trenches are labeled in orange and other features are labeled in blue. Figures 2 and 3 are the left- and right-eye members of a stereo pair. For scale, the 'Pet Donkey' trench just to the right of center is approximately 38 centimeters (15 inches) long and 31 to 34 centimeters (12 to 13 inches) wide. In addition, the rock in front of it, 'Headless,' is about 11.5 by 8.5 centimeters (4.5 by 3.3 inches), and about 5 centimeters (2 inches) tall. The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  9. Valorization of date palm (Phoenix dactylifera) fruit processing by-products and wastes using bioprocess technology - Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrasekaran, M; Bahkali, Ali H

    2013-04-01

    The date palm Phoenix dactylifera has played an important role in the day-to-day life of the people for the last 7000 years. Today worldwide production, utilization and industrialization of dates are continuously increasing since date fruits have earned great importance in human nutrition owing to their rich content of essential nutrients. Tons of date palm fruit wastes are discarded daily by the date processing industries leading to environmental problems. Wastes such as date pits represent an average of 10% of the date fruits. Thus, there is an urgent need to find suitable applications for this waste. In spite of several studies on date palm cultivation, their utilization and scope for utilizing date fruit in therapeutic applications, very few reviews are available and they are limited to the chemistry and pharmacology of the date fruits and phytochemical composition, nutritional significance and potential health benefits of date fruit consumption. In this context, in the present review the prospects of valorization of these date fruit processing by-products and wastes' employing fermentation and enzyme processing technologies towards total utilization of this valuable commodity for the production of biofuels, biopolymers, biosurfactants, organic acids, antibiotics, industrial enzymes and other possible industrial chemicals are discussed.

  10. Polymicro technologies receives prestigious award from European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN)

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    The CMS Collaboration of CERN presented two awards today to Polymicro Technologies, LLC of Phoenix, AZ in appreciation of their achievements in the development and production of radiation resistant silica optical fibers for use in the CMS detector (1/2 page).

  11. Valorization of date palm (Phoenix dactylifera) fruit processing by-products and wastes using bioprocess technology – Review

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    The date palm Phoenix dactylifera has played an important role in the day-to-day life of the people for the last 7000 years. Today worldwide production, utilization and industrialization of dates are continuously increasing since date fruits have earned great importance in human nutrition owing to their rich content of essential nutrients. Tons of date palm fruit wastes are discarded daily by the date processing industries leading to environmental problems. Wastes such as date pits represent ...

  12. The Phoenix Phenomenon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MICHAELO'NEILL

    2005-01-01

    Saturday evening, and as many as 50 million Chinese viewers are tuned in to the popular program ‘Entertainment Kingdom’aired by Hong Kong-based satellite broad caster Phoenix Television, The show's risqué tone,

  13. City of Phoenix - Energize Phoenix Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laloudakis, Dimitrios J.

    2014-09-29

    Energize Phoenix (EPHX) was designed as an ambitious, large-scale, three-year pilot program to provide energy efficiency upgrades in buildings, along Phoenix’s new Light Rail Corridor – part of a federal effort to reduce energy consumption and stimulate job growth, while simultaneously reducing the country’s carbon footprint and promoting a shift towards a green economy. The program was created through a 2010 competitive grant awarded to the City of Phoenix who managed the program in partnership with Arizona State University (ASU), the state’s largest university, and Arizona Public Service (APS), the state’s largest electricity provider. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Better Buildings Neighborhood Program (BBNP) and the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) of 2009 provided $25M in funding for the EPHX program. The Light Rail Corridor runs through the heart of downtown Phoenix, making most high-rise and smaller commercial buildings eligible to participate in the EPHX program, along with a diverse mix of single and multi-family residential buildings. To ensure maximum impact and deeper market penetration, Energize Phoenix was subdivided into three unique parts: i. commercial rebate program, ii. commercial financing program, and iii. residential program Each component was managed by the City of Phoenix in partnership with APS. Phoenix was fortunate to partner with APS, which already operated robust commercial and residential rebate programs within its service territory. Phoenix tapped into the existing utility contractor network, provided specific training to over 100 contracting firms, and leveraged the APS rebate program structure (energy efficiency funding) to launch the EPHX commercial and residential rebate programs. The commercial finance program was coordinated and managed through a contract with National Bank of Arizona, NBAZ, which also provided project capital leveraging EPHX finance funds. Working in unison, approved contractors

  14. Phoenix Conductivity Probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    This image taken by the Surface Stereo Imager on Sol 49, or the 49th Martian day of the mission (July 14, 2008), shows thermal and electrical conductivity probe on NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander's Robotic Arm. The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is led by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  15. Soil on Phoenix's MECA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    This image shows soil delivery to NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander's Microscopy, Electrochemistry and Conductivity Analyzer (MECA). The image was taken by the lander's Surface Stereo Imager on the 131st Martian day, or sol, of the mission (Oct. 7, 2008). At the bottom of the image is the chute for delivering samples to MECA's microscopes. It is relatively clean due to the Phoenix team using methods such as sprinkling to minimize cross-contamination of samples. However, the cumulative effect of several sample deliveries can be seen in the soil piles on either side of the chute. On the right side are the four chemistry cells with soil residue piled up on exposed surfaces. The farthest cell has a large pile of material from an area of the Phoenix workspace called 'Stone Soup.' This area is deep in the trough at a polygon boundary, and its soil was so sticky it wouldn't even go through the funnel. One of Phoenix's solar panels is shown in the background of this image. The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  16. EnviroAtlas - Phoenix, AZ - Impervious Proximity Gradient

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — In any given 1-square meter point in this EnviroAtlas dataset, the value shown gives the percentage of impervious surface within 1 square kilometer centered over the...

  17. EnviroAtlas - Phoenix, AZ - Near Road Block Group Summary

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas dataset addresses the tree buffer along heavily traveled roads. The roads are interstates, arterials, and collectors within the EnviroAtlas...

  18. EnviroAtlas - Phoenix, AZ - Greenspace Proximity Gradient

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — In any given 1-square meter point in this EnviroAtlas dataset, the value shown gives the percentage of square meters of greenspace within 1/4 square kilometer...

  19. EnviroAtlas - Phoenix, AZ - Near Road Tree Buffer

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas dataset addresses the tree buffer along heavily traveled roads. The roads are interstates, arterials, and collectors within the EnviroAtlas...

  20. EnviroAtlas - Phoenix, AZ - Proximity to Parks

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas dataset shows the approximate walking distance from a park entrance at any given location within the EnviroAtlas community boundary. The zones are...

  1. EnviroAtlas - Phoenix, AZ - Demographics by Block Group

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas dataset is a summary of key demographic groups for the EnviroAtlas community. This dataset was produced by the US EPA to support research and online...

  2. EnviroAtlas - Phoenix, AZ - Land Cover by Block Group

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas dataset describes the percentage of each block group that is classified as impervious, forest, agriculture, and green space. Forest is combination...

  3. EnviroAtlas - Phoenix, AZ - Park Access by Block Group

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas dataset shows the block group population that is within and beyond an easy walking distance (500m) of a park entrance. Park entrances were included...

  4. Phoenix Animation Looking North

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on image for animation This animation is a series of images, taken by NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander's Surface Stereo Imager, combined into a panoramic view looking north from the lander. The area depicted is beyond the immediate workspace of the lander and shows a system of polygons and troughs that connect with the ones Phoenix will be investigating in depth. The images were taken on sol 14 (June 8, 2008) or the 14th Martian day after landing. The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  5. Phoenix Work Area Animation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on image for animation This animation from Sol 1 shows a mosaic of the Phoenix digging area in the Martian terrain. Phoenix scientists are very pleased with this view as the terrain features few rocks an optimal place for digging. The mast of the camera looks disjointed because the photos that comprise this mosaic were taken at different times of day. This video also show some of the lander's instrumentation. The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  6. Soil on Phoenix Deck

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    This image, taken by the Surface Stereo Imager (SSI) of NASA's Phoenix Lander, shows Martian soil piled on top of the spacecraft's deck and some of its instruments. Visible in the upper-left portion of the image are several wet chemistry cells of the lander's Microscopy, Electrochemistry, and Conductivity Analyzer (MECA). The instrument on the lower right of the image is the Thermal and Evolved-Gas Analyzer. The excess sample delivered to the MECA's sample stage can be seen on the deck in the lower left portion of the image. This image was taken on Martian day, or sol, 142, on Saturday, Oct. 19, 2008. Phoenix landed on Mars' northern plains on May 25, 2008. The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  7. Phoenix's Wet Chemistry Lab

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    This is an illustration of the analytical procedure of NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander's Wet Chemistry Lab (WCL) on board the Microscopy, Electrochemistry, and Conductivity Analyzer (MECA) instrument. By dissolving small amounts of soil in water, WCL can determine the pH, the abundance of minerals such as magnesium and sodium cations or chloride, bromide and sulfate anions, as well as the conductivity and redox potential. The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  8. Clumps in Phoenix Scoop

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    This sample of Martian soil was collected by the NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander during the 14th Martian day after landing (June 8, 2008) for later delivery to the lander's Optical Microscope. The Robotic Arm Camera took the picture of the contents of the arm's scoop, about 9 centimeters (3.5 inches) wide. The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  9. Phoenix Robotic Arm Rasp

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    This photograph shows the rasp protruding from the back of the scoop on NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander's Robotic Arm engineering model in the Payload Interoperability Testbed at the University of Arizona, Tucson. This is the position the rasp will assume when it drills into the Martian soil to acquire an icy soil sample for analysis. The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is led by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  10. Phoenix's Wet Chemistry Lab

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    This is an illustration of soil analysis on NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander's Wet Chemistry Lab (WCL) on board the Microscopy, Electrochemistry, and Conductivity Analyzer (MECA) instrument. By dissolving small amounts of soil in water, WCL will attempt to determine the pH, the abundance of minerals such as magnesium and sodium cations or chloride, bromide and sulfate anions, as well as the conductivity and redox potential. The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  11. Phoenix's Snow White Trench

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    A soil sample taken from the informally named 'Snow White' trench at NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander work site produced minerals that indicate evidence of past interaction between the minerals and liquid water. This image was taken by the Surface Stereo Imager on Sol 103, the 103rd day since landing (Sept. 8, 2008). The trench is approximately 23 centimeters (9 inches) long. The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by JPL, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development was by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  12. Double Cups with Phoenix

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1994-01-01

    THIS cup, unearthed at the site of an aristocrat’s tomb (No. 2 Baoshan Tomb) of the Chu State, was a vessel used during weddings in ancient times. According to the earliest account of the vessel, found in the book Liji, a new couple would use it to gargle together, which meant that they would be of one heart and one mind, and that they would love and take care of each other. Shaped like a standing phoenix, the vessel is 17.6 cm. long. The phoenix holds a pearl in its beak and its wings are spread

  13. Soil on Phoenix's TEGA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    This image shows soil on the doors of the Thermal and Evolved Gas Analyzer (TEGA) onboard NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander. The image was taken by the lander's Robotic Arm Camera on the 131st Martian day, or sol, of the mission (Oct. 7, 2008). This sample delivered to TEGA was named 'Rosy Red.' The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  14. The Phoenix Mars Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamppari, Leslie K.; Smith, Peter H.

    2008-01-01

    This slide presentation details the Phoenix Mission which was designed to enhance our understanding of water and the potential for habitability on the north polar regions of Mars. The slides show the instruments and the robotics designed to scrape Martian surface material, and analyze it in hopes of identifying water in the form of ice, and other chemicals.

  15. The technology of preparing green coating by conducting micro-arc oxidation on AZ91D magnesium alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Sheng

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Micro-arc oxidation was applied to AZ91D magnesium alloy by taking K2Cr2O7 as the colouring salt in the silicate system. It was shown that the green coating obtained through performing micro-arc oxidation on magnesium alloy consisted of Mg, Mg2SiO4, MgO, and MgCr2O4 based on analysis of X-ray diffraction (XRD, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM. Among which, MgCr2O4 was the colouring salt; there were something in the lamellar, pit, and convex forms found on the surface of the coating. The coating consisted of a porous, and a compact, layer from the outside to the inside. As demonstrated, the colour of the coating depended on the K2Cr2O7 concentration: it became gradually deeper with the addition of K2Cr2O7 and the increasing micro-arc oxidation time. The corrosion resistance and hardness of the green coating were greater than that of the matrix.

  16. Phoenix Test Sample Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    This image, acquired by NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander's Surface Stereo Imager on Sol 7, the seventh day of the mission (June 1, 2008), shows the so-called 'Knave of Hearts' first-dig test area to the north of the lander. The Robotic Arm's scraping blade left a small horizontal depression above where the sample was taken. Scientists speculate that white material in the depression left by the dig could represent ice or salts that precipitated into the soil. This material is likely the same white material observed in the sample in the Robotic Arm's scoop. The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  17. Phoenix's La Mancha Trench

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    This false color image, taken by NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander's Surface Stereo Imager, was taken on the 131st Martian day, or sol, of the mission (Oct. 7, 2008). The image shows color variations of the trench, informally named 'La Mancha,' and reveals the ice layer beneath the soil surface. The trench's depth is about 5 centimeters deep. The color outline of the shadow at the bottom of the image is a result of sun movement with the combined use of infrared, green, and blue filters. The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  18. Underneath the Phoenix Lander

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    The Robotic Arm Camera on NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander took this image on Oct. 18, 2008, during the 142nd Martian day, or sol, since landing. The flat patch in the center of the image has the informal name 'Holy Cow,' based on researchers' reaction when they saw the initial image of it only a few days after the May 25, 2008 landing. Researchers first saw this flat patch in an image taken by the Robotic Arm Camera on May 30, the fifth Martian day of the mission. The Phoenix mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  19. Effect of ultrasonic cold forging technology as the pretreatment on the corrosion resistance of MAO Ca/P coating on AZ31B Mg alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Lingling, E-mail: daisy_chenlingling@163.com [College of Mechanical Engineering, Beijing Institute of Petrochemical Technology, Beijing 102617 (China); College of Mechanical and Electrical Engineering, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China); Gu, Yanhong, E-mail: gu_yanhong@163.com [College of Mechanical Engineering, Beijing Institute of Petrochemical Technology, Beijing 102617 (China); Liu, Lu, E-mail: liulu@bipt.edu.cn [College of Mechanical Engineering, Beijing Institute of Petrochemical Technology, Beijing 102617 (China); Liu, Shujing, E-mail: liushujing@bipt.edu.cn [College of Mechanical Engineering, Beijing Institute of Petrochemical Technology, Beijing 102617 (China); Hou, Binbin, E-mail: sohu19880815@126.com [School of Engineering and Technology, China University of Geosciences, Beijing 100083 (China); Liu, Qi, E-mail: 13521196884@sina.cn [College of Mechanical Engineering, Beijing Institute of Petrochemical Technology, Beijing 102617 (China); Ding, Haiyang, E-mail: dinghaiyang@bipt.edu.cn [College of Mechanical Engineering, Beijing Institute of Petrochemical Technology, Beijing 102617 (China)

    2015-06-25

    Highlights: • Ultrasonic cold forging technology was used as the pretreatment for MAO coating. • Nano layer with the grain size of 30–80 nm was formed on the UCFT treated surface. • Calcium phosphate contained coating was obtained by MAO process. • The remained nano layer underlying MAO coating could impact the corrosion resistance greatly. - Abstract: A calcium phosphate contained (Ca/P) coating was obtained on AZ31B Mg alloy by micro-arc oxidation (MAO) process under the pretreatment of ultrasonic cold forging technology (UCFT). The surface nanograins were introduced after UCFT pretreatment on AZ31B Mg alloy. Optical microscope (OM) was employed to observe the microstructures of the untreated and UCFT treated samples. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and atomic force microscope (AFM) were employed to observe the microstructures of nanograins and the surface roughness of the UCFT treated Mg alloys. The grain size of the UCFT treated Mg alloy is 48.67 nm and the surface roughness is 17.03 nm. The microstructures and the phase compositions of MAO samples were observed and analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD), respectively. The XRD results show that the coating include Ca/P phase, including hydroxyapatite (Ca{sub 10}(PO{sub 4}){sub 6}(OH){sub 2}), HA), tertiary calcium phosphate (Ca{sub 3}(PO{sub 4}){sub 2}, TCP) and calcium phosphate dehydrate (CaHPO{sub 4}⋅2H{sub 2}O, DCPD). The hardness of the samples was measured by the micro-hardness tester under the loads of 10 g, 25 g and 50 g. 3D topographies of hardness indenter were characterized by 3D profiler. The immersion tests and potentiodynamic polarization tests were used to evaluate the weight loss rate and corrosion current density in simulated body fluid (SBF). The results show that the corrosion resistance of Ca/P MAO coating on Mg alloy was improved greatly by the pretreatment of UCFT.

  20. Soil Fills Phoenix Laboratory Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    This image shows four of the eight cells in the Thermal and Evolved-Gas Analyzer, or TEGA, on NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander. TEGA's ovens, located underneath the cells, heat soil samples so the released gases can be analyzed. Left to right, the cells are numbered 7, 6, 5 and 4. Phoenix's Robotic Arm delivered soil most recently to cell 6 on the 137th Martian day, or sol, of the mission (Oct. 13, 2008). Phoenix's Robotic Arm Camera took this image at 3:03 p.m. local solar time on Sol 138 (Oct. 14, 2008). Phoenix landed on Mars' northern plains on May 25, 2008. The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  1. 南沙港HZ和AZ型组合钢板桩陆上施工技术%Construction technology of Steel Pile Wall Formed by HZ and AZ-section Steel Sheet Pile

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    古建波; 郭生强

    2011-01-01

    介绍了南沙港粮食及通用码头HZ和AZ型组合钢板桩施工技术,对施打钢板桩用的导向架,采用活动式限位装置、防扭曲装置加以改进,加强测量控制,提高了钢板桩施工质量.%In this paper,construction technology of steel pile wall formed by HZ and AZ-section steel sheet pile on land is introduced.By setting up the active spacing equipment and equipment provided against twist in steel guide frame for steel sheet pile driving,the error of HZ and AZ-section steel sheet pile driving meet construction specifications.

  2. Advanced technology optical telescopes IV; Proceedings of the Meeting, Tucson, AZ, Feb. 12-16, 1990. Parts 1 & 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, Lawrence D. (Editor)

    1990-01-01

    The present conference on the current status of large, advanced-technology optical telescope development and construction projects discusses topics on such factors as their novel optical system designs, the use of phased arrays, seeing and site performance factors, mirror fabrication and testing, pointing and tracking techniques, mirror thermal control, structural design strategies, mirror supports and coatings, and the control of segmented mirrors. Attention is given to the proposed implementation of the VLT Interferometer, the first diffraction-limited astronomical images with adaptive optics, a fiber-optic telescope using a large cross-section image-transmitting bundle, the design of wide-field arrays, Hartmann test data reductions, liquid mirrors, inertial drives for telescope pointing, temperature control of large honeycomb mirrors, evaporative coatings for very large telescope mirrors, and the W. M. Keck telescope's primary mirror active control system software.

  3. Phoenix Lidar Operation Animation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on image for animation This is an animation of the Canadian-built meteorological station's lidar, which was successfully activated on Sol 2. The animation shows how the lidar is activated by first opening its dust cover, then emitting rapid pulses of light (resembling a brilliant green laser) into the Martian atmosphere. Some of the light then bounces off particles in the atmosphere, and is reflected back down to the lidar's telescope. This allows the lidar to detect dust, clouds and fog. The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  4. Phoenix Society for Burn Survivors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Medical Professionals Phoenix Society is the leader in connecting the burn recovery community and creating resources for survivors. Since 1977, we have partnered with survivors, families, health care professionals, burn centers, and the fire ...

  5. Animation of Phoenix's Wrist Unlatching

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    This animation shows what happened underneath Phoenix's Robotic Arm wrist on Sol 3. The pin that goes through the loop is what holds the wrist in place. The rotation of the wrist pops the pin free. The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  6. Regional-scale transport of air pollutants: impacts of southern California emissions on Phoenix ground-level ozone concentrations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Li

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In this study, WRF-Chem is utilized at high-resolution (1.333 km grid spacing for the innermost domain to investigate impacts of southern California anthropogenic emissions (SoCal on Phoenix ground-level ozone concentrations ([O3] for a pair of recent exceedance episodes. First, WRF-Chem Control simulations are conducted to evaluate model performance. Compared with surface observations of hourly ozone, CO, NOx, and wind fields, the Control simulations reproduce observed variability well. Simulated [O3] are within acceptance ranges recommended by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA that characterize skillful experiments. Next, the relative contribution of SoCal and Arizona local anthropogenic emissions (AZ to ozone exceedance within the Phoenix metropolitan area is investigated via a trio of sensitivity simulations: (1 SoCal emissions are excluded, with all other emissions as in Control; (2 AZ emissions are excluded with all other emissions as in Control; and (3 SoCal and AZ emissions are excluded (i.e., all anthropogenic emissions are eliminated to account only for biogenic emissions [BEO]. Results for the selected events indicate the impacts of AZ emissions are dominant on daily maximum 8 h average (DMA8 [O3] in Phoenix. SoCal contributions to DMA8 [O3] for the Phoenix metropolitan area range from a few ppbv to over 30 ppbv (10–30% relative to Control experiments. [O3] from SoCal and AZ emissions exhibit the expected diurnal characteristics that are determined by physical and photochemical processes, while BEO contributions to DMA8 [O3] in Phoenix also play a key role. Finally, ozone transport processes and pathways within the lower troposphere are investigated. During daytime, pollutants (mainly ozone near the southern California coasts are pumped into the planetary boundary-layer over the southern California desert through the mountain chimney and pass channel effects, aiding eastward transport along the desert air basins in southern

  7. Differences between the Texas phoenix palm phytoplasma and the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ntushk

    Key words: nusA, hflB, phytoplasma, Texas Phoenix decline. INTRODUCTION .... The reagent made a total volume of 50 µL and the PCR reaction consisted of 35 cycles, ... The ligated PCR product was transformed into Top 10 chemically competent. Escherichia coli cells (Invitrogen Life Technologies, Carlsbad, CA,. USA).

  8. Phoenix Telemetry Processor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanboli, Alice

    2013-01-01

    Phxtelemproc is a C/C++ based telemetry processing program that processes SFDU telemetry packets from the Telemetry Data System (TDS). It generates Experiment Data Records (EDRs) for several instruments including surface stereo imager (SSI); robotic arm camera (RAC); robotic arm (RA); microscopy, electrochemistry, and conductivity analyzer (MECA); and the optical microscope (OM). It processes both uncompressed and compressed telemetry, and incorporates unique subroutines for the following compression algorithms: JPEG Arithmetic, JPEG Huffman, Rice, LUT3, RA, and SX4. This program was in the critical path for the daily command cycle of the Phoenix mission. The products generated by this program were part of the RA commanding process, as well as the SSI, RAC, OM, and MECA image and science analysis process. Its output products were used to advance science of the near polar regions of Mars, and were used to prove that water is found in abundance there. Phxtelemproc is part of the MIPL (Multi-mission Image Processing Laboratory) system. This software produced Level 1 products used to analyze images returned by in situ spacecraft. It ultimately assisted in operations, planning, commanding, science, and outreach.

  9. Structure evolution of AZ61 magnesium alloy in SIMA process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAN Hong; ZHANG Fa-yun; JIE Xiao-ping

    2005-01-01

    The effect of prior compressive deformation, isothermal temperature and holding time on the structure of AZ61 magnesium alloy fabricated by strain-induced melt activation(SIMA) processing was investigated. The specimens were subjected under deformation ratios of 0%, 22% and 40% and various heat treatment time and temperature regions. The results indicate that the ideal technological parameters of semi-solid AZ61 alloy produced with non-dendrites are recommended as 22% (prior compressive deformation), 595 ℃ (heat treatment temperature) and 40 min(time). The as-cast AZ61 magnesium alloy isn't fit for semi-solid forming.

  10. Flyover Animation of Phoenix Workspace

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on image for animation This animated 'flyover' of the workspace of NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander's was created from images taken by the Surface Stereo Imager on Sol 14 (June 8, 2008), or the 14th Martian day after landing. The visualization uses both of the camera's 'eyes' to provide depth perception and ranging. The camera is looking north over the workspace. The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  11. Discovering Diversity Downtown: Questioning Phoenix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talmage, Craig A.; Dombrowski, Rosemarie; Pstross, Mikulas; Peterson, C. Bjørn; Knopf, Richard C.

    2015-01-01

    Applied community learning experiences for university students are promising endeavors in downtown urban environments. Past research is applied to help better comprehend a community engagement initiative conducted in downtown Phoenix, Arizona. The initiative aimed to illuminate the socio-cultural diversity of the downtown area utilizing…

  12. Hot Cracking in AZ31 and AZ61 Magnesium Alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    C.J. Huang; C.M. Cheng; C.P. Chou; F.H. Chen

    2011-01-01

    This paper examined the impact of the number of thermal cycles and augmented strain on hot cracking in AZ31 and AZ61 magnesium alloy. Statistical analyses were performed. Following observation using a scanning electron microscope (SEM), an energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS) was used for component analysis. Results showed that Al content in magnesium alloy has an effect on hot cracking susceptibility. In addition, the nonequilibrium solidification process produced segregation in Al content, causing higher liquid Mg-alloy rich Al content at grain boundaries, and resulting into liquefied grain boundaries of partially melted zone (PMZ). In summary, under multiple thermal cycles AZ61 produced serious liquation cracking. AZ61 has higher (6 wt%) Al content and produced much liquefied Mg17Al12 at grain boundaries under multiple thermal cycles. The liquefied Mg17Al12 were pulled apart and hot cracks formed at weld metal HAZ due to the augmented strain. Since AZ31 had half the Al content of AZ61, its hot-cracking susceptibility was lower than AZ61. In addition, AZ61 showed longer total crack length (TCL) in one thermal cycle compared to that in three thermal cycles. This phenomenon was possibly due to high-temperature gasification of Al during the welding process, which resulted in lower overall Al content. Consequently, shorter hot cracks exhibited in three thermal cycles. It was found the Al content of AZ31 and AZ61 can be used to assess the hot-cracking susceptibility.

  13. Phoenix Deepens Trenches on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    The Surface Stereo Imager on NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander took this false color image on Oct. 21, 2008, during the 145th Martian day, or sol, since landing. The bluish-white areas seen in these trenches are part of an ice layer beneath the soil. The trench on the upper left, called 'Dodo-Goldilocks,' is about 38 centimeters (15 inches) long and 4 centimeters (1.5 inches) deep. The trench on the right, called 'Upper Cupboard,' is about 60 centimeters (24 inches) long and 3 centimeters (1 inch) deep. The trench in the lower middle is called 'Stone Soup.' The Phoenix mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  14. Declining Sunshine for Phoenix Lander

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    The yellow line on this graphic indicates the number of hours of sunlight each sol, or Martian day, at the Phoenix landing site's far-northern latitude, beginning with the entire Martian day (about 24 hours and 40 minutes) for the first 90 sols, then declining to no sunlight by about sol 300. The blue tick mark indicates that on Sol 124 (Sept. 29, 2008), the sun is above the horizon for about 20 hours. The brown vertical bar represents the period from Nov. 18 to Dec. 24, 2008, around the 'solar conjunction,' when the sun is close to the line between Mars and Earth, affecting communications. The green vertical rectangle represents the period from February to November 2009 when the Phoenix lander is expected to be encased in carbon-dioxide ice.

  15. Images from Phoenix's MECA Instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    The image on the upper left is from NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander's Optical Microscope after a sample informally called 'Sorceress' was delivered to its silicon substrate on the 38th Martian day, or sol, of the mission (July 2, 2008). A 3D representation of the same sample is on the right, as seen by Phoenix's Atomic Force Microscope. This is 200 times greater magnification than the view from the Optical Microscope, and the most highly magnified image ever seen from another world. The image shows four round pits, only 5 microns in depth, that were micromachined into the silicon substrate, which is the background plane shown in red. This image has been processed to reflect the levelness of the substrate. A Martian particle only one micrometer, or one millionth of a meter, across is held in the upper left pit. The rounded particle shown at the highest magnification ever seen from another world is a particle of the dust that cloaks Mars. Such dust particles color the Martian sky pink, feed storms that regularly envelop the planet and produce Mars' distinctive red soil. The Optical Microscope and the Atomic Force Microscope are part of Phoenix's Microscopy, Electrochemistry and Conductivity Analyzer instrument. The AFM was developed by a Swiss-led consortium, with Imperial College London producing the silicon substrate that holds sampled particles. The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  16. RS-34 Phoenix (Peacekeeper Post Boost Propulsion System) Utilization Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esther, Elizabeth A.; Kos, Larry; Burnside, Christopher G.; Bruno, Cy

    2013-01-01

    The Advanced Concepts Office (ACO) at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in conjunction with Pratt & Whitney Rocketdyne conducted a study to evaluate potential in-space applications for the Rocketdyne produced RS-34 propulsion system. The existing RS-34 propulsion system is a remaining asset from the de-commissioned United States Air Force Peacekeeper ICBM program, specifically the pressure-fed storable bipropellant Stage IV Post Boost Propulsion System, renamed Phoenix. MSFC gained experience with the RS-34 propulsion system on the successful Ares I-X flight test program flown in October 2009. RS-34 propulsion system components were harvested from stages supplied by the USAF and used on the Ares I-X Roll control system (RoCS). The heritage hardware proved extremely robust and reliable and sparked interest for further utilization on other potential in-space applications. MSFC is working closely with the USAF to obtain RS-34 stages for re-use opportunities. Prior to pursuit of securing the hardware, MSFC commissioned the Advanced Concepts Office to understand the capability and potential applications for the RS-34 Phoenix stage as it benefits NASA, DoD, and commercial industry. As originally designed, the RS-34 Phoenix provided in-space six-degrees-of freedom operational maneuvering to deploy multiple payloads at various orbital locations. The RS-34 Phoenix Utilization Study sought to understand how the unique capabilities of the RS-34 Phoenix and its application to six candidate missions: 1) small satellite delivery (SSD), 2) orbital debris removal (ODR), 3) ISS re-supply, 4) SLS kick stage, 5) manned GEO servicing precursor mission, and an Earth-Moon L-2 Waypoint mission. The small satellite delivery and orbital debris removal missions were found to closely mimic the heritage RS-34 mission. It is believed that this technology will enable a small, low-cost multiple satellite delivery to multiple orbital locations with a single boost. For both the small

  17. The Phoenix Mission and its Current Landing Site options

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamppari, LK; Smith, P.; Arvidson, RE; Phoenix Team

    2005-08-01

    Phoenix is the 2007 Mars Scout program mission that will send a lander and suite of instruments to study the north polar region on Mars. Central goals for the Phoenix mission are to study the recent history of water as written into the high latitude soils and to search for habitable zones. In order to do this, Phoenix carries a comprehensive suite of seven instruments. This suite includes 3 cameras, an optical microscope and an atomic-force microscope, allowing imaging at spatial scales ranging from kms, for large scale geomorphological studies, to microns, for examining single grain sizes and shapes. Phoenix also has a meteorology suite, which includes atmospheric temperature measurements at 3 levels, atmospheric pressure, and an upward-looking lidar, for dust and water-ice cloud detection. A robotic arm will dig a trench into the surface near the lander to collect and deliver samples to on-board chemistry and mineralogy experiments. These experiments will allow the detection of the mineral makeup of the soil as well as its water content, pH, salt content, and organic content. An important aspect of this exciting mission is the selection of the landing site, within the 65-72 deg N latitude band. Both science and safety concerns will play into this selection. Work is ongoing to determine the most favorable location, with consideration focusing on the best ice/soil ratio, the shallowest slopes and fewest large rocks. Current sites under consideration will be discussed. Selected in 2003, Phoenix was recently confirmed to proceed into Phase C/D of spacecraft development. This research was funded by a NASA Grant and carried out by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology.

  18. Phoenix Robotic Arm connects with `Alice'

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander's Robotic Arm comes into contact with a rock informally named 'Alice' near the 'Snow White' trench. This image was acquired by Phoenix's NASA's Surface Stereo Imager on July 13 during the 48th Martian day, or sol, since Phoenix landed. For scale, the width of the scoop at the end of the arm is about 8.5 centimeters (3.3 inches). The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  19. Bronze Dragons and Phoenix Table

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    The table is one of the oldest kinds of furniture in China.Most, however, haven’t survived as they were made ofbamboo or wood, The discovery of this bronze table gives usa chance to see a real object from the Warring States Periodfor the first time. This bronze table was unearthed from the tomb of a kingof the Zhongshan Kingdom during the Warring States Periodat today’s Pingshan County, Hebei Province. The stand isformed from four two-winged dragons and four phoenixes

  20. Another Phoenix VA director leaves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robbins RA

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated after 150 words. The Arizona Republic reports that the director at the Phoenix VA Medical Center, Deborah Amdur, will retire after only 9 months for health reasons (1. Amdur will be replaced by Barbara Fallen, director of the VA Loma Linda Healthcare System. Fallen will be interim director until a permanent replacement for Amdur can be found. This is the fifth hospital director since former Director Sharon Helman was removed in mid-2014 amid the nationwide veterans health-care scandal that was first exposed at the Phoenix VA. The Veterans Integrated Service Network (VISN in Gilbert, which oversees the VA Medical Center in Arizona, New Mexico and West Texas has also been through a series of 4 directors since Susan Bowers retired under pressure in the wake of the VA scandal. Marie Weldon, current acting regional director, also oversees the Los Angeles-based VA Desert Pacific Healthcare System. Weldon described Fallen as “an experienced leader who ...

  1. Rasp Tool on Phoenix Robotic Arm Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    This close-up photograph taken at the Payload Interoperability Testbed at the University of Arizona, Tucson, shows the motorized rasp protruding from the bottom of the scoop on the engineering model of NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander's Robotic Arm. The rasp will be placed against the hard Martian surface to cut into the hard material and acquire an icy soil sample for analysis by Phoenix's scientific instruments. The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is led by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  2. Phoenix's Probe Inserted in Martian Soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    The Phoenix Mars lander's robotic-arm camera took this image of the spacecraft's thermal and electrical-conductivity probe (TECP) inserted into Martian soil on day 149 of the mission. Phoenix landed on Mars' northern plains on May 25, 2008, landing. The robotic-arm camera acquired this image at 16:02:41 local solar time. The camera pointing was elevation -72.6986 degrees and azimuth 2.1093 degrees. The Phoenix mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  3. Phoenix - The First Mars Scout Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Barry; Shotwell, Robert

    2008-01-01

    As the first of the new Mars Scouts missions, the Phoenix project was selected by NASA in August of 2003. Four years later, almost to the day, Phoenix was launched from Cape Canaveral Air Station and successfully injected into an interplanetary trajectory on its way to Mars. On May 25, 2008 Phoenix conducted the first successful powered decent on Mars in over 30 years. This paper will highlight some of the key changes since the 2008 IEEE paper of the same name, as well as performance through cruise, landing at the north pole of Mars and some of the preliminary results of the surface mission.

  4. Forging of Mg-alloys AZ31 and AZ80

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viehweger, B.; Karabet, A.; Duering, M. [Brandenburg University of Technology, Interdisciplinary Research Centre for Lightweight Materials ' ' Panta Rhei' ' , Konrad-Wachsmann-Allee 17, 03046 Cottbus (Germany); Schaeffer, L. [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre (Brazil)

    2005-05-01

    Mg-wrought alloys recently became an engineer material of constantly increasing interest. The mechanical properties of extruded Mg-feedstock of the alloys AZ80 and AZ31 indicate their suitability for automotive applications in form of high-quality forgings. Therefore a detailed knowledge about the forming behaviour is of particular importance. In order to compare mechanical properties of available Mg-feedstock qualities compression tests at room temperature have been carried out by applying batches of AZ31- and AZ80-feedstock. Cylindrical specimens were made out of received continuously casted as well as extruded AZ31- and AZ80 - rods. A quantitative analysis of Mg-feedstock's microstructure has been carried out. The characterization of the deformability of applied Mg-feedstock under hot working conditions could be performed by means of uniaxial plain strain upsetting tests at temperatures between 300 and 450 C as well as logarithmic strain rates of 10{sup -1}, 1 and 10s{sup -1}. It is shown that the chosen parameter range ensures an enhanced deformability of continuously as well as extruded Mg-feedstock. The subsequently carried out determination of microstructural evolution could be related to obtained flow stress curves of applied batches of Mg-feedstock. Furthermore, FVM/FEM-systems have been employed in order to design a simplified geometry of heated forging dies suitable for forging tests. The tests have been carried out by means of a hydraulic press. During the tests their punch velocity has been varied between 1 and 40 mm/s. Hence numerically simulated results could be confirmed by practical tests. Exemplary forgings of a simplified shape were made out of all applied batches of Mg-feedstock. No remarkable failures have been detected. (Abstract Copyright [2005], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.) [German] Das Interesse an Mg-Knetlegierungen als Konstruktionswerkstoff fuer automobile Anwendung ist in juengster Zeit stark gewachsen. Daher ist eine detaillierte

  5. Phoenix66 WCG之旅

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Byron

    2006-01-01

    WCG已经过去近两个月了,在这段时间里面各种比赛铺天盖地的涌来,是我们几乎淡忘了在意大利Monza三个中国英雄的身影。而庄传海Phoenix66(以下简称66)也为我们奉献了数场精彩的比赛,虽然身处强者之林未能成功出线,但是他在比赛中表现出来的一个职业选手所应该具有的素质十分值得我们学习。下面就让我们来感受一下比赛给我们带来的激情吧。

  6. Innovative science experiments using Phoenix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, B. P. Ajith; Satyanarayana, V. V. V.; Singh, Kundan; Singh, Parmanand

    2009-09-01

    A simple, flexible and very low cost hardware plus software framework for developing computer-interfaced science experiments is presented. It can be used for developing computer-interfaced science experiments without getting into the details of electronics or computer programming. For developing experiments this is a middle path between push-button systems and the develop-from-scratch approach. Emphasis is on leveraging the power of personal computers for experiment control, data acquisition and the mathematical analysis of data. The language 'Python' is chosen for data acquisition and analysis. This article explains the architecture of Phoenix (Physics with Home-made Equipment and Innovative Experiments) along with some sample experiments. The hardware design is open and the project is totally based on free software.

  7. Martian Surface after Phoenix's Conductivity Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander's Robotic Arm Camera took this image on Sol 71 (August 6, 2008), the 71st Martian day after landing. The shadow shows the outline of Phoenix's Thermal and Electrical Conductivity Probe, or TECP. The holes seen in the Martian surface were made by this instrument to measure the soil's conductivity. A fork-like probe inserted into the soil checks how well heat and electricity move through the soil from one prong to another. The measurements completed Wednesday ran from the afternoon of Phoenix's 70th Martian day, or sol, to the morning of Sol 71. The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  8. Chlorine Salts at the Phoenix Landing Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanley, J.; Horgan, B.

    2016-09-01

    Although chlorine salts (perchlorates, chlorides) are known to exist at the Phoenix landing site, their distribution and type have not been positively identified yet. We look for these salts through a novel NIR remote sensing technique.

  9. Phoenix Conductivity Probe Inserted into Martian Soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander inserted the four needles of its thermal and conductivity probe into Martian soil during the 98th Martian day, or sol, of the mission and left it in place until Sol 99 (Sept. 4, 2008). The Robotic Arm Camera on Phoenix took this image on the morning of Sol 99 while the probe's needles were in the ground. The science team informally named this soil target 'Gandalf.' The thermal and conductivity probe measures how fast heat and electricity move from one needle to an adjacent one through the soil or air between the needles. Conductivity readings can be indicators about water vapor, water ice and liquid water. The probe is part of Phoenix's Microscopy, Electrochemistry and Conductivity suite of instruments. The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  10. Phoenix Telltale Movie with Clouds, Sol 103

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander's telltale catches a breeze as clouds move over the landing site on Sol 103 (Sept. 7, 2008), the 103rd Martian day since landing. Phoenix's Surface Stereo Imager took this series of images during daily telltale monitoring around 3 p.m. local solar time and captured the clouds moving over the landing site. Phoenix can measure wind speed and direction by imaging the telltale, which is about about 10 centimeters (4 inches) tall. The telltale was built by the University of Aarhus, Denmark. The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  11. Flyover Video of Phoenix Work Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on image for animation This video shows an overhead view of NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander and the work area of the Robotic Arm. The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  12. Phoenix Landing Site Indicated on Global View

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    NASA's Phoenix Mars Mission landed at 68.2 degrees north latitude, 234.2 degrees east longitude. The far-northern location of the site is indicated on this global view from the Mars Orbiter Camera on NASA's Mars Global Surveyor. The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by JPL, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development was by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  13. Phoenix Metropolitan Model Deployment Initiative Evaluation Report

    OpenAIRE

    Zimmerman, C; Marks, J.; Jenq, J.; Cluett, Chris; DeBlasio, Allan; Lappin, Jane; Rakha, Hesham A.; Wunderlich, K

    2000-01-01

    This report presents the evaluation results of the Phoenix, Arizona Metropolitan Model Deployment Initiative (MMDI). The MMDI was a three-year program of the Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS) Joint Program Office of the U.S. Department of Transportation. It focused on aggressive deployment of ITS at four sites across the United States, including the metropolitan areas of San Antonio, Seattle, NY/NJ/Connecticut as well as Phoenix. The focus of the deployments was on integration of exist...

  14. EnviroAtlas - Phoenix, AZ - 51m Riparian Buffer Vegetated Cover

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas dataset describes the percentage of a 51-m riparian buffer that is vegetated. There is a potential for decreased water quality in areas where the...

  15. EnviroAtlas - Phoenix, AZ - 15m Riparian Buffer Forest Cover

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas dataset describes the percentage of a 15-m riparian buffer that is forested. There is a potential for decreased water quality in areas where the...

  16. EnviroAtlas - Phoenix, AZ - Residents with Potential Window Views of Water by Block Group

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas dataset describes the block group population and the percentage of the block group population that has potential views of water bodies. A potential...

  17. EnviroAtlas - Phoenix, AZ - Estimated Intersection Density of Walkable Roads

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas dataset estimates the intersection density of walkable roads within a 750 meter radius of any given 10 meter pixel in the community. Intersections...

  18. Opportunities and Challenges for Integrating Sustainability Education into K-12 Schools: Case Study Phoenix, AZ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redman, Erin

    2013-01-01

    Teacher education for sustainability is a central part of integrating sustainability into classrooms and schools. However, educating for sustainability is not limited to increased content knowledge; rather it encompasses different forms of knowledge that embrace the normative, dynamic and action-oriented nature of sustainability. Curriculum for a…

  19. EnviroAtlas - Phoenix, AZ - Estimated Percent Tree Cover Along Walkable Roads

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas dataset estimates tree cover along walkable roads. The road width is estimated for each road and percent tree cover is calculated in a 8.5 meter...

  20. EnviroAtlas - Phoenix, AZ - Residents with Potential Window Views of Trees by Block Group

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas dataset shows the total block group population and the percentage of the block group population that has little access to potential window views of...

  1. EnviroAtlas - Phoenix, AZ - Tree Cover Configuration and Connectivity, Water Background Web Service

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas web service supports research and online mapping activities related to EnviroAtlas (https://www.epa.gov/enviroatlas). The EnviroAtlas Durham, NC...

  2. EnviroAtlas - Phoenix, AZ - 51m Riparian Buffer Forest Cover

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas dataset describes the percentage of a 51-m riparian buffer that is forested. There is a potential for decreased water quality in areas where the...

  3. EnviroAtlas - Phoenix, AZ - 15m Riparian Buffer Vegetated Cover

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas dataset describes the percentage of a 15-m riparian buffer that is vegetated. There is a potential for decreased water quality in areas where the...

  4. EnviroAtlas - Phoenix, AZ - Demographics by Block Group Web Service

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas web service supports research and online mapping activities related to EnviroAtlas (https://www.epa.gov/enviroatlas). This EnviroAtlas dataset is a...

  5. EnviroAtlas - Phoenix, AZ - Estimated Percent Green Space Along Walkable Roads

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas dataset estimates green space along walkable roads. Green space within 25 meters of the road centerline is included and the percentage is based on...

  6. EnviroAtlas - Phoenix, AZ - Riparian Buffer Land Cover by Block Group

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas dataset describes the percentage of different land cover types within 15- and 50-meters of hydrologically connected streams, rivers, and other water...

  7. EnviroAtlas - Phoenix, AZ - Greenspace Around Schools by Block Group

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas data set shows the number of schools in each block group in the EnviroAtlas community boundary as well as the number of schools where less than 25%...

  8. EnviroAtlas - Phoenix, AZ - Tree Cover Configuration and Connectivity, Water Background

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas dataset categorizes forest land cover into structural elements (e.g. core, edge, connector, etc.). In this community, forest is only trees &...

  9. EnviroAtlas - Phoenix, AZ - Historic Places by Census Block Group

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas dataset portrays the total number of historic places located within each Census Block Group (CBG). The historic places data were compiled from the...

  10. Results from the Phoenix Urban Heat Island (UHI) experiment: effects at the local, neighbourhood and urban scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    di Sabatino, S.; Leo, L. S.; Hedquist, B. C.; Carter, W.; Fernando, H. J. S.

    2009-04-01

    This paper reports on the analysis of results from a large urban heat island experiment (UHI) performed in Phoenix (AZ) in April 2008. From 1960 to 2000, the city of Phoenix experienced a minimum temperature rise of 0.47 °C per decade, which is one of the highest rates in the world for a city of this size (Golden, 2004). Contemporaneously, the city has recorded a rapid enlargement and large portion of the land and desert vegetation have been replaced by buildings, asphalt and concrete (Brazel et al., 2007, Emmanuel and Fernando, 2007). Besides, model predictions show that minimum air temperatures for Phoenix metropolitan area in future years might be even higher than 38 °C. In order to make general statements and mitigation strategies of the UHI phenomenon in Phoenix and other cities in hot arid climates, a one-day intensive experiment was conducted on the 4th-5th April 2008 to collect surface and ambient temperatures within various landscapes in Central Phoenix. Inter alia, infrared thermography (IRT) was used for UHI mapping. The aim was to investigate UHI modifications within the city of Phoenix at three spatial scales i.e. the local (Central Business District, CBD), the neighborhood and the city scales. This was achieved by combining IRT measurements taken at ground level by mobile equipment (automobile-mounted and pedicab) and at high elevation by a helicopter. At local scale detailed thermographic images of about twenty building façades and several street canyons were collected. In total, about two thousand images were taken during the 24-hour campaign. Image analysis provides detailed information on building surface and pavement temperatures at fine resolution (Hedquist et al. 2009, Di Sabatino et al. 2009). This unique dataset allows us several investigations on local air temperature dependence on albedo, building thermal inertia, building shape and orientation and sky view factors. Besides, the mosaic of building façade temperatures are being analyzed

  11. Comparison of some Phoenix and gusev soil types

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Walter..[], Goetz; Hviid, S.F.; Madsen, Morten Bo

    2010-01-01

    The comparison of soil particles at the Phoenix landing site and in Gusev Crater provides clues on their origin and global distribution. Some unusual Phoenix particles are possibly of (more) local origin, as they appear to be absent in Gusev dunes.......The comparison of soil particles at the Phoenix landing site and in Gusev Crater provides clues on their origin and global distribution. Some unusual Phoenix particles are possibly of (more) local origin, as they appear to be absent in Gusev dunes....

  12. Martian Dust Collected by Phoenix's Arm

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    This image from NASA's Phoenix Lander's Optical Microscope shows particles of Martian dust lying on the microscope's silicon substrate. The Robotic Arm sprinkled a sample of the soil from the Snow White trench onto the microscope on July 2, 2008, the 38th Martian day, or sol, of the mission after landing. Subsequently, the Atomic Force Microscope, or AFM, zoomed in one of the fine particles, creating the first-ever image of a particle of Mars' ubiquitous fine dust, the most highly magnified image ever seen from another world. The Atomic Force Microscope was developed by a Swiss-led consortium in collaboration with Imperial College London. The AFM is part of Phoenix's Microscopy, Electrochemistry and Conductivity Analyzer instrument. The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  13. Dust Storm Moving Near Phoenix Lander

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    This series of images show the movement of several dust storms near NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander. These images were taken by the lander's Surface Stereo Imager (SSI) on the 137th Martian day, or sol, of the mission (Oct. 13, 2008). These images were taken about 50 seconds apart, showing the formation and movement of dust storms for nearly an hour. Phoenix scientists are still figuring out the exact distances these dust storms occurred from the lander, but they estimate them to be about 1 to 2 kilometers (.6 or 1.2 miles) away. The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  14. Winds at the Phoenix landing site

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holstein-Rathlou, C.; Gunnlaugsson, H.P.; Merrison, J.P.

    2010-01-01

    Wind speeds and directions were measured on the Phoenix Lander by a mechanical anemometer, the so-called Telltale wind indicator. Analysis of images of the instrument taken with the onboard imager allowed for evaluation of wind speeds and directions. Daily characteristics of the wind data...... ± 3 mm, respectively. The Telltale wind data are used to suggest that Heimdal crater is a source of nighttime temperature fluctuations. Deviations between temperatures measured at various heights are explained as being due to winds passing over the Phoenix Lander. Events concerning sample delivery...... and frost formation are described and discussed. Two different mechanisms of dust lifting affecting the Phoenix site are proposed based on observations made with Mars Color Imager on Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter and the Telltale. The first is related to evaporation of the seasonal CO2 ice and is observed up...

  15. Phoenix Deepens Trenches on Mars (3D)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    The Surface Stereo Imager on NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander took this anaglyph on Oct. 21, 2008, during the 145th Martian day, or sol. Phoenix landed on Mars' northern plains on May 25, 2008. The trench on the upper left, called 'Upper Cupboard,' is about 60 centimeters (24 inches) long and 3 centimeters (1 inch) deep. The trench in the middle,called 'Ice Man,' is about 30 centimeters (12 inches) long and 3 centimeters (1 inch) deep. The trench on the right, called 'La Mancha,' is about 31 centimeters (12 inches) and 5 centimeters (2 inches) deep. The Phoenix mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  16. Phoenix Deploying its Robotic Arm Elbow

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    This animated gif is compiled of images from Phoenix's Stereo Surface Imager (SSI) taken on Sol 3. It shows the stair-step motion used to unstow the arm from a protective covering called the biobarrier. The last two moves allow the arm to stand straight up. The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  17. Phoenix Deploying its Robotic Arm Elbow

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    This animated gif is compiled of images from Phoenix's Stereo Surface Imager (SSI) taken on Sol 3. It shows the stair-step motion used to unstow the arm from a protective covering called the biobarrier. The last two moves allow the arm to stand straight up. The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  18. Martian Soil Inside Phoenix's Robotic Arm Scoop

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    This image from NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander's Robotic Arm Camera (RAC) shows material from the Martian surface captured by the Robotic Arm (RA) scoop during its first test dig and dump on the seventh Martian day of the mission, or Sol 7 (June 1, 2008). The test sample shown was taken from the digging area informally known as 'Knave of Hearts.' The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  19. Phoenix Carries Soil to Wet Chemistry Lab

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    This image taken by the Surface Stereo Imager on NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander shows the lander's Robotic Arm scoop positioned over the Wet Chemistry Lab delivery funnel on Sol 29, the 29th Martian day after landing, or June 24, 2008. The soil will be delivered to the instrument on Sol 30. This image has been enhanced to brighten the scene. The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  20. Phoenix's La Mancha Trench in 3D

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    This anaglyph, taken by NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander's Surface Stereo Imager, was taken on the 131st Martian day, or sol, of the mission (Oct. 7, 2008). The anaglyph highlights the depth of the trench, informally named 'La Mancha,' and reveals the ice layer beneath the soil surface. The trench's depth is about 5 centimeters deep. The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  1. Meteor Crater, AZ

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    -term research and technology program designed to examine Earth's land, oceans, atmosphere, ice and life as a total integrated system.The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of ASTER will provide scientists in numerous disciplines with critical information for surface mapping, and monitoring dynamic conditions and temporal change. Example applications are: monitoring glacial advances and retreats; monitoring potentially active volcanoes; identifying crop stress; determining cloud morphology and physical properties; wetlands evaluation; thermal pollution monitoring; coral reef degradation; surface temperature mapping of soils and geology; and measuring surface heat balance.Size: 15 x 30 km (9 x 18 miles) Location: 35.1 deg. North lat., 111.0 deg. West long. Orientation: Northeast at top Image Data: ASTER bands 1,2, and 3. Original Data Resolution: 15 m Date Acquired: May 17, 2001

  2. Phoenix Conductivity Probe Inserted in Martian Soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    This series of six images from the Robotic Arm Camera on NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander records the first time that the four spikes of the lander's thermal and electrical conductivity probe were inserted into Martian soil. The images were taken on July 8, 2008, during the Phoenix mission's 43rd Martian day, or sol, since landing. The insertion visible from the shadows cast on the ground on that sol was a validation test of the procedure. The spikes on the probe are about 1.5 centimeters or half an inch long. The science team will use the probe tool to assess how easily heat and electricity move through the soil from one spike to another. Such measurements can provide information about frozen or unfrozen water in the soil. The probe is mounted on the 'knuckle' of Phoenix's Robotic Arm. It has already been used for assessing water vapor in the atmosphere when it is held above the ground. The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is led by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  3. Phoenix Conductivity Probe with Shadow and Toothmark

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander inserted the four needles of its thermal and conductivity probe into Martian soil during the 98th Martian day, or sol, of the mission and left it in place until Sol 99 (Sept. 4, 2008). The Robotic Arm Camera on Phoenix took this image on the morning of Sol 99 after the probe was lifted away from the soil. The imprint left by the insertion is visible below the probe, and a shadow showing the probe's four needles is cast on a rock to the left. The thermal and conductivity probe measures how fast heat and electricity move from one needle to an adjacent one through the soil or air between the needles. Conductivity readings can be indicators about water vapor, water ice and liquid water. The probe is part of Phoenix's Microscopy, Electrochemistry and Conductivity suite of instruments. The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  4. Gender Roles in Chika Unigwe's The Phoenix

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper examines gender roles in Chika Unigwe's The Phoenix (2007). In ... of man. The rise of feminist movements/campaigns in Africa can be traced more to ..... Ortner, Sherry B. “Reading America: Preliminary Notes on Class and Culture.

  5. Digibaro pressure instrument onboard the Phoenix Lander

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harri, A.-M.; Polkko, J.; Kahanpää, H. H.; Schmidt, W.; Genzer, M. M.; Haukka, H.; Savijarv1, H.; Kauhanen, J.

    2009-04-01

    The Phoenix Lander landed successfully on the Martian northern polar region. The mission is part of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA's) Scout program. Pressure observations onboard the Phoenix lander were performed by an FMI (Finnish Meteorological Institute) instrument, based on a silicon diaphragm sensor head manufactured by Vaisala Inc., combined with MDA data processing electronics. The pressure instrument performed successfully throughout the Phoenix mission. The pressure instrument had 3 pressure sensor heads. One of these was the primary sensor head and the other two were used for monitoring the condition of the primary sensor head during the mission. During the mission the primary sensor was read with a sampling interval of 2 s and the other two were read less frequently as a check of instrument health. The pressure sensor system had a real-time data-processing and calibration algorithm that allowed the removal of temperature dependent calibration effects. In the same manner as the temperature sensor, a total of 256 data records (8.53 min) were buffered and they could either be stored at full resolution, or processed to provide mean, standard deviation, maximum and minimum values for storage on the Phoenix Lander's Meteorological (MET) unit.The time constant was approximately 3s due to locational constraints and dust filtering requirements. Using algorithms compensating for the time constant effect the temporal resolution was good enough to detect pressure drops associated with the passage of nearby dust devils.

  6. More Soil Delivered to Phoenix Lab

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    This image, taken by NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander's Surface Stereo Imager, documents the delivery of a soil sample from the 'Snow White' trench to the Wet Chemistry Laboratory. A small pile of soil is visible on the lower edge of the second cell from the top.This deck-mounted lab is part of Phoenix's Microscopy, Electrochemistry and Conductivity Analyzer (MECA). The delivery was made on Sept. 12, 2008, which was Sol 107 (the 107th Martian day) of the mission, which landed on May 25, 2008. The Wet Chemistry Laboratory mixes Martian soil with an aqueous solution from Earth as part of a process to identify soluble nutrients and other chemicals in the soil. Preliminary analysis of this soil confirms that it is alkaline, and composed of salts and other chemicals such as perchlorate, sodium, magnesium, chloride and potassium. This data validates prior results from that same location, said JPL's Michael Hecht, the lead scientist for MECA. In the coming days, the Phoenix team will also fill the final four of eight single-use ovens on another soil-analysis instrument, the Thermal and Evolved Gas Analyzer, or TEGA. The team's strategy is to deliver as many samples as possible before the power produced by Phoenix's solar panels declines due to the end of the Martian summer. The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  7. Assessing Habitability: Lessons from the Phoenix Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoker, Carol R.

    2013-01-01

    The Phoenix mission's key objective was to search for a habitable zone. The Phoenix lander carried a robotic arm with digging scoop to collect soil and icy material for analysis with an instrument payload that included volatile mineral and organic analysis(3) and soil ionic chemistry analysis (4). Results from Phoenix along with theoretical modeling and other previous mission results were used to evaluate the habitability of the landing site by considering four factors that characterize the environments ability to support life as we know it: the presence of liquid water, the presence of an energy source to support metabolism, the presence of nutrients containing the fundamental building blocks of life, and the absence of environmental conditions that are toxic to or preclude life. Phoenix observational evidence for the presence of liquid water (past or present) includes clean segregated ice, chemical etching of soil grains, calcite minerals in the soil and variable concentrations of soluble salts5. The maximum surface temperature measured was 260K so unfrozen water can form only in adsorbed films or saline brines but warmer climates occur cyclically on geologically short time scales due to variations in orbital parameters. During high obliquity periods, temperatures allowing metabolism extend nearly a meter into the subsurface. Phoenix discovered 1%w/w perchlorate salt in the soil, a chemical energy source utilized by a wide range of microbes. Nutrient sources including C, H, N, O, P and S compounds are supplied by known atmospheric sources or global dust. Environmental conditions are within growth tolerance for terrestrial microbes. Summer daytime temperatures are sufficient for metabolic activity, the pH is 7.8 and is well buffered and the projected water activity of a wet soil will allow growth. In summary, martian permafrost in the north polar region is a viable location for modern life. Stoker et al. presented a formalism for comparing the habitability of

  8. A study of weldability and fracture modes in electron beam weldments of AZ series magnesium alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chi, C.-T. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan (China) and System Manufacturing Center, Chung-Shan Institute of Science and Technology, PO Box 90008-14, Sanxia 237, Taipei, Taiwan (China)]. E-mail: joseph.mse92g@nctu.edu.tw; Chao, C.-G. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan (China)]. E-mail: c_g_chao@hotmail.com; Liu, T.-F. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan (China)]. E-mail: coe@cc.nctu.edu.tw; Wang, C.-C. [Graduate School of Industrial Design and Architecture, Shih-Chien University, Taipei 104, Taiwan (China)]. E-mail: zcwang@mail.usc.edu.tw

    2006-11-05

    Given the growing need for environmental protection and lightweight construction, electron beam welding (EBW) is becoming the most important welding technology because it can compensate for the poor formability of magnesium alloys. This paper examines interactions between the properties of three AZ series magnesium alloys and welding conditions. The EBW process can yield four kinds of defect in a weld: cavities, the heat-affected zone (HAZ), undercuts, and root concavities. These defects obviously induce stress concentrations in the weld, and may seriously damage its strength. Additionally, the distribution of precipitates ({gamma} phase, Mg{sub 17}Al{sub 12}) in the fusion zone (FZ) changes from a relatively small number of scattered particles to a dense population of dendrites as the Al content of the magnesium alloy increases. Under excessive tensile stress, alloy weldments break in one of two fracture modes: an irregular FZ fracture, or a regular HAZ fracture. AZ31B usually exhibits the former mode and AZ91D the latter, while AZ61A exhibits each mode half the time. The overall weldability, which depends on the random distribution of these precipitates and defects, is found to be greatest for the AZ61A alloy. The best process window, on the other hand, is found for the AZ91D alloy. Finally, we obtain optimum parameters for the EBW process and empirical formulae for the weldment strength as a function of these parameters. These results are closely related to each other.

  9. Microstructures of AZ91D alloy solidified during electromagnetic stirring

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MAO Wei-min; ZHEN Zi-sheng; CHEN Hong-tao

    2005-01-01

    With the help of an electromagnetic stirring device self-made and alloy melt quenching technology,the effect of electromagnetic stirring parameters on the microstructures of semi-solid AZ91D alloy was mainly studied at the stirring frequency of 200 Hz.The experimental results show that when the stirring power rises,the primary α-Mg rosettes in the semi-solid melt will bear stronger man-made temperature fluctuation and the root remelting effect of the dendritic arms is promoted so that the spherical primary α-Mg grains become much more and rounder.If the stirring frequency is 200 Hz,the ideal semi-solid microstructure of AZ91D magnesium alloy can be obtained when the stirring power is increased to 6.0 kW.If the stirring frequency is 200 Hz and the stirring power is 6.0 kW,it is found that the lower cooling rate is favorable for the spherical primary α-Mg grains to be developed during the electromagnetic stirring stage.If the AZ91D magnesium alloy billet prepared during electromagnetic stirring at the stirring frequency of 200 Hz and the stirring power of 6.0 kW is reheated to the solidus and liquidus temperature region,the primary α-Mg grain's shape will get more spherical,so it is very advantageous to the semi-solid thixoforming process.

  10. Overnight Changes Recorded by Phoenix Conductivity Probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    This graph presents simplified data from overnight measurements by the Thermal and Electrical Conductivity Probe on NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander from noon of the mission's 70th Martian day, or sol, to noon the following sol (Aug. 5 to Aug. 6, 2008). The graph shows that water disappeared from the atmosphere overnight, at the same time that electrical measurements detected changes consistent with addition of water to the soil. Water in soil appears to increase overnight, when water in the atmosphere disappears. The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  11. How Phoenix Creates Color Images (Animation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on image for animation This simple animation shows how a color image is made from images taken by Phoenix. The Surface Stereo Imager captures the same scene with three different filters. The images are sent to Earth in black and white and the color is added by mission scientists. By contrast, consumer digital cameras and cell phones have filters built in and do all of the color processing within the camera itself. The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASAaE(TM)s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  12. Phoenix Robotic Arm Scoop with Rasp

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    This drawing shows a side view of NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander's scoop with various tools for acquiring soil, icy soil and ice samples. The front blade, at left, is for scraping. A secondary blade can scrape hard materials. The motorized rasp, protruding at the bottom on the image, can penetrate the hard icy soil and acquire the cuttings produced through the rear chamber of the scoop. The rasp is a tungsten carbide cutting bit mounted within a pivoting housing that allows the bit to protrude during sample acquisition. The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is led by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  13. Phoenix Robotic Arm's Workspace After 90 Sols

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    During the first 90 Martian days, or sols, after its May 25, 2008, landing on an arctic plain of Mars, NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander dug several trenches in the workspace reachable with the lander's robotic arm. The lander's Surface Stereo Imager camera recorded this view of the workspace on Sol 90, early afternoon local Mars time (overnight Aug. 25 to Aug. 26, 2008). The shadow of the the camera itself, atop its mast, is just left of the center of the image and roughly a third of a meter (one foot) wide. The workspace is on the north side of the lander. The trench just to the right of center is called 'Neverland.' The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  14. Phoenix's Laser Beam in Action on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on image to view the animation The Surface Stereo Imager camera aboard NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander acquired a series of images of the laser beam in the Martian night sky. Bright spots in the beam are reflections from ice crystals in the low level ice-fog. The brighter area at the top of the beam is due to enhanced scattering of the laser light in a cloud. The Canadian-built lidar instrument emits pulses of laser light and records what is scattered back. The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  15. Sprinkle Test by Phoenix's Robotic Arm (Movie)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander used its Robotic Arm during the mission's 15th Martian day since landing (June 9, 2008) to test a 'sprinkle' method for delivering small samples of soil to instruments on the lander deck. This sequence of four images from the spacecraft's Surface Stereo Imager covers a period of 20 minutes from beginning to end of the activity. In the single delivery of a soil sample to a Phoenix instrument prior to this test, the arm brought the scooped up soil over the instrument's opened door and turned over the scoop to release the soil. The sprinkle technique, by contrast, holds the scoop at a steady angle and vibrates the scoop by running the motorized rasp located beneath the scoop. This gently jostles some material out of the scoop to the target below. For this test, the target was near the upper end the cover of the Microscopy, Electrochemistry and Conductivity Analyzer instrument suite, or MECA. The cover is 20 centimeters (7.9 inches) across. The scoop is about 8.5 centimeters (3.3 inches) across. Based on the test's success in delivering a small quantity and fine-size particles, the Phoenix team plans to use the sprinkle method for delivering samples to MECA and to the Thermal and Evolved-Gas Analyzer, or TEGA. The next planned delivery is to MECA's Optical Microscope, via the port in the MECA cover visible at the bottom of these images. The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  16. Zenith Movie showing Phoenix's Lidar Beam (Animation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on image for animation A laser beam from the Canadian-built lidar instrument on NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander can be seen in this contrast-enhanced sequence of 10 images taken by Phoenix's Surface Stereo Imager on July 26, 2008, during early Martian morning hours of the mission's 61st Martian day after landing. The view is almost straight up and includes about 1.5 kilometer (about 1 mile) of the length of the beam. The camera, from its position close to the lidar on the lander deck, took the images through a green filter centered on light with wavelength 532 nanometers, the same wavelength of the laser beam. The movie has been artificially colored to to approximately match the color that would be seen looking through this filter on Mars. Contrast is enhanced to make the beam more visible. The lidar beam can be seen extending from the lower right to the upper right, near the zenith, as it reflects off particles suspended in the atmosphere. Particles that scatter the beam directly into the camera can be seen to produce brief sparkles of light. In the background, dust can be seen drifting across the sky pushed by winds aloft. The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  17. Digging Movie from Phoenix's Sol 18

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    The Surface Stereo Imager on NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander recorded the images combined into this movie of the lander's Robotic Arm enlarging and combining the two trenches informally named 'Dodo' (left) and 'Goldilocks.' The 21 images in this sequence were taken over a period of about 2 hours during Phoenix's Sol 18 (June 13, 2008), or the 18th Martian day since landing. The main purpose of the Sol 18 dig was to dig deeper for learning the depth of a hard underlying layer. A bright layer, possibly ice, was increasingly exposed as the digging progressed. Further digging and scraping in the combined Dodo-Goldilocks trench was planned for subsequent sols. The combined trench is about 20 centimeters (about 8 inches) wide. The depth at the end of the Sol 18 digging is 5 to 6 centimeters (about 2 inches). The Goldilocks trench was the source of soil samples 'Baby Bear' and 'Mama Bear,' which were collected on earlier sols and delivered to instruments on the lander deck. The Dodo trench was originally dug for practice in collecting and depositing soil samples. The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  18. Abell 1033: birth of a radio phoenix

    CERN Document Server

    de Gasperin, F; van Weeren, R J; Dawson, W A; Brüggen, M; Bonafede, A; Simionescu, A

    2015-01-01

    Extended steep-spectrum radio emission in a galaxy cluster is usually associated with a recent merger. However, given the complex scenario of galaxy cluster mergers, many of the discovered sources hardly fit into the strict boundaries of a precise taxonomy. This is especially true for radio phoenixes that do not have very well defined observational criteria. Radio phoenixes are aged radio galaxy lobes whose emission is reactivated by compression or other mechanisms. Here, we present the detection of a radio phoenix close to the moment of its formation. The source is located in Abell 1033, a peculiar galaxy cluster which underwent a recent merger. To support our claim, we present unpublished Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope and Chandra observations together with archival data from the Very Large Array and the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. We discover the presence of two sub-clusters displaced along the N-S direction. The two sub-clusters probably underwent a recent merger which is the cause of a moderately per...

  19. Spectroscopic Classification of ASASSN-16az

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prieto, J. L.; Rich, J.; Shappee, B. J.

    2016-02-01

    We obtained an optical spectrum (range 360-920 nm) of ASASSN-16az (ATel #8614) on UT 2016 Feb 2.4 with WFCCD mounted on the du Pont 2.5m telescope at Las Campanas Observatory. Cross-correlation with a library of SN spectra using SNID (Blondin & Tonry 2007, ApJ, 666, 1024) shows that ASASSN-16az is a normal Type Ia at +10 days.

  20. Rapid coating of AZ31 magnesium alloy with calcium deficient hydroxyapatite using microwave energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ren, Yufu, E-mail: Yufu.Ren@rockets.utoledo.edu [Department of Mechanical, Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering, The University of Toledo, Toledo, OH (United States); Zhou, Huan [Department of Mechanical, Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering, The University of Toledo, Toledo, OH (United States); Institute of Biomedical Engineering and Health Sciences, Changzhou University, Changzhou, Jiangsu (China); Nabiyouni, Maryam [Department of Bioengineering, The University of Toledo, Toledo, OH (United States); Bhaduri, Sarit B. [Department of Mechanical, Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering, The University of Toledo, Toledo, OH (United States); Division of Dentistry, The University of Toledo, Toledo, OH (United States)

    2015-04-01

    Due to their unique biodegradability, magnesium alloys have been recognized as suitable metallic implant materials for degradable bone implants and bioresorbable cardiovascular stents. However, the extremely high degradation rate of magnesium alloys in physiological environment has restricted its practical application. This paper reports the use of a novel microwave assisted coating technology to improve the in vitro corrosion resistance and biocompatibility of Mg alloy AZ31. Results indicate that a dense calcium deficient hydroxyapatite (CDHA) layer was uniformly coated on a AZ31 substrate in less than 10 min. Weight loss measurement and SEM were used to evaluate corrosion behaviors in vitro of coated samples and of non-coated samples. It was seen that CDHA coatings remarkably reduced the mass loss of AZ31 alloy after 7 days of immersion in SBF. In addition, the prompt precipitation of bone-like apatite layer on the sample surface during immersion demonstrated a good bioactivity of the CDHA coatings. Proliferation of osteoblast cells was promoted in 5 days of incubation, which indicated that the CDHA coatings could improve the cytocompatibility of the AZ31 alloy. All the results suggest that the CDHA coatings, serving as a protective layer, can enhance the corrosion resistance and biological response of magnesium alloys. Furthermore, this microwave assisted coating technology could be a promising method for rapid surface modification of biomedical materials. - Highlights: • A microwave assisted coating process for biodegradable Mg alloy. • CDHA coatings were successfully developed on AZ31 alloy in minutes. • The as-deposited CDHA coatings significantly reduced the degradation rate of AZ31 alloy. • The CDHA coated AZ31 alloy showed good bioactivity and biocompatibility in vitro. • The microwave assisted coating process can be used as rapid surface modification for bioimplants.

  1. Semi-solid metal processing of aluminum alloy A356 and magnesium alloy AZ91: Comparison based on metallurgical consideration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kleiner, S.; Beffort, O. [Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Testing and Research, EMPA Thun, CH-3602 Thun (Switzerland); Ogris, E.; Uggowitzer, P.J. [Institute of Metallurgy, ETH Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, CH-8092 Zuerich (Switzerland)

    2003-09-01

    Thixocasting or rheocasting of AZ and AM magnesium alloys continues to be a problematic case in semi-solid processing. The comparison with the aluminum thixo alloy A356 shows that the metallurgical and physical properties of the Mg alloy AZ91 are little compatible with this technology: The conclusions from this study are of fundamental importance for future developments in this field of research. (Abstract Copyright [2003], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  2. Implementation of a quality management system at the PHOENIX facility (CryoMaK)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urbach, Elisabeth, E-mail: elisabeth.urbach@kit.edu; Bagrets, Nadezda; Weiss, Klaus-Peter

    2013-10-15

    Within a variety of mechanical tests in the Cryogenic Material Test Facility Karlsruhe (CryoMaK) at Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) the PHOENIX facility was prepared for multiple standard tensile tests in liquid helium, liquid nitrogen and at room temperature. With the multiple specimens holder 10 specimens can be tested within one cool down one after another. A quality management system is needed for ensuring reproducible preconditions. For the guarantee of the competence of the laboratory and the measurement equipment, a quality management system was implemented and prepared for accreditation according to DIN EN ISO/IEC 17025 (ISO 17025). The implementation of a quality management system allows high precision test results included the estimation of measurement uncertainty. This paper gives an overview of the management and technical requirements for the accreditation of the PHOENIX testing facility.

  3. Influence of Procedure Parameters on Rheological Property of Semi-Solid AZ91D Magnesium Alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiang Yunxi; Xie Shuisheng; Li Xinggang; Li Lei

    2004-01-01

    Semi-solid AZ91D magnesium alloy was investigated in isothermal steady-state condition. The influence of stirring technological parameters such as stirring temperature and shear rate to apparent viscosity of semi-solid alloy slurry was discussed. Apparent viscosity increases with stirring temperature decreases at the same shear rate. At the same stirring temperature, apparent viscosity decreases rapidly at first with shear rate increases, and then apparent viscosity decreases slowly with shear rate increases, when shear rate reaches a certain value, apparent viscosity appears tiny increase. According to the experimental data, the relation between solid volume fraction and apparent viscosity of semi-solid AZ9l D alloy at shear rate 238 s- 1 is fitted by regression method, it supplies useful data to the numerical simulation of semi-solid AZ91D alloy die casting process.

  4. Vertical Distribution of Water at Phoenix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamppari, L. K.; Lemmon, M. T.

    2011-01-01

    Phoenix results, combined with coordinated observations from the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter of the Phoenix lander site, indicate that the water vapor is nonuniform (i.e., not well mixed) up to a calculated cloud condensation level. It is important to understand the mixing profile of water vapor because (a) the assumption of a well-mixed atmosphere up to a cloud condensation level is common in retrievals of column water abundances which are in turn used to understand the seasonal and interannual behavior of water, (b) there is a long history of observations and modeling that conclude both that water vapor is and is not well-mixed, and some studies indicate that the water vapor vertical mixing profile may, in fact, change with season and location, (c) the water vapor in the lowest part of the atmosphere is the reservoir that can exchange with the regolith and higher amounts may have an impact on the surface chemistry, and (d) greater water vapor abundances close to the surface may enhance surface exchange thereby reducing regional transport, which in turn has implications to the net transport of water vapor over seasonal and annual timescales.

  5. Schematic Animation of Phoenix's Microscope Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on image for animation This animation shows the workings of the microscope station of the Microscopy, Electrochemistry and Conductivity Analyzer (MECA) instrument suite of NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander. Samples are delivered to the horizontal portion of the sample wheel (yellow) that pokes outside an opening in the box enclosure. The wheel rotates to present the sample to the microscopes. The Optical Microscope (red) can see particles a little smaller than one-tenth the diameter of a human hair. The Atomic Force Microscope (pink) can see particles forty time smaller. The samples are on a variety of substrate surfaces, the small circles on the beveled edge of the sample wheel. For scale, the diameter of the wheel is about 14 centimeters (5.5 inches). Each substrate is a circle 3 millimeters (0.1 inch) in diameter. The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  6. The Phoenix Mars Lander Robotic Arm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonitz, Robert; Shiraishi, Lori; Robinson, Matthew; Carsten, Joseph; Volpe, Richard; Trebi-Ollennu, Ashitey; Arvidson, Raymond E.; Chu, P. C.; Wilson, J. J.; Davis, K. R.

    2009-01-01

    The Phoenix Mars Lander Robotic Arm (RA) has operated for over 150 sols since the Lander touched down on the north polar region of Mars on May 25, 2008. During its mission it has dug numerous trenches in the Martian regolith, acquired samples of Martian dry and icy soil, and delivered them to the Thermal Evolved Gas Analyzer (TEGA) and the Microscopy, Electrochemistry, and Conductivity Analyzer (MECA). The RA inserted the Thermal and Electrical Conductivity Probe (TECP) into the Martian regolith and positioned it at various heights above the surface for relative humidity measurements. The RA was used to point the Robotic Arm Camera to take images of the surface, trenches, samples within the scoop, and other objects of scientific interest within its workspace. Data from the RA sensors during trenching, scraping, and trench cave-in experiments have been used to infer mechanical properties of the Martian soil. This paper describes the design and operations of the RA as a critical component of the Phoenix Mars Lander necessary to achieve the scientific goals of the mission.

  7. Vertical Distribution of Water at Phoenix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamppari, L. K.; Lemmon, M. T.

    2011-01-01

    Phoenix results, combined with coordinated observations from the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter of the Phoenix lander site, indicate that the water vapor is nonuniform (i.e., not well mixed) up to a calculated cloud condensation level. It is important to understand the mixing profile of water vapor because (a) the assumption of a well-mixed atmosphere up to a cloud condensation level is common in retrievals of column water abundances which are in turn used to understand the seasonal and interannual behavior of water, (b) there is a long history of observations and modeling that conclude both that water vapor is and is not well-mixed, and some studies indicate that the water vapor vertical mixing profile may, in fact, change with season and location, (c) the water vapor in the lowest part of the atmosphere is the reservoir that can exchange with the regolith and higher amounts may have an impact on the surface chemistry, and (d) greater water vapor abundances close to the surface may enhance surface exchange thereby reducing regional transport, which in turn has implications to the net transport of water vapor over seasonal and annual timescales.

  8. The Phoenix Mars Lander Robotic Arm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonitz, Robert; Shiraishi, Lori; Robinson, Matthew; Carsten, Joseph; Volpe, Richard; Trebi-Ollennu, Ashitey; Arvidson, Raymond E.; Chu, P. C.; Wilson, J. J.; Davis, K. R.

    2009-01-01

    The Phoenix Mars Lander Robotic Arm (RA) has operated for over 150 sols since the Lander touched down on the north polar region of Mars on May 25, 2008. During its mission it has dug numerous trenches in the Martian regolith, acquired samples of Martian dry and icy soil, and delivered them to the Thermal Evolved Gas Analyzer (TEGA) and the Microscopy, Electrochemistry, and Conductivity Analyzer (MECA). The RA inserted the Thermal and Electrical Conductivity Probe (TECP) into the Martian regolith and positioned it at various heights above the surface for relative humidity measurements. The RA was used to point the Robotic Arm Camera to take images of the surface, trenches, samples within the scoop, and other objects of scientific interest within its workspace. Data from the RA sensors during trenching, scraping, and trench cave-in experiments have been used to infer mechanical properties of the Martian soil. This paper describes the design and operations of the RA as a critical component of the Phoenix Mars Lander necessary to achieve the scientific goals of the mission.

  9. Spatio-Temporal Analysis of Urban Heat Island and Urban Metabolism by Satellite Imagery over the Phoenix Metropolitan Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Q.; Zhan, S.; Kuai, X.; Zhan, Q.

    2015-12-01

    The goal of this research is to combine DMSP-OLS nighttime light data with Landsat imagery and use spatio-temporal analysis methods to evaluate the relationships between urbanization processes and temperature variation in Phoenix metropolitan area. The urbanization process is a combination of both land use change within the existing urban environment as well as urban sprawl that enlarges the urban area through the transformation of rural areas to urban structures. These transformations modify the overall urban climate environment, resulting in higher nighttime temperatures in urban areas compared to the surrounding rural environment. This is a well-known and well-studied phenomenon referred to as the urban heat island effect (UHI). What is unknown is the direct relationship between the urbanization process and the mechanisms of the UHI. To better understand this interaction, this research focuses on using nighttime light satellite imagery to delineate and detect urban extent changes and utilizing existing land use/land cover map or newly classified imagery from Landsat to analyze the internal urban land use variations. These data are combined with summer and winter land surface temperature data extracted from Landsat. We developed a time series of these combined data for Phoenix, AZ from 1992 to 2013 to analyze the relationships among land use change, land surface temperature and urban growth.

  10. Project Phoenix: A Summary of SETI Observations and Results, 1995 - 2004

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backus, P. R.; Project Phoenix Team

    2004-05-01

    Project Phoenix was a Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence (SETI) that observed nearly 800 stars within about 80 parsecs over the available frequencies in the microwave spectrum from 1200 to 3000 MHz with a resolution of 0.7 Hz. The search had three major observing campaigns using the Parkes 64 meter, the NRAO 140 Foot, and the Arecibo 305 meter antennas. Phoenix used real time signal detection and immediate verification of possible ETI signals. The search looked for narrowband signals that were continuously present, or pulsed regularly, and allowed for frequency drift rates of up to about 1 Hz per second. A database of terrestrial signals found in the previous week was used to match against detections for each observation. Candidate signals, i.e., those not in the database, were checked immediately with a "pseudo-interferometric" observation using a second, distant antenna, or by simple on-off observations if the second antenna was unavailable. While millions of signals were detected, all proved to be from terrestrial technology. In conclusion, we can set upper limits on the power of narrowband transmitters in the vicinity of nearby stars. Project Phoenix was the privately-funded continuation of the NASA Targeted Search SETI program and we gratefully acknowledge the use of NASA equipment on long term loan through 2002. The search was supported by contributions from Bernard M. Oliver, William and Rosemary Hewlett, Gordon and Betty Moore, the David and Lucile Packard Foundation, and the Paul G. Allen Foundation.

  11. Animation of Panorama of Phoenix Landing Area Looking Southeast

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on image for animation This is an animation of panoramic images taken by NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander's Surface Stereo Imager on Sol 15 (June 9, 2008), the 15th Martian day after landing. The panorama looks to the southeast and shows rocks casting shadows, polygons on the surface and as the image looks to the horizon, Phoenix's backshell gleams in the distance. The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  12. Power lines Phoenix and the making of the modern southwest

    CERN Document Server

    Needham, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    In 1940, Phoenix was a small, agricultural city of sixty-five thousand, and the Navajo Reservation was an open landscape of scattered sheepherders. Forty years later, Phoenix had blossomed into a metropolis of 1.5 million people and the territory of the Navajo Nation was home to two of the largest strip mines in the world. Five coal-burning power plants surrounded the reservation, generating electricity for export to Phoenix, Los Angeles, and other cities. Exploring the postwar developments of these two very different landscapes, Power Lines tells the story of the far-reaching environmental a

  13. Biochemistry Games: "AZ-Quiz" and "Jeopardy!"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostejnska, Milada; Klimova, Helena

    2011-01-01

    "AZ-Quiz" and "Jeopardy!" are popular television shows and serve as the basis for in-class games designed to support and diversify chemistry instruction at the high school level. Both games were created in Microsoft PowerPoint, which is an easily accessible and controllable instrument that enables the creation of engaging animation. The use of…

  14. 78 FR 57923 - Arizona Disaster #AZ-00029

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-20

    ... ADMINISTRATION Arizona Disaster AZ-00029 AGENCY: Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a notice of an Administrative declaration of a disaster for the State of Arizona dated 09/13/2013. Incident: Yarnell Hill Fire. Incident Period: 06/28/2013 through 07/10/2013. Effective Date:...

  15. 76 FR 42156 - Arizona Disaster #AZ-00016

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-18

    ... ADMINISTRATION Arizona Disaster AZ-00016 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a notice of an Administrative declaration of a disaster for the State of Arizona dated 07/11/2011. Incident: Monument Fire. Incident Period: 06/12/2011 and continuing. Effective Date:...

  16. 76 FR 45644 - Arizona Disaster #AZ-00016

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-29

    ... is hereby amended to modify the incident description for this disaster from Monument Fire to Monument... ADMINISTRATION Arizona Disaster AZ-00016 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Amendment 1. SUMMARY: This is an amendment of the Administrative declaration of disaster for the State of Arizona dated...

  17. Comparison of corrosion behaviors of AZ31, AZ91,AM60 and ZK60 magnesium alloys

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENG Ying-liang; QIN Ting-wei; WANG Hui-min; ZHANG Zhao

    2009-01-01

    The corrosion behaviours of four kinds of rolled magnesium alloys of AZ31, AZ91, AM60 and ZK60 were studied in 1 mol/L sodium chloride solution. The results of EIS and potentiodynamic polarization show that the corrosion resistance of the four materials is ranked as ZK60>AM60>AZ31>AZ91. The corrosion processes of the four magnesium alloys were also analyzed by SEM and energy dispersive spectroscopy(EDS). The results show that the corrosion patterns of the four alloys are localized corrosion and the galvanic couples formed by the second phase particles and the matrix are the main source of the localized corrosion of magnesium alloys. The corrosion resistance of the different magnesium alloys has direct relationship with the concentration of alloying elements and microstructure of magnesium alloys. The ratio of the β phase in AZ91 is higher than that in AZ31 and the β phase can form micro-galvanic cell with the alloy matrix, as a result, the corrosion resistance of AZ31 will be higher than AZ91. The manganese element in AM60 magnesium alloy can form the second phase particle of AlMnFe, which can reduce the Fe content in magnesium alloy matrix, purifying the microstructure of alloy, as a result, the corrosion resistance of AM60 is improved. However, due to the more noble galvanic couples of AlMnFe and matrix, the microscopic corrosion morphology of AM60 is more localized. The zirconium element in ZK60 magnesium alloy can refine grain, form stable compounds with Fe and Si, and purify the composition of alloy, which results in the good corrosion resistance of ZK60 magnesium alloy.

  18. HYDRAULICS, LA PAZ COUNTY, AZ

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Recent developments in digital terrain and geospatial database management technology make it possible to protect this investment for existing and future projects to...

  19. Tank 241-AZ-101 tank characterization plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schreiber, R.D.

    1995-02-06

    The Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board has advised the DOE to concentrate the near-term sampling and analysis activities on identification and resolution of safety issues. The Data Quality Objective (DQO) process was chosen as a tool to be used in the resolution of safety issues. As a result, A revision in the Federal Facilities Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) milestone M-44 has been made, which states that ``A Tank Characterization Plan (TCP) will also be developed for each double-shell tank (DST) and single-shell tank (SST) using the DQO process. Development of TCPs by the DQO process is intended to allow users to ensure their needs will be met and that resources are devoted to gaining only necessary information``. This document satisfies that requirement for Tank 241-AZ-101 (AZ-101) sampling activities. Tank AZ-101 is currently a non-Watch List tank, so the only DQOs applicable to this tank are the safety screening DQO and the compatibility DQO, as described below. The contents of Tank AZ-101, as of October 31, 1994, consisted of 3,630 kL (960 kgal) of dilute non-complexed waste and aging waste from PUREX (NCAW, neutralized current acid waste). Tank AZ-101 is expected to have two primary layers. The bottom layer is composed of 132 kL of sludge, and the top layer is composed of 3,500 kL of supernatant, with a total tank waste depth of approximately 8.87 meters.

  20. Tank 241-AZ-102 tank characterization plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schreiber, R.D.

    1995-02-06

    The Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board has advised the DOE to concentrate the near-term sampling and analysis activities on identification and resolution of safety issues. The Data Quality Objective (DQO) process was chosen as a tool to be used in the resolution of safety issues. As a result, a revision in the Federal Facilities Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) milestone M-44 has been made, which states that ``A Tank Characterization Plan (TCP) will also be developed for each double-shell tank (DST) and single-shell tank (SST) using the DQO process ... Development of TCPs by the DQO process is intended to allow users to ensure their needs will be met and that resources are devoted to gaining only necessary information``. This document satisfies that requirement for tank 241-AZ-102 (AZ-102) sampling activities. Tank AZ-102 is currently a non-Watch List tank, so the only DQOs applicable to this tank are the safety screening DQO and the compatibility DQO, as described below. The current contents of Tank AZ-102, as of October 31, 1994, consisted of 3,600 kL (950 kgal) of dilute non-complexed waste and aging waste from PUREX (NCAW, neutralized current acid waste). Tank AZ-102 is expected to have two primary layers. The bottom layer is composed of 360 kL of sludge, and the top layer is composed of 3,240 kL of supernatant, with a total tank waste depth of approximately 8.9 meters.

  1. Working End of Robotic Arm on Phoenix

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Annotated Version This illustration shows some of the components on and near the end of the robotic arm on NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander. Primary and secondary blades on the scoop will aid in the collection of soil samples. A powered rasp will allow the arm to sample an icy layer expected to be about as hard as concrete. The thermal and electrical conductivity probe, which is one part of the Microscopy, Electrochemistry and Conductivity Analyzer, will assess how heat and electrons move through the soil from one spike to another of a four-spike electronic fork that will be pushed into the soil at different stages of digging by the arm.

  2. CRED REA Coral Population Parameters at Howland, Phoenix Islands, 2004

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Belt transects along 2 consecutively-placed, 25m transect lines were surveyed as part of Rapid Ecological Assessments conducted at 3 sites at Howland in the Phoenix...

  3. Telecommunications Relay Support of the Mars Phoenix Lander Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Charles D., Jr.; Erickson, James K.; Gladden, Roy E.; Guinn, Joseph R.; Ilott, Peter A.; Jai, Benhan; Johnston, Martin D.; Kornfeld, Richard P.; Martin-Mur, Tomas J.; McSmith, Gaylon W.; hide

    2010-01-01

    The Phoenix Lander, first of NASA's Mars Scout missions, arrived at the Red Planet on May 25, 2008. From the moment the lander separated from its interplanetary cruise stage shortly before entry, the spacecraft could no longer communicate directly with Earth, and was instead entirely dependent on UHF relay communications via an international network of orbiting Mars spacecraft, including NASA's 2001 Mars Odyssey (ODY) and Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) spacecraft, as well as ESA's Mars Express (MEX) spacecraft. All three orbiters captured critical event telemetry and/or tracking data during Phoenix Entry, Descent and Landing. During the Phoenix surface mission, ODY and MRO provided command and telemetry services, far surpassing the original data return requirements. The availability of MEX as a backup relay asset enhanced the robustness of the surface relay plan. In addition to telecommunications services, Doppler tracking observables acquired on the UHF link yielded an accurate position for the Phoenix landing site.

  4. Molecular survey of the Texas Phoenix decline phytoplasma ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    symptoms of Texas Phoenix decline (TPD) in West Central Florida. The IGS region was .... DNA from a healthy plant, and a water control (no DNA template). The PCR .... supplement sequencing data which may be subject to sequencing errors.

  5. CRED REA Coral Population Parameters at Baker, Phoenix Islands, 2004

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Belt transects along 2 consecutively-placed, 25m transect lines were surveyed as part of Rapid Ecological Assessments conducted at 3 sites at Baker in the Phoenix...

  6. Telecommunications Relay Support of the Mars Phoenix Lander Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Charles D., Jr.; Erickson, James K.; Gladden, Roy E.; Guinn, Joseph R.; Ilott, Peter A.; Jai, Benhan; Johnston, Martin D.; Kornfeld, Richard P.; Martin-Mur, Tomas J.; McSmith, Gaylon W.; Thomas, Reid C.; Varghese, Phil; Signori, Gina; Schmitz, Peter

    2010-01-01

    The Phoenix Lander, first of NASA's Mars Scout missions, arrived at the Red Planet on May 25, 2008. From the moment the lander separated from its interplanetary cruise stage shortly before entry, the spacecraft could no longer communicate directly with Earth, and was instead entirely dependent on UHF relay communications via an international network of orbiting Mars spacecraft, including NASA's 2001 Mars Odyssey (ODY) and Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) spacecraft, as well as ESA's Mars Express (MEX) spacecraft. All three orbiters captured critical event telemetry and/or tracking data during Phoenix Entry, Descent and Landing. During the Phoenix surface mission, ODY and MRO provided command and telemetry services, far surpassing the original data return requirements. The availability of MEX as a backup relay asset enhanced the robustness of the surface relay plan. In addition to telecommunications services, Doppler tracking observables acquired on the UHF link yielded an accurate position for the Phoenix landing site.

  7. Thermal and Electrical Conductivity Probe for Phoenix Mars Lander

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander will assess how heat and electricity move through Martian soil from one spike or needle to another of a four-spike electronic fork that will be pushed into the soil at different stages of digging by the lander's Robotic Arm. The four-spike tool, called the thermal and electrical conductivity probe, is in the middle-right of this photo, mounted near the end of the arm near the lander's scoop (upper left). In one type of experiment with this tool, a pulse of heat will be put into one spike, and the rate at which the temperature rises on the nearby spike will be recorded, along with the rate at which the heated spike cools. A little bit of ice can make a big difference in how well soil conducts heat. Similarly, soil's electrical conductivity -- also tested with this tool -- is a sensitive indicator of moisture in the soil. This device adapts technology used in soil-moisture gauges for irrigation-control systems. The conductivity probe has an additional role besides soil analysis. It will serve as a hunidity sensor when held in the air.

  8. Friction stir welding of AZ31 magnesium alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林三宝; 张华; 吴林; 冯吉才; 戴鸿滨

    2003-01-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) is an new solid-phase joining technology which has more advantages over fusion welding methods in welding of aluminum and other non-ferrous metals. The effects of welding parameters on mechanical properties and microstructure during friction stir welding of AZ31 magnesium alloy were studied in this paper. Microstructures and mechanical properties of the joints were investigated by means of optical microscopy, scanning electric microscopy (SEM), micro-hardness analysis, and tensile test. Experimental results show that the magnesium alloy can be successfully welded by FSW method, and the ultimate tensile strength (UTS) of FSW joint reaches up to 90 percent of base metal. The microstructures of welded joints exhibit the variation from dynamically recrystallized fine grains to greatly deformed grains. Hardness in nugget zone was found lower than the base metal but not too obvious.

  9. EnviroAtlas - Phoenix, AZ - Domestic Water Demand per Day by U.S. Census Block Group

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — As included in this EnviroAtlas dataset, community level domestic water demand is calculated using locally available water use data per capita in gallons of water...

  10. Troubles continue for the Phoenix VA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robbins RA

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated after 150 words. According to the Joint Commission on the Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations (Joint Commission, JCAHO, an independent organization that reviews hospitals, the Phoenix VA does not comply with U.S. standards for safety, patient care and management (1. The hospital was at the epicenter of the national scandal over the quality of care being afforded to the nation's veterans where the now notorious practice of double-booking patient appointments was first exposed. The hospital's indifferent management provoked congressional investigations that uncovered still more system-wide abuses leading to the removal of the hospital director and the resignation of then VA secretary, Eric Shinseki. The hospital maintains its accreditation but with a follow-up survey in 1-6 months where it must show that it has successfully addressed the 13 identified problems (1. Inspectors who conducted the review in July found that VA employees were unable to report concerns "without retaliatory action from the hospital." Other alarming ...

  11. Effect of coolant inhibitors on AZ91D

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    I.M. Baghni; WU Yinshun; ZHANG Wei; LI Jiuqing

    2004-01-01

    The inhibition effects of sodium vanadate along with inorganic coolant inhibitors were examined on corrosion of AZ91D in ASTM D1384-80 corrosive water by polarization measurements. The galvanic corrosion of AZ91D coupled to 3003, 6063, and 356 Al alloys were also tested. An effective combination of inhibitors containing (but not limited to) sodium vanadate, silicate, and nitrate was proposed for inhibition of AZ91D and prevention of galvanic corrosion.

  12. Wind-Related Topography in Phoenix's Region of Mars (Animation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on image for animation This movie shifts from a global zoom indicating the Phoenix landing area on Mars to a topographical map indicating relative elevations in the landing region. The elevations could affect wind patterns at the site. In particular, Phoenix is in a broad, shallow valley. The edge of the valley, about 150 meters (500 feet) above the floor, may provide enough of a slope to the east of Phoenix to explain winds coming from the east during nights at the site. Cooler, denser air could be sinking down the slope and toward the lander. Atmospheric scientists on the Phoenix team are analyzing wind patterns to distiguish effects of nearby topography from larger-scale movement of the atmosphere in the polar region. The elevation information for this topographical mapping comes from the Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter on NASA's Mars Global Surveyor orbiter. The blue-coded area is the valley floor. Orange and yellow indicate relatively higher elevations. The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver. JPL managed the Mars Global Surveyor mission for the NASA Science Mission Directorate.

  13. Computer simulation of the leaching and washing of waste in tanks C-106, AY-102, AZ-101, and AZ-102

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacLean, G.T.

    1997-05-01

    The waste in underground storage tanks C-106, AY-102, AZ-101, and AZ-102 will be used to prepare feed material for the proposed high level waste vitrification demonstration plant at Hanford. A chemical process simulation computer program called the Environment Simulation Program (ESP) was used to estimate the compositions and quantities of this waste and the products after pretreatment processing. The amount of precipitated material in Tank C-106 predicted to be dissolved by sluicing is 27 wt.%. The amount of precipitated material predicted to be dissolved by mild leaching is about 30% for the C-106 and AY-102 combined waste and about 50% for AZ-101, and 35% for AZ-102 wastes. The predicted caustic solution raw material requirements for leaching are 158 m{sup 3} for C-106 and AY-102, 60 m{sup 3} for AZ-101, and 146 m{sup 3} for AZ-102, all as 50 wt.% NAOH.

  14. Hot deformation behavior and dynamic recrystallization kinetics of AZ61 and AZ61 + Sr magnesium alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Aliakbari Sani

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the effect of strontium addition on hot deformation of AZ61 alloy was investigated by hot compression tests. A reference alloy (AZ61 and an Sr-containing alloy (AZ61 + Sr was cast while their average initial grain size were supposed to be about 140 and 40 µm, respectively. In AZ61 + Sr alloy, the Sr-containing precipitations were stable at homogenization temperature. Analysing the hot compression curves, it was revealed that dynamic recrystallization phenomenon had occurred and controlled the thermomechanical behaviour of the alloys. The derived constitutive equations showed that the hot deformation parameters (n and Q in AZ61 + Sr alloy is smaller than those of AZ61 alloy; this can be related to the small initial grain size and the lower amounts of solute aluminium atoms. The analysis of DRX kinetics along with the micrographs of the deformed microstructures showed that at the same condition the development of DRXed microstructure in AZ61 + Sr alloy was faster than AZ61 alloy. The increased recrystallized microstructure was interpretated to be attributed to (1 the more grain boundaries present and (2 the existance of the Al-Mg-Sr precipitations assisted the PSN mechanism. Also, the attenuated intensity of the basal texture of AZ61 + Sr was related to the DRX fraction of microstructure.

  15. Animation of Panorama of Phoenix's Solar Panel and Robotic Arm

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on image for animation This is an animation of panorama images of NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander's solar panel and the lander's Robotic Arm with a sample in the scoop. The image was taken just before the sample was delivered to the Optical Microscope. The images making up this animation were taken by the lander's Surface Stereo Imager looking west during Phoenix's Sol 16 (June 10, 2008), or the 16th Martian day after landing. This view is a part of the 'mission success' panorama that will show the whole landing site in color. The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  16. Animation of Panorama of Phoenix's Solar Panel and Robotic Arm

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on image for animation This is an animation of panorama images of NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander's solar panel and the lander's Robotic Arm with a sample in the scoop. The image was taken just before the sample was delivered to the Optical Microscope. The images making up this animation were taken by the lander's Surface Stereo Imager looking west during Phoenix's Sol 16 (June 10, 2008), or the 16th Martian day after landing. This view is a part of the 'mission success' panorama that will show the whole landing site in color. The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  17. Joining of AZ31 and AZ91 Mg alloys by friction stir welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Ratna Sunil

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Two dissimilar magnesium (Mg alloy sheets, one with low aluminium (AZ31 and another with high aluminium (AZ91 content, were successfully joined by friction stir welding (FSW. The effect of process parameters on the formation of hot cracks was investigated. A sound metallurgical joint was obtained at optimized process parameters (1400 rpm with 25 mm/min feed which contained fine grains and distributed β (Mg17Al12 phase within the nugget zone. An increasing trend in the hardness measurements has also confirmed more amount of dissolution of aluminium within the nugget zone. A sharp interface between nugget zone and thermo mechanical affected zone (TMAZ was clearly noticed at the AZ31 Mg alloy side (advancing but not on the AZ91 Mg alloy side (retreating. From the results it can be concluded that FSW can be effectively used to join dissimilar metals, particularly difficult to process metals such as Mg alloys, and hot cracking can be completely eliminated by choosing appropriate process parameters to achieve sound joint.

  18. Mathematical modeling of the Phoenix Rising pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chad Liu

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Apoptosis is a tightly controlled process in mammalian cells. It is important for embryogenesis, tissue homoeostasis, and cancer treatment. Apoptosis not only induces cell death, but also leads to the release of signals that promote rapid proliferation of surrounding cells through the Phoenix Rising (PR pathway. To quantitatively understand the kinetics of interactions of different molecules in this pathway, we developed a mathematical model to simulate the effects of various changes in the PR pathway on the secretion of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2, a key factor for promoting cell proliferation. These changes include activation of caspase 3 (C3, caspase 7 (C7, and nuclear factor κB (NFκB. In addition, we simulated the effects of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX2 inhibition and C3 knockout on the level of secreted PGE2. The model predictions on PGE2 in MEF and 4T1 cells at 48 hours after 10-Gray radiation were quantitatively consistent with the experimental data in the literature. Compared to C7, the model predicted that C3 activation was more critical for PGE2 production. The model also predicted that PGE2 production could be significantly reduced when COX2 expression was blocked via either NFκB inactivation or treatment of cells with exogenous COX2 inhibitors, which led to a decrease in the rate of conversion from arachidonic acid to prostaglandin H2 in the PR pathway. In conclusion, the mathematical model developed in this study yielded new insights into the process of tissue regrowth stimulated by signals from apoptotic cells. In future studies, the model can be used for experimental data analysis and assisting development of novel strategies/drugs for improving cancer treatment or normal tissue regeneration.

  19. Azúcar y diabetes: recomendaciones internacionales

    OpenAIRE

    Álejandro Sanz París; Diana Boj Carceller; Isabel Melchor Lacleta; Ramón Albero Gamboa

    2013-01-01

    La nutrición en el paciente diabético no es sólo un del mero aporte de nutrientes sino que es la base su tratamiento. De hecho, las sociedades científicas internacionales lo han denominado "tratamiento médico nutricional" para darle el énfasis que se merece. Las recomendaciones nutricionales de las sociedades científicas han ido cambiando en los últimos años con la medicina basada en la evidencia. Respecto al consumo de azúcar, la mayoría considera que no afecta el control metabólico si éste ...

  20. Martian Arctic Dust Devil and Phoenix Meteorology Mast

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    The Surface Stereo Imager on NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander caught this dust devil in action west-southwest of the lander at 11:16 a.m. local Mars time on Sol 104, or the 104th Martian day of the mission, Sept. 9, 2008. Dust devils have not been detected in any Phoenix images from earlier in the mission, but at least six were observed in a dozen images taken on Sol 104. Dust devils are whirlwinds that often occur when the Sun heats the surface of Mars, or some areas on Earth. The warmed surface heats the layer of atmosphere closest to it, and the warm air rises in a whirling motion, stirring dust up from the surface like a miniature tornado. The vertical post near the left edge of this image is the mast of the Meteorological Station on Phoenix. The dust devil visible at the horizon just to the right of the mast is estimated to be 600 to 700 meters (about 2,000 to 2,300 feet) from Phoenix, and 4 to 5 meters (10 to 13 feet) in diameter. It is much smaller than dust devils that have been observed by NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit much closer to the equator. It is closer in size to dust devils seen from orbit in the Phoenix landing region, though still smaller than those. The image has been enhanced to make the dust devil easier to see. The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  1. Thermal Design Validation of the Mars Scout Phoenix Payload

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuyuki, Glenn T.; Lee, Chern-Jiin

    2007-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the validation of the thermal design for the Mars Scout Phoenix Payload. It includes a description of the Phoenix Mission, the science objectives, the timeline, and the flight system and payloads that were on the lander. The initial responsibility for the development and validation the thermal design was with the developers. This process lacked overall system engineering, there was a difference of thermal expertise, and the number of institutions involved complicated the interactions. The revised approach for payload thermal design validation is described.

  2. Dinosaur or Phoenix: Nuclear Bombers in the 21st Century

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-12

    REPORT DATE 02-04-10 2. REPORT TYPE Master’s Thesis 3. DATES COVERED 31-07-09 to 16-06-10 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Dinosaur or Phoenix: Nuclear...WARFIGHTING SCHOOL DINOSAUR OR PHOENIX: NUCLEAR BOMBERS IN THE 21ST CENTURY by John W. Morehead Colonel, United States Air Force A paper...can argue Secretary Gates’ decision to halt development of a follow-on bomber indicates the DOD views nuclear bombers as dinosaurs no longer needed as

  3. ANALYSIS RESULTS FOR BUILDING 241 702-AZ A TRAIN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DUNCAN JB; FRYE JM; COOKE CA; LI SW; BROCKMAN FJ

    2006-12-13

    This report presents the analyses results for three samples obtained under RPP-PLAN-28509, Sampling and Analysis Plan for Building 241 702-AZ A Train. The sampling and analysis was done in response to problem evaluation request number PER-2004-6139, 702-AZ Filter Rooms Need Radiological Cleanup Efforts.

  4. 76 FR 18378 - Amendment of Class E Airspace; Taylor, AZ

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-04

    ... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 71 Amendment of Class E Airspace; Taylor, AZ AGENCY: Federal... Taylor Airport, Taylor, AZ, to accommodate aircraft using the CAMBO One Departure, and the Area Navigation (RNAV) standard instrument approach procedures at Taylor Airport. This will improve the safety...

  5. Microstructural formation of semi-solid AZ91D alloy stirred by electromagnetic field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    With the help of an electromagnetic stirring device, alloy melt quenching and EBSD (electron back scatter diffraction)analysis technology, the microstructure of the semi-solid AZ91D magnesium alloy slurry stirred by rotational electromagnetic field under different stirring power conditions has been studied. The results show that the size of primary α-Mg phase is reduced obviously when the solidifying alloy melt is stirred by rotational electromagnetic field, moreover, the primary α-Mg grains are changed to fine rosette grains or spherical grains which are proved to belong to the different grains in three-dimension by the EBSD analysis technology. The results also show that the stirring power is an important processing parameter in the preparation of the semi-solid AZ91D magnesium alloy slurry. The larger the stirring power, the finer the primary α-Mg grains, the less the rosette primary α-Mg grains, and the more the spherical primary α-Mg grains. Theoretical analysis indicates that a stronger flow motion leads to a more even temperature field and solute field and a stronger man-made temperature fluctuation in the alloy melt so that the specially fine rosette and/or spherical primary α-Mg grains are formed in the semi-solid AZ91D magnesium alloy slurry.

  6. Does the spatial arrangement of vegetation and anthropogenic land cover features matter? Case studies of urban warming and cooling in Phoenix and Las Vegas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myint, S. W.; Zheng, B.; Fan, C.; Kaplan, S.; Brazel, A.; Middel, A.; Smith, M.

    2014-12-01

    While the relationship between fractional cover of anthropogenic and vegetation features and the urban heat island has been well studied, the effect of spatial arrangements (e.g., clustered, dispersed) of these features on urban warming or cooling are not well understood. The goal of this study is to examine if and how spatial configuration of land cover features influence land surface temperatures (LST) in urban areas. This study focuses on Phoenix, AZ and Las Vegas, NV that have undergone dramatic urban expansion. The data used to classify detailed urban land cover types include Geoeye-1 (Las Vegas) and QuickBird (Phoenix). The Geoeye-1 image (3 m resolution) was acquired on October 12, 2011 and the QuickBird image (2.4 m resolution) was taken on May 29, 2007. Classification was performed using object based image analysis (OBIA). We employed a spatial autocorrelation approach (i.e., Moran's I) that measures the spatial dependence of a point to its neighboring points and describes how clustered or dispersed points are arranged in space. We used Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) data acquired over Phoenix (daytime on June 10, 2011 and nighttime on October 17, 2011) and Las Vegas (daytime on July 6, 2005 and nighttime on August 27, 2005) to examine daytime and nighttime LST with regards to the spatial arrangement of anthropogenic and vegetation features. We spatially correlate Moran's I values of each land cover per surface temperature, and develop regression models. The spatial configuration of grass and trees shows strong negative correlations with LST, implying that clustered vegetation lowers surface temperatures more effectively. In contrast, a clustered spatial arrangement of anthropogenic land-cover features, especially impervious surfaces, significantly elevates surface temperatures. Results from this study suggest that the spatial configuration of anthropogenic and vegetation features influence urban warming and cooling.

  7. The Flight of the Phoenix: Interpersonal Aspects of Project Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huffman, Brian J.; Kilian, Claire McCarty

    2012-01-01

    Although many classroom exercises use movies to focus on management and organizational behavior issues, none of those do so in the context of project management. This article presents such an exercise using "The Flight of the Phoenix", an incredibly rich story for any management class, which provides clear examples of organizational behavior…

  8. Comparison studies of ozone precursors in Phoenix, Arizona

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez, C.; Guyton, J.; Lee, C.P. [Arizona Dept. of Environmental Quality, Phoenix, AZ (United States); Parmar, S. [Atmospheric Analysis and Consulting Co., Ventura, CA (United States)

    1994-12-31

    This paper will present the comparison of the ozone precursors monitoring program for Phoenix, Arizona during 1992 and 1993. Specific details and methodologies will be presented involving collection of air samples and analysis of speciated measurements for reactive VOC and carbonyl precursors responsible for ozone formation. Quality control and quality assurance techniques will also be discussed.

  9. Public School Choice and Student Mobility in Metropolitan Phoenix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, Jeanne M.; Topper, Amelia M.; Silver, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Arizona's interdistrict open enrollment and charter schools laws allow families to send their children to the public schools of their choice. We assessed how public school choice affected elementary school enrollments in 27 metropolitan Phoenix school districts. Student mobility rates varied widely between districts and by location. The higher…

  10. Vaccination Coverage among Kindergarten Children in Phoenix, Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frimpong, Jemima A.; Rivers, Patrick A.; Bae, Sejong

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate school immunization records and document the immunization coverage and compliance level of children enrolled in kindergarten in Phoenix during the 2001-2002 school year. The purpose was to obtain information on: 1) immunization status by age two; 2) under-immunization in kindergarten; 3) administration error; and 4)…

  11. Telltale wind indicator for the Mars Phoenix lander

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gunnlaugsson, H.P.; Honstein-Rathlou, C.; Merrison, J.P.

    2008-01-01

    The Telltale wind indicator is a mechanical anemometer designed to operate on the Martian surface as part of the meteorological package on the NASA Phoenix lander. It consists of a lightweight cylinder suspended by Kevlar fibers and is deflected under the action of wind. Imaging of the Telltale...

  12. The Phoenix galaxy as seen by NuSTAR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Masini, A.; Comastri, A.; Puccetti, S.

    2017-01-01

    Aims. We study the long-term variability of the well-known Seyfert 2 galaxy Mrk 1210 (also known as UGC 4203, or the Phoenix galaxy). Methods. The source was observed by many X-ray facilities in the last 20 yr. Here we present a NuSTAR observation and put the results in the context of previously...

  13. Public School Choice and Student Mobility in Metropolitan Phoenix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, Jeanne M.; Topper, Amelia M.; Silver, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Arizona's interdistrict open enrollment and charter schools laws allow families to send their children to the public schools of their choice. We assessed how public school choice affected elementary school enrollments in 27 metropolitan Phoenix school districts. Student mobility rates varied widely between districts and by location. The higher…

  14. The RR Lyrae Variable Population in the Phoenix Dwarf Galaxy

    CERN Document Server

    Ordoñez, Antonio J; Sarajedini, Ata

    2014-01-01

    We present the first detailed study of the RR Lyrae variable population in the Local Group dSph/dIrr transition galaxy, Phoenix, using previously obtained HST/WFPC2 observations of the galaxy. We utilize template light curve fitting routines to obtain best fit light curves for RR Lyrae variables in Phoenix. Our technique has identified 78 highly probable RR Lyrae stars (54 ab-type; 24 c-type) with about 40 additional candidates. We find mean periods for the two populations of $\\langle P_{ab}\\rangle = 0.60 \\pm 0.03$ days and $\\langle P_{c}\\rangle = 0.353 \\pm 0.002$ days. We use the properties of these light curves to extract, among other things, a metallicity distribution function for ab-type RR Lyrae. Our analysis yields a mean metallicity of $\\langle [Fe/H]\\rangle = -1.68 \\pm 0.06$ dex for the RRab stars. From the mean period and metallicity calculated from the ab-type RR Lyrae, we conclude that Phoenix is more likely of intermediate Oosterhoff type; however the morphology of the Bailey diagram for Phoenix R...

  15. The Flight of the Phoenix: Interpersonal Aspects of Project Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huffman, Brian J.; Kilian, Claire McCarty

    2012-01-01

    Although many classroom exercises use movies to focus on management and organizational behavior issues, none of those do so in the context of project management. This article presents such an exercise using "The Flight of the Phoenix", an incredibly rich story for any management class, which provides clear examples of organizational behavior…

  16. Phoenix Water Vapor Measurements using the SSI Camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamppari, Leslie; Lemmon, Mark T.

    2016-10-01

    The Phoenix and Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) spacecraft participated together in an observation campaign that was a coordinated effort to study the Martian atmosphere. These coordinated observations were designed to provide near-simultaneous observations of the same column of atmosphere over the Phoenix lander. Seasonal coverage was obtained at Ls=5-10° resolution and diurnal coverage was obtained as often as possible and with as many times of day as possible. One key aspect of this observation set was the means to compare the amount of water measured in the whole column (via the MRO Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM; Murchie et al., 2007) and the Phoenix Surface Stereo Imager (SSI) with that measured at the surface (via the Phoenix Thermal and Electrical Conductivity probe (TECP; Zent et al., 2008) which contained a humidity sensor). This comparison, along with the Phoenix LIDAR observations of the depth to which aerosols are mixed (Whiteway et al., 2008, 2009), provides clues to the water vapor mixing ratio profile. Tamppari et al. (2009) showed that examination of a subset of these coordinated observations indicate that the water vapor is not well mixed in the atmosphere up to a cloud condensation height at the Phoenix location during northern summer, and results indicated that a large amount of water must be confined to the lowest 0.5-1 km. This is contrary to the typical assumption that water vapor is "well-mixed."Following a similar approach to Titov et al. (2000), we use the Phoenix SSI camera [Lemmon et al., 2008] filters to detect water vapor: LA = 930.7 nm (broad), R4 = 935.5 nm (narrow), and R5 = 935.7 nm (narrow). We developed a hybrid DISORT-spherical model (DISORT model, Stamnes et al. 1988) to model the expected absorption due to a prescribed water vapor content and profile, to search for matches to the observations. Improvements to the model have been made and recent analysis using this model and comparisons to

  17. Corrosion product layers on magnesium alloys AZ31 and AZ61: Surface chemistry and protective ability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feliu, S., E-mail: sfeliu@cenim.csic.es; Llorente, I.

    2015-08-30

    Highlights: • Surface chemistry of the corrosion product layers on magnesium alloys. • Influence of the type of alloy on the carbonate surface enrichment. • Relation between surface composition and protection properties. - Abstract: This paper studies the chemical composition of the corrosion product layers formed on magnesium alloys AZ31 and AZ61 following immersion in 0.6 M NaCl, with a view to better understanding their protective action. Relative differences in the chemical nature of the layers were quantified by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive analysis of X-ray (EDX) and low-angle X-ray diffraction (XRD). Corrosion behavior was investigated by Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) and hydrogen evolution measurement. An inhibitive effect from the corrosion product layers was observed from EIS, principally in the case of AZ31, as confirmed by hydrogen evolution tests. A link was found between carbonate enrichment observed by XPS in the surface of the corrosion product layer, concomitant with the increase in the protective properties observed by EIS.

  18. Facebook Marketing - Fra A-Z

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Thomas Bøtker

    2009-01-01

    Facebook Marketing – Leverage Social Media to Grow Your Business af Steven Holzner er Facebook Marketing fra A-Z, som kan anbefales til virksomheder, som overvejer at bevæge sig ud i cyber space og afprøve mulighederne for at markedsføre sig dér. Bogen beskriver på hvilke væsentlige punkter...... marketing på Facebook adskiller sig fra traditionel marketing, og gennemgår trin for trin de fundamentale ting, som man skal vide for, at virksomheden kan agere med den tilsigtede effekt i et socialt netværk som Facebook. Og eftersom 34 % af den danske befolkning i dag er hoppet med på Facebook vognen og...

  19. Facebook Marketing - Fra A-Z

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Thomas Bøtker

    2009-01-01

    Facebook Marketing – Leverage Social Media to Grow Your Business af Steven Holzner er Facebook Marketing fra A-Z, som kan anbefales til virksomheder, som overvejer at bevæge sig ud i cyber space og afprøve mulighederne for at markedsføre sig dér. Bogen beskriver på hvilke væsentlige punkter...... marketing på Facebook adskiller sig fra traditionel marketing, og gennemgår trin for trin de fundamentale ting, som man skal vide for, at virksomheden kan agere med den tilsigtede effekt i et socialt netværk som Facebook. Og eftersom 34 % af den danske befolkning i dag er hoppet med på Facebook vognen og...

  20. Azúcar y diabetes: recomendaciones internacionales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Álejandro Sanz París

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available La nutrición en el paciente diabético no es sólo un del mero aporte de nutrientes sino que es la base su tratamiento. De hecho, las sociedades científicas internacionales lo han denominado "tratamiento médico nutricional" para darle el énfasis que se merece. Las recomendaciones nutricionales de las sociedades científicas han ido cambiando en los últimos años con la medicina basada en la evidencia. Respecto al consumo de azúcar, la mayoría considera que no afecta el control metabólico si éste se sustituye por otros hidratos de carbono, pero no se indica una cantidad concreta.

  1. Finite Element Simulation of Magnesium Alloy AZ31 Tube Bending

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Wenyun

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A finite element method based model has been developed for magnesium alloy AZ31 tube bending process simulation, using the tensile (for bend outer radius and compressive (for bend inner radius properties of the AZ31 alloy at the bending temperature of 150°C. The results shown that very high compressive stresses are developed in the bend inner radius, limiting the minimum bend radius for the AZ31 tube. The simulation results suggest the minimum centerline bend radius to the tube outer diameter ratio is 1.5 to 2. The maximum diameter to thickness ratio is 30.

  2. Nuclear microsatellite markers for the date palm (Phoenix dactylifera L.): characterization and utility across the genus Phoenix and in other palm genera.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Billotte, N.; Marseillac, P.; Brottier, P.; Noyer, J.L.; Jacquemoud, J.P.; Moreau, C.; Couvreur, T.L.P.; Chavallier, M.H.; Pintaud, J.C.; Risterucci, A.M.

    2004-01-01

    A (GA)n microsatellite-enriched library was constructed and 16 nuclear simple sequence repeat (SSR) loci were characterized in Phoenix dactylifera. Across-taxa amplification and genotyping tests showed the utility of most SSR markers in 11 other Phoenix species and the transferability of some of the

  3. Preparation of biomimetic hydrophobic coatings on AZ91D magnesium alloy surface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    The hydrophobic coating has been a promising technology for improving surface performance. The surface performance of magnesium alloy has been limited in application. Furthermore, the hydrophobic of magnesium alloy is rarely investigated because magnesium alloy is an active metal alloy. In this paper, inspired by microstructure character of typical plant leaf surface such as lotus, the biomimetic hydrophobic coatings on AZ91D magnesium alloy surface were prepared by means of wet-chemical combining electroless. The samples were immersed into AgNO3 solution in wet-chemical method firstly. Then, biomimetic hydrophobic coatings were prepared by electroless after wet-method pretreatment. The microstructure was observed by SEM and the contact angles were measured by contact angle tester. The results indicated that the biomimetic hydrophobic coatings with uniform crystalline and dense structure could be obtained on AZ91D magnesium alloy surface. The results of contact angle revealed that the biomimetic nano-composite coatings were hydrophobic. The wet-chemical method treatment on the AZ91D magnesium alloy substrate provided a rough microstructure, thus improving adhesion of the coating and the substrate.

  4. Tank 241-AZ-101 and Tank 241-AZ-102 Airlift Circulator Operation Vapor Sampling and Analysis Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    TEMPLETON, A.M.

    1999-12-07

    This sampling and analysis plan (SAP) identifies characterization objectives pertaining to sample collection, laboratory analytical evaluation, and reporting requirements for vapor samples obtained during the operation of the tank 241-AZ-101 and 241-AZ-102 airlift circulators (ALCs) and during the initial operation (''bump'') of the tank 241-AZ-101 mixer pumps. The purpose of the ALC operation is to support portions of the operational test procedure (OTP) for Project W-030 (OTP-W030-001) and to perform functional test in support of Project W-151. Project W-030 is the 241-A-702 ventilation upgrade project (241-142-702) and Project W-151 is the 241-AZ-101 Mixer Pump Test. The functional tests will check the operability of the tank 241-AZ-101 ALCs. Process Memo's No. 2E98-082 and No. 2E99-001 (LMHC 1999a, LMHC 1999b) direct the operation of the ALCs and the Industrial Hygiene monitoring respectively. A series of tests will be conducted in which the ALCs in tanks 241-AZ-101 and 241-AZ-102 will be operated at different air flow rates. Vapor samples will be obtained to determine constituents that may be present in the tank headspace during ALC operation at tanks 241-AZ-101 and 241-AZ-102 as the waste is disturbed. During the testing, vapor samples will be obtained from the headspace of tanks 241-AZ-101 and 241-AZ-102 via the unused port on the standard hydrogen monitoring system (SHMS). In addition the last two vapor samples will be collected from the headspace of tank 241-AZ-101 during the operation of the mixer pumps. Each mixer pump will be operated for approximately 5 minutes. Results will be used to provide the waste feed delivery program with environmental air permitting data for tank waste disturbing activities. Because of radiological concerns, the samples will be filtered for particulates. It is recognized that this may remove some organic compounds. The following sections provide the general methodology and procedures to be used in the

  5. Laser welding of AZ61 magnesium-based alloys

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Hongying; Li Zhijun; Zhang Yihui

    2006-01-01

    Laser welding of AZ61 magnesium alloys was carried out asing a CO2 laser weldingexperimental system.The welding properties of AZ61 sheets with different thickness were investigated.The effect of processing parameters including laser power, welding speed and protection gas flow was researched.The results show that laser power and welding speed have large effect on the weld width and joint dimensions.Protection gas flow has relatively slight effect on the weld width.The property test of three typical joints indicates that microhardness and tensile strength in weld zone are higher than that of AZ61 base metal.Joints with good appearance and excellent mechanical properties can be produced using CO2 laser welding method.The microstructure with small grains in weld zone is believed to be responsible for the excellent mechanical properties of AZ61 joints.

  6. Recommendation Report: EJournals/EBooks A-Z Management System

    KAUST Repository

    Ramli, Rindra M.

    2014-01-01

    This is a recommendation report for KAUST Library on the Ejournals / EBooks AZ Management systems project. It briefly described the issues faced by the ERM Team, project plan overview and the project findings as well as the recommendation(s).

  7. 78 FR 3877 - Radio Broadcasting Services; Peach Springs, AZ

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-17

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 73 Radio Broadcasting Services; Peach Springs, AZ AGENCY: Federal Communications..., Radio broadcasting. Federal Communications Commission. Nazifa Sawez, Assistant Chief, Audio...

  8. 75 FR 81190 - Television Broadcasting Services; Yuma, AZ

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-27

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 73 Television Broadcasting Services; Yuma, AZ AGENCY: Federal Communications Commission. ACTION: Dismissal. SUMMARY: The Commission dismisses the petition for rulemaking filed by...

  9. Test Plan for Tank 241-AZ-101 Solubility Screening Tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    PERSON, J.C.

    1999-12-03

    Tank 241-AZ-101 (101-AZ) has been identified as one of the early tanks to be retrieved for waste pretreatment and immobilization. Retrieval of the tank waste from other tanks may require dilution. This test is to determine the effects of dilution on the mass of solids and their composition, which can be compared with tanks where dilution is required. This test plan gives test instructions, example data sheets, a waste compatibility review, and a waste stream fact sheet.

  10. Hot Deformation Kinetics of Magnesium Alloy AZ31

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Lingyun; HUANG Guangjie; FAN Yonge; LU Zhiwen; PAN Fusheng

    2006-01-01

    The flow stress at elevated temperatures for magnesium alloy AZ31 was studied using isothermal compression testing. The effect of deformation parameters on the flow stress was studied as well. The kinetics of elevated temperature deformation was expressed by means of some empirical rate equations. The activation parameter has been calculated. A mechanism for the dynamic softening of AZ31 alloy in a hot deformation experiment was identified to be the dynamic recrystallization.

  11. Solar Panel Buffeted by Wind at Phoenix Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    Winds were strong enough to cause about a half a centimeter (.19 inch) of motion of a solar panel on NASA's Phoenix Mars lander when the lander's Surface Stereo Imager took this picture on Aug. 31, 2008, during the 96th Martian day since landing. The lander's telltale wind gauge has been indicating wind speeds of about 4 meters per second (9 miles per hour) during late mornings at the site. These conditions were anticipated and the wind is not expected to do any harm to the lander. The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  12. Phoenix Again Carries Soil to Wet Chemistry Lab

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    This image taken by the Surface Stereo Imager on NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander shows the lander's Robotic Arm scoop positioned over the Wet Chemistry Lab Cell 1 delivery funnel on Sol 41, the 42nd Martian day after landing, or July 6, 2008, after a soil sample was delivered to the instrument. The instrument's Cell 1 is second one from the foreground of the image. The first cell, Cell 0, received a soil sample two weeks earlier. This image has been enhanced to brighten the scene. The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  13. Solar Panel Buffeted by Wind at Phoenix Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    Winds were strong enough to cause about a half a centimeter (.19 inch) of motion of a solar panel on NASA's Phoenix Mars lander when the lander's Surface Stereo Imager took this picture on Aug. 31, 2008, during the 96th Martian day since landing. The lander's telltale wind gauge has been indicating wind speeds of about 4 meters per second (9 miles per hour) during late mornings at the site. These conditions were anticipated and the wind is not expected to do any harm to the lander. The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  14. Dark Skies and Clouds Move in at Phoenix site

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    Clouds of dust and ice swirl past the Surface Stereo Imager (SSI) camera on NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander in a series of images taken on the 132nd Martian day of the mission (Oct. 7, 2008). The images show the increase in storm activity and potential for snowfall. The solar powered spacecraft was disabled by decreased light from heavy dust storms in the area a few weeks later. The last communication heard from the lander occurred on Nov. 2, 2008. The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  15. Sediment transport in the nearshore area of Phoenix Island

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Rijun; Ma, Fang; Wu, Jianzheng; Zhang, Wei; Jiang, Shenghui; Xu, Yongchen; Zhu, Longhai; Wang, Nan; Liu, Aijiang

    2016-10-01

    Based on the measured data, suspended sediment concentration, surface sediment grain size, current and waves, the sediment transport mechanisms and pathways in the Phoenix Island area were analyzed using methods of flux decomposition and Grain Size Trend Analysis (GSTA). The results show that net suspended sediment is mainly transported by average current, Stokes drift, and gravitational circulation. The transport direction of suspended sediment is varying and basically following the direction of residual tidal currents. Surface sediment transport pathways are primarily parallel to the coastline along with two convergent centers. Waves and longshore currents have a significant influence on sediment transport, but the influence is limited due to a steep and deep underwater bank. Tidal current is the main controlling factor for sediment transport, especially in the deep water area. Neither suspended nor surface sediment is transported towards the southwest. The South Shandong Coastal Current (SSCC) has little effect on sediment transport processes in the nearshore area of Phoenix Island.

  16. Bo Painting with Human, Dragon and Phoenix Pattern

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1995-01-01

    During the period between the Warring States and Qin (221-207 B.C.), Han (206 B.C.-A.D. 220) dynasties in China, silk was called bo, so paintings on silk were called bohua and words on silk boshu. The bohua with a human, dragon and phoenix pattern excavated in 1949 in Changsha, Hunan Province, dates back to the Warring States. It is the earliest painting

  17. View from Above of Phoenix's Stowed Robotic Arm Camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on image for animation This artist's animation of an imaginary camera zooming in from above shows the location of the Robotic Arm Camera on NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander as it acquires an image of the scoop at the end of the arm. Located just beneath the Robotic Arm Camera lens, the scoop is folded in the stowed position, with its open end facing the Robotic Arm Camera. The last frame in the animation shows the first image taken by the Robotic Arm Camera, one day after Phoenix landed on Mars. In the center of the image is the robotic scoop the lander will use to dig into the surface, collect samples and touch water ice on Mars for the first time. The scoop is in the stowed position, awaiting deployment of the robotic arm. The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  18. UHF Relay Antenna Measurements on Phoenix Mars Lander Mockup

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilott, Peter; Harrel, Jefferson; Arnold, Bradford; Bliznyuk, Natalia; Nielsen, Rick; Dawson, David; McGee, Jodi

    2006-01-01

    The Phoenix Lander, a NASA Discovery mission which lands on Mars in the spring of 2008, will rely entirely on UHF relay links between it and Mars orbiting assets, (Odyssey and Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO)), to communicate with the Earth. As with the Mars Exploration Rover (MER) relay system, non directional antennas will be used to provide roughly emispherical coverage of the Martian sky. Phoenix lander deck object pattern interference and obscuration are significant, and needed to be quantified to answer system level design and operations questions. This paper describes the measurement campaign carried out at the SPAWAR (Space and Naval Warfare Research) Systems Center San Diego (SSC-SD) hemispherical antenna range, using a Phoenix deck mockup and engineering model antennas. One goal of the measurements was to evaluate two analysis tools, the time domain CST, and the moment method WIPL-D software packages. These would subsequently be used to provide pattern analysis for configurations that would be difficult and expensive to model and test on Earth.

  19. Microstructure and Tensile Properties of AZ31B Alloy and AZ31B-SiCp Deformed Through a Multi-step Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, M. J.; Wang, X. J.; Ying, T.; Zhang, M. F.; Wu, K.

    2016-10-01

    The 15 vol.% micron SiC particle (SiCp)-reinforced AZ31B magnesium matrix composite (AZ31B-SiCp) prepared with semisolid stirring-assisted ultrasonic vibration was subjected to a multi-step process. The influence of the multi-step processing route on the microstructure and mechanical properties of the AZ31B-SiCp was investigated. For comparison, the monolithic AZ31B alloy was also processed under the same conditions. The results showed that the grain sizes of the AZ31B alloy and the AZ31B-SiCp were gradually decreased with increasing the processing step. Compared with the AZ31B-SiCp, the grain size of the AZ31B alloy was much larger, and the grain size distribution was inhomogeneous at the same processing condition. The particles of the AZ31B-SiCp were dispersed uniformly through the multi-step processing. Moreover, the tensile properties of the materials were gradually improved with increasing the processing step. In particular, the strength of AZ31B-SiCp and the ductility of AZ31B alloy improved significantly based on the room-temperature tensile test results.

  20. Comparison of simulants to actual neutralized current acid waste: process and product testing of three NCAW core samples from Tanks 101-AZ and 102-AZ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morrey, E.V.; Tingey, J.M.; Elliott, M.L.

    1996-10-01

    A vitrification plant is planned to process the high-level waste (HLW) solids from Hanford Site tanks into canistered glass logs for disposal in a national repository. Programs were established within the Pacific Northwest Laboratory Vitrification Technology Development (PVTD) Project to test and model simulated waste to support design, feed processability, operations, permitting, safety, and waste-form qualification. Parallel testing with actual radioactive waste was performed on a laboratory-scale to confirm the validity of using simulants and glass property models developed from simulants. Laboratory-scale testing has been completed on three radioactive core samples from tanks 101-AZ and 102-AZ containing neutralized current acid waste (NCAW), which is one of the first waste types to be processed in the high-level waste vitrification plant under a privatization scenario. Properties of the radioactive waste measured during process and product testing were compared to simulant properties and model predictions to confirm the validity of simulant and glass property ,models work. This report includes results from the three NCAW core samples, comparable results from slurry and glass simulants, and comparisons to glass property model predictions.

  1. Comparison of simulants to actual neutralized current acid waste: Process and product testing of three NCAW core samples from Tanks 101-AZ and 102-AZ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morrey, E.V.; Tingey, J.M.

    1996-04-01

    A vitrification plant is planned to process the high-level waste (HLW) solids from Hanford Site tanks into canistered glass logs for disposal in a national repository. Programs have been established within the Pacific Northwest Laboratory Vitrification Technology Development (PVTD) Project to test and model simulated waste to support design, feed processability, operations, permitting, safety, and waste-form qualification. Parallel testing with actual radioactive waste is being performed on a laboratory-scale to confirm the validity of using simulants and glass property models developed from simulants. Laboratory-scale testing has been completed on three radioactive core samples from tanks 101-AZ and 102-AZ containing neutralized current acid waste (NCAW), which is one of the first waste types to be processed in the high-level waste vitrification plant under a privatization scenario. Properties of the radioactive waste measured during process and product testing were compared to simulant properties and model predictions to confirm the validity of simulant and glass property models work. This report includes results from the three NCAW core samples, comparable results from slurry and glass simulants, and comparisons to glass property model predictions.

  2. Comparison of simulants to actual neutralized current acid waste: process and product testing of three NCAW core samples from Tanks 101-AZ and 102-AZ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morrey, E.V.; Tingey, J.M.; Elliott, M.L.

    1996-10-01

    A vitrification plant is planned to process the high-level waste (HLW) solids from Hanford Site tanks into canistered glass logs for disposal in a national repository. Programs were established within the Pacific Northwest Laboratory Vitrification Technology Development (PVTD) Project to test and model simulated waste to support design, feed processability, operations, permitting, safety, and waste-form qualification. Parallel testing with actual radioactive waste was performed on a laboratory-scale to confirm the validity of using simulants and glass property models developed from simulants. Laboratory-scale testing has been completed on three radioactive core samples from tanks 101-AZ and 102-AZ containing neutralized current acid waste (NCAW), which is one of the first waste types to be processed in the high-level waste vitrification plant under a privatization scenario. Properties of the radioactive waste measured during process and product testing were compared to simulant properties and model predictions to confirm the validity of simulant and glass property ,models work. This report includes results from the three NCAW core samples, comparable results from slurry and glass simulants, and comparisons to glass property model predictions.

  3. 77 FR 71757 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; 90-Day Finding on a Petition To List Phoenix...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-04

    ... on a Petition To List Phoenix dactylifera `Sphinx' (Sphinx Date Palm) AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife... Service (Service), announce a 90-day finding on a petition to list Phoenix dactylifera `Sphinx' (sphinx... 103, Phoenix, Arizona 85021-4951. Please submit any new information, materials, comments, or...

  4. Carpological analysis of Phoenix (Arecaceae): contributions to the taxonomy and evolutionary history of the genus

    Science.gov (United States)

    The main purpose of this study was, first, to analyze the morphology of seeds of Phoenix spp. and relevant cultivars and to assess the taxonomic value of the information generated as a means of studying the systematics and evolutionary history of the genus Phoenix. We then analyzed seed morphologica...

  5. Improvement of wear resistance of AZ31 and AZ91HP by high current pulsed electron beam treatment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Bo; HAO Sheng-zhi; DONG Chuang; TU Gan-feng

    2005-01-01

    The surface modification of magnesium alloys (AZ31 and AZ91HP) was studied by a high current pulsed electron beam(HCPEB). The results show that the cross-sectional microhardness of treated samples increases not only in the heat affected zone(HAZ), but also beyond HAZ, reaching over 250 μm. This is due to the action of quasi-static thermal stress and the shock thermal stress wave with materials, which result in its fast deformation on the surface layer and so increases microhardness. For the AZ91HP alloy, a nearly complete dissolution of the intermetallic phase Mg17Al12 is observed, and a super-saturated solid solution forms on the re-melted surface, which is due to the solute trapping effect during the fast solidification process. Measurements on sliding wear show that wear resistance is improved by approximately 5.6 and 2.4 times for the AZ31 and AZ91HP respectively, as compared with as-received samples.

  6. Preliminary study of biodegradation of AZ31B magnesium alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    REN Yibin; HUANG Jingjing; ZHANG Bingchun; YANG Ke

    2007-01-01

    Magnesium alloys are potential to be developed as a new type of biodegradable implant material by use of their active corrosion behavior.Both in vitro and in vivo biodegradation properties of an AZ31B magnesium alloy were investigated in this work.The results showed that AZ31B alloy has a proper degradation rate and much lower hydrogen release in Hank's solution,with a degradation rate of about 0.3 mm/year and hydrogen release below 0.15mL/cm2.The animal implantation test showed that the AZ31B alloy could slowly biodegrade in femur of the rabbit and form calcium phosphate around the alloy sample,with the Ca/P ratio close to the natural bone.

  7. Environmentally friendly anodization on AZ31 magnesium alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    A novel anodization which is environmentally friendly,low voltage and lOW energy consumption was developed to improve corrosion resistance of AZ31 magnesium alloy.The corrosion resistance of the anodic films was studied by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy(EIS)and potentiodynamic polarization techniques.The microstructure and compositions of films were examined by SEM,XPS and XRD.A new kind of organic additive used in the electrolyte is friendly to the environment.The compact,intact and uniform coating with high hardness can be prepared on AZ31 magnesium alloy by the environmentally friendly anodization,which enhances the corrosion resistance of AZ31 Mg alloy significantly.

  8. Annealing behavior of rolled AZ31 alloy sheet

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PENG Wei-ping; LI Pei-jie; ZENG Pan

    2006-01-01

    The annealed microstructures of the rolled AZ31 alloy sheets were examined by using light optical microscopy. The mechanical properties were measured by tensile testing, with their crystal orientations analyzed by X-ray diffraction (XRD). After the annealing treatment, the elongated grains were transformed to equiaxed grains with uniform and homogeneous structures. The changes of microstructure decreased the yield strength and enhanced the elongation. The analysis of XRD shows that the AZ31 alloy sheet possesses intense basal-texture, which is weakened during the recrystallization while reinforced during the grain growth. The intense basal-texture induces low ductility, which hence makes the further rolling more difficult. The results indicate that the optimum annealing treatment during AZ31 alloys sheet rolling is at about 300 ℃ for 60-120 min.

  9. A two-step superplastic forging forming of semi-continuously cast AZ70 magnesium alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pan Wang

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available A two-step technology combined forging with superplastic forming has been developed to enhance the forgeability of semi-continuously cast AZ70 magnesium alloy and realize the application of the as-cast magnesium alloy in large deformation bullet shell. In the first step, fine-grained microstructure preforms that are suitable for superplastic forming were obtained by reasonably designing the size of the initial blanks with the specific height-to-diameter ratio, upsetting the blanks and subsequent annealing. In the second step, the heat treated preforms were forged into the end products at the superplastic conditions. The end products exhibit high quality surface and satisfied microstructure. Consequently, this forming technology that not only avoids complicating the material preparation but also utilizes higher strain rate superplastic provides a near net-shaped novel method on magnesium forging forming technology using as-cast billet.

  10. Data of evolutionary structure change: 1AZ5A-1HTGA [Confc[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 1AZ5A-1HTGA 1AZ5 1HTG A A PQFHLWKRPVVTAHIEGQPVEVLLDTGADDSIVTGIELG...PHYTPKIV----GFINTKEYKNVEVEVLGKRIKGTIMTGDTPINIFGRNLLTALGMSLNF PQITLWQRPLVTIKIGGQLKEALLDTGADDTVLE...THR CA 318 1HTG A 1HTGA

  11. Land use mapping and modelling for the Phoenix Quadrangle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Place, J. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1974-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. The mapping of generalized land use (level 1) from ERTS 1 images was shown to be feasible with better than 95% accuracy in the Phoenix quadrangle. The accuracy of level 2 mapping in urban areas is still a problem. Updating existing maps also proved to be feasible, especially in water categories and agricultural uses; however, expanding urban growth has presented with accuracy. ERTS 1 film images indicated where areas of change were occurring, thus aiding focusing-in for more detailed investigation. ERTS color composite transparencies provided a cost effective source of information for land use mapping of very large regions at small map scales.

  12. Use of Python and Phoenix-M Interface in Robotics

    CERN Document Server

    Chakraborty, Shubham

    2011-01-01

    In this paper I will show how to use Python programming with a computer interface such as Phoenix-M 1 to drive simple robots. In my quest towards Artificial Intelligence(AI) I am experimenting with a lot of different possibilities in Robotics. This one will try to mimic the working of a simple insect's nervous system using hard wiring and some minimal software usage. This is the precursor to my advanced robotics and AI integration where I plan to use a new paradigm of AI based on Machine Learning and Self Consciousness via Knowledge Feedback and Update Process.

  13. Thermal analytical investigations of the magnesium alloy AZ91

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.N. Braszczyńska - Malik

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available The results of thermal derivative analysis (TDA, differential scanning calorimetric (DSC measurements and microstructure investigations of commercial AZ91 magnesium alloy are presented. The performed examinations allowed to determine the microstructure after solidification process and also precipitation process during continuous heating of supersaturated solid solution. The α-phase and α+γ semi-divorced eutectic were observed in as-cast material, whereas both discontinuous and continuous precipitates of γ phase were revealed after heating supersaturated AZ91 alloy.

  14. AZ-101 Mixer Pump Test Qualification Test Procedures (QTP)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    THOMAS, W.K.

    2000-01-10

    Describes the Qualification test procedure for the AZ-101 Mixer Pump Data Acquisition System (DAS). The purpose of this Qualification Test Procedure (QTP) is to confirm that the AZ-101 Mixer Pump System has been properly programmed and hardware configured correctly. This QTP will test the software setpoints for the alarms and also check the wiring configuration from the SIMcart to the HMI. An Acceptance Test Procedure (ATP), similar to this QTP will be performed to test field devices and connections from the field.

  15. 75 FR 77666 - Notice of Determinations Regarding Eligibility To Apply for Worker Adjustment Assistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-13

    ... Freeport-McMoran Copper Phoenix, AZ........ July 17, 2009. & Gold, Information Technology Department. 74.... Subject firm Location Impact date 74,119 Design Metal Plating, Emporium, PA....... May 11, 2009....

  16. Whaling: will the Phoenix rise again?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, Sidney J

    2007-08-01

    It is argued that Japan's authorities and entrepreneurs involved in whaling and the whale-meat trade have a long-term goal of rebuilding a large and profitable industry of pelagic whaling, particularly in the Southern Hemisphere, in the next 20 years or so. They have made large investments in this enterprise since the so-called moratorium on commercial whaling was adopted by the International Whaling Commission in 1982. These include, but are not confined to, state subsidizing of an expanding and diversifying 20-year programme of commercial whaling under provisions in all relevant international agreements since 1937 that permit unlimited and unilaterally decreed whaling, supposedly for scientific purposes, provided that the commodities from the whales killed are fully utilized. The context of this is the monopoly of technical knowledge, special skills and the market for valuable whale-meat that Japanese enterprises acquired in the post-world war II period, having broken - in 1937 - the strongly defended de facto Anglo-Norwegian monopoly of technology, skills, access to Antarctic whaling grounds and the market for whale-oil that had existed until then. The attraction of 'scientific whaling' is not only that it by-passes any internationally agreed catch-limits but that it also circumvents all other rules - many dating fr/om the League of Nations whaling convention of 1931 - regarding protected species, closed areas, killing of juveniles, less inhumane killing methods, etc. The groundwork is being laid to justify that resumed whaling on partially recovered whale stocks will be at the unsustainable levels that will be profitable again. This justification is based on spurious assertions that numerous and hungry whales threaten the world's fisheries, and that the abundance and possible increase in some whale species is impeding the recovery of other, severely depleted, and potentially more valuable species such as the blue whale. If the scenario presented here is correct

  17. Analysis of Effectiveness of Phoenix Entry Reaction Control System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyakonov, Artem A.; Glass, Christopher E.; Desai, Prasun, N.; VanNorman, John W.

    2008-01-01

    Interaction between the external flowfield and the reaction control system (RCS) thruster plumes of the Phoenix capsule during entry has been investigated. The analysis covered rarefied, transitional, hypersonic and supersonic flight regimes. Performance of pitch, yaw and roll control authority channels was evaluated, with specific emphasis on the yaw channel due to its low nominal yaw control authority. Because Phoenix had already been constructed and its RCS could not be modified before flight, an assessment of RCS efficacy along the trajectory was needed to determine possible issues and to make necessary software changes. Effectiveness of the system at various regimes was evaluated using a hybrid DSMC-CFD technique, based on DSMC Analysis Code (DAC) code and General Aerodynamic Simulation Program (GASP), the LAURA (Langley Aerothermal Upwind Relaxation Algorithm) code, and the FUN3D (Fully Unstructured 3D) code. Results of the analysis at hypersonic and supersonic conditions suggest a significant aero-RCS interference which reduced the efficacy of the thrusters and could likely produce control reversal. Very little aero-RCS interference was predicted in rarefied and transitional regimes. A recommendation was made to the project to widen controller system deadbands to minimize (if not eliminate) the use of RCS thrusters through hypersonic and supersonic flight regimes, where their performance would be uncertain.

  18. After Rasping by Phoenix in 'Snow White' Trench, Sol 60

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander used the motorized rasp on the back of its robotic arm scoop during the mission's 60th Martian day, or sol, (July 26, 2008) to penetrate a hard layer at the bottom of a trench informally called 'Snow White.' This view, taken by the lander's Surface Stereo Imager and presented in approximately true color, shows the trench later the same sol. Most of the 16 holes left by a four-by-four array of rasp placements are visible in the central area of the image. A total 3 cubic centimeters, or about half a teaspoon, of material was collected in the scoop. Material in the scoop was collected both by the turning rasp, which threw material into the scoop through an opening at the back of the scoop, and by the scoop's front blade, which was run over the rasped area to pick up more shavings. The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  19. Vulnerability assessment of climate-induced water shortage in Phoenix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gober, Patricia; Kirkwood, Craig W

    2010-12-14

    Global warming has profound consequences for the climate of the American Southwest and its overallocated water supplies. This paper uses simulation modeling and the principles of decision making under uncertainty to translate climate information into tools for vulnerability assessment and urban climate adaptation. A dynamic simulation model, WaterSim, is used to explore future water-shortage conditions in Phoenix. Results indicate that policy action will be needed to attain water sustainability in 2030, even without reductions in river flows caused by climate change. Challenging but feasible changes in lifestyle and slower rates of population growth would allow the region to avoid shortage conditions and achieve groundwater sustainability under all but the most dire climate scenarios. Changes in lifestyle involve more native desert landscaping and fewer pools in addition to slower growth and higher urban densities. There is not a single most likely or optimal future for Phoenix. Urban climate adaptation involves using science-based models to anticipate water shortage and manage climate risk.

  20. Phoenix Lander Self Portrait on Mars, Vertical Projection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    This view is a vertical projection that combines hundreds of exposures taken by the Surface Stereo Imager camera on NASA's Mars Phoenix Lander and projects them as if looking down from above. The black circle is where the camera itself is mounted on the lander, out of view in images taken by the camera. North is toward the top of the image. This view comprises more than 100 different Stereo Surface Imager pointings, with images taken through three different filters at each pointing. The images were taken throughout the period from the 13th Martian day, or sol, after landing to the 47th sol (June 5 through July 12, 2008). The lander's Robotic Arm appears cut off in this mosaic view because component images were taken when the arm was out of the frame. The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  1. Phoenix Lander on Mars with Surrounding Terrain, Polar Projection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    This view is a polar projection that combines more than 500 exposures taken by the Surface Stereo Imager camera on NASA's Mars Phoenix Lander and projects them as if looking down from above. The black circle on the spacecraft is where the camera itself is mounted on the lander, out of view in images taken by the camera. North is toward the top of the image. The lander's meteorology mast extends above the southwest horzon and is topped by the telltale wind gauge. The ground surface around the lander has polygonal patterning similar to patterns in permafrost areas on Earth. The landing site is at 68.22 degrees north latitude, 234.25 degrees east longitude on Mars. This view in approximately true color comprises more than 100 different Stereo Surface Imager pointings, with images taken through three different filters at each pointing. The images were taken throughout the period from the 13th Martian day, or sol, after landing to the 47th sol (June 5 through July 12, 2008). The lander's Robotic Arm is cut off in this mosaic view because component images were taken when the arm was out of the frame. The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  2. Phoenix Lander on Mars with Surrounding Terrain, Vertical Projection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    This view is a vertical projection that combines more than 500 exposures taken by the Surface Stereo Imager camera on NASA's Mars Phoenix Lander and projects them as if looking down from above. The black circle on the spacecraft is where the camera itself is mounted on the lander, out of view in images taken by the camera. North is toward the top of the image. The height of the lander's meteorology mast, extending toward the southwest, appears exaggerated because that mast is taller than the camera mast. This view in approximately true color covers an area about 30 meters by 30 meters (about 100 feet by 100 feet). The landing site is at 68.22 degrees north latitude, 234.25 degrees east longitude on Mars. The ground surface around the lander has polygonal patterning similar to patterns in permafrost areas on Earth. This view comprises more than 100 different Stereo Surface Imager pointings, with images taken through three different filters at each pointing. The images were taken throughout the period from the 13th Martian day, or sol, after landing to the 47th sol (June 5 through July 12, 2008). The lander's Robotic Arm is cut off in this mosaic view because component images were taken when the arm was out of the frame. The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  3. Physics Simulations of fluids - a brief overview of Phoenix FD

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva; Nikolov, Svetlin

    2014-01-01

    The presentation will briefly describe the simulation and rendering of fluids with Phoenix FD, and then proceed into implementation details. We will present our methods of parallelizing the core simulation algorithms and our utilization of the GPU. We will also show how we take advantage of computational fluid dynamics specifics in order to speed up the preview and final rendering, thus achieving a quick pipeline for the creation of various visual effects. About the speakers Ivaylo Iliev is a Senior Software developer at Chaos Group and is the creator of the Phoenix FD simulator for fluid effects. He has a strong interest in physics and has worked on military simulators before focusing on visual effects. He has a Master?s degree from the Varna Technical University. Svetlin Nikolov is a Senior Software developer at Chaos Group with keen interest in physics and artificial intelligence and 7 years of experience in the software industry. He comes from a game development background with a focu...

  4. The Thermal Electrical Conductivity Probe (TECP) for Phoenix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zent, Aaron P.; Hecht, Michael H.; Cobos, Doug R.; Campbell, Gaylon S.; Campbell, Colin S.; Cardell, Greg; Foote, Marc C.; Wood, Stephen E.; Mehta, Manish

    2009-01-01

    The Thermal and Electrical Conductivity Probe (TECP) is a component of the Microscopy, Electrochemistry, and Conductivity Analyzer (MECA) payload on the Phoenix Lander. TECP will measure the temperature, thermal conductivity and volumetric heat capacity of the regolith. It will also detect and quantify the population of mobile H2O molecules in the regolith, if any, throughout the polar summer, by measuring the electrical conductivity of the regolith, as well as the dielectric permittivity. In the vapor phase, TECP is capable of measuring the atmospheric H2O vapor abundance, as well as augment the wind velocity measurements from the meteorology instrumentation. TECP is mounted near the end of the 2.3 m Robotic Arm, and can be placed either in the regolith material or held aloft in the atmosphere. This paper describes the development and calibration of the TECP. In addition, substantial characterization of the instrument has been conducted to identify behavioral characteristics that might affect landed surface operations. The greatest potential issue identified in characterization tests is the extraordinary sensitivity of the TECP to placement. Small gaps alter the contact between the TECP and regolith, complicating data interpretation. Testing with the Phoenix Robotic Arm identified mitigation techniques that will be implemented during flight. A flight model of the instrument was also field tested in the Antarctic Dry Valleys during the 2007-2008 International Polar year. 2

  5. Efficacy of Phoenix dactylifera L. (Date Palm Creams on Healthy Skin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sidra Meer

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The date palm fruit (Phoenix dactylifera L. Arecaceae is used in most of the countries of the world and is an essential part of the diet, especially in many Arabian countries. Phoenix dactylifera L. fruits are a rich source of sugars (glucose and fructose, vitamins (A, C, and B complex, fibers, minerals, and phenolic compounds having antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. This study is designed to explore the Phoenix dactylifera L. fruit for skin care. A single-blinded, placebo control trial was conducted, including 11 healthy female volunteers after their informed consent. The efficacy of the Phoenix dactylifera L. extract (4% was evaluated in cream form after one, two, three, four, six, and eight weeks of treatment compared with the baseline. Prior to the study, the composition of the extract was analyzed to understand the underlying mechanisms by which the extract affects skin. Treating facial skin with the Phoenix dactylifera L. extract significantly improved all parameters investigated, such as skin elasticity, pigmentation, redness, brightness, and hydration and led to the improvement of the facial skin. There were no adverse reactions noted during the course of the patch test, demonstrating that the extract could be safe to apply on the skin. The Phoenix dactylifera L. fruit extract serves as a skin care ingredient that significantly improves characteristics important for perception of skin ageing and health. The efficacy of the treatment is possibly due to a combination of numerous active substances found in the Phoenix dactylifera L. extract.

  6. 75 FR 76293 - Radio Broadcasting Services; Peach Springs, AZ

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-08

    ... COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 73 Radio Broadcasting Services; Peach Springs, AZ AGENCY: Federal Communications..., allots FM Channel 281C3 at Peach Springs, Arizona, in order to maintain a first local service at that community. Channel 281C3 can be allotted at Peach Springs, Arizona, in compliance with the...

  7. Accretion Events in Binary Systems: AZ Cas and VV Cep

    CERN Document Server

    Gałan, C; Tomov, T; Wiȩcek, M; Majcher, A; Wychudzki, P; Świerczyński, E; Kolev, D; Brożek, T; Maciejewski, G; Zoła, S; Kurpińska-Winiarska, M; Winiarski, M; Ogłoza, W; Drożdż, M; Krzesiński, J

    2011-01-01

    The sudden lengthening of orbital period of VV Cep eclipsing binary by about 1% was observed in the last epoch. The mass transfer and/or mass loss are most possible explanations of this event. The photometric behaviour of AZ Cas, the cousin of VV Cep, suggests that the accretion can occur and could be important in this system, too.

  8. AZ91C magnesium alloy modified by Cd

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shabadi, R.; Ambat, Rajan; Dwarakadasa, E.S.

    2014-01-01

    In the present work, the effect of Cd on the microstructure, mechanical properties and general corrosion behaviour of AZ91C alloys was investigated. Addition of Cd was found not to be efficient in modifying/refining the microstructure or β-phase. A morphology change in β-phase from fine continuou...

  9. HYDRAULICS, SANTA CRUZ COUNTY, AZ, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Recent developments in digital terrain and geospatial database management technology make it possible to protect this investment for existing and future projects to...

  10. Cytotoxicity studies of AZ31D alloy and the effects of carbon dioxide on its biodegradation behavior in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jiali, E-mail: wangjialicsu@yahoo.cn [Center for Translational Medicine Research and Development, Institute of Biomedical and Health Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenzhen 518055 (China); Musculoskeletal Research Laboratory, Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong SAR (China); Qin, Ling [Center for Translational Medicine Research and Development, Institute of Biomedical and Health Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenzhen 518055 (China); Musculoskeletal Research Laboratory, Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong SAR (China); Wang, Kai [School of Humanities and Social Sciences, Hunan University of Chinese Medicine, Changsha 410208 (China); Wang, Jue; Yue, Ye [Center for Translational Medicine Research and Development, Institute of Biomedical and Health Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenzhen 518055 (China); Li, Yangde [Guangdong Innovation Team for Biodegradable Magnesium and Medical Implants, E-ande, Dongguan 523660 (China); Tang, Jian [Center for Translational Medicine Research and Development, Institute of Biomedical and Health Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenzhen 518055 (China); Li, Weirong [Guangdong Innovation Team for Biodegradable Magnesium and Medical Implants, E-ande, Dongguan 523660 (China)

    2013-10-01

    Magnesium alloys have been advocated as potential artificial bone materials due to their biocompatibility and biodegradability. The understanding of their corrosive mechanism in physiological environments is therefore essential for making application-orientated designs. Thus, this in vitro study was designed to assess the effects of CO{sub 2} on corrosive behavior of AZ31D to mimic in vivo special ingredient. Electrochemical technologies accompanied with Scanning electron microscope, Fourier transform infrared, X-ray diffraction, Energy dispersive spectroscopy and hydrogen evolution measurement were employed to analyze corrosive rates and mechanisms of AZ31D. Moreover, the biocompatibility of AZ31D was assessed with a direct cell attachment assay and an indirect cytotoxicity test in different diluted extracts. The ion concentrations in extracts were measured using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry to offer explanations on the differences of cell viability in the indirect test. The results of the direct cytotoxicity assay showed that the corrosive rate of AZ31D was too rapid to allow for cell adhesion. Extracts diluted less than 20 times would cause adverse effects on cell proliferation, likely due to excessive ions and gas release. Moreover, the presence of CO{sub 2} did not cause significant differences on corrosive behavior of AZ31D according to the results of electrochemical testing and hydrogen evolution measurement. This might be caused by the simultaneous process of precipitation and dissolution of MgCO{sub 3} due to the penetration role of CO{sub 2}. This analysis of corrosive atmospheres on the degradation behavior of magnesium alloys would contribute to the design of more scientific in vitro testing systems in the future. - Highlights: • We evaluate the effects of CO{sub 2} on corrosion behavior of magnesium alloys. • We assess the feasibility of commercial AZ31D alloy as potential implants. • CO{sub 2} is not the key factor to minimize

  11. Animated Optical Microscope Zoom in from Phoenix Launch to Martian Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on image for animation This animated camera view zooms in from NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander launch site all the way to Phoenix's Microscopy and Electrochemistry and C Eonductivity Analyzer (MECA) aboard the spacecraft on the Martian surface. The final frame shows the soil sample delivered to MECA as viewed through the Optical Microscope (OM) on Sol 17 (June 11, 2008), or the 17th Martian day. The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  12. Animated Optical Microscope Zoom in from Phoenix Launch to Martian Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on image for animation This animated camera view zooms in from NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander launch site all the way to Phoenix's Microscopy and Electrochemistry and C Eonductivity Analyzer (MECA) aboard the spacecraft on the Martian surface. The final frame shows the soil sample delivered to MECA as viewed through the Optical Microscope (OM) on Sol 17 (June 11, 2008), or the 17th Martian day. The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  13. Influence of artificial biological fluid composition on the biocorrosion of potential orthopedic Mg-Ca, AZ31, AZ91 alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, X N; Zheng, Y F; Chen, L J

    2009-12-01

    The electrochemical behavior of potential orthopedic Mg-Ca, AZ31 and AZ91 alloys was studied in Hank's solution, Dulbecco's Modified Eagle's Medium (DMEM) and serum-containing medium (DMEM adding 10% fetal bovine serum (DMEM+FBS)) over a 7 day immersion period. The biocorrosion of the above three alloys for various immersion time intervals was investigated by linear polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). After 7 day immersion, potentiodynamic polarization tests were carried out and the surface morphologies of experimental samples were examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) observation complemented by energy-disperse spectrometer (EDS) analysis. It was shown that the corrosion of magnesium alloys was influenced by the composition of the solution. The results indicated that chloride ion could reduce the corrosion resistance and the hydrocarbonate ions could induce rapid surface passivation. The adsorbed amino acid on the experimental magnesium alloys' surface increased their polarization resistance and reduced current densities. The influence of the serum protein on corrosion was found to be associated with the magnesium alloy compositions. A Mg-Ca alloy exhibited an increased corrosion rate in the presence of serum protein. An AZ31 alloy showed an increased corrosion rate in DMEM+FBS in the initial 3 day immersion and the corrosion rate decreased thereafter. An AZ91 alloy, with high Al content, showed a reduced corrosion rate with the addition of FBS into DMEM.

  14. Influence of artificial biological fluid composition on the biocorrosion of potential orthopedic Mg-Ca, AZ31, AZ91 alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gu, X N; Zheng, Y F [State Key Laboratory for Turbulence and Complex System and Department of Advanced Materials and Nanotechnology, College of Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Chen, L J, E-mail: yfzheng@pku.edu.c [School of Material Science and Engineering, Shengyang University of Technology, Shenyang 110023 (China)

    2009-12-15

    The electrochemical behavior of potential orthopedic Mg-Ca, AZ31 and AZ91 alloys was studied in Hank's solution, Dulbecco's Modified Eagle's Medium (DMEM) and serum-containing medium (DMEM adding 10% fetal bovine serum (DMEM+FBS)) over a 7 day immersion period. The biocorrosion of the above three alloys for various immersion time intervals was investigated by linear polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). After 7 day immersion, potentiodynamic polarization tests were carried out and the surface morphologies of experimental samples were examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) observation complemented by energy-disperse spectrometer (EDS) analysis. It was shown that the corrosion of magnesium alloys was influenced by the composition of the solution. The results indicated that chloride ion could reduce the corrosion resistance and the hydrocarbonate ions could induce rapid surface passivation. The adsorbed amino acid on the experimental magnesium alloys' surface increased their polarization resistance and reduced current densities. The influence of the serum protein on corrosion was found to be associated with the magnesium alloy compositions. A Mg-Ca alloy exhibited an increased corrosion rate in the presence of serum protein. An AZ31 alloy showed an increased corrosion rate in DMEM+FBS in the initial 3 day immersion and the corrosion rate decreased thereafter. An AZ91 alloy, with high Al content, showed a reduced corrosion rate with the addition of FBS into DMEM.

  15. In Vivo Corrosion Resistance of Ca-P Coating on AZ60 Magnesium Alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xing Xiao; Haiying Yu; Qingsan Zhu; Guangyu Li; Yang Qu; Rui Gu

    2013-01-01

    Magnesium-based alloys are frequently reported as potential biodegradable orthopedic implant materials.Controlling the degradation rate and mechanical integrity of magnesium alloys in the physiological environment is the key to their applications.In this study,calcium phosphate (Ca-P) coating was prepared on AZ60 magnesium alloy using phosphating technology.AZ60 samples were immersed in a phosphating solution at 37 ± 2 ℃ for 30 min,and the solution pH was adjusted to 2.6 to 2.8 by adding NaOH solution.Then,the samples were dried in an attemperator at 60 ℃.The degradation behavior was studied in vivo using Ca-P coated and uncoated magnesium alloys.Samples of these two different materials were implanted into rabbit femora,and the corrosion resistances were evaluated after 1,2,and 3 months.The Ca-P coated samples corroded slower than the uncoated samples with prolonged time.Significant differences (p < 0.05) in mass losses and corrosion rates between uncoated samples and Ca-P coated samples were observed by micro-computed tomography.The results indicate that the Ca-P coating could slow down the degradation of magnesium alloy in vivo.

  16. Connection of AZ31B Magnesium Alloys and TC4 Titanium Alloy Via Resistance Spot Welding%AZ31B镁合金与TC4钛合金之间的电阻点焊连接

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谈芬芳; 谢志雄; 杜康; 梅张强

    2013-01-01

    In order to make it became realistic that welding of AZ31B magnesium alloys and TC4 titanium alloy via resistance spot welding, in this work the theory of diffusion welding was used. The welding technology of AZ31B magnesium alloys and TC4 titanium alloy aluminum was discussed. In the process, aluminium foil and aluminium powder were used. The property and microstructure of welding spot were analysised by scanning electron microscope (SEM) and X-ray energy dispersion spectroscope (EDS). The results indicate that the mechanical performace of welding sopt is better when aluminiun powder as additive, the diffusion of elements and alloying reaction are conducive to improve the machanical property of welding spot.%为实现AZ31B镁合金与TC4钛合金异种材料的电阻点焊连接,借助扩散焊原理,探讨了在其之间添加铝箔和铝粉的电阻点焊工艺,并对焊点的力学性能及微观结构进行了分析.结果表明,以铝粉作为添加物,可以获得力学性能较好的焊点,元素间的扩散及合金化反应是焊点性能得以提高的主要原因.

  17. Photoelastic stress analysis on a Phoenix 7. 9-meter blade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Musial, W D; Jenks, M D; Osgood, R M; Johnson, J A

    1991-10-01

    Photoelastic tests were conducted on the Phoenix 7.9-meter blade to develop the basic methodology for locating critical strain areas on full-scale composite structures. Under relatively low elastic loading the strain fields over various regions on the blade planform were documented with 35mm photographs under different loading conditions at the Solar Energy Research Institute (SERI) Structural Test Facility (STF). Strain concentrations were easily located and quantified. Principal strain magnitudes and directions were determined at the highest strain areas using separator gages. Results were compared to measured operating loads. This experiment demonstrated the value of experimental stress analysis using the photoelastic technique for the evaluation of composite blade designs. 9 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  18. Phoenix Mars Scout Parachute Flight Behavior and Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Douglas S.; Witkowski, Allen; Kandis, Mike

    2011-01-01

    The data returned from the successful Phoenix Mars Scout mission are analyzed in order to determine characteristics and behaviors of the supersonic parachute that was used to slow the entry body during its descent to the surface. At least one significant drag reduction event was observed when the vehicle was traveling at Mach 1.6; this is consistent with previously reported terrestrial high altitude testing and is likely associated with an area oscillation of the parachute. The parachute is shown to possess some lateral instability relative to the anti-velocity vector that is also at a level that is consistent with the same historic data. Ramifications of the lateral instability and, in particular, the unsteadiness in the parachute drag are discussed as energizing elements of the entry body wrist mode. The apparent coefficient of drag for the parachute is calculated and shown to have relatively small variations on an average basis over the supersonic portion of flight.

  19. Developing Carbon Budgets for Cities: Phoenix as a Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    McHale, M. R.; Baker, L. A.; Koerner, B. A.; Grimm, N. B.

    2008-12-01

    Studies have shown that cities can alter regional carbon dynamics through changing ecosystem productivity, overall carbon cycling rate, and total carbon storage in vegetation and soils. Furthermore, people in urban regions import a large amount of carbon in food and fuel, as well as release an exceptional amount of CO2 into the atmosphere. Numerous studies have attempted to quantify some sources and sinks of carbon in urban areas, although a complete carbon budget for a city that accounts for total inputs, outputs, and storage within the ecosystem has yet to be fully accomplished. One challenge is associated with attaining the data necessary to accurately account for all carbon dynamics in these heterogeneous and complex ecosystems. Our goal was to estimate a budget for the Phoenix metropolitan area while developing methodology to calculate carbon dynamics in urban systems that can be applied to cities across the US. Only with comparable carbon budgets for multiple cities will we finally begin to understand the influence of urbanization on carbon dynamics. Our analysis shows when calculating certain variables like transportation emissions, results can vary radically (up to 250%) depending on the data source and methodology implemented (i.e. bottom-up vs. top-down). A common assumption is that productivity and carbon storage will increase with urbanization in arid systems due to water and nutrient inputs, as well as changes in vegetation structure; however, our results indicated that this may not actually be the case in Phoenix where a large number of residents design landscapes to conserve water. Even if all urban expansion was dedicated to landscapes designed for carbon sequestration and storage, vegetation and soils will unlikely have a large effect on the C budget without significant changes in transportation and lifestyle choices.

  20. Tube extrusion of AZ31 alloy with Sr additions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sadeghi, Alireza, E-mail: Alireza.Sadeghi@mail.mcgill.ca [McGill University, Department of Mining and Materials Science, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Hoseini, Majid; Pekguleryuz, Mihriban [McGill University, Department of Mining and Materials Science, Montreal, Quebec (Canada)

    2012-05-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Bending and unbending of material flow during extrusion tilts the basal pole from the center of the pole figure. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Circumferential movement of material inside the welding zone forms two extra texture components. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Addition of Sr removes Al from {alpha}-Mg as a result grains could deform more easily in the circumferential directions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer By increasing level of Sr, maximum intensity of the ODFs decreases while the extra texture components strengthen. - Abstract: Three Mg alloys (AZ31, and AZ31 + 0.4 and 0.8 wt%Sr) were successfully hot extruded into tubes at 400 Degree-Sign C through a porthole die. Strontium (Sr) additions to AZ31 alloy reduced twining and the dynamically recrystallized grain size. However, Sr also increased the surface cracking tendency during extrusion. It was noted that the complex deformation path in the porthole die distributes the Sr-rich precipitates homogeneously across the microstructure and stringer formation is effectively avoided. The material flow in the die resembles that seen in multiple equal channel angular pressing (ECAP) routes and similar and significant effects on the final texture are observed. The material flow curvatures in the extrusion direction rotate the basal poles 25 Degree-Sign from the radial direction. Two other texture components ({delta}{sub 1}, {delta}{sub 2}) are also formed in the welding zone by the circumferential flow of material. The maximum intensity of the orientation distribution function (ODF) is reduced with increasing level of Sr. Noteworthy, the maximum intensity in AZ31 + 0.8Sr occurs at the {delta}{sub 1} component while for AZ31 and AZ31 + 0.4Sr, the maximum intensity is located at the basal components. With Sr, alloying, Al is depleted from Mg solid solution and grains deform more easily in the circumferential direction. As a result, selective workhardening

  1. How Neoliberal Imperialism is Expressed by Programming Strategies of Phoenix TV: A Critical Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuang Xie

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available This project is a case study of Phoenix Television, which is a Hong Kong-based satellite TV network broadcasting to the global Chinese-speaking community, primarily to the mainland of China. In the theoretical framework of media imperialism and neoliberal imperialism, this study focuses on the programming strategies of Phoenix TV and examines how the global trend of neoliberalism, the Chinese government’s tight control of the media, and the sophisticated ownership of Phoenix TV intertwined to influence on its programming. The analysis of the format, content, naming, and scheduling reveals that US-inspired neoliberalism is expressed in the network’s programming strategies. This expression, in fact, is the balance that Phoenix found between the tension of global and Chinese interests, the tension between revenue making and public service, and the tension between Party-control and profit seeking.

  2. Landing Site Dispersion Analysis and Statistical Assessment for the Mars Phoenix Lander

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonfiglio, Eugene P.; Adams, Douglas; Craig, Lynn; Spencer, David A.; Strauss, William; Seelos, Frank P.; Seelos, Kimberly D.; Arvidson, Ray; Heet, Tabatha

    2008-01-01

    The Mars Phoenix Lander launched on August 4, 2007 and successfully landed on Mars 10 months later on May 25, 2008. Landing ellipse predicts and hazard maps were key in selecting safe surface targets for Phoenix. Hazard maps were based on terrain slopes, geomorphology maps and automated rock counts of MRO's High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) images. The expected landing dispersion which led to the selection of Phoenix's surface target is discussed as well as the actual landing dispersion predicts determined during operations in the weeks, days, and hours before landing. A statistical assessment of these dispersions is performed, comparing the actual landing-safety probabilities to criteria levied by the project. Also discussed are applications for this statistical analysis which were used by the Phoenix project. These include using the statistical analysis used to verify the effectiveness of a pre-planned maneuver menu and calculating the probability of future maneuvers.

  3. CRED REA Coral Population Parameters at Howland, Phoenix Islands, Pacific Remote Island Areas in 2008

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Belt transects along 2 consecutively-placed, 25m transect lines were surveyed as part of Rapid Ecological Assessments conducted at 4 sites at Howland, Phoenix...

  4. CRED REA Coral Population Parameters at Baker, Phoenix Islands, Pacific Remote Island Areas in 2008

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Belt transects along 2 consecutively-placed, 25m transect lines were surveyed as part of Rapid Ecological Assessments conducted at 4 sites at Baker, Phoenix Islands...

  5. Phoenix light - Heating and cooling with phase-change materials; Phoenix light: Heizen und Kuehlen mit PCM - Schlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haechler, E. [Suiselectra Ingenieurunternehmung AG, Basel (Switzerland); Schneider, B. [Hochschule Esslingen, University of Applied Sciences, Esslingen (Germany)

    2002-12-15

    This final report for the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE) deals with the use of phase-change materials (PCM) in buildings in order to help provide cooling in summer and heating in winter. General information on PCM and its use in the automotive industry, clothing, heating systems and office materials as well as in the electronics industry is provided. The physical and chemical basics are discussed and examples of PCM use in practice are provided. Also, work done in research institutes is mentioned. PCM systems from various manufacturers are noted. The 'phoenix light' system concept is discussed. The 'comfort cooler' concept is introduced and laboratory measurements made at the University of Applied Sciences in Esslingen, Germany, are discussed. Further, measurements made at an installation in an existing building are presented and discussed. Knowledge gained and the optimisation of the system are discussed. Finally, proposals for further work to be done are noted.

  6. Constitutive turnover of histone H2A.Z at yeast promoters requires the preinitiation complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tramantano, Michael; Sun, Lu; Au, Christy; Labuz, Daniel; Liu, Zhimin; Chou, Mindy; Shen, Chen; Luk, Ed

    2016-07-20

    The assembly of the preinitiation complex (PIC) occurs upstream of the +1 nucleosome which, in yeast, obstructs the transcription start site and is frequently assembled with the histone variant H2A.Z. To understand the contribution of the transcription machinery in the disassembly of the +1 H2A.Z nucleosome, conditional mutants were used to block PIC assembly. A quantitative ChIP-seq approach, which allows detection of global occupancy change, was employed to measure H2A.Z occupancy. Blocking PIC assembly resulted in promoter-specific H2A.Z accumulation, indicating that the PIC is required to evict H2A.Z. By contrast, H2A.Z eviction was unaffected upon depletion of INO80, a remodeler previously reported to displace nucleosomal H2A.Z. Robust PIC-dependent H2A.Z eviction was observed at active and infrequently transcribed genes, indicating that constitutive H2A.Z turnover is a general phenomenon. Finally, sites with strong H2A.Z turnover precisely mark transcript starts, providing a new metric for identifying cryptic and alternative sites of initiation.

  7. Rheo-diecasting of AZ91D magnesium alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Jun; LIU Guojun; ZHANG Shaoming; SHI Likai; FAN Zhongyun

    2010-01-01

    A rheo-diecasting process(RDC)was investigated for semisolid processing of an AZ91D magnesium alloy.The results of the RDC samples in as-cast state indicate that the microstructure of primary ct-Mg particles has a fine size,nearly spherical morphology,and uniform distribution throughout the components.Due to the advanced microstructure and reduced level of defects,the RDC AZ91D Mg alloy exhibits an apparent improvement in mechanical properties.The quantitative metallographic investigations reveal that increasing the intensity of forced convection during the slurry preparation results in a promoted nucleation and reduced volume fraction of the primary phase solidified in the slurry makor.

  8. The Formablity of AZ31B Magnesium Alloy Sheet

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Lingyun; LU Zhiwen; ZHAO Yazhong; QIU Xiaogang

    2006-01-01

    The forming limit diagrams(FLD)of AZ31B magnesium alloy sheet were tested by means of the electro etching grid method based on the forming experiment of magnesium alloy sheet carried out with a BCS-30D sheet forming testing machine and the strain testing analysis made with an advanced ASAME automatic strain measuring system. Experiments show that, at room temperature, the mechanical properties and deep drawing performance of AZ31B cold-rolled magnesium alloy sheet were so poor that it failed to test the forming limit diagrams without an ideal forming and processing capacity, while the hot-rolled magnesium alloy sheet was of a little better plasticity and forming performance after testing its forming limit diagrams. It can be concluded that the testing of the forming limit curves (FLC)offers the theoretical foundation for the drawing of the deep drawing and forming process of magnesium alloy sheet.

  9. MICROSTRUCTURAL STUDIES OF FRICTION STIR WELDED AZ31 MAGNESIUM ALLOY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    H.Zhang; S.B.Lin; L.Wu; J.C.Feng

    2004-01-01

    Friction stir welding achieves the weld in solid phase by locally introducing frictional heating and plastic flow arising from rotation of the welding tool, which results in changes in the local microstructure of magnesium alloy. The purpose in the paper is to study the microstructures of friction stir welded AZ3I magnesium alloy. Residual microstructures,including dynamic re-crystallization zone and nugget structures have been systematically investigated utilizing optical microscopy (OM), scanning electric microscopy (SEM),transmission electron microscopy (TEM) with energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and micro-hardness. AZ31 magnesium alloy has been successfully friction stir welded and exhibits the variations of microstructure including dynamically recrystallized,equaxied grains in the weld nugget. Residual hardness in the nugget was found slightly lower than the parent but not too obvious.

  10. Investigation on hot deformation behavior of AZ31 madnesium alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    汪凌云; HUANG; Guangsheng; 等

    2002-01-01

    The hot compressive deformation of extruded AZ31 magnesium alloy with the mass fractions of Al and Zn equal to 3%and 1% respectively is studied by a Gleeble-1500D thermal mechanical simulator over the temperature range from 200℃to 400℃ and the strain rate from 10-3 s-1 to 100s-1.The true stress-strain curves of the strain of 65% are tested.The deformation activation energy is obtained and the flow stress model is established by analyzng the effects of strain rate and temperature on the flow stress.Zener-Hollomon parameter is introduced to describe the softening behaviors of AZ31 magnesium alloy resulted from dynamic recrystallization during the hot compressive deformation,whose natural logarithm is linear with the critical strain of dynamic recrystallization.

  11. A FLOW STRESS MODEL FOR AZ61 MAGNESIUM ALLOY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    H.T.Zhou; X.Q.Zeng; Q.D Wang; W.J.Ding

    2004-01-01

    The flow stress behaviors of AZ61 alloy has been investigated at temperature range from 523 to 673K with the strain rates of 0.001-1s-1.It is found that the average activation energy,strain rate sensitive exponent and stress exponent are different at various deformation conditions changing from 1i3.6 to 176.3k J/mol,0.125 to 0.167 and 6 to 8 respectively.A flow stress model for AZ61 alloy is derived by analyzing the stress data based on hot compression test.It is demonstrated that the flow stress model including strain hardening exponent and strain softening exponent is suitable to predicate the flow stress.The prediction of the flow stress of AZ61 alloy has shown to be good agreement with the test data.The maximum differences of the peak stresses calculated by the model and obtained by experiment is less than 8%.

  12. HIGH STRAIN RATE BEHAVIOUR OF AN AZ31 + 0.5 Ca MAGNESIUM ALLOY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josef Pešička

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper reports behaviour of magnesium alloy AZ31 (nominal composition 3 % Al - 1 % Zn – balance Mg with an addition of 0.5 wt. % Ca at high strain rates. Samples were prepared by the squeeze cast technology. Dynamic compression Hopkinson tests were performed at room temperature with impact velocities ranging from 11.2 to 21.9 m.s-1. A rapid increase of the flow stress and the strain rate sensitivity was observed at high strain rates. Transmission electron microscopy showed extremely high dislocation density and mechanical twins of two types. Adiabatic shear banding is discussed as the reason for the observed behaviour at high strain rates.

  13. Reheating microstructure of refined AZ91D magnesium alloy in semi-solid state

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姜巨福; 罗守靖

    2004-01-01

    By means of equal channel angular extrusion (ECAE) test, upsetting test and metalloscope, reheating microstructures of raw casting ingots, materials prepared by SIMA and materials extruded by ECAE in semi-solid state were investigated. The results show that compared with those of raw casting ingots and materials prepared by SIMA, reheating microstructure of materials extruded by ECAE is the best and the final grain size is the finest.With increasing holding time, a growing phenomenon occurs in reheating microstructure of materials extruded by ECAE, which can be described by Ostwald ripening law. The average grain size increases firstly, subsequently decreases and the shape factor of grains approaches to 1 as the reheating temperature increases. With increasing equivalent strain, the average grain size decreases. This demonstrates that reheating material extruded by ECAE technology is a good method to prepare AZ91D magnesium alloy semi-solid billets.

  14. Enhancing Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of AZ31-MWCNT Nanocomposites through Mechanical Alloying

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Jayakumar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs reinforced Mg alloy AZ31 nanocomposites were fabricated by mechanical alloying and powder metallurgy technique. The reinforcement material MWCNTs were blended in three weight fractions (0.33%, 0.66%, and 1% with the matrix material AZ31 (Al-3%, zinc-1% rest Mg and blended through mechanical alloying using a high energy planetary ball mill. Specimens of monolithic AZ31 and AZ31-MWCNT composites were fabricated through powder metallurgy technique. The microstructure, density, hardness, porosity, ductility, and tensile properties of monolithic AZ31 and AZ31-MWCNT nano composites were characterized and compared. The characterization reveals significant reduction in CNT (carbon nanoTube agglomeration and enhancement in microstructure and mechanical properties due to mechanical alloying through ball milling.

  15. Reorganization of Damaged Chromatin by the Exchange of Histone Variant H2A.Z-2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishibuchi, Ikuno [Department of Cellular Biology, Research Institute for Radiation Biology and Medicine, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima (Japan); Department of Radiation Oncology, Graduate School of Biomedical and Health Sciences, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima (Japan); Department of Radiation Oncology, Hiroshima Prefectural Hospital, Hiroshima (Japan); Suzuki, Hidekazu; Kinomura, Aiko; Sun, Jiying; Liu, Ning-Ang [Department of Cellular Biology, Research Institute for Radiation Biology and Medicine, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima (Japan); Horikoshi, Yasunori [Department of Cellular Biology, Research Institute for Radiation Biology and Medicine, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima (Japan); Research Center for Mathematics of Chromatin Live Dynamics, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima (Japan); Shima, Hiroki [Department of Biochemistry, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Tohoku University, Sendai (Japan); Kusakabe, Masayuki; Harata, Masahiko [Laboratory of Molecular Biology, Graduate School of Agricultural Science, Tohoku University, Sendai (Japan); Fukagawa, Tatsuo [Department of Molecular Genetics, National Institute of Genetics and The Graduate University for Advanced Studies, Mishima (Japan); Ikura, Tsuyoshi [Laboratory of Chromatin Regulatory Network, Department of Mutagenesis, Radiation Biology Center, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Ishida, Takafumi [Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, Graduate School of Biomedical and Health Sciences, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima (Japan); Nagata, Yasushi [Department of Radiation Oncology, Graduate School of Biomedical and Health Sciences, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima (Japan); Tashiro, Satoshi, E-mail: ktashiro@hiroshima-u.ac.jp [Department of Cellular Biology, Research Institute for Radiation Biology and Medicine, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima (Japan); Research Center for Mathematics of Chromatin Live Dynamics, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima (Japan)

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: The reorganization of damaged chromatin plays an important role in the regulation of the DNA damage response. A recent study revealed the presence of 2 vertebrate H2A.Z isoforms, H2A.Z-1 and H2A.Z-2. However, the roles of the vertebrate H2A.Z isoforms are still unclear. Thus, in this study we examined the roles of the vertebrate H2A.Z isoforms in chromatin reorganization after the induction of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). Methods and Materials: To examine the dynamics of H2A.Z isoforms at damaged sites, we constructed GM0637 cells stably expressing each of the green fluorescent protein (GFP)-labeled H2A.Z isoforms, and performed fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) analysis and inverted FRAP analysis in combination with microirradiation. Immunofluorescence staining using an anti-RAD51 antibody was performed to study the kinetics of RAD51 foci formation after 2-Gy irradiation of wild-type (WT), H2A.Z-1- and H2A.Z-2-deficient DT40 cells. Colony-forming assays were also performed to compare the survival rates of WT, H2A.Z-1-, and H2A.Z-2-deficient DT40 cells with control, and H2A.Z-1- and H2A.Z-2-depleted U2OS cells after irradiation. Results: FRAP analysis revealed that H2A.Z-2 was incorporated into damaged chromatin just after the induction of DSBs, whereas H2A.Z-1 remained essentially unchanged. Inverted FRAP analysis showed that H2A.Z-2 was released from damaged chromatin. These findings indicated that H2A.Z-2 was exchanged at DSB sites immediately after the induction of DSBs. RAD51 focus formation after ionizing irradiation was disturbed in H2A.Z-2-deficient DT40 cells but not in H2A.Z-1-deficient cells. The survival rate of H2A.Z-2-deficient cells after irradiation was lower than those of WT and H2A.Z-1- DT40 cells. Similar to DT40 cells, H2A.Z-2-depleted U2OS cells were also radiation-sensitive compared to control and H2A.Z-1-depleted cells. Conclusions: We found that vertebrate H2A.Z-2 is involved in the regulation of the DNA

  16. Microstructures and mechanical properties of AZ80 alloy treated by pulsed ultrasonic vibration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Pulsed ultrasonic field was employed in the melt of the AZ80 magnesium alloy. The effects of pulsed ultrasonic field on mierostructure and mechanical properties of AZ80 magnesium alloy were investigated. The results show that the as-cast mierostructure of the AZ80 alloy with pulsed ultrasonic treatment is significantly changed. Pulsed ultrasonic field significantly decreases the grain size, changes the morphologies of the β-Mg17Al12 phases and reduces their area fraction. It is found that pulse width of ultrasonic plays an important role on the microstrueture formation of AZ80 alloy. With increasing pulse width, grains beeome finer and more uniform. In the range of experimental parameters, the optimum pulse width for melt treatment process is found to be 210 μs. The mechanical tests show that the mechanical properties of the as-cast AZ80 magnesium alloy with pulsed ultrasonic treatment are much higher than those of AZ80 alloy without ultrasonic field.

  17. Symposium on High Power, Ambient Temperature Lithium Batteries, 180th Meeting of the Electrochemical Society, Phoenix, AZ, Oct. 13-17, 1991, Proceedings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, W. D. K. (Editor); Halpert, Gerald (Editor)

    1992-01-01

    Papers presented in these proceedings are on the state of the art in high-power lithium batteries, a design analysis of high-power Li-TiS2 battery, the performance and safety features of spiral wound lithium/thionyl chloride cells, the feasibility of a superhigh energy density battery of the Li/BrF3 electrochemical system, and an enhanced redox process of disulfide compounds and their application in high energy storage. Attention is also given to the structure and charge-discharge characteristics of mesophase-pitch based carbons, a study of carbons and graphites as anodes for lithium rechargeable cells, Li metal-free rechargeable Li(1+x)Mn2O4/carbon cells, and rechargeable lithium batteries using V6O13/V5O5 as the positive electrode material. Other papers discuss the electrochemical stability of organic electrolytes in contact with solid inorganic cathode materials, the electrochemical behavior of methyl formate solutions, and the interface between a solid polymer electrolyte and lithium anode.

  18. The Domestication Syndrome in Phoenix dactylifera Seeds: Toward the Identification of Wild Date Palm Populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gros-Balthazard, Muriel; Newton, Claire; Ivorra, Sarah; Pierre, Marie-Hélène; Pintaud, Jean-Christophe; Terral, Jean-Frédéric

    2016-01-01

    Investigating crop origins is a priority to understand the evolution of plants under domestication, develop strategies for conservation and valorization of agrobiodiversity and acquire fundamental knowledge for cultivar improvement. The date palm (Phoenix dactylifera L.) belongs to the genus Phoenix, which comprises 14 species morphologically very close, sometimes hardly distinguishable. It has been cultivated for millennia in the Middle East and in North Africa and constitutes the keystone of oasis agriculture. Yet, its origins remain poorly understood as no wild populations are identified. Uncultivated populations have been described but they might represent feral, i.e. formerly cultivated, abandoned forms rather than truly wild populations. In this context, this study based on morphometrics applied to 1625 Phoenix seeds aims to (1) differentiate Phoenix species and (2) depict the domestication syndrome observed in cultivated date palm seeds using other Phoenix species as a "wild" reference. This will help discriminate truly wild from feral forms, thus providing new insights into the evolutionary history of this species. Seed size was evaluated using four parameters: length, width, thickness and dorsal view surface. Seed shape was quantified using outline analyses based on the Elliptic Fourier Transform method. The size and shape of seeds allowed an accurate differentiation of Phoenix species. The cultivated date palm shows distinctive size and shape features, compared to other Phoenix species: seeds are longer and elongated. This morphological shift may be interpreted as a domestication syndrome, resulting from the long-term history of cultivation, selection and human-mediated dispersion. Based on seed attributes, some uncultivated date palms from Oman may be identified as wild. This opens new prospects regarding the possible existence and characterization of relict wild populations and consequently for the understanding of the date palm origins. Finally, we

  19. The Domestication Syndrome in Phoenix dactylifera Seeds: Toward the Identification of Wild Date Palm Populations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muriel Gros-Balthazard

    Full Text Available Investigating crop origins is a priority to understand the evolution of plants under domestication, develop strategies for conservation and valorization of agrobiodiversity and acquire fundamental knowledge for cultivar improvement. The date palm (Phoenix dactylifera L. belongs to the genus Phoenix, which comprises 14 species morphologically very close, sometimes hardly distinguishable. It has been cultivated for millennia in the Middle East and in North Africa and constitutes the keystone of oasis agriculture. Yet, its origins remain poorly understood as no wild populations are identified. Uncultivated populations have been described but they might represent feral, i.e. formerly cultivated, abandoned forms rather than truly wild populations. In this context, this study based on morphometrics applied to 1625 Phoenix seeds aims to (1 differentiate Phoenix species and (2 depict the domestication syndrome observed in cultivated date palm seeds using other Phoenix species as a "wild" reference. This will help discriminate truly wild from feral forms, thus providing new insights into the evolutionary history of this species. Seed size was evaluated using four parameters: length, width, thickness and dorsal view surface. Seed shape was quantified using outline analyses based on the Elliptic Fourier Transform method. The size and shape of seeds allowed an accurate differentiation of Phoenix species. The cultivated date palm shows distinctive size and shape features, compared to other Phoenix species: seeds are longer and elongated. This morphological shift may be interpreted as a domestication syndrome, resulting from the long-term history of cultivation, selection and human-mediated dispersion. Based on seed attributes, some uncultivated date palms from Oman may be identified as wild. This opens new prospects regarding the possible existence and characterization of relict wild populations and consequently for the understanding of the date palm origins

  20. Microstructural Characteristics and Mechanical Properties of 2205/AZ31B Laminates Fabricated by Explosive Welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Li

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available A bimetal composite of 2205 duplex stainless steel and AZ31B magnesium alloy was cladded successfully through the method of explosive welding. The microstructural characteristics and mechanical properties of 2205/AZ31B bimetal composite are discussed. The interface of 2205/AZ31B bimetallic composite was a less regular wavy morphology with locally melted pockets. Adiabatic shear bands occurred only in the AZ31B side near explosive welding interface. The microstructure observed with EBSD showed a strong refinement near the interface zones. Line scan confirmed that the interface had a short element diffusion zone which would contribute to the metallurgical bonding between 2205 duplex stainless steel and AZ31B magnesium alloy. The value of micro-hardness near the bonding interface of composite plate increased because of work hardening and grain refinement. The tensile shear strength of bonding interface of 2205/AZ31B composite was 105.63 MPa. Tensile strength of 2205/AZ31B composite material was higher than the base AZ31B. There were two abrupt drops in stress in the stress–strain curves of the 2205/AZ31B composite materials.

  1. Plasma electrolytic oxidation coating on AZ91 magnesium alloy modified by neodymium and its corrosion resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Y. L.; Liu, Y. H.; Yu, S. R.; Zhu, X. Y.; Wang, Q.

    2008-03-01

    Ceramic coatings on the surfaces of Mg-9Al-1Zn (AZ91) magnesium alloy and Mg-9Al-1Zn-1Nd magnesium alloy (AZ91 magnesium alloy modified by neodymium, named as AZ91Nd in this paper) are synthesized in aluminate electrolyte by plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) process, respectively. X-ray diffraction and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analyses show the PEO coating on the Mg-9Al-1Zn-1Nd alloy comprises not only MgO and Al 2O 3, which are found in the coating on the AZ91 alloy, but also a trace amount of Nd 2O 3. Microstructure observations indicate the addition of Nd can decrease the sizes of β phases and form Al 2Nd intermetallics in the AZ91 alloy. The fine β phases can effectively restrain the formation of unclosed-holes and greatly decrease the sizes of pores in the coating during the PEO process. In addition, the Al 2Nd intermetallics can be completely covered due to the lateral growth of the PEO coatings formed on the α and β phases. As a result, the coating on the AZ91Nd alloy possesses a dense microstructure compared with that on the AZ91 alloy. The following corrosion tests indicate the corrosion resistance of the PEO coating on the AZ91Nd alloy is evidently higher than that of the PEO coating on the AZ91 alloy.

  2. 241-AZ Tank Farm Construction Extent of Condition Review for Tank Integrity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnes, Travis J.; Boomer, Kayle D.; Gunter, Jason R.; Venetz, Theodore J.

    2013-07-30

    This report provides the results of an extent of condition construction history review for tanks 241-AZ-101 and 241-AZ-102. The construction history of the 241-AZ tank farm has been reviewed to identify issues similar to those experienced during tank AY-102 construction. Those issues and others impacting integrity are discussed based on information found in available construction records, using tank AY-102 as the comparison benchmark. In the 241-AZ tank farm, the second DST farm constructed, both refractory quality and tank and liner fabrication were improved.

  3. AZ31B镁合金TIG焊接件应力腐蚀性能研究%Research on the Properties of Stress Corrosion Cracking for Tungsten Inert-Gas Arc Welded AZ31B Magnesium Alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    葛茂忠; 项建云; 张永康

    2013-01-01

    为了研究AZ31B镁合金钨极氩弧焊接件应力腐蚀性能,室温下采用三点加载的方式,在去离子水中对试样进行应力腐蚀试验.利用光学显微镜(OM)观测试样微观结构,利用扫描电镜(SEM)观测应力腐蚀断口,利用X-350A型X射线应力仪和CHI660B型电化学工作站分别测定试样表面残余应力和动电位极化曲线.试验结果表明:采用单面焊双面成型工艺,在45~50 A的焊接电流及合适的焊接速度条件下,焊接2.2 mm厚AZ31B镁合金薄板时,钨极氩弧焊能够获得理想的焊接接头,抗拉强度达到209 MPa;焊接件热影响区表面残余拉应力为60 MPa;同母材相比,焊接件自腐蚀电位减小27 mV,腐蚀电流增大了41.4%,从而增加焊接件腐蚀倾向;AZ31B焊接件在去离子水中浸没192 h后出现应力腐蚀开裂,属于穿晶型脆性断裂,这表明AZ31B镁合金焊接件在去离子水中具有很高的应力腐蚀敏感性.%In order to study the properties of the stress corrosion cracking (SCO for the tungsten inert-gas (TIG) arc welded AZ31B magnesium alloy sheets, the SCC susceptibility of the welded samples was assessed by three points loading method in deionized water at room temperature. The microstructure of specimens and fracture surfaces were analyzed by OM and SEM, respectively. Surface residual stress and potentiodynamic polarization behaviors of the welded samples were examined by using X-ray diffraction technology and a CHI660B electrochemical workstation, respectively. The results show that when TIG arc welding was used to weld AZ31B Mg alloy plates with the thickness of 2. 2 mm by using single-side welding double-side molding process, the ideal welding joints can be obtained at the welding current range from 45 A to 50 A and appropriate welding speed, the ultimate tensile strength of the welded joints is 209 Mpa; The residual tensile stress is 60 Mpa in the surface of heat effected zone of the welded joints; corrosion potential

  4. 3D Visualization for Phoenix Mars Lander Science Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Laurence; Keely, Leslie; Lees, David; Stoker, Carol

    2012-01-01

    Planetary surface exploration missions present considerable operational challenges in the form of substantial communication delays, limited communication windows, and limited communication bandwidth. A 3D visualization software was developed and delivered to the 2008 Phoenix Mars Lander (PML) mission. The components of the system include an interactive 3D visualization environment called Mercator, terrain reconstruction software called the Ames Stereo Pipeline, and a server providing distributed access to terrain models. The software was successfully utilized during the mission for science analysis, site understanding, and science operations activity planning. A terrain server was implemented that provided distribution of terrain models from a central repository to clients running the Mercator software. The Ames Stereo Pipeline generates accurate, high-resolution, texture-mapped, 3D terrain models from stereo image pairs. These terrain models can then be visualized within the Mercator environment. The central cross-cutting goal for these tools is to provide an easy-to-use, high-quality, full-featured visualization environment that enhances the mission science team s ability to develop low-risk productive science activity plans. In addition, for the Mercator and Viz visualization environments, extensibility and adaptability to different missions and application areas are key design goals.

  5. Photochemical Age Determinations in the Phoenix Metropolitan Area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kleinman, Lawrence I.; Daum, Peter H.; Lee, Y.- N.; Nunnermacker, L. J.; Springston, S. R.; Weinstein-Lloyd, J.; Hyde, P.; Doskey, Paul; Rudolph, Jochen; Fast, Jerome D.; Berkowitz, Carl M.

    2003-02-05

    An extensive VOC data set was gathered as part of a photochemical oxidant field campaign conducted in the Phoenix air basin in the late spring of 1998. Sampling was done at the surface and by aircraft at mid-boundary layer height; in regions with emission sources and downwind in the urban plume. VOC concentration ratios were used to calculate photochemical age, defined as the time integrated exposure of an air mass to OH radical. Based on the VOC ratios of 15 compounds (with OH reactivity varying between acetylene and p,m-xylene), we present estimates for photochemical age and dilution factors for several regions within the air basin. Geographic trends are in agreement with the expectation that pollutants are transported in a generally eastward direction so that older and more dilute mixtures occur to the east of the city. Photochemical ages determined from aircraft samples agree with those determined at a downwind surface site. The bias in photochemical age that occurs because fresh pollutants are added to an aged mixture has been quantified by using a particle trajectory model. A combination of trajectory results (actual age of the pollutants in an air mass) and photochemical age yields an estimate of the average OH concentration experienced by the air parcel. OH obtained in this way is somewhat lower, but has the same trends as OH concentrations calculated using a photochemical box model that is constrained with observed concentrations coincident with the VOC samples.

  6. Propulsive Maneuver Design for the 2007 Mars Phoenix Lander Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raofi, Behzad; Bhat, Ramachandra S.; Helfrich, Cliff

    2008-01-01

    On May 25, 2008, the Mars Phoenix Lander (PHX) successfully landed in the northern planes of Mars in order to continue and complement NASA's "follow the water" theme as its predecessor Mars missions, such as Mars Odyssey (ODY) and Mars Exploration Rovers, have done in recent years. Instruments on the lander, through a robotic arm able to deliver soil samples to the deck, will perform in-situ and remote-sensing investigations to characterize the chemistry of materials at the local surface, subsurface, and atmosphere. Lander instruments will also identify the potential history of key indicator elements of significance to the biological potential of Mars, including potential organics within any accessible water ice. Precise trajectory control and targeting were necessary in order to achieve the accurate atmospheric entry conditions required for arriving at the desired landing site. The challenge for the trajectory control maneuver design was to meet or exceed these requirements in the presence of spacecraft limitations as well as other mission constraints. This paper describes the strategies used, including the specialized targeting specifically developed for PHX, in order to design and successfully execute the propulsive maneuvers that delivered the spacecraft to its targeted landing site while satisfying the planetary protection requirements in the presence of flight system constraints.

  7. Navigation Challenges of the Mars Phoenix Lander Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portock, Brian M.; Kruizinga, Gerhard; Bonfiglio, Eugene; Raofi, Behzad; Ryne, Mark

    2008-01-01

    The Mars Phoenix Lander mission was launched on August 4th, 2007. To land safely at the desired landing location on the Mars surface, the spacecraft trajectory had to be controlled to a set of stringent atmospheric entry and landing conditions. The landing location needed to be controlled to an elliptical area with dimensions of 100km by 20km. The two corresponding critical components of the atmospheric entry conditions are the entry flight path angle (target: -13.0 deg +/-0.21 deg) and the entry time (within +/-30 seconds). The purpose of this paper is to describe the navigation strategies used to overcome the challenges posed during spacecraft operations, which included an attitude control thruster calibration campaign, a trajectory control strategy, and a trajectory reconstruction strategy. Overcoming the navigation challenges resulted in final Mars atmospheric entry conditions just 0.007 deg off in entry flight path angle and 14.9 sec early in entry time. These entry dispersions in addition to the entry, descent, and landing trajectory dispersion through the atmosphere, lead to a final landing location just 7 km away from the desired landing target.

  8. Knox named Phoenix associate dean of faculty affairs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robbins RA

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated after 150 words. The University of Arizona College of Medicine-Phoenix has announced the appointment of nationally recognized physician-scientist Kenneth S. Knox, MD, as the associate dean of faculty affairs. Dr. Knox who has been at the University of Arizona-Tucson since 2008, will oversee the Faculty Affairs Office whose charge is to promote an engaged, diverse community of faculty and scholars that sustain a culture of engagement, professionalism and inclusion. He also will serve as director of research at the Banner Lung Institute. Dr. Knox is a pulmonologist known for his research in sarcoidosis, fungal diagnostics and immunologic lung disease. His work includes developing treatments for HIV, AIDS and valley fever. The division chief of Pulmonary, Allergy, Critical Care and Sleep Medicine in Tucson, Knox was responsible for dramatic growth. His accomplishments include increasing the number of clinical and basic science faculty from five to 30 and fellowship trainings from six to 20, rekindling …

  9. February 2014 Phoenix critical care journal club: subgroup analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robbins RA

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated at 150 words. Sun X, Ioannidis JP, Agoritsas T, Alba AC, Guyatt G. How to use a subgroup analysis: users' guide to the medical literature. JAMA. 2014;311(4:405-11. One of Dr. Raschke's pet peeves is unplanned subgroup analysis. In the September 2013 Banner Good Samaritan / Phoenix VA Critical Care Journal Club (1 he commented on an article by Hung et al. (2 that used a post hoc subgroup analysis. He felt strongly enough to write to the editor about why post hoc subgroup analysis should not be acceptable as a basis for scientific conclusions and his letter was published this month (3. Therefore, we have been on the lookout for a review article to discuss subgroup analysis and came across this timely publication in JAMA. The authors cite a number of examples and provide 5 criteria to use when assessing the validity of subgroup analyses: 1. Can chance explain the apparent subgroup effect ...

  10. Massive NLTE models for X-ray novae with PHOENIX

    CERN Document Server

    van Rossum, Daniel R

    2012-01-01

    X-ray grating spectra provide the confirmation of continued mass loss from novae in the super-soft source (SSS) phase of the outburst. In this work expanding nova atmosphere models are developed and used to study the effect of mass loss on the SSS spectra. The very high temperatures combined with high expansion velocities and large radial extension make nova in the SSS phase very interesting but also difficult objects to model. The radiation transport code PHOENIX was applied to SSS novae before, but careful analysis of the old results has revealed a number of problems which lead to new methods and improvements to the code: 1) an improved NLTE module (a new opacity formalism, rate matrix solver, global iteration scheme, and temperature correction method); 2) a new hybrid hydrostatic-dynamic nova atmosphere setup; 3) the models are treated in pure NLTE (no LTE approximation for any opacity). With the new framework a modest amount of models (limited by computation time) are calculated. These show: 1) systematic...

  11. Anti-Oxiflammatory Profile of Date Extracts (Phoenix sylvestris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rintu Das

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Fruit of date palm (Phoenix sylvestrisL. is edible and used as an anti-geriatric, anti-oxidant ethnomedicine. In this study, three different types ofdateextracts, methanolic, acidic ethanolic and basic ethanolicwere evaluated for their putative in vitro scavenging effects on reactive oxygen species (ROS, where scavenging of hydroxyl radicals (basic ethanolic>acidic ethanolic>methanolic, superoxide radicals (acidic ethanolic>basic ethanolic>methanolic, DPPH radicals (acidic ethanolic>methanolic>basic ethanolic, nitric oxide (NO (methanolic>acidic ethanolic>basic ethanolic and inhibition of lipid peroxidation (basic ethanolic>acidic ethanolic> methanolic were found to occur in a dose dependent manner. Their flavonoid and phenolic contents proved to be the source of this potent free radical scavenging activity and indicated a direct correlation with their total anti-oxidant capacity. On human embryonic kidney cell line (HEK and murine RAW macrophages, bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS induced inflammation, the date extracts applied therapeutically, inhibit intracellular oxidative stress significantly. This reinstatement of cellular homeostasis presumably occurs via mitochondrial pathways. [Biomed Res Ther 2015; 2(6.000: 297-317

  12. Alexander's and Phoebe's stars: Two New Exotic Phoenix Giants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melis, Carl; Zuckerman, B.; Song, I.; Rhee, J. H.; Bessell, M. S.; Murphy, S. J.

    2011-01-01

    Phoenix Giants are first-ascent giant stars orbited by substantial dusty and gaseous disks that are sometimes accreting onto the central star. We present the characterization of two dusty first-ascent giant stars identified through cross-correlating the Tycho-2 and IRAS catalogs. CD-30 11814 (hereafter Alexander's star) is a high-velocity Pop II star that exhibits rapid accretion and outflowing gas. Multiple epochs of spectroscopic observations show that the double-peaked Ca II infrared triplet emission from this source has variable morphology and strength. TYC 596 145 1 (hereafter Phoebe's star) is a lithium-rich K2.5 III star orbited by a substantial icy disk as indicated by water-ice features detected in Spitzer IRS and IRTF/SpeX infrared spectroscopy. Each source can yield interesting insights into binary star evolution and planetary systems. Funding for this research came from NASA grants and an LLNL-Minigrant to UCLA and from the Spitzer Visiting Graduate Student Program.

  13. The Phoenix galaxy as seen by NuSTAR

    CERN Document Server

    Masini, A; Puccetti, S; Baloković, M; Gandhi, P; Guainazzi, M; Bauer, F E; Boggs, S E; Boorman, P G; Brightman, M; Christensen, F E; Craig, W W; Farrah, D; Hailey, C J; Harrison, F A; Koss, M J; LaMassa, S M; Ricci, C; Stern, D; Walton, D J; Zhang, W W

    2016-01-01

    Aims. We study the long-term variability of the well-known Seyfert 2 galaxy Mrk 1210 (a.k.a. UGC 4203, or the Phoenix galaxy). Methods. The source was observed by many X-ray facilities in the last 20 years. Here we present a NuSTAR observation and put the results in context of previously published observations. Results. NuSTAR observed Mrk 1210 in 2012 for 15.4 ks. The source showed Compton-thin obscuration similar to that observed by Chandra, Suzaku, BeppoSAX and XMM-Newton over the past two decades, but different from the first observation by ASCA in 1995, in which the active nucleus was caught in a low flux state - or obscured by Compton-thick matter, with a reflection-dominated spectrum. Thanks to the high-quality hard X-ray spectrum obtained with NuSTAR and exploiting the long-term spectral coverage spanning 16.9 years, we can precisely disentangle the transmission and reflection components and put constraints on both the intrinsic long-term variability and hidden nucleus scenarios. In the former case, t...

  14. The Phoenix galaxy as seen by NuSTAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masini, A.; Comastri, A.; Puccetti, S.; Baloković, M.; Gandhi, P.; Guainazzi, M.; Bauer, F. E.; Boggs, S. E.; Boorman, P. G.; Brightman, M.; Christensen, F. E.; Craig, W. W.; Farrah, D.; Hailey, C. J.; Harrison, F. A.; Koss, M. J.; LaMassa, S. M.; Ricci, C.; Stern, D.; Walton, D. J.; Zhang, W. W.

    2017-01-01

    Aims: We study the long-term variability of the well-known Seyfert 2 galaxy Mrk 1210 (also known as UGC 4203, or the Phoenix galaxy). Methods: The source was observed by many X-ray facilities in the last 20 yr. Here we present a NuSTAR observation and put the results in the context of previously published observations. Results: NuSTAR observed Mrk 1210 in 2012 for 15.4 ks. The source showed Compton-thin obscuration similar to that observed by Chandra, Suzaku, BeppoSAX and XMM-Newton over the past two decades, but different from the first observation by ASCA in 1995, in which the active nucleus was caught in a low flux state or was obscured by Compton-thick matter with a reflection-dominated spectrum. Thanks to the high-quality hard X-ray spectrum obtained with NuSTAR and exploiting the long-term spectral coverage spanning 16.9 yr, we can precisely disentangle the transmission and reflection components and put constraints on both the intrinsic long-term variability and hidden nucleus scenarios. In the former case, the distance between the reflector and the source must be at least 2 pc, while in the latter the eclipsing cloud may be identified with a water maser-emitting clump.

  15. The Phoenix stream: a cold stream in the Southern hemisphere

    CERN Document Server

    Balbinot, E; Li, T S; Santiago, B; Marshall, J L; Finley, D A; Pieres, A; Abbott, T M C; Abdalla, F B; Allam, S; Benoit-Lévy, A; Bernstein, G M; Bertin, E; Brooks, D; Burke, D L; Rosell, A Carnero; Kind, M Carrasco; Carretero, J; Cunha, C E; da Costa, L N; DePoy, D L; Desai, S; Diehl, H T; Doel, P; Estrada, J; Flaugher, B; Frieman, J; Gerdes, D W; Gruen, D; Gruendl, R A; Honscheid, K; James, D J; Kuehn, K; Kuropatkin, N; Lahav, O; March, M; Martini, P; Miquel, R; Nichol, R C; Ogando, R; Romer, A K; Sanchez, E; Schubnell, M; Sevilla-Noarbe, I; Smith, R C; Soares-Santos, M; Sobreira, F; Suchyta, E; Tarle, G; Thomas, D; Tucker, D; Walker, A R

    2015-01-01

    We report the discovery of a stellar stream in the Dark Energy Survey (DES) Year 1 (Y1A1) data. The discovery was made through simple color-magnitude filters and visual inspection of the Y1A1 data. We refer to this new object as the Phoenix stream, after its residing constellation. Through the subtraction of the background stellar population we detect a clear signal of a simple stellar population. By fitting the ridge line of the stream in color-magnitude space, we find that a stellar population with age $\\tau=11.5\\pm0.5$ Gyr and ${\\rm [Fe/H]}<-1.6$ located 17.5$\\pm$0.9 kpc from the Sun gives an adequate description of the stream stellar population. The stream is detected over an extension of 8$^{\\circ}$.1 (2.5 kpc) and has a width of $\\sim$54 pc assuming a Gaussian profile, indicating that a globular cluster is a probable progenitor. There is no known globular cluster within 5 kpc compatible with being the progenitor of the stream, assuming that the stream traces its orbit. We examined overdensities along...

  16. The Phoenix TECP Relative Humidity Sensor: Revised Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zent, Aaron

    2014-01-01

    The original calibration function of the RH sensor on the Phoenix mission's Thermal and Electrical Conductivity Sensor (TECP), has been revised to correct the erroneously-published original calibration equation, to demonstrate the value of this unique data set, and to improve characterization of H2O exchange between the martian regolith and atmosphere. TECP returned two data streams, the temperature of the electronics analog board (Tb) and the digital 12-bit output of the RH sensor (DN), both of which are required to uniquely specify the H2O abundance. Because the original flight instrument calibration was performed against a pair of hygrometers that measured frost point (Tf), the revised calibration equation is also cast in terms of frost point. The choice of functional form for the calibration function is minimally constrained. A series of profiles across the calibration data cloud at constant DN and Tb does not reveal any evidence of a complex functional form. Therefore, a series of polynomials in both DN and Tb was investigated, along with several non-linear functions of DN and Tb.

  17. Velocity Variations in the Phoenix-Hermus Star Stream

    CERN Document Server

    Carlberg, Raymond

    2016-01-01

    Measurements of velocity and density perturbations along stellar streams in the Milky Way provide a time integrated measure of dark matter substructure at larger galactic radius than the complementary instantaneous inner halo strong lensing detections of dark matter sub-halos in distant galaxies. An interesting case to consider is the proposed Phoenix-Hermus star stream, which is long, thin and on a nearly circular orbit, making it a particular good target to study for velocity variations along its length. In the presence of dark matter sub-halos the distribution of velocities is significantly perturbed in a manner that is readily understood with the impulse approximation. A set of simulations show that only sub-halos above a few $10^7 \\msun$ lead to reasonably long lived observationally detectable velocity variations of amplitude of order 1 \\kms, with an average of about one visible hit per (two-armed) stream. An implication is that globular clusters themselves will not have a visible impact on the stream. R...

  18. Velocity Variations in the Phoenix-Hermus Star Stream

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlberg, R. G.; Grillmair, C. J.

    2016-10-01

    Measurements of velocity and density perturbations along stellar streams in the Milky Way provide a time-integrated measure of dark matter substructure at larger galactic radius than the complementary instantaneous inner-halo strong lensing detection of dark matter sub-halos in distant galaxies. An interesting case to consider is the proposed Phoenix-Hermus star stream, which is long, thin, and on a nearly circular orbit, making it a particular good target to study for velocity variations along its length. In the presence of dark matter sub-halos, the stream velocities are significantly perturbed in a manner that is readily understood with the impulse approximation. A set of simulations shows that only sub-halos above a few 107 M ⊙ lead to reasonably long-lived observationally detectable velocity variations of amplitude of order 1 km s-1, with an average of about one visible hit per (two-armed) stream over a 3 Gyr interval. An implication is that globular clusters themselves will not have a visible impact on the stream. Radial velocities have the benefit of being completely insensitive to distance errors. Distance errors scatter individual star velocities perpendicular and tangential to the mean orbit, but their mean values remain unbiased. Calculations like these help build the quantitative case to acquire large, fairly deep, precision velocity samples of stream stars.

  19. Community Background Reports: Three Boarding Schools (Phoenix Indian School, Phoenix, Arizona; Theodore Roosevelt School, Fort Apache, Arizona; Chemawa Indian School, Salem, Oregon). National Study of American Indian Education, Series I, No. 15, Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wesemann, Ralph E.; And Others

    Three Bureau of Indian Affairs off-reservation boarding schools (Phoenix Indian School in Phoenix, Arizona; Theodore Roosevelt School in Fort Apache, Arizona; and Chemawa Indian School in Salem, Oregon) are the subjects for this report, which is a part of the National Study of American Indian Education. Brief descriptions of the physical plant,…

  20. Mars Phoenix Entry, Descent, and Landing Simulation Design and Modelling Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prince, Jill L.; Desai, Prasun N.; Queen, Eric M.; Grover, Myron R.

    2008-01-01

    The 2007 Mars Phoenix Lander was launched in August of 2007 on a ten month cruise to reach the northern plains of Mars in May 2008. Its mission continues NASA s pursuit to find evidence of water on Mars. Phoenix carries upon it a slew of science instruments to study soil and ice samples from the northern region of the planet, an area previously undiscovered by robotic landers. In order for these science instruments to be useful, it was necessary for Phoenix to perform a safe entry, descent, and landing (EDL) onto the surface of Mars. The EDL design was defined through simulation and analysis of the various phases of the descent. An overview of the simulation and various models developed to characterize the EDL performance is provided. Monte Carlo statistical analysis was performed to assess the performance and robustness of the Phoenix EDL system and are presented in this paper. Using these simulation and modelling tools throughout the design and into the operations phase, the Mars Phoenix EDL was a success on May 25, 2008.

  1. MICROSTRUCTURAL FORMATION MECHANISM OF SEMI-SOLID AZ91D ALLOY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    W.M. Mao; Z.S. Zhen; H.T. Chen; X.Y. Zhong

    2005-01-01

    With the help of an electromagnetic stirring device and alloy melt quenching technology, the microstructure of semi-solid AZ9lD magnesium alloy slurry stirred by a rotationally electromagnetic field was studied and the experimental results are shown as the following. The primary α-Mg grains are refined obviously when the slurry is stirred by a rotational electromagnetic field during continuously cooling and they are eventually changed to fine rosette grains or spherical grains. If the above semi-solid slurry is further stirred isothermally .for some time,much more spherical primary α-Mg grains can be obtained. If the melt is first cooled down to a given semi-solid temperature and then starts being stirred by the rotational electromagnetic field, the primary α-Mg dendrites will be large, and a longer time will be taken and a larger stirring power will be needed for the secondary arms of the dendrites to be remelted on the roots to prepare an ideal semi-solid slurry. Theoretical analysis indicates that the strong flow motion leads to a more even temperature field and a solute field and stronger man-made temperature fluctuation in the AZ91D magnesium alloy melt so that the spherical primary α-Mg grains are increased in the slurry. Moreover, all the measures promoting the temperature fluctuation will be favorable to the formation of spherical primary α-Mg grains and all the factors increasing the arm's root remelting difficulty will be favorable to the formation of rosette-type primary α-Mg grains.

  2. Vida y escritura de Bernal Díaz del Castillo

    OpenAIRE

    Guillermo Serés

    2012-01-01

    A la hora de redactar su excelente crónica, la Historia verdadera de la conquista de la Nueva España, Bernal Díaz del Castillo quiere hacer equiparable la sencillez de estilo con la verdad, con lo que denuncia que la retórica y los que la ofician, los cronistas profesionales, mienten necesaria e irremediablemente. En otras palabras, la estética de la escritura de Bernal, como su vida, se concreta en una identificación de lo bello y lo verdadero: nace por oposición a la de...

  3. Thermomechanical Processing and Superplasticity of AZ91 Magnesium Alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rongshi CHEN; J.J. Blandin; M.Suéry; Qudong WANG; Enhou HAN

    2004-01-01

    The effect of extrusion on grain refinement has been studied in the AZ91 cast ingots. It is found that grain size smaller than 10 μm can be obtained by the extrusion processing. Vickers hardness measurements were also carried out to evaluate the effect of these processes on the room temperature mechanical properties. The experimental results of high temperature tensile tests revealed that the stress was inversely proportional to the square of the grain size and that the activation energy for superplastic flow was higher than that for grain boundary diffusion.

  4. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Phoenix dwarf galaxy RV and [Fe/H] catalog (Kacharov+, 2017)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kacharov, N.; Battaglia, G.; Rejkuba, M.; Cole, A. A.; Carrera, R.; Fraternali, F.; Wilkinson, M. I.; Gallart, C. G.; Irwin, M.; Tolstoy, E.

    2017-01-01

    This catalogue provides photometry, radial velocities, metallicities, and the Ca triplet (CaT) equivalent widths of 228 stars in the field of the Phoenix dwarf galaxy observed with the FORS2 spectrograph at the VLT. 194 stars are confirmed Phoenix members. (1 data file).

  5. 3D Modeling of Spectra and Light Curves of Hot Jupiters with PHOENIX; a First Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez-Torres, J. J.

    2016-04-01

    A detailed global circulation model was used to feed the PHOENIX code and calculate 3D spectra and light curves of hot Jupiters. Cloud free and dusty radiative fluxes for the planet HD179949b were modeled to show differences between them. The PHOENIX simulations can explain the broad features of the observed 8 μm light curves, including the fact that the planet-star flux ratio peaks before the secondary eclipse. The PHOENIX reflection spectrum matches the Spitzer secondary-eclipse depth at 3.6 μm and underpredicts eclipse depths at 4.5, 5.8 and 8.0 μm. These discrepancies result from the chemical composition and suggest the incorporation of different metallicities in future studies.

  6. 3D MODELING OF SPECTRA AND LIGHT CURVES OF HOT JUPITERS WITH PHOENIX; A FIRST APPROACH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan J. Jiménez-Torres

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A detailed global circulation model was used to feed the PHOENIX code and calculate 3D spectra and light curves of hot Jupiters. Cloud free and dusty radiative fluxes for the planet HD179949b were modeled to show differences between them. The PHOENIX simulations can explain the broad features of the observed 8 µm light curves, including the fact that the planet-star flux ratio peaks before the secondary eclipse. The PHOENIX reflection spectrum matches the Spitzer secondary-eclipse depth at 3.6 µm and underpredicts eclipse depths at 4.5, 5.8 and 8.0 µm. These discrepancies result from the chemical composition and suggest the incorporation of different metallicities in future studies.

  7. Independent Review Support for Phoenix Mars Mission Robotic Arm Brush Motor Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    McManamen, John P.; Pellicciotti, Joseph; DeKramer, Cornelis; Dube, Michael J.; Peeler, Deborah; Muirhead, Brian K.; Sevilla, Donald R.; Sabahi, Dara; Knopp, Michael D.

    2007-01-01

    The Phoenix Project requested the NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) perform an independent peer review of the Robotic Arm (RA) Direct Current (DC) motor brush anomalies that originated during the Mars Exploration Rover (MER) Project and recurred during the Phoenix Project. The request was to evaluate the Phoenix Project investigation efforts and provide an independent risk assessment. This includes a recommendation for additional work and assessment of the flight worthiness of the RA DC motors. Based on the investigation and findings contained within this report, the IRT concurs with the risk assessment Failure Cause / Corrective Action (FC/CA) by the project, "Failure Effect Rating "3"; Major Degradation or Total Loss of Function, Failure Cause/Corrective Action Rating Currently "4"; Unknown Cause, Uncertainty in Corrective Action."

  8. Full-Circle Color Panorama of Phoenix Landing Site on Northern Mars, Vertical Projection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    This view combines more than 400 images taken during the first several weeks after NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander arrived on an arctic plain at 68.22 degrees north latitude, 234.25 degrees east longitude on Mars. The full-circle panorama in approximately true color shows the polygonal patterning of ground in the landing area, similar to patterns in permafrost areas on Earth. North is toward the top. Trenches where Phoenix's robotic arm has been exposing subsurface material are visible just north of the lander. This view comprises more than 100 different camera pointings, with images taken through three different filters at each pointing. It is presented here as a vertical projection. The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  9. Genome Sequence of the Acidophilic Bacterium Acidocella sp. Strain MX-AZ02

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Servín-Garcidueñas, Luis E.; Garrett, Roger A.; Amils, Ricardo;

    2013-01-01

    Here, we report the draft genome sequence of Acidocella sp. strain MX-AZ02, an acidophilic and heterotrophic alphaproteobacterium isolated from a geothermal lake in western Mexico.......Here, we report the draft genome sequence of Acidocella sp. strain MX-AZ02, an acidophilic and heterotrophic alphaproteobacterium isolated from a geothermal lake in western Mexico....

  10. Data of evolutionary structure change: 1JH5I-2AZ5A [Confc[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ID> I 1JH5I LYTDK-----TYAMG ...>EE -----EEEEE> ATOM 9622 CA LEU I 59 -64.244 97.997...ain> 2AZ5A LFKGQGCPSTHVLLT >EEEE EE... 2AZ5A IAVSY----QTKVN ...>E ---- EEE > ATOM 526 CA ILE A 83 -19.844 60.232 51

  11. Data of evolutionary structure change: 1B99C-2AZ1D [Confc[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available GSDS--VESAN >E --HHHHH> ATOM 316...>D 2AZ1D HGSDHEDEGANE >E HHH...pdbID>1B99 C 1B99C EELLT-EVKPN ...> - > ATOM 3319 CA GLU C 141 17.330 5.755...DChain>2AZ1D DELVDWDRDAS re>GG EEGGHcture

  12. Sintered AZS Bricks for Glass Melting Furnace JC/T 925-2003

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu Lingyan; Chai Junlan

    2009-01-01

    @@ 1 Scope This standard specifies the brand,technical requirements,test methods,inspection rules,marking,packing,transportation,storage,and quality certificate of sintered AZS bricks for glass melting furnace.This standard is applicable to sintered AZS bricks for glass melting furnace.

  13. 76 FR 3570 - Proposed Amendment of Class E Airspace; Taylor, AZ

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-20

    ... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 71 Proposed Amendment of Class E Airspace; Taylor, AZ AGENCY... action proposes to modify Class E airspace at Taylor Airport, Taylor, AZ. Controlled airspace is necessary to accommodate aircraft using the CAMBO One Departure Area Navigation (RNAV) out of Taylor...

  14. H2A.Z.1 Monoubiquitylation Antagonizes BRD2 to Maintain Poised Chromatin in ESCs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surface, Lauren E; Fields, Paul A; Subramanian, Vidya; Behmer, Russell; Udeshi, Namrata; Peach, Sally E; Carr, Steven A; Jaffe, Jacob D; Boyer, Laurie A

    2016-02-09

    Histone variant H2A.Z occupies the promoters of active and poised, bivalent genes in embryonic stem cells (ESCs) to regulate developmental programs, yet how it contributes to these contrasting states is poorly understood. Here, we investigate the function of H2A.Z.1 monoubiquitylation (H2A.Z.1ub) by mutation of the PRC1 target residues (H2A.Z.1(K3R3)). We show that H2A.Z.1(K3R3) is properly incorporated at target promoters in murine ESCs (mESCs), but loss of monoubiquitylation leads to de-repression of bivalent genes, loss of Polycomb binding, and faulty lineage commitment. Using quantitative proteomics, we find that tandem bromodomain proteins, including the BET family member BRD2, are enriched in H2A.Z.1 chromatin. We further show that BRD2 is gained at de-repressed promoters in H2A.Z.1(K3R3) mESCs, whereas BRD2 inhibition restores gene silencing at these sites. Together, our study reveals an antagonistic relationship between H2A.Z.1ub and BRD2 to regulate the transcriptional balance at bivalent genes to enable proper execution of developmental programs.

  15. 77 FR 2241 - Radio Broadcasting Services; Ehrenberg, First Mesa, Kachina Village, Wickenburg, and Williams, AZ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-17

    ... COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 73 Radio Broadcasting Services; Ehrenberg, First Mesa, Kachina Village, Wickenburg, and Williams, AZ; and Application of Univision Radio License Corporation, KHOV-FM, Wickenburg, AZ... by Rocket Radio, Inc., proposes the allotment of FM Channel 287C2 at Williams, Arizona, as...

  16. Results from the Mars Phoenix Lander Robotic Arm experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arvidson, R. E.; Bonitz, R. G.; Robinson, M. L.; Carsten, J. L.; Volpe, R. A.; Trebi-Ollennu, A.; Mellon, M. T.; Chu, P. C.; Davis, K. R.; Wilson, J. J.; Shaw, A. S.; Greenberger, R. N.; Siebach, K. L.; Stein, T. C.; Cull, S. C.; Goetz, W.; Morris, R. V.; Ming, D. W.; Keller, H. U.; Lemmon, M. T.; Sizemore, H. G.; Mehta, M.

    2009-10-01

    The Mars Phoenix Lander was equipped with a 2.4 m Robotic Arm (RA) with an Icy Soil Acquisition Device capable of excavating trenches in soil deposits, grooming hard icy soil surfaces with a scraper blade, and acquiring icy soil samples using a rasp tool. A camera capable of imaging the scoop interior and a thermal and electrical conductivity probe were also included on the RA. A dozen trench complexes were excavated at the northern plains landing site and 31 samples (including water-ice-bearing soils) were acquired for delivery to instruments on the Lander during the 152 sol mission. Deliveries included sprinkling material from several centimeters height to break up cloddy soils on impact with instrument portals. Excavations were done on the side of the Humpty Dumpty and the top of the Wonderland polygons, and in nearby troughs. Resistive forces encountered during backhoe operations show that soils above the 3-5 cm deep icy soil interfaces are stronger with increasing depth. Further, soils are similar in appearance and properties to the weakly cohesive crusty and cloddy soils imaged and excavated by the Viking Lander 2, which also landed on the northern plains. Adsorbed H2O is inferred to be responsible for the variable nature and cohesive strength of the soils. Backhoe blade chatter marks on excavated icy soil surfaces, combined with rasp motor currents, are consistent with laboratory experiments using grain-supported icy soil deposits, as is the relatively rapid decrease in icy soil strength over time as the ice sublimated on Mars.

  17. Neural cell protective compounds isolated from Phoenix hanceana var. formosana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yi-Pei; Chen, Tai-Yuan; Tseng, Hsiang-Wen; Lee, Mei-Hsien; Chen, Shui-Tein

    2009-06-01

    A platform for screening drugs for their ability to protect neuronal cells against cytotoxicity was developed. Nerve growth factor (NGF) differentiates PC12 cells into nerves, and these differentiated PC12 cells enter apoptosis when challenged with 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA). A screening spectrophotometer was used to assay cytotoxicity in these cells; pretreatment with test samples allowed identification of compounds that protected against this neuronal cytotoxicity. The 95% ethanol extract of Phoenix hanceana Naudin var. formosana Beccari. (PH) showed potential neuroprotective activity in these assays. The PH ethanol extract was further fractionated by sequential partitioning with n-hexane, ethyl acetate (EtOAc), n-butanol (n-BuOH), and water. Subsequent rounds of assaying resulted in the isolation of ten constituents, and their structures were characterized by various spectroscopic techniques and identified by comparison with previous data as: isoorientin (1), isovitexin (2), veronicastroside (3), luteolin-7-O-beta-d-glucopyranoside (4), isoquercitrin (5), tricin-7-neohesperidoside (6), tricin-7-O-beta-d-gluco-pyranoside (7), (+)-catechin (8), (-)-epicatechin (9), and orientin 7-O-beta-d-glucopyranoside (10). Among these compounds, isovitexin (2), luteolin-7-O-beta-d-glucopyranoside (4) and (+)-catechin (8) showed significant neuroprotective activity in cell viability (WST-8 reduction), anti-apoptosis (Annexin V-FITC/propidium iodide double-labeled flow cytometry), and cellular ROS scavenging assays (besides isovitexin (2)), as well as a decreased caspase-8 activity in 6-OHDA-induced PC12 cells. Hence, isovitexin (2), luteolin-7-O-beta-d-glucopyranoside (4), and (+)-catechin (8) protected PC12 cells from 6-OHDA-induced apoptotic neurotoxicity.

  18. The Phoenix Stream: A Cold Stream in the Southern Hemisphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balbinot, E.; Yanny, B.; Li, T. S.; Santiago, B.; Marshall, J. L.; Finley, D. A.; Pieres, A.; Abbott, T. M. C.; Abdalla, F. B.; Allam, S.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bernstein, G. M.; Bertin, E.; Brooks, D.; Burke, D. L.; Carnero Rosell, A.; Carrasco Kind, M.; Carretero, J.; Cunha, C. E.; da Costa, L. N.; DePoy, D. L.; Desai, S.; Diehl, H. T.; Doel, P.; Estrada, J.; Flaugher, B.; Frieman, J.; Gerdes, D. W.; Gruen, D.; Gruendl, R. A.; Honscheid, K.; James, D. J.; Kuehn, K.; Kuropatkin, N.; Lahav, O.; March, M.; Martini, P.; Miquel, R.; Nichol, R. C.; Ogando, R.; Romer, A. K.; Sanchez, E.; Schubnell, M.; Sevilla-Noarbe, I.; Smith, R. C.; Soares-Santos, M.; Sobreira, F.; Suchyta, E.; Tarle, G.; Thomas, D.; Tucker, D.; Walker, A. R.; DES Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    We report the discovery of a stellar stream in the Dark Energy Survey Year 1 (Y1A1) data. The discovery was made through simple color-magnitude filters and visual inspection of the Y1A1 data. We refer to this new object as the Phoenix stream, after its resident constellation. After subtraction of the background stellar population we detect a clear signal of a simple stellar population. By fitting the ridge line of the stream in color-magnitude space, we find that a stellar population with age τ = 11.5 ± 0.5 Gyr and [Fe/H] < -1.6, located 17.5 ± 0.9 kpc from the Sun, gives an adequate description of the stream stellar population. The stream is detected over an extension of 8.°1 (2.5 kpc) and has a width of ˜54 pc assuming a Gaussian profile, indicating that a globular cluster (GC) is a probable progenitor. There is no known GC within 5 kpc that is compatible with being the progenitor of the stream, assuming that the stream traces its orbit. We examined overdensities (ODs) along the stream, however, no obvious counterpart-bound stellar system is visible in the coadded images. We also find ODs along the stream that appear to be symmetrically distributed—consistent with the epicyclic OD scenario for the formation of cold streams—as well as a misalignment between the northern and southern part of stream. Despite the close proximity we find no evidence that this stream and the halo cluster NGC 1261 have a common accretion origin linked to the recently found EriPhe OD.

  19. Establishment, management, and maintenance of the phoenix islands protected area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotjan, Randi; Jamieson, Regen; Carr, Ben; Kaufman, Les; Mangubhai, Sangeeta; Obura, David; Pierce, Ray; Rimon, Betarim; Ris, Bud; Sandin, Stuart; Shelley, Peter; Sumaila, U Rashid; Taei, Sue; Tausig, Heather; Teroroko, Tukabu; Thorrold, Simon; Wikgren, Brooke; Toatu, Teuea; Stone, Greg

    2014-01-01

    The Republic of Kiribati's Phoenix Islands Protected Area (PIPA), located in the equatorial central Pacific, is the largest and deepest UNESCO World Heritage site on earth. Created in 2008, it was the first Marine Protected Area (MPA) of its kind (at the time of inception, the largest in the world) and includes eight low-lying islands, shallow coral reefs, submerged shallow and deep seamounts and extensive open-ocean and ocean floor habitat. Due to their isolation, the shallow reef habitats have been protected de facto from severe exploitation, though the surrounding waters have been continually fished for large pelagics and whales over many decades. PIPA was created under a partnership between the Government of Kiribati and the international non-governmental organizations-Conservation International and the New England Aquarium. PIPA has a unique conservation strategy as the first marine MPA to use a conservation contract mechanism with a corresponding Conservation Trust established to be both a sustainable financing mechanism and a check-and-balance to the oversight and maintenance of the MPA. As PIPA moves forward with its management objectives, it is well positioned to be a global model for large MPA design and implementation in similar contexts. The islands and shallow reefs have already shown benefits from protection, though the pending full closure of PIPA (and assessments thereof) will be critical for determining success of the MPA as a refuge for open-ocean pelagic and deep-sea marine life. As global ocean resources are continually being extracted to support a growing global population, PIPA's closure is both timely and of global significance.

  20. Pyrolysis Characteristics and Kinetics of Phoenix Tree Residues as a Potential Energy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Li

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available By using a thermogravimetric analyser under argon atmosphere, the pyrolysis process and the kinetic model of phoenix tree residues (the little stem, middle stem, and leaf at a 30 °C min−1 heating rate and the phoenix tree mix at three different heating rates (10 °C min−1, 30 °C min−1, and 50 °C min−1 were examined. The catalyst and the co-pyrolysis samples were at a 30 °C min−1 heating rate. The catalysts were Na2CO3, ZnCl2 and CaO in a mass fraction of 5 %. The experimental results revealed that the phoenix tree residues pyrolysis process consisted of three stages: dehydration stage, main pyrolysis stage, and the slow decomposition of residues. As the heating rate increased, the pyrolysis characteristic temperature of the phoenix tree grew, there was a backward-shift of the pyrolysis rate curve, and the mass loss rate gradually increased. The phoenix tree residues’ activation energy changed throughout the whole pyrolysis process, and the pyrolysis temperature ranges of the three main components (cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin existed in overlapping phenomenon. As compared to the little stem, middle stem, and leaf, the phoenix tree mix was more likely to be pyrolysed under the same heating rate. Different catalysts had a different impact on the pyrolysis: ZnCl2 moved the start point of the reaction to the lower temperatures, but did not speed up the reaction; Na2CO3 speeded up the reaction without changing the start point of the reaction; CaO speeded up the reaction, moved the start point of the reaction to higher temperatures.

  1. Rhizosphere effects of PAH-contaminated soil phytoremediation using a special plant named Fire Phoenix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Rui; Xiao, Nan; Wei, Shuhe; Zhao, Lixing; An, Jing

    2014-03-01

    The rhizosphere effect of a special phytoremediating species known as Fire Phoenix on the degradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) was investigated, including changes of the enzymatic activity and microbial communities in rhizosphere soil. The study showed that the degradation rate of Σ8PAHs by Fire Phoenix was up to 99.40% after a 150-day culture. The activity of dehydrogenase (DHO), peroxidase (POD) and catalase (CAT) increased greatly, especially after a 60-day culture, followed by a gradual reduction with an increase in the planting time. The activity of these enzymes was strongly correlated to the higher degradation performance of Fire Phoenix growing in PAH-contaminated soils, although it was also affected by the basic characteristics of the plant species itself, such as the excessive, fibrous root systems, strong disease resistance, drought resistance, heat resistance, and resistance to barren soil. The activity of polyphenoloxidase (PPO) decreased during the whole growing period in this study, and the degradation rate of Σ8PAHs in the rhizosphere soil after having planted Fire Phoenix plants had a significant (R(2)=0.947) negative correlation with the change in the activity of PPO. Using an analysis of the microbial communities, the results indicated that the structure of microorganisms in the rhizosphere soil could be changed by planting Fire Phoenix plants, namely, there was an increase in microbial diversity compared with the unplanted soil. In addition, the primary advantage of Fire Phoenix was to promote the growth of flora genus Gordonia sp. as the major bacteria that can effectively degrade PAHs.

  2. Examination of dynamic recrystallization during compression of AZ31 magnesium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIN RenLong; WANG BingShu; CHEN XingPin; HUANG GuangJie; LIU Qing

    2009-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate dynamic recrystallization (DRX) behavior during compression of mag-nesium alloy AZ31. Cylinder samples were cut from the extruded rod and hot rolled sheet AZ31 for compression test. The samples were compressed using a Gleeble 1500D at a temperature of 300Ⅱ and a strain rate of 0.01 s-1. Grain orientations and misorientation angles across grain boundaries for the tested samples were obtained by using electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) technique. The results showed that strong basal texture was observed after 50% compression (ε = 0.69) on both the extruded and hot rolled samples, which have different initial textures. It was observed that with increased strain, DRX grains gradually rotated to basal orientation, and grain boundaries with misorientation angle of near 30° was formed in the samples. At the strain of 0.69, a high fraction of high-angle (> 60°) bounda-ries was present in the extruded sample, whereas almost no high angle boundaries were observed in the hot rolled sheet sample.

  3. Examination of dynamic recrystallization during compression of AZ31 magnesium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate dynamic recrystallization (DRX) behavior during compression of magnesium alloy AZ31. Cylinder samples were cut from the extruded rod and hot rolled sheet AZ31 for compression test. The samples were compressed using a Gleeble 1500D at a temperature of 300℃ and a strain rate of 0.01 s-1. Grain orientations and misorientation angles across grain boundaries for the tested samples were obtained by using electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) technique. The results showed that strong basal texture was observed after 50% compression (ε = 0.69) on both the extruded and hot rolled samples, which have different initial textures. It was observed that with increased strain, DRX grains gradually rotated to basal orientation, and grain boundaries with misorientation angle of near 30° was formed in the samples. At the strain of 0.69, a high fraction of high-angle (> 60°) bounda-ries was present in the extruded sample, whereas almost no high angle boundaries were observed in the hot rolled sheet sample.

  4. Recrystallization in AZ31 magnesium alloy during hot deformation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Essadiqi, E.; Liu, W.J.; Kao, V. [Natural Resources Canada, Materials Technology Lab., CANMET, Ottawa, ON (Canada); Yue, S. [Dept. of Metallurgical Engineering, McGill Univ., Montreal, PQ (Canada); Verma, R. [General Motors, Materials and Processes Lab, Warren, MI (United States)

    2005-07-01

    In this study, isothermal torsion tests were carried out on magnesium AZ31B alloy under constant strain rate conditions, in the range of 250 to 400 C at 0.01, 0.1, and 1.0 s{sup -1}. Alloy flow stress dependence on strain rate and temperature can be described by a power law with activation energy of 130 kJ/mol. Microstructural examination of hot deformed samples shows very fine recrystallized grains decorating grain boundaries of larger gains in the form of a necklace. These fine grains are produced by dynamic recrystallization at the grain boundaries of original grains. Microstructure evolution, based on samples quenched at different strain levels, indicates that increasing deformation strain has little effect on recrystallized grain size but widens the recrystallized region, with full recrystallization achieved at a certain high strain level. Recrystallized grain size increases with increasing deformation temperature and strain rate. The latter suggests recrystallization in AZ31 to be essentially a time dependant phenomenon. (orig.)

  5. Dynamic recrystallization behavior of AZ61 magnesium alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Hai-tao; YAN An-qing; LIU Chu-ming

    2005-01-01

    An AZ61 alloy was subjected to hot compression at temperatures ranging from 523 K to 673 K,with strain rates of 0. 001 - 1 s-1. Flow softening occurs at all temperatures and strain rates. There are peak and plateau stresses on flow curves. The initiation and evolution of dynamic recrystallization(DRX) were studied by the flow softening mechanism based on the flow curves and microstructural observations. A linear relationship was established between the logarithmic value of the critical strain for DRX initiation(lnεc) and the logarithmic value of the Zener-Hollomon parameter (lnZ). The volume fraction of DRX grain (ψd) is formulated as a function of the process parameters including strain rate, temperature, and strain. The calculated values of ψd agree well with the values extracted from the flow curves. The size of DRX grain(d) was also formulated as a function of the ZenerHollomon parameter. This study suggests that DRX behavior of AZ61 can be predicated from plastic process parameters.

  6. Effects of rare earth elements on the microstructure and properties of magnesium alloy AZ91D

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KaikunWang; KuiZhang; 等

    2002-01-01

    The effects of rare earth elements on the microstructure and properties of Magnesium alloy AZ91D alloy were studied.The different proportion of rare earth elements was added to the AZ91D and the tensile tests were carried out at different temperatures.The experimental results show that at room temperature or at 120℃ the AZ91D's decrease with the increasing amount of the rare earth elements.however,the ductility is improved.The influence of 0.14%Sb(mass fraction)on the AZ91D's strength is like that of rare earth elements(0.2%-0.4%)(mass fraction).Microstructure graphs demonstrate that appropriate amount of rare earth elements (0.1%-0.2%) can fine AZ91D's grain and improve its ductility.

  7. Effects of rare earth elements on the microstructureand properties of magnesium alloy AZ91D

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The effects of rare earth elements on the microstructure and properties of magnesium alloy AZ91D alloy were studied. The different proportion of rare earth elements was added to the AZ91D and the tensile tests were carried out at different temperatures. The experimental results show that at room temperature or at 120℃ the AZ91D's strength decrease with the increasing amount of the rare earth elements. However, the ductility is improved. The influence of 0.14%Sb (mass fraction) on the AZ91D's strength is like that of rare earth elements (0.2%-0.4%) (mass fraction). Microstructure graphs demonstrate that appropriate amount of rare earth elements (0.1%-0.2%) can fine AZ91D's grain and improve its ductility.

  8. Influence of hot extrusion on microstructure and mechanical properties of AZ31 magnesium alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Ling; TIAN Su-gui; MENG Fan-lai; DU Hong-qiang

    2006-01-01

    Extrusion treatment is a common method to refine the grain size and improve the mechanical properties of metal material. The influence of hot extrusion on microstructure and mechanical properties of AZ31 magnesium alloy was investigated. The results show that the mechanical properties of AZ31 alloy are obviously improved by extrusion treatment. The ultimate tensile strength (UTS) of AZ31 alloy at room temperature is measured to be 222 MPa, and is enhanced to 265.8 MPa after extrusion at 420℃. The yield tensile strength (YTS) of AZ31 alloy at room temperature is measured to be 84 MPa, and is enhanced to 201 MPa after extrusion at 420℃. The effective improvements on mechanical properties result from the formation of the finer grains during extrusion and the finer particles precipitated by age treatment. The features of the microstructure evolution during hot extruded of AZ31 alloy are dislocation slipping on the matrix and occurrence of the dynamic recrystallization.

  9. The chloroplast DNA locus psbZ-trnfM as a potential barcode marker in Phoenix L. (Arecaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Ballardini

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The genus Phoenix (Arecaceae comprises 14 species distributed from Cape Verde Islands to SE Asia. It includes the economically important species Phoenix dactylifera. The paucity of differential morphological and anatomical useful characters, and interspecific hybridization, make identification of Phoenix species difficult. In this context, the development of reliable DNA markers for species and hybrid identification would be of great utility. Previous studies identified a 12 bp polymorphic chloroplast minisatellite in the trnG(GCC-trnfM(CAU spacer, and showed its potential for species identification in Phoenix. In this work, in order to develop an efficient DNA barcode marker for Phoenix, a longer cpDNA region (700 bp comprising the mentioned minisatellite, and located between the psbZ and trnfM(CAU genes, was sequenced. One hundred and thirty-six individuals, representing all Phoenix species except P. andamanensis, were analysed. The minisatellite showed 2-7 repetitions of the 12 bp motif, with 1-3 out of seven haplotypes per species. Phoenix reclinata and P. canariensis had species-specific haplotypes. Additional polymorphisms were found in the flanking regions of the minisatellite, including substitutions, indels and homopolymers. All this information allowed us to identify unambiguously eight out of the 13 species, and overall 80% of the individuals sampled. Phoenix rupicola and P. theophrasti had the same haplotype, and so had P. atlantica, P. dactylifera, and P. sylvestris (the “date palm complex” sensu Pintaud et al. 2013. For these species, additional molecular markers will be required for their unambiguous identification. The psbZ-trnfM(CAU region therefore could be considered as a good basis for the establishment of a DNA barcoding system in Phoenix, and is potentially useful for the identification of the female parent in Phoenix hybrids.

  10. American Flag and Mini-DVD Attached to Deck of Phoenix

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    This image, released on Memorial Day, May 26, 2008, shows the American flag and a mini-DVD on the Phoenix's deck, which is about 3 ft. above the Martian surface. The mini-DVD from the Planetary Society contains a message to future Martian explorers, science fiction stories and art inspired by the Red Planet, and the names of more than a quarter million earthlings. The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  11. Magnetic and optical properties of airborne dust and settling rates at the Phoenix landing site

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Drube, Line; Leer, Kristoffer; Walter, Goetz

    2010-01-01

    The Magnetic Properties Experiment (referred to as iSweep or Caltarget) onboard the Phoenix lander was executed in the arctic region of Mars during the mission's 152 sols lifetime. The iSweep experiment involved periodic multispectral imaging of a series of permanent ring magnets. It was designed...... on the precursor Sweep Magnet Experiment onboard the Mars Exploration Rovers near Mars' equator, and also this dust is found to be brighter than both surface soil near the lander and soil in the region surrounding the lander. As most other dust and soils on Mars, the Phoenix dust lacks strong spectral signatures...

  12. The complete chloroplast genome sequence of date palm (Phoenix dactylifera L..

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng Yang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Date palm (Phoenix dactylifera L., a member of Arecaceae family, is one of the three major economically important woody palms--the two other palms being oil palm and coconut tree--and its fruit is a staple food among Middle East and North African nations, as well as many other tropical and subtropical regions. Here we report a complete sequence of the data palm chloroplast (cp genome based on pyrosequencing. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: After extracting 369,022 cp sequencing reads from our whole-genome-shotgun data, we put together an assembly and validated it with intensive PCR-based verification, coupled with PCR product sequencing. The date palm cp genome is 158,462 bp in length and has a typical quadripartite structure of the large (LSC, 86,198 bp and small single-copy (SSC, 17,712 bp regions separated by a pair of inverted repeats (IRs, 27,276 bp. Similar to what has been found among most angiosperms, the date palm cp genome harbors 112 unique genes and 19 duplicated fragments in the IR regions. The junctions between LSC/IRs and SSC/IRs show different features of sequence expansion in evolution. We identified 78 SNPs as major intravarietal polymorphisms within the population of a specific cp genome, most of which were located in genes with vital functions. Based on RNA-sequencing data, we also found 18 polycistronic transcription units and three highly expression-biased genes--atpF, trnA-UGC, and rrn23. CONCLUSIONS: Unlike most monocots, date palm has a typical cp genome similar to that of tobacco--with little rearrangement and gene loss or gain. High-throughput sequencing technology facilitates the identification of intravarietal variations in cp genomes among different cultivars. Moreover, transcriptomic analysis of cp genes provides clues for uncovering regulatory mechanisms of transcription and translation in chloroplasts.

  13. In Vitro Studies on the Degradability, Bioactivity, and Cell Differentiation of PRP/AZ31B Mg Alloys Composite Scaffold

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Zou

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, more and more methods have been developed to improve the bioactivity of the biodegradable materials in bone tissue regeneration. In present study, we used rat mesenchymal stem cells (rMSCs to evaluate the outcomes of Mg alloys (AZ31B, Magnesium, and Aluminum and Platelet-rich plasma (PRP/Mg alloys on rMSCs biocompatibility and osteogenic differentiation. Water absorption experiments indicated that both bare AZ31B and PRP/AZ31B were capable of absorbing large amounts of water. But the water absorption ratio for PRP/AZ31B was significantly higher than that for bare AZ31B. The degradability experiments implied that both samples degraded at same speed. rMSCs on the surface of AZ31B distributed more and better than those on the AZ31B scaffold. In ALP activity experiment, the activity of rMSCs on the PRP/AZ31B was markedly higher than that on the AZ31B scaffolds on the 7th day and 14th day. qRT-PCR also showed that OPN and OCN were expressed in both samples. OPN and OCN expression in PRP/AZ31B sample were higher than those in bare AZ31B samples. In summary, the in vitro study implied that AZ31B combined with PRP could remarkably improve cell seeding, attachment, proliferation, and differentiation.

  14. In Vitro Studies on the Degradability, Bioactivity, and Cell Differentiation of PRP/AZ31B Mg Alloys Composite Scaffold

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Jian; Xu, Hongwei; Li, Xiaolin

    2017-01-01

    In recent years, more and more methods have been developed to improve the bioactivity of the biodegradable materials in bone tissue regeneration. In present study, we used rat mesenchymal stem cells (rMSCs) to evaluate the outcomes of Mg alloys (AZ31B, Magnesium, and Aluminum) and Platelet-rich plasma (PRP)/Mg alloys on rMSCs biocompatibility and osteogenic differentiation. Water absorption experiments indicated that both bare AZ31B and PRP/AZ31B were capable of absorbing large amounts of water. But the water absorption ratio for PRP/AZ31B was significantly higher than that for bare AZ31B. The degradability experiments implied that both samples degraded at same speed. rMSCs on the surface of AZ31B distributed more and better than those on the AZ31B scaffold. In ALP activity experiment, the activity of rMSCs on the PRP/AZ31B was markedly higher than that on the AZ31B scaffolds on the 7th day and 14th day. qRT-PCR also showed that OPN and OCN were expressed in both samples. OPN and OCN expression in PRP/AZ31B sample were higher than those in bare AZ31B samples. In summary, the in vitro study implied that AZ31B combined with PRP could remarkably improve cell seeding, attachment, proliferation, and differentiation. PMID:28337451

  15. In Retrospect, Five Year's Splendid Journey of Wind and Rain,Look into the Future, Five Year's Grand Prospect--Shanxi Phoenix Conveyor Belt Co., Ltd.

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

      On January 21, 2006, ShanxiPhoenix Conveyor Belt Co.,Ltd. held the 2005 Honor Convention. Those who attended the conference were Mr. Ren Runhou, Board Chairman of Shanxi Phoenix Conveyor Belt Co., Ltd., Board Chairman & General Manager of Shanxi Luan Mining Group, Mr. Shi Wenlin, Director of Shanxi Phoenix Conveyor Belt Co., Ltd.,Vice General Manager of Shanxi Luan Mining Group, Dr. Feng Weimin, General Manager of Shanxi Phoenix Conveyor Belt Co., Ltd. and Mr. Feng Qiang,Administrative General Manager of Shanxi Phoenix Conveyor Belt Co., Ltd.The conference was presided by Vice General Manager Zhu Junhong.……

  16. In Retrospect, Five Year's Splendid Journey of Wind and Rain,Look into the Future, Five Year's Grand Prospect--Shanxi Phoenix Conveyor Belt Co., Ltd.

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    @@ On January 21, 2006, ShanxiPhoenix Conveyor Belt Co.,Ltd. held the 2005 Honor Convention. Those who attended the conference were Mr. Ren Runhou, Board Chairman of Shanxi Phoenix Conveyor Belt Co., Ltd., Board Chairman & General Manager of Shanxi Luan Mining Group, Mr. Shi Wenlin, Director of Shanxi Phoenix Conveyor Belt Co., Ltd.,Vice General Manager of Shanxi Luan Mining Group, Dr. Feng Weimin, General Manager of Shanxi Phoenix Conveyor Belt Co., Ltd. and Mr. Feng Qiang,Administrative General Manager of Shanxi Phoenix Conveyor Belt Co., Ltd.The conference was presided by Vice General Manager Zhu Junhong.

  17. AZ31和AZ91镁合金等温挤压及挤压后的微观组织变化%The isothermal extrusion and the microstructure evolution after extrusion of AZ31 and AZ91 magnesium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李洪波; 吕玫; 马文昌

    2011-01-01

    The extrusion property and microstructure evolution of AZ31 and AZ91 magnesium alloy under different deformation conditions were studied in isothermal extrusion process and through metallographic examination. The results show that the form-ing quality of AZ31 magnesium alloy is better than AZ91 magnesium alloy. For AZ91, the cracks would appear on the specimen surface at extrusion ratio 4:1, extrusion temperature 400℃, and at extrusion ratio 9 :1, extrusion temperature 350℃ and 400℃. The best forming temperature for AZ31 is 300℃~400℃, for AZ91 is 300℃~350℃. Dynamic recrystallization occurred in the hot extrusion process of the magnesium alloy, the grain of extruded samples were significantly refined.%通过等温挤压和金相观察,研究了AZ31和AZ91镁合金不同变形条件下的挤压性能和变形后的微观组织变化.结果表明,AZ31镁合金的挤压变形性能较好,而AZ91镁合金在挤压比为4∶1、挤压温度为400℃,以及在挤压比为9∶1、挤压温度为350℃和400℃时,挤压后的试件表面均出现了裂纹;AZ31镁合金的最佳成形温度为300℃~400℃,AZ91镁合金的最佳成形温度为300℃~350℃;镁合金在热挤压过程中发生了动态再结晶,挤压之后合金的晶粒显著细化.

  18. (Ca,Mg)-Carbonate and Mg-Carbonate at the Phoenix Landing Site: Evaluation of the Phoenix Lander's Thermal Evolved Gas Analyzer (TEGA) Data Using Laboratory Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutter, B.; Ming, D. W.; Boynton, W. V.; Niles, P. B.; Morris, R. V.

    2011-01-01

    Calcium carbonate (4.5 wt. %) was detected in the soil at the Phoenix Landing site by the Phoenix Lander s The Thermal and Evolved Gas Analyzer [1]. TEGA operated at 12 mbar pressure, yet the detection of calcium carbonate is based on interpretations derived from thermal analysis literature of carbonates measured under ambient (1000 mbar) and vacuum (10(exp -3) mbar) conditions [2,3] as well as at 100 and 30 mbar [4,5] and one analysis at 12 mbar by the TEGA engineering qualification model (TEGA-EQM). Thermodynamics (Te = H/ S) dictate that pressure affects entropy ( S) which causes the temperature (Te) of mineral decomposition at one pressure to differ from Te obtained at another pressure. Thermal decomposition analyses of Fe-, Mg-, and Ca-bearing carbonates at 12 mbar is required to enhance the understanding of the TEGA results at TEGA operating pressures. The objectives of this work are to (1) evaluate the thermal and evolved gas behavior of a suite of Fe-, Mg-, Ca-carbonate minerals at 1000 and 12 mbar and (2) discuss possible emplacement mechanisms for the Phoenix carbonate.

  19. The Impact of Emerging Technologies on Small and Medium Enterprises (SMEs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Dai

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores the potential of emerging technologies in transforming and automating the business processes of Small and Medium Enterprises (SMEs and enable them to engage with trading partners and customers in global networks. The technologies are associated with Services Oriented Architecture (SOA through Software as a Service (SaaS, cloud computing and innovative application environment developed through the Phoenix research program at Victoria University. A service framework based on the emerging technologies from the Phoenix program is presented and discussed in response to the SME barriers raised in accessing those technologies.

  20. Advancements in rotary steerable technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buker, M. [Phoenix Technology Services, Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2001-07-01

    The preferred method of drilling horizontal and directional wells is to use conventional measurement while drilling (MWD) systems and mud motors. However, this method has demonstrated some inefficiencies even though it has been used on thousands of wells. The process of slide drilling can result in undesirable doglegs, hole cleaning problems and reduced weight to the bit. A viable alternative to mud motors is rotary steerable technology, which in recent years, has undergone major transformation. Phoenix Technology Services markets and services a rotary steerable system called the Well Director Automatic Directional Drilling System. This paper described rotary steerable technology in general and then focused on the product developed by Phoenix which is in the final stages of becoming commercially available. The mechanical, hydraulic and data transmission methods for the Well Director were described. The tool has to pass a test of drilling without problems for the length of a bit run, and the re-programming function of the tool has to be de-bugged before the Well Director can be commercialized. Phoenix is confident that the tool offers operators a way to drill wellbores more quickly, smoothly and accurately than with conventional technology. 1 tab., 1 fig.

  1. Crystal structures of heterotypic nucleosomes containing histones H2A.Z and H2A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horikoshi, Naoki; Arimura, Yasuhiro; Taguchi, Hiroyuki; Kurumizaka, Hitoshi

    2016-06-01

    H2A.Z is incorporated into nucleosomes located around transcription start sites and functions as an epigenetic regulator for the transcription of certain genes. During transcriptional regulation, the heterotypic H2A.Z/H2A nucleosome containing one each of H2A.Z and H2A is formed. However, previous homotypic H2A.Z nucleosome structures suggested that the L1 loop region of H2A.Z would sterically clash with the corresponding region of canonical H2A in the heterotypic nucleosome. To resolve this issue, we determined the crystal structures of heterotypic H2A.Z/H2A nucleosomes. In the H2A.Z/H2A nucleosome structure, the H2A.Z L1 loop structure was drastically altered without any structural changes of the canonical H2A L1 loop, thus avoiding the steric clash. Unexpectedly, the heterotypic H2A.Z/H2A nucleosome is more stable than the homotypic H2A.Z nucleosome. These data suggested that the flexible character of the H2A.Z L1 loop plays an essential role in forming the stable heterotypic H2A.Z/H2A nucleosome.

  2. Corrosion resistance of biodegradable polymeric layer-by-layer coatings on magnesium alloy AZ31

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Lan-Yue; Zeng, Rong-Chang; Zhu, Xiao-Xiao; Pang, Ting-Ting; Li, Shuo-Qi; Zhang, Fen

    2016-06-01

    Biocompatible polyelectrolyte multilayers (PEMs) and polysiloxane hybrid coatings were prepared to improve the corrosion resistance of biodegradable Mg alloy AZ31. The PEMs, which contained alternating poly(sodium 4-styrenesulfonate) (PSS) and poly(allylamine hydrochloride) (PAH), were first self-assembled on the surface of the AZ31 alloy substrate via electrostatic interactions, designated as (PAH/PSS)5/AZ31. Then, the (PAH/PSS)5/AZ31 samples were dipped into a methyltrimethoxysilane (MTMS) solution to fabricate the PMTMS films, designated as PMTMS/(PAH/PSS)5/AZ31. The surface morphologies, microstructures and chemical compositions of the films were investigated by FE-SEM, FTIR, XRD and XPS. Potentiodynamic polarization, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and hydrogen evolution measurements demonstrated that the PMTMS/(PAH/PSS)5/AZ31 composite film significantly enhanced the corrosion resistance of the AZ31 alloy in Hank's balanced salt solution (HBSS). The PAH and PSS films effectively improved the deposition of Ca-P compounds including Ca3(PO4)2 and hydroxyapatite (HA). Moreover, the corrosion mechanism of the composite coating was discussed. These coatings could be an alternative candidate coating for biodegradable Mg alloys.

  3. Effect of Annealing on Microstructure and Tensile Properties of 5052/AZ31/5052 Clad Sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Huihui; Liang, Wei; Chi, Chengzhong; Li, Xianrong; Fan, Haiwei; Yang, Fuqian

    2016-05-01

    Three-layered 5052Al/AZ31Mg/5052Al (5052/AZ31/5052) clad sheets were fabricated by four-pass rolling and annealed under different conditions. Under the optimal annealing condition, homogeneous and equiaxial grains with an average AZ31 grain size of 5.24 µm were obtained and the maximum values of ultimate tensile strength and elongation of the clad sheet reached 230 MPa and 18%, respectively. Electron backscatter diffraction analysis showed that the AZ31 layer had a typical rolling texture with its c-axis parallel to the normal direction. The fraction of low-angle grain boundaries in the 5052 layer was nearly four times more than that in the AZ31 layer because of different deformation extent and recrystallization driving forces. The textures of Al3Mg2 and Mg17Al12 were similar to that of 5052 because of the deformation coordination during the rolling and recrystallization process. The orientation relationship between Mg17Al12 and AZ31 seemed to be (110) Mg17Al12//(10-11) AZ31.

  4. Arpaio Doesn't Control Anything: A Summer with El Hormiguero in Phoenix, Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrillo, Juan F.

    2013-01-01

    Drawing from observations and interview data, this essay examines the role of "hormiguero agency" in nurturing empowered identities amongst Latin@s in Phoenix, Arizona. Specific links are made to how dehumanizing state level policies are resisted in multiple spaces, including schools, activist organizations, and within underground business…

  5. Status of the PHOENIX electron cyclotron resonance charge breeder at ISOLDE, CERN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, Charles; Cederkall, Joakim; Delahaye, Pierre; Kester, Oliver; Lamy, Thierry; Marie-Jeanne, Mélanie

    2008-02-01

    We report here on the last progresses made with the PHOENIX electron cyclotron resonance charge breeder test bench at ISOLDE. Recently, an experiment was performed to test the trapping of (61)Fe daughter nuclides from the decay of (61)Mn nuclides. Preliminary results are given.

  6. Phoenix dactylifera L. spathe essential oil: Chemical composition and repellent activity against the yellow fever mosquito

    Science.gov (United States)

    Date palm, Phoenix dactylifera L. (Arecaceae), grows commonly in the Arabian Peninsula and is traditionally used to treat various diseases. The aim of the present study was to identify chemical composition of the essential oil and to investigate the repellent activity. The essential oil of P. dacty...

  7. Phoenix: A Collaborative Location-Based Notification System for Mobile Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongping Xiong

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Location-based notification (LBN aims to alert the users in a target area to their interested information. With a wide range of applications, LBN has been gaining more and more attraction among wireless users and service providers. The mainstream centralized solution based on cellular networks may incur high service cost. In this paper, we present an innovative scheme called Phoenix, which does not rely on any infrastructure, to implement location-based notification service. In our design, devices (users across the target area form a dynamic peer-to-peer network, where a user can be a message source, a message carrier, or a message subscriber. When a user meets the message carrier, he will get a copy of the message. Phoenix keeps messages of interest being circulated in the target area; hence users are being notified. To achieve desired notification performance, Phoenix adaptively controls when a user should take the carrier role and help disseminating a message in order to keep the message “alive,” given the fact that message carriers may leave the target area and drop the message. Extensive simulations have been conducted to show the efficacy of Phoenix notification system.

  8. Historical evidence of the Spanish introduction of date palm (Phoenix dactylifera L., Arecaceae) into the Americas

    Science.gov (United States)

    America’s date palm (Phoenix dactylifera L.) groves can be found from 36o N Lat. (USA) to 21o S Lat. (Chile) and from 63o W Long. (Venezuela) to 117o W Long. (USA), at elevations from sea level 2000 m (Colombia). However, successful production of ripe dates is possible only in the arid regions of Pe...

  9. Phoenix Conductivity Probe after Extraction from Martian Soil on Sol 99

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander inserted the four needles of its thermal and conductivity probe into Martian soil during the 98th Martian day, or sol, of the mission and left it in place until Sol 99 (Sept. 4, 2008). The Surface Stereo Imager on Phoenix took this image on the morning of Sol 99 after the probe was lifted away from the soil. This imaging served as a check of whether soil had stuck to the needles. The thermal and conductivity probe measures how fast heat and electricity move from one needle to an adjacent one through the soil or air between the needles. Conductivity readings can be indicators about water vapor, water ice and liquid water. The probe is part of Phoenix's Microscopy, Electrochemistry and Conductivity suite of instruments. The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  10. An Extraordinary Partnership between Arizona State University and the City of Phoenix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Debra

    2009-01-01

    The Arizona State University Downtown Phoenix campus is a grand-scale exemplar of a city-university partnership. Its demonstrated impacts are economic, social, and educational, transforming both the city and the university. The magnitude of the investment of $223 million by the citizens of a city in a state university is unparalleled in higher…

  11. Greater Phoenix Forward: Sustaining and Enhancing the Human-Services Infrastructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison Institute for Public Policy, Arizona State University, 2008

    2008-01-01

    This report provides descriptive data for understanding the status of human services in Greater Phoenix, describes provocative issues that certain populations and providers face, and offers a starting point for determining Maricopa Valley's aspirations for tomorrow's human-services infrastructure. This report describes an array of populations that…

  12. Tuhast tõusnud Phoenix jõudis Marsile elu võimalikkust uurima / Liisi Poll

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Poll, Liisi, 1980-

    2008-01-01

    Vt. ka Postimees : na russkom jazõke 27. mai, lk. 8. Marsile jõudnud NASA automaatjaam Phoenix maandus naaberplaneedi põhjapoolusele lähemale kui ükski inimese leiutatud masin kunagi varem. Lisa: Marsi uurimiste ajalugu

  13. Application of AZ4903 to production of stator windings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhanshe GUO; Yihui WU; Yonggang MENG; Dezhi ZHENG

    2008-01-01

    To satisfy the needs of the high deep-width ratio and thickness of a planar micromotor's stator windings, a process method to produce an electromag-netic planar micromotor with AZ4903 is proposed. Optimum relationships, such as the desired rotation speed vs. thickness of the coating process, and the temperature vs. time of pre-baking, are obtained. The appropriate time of lithography and development are also achieved. The thickness of the produced windings is 40 μm with ideal perpendicularity. Finally, stators and rotors are fabricated. The rotation speed and pull-out torque of the micromotor are tested. The experiment proved that the micromotor worked with a steady speed and a low ripple of pull-out torque.

  14. Influence of deformation on precipitation in AZ80 magnesium alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ping; Wang, Li-Na; Xie, Qing-Ge; Li, Ji-Zhong; Ding, Hua; Lu, Lin-Lin

    2011-06-01

    Precipitates in the conventionally processed (solution treatment followed by aging) AZ80 alloy are coarse, cellular, and incoherent. They nucleate and grow on the basal planes of the matrix or distribute discontinuously in the alloy. Their unique morphology and undesired distribution make them ineffective for precipitation strengthening. This condition, however, can be modified by applying selected deformation and heat treatment conditions. The effect of deformation and heat treatment on the morphology and distribution of precipitates has been studied. Deformation was introduced by hot extrusion, cold rolling, or equal channel angular pressing (ECAP). The microstructures were characterized using scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and X-ray diffraction. The results showed that cold deformation improved precipitation more significantly than hot deformation, and twinning promoted precipitation more effectively than slip. When ECAP was applied, the Bc-route induced more precipitates than the A-route.

  15. Microstructural stability after severe plastic deformation of AZ31 Magnesium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, J. P.; Askari, H.; Hovanski, Y.; Heiden, M. J.; Field, D. P.

    2014-08-01

    Friction stir processing (FSP) and equal channel angular pressing (ECAP) were used to modify the microstructure of twin roll cast (TRC) AZ31 magnesium. The influence of these processes on the microstructural properties of the material was investigated. It was found that both processes produced microstructures with an average grain size of less than 10 pm, suggesting that they have the potential for superplastic deformation. Heat treatments were performed on the TRC, ECAP and FSP materials to assess their microstructural stability. Both the ECAP and TRC material were found to be fairly stable, showing normal grain growth while the FSP material grew substantially at temperatures above 200°C. The activation energy of grain boundary motion of the TRC material was calculated to be 167 kJ/mol.

  16. Fretting wear behavior of AZ91D magnesium alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN An-hua; HUANG Wei-jiu; LI Zhao-feng

    2006-01-01

    The fretting behaviour of the AZ91D magnesium alloy was investigated. The influence of the number of cycles, normal load (contact pressure) and the amplitude of slip on the fretting behavior of the material were focused. Fretting tests were performed under various running conditions with regard to normal load levels and slip amplitudes. The friction coefficient between the surfaces at the fretting junction was continuously recorded. The fretting damage on the magnesium specimens was studied by SEM. The results show that the wear volume increases with the increase of slip amplitude, and linearly increases with the increase of normal load in the mixed and gross slip regime, but the normal load has no obvious effect on the wear volume in the partial slip regime. The predominant fretting wear mechanism of magnesium alloy in the slip regime is the oxidation wear, delaminated wear and abrasive wear.

  17. On the deformation twinning of Mg AZ31B

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abdolvand, Hamidreza; Majkut, Marta; Oddershede, Jette

    2015-01-01

    variants was non-negligible. The CPFE simulation indicates that there is a small variation in the stress within each grain in the elastic regime, which increases drastically upon the onset of plasticity. One of the significant outcomes of this work is the new statistical information on the interaction......Crystals with a hexagonal close-packed (HCP) structure are inherently anisotropic, and have a limited number of independent slip systems, which leads to strong deformation textures and reduced formability in polycrystalline products. Tension along the c-axis of the crystal ideally activates...... extension twinning as a deformation mode due to the lack of easy-slip systems. In this work, experiments were devised to study extension twinning in a polycrystalline Mg alloy AZ31B with a strong basal rolling texture by tensile deformation parallel to the plate normal. Three-dimensional synchrotron X...

  18. Devolatilization or melting of carbonates at Meteor Crater, AZ?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hörz, F.; Archer, P. D.; Niles, P. B.; Zolensky, M. E.; Evans, M.

    2015-06-01

    We have investigated the carbonates in the impact melts and in a monolithic clast of highly shocked Coconino sandstone of Meteor Crater, AZ to evaluate whether melting or devolatilization is the dominant response of carbonates during high-speed meteorite impact. Both melt- and clast-carbonates are calcites that have identical crystal habits and that contain anomalously high SiO2 and Al2O3. Also, both calcite occurrences lack any meteoritic contamination, such as Fe or Ni, which is otherwise abundantly observed in all other impact melts and their crystallization products at Meteor Crater. The carbon and oxygen isotope systematics for both calcite deposits suggest a low temperature environment (Meteor Crater. Although confined to Meteor Crater, these findings are in stark contrast to Osinski et al. (2008) who proposed that melting of carbonates, rather than devolatilization, is the dominant process during hypervelocity impact into carbonate-bearing targets, including Meteor Crater.

  19. Grain refinement in magnesium alloy AZ31 during hot deformation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang Xuyue; Miura, H.; Sakai, T. [Dept. of Mechanical Engineering and Intelligent Systems, Univ. of Electro-Communications, Chofu, Tokyo (Japan)

    2004-07-01

    The deformation behavior and structure changes of magnesium alloy AZ31 were studied in compression at temperatures ranging from 523 K to 673 K and at a strain rate of 3 x 10{sup -3} s{sup -1}. They depend sensitively on deformation temperature. At high temperatures, grain fragmentation takes place due to frequent formation of kink bands initially at corrugated grain boundaries and then in grain interiors, followed by full development of new grains in high strain. At lower temperatures, in contrast, twinning takes place in rather coarse grains and kink bands are formed mainly in finer original ones in low strain. It is concluded that new grain evolution can be controlled by a deformation-induced continuous reaction resulting in grain fragmentation by kink bands, i.e. continuous dynamic recrystallization (cDRX). The latter is discussed comparing with conventional, i.e. discontinuous, DRX. (orig.)

  20. Telomeric heterochromatin boundaries require NuA4-dependent acetylation of histone variant H2A.Z in Saccharomycescerevisiae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babiarz, Joshua E.; Halley, Jeffrey E.; Rine, Jasper

    2006-01-01

    SWR1-Com, which is responsible for depositing H2A.Z into chromatin, shares four subunits with the NuA4 histone acetyltransferase complex. This overlap in composition led us to test whether H2A.Z was a substrate of NuA4 in vitro and in vivo. The N-terminal tail of H2A.Z was acetylated in vivo at multiple sites by a combination of NuA4 and SAGA. H2A.Z acetylation was also dependent on SWR1-Com, causing H2A.Z to be efficiently acetylated only when incorporated in chromatin. Unacetylatable H2A.Z mutants were, like wild-type H2A.Z, enriched at heterochromatin boundaries, but were unable to block spreading of heterochromatin. A mutant version of H2A.Z that could not be acetylated, in combination with a mutation in a nonessential gene in the NuA4 complex, caused a pronounced decrease in growth rate. This H2A.Z mutation was lethal in combination with a mutant version of histone H4 that could not be acetylated by NuA4. Taken together, these results show a role for H2A.Z acetylation in restricting silent chromatin, and reveal that acetylation of H2A.Z and H4 can contribute to a common function essential to life. PMID:16543222

  1. Bioetanol de la caña de azúcar

    OpenAIRE

    N. Aguilar-Rivera

    2007-01-01

    La búsqueda de la viabilidad y desarrollo de la agroindustria de la caña de azúcar es ya una política imperativa. La producción de caña y azúcar constituyen la principal agroindustria del país, con presencia en 57 ingenios azucareros, localizados en 15 estados de la república. Sin embargo, la actual ineficiencia productiva, altos costos y otras causas como la entrada de jarabe de maíz de alta fructosa (HFCS) de menor costo han desplazado el consumo interno de azúcar...

  2. Influence of neodymium on high cycle fatigue behavior of die cast AZ91D magnesium alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨友; 李雪松

    2010-01-01

    High cycle fatigue behavior of die cast AZ91D magnesium alloy with different Nd contents was investigated.Axial mechanical fatigue tests were conducted at the stress ratio R=0.1 and the fatigue strength was evaluated using up-to-down load method on specimens of AZ91D with different Nd contents.The results showed that the grain of AZ91D alloy was refined,the size and amount of β-Mg17Al12 phase decreased and distributed uniformly with increasing Nd content.At the number of cycles to failure,Nf=107,the fatigue...

  3. Simulation of Magnesium Alloy AZ91D Microstructure Using Modified Cellular Automaton Method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUO Liang; LI Bin; SHI Yufeng; XU Qingyan; HAN Zhiqiang; LIU Baicheng

    2009-01-01

    A two-dimensional modified cellular automaton model was developed to simulate the solidification process of magnesium alloy, The stochastic nucleation, solute redistribution, and growth anisotropy effects were taken into account in the present model. The model was used to simulate the grain size of magnesium alloy AZ91D for various cooling rates during the solidification process. To quantitatively validate the current model, metallographic expedments were carded out on specimens obtained from sand mold AZ91D step castings. The metallographic results agree well with the prediction results. The current model can be used to accurately predict the grain sizes of cast AZ91D magnesium alloy.

  4. System Description for Tank 241-AZ-101 Waste Retrieval Data Acquisition System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ROMERO, S.G.

    2000-01-10

    Describes the hardware and software for the AZ-101 Mixer Pump Data Acquisition System. The purpose of the tank 241-AZ-101 retrieval system Data Acquisition System (DAS) is to provide monitoring and data acquisition of key parameters in order to confirm the effectiveness of the mixer pumps utilized for suspending solids in the tank. The suspension of solids in Tank 241-AZ-101 is necessary for pretreatment of the neutralized current acid waste (NCAW), and eventual disposal as glass via the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant.

  5. Merged dust climatology in Phoenix, Arizona based on satellite and station data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Hang; Wang, Julian X. L.; Tong, Daniel Q.; Lee, Pius

    2016-11-01

    In order to construct climate quality long-term dust storm dataset, merged dust storm climatology in Phoenix is developed based on three data sources: regular meteorological records, in situ air quality measurements, and satellite remote sensing observations. The result presented in this paper takes into account the advantages of each dataset and integrates individual analyses demonstrated and presented in previous studies that laid foundation to reconstruct a consistent and continuous time series of dust frequency. A key for the merging procedure is to determine analysis criteria suitable for each individual data source. A practical application to historic records of dust storm activities over the Phoenix area is presented to illustrate detailed steps, advantages, and limitations of the newly developed process. Three datasets are meteorological records from the Sky Harbor station, satellite observed aerosol optical depth data from moderate resolution imaging spectroradiometer, and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Air Quality System particulate matter data of eight sites surrounding Phoenix. Our purpose is to construct dust climatology over the Phoenix region for the period 1948-2012. Data qualities of the reconstructed dust climatology are assessed based on the availability and quality of the input data. The period during 2000-2012 has the best quality since all datasets are well archived. The reconstructed climatology shows that dust storm activities over the Phoenix region have large interannual variability. However, seasonal variations show a skewed distribution with higher frequency of dust storm activities in July and August and relatively quiet during the rest of months. Combining advantages of all the available datasets, this study presents a merged product that provides a consistent and continuous time series of dust storm activities suitable for climate studies.

  6. Phxnlme: An R package that facilitates pharmacometric workflow of Phoenix NLME analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Chay Ngee; Liang, Shuang; Feng, Kevin; Chittenden, Jason; Henry, Ana; Mouksassi, Samer; Birnbaum, Angela K

    2017-03-01

    Pharmacometric analyses are integral components of the drug development process, and Phoenix NLME is one of the popular software used to conduct such analyses. To address current limitations with model diagnostic graphics and efficiency of the workflow for this software, we developed an R package, Phxnlme, to facilitate its workflow and provide improved graphical diagnostics. Phxnlme was designed to provide functionality for the major tasks that are usually performed in pharmacometric analyses (i.e. nonlinear mixed effects modeling, basic model diagnostics, visual predictive checks and bootstrap). Various estimation methods for modeling using the R package are made available through the Phoenix NLME engine. The Phxnlme R package utilizes other packages such as ggplot2 and lattice to produce the graphical output, and various features were included to allow customizability of the output. Interactive features for some plots were also added using the manipulate R package. Phxnlme provides enhanced capabilities for nonlinear mixed effects modeling that can be accessed using the phxnlme() command. Output from the model can be graphed to assess the adequacy of model fits and further explore relationships in the data using various functions included in this R package, such as phxplot() and phxvpc.plot(). Bootstraps, stratified up to three variables, can also be performed to obtain confidence intervals around the model estimates. With the use of an R interface, different R projects can be created to allow multi-tasking, which addresses the current limitation of the Phoenix NLME desktop software. In addition, there is a wide selection of diagnostic and exploratory plots in the Phxnlme package, with improvements in the customizability of plots, compared to Phoenix NLME. The Phxnlme package is a flexible tool that allows implementation of the analytical workflow of Phoenix NLME with R, with features for greater overall efficiency and improved customizable graphics. Phxnlme is

  7. Prolate rotation and metallicity gradient in the transforming dwarf galaxy Phoenix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kacharov, Nikolay; Battaglia, Giuseppina; Rejkuba, Marina; Cole, Andrew A.; Carrera, Ricardo; Fraternali, Filippo; Wilkinson, Mark I.; Gallart, Carme G.; Irwin, Mike; Tolstoy, Eline

    2017-04-01

    Transition type dwarf galaxies are thought to be systems undergoing the process of transformation from a star-forming into a passively evolving dwarf, which makes them particularly suitable to study evolutionary processes driving the existence of different dwarf morphological types. Here we present results from a spectroscopic survey of ∼200 individual red giant branch stars in the Phoenix dwarf, the closest transition type with a comparable luminosity to 'classical' dwarf galaxies. We measure a systemic heliocentric velocity Vhelio = -21.2 ± 1.0 km s-1. Our survey reveals the clear presence of prolate rotation that is aligned with the peculiar spatial distribution of the youngest stars in Phoenix. We speculate that both features might have arisen from the same event, possibly an accretion of a smaller system. The evolved stellar population of Phoenix is relatively metal-poor ( = -1.49 ± 0.04 dex) and shows a large metallicity spread (σ[Fe/H] = 0.51 ± 0.04 dex), with a pronounced metallicity gradient of -0.13 ± 0.01 dex arcmin-1 similar to luminous, passive dwarf galaxies. We also report a discovery of an extremely metal-poor star candidate in Phoenix and discuss the importance of correcting for spatial sampling when interpreting the chemical properties of galaxies with metallicity gradients. This study presents a major leap forward in our knowledge of the internal kinematics of the Phoenix transition type dwarf galaxy and the first wide area spectroscopic survey of its metallicity properties. A table containing the measured velocities, metallicities, and CaT equivalent widths of all spectroscopic targets is available online at the CDS.

  8. Thermal fatigue of magnesium-base alloy AZ91; Zur thermischen Ermuedung der Magnesium-Basislegierung AZ91

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krauss, M.; Scholtes, B. [Institut fuer Werkstofftechnik - Metallische Werkstoffe, Universitaet Kassel (Germany)

    2008-08-15

    Thermal fatigue tests of the magnesium-base alloy AZ91 were carried out under total strain control and out-of-phase-loading conditions in a temperature range between -50 C and +190 C. Specimens produced by a vacuum die casting process were loaded under constant total strain and uniaxial homogeneous stress. To simulate the influence of different mean stresses, experiments were started at different temperature levels, e.g. the lower, mean or upper temperature of the thermal cycle. The thermal fatigue behavior is described by the resulting stress amplitudes, plastic strain amplitudes and mean stresses as a function of the number of thermal loading cycles. Depending on the maximum temperature and the number of loading cycles, cyclic softening as well as cyclic hardening behavior is observed. Due to the complex interaction of deformation, recovery and recrystallization processes and as a consequence of the individual temperature and deformation history, thermal fatigue processes of the material investigated cannot be assessed using results of isothermal experiments alone. The upper temperatures or the resp. temperature amplitudes determine the total fatigue lifetime. (Abstract Copyright [2008], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.) [German] Es wird ueber Ergebnisse von Untersuchungen zur thermischen Ermuedung der Mg-Gusslegierung AZ91 berichtet. Die im Vakuumdruckgussverfahren hergestellten Proben wurden bei Konstanthaltung der Totaldehnung unter einachsig-homogener Beanspruchung im Temperaturbereich zwischen -50 C und +190 C belastet. Die Versuche wurden bei unterschiedlichen Temperaturniveaus gestartet, so dass sich zu Beginn unterschiedliche Mittelbeanspruchungen einstellten. Das Werkstoffverhalten wird durch die resultierenden Spannungsamplituden, plastischen Dehnungsamplituden und Mittelspannungen charakterisiert. In Abhaengigkeit der Temperatur und der Lastspielzahl wird sowohl zyklische Entfestigung als auch Verfestigung beobachtet. Aufgrund der komplexen Wechselwirkungen

  9. 75 FR 49526 - Freescale Semiconductor, Inc., Technical Information Center, Tempe, AZ; Freescale Semiconductor...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-13

    ... Employment and Training Administration Freescale Semiconductor, Inc., Technical Information Center, Tempe, AZ; Freescale Semiconductor, Inc., Technical Information Center, Woburn, MA; Amended Certification Regarding... Semiconductor, Inc., Technical Information Center, Tempe, Arizona. The notice was published in the...

  10. Wear resistance of ceramic coating on AZ91 magnesium alloy by micro-arc oxidation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Hui; LIU Zheng; CHEN Li-jia; CHEN Ji; HAN Zhong

    2006-01-01

    The ceramic coating formed on AZ91 magnesium alloy by micro-arc oxidation (MAO) was characterized. The results show that the ceramic coating(3.4-23 μm in thickness)on the surface of AZ91 alloy was attained under different micro-arc oxidation treatment conditions, which consist mainly of MgO, Mg2SiO4 and MgSiO3 phases. Nano-hardness in a cross-sectional specimen was determined by nano-indentation experiment. The MAO coatings exhibit higher hardness than the substrate. Dry sliding wear tests for the MAO coatings and AZ91 alloy were also carried out using an oscillating friction and wear tester in a ball-on-disc contact configuration. The wear resistance of the MAO coatings is improved respectively under different treatment time as a result of different structures of ceramic coatings formed on AZ91 alloy.

  11. 78 FR 7391 - Motorized Travel Management Plan, Tonto National Forest; Gila, Maricopa, Pinal, and Counties, AZ

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-01

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Forest Service Motorized Travel Management Plan, Tonto National Forest; Gila, Maricopa, Pinal, and Counties, AZ AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of intent to prepare an environmental...

  12. Remediation System Evaluation, A-Z Automotive in West Milford, New Jersey

    Science.gov (United States)

    The A-Z Automotive site is a former gasoline retail outlet and automobile service station located on Union Valley Road between St. George Street and Lou Ann Boulevard in West Milford, Passaic County, New Jersey.

  13. 77 FR 20356 - Foreign-Trade Zone 277-Western Maricopa County, AZ; Application for Manufacturing Authority...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-04

    ... Manufacturing Authority; Suntech Arizona, Inc., (Solar Panel Manufacturing), Goodyear, AZ An application has..., Inc., grantee of FTZ 277, requesting manufacturing authority on behalf of Suntech Arizona, Inc... foreign inputs that become scrap or waste during manufacturing. FTZ designation would further...

  14. Martian Multimedia: The Agony and Ecstasy of Communicating Real-Time, Authentic Science During the Phoenix Mars Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitter, C.; Buxner, S. R.

    2009-03-01

    The Phoenix Mars Mission faced robust communication challenges requiring real-time solutions. Managing the message from Mars and ensuring the highest quality of science data and news releases were our top priorities during mission surface operations.

  15. Adsorption Driven Regolith-Atmospheric Water Vapor Transfer on Mars: Analysis of Phoenix TECP and MSL REMS Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farris, H. N.; Conner, M. B.; Chevrier, V. F.; Rivera-Valentin, E. G.

    2016-09-01

    BET adsorption theory is implemented to explain sol-to-sol dependencies of temperature and humidity at the Phoenix landing site and along the MSL traverse and thus, the implications for transient, adsorbed, liquid water at the surface.

  16. Influence of Noise Barriers on Near-Road and On-Road Air Quality: Results from Phoenix

    Science.gov (United States)

    The presentation describes field study results quantifying the impact of roadside barriers under real-world conditions in Phoenix, Arizona. Public health concerns regarding adverse health effects for populations spending significant amounts of time near high traffic roadways has ...

  17. Effects of CH3OH Addition on Plasma Electrolytic Oxidation of AZ31 Magnesium Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yongyi; Chen, Li; Yan, Zongcheng; Zhang, Yalei

    2015-09-01

    Plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) films on AZ31 magnesium alloys were prepared in alkaline silicate electrolytes (base electrolyte) with the addition of different volume concentrations of CH3OH, which was used to adjust the thickness of the vapor sheath. The compositions, morphologies, and thicknesses of ceramic layers formed with different CH3OH concentrations were determined via X-ray diffraction (XRD), energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Corrosion behavior of the oxide films was evaluated in 3.5 wt.% NaCl solution using potentiodynamic polarization tests. PEO coatings mainly comprised Mg, MgO, and Mg2SiO4. The addition of CH3OH in base electrolytes affected the thickness, pores diameter, and Mg2SiO4 content in the films. The films formed in the electrolyte containing 12% CH3OH exhibited the highest thickness. The coatings formed in the electrolyte containing different concentrations of CH3OH exhibited similar corrosion resistance. The energy consumption of PEO markedly decreased upon the addition of CH3OH to the electrolytes. The result is helpful for energy saving in the PEO process. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 21376088), the Project of Production, Education and Research, Guangdong Province and Ministry of Education (Nos. 2012B09100063, 2012A090300015), and Guangzhou Science and Technology Plan Projects of China (No. 2014Y2-00042)

  18. Formation of Structure and Properties in Casting Processes on the Example of AZ91 Magnesium Alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Augustyn B.

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Contemporary materials engineering requires the use of materials characterised by high mechanical properties, as these precisely properties determine the choice of material for parts of machinery and equipment. Owing to these properties it is possible to reduce the weight and, consequently, the consumption of both material and energy. Trying to meet these expectations, the designers are increasingly looking for solutions in the application of magnesium alloys as materials offering a very beneficial strength-to-weight ratio. However, besides alloying elements, the properties are to a great extent shaped by the solidification conditions and related structure. The process of structure formation depends on the choice of casting method forced by the specific properties of casting or by the specific intended use of final product. The article presents a comparison of AZ91 magnesium alloys processed by different casting technologies. A short characteristic was offered for materials processed by the traditional semi-continuous casting process, which uses the solidification rates comprised in a range of 5 - 20°C/s, and for materials made in the process of Rapid Solidification, where the solidification rate can reach 106 °C/s. As a result of the casting process, a feedstock in the form of billets and thin strips was obtained and was subjected next to the process of plastic forming. The article presents the results of structural analysis of the final product. The mechanical properties of the ø7 mm extruded rods were also evaluated and compared.

  19. BD PHOENIX-100全自动微生物鉴定仪对葡萄球菌鉴定能力的评价%Evaluation of the BD PHOENIX-100 Automated Microbiology System for Identification of Staphylococcus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王原; 曹俊敏; 陈益民; 许江燕

    2009-01-01

    [目的]评价BD PHOENIX-100全自动微生物鉴定仪(PHOENIX-100)对葡萄球菌的鉴定能力.[方法]收集从我院病人标本中分离的葡萄球菌81株.常规细菌培养后,用PHOENIX-100和API Staph系统进行检测,以API Staph系统为参照,评价PHOENIX-100的优势和不足.[结果]PHOENIX-100和API Staph系统的总体鉴定符合率为86.4%,其中金黄色葡萄球菌的鉴定符合率为100%,凝固酶阴性葡萄球菌的鉴定符合率为73.8%.[结论]PHOENIX-100鉴定系统能够基本满足临床工作的需求,其中对金黄色葡萄球菌的鉴定率较高,在进行凝固酶阴性葡萄球菌鉴定时有局限性.

  20. Semi-solid slurry of AZ91 magnesium alloy prepared by electromagnetic stirring near liquidus temperature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    An electromagnetic stirring process near liquidus temperature was designed and demonstrated experimentally to produce semi-solid slurry of AZ91 magnesium alloy, in order to avoid not only contamination from mechanical stirring but also the inflammation of Mg alloy melt at elevated temperature. AZ91 alloy feedstock was isothermally heat treated at 600-610 ℃ for 20 min, and then stirred by electromagnetic field. Globular primary particle characteristic was observed optically in the castings. Mechanical properties were also studied.

  1. Final results of double-shell tank 241-AZ-101 ultrasonic inspection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    JENSEN, C.E.

    1999-08-23

    This document presents the results and documentation of the nondestructive ultrasonic examination of tank 241-AZ-101. A tank inspection supplier was retained to provide and use an ultrasonic examination system (equipment, procedures, and inspectors) to scan a limited area of double-shell tank 241-AZ-101 primary tank wall and welds. The inspection found one reportable indication of thinning and no reportable pitting, corrosion, or cracking.

  2. Operational Test Report for the 241-AZ-101 Suspended Solids Profiler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    STENKAMP, D.M.

    2000-04-03

    This document comprises the Operational Test Report for the 241-AZ-101 Suspended Solids Profiler. This document presents the results of Operational Testing of the 241-AZ-101 Suspended Solids Profiler (SSP). Testing of the SSP was performed in accordance with OTP-260-005, ''SUSPENDED SOLIDS PROFILER OPERATIONAL TEST PROCEDURE''. The objective of the testing was to verify that all equipment and components functioned as designed, following construction completion and turnover to operations.

  3. Development of Rolling Schedules for Equal Channel Angular Extrusion (ECAE)-Processed AZ31 Magnesium Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-01

    failing to comply with a collection of information if it does not display a currently valid OMB control number. PLEASE DO NOT RETURN YOUR FORM TO THE...processed AZ31 magnesium plates have been developed. Using a temperature of 300 °C and a 10% reduction per rolling pass, the initially 9-mm-thick plates were... measured ductility along the longitudinal and transverse directions, respectively, than does texture C. 15. SUBJECT TERMS magnesium, AZ31, ECAE

  4. System Description for Tank 241-AZ-101 Waste Retrieval Data Acquisition System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ROMERO, S.G.

    2000-02-14

    The proposed activity provides the description of the Data Acquisition System for Tank 241-AZ-101. This description is documented in HNF-5572, Tank 241-AZ-101 Waste Retrieval Data Acquisition System (DAS). This activity supports the planned mixer pump tests for Tank 241-AZ-101. Tank 241-AZ-101 has been selected for the first full-scale demonstration of a mixer pump system. The tank currently holds over 960,000 gallons of neutralized current acid waste, including approximately 12.7 inches of settling solids (sludge) at the bottom of the tank. As described in Addendum 4 of the FSAR (LMHC 2000a), two 300 HP mixer pumps with associated measurement and monitoring equipment have been installed in Tank 241-AZ-101. The purpose of the Tank 241-AZ-101 retrieval system Data Acquisition System (DAS) is to provide monitoring and data acquisition of key parameters in order to confirm the effectiveness of the mixer pumps utilized for suspending solids in the tank. The suspension of solids in Tank 241-AZ-101 is necessary for pretreatment of the neutralized current acid waste and eventual disposal as glass via the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant. HNF-5572 provides a basic description of the Tank 241-AZ-101 retrieval system DAS, including the field instrumentation and application software. The DAS is provided to fulfill requirements for data collection and monitoring. This document is not an operations procedure or is it intended to describe the mixing operation. This USQ screening provides evaluation of HNF-5572 (Revision 1) including the changes as documented on ECN 654001. The changes include (1) add information on historical trending and data backup, (2) modify DAS I/O list in Appendix E to reflect actual conditions in the field, and (3) delete IP address in Appendix F per Lockheed Martin Services, Inc. request.

  5. Determination of substrate log-normal distribution in the AZ91/SICP composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Lelito

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim in this work is to develop a log-normal distribution of heterogeneous nucleation substrates for the composite based on AZ91 alloy reinforced by SiC particles. The computational algorithm allowing the restore of the nucleation substrates distribution was used. The experiment was performed for the AZ91 alloy containing 1 % wt. of SiC particles. Obtained from experiment, the grains density of magnesium primary phase and supercooling were used to algorithm as input data.

  6. Effect of Ca and Y additions on oxidation behavior of AZ91 alloy at elevated temperatures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENG Su-ling; YANG Gen-cang; FAN Jian-feng; LI You-jie; ZHOU Yao-he

    2009-01-01

    In order to develop the ignition-proof magnesium alloy, the effect of alloying elements, Ca and Y, on the oxidation behavior of AZ91 magnesium alloy at elevated temperatures was investigated. The ignition-proof performance, oxide products and oxidation kinetics of Ca- and Y-containing AZ91 alloys were studied. The results indicate that the proper addition of Ca can increase the ignition point of AZ91 alloy greatly. However, the oxide film of Ca-bearing AZ91 alloy formed at elevated temperature is thick and brittle, which is prone to crack in melting and cooling process. In addition, the oxide film of AZ91-xCa alloy is incompact and cannot inhibit the diffusion of reaction particles. The oxide film of AZ91-xCa alloy turns to thin and plastic one after Y is added, and the density of the oxide film increases greatly due to the formation of composite oxide film composed of MgO, CaO and Y2O3.

  7. Electrochemical corrosion behavior of AZ91D alloy in ethylene glycol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fekry, A.M. [Chemistry Department, Faculty of Science, Cairo University, Giza 12613 (Egypt)], E-mail: hham4@hotmail.com; Fatayerji, M.Z. [Chemistry Department, Faculty of Science, Cairo University, Giza 12613 (Egypt)

    2009-11-01

    The effect of concentration on the corrosion behavior of Mg-based alloy AZ91D was investigated in ethylene glycol-water solutions using electrochemical techniques i.e. potentiodynamic polarization, electrochemical impedance measurements (EIS) and surface examination via scanning electron microscope (SEM) technique. This can provide a basis for developing new coolants for magnesium alloy engine blocks. Corrosion behavior of AZ91D alloy by coolant is important in the automotive industry. It was found that the corrosion rate of AZ91D alloy decreased with increasing concentration of ethylene glycol. For AZ91D alloy in chloride >0.05 M or fluoride <0.05 M containing 30% ethylene glycol solution, they are more corrosive than the blank (30% ethylene glycol-70% water). However, at concentrations <0.05 for chloride or >0.05 M for fluoride containing ethylene glycol solution, some inhibition effect has been observed. The corrosion of AZ91D alloy in the blank can be effectively inhibited by addition of 0.05 mM paracetamol that reacts with AZ91D alloy and forms a protective film on the surface at this concentration as confirmed by surface examination.

  8. Effects of grain refinement on mechanical properties and microstructures of AZ31 alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Cerium was added in AZ31 alloy with the contents of 0.4%, 0.8% and 1.2% respectively to produce experimental alloys.The grain refinement of Ce in the as-east and rolled AZ31 alloy were studied by using Polyvar-MET optical microscope with a VSM2000 quantitative analysis system, KYKY2000 SEM and Tecnai G2 20 TEM. And the mechanical properties of AZ31+Ce alloy were tested on a CSS-44100 testing system with computerized data acquisition. The results show that the cerium has a good grain refinement effect on the as-cast AZ31 alloy because cerium can build up a solute enriched zone rapidly during the solidification process. The dynamic recrystallization (DRX) grains less than 10 μm can be obtained in hot rolled AZ31+Ce alloy. A cold rolling deformation degree over than 20% and a following annealing at 400 ℃ for 1h will lead to refine and uniform grains with the sizes of about 25μm. The cerium can form dispersed and thermally stable Al4Ce phase that can prohibit the coarsening of grains in AZ31 +Ce alloy during the hot rolling and annealing process.

  9. Microstructural development of high temperature deformed AZ31 magnesium alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shahbeigi Roodposhti, Peiman, E-mail: pshahbe@ncsu.edu; Sarkar, Apu; Murty, Korukonda Linga

    2015-02-25

    Due to their significant role in automobile industries, high temperature deformation of Mg–Al–Zn alloys (AZ31) at constant stress (i.e. creep) were studied at a wide range of stresses and temperatures to characterize underlying deformation mechanism, dynamic recrystallization (DRX) and dislocation density evolution. Various microstructures (e.g. grain growth & DRX) are noted during steady-state creep mechanisms such as grain boundary sliding (GBS), dislocation glide creep (DGC) and dislocation climb creep (DCC). Although a combination of DRX and grain growth is characteristic of low stacking fault energy materials like Mg alloys at elevated temperatures, observation reveals grain growth at low strain-rates (GBS region) along with dynamic recovery (DRV) mechanism. X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) analysis revealed a decrease in dislocation density during GBS region while it increased under dislocation based creep mechanisms which could be related to the possible DRV and DRX respectively. Scanning Electron Microscopic (SEM) characterization of the fracture surface reveals more inter-granular fracture for large grains (i.e. GBS region with DRV process) and more dimple shape fracture for small grains (i.e. DGC & DCC region with DRX)

  10. Bioactive benzofuran derivatives: moracins A-Z in medicinal chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naik, Ravi; Harmalkar, Dipesh S; Xu, Xuezhen; Jang, Kyusic; Lee, Kyeong

    2015-01-27

    Benzofuran heterocycles are fundamental structural units in a variety of biologically active natural products as well as synthetic materials. Over the time, benzofuran derivatives have attracted many researchers due to the broad scope of their biological activity, which include anticancer, antimicrobial, immunomodulatory, antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. Egonol, homoegonol and moracin families are biologically active natural products containing benzofuran heterocycle as basic structural units. This paper focuses on the moracin family (moracin A to Z). Morus, a genus of flowering plants in the family Moraceae, comprises 10-16 species of deciduous trees commonly known as mulberries. The root bark, stem bark and leaves of Morus alba, M. lhou, Morus macroura are the main sources for arylbenzofuran derivatives including the moracins. A large volume of research has been carried out on moracins and their derivatives, which has shown the pharmacological importance of this benzofuran heterocyclic nucleus. In this mini-review, we attempt to highlight the importance of moracins, as they have been a major source for drug development. Herein, we also summarize the current state of the art concerning the synthesis and medicinal use of moracins A-Z.

  11. CYCLIC FATIGUE RESISTANCE OF AZ91 MAGNESIUM ALLOY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aneta Němcová

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with determination of principal mechanical properties and the investigation of fatigue behaviour of AZ91 magnesium alloy. The experimental material was made by squeeze casting technique and heat treated to obtain T4 state (solution annealing, when hard, brittle Mg17Al12 intermetallic phase is dissolved. The basic mechanical properties (Young’s modulus, ultimate tensile strength, yield strength, elongation to fracture and reduction of area were determined by static tensile test. Furthermore, fatigue parameters were investigated. The S-N curve on the basis of smooth test bars tested under symmetrical push-pull loading at room temperature was evaluated. The measured data were subsequently used for fitting with suitable regression functions (Kohout & Věchet and Stromeyer for determination of the fatigue parameters. Fatigue limit sigma-c of the studied alloy for 108 cycles is approaching 50 MPa. In addition, the fracture surfaces were observed by scanning electron microscopy. The failure analysis proved that the striations were observed in fatigue crack propagation area and in the area of static fracture was observed the transgranular ductile fracture. The structure of the studied alloy in the basic state and after heat treatment was observed by light and scanning electron microscopy.

  12. Multibody Modeling and Simulation for the Mars Phoenix Lander Entry, Descent and Landing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Queen, Eric M.; Prince, Jill L.; Desai, Prasun N.

    2008-01-01

    A multi-body flight simulation for the Phoenix Mars Lander has been developed that includes high fidelity six degree-of-freedom rigid-body models for the parachute and lander system. The simulation provides attitude and rate history predictions of all bodies throughout the flight, as well as loads on each of the connecting lines. In so doing, a realistic behavior of the descending parachute/lander system dynamics can be simulated that allows assessment of the Phoenix descent performance and identification of potential sensitivities for landing. This simulation provides a complete end-to-end capability of modeling the entire entry, descent, and landing sequence for the mission. Time histories of the parachute and lander aerodynamic angles are presented. The response of the lander system to various wind models and wind shears is shown to be acceptable. Monte Carlo simulation results are also presented.

  13. Characterization of AZ31 magnesium alloy by duplex process combining laser surface melting and plasma electrolytic oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Cancan; Liang, Jun; Zhou, Jiansong; Li, Qingbiao; Wang, Lingqian

    2016-09-01

    Top ceramic coatings were fabricated on the laser surface melting (LSM) modified AZ31 alloy by plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) in a phosphate electrolyte. The effect of LSM treatment on the microstructure and corrosion behavior of the bare and PEO treated AZ31 alloy was evaluated. Results showed that LSM treatment produced a homogeneous modified layer with redistributed intermetallic compounds, resulting in enhanced corrosion resistance of AZ31 alloy. The LSM treatment had no obvious influence on the surface and cross-sectional microstructures of the PEO coatings on AZ31 alloy. Besides, MgO was the main constituent for PEO coatings, regardless of LSM pretreatment. However, the long-term corrosion properties of the PEO coated AZ31 alloy with LSM pretreatment revealed large enhancement. Based on the analysis of microstructure and corrosion property, the corrosion mechanisms of the PEO and LSM-PEO coated AZ31 alloy were proposed.

  14. Date palm (Phoenix dactylifera)dispersal to the Americas: Historical evidence of the Spanish introduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Date palm (Phoenix dactylifera) groves are found in the Americas from the south-west USA (36°N lat.) to Chile (21°S lat.) and eastward to the Caribbean Islands; from Venezuela, 63°W long. to 117°W long. (USA) and at elevations from 0-2,000 m. However, successful production of ripe dates is possible ...

  15. Phoenix is required for mechanosensory hair cell regeneration in the zebrafish lateral line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behra, Martine; Bradsher, John; Sougrat, Rachid; Gallardo, Viviana; Allende, Miguel L; Burgess, Shawn M

    2009-04-01

    In humans, the absence or irreversible loss of hair cells, the sensory mechanoreceptors in the cochlea, accounts for a large majority of acquired and congenital hearing disorders. In the auditory and vestibular neuroepithelia of the inner ear, hair cells are accompanied by another cell type called supporting cells. This second cell population has been described as having stem cell-like properties, allowing efficient hair cell replacement during embryonic and larval/fetal development of all vertebrates. However, mammals lose their regenerative capacity in most inner ear neuroepithelia in postnatal life. Remarkably, reptiles, birds, amphibians, and fish are different in that they can regenerate hair cells throughout their lifespan. The lateral line in amphibians and in fish is an additional sensory organ, which is used to detect water movements and is comprised of neuroepithelial patches, called neuromasts. These are similar in ultra-structure to the inner ear's neuroepithelia and they share the expression of various molecular markers. We examined the regeneration process in hair cells of the lateral line of zebrafish larvae carrying a retroviral integration in a previously uncharacterized gene, phoenix (pho). Phoenix mutant larvae develop normally and display a morphologically intact lateral line. However, after ablation of hair cells with copper or neomycin, their regeneration in pho mutants is severely impaired. We show that proliferation in the supporting cells is strongly decreased after damage to hair cells and correlates with the reduction of newly formed hair cells in the regenerating phoenix mutant neuromasts. The retroviral integration linked to the phenotype is in a novel gene with no known homologs showing high expression in neuromast supporting cells. Whereas its role during early development of the lateral line remains to be addressed, in later larval stages phoenix defines a new class of proteins implicated in hair cell regeneration.

  16. Phoenix is required for mechanosensory hair cell regeneration in the zebrafish lateral line.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martine Behra

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available In humans, the absence or irreversible loss of hair cells, the sensory mechanoreceptors in the cochlea, accounts for a large majority of acquired and congenital hearing disorders. In the auditory and vestibular neuroepithelia of the inner ear, hair cells are accompanied by another cell type called supporting cells. This second cell population has been described as having stem cell-like properties, allowing efficient hair cell replacement during embryonic and larval/fetal development of all vertebrates. However, mammals lose their regenerative capacity in most inner ear neuroepithelia in postnatal life. Remarkably, reptiles, birds, amphibians, and fish are different in that they can regenerate hair cells throughout their lifespan. The lateral line in amphibians and in fish is an additional sensory organ, which is used to detect water movements and is comprised of neuroepithelial patches, called neuromasts. These are similar in ultra-structure to the inner ear's neuroepithelia and they share the expression of various molecular markers. We examined the regeneration process in hair cells of the lateral line of zebrafish larvae carrying a retroviral integration in a previously uncharacterized gene, phoenix (pho. Phoenix mutant larvae develop normally and display a morphologically intact lateral line. However, after ablation of hair cells with copper or neomycin, their regeneration in pho mutants is severely impaired. We show that proliferation in the supporting cells is strongly decreased after damage to hair cells and correlates with the reduction of newly formed hair cells in the regenerating phoenix mutant neuromasts. The retroviral integration linked to the phenotype is in a novel gene with no known homologs showing high expression in neuromast supporting cells. Whereas its role during early development of the lateral line remains to be addressed, in later larval stages phoenix defines a new class of proteins implicated in hair cell regeneration.

  17. Direct Electroless Nickel Plating on AZ91D Magnesium Alloy from a Sulfate Solution and its Deposition Mechanism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GU Chang-dong; LIAN Jian-she; LI Guang-yu; NIU Li-yuan; JIANG Zhong-hao

    2004-01-01

    A bath of electroless plating Ni on the AZ91D magnesium alloy, containing sulfate nickel, was given in this paper. The nucleation mechanism of Ni-P deposits on the AZ91D magnesium alloy was studied by using XRD and SEM.The electroless Ni-P deposits were preferentially nucleated on the β (Mg17Al12) phase and extended to the primary and eutectic α phases of the AZ91D magnesium alloy.

  18. Direct Electroless Nickel Plating on AZ91D Magnesium Alloy from a Sulfate Solution and its Deposition Mechanism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUChang-dong; LIANJian-she; LIGuang-yu; NIULi-yuan; JIANGZhong-hao

    2004-01-01

    A bath of electroless plating Ni on the AZ91D magnesium alloy, containing sulfate nickel, was given in this paper. The nucleation mechanism of Ni-P deposits on the AZ91D magnesium alloy was studied by using XRD and SEM. The electroless Ni-P deposits were preferentially nucleated on the β(Mg17Al12) phase and extended to the primary and eutectic α phases of the AZ91D magnesium alloy.

  19. Montesquieu a pénzről, az árfolyamokról és az államadósságról

    OpenAIRE

    Csató, Katalin

    2013-01-01

    Montesquieu, Charles-Louis de Secondat (1689-1755) A törvények szelleméről című híres művében néhány fejezetet szentelt a pénz szerepének. E tanulmány rekonstruálni igyekszik Montesquieu nézetrendszerét a pénzről, az árakról, a pénzkínálat és az árak összefüggéséről, a kereskedelemi mérlegek és a (váltó)árfolyam kapcsolatáról, az államadósságról. Montesquieu a korabeli vitákban azok oldalán állt, akik az állam eladósodottságának mértékét veszélyesnek tartották. Több tervezetet, "pénzügyi trük...

  20. A study on the relationships between corrosion properties and chemistry of thermally oxidised surface films formed on polished commercial magnesium alloys AZ31 and AZ61

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feliu, Sebastián, E-mail: sfeliu@cenim.csic.es [Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Metalúrgicas CSIC, Avda. Gregorio del Amo 8, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Samaniego, Alejandro [Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Metalúrgicas CSIC, Avda. Gregorio del Amo 8, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Barranco, Violeta [Instituto de Ciencias de Materiales de Madrid, ICMM, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas, CSIC, Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz, 3, Cantoblanco, 28049, Madrid (Spain); El-Hadad, A.A. [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Al-Azhar University, Nasr City 11884, Cairo (Egypt); Llorente, Irene [Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Metalúrgicas CSIC, Avda. Gregorio del Amo 8, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Serra, Carmen [Servicio de Nanotecnologia y Análisis de Superficies, CACTI, Universidade de Vigo, 36310 Vigo (Spain); Galván, J.C. [Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Metalúrgicas CSIC, Avda. Gregorio del Amo 8, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2014-03-01

    Highlights: • Surface chemistry of heat treated magnesium alloys. • Relation between heat treatment and aluminium subsurface enrichment. • Relation between surface composition and corrosion behaviour. - Abstract: This paper studies the changes in chemical composition of the thin oxide surface films induced by heating in air at 200 °C for time intervals from 5 min to 60 min on the freshly polished commercial AZ31 and AZ61 alloys with a view to better understanding their protective properties. This thermal treatment resulted in the formation of layers enriched in metallic aluminium at the interface between the outer MgO surface films and the bulk material. A strong link was found between the degree of metallic Al enrichment in the subsurface layer (from 10 to 15 at.%) observed by XPS (X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy) in the AZ61 treated samples and the increase in protective properties observed by EIS (electrochemical impedance spectroscopy) in the immersion test in 0.6 M NaCl. Heating for 5–60 min in air at 200 °C seems to be an effective, easy to perform and inexpensive method for increasing the corrosion resistance of the AZ61 alloy by approximately two or three times.

  1. In aftermath of financial investigation Phoenix VA employee demoted after her testimony

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robbins RA

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated after 150 words. A previous Southwest Journal of Pulmonary and Critical Care Journal editorial commented on fiscal mismanagement at the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA Medical Center in Phoenix (1. Now Paula Pedene, the former Phoenix VA public affairs officer, claims she was demoted for testimony she gave to the VA Inspector General’s Office (OIG regarding that investigation (2. In 2011, the OIG investigated the Phoenix VA for excess spending on private care of patients (3. The report blamed systemic failures for controls so weak that $56 million in medical fees were paid during 2010 without adequate review. The report particularly focused on one clinician assigned by the Chief of Staff to review hundreds of requests per week and the intensive care unit physicians for transferring patients to chronic ventilator units (1,3. After the investigation, the director and one of the associate directors left the VA and the chief of staff was promoted …

  2. Full-Circle Color Panorama of Phoenix Lander Deck and Landing Site on Northern Mars, Animation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on image to view the animation This view combines more than 500 images taken after NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander arrived on an arctic plain at 68.22 degrees north latitude, 234.25 degrees east longitude on Mars. This movie makes a slow tour around highlights of the image including the landscape and the spacecraft's science deck. The full-circle panorama in approximately true color shows the polygonal patterning of ground at the landing area, similar to patterns in permafrost areas on Earth. The center of the image is the westward part of the scene. Trenches where Phoenix's robotic arm has been exposing subsurface material are visible in the right half of the image. The spacecraft's meteorology mast, topped by the telltale wind gauge, extends into the sky portion of the panorama. This view comprises more than 100 different Stereo Surface Imager camera pointings, with images taken through three different filters at each pointing. It is presented here as a cylindrical projection. The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  3. Phoenix : Complex Adaptive System of Systems (CASoS) engineering version 1.0.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, Thomas W.; Quach, Tu-Thach; Detry, Richard Joseph; Conrad, Stephen Hamilton; Kelic, Andjelka; Starks, Shirley J.; Beyeler, Walter Eugene; Brodsky, Nancy S.; Verzi, Stephen J.; Brown, Theresa Jean; Glass, Robert John, Jr.; Sunderland, Daniel J.; Mitchell, Michael David; Ames, Arlo Leroy; Maffitt, S. Louise; Finley, Patrick D.; Russell, Eric Dean; Zagonel, Aldo A.; Reedy, Geoffrey E.; Mitchell, Roger A.; Corbet, Thomas Frank, Jr.; Linebarger, John Michael

    2011-08-01

    Complex Adaptive Systems of Systems, or CASoS, are vastly complex ecological, sociological, economic and/or technical systems which we must understand to design a secure future for the nation and the world. Perturbations/disruptions in CASoS have the potential for far-reaching effects due to pervasive interdependencies and attendant vulnerabilities to cascades in associated systems. Phoenix was initiated to address this high-impact problem space as engineers. Our overarching goals are maximizing security, maximizing health, and minimizing risk. We design interventions, or problem solutions, that influence CASoS to achieve specific aspirations. Through application to real-world problems, Phoenix is evolving the principles and discipline of CASoS Engineering while growing a community of practice and the CASoS engineers to populate it. Both grounded in reality and working to extend our understanding and control of that reality, Phoenix is at the same time a solution within a CASoS and a CASoS itself.

  4. Full-Circle Color Panorama of Phoenix Landing Site on Northern Mars, Polar Projection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    This view combines more than 400 images taken during the first several weeks after NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander arrived on an arctic plain at 68.22 degrees north latitude, 234.25 degrees east longitude on Mars. The full-circle panorama in approximately true color shows the polygonal patterning of ground at the landing area, similar to patterns in permafrost areas on Earth. South is toward the top. Trenches where Phoenix's robotic arm has been exposing subsurface material are visible in the lower half of the image. The spacecraft's meteorology mast, topped by the telltale wind gauge, extends into the sky portion of the panorama. This view comprises more than 100 different camera pointings, with images taken through three different filters at each pointing. It is presented here as a polar projection. The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  5. Full-Circle Color Panorama of Phoenix Landing Site on Northern Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Mission Success Pan Click on image to view the movie This view combines more than 400 images taken during the first several weeks after NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander arrived on an arctic plain at 68.22 degrees north latitude, 234.25 degrees east longitude on Mars. The movie makes a slow tour around highlights of the image. The full-circle panorama in approximately true color shows the polygonal patterning of ground at the landing area, similar to patterns in permafrost areas on Earth. The center of the image is the westward part of the scene. Trenches where Phoenix's robotic arm has been exposing subsurface material are visible in the right half of the image. The spacecraft's meteorology mast, topped by the telltale wind gauge, extends into the sky portion of the panorama. This view comprises more than 100 different camera pointings, with images taken through three different filters at each pointing. It is presented here as a cylindrical projection. The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  6. Discovery of a Stellar Overdensity in Eridanus-Phoenix in the Dark Energy Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, T. S.; Balbinot, E.; Mondrik, N.; Marshall, J. L.; Yanny, B.; Bechtol, K.; Drlica-Wagner, A.; Oscar, D.; Santiago, B.; Simon, J. D.; Vivas, A. K.; Walker, A. R.; Wang, M. Y.; Abbott, T. M. C.; Abdalla, F. B.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bernstein, G. M.; Bertin, E.; Brooks, D.; Burke, D. L.; Carnero Rosell, A.; Carrasco Kind, M.; Carretero, J.; da Costa, L. N.; DePoy, D. L.; Desai, S.; Diehl, H. T.; Doel, P.; Estrada, J.; Finley, D. A.; Flaugher, B.; Frieman, J.; Gruen, D.; Gruendl, R. A.; Gutierrez, G.; Honscheid, K.; James, D. J.; Kuehn, K.; Kuropatkin, N.; Lahav, O.; Maia, M. A. G.; March, M.; Martini, P.; Ogando, R.; Plazas, A. A.; Reil, K.; Romer, A. K.; Roodman, A.; Sanchez, E.; Scarpine, V.; Schubnell, M.; Sevilla-Noarbe, I.; Smith, R. C.; Soares-Santos, M.; Sobreira, F.; Suchyta, E.; Swanson, M. E. C.; Tarle, G.; Tucker, D.; Zhang, Y.; DES Collaboration

    2016-02-01

    We report the discovery of an excess of main-sequence turnoff stars in the direction of the constellations of Eridanus and Phoenix from the first-year data of the Dark Energy Survey (DES). The Eridanus-Phoenix (EriPhe) overdensity is centered around l˜ 285^\\circ and b˜ -60^\\circ and spans at least 30° in longitude and 10° in latitude. The Poisson significance of the detection is at least 9σ . The stellar population in the overdense region is similar in brightness and color to that of the nearby globular cluster NGC 1261, indicating that the heliocentric distance of EriPhe is about d˜ 16 {{kpc}}. The extent of EriPhe in projection is therefore at least ˜4 kpc by ˜3 kpc. On the sky, this overdensity is located between NGC 1261 and a new stellar stream discovered by DES at a similar heliocentric distance, the so-called Phoenix Stream. Given their similar distance and proximity to each other, it is possible that these three structures may be kinematically associated. Alternatively, the EriPhe overdensity is morphologically similar to the Virgo overdensity and the Hercules-Aquila cloud, which also lie at a similar Galactocentric distance. These three overdensities lie along a polar plane separated by ˜120° and may share a common origin. Spectroscopic follow-up observations of the stars in EriPhe are required to fully understand the nature of this overdensity.

  7. Visual Analytics for the Food-Water-Energy Nexus in the Phoenix Active Management Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maciejewski, R.; Mascaro, G.; White, D. D.; Ruddell, B. L.; Aggarwal, R.; Sarjoughian, H.

    2016-12-01

    The Phoenix Active Management Area (AMA) is an administrative region of 14,500 km2 identified by the Arizona Department of Water Resources with the aim of reaching and maintaining the safe yield (i.e. balance between annual amount of groundwater withdrawn and recharged) by 2025. The AMA includes the Phoenix metropolitan area, which has experienced a dramatic population growth over the last decades with a progressive conversion of agricultural land into residential land. As a result of these changes, the water and energy demand as well as the food production in the region have significantly evolved over the last 30 years. Given the arid climate, a crucial role to support this growth has been the creation of a complex water supply system based on renewable and non-renewable resources, including the energy-intensive Central Arizona Project. In this talk, we present a preliminary characterization of the evolution in time of the feedbacks between food, water, and energy in the Phoenix AMA by analyzing secondary data (available from water and energy providers, irrigation districts, and municipalities), as well as satellite imagery and primary data collected by the authors. A preliminary visual analytics framework is also discussed describing current design practices and ideas for exploring networked components and cascading impacts within the FEW Nexus. This analysis and framework represent the first steps towards the development of an integrated modeling, visualization, and decision support infrastructure for comprehensive FEW systems decision making at decision-relevant temporal and spatial scales.

  8. 西门子与Phoenix Contact加强合作

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Phoenix Contact公司与西门子A&D公司日前宣布今后将继续保持良好的战略伙伴关系,并进一步加大他们在接线盒和过电压防护产品上的合作。Phoenix Contact公司将为西门子公司进一步研制和生产接线盒产品,并且获得目前西门子公司该产品的使用权及其在希腊的生产权。而西门子公司未来将只从Phoenix Contact公司那里获取相应地以西门子品牌进行销售的产品,从而为其客户提供该领域里的全套产品。

  9. Evolution of sex chromosomes prior to speciation in the dioecious Phoenix species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherif, E; Zehdi-Azouzi, S; Crabos, A; Castillo, K; Chabrillange, N; Pintaud, J-C; Salhi-Hannachi, A; Glémin, S; Aberlenc-Bertossi, F

    2016-08-01

    Understanding the driving forces and molecular processes underlying dioecy and sex chromosome evolution, leading from hermaphroditism to the occurrence of male and female individuals, is of considerable interest in fundamental and applied research. The genus Phoenix, belonging to the Arecaceae family, consists uniquely of dioecious species. Phylogenetic data suggest that the genus Phoenix has diverged from a hermaphroditic ancestor which is also shared with its closest relatives. We have investigated the cessation of recombination in the sex-determination region within the genus Phoenix as a whole by extending the analysis of P. dactylifera SSR sex-related loci to eight other species within the genus. Phylogenetic analysis of a date palm sex-linked PdMYB1 gene in these species has revealed that sex-linked alleles have not clustered in a species-dependent way but rather in X and Y-allele clusters. Our data show that sex chromosomes evolved from a common autosomal origin before the diversification of the extant dioecious species.

  10. Discovery of a Stellar Overdensity in Eridanus-Phoenix in the Dark Energy Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Li, T S; Mondrik, N; Marshall, J L; Yanny, B; Bechtol, K; Drlica-Wagner, A; Oscar, D; Santiago, B; Simon, J D; Vivas, A K; Walker, A R; Wang, M Y; Abbott, T M C; Abdalla, F B; Benoit-Lévy, A; Bernstein, G M; Bertin, E; Brooks, D; Burke, D L; Rosell, A Carnero; Kind, M Carrasco; Carretero, J; da Costa, L N; DePoy, D L; Desai, S; Diehl, H T; Doel, P; Estrada, J; Finley, D A; Flaugher, B; Frieman, J; Gruen, D; Gruendl, R A; Gutierrez, G; Honscheid, K; James, D J; Kuehn, K; Kuropatkin, N; Lahav, O; Maia, M A G; March, M; Martini, P; Ogando, R; Plazas, A A; Romer, A K; Roodman, A; Sanchez, E; Scarpine, V; Schubnell, M; Sevilla-Noarbe, I; Smith, R C; Soares-Santos, M; Sobreira, F; Suchyta, E; Swanson, M E C; Tarle, G; Tucker, D; Zhang, Y

    2015-01-01

    We report the discovery of an excess of main sequence turn-off stars in the direction of the constellations of Eridanus and Phoenix from the first year data of the Dark Energy Survey (DES). The Eridanus-Phoenix (EriPhe) overdensity is centered around l~285 deg and b~-60 deg and spans at least 30 deg in longitude and 10 deg in latitude. The Poisson significance of the detection is at least 9 sigma. The stellar population in the overdense region is similar in brightness and color to that of the nearby globular cluster NGC 1261, indicating that the heliocentric distance of EriPhe is about d~16 kpc. The extent of EriPhe in projection is therefore at least ~4 kpc by ~3 kpc. On the sky, this overdensity is located between NGC 1261 and a new stellar stream discovered by DES at a similar heliocentric distance, the so-called Phoenix Stream. Given their similar distance and proximity to each other, it is possible that these three structures may be kinematically associated. Alternatively, the EriPhe overdensity is morph...

  11. 超声振动在AZ61镁合金半固态浆料制备工艺中的应用研究%Application Research on Preparation Process of Semi-solid AZ61 Magnesium Alloy by Ultrasonic Stirring

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王翠芳; 李力

    2011-01-01

    利用自行设计和研制的一套超声振动装置,对制备过程中的工艺参数,如:超声导入温度,超声输出功率和超声处理时间,对半固态AZ61镁合金组织的影响进行了分析;通过正交实验设计获得了超声制备AZ61镁合金半固态浆料的最佳工艺方案,即:超声导入温度为605℃,超声处理功率为900W,超声作用时间为60s.%Using the ultrasonic vibration equipment designed and studied by ourselves, the effects of technological parameters on the semi-solid microstructure of AZ61 magnesium alloy were analyzed, such as the melt temperature, the output power of ultrasonic stirring and the ultrasonic treatment time. The optimal preparing conditions obtained by orthogonal design are as follows: the optimum melt temperature is 605 °C, the output power of ultrasonic stirring is 900 W and the ultrasonic treatment time is 60 s.

  12. 78 FR 15044 - Notice of Realty Action: Direct Sale of Public Land in Pinal County, AZ

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-08

    ... Indian Community (Community) at not less than the appraised fair market value (FMV). The sale will be... sent to Penny Foreman, Acting Field Manager, LSFO, Phoenix ] District Office, 21605 North 7th Avenue...: The following parcel of public land is proposed for direct sale to the Community and is...

  13. Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Online-Offline, 1998

    1998-01-01

    Focuses on technology, on advances in such areas as aeronautics, electronics, physics, the space sciences, as well as computers and the attendant progress in medicine, robotics, and artificial intelligence. Describes educational resources for elementary and middle school students, including Web sites, CD-ROMs and software, videotapes, books,…

  14. 76 FR 62760 - Foreign-Trade Zone 277-Western Maricopa County, AZ; Application for Temporary/Interim...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-11

    .../Interim Manufacturing Authority; Sub-Zero, Inc.; (Refrigerators); Goodyear, AZ An application has been... County Foreign Trade Zone, Inc., grantee of FTZ 277, requesting temporary/ interim manufacturing...

  15. Effect of the chemistry and structure of the native oxide surface film on the corrosion properties of commercial AZ31 and AZ61 alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feliu, Sebastian, E-mail: sfeliu@cenim.csic.es [Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Metalurgicas CSIC, Avda. Gregorio del Amo 8, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Maffiotte, C. [CIEMAT-DT edificio 30, Avda. Complutense, 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Samaniego, A.; Galvan, Juan Carlos [Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Metalurgicas CSIC, Avda. Gregorio del Amo 8, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Barranco, Violeta [Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Metalurgicas CSIC, Avda. Gregorio del Amo 8, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Instituto de Ciencias de Materiales de Madrid, ICMM, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, CSIC, Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz, 3, Cantoblanco, 28049, Madrid (Spain)

    2011-08-01

    The purpose of this study has been to advance in knowledge of the chemical composition, structure and thickness of the thin native oxide film formed spontaneously in contact with the laboratory atmosphere on the surface of freshly polished commercial AZ31 and AZ61 alloys with a view to furthering the understanding of protection mechanisms. For comparative purposes, and to more fully describe the behaviour of the native oxide film, the external oxide films formed as a result of the manufacturing process (as-received condition) have been characterised. The technique applied in this research to study the thin oxide films (thickness of just a few nanometres) present on the surface of the alloys has basically been XPS (X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy) in combination with ion sputtering. Corrosion properties of the alloys were studied in 0.6 M NaCl by measuring charge transfer resistance values, which are deduced from EIS (electrochemical impedance spectroscopy) measurements after 1 h of exposure. Alloy AZ61 generally showed better corrosion resistance than AZ31, and the freshly polished alloys showed better corrosion resistance than the alloys in as-received condition. This is attributed to a combination of (1) higher thickness of the native oxide film on the AZ61 alloy and (2) greater uniformity of the oxide film in the polished condition. The formation of an additional oxide layer composed by a mixture of spinel (MgAl{sub 2}O{sub 4}) and MgO seems to diminish the protective properties of the passive layer on the surface of the alloys in as-received condition.

  16. Comparison of BD phoenix to vitek 2, microscan MICroSTREP, and Etest for antimicrobial susceptibility testing of Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittman, Scott A; Huard, Richard C; Della-Latta, Phyllis; Whittier, Susan

    2009-11-01

    The performance of the BD Phoenix Automated Microbiology System (BD Diagnostic Systems) was compared to those of the Vitek 2 (bioMérieux), the MicroScan MICroSTREP plus (Siemens), and Etest (bioMérieux) for antibiotic susceptibility tests (AST) of 311 clinical isolates of Streptococcus pneumoniae. The overall essential agreement (EA) between each test system and the reference microdilution broth reference method for S. pneumoniae AST results was >95%. For Phoenix, the EAs of individual antimicrobial agents ranged from 90.4% (clindamycin) to 100% (vancomycin and gatifloxacin). The categorical agreements (CA) of Phoenix, Vitek 2, MicroScan, and Etest for penicillin were 95.5%, 94.2%, 98.7%, and 97.7%, respectively. The overall CA for Phoenix was 99.3% (1 very major error [VME] and 29 minor errors [mEs]), that for Vitek 2 was 98.8% (7 VMEs and 28 mEs), and those for MicroScan and Etest were 99.5% each (19 and 13 mEs, respectively). The average times to results for Phoenix, Vitek 2, and the manual methods were 12.1 h, 9.8 h, and 24 h, respectively. From these data, the Phoenix AST results demonstrated a high degree of agreement with all systems evaluated, although fewer VMEs were observed with the Phoenix than with the Vitek 2. Overall, both automated systems provided reliable AST results for the S. pneumoniae-antibiotic combinations in half the time required for the manual methods, rendering them more suitable for the demands of expedited reporting in the clinical setting.

  17. Neogene kinematic history of Nazca-Antarctic-Phoenix slab windows beneath Patagonia and the Antarctic Peninsula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breitsprecher, Katrin; Thorkelson, Derek J.

    2009-01-01

    The Patagonian slab window is a subsurface tectonic feature resulting from subduction of the Nazca-Antarctic spreading-ridge system (Chile Rise) beneath southern South America. The geometry of the slab window had not been rigorously defined, in part because of the complex nature of the history of ridge subduction in the southeast Pacific region, which includes four interrelated spreading-ridge systems since 20 Ma: first, the Nazca-Phoenix ridge beneath South America, then simultaneous subduction of the Nazca-Antarctic and the northern Phoenix-Antarctic spreading-ridge systems beneath South America, and the southern Phoenix-Antarctic spreading-ridge system beneath Antarctica. Spreading-ridge paleo-geographies and rotation poles for all relevant plate pairs (Nazca, Phoenix, Antarctic, South America) are available from 20 Ma onward, and form the mathematical basis of our kinematic reconstruction of the geometry of the Patagonia and Antarctic slab windows through Neogene time. At approximately 18 Ma, the Nazca-Phoenix-Antarctic oceanic (ridge-ridge-ridge) triple junction enters the South American trench; we recognize this condition as an unstable quadruple junction. Heat flow at this junction and for some distance beneath the forearc would be considerably higher than is generally recognized in cases of ridge subduction. From 16 Ma onward, the geometry of the Patagonia slab window developed from the subduction of the trailing arms of the former oceanic triple junction. The majority of the slab window's areal extent and geometry is controlled by the highly oblique (near-parallel) subduction angle of the Nazca-Antarctic ridge system, and by the high contrast in relative convergence rates between these two plates relative to South America. The very slow convergence rate of the Antarctic slab is manifested by the shallow levels achieved by the slab edge (< 45 km); thus no point on the Antarctic slab is sufficiently deep to generate "normal" mantle-derived arc-type magmas

  18. Phoenix Lander's Thermal Evolved Gas Analyzer: Differential Scanning Calorimeter and Mass Spectrometer Database Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutter, B.; Lauer, H. V.; Golden, D. C.; Ming, D. W.; Boynton, W. V.

    2008-01-01

    The Mars Scout Phoenix lander will land in the north polar region of Mars in May, 2008. One objective of the Phoenix lander is to search for evidence of past life in the form of molecular organics that may be preserved in the subsurface soil. The Thermal Evolved Gas Analyzer (TEGA) was developed to detect these organics by coupling a simultaneous differential thermal analyzer (SDTA) with a mass spectrometer. Martian soil will be heated to approx.1000 C and potential organic decomposition products such as CO2, CH4 etc. will be examined for with the MS. TEGA s SDTA will also assess the presence of endothermic and exothermic reactions that are characteristic of soil organics and minerals as the soil is heated. The MS in addition to detecting organic decompositon products, will also assess the levels of soil inorganic volatiles such as H2O, SO2, and CO2. Organic detection has a high priority for this mission; however, TEGA has the ability to provide valuable insight into the mineralogical composition of the soil. The overall goal of this work is to develop a TEGA database of minerals that will serve as a reference for the interpretation of Phoenix-TEGA. Previous databases for the ill-fated Mars Polar Lander (MPL)-TEGA instrument only went to 725 C. Furthermore, the MPL-TEGA could only detect CO2 and H2O while the Phoenix-TEGA MS can examine up to 144 atomic mass units. The higher temperature Phoenix-TEGA SDTA coupled with the more capable MS indicates that a higher temperature database is required for TEGA interpretation. The overall goal of this work is to develop a differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) database of minerals along with corresponding MS data of evolved gases that can used to interpret TEGA data during and after mission operations. While SDTA and DSC measurement techniques are slightly different (SDTA does not use a reference pan), the results are fundamentally similar and thus DSC is a useful technique in providing comparative data for the TEGA

  19. Caña de azúcar en Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramos Gómez, Oscar Gerardo

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available This article studies the sugar industry in Colombia, mainly in the Cauca Valley. The analysis is focused on the technical evolution undergone since its inception and the way in which a «sugar culture» evolved. This work also studies the participation of «hacendados» and croppers during the Independence period and the formation of republican oligarchies, their adaptation to the economy modernization processes in the 20th Century, as well as the State intervention and the associative mechanisms the sector used to confront the 1930 crisis. These mechanisms helped to expand the sector. Finally the recent performance of the sugar industry is analyzed, mainly its growth in the seventies and the present efforts at competitiveness, environmental impact and situation in the world trade.

    Este artículo analiza la industria azucarera en Colombia, sobre todo en el Valle del Cauca, su evolución técnica desde sus orígenes y el modo en que se fue configurando una cultura de la caña de azúcar. Además, estudia la participación de los hacendados y cultivadores en la independencia y la formación de las oligarquías republicanas, su adaptación a la modernización de la economía nacional en el siglo XX y la intervención el Estado y los mecanismos asociativos con que hizo frente el sector a la crisis de 1930 y que dieron lugar a una notable expansión del mismo. La parte final del texto explora el desempeño reciente de dicha actividad, su fuerte crecimiento en el decenio de 1970 y sus actuales esfuerzos por mejorar su competitividad, impacto medioambiental y posición en el comercio mundial.

  20. Phoenix Mars Lander: Vortices and Dust Devils at the Landing Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellehoj, M. D.; Taylor, P. A.; Gunnlaugsson, H. P.; Gheynani, B. T.; Drube, L.; von Holstein-Rathlou, C.; Whiteway, J.; Lemmon, M.; Madsen, M. B.; Fisher, D.; Volpe, R.; Smith, P.

    2008-12-01

    Near continuous measurements of temperatures and pressure on the Phoenix Mars Lander are used to identify the passage of vertically oriented vortex structures at the Phoenix landing site (126W, 68N) on Mars. Observations: During the Phoenix mission the pressure and temperature sensors frequently detected features passing over or close to the lander. Short duration (order 20 s) pressure drops of order 1-2 Pa, and often less, were observed relatively frequently, accompanied by increases in temperature. Similar features were observed from the Pathfinder mission, although in that case the reported pressure drops were often larger [1]. Statistics of the pressure drop features over the first 102 sols of the Phoenix mission shows that most of the events occur between noon and 15:00 LMST - the hottest part of the sol. Dust Raising: By assuming the concept of a vortex in cyclostrophic flow as well as various assumptions about the atmosphere, we obtain a pressure drop of 1.9 - 3.2 Pa if dust is to be raised. We only saw few pressure drops this large in Sols 0-102. However, the features do not need to pass directly over the lander and the pressures could be lower than the minima we measure. Furthermore, the response time of the pressure sensor is of order 3-5 s so it may not capture peak pressure perturbations. Thus, more dust devils may have occurred near the Phoenix site, but most of our detected vortices would be ghostly, dustless devils. Modelling: Using a Large Eddy Simulation model, we can simulate highly convective boundary layers on Mars [2]. The typical vortex has a diameter of 150 m, and extends up to 1 km. Further calculations give an incidence of 11 vortex events per day that could be compatible with the LES simulations. Deeper investigation of this is planned -but the numbers are roughly compatible. If the significant pressure signatures are limited to the center of the vortex then 5 per sol might be appropriate. The Phoenix mission has collected a unique set of

  1. Histone H2A.Z subunit exchange controls consolidation of recent and remote memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zovkic, Iva B; Paulukaitis, Brynna S; Day, Jeremy J; Etikala, Deepa M; Sweatt, J David

    2014-11-27

    Memory formation is a multi-stage process that initially requires cellular consolidation in the hippocampus, after which memories are downloaded to the cortex for maintenance, in a process termed systems consolidation. Epigenetic mechanisms regulate both types of consolidation, but histone variant exchange, in which canonical histones are replaced with their variant counterparts, is an entire branch of epigenetics that has received limited attention in the brain and has never, to our knowledge, been studied in relation to cognitive function. Here we show that histone H2A.Z, a variant of histone H2A, is actively exchanged in response to fear conditioning in the hippocampus and the cortex, where it mediates gene expression and restrains the formation of recent and remote memory. Our data provide evidence for H2A.Z involvement in cognitive function and specifically implicate H2A.Z as a negative regulator of hippocampal consolidation and systems consolidation, probably through downstream effects on gene expression. Moreover, alterations in H2A.Z binding at later stages of systems consolidation suggest that this histone has the capacity to mediate stable molecular modifications required for memory retention. Overall, our data introduce histone variant exchange as a novel mechanism contributing to the molecular basis of cognitive function and implicate H2A.Z as a potential therapeutic target for memory disorders.

  2. Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Jing

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The traditional answer card reading method using OMR (Optical Mark Reader, most commonly, OMR special card special use, less versatile, high cost, aiming at the existing problems proposed a method based on pattern recognition of the answer card identification method. Using the method based on Line Segment Detector to detect the tilt of the image, the existence of tilt image rotation correction, and eventually achieve positioning and detection of answers to the answer sheet .Pattern recognition technology for automatic reading, high accuracy, detect faster

  3. Tank 241-AZ-102 Privatization Push Mode Core Sampling and Analysis Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    TEMPLETON, A.M.

    1999-07-08

    This sampling and analysis plan (SAP) identifies characterization objectives pertaining to sample collection, laboratory analytical evaluation, and reporting requirements for samples obtained from tank 241-AZ-102. The purpose of this sampling event is to obtain information about the characteristics of the contents of 241-AZ-102. Push mode core samples will be obtained from risers 15C and 24A to provide sufficient material for the chemical analyses and tests required to satisfy these data quality objectives. The 222-S Laboratory will extrude core samples, composite the liquids and solids, perform chemical analyses, and provide subsamples to the Process Chemistry Laboratory. The Process Chemistry Laboratory will prepare test plans and perform process tests to evaluate the behavior of the 241-AZ-102 waste undergoing the retrieval and treatment scenarios defined in the applicable DQOs. Requirements for analyses of samples originating in the process tests will be documented in the corresponding test plan.

  4. Diffusion Bonding and Post-Weld Heat Treatment of Extruded AZ91 Magnesium Alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei LIN

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The grain size of as-extruded AZ91 magnesium alloys was refined to 12.31 μm from 21.41 μm by recrystallization annealing. The vacuum diffusion welding of as-annealed AZ91 magnesium alloys was researched. The results showed that the maximum shear strength of joints reached 64.70 MPa in the situation of 10 MPa bonding pressure, 18 Pa vacuum degree, 470 °C bonding temperature and 90 min bonding time; both bonding temperature and time are the main influence factors on as-extruded AZ91 magnesium alloys diffusion welding. Then the diffusion welded specimens were annealed, and the shear strength of joints was further improved to 76.93 MPa.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.21.4.9699

  5. Grain refinement of AZ31 magnesium alloy by Al-Ti-C-Y master alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Chunxiang; LU Binfeng; L(U) Zhengling; LIANG Wei

    2008-01-01

    Al-Ti-C-Y master alloy was prepared by combining SHS technique and melting-casting method. The microstructure of master alloy and its grain-refining effect on AZ31 alloy were investigated by means of OM, XRD, SEM and EDS. Experimental results indicated that the prepared master alloy consisted of α-Al, TiAl3, TiC and Al3Y phases, and exhibited good grain-refining performance of AZ31 alloy. Morphology of α-Mg changed from coarse dendritic to fine equiaxed and the average grain size of α-Mg matrix reduced from the original 580 to 170 μm after adding 1.0 wt.% master alloy. The grain refining efficiency of Al-Ti-C-Y master alloy on AZ31 alloy was mainly attributed to heterogeneous nucleation of TiC particles and grain growth restriction of Al-Y compound or TiC at grain boundaries.

  6. Tank 241-AZ-101 Mixer Pump Test Vapor Sampling and Analysis Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    TEMPLETON, A.M.

    2000-04-10

    This sampling and analysis plan (SAP) identifies characterization objectives pertaining to sample collection, laboratory analytical evaluation, and reporting requirements for vapor samples obtained during the operation of mixer pumps in tank 241-AZ-101. The primary purpose of the mixer pump test (MPT) is to demonstrate that the two 300 horsepower mixer pumps installed in tank 241-AZ-101 can mobilize the settled sludge so that it can be retrieved for treatment and vitrification. Sampling will be performed in accordance with Tank 241-AZ-101 Mixer Pump Test Data Quality Objective (Banning 1999) and Data Quality Objectives for Regulatory Requirements for Hazardous and Radioactive Air Emissions Sampling and Analysis (Mulkey 1999). The sampling will verify if current air emission estimates used in the permit application are correct and provide information for future air permit applications.

  7. Tank 241-AZ-101 Mixer Pump Test Vapor Sampling and Analysis Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    TEMPLETON, A.M.

    2000-03-06

    This sampling and analysis plan (SAP) identifies characterization objectives pertaining to sample collection, laboratory analytical evaluation, and reporting requirements for vapor samples obtained during the operation of mixer pumps in tank 241-AZ-101. The primary purpose of the mixer pump test (MPT) is to demonstrate that the two 300 horsepower mixer pumps installed in tank 241-AZ-101 can mobilize the settled sludge so that it can be retrieved for treatment and vitrification. Sampling will be performed in accordance with Tank 241-AZ-101 Mixer Pump Test Data Quality Objective (Banning 1999) and Data Quality Objectives for Regulatory Requirements for Hazardous and Radioactive Air Emissions Sampling and Analysis (Mulkey 1999). The sampling will verify if current air emission estimates used in the permit application are correct and provide information for future air permit applications.

  8. Tank 241-AZ-101 Mixer Pump Test Vapor Sampling and Analysis Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    TEMPLETON, A.M.

    2000-01-31

    This sampling and analysis plan (SAP) identifies characterization objectives pertaining to sample collection, laboratory analytical evaluation, and reporting requirements for vapor samples obtained during the operation of mixer pumps in tank 241-AZ-101. The primary purpose of the mixer pump test (MPT) is to demonstrate that the two 300 horsepower mixer pumps installed in tank 241-AZ-101 can mobilize the settled sludge so that it can be retrieved for treatment and vitrification Sampling will be performed in accordance with Tank 241-AZ-101 Mixer Pump Test Data Quality Objective (Banning 1999) and Data Quality Objectives for Regulatory Requirements for Hazardous and Radioactive Air Emissions Sampling and Analysis (Mulkey 1999). The sampling will verify if current air emission estimates used in the permit application are correct and provide information for future air permit applications.

  9. Grain Refinement and Deformation Mechanisms in Room Temperature Severe Plastic Deformed Mg-AZ31

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ludwig Schultz

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available A Ti-AZ31 composite was severely plastically deformed by rotary swaging at room temperature up to a logarithmic deformation strain of 2.98. A value far beyond the forming limit of pure AZ31 when being equivalently deformed. It is observed, that the microstructure evolution in Mg-AZ31 is strongly influenced by twinning. At low strains the {̅1011} (10̅12 and the {̅1012} (10̅11 twin systems lead to fragmentation of the initial grains. Inside the primary twins, grain refinement takes place by dynamic recrystallization, dynamic recovery and twinning. These mechanisms lead to a final grain size of ≈1 μm, while a strong centered ring fibre texture is evolved.

  10. Interfacial reaction in squeeze cast SiCw/AZ91 composites with different binders

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The whisker/matrix interfaces in squeeze cast SiCw/AZ91 composites with different binders (silica binder, acid aluminum phosphate binder and without binder), were studied by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and high resolution electron microscopy (HREM). The SiCw/AZ91 interface is very clean in the composites with no binders. For the composites with acid aluminum phosphate binders or silica binders, there exists fine discrete interfacial reaction products MgO at the interface, and a definite orientation relationship between MgO and SiCw. The interfacial reaction products MgO is unevenly distributed at different parts of the composite ingot with silica binder, and mainly distributed to the interface at the side part of the composite cylinder. While in the SiCw/AZ91 composite with acid aluminum phosphate binder, MgO particles are distributed evenly at the interface in almost all the parts of the composite ingot.

  11. Effect of thermal processing on microstructure and mechanical properties of AZ80 magnesium alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The influences of deformation temperature and deformation degree on the mierostructure and mechanical properties of AZ80 magnesium alloy were investigated by the adoption of isothermal plain strain compression experiment. The results show that thermal compression processing can refine the grain size and the tensile strength of all the deformed AZ80 magnesium alloys is increased to the maximum of 320 MPa. With the increasing of deformation temperature, the tensile strength decreases; with the increasing of the deformation degree, the tensile strength increases significantly in the temperature range of 200-300 ℃ and becomes stable at temperature higher than 300 ℃. During the compression processing of AZ80 magnesium alloys, at lower temperature(300 ℃), dynamic reerystallization is complete and refined grainstrengthening is dominant, leading to little effect of deformation degree on mechanical properties.

  12. Electrodeposition of high corrosion resistance Cu/Ni-P coating on AZ91D magnesium alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shan; Cao, Fahe; Chang, Linrong; Zheng, JunJun; Zhang, Zhao; Zhang, Jianqing; Cao, Chunan

    2011-08-01

    High corrosion resistance Cu/Ni-P coatings were electrodeposited on AZ91D magnesium alloy via suitable pretreatments, such as one-step acid pickling-activation, once zinc immersion and environment-friendly electroplated copper as the protective under-layer, which made Ni-P deposit on AZ91D Mg alloy in acid plating baths successfully. The pH value and current density for Ni-P electrodeposition were optimized to obtain high corrosion resistance. With increasing the phosphorous content of the Ni-P coatings, the deposits were found to gradually transform to amorphous structure and the corrosion resistance increased synchronously. The anticorrosion ability of AZ91D Mg alloy was greatly improved by the amorphous Ni-P deposits, which was investigated by potentiodynamic polarization curve and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The corrosion current density ( Icorr) of the coated Mg alloy substrate is about two orders of magnitude less than that of the uncoated.

  13. In vitro Study on Biodegradable AZ31 Magnesium Alloy Fibers Reinforced PLGA Composite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Y.H.Wu; N.Li; Y.Cheng; Y.F.Zheng; Y.Han

    2013-01-01

    AZ31 magnesium alloy fibers reinforced poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) composites were prepared and their mechanical property,immersion corrosion behavior and biocompatibility were studied.The tensile test showed that with the addition of AZ31 fibers,the composites had a significant increment in tensile strength and elongation.For the direct cell attachment test,all the cells showed a healthy morphology and spread well on the experimental sample surfaces.The immersion results indicated that pH values of the immersion medium increased with increasing AZ31 fiber contents.All the in vitro experimental results indicated that this new kind of magnesium alloy fibers reinforced PLGA composites show a potential for future biomedical applications.

  14. Analysis of laser welded joint of microstructure and mechanical properties of dissimilar magnesium AZ31B and AZ91D%AZ31B/AZ91D 异种镁合金激光焊接头组织性能分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘军; 黄飞; 稼海星; 侯继军; 杜赵新

    2015-01-01

    Studies on the microstructure and properties of dissimilar magnesium AZ31B and AZ91D joints welded by CO2 laser using optical microscope,tensile test,microhardness test and etc are presented.The results show that a sound weld can be ob-tained with a laser power of 1 800 W,a welding speed of 600 mm/min and a flow rate of shielding gas of 15 L/min.Analysis of microstructure of welded joint shows that the heat affected zone is not apparent,the growth of the grains in base metal close to the fusion line are not obvious,and the grain size in weld is refined.X-ray diffraction shows that there areα-Mg andβ-Al12 Mg17 phases in the welded zone.EDS analysis shows that the element’s content of Mg,Al in the welded zone are between that of the base metal AZ91D and AZ31B.Tension results show that the fracture is mainly happened on AZ91D,which indicates that the tensile strength of joint is higher than the base metal AZ91D,and the dominant fracture mechanism is brittle fracture.The hard-ness of welded zone is higher than two base metals.%针对 AZ31B 和 AZ91D 异种镁合金材料的激光焊接问题,通过光学显微镜、拉伸试验、显微硬度测试等手段分析研究AZ31B 和 AZ91D 异种镁合金 CO2激光焊接头组织性能。结果表明:在功率为1800 W,焊接速度为600 mm/min,保护气流量为15 L/min 时,可以获得成形良好的焊缝。对焊接接头微观组织进行分析发现,接头热影响区不明显,熔合线附近母材侧晶粒未发生明显长大,焊缝晶粒明显细化;通过 XRD 检测可知焊缝区主要由α-Mg 和β-Al12 Mg17这2相组成;通过 EDS 能谱分析得到焊缝区 Mg、Al 元素的质量分数介于2种母材之间;通过拉伸试验发现,断裂位置位于 AZ91D 母材上,焊接接头抗拉强度高于AZ91D 母材,扫描断口显示断裂方式为脆性断裂;焊缝硬度高于2种母材硬度。

  15. The effect of extrusion conditions on the properties and textures of AZ31B alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiang Liu

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The effect of extrusion conditions on the tensile properties and texture of AZ31B alloy has been investigated by means of optical microscopy (OM, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD and tensile tests. It is found that the ultimate tensile strength (UTS, the yield strength (YS and elongation (EN of the extruded AZ31B alloy are more significantly influenced by extrusion velocities in contrast with temperature. Although the extrusion conditions are different, the {112¯0} 〈011¯0〉 texture is the chief texture in the AZ31B after extrusion. Moreover, the extrusion textures become scattered with increasing the temperatures at the same extrusion velocity. As the extrusion velocity is raised at the same temperature, the orientation density of textures increases and the separated textures become relatively concentrated. This leads to the changes of tensile properties at different extrusion conditions.

  16. Microstructure and corrosion property of AZ61 magnesium alloy by electromagnetic stirring

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FANG Can-feng; ZHANG Xing-guo; JI Shou-hua; JIN Jun-ze; CHANG Yu-bao

    2005-01-01

    The influence of permanent-magnet-driven stirring during solidification on the microstructure and corrosion property of AZ61 magnesium alloy was investigated. The corrosion behaviour of AZ61 was studied in 3.5mol/L NaCl by measuring electrochemical polarization. The results show that the permanent-magnet stirring refines the microstructure of AZ61 magnesium alloy, which improves the precipitation amount and distribution uniformity of β phase and decreases the content of hydrogen, but it has less influence on the distribution uniformity of Zn. The change of precipitation amount of β phase influences the corrosive nature of the matrix, and it has no direct proportion with the corrosion resistance of the matrix.

  17. Improvement on the Corrosion Resistance of AZ91D Magnesium Alloy by Aluminum Diffusion Coating

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hongwei HUO; Ying LI; Fuhui WANG

    2007-01-01

    By combination of magnetron sputtering deposition and vacuum annealing, an aluminum diffusion coating was prepared on the substrate of AZ91D alloy to improve its corrosion resistance. The microstructure and composition of the diffusion coating was investigated by scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. The diffusion coating was mainly comprised of β phase-Al12Mg17. The continuous immersion test in 3.5 wt pct neutral NaCl solution indicated that the specimen with diffusion coating had better corrosion resistance compared with the bare AZ91D alloy specimen. The potentiodynamic polarization measurement indicated that the diffusion coating could function as an effectively protective layer to reduce the corrosion rate of AZ91D alloy when exposed to 3.5 wt pct NaCl solution.

  18. Structural characterization and property of in-situ synthesized AZ91-Mg2Si composite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DONG Long-xiang; WU Yao-ming; DOU Chuan-guo; XU Guo-gen; WANG Li-min

    2006-01-01

    A new-type Mg2Si composite was prepared with Mg-9Al-1Zn (AZ91) alloy and vermiculite as raw materials by melt infiltration method. The results show that the microstructure of composite consists of a large amount of Mg2Si precipitates and a little amount of MgO embedded in α-Mg matrix. The Vickers hardness of the composite is obviously higher than that of matrix of AZ91 alloy. Moreover, the composite exhibits excellent compressive property. The ultimate compressive strength of the material is 290 MPa, the yield strength is 175 MPa, and the elongation is about 5%, which are higher than those of AZ91alloy.

  19. Effects of Ce on damping capacity of AZ91D magnesium alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄正华; 郭学锋; 张忠明

    2004-01-01

    The microstructures and damping capacity of AZ91D cast alloys containing various Ce contents were investigated. Damping capacity (Q-1) of the alloys was measured by cantilever beam technique, and the relationship between damping capacity and strain amplitude was investigated. The results show that Al4 Ce phase is formed in AZ91D alloy after adding a certain quantity of Ce contents, then as-cast microstructures of the alloys are refined.Meanwhile the damping capacity of the alloys is also improved. When the mass fraction of Ce is 0.7 %, the most obvious refinement effect and the maximum damping capacity can be obtained. When the damping capacity (Q-1) is 2. 728 × 10-3 , 61% increment can be obtained compared with unmodified AZ91D alloy. The damping capacity of the alloys is relative to strain amplitude, and the damping behavior can be explained by the theory of Granato and Lucke.

  20. Microstructure and corrosion behavior of electrodeposited nano-crystalline nickel coating on AZ91 Mg alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zarebidaki, Arman, E-mail: arman.zare@iauyazd.ac.ir; Mahmoudikohani, Hassan, E-mail: hassanmahmoudi.k@gmail.com; Aboutalebi, Mohammad-Reza

    2014-12-05

    Highlights: • Activation, zincating, and Cu electrodeposition were used as pretreatment processes for electrodeposition of nickel coatings. • Nano-crystalline nickel coatings were successfully electrodeposited onto the AZ91 Mg alloys. • Effect of nickel electrodeposited coating on the corrosion resistance of AZ91 Mg alloy has been studied. - Abstract: In order to enhance the corrosion resistance, nickel coating was electrodeposited onto AZ91 Mg alloy. Activation, zincating, and Cu electrodeposition used as pretreatment processes for better adhesion and corrosion performance of the nickel over layer. The corrosion properties of the AZ91 Mg alloy, nickel electroplated AZ91 Mg alloy, and pure nickel was assessed via polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) methods in 3.5 wt% NaCl solution. Moreover, the structure of the coating was investigated by means of X-ray diffraction, whereas specimen’s morphology and elemental composition were analyzed using scanning electron microscope (SEM) equipped with energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS). Measurements revealed that the coating has a nano-crystalline structure with the grain size of 95 nm. Corrosion results showed superior corrosion resistance for the coated AZ91 Mg alloy as the corrosion current density decreased from 2.5 × 10{sup −4} A cm{sup −2}, for the uncoated sample, to 1.5 × 10{sup −5} A cm{sup −2}, for coated specimen and the corrosion potential increased from −1.55 V to −0.98 V (vs. Ag/AgCl) at the same condition.

  1. Corrosion and mechanical performance of AZ91 exposed to simulated inflammatory conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Emily K; Der, Stephanie; Ehrensberger, Mark T

    2016-03-01

    Magnesium (Mg) and its alloys, including Mg-9%Al-1%Zn (AZ91), are biodegradable metals with potential use as temporary orthopedic implants. Invasive orthopedic procedures can provoke an inflammatory response that produces hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and an acidic environment near the implant. This study assessed the influence of inflammation on both the corrosion and mechanical properties of AZ91. The AZ91 samples in the inflammatory protocol were immersed for three days in a complex biologically relevant electrolyte (AMEM culture media) that contained serum proteins (FBS), 150 mM of H2O2, and was titrated to a pH of 5. The control protocol immersed AZ91 samples in the same biologically relevant electrolyte (AMEM & FBS) but without H2O2 and the acid titration. After 3 days all samples were switched into fresh AMEM & FBS for an additional 3-day immersion. During the initial immersion, inflammatory protocol samples showed increased corrosion rate determined by mass loss testing, increased Mg and Al ion released to solution, and a completely corroded surface morphology as compared to the control protocol. Although corrosion in both protocols slowed once the test electrolyte solution was replaced at 3 days, the samples originally exposed to the simulated inflammatory conditions continued to display enhanced corrosion rates as compared to the control protocol. These lingering effects may indicate the initial inflammatory corrosion processes modified components of the surface oxide and corrosion film or initiated aggressive localized processes that subsequently left the interface more vulnerable to continued enhanced corrosion. The electrochemical properties of the interfaces were also evaluated by EIS, which found that the corrosion characteristics of the AZ91 samples were potentially influenced by the role of intermediate adsorption layer processes. The increased corrosion observed for the inflammatory protocol did not affect the flexural mechanical properties of the AZ91

  2. Patrón de consumo e ingestas recomendadas de azúcar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joan Quiles i Izquierdo

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Los azúcares son hidratos de carbono con sabor dulce que proveen energía al organismo. El cerebro adulto utiliza aproximadamente 140 g de glucosa al día, cantidad que puede representar hasta el 50% del total de hidratos de carbono que se consumen. En nuestro país el patrón de consumo de azúcar en alimentos permanece constante, mientras que el consumo de bebidas refrescantes presenta un aumento en los últimos cuatro años. La Encuesta Nacional de Ingesta Dietética de España (ENIDE, 2010-11 estimó que un 20% de la ingesta calórica de los españoles procede de los hidratos de carbono denominados azúcares. Se ha asociado el consumo de azúcar con diversas patologías (diabetes, obesidad, caries, cardiovasculares si bien estas relaciones no presentan consistencia en las evidencias encontradas. La información alimentaria a través del etiquetado nutricional, incluida la relativa a los azúcares presentes en los alimentos, facilitada al consumidor persigue proteger la salud de los mismos y garantizar su derecho a la información para que puedan tomar decisiones con criterio. A la vista de las distintas valoraciones y estudios existentes y sobre todo, en ausencia de una evidencia científica sólida que arroje datos concretos sobre los que realizar recomendaciones, el mejor consejo nutricional para la población general podría ser llevar una dieta variada y equilibrada con alimentos y nutrientes procedentes de diversas fuentes, combinando dicha dieta con el ejercicio y la actividad física. De manera más concreta, un consumo moderado de azúcar (< 10% de la energía total en el anterior contexto de dieta variada y equilibrada, es compatible.

  3. Assessing the ecosystem service potential of Tucson AZ's urban forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavao-Zuckerman, M.

    2011-12-01

    Urbanization is arguably one of the most dramatic forms of landscape change, and an important anthropogenic influence on the structure and function of ecosystems. Cities have obvious impacts on local ecologies and environments, such as shifts in species diversity and alteration of local microclimates. While scientists are now familiar with many of these localized impacts of urbanization, cities and suburban areas contribute to 10-15 % of surface land cover in the conterminous U.S., pointing to the potential, yet poorly understood, contribution of cities to regional, national, and global carbon (C) and energy budgets. As cities continue to expand urban ecologists place more emphasis on understanding the functions of urban ecosystems and the ecosystem services (e.g. habitat, air, and water quality) that cities provide. While studies demonstrate that the urban environment alters the structure and function of remnant patches of native ecosystems relative to their non-urban counterparts, the ability of restoration, planning, and design to improve the provision of ecosystem services is a new approach within ecology. One strategy involves green urban design, or using ecological principles for planning or reinvigorating certain ecological processes, in cities. Increasing the amount of vegetative cover can reduce this effect by reinforcing ecosystem services in cities, including shading of surfaces, promotion of cooling through evapotranspiration, and the sequestration of atmospheric CO2 in plant tissues and soils. However, the on-the-ground reality of such strategies is relatively unknown. A pilot study is being conducted in Tucson, AZ to investigate the impact of increasing the cover of trees in the urban landscape on local microclimates and the urban heat island. Trees (Velvet Mesquite, Chilean Mesquite, and Desert Willow) were planted in two neighborhoods in Tucson in 1990. We are collecting data during the summer 2011 monsoon (DBH, crown volume, and hemispherical

  4. VizieR Online Data Catalog: AzTEC/ASTE 1.1mm survey of SSA22 (Umehata+, 2014)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umehata, H.; Tamura, Y.; Kohno, K.; Hatsukade, B.; Scott, K. S.; Kubo, M.; Yamada, T.; Ivison, R. J.; Cybulski, R.; Aretxaga, I.; Austermann, J.; Hughes, D. H.; Ezawa, H.; Hayashino, T.; Ikarashi, S.; Iono, D.; Kawabe, R.; Matsuda, Y.; Matsuo, H.; Nakanishi, K.; Oshima, T.; Perera, T.; Takata, T.; Wilson, G. W.; Yun, M. S.

    2015-01-01

    We used the AzTEC camera operating at 1.1mm mounted on the ASTE 10-m submillimetre telescope located at Pampa la Bola, near Cerro Chajnantor in northern Chile. All of the AzTEC/ASTE observations of SSA22 were carried out at night during 2007 August-September and 2008 August-September. (4 data files).

  5. Effect of filler wire on the joint properties of AZ31 magnesium alloys using CO2 laser welding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Hongying; Li Zhijun

    2007-01-01

    Laser welding with filler wire of AZ31 magnesium alloys is investigated using a CO2 laser experimental system. The effect of three different filler wires on the joint properties is researched. The results show that the weld appearance can be effectively improved when using laser welding with filler wire. The microhardness and tensile strength of joints are almost the same as those of the base metal when ER AZ31 or ER AZ61 wire is adopted. However, when the filler wire of ER 5356 aluminum alloy is used, the mechanical properties of joints become worse. For ER AZ31 and ER AZ61 filler wires, the microstructure of weld zone shows small dendrite grains. In comparison, for ER 5356 filler wire, the weld shows a structure of snowy dendrites and many intermetallic compounds and eutectic phases distribute in the dendrites. These intermetallic constituents with low melting point increase the tendency of hot crack and result in fragile joint properties. Therefore, ER AZ31 and ER AZ61 wire are more suitable filler material than ER 5356 for CO2 laser welding of AZ31 magnesium alloys.

  6. Numerical simulation of microstructure formation of AZ91 using mCA method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE Bo-lin; LI Qiu-ping; QI Qing-yan; YAO Xiang-dong

    2006-01-01

    A stochastic model for simulating the microstructure formation of Mg alloy AZ91 during solidification was developed based on the finite element method(FEM) for macroscopic model of heat transfer calculation and a modified Cellular Automaton (mCA) for microscopic modeling of nucleation, growth of crystal. In this model, the effect of solute redistribution, interface curvature and preferred orientation was considered. A numerical simulation was developed with C++ program language. The computation was carried out to understand the effect of varying processing parameters, such as nucleation parameters and heat transfer coefficient, on the microstructure formation of AZ91. The result of simulation was displayed on screen.

  7. Qualitative Research of AZ31 Magnesium Alloy Aircraft Brackets Produced by a New Forging Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dziubińska A.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper reports a selection of numerical and experimental results of a new closed-die forging method for producing AZ31 magnesium alloy aircraft brackets with one rib. The numerical modelling of the new forming process was performed by the finite element method.The distributions of stresses, strains, temperature and forces were examined. The numerical results confirmed that the forgings produced by the new forming method are correct. For this reason, the new forming process was verified experimentally. The experimental results showed good agreement with the numerical results. The produced forgings of AZ31 magnesium alloy aircraft brackets with one rib were then subjected to qualitative tests.

  8. Incremental forming of free surface with magnesium alloy AZ31 sheet at warm temperatures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The formability of AZ31 sheet begins to increase drastically at 150 ℃. The incremental forming technique was thus applied to AZ31 sheet at 150 ℃ to utilize the formability to its fullest capacity at the lowest possible temperature for forming applications. A surface scanning technique was used followed by the tool path generation to incrementally form an egg surface. After thorough examination of various tool paths, the surface was most successfully produced by forming an intermediate shape followed by a series of tool paths. Flexible scale stickers were devised to improve the accuracy in the measurement of grid deformation.

  9. Grain refinement of AZ31 magnesium alloy by electromagnetic stirring under effect of grain-refiner

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Y Gao; Q C Le; Z Q Zhang; J Z Cui

    2012-08-01

    The effects of electromagnetic stirring and Al4C3 grain refiner on the grain refinement of semicontinuously cast AZ31 magnesium alloy were discussed in this investigation. The results indicate that electromagnetic stirring has an effective refining effect on the grain size of AZ31 magnesium alloy under the effect of Al4C3 grain refiner. Electromagnetic stirring can `activate’ the Al4C3 particles, resulting in more heterogeneous nucleation sites for the primary -Mg grains. But, longer holding time can `deactivate’ the Al4C3 particles and poison the grain refining effect.

  10. Phosphating process of AZ31 magnesium alloy and corrosion resistance of coatings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENG Ying-liang; WU Hai-lan; CHEN Zhen-hua; WANG Hui-min; LI Ling-ling

    2006-01-01

    Zinc phosphate films were formed on AZ31 magnesium alloy by immersing into a phosphatation bath to enhance the corrosion resistance of AZ31. Different films were prepared by changing the processing parameters such as immersing time and temperature. The corrosion protection of the coatings was studied by electrochemical measurements such as electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, potentiodynamic polarization curves, and the structure of the films were studied by metalloscopy and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The results show that, the film formed at 80 ℃, 10 min has the highest corrosion resistance. The XRD patterns show that the film consists of hopeite (Zn3(PO4)2·xH2O).

  11. Effect of side transmission of power ultrasonic on structure of AZ81 magnesium alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张海波; 翟启杰; 戚飞鹏; 龚永勇

    2004-01-01

    In order to promote the application of power ultrasonic in metallurgic industry, ultrasonic vibration is introduced from the side of AZ81 ingot by adopting the automatic-attracting amplitude transformer horn which has independently been designed and produced, and the effect of the side transmission of ultrasonic on the solidification structure of metal is investigated. The results show that under this experimental condition, power ultrasonic can greatly improve the solidification structure of AZ81 magnesium alloy. Compared with the traditional modification methods in which inoculants are added into melt, power ultrasonic has a better performance. The present research gives us a new way for the application of ultrasonic refinement technique.

  12. Effects of organic acid pickling on the corrosion resistance of magnesium alloy AZ31 sheet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nwaogu, Ugochukwu Chibuzoh; Blawert, C.; Scharnagl, N.;

    2010-01-01

    mu m of the contaminated surface was required to reach corrosion rates less than 1 mm/year in salt spray condition. Among the three organic acids examined, acetic acid is the best choice. Oxalic acid can be an alternative while citric acid is not suitable for cleaning AZ31 sheet, because......Organic acids were used to clean AZ31 magnesium alloy sheet and the effect of the cleaning processes on the surface condition and corrosion performance of the alloy was investigated. Organic acid cleanings reduced the surface impurities and enhanced the corrosion resistance. Removal of at least 4...

  13. Genetic complementation analysis showed distinct contributions of the N-terminal tail of H2A.Z to epigenetic regulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusakabe, Masayuki; Oku, Hiroyuki; Matsuda, Ryo; Hori, Tetsuya; Muto, Akihiko; Igarashi, Kazuhiko; Fukagawa, Tatsuo; Harata, Masahiko

    2016-02-01

    H2A.Z is one of the most evolutionally conserved histone variants. In vertebrates, this histone variant has two isoforms, H2A.Z.1 and H2A.Z.2, each of which is coded by an individual gene. H2A.Z is involved in multiple epigenetic regulations, and in humans, it also has relevance to carcinogenesis. In this study, we used the H2A.Z DKO cells, in which both H2A.Z isoform genes could be inducibly knocked out, for the functional analysis of H2A.Z by a genetic complementation assay, as the first example of its kind in vertebrates. Ectopically expressed wild-type H2A.Z and two N-terminal mutants, a nonacetylable H2A.Z mutant and a chimera in which the N-terminal tail of H2A.Z.1 was replaced with that of the canonical H2A, complemented the mitotic defects of H2A.Z DKO cells similarly, suggesting that both acetylation and distinctive sequence of the N-terminal tail of H2A.Z are not required for mitotic progression. In contrast, each one of these three forms of H2A.Z complemented the transcriptional defects of H2A.Z DKO cells differently. These results suggest that the N-terminal tail of vertebrate H2A.Z makes distinctively different contributions to these epigenetic events. Our results also imply that this genetic complementation system is a novel and useful tool for the functional analysis of H2A.Z.

  14. Energy Performance Impacts from Competing Low-slope Roofing Choices and Photovoltaic Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagengast, Amy L.

    With such a vast quantity of space, commercial low-slope roofs offer significant potential for sustainable roofing technology deployment. Specifically, building energy performance can be improved by installing rooftop energy technologies such as photovoltaic (PV) panels, and/or including designs such as white or green roofs instead of traditional black. This research aims to inform and support roof decisions through quantified energy performance impacts across roof choices and photovoltaic technologies. The primary dataset for this research was measured over a 16 month period (May 24, 2011 to October 13, 2012) from a large field experiment in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania on top of a commercial warehouse with white, black and green roof sections, each with portions covered by polycrystalline photovoltaic panels. Results from the Pittsburgh experiment were extended to three different cities (San Diego, CA; Huntsville, AL; and Phoenix, AZ) chosen to represent a wide range of irradiance and temperature values. First, this research evaluated the difference in electricity production from a green-moss roof and black roof underneath photovoltaic panels to determine if the green roof's cooler air increases the panel efficiency. Second, separate studies examine 1) average hourly heat flux by month for unobstructed and shaded roof membranes 2) heat flux peak time delay, and 3) air temperature across roof types. Results of this research show green roofs slightly increased (0.8-1.5%) PV panel efficiency in temperatures approximately at or above 25° C (77°F) compared to black roofs. However in cool climates, like Pittsburgh, the roof type under the PV panels had little overall impact on PV performance when considering year round temperatures. Instead, roof decisions should place a stronger emphasis on heat flux impacts. The green roof outperformed both black and white roofs at minimizing total conductive heat flux. These heat flow values were used to develop a new, straight

  15. AZ31镁合金热变形过程中的流变应力%The Flow Stress During Hot Deformation of AZ31 Magnesium Alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王庆; 林金保; 黄庆学; 王翀

    2014-01-01

    在Gleeble-1500热模拟试验机和UTM5305实验机上以不同的变形条件对AZ31镁合金进行高温热变形试验,研究该材料在高温热变形过程中的真应力应变。研究结果证明:在变形过程中的AZ31镁合金的真应力随应变速率增大、变形温度降低而升高。在压缩变形过程中的真应力峰值、真应变和动态再结晶与拉伸变形过程相比有明显差异;该镁合金热变形过程中的真应力为用包含Arrhenius项的Zener-Hollomon参数来描述,其压缩拉伸变形激活能分别为132.38 kJ/mol和Q=255.26 kJ/mol.%The behaviors of flow stress of alloy AZ31 Magnesium Alloy during high-temperature deformation were studied by isothermal deformation test on Gleeble-1500 and UTM5305 thermal mechanical simulator. The results show that the true stress increases with the strain rate and decreases with temperature. Compared with the tensile deformation process,the peak of true stress,true strain and dynamic recrystallization of compression process has a significant difference. The flow stress of AZ31 Magnesium Alloy during hot deformation can be described by using Zener-Hollomon parameter including Arrhenius item,and the compression deformation activation energy is 132. 38 kJ/mol,the tensile deformation activation energy is 255. 26 kJ/mol.

  16. 纳米晶AZ31镁合金粉末制备的研究%Preparation of Nanocrystalline AZ31 Magnesium Alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭宇; 刘广东

    2010-01-01

    研究了AZ31镁合金粉末在氢化一脱氢过程中的组织结构与粉末形貌演变规律,在350℃的条件下进行真空脱氢处理,MgH2转变为Mg,获得晶粒尺寸约为40nm的纳米晶镁合金粉末.

  17. Drug susceptibility testing of clinical isolates of streptococci and enterococci by the Phoenix automated microbiology system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sokeng Gertrude

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Drug resistance is an emerging problem among streptococcal and enterococcal species. Automated diagnostic systems for species identification and antimicrobial susceptibility testing (AST have become recently available. We evaluated drug susceptibility of clinical isolates of streptococci and enterococci using the recent Phoenix system (BD, Sparks, MD. Diagnostic tools included the new SMIC/ID-2 panel for streptococci, and the PMIC/ID-14 for enterococci. Two-hundred and fifty isolates have been investigated: β-hemolytic streptococci (n = 65, Streptococcus pneumoniae (n = 50, viridans group streptococci (n = 32, Enterococcus faecium (n = 40, Enterococcus faecalis (n = 43, other catalase-negative cocci (n = 20. When needed, species ID was determined using molecular methods. Test bacterial strains were chosen among those carrying clinically-relevant resistance determinants (penicillin, macrolides, fluoroquinolones, glycopeptides. AST results of the Phoenix system were compared to minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC values measured by the Etest method (AB Biodisk, Solna, Sweden. Results Streptococci: essential agreement (EA and categorical agreement (CA were 91.9% and 98.8%, respectively. Major (ME and minor errors (mE accounted for 0.1% and 1.1% of isolates, respectively. No very major errors (VME were produced. Enterococci: EA was 97%, CA 96%. Small numbers of VME (0.9%, ME (1.4% and mE (2.8% were obtained. Overall, EA and CA rates for most drugs were above 90% for both genera. A few VME were found: a teicoplanin and high-level streptomycin for E. faecalis, b high-level gentamicin for E. faecium. The mean time to results (± SD was 11.8 ± 0.9 h, with minor differences between streptococci and enterococci. Conclusion The Phoenix system emerged as an effective tool for quantitative AST. Panels based on dilution tests provided rapid and accurate MIC values with regard to clinically-relevant streptococcal and enterococcal

  18. Subsurface ices at the Mars Phoenix Landing Site: Assessing emplacement mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cull, S.; Arvidson, R. E.; Mellon, M. T.; Skemer, P. A.; Shaw, A.; Morris, R. V.

    2010-12-01

    Several mechanisms have been proposed to explain the emplacement of subsurface ices on Mars: vapor diffusion from the atmosphere, freezing of bodies of surface water (e.g., lakes or oceans), buried glaciers, or accumulation and burial of packed snow. These formation mechanisms predict different physical properties for the subsurface ices: vapor diffusion should produce pore ice, whereas other mechanisms should produce massive, relatively pure ice. NASA's Phoenix Lander uncovered two types of ice at its 2008 landing site on the northern plains of Mars: a light-toned ice (Dodo-Goldilocks) that broke into pieces during backhoe operations; and a hard, darker icy surface that had to be scraped to provide particulate materials for sampling (Snow White). Here, we use spectra from Phoenix's Surface Stereo Imager (SSI) and a non-linear mixing model with ice and soil components to determine the ice to soil ratio of the ices exposed at the Phoenix landing site. We find Dodo-Goldilocks consists of almost pure water ice. The darker icy material contains ~30 wt% ice (~55 vol%), indicating that it probably formed as pore ice between grains of soil. We conclude that these two types of ice represent two different emplacement mechanisms and periods of deposition. Snow White ice was probably deposited via vapor diffusion from the atmosphere. Dodo-Goldilocks ice was probably deposited through an ice-lens or needle ice mechanism. Buried snow or glacial ice is unlikely for Dodo-Goldilocks, given its restricted spatial extent and the fact that the site is covered by large rocks.

  19. A Physical Taxonomy of Martian Sand and Dust Grainsat the Phoenix Landing Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, John; Stoker, Carol

    2014-11-01

    A quantitative taxonomy of martian sand and dust grains for soil samples at the Phoenix lander site has been developed from the mission’s optical microscope data with a resolution of 4 μm per pixel. Approx. 3-4000 grains were analyzed for color, hue, size, shape, surface texture, aspect ratio, and optical properties. At least 26 types of sand and dust grains have been identified. Grain colors include black, brown, orange, red, white, and clear. Most grains are opaque, but many are translucent or transparent. Grain shapes range from botryoidal, blackberry-like, bead-like and rounded, to subrounded, elongate, angular, and highly irregular forms. Surface textures range from knobbly, rough, and multifaceted to smooth and polished. Surface reflectivity varied from dull to shiny to specularly reflective. Materials may include augite, pyroxenes, olivine, volcanic glass, hematite, other iron oxides, and salts. Grain size of the sand has a modal value of ~90 μm, but there is no gradation into dust sizes, indicating a bimodal distribution of the samples. The dust was probably imported into the region from aeolian dust storms. This accords with a mineralogical dissimilarity between the sand and dust grain populations. The sand is dominated by black and brown grains; the dust is dominated by orange grains. The Phoenix site also has centimeter and larger stones in abundance that again have no apparent gradation into the sand size material. Thus, the Phoenix landing site soil appears multimodal. The soil appears to be magnetically susceptible, but it is unclear what the source of magnetism might be. Specific magnetic minerals were not identified in the samples with the possible exception of paramagnetic microbotryoidal hematite. The soil was nevertheless adhesive to the substrates and internally cohesive (forming spherical aggregates) owing to van der Waals forces and possibly salt/moisture bonding.

  20. Comportamiento mecánico de la aleación AZ31 reforzada con nanofibras de carbono

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adeva, P.

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of reinforcing AZ31 with carbon nanofibres. The materials AZ31, AZ31-1 % C y AZ31-2 % C were produced by a conventional powder metallurgy route consisting of mechanical mixing of nanofibres and powders of AZ31, cool compactation and extrusion at 350 °C. After extrusion the three materials exhibited a recrystallized microstructure of similar grain size, fine and rather inhomogeneous. Furthermore, they presented a weak fibre texture with basal plane parallel to the extrusion direction. The tensile properties were affected by the nanofibres presence only at 100 °C. At this temperature, yield strength and tensile strength were 30% higher than in the unreinforced alloy.

    En este trabajo se ha estudiado el efecto de la adición de nanofibras de carbono en las propiedades mecánicas de la aleación AZ31 procesada por una ruta pulvimetalúrgica convencional. Se prepararon tres materiales, AZ31, AZ31- 1 % C y AZ31-2 % C. Tras una mezcla mecánica de las nanofibras con los polvos de AZ31, se precompactaron en frío y se extruyeron a 350 °C. Los tres presentan una microestructura recristalizada con un tamaño de grano similar, fino aunque algo heterogéneo. Los tres materiales presentan una débil textura de fibra con el plano basal paralelo a la dirección de extrusión. Las propiedades mecánicas a tracción únicamente se ven afectadas por la presencia de nanofibras a 100 °C superando los materiales reforzados en un 30 % a los valores de límite elástico y resistencia de la aleación sin reforzar.

  1. Die forging of the alloys Az80 and Zk60

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kurz, G.; Clauw, B.; Sillekens, W.H.; Letzig, D.

    2009-01-01

    Overall goal of the MagForge project is to provide tailored and cost-effective technologies for the industrial manufacturing of magnesium forged components. Scientific and technological aspects are new alloys/feedstock materials with improved performance, forging process modeling and design tools wi

  2. AZ91D镁合金板材电脉冲轧制工艺研究%Research on electrostimulated rolling of AZ91D magnesium alloy plate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    阎峰云; 黄旺; 杨群英; 程从德

    2010-01-01

    利用自主研发的电脉冲轧制设备,对AZ91D镁合金板材进行了电脉冲轧制实验,证明了AZ91D镁合金具有一定的可轧性,并获得了合适的工艺参数.对高能电脉冲和轧制力共同作用下AZ91板材变形量、力学性能及微观组织的变化机理进行了分析,并与常规轧制进行了比较.结果表明,由于电塑性效应的影响,与常规轧制相比,道次累计变形量达到了40%,显微组织变化明显,晶粒明显细化,晶粒和晶界明显拉长,抗拉强度等力学性能有显著提高.

  3. Crater Morphology in the Phoenix Landing Ellipse: Insights Into Net Erosion and Ice Table Depth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noe Dobrea, E. Z.; Stoker, C. R.; McKay, C. P.; Davila, A. F.; Krco, M.

    2015-01-01

    Icebreaker [1] is a Discovery class mission being developed for future flight opportunities. Under this mission concept, the Icebreaker payload is carried on a stationary lander, and lands in the same landing ellipse as Phoenix. Samples are acquired from the subsurface using a drilling system that penetrates into materials which may include loose or cemented soil, icy soil, pure ice, rocks, or mixtures of these. To avoid the complexity of mating additional strings, the drill is single-string, limiting it to a total length of 1 m.

  4. Analysis of Phoenix Anomalies and IV and V Findings Applied to the GRAIL Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Steve

    2012-01-01

    Analysis of patterns in IV&V findings and their correlation with post-launch anomalies allowed GRAIL to make more efficient use of IV&V services . Fewer issues. . Higher fix rate. . Better communication. . Increased volume of potential issues vetted, at lower cost. . Hard to make predictions of post-launch performance based on IV&V findings . Phoenix made sound fix/use as-is decisions . Things that were fixed eliminated some problems, but hard to quantify. . Broad predictive success in one area, but inverse relationship in others.

  5. F-35A Training Basing Environmental Impact Statement. Volume 2. Appendix D - Comment Response Document. Book 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-01

    Tucson AGS 1508 GE-3 Hernandez Bonnie Luke AFB 1059 GE-3 Herron Jane Tucson AGS A1106 GE-3 Hess Jr. Kenneth & Nancy Goodyear AZ Luke AFB 1033 GE...5834 Egland Samuel Phoenix AZ 7050 Eglinton Larry Chandler AZ 8586 Ehle David Tempe AZ 4299 Ehlers Herman Peoria AZ 11755 Ehlers Jessica El Mirage...Litchfield Park AZ 6204 Hess Michelle Buckeye AZ 9425 Hessel Jan Buckeye AZ 10890 Hesseltine Art Tempe AZ 8613 Hesskamp Dennis Surprise AZ 9067

  6. Expression of P. falciparum var genes involves exchange of the histone variant H2A.Z at the promoter.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michaela Petter

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Plasmodium falciparum employs antigenic variation to evade the human immune response by switching the expression of different variant surface antigens encoded by the var gene family. Epigenetic mechanisms including histone modifications and sub-nuclear compartmentalization contribute to transcriptional regulation in the malaria parasite, in particular to control antigenic variation. Another mechanism of epigenetic control is the exchange of canonical histones with alternative variants to generate functionally specialized chromatin domains. Here we demonstrate that the alternative histone PfH2A.Z is associated with the epigenetic regulation of var genes. In many eukaryotic organisms the histone variant H2A.Z mediates an open chromatin structure at promoters and facilitates diverse levels of regulation, including transcriptional activation. Throughout the asexual, intraerythrocytic lifecycle of P. falciparum we found that the P. falciparum ortholog of H2A.Z (PfH2A.Z colocalizes with histone modifications that are characteristic of transcriptionally-permissive euchromatin, but not with markers of heterochromatin. Consistent with this finding, antibodies to PfH2A.Z co-precipitate the permissive modification H3K4me3. By chromatin-immunoprecipitation we show that PfH2A.Z is enriched in nucleosomes around the transcription start site (TSS in both transcriptionally active and silent stage-specific genes. In var genes, however, PfH2A.Z is enriched at the TSS only during active transcription in ring stage parasites. Thus, in contrast to other genes, temporal var gene regulation involves histone variant exchange at promoter nucleosomes. Sir2 histone deacetylases are important for var gene silencing and their yeast ortholog antagonises H2A.Z function in subtelomeric yeast genes. In immature P. falciparum parasites lacking Sir2A or Sir2B high var transcription levels correlate with enrichment of PfH2A.Z at the TSS. As Sir2A knock out parasites mature the var

  7. 75 FR 11939 - DNS Electronics, Chandler, AZ; Notice of Termination of Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-12

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Employment and Training Administration DNS Electronics, Chandler, AZ; Notice of Termination of Investigation... a petition filed on May 27, 2009, by three workers on behalf of workers of DNS Electronics,...

  8. Arabidopsis meiotic crossover hotspots overlap with H2A.Z nucleosomes at gene promoters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Kyuha; Zhao, Xiaohui; Kelly, Krystyna A.; Venn, Oliver; Higgins, James D.; Yelina, Nataliya E.; Hardcastle, Thomas J.; Ziolkowski, Piotr A.; Copenhaver, Gregory P.; Franklin, F. Chris H.; McVean, Gil; Henderson, Ian R.

    2013-01-01

    PRDM9 directs human meiotic crossover hotspots to intergenic sequence motifs, whereas budding yeast hotspots overlap low nucleosome density regions in gene promoters. To investigate hotspots in plants, which lack PRDM9, we used coalescent analysis of Arabidopsis genetic variation. Crossovers increase towards gene promoters and terminators, and hotspots are associated with active chromatin modifications, including H2A.Z, histone H3K4me3, low nucleosome density and low DNA methylation. Hotspot-enriched A-rich and CTT-repeat DNA motifs occur upstream and downstream of transcriptional start respectively. Crossovers are asymmetric around promoters and highest over CTT-motifs and H2A.Z-nucleosomes. Pollen-typing, segregation and cytogenetic analysis show decreased crossovers in the arp6 H2A.Z deposition mutant, at multiple scales. During meiosis H2A.Z and DMC1/RAD51 recombinases form overlapping chromosomal foci. As arp6 reduces DMC1/RAD51 foci, H2A.Z may promote formation or processing of meiotic DNA double-strand breaks. We propose that gene chromatin ancestrally designates hotspots within eukaryotes and PRDM9 is a derived state within vertebrates. PMID:24056716

  9. 75 FR 5115 - Temporary Concession Contract for Lake Mead National Recreation Area, AZ/NV

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-01

    ... accommodations, food and beverage, retail, fuel, and short term trailer villages. This action is necessary to... National Park Service Temporary Concession Contract for Lake Mead National Recreation Area, AZ/NV AGENCY: National Park Service, Department of the Interior. ACTION: Notice of intention to award temporary...

  10. Synthesis of dittmarite/Mg(OH){sub 2} composite coating on AZ31 using hydrothermal treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Qing, E-mail: qzhaoyuping@bit.edu.cn; Mahmood, Waqas; Zhu, Yanying

    2016-03-30

    Highlights: • Synthesis of dittmarite Mg(OH){sub 2} coating on AZ31 alloy by hydrothermal method. • The mechanism of composite coating growth and its characterizations. • The coating is corrosion resistant significantly. • Lack of hydroxyl deposition on the coating surface. • Strong adhesion between the coating and the substrate. • The synthesized coating meets the cytotoxicity standards. - Abstract: In this work, we have used hydrothermal method for the synthesis of dittmarite/Mg(OH){sub 2} composite (DMC) layer on AZ31 alloy of magnesium. The synthesized coating was characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). In a test immersion into the Hank's mixture for 31 days, the synthesized coating inhibited corrosion of AZ31 significantly and the amorphous calcium apatite precursor deposited on the coating surface. In another tape test, we noticed strong adhesion between the coating and substrate that eventually concludes that the synthesized coating is hydrophilic and a promising candidate to be used in the absorbable implant materials. Besides, the cytotoxicity of the AZ31 alloy with DMC coating, grown under different conditions on L-929 cells in vitro was examined indirectly through the growth inhibition method (MTT assay). The cytotoxicity of the deposited coating lie between 0 ∼ 1 that indicates it as a promising biomaterial.

  11. Effect of Neodymium on As-Cast Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of AZ31 Wrought Alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Mingzhao; Fan Jinping; Zhang Junyuan; Liu Xuguang; Xu Bingshe

    2007-01-01

    Nd in the form of powder or intermediate alloy was added to AZ31 wrought alloy. The as-obtained alloy was characterized and tested with respect to its microstructure and mechanical properties. The relationship between the microstructure, mechanical properties and tensile fracture mechanism were discussed, with relevant alloys as reference for comparison. Experimental results show that the same quantity of Nd was added into AZ31 in powder form or in intermediate alloy, the absorption rate of Nd reached only 10.8% for the former case and as high as 95% for the later case. Pure Nd powder was added, no new compound was detected, but it served as reductant and purified alloy melt, resulting in improving the tensile strength while Nd was added into AZ31 as Mg-Nd intermediate alloy. The compound Al2Nd and Mg12 Nd were formed in magnesium alloy, which were distributed in the matrix in the shapes of strip and particle, evidently refined the as-cast structure. The as-cast tensile strength (228MPa) of adding pure Nd powder approximated to the figure (245MPa) of adding Mg-Nd intermediate alloy. The tensile fracture mchanism of as-cast AZ31 transformed from cleavage fracture into quasi-cleavage fracture.

  12. Microstructure refinement of AZ91D alloy solidified with pulsed magnetic field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Bin; YANG Yuan-sheng; ZHOU Ji-xue; TONG Wen-hui

    2008-01-01

    The effects of pulsed magnetic field on the solidified microstructure of an AZ91D magnesium alloy were investigated. The experimental results show that the remarkable microstructural refinement is achieved when the pulsed magnetic field is applied in the solidification of AZ91D alloy. The average grain size of the as-cast microstructure of AZ91D alloy is refined to 104μm. Besides the grain refinement, the morphology of the primary α-Mg is changed from dendritic to rosette, then to globular shape with changing the parameters of the pulsed magnetic field. The pulsed magnetic field causes melt convection during solidification, which makes the temperature of the whole melt homogenized, and produces an undercooling zone in front of the liquid/solid interface by the magnetic pressure, which makes the nucleation rate increased and big dendrites prohibited. In addition, primary α-Mg dendrites break into fine crystals, resulting in a refined solidification structure of the AZ91D alloy. The Joule heat effect induced in the melt also strengthens the grain refinement effect and spheroidization of dendrite arms.

  13. Effect of cooling rate on microstructure and compressive performance of AZ91 magnesium alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Lin; FENG Hui; QIU Ke-qiang; CHEN Li-jia; LIU Zheng

    2006-01-01

    Effect of cooling rate on both microstructure and room temperature compressive performance of the AZ91 magnesium alloy was investigated. The experimental results show that with increasing cooling rate, the quantity of the solid solution phase increases and the fraction of secondary phase Mg17Al12 decreases. The almost single solid solution phase can be obtained with using liquid nitrogen as a coolant. The compressive strengths of the rapid solidified AZ91 magnesium alloys are higher than those of normal cast alloy, and decrease with increasing cooling rate. After artificial aging treatment for 14 h at 168 ℃, the compressive strength of the rapidly solidified AZ91 magnesium alloy cooled in liquid nitrogen increases from 253.5 to 335.3 MPa, while the compressive yield strength increases from 138.1 to 225.91 MPa. The improvement in the compressive strength of the rapidly solidified AZ91magnesium alloys can be attributed to the hardening effect from fine secondary phase.

  14. 78 FR 40503 - Notice of Realty Action: Direct Sale of Public Lands in Pima County, AZ

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-05

    ... Bureau of Land Management Notice of Realty Action: Direct Sale of Public Lands in Pima County, AZ AGENCY... approximately 5.96 acres in Pima County, Arizona. The parcel is being proposed for noncompetitive direct sale to... market value (FMV) of $83,440. DATES: Comments regarding the proposed direct sale must be received by...

  15. 78 FR 71641 - Notice of Realty Action: Direct Sale of Public Land in Graham County, AZ

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-29

    ... Bureau of Land Management Notice of Realty Action: Direct Sale of Public Land in Graham County, AZ AGENCY... Management (BLM), Safford Field Office (SFO), is considering a noncompetitive direct sale of approximately 15...: Written comments concerning the proposed direct sale should be sent to Scott Cooke, Field Manager,...

  16. 241-AZ-101 Waste Tank Color Video Camera System Shop Acceptance Test Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    WERRY, S.M.

    2000-03-23

    This report includes shop acceptance test results. The test was performed prior to installation at tank AZ-101. Both the camera system and camera purge system were originally sought and procured as a part of initial waste retrieval project W-151.

  17. 77 FR 2242 - Radio Broadcasting Services; Ehrenberg, First Mesa, Kachina Village, Wickenburg, and Williams, AZ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-17

    ... COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 73 [MB Docket No. 08-85; RM-11427, RM-11517, RM-11518, RM-11519; DA 11- 2059] Radio Broadcasting Services; Ehrenberg, First Mesa, Kachina Village, Wickenburg, and Williams, AZ, and Needles, CA... Radio, Inc. (RM-11517) and Univision Radio License Corporation (RM-11518), which are mutually...

  18. 76 FR 42155 - Arizona Disaster #AZ-00017 Declaration of Economic Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-18

    ... ADMINISTRATION Arizona Disaster AZ-00017 Declaration of Economic Injury AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a notice of an Economic Injury Disaster Loan (EIDL) declaration for the State of Arizona, dated 07/11/2011. Incident: Wallow Fire. Incident Period: 05/29/2011...

  19. A generalized AZ-non-Maxwellian velocity distribution function for space plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abid, A. A.; Khan, M. Z.; Lu, Quanming; Yap, S. L.

    2017-03-01

    A more generalized form of the non-Maxwellian distribution function, i.e., the AZ-distribution function is presented. Its fundamental properties are numerically observed by the variation of three parameters: α (rate of energetic particles on the shoulder), r (energetic particles on a broad shoulder), and q (superthermality on the tail of the velocity distribution curve of the plasma species). It has been observed that (i) the A Z - distribution function reduces to the ( r , q ) - distribution for α → 0 ; (ii) the A Z - distribution function reduces to the q - distribution for α → 0 , and r → 0 ; (iii) the A Z -distribution reduces to Cairns-distribution function for r → 0 , and q → ∞ ; (iv) the AZ-distribution reduces to Vasyliunas Cairns distribution for r → 0 , and q = κ + 1 ; (v) the AZ-distribution reduces to kappa distribution for α → 0 , r → 0 , and q = κ + 1 ; and (vi) finally, the AZ-distribution reduces to Maxwellian distribution for α → 0 , r → 0 , and q → ∞ . The uses of this more generalized A Z - distribution function in various space plasmas are briefly discussed.

  20. 78 FR 3027 - Notice of Temporary Closures of Public Lands in La Paz County, AZ

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-15

    ...-10-05] Notice of Temporary Closures of Public Lands in La Paz County, AZ AGENCY: Bureau of Land... Lake Havasu Field Office in La Paz County, Arizona. This action is being taken to help ensure public... the La Paz County Emergency Medical Services and Fire, the Arizona Department of Public Safety, or...

  1. 76 FR 5398 - Notice of Temporary Closure of Selected Public Lands in La Paz County, AZ

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-31

    ...-330-07-02] Notice of Temporary Closure of Selected Public Lands in La Paz County, AZ AGENCY: Bureau of... its administration in La Paz County, Arizona. This action is being taken to protect persons, property... under the guidance of the La Paz County Emergency Medical Services and Fire, or the Arizona...

  2. Compression Deformation Behavior of AZ81 Magnesium Alloy at Elevated Temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoping Luo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The hot deformation behavior of an AZ81 magnesium alloy was investigated by hot compressive testing on a Gleeble-1500 thermal mechanical simulator in the temperature range from 200 to 400°C and in the strain rate range of 0.001–5 s−1. The relationships among flow stress, strain rate, and deformation temperature were analyzed, and the deformation activation energy and stress exponent were calculated. The microstructure evolution of the AZ81 magnesium alloy under high deformation was examined. The results indicated that the maximum value of the flow stress increased with the decrease of deformation temperature and the increase of strain rate. When the deformation temperature is constant, the flow stress of the AZ81 magnesium alloy increases with the increase of strain rate, which can be demonstrated by a Zener-Hollomon parameter in a hyperbolic-sine-type equation with a hot compression deformation activation energy of 176.01 KJ/mol and basic hot deformation material factors A, n, and a in the analytical expression of the AZ81 magnesium alloy flow stress of 3.21227×1014 s−1, 7.85, and 0.00866 MPa, respectively.

  3. INFLUENCE OF HEAT TREATMENT ON DAMPING BEHAVIOUR OF THE MAGNESIUM WROUGHT ALLOY AZ61

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The effect of isochronal heat treatments for 1h on variation of damping, hardness and microstructural change of the magnesium wrought alloy AZ61 was investigated. Damping and hardness behaviour could be attributed to the evolution of precipitation process. The influence of precipitation on damping behaviour was explained in the framework of the dislocation string model of Granato and Lücke.

  4. 75 FR 10552 - Noise Exposure Map Notice for Chandler Municipal Airport, Chandler, AZ

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-08

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Noise Exposure Map Notice for Chandler Municipal Airport, Chandler, AZ... Administration (FAA) announces its determination that the noise exposure maps submitted by City of Chandler, for Chandler Municipal Airport under the provisions of 49 U.S.C. 47501 et seq. (Aviation Safety and...

  5. THE APPARENT VISCOSITY OF SEMI-SOLID AZ91D ALLOY AT STEADY STATE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Z.S. Zhen; W.M. Mao; S.J. Yan; A.M. Zhao; C.L. CuI; X.Y. Zhong

    2002-01-01

    The Rheological behavior of semi-solid AZ91D at steady state is studied using a Couettetype viscometer in the present paper. The results show that the apparent viscosity ofsemi-solid AZ91D at the steady state increases with the solid fraction increasing, andgoes up sharply when the solid fraction reaches a certain value, which is called criticalfraction. In addition, the apparent viscosity of semi-solid AZ91D at the steady statetakes on a distinct downtrend with the shearing rate increasing, which indicates astrong shear thinning property. In addition, the critical solid fraction becomes higherunder larger shearing rate, owing to the more globular shape of the solid particles.Based on the present experiment results, an empirical equation is built as that, relatingthe steady state apparent viscosity of semi-solid AZ91D with the solid fraction fs andshearing rate γ at the same time: ηapp=10. 74exp(6.95fs)γ-0.86.

  6. 78 FR 17097 - Safety Zone; Lake Havasu Triathlon; Lake Havasu City, AZ

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-20

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Lake Havasu Triathlon; Lake Havasu City, AZ... Havasu Triathlon. This temporary safety zone is necessary to provide safety for the swimmers, crew... Triathlon will consist of 600 participants. The waterside swim course consists of 1500 meters in Lake...

  7. Selectividad de caña de azúcar en bovinos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. M. Aranda

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Se condujo este trabajo con el objetivo de conocer la aceptación del forraje de caña de azúcar integral en la dieta con base de pasto para bovinos adultos fistulados en rumen y duodeno estabulados; para ello, se ofreció pasto estrella africana (Cynodon plectostachyus y caña de azúcar (Saccharum officinarum mezclada con 1% de urea a voluntad, por separado. Se midió la composición de los alimentos, consumo de materia seca, pH ruminal y duodenal. Se utilizaron técnicas de la estadística descriptiva, como la media aritmética y error estándar. La proteína, paredes celulares y hemicelulosa fueron mayores para el pasto estrella. El consumo de MS fue de 46.6 y 38.1% para la caña de azúcar y el pasto, respectivamente; el pH ruminal tuvo valores de 7.3, disminuyendo a 6.7 a las 12 h.; y el pH de la digesta duodenal osciló de 3.7 a 4.7. Se concluye que hubo mayor aceptación por la caña de azúcar y el pH ruminal no indica valores que afecten la celulólisis ruminal.

  8. 挤压AZ31B镁合金多轴疲劳寿命预测%MULTIAXIAL FATIGUE LIFE PREDICTION FOR EXTRUDED AZ31B MAGNESIUM ALLOY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    熊缨; 程利霞

    2012-01-01

    采用挤压AZ31B镁合金薄壁圆筒试样,分别进行了单轴和多轴加载下的对称应变控制疲劳实验,研究了不同加载路径对疲劳寿命的影响.单轴加载包括对称拉压和扭转路径,多轴加载包括45°比例加载和90°非比例加载路径.结果表明,在加载的等效应变幅值为0.3% 0.55%附近,4种加载路径下的应变-寿命曲线均出现了不连续的拐点;比例加载路径在等效应变幅大于0.45%时疲劳寿命最高,拉压路径在等效应变幅小于0.45%时疲劳寿命最高;非比例加载路径的疲劳寿命最低.使用基于临界平面法的多轴疲劳模型FS,SWT以及修正SWT分别预测了各个路径加载下的疲劳寿命.预测结果表明,SWT模型对于拉压和循环扭转加载下寿命预测结果误差较大;FS模型与修正SWT模型可以较好地预测挤压AZ31B镁合金各个路径加载下的疲劳寿命.%Magnesium alloy components were widely used in automobile and aircraft industries, due to their light weight, high specific strength, stiffness, damping capacity, machinability, and recyclability. Engineering components subjected cyclic loading inevitably and led to fatigue failure. Most studies on magnesium alloy were focus on uniaxial fatigue, very limited work has been done of magnesium alloys under multiaxial loading. In this study, strain-controlled multiaxial fatigue experiments were conducted on extruded AZ31B magnesium alloy using thin-walled tubular specimens in ambient air. Four loading paths, including fully reversed tension-compression, cyclic torsion, 45° in-phase axial-torsion and 90° out-of-phase axial-torsion, were adopted in the fatigue experiments. It is observed that the strain-life curve displays a distinguishable kink under each loading path at the equivalent strain amplitude around 0.3% to 0.55%. The fatigue life -under the proportional loading path is the highest when equivalent strain amplitudes higher than 0.45%, and the fatigue

  9. IMPACT OF DEPTH OF CUT ON CHIP FORMATION IN AZ91HP MAGNESIUM ALLOY MILLING WITH TOOLS OF VARYING CUTTING EDGE GEOMETRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Gziut

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Safety of Mg milling processes can be expressed by means of the form and the number of fractions of chips formed during milling. This paper presents the state of the art of magnesium alloys milling technology in the aspect of chip fragmentation. Furthermore, the impact of the depth of cut ap and the rake angle γ on the number of chip fractions was analysed in the study. These were conducted on AZ91HP magnesium cast alloy and milling was performed with carbide tools of varying rake angle values (γ = 5º and γ = 30º. It was observed that less intense chip fragmentation occurs with decreasing depth of cut ap. The number of chip fractions was lower at the tool rake angle of γ = 30º. The test results were formulated as technological recommendations according to the number of generated chip fractions.

  10. Design, Simulation, and Analysis of Domestic Solar Water Heating Systems in Phoenix, Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Fresart, Edouard Thomas

    Research was conducted to quantify the energy and cost savings of two different domestic solar water heating systems compared to an all-electric water heater for a four-person household in Phoenix, Arizona. The knowledge gained from this research will enable utilities to better align incentives and consumers to make more informed decisions prior to purchasing a solar water heater. Daily energy and temperature data were collected in a controlled, closed environment lab. Three mathematical models were designed in TRNSYS 17, a transient system simulation tool. The data from the lab were used to validate the TRNSYS models, and the TRNSYS results were used to project annual cost and energy savings for the solar water heaters. The projected energy savings for a four-person household in Phoenix, Arizona are 80% when using the SunEarthRTM system with an insulated and glazed flat-plate collector, and 49% when using the FAFCO RTM system with unglazed, non-insulated flat-plate collectors. Utilizing all available federal, state, and utility incentives, a consumer could expect to recoup his or her investment after the fifth year if purchasing a SunEarth RTM system, and after the eighth year if purchasing a FAFCO RTM system. Over the 20-year analysis period, a consumer could expect to save 2,519 with the SunEarthRTM system, and 971 with the FAFCORTM system.

  11. Possible Calcite and Magnesium Perchlorate Interaction in the Mars Phoenix Thermal and Evolved Gas Analyzer (TEGA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannon, K. M.; Sutter, B.; Ming, D. W.; Boynton, W. V.; Quinn, R. C.

    2012-01-01

    The Mars Phoenix Lander's TEGA instrument detected a calcium carbonate phase decomposing at high temperatures (approx.700 C) from the Wicked Witch soil sample [1]. TEGA also detected a lower temperature CO2 release between 400 C and 680 C [1]. Possible explanations given for this lower temperature CO2 release include thermal decomposition of Mg or Fe carbonates, a zeolitictype desorption reaction, or combustion of organic compounds in the soil [2]. The detection of 0.6 wt % soluble perchlorate by the Wet Chemistry Laboratory (WCL) on Phoenix [3] has implications for the possibility of organic molecules in the soil. Ming et al. [4] demonstrated that perchlorates could have oxidized organic compounds to CO2 in TEGA, preventing detection of their characteristic mass fragments. Here, we propose that a perchlorate salt and calcium carbonate present in martian soil reacted to produce the 400 C - 680 C TEGA CO2 release. The parent salts of the perchlorate on Mars are unknown, but geochemical models using WCL data support the possible dominance of Mg-perchlorate salts [5]. Mg(ClO4)2 6H2O is the stable phase at ambient martian conditions [6], and breaks down at lower temperatures than carbonates giving off Cl2 and HCl gas [7,8]. Devlin and Herley [7] report two exotherms at 410-478 C and 473-533 C which correspond to the decomposition of Mg(ClO4)2.

  12. Morning Frost in Trench Dug by Phoenix, Sol 113 (False Color)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    This image from the Surface Stereo Imager on NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander shows morning frost inside the 'Snow White' trench dug by the lander, in addition to subsurface ice exposed by use of a rasp on the floor of the trench. The camera took this image at about 9 a.m. local solar time during the 113th Martian day of the mission (Sept. 18, 2008). Bright material near and below the four-by-four set of rasp holes in the upper half of the image is water-ice exposed by rasping and scraping in the trench earlier the same morning. Other bright material especially around the edges of the trench, is frost. Earlier in the mission, when the sun stayed above the horizon all night, morning frost was not evident in the trench. This image is presented in false color that enhances the visibility of the frost. The trench is 4 to 5 centimeters (about 2 inches) deep, about 23 centimeters (9 inches) wide. Phoenix landed on a Martian arctic plain on May 25, 2008. The mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is led by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development was by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  13. Mars Phoenix Scout Thermal Evolved Gas Analyzer (TEGA) Database: Thermal Database Development and Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutter, B.; Archer, D.; Niles, P. B.; Stein, T. C.; Hamara, D.; Boynton, W. V.; Ming, D. W.

    2017-01-01

    The Mars Phoenix Scout Lander mission in 2008 examined the history of water, searched for organics, and evaluated the potential for past/present microbial habitability in a martian arctic ice-rich soil [1]. The Thermal Evolved Gas Analyzer (TEGA) instrument measured the isotopic composition of atmospheric CO2 and detected volatile bearing mineralogy (perchlorate, carbonate, hydrated mineral phases) in the martian soil [2-7]. The TEGA data are archived at the Planetary Data System (PDS) Geosciences Node but are reported in forms that require further processing to be of use to the non-TEGA expert. The soil and blank TEGA thermal data are reported as duty cycle and must be converted to differential power (mW) to allow for enthalpy calculations of exothermic/endothermic transitions. The exothermic/endothermic temperatures are also used to determine what phases (inorganic/organic) are present in the sample. The objectives of this work are to: 1) Describe how interpretable thermal data can be created from TEGA data sets on the PDS and 2) Provide additional thermal data interpretation of two Phoenix soils (Baby Bear, Wicked Witch) and include interpretations from three unreported soils (Rosy Red 1, 2, and Burning Coals).

  14. Phoenix flagships: Conservation values and guanaco reintroduction in an anthropogenic landscape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindon, Adrien; Root-Bernstein, Meredith

    2015-09-01

    Multiple forms of valuation contribute to public acceptance of conservation projects. Here, we consider how esthetic, intrinsic, and utilitarian values contribute to public attitudes toward a proposed reintroduction of guanaco (Lama guanicoe) in a silvopastoral system of central Chile. The nexus among landscape perceptions and valuations, support for reintroductions, and management of anthropogenic habitats is of increasing interest due to the proliferation of conservation approaches combining some or all of these elements, including rewilding and reconciliation ecology, for example. We assessed attitudes and values through an online questionnaire for residents of Santiago, Chile, using multiple methods including photo-montages and Likert scale assessments of value-based statements. We also combined the questionnaire approach with key informant interviews. We find strong support for the reintroduction of guanacos into the Chilean silvopastoral system ('espinal') in terms of esthetic and intrinsic values but less in terms of utilitarian values. Respondents preferred a scenario of espinal with guanacos and expressed interest in visiting it, as well as support for the reintroduction project on the basis that guanacos are native to central Chile. We suggest that reintroduced guanacos could serve as a 'phoenix flagship species' for espinal conservation, that is, a flagship species that has gone regionally extinct and is known but not associated with the region in the cultural memory. We consider how the lack of local cultural identity can both help and weaken phoenix flagships, which we expect to become more common.

  15. Analysis of Phoenix Anomalies and IV & V Findings Applied to the GRAIL Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Steve

    2012-01-01

    NASA IV&V was established in 1993 to improve safety and cost-effectiveness of mission critical software. Since its inception the tools and strategies employed by IV&V have evolved. This paper examines how lessons learned from the Phoenix project were developed and applied to the GRAIL project. Shortly after selection, the GRAIL project initiated a review of the issues documented by IV&V for Phoenix. The motivation was twofold: the learn as much as possible about the types of issues that arose from the flight software product line slated for use on GRAIL, and to identify opportunities for improving the effectiveness of IV&V on GRAIL. The IV&V Facility provided a database dump containing 893 issues. These were categorized into 16 bins, and then analyzed according to whether the project responded by changing the affected artifacts or using as-is. The results of this analysis were compared to a similar assessment of post-launch anomalies documented by the project. Results of the analysis were discussed with the IV&V team assigned to GRAIL. These discussions led to changes in the way both the project and IV&V approached the IV&V task, and improved the efficiency of the activity.

  16. Radio variability in the Phoenix Deep Survey at 1.4 GHz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hancock, P. J.; Drury, J. A.; Bell, M. E.; Murphy, T.; Gaensler, B. M.

    2016-09-01

    We use archival data from the Phoenix Deep Survey to investigate the variable radio source population above 1 mJy beam-1 at 1.4 GHz. Given the similarity of this survey to other such surveys we take the opportunity to investigate the conflicting results which have appeared in the literature. Two previous surveys for variability conducted with the Very Large Array (VLA) achieved a sensitivity of 1 mJy beam-1. However, one survey found an areal density of radio variables on time-scales of decades that is a factor of ˜4 times greater than a second survey which was conducted on time-scales of less than a few years. In the Phoenix deep field we measure the density of variable radio sources to be ρ = 0.98 deg-2 on time-scales of 6 months to 8 yr. We make use of Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer infrared cross-ids, and identify all variable sources as an active galactic nucleus of some description. We suggest that the discrepancy between previous VLA results is due to the different time-scales probed by each of the surveys, and that radio variability at 1.4 GHz is greatest on time-scales of 2-5 yr.

  17. Radio variability in the Phoenix Deep Survey at 1.4GHz

    CERN Document Server

    Hancock, Paul; Bell, Martin; Murphy, Tara; Gaensler, Bryan

    2016-01-01

    We use archival data from the Phoenix Deep Survey to investigate the variable radio source population above 1mJy/beam at 1.4GHz. Given the similarity of this survey to other such surveys we take the opportunity to investigate the conflicting results which have appeared in the literature. Two previous surveys for variability conducted with the Very Large Array (VLA) achieved a sensitivity of 1mJy/beam. However, one survey found an areal density of radio variables on timescales of decades that is a factor of ~4 times greater than a second survey which was conducted on timescales of less than a few years. In the Phoenix deep field we measure the density of variable radio sources to be $\\rho =0.98\\mathrm{deg}^{-2}$ on timescales of 6 months to 8 years. We make use of WISE infrared cross-ids, and identify all variable sources as an AGN of some description. We suggest that the discrepancy between previous VLA results is due to the different time scales probed by each of the surveys, and that radio variability at 1....

  18. What a Tangled Web We Weave: Hermus as the Northern Extension of the Phoenix Stream

    CERN Document Server

    Grillmair, Carl J

    2016-01-01

    We investigate whether the recently discovered Phoenix stream may be part of a much longer structure that includes the previously discovered Hermus stream. Using a simple model of the Galaxy with a disk, bulge, and a spherical dark matter halo, we show that a nearly circular orbit, highly inclined with respect to the disk, can be found that fits the positions, orientations, and distances of both streams. While the two streams are somewhat misaligned in the sense that they do not occupy the same plane, nodal precession due to the Milky Way disk potential naturally brings the orbit into line with each stream in the course of half an orbit. We consequently consider a common origin for the two streams as plausible. Based on our best fitting orbit, we make predictions for the positions, distances, radial velocities, and proper motions along each stream. If our hypothesis is borne out by measurements, then at ~183 degrees (~235 degrees with respect to the Galactic center) and ~76 kpc in length, Phoenix-Hermus would...

  19. What a Tangled Web We Weave: Hermus as the Northern Extension of the Phoenix Stream

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grillmair, Carl J.; Carlberg, Raymond G.

    2016-04-01

    We investigate whether the recently discovered Phoenix stream may be part of a much longer stream that includes the previously discovered Hermus stream. Using a simple model of the Galaxy with a disk, bulge, and a spherical dark matter halo, we show that a nearly circular orbit, highly inclined with respect to the disk, can be found that fits the positions, orientations, and distances of both streams. While the two streams are somewhat misaligned in the sense that they do not occupy the same plane, nodal precession due to the Milky Way disk potential naturally brings the orbit into line with each stream in the course of half an orbit. We consequently consider a common origin for the two streams as plausible. Based on our best-fitting orbit, we make predictions for the positions, distances, radial velocities, and proper motions along each stream. If our hypothesis is borne out by measurements, then at ≈183° (≈235° with respect to the Galactic center) and ≈76 kpc in length, Phoenix-Hermus would become the longest cold stream yet found. This would make it a particularly valuable new probe of the shape and mass of the Galactic halo out to ≈20 kpc.

  20. Global dynamics of newly constructed oligonucleosomes of conventional and variant H2A.Z histone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioshikhes Ilya

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Complexes of nucleosomes, which often occur in the gene promoter areas, are one of the fundamental levels of chromatin organization and thus are important for transcription regulation. Investigating the dynamic structure of a single nucleosome as well as nucleosome complexes is important for understanding transcription within chromatin. In a previous work, we highlighted the influence of histone variants on the functional dynamics of a single nucleosome using normal mode analysis developed by Bahar et al. The present work further analyzes the dynamics of nucleosome complexes (nucleosome oligomers or oligonucleosomes such as dimer, trimer and tetramer (beads on a string model with conventional core histones as well as with the H2A.Z histone variant using normal mode analysis. Results The global dynamics of oligonucleosomes reveal larger amplitude of motion within the nucleosomes that contain the H2A.Z variant with in-planar and out-of-planar fluctuations as the common mode of relaxation. The docking region of H2A.Z and the L1:L1 interactions between H2A.Z monomers of nucleosome (that are responsible for the highly stable nucleosome containing variant H2A.Z-histone are highly dynamic throughout the first two dynamic modes. Conclusion Dissection of the dynamics of oligonucleosomes discloses in-plane as well as out-of-plane fluctuations as the common mode of relaxation throughout the global motions. The dynamics of individual nucleosomes and the combination of the relaxation mechanisms expressed by the individual nucleosome are quite interesting and highly dependent on the number of nucleosome fragments present in the complexes. Distortions generated by the non-planar dynamics influence the DNA conformation, and hence the histone-DNA interactions significantly alter the dynamics of the DNA. The variant H2A.Z histone is a major source of weaker intra- and inter-molecular correlations resulting in more disordered motions.