WorldWideScience

Sample records for technologies laser electron

  1. CERN's web application updates for electron and laser beam technologies

    CERN Document Server

    Sigas, Christos

    2017-01-01

    This report describes the modifications at CERN's web application for electron and laser beam technologies. There are updates at both the front and the back end of the application. New electron and laser machines were added and also old machines were updated. There is also a new feature for printing needed information.

  2. Storage Ring Technology for Free Electron Lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-04-01

    SPIE Volume 453, 83-288 (1984). 14.) P. Elleaume, "Optical Klystrons", Journ. de Physique Colloque, 44, Cl-333 - Cl-352 (1983). 15.) C. Bazin...Finalement une augmentation d’un i * facteur 100 de ]a puissance crete. a et& obtenue en asservissant le laser a un generateur exterieur de signaux basse...VIIED Lt-ME AS RPT 1- CSERS IA((’,-4 22a NAME OF RESPONSIBLE NOIVIOUAL 22b TELEPHONE NUMBER 22c OFFICf SYWhBOL Inclu~ de A a Code, DO FORM 1473, 83 APR

  3. Development of superconducting acceleration cavity technology for free electron lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jong Min; Lee, Byung Cheol; Kim, Sun Kook; Jeong, Young Uk; Cho, Sung Oh

    2000-10-01

    As a result of the cooperative research between the KAERI and Peking University, the key technologies of superconducting acceleration cavity and photoelectron gun have been developed for the application to high power free electron lasers. A 1.5-GHz, 1-cell superconducting RF cavity has been designed and fabricated by using pure Nb sheets. The unloaded Q values of the fabricated superconducting cavity has been measured to be 2x10 9 at 2.5K, and 8x10 9 at 1.8K. The maximum acceleration gradient achieved was 12 MeV/m at 2.5K, and 20MV/m at 1.8 K. A cryostat for the 1-cell superconducting cavity has been designed. As a source of electron beam, a DC photocathode electron gun has been designed and fabricated, which is composed of a photocathode evaporation chamber and a 100-keV acceleration chamber. The efficiency of the Cs2Te photocathode is 3% nominally at room temperature, 10% at 290 deg C. The superconducting photoelectron gun system developed has been estimated to be a good source of high-brightness electron beam for high-power free electron lasers

  4. Laser Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauger, Robert

    1993-01-01

    Describes lasers and indicates that learning about laser technology and creating laser technology activities are among the teacher enhancement processes needed to strengthen technology education. (JOW)

  5. Lasers technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    The Laser Technology Program of IPEN is developed by the Center for Lasers and Applications (CLA) and is committed to the development of new lasers based on the research of new optical materials and new resonator technologies. Laser applications and research occur within several areas such as Nuclear, Medicine, Dentistry, Industry, Environment and Advanced Research. Additional goals of the Program are human resource development and innovation, in association with Brazilian Universities and commercial partners

  6. Electronic technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jin Su

    2010-07-01

    This book is composed of five chapters, which introduces electronic technology about understanding of electronic, electronic component, radio, electronic application, communication technology, semiconductor on its basic, free electron and hole, intrinsic semiconductor and semiconductor element, Diode such as PN junction diode, characteristic of junction diode, rectifier circuit and smoothing circuit, transistor on structure of transistor, characteristic of transistor and common emitter circuit, electronic application about electronic equipment, communication technology and education, robot technology and high electronic technology.

  7. Introduction to laser technology

    CERN Document Server

    Hitz, C Breck; Hecht, Jeff; Hitz, C Breck; John Wiley & Sons

    2001-01-01

    Electrical Engineering Introduction to Laser Technology , Third Edition. Would you like to know how a laser works, and how it can be modified for your own specific tasks? This intuitive third edition-previously published as Understanding Laser Technology , First and Second Editions-introduces engineers, scientists, technicians, and novices alike to the world of modern lasers, without delving into the mathematical details of quantum electronics. It is the only introductory text on the market today that explains the underlying physics and engineering applicable to all lasers. A unique combinatio.

  8. Excimer Laser Technology

    CERN Document Server

    Basting, Dirk

    2005-01-01

    This comprehensive survey on Excimer Lasers investigates the current range of the technology, applications and devices of this commonly used laser source, as well as the future of new technologies, such as F2 laser technology. Additional chapters on optics, devices and laser systems complete this compact handbook. A must read for laser technology students, process application researchers, engineers or anyone interested in excimer laser technology. An effective and understandable introduction to the current and future status of excimer laser technology.

  9. Free-electron lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brau, C.A.

    1990-01-01

    Free-electron lasers represent an altogether new and exciting class of coherent optical sources. Making use of a simple and elegant gain medium - an electron beam in a magnetic field - they have already demonstrated broad wavelength tunability and excellent optical-beam quality. For the future they offer the possibility of generating the greatest focused power ever achieved by a laser. But even before this is achieved, the unique advantages of free-electron lasers, especially their tunability, will make them useful for a variety of important applications in science, medicine, and industry. (author)

  10. Laser technology (selected articles)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-04-09

    This paper presents high-energy CW HF/DF chemical lasers developed under the U.S. Navy Sealite program and the Alpha program of the DARPA Triad program, and a brief account of Soviet chemical lasers. Continuous wave HF/DF chemical lasers were developed starting in the late sixties as high-power lasers of consistent interest to military circles. These are lasers that have the most matured technology among present-day high-energy lasers. It is hoped that in the near future CW HF/DF chemical lasers can be developed into a space laser weapon to deal with ICBMs. CW HF/DF chemical lasers are an integration of technologies in gas dynamics, chemistry, fluid chemistry, optics, and lasers. By using the branching chain reaction of heat liberation, inversion of the population ratio is generated to obtain lasers.

  11. Laser marking as environment technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobotova, Lydia; Badida, Miroslav

    2017-11-01

    The contribution deals with the laser marking as one of the progressive and environment friendly technologies with utilisation in many branches of industry. Engraving and other types of laser marking of different types of materials are very actual technologies these days. Laser marking decreases the waste creation in comparison with the other classical marking technologies, which use paintings or created chips. In this experimental investigation the laser marking surface texturing of material AL99,7 according to STN 42 4003:1993-08 (STN EN 573) has been conducted. The laser marking machine TruMark 6020 and software TruTops Mark were used. Laser surface texturing after laser marking has been realised under different combinations of process parameters: pulse frequency, pulse energy and laser beam scanning speed. The morphological characterization of engraving or annealing surfaces has been performed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) technique. The evaluation of roughness of engraved surfaces has been realized according to STN EN ISO 4287 by using Surftest SJ 301. The aim of the contribution was to show how different laser parameters affect the surface texture and colour change of metallic materials while creating minimal waste.

  12. Introduction to laser technology

    CERN Document Server

    Hitz, C Breck; Hecht, Jeff

    2012-01-01

    The only introductory text on the market today that explains the underlying physics and engineering applicable to all lasersAlthough lasers are becoming increasingly important in our high-tech environment, many of the technicians and engineers who install, operate, and maintain them have had little, if any, formal training in the field of electro-optics. This can result in less efficient usage of these important tools. Introduction to Laser Technology, Fourth Edition provides readers with a good understanding of what a laser is and what it can and cannot do. The book explains what types of las.

  13. Airclad fiber laser technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kim P.; Olausson, Christina Bjarnal Thulin; Broeng, Jes

    2008-01-01

    High-power fiber lasers and amplifiers have gained tremendous momentum in the last five years, and many of the traditional manufactures of gas and solid-state lasers are pursuing the attractive fiber-based systems, which are now displacing the old technology in many areas. High-power fiber laser...... systems require specially designed fibers with large cores and good power handling capabilities - requirements that are all met by the airclad fiber technology. In the present paper we go through many of the building blocks needed to build high-power systems and we show an example of a complete airclad...... laser system. We present the latest advancements within airclad fiber technology including a new 70 μm single-mode polarization-maintaining rod-type fiber capable of amplifying to MW power levels. Furthermore we describe the novel airclad based pump combiners and their use in a completely monolithic 350...

  14. Airclad fiber laser technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kim P.; Olausson, Christina Bjarnal Thulin; Broeng, Jes

    2011-01-01

    High-power fiber lasers and amplifiers have gained tremendous momentum in the last 5 years. Many of the traditional manufacturers of gas and solid-state lasers are now pursuing the fiber-based systems, which are displacing the conventional technology in many areas. High-power fiber laser systems ...... monolithic 350 W cw fiber laser system with an M2 of less than 1.1. © 2011 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE).......High-power fiber lasers and amplifiers have gained tremendous momentum in the last 5 years. Many of the traditional manufacturers of gas and solid-state lasers are now pursuing the fiber-based systems, which are displacing the conventional technology in many areas. High-power fiber laser systems...... require reliable fibers with large cores, stable mode quality, and good power handling capabilities-requirements that are all met by the airclad fiber technology. In the present paper we go through many of the building blocks needed to build high-power systems and we show an example of a complete airclad...

  15. Ultraviolet and soft X-ray free-electron lasers introduction to physical principles, experimental results, technological challenges

    CERN Document Server

    Schmüser, Peter; Rossbach, Jörg; Fujimori, A; Kühn, J; Müller, T; Steiner, F; Trümper, J; Varma, C; Wölfle, P

    2008-01-01

    In the introduction accelerator-based light sources are considered and a comparison is made between free-electron lasers and conventional quantum lasers. The motion and radiation of relativistic electrons in undulator magnets is discussed. The principle of a low-gain free-electron laser is explained and the pendulum equations are introduced that characterize the electron dynamics in the field of a light wave. The differential equations of the high-gain FEL are derived from the Maxwell equations of electrodynamics. Analytical and numerical solutions of the FEL equations are presented and important FEL parameters are defined, such as gain length, FEL bandwidth and saturation power. A detailed numerical study of the all-important microbunching process is presented. The mechanism of Self Amplified Spontaneous Emission is described theoretically and illustrated with numerous experimental results. Three-dimensional effects such as betatron oscillations and optical diffraction are addressed and their impact on the F...

  16. Rf Feedback free electron laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brau, Charles A.; Swenson, Donald A.; Boyd, Jr., Thomas J.

    1981-01-01

    A free electron laser system and electron beam system for a free electron laser which use rf feedback to enhance efficiency. Rf energy is extracted from an electron beam by decelerating cavities and returned to accelerating cavities using rf returns such as rf waveguides, rf feedthroughs, etc. This rf energy is added to rf klystron energy to lower the required input energy and thereby enhance energy efficiency of the system.

  17. Photon technology. Laser processing technology; Photon technology. Laser process gijutsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-03-01

    Survey has been conducted to develop laser processing technology utilizing the interaction between substance and photon. This is a part of the leading research on photon technology development. The photon technology development is aimed at novel technology development highly utilizing the quantum nature of photons. In the field of laser processing, high quality photons are used as tools, special functions of atoms and molecules will be discovered, and processing for functional fabrication (photon machining) will be established. A role of laser processing in industries has become significant, which is currently spreading not only into cutting and welding of materials and scalpels but also into such a special field as ultrafine processing of materials. The spreading is sometimes obstructed due to the difficulty of procurement of suitable machines and materials, and the increase of cost. The purpose of this study is to develop the optimal laser technology, to elucidate the interaction between substance and photon, and to develop the laser system and the transmission and regulation systems which realize the optimal conditions. 387 refs., 115 figs., 25 tabs.

  18. Development of free electron laser and accelerator technology in Poland (CARE and EuCARD projects)

    CERN Document Server

    Romaniuk, Ryszard

    2009-01-01

    The development of accelerator technology in Poland is strictly combined with the cooperation with specialist accelerator centers of global character, where the relevant knowledge is generated, allowing to build big and modern machines. These are relatively costly undertakings of interdisciplinary character. Most of them are financed from the local resources. Only the biggest machines are financed commonly by many nations like: LHC in CERN, ILC in Fermi Lab, E-XFEL in DESY. A similar financing solution has to be implemented in Poland, where a scientific and political campaign is underway on behalf of building two big machines, a Polish Synchrotron in Kraków and a Polish FEL in Świerk. Around these two projects, there are realized a dozen or so smaller ones.

  19. Laser-driven electron accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palmer, R.B.

    1981-01-01

    The following possibilities are discussed: inverse free electron laser (wiggler accelerator); inverse Cerenkov effect; plasma accelerator; dielectric tube; and grating linac. Of these, the grating acceleraton is considered the most attractive alternative

  20. High-energy laser weapons: technology overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perram, Glen P.; Marciniak, Michael A.; Goda, Matthew

    2004-09-01

    High energy laser (HEL) weapons are ready for some of today"s most challenging military applications. For example, the Airborne Laser (ABL) program is designed to defend against Theater Ballistic Missiles in a tactical war scenario. Similarly, the Tactical High Energy Laser (THEL) program is currently testing a laser to defend against rockets and other tactical weapons. The Space Based Laser (SBL), Advanced Tactical Laser (ATL) and Large Aircraft Infrared Countermeasures (LAIRCM) programs promise even greater applications for laser weapons. This technology overview addresses both strategic and tactical roles for HEL weapons on the modern battlefield and examines current technology limited performance of weapon systems components, including various laser device types, beam control systems, atmospheric propagation, and target lethality issues. The characteristics, history, basic hardware, and fundamental performance of chemical lasers, solid state lasers and free electron lasers are summarized and compared. The elements of beam control, including the primary aperture, fast steering mirror, deformable mirrors, wavefront sensors, beacons and illuminators will be discussed with an emphasis on typical and required performance parameters. The effects of diffraction, atmospheric absorption, scattering, turbulence and thermal blooming phenomenon on irradiance at the target are described. Finally, lethality criteria and measures of weapon effectiveness are addressed. The primary purpose of the presentation is to define terminology, establish key performance parameters, and summarize technology capabilities.

  1. Electronic equipment packaging technology

    CERN Document Server

    Ginsberg, Gerald L

    1992-01-01

    The last twenty years have seen major advances in the electronics industry. Perhaps the most significant aspect of these advances has been the significant role that electronic equipment plays in almost all product markets. Even though electronic equipment is used in a broad base of applications, many future applications have yet to be conceived. This versatility of electron­ ics has been brought about primarily by the significant advances that have been made in integrated circuit technology. The electronic product user is rarely aware of the integrated circuits within the equipment. However, the user is often very aware of the size, weight, mod­ ularity, maintainability, aesthetics, and human interface features of the product. In fact, these are aspects of the products that often are instrumental in deter­ mining its success or failure in the marketplace. Optimizing these and other product features is the primary role of Electronic Equipment Packaging Technology. As the electronics industry continues to pr...

  2. Methane LIDAR Laser Technology Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Fibertek proposes to develop laser technology intended to meet NASA's need for innovative lidar technologies for atmospheric measurements of methane. NASA and the...

  3. Electrons and atoms in intense laser fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davidovich, L.

    1982-11-01

    Several non-linear effects that show up when electrons and atoms interact with strong laser fields are considered. Thomson scattering, electron potential scattering in the presence of a laser beam, atomic ionization by strong laser fields, the refraction of electrons by laser beams and the Kapitza-Dirac effect are discussed. (Author) [pt

  4. Electrons and atoms in intense laser fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davidovich, L.

    1982-01-01

    Several non-linear effects that show up when electrons and atoms interact with strong laser fields are considered. Thomson scattering, electron potential scattering in the presence of a laser beam, atomic ionization by strong laser fields, the refraction of electrons by laser beams and the Kapitza-Dirac effect are discussed. (Author) [pt

  5. Mathematics for electronic technology

    CERN Document Server

    Howson, D P

    1975-01-01

    Mathematics for Electronic Technology is a nine-chapter book that begins with the elucidation of the introductory concepts related to use of mathematics in electronic engineering, including differentiation, integration, partial differentiation, infinite series, vectors, vector algebra, and surface, volume and line integrals. Subsequent chapters explore the determinants, differential equations, matrix analysis, complex variable, topography, graph theory, and numerical analysis used in this field. The use of Fourier method for harmonic analysis and the Laplace transform is also described. The ma

  6. Japan's electronic packaging technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tummala, Rao R.; Pecht, Michael

    1995-01-01

    The JTEC panel found Japan to have significant leadership over the United States in the strategic area of electronic packaging. Many technologies and products once considered the 'heart and soul' of U.S. industry have been lost over the past decades to Japan and other Asian countries. The loss of consumer electronics technologies and products is the most notable of these losses, because electronics is the United States' largest employment sector and is critical for growth businesses in consumer products, computers, automobiles, aerospace, and telecommunications. In the past there was a distinction between consumer and industrial product technologies. While Japan concentrated on the consumer market, the United States dominated the industrial sector. No such distinction is anticipated in the future; the consumer-oriented technologies Japan has dominated are expected to characterize both domains. The future of U.S. competitiveness will, therefore, depend on the ability of the United States to rebuild its technological capabilities in the area of portable electronic packaging.

  7. Japan's electronic packaging technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tummala, Rao R.; Pecht, Michael

    1995-02-01

    The JTEC panel found Japan to have significant leadership over the United States in the strategic area of electronic packaging. Many technologies and products once considered the 'heart and soul' of U.S. industry have been lost over the past decades to Japan and other Asian countries. The loss of consumer electronics technologies and products is the most notable of these losses, because electronics is the United States' largest employment sector and is critical for growth businesses in consumer products, computers, automobiles, aerospace, and telecommunications. In the past there was a distinction between consumer and industrial product technologies. While Japan concentrated on the consumer market, the United States dominated the industrial sector. No such distinction is anticipated in the future; the consumer-oriented technologies Japan has dominated are expected to characterize both domains. The future of U.S. competitiveness will, therefore, depend on the ability of the United States to rebuild its technological capabilities in the area of portable electronic packaging.

  8. Laser applications in the electronics and optoelectronics industry in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washio, Kunihiko

    1999-07-01

    This paper explains current status and technological trends in laser materials processing applications in electronics and optoelectronics industry in Japan. Various laser equipment based on solid state lasers or gas lasers such as excimer lasers or CO2 lasers has been developed and applied in manufacturing electronic and optoelectronic devices to meet the strong demands for advanced device manufacturing technologies for high-performance, lightweight, low power-consumption portable digital electronic appliances, cellular mobile phones, personal computers, etc. Representative applications of solid-state lasers are, opaque and clear defects repairing of photomasks for LSIs and LCDs, trimming of thick-film chip resistors and low resistance metal resistors, laser cutting and drilling of thin films for high-pin count semiconductor CSP packages, laser patterning of thin-film amorphous silicon solar cells, and laser welding of electronic components such as hard-disk head suspensions, optical modules, miniature relays and lithium ion batteries. Compact and highly efficient diode- pumped and Q-switched solid-state lasers in second or third harmonic operation mode are now being increasingly incorporated in various laser equipment for fine material processing. Representative applications of excimer lasers are, sub-quarter micron design-rule LSI lithography and low- temperature annealing of poly-silicon TFT LCD.

  9. Los Alamos advanced free-electron laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, K. C. D.; Kraus, R. H.; Ledford, J.; Meier, K. L.; Meyer, R. E.; Nguyen, D.; Sheffield, R. L.; Sigler, F. L.; Young, L. M.; Wang, T. S.; Wilson, W. L.; Wood, R. L.

    1992-07-01

    Los Alamos researchers are building a free-electron laser (FEL) for industrial, medical, and research applications. This FEL, which will incorporate many of the new technologies developed over the last decade, will be compact, robust, and user-friendly. Electrons produced by a photocathode will be accelerated to 20 MeV by a high-brightness accelerator and transported by permanent-magnet quadrupoles and dipoles. The resulting electron beam will have an excellent instantaneous beam quality of 10πmm mrad in transverse emittance and 0.3% in energy spread at a peak current up to 300 A. Including operation at higher harmonics, the laser wavelength extends from 3.7 μm to 0.4 μm.

  10. Free-electron laser theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dattoli, G.; Torre, A.

    1989-01-01

    The essential features of the theory of the free electron laser (FEL) are given in some detail. Beginning with an explanation of the basic gain mechanism, the lectures continue with a discussion of the problems associated with single-passage and recirculated (storage-ring) operation. Pulse propagation effects and the so-called 'lethargic' behaviour are analysed more completely. Finally, elements of FEL quantum theory are reported, in order to clarify the laser process from the microscopic point of view. Appendices give a fuller treatment of optical cavities and undulator magnets. (orig.)

  11. NASA Space Laser Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krainak, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    Over the next two decades, the number of space based laser missions for mapping, spectroscopy, remote sensing and other scientific investigations will increase several fold. The demand for high wall-plug efficiency, low noise, narrow linewidth laser systems to meet different systems requirements that can reliably operate over the life of a mission will be high. The general trends will be for spatial quality very close to the diffraction limit, improved spectral performance, increased wall-plug efficiency and multi-beam processing. Improved spectral performance will include narrower spectral width (very near the transform limit), increased wavelength stability and or tuning (depending on application) and lasers reaching a wider range of wavelengths stretching into the mid-infrared and the near ultraviolet. We are actively developing high efficiency laser transmitter and high-sensitivity laser receiver systems that are suitable for spaceborne applications.

  12. Electron-beam pumping of visible and ultraviolet gas lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bradley, L.P.

    1975-01-01

    Several techniques for using direct electron-pumping of gas lasers are reviewed. The primary objective is to categorize pump geometries and to give guidelines for gun selection and pulser design. Examples and application of pump technology are given

  13. Advances in femtosecond laser technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Callou TP

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Thais Pinheiro Callou, Renato Garcia, Adriana Mukai, Natalia T Giacomin, Rodrigo Guimarães de Souza, Samir J Bechara Department of Ophthalmology, University of Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, Brazil Abstract: Femtosecond laser technology has become widely adopted by ophthalmic surgeons. The purpose of this study is to discuss applications and advantages of femtosecond lasers over traditional manual techniques, and related unique complications in cataract surgery and corneal refractive surgical procedures, including: LASIK flap creation, intracorneal ring segment implantation, presbyopic treatments, keratoplasty, astigmatic keratotomy, and intrastromal lenticule procedures. Keywords: laser therapy, refractive surgical procedures, intracorneal ring, laser in situ keratomileusis, keratoplasty, presbyopia, cataract extraction, astigmatism surgery

  14. CSIR eNews: Laser technology

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    CSIR

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available The CSIR provides a critical core of laser technology knowledge and expertise through the research, development and implementation of laser based technologies and applications in Africa. This knowledge, housed at the CSIR National Laser Centre...

  15. CSIR eNews: Laser technology

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    CSIR

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available The CSIR provides a critical core of laser technology knowledge and expertise through the research, development and implementation of laser based technologies and applications in Africa. This knowledge, housed at the CSIR National Laser Centre...

  16. CSIR eNews: Laser technology

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    CSIR

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The CSIR provides a critical core of laser technology knowledge and expertise through the research, development and implementation of laser based technologies and applications in Africa. This knowledge, housed at the CSIR National Laser Centre...

  17. Ultraviolet laser technology and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Elliott, David L

    1995-01-01

    Ultraviolet Laser Technology and Applications is a hands-on reference text that identifies the main areas of UV laser technology; describes how each is applied; offers clearly illustrated examples of UV opticalsystems applications; and includes technical data on optics, lasers, materials, and systems. This book is unique for its comprehensive, in-depth coverage. Each chapter deals with a different aspect of the subject, beginning with UV light itself; moving through the optics, sources, and systems; and concluding with detailed descriptions of applications in various fields.The text enables pr

  18. Future Applications of Electronic Technology to Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Arthur J.; And Others

    Developments in electronic technology that have improved and linked together telecommunication and computers are discussed, as well as their use in instruction, implications of this use, and associated issues. The first section briefly describes the following developments: microcomputers and microprocessors, bubble memory, lasers, holography,…

  19. Electron-beam initiated HF lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerber, R.A.; Patterson, E.L.

    1975-01-01

    Electron beams were used to ignite hydrogen/fluorine mixtures, producing laser energies up to 4.2 kJ, and giving hope that this approach may soon produce energy levels suitable for laser-fusion studies. (auth)

  20. School on Laser Physics & Technology

    CERN Document Server

    Khare, Rajeev

    2015-01-01

    The book, ‘Laser Physics and Technology’, addresses fundamentals of laser physics, representative laser systems and techniques, and some important applications of lasers. The present volume is a collection of articles based on some of the lectures delivered at the School on ‘Laser Physics and Technology’ organized at Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology during March, 12-30, 2012. The objective of the School was to provide an in-depth knowledge of the important aspects of laser physics and technology to doctoral students and young researchers and motivate them for further work in this area. In keeping with this objective, the fourteen chapters, written by leading Indian experts, based on the lectures delivered by them at the School, provide along with class room type coverage of the fundamentals of the field, a brief review of the current status of the field. The book will be useful for doctoral students and young scientists who are embarking on a research in this area as well as to professional...

  1. Free electron lasers on superconducting linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lapierrre, Y.

    1986-01-01

    Analysing the results of several Free Electron Laser experiments, we show that the best accelerator should be a superconducting linear accelerator: it can provide a c.w. high quality beam (energy spread and emittance). The technology of RF superconductivity provide the opportunity to build such an accelerator. In this paper, we present the foreseen results one can expect from a FEL based on such a machine: - Average power > 1 Kw, - Total efficiency > 2.5%, - Tunability between 0.6 and 5 μm [fr

  2. Free-electron laser beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minehara, Eisuke

    2003-01-01

    The principle and history of free-electron laser (FEL), first evidenced in 1977, the relationship between FEL wavelength and output power, the high-power FEL driven by the superconducting linac, the X-ray FEL by the linac, and the medical use are described. FEL is the vacuum oscillator tube and essentially composed from the high-energy linac, undulator and light-resonator. It utilizes free electrons in the vacuum to generate the beam with wavelength ranging from microwave to gamma ray. The first high-power FEL developed in Japanese Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) is based on the development of superconducting linac for oscillating the highest power beam. In the medical field, applications to excise brain tumors (in US) and to reconstruct experimentally blood vessels in the pig heart (in Gunma University) by lasing and laser coagulator are in progress with examinations to remove intra-vascular cholesterol mass by irradiation of 5.7μm FEL beam. Cancer cells are considered diagnosed by FEL beam of far-infrared-THz range. The FEL beam CT is expected to have a wide variety of application without the radiation exposure and its resolution is equal or superior to that of usual imaging techniques. (N.I.)

  3. Laser Technologies in Industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-06-01

    Biophysics Ies. Lab., lech Univ Budapest IBdbpest Krusper ltca 2-4. Budapest 1l11 - HUNGARY P. "drlharan - CSIRu Dlv of Applied Physics, Box 218 lindfield...of Contour Naps of Manufacturing Components ---- 1H3O-IiIUU U.R. Barton and N.J. Lalor Liverpool Polytechnic. U.K. SESSION 2C - Laser lech . fcr Chai...8217- 0: : C0. 0 W W41> . id IA4󈧒 00)1-40 w I 04J Id 4 C41.-C 4 o r1-D 1- IV ,- COcO 0 1. .-- A 0-C4 4- C m In ~ 44) 4 411.1A -.41 -1044.. 4- 0 CL 4

  4. Emerging technologies for compact visible laser sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forrest, G.T.

    1988-01-01

    A number of laser and non-linear optical technologies and converging on commercial designs. High power laser diodes and non-linear materials are being incorporated in prototype lasers, many of which will become commercially available products during the next 1-5 years. This paper reviews the output characteristics of such lasers. Lasers which are discussed include direct doubling of laser diodes based on proton exchanged lithium niobate, fiber lasers, frequency doubled diode pumped Nd:YAG lasers, and sum frequency mixed Nd:YAG lasers. Such lasers are capable of providing milliwatt output powers in the green and/or blue spectral regions

  5. Simulation of DARMSTADT Free Electron Laser and a Comparison of High Gain Free Electron Lasers

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Massey, Daniel

    2000-01-01

    ...: the height of the separatrix for a tapered undulator, use of dimensionless parameters in a simple model and description for several high gain free electron lasers, and simulations of the Darmstadt free electron laser...

  6. FPGA technology application in a fast measurement and control system for the TESLA superconducting cavity of a FLASH free electron laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozniak, Krzysztof T.

    2007-08-01

    Contemporary basic research in physics, biology, chemistry, pharmacology, material technology and other branches uses methods based on sample penetration (and the effect measurement) with pulsed ultra-short EM waves of very high beam intensity. This paper is an overview of a free electron laser (FEL) used in such methods. A method for the stabilization of the EM field in a superconducting 'TESLA' cavity accelerator for electrons is presented. This requires precise measurements of the field. The SC accelerator is a basic part of the FEL. The given example concerns the FLASH machine in DESY. The presented, high power EM field stabilization system is based on FPGA circuits with embedded fast hardware multiplication blocks. Examples of a few families of such new generation practically designed and constructed system realizations are given. The system is referred to as the SIMCON (from the microwave superconducting cavity SIMulator and CONtroller). SIMCONs consist of either single-module, multi-module configurable or multichannel distributed units. The SIMCON system stabilizes the EM field by a very fast feedback loop with an adaptation process, supplemented with a feed-forward. The following are presented: a parametric hardware description (firmware) in the form of behavioural VHDL algorithms; implementation results in VirtexIIPro circuits; examples of measurements of high power EM field stability performed under the nominal conditions of accelerator work.

  7. Laser Sintering Technology and Balling Phenomenon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyar, Perihan

    2018-02-01

    The aim of this review was to evaluate the balling phenomenon which occurs typically in Selective Laser Sintering (SLS). The balling phenomenon is a typical SLS defect, and observed in laser sintered powder, significantly reduces the quality of SLS, and hinders the further development of SLS Technology. Electronic database searches were performed using Google Scholar. The keywords "laser sintering, selective laser sintering, direct metal laser melting, and balling phenomenon" were searched in title/abstract of publications, limited to December 31, 2016. The inclusion criteria were SLS, balling phenomenon, some alloys (such as Cr-Co, iron, stainless steel, and Cu-based alloys) mechanical properties, microstructure and bond strength between metal-ceramic crown, laboratory studies, full text, and in English language. A total of 100 articles were found the initial search and yielded a total of 50 studies, 30 of which did not fulfill the inclusion criteria and were therefore excluded. In addition, 20 studies were found by screening the reference list of all included publications. Finally, 40 studies were selected for this review. The method in question is regulated by powder material characteristics and the conditions of laser processing. The procedure of formation, affecting factors, and the mechanism of the balling effect are very complex.

  8. Ultrashort pulse laser technology laser sources and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Schrempel, Frank; Dausinger, Friedrich

    2016-01-01

    Ultrashort laser pulses with durations in the femtosecond range up to a few picoseconds provide a unique method for precise materials processing or medical applications. Paired with the recent developments in ultrashort pulse lasers, this technology is finding its way into various application fields. The book gives a comprehensive overview of the principles and applications of ultrashort pulse lasers, especially applied to medicine and production technology. Recent advances in laser technology are discussed in detail. This covers the development of reliable and cheap low power laser sources as well as high average power ultrashort pulse lasers for large scale manufacturing. The fundamentals of laser-matter-interaction as well as processing strategies and the required system technology are discussed for these laser sources with respect to precise materials processing. Finally, different applications within medicine, measurement technology or materials processing are highlighted.

  9. Laser technologies. KrF laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Owadano, Yoshiro; Okuda, Isao; Matsushima, Isao; Yashiro, Hidehiko; Matsumoto, Yuji

    1994-01-01

    Krypton-fluoride (KrF) laser is one of the promising driver for inertial confinement fusion because of its short wavelength, broad band width, high efficiency and capability of high repetition-rate operation. A high gain double-pass amplifier can yield a high, heavily saturated output intensity (5 to 6 times saturation intensity, > 10MW/cm 2 ) with nearly maximum efficiency (> 10%) and high stage gain (> 50) at the same time. The high gain can be achieved by cylindrical electron-beam pumping configuration without external magnetic field. Angular pulse multiplexing enables efficient pulse compression and amplification of beams with broad spectral width. The broad band width is required for irradiation smoothing methods, BRP (broad-band Random Phase Irradiation) or ISI (Induced Spatial Incoherence). Multi-kJ KrF laser, Super-ASHURA (Electrotechnical Laboratory, 8kJ), NIKE (at Naval Research Laboratory, 3kJ) and TITANIA (Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, 2kJ) are being developed and close to completion. (author)

  10. Free electron laser in storage rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Couprie, M.E.

    1989-05-01

    Investigations on the development of a free electron laser, carried out in ACO storage ring, are reported. The emission of synchrotron radiation is obtained from the interaction of relativistic charged particles with the magnetic field of the undulator. The synchrotron radiation is stored in a cavity, where interaction with electrons occurs. From the amplification of light waves, the laser radiation is then obtained. The changes in the electron wave packets induced by LEL experiment, carried out in ACO storage ring, are reported. A better understanding of the saturation mechanism, which dictates laser equilibrium, is obtained. Experiments in Super ACO were carried out and the following topics, on the construction of the laser, were investigated: the development of an optical klystron, gain optimization, the position of the mirrors (concerning the radiation from the undulator). This work allowed the construction of a 600 MeV free electron laser, at Super ACO. The development of a laser involving UV range radiation, is considered [fr

  11. Economic technology of laser cutting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedin, Alexander V.; Shilov, Igor V.; Vassiliev, Vladimir V.; Malov, Dmitri V.; Peskov, Vladimir N.

    2000-02-01

    The laser cutting of color metals and alloys by a thickness more than 2 mm has significant difficulties due to high reflective ability and large thermal conduction. We made it possible to raise energy efficiency and quality of laser cutting by using a laser processing system (LPS) consisting both of the YAG:Nd laser with passive Q-switching on base of LiF:F2- crystals and the CO2 laser. A distinctive feature of the LPS is that the radiation of different lasers incorporated in a coaxial beam has simultaneously high level of peak power (more than 400 kW in a TEM00 mode) and significant level of average power (up to 800 W in a TEM01 mode of the CO2 laser). The application of combined radiation for cutting of an aluminum alloy of D16 type made it possible to decrease the cutting energy threshold in 1.7 times, to increase depth of treatment from 2 up to 4 mm, and velocity from 0.015 up to 0.7 m/min, and also to eliminate application of absorptive coatings. At cutting of steels the velocity of treatment was doubled, and also an oxygen flow was eliminated from the technological process and replaced by the air. The obtained raise of energy efficiency and quality of cutting is explained by an essential size reducing of a formed penetration channel and by the shifting of a thermal cutting mode from melting to evaporation. The evaluation of interaction efficiency of a combined radiation was produced on the basis of non-stationary thermal-hydrodynamic model of a heating source moving as in the cutting direction, and also into the depth of material.

  12. Ultrafast magnetodynamics with free-electron lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malvestuto, Marco; Ciprian, Roberta; Caretta, Antonio; Casarin, Barbara; Parmigiani, Fulvio

    2018-02-01

    The study of ultrafast magnetodynamics has entered a new era thanks to the groundbreaking technological advances in free-electron laser (FEL) light sources. The advent of these light sources has made possible unprecedented experimental schemes for time-resolved x-ray magneto-optic spectroscopies, which are now paving the road for exploring the ultimate limits of out-of-equilibrium magnetic phenomena. In particular, these studies will provide insights into elementary mechanisms governing spin and orbital dynamics, therefore contributing to the development of ultrafast devices for relevant magnetic technologies. This topical review focuses on recent advancement in the study of non-equilibrium magnetic phenomena from the perspective of time-resolved extreme ultra violet (EUV) and soft x-ray spectroscopies at FELs with highlights of some important experimental results.

  13. GBFEL-TIE (Ground-Based Free Electron Laser Technology Experiment) sample survey on White Sands Missile Range, New Mexico: The NASA, Stallion, and Orogrande Alternatives. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seaman, T.J.; Doleman, W.H.

    1988-09-30

    Three locations on White Sands Missile Range, New Mexico, are under consideration as alternatives for the proposed Ground-Based Free-Electron Laser Technology Integration Experiment (GBFEL-TIE). The study conducted jointly by Prewitt and Associates, Inc., and the Office of Contract Archeology, was designed to provide input into the GBFEL-TIE Draft Environmental Impact Statement concerning the potential impact of the proposed project on cultural resources in each of the alternatives. The input consists of a series of predictions based on data gathered from two sources: (1) a cultural resource sample survey (15%) of two alternatives conducted as part of this study, and (2) from a previous survey of the third alternative. A predictive model was devleoped and applied using these data that estimated the potential impact of the GBFEL-TIE facility on the cultural resources within each alternative. The predictions indicate that the NASA alternatives, by far, the least favorable location for the facility followed by the Orogrande and Stallion Alternatives.

  14. ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION REPORT LASER TOUCH AND TECHNOLOGIES, LLC LASER TOUCH MODEL LT-B512

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Environmental Technology Verification report discusses the technology and performance of Laser Touch model LT-B512 targeting device manufactured by Laser Touch and Technologies, LLC, for manual spray painting operations. The relative transfer efficiency (TE) improved an avera...

  15. Laser technologies of ceramics treatment (review)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markov, E.M.; Voronezhtsev, Yu.I.; Gol'dade, V.A.

    1990-01-01

    Publications on the laser technologies of ceramic coating production, ceramics treatment and ceramics manufacture are analyzed for the past 5 years. Features of production processes utilizing the interaction of laser radiation with ceramics and other substances which form the ceramics as a result of such interaction are considered. Possible ways of improving laser technologies of ceramics treatment are outlined

  16. Development of laser technology in Poland

    CERN Document Server

    Gajda, J

    2009-01-01

    The paper presents chosen development threads of laser technology and associated branches of optoelectronics in this country. An occasion to summarize the work and show their current status is the 50 th anniversary of construction of the first laser. The first laser in Poland was launched successfully in 1969, almost simultaneously at WAT and PW. Domestic achievements in this area are summarized every three years by Symposium on Laser Technology held traditionally in Swinoujscie. The work carried on in Poland concerns technology of laser materials, construction of new lasers and associated equipment as well as laser applications. Many technical teams participate in laser oriented European structural and framework projects. Ths is an invited paper to present participation of Polish teams in such European projects as EuCARD - European Coordination of Accelerator Research, FLASH - Free ELctron Laser in DESY Hamburg, E-XFEL - European X-Ray FEL, ELI - Extreme Light Infrastructure, and HIPER.

  17. Free electron laser and superconductivity

    CERN Document Server

    Iwata, A

    2003-01-01

    The lasing of the first free-electron laser (FEL) in the world was successfully carried out in 1977, so the history of FELs as a light source is not so long. But FELs are now utilized for research in many scientific and engineering fields owing to such characteristics as tunability of the wavelength, and short pulse and high peak power, which is difficult utilizing a common light source. Research for industrial applications has also been carried out in some fields, such as life sciences, semiconductors, nano-scale measurement, and others. The task for the industrial use of FEL is the realization of high energy efficiency and high optical power. As a means of promoting realization, the combining of an FEL and superconducting linac is now under development in order to overcome the thermal limitations of normal-conducting linacs. Further, since tuning the wavelength is carried out by changing the magnetic density of the undulator, which is now induced by moving part of the stack of permanent magnets, there is un...

  18. Theoretical study of free electron laser physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, Jae Gwon; Cho, Sung Oh; Jeong, Young Uk; Kim, Sun Kook; Lee, Byung Cheol; Cha, Byung Heon; Lee, Jong Min [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejeon (Korea)

    2000-04-01

    A theoretical study of free electron laser physics is presented in this report. In particular, an analysis is given of the free electron laser with a linearly polarized magnetic wiggler. We describe the basic electron dynamics and gain mechanism in a free electron laser by solving the one-body classical Lorentz force equations in the presence of a periodic magnetic field and a plane electromagnetic wave. Phase space paths for electrons analogously related to those of a simple pendulum are used to describe the laser gain and saturation, and the evolution of the electron beam energy and position distributions. We present an analysis of the single-mode problem and a self-consistent nonlinear treatment of the finite transverse dimensional effects associated with the free electron laser in a steady state. Results computed by applying an external D.C. electric field to the system are discussed for investigating efficiency enhancement of the free electron lasers. Finally optical guiding effect in small signal regime is described to investigate the possibility of amplifying radiation fields in very long wigglers for large gain and high extraction efficiency. 14 refs., 45 figs. (Author)

  19. Direct longitudinal laser acceleration of electrons in free space

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Carbajo

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Compact laser-driven accelerators are pursued heavily worldwide because they make novel methods and tools invented at national laboratories widely accessible in science, health, security, and technology [V. Malka et al., Principles and applications of compact laser-plasma accelerators, Nat. Phys. 4, 447 (2008]. Current leading laser-based accelerator technologies [S. P. D. Mangles et al., Monoenergetic beams of relativistic electrons from intense laser-plasma interactions, Nature (London 431, 535 (2004; T. Toncian et al., Ultrafast laser-driven microlens to focus and energy-select mega-electron volt protons, Science 312, 410 (2006; S. Tokita et al. Single-shot ultrafast electron diffraction with a laser-accelerated sub-MeV electron pulse, Appl. Phys. Lett. 95, 111911 (2009] rely on a medium to assist the light to particle energy transfer. The medium imposes material limitations or may introduce inhomogeneous fields [J. R. Dwyer et al., Femtosecond electron diffraction: “Making the molecular movie,”, Phil. Trans. R. Soc. A 364, 741 (2006]. The advent of few cycle ultraintense radially polarized lasers [S. Carbajo et al., Efficient generation of ultraintense few-cycle radially polarized laser pulses, Opt. Lett. 39, 2487 (2014] has ushered in a novel accelerator concept [L. J. Wong and F. X. Kärtner, Direct acceleration of an electron in infinite vacuum by a pulsed radially polarized laser beam, Opt. Express 18, 25035 (2010; F. Pierre-Louis et al. Direct-field electron acceleration with ultrafast radially polarized laser beams: Scaling laws and optimization, J. Phys. B 43, 025401 (2010; Y. I. Salamin, Electron acceleration from rest in vacuum by an axicon Gaussian laser beam, Phys. Rev. A 73, 043402 (2006; C. Varin and M. Piché, Relativistic attosecond electron pulses from a free-space laser-acceleration scheme, Phys. Rev. E 74, 045602 (2006; A. Sell and F. X. Kärtner, Attosecond electron bunches accelerated and

  20. An alternative communication source : Free Electron Laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mehmet, Kara; Metin, Orbay

    2010-01-01

    Nowadays, conventional lasers are widely used in communication systems. In this point, Free Electron Laser (FEL) represents a radical alternative to conventional lasers, due to being high power, tunable source and short wavelength in spite of the considerable cost and complexicity. In this presentation, firstly, the currently operating FELs performance will be summarized. After that the desired requirements of a communication source will be outlined and compared to the FEL features

  1. Material Technology for Vortex Electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, T.; Oda, S.; Michikami, O.; Terashima, T.

    High-T_c superconductor (HTSC) thin films are typically grown by mean of pulsed laser deposition (PLD), metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD), sputtering or molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). This chapter reviews recent progress in the thin film growth technologies of HTSCs.

  2. Free electron laser as a fusion driver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prosnitz, D.; Schlitt, L.

    1981-01-01

    The Free Electron Laser (FEL) is shown to be a potentially attractive solution to the problem of finding a suitable short wavelength fusion driver. The design of a 3 MJ, 250 nm FEL fusion driver is discussed

  3. Laser and Plasma Technology Division, Annual Reports 1996 and 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venkatramani, N.

    1999-04-01

    This report describes the activity of the Laser and Plasma Technology Division of Bhabha Atomic Research Centre during the two year period 1996- 1997. This division is engaged in the research and development of high power beams mainly laser, plasma and electron beams. Laser and Plasma Technology Division has strived to establish indigenous capability to cater to the requirements of Department of Atomic Energy. This involves development and technology readiness study of laser, plasma and electron beam devices. In addition, studies are also carried out on related physical phenomenon with a view to gain better understanding of the devices. This report has been compiled from individual reports of various groups/sections working in the division. A list of publications by the several members of the division is also included. (author)

  4. 2nd Topical Workshop on Laser Technology and Optics Design

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    Lasers have a variety of applications in particle accelerator operation and will play a key role in the development of future particle accelerators by improving the generation of high brightness electron and exotic ion beams and through increasing the acceleration gradient. Lasers will also make an increasingly important contribution to the characterization of many complex particle beams by means of laser-based beam diagnostics methods. The second LANET topical workshop will address the key aspects of laser technology and optics design relevant to laser application to accelerators. The workshop will cover general optics design, provide an overview of different laser sources and discuss methods to characterize beams in details. Participants will be able to choose from a range of topical areas that go deeper in more specific aspects including tuneable lasers, design of transfer lines, noise sources and their elimination and non-linear optics effects. The format of the workshop will be mainly training-based wit...

  5. Analysis of Laser Sintering Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladislav Markovič

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The new, high-tech development and customization is one ofthe most important factors in promoting the country‘s economicgrowth indicators. The economic downturn in the industryrequires technology and equipment using a minimumof raw materials and providing maximum performance. Thisstatement perfectly describes the innovative, forward-looking,cost-effective laser powder sintering (SLS technology. Here,thanks to the latest engineering achievements, product surfacesare modified and improved, they gain new characteristics. SLSis viable in automobile, engineering, construction, aerospace,aircraft, printing, medical and other areas.In order to create a product which meets the standards andtechnical documentation it is necessary to use and ensure highquality of raw materials, high-end equipment, qualified personnel,the working environment with proper climatic conditions, ergonomics,etc. But all of these, the quality of the product becomesthe decisive indicators meaningless if know how to properly selectthe laser processing operation. Scanning speed, beam power,pulse frequency, protective gases, powder layer thickness – allof them are the physical and mechanical characteristics of thechange in a small range changes the quality of the product of thefuture, the field of application and performance characteristics.

  6. High Frequency Electronic Packaging Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman, M.; Lowry, L.; Lee, K.; Kolawa, E.; Tulintseff, A.; Shalkhauser, K.; Whitaker, J.; Piket-May, M.

    1994-01-01

    Commercial and government communication, radar, and information systems face the challenge of cost and mass reduction via the application of advanced packaging technology. A majority of both government and industry support has been focused on low frequency digital electronics.

  7. Accessible Electronic and Information Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    This Policy establishes EPA's responsibilities and procedures for making its Electronic and Information Technology (EIT) products accessible to all people, including people with disabilities, in accordance with Section 508 of the Rehabilitation Act.

  8. Phase conjugating plasma mirror free electron laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhowmik, A.; McMullin, W.A.

    1988-02-02

    A self-aligning, high power, free-electron laser (FEL) oscillator is described comprising: (a) a partially transmitting, stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) plasma mirror output element located near the output end of the FEL wiggler for reflecting a portion of the radiation emitted by the FEL wiggler back through the wiggler; (b) a self-aligning, feedback element located near the electron beam input end of the FEL wiggler for reflecting the portion of radiation from the output element back through the FEL wiggler; (c) laser beam expansion elements in succession on the path of the resulting output laser beam for magnifying the laser beam to a desired output diameter; and (d) a totally reflecting, removable start-up mirror located between the SBS plasma mirror and the laser beam expansion elements, the removable start-up mirror for providing feedback until the SBS threshold is reached.

  9. Research of laser stealth performance test technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhen-xing; Shi, Sheng-bing; Han, Fu-li; Wu, Yan-lin; Song, Chun-yan

    2014-09-01

    Laser stealth is an important way of photoelectric stealth weapons systems. According to operational principle of laser range finder, we actively explore and study the stealth performance approval testing technology of laser stealth materials, and bring forward and establish the stealth performance field test methods of stealth efficiency evaluation. Through contrastive test of two kinds of materials, the method is correct and effective.

  10. High power electron beam accelerators for gas laser excitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelly, J.G.; Martin, T.H.; Halbleib, J.A.

    1976-06-01

    A preliminary parameter investigation has been used to determine a possible design of a high-power, relativistic electron beam, transversely excited laser. Based on considerations of present and developing pulsed power technology, broad area diode physics and projected laser requirements, an exciter is proposed consisting of a Marx generator, pulse shaping transmission lines, radially converging ring diodes and a laser chamber. The accelerator should be able to deliver approximately 20 kJ of electron energy at 1 MeV to the 10 4 cm 2 cylindrical surface of a laser chamber 1 m long and 0.3 m in diameter in 24 ns with very small azimuthal asymmetry and uniform radial deposition

  11. Benchmarking foreign electronics technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bostian, C.W.; Hodges, D.A.; Leachman, R.C.; Sheridan, T.B.; Tsang, W.T.; White, R.M.

    1994-12-01

    This report has been drafted in response to a request from the Japanese Technology Evaluation Center`s (JTEC) Panel on Benchmarking Select Technologies. Since April 1991, the Competitive Semiconductor Manufacturing (CSM) Program at the University of California at Berkeley has been engaged in a detailed study of quality, productivity, and competitiveness in semiconductor manufacturing worldwide. The program is a joint activity of the College of Engineering, the Haas School of Business, and the Berkeley Roundtable on the International Economy, under sponsorship of the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, and with the cooperation of semiconductor producers from Asia, Europe and the United States. Professors David A. Hodges and Robert C. Leachman are the project`s Co-Directors. The present report for JTEC is primarily based on data and analysis drawn from that continuing program. The CSM program is being conducted by faculty, graduate students and research staff from UC Berkeley`s Schools of Engineering and Business, and Department of Economics. Many of the participating firms are represented on the program`s Industry Advisory Board. The Board played an important role in defining the research agenda. A pilot study was conducted in 1991 with the cooperation of three semiconductor plants. The research plan and survey documents were thereby refined. The main phase of the CSM benchmarking study began in mid-1992 and will continue at least through 1997. reports are presented on the manufacture of integrated circuits; data storage; wireless technology; human-machine interfaces; and optoelectronics. Selected papers are indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  12. Laser and electron beam processing of silicon and gallium arsenide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Narayan, J.

    1979-10-01

    Laser (photon) and electron beams provide a controlled source of heat by which surface layers of silicon and gallium arsenide can be rapidly melted and cooled with rates exceeding 10/sup 80/C/sec. The melting process has been used to remove displacement damage in ion implanted Si and GaAs, to remove dislocations, loops and precipitates in silicon and to study impurity segregation and solubility limits. The mechanisms associated with various phenomena will be examined. The possible impact of laser and electron beam processing on device technology, particularly with respect to solar cells is discussed.

  13. Ultrashort laser pulse driven inverse free electron laser accelerator experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. T. Moody

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we discuss the ultrashort pulse high gradient inverse free electron laser accelerator experiment carried out at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory which demonstrated gradients exceeding 200  MV/m using a 4 TW 100 fs long 800 nm Ti:Sa laser pulse. Due to the short laser and electron pulse lengths, synchronization was determined to be one of the main challenges in this experiment. This made necessary the implementation of a single-shot, nondestructive, electro-optic sampling based diagnostics to enable time-stamping of each laser accelerator shot with <100  fs accuracy. The results of this experiment are expected to pave the way towards the development of future GeV-class IFEL accelerators.

  14. Laser technology and applications 2012: a preview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gajda, Jerzy; Romaniuk, Ryszard S.

    The research and technical achievements in the area of lasers are summarized every three years by the National Symposium on Laser Technology held in the Baltic See Resort Świnoujście near Szczecin, Poland. The paper presents a preview of the symposium works to be shown and debated during this key event in September 2012. There are shown development tendencies of laser materials and technologies and laser associated branches of optoelectronics in this country, including the efforts of academia, governmental institutes, research businesses and industry. The second branch of the symposium works are laser applications, where the laser systems operators and laser users present their achievements. Topical tracks of the meeting are presented, as well as the keynote and invited subjects delivered by key representatives of the laser industry.

  15. Laser measurement technology fundamentals and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Donges, Axel

    2015-01-01

    Laser measurement technology has evolved in the last years in a versatile and reflationary way. Today, its methods are indispensable for research and development activities as well as for production technology. Every physicist and engineer should therefore gain a working knowledge of laser measurement technology. This book closes the gap of existing textbooks. It introduces in a comprehensible presentation laser measurement technology in all its aspects. Numerous figures, graphs and tables allow for a fast access into the matter. In the first part of the book the important physical and optical basics are described being necessary to understand laser measurement technology. In the second part technically significant measuring methods are explained and application examples are presented. Target groups of this textbook are students of natural and engineering sciences as well as working physicists and engineers, who are interested to make themselves familiar with laser measurement technology and its fascinating p...

  16. Control system for JAERI Free Electron Laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugimoto, Masayoshi

    1992-01-01

    A control system comprising of the personal computers network and the CAMAC stations for the JAERI Free Electron Laser is designed and is in the development stage. It controls the equipment and analyzes the electron and optical beam experiments. The concept and the prototype of the control system are described. (author)

  17. Laser-assisted electron-atom collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mason, N.J.

    1989-01-01

    New developments in our understanding of the electron-atom collision process have been made possible by combining the use of highly monochromatic electron beams and intense CO 2 lasers. This paper reviews such experiments and discusses possible future progress in what is a new field in atomic collision physics. (author)

  18. Skylab electronic technological advancements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornback, G. L.

    1974-01-01

    The present work describes three electronic devices designed for use in the Skylab airlock module: the teleprinter system, the quartz crystal microbalance contamination monitor (QCM), and the speaker. Design considerations, operation, characteristics, and system development are described for these systems, with accompanying diagrams, graphs, and photographs. The teleprinter is a thermal dot printer used to produce hard copy messages by electrically heating print elements in contact with heat-sensitive paper. The QCM was designed to estimate contamination buildup on optical surfaces of the earth resources experiment package. A vibrating quartz crystal is used as a microbalance relating deposited mass to shifts in the crystal's resonant frequency. Audio devices provide communication between crew members and between crew and STDN, and also provide audible alarms, via the caution and warning system, of out-of-limit-conditions.

  19. Laser and Plasma Technology Division annual report 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venkatramani, N.; Verma, R.L.

    1995-01-01

    A brief account of the research and development (R and D) activities carried out by Laser and Plasma Technology Division of Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Bombay during the period 1994 is presented. The activities are reported under the headings: 1) laser activities, 2) thermal plasma activities, 3) electron beam activity. At the end of each section, a list of publications by the staff members in the field indicated by the title of the section is given. (author). refs., tabs., figs

  20. Laser and Plasma Technology Division : annual report 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    A brief account of the research and development (R and D) activities carried out by Laser and Plasma Technology Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Bombay during 1991 is presented. The R and D activities are reported under the headings (1) Laser Activities, (2) Thermal Plasma Activities, (3) Electron Beam Activities and (4) Divisional Workshop Activities. List of publications is given at the end of each activity heading

  1. Laser and Plasma Technology Division : annual report (1990-91)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    A brief account of the research and development (R and D) activities carried out by Laser and Plasma Technology Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Bombay during the period 1990-91 is presented. The R and D activities are reported under the headings: 1) Laser Activities, 2) Thermal Plasma Activities, and 3) Electron Beam Activities. List of publications including journal articles, papers published in symposia, conferences etc. is given at the end. (original). figs

  2. The Next Technology Revolution - Nano Electronic Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turlik, Iwona

    2004-03-01

    Nanotechnology is a revolutionary engine that will engender enormous changes in a vast majority of today's industries and markets, while potentially creating whole new industries. The impact of nanotechnology is particularly significant in the electronics industry, which is constantly driven by the need for higher performance, increased functionality, smaller size and lower cost. Nanotechnology can influence many of the hundreds of components that are typically assembled to manufacture modern electronic devices. Motorola manufactures electronics for a wide range of industries and communication products. In this presentation, the typical components of a cellular phone are outlined and technology requirements for future products, the customer benefits, and the potential impact of nanotechnology on many of the components are discussed. Technology needs include reliable materials supply, processes for high volume production, experimental and simulation tools, etc. For example, even routine procedures such as failure characterization may require the development of new tools for investigating nano-scale phenomena. Business needs include the development of an effective, high volume supply chain for nano-materials and devices, disruptive product platforms, and visible performance impact on the end consumer. An equally significant long-term industry need is the availability of science and engineering graduates with a multidisciplinary focus and a deep understanding of the fundamentals of nano-technology, that can harness the technology to create revolutionary products.

  3. Ferroelectric Electron Emission Principles and Technology

    CERN Document Server

    Riege, H

    1997-01-01

    The spontaneous electrical polarization of ferroelectric materials can be changed either by reversal or by phase transition from a ferroelectric into a non-ferroelectric state or vice versa. If spontaneous polarization changes are induced with fast heat, mechanical pressure, laser or electric field pulses on a submicrosecond time scale, strong uncompensated surface charge densities and related polarization fields are generated, which may lead to the intense self-emission of electrons from the negatively charged free surface areas of the ferroelectric sample. Hence, electron guns can be built with extraction-field-free ferroelectric cathodes, which may be easily separated from the high-field regions of post-accelerating gap structures. The intensity, the energy, the temporal and spatial distribution, and the repetitition rate of the emitted electron beams can be controlled within wide limits via the excitation pulses and external focusing and accelerating electromagnetic fields. The technological advantages an...

  4. Laser and Plasma Technology Division annual report 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venkatramani, N.

    1996-01-01

    This report describes the activity of the Laser and Plasma Technology Division of Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai during the period 1995. This division is engaged in the research and development of high power beams namely lasers, plasma and electron beams which are characterized by high power density. This division has strived to establish indigenous capability to cater to the requirements of the Department of Atomic Energy. The broad program objectives of the division are (1) development and technology readiness studies of laser, plasma and electron beam devices; (2) studies on related physical phenomena with a view to gain better understanding of the devices and (3) improvements in technology and exploration of new areas. This report has been compiled from individual reports of various groups/sections with marginal editing. At the end of each section; a list of publications by the staff members in the field indicated by the title of the section is given. refs., figs., tabs

  5. Undulators and free-electron lasers

    CERN Document Server

    Luchini, P

    1990-01-01

    This book is a reference text for all those working in free-electron laser research as well as being a learning aid for physicists and graduate students who wish an introduction to this field. Only a basic understanding of relativistic mechanics and electromagnetism is presupposed. After an overview of early developments and general principles of operation, the different models that can be used to describe free-electron lasers are presented, organized according to their range of applicability. The relevent conceptual and mathematical constructs are built up from first principles with attention to obtaining the practically important results in a simple but rigorous way. Interaction of the undulator with the driving electron accelerator and the laser cavity and design of undulator magnets are treated and an overview is given of some typical experiments.

  6. Galvanometer scanning technology for laser additive manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Xi; Li, Jin; Lucas, Mark

    2017-02-01

    A galvanometer laser beam scanning system is an essential element in many laser additive manufacturing (LAM) technologies including Stereolithography (SLA), Selective Laser Sintering (SLS) and Selective Laser Melting (SLM). Understanding the laser beam scanning techniques and recent innovations in this field will greatly benefit the 3D laser printing system integration and technology advance. One of the challenges to achieve high quality 3D printed parts is due to the non-uniform laser power density delivered on the materials caused by the acceleration and deceleration movements of the galvanometer at ends of the hatching and outlining patterns. One way to solve this problem is to modulate the laser power as the function of the scanning speed during the acceleration or deceleration periods. Another strategy is to maintain the constant scanning speed while accurately coordinating the laser on and off operation throughout the job. In this paper, we demonstrate the high speed, high accuracy and low drift digital scanning technology that incorporates both techniques to achieve uniform laser density with minimal additional process development. With the constant scanning speed method, the scanner not only delivers high quality and uniform results, but also a throughput increase of 23% on a typical LAM job, compared to that of the conventional control method that requires galvanometer acceleration and deceleration movements.

  7. Laser Processing Technology using Metal Powders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jang, Jeong-Hwan; Moon, Young-Hoon

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to review the state of laser processing technology using metal powders. In recent years, a series of research and development efforts have been undertaken worldwide to develop laser processing technologies to fabricate metal-based parts. Layered manufacturing by the laser melting process is gaining ground for use in manufacturing rapid prototypes (RP), tools (RT) and functional end products. Selective laser sintering / melting (SLS/SLM) is one of the most rapidly growing rapid prototyping techniques. This is mainly due to the processes's suitability for almost any materials, including polymers, metals, ceramics and many types of composites. The interaction between the laser beam and the powder material used in the laser melting process is one of the dominant phenomena defining feasibility and quality. In the case of SLS, the powder is not fully melted during laser scanning, therefore the SLS-processed parts are not fully dense and have relatively low strength. To overcome this disadvantage, SLM and laser cladding (LC) processes have been used to enable full melting of the powder. Further studies on the laser processing technology will be continued due to the many potential applications that the technology offers.

  8. An inverse free electron laser accelerator experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wernick, I.; Marshall, T.C.

    1992-01-01

    A free electron laser was configured as an autoaccelerator to test the principle of accelerating electrons by stimulated absorption of radiation (λ = 1.65mm) by an electron beam (750kV) traversing an undulator. Radiation is produced in the first section of a constant period undulator (1 w1 = 1.43cm) and then absorbed (∼ 40%) in a second undulator, having a tapered period (1 w2 = 1.8 - 2.25cm), which results in the acceleration of a subgroup (∼ 9%) of electrons to ∼ 1MeV

  9. Microlens Array Laser Transverse Shaping Technique for Photoemission Electron Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halavanau, A. [Northern Illinois Univ., DeKalb, IL (United States); Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Ha, G. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Pohang Univ. of Science and Technology (POSTECH) (Korea, Republic of); Qiang, G. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Tsinghua Univ., Beijing (China); Gai, W. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Power, J. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Piot, P. [Northern Illinois Univ., DeKalb, IL (United States); Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Wisniewski, E. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Edstrom, D. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Ruan, J. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Santucci, J. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States)

    2016-09-06

    A common issue encountered in photoemission electron sources used in electron accelerators is distortion of the laser spot due to non ideal conditions at all stages of the amplification. Such a laser spot at the cathode may produce asymmetric charged beams that will result in degradation of the beam quality due to space charge at early stages of acceleration and fail to optimally utilize the cathode surface. In this note we study the possibility of using microlens arrays to dramatically improve the transverse uniformity of the drive laser pulse on UV photocathodes at both Fermilab Accelerator Science \\& Technology (FAST) facility and Argonne Wakefield Accelerator (AWA). In particular, we discuss the experimental characterization of the homogeneity and periodic patterned formation at the photocathode. Finally, we compare the experimental results with the paraxial analysis, ray tracing and wavefront propagation software.

  10. New technologies for submillimeter laser ranging

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Blažek, J.; Procházka, I.; Kodet, J.; Pánek, Petr

    -, 301-303 (2011), s. 397-401 ISSN 1662-8985 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20670512 Keywords : time measurement * laser ranging Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering

  11. Rippled beam free electron laser amplifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlsten, Bruce E.

    1999-01-01

    A free electron laser amplifier provides a scalloping annular electron beam that interacts with the axial electric field of a TM.sub.0n mode. A waveguide defines an axial centerline and, a solenoid arranged about the waveguide produces an axial constant magnetic field within the waveguide. An electron beam source outputs a annular electron beam that interacts with the axial magnetic field to have an equilibrium radius and a ripple radius component having a variable radius with a ripple period along the axial centerline. An rf source outputs an axial electric field that propagates within the waveguide coaxial with the electron beam and has a radial mode that interacts at the electron beam at the equilibrium radius component of the electron beam.

  12. Processing techniques applying laser technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Yuji; Makino Yoshinobu

    2000-01-01

    The requirements for the processing of nuclear energy equipment include high precision, low distortion, and low heat input. Toshiba has developed laser processing techniques for cutting, welding, and surface heat treatment of nuclear energy equipment because the zone affected by distortion and heat in laser processing is very small. Laser processing contributes to the manufacturing of high-quality and high-reliability equipment and reduces the manufacturing period. (author)

  13. Free Electron Laser Synthesis of Functional Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaaf, Peter; Höche, Daniel

    Functional and smart surfaces and coatings play an increasingly decisive role in the applicability and performance of modern materials. From an industrial point of view, there is a great interest with respect to friction, wear, corrosion, and further properties. Many methods have been developed for the improvement of the respective surface and material properties. Traditionally, these treatments range from simple PVD and CVD processes to complicated plasma and hybrid methods. Recently, it has been established that short laser pulses of high energy can induce a direct laser synthesis of functional coatings if the material's surface is irradiated in a reactive atmosphere. The process is based on a complicated combination of laser plasma - gas - material surface interactions. Tests for steel, aluminum, magnesium, titanium, and silicon in nitrogen, methane, and hydrogen atmospheres have been carried out successfully; with these materials, interesting coatings can be produced by direct laser synthesis, for example, AlN and SiC. Various laser types can be used for this purpose: Excimer, Nd:YAG, CO2 Laser, and even the free electron laser (FEL).

  14. Electronic Subsystems For Laser Communication System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Catherine; Maruschak, John; Patschke, Robert; Powers, Michael

    1992-01-01

    Electronic subsystems of free-space laser communication system carry digital signals at 650 Mb/s over long distances. Applicable to general optical communications involving transfer of great quantities of data, and transmission and reception of video images of high definition.

  15. Applications for Energy Recovering Free Electron Lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    George Neil

    2007-08-01

    The availability of high-power, high-brilliance sources of tunable photons from energy-recovered Free Electron Lasers is opening up whole new fields of application of accelerators in industry. This talk will review some of the ideas that are already being put into production, and some of the newer ideas that are still under development.

  16. Commissioning of laser assisted cold spraying technology

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Tlotleng, Monnamme

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available This study demonstrates the potential of a newly designed, assembled and commissioned laser assisted cold spraying (LACS) technology at the National Laser Centre, Pretoria, South Africa, to deposit Al-12wt%Si coatings on stainless steel substrate...

  17. Laser and Plasma Technology Division annual report 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venkatramani, N.; Verma, R.L.

    1993-01-01

    The report describes the research and development (R and D) activities of Laser and Plasma technology Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Bombay during 1992. The broad programme objectives of the Division are: (1) development and technology readiness studies of laser, plasma and electron beam devices, (2) studies on related physical phenomena with a view to gain better understanding of the devices, and (3) improvements in technology and exploration of new areas. The R and D activities are reported under the sections entitled: (1) Laser Activities, (2) Thermal Plasma Activities, and (3) Electron Beam Activities. At the end of each section, a list of publications by the staff members in the field indicated by the title of the section is given. Some of the highlights of R and D work during 1992 are:(1) fabrication of an electron beam sustained CO 2 laser, (2) commissioning of a 6.5 m high LMMHD (Liquid Metal Magneto-hydrodynamic) generator loaded with 1.5 tons of mercury, (3) fabrication of electron beam processing equipment, and (4) study of the magnetic properties of vanadium nitride films produced by reactive sputtering in an indigenously developed DC magnetron sputtering equipment. (author). 56 figs., 6 tabs

  18. Induction accelerators and free-electron lasers at LLNL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Briggs, R.J.

    1989-01-01

    Linear induction accelerators have been developed to produce pulses of charged particles at voltages exceeding the capabilities of single-stage, diode-type accelerators and at currents too high for rf accelerators. In principle, one can accelerate charged particles to arbitrarily high voltages using a multi-stage induction machine. The advent of magnetic pulse power systems makes sustained operation at high repetition rates practical, and high-average-power capability is very likely to open up many new applications of induction machines. In part A of this paper, the US induction linac technology is surveyed emphasizing electron machines. A simplified description is given of how induction machines couple energy to the electron beam to illustrate many general issues that designers of high-brightness and high-average-power induction linacs must consider. An example is given of the application of induction accelerator technology to the relativistic klystron, a power source for high-gradient accelerators. In part B the application of LIAs to free-electron lasers is addressed. The multikiloampere peak currents available from linear induction accelerators make high-gain, free-electron laser amplifier configurations feasible. High extraction efficiencies in a single pass of the electron beam are possible if the wiggler parameters are appropriately tapered, as recently demonstrated at millimeter wavelengths on the 4-MeV ELF facility. Key issues involved in extending the technology to shorter wavelengths and higher average powers are described. Current FEL experiments at LLNL are discussed. 5 references, 16 figures, 1 table

  19. Laser technology inspires new accelerator concepts

    CERN Multimedia

    Katarina Anthony

    2012-01-01

    A new EU-funded research network, LA³NET, is bringing together universities, research centres and industry partners worldwide to explore the use of laser technology in particle beam generation, acceleration and diagnostics. As one of the network partners, CERN will be hosting three early stage researchers in the BE and EN Departments.   One of the laser systems now in use in the ISOLDE experiment. If you take a closer look at recent experimental developments, you’ll notice a new topic trending: laser technology. It’s being used to study the characteristics of particles, as incorporated into the new ALPHA-2 set-up; to conduct diagnostics of particle beams, as used in a laser wire scanner at Petra III; to “breed” unusual ion beams, as carried out by ISOLDE’s Resonance Ionization Laser Ion Source (RILIS); and even to accelerate particles to high energies, as explored at Berkeley’s BELLA facility. These projects notwithstanding...

  20. High Extraction Free-Electron Laser Experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-03-29

    to the wiggler at five locations in January 1992 to assist in beam characterization. The screens, in combination with new dipole coils along the...Lobb, L’onde Electrique 27, 27 (1947). 9. D.C. Quimby, "Floating Wire asurement of Transverse Magnetic Field Errors in a Planar Free-Electron Laser...Design of High Power Laser System" Appl. Phys. Lett. 23, 95 (1973) 6. J. Lobb, L’onde Electrique 27, 27 (1947). 9. D.C. Quimby, "Floating Wire Neasuresent

  1. Simulations of free electron laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwan, T.; Godfrey, B.B.

    1979-01-01

    The generation of coherent electromagnetic radiation by the interaction of a relativistic electron beam with a static helical magnetic field is investigated using one- and two-dimensional relativistic electromagnetic plasma simulation codes. In the one-dimensional simulations, we observed the coupling between the negative energy beam mode and the positive energy electromagnetic wave. Substantial growth rate (omega 1 approx. 0.1 omega/sub pe/) of the unstable electromagnetic wave has been observed and efficiency of radiation production is found to be between 25 to 30% depending on various parameters. In the two-dimensional simulations, we observed a decrease in the growth rate, but increased efficiency due to the decrease in the phase velocity of the unstable electrostatic wave. In addition, we also observed waves propagating at an angle with respect to the electron beam. Consequently, the beam is bunched in the radial as well as the axial directions. These waves are believed to be generated by another instability which saturates at relatively low level

  2. Smith-Purcell free-electron laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woods, K.J.; Walsh, J.E.

    1995-01-01

    The term Smith-Purcell free electron laser can be employed generally to describe any coherent radiation source in which a diffraction grating is used to couple an electron beam with the electromagnetic field. To date, most practical developments of this concept have focused on devices which operate in the millimeter spectral regime. In this paper construction of a Smith-Purcell free-electron laser operating in the far-infrared (FIR) region using a novel resonator cavity design and the electron beam from a low energy (0.5-5 MeV) radio-frequency accelerator will be discussed. A tunable source in this region would have many applications and since the beam energy is low, the small size and low overall cost of such a device would make it a laboratory instrument. Current projects which are progressing towards developing a FIR source are the programs at Stanford and CREOL. Both of these projects are using permanent magnet undulators to couple the electron beam with the electromagnetic field. An alternative approach is to use an electron beam passing over a diffraction grating as the radiating mechanism. This phenomenon is known as Smith-Purcell radiation and was first demonstrated for incoherent emission at visible wavelengths. The addition of feedback enhances the stimulated component of the emission which leads to the growth of coherence. Recent calculations for spontaneous emission have shown that the wiggler parameter and the grating efficiency are analogous. This result has important implications for the development of a Smith-Purcell FEL because a grating based free-electron laser would offer a greater range of tunability at a lower cost than its wiggler based counterpart

  3. Polarization in free electron lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papadichev, V.A. [Lebedev Physical Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1995-12-31

    Polarization of electromagnetic radiation is required very often in numerous scientific and industrial applications: studying of crystals, molecules and intermolecular interaction high-temperature superconductivity, semiconductors and their transitions, polymers and liquid crystals. Using polarized radiation allows to obtain important data (otherwise inaccessible) in astrophysics, meteorology and oceanology. It is promising in chemistry and biology for selective influence on definite parts of molecules in chain synthesis reactions, precise control of various processes at cell and subcell levels, genetic engineering etc. Though polarization methods are well elaborated in optics, they can fail in far-infrared, vacuum-ultraviolet and X-ray regions because of lack of suitable non-absorbing materials and damaging of optical elements at high specific power levels. Therefore, it is of some interest to analyse polarization of untreated FEL radiation obtained with various types of undulators, with and without axial magnetic field. The polarization is studied using solutions for electron orbits in various cases: plane or helical undulator with or without axial magnetic field, two plane undulators, a combination of right- and left-handed helical undulators with equal periods, but different field amplitudes. Some examples of how a desired polarization (elliptical circular or linear) can be obtained or changed quickly, which is necessary in many experiments, are given.

  4. The Mercury Laser Advances Laser Technology for Power Generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ebbers, C A; Caird, J; Moses, E

    2009-01-21

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) at Lawrence Livermore Laboratory is on target to demonstrate 'breakeven' - creating as much fusion-energy output as laser-energy input. NIF will compress a tiny sphere of hydrogen isotopes with 1.8 MJ of laser light in a 20-ns pulse, packing the isotopes so tightly that they fuse together, producing helium nuclei and releasing energy in the form of energetic particles. The achievement of breakeven will culminate an enormous effort by thousands of scientists and engineers, not only at Livermore but around the world, during the past several decades. But what about the day after NIF achieves breakeven? NIF is a world-class engineering research facility, but if laser fusion is ever to generate power for civilian consumption, the laser will have to deliver pulses nearly 100,000 times faster than NIF - a rate of perhaps 10 shots per second as opposed to NIF's several shots a day. The Mercury laser (named after the Roman messenger god) is intended to lead the way to a 10-shots-per-second, electrically-efficient, driver laser for commercial laser fusion. While the Mercury laser will generate only a small fraction of the peak power of NIF (1/30,000), Mercury operates at higher average power. The design of Mercury takes full advantage of the technology advances manifest in its behemoth cousin (Table 1). One significant difference is that, unlike the flashlamp-pumped NIF, Mercury is pumped by highly efficient laser diodes. Mercury is a prototype laser capable of scaling in aperture and energy to a NIF-like beamline, with greater electrical efficiency, while still running at a repetition rate 100,000 times greater.

  5. Linac based free-electron laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rossbach, J.

    2004-01-01

    A basic treatment of the principle of the linac-driven free-electron laser (FEL) is given. The first part of the paper describes the FEL in low-gain approximation, and in the second part the high-gain FEL theory is given. The majority of the treatment describes FELs in one dimensional approximation, neglecting effects by diffraction of radiation and by electron beam emittance. Only in the final section a few remarks on these issues are given. The ambition of the paper is by no means any progress in FEL theory but a clear presentation of basic FEL theory concepts with explicit derivation of the formulae from first principles. (orig.)

  6. Laser and Plasma Technology Division annual report 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venkatramani, N.; Verma, R.L.

    1994-01-01

    This report describes the activities of the Laser and Plasma Technology Division during the year 1993. This Division is engaged in the research and development of high power beams namely laser, plasma and electron beams, which are characterized by high power density, normally in excess of 1 kW/mm 2 . Laser and Plasma Technology Division has strived to establish indigenous capability to cater to the requirements of the Department of Atomic Energy. The broad programme objectives of the Division are : (1) Development and technology readiness studies of laser, plasma and electron beam devices, (2) Studies on related physical phenomena with a view to gain better understanding of the devices, and (3) Improvements in technology and exploration of new areas. This report covers the activities of the Division during 1993 and describes how successfully the objectives have been met. The activities described in the report are diverse in nature. The report has been compiled from individual reports of various groups/sections with marginal editing. (author). refs., tabs., figs

  7. A Free Electron Laser Weapon for Sea Archer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-12-01

    4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE A Free Electron Laser Weapon for Sea Archer 5. FUNDING NUMBERS 6. AUTHOR (S) Ng, Ivan 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION...iii Approved for public release; distribution unlimited A FREE ELECTRON LASER WEAPON FOR SEA ARCHER Ivan Y.C. Ng Defence Science...of laser weapon in a naval environment would be the Free Electron Laser (FEL). FELs provide coherent, tunable, high power radiation, which spans

  8. Laser technology in biomimetics basics and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Belegratis, Maria

    2013-01-01

    Lasers are progressively more used as versatile tools for fabrication purposes. The wide range of available powers, wavelengths, operation modes, repetition rates etc. facilitate the processing of a large spectrum of materials at exceptional precision and quality. Hence, manifold methods were established in the past and novel methods are continuously under development. Biomimetics, the translation from nature-inspired principles to technical applications, is strongly multidisciplinary. This field offers intrinsically a wide scope of applications for laser based methods regarding structuring and modification of materials. This book is dedicated to laser fabrication methods in biomimetics. It introduces both, a laser technology as well as an application focused approach.  The book covers the most important laser lithographic methods and various biomimetics application scenarios ranging from coatings and biotechnology to construction, medical applications and photonics.

  9. Electron acceleration by femtosecond laser interaction with micro-structured plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goers, Andy James

    Laser-driven accelerators are a promising and compact alternative to RF accelerator technology for generating relativistic electron bunches for medical, scientific, and security applications. This dissertation presents three experiments using structured plasmas designed to advance the state of the art in laser-based electron accelerators, with the goal of reducing the energy of the drive laser pulse and enabling higher repetition rate operation with current laser technology. First, electron acceleration by intense femtosecond laser pulses in He-like nitrogen plasma waveguides is demonstrated. Second, significant progress toward a proof of concept realization of quasi-phasematched direct acceleration (QPM-DLA) is presented. Finally, a laser wakefield accelerator at very high plasma density is studied, enabling relativistic electron beam generation with ˜10 mJ pulse energies. Major results from these experiments include: • Acceleration of electrons up to 120 MeV from an ionization injected wakefield accelerator driven in a 1.5 mm long He-like nitrogen plasma waveguide • Guiding of an intense, quasi-radially polarized femtosecond laser pulse in a 1 cm plasma waveguide. This pulse provides a strong drive field for the QPM-DLA concept. • Wakefield acceleration of electrons up to ˜10 MeV with sub-terawatt, ˜10 mJ pulses interacting with a thin (˜200 mum), high density (>1020 cm-3) plasma. • Observation of an intense, coherent, broadband wave breaking radiation flash from a high plasma density laser wakefield accelerator. The flash radiates > 1% of the drive laser pulse energy in a bandwidth consistent with half-cycle (˜1 fs) emission from violent unidirectional acceleration of electron bunches from rest. These results open the way to high repetition rate (>˜kHz) laser-driven generation of relativistic electron beams with existing laser technology.

  10. Laser technology in solar absorber manufacturing; Laser punktet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berner, Joachim

    2009-12-07

    No other solar collector manufacturing stage is as fully automatic as absorber fabrication. Laser welding systems are well established in the market. In addition to welding machines, some manufacturers are also offering complete assembly lines for solar collector production. SONNE WIND and WAeRME presents technologies and manufacturers. (orig./AKB)

  11. Medical free-electron laser: fact or fiction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, James P.; Ponikvar, Donald R.

    1994-07-01

    The free electron laser (FEL) has long been proposed as a flexible tool for a variety of medical applications, and yet the FEL has not seen widespread acceptance in the medical community. The issues have been the laser's size, cost, and complexity. Unfortunately, research on applications of FELs has outpaced the device development efforts. This paper describes the characteristics of the FEL, as they have been demonstrated in the U.S. Army's FEL technology development program, and identifies specific medical applications where demonstrated performance levels would suffice. This includes new photodynamic therapies for cancer and HIV treatment, orthopedic applications, tissue welding applications, and multiwavelength surgical techniques. A new tunable kilowatt class FEL device is described, which utilizes existing hardware from the U.S. Army program. An assessment of the future potential, based on realistic technology scaling is provided.

  12. All-Optical Laser-Wakefield Electron Injector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Umstadter, Donald P.

    2003-01-01

    Demonstrated the principle of optical control of laser accelerators, namely, that one laser pulse could modify the properties (e.g., emittance and electron number) of an electron beam accelerated by a separate but synchronized laser pulse. Another recent highlight was that, using our new 30-fs 10-TW laser system, we accelerated with a laser accelerator an electron beam with a record low divergence (0.2 degrees). This is more than 100 times lower than the 30-degree divergence that was reported recently by a French group using a laser with similar parameters

  13. The story of laser brazing technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Peter; Dierken, Roland

    2012-03-01

    This article gives an overview on the development of laser brazing technology as a new joining technique for car body production. The story starts with fundamental research work at German institutes in 1993, continues with the first implementations in automobile production in 1998, gives examples of applications since then and ends with an outlook. Laser brazing adapted design of joints and boundary conditions for a safe processing are discussed. Besides a better understanding for the sensitivity of the process against joint irregularities and misalignment, the key to successful launch was an advanced system technology. Different working heads equipped with wire feeding device, seam tracking system or tactile sensors for an automated teaching are presented in this paper. Novel laser heads providing a two beam technology will allow improved penetration depth of the filler wire and a more ecological processing by means of energy consumption.

  14. Simulation of Laser-Compton Cooling of Electron Beams

    OpenAIRE

    Ohgaki, T.

    2000-01-01

    We study a method of laser-Compton cooling of electron beams. Using a Monte Carlo code, we evaluate the effects of the laser-electron interaction for transverse cooling. The optics with and without chromatic correction for the cooling are examined. The laser-Compton cooling for JLC/NLC at E_0=2 GeV is considered.

  15. Plasma heating in a long solenoid by a laser or a relativistic electron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tajima, T.

    1975-01-01

    Advances in the technology of a large energy laser and/or relativistic electron beam (REB) generator have made it possible to seriously consider a long solenoid reactor concept. This concept has been reviewed. The physical problems in the plasma heating of the long solenoid by a laser or a REB are studied

  16. Free electron laser and fundamental physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dattoli, Giuseppe; Nguyen, Federico

    2018-03-01

    This review paper is devoted to the understanding of free-electron lasers (FEL) as devices for fundamental physics (FP) studies. After clarifying what FP stands for, we select some aspects of the FEL physics which can be viewed as fundamental. Furthermore, we discuss the perspective uses of the FEL in FP experiments. Regarding the FP aspects of the FEL, we analyze the quantum electrodynamics (QED) nature of the underlying laser mechanism. We look for the truly quantum signature in a process whose phenomenology is dominated by classical effects. As to the use of FEL as a tool for FP experiments we discuss the realization of a device dedicated to the study of non-linear effects in QED such as photon-photon scattering and shining-through-the-wall experiments planned to search for dark matter candidates like axions.

  17. Femtosecond laser technologies for linear collider designs

    CERN Document Server

    Kobayashi, K

    2001-01-01

    A highly stabilized high-energy femtosecond laser system was developed for Compton X-ray experiments. The laser system is based on the chirped pulse amplification, and each component is actively or passively stabilized. A master oscillator with less than 100 fs timing jitter, two independent oscillators with 300 fs relative timing lag, a new measurement technique of timing fluctuation of low-repetition amplified pulse, and a special designed regenerative amplifier with high quality beam were developed. New technical options for linear collider are proposed based on these expertises. The options are temporally square pulse for low emittance electron generation, a timing stabilized seeder for CO sub 2 amplifier, and multi-pulse high-energy lasers for gamma-gamma collision and for multi-bunch electron generation.

  18. Application of conventional laser technology to gamma-gamma colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clayton, C.E.; Kurnit, N.A.; Meyerhofer, D.D.

    1995-01-01

    A future e - e + (electron-positron) linear collider can be configured with perhaps minimal modification to serve as an γ-γ (gamma-gamma) or a e - -γ collider. This is accomplished by Compton-backscattering low energy photons (from a laser source) off of the high-energy electron beams prior to the crossing of the electron beams. However, to be competitive with the e - e + configuration, the luminosity cannot be compromised in the process. This requires that the laser source deliver a sufficient number of photons per pulse with a pulse format and rate matching that of the electron beams. As it turns out, this requires an average optical power of 5 to 15 kW from the laser which is beyond the current state of the art. In this paper, the authors address how to generate the required pulse format and how the high average power requirement can be met with conventional laser technology. They also address concerns about the survivability of mirrors located near the interaction point. Finally, they list a program of research and development which addresses some of the unknowns in such a system

  19. Research on heightening quality of free electron laser using superconducting linear accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minehara, Eisuke

    1996-01-01

    In this paper, the superconducting high frequency linear accelerator technology using low temperature superconductor is introduced, and its application to the heightening of quality of free electron laser is discussed. The high frequency application of superconductivity is a relatively new technology, and the first superconducting high frequency linear accelerator was made at the middle of 1960s. The invention of free electron laser and the development so far are described. In free electron laser, the variation of wavelength, high efficiency and high power output are possible as compared with conventional type lasers. The price and the size are two demerits of free electron laser that remain to the last. In Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, the adjustment experiment is carried out for the prototype free electron laser. About this prototype, injection system, superconducting accelerator, helium refrigerator, whole solid element high frequency power source, control system, electron beam transport system, undulator system and optical resonator are described. The application of high mean power output free electron laser and its future are discussed. (K.I.)

  20. Kinetic theory of free electron lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hafizi, B. [Naval Research Lab., Washington, DC (United States); Roberson, C.W. [Office of Naval Research, Arlington, VA (United States)

    1995-12-31

    We have developed a relativistic kinetic theory of free electron lasers (FELs). The growth rate, efficiency, filling factor and radius of curvature of the radiation wave fronts are determined. We have used the theory to examine the effects of beam compression on growth rate. The theory has been extended to include self field effects on FEL operation. These effects are particularly important in compact, low voltage FELs. The surprising result is that the self field contribution to the beam quality is opposite to the emittance contribution. Hence self fields can improve beam quality, particularly in compact, low voltage FELs.

  1. X-ray Free-electron Lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feldhaus, J.; /DESY; Arthur, J.; Hastings, J.B.; /SLAC

    2007-02-23

    In a free-electron laser (FEL) the lasing medium is a high-energy beam of electrons flying with relativistic speed through a periodic magnetic field. The interaction between the synchrotron radiation that is produced and the electrons in the beam induces a periodic bunching of the electrons, greatly increasing the intensity of radiation produced at a particular wavelength. Depending only on a phase match between the electron energy and the magnetic period, the wavelength of the FEL radiation can be continuously tuned within a wide spectral range. The FEL concept can be adapted to produce radiation wavelengths from millimeters to Angstroms, and can in principle produce hard x-ray beams with unprecedented peak brightness, exceeding that of the brightest synchrotron source by ten orders of magnitude or more. This paper focuses on short-wavelength FELs. It reviews the physics and characteristic properties of single-pass FELs, as well as current technical developments aiming for fully coherent x-ray radiation pulses with pulse durations in the 100 fs to 100 as range. First experimental results at wavelengths around 100 nm and examples of scientific applications planned on the new, emerging x-ray FEL facilities are presented.

  2. IL 2 Laser Accelerated Protons and Electrons in Medical Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ceccotti, T.; Martin, Ph.; Giulietti, A.

    2010-01-01

    protons for PBT is about 200 to 250 MeV corresponding to a range of 25 to 30 cm in a human body. Standard cyclotrons and synchrotrons able to get such energies are commercially available but their cost and their overall dimensions still restrains a large scale distribution of this kind of devices. The use of lasers should considerably reduce the size of such devices partly due to the fact that a local rather than generalized radio shielding is needed. In addition, lasers able to produce energetic ions are more and more compact, as the technology increase their capability. In order to evaluate the feasibility of a compact laser driven proton therapy facility compatible with the medical demands, an heterogeneous team, gathering top level competences from all the concerned research domains, has been constituted around the project SAPHIR. Our group shares this project with the ENSTA-LOA, the CEA-DAM, Amplitude Technologies, the Gustave Roussy Institute, the Curie Institute, the Centre de Protontherapie d'Orsay, Propulse s.a.s, Imagine Optic and Dosisoft. Laser-based Proton sources are usually obtained through the interaction of the intense laser field with a solid target. We will discuss recent encouraging results obtained in Saclay using a 'small' 100 TW, 25 fs laser, and novel acceleration mechanisms based on the ultra-high contrast interaction regime. Indeed, the complex motion of highly excited electrons builds-up an electrostatic field which accelerates ions to a few MeV energies at the plasma-vacuum interface. The hints to increase the maximum proton energies will be presented as well as the tailoring of their spectral distribution. IORT practice starts in the early 70's and is now currently employed in several hospitals worldwide with a growing interest. Whereas PBT directly acts on a well delimited cancer from outside the patient body, IORT applies after the cancer has been surgically removed. Tissues around the removed cancer location are

  3. Laser Coating Technology; A Commercial Reality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blake, Andrew G.; Mangaly, A. A.; Everett, M. A.; Hammeke, A. H.

    1988-10-01

    Commercial acceptance of laser coating technology suffered for many years due to questions about its economic viability. During this period, however, many companies, universities, and government research groups were busy developing the technology to overcome these questions. Today, laser coating technology is having a major impact as a high quality, economical method of hardfacing for wear and corrosion resistance in several key industries. This has occurred because of advances in five key areas: 1. High power laser design 2. Method of alloy deposition, and associated hardware 3. In-process feed back control system hardware/software development 4. Alloy systems 5. Marketing/sales sophistication High power lasers have improved in mode stability, power conversion efficiency, and optical flexibility (reflective vs. transmissive materials). This has enabled the process engineer to increase deposition efficiency, and maintain flexibility on the use of optics specifically designed for a user application. Improvements in the method of alloy deposition have led to developments such as the DPF system with specialized nozzles developed for specific user applications. Another effective technique includes the use of pre-fabricated cast alloy chips that are welded to the component surface on the specific area requiring protection. The development of feedback control systems that integrate process control software with hard tooling, the laser, and the alloy delivery system are greatly improving process reliability and product quality. Because of this, "in-process" quality control is becoming a viable alternative to traditional methods of quality control. Metallurgical evaluations of some of the most widely used hardfacing alloys and base materials have been investigated by numerous researchers. Analysis has confirmed that laser applied coatings are of high metallurgical quality, extremely low in dilution, and distort less due to low heat input. The technology can also be used to

  4. Externally Controlled Injection of Electrons by a Laser Pulse in a Laser Wakefield Electron Accelerator

    CERN Document Server

    Chen Szu Yuan; Chen Wei Ting; Chien, Ting-Yei; Lee, Chau-Hwang; Lin, Jiunn-Yuan; Wang, Jyhpyng

    2005-01-01

    Spatially and temporally localized injection of electrons is a key element for development of plasma-wave electron accelerator. Here we report the demonstration of two different schemes for electron injection in a self-modulated laser wakefield accelerator (SM-LWFA) by using a laser pulse. In the first scheme, by implementing a copropagating laser prepulse with proper timing, we are able to control the growth of Raman forward scattering and the production of accelerated electrons. We found that the stimulated Raman backward scattering of the prepulse plays the essential role of injecting hot electrons into the fast plasma wave driven by the pump pulse. In the second scheme, by using a transient density ramp we achieve self-injection of electrons in a SM-LWFA with spatial localization. The transient density ramp is produced by a prepulse propagating transversely to drill a density depression channel via ionization and expansion. The same mechanism of injection with comparable efficiency is also demonstrated wi...

  5. A compact x-ray free electron laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barletta, W.; Attac, M.; Cline, D.B.

    1988-01-01

    We present a design concept and simulation of the performance of a compact x-ray, free electron laser driven by ultra-high gradient rf-linacs. The accelerator design is based on recent advances in high gradient technology by a LLNL/SLAC/LBL collaboration and on the development of bright, high current electron sources by BNL and LANL. The GeV electron beams generated with such accelerators can be concerted to soft x-rays in the range from 2--10 nm by passage through short period, high fields strength wigglers as are being designed at Rocketdyne. Linear light sources of this type can produce trains of picosecond (or shorter) pulses of extremely high spectral brilliance suitable for flash holography of biological specimens in vivo and for studies of fast chemical reactions. 12 refs., 8 figs., 4 tabs

  6. Analysis of multibunch free electron laser operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellert, Thorsten; Decking, Winfried; Branlard, Julien

    2017-09-01

    At the SASE-FEL user facilities FLASH and European XFEL, superconducting TESLA type cavities are used for acceleration of the driving electron bunches. The high achievable duty cycle allows for operating with long bunch trains, hence considerably increasing the efficiency of the machine. However, multibunch free electron lasers (FEL) operation requires longitudinal and transverse stability within the bunch train. The purpose of this work is to investigate the intra-bunch-train transverse dynamics at FLASH and European XFEL. Key relationships of superconducting rf cavity operation and the resulting impact on the intrabunch-train trajectory variation are described. The observed trajectory variation during multibunch user runs at FLASH is analyzed and related to both, intrabunch-train variations of the rf and the following impact on the multibunch FEL performance.

  7. Analysis of multibunch free electron laser operation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thorsten Hellert

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available At the SASE-FEL user facilities FLASH and European XFEL, superconducting TESLA type cavities are used for acceleration of the driving electron bunches. The high achievable duty cycle allows for operating with long bunch trains, hence considerably increasing the efficiency of the machine. However, multibunch free electron lasers (FEL operation requires longitudinal and transverse stability within the bunch train. The purpose of this work is to investigate the intra-bunch-train transverse dynamics at FLASH and European XFEL. Key relationships of superconducting rf cavity operation and the resulting impact on the intrabunch-train trajectory variation are described. The observed trajectory variation during multibunch user runs at FLASH is analyzed and related to both, intrabunch-train variations of the rf and the following impact on the multibunch FEL performance.

  8. Short Rayleigh Length Free Electron Lasers

    CERN Document Server

    Crooker, P P; Armstead, R L; Blau, J

    2004-01-01

    Conventional free electron laser (FEL) oscillators minimize the optical mode volume around the electron beam in the undulator by making the resonator Rayleigh length about one third of the undulator length. This maximizes gain and beam-mode coupling. In compact configurations of high-power infrared FELs or moderate power UV FELs, the resulting optical intensity can damage the resonator mirrors. To increase the spot size and thereby reduce the optical intensity at the mirrors below the damage threshold, a shorter Rayleigh length can be used, but the FEL interaction is significantly altered. A new FEL interaction is described and analyzed with a Rayleigh length that is only one tenth the undulator length, or less. The effect of mirror vibration and positioning are more critical in the short Rayleigh length design, but we find that they are still within normal design tolerances.

  9. Manipulation and electron-oscillation-measurement of laser accelerated electron beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotaki, H; Hayashi, Y; Kawase, K; Mori, M; Kando, M; Homma, T; Koga, J K; Daido, H; Bulanov, S V, E-mail: kotaki.hideyuki@jaea.go.jp [Advanced Photon Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 8-1-7, Umemidai, Kizugawa, Kyoto (Japan)

    2011-01-15

    Monoenergetic electron beams have been generated in the self-injection scheme of laser acceleration. In applications of these laser accelerated electron beams, stable and controllable electron beams are necessary. A stable electron beam is generated in the self-injection scheme by using a nitrogen gas jet target. We found the profile of the electron beam was manipulated by rotating the laser polarization. The electron beam is in the first bucket of the wake wave. In the energy space, transverse oscillation is observed when the laser pulse has S-polarization. The direction of the electron beam is controlled by the gas jet position.

  10. The Shipboard Employment of a Free Electron Laser Weapon System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-12-01

    EMPLOYMENT OF A FREE ELECTRON LASER WEAPON SYSTEM by Gregory G. Allgaier December 2003 Thesis Advisor: William Colson Second Reader...Free Electron Laser Weapon System 6. AUTHOR(S) Allgaier, Gregory G. 5. FUNDING NUMBERS 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) Naval...release; distribution is unlimited. THE SHIPBOARD EMPLOYMENT OF A FREE ELECTRON LASER WEAPON SYSTEM Gregory G. Allgaier Lieutenant, United

  11. Observation of 690 MV m-1 Electron Accelerating Gradient with a Laser-Driven Dielectric Microstructure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wootton, K. P.; Wu, Z.; Cowan, B. M.; Hanuka, A.; Makasyuk, I. V.; Peralta, E. A.; Soong, K.; Byer, R. L.; England, R. J.

    2016-01-01

    Acceleration of electrons using laser-driven dielectric microstructures is a promising technology for the miniaturization of particle accelerators. In this work, experimental results are presented of relativistic electron acceleration with 690±100 MVm -1 gradient. This is a record-high accelerating gradient for a dielectric microstructure accelerator, nearly doubling the previous record gradient. To reach higher acceleration gradients the present experiment employs 90 fs duration laser pulses.

  12. Airborne Tactical Free-Electron Laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whitney, Roy; Neil, George

    2007-02-01

    The goal of 100 kilowatts (kW) of directed energy from an airborne tactical platform has proved challenging due to the size and weight of most of the options that have been considered. However, recent advances in Free-Electron Lasers appear to offer a solution along with significant tactical advantages: a nearly unlimited magazine, time structures for periods from milliseconds to hours, radar like functionality, and the choice of the wavelength of light that best meets mission requirements. For an Airborne Tactical Free-Electron Laser (ATFEL) on a platforms such as a Lockheed C-130J-30 and airships, the two most challenging requirements, weight and size, can be met by generating the light at a higher harmonic, aggressively managing magnet weights, managing cryogenic heat loads using recent SRF R&D results, and using FEL super compact design concepts that greatly reduce the number of components. The initial R&D roadmap for achieving an ATFEL is provided in this paper. Performing this R&D is expected to further reduce the weight, size and power requirements for the FELs the Navy is currently developing for shipboard applications, as well as providing performance enhancements for the strategic airborne MW class FELs. The 100 kW ATFEL with its tactical advantages may prove sufficiently attractive for early advancement in the queue of deployed FELs.

  13. En Route: next-generation laser-plasma-based electron accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hidding, Bernhard

    2008-05-01

    Accelerating electrons to relativistic energies is of fundamental interest, especially in particle physics. Today's accelerator technology, however, is limited by the maximum electric fields which can be created. This thesis presents results on various mechanisms aiming at exploiting the fields in focussed laser pulses and plasma waves for electron acceleration, which can be orders of magnitude higher than with conventional accelerators. With relativistic, underdense laser-plasma-interaction, quasimonoenergetic electron bunches with energies up to ∼50 MeV and normalized emittances of the order of 5mmmrad have been generated. This was achieved by focussing the ∼80 fs, 1 J pulses of the JETI-laser at the FSU Jena to intensities of several 10 19 W=cm 2 into gas jets. The experimental observations could be explained via ''bubble acceleration'', which is based on self-injection and acceleration of electrons in a highly nonlinear breaking plasma wave. For the rst time, this bubble acceleration was achieved explicitly in the self-modulated laser wakefield regime (SMLWFA). This quasimonoenergetic SMLWFA-regime stands out by relaxing dramatically the requirements on the driving laser pulse necessary to trigger bubble acceleration. This is due to self-modulation of the laser pulse in high-density gas jets, leading to ultrashort laser pulse fragments capable of initiating bubble acceleration. Electron bunches with durations < or similar 5 fs can thus be created, which is at least an order of magnitude shorter than with conventional accelerator technology. In addition, more than one laser pulse fragment can be powerful enough to drive a bubble. Distinct double peaks have been observed in the electron spectra, indicating that two quasimonoenergetic electron bunches separated by only few tens of fs have formed. This is backed up by PIC-Simulations (Particle-in-Cell). These results underline the feasibility of the construction of small table-top accelerators, while at the

  14. Integrated Applications with Laser Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Octavian DOSPINESCU

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The introduction of new materials as Power Point presentations are the most convenient way of teaching a course or to display a scientific paper. In order to support this function, most schools, universities, institutions, are equipped with projectors and computers. For controlling the presentation of the materials, the persons that are in charge with the presentation use, in most cases, both the keyboard of the computer as well as the mouse for the slides, thing that burdens, in a way, the direct communication (face to face with the audience. Of course, the invention of the wireless mouse allowed a sort of freedom in controlling from the distance the digital materials. Although there seems to appear a certain impediment: in order to be used, the mouse requires to be placed on a flat surface. This article aims at creating a new application prototype that will manipulate, only through the means of a light-beam instrument (laser fascicle, both the actions of the mouse as well as some of the elements offered by the keyboard on a certain application or presentation. The light fascicle will be „connected” to a calculus system only through the images that were captured by a simple webcam.

  15. Laser Processed Condensing Heat Exchanger Technology Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Scott; Wright, Sarah; Wallace, Sarah; Hamilton, Tanner; Dennis, Alexander; Zuhlke, Craig; Roth, Nick; Sanders, John

    2017-01-01

    The reliance on non-permanent coatings in Condensing Heat Exchanger (CHX) designs is a significant technical issue to be solved before long-duration spaceflight can occur. Therefore, high reliability CHXs have been identified by the Evolvable Mars Campaign (EMC) as critical technologies needed to move beyond low earth orbit. The Laser Processed Condensing Heat Exchanger project aims to solve these problems through the use of femtosecond laser processed surfaces, which have unique wetting properties and potentially exhibit anti-microbial growth properties. These surfaces were investigated to identify if they would be suitable candidates for a replacement CHX surface. Among the areas researched in this project include microbial growth testing, siloxane flow testing in which laser processed surfaces were exposed to siloxanes in an air stream, and manufacturability.

  16. Aerosol Imaging with a Soft X-ray Free Electron Laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bogan, Michael J.; Boutet, Sebastien; Chapman, Henry N.; Marchesini, Stefano; Barty, Anton; Benner, W. Henry; Rohner, Urs; Frank, Matthias; Hau-Riege, Stefan P.; Bajt, Sasa; Woods, Bruce; Seibert, M.M.; Iwan, Bianca; Timneanu, Nicusor; Hajdu, Janos; Schulz, Joachim

    2010-01-01

    Lasers have long played a critical role in the advancement of aerosol science. A new regime of ultrafast laser technology has recently be realized, the world's first soft xray free electron laser. The Free electron LASer in Hamburg, FLASH, user facility produces a steady source of 10 femtosecond pulses of 7-32 nm x-rays with 10 12 photons per pulse. The high brightness, short wavelength, and high repetition rate (>500 pulses per second) of this laser offers unique capabilities for aerosol characterization. Here we use FLASH to perform the highest resolution imaging of single PM2.5 aerosol particles in flight to date. We resolve to 35 nm the morphology of fibrous and aggregated spherical carbonaceous nanoparticles that existed for less than two milliseconds in vacuum. Our result opens the possibility for high spatialand time-resolved single particle aerosol dynamics studies, filling a critical technological need in aerosol science.

  17. Short Rayleigh length free electron lasers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. B. Colson

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Conventional free electron laser (FEL oscillators minimize the optical mode volume around the electron beam in the undulator by making the resonator Rayleigh length about one third to one half of the undulator length. This maximizes gain and beam-mode coupling. In compact configurations of high-power infrared FELs or moderate power UV FELs, the resulting optical intensity can damage the resonator mirrors. To increase the spot size and thereby reduce the optical intensity at the mirrors below the damage threshold, a shorter Rayleigh length can be used, but the FEL interaction is significantly altered. We model this interaction using a coordinate system that expands with the rapidly diffracting optical mode from the ends of the undulator to the mirrors. Simulations show that the interaction of the strongly focused optical mode with a narrow electron beam inside the undulator distorts the optical wave front so it is no longer in the fundamental Gaussian mode. The simulations are used to study how mode distortion affects the single-pass gain in weak fields, and the steady-state extraction in strong fields.

  18. Comparison study of in vivo dose response to laser-driven versus conventional electron beam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oppelt, Melanie; Baumann, Michael; Bergmann, Ralf; Beyreuther, Elke; Brüchner, Kerstin; Hartmann, Josefin; Karsch, Leonhard; Krause, Mechthild; Laschinsky, Lydia; Leßmann, Elisabeth; Nicolai, Maria; Reuter, Maria; Richter, Christian; Sävert, Alexander; Schnell, Michael; Schürer, Michael; Woithe, Julia; Kaluza, Malte; Pawelke, Jörg

    2015-05-01

    The long-term goal to integrate laser-based particle accelerators into radiotherapy clinics not only requires technological development of high-intensity lasers and new techniques for beam detection and dose delivery, but also characterization of the biological consequences of this new particle beam quality, i.e. ultra-short, ultra-intense pulses. In the present work, we describe successful in vivo experiments with laser-driven electron pulses by utilization of a small tumour model on the mouse ear for the human squamous cell carcinoma model FaDu. The already established in vitro irradiation technology at the laser system JETI was further enhanced for 3D tumour irradiation in vivo in terms of beam transport, beam monitoring, dose delivery and dosimetry in order to precisely apply a prescribed dose to each tumour in full-scale radiobiological experiments. Tumour growth delay was determined after irradiation with doses of 3 and 6 Gy by laser-accelerated electrons. Reference irradiation was performed with continuous electron beams at a clinical linear accelerator in order to both validate the dedicated dosimetry employed for laser-accelerated JETI electrons and above all review the biological results. No significant difference in radiation-induced tumour growth delay was revealed for the two investigated electron beams. These data provide evidence that the ultra-high dose rate generated by laser acceleration does not impact the biological effectiveness of the particles.

  19. Hybrid laser technology and doped biomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jelínek, Miroslav; Zemek, Josef; Remsa, Jan; Mikšovský, Jan; Kocourek, Tomáš; Písařík, Petr; Trávníčková, Martina; Filová, Elena; Bačáková, Lucie

    2017-09-01

    Hybrid laser-based technologies for deposition of new types of doped thin films are presented. The focus is on arrangements combining pulsed laser deposition (PLD) with magnetron sputtering (MS), and on the setup with two simultaneously running PLD systems (dual PLD). Advantages and disadvantages of both arrangements are discussed. Layers of different dopants concentration were prepared. Experience with deposition of chromium and titanium doped diamond-like carbon (DLC) films for potential coating of bone implants is presented. Properties of the layers prepared by both technologies are compared and discussed. The suitability of the layers for colonization with human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells and human osteoblast-like cells, were also evaluated under in vitro conditions.

  20. Imaging femtosecond laser-induced electronic excitation in glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mao Xianglei; Mao, Samuel S.; Russo, Richard E.

    2003-01-01

    While substantial progress has been achieved in understanding laser ablation on the nanosecond and picosecond time scales, it remains a considerable challenge to elucidate the underlying mechanisms during femtosecond laser material interactions. We present experimental observations of electronic excitation inside a wide band gap glass during single femtosecond laser pulse (100 fs, 800 nm) irradiation. Using a femtosecond time-resolved imaging technique, we measured the evolution of a laser-induced electronic plasma inside the glass and calculated the electron number density to be on the order of 10 19 cm -3

  1. Two-dimensional optimization of free-electron-laser designs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prosnitz, D.; Haas, R.A.

    1982-05-04

    Off-axis, two-dimensional designs for free electron lasers are described that maintain correspondence of a light beam with a synchronous electron at an optimal transverse radius r > 0 to achieve increased beam trapping efficiency and enhanced laser beam wavefront control so as to decrease optical beam diffraction and other deleterious effects.

  2. Pair creation and an x-ray free electron laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkofer, R; Hecht, M B; Roberts, C D; Schmidt, S M; Vinnik, D V

    2001-11-05

    Using a quantum kinetic equation we study the possibility that focused beams at proposed x-ray free electron laser facilities can initiate spontaneous electron-positron pair production from the QED vacuum. Under conditions reckoned achievable at planned facilities, repeated cycles of particle creation and annihilation will take place in tune with the laser frequency. The peak particle number density is insensitive to this frequency, and one can anticipate the production of a few hundred particle pairs per laser period.

  3. Optimizing chirped laser pulse parameters for electron acceleration in vacuum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akhyani, Mina; Jahangiri, Fazel; Niknam, Ali Reza; Massudi, Reza, E-mail: r-massudi@sbu.ac.ir [Laser and Plasma Research Institute, Shahid Beheshti University, Tehran 1983969411 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-11-14

    Electron dynamics in the field of a chirped linearly polarized laser pulse is investigated. Variations of electron energy gain versus chirp parameter, time duration, and initial phase of laser pulse are studied. Based on maximizing laser pulse asymmetry, a numerical optimization procedure is presented, which leads to the elimination of rapid fluctuations of gain versus the chirp parameter. Instead, a smooth variation is observed that considerably reduces the accuracy required for experimentally adjusting the chirp parameter.

  4. Direct metal laser sintering: a digitised metal casting technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatesh, K Vijay; Nandini, V Vidyashree

    2013-12-01

    Dental technology is undergoing advancements at a fast pace and technology is being imported from various other fields. One such imported technology is direct metal laser sintering technology for casting metal crowns. This article will discuss the process of laser sintering for making metal crowns and fixed partial dentures with a understanding of their pros and cons.

  5. Laser electron collider within a micro-channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Liangliang

    2017-10-01

    We propose a laser-electron collider based on a laser-driven micro-channel-plate target. In this unique geometry, electrons accelerated within the channel can collide head-on with the laser reflected from a foil attached onto the rear target surface. The simple scheme allows for efficient generation of gamma-photons and most importantly, the observing of radiation-reaction effect for the first time. It resolves the aligning and time synchronization challenges for laser-electron colliding scenarios involving two light/electron beams. We predict that a single 5PW laser is sufficient to make radiation-reaction effect measurable. A principle-of-proof experiment was conducted at a currently available 200TW laser system. The superior acceleration of electrons with the novel micro-channel structure was confirmed, showing enhanced electron cut-off energies and slope temperatures compared to ordinary flat interfaces. The results set forth the basis for radiation-reaction measurement from laser-electron colliding in upcoming multi-petawatt laser systems.

  6. Electronic properties of asymmetrical quantum dots dressed by laser field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kibis, O.V. [Department of Applied and Theoretical Physics, Novosibirsk State Technical University, Karl Marx Avenue 20, 630092 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Slepyan, G.Ya.; Maksimenko, S.A. [Institute for Nuclear Problems, Belarus State University, Bobruyskaya St. 11, 220050 Minsk (Belarus); Hoffmann, A. [Institut fuer Festkoerperphysik, Technische Universitaet Berlin, Hardenbergstrasse 36, 10623 Berlin (Germany)

    2012-05-15

    In the present paper, we demonstrate theoretically that the strong non-resonant interaction between asymmetrical quantum dots (QDs) and a laser field results in harmonic oscillations of their band gap. It is shown that such oscillations change the spectrum of elementary electron excitations in QDs: in the absence of the laser pumping there is only one resonant electron frequency, but QDs dressed by the laser field have a set of electron resonant frequencies. One expects that this modification of elementary electron excitations in QDs can be observable in optical experiments. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  7. High energy gain electron beam acceleration by 100TW laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kotaki, Hideyuki; Kando, Masaki; Kondo, Shuji; Hosokai, Tomonao; Kanazawa, Shuhei; Yokoyama, Takashi; Matoba, Toru; Nakajima, Kazuhisa

    2001-01-01

    A laser wakefield acceleration experiment using a 100TW laser is planed at JAERI-Kansai. High quality and short pulse electron beams are necessary to accelerate the electron beam by the laser. Electron beam - laser synchronization is also necessary. A microtron with a photocathode rf-gun was prepared as a high quality electron injector. The quantum efficiency (QE) of the photocathode of 2x10 -5 was obtained. A charge of 100pC from the microtron was measured. The emittance and pulse width of the electron beam was 6π mm-mrad and 10ps, respectively. In order to produce a short pulse electron beam, and to synchronize between the electron beam and the laser pulse, an inverse free electron laser (IFEL) is planned. One of problems of LWFA is the short acceleration length. In order to overcome the problem, a Z-pinch plasma waveguide will be prepared as a laser wakefield acceleration tube for 1 GeV acceleration. (author)

  8. Polymer electronics a flexible technology

    CERN Document Server

    Technology, Rapra

    2009-01-01

    The worldwide market for polymer electronic products has been estimated to be worth up to £15 billion by 2015 and the opportunity for new markets could be as high as £125 billion by 2025.'The rapid development of polymer electronics has revealed the possibility for transforming the electronics market by offering lighter, flexible and more cost effective alternatives to conventional materials and products. With applications ranging from printed, flexible conductors and novel semiconductor components to intelligent labels and large area displays and solar panels, products that were previously un

  9. Plasma Wave Electronic Terahertz Technology

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Shur, Michael

    2003-01-01

    Plasma waves are oscillations of electron density in time and space. In deep submicron field effect transistors plasma wave frequencies lie in the terahertz range and can be tuned by applied gate bias...

  10. Laser space communication experiment: Modulator technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, F. E.

    1973-01-01

    Results are presented of a contractual program to develop the modulator technology necessary for a 10.6 micron laser communication system using cadmium telluride as the modulator material. The program consisted of the following tasks: (1) The growth of cadmium telluride crystals of sufficient size and purity and with the necessary optical properties for use as laser modulator rods. (2) Develop a low loss antireflection coating for the cadmium telluride rods. (3) Design and build a modulator capable of 300 MHz modulation. (4) Develop a modulator driver capable of a data rate of 300 MBits/sec, 12 W rms output power, and 40 percent efficiency. (5) Assemble and test the modulator system. All design goals were met and the system was built and tested.

  11. Laser Assisted Free-Free Transition in Electron - Atom Collision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, C.; Bhatia, A. K.

    2011-01-01

    Free-free transition is studied for electron-Hydrogen atom system in ground state at very low incident energies in presence of an external homogeneous, monochromatic and linearly polarized laser field. The incident electron is considered to be dressed by the laser in a non perturbative manner by choosing the Volkov solutions in both the channels. The space part of the scattering wave function for the electron is solved numerically by taking into account the effect of electron exchange, short range as well as of the long range interactions. Laser assisted differential as well as elastic total cross sections are calculated for single photon absorption/emission in the soft photon limit, the laser intensity being much less than the atomic field intensity. A strong suppression is noted in the laser assisted cross sections as compared to the field free situations. Significant difference is noted in the singlet and the triplet cross sections.

  12. Improved Laser performance through Planar Waveguide Technology Development

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose a laser technology development to improve efficiency and performance for a variety of science applications including: Lunar Ice, 2-Step Laser Tandem Mass...

  13. Laser-Electron-Gamma-Source. Progress report, July 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dowell, D.H.; Fineman, B.; Giordano, G.; Kistner, OC.; Matone, G.; Sandorfi, A.M.; Schaerf, C.; Thorn, C.E.; Ziegler, W.

    1986-07-01

    When completed, the Laser Electron Gamma Source (LEGS) is expected to provide intense beams of monochromatic and polarized (circular or linear) gamma rays with energies up to 500 MeV. The gamma-ray beams will be produced by Compton backscattering uv laser light from the electrons circulating in a storage ring. Progress with installation of the facility is described, particularly the Ar-ion laser and tagging spectrometer. Tests of the tagging spectrometer coponents is reported, and a second laser is described for higher energy operation. Estimates are given of expected beam parameters. Experimental equipment for the planned research projects to be carried out at the LEGS facility is discussed

  14. Application of CO2 laser for electronic components soldering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mascorro-Pantoja, J.; Soto-Bernal, J. J.; Nieto-Pérez, M.; Gonzalez-Mota, R.; Rosales-Candelas, I.

    2011-10-01

    Laser provides a high controllable and localized spot for soldering joint formation and this is a valuable tool in Sn/Pb Soldering process on electronic industry, in recent years, laser beam welding has become an emerging welding technique, the use of laser in welding area is a high efficiency method. A 60 Watts CO2 continuous laser was used on this study, during welding experimental results indicated the laser could significantly improve speed and weld quality. In this work, the welding interactions of CO2 laser with Sn/Pb wire have been investigated in details through varying the energy ratios of laser. And at the same time, the effect of distance from laser spot to material.

  15. Quasi-monoenergetic laser-plasma acceleration of electrons to 2 GeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoming; Zgadzaj, Rafal; Fazel, Neil; Li, Zhengyan; Yi, S. A.; Zhang, Xi; Henderson, Watson; Chang, Y.-Y.; Korzekwa, R.; Tsai, H.-E.; Pai, C.-H.; Quevedo, H.; Dyer, G.; Gaul, E.; Martinez, M.; Bernstein, A. C.; Borger, T.; Spinks, M.; Donovan, M.; Khudik, V.; Shvets, G.; Ditmire, T.; Downer, M. C.

    2013-06-01

    Laser-plasma accelerators of only a centimetre’s length have produced nearly monoenergetic electron bunches with energy as high as 1 GeV. Scaling these compact accelerators to multi-gigaelectronvolt energy would open the prospect of building X-ray free-electron lasers and linear colliders hundreds of times smaller than conventional facilities, but the 1 GeV barrier has so far proven insurmountable. Here, by applying new petawatt laser technology, we produce electron bunches with a spectrum prominently peaked at 2 GeV with only a few per cent energy spread and unprecedented sub-milliradian divergence. Petawatt pulses inject ambient plasma electrons into the laser-driven accelerator at much lower density than was previously possible, thereby overcoming the principal physical barriers to multi-gigaelectronvolt acceleration: dephasing between laser-driven wake and accelerating electrons and laser pulse erosion. Simulations indicate that with improvements in the laser-pulse focus quality, acceleration to nearly 10 GeV should be possible with the available pulse energy.

  16. Pulsed Gas Lasers Pumped by a Runaway Electron Initiated Discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panchenko, A. N.; Tarasenko, V. F.; Panchenko, N. A.

    2017-12-01

    The generation parameters are investigated in a runaway electron preionized diffuse discharge (REP DD). Laser generation is produced in different spectral bands from the IR to VUV range. New modes of the nitrogen laser operation are obtained. Ultimate efficiencies of N2- and nonchain HF(DF)-lasers are achieved. A possibility of increasing the pulse durations of XeF-, KrF-, ArF- and VUV F2- lasers (157 nm) in an oscillating REP DD is shown. The efficiencies of VUV- and UV-generation comparable with that of a laser pumped by a self-sustained volume discharge with preionization are gained.

  17. Spin effects in strong-field laser-electron interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahrens, S; Bauke, H; Müller, T-O; Villalba-Chávez, S; Müller, C

    2013-01-01

    The electron spin degree of freedom can play a significant role in relativistic scattering processes involving intense laser fields. In this contribution we discuss the influence of the electron spin on (i) Kapitza-Dirac scattering in an x-ray laser field of high intensity, (ii) photo-induced electron-positron pair production in a strong laser wave and (iii) multiphoton electron-positron pair production on an atomic nucleus. We show that in all cases under consideration the electron spin can have a characteristic impact on the process properties and their total probabilities. To this end, spin-resolved calculations based on the Dirac equation in the presence of an intense laser field are performed. The predictions from Dirac theory are also compared with the corresponding results from the Klein-Gordon equation.

  18. Field Emitter Arrays for a Free Electron Laser Application

    CERN Document Server

    Shing-Bruce-Li, Kevin; Ganter, Romain; Gobrecht, Jens; Raguin, Jean Yves; Rivkin, Leonid; Wrulich, Albin F

    2004-01-01

    The development of a new electron gun with the lowest possible emittance would help reducing the total length and cost of a free electron laser. Field emitter arrays (FEAs) are an attractive technology for electron sources of ultra high brightness. Indeed, several thousands of microscopic tips can be deposited on a 1 mm diameter area. Electrons are then extracted by applying voltage to a first grid layer close to the tip apexes, the so called gate layer, and focused by a second grid layer one micrometer above the tips. The typical aperture diameter of the gate and the focusing layer is in the range of one micrometer. One challenge for such cathodes is to produce peak currents in the ampere range since the usual applications of FEAs require less than milliampere. Encouraging peak current performances have been obtained by applying voltage pulses at low frequency between gate and tips. In this paper we report on different tip materials available on the market: diamond FEAs from Extreme Devices Inc., ZrC single ...

  19. Biological applications of ultraviolet free-electron lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sutherland, J.C.

    1997-10-01

    This review examines the possibilities for biological research using the three ultraviolet free-electron lasers that are nearing operational status in the US. The projected operating characteristics of major interest in biological research of the free-electron lasers at Brookhaven National Laboratory, the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, and Duke University are presented. Experimental applications in the areas of far- and vacuum ultraviolet photophysics and photochemistry, structural biology, environmental photobiology, and medical research are discussed and the prospects for advances in these areas, based upon the characteristics of the new ultraviolet free-electron lasers, are evaluated

  20. Terawatt Picosecond CO2 Laser Technology for High Energy Physics Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pogorelsky, I. V.

    1998-01-01

    Demonstration of ultra-high acceleration gradients in the SM LWFA experiments put a next objective for the laser accelerator development to achieve a low-emittance monochromatic acceleration over extended interaction distances. The emerging picosecond terawatt (ps-TW) CO 2 laser technology helps to meet this strategic goal. Among the considered examples are: the staged electron laser accelerator (STELLA) experiment, which is being conducted at the Brookhaven ATF, and the plasma-channeled LWFA. The long-wavelength and high average power capabilities of CO 2 lasers maybe utilized also for generation of intense x-ray and gamma radiation through Compton back-scattering of the laser beams off relativistic electrons. We discuss applications of ps-TW CO 2 lasers for a tentative γ-γ (or γ-lepton) collider and generation of polarized positron beams

  1. Ultraviolet laser transverse profile shaping for improving x-ray free electron laser performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, S.; Alverson, S.; Bohler, D.; Egger, A.; Fry, A.

    2017-01-01

    The photocathode rf gun is one of the most critical components in x-ray free electron lasers. The drive laser strikes the photocathode surface, which emits electrons with properties that depend on the shape of the drive laser. Most free electron lasers use photocathodes with work function in the ultraviolet, a wavelength where direct laser manipulation becomes challenging. In this paper, we present a novel application of a digital micromirror device (DMD) for the 253 nm drive laser at the Linear Coherent Light Source. Laser profile shaping is accomplished through an iterative algorithm that takes into account shaping error and efficiency. Next, we use laser shaping to control the X-ray laser output via an online optimizer, which shows improvement in FEL pulse energy. Lastly, as a preparation for electron beam shaping, we use the DMD to measure the photocathode quantum efficiency across cathode surface with an averaged laser rms spot size of 59 μm. In conclusion, our experiments demonstrate promising outlook of using DMD to shape ultraviolet lasers for photocathode rf guns with various applications.

  2. Ultraviolet laser transverse profile shaping for improving x-ray free electron laser performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, S.; Alverson, S.; Bohler, D.; Egger, A.; Fry, A.; Gilevich, S.; Huang, Z.; Miahnahri, A.; Ratner, D.; Robinson, J.; Zhou, F.

    2017-08-01

    The photocathode rf gun is one of the most critical components in x-ray free electron lasers. The drive laser strikes the photocathode surface, which emits electrons with properties that depend on the shape of the drive laser. Most free electron lasers use photocathodes with work function in the ultraviolet, a wavelength where direct laser manipulation becomes challenging. In this paper, we present a novel application of a digital micromirror device (DMD) for the 253 nm drive laser at the Linear Coherent Light Source. Laser profile shaping is accomplished through an iterative algorithm that takes into account shaping error and efficiency. Next, we use laser shaping to control the X-ray laser output via an online optimizer, which shows improvement in FEL pulse energy. Lastly, as a preparation for electron beam shaping, we use the DMD to measure the photocathode quantum efficiency across cathode surface with an averaged laser rms spot size of 59 μ m . Our experiments demonstrate promising outlook of using DMD to shape ultraviolet lasers for photocathode rf guns with various applications.

  3. Slippage effect on energy modulation in seeded free-electron lasers with frequency chirped seed laser pulses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Feng

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Free-electron lasers (FELs seeded with external lasers hold great promise for generating high power radiation with nearly transform-limited bandwidth in the soft x-ray region. However, it has been pointed out that the initial seed laser phase error will be amplified by the frequency up-conversion process, which may degrade the quality of the output radiation produced by a harmonic generation scheme. In this paper, theoretical and simulation studies on frequency chirp amplification in seeded FEL schemes with slippage effect taken into account are presented. It is found that the seed laser imperfection experienced by the electron beam can be significantly smoothed by the slippage effect in the modulator when the slippage length is comparable to the seed laser pulse length. This smoothing effect allows one to preserve the excellent temporal coherence of seeded FELs in the presence of large frequency chirp in the seed laser. Our studies show that the tolerance on frequency chirp in the seed laser for generating nearly transform-limited soft x-ray pulses in seeded FELs is much looser than previously thought and fully coherent radiation at nanometer wavelength may be reached with current technologies.

  4. Technology scan for electronic toll collection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-06-01

    The purpose of this project was to identify and assess available technologies and methodologies for electronic toll collection (ETC) and to develop recommendations for the best way(s) to implement toll collection in the Louisville metropolitan area. ...

  5. Proceedings of the Laser Issues for Electron RF Photoinjectors Workshop

    CERN Document Server

    Bolton, P

    2003-01-01

    The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) proposed for SLAC is a SASE FEL designed to generate high brightness, coherent, ultrashort x-ray pulses. The injector of choice is the RF photoinjector, which is capable of producing suitably low emittance electron beams. It is well established that the performance of the SASE FEL depends critically on properties of the electron beam generated by the injector and therefore on the injector laser beam parameters. This workshop was established specifically to provide a forum for discussion of photoinjector laser systems. Laser design requirements and technical challenges common to RF photoinjectors were highlighted and some solutions were explored. This included not only details of laser systems but also those of laser-based diagnostics envisioned for monitoring ultrashort electron microbunches on a single shot basis. Sixty-one registrants representing twenty-three institutions from Italy, Germany, Japan and the United States attended. The program listing shows that the twe...

  6. Novel aspects of direct laser acceleration of relativistic electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arefiev, Alexey

    2015-11-01

    Production of energetic electrons is a keystone aspect of ultraintense laser-plasma interactions that underpins a variety of topics and applications, including fast ignition inertial confinement fusion and compact particle and radiation sources. There is a wide range of electron acceleration regimes that depend on the duration of the laser pulse and the plasma density. This talk focuses on the regime in which the plasma is significantly underdense and the laser pulse duration is longer than the electron response time, so that, in contrast to the wakefield acceleration regime, the pulse creates a quasi-static channel in the electron density. Such a regime is of particular interest, since it can naturally arise in experiments with solid density targets where the pre-pulse of an ultraintense laser produces an extended sub-critical pre-plasma. This talk examines the impact of several key factors on electron acceleration by the laser pulse and the resulting electron energy gain. A detailed consideration is given to the role played by: (1) the static longitudinal electric field, (2) the static transverse electric field, (3) the electron injection into the laser pulse, (4) the electromagnetic dispersion, and (5) the static longitudinal magnetic field. It is shown that all of these factors lead, under conditions outlined in the talk, to a considerable electron energy gain that greatly exceeds the ponderomotive limit. The static fields do not directly transfer substantial energy to electrons. Instead, they alter the longitudinal dephasing between the electrons and the laser pulse, which then allows the electrons to gain extra energy from the pulse. The talk will also outline a time-resolution criterion that must be satisfied in order to correctly reproduce these effects in particle-in-cell simulations. Supported by AFOSR Contract No. FA9550-14-1-0045, National Nuclear Security Administration Contract No. DE-FC52-08NA28512, and US Department of Energy Contract No. DE-FG02

  7. Electronics Technology. Performance Objectives. Basic Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Guy

    Several intermediate performance objectives and corresponding criterion measures are listed for each of 20 terminal objectives for a basic electronics technology course. The materials were developed for a two-semester course (2 hours daily) designed to include instruction in basic electricity and electronic fundamentals, and to develop skills and…

  8. Multiple beam directors for naval free electron laser weapons

    OpenAIRE

    Mitchell, Ethan D.

    2004-01-01

    Approved for public release, distribution is unlimited The Free Electron Laser has the potential to become a revolutionary weapon system. Deep magazines, low cost-per-shot, pinpoint accuracy, and speed of light delivery give this developing weapon system significant advantages over conventional systems. One limiting factor in high energy laser implementation is thermal blooming, a lensing effect which is caused by the quick heating of the atmosphere, so that the laser beam does not focus o...

  9. Peculiarities of laser phase behavior associated with the accelerated electron in a chirped laser pulse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Q.; Wu, X. Y.; Wang, J. X.; Kawata, S.; Wang, P. X.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we qualitatively analyzed peculiarities of laser phase behavior associated with the accelerated electron in a chirped laser pulse. We unveiled the relationship between the changes in the orientation of the electron trajectory and the cusps in magnitude of the phase velocity of the optical field along the electron trajectory in a chirped laser pulse. We also explained how the chirp effect induced the singular point of the phase velocity. Finally, we discussed the phase velocity and phase witnessed by the electron in the particle's moving instantaneous frame

  10. Development of laser heated high current DC electron gun

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banerjee, Srutarshi; Bhattacharjee, Dhruva; Kandaswamy, E.; Ghodke, S.R.; Tiwari, Rajnish; Bakhtsingh, R.I.

    2015-01-01

    The paper deals with the development of a Laser heated cathode for Electron Accelerator. The electron gun is meant for Megawatt-class DC Accelerator for Electron Beam Flue Gas Treatment applications. Conventionally, LaB 6 cathode is indirectly heated by tungsten filaments whereas in the newly proposed gun, Laser is utilized for heating. A Nd:YAG Laser is used to heat the LaB 6 cathode to emission temperatures. The characterization of cathode heating at various Laser powers has been carried out. In initial trials, it has been observed that with 125 W of Laser power, the LaB 6 pellet was heated to 1315 ° C. Based on these experimental results, an electron gun rated for 30 kV, 350 mA CW has been designed. The optimization of gun electrode geometry has been done using CST Particle Studio in order to tune the various electron gun parameters. The beam diameter obtained in simulation is 8 mm at 100 mm from the LaB 6 cathode. The perveance obtained is 7.1 x 10 -8 A/V 3/2 . The Laser heated cathode has the advantages of eliminating the magnetic field effects of filament on the electron beam, electrical isolation needed for gun filament power supplies and better electron beam emittances. (author)

  11. Microbunching and coherent acceleration of electrons by subcycle laser pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rau, B.; Tajima, T. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States). Physics Dept.; Hojo, H. [Univ. of Tsukuba (Japan). Plasma Research Center

    1997-05-01

    The pick up and acceleration of all plasma electrons irradiated by an intense, subcyclic laser pulse is demonstrated via analytical and numerical calculations. It is shown that the initial low emittance of the plasma electrons is conserved during the process of acceleration, leading to an extremely cold, bunched electron beam. Compression of the electron bunch along the longitudinal coordinate is naturally achieved due to the interaction of electrons and laser pulse. In this paper, the authors find the localized solutions to Maxwell`s equations of a subcyclic laser pulse and use these to determine the acceleration of charged particles and they suggest future application for this acceleration mechanism as low energy particle injector and as electron source for coherent x-ray generation.

  12. Advanced metaheuristic algorithms for laser optimization in optical accelerator technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomizawa, Hiromitsu, E-mail: hiro@spring8.or.jp [Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute (JASRI), XFEL Joint Project/SPring-8, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo (Japan)

    2011-10-15

    Lasers are among the most important experimental tools for user facilities, including synchrotron radiation and free electron lasers (FEL). In the synchrotron radiation field, lasers are widely used for experiments with Pump-Probe techniques. Especially for X-ray-FELs, lasers play important roles as seed light sources or photocathode-illuminating light sources to generate a high-brightness electron bunch. For future accelerators, laser-based techonologies such as electro-optic (EO) sampling to measure ultra-short electron bunches and optical-fiber-based femtosecond timing systems have been intensively developed in the last decade. Therefore, controls and optimizations of laser pulse characteristics are strongly required for many kinds of experiments and improvement of accelerator systems. However, people believe that lasers should be tuned and customized for each requirement manually by experts. This makes it difficult for laser systems to be part of the common accelerator infrastructure. Automatic laser tuning requires sophisticated algorithms, and the metaheuristic algorithm is one of the best solutions. The metaheuristic laser tuning system is expected to reduce the human effort and time required for laser preparations. I have shown some successful results on a metaheuristic algorithm based on a genetic algorithm to optimize spatial (transverse) laser profiles, and a hill-climbing method extended with a fuzzy set theory to choose one of the best laser alignments automatically for each machine requirement.

  13. Advanced metaheuristic algorithms for laser optimization in optical accelerator technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomizawa, Hiromitsu

    2011-01-01

    Lasers are among the most important experimental tools for user facilities, including synchrotron radiation and free electron lasers (FEL). In the synchrotron radiation field, lasers are widely used for experiments with Pump-Probe techniques. Especially for X-ray-FELs, lasers play important roles as seed light sources or photocathode-illuminating light sources to generate a high-brightness electron bunch. For future accelerators, laser-based techonologies such as electro-optic (EO) sampling to measure ultra-short electron bunches and optical-fiber-based femtosecond timing systems have been intensively developed in the last decade. Therefore, controls and optimizations of laser pulse characteristics are strongly required for many kinds of experiments and improvement of accelerator systems. However, people believe that lasers should be tuned and customized for each requirement manually by experts. This makes it difficult for laser systems to be part of the common accelerator infrastructure. Automatic laser tuning requires sophisticated algorithms, and the metaheuristic algorithm is one of the best solutions. The metaheuristic laser tuning system is expected to reduce the human effort and time required for laser preparations. I have shown some successful results on a metaheuristic algorithm based on a genetic algorithm to optimize spatial (transverse) laser profiles, and a hill-climbing method extended with a fuzzy set theory to choose one of the best laser alignments automatically for each machine requirement.

  14. Improvements in or relating to laser annealed electronic devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barraclough, K.G.; Cullis, A.G.; Webber, H.C.

    1981-01-01

    A method of producing laser annealed electronic devices is described. The technique involves irradiating semiconductor material such as silicon or germanium to produce a neutron transmuted semiconductor material and laser annealing a selected region or regions in a slice of the transmuted material to a sub-micron depth. (U.K.)

  15. A control system for a free electron laser experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giove, D.

    1992-01-01

    The general layout of a control and data acquisition system for a Free Electron Laser experiment will be discussed. Some general considerations about the requirements and the architecture of the whole system will be developed. (author)

  16. Anti-Ship Missile Defense and the Free Electron Laser

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Herbert, Paul

    1998-01-01

    In order to improve ship self-defense against sea-skimming missiles, several concepts, such as the free electron laser, high-power microwaves, and the Phalanx gun system are reviewed and evaluated in this thesis...

  17. Laser Technology in Peace and War.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloembergen, N.

    Lasers emit light with a very high degree of monochromaticity, directionality and intensity. They can produce much higher intensities than incoherent light sources, such as incandescent lamps, fluorescent tubes and arcs. The first operating laser was realized in 1960, and much early research was funded by military agencies, but at the present time the commercial laser market is four times as large as the military market. Most applications of lasers are for peaceful purposes. Among the most important of these are fiber-optic communications and laser surgery. Other applications include laser printing, laser machining, construction alignment, and data storage on CD disks. Some military uses of lasers are also reviewed.

  18. Electron Dynamics in Nanostructures in Strong Laser Fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kling, Matthias

    2014-09-11

    The goal of our research was to gain deeper insight into the collective electron dynamics in nanosystems in strong, ultrashort laser fields. The laser field strengths will be strong enough to extract and accelerate electrons from the nanoparticles and to transiently modify the materials electronic properties. We aimed to observe, with sub-cycle resolution reaching the attosecond time domain, how collective electronic excitations in nanoparticles are formed, how the strong field influences the optical and electrical properties of the nanomaterial, and how the excitations in the presence of strong fields decay.

  19. Investigation of longitudinal dynamic in laser electron storage ring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karnaukhov, I.; Zelinsky, A. E-mail: zelinsky@kipt.kharkov.ua; Telegin, Yu

    2001-09-01

    Longitudinal dynamic of electron beam due to radiation damping and quantum fluctuations in the storage ring with a laser-electron interaction section (Compton scattering) is investigated. This investigation was carried out by numerical simulations using the Monte Carlo method. The dependence of the steady-state energy spread of electron beam due to the Compton back scattering of photons on the electron beam energy and photon flash density were obtained. Simulation findings are compared with the analytical estimations by Z. Huang.

  20. Investigation of longitudinal dynamic in laser electron storage ring

    CERN Document Server

    Karnaukhov, I; Telegin, Yu P

    2001-01-01

    Longitudinal dynamic of electron beam due to radiation damping and quantum fluctuations in the storage ring with a laser-electron interaction section (Compton scattering) is investigated. This investigation was carried out by numerical simulations using the Monte Carlo method. The dependence of the steady-state energy spread of electron beam due to the Compton back scattering of photons on the electron beam energy and photon flash density were obtained. Simulation findings are compared with the analytical estimations by Z. Huang.

  1. Staged electron laser accelerator (STELLA) experiment at brookhaven ATF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pogorelsky, I.V.; Steenbergen, A. van; Gallardo, J.C. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)] [and others

    1998-03-01

    The STELLA experiment is being prepared at the BNL Accelerator Test Facility (STF). The goal of the experiment is to demonstrate quasi-monochromatic inverse Cherenkov acceleration (ICA) of electrons bunched to the laser wavelength period. Microbunches on the order of 2 {mu}m in length separated by 10.6 {mu}m will be produced using an inverse free electron laser (IFEL) accelerator driven by a CO{sub 2} laser. The design and simulations for two phases of this experiment including demonstration of 10 MeV and 100 MeV acceleration are presented. (author)

  2. Structural defects in laser- and electron-beam annealed silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narayan, J.

    1979-01-01

    Laser and electron beam pulses provide almost an ideal source of heat by which thin layers of semiconductors can be rapidly melted and solidified with heating and cooling rates exceeding 10 80 C/sec. Microstructural modifications obtained as a function of laser parameters are examined and it is shown that both laser and electron beam pulses can be used to remove displacement damage, dislocations, dislocation loops and precipitates. Annealing of defects underneath the oxide layers in silicon is possible within a narrow energy window. The formation of cellular structure provides a rather clear evidence of melting which leads to segregation and supercooling, and subsequent cell formation

  3. Magnetic Field Generation and Electron Acceleration in Relativistic Laser Channel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kostyukov, I.Yu.; Shvets, G.; Fisch, N.J.; Rax, J.M.

    2001-01-01

    The interaction between energetic electrons and a circularly polarized laser pulse inside an ion channel is studied. Laser radiation can be resonantly absorbed by electrons executing betatron oscillations in the ion channel and absorbing angular momentum from the laser. The absorbed angular momentum manifests itself as a strong axial magnetic field (inverse Faraday effect). The magnitude of this magnetic field is calculated and related to the amount of the absorbed energy. Absorbed energy and generated magnetic field are estimated for the small and large energy gain regimes. Qualitative comparisons with recent experiments are also made

  4. Ultraviolet Free Electron Laser Facility preliminary design report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ben-Zvi, I.

    1993-02-01

    This document, the Preliminary Design Report (PDR) for the Brookhaven Ultraviolet Free Electron Laser (UV FEL) facility, describes all the elements of a facility proposed to meet the needs of a research community which requires ultraviolet sources not currently available as laboratory based lasers. Further, for these experiments, the requisite properties are not extant in either the existing second or upcoming third generation synchrotron light sources. This document is the result of our effort at BNL to identify potential users, determine the requirements of their experiments, and to design a facility which can not only satisfy the existing need, but have adequate flexibility for possible future extensions as need dictates and as evolving technology allows. The PDR is comprised of three volumes. In this, the first volume, background for the development of the proposal is given, including descriptions of the UV FEL facility, and representative examples of the science it was designed to perform. Discussion of the limitations and potential directions for growth are also included. A detailed description of the facility design is then provided, which addresses the accelerator, optical, and experimental systems. Information regarding the conventional construction for the facility is contained in an addendum to volume one (IA)

  5. Ultraviolet Free Electron Laser Facility preliminary design report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ben-Zvi, I. [ed.

    1993-02-01

    This document, the Preliminary Design Report (PDR) for the Brookhaven Ultraviolet Free Electron Laser (UV FEL) facility, describes all the elements of a facility proposed to meet the needs of a research community which requires ultraviolet sources not currently available as laboratory based lasers. Further, for these experiments, the requisite properties are not extant in either the existing second or upcoming third generation synchrotron light sources. This document is the result of our effort at BNL to identify potential users, determine the requirements of their experiments, and to design a facility which can not only satisfy the existing need, but have adequate flexibility for possible future extensions as need dictates and as evolving technology allows. The PDR is comprised of three volumes. In this, the first volume, background for the development of the proposal is given, including descriptions of the UV FEL facility, and representative examples of the science it was designed to perform. Discussion of the limitations and potential directions for growth are also included. A detailed description of the facility design is then provided, which addresses the accelerator, optical, and experimental systems. Information regarding the conventional construction for the facility is contained in an addendum to volume one (IA).

  6. [INVITED] Laser-induced forward transfer: A high resolution additive manufacturing technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delaporte, Philippe; Alloncle, Anne-Patricia

    2016-04-01

    Among the additive manufacturing techniques, laser-induced forward transfer addresses the challenges of printing thin films in solid phase or small volume droplets in liquid phase with very high resolution. This paper reviews the physics of this process and explores the pros and cons of this technology versus other digital printing technologies. The main field of applications are printed electronics, organic electronics and tissue engineering, and the most promising short terms ones concern digital laser printing of sensors and conductive tracks. Future directions and emerging areas of interest are discussed such as printing solid from a liquid phase and 3D digital nanomanufacturing.

  7. Quantitative evaluation of nonablative laser technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Paul M; Skover, Greg R; Payonk, Greg; Geronemus, Roy G

    2002-12-01

    analyzed and compared including the right and left cheek and the right and left forehead. Measurements were taken at baseline and then at 1-, 3- and 6-month follow-up visits. Skin roughness decreased 11% from baseline in the patient with photodamaged skin, while the patients with acne scarring showed a 33% improvement from baseline after 3 treatment sessions. Six-months after the fifth treatment session, a 26% improvement in skin smoothness was documented in the patients with photodamaged skin, while a 61% improvement was recorded in the subject with acne scarring. Biomechanical analysis of the skin showed a 23% decrease in skin stiffness and a 30% increase in skin compliance at the 6-month follow-up in the patients with photodamage. Alternatively, the patient with acne scarring showed a 50% increase in skin stiffness, and a 30% decrease in skin compliance at the 6-month follow-up. Three-dimensional in vivo optical skin imaging provided a rapid and quantitative assessment of surface topography and facial fine lines after multiple treatment sessions with a 1064-nm QS Nd:YAG laser, correlating with clinical and subjective responses. Biomechanical analysis provided technical understanding of structural changes in photodamaged skin and acne scarring following nonablative laser treatment. Future applications of these devices may include comparison of nonablative laser technology, optimization of treatment regimens, and objective evaluation of other aesthetic procedures performed by dermatologists.

  8. Development of Ultra-sensitive Laser Spectroscopic Analysis Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cha, H. K.; Kim, D. H.; Song, K. S. (and others)

    2007-04-15

    Laser spectroscopic analysis technology has three distinct merits in detecting various nuclides found in nuclear fields. High selectivity originated from small bandwidth of tunable lasers makes it possible to distinguish various kinds of isotopes and isomers. High intensity of focused laser beam makes it possible to analyze ultratrace amount. Remote delivery of laser beam improves safety of workers who are exposed in dangerous environment. Also it can be applied to remote sensing of environment pollution.

  9. Experimental and theoretical studies of picosecond laser interactions with electronic materials-laser ablation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mao, Samuel S. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2000-05-01

    Lasers having picosecond and shorter pulse duration are receiving much attention due to their capabilities for direct-write micromachining on many materials with minimal substrate damage. Substantial progress has been made in the understanding of laser ablation processes, particularly the creation of plasmas that often shield the target and reduce the material processing efficiency at nanosecond time scales. However, a considerable challenge that still remains is the understanding of the underlying mechanisms during picosecond laser interactions with electronic solids. In this work we first study picosecond laser-induced electron emission from semiconductor surfaces. A theoretical model was set up based on carrier transport inside the semiconductor material during picosecond laser-semiconductor interactions. We demonstrate that nonequilibrium carrier dynamics plays a significant role for picosecond, as well as short nanosecond, laser induced electron emission from semiconductors. Photoelectric effect is found to be responsible for electron emission at low incident laser fluences, whereas thermionic emission is dominant at higher fluences. We have also performed experimental and theoretical studies on the formation and subsequent evolution of plasmas during laser-metal interactions at the picosecond time scale. Using picosecond time-resolved shadowgrams ahd interferograms, a novel type of plasma is observed, which has an electron density on the order of 1020cm-3.The origin of this picosecond plasma is attributed to gas breakdown, which is caused by laser-induced electron emission fi-om the target surface. After the laser pulse is completed, the longitudinal expansion of the plasma is suppressed. This suppression is found to result from an electric field above the target that prevents, after laser irradiation, fbrther movement of the electrons inside the plasma. Measurements of lateral plasma expansion indicate that the picosecond plasma may absorb

  10. Laser-driven dielectric electron accelerator for radiobiology researches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyama, Kazuyoshi; Matsumura, Yosuke; Uesaka, Mitsuru; Yoshida, Mitsuhiro; Natsui, Takuya; Aimierding, Aimidula

    2013-05-01

    In order to estimate the health risk associated with a low dose radiation, the fundamental process of the radiation effects in a living cell must be understood. It is desired that an electron bunch or photon pulse precisely knock a cell nucleus and DNA. The required electron energy and electronic charge of the bunch are several tens keV to 1 MeV and 0.1 fC to 1 fC, respectively. The smaller beam size than micron is better for the precise observation. Since the laser-driven dielectric electron accelerator seems to suite for the compact micro-beam source, a phase-modulation-masked-type laser-driven dielectric accelerator was studied. Although the preliminary analysis made a conclusion that a grating period and an electron speed must satisfy the matching condition of LG/λ = v/c, a deformation of a wavefront in a pillar of the grating relaxed the matching condition and enabled the slow electron to be accelerated. The simulation results by using the free FDTD code, Meep, showed that the low energy electron of 20 keV felt the acceleration field strength of 20 MV/m and gradually felt higher field as the speed was increased. Finally the ultra relativistic electron felt the field strength of 600 MV/m. The Meep code also showed that a length of the accelerator to get energy of 1 MeV was 3.8 mm, the required laser power and energy were 11 GW and 350 mJ, respectively. Restrictions on the laser was eased by adopting sequential laser pulses. If the accelerator is illuminated by sequential N pulses, the pulse power, pulse width and the pulse energy are reduced to 1/N, 1/N and 1/N2, respectively. The required laser power per pulse is estimated to be 2.2 GW when ten pairs of sequential laser pulse is irradiated.

  11. Compact electron accelerator for pumping gas lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duncan, C.V.; Bradley, L.P.

    1976-01-01

    A description is given of the design and application of a simple e-beam generator for the repetitive pulse pumping of gas lasers. The circuit uses a low inductance Marx and series tuned pulse forming elements

  12. Maskless selective laser patterning of PEDOT:PSS on barrier/foil for organic electronics applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karnakis, Dimitris; Stephens, Tim; Chabrol, Gregoire

    2013-03-01

    Rapid developments in organic electronics promise low cost devices for applications such as OLED, organic transistors and organic photovoltaics on large-area glass or flexible substrates in the near future. The technology is very attractive as most device layers can be solution printed. But when directly patterned deposition is impossible, a post-patterning step is required and laser processing is gradually emerging as a key-enabling tool. DPSS lasers offer several advantages including maskless, non-contact, dry patterning, but also scalable large area processing, well suited to roll-to-roll manufacturing at μm resolutions. However, very few reports discuss in detail the merits of DPSS laser patterning technology, especially on flexible substrates. This paper describes the potential of ultrafast DPSS laser technology for OLED fabrication on foil and, specifically, picosecond laser ablation of PEDOT:PSS on multilayered barrier/foil or metal grids aimed as a synthetic alternative to inorganic transparent conductive electrodes. Key requirements include: (a) the complete removal of PEDOT layers without residue, (b) the complete absence of surface contamination from redeposited laser debris to avoid short circuiting and (c) no loss in performance of from laser exposure. We will demonstrate that with careful optimisation and appropriate choice of ultrafast laser, the above criteria can be fulfilled. A suitable process window exists resulting in clean laser structuring without damage to the underlying heat sensitive barrier layers whilst also containing laser debris. A low temperature ablation most likely proceeds via a stress-assisted (film fracture and ejection) process as opposed to vaporisation or other phase change commonly encountered with longer pulse lasers.

  13. Plasma mirror implementation on LFEX laser for ion and fast electron fast ignition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morace, A.; Kojima, S.; Arikawa, Y.; Fujioka, S.; Yogo, A.; Tosaki, S.; Sakata, S.; Abe, Y.; Lee, S. H.; Matsuo, K.; Sagisaka, A.; Kondo, K.; Pirozhkov, A. S.; Norimatsu, T.; Jitsuno, T.; Miyanaga, N.; Shiraga, H.; Nakai, M.; Nishimura, H.; Azechi, H.

    2017-12-01

    In this work we report the successful implementation of plasma mirror (PM) technology on an LFEX laser facility at the Institute of Laser Engineering, Osaka University. The LFEX laser pulse was successfully refocused at the target chamber center (TCC) by means of a spherical plasma mirror, resulting in 5  ×  1018 W cm-2 laser intensity, with 45% reflectivity at a laser flux of about 90 J cm-2 on the PM. Experimental results show stable focusing and pointing of the LFEX pulse after PM refocusing. The contrast improvement was demonstrated by both cooler fast electron slope temperature distribution as well as by the ability to shoot sub-µm plastic foils obtaining proton beams with maximum energy exceeding 20 MeV. Experimental results are qualitatively reproduced by 2D particle in cell simulations.

  14. High Efficiency Electron-Laser Interactions in Tapered Helical Undulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duris, Joseph Patrick

    Efficient coupling of relativistic electron beams with high power radiation lies at the heart of advanced accelerator and light source research and development. The inverse free electron laser is a stable accelerator capable of harnessing very high intensity laser electric fields to efficiently transfer large powers from lasers to electron beams. In this dissertation, we first present the theoretical framework to describe the interaction, and then apply our improved understanding of the IFEL to the design and numerical study of meter-long, GeV IFELs for compact light sources. The central experimental work of the dissertation is the UCLA BNL helical inverse free electron laser experiment at the Accelerator Test Facility in Brookhaven National Laboratory which used a strongly tapered 54cm long, helical, permanent magnet undulator and a several hundred GW CO2 laser to accelerate electrons from 52 to 106MeV, setting new records for inverse free electron laser energy gain (54MeV) and average accelerating gradient (100MeV/m). The undulator design and fabrication as well as experimental diagnostics are presented. In order to improve the stability and quality of the accelerated electron beam, we redesigned the undulator for a slightly reduced output energy by modifying the magnet gap throughout the undulator, and we used this modified undulator to demonstrated capture of >25% of the injected beam without prebunching. In the study of heavily loaded GeV inverse free electron lasers, we show that a majority of the power may be transferred from a laser to the accelerated electron beam. Reversing the process to decelerate high power electron beams, a mechanism we refer to as tapering enhanced stimulated superradiant amplification, offers a clear path to high power light sources. We present studies of radiation production for a wide range of wavelengths (10mum, 13nm, and 0.3nm) using this method and discuss the design for a deceleration experiment using the same undulator used

  15. Advanced thermal management technologies for defense electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloschock, Kristen P.; Bar-Cohen, Avram

    2012-05-01

    Thermal management technology plays a key role in the continuing miniaturization, performance improvements, and higher reliability of electronic systems. For the past decade, and particularly, the past 4 years, the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) has aggressively pursued the application of micro- and nano-technology to reduce or remove thermal constraints on the performance of defense electronic systems. The DARPA Thermal Management Technologies (TMT) portfolio is comprised of five technical thrust areas: Thermal Ground Plane (TGP), Microtechnologies for Air-Cooled Exchangers (MACE), NanoThermal Interfaces (NTI), Active Cooling Modules (ACM), and Near Junction Thermal Transport (NJTT). An overview of the TMT program will be presented with emphasis on the goals and status of these efforts relative to the current State-of-the-Art. The presentation will close with future challenges and opportunities in the thermal management of defense electronics.

  16. Semiconductor technologies in the era of electronics

    CERN Document Server

    Kang, Yong Hoon

    2014-01-01

    Technological advances in the field of materials, devices, circuits, and systems began by the discovery of new properties of objects, or the entrepreneurship with the applications of unique or practical concepts for commercial goods. To implement products using these findings and challenges textbook knowledge is usually sufficient. Semiconductor Technologies in the Era of Electronics therefore does not aim to look deeper in certain areas but it offers a broad and comprehensive overview of the field to: - Experts of specific knowledge who want to expand the overall understanding to different areas - Persons who wish to understand the principle of electronic devices often seen in everyday life - Entrepreneurs interested in the innovations and changes of semiconductor technologies and overall electronics industry. A profound and theoretical approach is therefore used and special cases essential to understanding these important concept are presented.

  17. Electronically-Steerable, Coherent Laser Arrays: REALLY Small, Lightweight, High Power Lasers for DoD Applications (BRIEFING CHARTS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-03-07

    Links Multi-target Search and Track Target ID Laser Countermeasures Laser Weapon Laser Sensing Multiple, Conformal, Electronically-Steered...Temperatures 35oC >50oC Reduce Laser Weapon System Size, Weight, and Cost – Impacts: • HELLADS Phase 4 • DARPA Fiber Laser Program • All DoD

  18. Measurements of plasma temperature and electron density in laser ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    using the Boltzmann plot method and the electron density is determined using the Saha–. Boltzmann equation method ... Laser-induced plasma; spectroscopy; plasma temperature; electron density. PACS Nos 52.50.Jm; 52.70. ... trace sample in any phase (solid, liquid and gas) with no or minimal sample prepa- ration [2–4].

  19. Free electron laser amplifier driven by an induction linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neil, V.K.

    1986-01-01

    This paper discusses the use of a free-electron laser amplifier as a means of converting the kinetic energy of an electron beam into coherent radiation. In particular, the use of an induction linear accelerator is discussed. The motion of the elections in the tapered and untapered wiggler magnets is discussed as well as the beam emittance, and the radiation fields involved

  20. Theory and Simulation of an Inverse Free Electron Laser Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, S. K.; Bhattacharjee, A.; Fang, J. M.; Marshall, T. C.

    1996-11-01

    An experimental demonstration of the acceleration of electrons using a high power CO2 laser in an inverse free electron laser (IFEL) is underway at the Brookhaven National Laboratory. This experiment has generated data, which we are attempting to simulate. Included in our studies are such effects as: a low-loss metallic waveguide with a dielectric coating on the walls; multi-mode coupling due to self-consistent interaction between the electrons and the optical wave; space charge (which is significant at lower laser power); energy-spread of the electrons; arbitrary wiggler field profile; and slippage. Two types of wiggler profile have been considered: a linear taper of the period, and a step-taper of the period (the period is ~ 3cm, the field is ~ 1T, and the wiggler length is 47cm). The energy increment of the electrons ( ~ 1-2%) is analyzed in detail as a function of laser power, wiggler parameters, and the initial beam energy (40MeV). For laser power ~ 0.5GW, the predictions of the simulations are in good accord with experimental results. A matter currently under study is the discrepancy between theory and observations for the electron energy distribution observed at the end of the IFEL. This work is supported by the Department of Energy.

  1. Future electron accelerators and free electron lasers: Potentials in clinical medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsson, Börje; Stepanek, Jiri

    1997-10-01

    Studies of the biological and technical prerequisites for the clinical use of monoenergetic X-rays, and their specific absorption in heavy elements are conducted, with a view towards plans for stereotactic photon activation radiosurgery. The primary aim is the controlled eradication of target structures in the brain for the treatment of functional brain disorders or small brain tumours, with monochromatic synchrotron X-rays. The specific cell-killing action is based on DNA-breakage caused by short-range Auger and Coster-Kronig electrons produced by heavy atoms upon K-shell absorption of their characteristic X-rays. To this end, iodine or heavy metals would have to be deposited, in or close to nuclear DNA in target cells by means of suitable molecular vehicles. Practically useful concepts for clinically useful monoenergetic X-ray facilities and beam-lines are being developed. In this paper attention is focussed on the possible use of laser Compton backscattering for the production of clinically useful monochromatic X-ray beams suitable for irradiation of very small targets in the brain through the intact skull. Particularly relevant, in the present context are prospects for introducing free electron laser technology to improve the calculated parameters of X-ray beams designed for stereotactic photon activation radiosurgery with monochromatic photons in the energy interval 30-100 keV. Constructive initiatives would be welcome!

  2. KrF laser pumping by electron beam discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonnet, Jean; Fournier, Gerard; Pigache, Daniel

    1981-01-01

    Homogeneous ionization with an electron beam has permitted discharge pumping of a KrF laser with a discharge-energy/beam-energy ratio greater than 5. This high value is obtained to the detriment of an energy density and an efficiency which are about half the best values obtained under other conditions. This new result does not really modify a recent conclusion indicating that an electron beam controlled discharge has no significant advantage over a pure electron beam as regards pumping high energy KrF lasers at high repetition rate [fr

  3. The History of X-ray Free-Electron Lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pellegrini, C.; /UCLA /SLAC

    2012-06-28

    The successful lasing at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory of the Linear Coherent Light Source (LCLS), the first X-ray free-electron laser (X-ray FEL), in the wavelength range 1.5 to 15 {angstrom}, pulse duration of 60 to few femtoseconds, number of coherent photons per pulse from 10{sup 13} to 10{sup 11}, is a landmark event in the development of coherent electromagnetic radiation sources. Until now electrons traversing an undulator magnet in a synchrotron radiation storage ring provided the best X-ray sources. The LCLS has set a new standard, with a peak X-ray brightness higher by ten orders of magnitudes and pulse duration shorter by three orders of magnitudes. LCLS opens a new window in the exploration of matter at the atomic and molecular scales of length and time. Taking a motion picture of chemical processes in a few femtoseconds or less, unraveling the structure and dynamics of complex molecular systems, like proteins, are some of the exciting experiments made possible by LCLS and the other X-ray FELs now being built in Europe and Asia. In this paper, we describe the history of the many theoretical, experimental and technological discoveries and innovations, starting from the 1960s and 1970s, leading to the development of LCLS.

  4. Peking university superconducting accelerator facility for free electron laser

    CERN Document Server

    Zhao Kui; Hao Jian Kui; Huang Sen Lin; Lu Xiang Yang; Quan Sheng Wen; Wang Li; Xiang Rong; Zhang Bao Cheng; Zhu Feng; Zhuang Jie Ji

    2002-01-01

    Peking University Superconducting Accelerator Facility (PKU-SCAF) is to generate high-quality electron beams with high average current. It is mainly composed of a DC-SC photocathode injector and a superconducting accelerator. It will operate in CW mode. The energy of the electrons is 20-35 MeV and the emittance is <15 pi mm mrad. PKU-SCAF will be used for Free Electron Lasers.

  5. Laser technology and applications in gynaecology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adelman, M R; Tsai, L J; Tangchitnob, E P; Kahn, B S

    2013-04-01

    The term 'laser' is an acronym for Light Amplification by Stimulated Emission of Radiation. Lasers are commonly described by the emitted wavelength, which determines the colour of the light, as well as the active lasing medium. Currently, over 40 types of lasers have been developed with a wide range of both industrial and medical uses. Gas and solid-state lasers are frequently used in surgical applications, with CO2 and Ar being the most common examples of gas lasers, and the Nd:YAG and KTP:YAG being the most common examples of solid-state lasers. At present, it appears that the CO2, Nd:YAG, and KTP lasers provide alternative methods for achieving similar results, as opposed to superior results, when compared with traditional endoscopic techniques, such as cold-cutting monopolar and bipolar energy. This review focuses on the physics, tissue interaction, safety and applications of commonly used lasers in gynaecological surgery.

  6. Harmonic lasing in x-ray free electron lasers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. A. Schneidmiller

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Harmonic lasing in a free electron laser with a planar undulator (under the condition that the fundamental frequency is suppressed might be a cheap and efficient way of extension of wavelength ranges of existing and planned x-ray free electron laser (FEL facilities. Contrary to nonlinear harmonic generation, harmonic lasing can provide much more intense, stable, and narrow-band FEL beam which is easier to handle due to the suppressed fundamental frequency. In this paper we perform a parametrization of the solution of the eigenvalue equation for lasing at odd harmonics, and present an explicit expression for FEL gain length, taking into account all essential effects. We propose and discuss methods for suppression of the fundamental harmonic. We also suggest a combined use of harmonic lasing and lasing at the retuned fundamental wavelength in order to reduce bandwidth and to increase brilliance of x-ray beam at saturation. Considering 3rd harmonic lasing as a practical example, we come to the conclusion that it is much more robust than usually thought, and can be widely used in the existing or planned x-ray FEL (XFEL facilities. In particular, Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS after a minor modification can lase to saturation at the 3rd harmonic up to the photon energy of 25–30 keV providing multigigawatt power level and narrow bandwidth. As for the European XFEL, harmonic lasing would allow one to extend operating range (ultimately up to 100 keV, to reduce FEL bandwidth and to increase brilliance, to enable two-color operation for pump-probe experiments, and to provide more flexible operation at different electron energies. Similar improvements can be realized in other x-ray FEL facilities with gap-tunable undulators like FLASH II, SACLA, LCLS II, etc. Harmonic lasing can be an attractive option for compact x-ray FELs (driven by electron beams with a relatively low energy, allowing the use of the standard undulator technology instead of

  7. Observation of 690 MV m-1 Electron Accelerating Gradient with a Laser-Driven Dielectric Microstructure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wootton, K.P.; Wu, Z.; /SLAC; Cowan, B.M.; /Tech-X, Boulder; Hanuka, A.; /SLAC /Technion; Makasyuk, I.V.; /SLAC; Peralta, E.A.; Soong, K.; Byer, R.L.; /Stanford U.; England, R.J.; /SLAC

    2016-06-27

    Acceleration of electrons using laser-driven dielectric microstructures is a promising technology for the miniaturization of particle accelerators. In this work, experimental results are presented of relativistic electron acceleration with 690±100 MVm-1 gradient. This is a record-high accelerating gradient for a dielectric microstructure accelerator, nearly doubling the previous record gradient. To reach higher acceleration gradients the present experiment employs 90 fs duration laser pulses.

  8. Development of laser preventive maintenance technology and application for PWRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoda, M.; Saeki, R.; Kato, H.; Chida, I.

    2008-01-01

    We developed a laser peening technology to prevent the stress corrosion cracking (SCC) on nuclear reactor in-core components. Since 2004, we started to apply it to PWRs and have practiced it three times successfully for Ikata-1,2 of Shikoku Electric Power Company as the SCC preventive maintenance technology for Alloy 600 materials. It is expected the laser peening technology will be applied to many other plants. (author)

  9. High-flux electron beams from laser wakefield accelerators driven by petawatt lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Ming; Tesileanu, Ovidiu

    2017-07-01

    Laser wakefield accelerators (LWFAs) are considered to be one of the most competitive next-generation accelerator candidates. In this paper, we will study the potential high-flux electron beam production of an LWFA driven by petawatt-level laser pulses. In our three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations, an optimal set of parameters gives ˜ 40 {nC} of charge with 2 {PW} laser power, thus ˜ 400 {kA} of instantaneous current if we assume the electron beam duration is 100 fs. This high flux and its secondary radiation are widely applicable in nuclear and QED physics, industrial imaging, medical and biological studies.

  10. The shipboard employment of a free electron laser weapon system

    OpenAIRE

    Allgaier, Gregory G.

    2003-01-01

    Approved for Public Release; Distribution is Unlimited A megawatt (MW) class Free Electron Laser (FEL) shows promise as a new weapon for antiship cruise missile defense. An FEL weapon system delivers energy at the speed of light at controllable energy levels, giving the war fighter new engagement options. Considerations for this weapon system include employment, design, and stability. In order to reach a MW class laser, system parameters must be optimized and the high power optical beam mu...

  11. Intense pulsed sources of ions and electrons produced by lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourrabier, G.; Consoli, T.; Slama, L.

    1966-11-01

    We describe a device for the acceleration of the plasma burst produced by focusing a laser beam into a metal target. We extract the electrons and the ions from the plasma. The maximum current is around 2000 amperes during few microseconds. The study of the effect of the kind of the target on the characteristics of the current shows the great importance of the initial conditions that is the ionisation potential of the target and the energy laser. (authors) [fr

  12. Impact of industrial needs on advances in laser technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denney, Paul E.

    2005-03-01

    Lasers have become accepted "tools" by a number of industries. Everything from cars to heart pacemakers to greeting cards are now using lasers to cut, drill, clad, heat treat, and weld/join. The market for industrial laser systems is expanding. For the first quarter of 2004 the sales in lasers systems increased 40% to over $120 million1. Some of this increase in sales may be due to the fact that lasers are now considered reliable and have proven to be economical. The primary industrial laser systems today are the CO2 and Nd:YAG (lamp pumped) lasers especially at the higher powers. Both laser designs have evolved in power, beam quality, and reliability. At the same time laser manufacturers have developed methods to decrease the fabrication cost for the lasers. While these improvements have had a major impact on the operating cost of lasers, significant additional improvements do not seem possible in the near future for these lasers. As a result other advances in laser technologies (diode, diode pumped Nd:YAG, disc, and Yb fiber) are being examined.

  13. Formation of plasmonic colloidal silver for flexible and printed electronics using laser ablation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kassavetis, S., E-mail: skasa@physics.auth.gr [University of Ioannina, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, 45110 Ioannina (Greece); Kaziannis, S. [University of Ioannina, Department of Physics, 45110 Ioannina (Greece); Pliatsikas, N. [University of Ioannina, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, 45110 Ioannina (Greece); Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Department of Physics, 54124 Thessaloniki (Greece); Avgeropoulos, A.; Karantzalis, A.E. [University of Ioannina, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, 45110 Ioannina (Greece); Kosmidis, C. [University of Ioannina, Department of Physics, 45110 Ioannina (Greece); Lidorikis, E. [University of Ioannina, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, 45110 Ioannina (Greece); Patsalas, P. [Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Department of Physics, 54124 Thessaloniki (Greece)

    2015-05-01

    Highlights: • Silver plasmonic colloidal in organic solvents by ps laser ablation process. • Ag NPs that meet size requirements of the printed organic electronics technology. • Ag NPs size refinement by secondary process using the 355 nm beam of a ns laser. - Abstract: Laser ablation (LA) in liquids has been used for the development of various nanoparticles (NPs); among them, Ag NPs in aqueous solutions (usually produced by nanosecond (ns) LA) have attracted exceptional interest due to its strong plasmonic response. In this work, we present a comprehensive study of the LA of Ag in water, chloroform and toluene, with and without PVP, using a picosecond (ps) Nd:YAG laser and we consider a wide range of LA parameters such as the laser wavelength (1064, 532, 355 nm), the pulse energy (0.3–17 mJ) and the number of pulses. In addition, we consider the use of a secondary nanosecond laser beam for the refinement of the NPs size distribution. The optical properties of the NPs were evaluated by in situ optical transmittance measurements in the UV–vis spectral ranges. The morphology of the NPs and the formation of aggregates were investigated by Scanning Electron Microscopy and High-Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy. The ps LA process resulted in the development of bigger Ag NPs, compared to the ns LA, compatible with the size requirements of the printed organic electronics technology. The optimum conditions for the ps LA of Ag in organic solvents include the use of the 355 nm beam at low pulse energy (<1 mJ); these conditions rendered isolated Ag nanoparticles manifesting strong and well defined surface plasmon resonance peak. The use of the secondary ns laser beam was proven to be able to refine the nanoparticles to intermediate size between those produced by the single ns or ps LA.

  14. Laser mode complexity analysis in infrared waveguide free-electron lasers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui Prazeres

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available We analyze an optical phenomenon taking place in waveguide free-electron lasers, which disturbs, or forbids, operation in far infrared range. Waveguides in the optical cavity are used in far-infrared and THz ranges in order to avoid diffraction optical losses, and a hole coupling on output mirror is used for laser extraction. We show that, when the length of the waveguide exceeds a given limit, a phenomenon of “mode disorder” appears in the cavity, which makes the laser difficult, or impossible, to work properly. This phenomenon is even more important when the waveguide covers the whole length of the cavity. A numerical simulation describes this effect, which creates discontinuities of the laser power in the spectral domain. We show an example with an existing infrared Free-Electron Laser, which exhibits such discontinuities of the power, and where no convincing explanation was proposed until now.

  15. Pulsed Laser Ablation and Deposition with the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility Free Electron Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reilly, Anne; Allmond, Chris; Shinn, Michelle

    2002-05-01

    We have been conducting some of the first experiments in pulsed laser ablation and deposition with the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility Free Electron Laser (TJNAF-FEL). The wavelength tunability, high average power (up to 1.72 kW), very high repetition rate (cw rate up to 74 MHz) and ultrafast pulses ( 650 fs) of the TJNAF-FEL present a combination of parameters unmatched by any laser, which has marked benefits for ablation and deposition. We will be presenting results on ablation of metals (Co,NiFe,Ti,Nb). Comparison with thin films deposited with a standard nanosecond laser source and an ultrafast low-repetition rate laser system show the advantage of using the FEL to produce high quality films at high deposition rates. Preliminary optical spectroscopy studies of the ablation plume and electron/ion emission studies during ablation will also be presented.

  16. Electron rescattering at metal nanotips induced by ultrashort laser pulses

    OpenAIRE

    Wachter, Georg; Lemell, Christoph; Burgdörfer, Joachim; Schenk, Markus; Krüger, Michael; Hommelhoff, Peter

    2012-01-01

    We report on the first investigation of plateau and cut-off structures in photoelectron spectra from nano-scale metal tips interacting with few-cycle near-infrared laser pulses. These hallmarks of electron rescattering, well-known from atom-laser interaction in the strong-field regime, appear at remarkably low laser intensities with nominal Keldysh parameters of the order of $\\gtrsim 10$. Quantum and quasi-classical simulations reveal that a large field enhancement near the tip and the increa...

  17. Solid state lasers: a major direction in quantum electronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shcherbakov, I.A.

    2004-01-01

    The aim of the report is to analyze development of solid-state lasers (SSL) as one of the most important avenues of the quantum electronics. The obtained intensity of a laser radiation at the focus equal to 5x10 1 0 W/cm 2 (the field intensity equal to about 5x10 1 0 V/cm 2 ) is noted to enable to observe nonlinear quantum- electrodynamic effects. Besides, one managed to increase the SSL efficiency conventionally equal to maximum 3% up to 48-50%. Paper describes new types of SSLs, namely, the crystalline fiber lasers with the lateral gradient of the index of refraction [ru

  18. Spatial Control of Laser Wakefield Accelerated Electron Beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maksimchuk, A.; Behm, K.; Zhao, T.; Joglekar, A. S.; Hussein, A.; Nees, J.; Thomas, A. G. R.; Krushelnick, K.; Elle, J.; Lucero, A.; Samarin, G. M.; Sarry, G.; Warwick, J.

    2017-10-01

    The laser wakefield experiments to study and control spatial properties of electron beams were performed using HERCULES laser at the University of Michigan at power of 100 TW. In the first experiment multi-electron beam generation was demonstrated using co-propagating, parallel laser beams with a π-phase shift mirror and showing that interaction between the wakefields can cause injection to occur for plasma and laser parameters in which a single wakefield displays no significant injection. In the second experiment a magnetic triplet quadrupole system was used to refocus and stabilize electron beams at the distance of 60 cm from the interaction region. This produced a 10-fold increase in remote gamma-ray activation of 63Cu using a lead converter. In the third experiment measurements of un-trapped electrons with high transverse momentum produce a 500 mrad (FWHM) ring. This ring is formed by electrons that receive a forward momentum boost by traversing behind the bubble and its size is inversely proportional to the plasma density. The characterization of divergence and charge of this electron ring may reveal information about the wakefield structure and trapping potential. Supported by U.S. Department of Energy and the National Nuclear Security Administration and Air Force Office of Scientific Research.

  19. Multi-GeV electron-positron beam generation from laser-electron scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vranic, Marija; Klimo, Ondrej; Korn, Georg; Weber, Stefan

    2018-03-16

    The new generation of laser facilities is expected to deliver short (10 fs-100 fs) laser pulses with 10-100 PW of peak power. This opens an opportunity to study matter at extreme intensities in the laboratory and provides access to new physics. Here we propose to scatter GeV-class electron beams from laser-plasma accelerators with a multi-PW laser at normal incidence. In this configuration, one can both create and accelerate electron-positron pairs. The new particles are generated in the laser focus and gain relativistic momentum in the direction of laser propagation. Short focal length is an advantage, as it allows the particles to be ejected from the focal region with a net energy gain in vacuum. Electron-positron beams obtained in this setup have a low divergence, are quasi-neutral and spatially separated from the initial electron beam. The pairs attain multi-GeV energies which are not limited by the maximum energy of the initial electron beam. We present an analytical model for the expected energy cutoff, supported by 2D and 3D particle-in-cell simulations. The experimental implications, such as the sensitivity to temporal synchronisation and laser duration is assessed to provide guidance for the future experiments.

  20. Free electron lasers for transmission of energy in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segall, S. B.; Hiddleston, H. R.; Catella, G. C.

    1981-01-01

    A one-dimensional resonant-particle model of a free electron laser (FEL) is used to calculate laser gain and conversion efficiency of electron energy to photon energy. The optical beam profile for a resonant optical cavity is included in the model as an axial variation of laser intensity. The electron beam profile is matched to the optical beam profile and modeled as an axial variation of current density. Effective energy spread due to beam emittance is included. Accelerators appropriate for a space-based FEL oscillator are reviewed. Constraints on the concentric optical resonator and on systems required for space operation are described. An example is given of a space-based FEL that would produce 1.7 MW of average output power at 0.5 micrometer wavelength with over 50% conversion efficiency of electrical energy to laser energy. It would utilize a 10 m-long amplifier centered in a 200 m-long optical cavity. A 3-amp, 65 meV electrostatic accelerator would provide the electron beam and recover the beam after it passes through the amplifier. Three to five shuttle flights would be needed to place the laser in orbit.

  1. Electron acceleration using laser produced plasmas

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva; Landua, Rolf

    2005-01-01

    Low density plasmas have long been of interest as a potential medium for particle acceleration since relativistic plasma waves are capable of supporting electric fields greater than 100 GeV/m. The physics of particle acceleration using plasmas will be reviewed, and new results will be discussed which have demonstrated that relatively narrow energy spread (<3%) beams having energies greater than 100 MeV can be produced from femtosecond laser plasma interactions. Future experiments and potential applications will also be discussed.

  2. Short Rayleigh Range Free Electron Laser Amplifiers

    CERN Document Server

    Yu, L H; Murphy, J B; Rose, J; Shaftan, T V; Wang, X J; Watanabe, T

    2005-01-01

    An important requirement for a high average power laser system is a manageable power density on the first optical element. One possibility to achieve this is a single pass amplifier which generates a short Rayleigh range (SRL) light beam. We present design parameters and calculated performances for several SRL configurations. These include a simulation of the optically guided (pinched) MW class FEL [1], the scalloped beam FEL amplifier [2] and high gain TOK amplifiers we propose to explore at our SDL facility.

  3. Biomedical Studies with the Free Electron Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-05-15

    disorders includ- Procedure for photosensitization nalignant melanoma has remained ing vitiligo and psoriasis , a logical ex- studies. When tumnors...singlet oxygen which causes irreversible oxidation of this a very attractive form of therapy. Treatment para - some essential cellular component...visible light (red of blue-greenl) delivered by laser was used to treat a paitientf with psoriasis . The psuiriatic les~ons responded vigorously to lawe

  4. A laser printing based approach for printed electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, T.; Hu, M.; Liu, Y.; Guo, Q.; Wang, X.; Zhang, W.; Lau, W.; Yang, J.

    2016-03-01

    Here we report a study of printing of electronics using an office use laser printer. The proposed method eliminates those critical disadvantages of solvent-based printing techniques by taking the advantages of electroless deposition and laser printing. The synthesized toner acts as a catalyst for the electroless copper deposition as well as an adhesion-promoting buffer layer between the substrate and deposited copper. The easy metallization of printed patterns and strong metal-substrate adhesion make it an especially effective method for massive production of flexible printed circuits. The proposed process is a high throughput, low cost, efficient, and environmentally benign method for flexible electronics manufacturing.

  5. Short wavelength optics for future free electron lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Attwood, D.T.

    1984-04-01

    Although much free-electron laser work is directed toward achieving sufficient single-pass gain to be useful for research purposes, the availability of mirrors of high reflectance for the vacuum ultraviolet and soft x-ray regime would make resonant cavities a possibility. In addition, as in ordinary synchrotron radiation work, mirrors are required for the construction of realistic experiments and for beam manipulation purposes such as folding and extraction. The Working Group discussed a number of approaches to reflecting optics for free electron lasers, which are summarized here, and described in some detail. 16 references, 2 figures

  6. Free electron laser on the ACO storage ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elleaume, P.

    1984-06-01

    This dissertation presents the design and characteristics of a Free Electron Laser built on the electron storage ring ACO at Orsay. The weak optical gain available (approximately 0.1% per pass) necessitated the use of an optical klystron instead of an undulator and the use of mirror with extremely high reflectivity. The laser characteristics: spectra, micro and macro-temporal structures, transverse structure and power are presented. They are in very good agreement with a classical theory based on the Lorentz force and Maxwell equations [fr

  7. Laser spectroscopy: Assessment of research needs for laser technologies applied to advanced spectroscopic methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hurst, G.S.

    1990-05-01

    This report is organized as follows. Section 2 summarizes the current program of DOE's Office of Health and Environmental Research (OHER) and provides some remarks on low laser science and technology could beneficially impact most of the research programs. Section 3 provides a brief global perspective on laser technology and attempts to define important trends in the field. Similarly, Section 4 provides a global perspective on laser spectroscopy and addresses important trends. Thus, Section 5 focuses on the trends in laser technology and spectroscopy which could impact the OHER mission in significant ways and contains the basis for recommendations made in the executive summary. For those with limited familiarity with laser technology and laser spectroscopy, reference is made to Appendix 1 for a list of abbreviations and acronyms. Appendix 2 can serve a useful review or tutorial for those who are not deeply involved with laser spectroscopy. Even those familiar with laser spectroscopy and laser technology may find it useful to know precisely what the authors of this document mean by certain specialized terms and expressions. Finally, a note on the style of referencing may be appropriate. Whenever possible a book or review articles is referenced as the preferred citation. However, we frequently found it useful to reference a number of individual papers of recent origin or those which were not conveniently found in the review articles

  8. Electronic technology and the SLD detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fox, J.D.; Dean, T.; Fox, M.J.; Freytag, D.; Gioumousis, A.; Haller, G.; Hoeflich, J.; Horelick, D.; Kang, H; Mazaheri, G.; Nelson, D.J.; Olsen, J.J.; Oxoby, G.; Paffrath, L.; Stiles, P.; Yim, A. (Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Menlo Park, CA (USA)); Bacchetta, N. (Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Padua (Italy)); Bilei, G.M. (Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Perugia (Italy)); Carpinelli, M.; Cast

    1990-06-01

    The SLD detector consists of five major subsystems, each with associated front-end electronics and an integrated FASTBUS control and data acquisition system. This paper highlights the choices among electronic technologies that have been developed for the SLD detector electronics. The common control, calibration, and data acquisition architectures are described. The functions of selected SLD integrated circuits, standard cells, gate arrays, and hybrids are summarized, and the integration of these functions into the common data acquisition path is described. Particular attention is directed to four areas of electronic technology developed for the SLD detector: the preamplifier hybrid designs are compared to their performance and implementation examined; the application of full custom CMOS digital circuits in SLD is compared to gate array and EPLD (electrically programmable logic device) implementations; the fiberoptic signal transmission techniques in SLD are examined and the data rates and link topology are presented; and finally, the packaging, power consumption, and cooling requirements for system functions resident inside the detector structure are explored. The rationale for the implementation choices in the SLD electronics is presented so that others might benefit from our experience.

  9. Development of Laser Application Technology for Stable Isotope Production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Do Young; Ko, Kwang Hoon; Kwon, Duck Hee [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)] (and others)

    2007-04-15

    Tl-203 is used as a source material to produce Tl-201 radioisotope which is produced in a cyclotron by irradiating the enriched Tl-203 target. Tl-201 is a radiopharmaceutical for SPECT (single photon emission computerized tomography) to diagnose heart diseases and tumors. This Project aim to develop laser application technology to product stable isotopes such as Tl-203, Yb-168, and Yb-176. For this, photoion extraction device, atomic beam generator, dye lasers, and high power IR lasers are developed.

  10. Coherent Doppler Laser Radar: Technology Development and Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavaya, Michael J.; Arnold, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center has been investigating, developing, and applying coherent Doppler laser radar technology for over 30 years. These efforts have included the first wind measurement in 1967, the first airborne flights in 1972, the first airborne wind field mapping in 1981, and the first measurement of hurricane eyewall winds in 1998. A parallel effort at MSFC since 1982 has been the study, modeling and technology development for a space-based global wind measurement system. These endeavors to date have resulted in compact, robust, eyesafe lidars at 2 micron wavelength based on solid-state laser technology; in a factor of 6 volume reduction in near diffraction limited, space-qualifiable telescopes; in sophisticated airborne scanners with full platform motion subtraction; in local oscillator lasers capable of rapid tuning of 25 GHz for removal of relative laser radar to target velocities over a 25 km/s range; in performance prediction theory and simulations that have been validated experimentally; and in extensive field campaign experience. We have also begun efforts to dramatically improve the fundamental photon efficiency of the laser radar, to demonstrate advanced lower mass laser radar telescopes and scanners; to develop laser and laser radar system alignment maintenance technologies; and to greatly improve the electrical efficiency, cooling technique, and robustness of the pulsed laser. This coherent Doppler laser radar technology is suitable for high resolution, high accuracy wind mapping; for aerosol and cloud measurement; for Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) measurements of atmospheric and trace gases; for hard target range and velocity measurement; and for hard target vibration spectra measurement. It is also suitable for a number of aircraft operations applications such as clear air turbulence (CAT) detection; dangerous wind shear (microburst) detection; airspeed, angle of attack, and sideslip measurement; and fuel savings through

  11. Organic electronics emerging concepts and technologies

    CERN Document Server

    Santato, Clara

    2013-01-01

    An overview of the tremendous potential of organic electronics, concentrating on those emerging topics and technologies that will form the focus of research over the next five to ten years. The young and energetic team of editors with an excellent research track record has brought together internationally renowned authors to review up-and-coming topics, some for the first time, such as organic spintronics, iontronics, light emitting transistors, organic sensors and advanced structural analysis. As a result, this book serves the needs of experienced researchers in organic electronics, graduate

  12. Automatic tuning of free electron lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agapov, Ilya; Zagorodnov, Igor; Geloni, Gianluca; Tomin, Sergey

    2017-01-01

    Existing FEL facilities often suffer from stability issues: so electron orbit, transverse electron optics, electron bunch compression and other parameters have to be readjusted often to account for drifts in performance of various components. The tuning procedures typically employed in operation are often manual and lengthy. We have been developing a combination of model-free and model-based automatic tuning methods to meet the needs of present and upcoming XFEL facilities. Our approach has been implemented at FLASH to achieve automatic SASE tuning using empirical control of orbit, electron optics and bunch compression. In this paper we describe our approach to empirical tuning, the software which implements it, and the results of using it at FLASH.We also discuss the potential of using machine learning and model-based techniques in tuning methods.

  13. Research on key technology of space laser communication network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chengwu; Huang, Huiming; Liu, Hongyang; Gao, Shenghua; Cheng, Liyu

    2016-10-01

    Since the 21st century, Spatial laser communication has made a breakthrough development. Europe, the United States, Japan and other space powers have carried out the test of spatial laser communication technology on-orbit, and put forward a series of plans. In 2011, China made the first technology demonstration of satellite-ground laser communication carried by HY-2 satellite. Nowadays, in order to improve the transmission rate of spatial network, the topic of spatial laser communication network is becoming a research hotspot at home and abroad. This thesis, from the basic problem of spatial laser communication network to solve, analyzes the main difference between spatial network and ground network, which draws forth the key technology of spatial laser communication backbone network, and systematically introduces our research on aggregation, addressing, architecture of spatial network. From the perspective of technology development status and trends, the thesis proposes the development route of spatial laser communication network in stages. So as to provide reference about the development of spatial laser communication network in China.

  14. Emittance Measurements from a Laser Driven Electron Injector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reis, David A

    2003-07-28

    The Gun Test Facility (GTF) at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center was constructed to develop an appropriate electron beam suitable for driving a short wavelength free electron laser (FEL) such as the proposed Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). For operation at a wavelength of 1.5 {angstrom}, the LCLS requires an electron injector that can produce an electron beam with approximately 1 {pi} mm-mrad normalized rms emittance with at least 1 nC of charge in a 10 ps or shorter bunch. The GTF consists of a photocathode rf gun, emittance-compensation solenoid, 3 m linear accelerator (linac), drive laser, and diagnostics to measure the beam. The rf gun is a symmetrized 1.6 cell, s-band high gradient, room temperature, photocathode structure. Simulations show that this gun when driven by a temporally and spatially shaped drive laser, appropriately focused with the solenoid, and further accelerated in linac can produce a beam that meets the LCLS requirements. This thesis describes the initial characterization of the laser and electron beam at the GTF. A convolved measurement of the relative timing between the laser and the rf phase in the gun shows that the jitter is less than 2.5 ps rms. Emittance measurements of the electron beam at 35 MeV are reported as a function of the (Gaussian) pulse length and transverse profile of the laser as well as the charge of the electron beam at constant phase and gradient in both the gun and linac. At 1 nC the emittance was found to be {approx} 13 {pi} mm-mrad for 5 ps and 8 ps long laser pulses. At 0.5 nC the measured emittance decreased approximately 20% in the 5 ps case and 40% in the 8 ps case. These measurements are between 40-80% higher than simulations for similar experimental conditions. In addition, the thermal emittance of the electron beam was measured to be 0.5 {pi} mm-mrad.

  15. The Intelligent Technologies of Electronic Information System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xianyu

    2017-08-01

    Based upon the synopsis of system intelligence and information services, this paper puts forward the attributes and the logic structure of information service, sets forth intelligent technology framework of electronic information system, and presents a series of measures, such as optimizing business information flow, advancing data decision capability, improving information fusion precision, strengthening deep learning application and enhancing prognostic and health management, and demonstrates system operation effectiveness. This will benefit the enhancement of system intelligence.

  16. Research on the laser angle deception jamming technology of laser countermeasure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Shi-wei; Chen, Wen-jian; Gao, Wei; Duan, Yuan-yuan

    2015-10-01

    In recent years , laser guided weapons behave very well at destroying the military goals in the local wars, the single-shot probability, effective range and hitting precision getting better. And the semi-active laser guided weapons are the most widely used laser guided weapons. In order to improve the viability and protect important military goals, it's necessary to study the technology to against the semi-active guided weapons. This paper studies the working principle, the advantages and disadvantages of the semi-active guided weapons at first, and analyze the possibility of laser angle deception jamming system working. Then it analyzes the working principle and process of laser angle deception jamming technology. Finally it designs a half-real simulation system of laser angle deception jamming, which consists of semi-active laser guided weapons simulation system and laser angle deception jamming system. The simulation system demonstrates the working process of the laser angle deception jamming system. This paper provides fundamental base for the research on the countermeasure technology of semi-active laser guided weapons.

  17. Laser-driven electron beam generation for secondary photon sources with few terawatt laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohacek, K.; Chaulagain, U.; Horny, V.; Kozlova, M.; Krus, M.; Nejdl, J.

    2017-05-01

    Relativistic electron beams accelerated by laser wakefield have the ability to serve as sources of collimated, point-like and femtosecond X-ray radiation. Experimental conditions for generation of stable quasi-monoenergetic electron bunches using a femtosecond few-terawatt laser pulse (600 mJ, 50 fs) were investigated as they are crucial for generation of stable betatron radiation and X-ray pulses from inverse Compton scattering. A mixture of helium with argon, and helium with an admixture of synthetic air were tested for this purpose using different backing pressures and the obtained results are compared. The approach to use synthetic air was previously proven to stabilize the energy and energy spread of the generated electron beams at the given laser power. The accelerator was operated in nonlinear regime with forced self-injection and resulted in the generation of stable relativistic electron beams with an energy of tens of MeV and betatron X-ray radiation was generated in the keV range. A razor blade was tested to create a steep density gradient in order to improve the stability of electron injection and to increase the total electron bunch charge. It was proven that the stable electron and X-ray source can be built at small-scale facilities, which readily opens possibilities for various applications due to availability of such few-terawatt laser systems in many laboratories around the world.

  18. Bunch decompression for laser-plasma driven free-electron laser demonstration schemes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Seggebrock

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available X-ray free-electron lasers (FELs require a very high electron beam quality in terms of emittance and energy spread. Since 2004 high quality electrons produced by laser-wakefield accelerators have been demonstrated, but the electron quality up to now did not allow the operation of a compact x-ray FEL using these electrons. Maier et al. [Phys. Rev. X 2, 031019 (2012PRXHAE2160-330810.1103/PhysRevX.2.031019] suggested a concept for a proof-of-principle experiment allowing FEL operation in the vacuum ultraviolet range based on an optimized undulator and bunch decompression using electron bunches from a laser-plasma accelerator as currently available. In this paper we discuss in more detail how a chicane can be used as a bunch stretcher instead of a bunch compressor to allow the operation of a laser-wakefield accelerator driven FEL using currently available electrons. A scaling characterizing the impact of bunch decompression on the gain length is derived and the feasibility of the concept is tested numerically in a demanding scenario.

  19. Desorption by Femtosecond Laser Pulses : An Electron-Hole Effect?

    OpenAIRE

    D. M., NEWNS; T. F., HEINZ; J. A., MISEWICH; IBM Research Division, T. J. Watson Research Center; IBM Research Division, T. J. Watson Research Center; IBM Research Division, T. J. Watson Research Center

    1992-01-01

    Desorption of molecules from metal surfaces induced by femtosecond visible laser pulses has been reported. Since the lattice temperature rise is insufficient to explain desorption, an electronic mechanism is clearly responsible. It is shown that a theory based on direct coupling between the center-of-mass degree of freedom of the adsorbate and the electron-hole excitations of the substrate provides a satisfactory explanation of the various experimental findings.

  20. Electron rescattering at metal nanotips induced by ultrashort laser pulses

    OpenAIRE

    Wachter, Georg; Lemell, Christoph; Burgdoerfer, Joachim

    2013-01-01

    We theoretically investigate the interaction of moderate intensity near-infrared few cycle laser pulses with nano-scale metal tips. Local field enhancement in a nanometric region around the tip apex triggers coherent electron emission on the nanometer length and femtosecond time scale. The quantum dynamics at the surface are simulated with time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) and interpreted based on the simple man's model. We investigate the dependence of the emitted electron spe...

  1. Inhomogeneous effects in the quantum free electron laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piovella, N.; Bonifacio, R.

    2006-01-01

    We include inhomogeneous effects in the quantum model of a free electron laser taking into account the initial energy spread of the electron beam. From a linear analysis, we obtain a generalized dispersion relation, from which the exponential gain can be explicitly calculated. We determine the maximum allowed initial energy spread in the quantum exponential regime and we discuss the limit of large energy spread

  2. Deuterium fluoride laser technology and demonstrators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Gerald; Graves, Bruce R.; Patterson, Stanley P.; Wank, Robert H.

    2004-09-01

    Deuterium fluoride (DF) lasers have been under development since about 1970. Their intrinsic ability to store high levels of energy internally plus their ability to quickly dispose of waste heat by the convective flow of exhaust gases make this type of laser attractive to the Army for producing high power levels for an air and missile defense weapon system. This paper reviews the basic principles of a DF laser, the chemistry and spectroscopy associated with producing an excited DF lasing molecule, and the generation of a high power laser beam. This paper also reviews the development history of DF lasers and early lethality demonstrations. This includes a detailed discussion of the Army"s recent Tactical High Energy Laser (THEL) Demonstrator, its architecture and successes during engagements of in-flight rockets and artillery projectiles. The Army is moving forward in developing a new generation, high power DF laser weapon system, the Mobile Tactical High Energy Laser (MTHEL). This system will provide our soldiers protection in the future against a variety of airborne threats.

  3. Realization of phonon laser with femtosecond technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Chi-Kuang; Huang, Yue-Kai; Chern, Gia-Wei

    2002-06-01

    One of the most desirable properties of phonon system is sound amplification by stimulated emission of phonon radiation, coined as SASER or called phonon laser or acoustic laser, which is the acoustic counterpart of LASER. Phonon stimulated emission, or sound amplification, has been previously observed fro several occasions in extremely low temperatures, however a lasing behavior of the phonon oscillators has never been established. It is also desirable to build a phonon laser operating at room temperature. Here we present an optically pumped nano-sized phonon laser with an output acoustic wavelength of 9.3 nm, operating at room temperature. The nano phonon laser is composed by InGaN/GaN multiple-quantum-wells (MQWs). By using femtosecond ultraviolet pulses as pumping sources, coherent acoustic phonon amplification with large acoustic gain was observed. When the induced acoustic gain is higher than the acoustic loss due to its traveling nature, a clear laser-like threshold behavior was observed, which resembles a pulsed optical laser. This demonstration will open a new way toward nano-ultrasonics.

  4. 29 CFR 1615.135 - Electronic and information technology requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Electronic and information technology requirements. 1615... INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY § 1615.135 Electronic and information technology requirements. (a) Development, procurement, maintenance, or use of electronic and information technology.—When developing, procuring...

  5. Feedback from Users of Electronic Chart Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmonds, David

    This paper was presented at the Third Electronic Chart Technology Conference, SASMEX International, Brighton, 22-23 April 1998.Electronic Chart Systems have been used by mariners across the entire user spectrum without official standards or specifications for 10 years. In the last three years, the debate has centred on chart data and the merits of differing cartographic technologies. There is little new that can be said for or against raster or vector technologies except what actual users might say to support the requirements of their day-to-day operations. Today, we approach a new stage as ENCs start to become available but only for limited areas. This in turn means that ENCs are capable of supporting the only approved electronic chart system, ECDIS, in a limited way. There is an urgent need for alternatives to ECDIS to cover those areas where ENCs will continue to be unavailable for the foreseeable future. This paper therefore summarizes a feedback from users of RCDS and ECDIS-type systems to demonstrate the benefits which can be secured from official recognition of RCDS systems as the legal equivalent of paper chart navigation.

  6. Inverse free electron laser accelerator for advanced light sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. P. Duris

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available We discuss the inverse free electron laser (IFEL scheme as a compact high gradient accelerator solution for driving advanced light sources such as a soft x-ray free electron laser amplifier or an inverse Compton scattering based gamma-ray source. In particular, we present a series of new developments aimed at improving the design of future IFEL accelerators. These include a new procedure to optimize the choice of the undulator tapering, a new concept for prebunching which greatly improves the fraction of trapped particles and the final energy spread, and a self-consistent study of beam loading effects which leads to an energy-efficient high laser-to-beam power conversion.

  7. Two-dimensional theory and simulation of free electron lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwan, T.J.T.; Cary, J.R.

    1981-01-01

    Two-dimensional homogeneous theory of free-electron lasers with a wiggler magnetic field of constant wavelength is formulated. It has been found from the theory that waves propagating obliquely with respect to the electron beam are always unstable with appreciable growth rates; therefore, mode competition among the on-axis and off-axis modes is an important consideration in the design of the free-electron laser. Furthermore, electromagnetic waves with group velocities opposite to the direction of electron beam propagation are absolutely unstable if k/sub o/v/sub o/ > ω/sub pe/(1/γ/sup 3/2/ + 1/γ/sup 1/2/). Due to strong nonlinear saturation levels of the low-frequency absolute instability, the dynamics of the electron beam and the generation of the high-frequency electromagnetic radiation can be severely affected. Two-dimensional particle simulations show that the efficiency of generation of the on-axis high-frequency electromagnetic wave decreases significantly due to instability of the off-axis modes. In addition, complete disruption of the electron beam and laser oscillation due to the onset of the absolute instability have been observed in simulations

  8. Femtosecond electron-bunch dynamics in laser wakefields and vacuum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khachatryan, A.G.; Irman, A.; van Goor, F.A.; Boller, Klaus J.

    2007-01-01

    Recent advances in laser wakefield acceleration demonstrated the generation of extremely short (with a duration of a few femtoseconds) relativistic electron bunches with relatively low (of the order of couple of percent) energy spread. In this article we study the dynamics of such bunches in drift

  9. Modeling paraxial wave propagation in free-electron laser oscillators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karssenberg, J.G.; van der Slot, Petrus J.M.; Volokhine, I.; Verschuur, Jeroen W.J.; Boller, Klaus J.

    2006-01-01

    Modeling free-electron laser (FEL) oscillators requires calculation of both the light-beam interaction within the undulator and the light propagation outside the undulator. We have developed a paraxial optical propagation code that can be combined with various existing models of gain media, for

  10. Mechanisms for the production of harmonics in free electron lasers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elgin, J.N.; Penman, C.

    1991-01-01

    Harmonics in the radiation of a free electron laser are useful for extending the range of tuning, may originate in spontaneous or parametric processes, and can take part in stimulated emission or amplification. These mechanisms exhibit interesting analogies with those of nonlinear optics. Apart from

  11. Measurements of plasma temperature and electron density in laser ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Pramana – Journal of Physics; Volume 74; Issue 6. Measurements of plasma temperature and electron density in laser-induced copper plasma by time-resolved spectroscopy of neutral atom and ion emissions. V K Unnikrishnan Kamlesh Alti V B Kartha C Santhosh G P Gupta B M Suri. Research Articles ...

  12. Ad hoc laser networks component technology for modular spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xiujun; Shi, Dele; Shen, Jingshi

    2017-10-01

    Distributed reconfigurable satellite is a new kind of spacecraft system, which is based on a flexible platform of modularization and standardization. Based on the module data flow analysis of the spacecraft, this paper proposes a network component of ad hoc Laser networks architecture. Low speed control network with high speed load network of Microwave-Laser communication mode, no mesh network mode, to improve the flexibility of the network. Ad hoc Laser networks component technology was developed, and carried out the related performance testing and experiment. The results showed that ad hoc Laser networks components can meet the demand of future networking between the module of spacecraft.

  13. Application and the key technology on high power fiber-optic laser in laser weapon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Zhou; Li, Qiushi; Meng, Haihong; Sui, Xin; Zhang, Hongtao; Zhai, Xuhua

    2014-12-01

    The soft-killing laser weapon plays an important role in photoelectric defense technology. It can be used for photoelectric detection, search, blinding of photoelectric sensor and other devices on fire control and guidance devices, therefore it draws more and more attentions by many scholars. High power fiber-optic laser has many virtues such as small volume, simple structure, nimble handling, high efficiency, qualified light beam, easy thermal management, leading to blinding. Consequently, it may be used as the key device of soft-killing laser weapon. The present study introduced the development of high power fiber-optic laser and its main features. Meanwhile the key technology of large mode area (LMA) optical fiber design, the beam combination technology, double-clad fiber technology and pumping optical coupling technology was stated. The present study is aimed to design high doping LMA fiber, ensure single mode output by increasing core diameter and decrease NA. By means of reducing the spontaneous emission particle absorbed by fiber core and Increasing the power density in the optical fiber, the threshold power of nonlinear effect can increase, and the power of single fiber will be improved. Meantime, high power will be obtained by the beam combination technology. Application prospect of high power fiber laser in photoelectric defense technology was also set forth. Lastly, the present study explored the advantages of high power fiber laser in photoelectric defense technology.

  14. Experiments on laser beam jitter control with applications to a shipboard free electron laser

    OpenAIRE

    Bateman, Brett E.

    2007-01-01

    A Free Electron Laser (FEL) shows potential as an effective defensive weapon for a naval ship against today's modern weapons such as supersonic anti-ship missiles. A laser can destroy these fast and highly maneuverable missiles at the speed of light. Several obstacles must be overcome to employ this weapon on a naval ship. This thesis discusses several methods for passive and active jitter control of a guided optical beam which might be employed in a FEL weapon system. Vibration experime...

  15. Synchrotron light sources and free-electron lasers accelerator physics, instrumentation and science applications

    CERN Document Server

    Khan, Shaukat; Schneider, Jochen; Hastings, Jerome

    2016-01-01

    Hardly any other discovery of the nineteenth century did have such an impact on science and technology as Wilhelm Conrad Röntgen’s seminal find of the X-rays. X-ray tubes soon made their way as excellent instruments for numerous applications in medicine, biology, materials science and testing, chemistry and public security. Developing new radiation sources with higher brilliance and much extended spectral range resulted in stunning developments like the electron synchrotron and electron storage ring and the freeelectron laser. This handbook highlights these developments in fifty chapters. The reader is given not only an inside view of exciting science areas but also of design concepts for the most advanced light sources. The theory of synchrotron radiation and of the freeelectron laser, design examples and the technology basis are presented. The handbook presents advanced concepts like seeding and harmonic generation, the booming field of Terahertz radiation sources and upcoming brilliant light sources dri...

  16. Intensity dependence of electron gas kinetics in a laser corona

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mašek Martin

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available In various experimental situations relevant to the laser fusion, such as plasma near the light entrance holes of hohlraum in the indirect drive experiments or more recently in the shock ignition direct drive a relatively long underdense plasma of corona type is encountered, which is subject to an intense nanosecond laser beam. The plasma is only weakly collisional and thus in the electron phase space a complicated kinetic evolution is going on, which is taking the electron gas fairly far from the thermal equilibrium and contributes to its unstable behaviour. These phenomena impede the absorption and thermalization of the incoming laser energy, create groups of fast electrons and also may lead to a non-linear reflection of the heating laser beam. One of the key processes leading to the electron acceleration is the stimulated Raman scattering (SRS in its non-linear phase. The SRS in the presence of electron-ion collisions requires a certain threshold intensity above which the mentioned non-dissipative phenomena can occur and develop to the stage, where they may become unpleasant for the fusion experiments. To assess this intensity limit a computational model has been developed based on the Vlasov-Maxwell kinetics describing such a plasma in 1D geometry. At a relatively high intensity of 1016 W/cm2 a number of non-linear phenomena are predicted by the code such as a saturation of Landau damping, which is then translated in an unfavourable time dependence of the reflected light intensity and formation of accelerated electron groups due to the electron trapping. The purpose of the present contribution is to map the intensity dependence of this non-linear development with the aim of assessing its weight in fusion relevant situations.

  17. The free electron laser: a system capable of determining the gold standard in laser vision correction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fowler, W. Craig; Rose, John G.; Chang, Daniel H.; Proia, Alan D.

    1999-01-01

    Introduction. In laser vision correction surgery, lasers are generally utilized based on their beam-tissue interactions and corneal absorption characteristics. Therefore, the free electron laser, with its ability to provide broad wavelength tunability, is a unique research tool for investigating wavelengths of possible corneal ablation. Methods. Mark III free electron laser wavelengths between 2.94 and 6.7 μm were delivered in serial 0.1 μm intervals to corneas of freshly enucleated porcine globes. Collateral damage, ablation depth, and ablation diameter were measured in histologic sections. Results. The least collateral damage (12-13 μm) was demonstrated at three wavelengths: 6.0, 6.1 (amide I), and 6.3 μm. Minimal collateral damage (15 μm) was noted at 2.94 μm (OH-stretch) and at 6.2 μm. Slightly greater collateral damage was noted at 6.45 μm (amide II), as well as at the 5.5-5.7 μm range, but this was still substantially less than the collateral damage noted at the other wavelengths tested. Conclusions. Our results suggest that select mid-infrared wavelengths have potential for keratorefractive surgery and warrant additional study. Further, the free electron laser's ability to allow parameter adjustment in the far-ultraviolet spectrum may provide unprecedented insights toward establishing the gold-standard parameters for laser vision correction surgery

  18. Electron energy and electron trajectories in an inverse free-electron laser accelerator based on a novel electrostatic wiggler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikrah, M.; Jafari, S.

    2016-06-01

    We expand here a theory of a high-gradient laser-excited electron accelerator based on an inverse free-electron laser (inverse-FEL), but with innovations in the structure and design. The electrostatic wiggler used in our scheme, namely termed the Paul wiggler, is generated by segmented cylindrical electrodes with applied oscillatory voltages {{V}\\text{osc}}(t) over {{90}\\circ} segments. The inverse-FEL interaction can be described by the equations that govern the electron motion in the combined fields of both the laser pulse and Paul wiggler field. A numerical study of electron energy and electron trajectories has been made using the fourth-order Runge-Kutta method. The results indicate that the electron attains a considerable energy at short distances in this device. It is found that if the electron has got sufficient suitable wiggler amplitude intensities, it can not only gain higher energy in longer distances, but also can retain it even after the passing of the laser pulse. In addition, the results reveal that the electron energy gains different peaks for different initial axial velocities, so that a suitable small initial axial velocity of e-beam produces substantially high energy gain. With regard to the transverse confinement of the electron beam in a Paul wiggler, there is no applied axial guide magnetic field in this device.

  19. U.S. Army High Energy Laser (HEL) technology program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavan, Michael J.; Wachs, John J.

    2011-11-01

    The US Army is investing in Solid State Laser (SSL) technology to assess counter rocket, artillery, and mortar (C-RAM) and counter unmanned aerial vehicle (C-UAV) capabilities of solid state based HEL systems, as well as other potential applications for HELs of interest to the Army. The Army HEL program thrust areas are systematically moving the technology forward toward weaponization, including solid state laser technologies, advances in beam control technology, and conducting major demonstrations. The High Energy Laser Mobile Demonstrator (HELMD) will be a major step toward demonstrating HEL weapon capability to the soldier. The US Army will continue to pursue technologies that enable more compact systems compatible with, for example, a Stryker tactical vehicle as a crucial part of our strategy to provide a capability to the warfighter that can maneuver with the force.

  20. Laser thermographic technologies for hard copy recording

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bessmel'tsev, Viktor P.; Baev, Sergej G.

    1995-04-01

    Methods of hard copies recording based on thermal interaction of the beam from CO2 or YAG lasers with various kinds of films on any substrates have been developed. The recording processes are single-step and require no additional development. Among them are: (1) Laser thermodestruction of thin mask layers or of a material surface on any kinds of substrates. (2) Laser thermochemical reactions of thermal decomposition of metal salts in solid state phase on a surface of various hygroscopic substrates. The laser recording devices using the methods, described above have been developed and are manufactured now; they allow one to record hard copies with a size of up to 27 X 31 inches, a resolution of 4000 dpi.

  1. A Compact Beam Source for Free Electron Lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Mingchang; Xu, Zhizhan; Yu, Jinhui; Lee, Byung Cheol; Lee, Jongmin

    2000-10-01

    A compact beam source produced by pseudospark discharge for free electron lasers is developed. An impedance match between a Marx generator and a pseudospark discharge chamber is analyzed, the impedance characteristic curve for the pseudospark discharge chamber is measured for the first time. The configuration of the new device is described, it has a length of one meter; the original pulse line accelerator has total length of 6 meters. A voltage of 300 kV, a current of 4 kA for the compact device is measured. The electron beam has a diameter of 1.5 mm and has self-pinch effect. The beam has a brightness of 10^12 A/(m rad)^2, as same as a brightness from photo-cathode. The compact beam source can be used for free electron lasers and high power switch.

  2. Attosecond Electron Wave Packet Dynamics in Strong Laser Fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnsson, P.; Remetter, T.; Varju, K.; L'Huillier, A.; Lopez-Martens, R.; Valentin, C.; Balcou, Ph.; Kazamias, S.; Mauritsson, J.; Gaarde, M. B.; Schafer, K. J.; Mairesse, Y.; Wabnitz, H.; Salieres, P.

    2005-01-01

    We use a train of sub-200 attosecond extreme ultraviolet (XUV) pulses with energies just above the ionization threshold in argon to create a train of temporally localized electron wave packets. We study the energy transfer from a strong infrared (IR) laser field to the ionized electrons as a function of the delay between the XUV and IR fields. When the wave packets are born at the zero crossings of the IR field, a significant amount of energy (∼20 eV) is transferred from the field to the electrons. This results in dramatically enhanced above-threshold ionization in conditions where the IR field alone does not induce any significant ionization. Because both the energy and duration of the wave packets can be varied independently of the IR laser, they are valuable tools for studying and controlling strong-field processes

  3. Energy Spread Reduction of Electron Beams Produced via Laser Wake

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pollock, Bradley Bolt [Univ. of California, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Laser wakefield acceleration of electrons holds great promise for producing ultra-compact stages of GeV scale, high quality electron beams for applications such as x-ray free electron lasers and high energy colliders. Ultra-high intensity laser pulses can be self-guided by relativistic plasma waves over tens of vacuum diffraction lengths, to give >1 GeV energy in cm-scale low density plasma using ionization-induced injection to inject charge into the wake at low densities. This thesis describes a series of experiments which investigates the physics of LWFA in the self-guided blowout regime. Beginning with high density gas jet experiments the scaling of the LWFA-produced electron beam energy with plasma electron density is found to be in excellent agreement with both phenomenological theory and with 3-D PIC simulations. It is also determined that self-trapping of background electrons into the wake exhibits a threshold as a function of the electron density, and at the densities required to produce electron beams with energies exceeding 1 GeV a different mechanism is required to trap charge into low density wakes. By introducing small concentrations of high-Z gas to the nominal He background the ionization-induced injection mechanism is enabled. Electron trapping is observed at densities as low as 1.3 x 1018 cm-3 in a gas cell target, and 1.45 GeV electrons are demonstrated for the first time from LWFA. This is currently the highest electron energy ever produced from LWFA. The ionization-induced trapping mechanism is also shown to generate quasi-continuous electron beam energies, which is undesirable for accelerator applications. By limiting the region over which ionization-induced trapping occurs, the energy spread of the electron beams can be controlled. The development of a novel two-stage gas cell target provides the capability to tailor the gas composition in the longitudinal direction, and confine the trapping process to occur only in a

  4. Optical diagnostic technology of fusion laser system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanabe, Tadashi; Nakatsuka, Masahiro

    1986-01-01

    As the lasers for nuclear fusion research, the construction of high power glass lasers has been rapidly carried out since 1970s. Around 1985, the glass laser of 100 kJ and 100 TW appeared, thus the remarkable technical development has been made. In the institute of Laser Engineering, Osaka University, a multi-beam system Gekko No.2 was installed in 1975 for the first time in Japan, and through a phosphate glass system Gekko No.4 as the first in the world, and Gekko M2 as the prototype of Gekko No.12, in 1983, Gekko No.12 of 20 kJ was completed. These laser systems are still in operation now. From November, 1983, high power amplifying test and target irradiation test were begun by using the Gekko No.12. In December, 1983, the largest output in the world of 57 TW was attained, and in the target implosion test, 4 x 10 10 neutrons were generated, which was the largest in the world at that time. Thereafter, the automatic operation of the laser, laser wave form correction, the adoption of high endurance, no reflection elements and the second higher harmonic wave conversion using a single crystal KDP of 38 cm diameter, the largest in the world, were carried out, and those enabled the supply of 0.53 μm light at the maximum conversion efficiency of 86 %. The constitution of measuring instruments for Gekko No.12, the measuring techniques at the oscillator and the laser system are described. (Kako, J.)

  5. Emerging terawatt picosecond CO{sub 2} laser technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pogorelsky, I.V. [Accelerator Test Facility, Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

    1998-03-01

    The first terawatt picosecond (TWps) CO{sub 2} laser is under construction at the BNL Accelerator Test Facility (ATF). TWps-CO{sub 2} lasers, having an order of magnitude longer wavelength than the well-known table-top terawatt solid state lasers, offer new opportunities for strong-field physics research. For laser wakefield accelerators (LWFA) the advantage of the new class of lasers is due to a gain of two orders of magnitude in the ponderomotive potential. The large average power of CO{sub 2} lasers is important for the generation of hard radiation through Compton back-scattering of the laser off energetic electron beams. We discuss applications of TWps-CO{sub 2} lasers for LWFA modules of a tentative electron-positron collider, for {gamma}-{gamma} (or {gamma}-lepton) colliders, for a possible `table-top` source of high-intensity x-rays and gamma rays, and the generation of polarized positron beams. (author)

  6. Correlated electron-ion collisions in a strong laser field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ristow, T.

    2007-01-01

    Electron-ion-collisions in plasmas in the presence of an ultra-short intensive laser pulse can cause high energy transfers to the electrons. During the collision the oscillation energy of the electron in the laser field is changed into drift energy. In this regime, multi-photon processes, known from the ionization of neutral atoms (Above-Threshold Ionization), and successive, so called correlated collisions, are important. The subject of the thesis is a study of binary Coulomb collisions in strong laser fields. The collisions are treated both in the context of classical Newtonian mechanics and in the quantum-mechanical framework by the Schroedinger equation. In the classical case a simplified instantaneous collision model and a complete dynamical treatment are discussed. Collisions can be treated instantaneously, if the ratio of the impact parameter to the quiver amplitude is small. The energy distributions calculated in this approximation show an elastic peak and a broad plateau due to rescattered electrons. At incident velocities smaller than the quiver velocity, correlated collisions are observed in the electron trajectories of the dynamical model. This effect leads to characteristic momentum distributions of the electrons, that are explicitly calculated and compared with the results of the instantaneous model. In addition, the time-dependence of the collisions is discussed in the framework of a singular perturbation theory. The complete description of the Coulomb scattering requires a quantum-mechanical description. A time-dependent method of wave-packet scattering is used and the corresponding time-dependent three-dimensional Schroedinger equation is solved by an implicit ADImethod on a spatial grid. The momentum and the energy distributions of the scattered electrons are calculated by the Fourier transformation of the wavefunction. A comparison of the scattering from a repulsive and an attractive potential is used to distinguish between simple collisions and

  7. A three-dimensional laser vibration measurement technology realized on five laser beam and its calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lu-Ke; Zhang, Shen-Feng

    2018-03-01

    Put forward a kind of three-dimensional vibration information technology of vibrating object by the mean of five laser beam of He-Ne laser, and with the help of three-way sensor, measure the three-dimensional laser vibration developed by above mentioned technology. The technology based on the Doppler principle of interference and signal demodulation technology, get the vibration information of the object, through the algorithm processing, extract the three-dimensional vibration information of space objects, and can achieve the function of angle calibration of five beam in the space, which avoid the effects of the mechanical installation error, greatly improve the accuracy of measurement. With the help of a & B K4527 contact three axis sensor, measure and calibrate three-dimensional laser vibrometer, which ensure the accuracy of the measurement data. Summarize the advantages and disadvantages of contact and non-contact sensor, and analysis the future development trends of the sensor industry.

  8. Electrical and electronic principles and technology

    CERN Document Server

    John Bird

    2013-01-01

    This much-loved textbook introduces electrical and electronic principles and technology to students who are new to the subject. Real-world situations and engineering examples put the theory into context. The inclusion of worked problems with solutions really help aid your understanding and further problems then allow you to test and confirm you have mastered each subject. In total the books contains 410 worked problems, 540 further problems, 340 multiple-choice questions, 455 short-answer questions, and 7 revision tests with answers online.This an ideal text for vocational courses enabling a s

  9. Investigation of electron heating in laser-plasma interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Parvazian

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available  In this paper, stimulated Raman scattering (SRS and electron heating in laser plasma propagating along the plasma fusion is investigated by particle-in cell simulation. Applying an external magnetic field to plasma, production of whistler waves and electron heating associated with whistler waves in the direction perpendicular to external magnetic field was observed in this simulation. The plasma waves with low phase velocities, generated in backward-SRS and dominateing initially in time and space, accelerated the backward electrons by trapping them. Then these electrons promoted to higher energies by the forward-SRS plasma waves with high phase velocities. This tow-stage electron acceleration is more efficient due to the coexistence of these two instabilities.

  10. Engineering, Trade, and Technical Cluster. Task Analyses. Drafting and Design Technology, Precision Machining Technology, Electronics Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henrico County Public Schools, Glen Allen, VA. Virginia Vocational Curriculum and Resource Center.

    Developed in Virginia, this publication contains task analysis guides to support selected tech prep programs that prepare students for careers in the engineering, trade, and technical cluster. Three occupations are profiled: drafting and design technology, precision machining technology, and electronics technology. Each guide contains the…

  11. Emittance Measurements from a Laser Driven Electron Injector

    CERN Document Server

    Reis, D

    2003-01-01

    The Gun Test Facility (GTF) at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center was constructed to develop an appropriate electron beam suitable for driving a short wavelength free electron laser (FEL) such as the proposed Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). For operation at a wavelength of 1.5 (angstrom), the LCLS requires an electron injector that can produce an electron beam with approximately 1 pi mm-mrad normalized rms emittance with at least 1 nC of charge in a 10 ps or shorter bunch. The GTF consists of a photocathode rf gun, emittance-compensation solenoid, 3 m linear accelerator (linac), drive laser, and diagnostics to measure the beam. The rf gun is a symmetrized 1.6 cell, s-band high gradient, room temperature, photocathode structure. Simulations show that this gun when driven by a temporally and spatially shaped drive laser, appropriately focused with the solenoid, and further accelerated in linac can produce a beam that meets the LCLS requirements. This thesis describes the initial characterization of the ...

  12. High quality electron beams from a laser wakefield accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiggins, S M; Issac, R C; Welsh, G H; Brunetti, E; Shanks, R P; Anania, M P; Cipiccia, S; Manahan, G G; Aniculaesei, C; Ersfeld, B; Islam, M R; Burgess, R T L; Vieux, G; Jaroszynski, D A [SUPA, Department of Physics, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow (United Kingdom); Gillespie, W A [SUPA, Division of Electronic Engineering and Physics, University of Dundee, Dundee (United Kingdom); MacLeod, A M [School of Computing and Creative Technologies, University of Abertay Dundee, Dundee (United Kingdom); Van der Geer, S B; De Loos, M J, E-mail: m.wiggins@phys.strath.ac.u [Pulsar Physics, Burghstraat 47, 5614 BC Eindhoven (Netherlands)

    2010-12-15

    High quality electron beams have been produced in a laser-plasma accelerator driven by femtosecond laser pulses with a peak power of 26 TW. Electrons are produced with an energy up to 150 MeV from the 2 mm gas jet accelerator and the measured rms relative energy spread is less than 1%. Shot-to-shot stability in the central energy is 3%. Pepper-pot measurements have shown that the normalized transverse emittance is {approx}1{pi} mm mrad while the beam charge is in the range 2-10 pC. The generation of high quality electron beams is understood from simulations accounting for beam loading of the wakefield accelerating structure. Experiments and self-consistent simulations indicate that the beam peak current is several kiloamperes. Efficient transportation of the beam through an undulator is simulated and progress is being made towards the realization of a compact, high peak brilliance free-electron laser operating in the vacuum ultraviolet and soft x-ray wavelength ranges.

  13. 48 CFR 1352.239-71 - Electronic and information technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Electronic and information technology. As prescribed in 48 CFR 1339.270(a), insert the following provision: Electronic and Information Technology (APR 2010) (a) To be considered eligible for award, offerors must propose electronic and information technology (EIT) that meet the applicable Access Board accessibility...

  14. Electron with orbital angular momentum in a strong laser wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlovets, Dmitry V.

    2012-12-01

    Electrons carrying orbital angular momentum (OAM) have recently been discovered theoretically and obtained experimentally, which opens up possibilities for using them in high-energy physics. We consider such a twisted electron moving in the external field of a plane electromagnetic wave and study how this field influences the electron's OAM. Being motivated by the development of high-power lasers, we focus our attention on a classically strong-field regime for which -e2A2¯/(me2c4)≳1. It is shown that, along with the well-known “plane-wave” Volkov solution, the Dirac equation also has the “non-plane-wave” solutions, which possess OAM and spin-orbit coupling and generalize the free-electron's Bessel states. Motion of an electron with OAM in a circularly polarized laser wave reveals a twofold character: the wave-packet center moves along a classical helical trajectory with some quantum transverse broadening (due to OAM) existing even for a free electron. Using the twisted states, we calculate the electron's total angular momentum and predict its shift in the strong-field regime, which is analogous to the well-known shifts of the electron's momentum and mass (and to a less-known shift of its spin) in intense fields. Since the electron's effective angular momentum is conserved in a plane wave, as well as in some more general field configurations, we discuss several possibilities for accelerating nonrelativistic twisted electrons by using focused and combined electromagnetic fields.

  15. Simulation of relativistically colliding laser-generated electron flows

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Yang, X.B.; Dieckmann, M.E.; Sarri, G.; Borghesi, Marco

    Roč. 19, č. 11 ( 2012 ), "113110-1"-"113110-7" ISSN 1070-664X R&D Projects: GA MŠk ED1.1.00/02.0061; GA MŠk EE2.3.20.0279 Grant - others:ELI Beamlines(XE) CZ.1.05/1.1.00/02.0061; OPVK 3 Laser Zdroj(XE) CZ.1.07/2.3.00/20.0279 Program:EE Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100523 Keywords : laser-plasma interaction * laser generated electron flows * simulation Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 2.376, year: 2012 http://pop.aip.org/resource/1/phpaen/v19/i11/p113110_s1?isAuthorized=no

  16. Relativistic electron mirrors from high intensity laser nanofoil interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiefer, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    The reflection of a laser pulse from a mirror moving close to the speed of light could in principle create an X-ray pulse with unprecedented high brightness owing to the increase in photon energy and accompanying temporal compression by a factor of 4γ 2 , where γ is the Lorentz factor of the mirror. While this scheme is theoretically intriguingly simple and was first discussed by A. Einstein more than a century ago, the generation of a relativistic structure which acts as a mirror is demanding in many different aspects. Recently, the interaction of a high intensity laser pulse with a nanometer thin foil has raised great interest as it promises the creation of a dense, attosecond short, relativistic electron bunch capable of forming a mirror structure that scatters counter-propagating light coherently and shifts its frequency to higher photon energies. However, so far, this novel concept has been discussed only in theoretical studies using highly idealized interaction parameters. This thesis investigates the generation of a relativistic electron mirror from a nanometer foil with current state-of-the-art high intensity laser pulses and demonstrates for the first time the reflection from those structures in an experiment. To achieve this result, the electron acceleration from high intensity laser nanometer foil interactions was studied in a series of experiments using three inherently different high power laser systems and free-standing foils as thin as 3nm. A drastic increase in the electron energies was observed when reducing the target thickness from the micrometer to the nanometer scale. Quasi-monoenergetic electron beams were measured for the first time from ultrathin (≤5nm) foils, reaching energies up to ∝35MeV. The acceleration process was studied in simulations well-adapted to the experiments, indicating the transition from plasma to free electron dynamics as the target thickness is reduced to the few nanometer range. The experience gained from those

  17. Relativistic electron mirrors from high intensity laser nanofoil interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiefer, Daniel

    2012-12-21

    The reflection of a laser pulse from a mirror moving close to the speed of light could in principle create an X-ray pulse with unprecedented high brightness owing to the increase in photon energy and accompanying temporal compression by a factor of 4γ{sup 2}, where γ is the Lorentz factor of the mirror. While this scheme is theoretically intriguingly simple and was first discussed by A. Einstein more than a century ago, the generation of a relativistic structure which acts as a mirror is demanding in many different aspects. Recently, the interaction of a high intensity laser pulse with a nanometer thin foil has raised great interest as it promises the creation of a dense, attosecond short, relativistic electron bunch capable of forming a mirror structure that scatters counter-propagating light coherently and shifts its frequency to higher photon energies. However, so far, this novel concept has been discussed only in theoretical studies using highly idealized interaction parameters. This thesis investigates the generation of a relativistic electron mirror from a nanometer foil with current state-of-the-art high intensity laser pulses and demonstrates for the first time the reflection from those structures in an experiment. To achieve this result, the electron acceleration from high intensity laser nanometer foil interactions was studied in a series of experiments using three inherently different high power laser systems and free-standing foils as thin as 3nm. A drastic increase in the electron energies was observed when reducing the target thickness from the micrometer to the nanometer scale. Quasi-monoenergetic electron beams were measured for the first time from ultrathin (≤5nm) foils, reaching energies up to ∝35MeV. The acceleration process was studied in simulations well-adapted to the experiments, indicating the transition from plasma to free electron dynamics as the target thickness is reduced to the few nanometer range. The experience gained from those

  18. Electron collisions with atoms, ions, molecules, and surfaces: Fundamental science empowering advances in technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartschat, Klaus; Kushner, Mark J.

    2016-06-01

    Electron collisions with atoms, ions, molecules, and surfaces are critically important to the understanding and modeling of low-temperature plasmas (LTPs), and so in the development of technologies based on LTPs. Recent progress in obtaining experimental benchmark data and the development of highly sophisticated computational methods is highlighted. With the cesium-based diode-pumped alkali laser and remote plasma etching of Si3N4 as examples, we demonstrate how accurate and comprehensive datasets for electron collisions enable complex modeling of plasma-using technologies that empower our high-technology-based society.

  19. Advances in AlGaInN laser diode technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najda, S. P.; Perlin, P.; Suski, T.; Marona, L.; Bockowski, Mike; Leszczyński, M.; Wisniewski, P.; Czernecki, R.; Kucharski, R.; Targowski, G.; Watson, S.; Kelly, A. E.

    2014-03-01

    The latest developments in AlGaInN laser diode technology are reviewed. The AlGaInN material system allows for laser diodes to be fabricated over a very wide range of wavelengths from u.v., i.e, 380nm, to the visible, i.e., 530nm, by tuning the indium content of the laser GaInN quantum well. Advantages of using Plasma assisted MBE (PAMBE) compared to more conventional MOCVD epitaxy to grow AlGaInN laser structures are highlighted. Ridge waveguide laser diode structures are fabricated to achieve single mode operation with optical powers of >100mW in the 400-420nm wavelength range that are suitable for telecom applications. Visible light communications at high frequency (up to 2.5 Gbit/s) using a directly modulated 422nm Galliumnitride (GaN) blue laser diode is reported. High power operation of AlGaInN laser diodes is demonstrated with a single chip, AlGaInN laser diode `mini-array' with a common p-contact configuration at powers up to 2.5W cw at 410nm. Low defectivity and highly uniform GaN substrates allow arrays and bars of nitride lasers to be fabricated. GaN laser bars of up to 5mm with 20 emitters, mounted in a CS mount package, give optical powers up to 4W cw at ~410nm with a common contact configuration. An alternative package configuration for AlGaInN laser arrays allows for each individual laser to be individually addressable allowing complex free-space and/or fibre optic system integration within a very small form-factor.

  20. Electron beam irradiation technology for environmental conservation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tokunaga, Okihiro; Arai, Hidehiko; Hashimoto, Shoji

    1992-01-01

    This paper reviews research and development of application of electron beam (EB) irradiation technology for treatment of flue gas and waste water, and for disinfection of sewage sludge. Feasibility studies on EB purification of flue gases have been performed with pilot-scale experiments in Japan, the USA and Germany, and is being carried out in Poland for flue gases from iron-sintering furnaces or coal burning boilers. Based on results obtained by experiments using simulated flue gas, pilot scale test for treatment of flue gas of low-sulfur containing coal combustion has recently started in Japan. Organic pollutants in waste water and ground water have been found to be decomposed by EB irradiation. Synergetic effect of EB irradiation and ozone addition was found to improve the decomposition efficiency. Electron beam irradiation technology for disinfection of water effluent from water treatment plants was found to avoid formation of chlorinated organic compounds which are formed in using chlorine. Efficient process for composting of sewage sludge disinfected by EB irradiation has been developed by small scale and pilot scale experiments. In the new process, disinfection by EB irradiation and composing can be done separately and optimum temperature for composting can be, therefore, selected to minimize period of composting. (author)

  1. Overview on the high power excimer laser technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jingru

    2013-05-01

    High power excimer laser has essential applications in the fields of high energy density physics, inertial fusion energy and industry owing to its advantages such as short wavelength, high gain, wide bandwidth, energy scalable and repetition operating ability. This overview is aimed at an introduction and evaluation of enormous endeavor of the international high power excimer laser community in the last 30 years. The main technologies of high power excimer laser are reviewed, which include the pumping source technology, angular multiplexing and pulse compressing, beam-smoothing and homogenous irradiation, high efficiency and repetitive operation et al. A high power XeCl laser system developed in NINT of China is described in detail.

  2. Physical aspects of laser applications to modern nuclear technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Semerok, A.

    2001-11-01

    This report has been presented by the author to obtain his HDR (accreditation to supervise research). After a brief presentation of his domain of skills, of his education, of his professional experience, and his awards, the author gives an overview of his work performed in the field of laser applications to modern nuclear technologies. Notably, he reports experimental studies dealing with the following topics: radiation source for uranium isotope separation by MLIS method, laser isotope separation in atom vapour, laser plasma diagnostics in strong magnetic field, laser ablation-time of flight mass spectrometry for low uranium isotope ratio measurements, laser ablation-optical emission spectroscopy for surface analysis. The report is completed by many published scientific articles

  3. Injection of electrons by colliding laser pulses in a laser wakefield accelerator

    CERN Document Server

    Hansson, Martin; Ekerfelt, Henrik; Persson, Anna; Lundh, Olle

    2016-01-01

    To improve the stability and reproducibility of laser wakefield accelerators and to allow for future applications, controlling the injection of electrons is of great importance. This allows us to control the amount of charge in the beams of accelerated electrons and final energy of the electrons. Results are presented from a recent experiment on controlled injection using the scheme of colliding pulses and performed using the Lund multi-terawatt laser. Each laser pulse is split into two parts close to the interaction point. The main pulse is focused on a 2 mm diameter gas jet to drive a nonlinear plasma wave below threshold for self-trapping. The second pulse, containing only a fraction of the total laser energy, is focused to collide with the main pulse in the gas jet under an angle of 150°. Beams of accelerated electrons with low divergence and small energy spread are produced using this set-up. Control over the amount of accelerated charge is achieved by rotating the plane of polarization of the second p...

  4. CSIR eNews: Laser technology

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    CSIR

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available of this year's events was Science Unlimited held in Pretoria in March." Du Plooy says, "Six science centres in South Africa now permanently display a DVD explaining the different types of lasers and their applications. This is certainly a leap towards PULSE...

  5. Applications of Free Electron Lasers in Biology and Medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pelka, J.B.; Tybor, K.R.; Nietubyc, R.; Wrochna, G.

    2010-01-01

    The advent of free electron lasers opens up new opportunities to probe the dynamics of ultrafast processes and the structure of matter with unprecedented spatial and temporal resolution. New methods inaccessible with other known types of radiation sources can be developed, resulting in a breakthrough in deep understanding the fundamentals of life as well as in numerous medical and biological applications. In the present work the properties of free electron laser radiation that make the sources excellent for probing biological matter at an arbitrary wavelength, in a wide range of intensities and pulse durations are briefly discussed. A number of biophysical and biomedical applications of the new sources, currently considered among the most promising in the field, are presented. (author)

  6. Crystallographic data processing for free-electron laser sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, Thomas A., E-mail: taw@physics.org; Barty, Anton; Stellato, Francesco [DESY, Notkestrasse 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); Holton, James M. [University of California, San Francisco, CA 94158 (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Kirian, Richard A. [DESY, Notkestrasse 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287 (United States); Zatsepin, Nadia A. [Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287 (United States); Chapman, Henry N. [DESY, Notkestrasse 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); University of Hamburg, Luruper Chaussee 149, 22761 Hamburg (Germany)

    2013-07-01

    A processing pipeline for diffraction data acquired using the ‘serial crystallography’ methodology with a free-electron laser source is described with reference to the crystallographic analysis suite CrystFEL and the pre-processing program Cheetah. A processing pipeline for diffraction data acquired using the ‘serial crystallography’ methodology with a free-electron laser source is described with reference to the crystallographic analysis suite CrystFEL and the pre-processing program Cheetah. A detailed analysis of the nature and impact of indexing ambiguities is presented. Simulations of the Monte Carlo integration scheme, which accounts for the partially recorded nature of the diffraction intensities, are presented and show that the integration of partial reflections could be made to converge more quickly if the bandwidth of the X-rays were to be increased by a small amount or if a slight convergence angle were introduced into the incident beam.

  7. Crystallographic data processing for free-electron laser sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, Thomas A.; Barty, Anton; Stellato, Francesco; Holton, James M.; Kirian, Richard A.; Zatsepin, Nadia A.; Chapman, Henry N.

    2013-01-01

    A processing pipeline for diffraction data acquired using the ‘serial crystallography’ methodology with a free-electron laser source is described with reference to the crystallographic analysis suite CrystFEL and the pre-processing program Cheetah. A processing pipeline for diffraction data acquired using the ‘serial crystallography’ methodology with a free-electron laser source is described with reference to the crystallographic analysis suite CrystFEL and the pre-processing program Cheetah. A detailed analysis of the nature and impact of indexing ambiguities is presented. Simulations of the Monte Carlo integration scheme, which accounts for the partially recorded nature of the diffraction intensities, are presented and show that the integration of partial reflections could be made to converge more quickly if the bandwidth of the X-rays were to be increased by a small amount or if a slight convergence angle were introduced into the incident beam

  8. Electron injection by evolution of self-modulated laser wakefields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Changbum; Kim, Guang-Hoon; Kim, Jong-Uk; Lee, Hae June; Suk, Hyyong; Ko, In Soo

    2003-01-01

    Self-injection mechanisms in the self-modulated laser wakefield acceleration (SM-LWFA) are investigated. Two-dimensional (2D) particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations show that a significant amount of plasma electrons can be self-injected into the acceleration phase of a laser wakefield by a dynamic increase in the wake wavelength in the longitudinal direction. In this process, it is found that the wake wavelength increases due to the relativistic effect and this leads to a large amount of electron injection into the wakefields. In this paper, the injection phenomena are studied with 2D simulations and a brief explanation of the new self-injection mechanism is presented. (author)

  9. Charged beam dynamics, particle accelerators and free electron lasers

    CERN Document Server

    Dattoli, Giuseppe; Sabia, Elio; Artioli, Marcello

    2017-01-01

    Charged Beam Dynamics, Particle Accelerators and Free Electron Lasers summarises different topics in the field of accelerators and of Free Electron Laser (FEL) devices. It is intended as a reference manual for the different aspects of FEL devices, explaining how to design both a FEL device and the accelerator providing the driving beam. It covers both theoretical and experimental aspects, allowing researchers to attempt a first design of a FEL device in different operating conditions. It provides an analysis of what is already available, what is needed, and what the challenges are to determine new progress in this field. All chapters contain complements and exercises that are designed in such a way that the reader will gradually acquire self-confidence with the matter treated in the book.

  10. Electron dynamics in RF sources with a laser controlled emission

    CERN Document Server

    Khodak, I V; Metrochenko, V V

    2001-01-01

    Photoemission radiofrequency (RF) electron sources are sources of electron beams with extremely high brightness. Beam bunching processes in such devices are well studied in case when laser pulse duration is much lower of rf oscillation period.At the same time photoemission RF guns have some merits when operating in 'long-pulse' mode. In this case the laser pulse duration is much higher of rf oscillation period but much lower of rise time of oscillations in a gun cavity. Beam parameters at the gun output are compared for photoemission and thermoemission cathode applications. The paper presents results of a beam dynamics simulation in such guns with different resonance structures. Questions connected with defining of the current pulse peak value that can be obtained in such guns are discussed.

  11. Electron heating enhancement by frequency-chirped laser pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yazdani, E.; Afarideh, H., E-mail: hafarideh@aut.ac.ir [Department of Energy Engineering and Physics, Amirkabir University of Technology, P.O. Box 15875-4413, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Sadighi-Bonabi, R., E-mail: Sadighi@sharif.ir [Department of Physics, Sharif University of Technology, P.O. Box 11365-9567, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Riazi, Z. [Physics and Accelerator School, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Hora, H. [Department of Theoretical Physics, University of New South Wales, Sydney 2052 (Australia)

    2014-09-14

    Propagation of a chirped laser pulse with a circular polarization through an uprising plasma density profile is studied by using 1D-3V particle-in-cell simulation. The laser penetration depth is increased in an overdense plasma compared to an unchirped pulse. The induced transparency due to the laser frequency chirp results in an enhanced heating of hot electrons as well as increased maximum longitudinal electrostatic field at the back side of the solid target, which is very essential in target normal sheath acceleration regime of proton acceleration. For an applied chirp parameter between 0.008 and 0.01, the maximum amount of the electrostatic field is improved by a factor of 2. Furthermore, it is noticed that for a chirped laser pulse with a₀=5, because of increasing the plasma transparency length, the laser pulse can penetrate up to about n{sub e}≈6n{sub c}, where n{sub c} is plasma critical density. It shows 63% increase in the effective critical density compared to the relativistic induced transparency regime for an unchirped condition.

  12. Help system for control of JAERI FEL (Free Electron laser)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugimoto, Masayoshi

    1993-01-01

    The control system of JAERI FEL (Free Electron Laser) has a help system to provide the information necessary to operate the machine and to develop the new user interface. As the control software is constructed on the MS-Windows 3.x, the hyper-text feature of the Windows help system can be accessed. It consists of three major parts: (1) on-line help, (2) full document, and (3) tutorial system. (author)

  13. Unlimited electron acceleration in laser-driven plasma waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katsouleas, T.; Dawson, J.M.

    1983-01-01

    It is shown that the limitation to the energy gain of 2(ω/ω/sub p/) 2 mc 2 of an electron in the laser-plasma beat-wave accelerator can be overcome by imposing a magnetic field of appropriate strength perpendicular to the plasma wave. This accelerates particles parallel to the phase fronts of the accelerating wave which keeps them in phase with it. Arbitrarily large energy is theoretically possible

  14. ETL linac facility and free-electron lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamazaki, T.; Noguchi, T.; Mikado, T.; Sugiyama, S.; Yamada, K.; Chiwaki, M.; Ohgaki, H.; Suzuki, R.; Sei, N.

    1993-01-01

    An outline is presented of the recent development on the ETL (Electro-technical Laboratory) electron-linac facility and storage-ring FELs (free-electron lasers). Some modifications including the injection system have been made to the linac. Four storage rings are working very well. The TERAS FEL system has been shut down after the successful oscillation around 590 nm. The new NIJI-IV FEL system has been proven to work well, and the current tunable wavelength range is over 100 nm (488-595 nm). Preparatory experiments on the FEL at shorter wavelength are underway. (author)

  15. Investigation of metal coatings for the free electron laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scott, M.L.; Arendt, P.N.; Springer, R.W.; Cordi, R.C.; McCreary, W.J.

    1985-01-01

    We are investigating the deposition and characteristics of metal coatings for use in environments such as the Free Electron Laser where the radiation resistance of metal coatings could prove to be of great benefit. We have concentrated our initial efforts on silver laminate coatings due to the high reflectance of silver at 1 micron wavelength. Our initial laminate coatings have utilized thin layers of titanium oxide to break up the columnar structure of the silver during electron-beam deposition on fused silica substrates. Our initial results on equal coating thickness samples indicate an improvement in damage threshold that ranges from 1.07 to 1.71 at 351 nm

  16. The LLNL/UCLA high gradient inverse free electron laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moody, J. T.; Musumeci, P.; Anderson, G.; Anderson, S.; Betts, S.; Fisher, S.; Gibson, D.; Tremaine, A.; Wu, S. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, UCLA, Los Angeles California, 90095 (United States); Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (United States)

    2012-12-21

    We describe the Inverse Free Electron Accelerator currently under construction at Lawrence Livermore National Lab. Upon completion of this accelerator, high brightness electrons generated in the photoinjector blowout regime and accelerated to 50 MeV by S-band accelerating sections will interact with > 4 TW peak power Ti:Sapphire laser in a highly tapered 50 cm undulator and experience an acceleration gradient of > 200 MeV/m. We present the final design of the accelerator as well as the results of start-to-end simulations investigating preservation of beam quality and tolerances involved with this accelerator.

  17. Ultrafast Diagnostics for Electron Beams from Laser Plasma Accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matlis, N. H.; Bakeman, M.; Geddes, C. G. R.; Gonsalves, T.; Lin, C.; Nakamura, K.; Osterhoff, J.; Plateau, G. R.; Schroeder, C. B.; Shiraishi, S.; Sokollik, T.; van Tilborg, J.; Toth, Cs.; Leemans, W. P.

    2010-06-01

    We present an overview of diagnostic techniques for measuring key parameters of electron bunches from Laser Plasma Accelerators (LPAs). The diagnostics presented here were chosen because they highlight the unique advantages (e.g., diverse forms of electromagnetic emission) and difficulties (e.g., shot-to-shot variability) associated with LPAs. Non destructiveness and high resolution (in space and time and energy) are key attributes that enable the formation of a comprehensive suite of simultaneous diagnostics which are necessary for the full characterization of the ultrashort, but highly-variable electron bunches from LPAs.

  18. Advances in superconducting materials and electronics technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palmer, D.N.

    1990-01-01

    Technological barriers blocking the early implementation of ceramic oxide high critical temperature [Tc] and LHe Nb based superconductors are slowly being dismantled. Spearheading these advances are mechanical engineers with diverse specialties and creative interests. As the technology expands, most engineers have recognized the importance of inter-disciplinary cooperation. Cooperation between mechanical engineers and material and system engineers is of particular importance. Recently, several problems previously though to be insurmountable, has been successfully resolved. These accomplishment were aided by interaction with other scientists and practitioners, working in the superconductor research and industrial communities, struggling with similar systems and materials problems. Papers published here and presented at the 1990 ASME Winter Annual Meeting held in Dallas, Texas 25-30 November 1990 can be used as a bellwether to gauge the progress in the development of both ceramic oxide and low temperature Nb superconducting device and system technologies. Topics are focused into two areas: mechanical behavior of high temperature superconductors and thermal and mechanical problems in superconducting electronics

  19. III International Conference on Laser and Plasma Researches and Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-12-01

    A.P. Kuznetsov and S.V. Genisaretskaya III Conference on Plasma and Laser Research and Technologies took place on January 24th until January 27th, 2017 at the National Research Nuclear University "MEPhI" (NRNU MEPhI). The Conference was organized by the Institute for Laser and Plasma Technologies and was supported by the Competitiveness Program of NRNU MEPhI. The conference program consisted of nine sections: • Laser physics and its application • Plasma physics and its application • Laser, plasma and radiation technologies in industry • Physics of extreme light fields • Controlled thermonuclear fusion • Modern problems of theoretical physics • Challenges in physics of solid state, functional materials and nanosystems • Particle accelerators and radiation technologies • Modern trends of quantum metrology. The conference is based on scientific fields as follows: • Laser, plasma and radiation technologies in industry, energetic, medicine; • Photonics, quantum metrology, optical information processing; • New functional materials, metamaterials, “smart” alloys and quantum systems; • Ultrahigh optical fields, high-power lasers, Mega Science facilities; • High-temperature plasma physics, environmentally-friendly energetic based on controlled thermonuclear fusion; • Spectroscopic synchrotron, neutron, laser research methods, quantum mechanical calculation and computer modelling of condensed media and nanostructures. More than 250 specialists took part in the Conference. They represented leading Russian scientific research centers and universities (National Research Centre "Kurchatov Institute", A.M. Prokhorov General Physics Institute, P.N. Lebedev Physical Institute, Troitsk Institute for Innovation and Fusion Research, Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Moscow Institute of Physics and Tecnology and others) and leading scientific centers and universities from Germany, France, USA, Canada, Japan. We would like to thank heartily all of

  20. Environmental applications of electron-beam technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pikaev, A.K.

    2001-01-01

    The main directions of modern environmental applications of electron-beam technology are the following: 1) treatment of polluted natural and drinking water, municipal and industrial wastewater, other liquid wastes; 2) purification of gases; 3) treatment of sewage sludges; 4) treatment of solid wastes (medical wastes, contaminated soil and so on). In some cases, the results of respective researches and developments found a large-scale application. For example, recently several industrial plants for electron-beam purification of flue gases of thermal power plants from SO2 and NOx were created in China, Poland and Japan. In the report, a brief summary of the most important results obtained in the mentioned directions will be presented. A special attention will be paid to the data in the first direction. In particular, the recent results on radiation treatment of some liquid systems obtained in the laboratory under author's leadership will be considered. One of them is water polluted with petroleum products (motor oil, diesel fuel, residual fuel oil). The pollutants were present in water in dissolved form and as a separate phase. It was found that irradiation (dose 25-40 kGy) decomposes and removes the pollutants as a precipitate. The second system is natural oil gas consisting of gaseous and low-boiling hydrocarbons, water and so on. Laboratory- and pilot-scale (with electron accelerator of 0.7 MeV and 30 kW) studies have shown that electron-beam treatment (in a recycling regime with continuous sampling the liquid phase) of this gas leads to the formation of a mixture of liquid branched hydrocarbons, alcohols, ethers and so on, i.e., there is a radiation-induced liquefaction of the natural oil gas. The mechanism of radiolytic conversions occurring in the mentioned systems will be discussed

  1. The modern trends of the evolution laser information technology in oncology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikov, A. A.; Svirin, V. N.

    2008-04-01

    Laser-optical information technologies and devices develop since the 70- years at the end of 20 century and are broadly used for diagnostics and treatment of oncological diseases to date. Although such methods as photodynamic therapy (PDT), laser-induce thermotherapy (LITT), fluorescent diagnostics and spectrophotometry already more than 30 years are used for treatment and diagnostics of oncological diseases, nevertheless, they are enough new methods and, as a rule, are used in large scientific centers and medical institutions. This is bound, first of all, with lack of information on modern method of cancer treatment, the absence of widely available laser procedures and corresponding devices in the polyclinics and even in district hospitals, as well as insufficient understanding of application areas, where laser methods has an advantage by comparison, for instance, with beam or chemotherapy. At present day laser methods are fast upcoming direction of the treatment oncological diseases. This is explained by progress in development essentially laser, particularly diode, improvement electronic and computing components and broad introduction software-algorithmic methods of control the undertaking therapeutic and diagnostic procedures. In article are considered new laser methods of the undertaking diagnostic and therapeutic procedures and is shown that introduction multiwave laser radiation for probe and influences on tissue, the different methods of the determination of the functional state of tissues, realization of the on-line diagnostics when carrying out the therapeutic procedures, automatic control systems of the power laser radiation, which depends on state patient tissue, as well as software-algorithmic methods of management session therapeutic and diagnostic procedures greatly raises efficiency of the treatment oncological diseases. On an example of the multipurpose laser therapeutic devices("MLTA") developed and introduced in clinical practice and multipurpose

  2. Synchrotron radiation and free-electron lasers principles of coherent X-ray generation

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Kwang-Je; Lindberg, Ryan

    2017-01-01

    Learn about the latest advances in high-brightness X-ray physics and technology with this authoritative text. Drawing upon the most recent theoretical developments, pre-eminent leaders in the field guide readers through the fundamental principles and techniques of high-brightness X-ray generation from both synchrotron and free-electron laser sources. A wide range of topics is covered, including high-brightness synchrotron radiation from undulators, self-amplified spontaneous emission, seeded high-gain amplifiers with harmonic generation, ultra-short pulses, tapering for higher power, free-electron laser oscillators, and X-ray oscillator and amplifier configuration. Novel mathematical approaches and numerous figures accompanied by intuitive explanations enable easy understanding of key concepts, whilst practical considerations of performance-improving techniques and discussion of recent experimental results provide the tools and knowledge needed to address current research problems in the field. This is a comp...

  3. Soft X-ray generation via inverse compton scattering between high quality electron beam and high power laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masakazu Washio; Kazuyuki Sakaue; Yoshimasa Hama; Yoshio Kamiya; Tomoko Gowa; Akihiko Masuda; Aki Murata; Ryo Moriyama; Shigeru Kashiwagi; Junji Urakawa

    2007-01-01

    High quality beam generation project based on High-Tech Research Center Project, which has been approved by Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology in 1999, has been conducted by advance research institute for science and engineering, Waseda University. In the project, laser photo-cathode RF-gun has been selected for the high quality electron beam source. RF cavities with low dark current, which were made by diamond turning technique, have been successfully manufactured. The low emittance electron beam was realized by choosing the modified laser injection technique. The obtained normalized emmitance was about 3 m.mrad at 100 pC of electron charge. The soft x-ray beam generation with the energy of 370 eV, which is in the energy region of so-called water window, by inverse Compton scattering has been performed by the collision between IR laser and the low emmitance electron beams. (Author)

  4. Simulations of LANL Regenerative MW Free Electron Laser amplifier

    OpenAIRE

    Nguyen, Richard T

    1997-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited The development of a speed-of-light hard-kill weapon system for military applications represents a significant advancement in technology over present conventional kinetic weapon systems. Over the past two decades, the US Navy has successfully developed a megawatt-class chemical laser; however, under some maritime environments, the high power beam propagation was unable to delivery sufficient energy to kill a modern anti-ship missile (A...

  5. Self-amplified spontaneous emission free electron laser devices and nonideal electron beam transport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. L. Lazzarino

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available We have developed, at the SPARC test facility, a procedure for a real time self-amplified spontaneous emission free electron laser (FEL device performance control. We describe an actual FEL, including electron and optical beam transport, through a set of analytical formulas, allowing a fast and reliable on-line “simulation” of the experiment. The system is designed in such a way that the characteristics of the transport elements and the laser intensity are measured and adjusted, via a real time computation, during the experimental run, to obtain an on-line feedback of the laser performances. The detail of the procedure and the relevant experimental results are discussed.

  6. En Route: next-generation laser-plasma-based electron accelerators; En Route: Elektronenbeschleuniger der naechsten Generation auf Laser-Plasma-Basis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hidding, Bernhard

    2008-05-15

    Accelerating electrons to relativistic energies is of fundamental interest, especially in particle physics. Today's accelerator technology, however, is limited by the maximum electric fields which can be created. This thesis presents results on various mechanisms aiming at exploiting the fields in focussed laser pulses and plasma waves for electron acceleration, which can be orders of magnitude higher than with conventional accelerators. With relativistic, underdense laser-plasma-interaction, quasimonoenergetic electron bunches with energies up to {approx}50 MeV and normalized emittances of the order of 5mmmrad have been generated. This was achieved by focussing the {approx}80 fs, 1 J pulses of the JETI-laser at the FSU Jena to intensities of several 10{sup 19}W=cm{sup 2} into gas jets. The experimental observations could be explained via 'bubble acceleration', which is based on self-injection and acceleration of electrons in a highly nonlinear breaking plasma wave. For the rst time, this bubble acceleration was achieved explicitly in the self-modulated laser wakefield regime (SMLWFA). This quasimonoenergetic SMLWFA-regime stands out by relaxing dramatically the requirements on the driving laser pulse necessary to trigger bubble acceleration. This is due to self-modulation of the laser pulse in high-density gas jets, leading to ultrashort laser pulse fragments capable of initiating bubble acceleration. Electron bunches with durations technology. In addition, more than one laser pulse fragment can be powerful enough to drive a bubble. Distinct double peaks have been observed in the electron spectra, indicating that two quasimonoenergetic electron bunches separated by only few tens of fs have formed. This is backed up by PIC-Simulations (Particle-in-Cell). These results underline the feasibility of the construction of small table

  7. Electron scattering from atoms in the presence of a laser field. III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mittleman, M.H.

    1977-01-01

    The development of the theory of the effect of a laser on electron-atom scattering is continued by the derivation of explicit relations between the observed electron-atom scattering cross sections in the presence of a laser and exact electron-atom scattering cross sections with no laser present. No approximation concerning the scattering interaction is made. The only approximations concerning the laser are that (1) the laser-atom interaction energy is small compared to atomic energies, (2) the Rabi frequency times the collision time is small, and (3) the laser intensity in appropriate units is small

  8. Future developments in laser technology and their applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyer, K.

    1979-01-01

    One of the many areas in which lasers are beginning to play an important role is that of chemistry. One application of great significance is the use of low average power tunable lasers as an analytical tool to measure or study reaction kinetics and products. The other application of equal or greater importance is the use of high average power tunable lasers as a manipulative tool to control or drive chemical reactions in industrial processes. Here the cost of photons is the most important factor and a new device called the 'Free Electron Laser' is under development which promises to reduce the photon cost to less than one dollar per pound of material, thus including a wide range of industrial products

  9. Six-beam homodyne laser Doppler vibrometry based on silicon photonics technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yanlu; Zhu, Jinghao; Duperron, Matthieu; O'Brien, Peter; Schüler, Ralf; Aasmul, Soren; de Melis, Mirko; Kersemans, Mathias; Baets, Roel

    2018-02-05

    This paper describes an integrated six-beam homodyne laser Doppler vibrometry (LDV) system based on a silicon-on-insulator (SOI) full platform technology, with on-chip photo-diodes and phase modulators. Electronics and optics are also implemented around the integrated photonic circuit (PIC) to enable a simultaneous six-beam measurement. Measurement of a propagating guided elastic wave in an aluminum plate (speed ≈ 909 m/s @ 61.5 kHz) is demonstrated.

  10. Advanced lasers laser physics and technology for applied and fundamental science

    CERN Document Server

    Sukhoivanov, Igor

    2015-01-01

    Presenting a blend of applied and fundamental research in highly interdisciplinary subjects of rapidly developing areas, this book contains contributions on the frontiers and hot topics of laser physics, laser technology and laser engineering, and covers a wide range of laser topics, from all-optical signal processing and chaotic optical communication to production of superwicking surfaces, correction of extremely high-power beams, and generation of ultrabroadband spectra. It presents both review-type contributions and well researched and documented case studies, and is intended for graduate students, young scientist, and emeritus scientist working/studying in laser physics, optoelectronics, optics, photonics, and adjacent areas. The book contains both experimental and theoretical studies, as well as combinations of these two, which is known to be a most useful and interesting form of reporting scientific results, allowing students to really learn from each contribution. The book contains over 130 illustratio...

  11. Molecular electron recollision dynamics in intense circularly polarized laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandrauk, André D.; Yuan, Kai-Jun

    2018-04-01

    Extreme UV and x-ray table top light sources based on high-order harmonic generation (HHG) are focused now on circular polarization for the generation of circularly polarized attosecond pulses as new tools for controlling electron dynamics, such as charge transfer and migration and the generation of attosecond quantum electron currents for ultrafast magneto-optics. A fundamental electron dynamical process in HHG is laser induced electron recollision with the parent ion, well established theoretically and experimentally for linear polarization. We discuss molecular electron recollision dynamics in circular polarization by theoretical analysis and numerical simulation. The control of the polarization of HHG with circularly polarized ionizing pulses is examined and it is shown that bichromatic circularly polarized pulses enhance recollision dynamics, rendering HHG more efficient, especially in molecules because of their nonspherical symmetry. The polarization of the harmonics is found to be dependent on the compatibility of the rotational symmetry of the net electric field created by combinations of bichromatic circularly polarized pulses with the dynamical symmetry of molecules. We show how the field and molecule symmetry influences the electron recollision trajectories by a time-frequency analysis of harmonics. The results, in principle, offer new unique controllable tools in the study of attosecond molecular electron dynamics.

  12. Electron beam diagnostic for the Los Alamos free-electron laser oscillator experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheffield, R.L.

    1984-01-01

    An electron beam diagnostic for the Los Alamos free-electron laser (FEL) oscillator experiment has been used to measure the time dependence of the electron energy distribution in a 100-μs time interval. The electron beam consists of macropulses that have a duration of 100 μs and a repetition rate of 1 Hz. Each macropulse consists of a series of micropulses that have approx. 30 ps duration, approx. 50 A peak current, and approx. 50 ns separation. The primary purpose of the electron beam diagnostic is measurement of the time dependence of the electron energy distribution during the build-up of the photon field in the oscillator. Since the exact time of build-up depends on various rf and cavity considerations, provisions were made to allow the observation window to be varied from 10 to 100 μs and to be delayed by times up to 100 μs. 5 references, 9 figures

  13. Electron-positron-photon cascades in the strong laser field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legkov, Maxim; Fedotov, Alexander

    2012-06-01

    At nearest future several ambitious projects (such as ELI and HiPER) may provide laser filed intensity up to 10^23--10^24 W/cm^2. In such strong fields quantum effects are essential. The most important among them is production of QED cascades. In this paper external field intensity is considered as ultra-relativistic but subcritical. Using a model of two colliding counter-propagating laser beams it was shown that the number of particles during the process is growing exponentially in time. This leads to vast formation of electron-positron-photon plasma. According to numerical simulations, this plasma quickly absorbs an essential part of the energy of the laser field thus leading to its depletion. Numerical simulation has been also performed for a case of high-energetic particle and laser beam collision. Probability rates of direct and recombination processes have been theoretically studied. Under some conditions, recombination may come into play and suppress cascade development. Using approximation of radiation in forward direction, system of kinetic equations, which describes plasma evaluation, was constructed. According to qualitative estimations based on kinetic equations, it was shown that recombination processes can be neglected for optical frequencies range of external field.

  14. Laser-induced forward transfer for printed electronics applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Pradas, J. M.; Sopeña, P.; González-Torres, S.; Arrese, J.; Cirera, A.; Serra, P.

    2018-02-01

    Laser-induced forward transfer (LIFT) is a printing technique based on the action of a laser pulse that is focused on a thin film of a precursor ink for getting the transfer of a droplet onto a receiver substrate. The experiments presented in this article aim to demonstrate the ability of LIFT to produce electronic circuits on paper, a substrate that is flexible, cheap and recyclable. Tests were conducted to study the printing of conductive tracks with an Ag ink. The printing of a suspension of carbon nanofibers was also studied to demonstrate the ability of LIFT for printing inks with particles with some microns in size that provoke inkjet nozzles to clog. As a proof-of-concept of the LIFT possibilities, both inks were used to print entirely by LIFT a functional humidity sensor on a piece of paper. All the LIFT experiments were performed with a Nd:YAG laser that delivers pulses of a few hundreds of ns in an attempt to approach the technique to laser systems that are already introduced in many production lines for marking and labeling.

  15. Isotope separation using tuned laser and electron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trajmar, S.

    1987-01-01

    The method for producing and separating a stream of a selected isotope from an atomic beam containing a mixture of isotopes is described comprising the steps of: (a) producing an atomic beam containing the isotope of interest and other isotopes; (b) producing a magnetic field to broaden the energy domain of the individual magnetic sublevels of the isotope of interest and having the atomic beam passing therethrough; (c) producing a laser beam; (d) adjusting the polarization of the laser beam to further maximize the activation of only individual magnetic sublevels of the isotope of interest; (e) aiming the laser beam to strike the atomic beam within the magnetic field and traverse the path of the atomic beam; (f) producing a collimated and high intensity beam of electrons within the magnetic field aimed to strike the atomic beam; and, (g) disposing deflection means to have the atomic beam pass therethrough after being struck by the electron beam and deflect the ionized isotope from the remainder of the beam to form a separate stream composed only of the isotope of interest

  16. Femtosecond electron-bunch dynamics in laser wakefields and vacuum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. G. Khachatryan

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Recent advances in laser wakefield acceleration demonstrated the generation of extremely short (with a duration of a few femtoseconds relativistic electron bunches with relatively low (of the order of couple of percent energy spread. In this article we study the dynamics of such bunches in drift space (vacuum and in channel-guided laser wakefields. Analytical solutions were found for the transverse coordinate of an electron and for the bunch envelope in the wakefield in the case of arbitrary change in the energy. Our results show strong bunch dynamics already on a millimeter scale propagation distance both in plasma and in vacuum. When the bunch propagates in vacuum, its transverse sizes grow considerably; the same is observed for the normalized bunch emittance that worsens the focusability of the bunch. A scheme of two-stage laser wakefield accelerator with small drift space between the stages is proposed. It is found that fast longitudinal betatron phase mixing occurs in a femtosecond bunch when it propagates along the wakefield axis. When bunch propagates off axis, strong bunch decoherence and fast emittance degradation due to the finite bunch length was observed.

  17. Electron density interferometry measurement in laser-matter interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popovics-Chenais, C.

    1981-05-01

    This work is concerned with the laser-interferometry measurement of the electronic density in the corona and the conduction zone external part. Particularly, it is aimed at showing up density gradients and at their space-time localization. The first chapter recalls the density profile influence on the absorption principal mechanisms and the laser energy transport. In chapter two, the numerical and analytical hydrodynamic models describing the density profile are analysed. The influence on the density profile of the ponderomotive force associated to high oscillating electric fields is studied, together with the limited thermal conduction and suprathermal electron population. The mechanism action, in our measurement conditions, is numerically simulated. Calculations are made with experimental parameters. The measurement interaction conditions, together with the diagnostic method by high resolution laser interferometry are detailed. The results are analysed with the help of numerical simulation which is the experiment modeling. An overview of the mechanisms shown up by interferometric measurements and their correlation with other diagnostics is the conclusion of this work [fr

  18. The electron beam dynamics simulation in the laser-electron storage ring involving compton and intrabeam scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gladkikh, P.I.; Telegin, Yu.N.; Karnaukhov, I.M.

    2002-01-01

    The feasibility of the development of intense X-ray sources based on Compton scattering in laser-electron storage rings is discussed. The results of the electron beam dynamics simulation involving Compton and intrabeam scattering are presented

  19. The electron beam dynamics simulation in the laser-electron storage ring involving compton and intrabeam scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Gladkikh, P I; Karnaukhov, I M

    2002-01-01

    The feasibility of the development of intense X-ray sources based on Compton scattering in laser-electron storage rings is discussed. The results of the electron beam dynamics simulation involving Compton and intrabeam scattering are presented.

  20. Impact of Electron Collision Mixing on the delay times of an electron beam excited Atomic Xe laser

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peters, P.J.M.; Lan, Y.F.; Lan, Yun Fu; Ohwa, Mieko; Kushner, Mark J.

    1990-01-01

    The atomic xenon (5d¿6p) infrared laser has been experimentally and theoretically investigated using a short-pulse (30-ns), high-power (1-10-MW/cm3) coaxial electron beam excitation source. In most cases, laser oscillation is not observed during the e-beam current pulse. Laser pulses of hundreds of

  1. Fast-electron transport in cylindrically laser-compressed matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, F.; Koenig, M.; Batani, D.; Baton, S. D.; Beg, F. N.; Benedetti, C.; Brambrink, E.; Chawla, S.; Dorchies, F.; Fourment, C.; Galimberti, M.; Gizzi, L. A.; Heathcote, R.; Higginson, D. P.; Hulin, S.; Jafer, R.; Koester, P.; Labate, L.; Lancaster, K.; Mac Kinnon, A. J.; McPhee, A. G.; Nazarov, W.; Nicolai, P.; Pasley, J.; Ravasio, A.; Richetta, M.; Santos, J. J.; Sgattoni, A.; Spindloe, C.; Vauzour, B.; Volpe, L.

    2009-12-01

    Experimental and theoretical results of relativistic electron transport in cylindrically compressed matter are presented. This experiment, which is a part of the HiPER roadmap, was achieved on the VULCAN laser facility (UK) using four long pulses beams (~4 × 50 J, 1 ns, at 0.53 µm) to compress a hollow plastic cylinder filled with plastic foam of three different densities (0.1, 0.3 and 1 g cm-3). 2D simulations predict a density of 2-5 g cm-3 and a plasma temperature up to 100 eV at maximum compression. A short pulse (10 ps, 160 J) beam generated fast electrons that propagate through the compressed matter by irradiating a nickel foil at an intensity of 5 × 1018 W cm-2. X-ray spectrometer and imagers were implemented in order to estimate the compressed plasma conditions and to infer the hot electron characteristics. Results are discussed and compared with simulations.

  2. Conceptual design of industrial free electron laser using superconducting accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saldin, E.L.; Schneidmiller, E.A.; Ulyanov, Yu.N. [Automatic Systems Corporation, Samara (Russian Federation)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    Paper presents conceptual design of free electron laser (FEL) complex for industrial applications. The FEL complex consists of three. FEL oscillators with the optical output spanning the infrared (IR) and ultraviolet (UV) wave-lengths ({lambda} = 0.3...20 {mu}m) and with the average output power 10 - 20 kW. The driving beam for the FELs is produced by a superconducting accelerator. The electron beam is transported to the FELs via three beam lines (125 MeV and 2 x 250 MeV). Peculiar feature of the proposed complex is a high efficiency of the. FEL oscillators, up to 20 %. This becomes possible due to the use of quasi-continuous electron beam and the use of the time-dependent undulator tapering.

  3. Present status of laser technology for maintenance and repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sano, Yuji

    2001-01-01

    A laser has superior spatial and timely controllability and has no repulsive force at its use, it is a tool suitable for remote operation. And, as a partial processing with low exotherm and deformation by its use becomes possible, it can have an advantage omissible for post processes such as heat treatment and so on. Therefore, on in-situ repair of present constructions, laser is thought to be an optimum tool. And, in nuclear energy plants, maintenance and management of their instruments are important, and then a number of technical developments activating its advantages have been carried out. Above all, repair engineering around a reactor has a number of places difficult to access them for its operators, so remote engineering using laser is desired for in special. Here was described on the present status of development and realization containing protect conservation and inspection repair technology using laser. (G.K.)

  4. CCD technology applied to laser cladding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meriaudeau, Fabrice; Renier, Eric; Truchetet, Frederic

    1996-03-01

    Power lasers are more and more used in aerospace industry or automobile industry; their widespread use through different processes such as: welding, drilling or coating, in order to perform some surface treatments of material, requires a better understanding. In order to control the quality of the process, many technics have been developed, but most of them are based on a post-mortem analysis of the samples, and/or require an important financial investment. Welding, coating or other material treatments involving material transformations are often controlled with a metallurgical analysis. We here propose a new method, a new approach of the phenomena, we control the industrial process during the application. For this, we use information provided by two CCD cameras. One supplies information related to the intensity, and geometry of the melted surface, the second about the shape of the powder distribution within the laser beam. We use data provided by post-mortem metallurgical analysis and correlate those informations with parameters measured by both CCD, we create a datas bank which represents the relation between the measured parameters and the quality of the coating. Both informations, provided by the 2 CCD cameras allows us to optimize the industrial process. We are actually working on the real time aspect of the application and expect an implementation of the system.

  5. Hemostatic properties of the free-electron laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cram, G.P. Jr.; Copeland, M.L.

    1998-01-01

    We have investigated the hemostatic properties of the free-electron laser (FEL) and compared these properties to the most commonly used commercial lasers in neurosurgery, CO 2 and Nd:YAG, using an acute canine model. Arterial and venous vessels, of varying diameters from 0.1 to 1.0 mm, were divided with all three lasers. Analysis of five wavelengths of the FEL (3.0, 4.5, 6.1, 6.45, and 7.7 microns) resulted in bleeding without evidence of significant coagulation, regardless of whether the vessel was an artery or vein. Hemorrhage from vessels less than 0.4 mm diameter was subsequently easily controlled with Gelfoam registered (topical hemostatic agent) alone, whereas larger vessels required bipolar electrocautery. No significant charring, or contraction of the surrounding parenchyma was noted with any of the wavelengths chosen from FEL source. The CO 2 laser, in continuous mode, easily coagulated vessels with diameters of 4 mm and less, while larger vessels displayed significant bleeding requiring bipolar electrocautery for control. Tissue charring was noted with application of the CO 2 laser. In super pulse mode, the CO 2 laser exhibited similar properties, including significant charring of the surrounding parenchyma. The Nd:YAG coagulated all vessels tested up to 1.4 mm, which was the largest diameter cortical artery found, however this laser displayed significant and extensive contraction and retraction of the surrounding parenchyma. In conclusion, the FEL appears to be a poor hemostatic agent. Our results did not show any benefit of the FEL over current conventional means of achieving hemostasis. However, control of hemorrhage was easily achieved with currently used methods of hemostasis, namely Gelfoam registered or bipolar electrocuatery. Although only cortical vessels in dogs were tested, we feel this data can be applied to all animals, including humans, and the peripheral, as well as central, vasculature, as our data on the CO 2 and Nd:YAG appear to closely

  6. Mirrors that are electron transparent for use in free-electron-laser oscillators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McAdoo, J.H.; Granatstein, V.L.

    1983-06-01

    The surface motion of a gold-coated Mylar pellicle was measured interferometrically while the pellicle was subjected to bombardment from a 15-MeV, 40-mA pulsed electron beam. No surface motion as large as 0.3 ..mu..m was observed during the electron pulse. A radiation dose of 5 x 10/sup 7/ rad did not damage the surface. The results show that this foil can be used as an end mirror in free-electron-laser oscillators.

  7. Electron Bunch Timing with Femtosecond Precision in a Superconducting Free-Electron Laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loehl, F.; Arsov, V.; Felber, M.; Hacker, K.; Lorbeer, B.; Ludwig, F.; Matthiesen, K.-H.; Schlarb, H.; Schmidt, B.; Winter, A.; Jalmuzna, W.; Schmueser, P.; Schulz, S.; Zemella, J.; Szewinski, J.

    2010-01-01

    High-gain free-electron lasers (FELs) are capable of generating femtosecond x-ray pulses with peak brilliances many orders of magnitude higher than at other existing x-ray sources. In order to fully exploit the opportunities offered by these femtosecond light pulses in time-resolved experiments, an unprecedented synchronization accuracy is required. In this Letter, we distributed the pulse train of a mode-locked fiber laser with femtosecond stability to different locations in the linear accelerator of the soft x-ray FEL FLASH. A novel electro-optic detection scheme was applied to measure the electron bunch arrival time with an as yet unrivaled precision of 6 fs (rms). With two beam-based feedback systems we succeeded in stabilizing both the arrival time and the electron bunch compression process within two magnetic chicanes, yielding a significant reduction of the FEL pulse energy jitter.

  8. Electron Bunch Timing with Femtosecond Precision in a Superconducting Free-Electron Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löhl, F.; Arsov, V.; Felber, M.; Hacker, K.; Jalmuzna, W.; Lorbeer, B.; Ludwig, F.; Matthiesen, K.-H.; Schlarb, H.; Schmidt, B.; Schmüser, P.; Schulz, S.; Szewinski, J.; Winter, A.; Zemella, J.

    2010-04-01

    High-gain free-electron lasers (FELs) are capable of generating femtosecond x-ray pulses with peak brilliances many orders of magnitude higher than at other existing x-ray sources. In order to fully exploit the opportunities offered by these femtosecond light pulses in time-resolved experiments, an unprecedented synchronization accuracy is required. In this Letter, we distributed the pulse train of a mode-locked fiber laser with femtosecond stability to different locations in the linear accelerator of the soft x-ray FEL FLASH. A novel electro-optic detection scheme was applied to measure the electron bunch arrival time with an as yet unrivaled precision of 6 fs (rms). With two beam-based feedback systems we succeeded in stabilizing both the arrival time and the electron bunch compression process within two magnetic chicanes, yielding a significant reduction of the FEL pulse energy jitter.

  9. Electron beam properties and impedance characterization for storage rings used for free electron lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dattoli, G.; Mezi, L.; Renieri, A.; Migliorati, M.; Walker, R.

    2000-01-01

    Good electron beam qualities and stability are the crucial features of Storage Rings dedicated to synchrotron radiation sources or to Free Electron Laser. Most of these characteristics depends on the coupling of the e-beam with the machine environment, which can be in turn modelled in terms of a characteristic impedance, whose absolute value and structure can be used to specify both the stability (longitudinal and transverse) of the beam and its qualities (energy spread, bunch length, peak current ...). In this paper are considered two specific examples of Storage Rings used for FEL operation and analyze their performances by means of semi analytical and numerical methods. The analysis is aimed at clarifying the dependence of beam energy spread and bunch length on beam current and at providing a set of parameters useful for the optimization of Free Electron Laser or synchrotron radiation sources [it

  10. Relativistic electronic dressing in laser-assisted ionization of atomic hydrogen by electron impact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Attaourti, Y.; Taj, S.

    2004-01-01

    Within the framework of the coplanar binary geometry where it is justified to use plane wave solutions for the study of the (e,2e) reaction and in the presence of a circularly polarized laser field, we introduce as a first step the Dirac-Volkov plane wave Born approximation 1 where we take into account only the relativistic dressing of the incident and scattered electrons. Then, we introduce the Dirac-Volkov plane wave Born approximation 2 where we take totally into account the relativistic dressing of the incident, scattered, and ejected electrons. We then compare the corresponding triple differential cross sections for laser-assisted ionization of atomic hydrogen by electron impact both for the nonrelativistic and the relativistic regime

  11. Technology Acceptance of Electronic Medical Records by Nurses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stocker, Gary

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the Technology Acceptance Model's (TAM) relevance of the intention of nurses to use electronic medical records in acute health care settings. The basic technology acceptance research of Davis (1989) was applied to the specific technology tool of electronic medical records (EMR) in a specific setting…

  12. Optimal Control of Atomic, Molecular and Electron Dynamics with Tailored Femtosecond Laser Pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brixner, Tobias; Pfeifer, Thomas; Gerber, Gustav; Wollenhaupt, Matthias; Baumert, Thomas

    With the invention of the laser, the dream was realized to actively exert control over quantum systems. Active control over the dynamics of quantum mechanical systems is a fascinating perspective in modern physics. Cleavage and creation of predetermined chemical bonds, selective population transfer in atoms and molecules, and steering the dynamics of bound and free electrons have been important milestones along this way. A promising tool for this purpose is available with femtosecond laser technologies. In this chapter we review some of our work on adaptive femtosecond quantum control where a learning algorithm and direct experimental feedback signals are employed to optimize user-defined objectives. Femtosecond laser pulses are modified in frequency-domain pulse shapers, which apart from phase- and intensity-modulation can also modify the polarization state as a function of time. We will highlight the major advances in the field of optimal control by presenting our own illustrative experimental examples such as gas-phase and liquid-phase femtochemistry, control in weak and strong laser fields, and control of electron dynamics.

  13. Dose properties of a laser accelerated electron beam and prospects for clinical application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kainz, K.K.; Hogstrom, K.R.; Antolak, J.A.; Almond, P.R.; Bloch, C.D.; Chiu, C.; Fomytskyi, M.; Raischel, F.; Downer, M.; Tajima, T.

    2004-01-01

    Laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) technology has evolved to where it should be evaluated for its potential as a future competitor to existing technology that produces electron and x-ray beams. The purpose of the present work is to investigate the dosimetric properties of an electron beam that should be achievable using existing LWFA technology, and to document the necessary improvements to make radiotherapy application for LWFA viable. This paper first qualitatively reviews the fundamental principles of LWFA and describes a potential design for a 30 cm accelerator chamber containing a gas target. Electron beam energy spectra, upon which our dose calculations are based, were obtained from a uniform energy distribution and from two-dimensional particle-in-cell (2D PIC) simulations. The 2D PIC simulation parameters are consistent with those reported by a previous LWFA experiment. According to the 2D PIC simulations, only approximately 0.3% of the LWFA electrons are emitted with an energy greater than 1 MeV. We studied only the high-energy electrons to determine their potential for clinical electron beams of central energy from 9 to 21 MeV. Each electron beam was broadened and flattened by designing a dual scattering foil system to produce a uniform beam (103%>off-axis ratio>95%) over a 25x25 cm2 field. An energy window (ΔE) ranging from 0.5 to 6.5 MeV was selected to study central-axis depth dose, beam flatness, and dose rate. Dose was calculated in water at a 100 cm source-to-surface distance using the EGS/BEAM Monte Carlo algorithm. Calculations showed that the beam flatness was fairly insensitive to ΔE. However, since the falloff of the depth-dose curve (R 10 -R 90 ) and the dose rate both increase with ΔE, a tradeoff between minimizing (R 10 -R 90 ) and maximizing dose rate is implied. If ΔE is constrained so that R 10 -R 90 is within 0.5 cm of its value for a monoenergetic beam, the maximum practical dose rate based on 2D PIC is approximately 0.1 Gy min-1

  14. Gain of a Smith-Purcell free-electron laser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. L. Andrews

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available A formula is derived for the small-signal gain of a Smith-Purcell free-electron laser. The theory describes the electron beam as a moving plasma dielectric, and assumes that the electron beam interacts with an evanescent mode traveling along the surface of a periodic waveguide with a rectangular profile. The phase velocity of the evanescent wave is synchronous with the electron velocity, but the group velocity is actually negative. The electron beam amplifies the evanescent wave, which does not itself radiate. According to this picture, the radiation observed emanating from the grating is Smith-Purcell radiation enhanced by the bunching of the electrons due to the interaction with the evanescent mode. There will also be radiation from the part of the evanescent mode that is outcoupled from the ends of the grating. This radiation appears at a lower frequency than the Smith-Purcell radiation. The new results explain both the gain and the radiation observed in the experiments of Urata and Walsh, and the cube-root current dependence of the gain inferred by Bakhtyari, Walsh, and Brownell.

  15. Laser cutting, State of the art and technological trends

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Flemming Ove

    1999-01-01

    In this paper a short review of the development trends in laser cutting will be given. The technoloty which is the fastest expanding industrial production technology will develop in both its core market segment: Flat bed cutting of sheet metal as it will expand in heavy industry and in cutting of 3...

  16. A high-repetition rate LWFA for studies of laser propagation and electron generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Zhaohan; Easter, James; Hou, Bixue; Krushelnick, Karl; Nees, John; Thomas, Alec

    2010-11-01

    Advances in ultrafast optics today have enabled laser systems to deliver ever shorter and more intense pulses. When focused, such laser pulses can easily exceed relativistic intensities where the wakefield created by the strong laser electric field can be used to accelerate electrons. Laser wakefield acceleration of electrons holds promise for future compact electron accelerators or drivers of other radiation sources in many scientific, medical and engineering applications. We present experimental studies of laser wakefield acceleration using the λ-cubed laser at the University of Michigan -- a table-top high-power laser system operating at 500 Hz repetition rate. The high repetition rate allows statistical studies of laser propagation and electron acceleration which are not accessible with typical sub-0.1 Hz repetition rate systems. In addition, we compare the experiments with particle-in-cell simulations using the code OSIRIS.

  17. A numerical study of the integral equations for the laser fields in free-electron lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoo, J. G.; Park, S. H.; Jeong, Y. U.; Lee, B. C.; Rhee, Y. J.; Cho, S. O.

    2004-01-01

    The dynamics of the radiation fields in free-electron lasers is investigated on the basis of the integro-differential equations in the one-dimensional formulation. For simple cases we solved the integro-differential equations analytically and numerically to test our numerical procedures developed on the basis of the Filon method. The numerical results showed good agreement with the analytical solutions. To confirm the legitimacy of the numerical package, we carried out numerical studies on the inhomogeneous broadening effects, where no analytic solutions are available, due to the energy spread and the emittance of the electron beam.

  18. Scaling of electron beam sources for laser fusion applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlitt, L.G.; Bradley, L.P.

    1975-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop a scheme for constructing electron beam machines capable of pumping large volumes of gas, to analyze their performance within the framework of existing knowledge of the physical mechanisms involved, to use this analysis to assess the viability of the overall concept, pinpoint weaknesses in the understanding of the physics, identify the most important limiting physical processes, and hence to propose a program to prepare for the eventual construction of a large scale gas laser system. (auth)

  19. Electron emission from laser irradiating target normal sheath acceleration (TNSA)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Torrisi, L.; Cutroneo, Mariapompea

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 171, 9-10 (2016), s. 754-765 ISSN 1042-0150. [12th Workshop on European Collaboration for Higher Education and Research in Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Protection. Bologna, Catania, Milan, 30.05.2016-01.06.2016] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP108/12/G108; GA MŠk LM2015056 Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : electron emission from plasma * TNSA * TOF * SiC * plastic scintillator * Thomson parabola spectrometer Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 0.443, year: 2016

  20. Radiated energy calculation in free electron lasers without inversion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oganesyan, K.B.

    2017-01-01

    The equations of particle motion in the free electron lasers without inversion are derived using the Hamiltonian formalism. In small signal regime the uncoupled one dimensional phase equation is derived in the form of pendulum equation. For the practical estimations the same equation along with the equation of particle energy change are solved using perturbation theory and the expressions for gain in FEL regime and particle angle dependence of energy at the exit of first undulator are obtained. Results for gain, particle phase and energy change depending on beam parameters and device are presented

  1. Upgrade of laser and electron beam welding database

    CERN Document Server

    Furman, Magdalena

    2014-01-01

    The main purpose of this project was to fix existing issues and update the existing database holding parameters of laser-beam and electron-beam welding machines. Moreover, the database had to be extended to hold the data for the new machines that arrived recently at the workshop. As a solution - the database had to be migrated to Oracle framework, the new user interface (using APEX) had to be designed and implemented with the integration with the CERN web services (EDMS, Phonebook, JMT, CDD and EDH).

  2. A CW normal-conductive RF gun for free electron laser and energy recovery linac applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baptiste, Kenneth; Corlett, John; Kwiatkowski, Slawomir; Lidia, Steven; Qiang, Ji; Sannibale, Fernando; Sonnad, Kiran; Staples, John; Virostek, Steven; Wells, Russell

    2008-10-08

    Currently proposed energy recovery linac and high average power free electron laser projects require electron beam sources that can generate up to {approx} 1 nC bunch charges with less than 1 mmmrad normalized emittance at high repetition rates (greater than {approx} 1 MHz). Proposed sources are based around either high voltage DC or microwave RF guns, each with its particular set of technological limits and system complications. We propose an approach for a gun fully based on mature RF and mechanical technology that greatly diminishes many of such complications. The concepts for such a source as well as the present RF and mechanical design are described. Simulations that demonstrate the beam quality preservation and transport capability of an injector scheme based on such a gun are also presented.

  3. Longitudinal space charge assisted echo seeding of a free-electron laser with laser-spoiler noise suppression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirsten Hacker

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Seed lasers are employed to improve the temporal coherence of free-electron laser (FEL light. However, when these seed pulses are short relative to the particle bunch, the noisy, temporally incoherent radiation from the unseeded electrons can overwhelm the coherent, seeded radiation. In this paper, a technique to seed a particle bunch with an external laser is presented in which a new mechanism to improve the contrast between coherent and incoherent free electron laser radiation is employed together with a novel, simplified echo-seeding method. The concept relies on a combination of longitudinal space charge wakes and an echo-seeding technique to make a short, coherent pulse of FEL light together with noise background suppression. Several different simulation codes are used to illustrate the concept with conditions at the soft x-ray free-electron laser in Hamburg, FLASH.

  4. Controlling electron-electron correlation in frustrated double ionization of triatomic molecules with orthogonally polarized two-color laser fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, A.; Kling, M. F.; Emmanouilidou, A.

    2017-09-01

    We demonstrate the control of electron-electron correlation in frustrated double ionization (FDI) of the two-electron triatomic molecule D3 + when driven by two orthogonally polarized two-color laser fields. We employ a three-dimensional semiclassical model that fully accounts for the electron and nuclear motion in strong fields. We analyze the FDI probability and the distribution of the momentum of the escaping electron along the polarization direction of the longer wavelength and more intense laser field. These observables, when considered in conjunction, bear clear signatures of the prevalence or absence of electron-electron correlation in FDI, depending on the time delay between the two laser pulses. We find that D3 + is a better candidate than H2 for demonstrating also experimentally that electron-electron correlation indeed underlies FDI.

  5. Optical system for UV-laser technological equipment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedosov, Yuri V.; Romanova, Galina E.; Afanasev, Maxim Ya.

    2017-09-01

    Recently there has been an intensive development of intelligent industrial equipment that is highly automated and can be rapidly adjusted for certain details. This equipment can be robotics systems, automatic wrappers and markers, CNC machines and 3D printers. The work equipment considered is the system for selective curing of photopolymers using a UV-laser and UV-radiation in such equipment that leads to additional technical difficulties. In many cases for transporting the radiation from the laser to the point processed, a multi-mirror system is used: however, such systems are usually difficult to adjust. Additionally, such multi-mirror systems are usually used as a part of the equipment for laser cutting of metals using high-power IR-lasers. For the UV-lasers, using many mirrors leads to crucial radiation losses because of many reflections. Therefore, during the development of the optical system for technological equipment using UV-laser we need to solve two main problems: to transfer the radiation for the working point with minimum losses and to include the system for controlling/handling the radiation spot position. We introduce a system for working with UV-lasers with 450mW of power and a wavelength of 0.45 μm based on a fiber system. In our modelling and design, we achieve spot sizes of about 300 μm, and the designed optical and mechanical systems (prototypes) were manufactured and assembled. In this paper, we present the layout of the technological unit, the results of the theoretical modelling of some parts of the system and some experimental results.

  6. Laser technology to manage periodontal disease: a valid concept?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low, Samuel B; Mott, Angie

    2014-06-01

    Present day dental lasers can create oral environments conducive for periodontal repair. With the bacterial etiology of periodontitis and the resulting host inflammatory reaction, clinicians continue to search for therapeutic modalities to assist in the non-surgical management of periodontal disease. Traditional chairside therapies consist of mechanical debridement with manual and/or ultrasonic instrumentation with the objective of removing calculus, biofilm, and endotoxin from tooth root surfaces. Decreasing the microbial stimuli and associated end products decreases the inflammatory reaction and allows the host an opportunity to regenerate tissue through wound healing. The purpose of this article is to examine whether dental lasers, which have been in use for the past 3 decades, may augment traditional non-surgical periodontal therapy. Review of research publications related to lasers and non-surgical periodontics with attention focused on systematic studies. Studies utilizing laser technology may demonstrate positive effects on 1) selectively decreasing the biofilm environment, 2) removing calculus deposits and neutralizing endotoxin, 3) removing sulcular epithelium to assist in reattachment and decreased pocket depth, and 4) biostimulation for enhanced wound healing. Comparisons of studies to determine the difference between lasers and their respective effects on the periodontium are difficult to assess due to a wide variation of laser protocols. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Reversible Electron Beam Heating for Suppression of Microbunching Instabilities at Free-Electron Lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Behrens, Christopher; /DESY; Huang, Zhirong; Xiang, Dao; /SLAC

    2012-05-30

    The presence of microbunching instabilities due to the compression of high-brightness electron beams at existing and future x-ray free-electron lasers (FELs) results in restrictions on the attainable lasing performance and renders beam imaging with optical transition radiation impossible. The instability can be suppressed by introducing additional energy spread, i.e., heating the electron beam, as demonstrated by the successful operation of the laser heater system at the Linac Coherent Light Source. The increased energy spread is typically tolerable for self-amplified spontaneous emission FELs but limits the effectiveness of advanced FEL schemes such as seeding. In this paper, we present a reversible electron beam heating system based on two transverse deflecting radio-frequency structures (TDSs) upstream and downstream of a magnetic bunch compressor chicane. The additional energy spread is introduced in the first TDS, which suppresses the microbunching instability, and then is eliminated in the second TDS. We show the feasibility of the microbunching gain suppression based on calculations and simulations including the effects of coherent synchrotron radiation. Acceptable electron beam and radio-frequency jitter are identified, and inherent options for diagnostics and on-line monitoring of the electron beam's longitudinal phase space are discussed.

  8. Direct acceleration of electrons by a CO2 laser in a curved plasma waveguide

    OpenAIRE

    Yi, Longqing; Pukhov, Alexander; Shen, Baifei

    2016-01-01

    Laser plasma interaction with micro-engineered targets at relativistic intensities has been greatly promoted by recent progress in the high contrast lasers and the manufacture of advanced micro- and nano-structures. This opens new possibilities for the physics of laser-matter interaction. Here we propose a novel approach that leverages the advantages of high-pressure CO$_{2}$ laser, laser-waveguide interaction, as well as micro-engineered plasma structure to accelerate electrons to peak energ...

  9. Technical Training Seminar: Laser Trackers: the Local Positioning Technology (LPT)

    CERN Multimedia

    Davide Vitè

    2005-01-01

    Friday 20 May from 10:00 to 16:00, Training Centre (bldg. 593) Laser Trackers: the Local Positioning Technology (LPT) Simon Moser, Michael Lettau, Achim Lupus, Niklaus Suter, Leica GEOSYSTEMS AG, Switzerland Laser trackers are used at CERN for different applications within the LHC Project. Leica Geosystems AG have been developing during the last four years the revolutionary Local Positioning Technology (LPT). Laser trackers are increasingly used to ensure accuracy of large fabrications, and alignment in the final assembly process. Competing portable Coordinate Measuring Machines (CMM) with articulated arms require a frequent repositioning, known to lead to a loss of accuracy and efficiency. Leica Geosystems developed armless solutions, the T-Probe and T-Scan, for use with its laser trackers. The combination of the tracker technology with photogrammetry is the base of LPT, enabling real time measurements with free hand-held devices, such as the T-Probe and T-Scan. T-Probe and T-Scan overcome the proble...

  10. Introduction to the theory of free electron lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krinsky, S.

    1985-01-01

    We present an introduction to some fundamental aspects of the theory of free electron lasers. Spontaneous radiation emitted by electrons traversing a wiggler magnet is briefly reviewed, and stimulated emission in the low-gain regime is discussed using Colson's pendulum equations and Madey's theorems. The high-gain regime is treated by an extention of the work of Bonifacio, Pellegrini, and Narducci. We introduce dynamical variables to describe the radiation field, and a Hamiltonian formulation of Maxwell's equations is employed. A canonical transformation to the interaction representation factors out the fast time variation of the radiation field, and the slow time dependence is determined by linearized equations for the appropriate collective variables. As an application of this technique we consider self-amplified spontaneous radiation, and we comment upon the relationship between our approach and the use of coupled Vlasov-Maxwell equations

  11. Introduction to free electron lasers (1/3)

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2002-01-01

    The Free-electron laser (FEL) is a source of coherent electromagnetic radiation based on a relativistic electron beam. First operated 25 years ago, the FEL has now reached a stage of maturity for operation in the infra-red region of the spectrum and several facilities provide intense FEL radiation beams for research covering a wide range of disciplines. Several projects both underway and proposed aim at pushing the minimum wavelength from its present limit around 100 nm progressively down to the 1 Angstrom region where the X-ray FEL would open up many new and exciting research possibilities. Other developments aim at increasing power levels to the 10's of kW level. In this series of lectures we give an introduction to the basic principles of FELs and their different modes of operation, and summarise their applications and current state of development.

  12. Introduction to free electron lasers (2/3)

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2002-01-01

    The Free-electron laser (FEL) is a source of coherent electromagnetic radiation based on a relativistic electron beam. First operated 25 years ago, the FEL has now reached a stage of maturity for operation in the infra-red region of the spectrum and several facilities provide intense FEL radiation beams for research covering a wide range of disciplines. Several projects both underway and proposed aim at pushing the minimum wavelength from its present limit around 100 nm progressively down to the 1 Angstrom region where the X-ray FEL would open up many new and exciting research possibilities. Other developments aim at increasing power levels to the 10's of kW level. In this series of lectures we give an introduction to the basic principles of FELs and their different modes of operation, and summarise their applications and current state of development.

  13. Introduction to free electron lasers (3/3)

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2002-01-01

    The Free-electron laser (FEL) is a source of coherent electromagnetic radiation based on a relativistic electron beam. First operated 25 years ago, the FEL has now reached a stage of maturity for operation in the infra-red region of the spectrum and several facilities provide intense FEL radiation beams for research covering a wide range of disciplines. Several projects both underway and proposed aim at pushing the minimum wavelength from its present limit around 100 nm progressively down to the 1 Angstrom region where the X-ray FEL would open up many new and exciting research possibilities. Other developments aim at increasing power levels to the 10's of kW level. In this series of lectures we give an introduction to the basic principles of FELs and their different modes of operation, and summarise their applications and current state of development.

  14. Free electron laser with terahertz band Bragg reflectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naum S. Ginzburg

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Periodical Bragg structures may be considered as an effective way of controlling the electromagnetic energy fluxes and provision of spatially coherent radiation in the free electron lasers with oversized interaction space. A new scheme of terahertz band FEL with hybrid Bragg resonator is proposed consisting of advanced input Bragg mirror and traditional output Bragg mirror. An advanced Bragg mirror exploiting the coupling between the two counterpropagating modes and the quasicutoff one provides mode selection over the transverse index. The main amplification of the wave by the electron beam takes place in the regular section of the resonator. Small reflections from the output traditional Bragg mirror are sufficient for oscillator self-excitation.

  15. Čerenkov free-electron laser with side walls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalkal, Yashvir, E-mail: yashvirkalkal@gmail.com [Homi Bhabha National Institute, Mumbai 400094 (India); Accelerator and Beam Physics Laboratory, Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology, Indore 452013 (India); Kumar, Vinit [Homi Bhabha National Institute, Mumbai 400094 (India); Accelerator and Beam Physics Laboratory, Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology, Indore 452013 (India)

    2016-08-11

    In this paper, we have proposed a Čerenkov free-electron laser (CFEL) with metallic side walls, which are used to confine an electromagnetic surface mode supported by a thin dielectric slab placed on top of a conducting surface. This leads to an enhancement in coupling between the optical mode and the co-propagating electron beam, and consequently, performance of the CFEL is improved. We set up coupled Maxwell–Lorentz equations for the system, in analogy with an undulator based conventional FEL, and obtain formulas for the small-signal gain and growth rate. It is shown that small signal gain and growth rate in this configuration are larger compared to the configuration without the side walls. In the nonlinear regime, we solve the coupled Maxwell–Lorentz equations numerically and study the saturation behaviour of the system. It is found that the Čerenkov FEL with side walls saturates quickly, and produces powerful coherent terahertz radiation.

  16. XUV free-electron laser-based projection lithography systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newnam, B.E.

    1990-01-01

    Free-electron laser sources, driven by rf-linear accelerators, have the potential to operate in the extreme ultraviolet (XUV) spectral range with more than sufficient average power for high-volume projection lithography. For XUV wavelengths from 100 nm to 4 nm, such sources will enable the resolution limit of optical projection lithography to be extended from 0.25 {mu}m to 0.05{mu}m and with an adequate total depth of focus (1 to 2 {mu}m). Recent developments of a photoinjector of very bright electron beams, high-precision magnetic undulators, and ring-resonator cavities raise our confidence that FEL operation below 100 nm is ready for prototype demonstration. We address the motivation for an XUV FEL source for commercial microcircuit production and its integration into a lithographic system, include reflecting reduction masks, reflecting XUV projection optics and alignment systems, and surface-imaging photoresists. 52 refs., 7 figs.

  17. II International Conference on Plasma and Laser Research and Technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurnaev, V A; Dodulad, E I

    2016-01-01

    II Conference on Plasma and Laser Research and Technologies took place on January 25 th until January 27 th , 2016 at National Research Nuclear University “MEPhI” (NRNU MEPhI). It was organized by the Institute of Laser and Plasma Technologies and was supported by the Competitiveness Program of NRNU MEPhI. The Conference consisted of four sections: Plasma physics and controlled nuclear fusion, Laser physics, Modern aspects of solid state matter physics and Charged particle accelerators. The Conference provided participants an opportunity to present their research results for the consideration of a wide audience from the sidelines of science. The main topics of the Conference were: • Controlled nuclear fusion with magnetic and inertial confinement; • Low-temperature plasma and its application in modern technology; • Laser physics and technologies for industry, environmental control and precise measurements; • Optical information control, holography, spintronics and photonics; • Modern aspects of solid state matter physics and nanophysics; • Charged particle accelerators. More than 200 specialists on plasma, laser and solid state physics took part in the II Conference. They represented leading Russian scientific research centres and universities (such as Troitsk Institute of Innovative and Thermonuclear Research, Institute of Crystallography, National Research Centre 'Kurchatov Institute', Institute of Physical Chemistry and Electrochemistry and others) and universities from Belarus, Ukraine, Germany, USA, Canada, Belgium, and Sweden. All report presentations were broadcasted online on the NRNU MEPhI official site. The translation was watched by viewers from Moscow, Prague, St. Petersburgh and other cities, who could not attend the Conference. We would like to thank heartily all of the speakers, participants and organizing committee members for their contribution to the conference. (paper)

  18. Composite Laser Ceramics by Advanced Bonding Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikesue, Akio; Aung, Yan Lin; Kamimura, Tomosumi; Honda, Sawao; Iwamoto, Yuji

    2018-02-09

    Composites obtained by bonding materials with the same crystal structure and different chemical compositions can create new functions that do not exist in conventional concepts. We have succeeded in bonding polycrystalline YAG and Nd:YAG ceramics without any interstices at the bonding interface, and the bonding state of this composite was at the atomic level, similar to the grain boundary structure in ceramics. The mechanical strength of the bonded composite reached 278 MPa, which was not less than the strength of each host material (269 and 255 MPa). Thermal conductivity of the composite was 12.3 W/mK (theoretical value) which is intermediate between the thermal conductivities of YAG and Nd:YAG (14.1 and 10.2 W/mK, respectively). Light scattering cannot be detected at the bonding interface of the ceramic composite by laser tomography. Since the scattering coefficients of the monolithic material and the composite material formed by bonding up to 15 layers of the same materials were both 0.10%/cm, there was no occurrence of light scattering due to the bonding. In addition, it was not detected that the optical distortion and non-uniformity of the refractive index variation were caused by the bonding. An excitation light source (LD = 808 nm) was collimated to 200 μm and irradiated into a commercial 1% Nd:YAG single crystal, but fracture damage occurred at a low damage threshold of 80 kW/cm². On the other hand, the same test was conducted on the bonded interface of 1% Nd:YAG-YAG composite ceramics fabricated in this study, but it was not damaged until the excitation density reached 127 kW/cm². 0.6% Nd:YAG-YAG composite ceramics showed high damage resistance (up to 223 kW/cm²). It was concluded that composites formed by bonding polycrystalline ceramics are ideal in terms of thermo-mechanical and optical properties.

  19. New Electronic-Transition Laser Systems. Part I. Electron Pumped Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-05-01

    important reaction intermediates could absorb the laser photons. Because of their low concentration , this may not affect the gain, but photo...recording the electronic signals from a fast phototube (generally a 1P28. coated, if necessary, with sodium salicylate for vacuum-uv measurements...state ot 1^ which radiates at 342.5 nm, very effectively, concentrates the energy flow from the intermediate atomic states and thereby provides the

  20. A polarized look at nucleons: Laser electron gamma source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    The LEGS Collaboration

    1991-12-31

    As the title suggests we are going to look at reactions induced on nucleons by polarized photons. The results I am going to show today are from the Laser Electron Gamma Source, or ``LEGS`` facility, at Brookhaven National Laboratory. At LEGS, gamma ray beams are produced by backscattering laser light from relativistic electrons. I will only summarize the main characteristics of this facility, and leave an in depth description to Dr. Schaerf who will discuss LEGS and other similar backscattering facilities on Wednesday. Reactions with polarized photons inevitably reflect interference terms that for the most part remain hidden in spin-averaged unpolarized measurements. This provides a tool for probing interactions that depend upon spin. In particular, we are going to look today at two cases where the polarization is used to probe the tensor interaction. First, we will examine the tensor force between a proton-neutron pair in deuterium. Secondly, we will examine the tensor force between quarks in a proton that produces a small E2 component that is mixed with the predominantly M1 excitation of the delta resonance.The magnitude of this E2 components provides a sensitive probe of the structure of the Nucleon.

  1. A polarized look at nucleons: Laser electron gamma source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-01-01

    As the title suggests we are going to look at reactions induced on nucleons by polarized photons. The results I am going to show today are from the Laser Electron Gamma Source, or LEGS'' facility, at Brookhaven National Laboratory. At LEGS, gamma ray beams are produced by backscattering laser light from relativistic electrons. I will only summarize the main characteristics of this facility, and leave an in depth description to Dr. Schaerf who will discuss LEGS and other similar backscattering facilities on Wednesday. Reactions with polarized photons inevitably reflect interference terms that for the most part remain hidden in spin-averaged unpolarized measurements. This provides a tool for probing interactions that depend upon spin. In particular, we are going to look today at two cases where the polarization is used to probe the tensor interaction. First, we will examine the tensor force between a proton-neutron pair in deuterium. Secondly, we will examine the tensor force between quarks in a proton that produces a small E2 component that is mixed with the predominantly M1 excitation of the delta resonance.The magnitude of this E2 components provides a sensitive probe of the structure of the Nucleon.

  2. Electron Acceleration by a Laser Pulse in a Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Startsev, E. A.; McKinstrie, C. J.

    1996-11-01

    The motion of a charged particle in an electromagnetic field is a well-known paradigm of physics. Suppose that the field is associated with a laser pulse of finite extent propagating in a vacuum. As the pulse overtakes the particle, the particle gains energy and momentum. However, the oscillatory energy of the particle is wasted, and it is difficult to extract the particle from the pulse. We have found an exact analytic solution for the motion of an electron under the influence of a circularly polarized laser pulse in a plasma. This solution shows that a pre-accelerated electron can be accelerated efficiently and extracted easily. Although the pulse tends to generate a plasma wake, to which it loses energy, one can eliminate the wake by choosing the duration of the pulse judiciously. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Inertial Confinement Fusion under Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC03-92SF19460.

  3. Numerical Simulations of X-Ray Free Electron Lasers (XFEL)

    KAUST Repository

    Antonelli, Paolo

    2014-11-04

    We study a nonlinear Schrödinger equation which arises as an effective single particle model in X-ray free electron lasers (XFEL). This equation appears as a first principles model for the beam-matter interactions that would take place in an XFEL molecular imaging experiment in [A. Fratalocchi and G. Ruocco, Phys. Rev. Lett., 106 (2011), 105504]. Since XFEL are more powerful by several orders of magnitude than more conventional lasers, the systematic investigation of many of the standard assumptions and approximations has attracted increased attention. In this model the electrons move under a rapidly oscillating electromagnetic field, and the convergence of the problem to an effective time-averaged one is examined. We use an operator splitting pseudospectral method to investigate numerically the behavior of the model versus that of its time-averaged version in complex situations, namely the energy subcritical/mass supercritical case and in the presence of a periodic lattice. We find the time-averaged model to be an effective approximation, even close to blowup, for fast enough oscillations of the external field. This work extends previous analytical results for simpler cases [P. Antonelli, A. Athanassoulis, H. Hajaiej, and P. Markowich, Arch. Ration. Mech. Anal., 211 (2014), pp. 711--732].

  4. On-line electron beam measurements for the Los Alamos Free-Electron Laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lumpkin, A.H.; Feldman, R.B.; Feldman, D.W.; Stein, W.E.

    1987-01-01

    Recent developments in the electron beam diagnostics used on the Los Alamos Free-Electron Laser (FEL) have extended our on-line, quantitative analysis capability to extraction efficiency and micropulse temporal duration. The FEL's 20-MeV electron beam is 100 μs in length and consists of ∼2000 micropulses of 20-ps duration and 46-ns separation. This extreme range of time scales is addressed by employing a combination of synchronized beam deflectors, an electron spectrometer, intensified video cameras, real-time video digitizers, and microcomputers. The tapered wiggler result for extraction efficiency (2%) and results for pulse duration measurements (10 to 15 ps) by two techniques are presented

  5. Multi-GeV electron-positron pair generation from laser-electron scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vranic, Marija; Klimo, Ondrej; Korn, Georg; Weber, Stefan

    2017-10-01

    Positron generation in the laboratory is of great importance, both for fundamental science and potential applications. For laboratory astrophysics, it is particularly important to produce neutral electron-positron plasma, with properties that allow studying their collective behavior. Electron-positron pairs can be generated by first emitting an energetic photon, that later decays into a pair in an intense background field (Breit-Wheeler process). Recently, several experiments demonstrated that high-frequency radiation can be generated in laser-electron beam scattering. Here we propose a new scattering configuration that can both generate electron-positron pairs, and later accelerate them to multi-GeV energies. This configuration allows obtaining an e+e- flow with a higher energy than that of the initial electron beam. We develop an analytical model that predicts the energy cutoff. We discuss the number of pairs expected, the acceleration and the overall quality of the beam. We also study the role of pulse duration and spatiotemporal synchronization for the overall number of pairs. The work is supported by OSIRIS QED-PIC simulations, and these ideas can be tested with a new generation laser system at ELI Beamlines that will provide 10 PW peak power in a 150 fs pulse duration.

  6. Direct acceleration of electrons by a CO2 laser in a curved plasma waveguide

    CERN Document Server

    Yi, Longqing; Shen, Baifei

    2016-01-01

    Laser plasma interaction with micro-engineered targets at relativistic intensities has been greatly promoted by recent progress in the high contrast lasers and the manufacture of advanced micro- and nano-structures. This opens new possibilities for the physics of laser-matter interaction. Here we propose a novel approach that leverages the advantages of high-pressure CO 2 laser, laser-waveguide interaction, as well as micro-engineered plasma structure to accelerate electrons to peak energy greater than 1 GeV with narrow slice energy spread (~1%) and high overall efficiency. The acceleration gradient is 26 GV/m for a 1.3 TW CO2 laser system. The micro-bunching of a long electron beam leads to the generation of a chain of ultrashort electron bunches with the duration roughly equal to half-laser-cycle. These results open a way for developing a compact and economic electron source for diverse applications.

  7. Absolute and convective instabilities in two-dimensional free-electron lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwan, T.J.T.; Cary, J.R.

    1981-01-01

    Computer simulations of the free-electron laser have been carried out using a two-and-one-half dimensional fully electromagnetic relativistic particle code. It has been found that waves propagating obliquely with respect to the electron beam are always unstable with appreciable growth rates and, therefore, mode competition is an important consideration in the design of free-electron lasers. Furthermore, electromagnetic waves with group velocities opposite to the direction of electron beam propagation can be absolutely unstable. It is shown that the absolutely unstable waves can completely disrupt the electron beam and any laser oscillaton; therefore, they are extremely detrimental to the operation of free electron lasers. However, it has been found that one can stabilize the absolute instability by taking particular precautions in the design of free-electron lasers

  8. Exploring warm dense water by using Free-Electron-Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sperling, P.; Kim, J.; Chen, Z.; French, M.; Curry, C.; Koralek, J.; Mo, M.; Nakatsutsumi, M.; Rodel, R.; Redmer, R.; Toleikis, S.; Zalden, P.; Glenzer, S. H.

    2017-10-01

    Warm dense water is predicted in the interior of giant planets and has an important impact on planetary evolutions. As such, the electrical and thermal properties in this regime are critically important for modelling astrophysical objects. We present electrical property measurements in warm dense water by using a novel planar water jet compatible with high repetition rate studies. The liquid density water is isochorically and uniformly heated to non-equilibrium warm dense matter by FLASH free-electron laser irradiation (5.5 nm, 0.1 - 20 μ J). The dielectric function can be extracted from optical transmission and reflection measurements on the picosecond timescale before significant expansion and subsequent relaxation occurs. The time-dependent dielectric function reveals the electronic properties of water at different temperatures of the electronic and ionic subsystem during the heating and relaxation process, that allow to infer the electron-ion energy coupling. Comparison with 2-temperature density-functional-theory molecular-dynamic simulations show good agreement, that can not be achieved by standard theories of plasma physics. This work is supported by DOE FES under FWP 100182.

  9. Modeling and multidimensional optimization of a tapered free electron laser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Jiao

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Energy extraction efficiency of a free electron laser (FEL can be greatly increased using a tapered undulator and self-seeding. However, the extraction rate is limited by various effects that eventually lead to saturation of the peak intensity and power. To better understand these effects, we develop a model extending the Kroll-Morton-Rosenbluth, one-dimensional theory to include the physics of diffraction, optical guiding, and radially resolved particle trapping. The predictions of the model agree well with that of the GENESIS single-frequency numerical simulations. In particular, we discuss the evolution of the electron-radiation interaction along the tapered undulator and show that the decreasing of refractive guiding is the major cause of the efficiency reduction, particle detrapping, and then saturation of the radiation power. With this understanding, we develop a multidimensional optimization scheme based on GENESIS simulations to increase the energy extraction efficiency via an improved taper profile and variation in electron beam radius. We present optimization results for hard x-ray tapered FELs, and the dependence of the maximum extractable radiation power on various parameters of the initial electron beam, radiation field, and the undulator system. We also study the effect of the sideband growth in a tapered FEL. Such growth induces increased particle detrapping and thus decreased refractive guiding that together strongly limit the overall energy extraction efficiency.

  10. Electron Beam Charge Diagnostics for Laser Plasma Accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, Kei; Gonsalves, Anthony; Lin, Chen; Smith, Alan; Rodgers, David; Donahue, Rich; Byrne, Warren; Leemans, Wim

    2011-06-27

    A comprehensive study of charge diagnostics is conducted to verify their validity for measuring electron beams produced by laser plasma accelerators (LPAs). First, a scintillating screen (Lanex) was extensively studied using subnanosecond electron beams from the Advanced Light Source booster synchrotron, at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The Lanex was cross calibrated with an integrating current transformer (ICT) for up to the electron energy of 1.5 GeV, and the linear response of the screen was confirmed for charge density and intensity up to 160 pC/mm{sup 2} and 0.4 pC/(ps mm{sup 2}), respectively. After the radio-frequency accelerator based cross calibration, a series of measurements was conducted using electron beams from an LPA. Cross calibrations were carried out using an activation-based measurement that is immune to electromagnetic pulse noise, ICT, and Lanex. The diagnostics agreed within {+-}8%, showing that they all can provide accurate charge measurements for LPAs.

  11. Ultrafast Laser Interaction Processes for LIBS and Other Sensing Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-05

    the plasma creation, a broad Gaussian spectrum can be observed. Hence Te and Ne can be calculated using the non-collective TS treatment . The minimum...special treatment was applied to make sure the surface reflection is minimized, the probe laser still cannot get infinitely close to the sample surface...9 (2002) 4045-4051. 83 K.M. Green, M.C. Borras , P.P. Woskov, G.J. Flores, III, K. Hadidi, P. Thomas, Electronic excitation temperature profiles in

  12. Electron ionization and spin polarization control of Fe atom adsorbed graphene irradiated by a femtosecond laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Dong; Jiang, Lan; Wang, Feng; Li, Xin; Qu, Liangti; Lu, Yongfeng

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the structural properties and ionized spin electrons of an Fe–graphene system, in which the time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) within the generalized gradient approximation is used. The electron dynamics, including electron ionization and ionized electron spin polarization, is described for Fe atom adsorbed graphene under femtosecond laser irradiation. The theoretical results show that the electron ionization and ionized electron spin polarization are sensitive to the laser parameters, such as the incident angle and the peak intensity. The spin polarization presents the maximum value under certain laser parameters, which may be used as a source of spin-polarized electrons. - Highlights: • The structural properties of Fe–graphene system are investigated. • The electron dynamics of Fe–graphene system under laser irradiation are described. • The Fe–graphene system may be used as a source of spin-polarized electrons

  13. Laser based maintenance technology for PWR power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itaru Chida; Masaki Yoda; Naruhiko Mukai; Yuji Sano; Makoto Ochiai; Takahiro Miura; Ryoichi Saeki

    2005-01-01

    Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) is the major factor to reduce the reliability of aged reactor components. Toshiba has developed various laser-based maintenance technologies and already applied them to several existing nuclear power plants. Recently, we have developed the maintenance system for the inner surface of bottom-mounted instruments (BMI) of PWR plants. This system performs nondestructive testing (NDT) and preventive maintenance against SCC by using YAG lasers. Laser ultrasonic testing (LUT) has a great potential to be applied to the remote inspection of reactor components. Laser-induced surface acoustic wave (SAW) inspection system was developed by using a compact probe with a multi-mode optical fiber and an interferometer. This system is used for both detection and depth measurement of surface-breaking cracks. It is confirmed through laboratory studies that the developed system successfully detected and sized micro slits of around 1.0 mm depth on weld metal and heat-affected zone (HAZ). SCCs produced by chemical method were also tested by the system. For the preventive maintenance treatment, laser-peening (LP) technology was developed and already applied to several reactor components in operating BWR plants. LP is a novel process to improve residual stress from tensile to compressive on material surface layer by irradiating focused high-power laser pulses in water. We have developed a fiber-delivered LP (FLP) system as a preventive maintenance against SCC. For checking the effect of FLP, we carried out FLP experiments on the inner surface of a small tube-shaped Alloy 600 by using this system. After FLP, residual stress was measured by X-ray method for radial and axial directions on the inner surface of the tube, and effectiveness of stress improvement was proved. Based on these experiences, LUT and FLP were applied to Ikata unit-1 of Shikoku Electric Power Company Inc. and successfully treated the inner surface of BMIs. (authors)

  14. Applications and advances in electronic-nose technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    A. D. Wilson; M. Baietto

    2009-01-01

    Electronic-nose devices have received considerable attention in the field of sensor technology during the past twenty years, largely due to the discovery of numerous applications derived from research in diverse fields of applied sciences. Recent applications of electronic nose technologies have come through advances in sensor design, material improvements, software...

  15. Values of Modern Technology to Electronic Media Management in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper examines the influence, impact and communicative values of modern technology to electronic media management in Nigeria. It evaluates changes in distribution and consumer technologies, the impact on media content, new business models for the electronic media, and concludes with a discussion of issues ...

  16. 48 CFR 311.7000 - Defining electronic information technology requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Defining electronic information technology requirements. 311.7000 Section 311.7000 Federal Acquisition Regulations System HEALTH... Accessibility Standards 311.7000 Defining electronic information technology requirements. HHS staff that define...

  17. Laser Acceleration of Electrons in Shock Wave Enhanced Gas Jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaganovich, Dmitri; Helle, Michael; Gordon, Daniel; Ting, Antonio

    2012-10-01

    Controlling the gas density gradient and profile is important for electron and proton acceleration. Using an optimized gas density profile, we have demonstrated 40 times higher electron energy compared to a Gaussian gas jet without lost of charge or stability. Propagation of a shock wave through a gas jet can modify the gas density profile and create sharp density gradients [1, 2]. Using different shock waves energies and shock originating positions, we were able to modify the plasma density profile of a ``typical'' Gaussian gas jet into a variety of profiles, from thin (foil-like) structure to elongated profiles with fast rise and slow fall. We used a plasma bubble Cherenkov diagnostic [3, 4] to optimize the acceleration process. Accelerated electron energy and charge were cross-correlated with the second harmonic diagnostic signal. The optimized gas density profile generated stable 0.5 nC of 40 MeV electrons using a 10 TW laser. The shock wave modified gas jet can be used as a stand alone electron source or as an injector coupled to additional acceleration structures. We demonstrated stable injection of electrons from the shock wave modified gas jet into a lower density plasma. The results are also being studied with numerical simulations. [4pt] [1] D. Kaganovich et al., Physics of Plasmas 18, 120701 (2011)[0pt] [2] D. Kaganovich et al., Applied Physics Letters 97, 191501 (2010)[0pt] [3] D. F. Gordon, et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 101, 045004 (2008)[0pt] [4] M. H. Helle et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 105, 105001 (2010)

  18. Ion Implantation Processing Technologies for Telecommunications Electronics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haynes, T E

    2000-05-01

    The subject CRADA was a collaboration between Oak Ridge National Laboratory and Bell Laboratories, Lucent Technologies (formerly AT and T Bell Laboratories) to explore the development of ion implantation technologies for silicon integrated circuit (IC) manufacturing.

  19. Characterization of electron-deficient chemical bonding of diborane with attosecond electron wavepacket dynamics and laser response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yonehara, Takehiro; Takatsuka, Kazuo

    2009-12-01

    We report a theoretical study of non-adiabatic electrons-nuclei coupled dynamics of diborane H 2BH 2BH 2 under several types of short pulse lasers. This molecule is known to have particularly interesting geometrical and electronic structures, which originate from the electron-deficient chemical bondings. We revisit the chemical bonding of diborane from the view point of electron wavepacket dynamics coupled with nuclear motions, and attempt to probe the characteristics of it by examining its response to intense laser fields. We study in the following three aspects, (i) bond formation of diborane by collision between two monoboranes, (ii) attosecond electron wavepacket dynamics in the ground state and first excited state by circularly polarized laser pulse, and (iii) induced fragmentation back to monoborane molecules by linearly polarized laser. The wave lengths of two types of laser field employed are 200 nm (in UV range) and 800 nm (in IR range), and we track the dynamics from hundreds of attoseconds up to few tens of femtoseconds. To this end, we apply the ab initio semiclassical Ehrenfest theory, into which the classical vector potential of a laser field is introduced. Basic features of the non-adiabatic response of electrons to the laser fields is elucidated in this scheme. To analyze the electronic wavepackets thus obtained, we figure out bond order density that is a spatial distribution of the bond order and bond order flux density arising only from the bonding regions, and so on. Main findings in this work are: (i) dimerization of monoboranes to diborane is so efficient that even intense laser is hard to prevent it; (ii) collective motions of electron flux emerge in the central BHHB bonding area in response to the circularly polarized laser fields; (iii) laser polarization with the direction of central two BH bonding vector is efficient for the cleavage of BH 3-BH 3; and (iv) nuclear derivative coupling plays a critical role in the field induced fragmentation

  20. Characterization of electron-deficient chemical bonding of diborane with attosecond electron wavepacket dynamics and laser response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yonehara, Takehiro; Takatsuka, Kazuo

    2009-01-01

    We report a theoretical study of non-adiabatic electrons-nuclei coupled dynamics of diborane H 2 BH 2 BH 2 under several types of short pulse lasers. This molecule is known to have particularly interesting geometrical and electronic structures, which originate from the electron-deficient chemical bondings. We revisit the chemical bonding of diborane from the view point of electron wavepacket dynamics coupled with nuclear motions, and attempt to probe the characteristics of it by examining its response to intense laser fields. We study in the following three aspects, (i) bond formation of diborane by collision between two monoboranes, (ii) attosecond electron wavepacket dynamics in the ground state and first excited state by circularly polarized laser pulse, and (iii) induced fragmentation back to monoborane molecules by linearly polarized laser. The wave lengths of two types of laser field employed are 200 nm (in UV range) and 800 nm (in IR range), and we track the dynamics from hundreds of attoseconds up to few tens of femtoseconds. To this end, we apply the ab initio semiclassical Ehrenfest theory, into which the classical vector potential of a laser field is introduced. Basic features of the non-adiabatic response of electrons to the laser fields is elucidated in this scheme. To analyze the electronic wavepackets thus obtained, we figure out bond order density that is a spatial distribution of the bond order and bond order flux density arising only from the bonding regions, and so on. Main findings in this work are: (i) dimerization of monoboranes to diborane is so efficient that even intense laser is hard to prevent it; (ii) collective motions of electron flux emerge in the central BHHB bonding area in response to the circularly polarized laser fields; (iii) laser polarization with the direction of central two BH bonding vector is efficient for the cleavage of BH 3 -BH 3 ; and (iv) nuclear derivative coupling plays a critical role in the field induced

  1. Structural and electronic characterization of 355 nm laser-crystallized silicon: Interplay of film thickness and laser fluence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Semler, Matthew R.; Swenson, Orven F.; Hoey, Justin M.; Guruvenket, Srinivasan; Gette, Cody R.; Hobbie, Erik K.

    2014-01-01

    We present a detailed study of the laser crystallization of amorphous silicon thin films as a function of laser fluence and film thickness. Silicon films grown through plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition were subjected to a Q-switched, diode-pumped solid-state laser operating at 355 nm. The crystallinity, morphology, and optical and electronic properties of the films are characterized through transmission and reflectance spectroscopy, resistivity measurements, Raman spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, atomic force microscopy, and optical and scanning-electron microscopy. Our results reveal a unique surface morphology that strongly couples to the electronic characteristics of the films, with a minimum laser fluence at which the film properties are optimized. A simple scaling model is used to relate film morphology to conductivity in the laser-processed films

  2. Advances in copper laser technology: kinetic enhancement [review article

    Science.gov (United States)

    Withford, Michael J.; Brown, Daniel J. W.; Mildren, Richard P.; Carman, Robert J.; Marshall, Graham D.; Piper, James A.

    Since their invention in 1966 copper vapour lasers (CVLs) have developed into a mature technology with applications including high-speed imaging, micro-machining, non-linear frequency conversion to the ultraviolet, and pumping of solid-state laser materials. However, the performance characteristics of conventional CVLs are fundamentally limited by kinetic processes at play within the gain medium and hence, these devices largely failed to keep pace with advances in visible solid state lasers during the late 1980s and early 1990s. In 1996 a new subclass of CVL, termed a kinetically enhanced or KE-CVL, was developed that used a ternary gas mixture (HCl-H 2-Ne) to tailor the kinetic processes that limit laser performance. These devices offer dramatic improvements in power (both average and high beam quality) and repetition rate scalability. Indeed, 100 W of visible, high beam quality power is now readily available from relatively small copper laser systems. In this paper the underlying principles and performance characteristics of KE-CVLs will be reviewed.

  3. Laser application of heat pipe technology in energy related programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbone, R.J.

    1975-01-01

    The design and operating parameters for a heat pipe laser utilizing metal vapors are proposed. The laser would be applied to laser induced fusion, laser induced chemistry, laser isotope separation, and power transport using optical beams. (U.S.)

  4. Laser cleaning of historical limestone buildings in Bordeaux appraisal using cathodoluminescence and electron paramagnetic resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapoulie, Rémy; Cazenave, Sandrine; Duttine, Mathieu

    2008-05-01

    Most historical buildings in Bordeaux city are made of limestone. This yellowish-white rock is rather porous and highly sensitive to pollution. As a consequence of local weathering conditions, these buildings present a dark appearance due to the development of a superficial dark grey to black crust. For the last decade, a campaign has been underway to clean these buildings. Eleven techniques of surface treatment have been used, including laser beam technology. As a contribution to the study of laser beam effects on stone buildings, two analytical methods have been used on clean versus unclean surfaces: Cathodoluminescence (CL) and Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR), in addition to SEM-EDX and XRD. The black crust is composed of different types of particles: carbon porous micro-particles of industrial origin, atmospheric dust due to the erosion of soils and rocks, alumino-silicate particles from urban pollution; all these particles being cemented by gypsum. As far as heritage conservation is concerned, the laser surface treatment not only preserves the original patina of the stone, but also leaves surface smoothness unaltered. CL and EPR data confirm that lasers--with highly controlled parameters--only get rid of the black crust and, thus, reveal the underneath layer, the so-called patina. This patina shows no luminescence, whereas the limestone on which it has grown shows a bright orange emission of CL. This indicates CL to be a fast and easy way to provide a high quality control for the restoration of polluted ancient stones.

  5. Features and Technology of Ferroelectric Electron Emission

    CERN Document Server

    Boscolo, I; Herleb, U; Riege, H

    1998-01-01

    Spontaneous electrical polarization of ferroelectric materials can be changed either by reversal or by phase transition from a ferroelectric into a non-polar state or vice versa. If spontaneous polarization changes are induced at a submicrosecond time-scale, strong uncompensated surface charge densities and related fields are generated, which may lead to the intense self-emission of electrons from the negatively-charged free surface areas of the ferroelectric cathode. The nature of this self-emission differs essentially from other methods of ferroelectric electron emission and from conventional electron emission in that the latter methods are only achieved by extracting electrons with externally applied electric fields. When electron guns are constructed with ferroelectric cathodes, new design criteria have to be taken into account. The intensity, the energy, the temporal and spatial distribution and the repetition rate of the emitted electron beams can be adjusted within wide limits. The advantages of ferroe...

  6. Hybrid laser technology for creation of doped biomedical layers

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jelínek, Miroslav; Bačáková, Lucie; Remsa, Jan; Kocourek, Tomáš; Mikšovský, Jan; Písařík, Petr; Vandrovcová, Marta; Filová, Elena; Kubinová, Šárka

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 4, Jan (2016), s. 98-104 ISSN 2327-6045 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA15-05864S; GA ČR(CZ) GA15-01558S Institutional support: RVO:68378271 ; RVO:67985823 ; RVO:68378041 Keywords : hybrid laser technology * biomaterials * thin Films * doped Layers * DLC Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism; JJ - Other Materials (FGU-C)

  7. Hybrid laser technology for composite coating and medical applications

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jelínek, Miroslav; Kocourek, Tomáš; Písařík, Petr; Mikšovský, Jan; Remsa, Jan; Mihailescu, I. N.; Kopeček, Jaromír

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 10, č. 1 (2014), s. 1-8 ISSN 1823-3430 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA101/09/0702; GA MŠk LD12069 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : hybrid technology * pulsed laser deposition * biocompatible composites * doped coating * composite coating Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism http://web.usm.my/jes/pastIssue.html

  8. 2nd International Conference on Photonics, Optics and Laser Technology

    CERN Document Server

    Raposo, Maria

    2016-01-01

    This collection of the selected papers presented to the Second International Conference on Photonics, Optics and laser technology PHOTOPTICS 2014 covers the three main conference scientific areas of “Optics”, “Photonics” and “Lasers”. The selected papers, in two classes full and short, result from a double blind review carried out by conference Program Committee members who are highly qualified experts in the conference topic areas.

  9. 3rd International Conference on Photonics, Optics and Laser Technology

    CERN Document Server

    Raposo, Maria

    2016-01-01

    The book provides a collection of selected papers presented to the third International Conference on Photonics, Optics and Laser Technology PHOTOPTICS 2015, covering the three main conference scientific areas of “Optics”, “Photonics” and “Lasers”. The selected papers, in two classes full and short, result from a double blind review carried out by the conference program committee members which are highly qualified experts in conference topic areas.

  10. Developing maintenance technologies for FBR's heat exchanger units by advanced laser processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishimura, Akihiko; Shimada, Yukihiro

    2011-01-01

    Laser processing technologies were developed for the purpose of maintenance of FBR's heat exchanger units. Ultrashort laser processing fabricated fiber Bragg grating sensor for seismic monitoring. Fiber laser welding with a newly developed robot system repair cracks on inner wall of heat exchanger tubes. Safety operation of the heat exchanger units will be improved by the advanced laser processing technologies. These technologies are expected to be applied to the maintenance for the next generation FBRs. (author)

  11. Characterization and control of femtosecond electron and X-ray beams at free-electron lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Behrens, Christopher

    2012-11-15

    X-ray free-electron lasers (FELs) open up new frontiers in photon science, and in order to take full advantage of these unique accelerator-based light sources, the characterization and control of the femtosecond electron and X-ray beams is essential. Within this cumulative thesis, recent results achieved within the active research field of femtosecond electron and X-ray beams at FELs are reported.The basic principles of X-ray FELs are described, and concepts of longitudinal electron beam diagnostics with femtosecond accuracy are covered. Experimental results obtained with a transverse deflecting structure (TDS) and spectroscopy of coherent terahertz radiation are presented, and the suppression of coherent optical radiation effects, required for diagnostics utilizing a TDS, is demonstrated. Control of the longitudinal phase space by using multiple radio frequencies for longitudinal electron beam tailoring is presented, and a new technique of reversible electron beam heating with two TDSs is described. For the characterization of femtosecond X-ray pulses, a novel method based on dedicated longitudinal phase space diagnostics for electron beams is introduced, and recent measurements with a streaking technique using external terahertz fields are presented.

  12. Characterization and control of femtosecond electron and X-ray beams at free-electron lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Behrens, Christopher

    2012-11-01

    X-ray free-electron lasers (FELs) open up new frontiers in photon science, and in order to take full advantage of these unique accelerator-based light sources, the characterization and control of the femtosecond electron and X-ray beams is essential. Within this cumulative thesis, recent results achieved within the active research field of femtosecond electron and X-ray beams at FELs are reported.The basic principles of X-ray FELs are described, and concepts of longitudinal electron beam diagnostics with femtosecond accuracy are covered. Experimental results obtained with a transverse deflecting structure (TDS) and spectroscopy of coherent terahertz radiation are presented, and the suppression of coherent optical radiation effects, required for diagnostics utilizing a TDS, is demonstrated. Control of the longitudinal phase space by using multiple radio frequencies for longitudinal electron beam tailoring is presented, and a new technique of reversible electron beam heating with two TDSs is described. For the characterization of femtosecond X-ray pulses, a novel method based on dedicated longitudinal phase space diagnostics for electron beams is introduced, and recent measurements with a streaking technique using external terahertz fields are presented.

  13. Electrons trajectories around a bubble regime in intense laser plasma interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, Ding; Xie, Bai-Song; Ali Bake, Muhammad; Sang, Hai-Bo; Zhao, Xue-Yan; Wu, Hai-Cheng

    2013-01-01

    Some typical electrons trajectories around a bubble regime in intense laser plasma interaction are investigated theoretically. By considering a modification of the fields and ellipsoid bubble shape due to the presence of residual electrons in the bubble regime, we study in detail the electrons nonlinear dynamics with or without laser pulse. To examine the electron dynamical behaviors, a set of typical electrons, which locate initially at the front of the bubble, on the transverse edge and at the bottom of the bubble respectively, are chosen for study. It is found that the range of trapped electrons in the case with laser pulse is a little narrower than that without laser pulse. The partial phase portraits for electrons around the bubble are presented numerically and their characteristic behaviors are discussed theoretically. Implication of our results on the high quality electron beam generation is also discussed briefly

  14. Preparations for a high gradient inverse free electron laser experiment at Brookhaven national laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duris, J.; Li, R. K.; Musumeci, P.; Sakai, Y.; Threlkeld, E.; Williams, O.; Fedurin, M.; Kusche, K.; Pogorelsky, I.; Polyanskiy, M.; Yakimenko, V. [UCLA Department of Physics and Astronomy, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Accelerator Test Facility, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY, 11973 (United States)

    2012-12-21

    Preparations for an inverse free electron laser experiment at Brookhaven National Laboratory's Accelerator Test Facilty are presented. Details of the experimental setup including beam and laser transport optics are first discussed. Next, the driving laser pulse structure is investigated and initial diagnostics are explored and compared to simulations. Finally, planned improvements to the experimental setup are discussed.

  15. Three-dimensional model of small signal free-electron lasers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen Webb

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Coherent electron cooling is an ultrahigh-bandwidth form of stochastic cooling which utilizes the charge perturbation from Debye screening as a seed for a free-electron laser. The amplified and frequency-modulated signal that results from the free-electron laser process is then used to give an energy-dependent kick on the hadrons in a bunch. In this paper, we present a theoretical description of a high-gain free-electron laser with applications to a complete theoretical description of coherent electron cooling.

  16. Efficiency enhancement of a harmonic lasing free-electron laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salehi, E.; Maraghechi, B., E-mail: behrouz@aut.ac.ir [Department of Physics, Amirkabir University of Technology, 15875-4413 Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mirian, N. S. [School of Particle and Accelerator Physics, Institute for Research in Fundamental Sciences (IPM), 19395-5531 Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-03-15

    The harmonic lasing free-electron laser amplifier, in which two wigglers is employed in order for the fundamental resonance of the second wiggler to coincide with the third harmonic of the first wiggler to generate ultraviolet radiation, is studied. A set of coupled nonlinear first-order differential equations describing the nonlinear evolution of the system, for a long electron bunch, is solved numerically by CYRUS code. Solutions for the non-averaged and averaged equations are compared. Remarkable agreement is found between the averaged and non-averaged simulations for the evolution of the third harmonic. Thermal effects in the form of longitudinal velocity spread are also investigated. For efficiency enhancement, the second wiggler field is set to decrease linearly and nonlinearly at the point where the radiation of the third harmonic saturates. The optimum starting point and the slope of the tapering of the amplitude of the wiggler are found by a successive run of the code. It is found that tapering can increase the saturated power of the third harmonic considerably. In order to reduce the length of the wiggler, the prebunched electron beam is considered.

  17. Fast-electron transport in cylindrically laser-compressed matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez, F; Koenig, M; Baton, S D; Brambrink, E [Laboratoire pour l' Utilisation des Lasers Intenses, Palaiseau (France); Batani, D; Jafer, R [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universito di Milano-Bicocca (Italy); Beg, F N; Chawla, S; Higginson, D P [University of California, San Diego, La Jolla (United States); Benedetti, C [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Bologna (Italy); Dorchies, F; Fourment, C; Hulin, S [Universite de Bordeaux - CNRS - CEA, Centre Lasers Intenses et Applications, Talence, F-33405 (France); Galimberti, M; Heathcote, R; Lancaster, K [Central Laser Facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Didcot (United Kingdom); Gizzi, L A; Koester, P; Labate, L [LIL-IPCF, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, PISA (Italy); MacKinnon, A J [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (United States)

    2009-12-15

    Experimental and theoretical results of relativistic electron transport in cylindrically compressed matter are presented. This experiment, which is a part of the HiPER roadmap, was achieved on the VULCAN laser facility (UK) using four long pulses beams ({approx}4 x 50 J, 1 ns, at 0.53{mu}m) to compress a hollow plastic cylinder filled with plastic foam of three different densities (0.1, 0.3 and 1 g cm{sup -3}). 2D simulations predict a density of 2-5 g cm{sup -3} and a plasma temperature up to 100 eV at maximum compression. A short pulse (10 ps, 160 J) beam generated fast electrons that propagate through the compressed matter by irradiating a nickel foil at an intensity of 5 x 10{sup 18} W cm{sup -2}. X-ray spectrometer and imagers were implemented in order to estimate the compressed plasma conditions and to infer the hot electron characteristics. Results are discussed and compared with simulations.

  18. Efficiency enhancement of a harmonic lasing free-electron laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salehi, E.; Maraghechi, B.; Mirian, N. S.

    2015-01-01

    The harmonic lasing free-electron laser amplifier, in which two wigglers is employed in order for the fundamental resonance of the second wiggler to coincide with the third harmonic of the first wiggler to generate ultraviolet radiation, is studied. A set of coupled nonlinear first-order differential equations describing the nonlinear evolution of the system, for a long electron bunch, is solved numerically by CYRUS code. Solutions for the non-averaged and averaged equations are compared. Remarkable agreement is found between the averaged and non-averaged simulations for the evolution of the third harmonic. Thermal effects in the form of longitudinal velocity spread are also investigated. For efficiency enhancement, the second wiggler field is set to decrease linearly and nonlinearly at the point where the radiation of the third harmonic saturates. The optimum starting point and the slope of the tapering of the amplitude of the wiggler are found by a successive run of the code. It is found that tapering can increase the saturated power of the third harmonic considerably. In order to reduce the length of the wiggler, the prebunched electron beam is considered

  19. Efficiency enhancement of a harmonic lasing free-electron laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salehi, E.; Maraghechi, B.; Mirian, N. S.

    2015-03-01

    The harmonic lasing free-electron laser amplifier, in which two wigglers is employed in order for the fundamental resonance of the second wiggler to coincide with the third harmonic of the first wiggler to generate ultraviolet radiation, is studied. A set of coupled nonlinear first-order differential equations describing the nonlinear evolution of the system, for a long electron bunch, is solved numerically by CYRUS code. Solutions for the non-averaged and averaged equations are compared. Remarkable agreement is found between the averaged and non-averaged simulations for the evolution of the third harmonic. Thermal effects in the form of longitudinal velocity spread are also investigated. For efficiency enhancement, the second wiggler field is set to decrease linearly and nonlinearly at the point where the radiation of the third harmonic saturates. The optimum starting point and the slope of the tapering of the amplitude of the wiggler are found by a successive run of the code. It is found that tapering can increase the saturated power of the third harmonic considerably. In order to reduce the length of the wiggler, the prebunched electron beam is considered.

  20. Technology of discharge and laser resonators for high power CO2 lasers. Koshutsuryoku CO2 laser ni tsukawareru hoden reiki laser kyoshinki gijutsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takenaka, Y.; Kuzumoto, M. (Mitsubishi Electric Corp., Tokyo (Japan))

    1994-03-20

    This paper describes discharge excitation technology and resonator technology as basic technologies for high power CO2 lasers. As a result of progress in high-frequency power element techniques, the discharge excitation technology now generally uses laser excitation using AC discharge of capacity coupling type. Its representative example is silent discharge (SD) excitation. This is a system to excite laser by applying high voltages with as high frequency as 100 kHz to 1 MHz across a pair of electrodes covered with a dielectric material. The system maintains stability in discharge even if power supply voltage amplitude is modulated, and easily provides pulse outputs. Discharge excitation for diffusion cooled type CO2 laser generates a discharge in a gap with a gap length of about 2 mm, and can perform gas cooling by means of thermal conduction of gas, whereas a compact resonator can be fabricated. A resonator for the diffusion cooled type CO2 laser eliminates gas circulation and cooling systems, hence the device can be made more compact. A report has been given that several of these compact resonators were combined, from which a laser output of 85W was obtained by using RF discharge of 2kW. 43 refs., 21 figs.

  1. Conceptual design of a laser-plasma accelerator driven free-electron laser demonstration experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seggebrock, Thorben

    2015-01-01

    Up to now, short-wavelength free-electron lasers (FEL) have been systems on the scale of hundreds of meters up to multiple kilometers. Due to the advancements in laser-plasma acceleration in the recent years, these accelerators have become a promising candidate for driving a fifth-generation synchrotron light source - a lab-scale free-electron laser. So far, demonstration experiments have been hindered by the broad energy spread typical for this type of accelerator. This thesis addresses the most important challenges of the conceptual design for a first lab-scale FEL demonstration experiment using analytical considerations as well as simulations. The broad energy spread reduces the FEL performance directly by weakening the microbunching and indirectly via chromatic emittance growth, caused by the focusing system. Both issues can be mitigated by decompressing the electron bunch in a magnetic chicane, resulting in a sorting by energies. This reduces the local energy spread as well as the local chromatic emittance growth and also lowers performance degradations caused by the short bunch length. Moreover, the energy dependent focus position leads to a focus motion within the bunch, which can be synchronized with the radiation pulse, maximizing the current density in the interaction region. This concept is termed chromatic focus matching. A comparison shows the advantages of the longitudinal decompression concept compared to the alternative approach of transverse dispersion. When using typical laser-plasma based electron bunches, coherent synchrotron radiation and space-charge contribute in equal measure to the emittance growth during decompression. It is shown that a chicane for this purpose must not be as weak and long as affordable to reduce coherent synchrotron radiation, but that an intermediate length is required. Furthermore, the interplay of the individual concepts and components is assessed in a start-to-end simulation, confirming the feasibility of the

  2. Scanning electron microscopy and ablation rates of hard dental tissue using 350-fs and 1-ns laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neev, Joseph; Huynh, Daniel S.; Dan, Claudiu C.; White, Joel M.; Da Silva, Luiz B.; Feit, Michael D.; Matthews, Dennis L.; Perry, Michael D.; Rubenchik, Alexander M.; Stuart, Brent C.

    1996-04-01

    Lasers are currently limited in their ability to remove hard tissue. Furthermore, many laser systems, such as the long pulse infrared lasers used to ablate bone or hard dental tissue, also generate unacceptable heat levels and cause collateral tissue damage. Ultrashort pulse lasers, however, are highly efficient, quiet, and relatively free of charge. With recent developments now allowing operation at high pulse repetition rates, ultrashort pulse systems can yield significant material volume removal which can potentially match or even exceed conventional technology while still maintaining the minimal collateral damage characteristics. In this paper, the interaction characteristics of two pulse regimes with enamel and dentin: 350 fs pulse ablation of hard dental tissues is compared to the interaction with one nanosecond pulses. Ablation rates were characterized and surface morphology, and structure were evaluated using a scanning electron microscope.

  3. High efficiency tapered free-electron lasers with a prebunched electron beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emma, C.; Sudar, N.; Musumeci, P.; Urbanowicz, A.; Pellegrini, C.

    2017-11-01

    In this paper we analyze the high gain, high efficiency tapered free-electron laser amplifier with a prebunched electron beam. Simple scaling laws are derived for the peak output power and extraction efficiency and verified using 1D simulations. These studies provide useful analytical expressions which highlight the benefits resulting from fine control of the initial conditions of the system, namely the initial electron beam bunching and input seed radiation. When time-dependent effects are included, the sideband instability is known to limit the radiation amplification due to particle detrapping. We discuss two different approaches to mitigate the sideband growth via 1-D time dependent simulations. We find that a more aggressive taper enabled by strong prebunching and a modulation of the resonance condition are both effective methods for suppressing the sideband instability growth rate.

  4. Electron beam halo monitor for a compact x-ray free-electron laser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideki Aoyagi

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available An electron beam halo monitor using diamond-based detectors, which are operated in the ionization mode, has been developed for the SPring-8 Angstrom compact free-electron laser (SACLA to protect its undulator magnets from radiation damage. Diamond-based detectors are inserted in a beam duct to measure the intensity of the beam halo directly. To suppress the degradation of the electron beam due to the installation of the beam halo monitor, rf fingers with aluminum windows are newly employed. We evaluated the effect of radiation from the Al windows on the output signal both experimentally and by simulation. The operational results of the beam halo monitor employed in SACLA are presented.

  5. Laser-driven electron beam and radiation sources for basic, medical and industrial sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    NAKAJIMA, Kazuhisa

    2015-01-01

    To date active research on laser-driven plasma-based accelerators have achieved great progress on production of high-energy, high-quality electron and photon beams in a compact scale. Such laser plasma accelerators have been envisaged bringing a wide range of applications in basic, medical and industrial sciences. Here inheriting the groundbreaker’s review article on “Laser Acceleration and its future” [Toshiki Tajima, (2010)],1) we would like to review recent progress of producing such electron beams due to relativistic laser-plasma interactions followed by laser wakefield acceleration and lead to the scaling formulas that are useful to design laser plasma accelerators with controllability of beam energy and charge. Lastly specific examples of such laser-driven electron/photon beam sources are illustrated. PMID:26062737

  6. Laser-driven electron beam and radiation sources for basic, medical and industrial sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, Kazuhisa

    2015-01-01

    To date active research on laser-driven plasma-based accelerators have achieved great progress on production of high-energy, high-quality electron and photon beams in a compact scale. Such laser plasma accelerators have been envisaged bringing a wide range of applications in basic, medical and industrial sciences. Here inheriting the groundbreaker's review article on "Laser Acceleration and its future" [Toshiki Tajima, (2010)],(1)) we would like to review recent progress of producing such electron beams due to relativistic laser-plasma interactions followed by laser wakefield acceleration and lead to the scaling formulas that are useful to design laser plasma accelerators with controllability of beam energy and charge. Lastly specific examples of such laser-driven electron/photon beam sources are illustrated.

  7. Industrial applications of the Jefferson Lab high-power free-electron laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In partnership with the US Navy, high-technology corporations, and research universities, Jefferson Lab is building a superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) accelerator-driven free-electron laser (FEL) and is outfitting an FEL user facility. This first fourth-generation light source - a 1 kW, 3 μm infrared (IR) laser - is the first step in a program to develop high-average-power SRF-based IR and ultraviolet (UV) FELs for multiple manufacturing applications as well as for defense-related applied research and basic scientific research. This initial FEL will be driven by a 42 MeV, 5 m A recirculating SRF linac similar to the much larger SRF linac in Jefferson Lab's 4 GeV, 200 μA Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF). The FEL is expected to demonstrate 75% energy recovery. Its linac will be cooled by the existing CEBAF cryogenic system. At Jefferson Lab, an infrastructure of facilities and people already supports the advance of SRF and closely related technologies in the furtherance of the lab's primary mission of nuclear and particle physics. This paper summarizes the opportunity represented by SRF-driven FELs and reports on the program now underway to develop them. (Copyright (c) 1998 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  8. High energy gain of trapped electrons in a tapered, diffraction-dominated inverse-free-electron laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musumeci, P; Tochitsky, S Ya; Boucher, S; Clayton, C E; Doyuran, A; England, R J; Joshi, C; Pellegrini, C; Ralph, J E; Rosenzweig, J B; Sung, C; Tolmachev, S; Travish, G; Varfolomeev, A A; Varfolomeev, A A; Yarovoi, T; Yoder, R B

    2005-04-22

    Energy gain of trapped electrons in excess of 20 MeV has been demonstrated in an inverse-free-electron-laser (IFEL) accelerator experiment. A 14.5 MeV electron beam is copropagated with a 400 GW CO2 laser beam in a 50 cm long undulator strongly tapered in period and field amplitude. The Rayleigh range of the laser, approximately 1.8 cm, is much shorter than the undulator length yielding a diffraction-dominated interaction. Experimental results on the dependence of the acceleration on injection energy, laser focus position, and laser power are discussed. Simulations, in good agreement with the experimental data, show that most of the energy gain occurs in the first half of the undulator at a gradient of 70 MeV/m and that the structure in the measured energy spectrum arises because of higher harmonic IFEL interaction in the second half of the undulator.

  9. High Energy Gain of Trapped Electrons in a Tapered, Diffraction-Dominated Inverse-Free-Electron Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musumeci, P.; Tochitsky, S. Ya.; Boucher, S.; Clayton, C. E.; Doyuran, A.; England, R. J.; Joshi, C.; Pellegrini, C.; Ralph, J. E.; Rosenzweig, J. B.; Sung, C.; Tolmachev, S.; Travish, G.; Varfolomeev, A. A.; Varfolomeev, A. A.; Yarovoi, T.; Yoder, R. B.

    2005-04-01

    Energy gain of trapped electrons in excess of 20 MeV has been demonstrated in an inverse-free-electron-laser (IFEL) accelerator experiment. A 14.5 MeV electron beam is copropagated with a 400 GW CO2 laser beam in a 50 cm long undulator strongly tapered in period and field amplitude. The Rayleigh range of the laser, ˜1.8 cm, is much shorter than the undulator length yielding a diffraction-dominated interaction. Experimental results on the dependence of the acceleration on injection energy, laser focus position, and laser power are discussed. Simulations, in good agreement with the experimental data, show that most of the energy gain occurs in the first half of the undulator at a gradient of 70 MeV/m and that the structure in the measured energy spectrum arises because of higher harmonic IFEL interaction in the second half of the undulator.

  10. Electronics in nuclear science and technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dastidar, P.R.

    1979-01-01

    Electronics plays a vital role in the field of nuclear research and industry. Nuclear instrumentation and control systems rely heavily on electronics for reliable plant operation and to ensure personnel safety from harmful radiations. Rapid developments in electronics have resulted in the gradual phasing out of pneumatic instruments and replacement by solid-state electronic systems. On-line computers are now being used extensively for centralised monitoring and control of large nuclear plants. The paper covers the following main topics: (i) radiation detection and measurement, (ii) systems for nuclear research and design, (iii) nuclear reactor control and safety systems and (iv) modern trends in reactor control and nuclear instrumentation systems. The methods for radiation detection, ionization chambers, self-powdered detectors and semiconductor detectors are discussed in brief, followed by the description of the electronic systems commonly used in nuclear research, namely the pulse height, multichannel, correlation and fourier analysers. NIM and CAMAC, the electronic system standards used in nuclear laboratories/industries are also outlined. Electronic systems used for nuclear reactor control, safety, reactor core monitoring, failed fuel detection and process control instrumentation, have been described. The application of computers to reactor control, plant data processing, better man-machine interface and the use of multiple computer systems for achieving better reliability have also been discussed. Micro-computer based instrumentation systems, computers in reactor safety and advanced nuclear instrumentation techniques are briefly illustrated. (auth.)

  11. Electron detachment from negative ions in a short laser pulse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shearer, S. F. C.; Smyth, M. C.; Gribakin, G. F.

    2011-01-01

    We present an efficient and accurate method to study electron detachment from negative ions by a few-cycle linearly polarized laser pulse. The adiabatic saddle-point method of Gribakin and Kuchiev [Phys. Rev. A 55, 3760 (1997)] is adapted to calculate the transition amplitude for a short laser pulse. Its application to a pulse with N optical cycles produces 2(N+1) saddle points in complex time, which form a characteristic 'smile.' Numerical calculations are performed for H - in a 5-cycle pulse with frequency 0.0043 a.u. and intensities of 10 10 , 5x10 10 , and 10 11 W/cm 2 , and for various carrier-envelope phases. We determine the spectrum of the photoelectrons as a function of both energy and emission angle, as well as the angle-integrated energy spectra and total detachment probabilities. Our calculations show that the dominant contribution to the transition amplitude is given by 5-6 central saddle points, which correspond to the strongest part of the pulse. We examine the dependence of the photoelectron angular distributions on the carrier-envelope phase and show that measuring such distributions can provide a way of determining this phase.

  12. Modal analysis of a seeded free-electron laser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sven Ackermann

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available It has been shown that the direct seeding can enhance the performance of a free-electron laser (FEL in terms of its spectral, temporal, and coherence properties and reduces fluctuations in FEL output energy and arrival-time jitter. The properties of the used seed photon pulse are of high importance. In this paper, we describe the influence of the M^{2} onto the achievable power contrast between the direct seeded and the unseeded FEL radiation. The results of these studies are compared with the data from the high harmonic generation direct seeding experiment “sFLASH” in Hamburg, Germany. A method to measure M^{2} from a single transverse intensity distribution of the high harmonics beam at waist is discussed.

  13. Modulated desynchronism in short pulse free-electron laser oscillators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oscar G. Calderón

    2000-09-01

    Full Text Available We present an experimental and theoretical study of the effect of desynchronism modulation on short pulse free-electron laser (FEL oscillators. We find that the output power and the micropulse length of the FEL beam oscillate periodically at the modulation frequency and that the minimum micropulse length during the cycle can be significantly shorter than that which can be obtained without modulation. For example, when the desynchronism of our FEL is modulated at 40 kHz, the minimum measured micropulse length is 300 fs. Without modulation the minimum is about 700 fs. We show that when the desynchronism is modulated, the FEL can operate for part of the cycle in the normally inaccessible portion of the output power curve where the FEL gain is less than the cavity losses. It is even possible for the FEL to operate periodically in the region of negative desynchronism where gain, as normally defined, does not exist.

  14. Recent developments in electron beam machine technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadat, T.; Ross, A.; Leveziel, H.

    1994-01-01

    Electron beam accelerator provides ionisation energy for industrial processing. Electron beam accelerators are increasingly used for decontamination, conservation and disinfestation of food, for sterilization of medical products, and for polymerisation of materials. These machines are easy to install into a production factory as the radiation stops as soon as the machine is switched off. This safety advantage, together with the flexibility of use of these highly automated machines, has allowed the electron beam accelerator to become an important production tool. (author). 23 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs

  15. Red Shift and Broadening of Backward Harmonic Radiation from Electron Oscillations Driven by Femtosecond Laser Pulse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tian Youwei; Yu Wei; Lu Peixiang; Senecha, Vinod K; Han, Xu; Deng Degang; Li Ruxin; Xu Zhizhan

    2006-01-01

    The characteristics of backward harmonic radiation due to electron oscillations driven by a linearly polarized fs laser pulse are analysed considering a single electron model. The spectral distributions of the electron's backward harmonic radiation are investigated in detail for different parameters of the driver laser pulse. Higher order harmonic radiations are possible for a sufficiently intense driving laser pulse. We have shown that for a realistic pulsed photon beam, the spectrum of the radiation is red shifted as well as broadened because of changes in the longitudinal velocity of the electrons during the laser pulse. These effects are more pronounced at higher laser intensities giving rise to higher order harmonics that eventually leads to a continuous spectrum. Numerical simulations have further shown that by increasing the laser pulse width the broadening of the high harmonic radiations can be controlled

  16. Generation of Homogeneous and Patterned Electron Beams using a Microlens Array Laser-Shaping Technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halavanau, Aliaksei [NICADD, DeKalb; Edstrom, Dean [Fermilab; Gai, Wei [Argonne, HEP; Ha, Gwanghui [Argonne, HEP; Piot, Philippe [NICADD, DeKalb; Power, John [Argonne, HEP; Qiang, Gao [Unlisted, CN; Ruan, Jinhao [Fermilab; Santucci, James [Fermilab; Wisniewski, Eric [Argonne, HEP

    2016-06-01

    In photocathodes the achievable electron-beam parameters are controlled by the laser used to trigger the photoemission process. Non-ideal laser distribution hampers the final beam quality. Laser inhomogeneities, for instance, can be "amplified" by space-charge force and result in fragmented electron beams. To overcome this limitation laser shaping methods are routinely employed. In the present paper we demonstrate the use of simple microlens arrays to dramatically improve the transverse uniformity. We also show that this arrangement can be used to produce transversely-patterned electron beams. Our experiments are carried out at the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator facility.

  17. Enhanced acceleration of injected electrons in a laser-beat-wave-induced plasma channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tochitsky, S Ya; Narang, R; Filip, C V; Musumeci, P; Clayton, C E; Yoder, R B; Marsh, K A; Rosenzweig, J B; Pellegrini, C; Joshi, C

    2004-03-05

    Enhanced energy gain of externally injected electrons by a approximately 3 cm long, high-gradient relativistic plasma wave (RPW) is demonstrated. Using a CO2 laser beat wave of duration longer than the ion motion time across the laser spot size, a laser self-guiding process is initiated in a plasma channel. Guiding compensates for ionization-induced defocusing (IID) creating a longer plasma, which extends the interaction length between electrons and the RPW. In contrast to a maximum energy gain of 10 MeV when IID is dominant, the electrons gain up to 38 MeV energy in a laser-beat-wave-induced plasma channel.

  18. Technology and application of two sets of industrial electron accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hua Degen

    2000-01-01

    The radiation industry in China Academy of Engineering Physics (CAEP) has had a big scale, and the two sets of industrial electron accelerators play important roles. The Electron Processing System (E.P.S), which was introduced in 1987, is a powerful electron accelerator. And the 10 MeV Accelerator, which is a traveling wave linear electron accelerator, has the higher electron energy. Both of the stes are equipped the driving devices under the beam, and has made a considerable economic results. This article describes the technology and application of the two electron accelerators. (author)

  19. Preparatory procedure and equipment for the European x-ray free electron laser cavity implementation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Reschke

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The European x-ray free electron laser is under construction at Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY. The electron beam energy of up to 17.5 GeV will be achieved by using superconducting accelerator technology. Final prototyping, industrialization, and new infrastructure are the actual challenges with respect to the accelerating cavities. This paper describes the preparation strategy optimized for the cavity preparation procedure in industry. For the industrial fabrication and preparation, several new hardware components have been already developed at DESY. The design and construction of a semiautomated rf-measurement machine for dumbbells and end groups are described. In a collaboration among FNAL, KEK, and DESY, an automatic cavity tuning machine has been designed and four machines are under construction. The functionality of these machines with special attention to safety aspects is described in this paper. A new high pressure rinsing system has been developed and is operational.

  20. High gain 10.6-micron free-electron laser amplifier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, J.L.; Chambers, F.W.; Chong, Y.P.; Edighoffer, J.A.; Orzechowski, T.J.; Prosnitz, D.; Scharlemann, E.T.; Halbach, K.

    1988-01-01

    A 10.6-micron wavelength free-electron laser (FEL) amplifier has been operated using a 45-MeV, 600-A electron beam from the Advanced Test Accelerator (ATA) and a 15.36-meter long electromagnetic wiggler. The peak small signal power gain was 27 dB(500). Gain guiding was observed to confine the amplified laser beam

  1. Relativistic electron kinetic effects on laser diagnostics in burning plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirnov, V. V.; Den Hartog, D. J.

    2018-02-01

    Toroidal interferometry/polarimetry (TIP), poloidal polarimetry (PoPola), and Thomson scattering systems (TS) are major optical diagnostics being designed and developed for ITER. Each of them relies upon a sophisticated quantitative understanding of the electron response to laser light propagating through a burning plasma. Review of the theoretical results for two different applications is presented: interferometry/polarimetry (I/P) and polarization of Thomson scattered light, unified by the importance of relativistic (quadratic in vTe/c) electron kinetic effects. For I/P applications, rigorous analytical results are obtained perturbatively by expansion in powers of the small parameter τ = Te/me c2, where Te is electron temperature and me is electron rest mass. Experimental validation of the analytical models has been made by analyzing data of more than 1200 pulses collected from high-Te JET discharges. Based on this validation the relativistic analytical expressions are included in the error analysis and design projects of the ITER TIP and PoPola systems. The polarization properties of incoherent Thomson scattered light are being examined as a method of Te measurement relevant to ITER operational regimes. The theory is based on Stokes vector transformation and Mueller matrices formalism. The general approach is subdivided into frequency-integrated and frequency-resolved cases. For each of them, the exact analytical relativistic solutions are presented in the form of Mueller matrix elements averaged over the relativistic Maxwellian distribution function. New results related to the detailed verification of the frequency-resolved solutions are reported. The precise analytic expressions provide output much more rapidly than relativistic kinetic numerical codes allowing for direct real-time feedback control of ITER device operation.

  2. Electron transport phenomena and dense plasmas produced by ultra-short pulse laser interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    More, R.M.

    1994-01-01

    Recent experiments with femtosecond lasers provide a test bed for theoretical ideas about electron processes in hot dense plasmas. We briefly review aspects of electron conduction theory likely to prove relevant to femtosecond laser absorption. We show that the Mott-Ioffe-Regel limit implies a maximum inverse bremsstrahlung absorption of about 50% at temperatures near the Fermi temperature. We also propose that sheath inverse bremsstrahlung leads to a minimum absorption of 7-10% at high laser intensity

  3. Simulation of laser-Compton cooling of electron beams for future linear colliders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Ohgaki

    2001-11-01

    Full Text Available We study a method of laser-Compton cooling of electron beams for future linear colliders. Using a Monte Carlo code, we evaluate the effects of the laser-electron interaction for transverse cooling. The optics with and without chromatic correction for the cooling are examined. The laser-Compton cooling for Japan Linear Collider/Next Linear Collider at E_{0}=2 GeV is considered.

  4. Modern laser technologies used for cutting textile materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isarie, Claudiu; Dragan, Anca; Isarie, Laura; Nastase, Dan

    2006-02-01

    With modern laser technologies we can cut multiple layers at once, yielding high production levels and short setup times between cutting runs. One example could be the operation of cutting the material named Nylon 66, used to manufacture automobile airbags. With laser, up to seven layers of Nylon 66 can be cut in one pass, that means high production rates on a single machine. Airbags must be precisely crafted piece of critical safety equipment that is built to very high levels of precision in a mass production environment. Of course, synthetic material, used for airbags, can be cut also by a conventional fixed blade system, but for a high production rates and a long term low-maintenance, laser cutting is most suitable. Most systems, are equipped with two material handling systems, which can cut on one half of he table while the finished product is being removed from the other half and the new stock material laid out. The laser system is reliable and adaptable to any flatbed-cutting task. Computer controlled industrial cutting and plotting machines are the latest offerings from a well established and experienced industrial engineering company that is dedicated to reduce cutting costs and boosting productivity in today's competitive industrial machine tool market. In this way, just one machine can carry out a multitude of production tasks. Authors have studied the cutting parameters for different textile materials, to reach the maximum output of the process.

  5. Measurement of the electron quenching rate in an electron beam pumped KrF* laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishioka, Hajime; Kurashima, Toshio; Kuranishi, Hideaki; Ueda, Kenichi; Takuma, Hiroshi; Sasaki, Akira; Kasuya, Koichi.

    1988-01-01

    The electron quenching rate of KrF * in an electron beam pumped laser has been studied by accurately measuring the saturation intensity in a mixture of Ar/Kr/F 2 = 94/6/0.284. The input intensity of the measurements was widely varied from 100 W cm -2 (small signal region) to 100 MW cm -2 (absorption dominant region) in order to separate laser parameters which are small signal gain coefficient, absorption coefficient, and saturation intensity from the measured net gain coefficients. The gas pressure and the pump rate were varied in the range of 0.5 to 2.5 atm and 0.3 to 1.4 MW cm -3 , respectively. The electron quenching rate constant of 4.5 x 10 -7 cm 3 s -1 was obtained from the pressure and the pump rate dependence of the KrF * saturation intensity with the temperature dependence of the rate gas 3-body quenching rate as a function of gas temperature to the -3rd power. The small signal gain coefficients calculated with the determined quenching rate constants shows excellent agreement with the measurements. (author)

  6. Measurement of the electron quenching rate in an electron beam pumped KrF/sup */ laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishioka, Hajime; Kurashima, Toshio; Kuranishi, Hideaki; Ueda, Kenichi; Takuma, Hiroshi; Sasaki, Akira; Kasuya, Koichi.

    1988-09-01

    The electron quenching rate of KrF/sup */ in an electron beam pumped laser has been studied by accurately measuring the saturation intensity in a mixture of Ar/Kr/F/sub 2/ = 94/6/0.284. The input intensity of the measurements was widely varied from 100 W cm/sup -2/ (small signal region) to 100 MW cm/sup -2/ (absorption dominant region) in order to separate laser parameters which are small signal gain coefficient, absorption coefficient, and saturation intensity from the measured net gain coefficients. The gas pressure and the pump rate were varied in the range of 0.5 to 2.5 atm and 0.3 to 1.4 MW cm/sup -3/, respectively. The electron quenching rate constant of 4.5 x 10/sup -7/ cm/sup 3/s/sup -1/ was obtained from the pressure and the pump rate dependence of the KrF/sup */ saturation intensity with the temperature dependence of the rate gas 3-body quenching rate as a function of gas temperature to the -3rd power. The small signal gain coefficients calculated with the determined quenching rate constants shows excellent agreement with the measurements.

  7. R&D for a Soft X-Ray Free Electron Laser Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corlett, John; Attwood, David; Byrd, John; Denes, Peter; Falcone, Roger; Heimann, Phil; Leemans, Wim; Padmore, Howard; Prestemon, Soren; Sannibale, Fernando; Schlueter, Ross; Schroeder, Carl; Staples, John; Venturini, Marco; Warwick, Tony; Wells, Russell; Wilcox, Russell; Zholent, Alexander; Adolphsen, Chris; Arthur, John; Bergmann, Uwe; Cai, Yunhai; Colby, Eric; Dowell, David; Emma, Paul; Fox, John; Frisch, Josef; Galayda, John; Hettel, Robert; Huang, Zhirong; Phinney, Nan; Rabedeau, Tom; Raubenheimer, Tor; Reis, David; Schmerge, John; Stohr, Joachim; Stupakov, Gennady; White, Bill; Xiang, Dao

    2009-06-08

    Several recent reports have identified the scientific requirements for a future soft x-ray light source, and a high-repetition-rate free-electron laser (FEL) facility that is responsive to these requirements is now on the horizon. R&D in some critical areas is needed, however, to demonstrate technical performance, thus reducing technical risks and construction costs. Such a facility most likely will be based on a CW superconducting linear accelerator with beam supplied by a high-brightness, high-repetition-rate photocathode electron gun operating in CW mode, and on an array of FELs to which the accelerated beam is distributed, each operating at high repetition rate and with even pulse spacing. Dependent on experimental requirements, the individual FELs can be configured for either self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE), seeded, or oscillator mode of operation, including the use of high-gain harmonic generation (HGHG), echo-enhanced harmonic generation (EEHG), harmonic cascade, or other configurations. In this White Paper we identify the overall accelerator R&D needs, and highlight the most important pre-construction R&D tasks required to value-engineer the design configuration and deliverables for such a facility. In Section 1.4 we identify the comprehensive R&D ultimately needed. We identify below the highest-priority requirements for understanding machine performance and reduce risk and costs at this pre-conceptual design stage. Details of implementing the required tasks will be the subject of future evaluation. Our highest-priority R&D program is the injector, which must be capable of delivering a beam with bunches up to a nanocoulomb at MHz repetition rate and with normalized emittance {le} 1 mm {center_dot} mrad. This will require integrated accelerating structure, cathode, and laser systems development. Cathode materials will impact the choice of laser technology in wavelength and energy per pulse, as well as vacuum requirements in the accelerating

  8. R and D for a Soft X-Ray Free Electron Laser Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corlett, John; Attwood, David; Byrd, John; Denes, Peter; Falcone, Roger; Heimann, Phil; Leemans, Wim; Padmore, Howard; Prestemon, Soren; Sannibale, Fernando; Schlueter, Ross; Schroeder, Carl; Staples, John; Venturini, Marco; Warwick, Tony; Wells, Russell; Wilcox, Russell; Zholent, Alexander; Adolphsen, Chris; Arthur, John; Bergmann, Uwe; Cai, Yunhai; Colby, Eric; Dowell, David; Emma, Paul; Fox, John; Frisch, Josef; Galayda, John; Hettel, Robert; Huang, Zhirong; Phinney, Nan; Rabedeau, Tom; Raubenheimer, Tor; Reis, David; Schmerge, John; Stoehr, Joachim; Stupakov, Gennady; White, Bill; Xiang, Dao

    2009-01-01

    Several recent reports have identified the scientific requirements for a future soft x-ray light source, and a high-repetition-rate free-electron laser (FEL) facility that is responsive to these requirements is now on the horizon. R and D in some critical areas is needed, however, to demonstrate technical performance, thus reducing technical risks and construction costs. Such a facility most likely will be based on a CW superconducting linear accelerator with beam supplied by a high-brightness, high-repetition-rate photocathode electron gun operating in CW mode, and on an array of FELs to which the accelerated beam is distributed, each operating at high repetition rate and with even pulse spacing. Dependent on experimental requirements, the individual FELs can be configured for either self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE), seeded, or oscillator mode of operation, including the use of high-gain harmonic generation (HGHG), echo-enhanced harmonic generation (EEHG), harmonic cascade, or other configurations. In this White Paper we identify the overall accelerator R and D needs, and highlight the most important pre-construction R and D tasks required to value-engineer the design configuration and deliverables for such a facility. In Section 1.4 we identify the comprehensive R and D ultimately needed. We identify below the highest-priority requirements for understanding machine performance and reduce risk and costs at this pre-conceptual design stage. Details of implementing the required tasks will be the subject of future evaluation. Our highest-priority R and D program is the injector, which must be capable of delivering a beam with bunches up to a nanocoulomb at MHz repetition rate and with normalized emittance (le) 1 mm · mrad. This will require integrated accelerating structure, cathode, and laser systems development. Cathode materials will impact the choice of laser technology in wavelength and energy per pulse, as well as vacuum requirements in the

  9. Electron beam properties and impedance characterization for storage rings used for free electron lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dattoli, G.; Mezi, L.; Renieri, A. [ENEA, Divisione Fisica Applicata, Centro Ricerche Frascati, Frascati, RM (Italy); Migliorati, M. [Rome Univ. La Sapienza, Rome (Italy). Dipt. di Energetica; Couprie, M.E.; Garzella, D.; Nutarelli, D.; Thomas, C.; De Ninno, G. [Service de Photons, Atomes et Molecules DSM/DRECAM, Gif Sur Yvette (France); Walker, R. [Sincrotrone, Basorizza, TS (Italy)

    2000-07-01

    Good electron beam qualities and stability are the crucial features of Storage Rings dedicated to synchrotron radiation sources or to Free Electron Laser. Most of these characteristics depends on the coupling of the e-beam with the machine environment, which can be in turn modelled in terms of a characteristic impedance, whose absolute value and structure can be used to specify both the stability (longitudinal and transverse) of the beam and its qualities (energy spread, bunch length, peak current ...). In this paper are considered two specific examples of Storage Rings used for FEL operation and analyze their performances by means of semi analytical and numerical methods. The analysis is aimed at clarifying the dependence of beam energy spread and bunch length on beam current and at providing a set of parameters useful for the optimization of Free Electron Laser or synchrotron radiation sources. [Italian] La qualita' di fascio di un anello di accumulazione e la sua stabilita' sono le caratteristiche cruciali di un anello di accumulazione dedicato a sorgenti di Luce di Sincrotrone o al Laser ad Elettroni Liberi. La gran parte di tali caratteristiche dipende dall'accoppiamento del fascio di elettroni con la macchina stessa, tale accoppiamento puo' essere descritto in termini di una impedenza caratteristica, il cui valore assoluto e struttura possono essere utilizzati per specificarne sia la stabilita' del fascio (longitudinale e trasversale) e le sue qualita' (dispersione di energia, lunghezza del pacchetto, corrente di picco ...). In questo articolo si considerano due esempi specifici di anelli di accumulazione utilizzati per l'operazione Laser ed Elettroni Liberi e si analizzano le loro caratteristiche per mezzo di metodi semianalitici e numerici. L'analisi e' essenzialmente dedicata a chiarire la dipendenza della dispersione di energia e della lunghezza del pacchetto dalla corrente media e a fornire un insieme di

  10. Laser based analysis using a passively Q-switched laser employing analysis electronics and a means for detecting atomic optical emission of the laser media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodruff, Steven D.; Mcintyre, Dustin L.

    2016-03-29

    A device for Laser based Analysis using a Passively Q-Switched Laser comprising an optical pumping source optically connected to a laser media. The laser media and a Q-switch are positioned between and optically connected to a high reflectivity mirror (HR) and an output coupler (OC) along an optical axis. The output coupler (OC) is optically connected to the output lens along the optical axis. A means for detecting atomic optical emission comprises a filter and a light detector. The optical filter is optically connected to the laser media and the optical detector. A control system is connected to the optical detector and the analysis electronics. The analysis electronics are optically connected to the output lens. The detection of the large scale laser output production triggers the control system to initiate the precise timing and data collection from the detector and analysis.

  11. Transmission of large amounts of scientific data using laser technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaev, E. A.; Tarasov, P. A.

    2016-08-01

    Currently, the volume of figures generated by different research scientific projects (the Large Hadron Collider (Large Hadron Collider, LHC), The Square Kilometre Array (SKA)), can reach tens of petabytes per day. The only technical solution that allows you to transfer such large amounts of scientific data to the places of their processing is the transfer of information by means of laser technology, using different propagation environment. This article discusses the possibility of data transmission via fiber-optic networks, data transmission using the modulation binary stream of light source by a special LED light source, the neccessity to apply laser technologies for deep space communications, the principle for an unlimited expansion of the capacity of laser data link. Also in this study is shown the need for a substantial increase in data transfer speed via a pre-existing communication networks and via the construction of new channels of communication that will cope with the transfer of very large scale data volumes, taking into account the projected rate of growth.

  12. Laser-plasma based electron acceleration studies planned at CAT, Indore

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naik, P.A.; Gupta, P.D.

    2005-01-01

    The Laser Plasma Division at the Centre for Advanced Technology is engaged in a variety of R and D activities on laser-plasma interaction with special emphasis on laser-matter interaction at ultra-high intensities. An important aspect of our future work is studies in laser-plasma based acceleration using an elaborate infrastructural set-up of ultra-fast laser and plasma diagnostic systems and recently acquired 10 TW, 50 fs Ti: Sapphire laser system. This paper presents outline of the planned studies in this field. (author)

  13. PRODUCTION OF PROTOTYPE PARTS USING DIRECT METAL LASER SINTERING TECHNOLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josef Sedlak

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Unconventional methods of modern materials preparation include additive technologies which involve the sintering of powders of different chemical composition, granularity, physical, chemical and other utility properties. The technology called Rapid Prototyping, which uses different technological principles of producing components, belongs to this type of material preparation. The Rapid Prototyping technology facilities use photopolymers, thermoplastics, specially treated paper or metal powders. The advantage is the direct production of metal parts from input data and the fact that there is no need for the production of special tools (moulds, press tools, etc.. Unused powder from sintering technologies is re-used for production 98% of the time, which means that the process is economical, as well as ecological.The present paper discusses the technology of Direct Metal Laser Sintering (DMLS, which falls into the group of additive technologies of Rapid Prototyping (RP. The major objective is a detailed description of DMLS, pointing out the benefits it offers and its application in practice. The practical part describes the production and provides an economic comparison of several prototype parts that were designed for testing in the automotive industry.

  14. Electron diffraction using ultrafast electron bunches from a laser-wakefield accelerator at kHz repetition rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Z.-H.; Thomas, A. G. R.; Beaurepaire, B.; Nees, J. A.; Hou, B.; Malka, V.; Krushelnick, K.; Faure, J.

    2013-02-01

    We show that electron bunches in the 50-100 keV range can be produced from a laser wakefield accelerator using 10 mJ, 35 fs laser pulses operating at 0.5 kHz. It is shown that using a solenoid magnetic lens, the electron bunch distribution can be shaped. The resulting transverse and longitudinal coherence is suitable for producing diffraction images from a polycrystalline 10 nm aluminum foil. The high repetition rate, the stability of the electron source, and the fact that its uncorrelated bunch duration is below 100 fs make this approach promising for the development of sub-100 fs ultrafast electron diffraction experiments.

  15. Determination of molecular parameters by electron collisions and laser techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colon, C.

    1989-01-01

    In this work a general procedure to study diatomic molecules in intermediate coupling scheme has been developed. This study allows to obtain expressions to calculate molecular line strengths and rotational transition intensities. These results are used in a numerical program to synthetize vibrational and rotational band spectra of any diatomic molecule. With this technique the experimental spectra of the first negative system of N 2 + and the fist positive system of N 2 are reproduced theoretically and it is possible to deduce its electronic transition moments values by comparison. Also the method has been applied to compare the synthetized bands with the experimental spectra of the B O u + -- x 1 Σ g + system of Au 2 and the A 2 Σ--- x 2 π system of OH. From these comparison band intensities and electronic moments can be deduced. The branching ratio method to measure the relative spectral response in the 1100-1560 A o =wavelength range of a vacuum uv monochromator has been used. Relative intensity of rotational lines with origine in a common upper vibrational-rotational level of Warner and Lyman systems of H 2 , have been measured. Also in this work, the deexcitation of the B 3 π + (0 + u ), v'=14 level of I 2 after pulsed laser excitation has been studied. The quenching cross sections by collisions with I 2 , H 2 , CO 2 and CH 4 have been determin-ed. (Author)

  16. Free electron laser experiments using a long pulse induction linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pasour, J.A.; Lucey, R.

    1983-01-01

    The NRL Long Pulse Induction Linac is being employed in a Free Electron Laser (FEL) experiment. The authors present results of beam transport and focusing experiments as well as measurements of the output radiation generated by various magnetic wigglers. The electron gun of the accelerator presently has a 17-cmdiam. cold cathode which is located in a nearly zero magnetic field (B /SUB z/ less than or equal to 5 G). The gun voltage is flat to within approx. = + or - 5% for 1.5 μsec with this graphite brush cathode. The beam is focused by a series of solenoidal coils as it propagates through the 4-m-long accelerator. 2 A solenoidal field which can be varied from 1-10 kG confines the beam in the FEL interaction region. Previous experiments were limited by poor beam transport, focusing, and matching into the relatively large solenoidal field in the FEL region. By smoothing the axial magnetic field profile in the accelerator and making a more adiabatic transition from the low field in the accelerator to the high field in the FEL, beam transport into the wiggler has been substantially improved. Currently, a 700 kV beam with I > 500 A and r /SUB b/ < 0.75 cm is transported through the FEL region. Beam transport is in qualitative agreement with envelope code calculations

  17. Solid state laser technology for inertial confinement fusion: A collection of articles from ''Energy and Technology Review''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-06-01

    This paper contains reprinted articles that record several milestones in laser research at LLNL. ''Neodymium-Glass Laser Research and Development at LLNL'' recounts the history of the Laser Program and our work on neodymium-glass lasers. ''Nova Laser Technology'' describes the capabilities of the Nova laser and some of its uses. ''Building Nova: Industry Relations and Technology Transfer'' illustrates the Laboratory's commitment to work with US industry in technology development. ''Managing the Nova Laser Project'' details the organization and close monitoring of costs and schedules during the construction of the Nova laser facility. The article ''Optical Coatings by the Sol-Gel Process,'' describes our chemical process for making the damage-resistant, antireflective silica coatings used on the Nova laser glass. The technical challenges in designing and fabricating the KDP crystal arrays used to convert the light wave frequency of the Nova lasers are reported in ''Frequency Conversion of the Nova Laser.'' Two articles, ''Eliminating Platinum Inclusions in Laser Glass'' and ''Detecting Microscopic Inclusions in Optical Glass,'' describe how we dealt with the problem of damaging metal inclusions in the Nova laser glass. The last article reprinted here, ''Auxilliary Target Chamber for Nova,'' discusses the diversion of two of Nova's ten beamlines into a secondary chamber for the purpose of increasing our capacity for experimentation

  18. Technologies and Capabilities in: Communications, Electronics and IT (Information Technologies)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1998-01-01

    ... and has offices in several international cities, including Brussels and Moscow. DERA is composed of hundreds of specialist teams, each of which is an expert in its particular technology or facility...

  19. Cold cathode electron guns in the LASL high power short-pulse CO2 laser program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singer, S.; Ladish, J.S.; Nutter, M.J.

    1975-01-01

    The Electron Beam Controlled Discharge CO 2 Laser is now firmly established as the only high power short pulse laser amplifier that has been demonstrated to have scaling capabilities to large apertures and energies much greater than 100 J. These devices require a beam of energetic electrons to control the gas discharge that produces the required population inversion. Until recently, the electron source was usually a thermionic emitter, even for rather large lasers, whose heater requirements dwarfed the pulsed energies associated with the transient operation of the laser. With the advent of reliable cold-cathode electron guns, the operation of these lasers has been greatly simplified. At LASL, there are four electron beam controlled laser systems which are in operation, under construction, or in design: the 1 kJ system, now operational; the 2.5 kJ system; the 10 kJ system; and the 100 kJ system. Only the first uses thermionic-emitter electron guns; the remainder use or will use cold cathode sources. The operation of the 200 x 35 cm 2 two sided cold cathode electron gun used in the 2.5 kJ laser system and to be used in the 10 kJ laser is described

  20. SSC dipole magnet measurement and alignment using laser technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lipski, A.; Carson, J.A.; Robotham, W.F.

    1990-06-01

    Advancing into the prototype production stage of the SSC dipole magnets has introduced the need for a reliable, readily available, accurate alignment measuring system which gives results in real time. Components and subassemblies such as the cold mass and vacuum vessel are being measured for various geometric conditions such as straightness and twist. Variations from nominal dimensions are also being recorded so they can be compensated for during the final assembly process. Precision laser alignment takes specific advantages of the greatest accuracy. When combined with an optically produced perpendicular plane, this results in a system of geometric references of unparalleled accuracy. This paper describes the geometric requirements for SSC dipole magnet components, sub and final assemblies as well as the use of laser technology for surveying as part of the assembly process

  1. Development of terahertz laser diagnostics for electron density measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawahata, K.; Akiyama, T.; Tanaka, K.; Nakayama, K.; Okajima, S.

    2008-01-01

    A two color laser interferometer using terahertz laser sources is under development for high performance operation on the large helical device and for future burning plasma experiments such as ITER. Through investigation of terahertz laser sources, we have achieved high power simultaneous oscillations at 57.2 and 47.6 μm of a CH 3 OD laser pumped by a cw 9R(8) CO 2 laser line. The laser wavelength around 50 μm is the optimum value for future fusion devices from the consideration of the beam refraction effect and signal-to-noise ratio for an expected phase shift due to plasma. In this article, recent progress of the terahertz laser diagnostics, especially in mechanical vibration compensation by using a two color laser operation and terahertz laser beam transmission through a dielectric waveguide, will be presented.

  2. Status of the visible Free-Electron Laser at the Brookhaven Accelerator Test Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batchelor, K.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Fernow, R.C.; Fisher, A.S.; Friedman, A.; Gallardo, J.; Ingold, G.; Kirk, H.; Kramer, S.; Lin, L.; Rogers, J.T.; Sheehan, J.F.; van Steenbergen, A.; Woodle, M.; Xie, J.; Yu, L.H.; Zhang, R.; Bhowmik, A.

    1991-01-01

    The 500 nm Free-Electron Laser (ATF) of the Brookhaven National Laboratory is reviewed. We present an overview of the ATF, a high-brightness, 50-MeV, electron accelerator and laser complex which is a users' facility for accelerator and beam physics. A number of laser acceleration and FEL experiments are under construction at the ATF. The visible FEL experiment is based on a novel superferric 8.8 mm period undulator. The electron beam parameters, the undulator, the optical resonator, optical and electron beam diagnostics are discussed. The operational status of the experiment is presented. 22 refs., 7 figs

  3. Energy modulation of nonrelativistic electrons with a CO2 laser using a metal microslit

    OpenAIRE

    Jongsuck, Bae; Ryo, Ishikawa; Sumio, Okuyama; Takashi, Miyajima; Taiji, Akizuki; Tatsuya, Okamoto; Koji, Mizuno

    2000-01-01

    A metal microslit has been used as an interaction circuit between a CO2 laser beam and nonrelativistic free electrons. Evanescent waves which are induced on the slit by illumination of the laser light modulate the energy of electrons passing close to the surface of the slit. The electron-energy change of more than ±5 eV for the 80 keV electron beam has been observed using the 7 kW laser beam at the wavelength of 10.6 μm.

  4. Energy modulation of nonrelativistic electrons with a CO2 laser using a metal microslit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Jongsuck; Ishikawa, Ryo; Okuyama, Sumio; Miyajima, Takashi; Akizuki, Taiji; Okamoto, Tatsuya; Mizuno, Koji

    2000-04-01

    A metal microslit has been used as an interaction circuit between a CO2 laser beam and nonrelativistic free electrons. Evanescent waves which are induced on the slit by illumination of the laser light modulate the energy of electrons passing close to the surface of the slit. The electron-energy change of more than ±5 eV for the 80 keV electron beam has been observed using the 7 kW laser beam at the wavelength of 10.6 μm.

  5. Laser Induced Forward Transfer of High Viscosity Silver Paste for New Metallization Methods in Photovoltaic and Flexible Electronics Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Y.; Munoz-Martin, D.; Morales, M.; Molpeceres, C.; Sánchez-Cortezon, E.; Murillo-Gutierrez, J.

    Laser Induced Forward Transfer (LIFT) has been studied in the past as a promising approach for precise metallization in electronics using metallic inks and pastes. In this work we present large area metallization using LIFT of fully commercial silver-based pastes initially designed for solar cell screen-printing. We discuss the mechanisms for the material transfer both in ns and ps regimes of irradiation of these high viscosity materials, and the potential use of this technique in the photovoltaic industry (both in standard c-Si solar cells and thin film technologies) and flexible electronics devices. In particular we summarize the results of our group in this field, demonstrating that our approach is capable of improving the aspect ratio of the standard metallization patterns achieved with screen-printing technologies in those technological fields and, in addition, of fulfilling the requirements imposed by the mechanical properties of the substrates in flexible electronic applications.

  6. High efficiency, multiterawatt x-ray free electron lasers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Emma

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we present undulator magnet tapering methods for obtaining high efficiency and multiterawatt peak powers in x-ray free electron lasers (XFELs, a key requirement for enabling 3D atomic resolution single molecule imaging and nonlinear x-ray science. The peak power and efficiency of tapered XFELs is sensitive to time dependent effects, like synchrotron sideband growth. To analyze this dependence in detail we perform a comparative numerical optimization for the undulator magnetic field tapering profile including and intentionally disabling these effects. We show that the solution for the magnetic field taper profile obtained from time independent optimization does not yield the highest extraction efficiency when time dependent effects are included. Our comparative optimization is performed for a novel undulator designed specifically to obtain TW power x-ray pulses in the shortest distance: superconducting, helical, with short period and built-in strong focusing. This design reduces the length of the breaks between modules, decreasing diffraction effects, and allows using a stronger transverse electron focusing. Both effects reduce the gain length and the overall undulator length. We determine that after a fully time dependent optimization of a 100 m long Linac coherent light source-like XFEL we can obtain a maximum efficiency of 7%, corresponding to 3.7 TW peak radiation power. Possible methods to suppress the synchrotron sidebands, and further enhance the FEL peak power, up to about 6 TW by increasing the seed power and reducing the electron beam energy spread, are also discussed.

  7. Special issue on frontiers of free electron laser science Special issue on frontiers of free electron laser science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucksbaum, Philip; Möller, Thomas; Ueda, Kiyoshi

    2012-08-01

    Your invitation to submit. Journal of Physics. B: Atomic Molecular and Optical Physics (JPhysB) is delighted to announce a forthcoming special issue on 'Frontiers of free electron laser science', to appear in 2013, and invites you to submit a paper. This special issue will highlight recent advances in x-ray free electron laser (FEL) research enabled by the new generation of FELs in Europe, Japan and the USA. This is a particularly good moment to launch a special issue on this topic in JPhysB, to consolidate and place into a broader context some the recent novel research in the earliest years of x-ray FELs. We invite you to contribute original papers that describe some of these exciting results in several areas: AMO physics at x-ray FELs covering now a broad energy range from a few 10 eV to several tens keV is a central area of interest for this topical issue. We also especially welcome research papers on the topic of x-ray lasers that are pumped by FELs, as well as the physics of the x-ray FEL itself. Recent rapid developments in beam conditioning should also be covered, including seeding, echo and selective emittance spoiling. Such improved instrumentation has made possible the first femtosecond x-ray matter studies at FELs, and we invite papers in these areas as well. Pump-probe spectroscopy has now been extended to x-ray FELs, both with multiple x-ray pulses and with synchronized optical and x-ray pulses. The science related to timing x-ray pulses to laser-induced phenomena, including streaking, cross correlations and other time tools will be emphasized in this issue. Ultrafast x-ray FELs are also among the most intense laser sources available, and exceed the focusable intensity of other x-ray sources by many orders of magnitude. Therefore, intense x-ray atom and molecule interactions will be highlighted in this issue, as will the science of x-ray-induced damage. High intensities also give rise to the new field of nonlinear x-ray physics, and we would like

  8. Innovation and Adoption of Electronic Business Technologies

    OpenAIRE

    Sülzle, Kai

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a duopoly model of e-business technology adoption. A leader and a follower benefit from a new e-business technology with uncertain quality depending on its innovation and adoption cost and both firms’ adoption timing. When innovation and adoption require large set-up costs, the leader favors quick adoption by the follower. The follower prefers either late or no adoption. This is due to a delayed first-mover benefit which stems from an innovators’ capability to impose a...

  9. Electron-atom potential scattering assisted by a bichromatic elliptically polarized laser field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korajac, Arman; Habibović, Dino; Čerkić, Aner; Busuladžić, Mustafa; Milošević, Dejan B.

    2017-10-01

    Electron-atom potential scattering assisted by a bichromatic (two-component) elliptically polarized laser field is analyzed in the frame of the S-matrix theory. The second Born approximation is applied in the expansion of the S-matrix element. The first term in the expansion corresponds to the single scattering, while the second term in the expansion corresponds to the double scattering of electrons on atomic targets. The double scattering is possible in the presence of a laser field. The electron that has scattered on an atomic target may be driven back by the laser field and scatter again on the same atom. The double-scattered electrons may have considerably higher energies than those that scattered only once. We have investigated the dependence of the energy spectrum on various laser-field and incident electron parameters. The calculated electron energy spectra show the plateau-like structures with abrupt cutoffs. These cutoffs are explained by a classical analysis.

  10. High quality electron bunch generation with CO2-laser-plasma interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lingang; Shen, Baifei; Xu, Jiancai; Ji, Liangliang; Zhang, Xiaomei; Wang, Wenpeng; Zhao, Xueyan; Yi, Longqing; Yu, Yahong; Shi, Yin; Xu, Tongjun; Xu, Zhizhan

    2015-02-01

    CO2 laser-driven electron acceleration in low-density plasma is demonstrated using particle-in-cell simulation. An intense CO2 laser pulse of long wavelength excites a wake bubble that has a large elongated volume for accelerating a large number of electrons before reaching the charge saturation limit. A transversely injected laser pulse is used to induce and control the electron injection. It is found that an electron bunch with total charge up to 10 nC and absolute energy spread less than 16 MeV can be obtained. As a result, the charge per energy interval of the bunch reaches up to 0.6 nC/MeV. Intense CO2-laser based electron acceleration can provide a new direction for generating highly charged electron bunches with low energy spread, which is of much current interest, especially for table-top X-ray generation.

  11. Enhancement of the Number of Fast Electrons Generated in a Laser Inverse Cone Interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan-Ling, Ji; Gang, Jiang; Wei-Dong, Wu; Ji-Cheng, Zhang; Yong-Jian, Tang

    2010-01-01

    Enhancement of the energy-conversion efficiency from laser to target electrons is demonstrated by two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations in a laser-inverse cone interaction. When an intense short-pulse laser illuminates the inverse cone target, the electrons at the cone end are accelerated by the ponderomotive force. Then these electrons are guided and confined to transport along the inverse cone walls by the induced electromagnetic fields. A device consisting of inverse hollow-cone and multihole array plasma is proposed in order to increase the energy-conversion efficiency from laser to electrons. Particle-in-cell simulations present that the multiholes transpiercing the cone end help to enhance the number of fast electrons and the maximum electron energy significantly. (physics of gases, plasmas, and electric discharges)

  12. Ta Keo Temple Reconstruction Based on Terrestrial Laser Scanning Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. Xi

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Ta Keo temple is one of the very famous temple complex of Angkor Wat in northwestern Cambodia. It has been suffering massive collapse and other serious damages in recent years. Nowadays, Terrestrial Laser Scanning(TLS technology is considered as a wellestablished resource for heritage documentation and protection (Lerma et al, 2008; Reshetyuk, 2009. This paper used TLS to reconstruct Ta Keo Temple. Firstly, we acquired 71 scanning stations of points cloud data with high density and high accuracy, and over one thousand images with high spatial resolution about the temple. Secondly, the raw points cloud data were denoised, reduced and managed efficiently, and registrated using an adjusted ICP algorithm. Thirdly, a triangulation method was used to model most objects. At last, we mapped the texture data into the digital model and a 3-D model of Ta Keo with high accuracy was achieved. The authors focus on large object reconstruction by TLS technology, and pay much attention to the scanning design, multi-station data and the whole project’s data registration, and texture mapping and so on. The research result will be useful for Ta Keo restoration, reconstruction and protection. Also, it is a good reference source for large complex buildings reconstruction when using terrestrial laser scanning technology.

  13. Ta Keo Temple Reconstruction Based on Terrestrial Laser Scanning Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xi, X.; Wang, C.; Wan, Y. P.; Khuon, K. N.

    2015-08-01

    Ta Keo temple is one of the very famous temple complex of Angkor Wat in northwestern Cambodia. It has been suffering massive collapse and other serious damages in recent years. Nowadays, Terrestrial Laser Scanning(TLS) technology is considered as a wellestablished resource for heritage documentation and protection (Lerma et al, 2008; Reshetyuk, 2009). This paper used TLS to reconstruct Ta Keo Temple. Firstly, we acquired 71 scanning stations of points cloud data with high density and high accuracy, and over one thousand images with high spatial resolution about the temple. Secondly, the raw points cloud data were denoised, reduced and managed efficiently, and registrated using an adjusted ICP algorithm. Thirdly, a triangulation method was used to model most objects. At last, we mapped the texture data into the digital model and a 3-D model of Ta Keo with high accuracy was achieved. The authors focus on large object reconstruction by TLS technology, and pay much attention to the scanning design, multi-station data and the whole project's data registration, and texture mapping and so on. The research result will be useful for Ta Keo restoration, reconstruction and protection. Also, it is a good reference source for large complex buildings reconstruction when using terrestrial laser scanning technology.

  14. Deploying Electronic Roadside Vehicle Identification Technology to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    transportation in Nigeria. Arms. Small arms is a term used by arms forces to denote infantry ... However, Nigerians and expatriates have been victims of armed robbery at banks, gas stations, grocery stores ..... used in many contexts, such as simulation of technology for performance optimization and for scientific modeling of.

  15. Evolution of MEMS scanning mirrors for laser projection in compact consumer electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tauscher, Jason; Davis, Wyatt O.; Brown, Dean; Ellis, Matt; Ma, Yunfei; Sherwood, Michael E.; Bowman, David; Helsel, Mark P.; Lee, Sung; Coy, John Wyatt

    2010-02-01

    The applicability of MOEMS scanning mirrors towards the creation of "flying spot" scanned laser displays is well established. The extension of this concept towards compact embedded pico-projectors has required an evolution of scanners and packaging to accommodate the needs of the consumer electronics space. This paper describes the progression of the biaxial MOEMS scanning mirrors developed by Microvision over recent years. Various aspects of the individual designs are compared. Early devices used a combination of magnetic quasistatic actuation and resonant electrostatic operation in an evacuated atmosphere to create a projection engine for retinal scanned displays. Subsequent designs realized the elimination of both the high voltage electrostatic drive and the vacuum package, and a simplification of the actuation scheme through proprietary technical advances. Additional advances have doubled the scan angle capability and greatly miniaturized the MOEMS component while not incurring significant increase in power consumption, making it an excellent fit for the consumer pico-projector application. The simplicity of the scanned laser-based pico-projector optical design enables high resolution and a large effective image size in a thin projection engine, all of which become critical both to the viability of the technology and adoption by consumers. Microvision's first scanned laser pico-projector is built around a MOEMS scanning mirror capable of projecting 16:9 aspect ratio, WVGA display within a 6.6 mm high package. Further evolution on this path promises continued improvement in resolution, size, and power.

  16. Laser Opto-Electronic Correlator for Robotic Vision Automated Pattern Recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzwell, Neville

    1995-01-01

    A compact laser opto-electronic correlator for pattern recognition has been designed, fabricated, and tested. Specifically it is a translation sensitivity adjustable compact optical correlator (TSACOC) utilizing convergent laser beams for the holographic filter. Its properties and performance, including the location of the correlation peak and the effects of lateral and longitudinal displacements for both filters and input images, are systematically analyzed based on the nonparaxial approximation for the reference beam. The theoretical analyses have been verified in experiments. In applying the TSACOC to important practical problems including fingerprint identification, we have found that the tolerance of the system to the input lateral displacement can be conveniently increased by changing a geometric factor of the system. The system can be compactly packaged using the miniature laser diode sources and can be used in space by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and ground commercial applications which include robotic vision, and industrial inspection of automated quality control operations. The personnel of Standard International will work closely with the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) to transfer the technology to the commercial market. Prototype systems will be fabricated to test the market and perfect the product. Large production will follow after successful results are achieved.

  17. A free-electron laser fourth-generation X-ray source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moncton, D. E.

    1999-01-01

    The field of synchrotrons radiation research has grown rapidly over the last 25 years due to both the push of the accelerator and magnet technology that produces the x-ray beams and the pull of the extraordinary scientific research those beams make possible. Three successive generations of synchrotrons radiation facilities have resulted in beam brilliances 11 to 12 orders of magnitude greater than the standard laboratory x-ray tube. However, greater advances can be easily imagined given the fact that x-ray beams from present-day facilities do not exhibit the coherence or time structure so familiar with the.optical laser. Theoretical work over the last ten years or so has pointed to the possibility of generating hard x-ray beams with laser-like characteristics. The concept is based on self-amplified spontaneous emission in free electron lasers. The use of a superconducting linac could produce a major, cost-effective facility that spans wavelengths from the ultraviolet to the hard x-ray regime, simultaneously servicing large numbers experimenters from a wide range of disciplines. As with each past generation of synchrotron facilities, immense new scientific opportunities from fourth-generation sources

  18. Simulations of LANL Regenerative MW Free Electron Laser Amplifier

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nguyen, Richard

    1997-01-01

    .... A critical problem to resolve for the shipboard high-energy laser weapon systems is to develop a shipboard-compatible megawatt-class laser weapon at a wavelength where the atmospheric absorption is smallest...

  19. Mode and gain analysis for symmetric and staggered grating-waveguide free-electron laser

    OpenAIRE

    Yuan-Yao Lin; Yen-Chieh Huang

    2007-01-01

    A grating-waveguide free-electron laser is driven by an axial electron beam that propagates between two planar gratings. This investigation addresses the mode analysis, gain calculation, and frequency tuning for such a device with arbitrary longitudinal and transverse displacements between the two gratings. It demonstrates that a grating waveguide free-electron laser is a promising coherent THz emitter when it is adopted as a backward-wave oscillator or a distributed-feedback oscillator.

  20. Mode and gain analysis for symmetric and staggered grating-waveguide free-electron laser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan-Yao Lin

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available A grating-waveguide free-electron laser is driven by an axial electron beam that propagates between two planar gratings. This investigation addresses the mode analysis, gain calculation, and frequency tuning for such a device with arbitrary longitudinal and transverse displacements between the two gratings. It demonstrates that a grating waveguide free-electron laser is a promising coherent THz emitter when it is adopted as a backward-wave oscillator or a distributed-feedback oscillator.

  1. Time-resolved phase measurement of a self-amplified free-electron laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report on the first time-resolved phase measurement on self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE) free-electron laser (FEL) pulses. We observed that the spikes in the output of such free-electron laser pulses have an intrinsic positive chirp. We also observed that the energy chirp in the electron bunch mapped directly into the FEL output. Under certain conditions, the two chirps cancel each other. The experimental result was compared with simulations and interpreted with SASE theory

  2. Control system in the technological electron linacs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boriskin, V.N.; Akchurin, Yu.I.; Bahmetev, N.N.; Gurin, V.A.

    1999-01-01

    The special system has been developed for linac control.It controls the electron beam current,the energy and the position,protects the accelerating and scanning systems from the damage caused by the beam;blocks the modulator and the klystron amplifier in the case of intolerable operating modes;regulates the phase and power of the HF signals in the injecting system and also regulates the source power currents in the magnetic system

  3. The Impact of Electronic Communication Technology on Written Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamzah, Mohd. Sahandri Gani B.; Ghorbani, Mohd. Reza; Abdullah, Saifuddin Kumar B.

    2009-01-01

    Communication technology is changing things. Language is no exception. Some language researchers argue that language is deteriorating due to increased use in electronic communication. The present paper investigated 100 randomly selected electronic mails (e-mails) and 50 short messaging system (SMS) messages of a representative sample of…

  4. Development of Broadband Telecommunication System for Railways using Laser Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Kazuki; Nakagawa, Shingo; Matsubara, Hiroshi; Tatsui, Daisuke; Seki, Kiyotaka; Haruyama, Shinichiro; Teraoka, Fumio

    We developed a high-speed telecommunication system applicable to railways, to improve customer service and efficiency of operator's telecommunication between the ground facilities and trains under operations. We manufactured a mobile telecommunication system, capable of recording the transfer rate of 1Gbps in theory by applying the laser beam communication technology. We carried out a field test using trains in active service, and obtained the result of the transfer rate of approximately 700Mbps on the TCP layer between the ground and the train running at a speed of approximately 130km/h.

  5. Laser-driven relativistic electron dynamics in a cylindrical plasma channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Pan-Fei; Lv, Wen-Juan; Li, Xiao-Liang; Tang, Rong-An; Xue, Ju-Kui

    2018-03-01

    The energy and trajectory of the electron, which is irradiated by a high-power laser pulse in a cylindrical plasma channel with a uniform positive charge and a uniform negative current, have been analyzed in terms of a single-electron model of direct laser acceleration. We find that the energy and trajectory of the electron strongly depend on the positive charge density, the negative current density, and the intensity of the laser pulse. The electron can be accelerated significantly only when the positive charge density, the negative current density, and the intensity of the laser pulse are in suitable ranges due to the dephasing rate between the wave and electron motion. Particularly, when their values satisfy a critical condition, the electron can stay in phase with the laser and gain the largest energy from the laser. With the enhancement of the electron energy, strong modulations of the relativistic factor cause a considerable enhancement of the electron transverse oscillations across the channel, which makes the electron trajectory become essentially three-dimensional, even if it is flat at the early stage of the acceleration. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11475027, 11765017, 11764039, 11305132, and 11274255), the Natural Science Foundation of Gansu Province, China (Grant No. 17JR5RA076), and the Scientific Research Project of Gansu Higher Education, China (Grant No. 2016A-005).

  6. Information Technology in project-organized electronic and computer technology engineering education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Kirsten Mølgaard; Nielsen, Jens Frederik Dalsgaard

    1999-01-01

    This paper describes the integration of IT in the education of electronic and computer technology engineers at Institute of Electronic Systems, Aalborg Uni-versity, Denmark. At the Institute Information Technology is an important tool in the aspects of the education as well as for communication...

  7. Laser technology: foreign language translations from the joint publications research service. (Latest citations from the NTIS data base). Published Search

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-06-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning laser technology translated from foreign language (non-English) publications. Laser cavities, laser output, laser pumping, laser mode locking, and laser tuning are among the topics discussed. The citations examine laser technology in applications such as the identification of meteorological objects; holography; instruments for spacecraft, communications, target acquisition, and positioning; and materials processing. (Contains a minimum of 241 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  8. Ultra-High-Contrast Laser Acceleration of Relativistic Electrons in Solid Targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Higginson, Drew Pitney [Univ. of California, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2013-01-01

    The cone-guided fast ignition approach to Inertial Con nement Fusion requires laser-accelerated relativistic electrons to deposit kilojoules of energy within an imploded fuel core to initiate fusion burn. One obstacle to coupling electron energy into the core is the ablation of material, known as preplasma, by laser energy proceeding nanoseconds prior to the main pulse. This causes the laser-absorption surface to be pushed back hundreds of microns from the initial target surface; thus increasing the distance that electrons must travel to reach the imploded core. Previous experiments have shown an order of magnitude decrease in coupling into surrogate targets when intentionally increasing the amount of preplasma. Additionally, for electrons to deposit energy within the core, they should have kinetic energies on the order of a few MeV, as less energetic electrons will be stopped prior to the core and more energetic electrons will pass through the core without depositing much energy. Thus a quantitative understanding of the electron energy spectrum and how it responds to varied laser parameters is paramount for fast ignition. For the rst time, this dissertation quantitatively investigates the acceleration of electrons using an ultra-high-contrast laser. Ultra-high-contrast lasers reduce the laser energy that reaches the target prior to the main pulse; drastically reducing the amount of preplasma. Experiments were performed in a cone-wire geometry relevant to fast ignition. These experiments irradiated the inner-tip of a Au cone with the laser and observed electrons that passed through a Cu wire attached to the outer-tip of the cone. The total emission of K x-rays is used as a diagnostic to infer the electron energy coupled into the wire. Imaging the x-ray emission allowed an e ective path-length of electrons within the wire to be determined, which constrained the electron energy spectrum. Experiments were carried out on the ultra-high-contrast Trident laser at Los

  9. Laser-driven wakefield electron acceleration and associated radiation sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davoine, X.

    2009-10-01

    The first part of this research thesis introduces the basic concepts needed for the understanding of the laser-driven wakefield acceleration. It describes the properties of the used laser beams and plasmas, presents some notions about laser-plasma interactions for a better understanding of the physics of laser-driven acceleration. The second part deals with the numerical modelling and the presentation of simulation tools needed for the investigation of laser-induced wakefield acceleration. The last part deals with the optical control of the injection, a technique analogous to the impulsion collision scheme

  10. Airborne laser induced fluorescence imaging. Innovative technology summary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-06-01

    Laser-Induced Fluorescence (LIF) was demonstration as part of the Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP) Plant 1 Large Scale Demonstration and Deployment Project (LSDDP) sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science and Technology, Deactivation and Decommissioning Focus Area located at the Federal Energy Technology Center (FETC) in Morgantown, West Virginia. The demonstration took place on November 19, 1996. In order to allow the contaminated buildings undergoing deactivation and decommissioning (D and D) to be opened to the atmosphere, radiological surveys of floors, walls and ceilings must take place. After successful completion of the radiological clearance survey, demolition of the building can continue. Currently, this process is performed by collecting and analyzing swipe samples for radiological analysis. Two methods are used to analyze the swipe samples: hand-held frisker and laboratory analysis. For the purpose of this demonstration, the least expensive method, swipe samples analyzed by hand-held frisker, is the baseline technology. The objective of the technology demonstration was to determine if the baseline technology could be replaced using LIF

  11. Measurement of electron density and electron temperature of a cascaded arc plasma using laser Thomson scattering compared to an optical emission spectroscopic approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yong, WANG; Cong, LI; Jielin, SHI; Xingwei, WU; Hongbin, DING

    2017-11-01

    As advanced linear plasma sources, cascaded arc plasma devices have been used to generate steady plasma with high electron density, high particle flux and low electron temperature. To measure electron density and electron temperature of the plasma device accurately, a laser Thomson scattering (LTS) system, which is generally recognized as the most precise plasma diagnostic method, has been established in our lab in Dalian University of Technology. The electron density has been measured successfully in the region of 4.5 × 1019 m-3 to 7.1 × 1020 m-3 and electron temperature in the region of 0.18 eV to 0.58 eV. For comparison, an optical emission spectroscopy (OES) system was established as well. The results showed that the electron excitation temperature (configuration temperature) measured by OES is significantly higher than the electron temperature (kinetic electron temperature) measured by LTS by up to 40% in the given discharge conditions. The results indicate that the cascaded arc plasma is recombining plasma and it is not in local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE). This leads to significant error using OES when characterizing the electron temperature in a non-LTE plasma.

  12. New laser technology to determine present weather parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, R. A.; Sandford, A. P.; Jones, G. E.; Richards, J.; Petzing, J.; Coupland, J. M.

    2006-07-01

    Present weather sensors are becoming increasingly important as a means to augment networks of automated weather stations and extend the capability of manned observations. The classification of hydrometeors is one of the principal tasks that is addressed by present weather sensors. In this paper, we discuss a new laser-based technology for this purpose. The system improves upon current precipitation monitors by using a derivative of phase Doppler anemometry techniques to accurately determine particle speed and size. The instrument is also capable of distinguishing between liquid droplets and solid polycrystalline hydrometeors and can be used to estimate visibility. The incorporation of this technology into a meteorological station with other sensors, such as temperature and relative humidity probes, leads to the accurate classification of particle type. The example data shown are taken from tests in Leicestershire, England and Utah, USA and show the differences between solid and liquid precipitation events.

  13. Observation of Time-Domain Modulation of Free-Electron-Laser Pulses by Multipeaked Electron-Energy Spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrillo, V.; Anania, M. P.; Artioli, M.; Bacci, A.; Bellaveglia, M.; Chiadroni, E.; Cianchi, A.; Ciocci, F.; Dattoli, G.; Di Giovenale, D.; Di Pirro, G.; Ferrario, M.; Gatti, G.; Giannessi, L.; Mostacci, A.; Musumeci, P.; Petralia, A.; Pompili, R.; Quattromini, M.; Rau, J. V.; Ronsivalle, C.; Rossi, A. R.; Sabia, E.; Vaccarezza, C.; Villa, F.

    2013-09-01

    We present the experimental demonstration of a new scheme for the generation of ultrashort pulse trains based on free-electron-laser (FEL) emission from a multipeaked electron energy distribution. Two electron beamlets with energy difference larger than the FEL parameter ρ have been generated by illuminating the cathode with two ps-spaced laser pulses, followed by a rotation of the longitudinal phase space by velocity bunching in the linac. The resulting self-amplified spontaneous emission FEL radiation, measured through frequency-resolved optical gating diagnostics, reveals a double-peaked spectrum and a temporally modulated pulse structure.

  14. Reduction of secondary electron yield for E-cloud mitigation by laser ablation surface engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valizadeh, R., E-mail: reza.valizadeh@stfc.ac.uk [ASTeC, STFC Daresbury Laboratory, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Malyshev, O.B. [ASTeC, STFC Daresbury Laboratory, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Wang, S. [ASTeC, STFC Daresbury Laboratory, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Department of Physics, Loughborough University, Loughborough LE11 3TU (United Kingdom); Sian, T. [ASTeC, STFC Daresbury Laboratory, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); The Photon Science Institute, The University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Cropper, M.D. [Department of Physics, Loughborough University, Loughborough LE11 3TU (United Kingdom); Sykes, N. [Micronanics Ltd., Didcot, Oxon OX11 0QX (United Kingdom)

    2017-05-15

    Highlights: • SEY below 1 can be achieved with Laser ablation surface engineering. • SEY <1 surface can be produced with different types of nanosecond lasers. • Both microstructure (groves) and nano-structures are playing a role in reducing SEY. - Abstract: Developing a surface with low Secondary Electron Yield (SEY) is one of the main ways of mitigating electron cloud and beam-induced electron multipacting in high-energy charged particle accelerators. In our previous publications, a low SEY < 0.9 for as-received metal surfaces modified by a nanosecond pulsed laser was reported. In this paper, the SEY of laser-treated blackened copper has been investigated as a function of different laser irradiation parameters. We explore and study the influence of micro- and nano-structures induced by laser surface treatment in air of copper samples as a function of various laser irradiation parameters such as peak power, laser wavelength (λ = 355 nm and 1064 nm), number of pulses per point (scan speed and repetition rate) and fluence, on the SEY. The surface chemical composition was determined by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) which revealed that heating resulted in diffusion of oxygen into the bulk and induced the transformation of CuO to sub-stoichiometric oxide. The surface topography was examined with high resolution scanning electron microscopy (HRSEM) which showed that the laser-treated surfaces are dominated by microstructure grooves and nanostructure features.

  15. Creating intense polarized electron beam via laser stripping and spin-orbit interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Danilov, V.; Ptitsyn, V.; Gorlov, T.

    2010-01-01

    The recent advance in laser field make it possible to excite and strip electrons with definite spin from hydrogen atoms. The sources of hydrogen atoms with orders of magnitude higher currents (than that of the conventional polarized electron cathods) can be obtained from H - sources with good monochromatization. With one electron of H - stripped by a laser, the remained electron is excited to upper state (2P 3/2 and 2P 1/2 ) by a circular polarization laser light from FEL. Then, it is excited to a high quantum number (n=7) with mostly one spin direction due to energy level split of the states with a definite direction of spin and angular momentum in an applied magnetic field and then it is stripped by a strong electric field of an RF cavity. This paper presents combination of lasers and fields to get high polarization and high current electron source.

  16. Time-resolved measurements with streaked diffraction patterns from electrons generated in laser plasma wakefield

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Zhaohan; Nees, John; Hou, Bixue; Krushelnick, Karl; Thomas, Alec; Beaurepaire, Benoît; Malka, Victor; Faure, Jérôme

    2013-10-01

    Femtosecond bunches of electrons with relativistic to ultra-relativistic energies can be robustly produced in laser plasma wakefield accelerators (LWFA). Scaling the electron energy down to sub-relativistic and MeV level using a millijoule laser system will make such electron source a promising candidate for ultrafast electron diffraction (UED) applications due to the intrinsic short bunch duration and perfect synchronization with the optical pump. Recent results of electron diffraction from a single crystal gold foil, using LWFA electrons driven by 8-mJ, 35-fs laser pulses at 500 Hz, will be presented. The accelerated electrons were collimated with a solenoid magnetic lens. By applying a small-angle tilt to the magnetic lens, the diffraction pattern can be streaked such that the temporal evolution is separated spatially on the detector screen after propagation. The observable time window and achievable temporal resolution are studied in pump-probe measurements of photo-induced heating on the gold foil.

  17. Calculating the radiation characteristics of accelerated electrons in laser-plasma interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, X. F.; Yu, Q.; Qu, J. F.; Kong, Q.; Gu, Y. J.; Ma, Y. Y.; Kawata, S.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we studied the characteristics of radiation emitted by electrons accelerated in a laser–plasma interaction by using the Lienard–Wiechert field. In the interaction of a laser pulse with a underdense plasma, electrons are accelerated by two mechanisms: direct laser acceleration (DLA) and laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA). At the beginning of the process, the DLA electrons emit most of the radiation, and the DLA electrons emit a much higher peak photon energy than the LWFA electrons. As the laser–plasma interaction progresses, the LWFA electrons become the major radiation emitter; however, even at this stage, the contribution from DLA electrons is significant, especially to the peak photon energy.

  18. A microwave FEL [free electron laser] code using waveguide modes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Byers, J.A.; Cohen, R.H.

    1987-08-01

    A free electron laser code, GFEL, is being developed for application to the LLNL tokamak current drive experiment, MTX. This single frequency code solves for the slowly varying complex field amplitude using the usual wiggler-averaged equations of existing codes, in particular FRED, except that it describes the fields by a 2D expansion in the rectangular waveguide modes, using coupling coefficients similar to those developed by Wurtele, which include effects of spatial variations in the fields seen by the wiggler motion of the particles. Our coefficients differ from those of Wurtele in two respects. First, we have found a missing √2γ/a/sub w/ factor in his C/sub z/; when corrected this increases the effect of the E/sub z/ field component and this in turn reduces the amplitude of the TM mode. Second, we have consistently retained all terms of second order in the wiggle amplitude. Both corrections are necessary for accurate computation. GFEL has the capability of following the TE/sub 0n/ and TE(M)/sub m1/ modes simultaneously. GFEL produces results nearly identical to those from FRED if the coupling coefficients are adjusted to equal those implied by the algorithm in FRED. Normally, the two codes produce results that are similar but different in detail due to the different treatment of modes higher than TE/sub 01/. 5 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab

  19. SATURNUS: the UCLA infrared free-electron laser project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dodd, J.W.; Hartman, S.C.; Park, S.; Pellegrini, C.; Rosenzweig, J.B.; Smolin, J.A.; Hairapetian, G.; Kolonko, J.; Barletta, W.A.; Cline, D.B.; Favis, J.G.; Joshi, C.J.; Luhmann, N.C. Jr.; Ivanchenkov, S.N.; Khlebnikov, A.S.; Lachin, Y.Y.; Varfolomeev, A.A.

    1991-01-01

    A compact 20 MeV linac with an RF laser-driven electron gun will be used to drive a high-gain (10cm gain length), 10.6 μm wavelength FEL amplifier, operating in the SASE mode. Saturnus will mainly study FEL physics in the high-gain regime, including start-up from noise, optical guiding, sidebands, saturation, and superradiance, with emphasis on the effects important for future short wavelength operation of FEL's. The hybrid undulator was designed and built at the Kurchatov Inst. of Atomic Energy in the USSR. The primary magnetic flux is provided by C-shaped iron yokes, where between the poles thin blocks of neodymium-iron-boron magnets are placed to provide additional magnetic flux along the undulator axis. The field strength is adjusted by moving the thin Nd-Fe-B blocks on a set screw mount. The initial assembly will have forty periods, each 1.5 cm long. The gap distance between the yoke pole-pieces is fixed at 5 mm. The undulator field has been measured, yielding on an axis peak value of 6.6kGauss, which closely matches computer simulations

  20. Laser direct written silicon nanowires for electronic and sensing applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Woongsik

    Silicon nanowires are promising building blocks for high-performance electronics and chemical/biological sensing devices due to their ultra-small body and high surface-to-volume ratios. However, the lack of the ability to assemble and position nanowires in a highly controlled manner still remains an obstacle to fully exploiting the substantial potential of nanowires. Here we demonstrate a one-step method to synthesize intrinsic and doped silicon nanowires for device applications. Sub-diffraction limited nanowires as thin as 60 nm are synthesized using laser direct writing in combination with chemical vapor deposition, which has the advantages of in-situ doping, catalyst-free growth, and precise control of position, orientation, and length. The synthesized nanowires have been fabricated into field effect transistors (FETs) and FET sensors. The FET sensors are employed to detect the proton concentration (pH) of an aqueous solution and highly sensitive pH sensing is demonstrated. Both top- and back-gated silicon nanowire FETs are demonstrated and electrically characterized. In addition, modulation-doped nanowires are synthesized by changing dopant gases during the nanowire growth. The axial p-n junction nanowires are electrically characterized to demonstrate the diode behavior and the transition between dopant levels are measured using Kelvin probe force microscopy.

  1. Free-electron laser spectrum evaluation and automatic optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruchon, Niky; Fenu, Gianfranco; Gaio, Giulio; Lonza, Marco; Pellegrino, Felice Andrea; Saule, Lorenzo

    2017-11-01

    The radiation generated by a seeded free-electron laser (FEL) is characterized by a high temporal coherence, which is close to the Fourier limit in the ideal case. The setup and optimization of a FEL is a non-trivial and challenging operation. This is due to the plethora of highly sensitive machine parameters and to the complex correlations between them. The fine tuning of the FEL process is normally supervised by physicists and is carried out by scanning various parameters with the aim of optimizing the spectrum of the emitted pulses in terms of intensity and line-width. In this article we introduce a novel quantitative method for the evaluation of the FEL spectrum via a quality index. Moreover, we investigate the possibility of optimization of the FEL parameters using this index as the objective function of an automatic procedure. We also present the results of the preliminary tests performed in the FERMI FEL focused on the effectiveness and ability of the automatic procedure to assist in the task of machine tuning and optimization.

  2. Characteristics of electron ponderomotive acceleration by a laser pulse in vacuum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, D; Kong, Q; Chen, Z; Wang, P X; Ho, Y K

    2008-01-01

    The ponderomotive acceleration scenario (PAS) for slow-electron acceleration by an intense laser pulse has been studied in detail using three-dimensional test-particle simulations. The relativistic Newton-Lorentz equation has been solved numerically for a linearly polarized laser. The results show that the PAS can accelerate slow electrons to an energy close to 1 MeV for a laser intensity a 0 = 3 (around 10 19 W cm -2 for a Ti : sapphire laser) and 24 MeV for a 0 = 20. These data are consistent with the experimental observation. The net gain comes from an asymmetry in the fields experienced by the electron during its acceleration and deceleration stages. It is found that electrons are scattered isotropically in the transverse direction for moderate laser intensity. The output bunches exhibit relatively wide angular and energy dispersions. We have also discussed an interesting bifurcation phenomenon in the energy-angle correlation spectra. According to our simulations, the maximal electron-energy gain in the PAS regime is approximately proportional to the laser intensity and the laser beam width and inversely proportional to the laser pulse duration. Physical interpretations based on the ponderomotive potential model as well as Lorentz-Newton force analyses are presented

  3. Hot Electron and Pair Production from the Texas Petawatt Laser Irradiating Thick Gold Targets

    OpenAIRE

    Taylor, Devin; Liang, Edison; Clarke, Taylor; Henderson, Alexander; Chaguine, Petr; Wang, Xin; Dyer, Gilliss; Serratto, Kristina; Riley, Nathan; Donovan, Michael; Ditmire, Todd

    2012-01-01

    We present data for relativistic hot electron production by the Texas Petawatt Laser irradiating solid Au targets with thickness between 1 and 4 mm. The experiment was performed at the short focus target chamber TC1 in July 2011, with laser energies around 50 J. We measured hot electron spectra out to 50 MeV which show a narrow peak around 10 - 20 MeV plus high energy exponential tail. The hot electron spectral shape differs from those reported for other PW lasers. We did not observe direct e...

  4. Two-Screen Method for Determining Electron Beam Energy and Deflection from Laser Wakefield Acceleration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pollock, B B; Ross, J S; Tynan, G R; Divol, L; Glenzer, S H; Leurent, V; Palastro, J P; Ralph, J E; Froula, D H; Clayton, C E; Marsh, K A; Pak, A E; Wang, T L; Joshi, C

    2009-04-24

    Laser Wakefield Acceleration (LWFA) experiments have been performed at the Jupiter Laser Facility, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. In order to unambiguously determine the output electron beam energy and deflection angle at the plasma exit, we have implemented a two-screen electron spectrometer. This system is comprised of a dipole magnet followed by two image plates. By measuring the electron beam deviation from the laser axis on each plate, both the energy and deflection angle at the plasma exit are determined through the relativistic equation of motion.

  5. Acceleration of electrons by high intensity laser radiation in a magnetic field

    OpenAIRE

    Melikian, Robert

    2013-01-01

    We consider the acceleration of electrons in vacuum by means of the circularly-polirized electromagnetic wave, propagating along a magnetic field. We show that the electron energy growth, when using ultra-short and ultra-intense laser pulses (10 ps, 10^{18} Bm/cm^2, CO_{2} laser) in the presence of a magnetic field, may reach up to the value 2,1 Gev. The growth of the electron energy is shown to increase proportionally with the increase of the laser intensity and the initial energy of the ele...

  6. Adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscope imaging: technology update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Merino D

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available David Merino, Pablo Loza-Alvarez The Institute of Photonic Sciences (ICFO, The Barcelona Institute of Science and Technology, Castelldefels, Barcelona, Spain Abstract: Adaptive optics (AO retinal imaging has become very popular in the past few years, especially within the ophthalmic research community. Several different retinal techniques, such as fundus imaging cameras or optical coherence tomography systems, have been coupled with AO in order to produce impressive images showing individual cell mosaics over different layers of the in vivo human retina. The combination of AO with scanning laser ophthalmoscopy has been extensively used to generate impressive images of the human retina with unprecedented resolution, showing individual photoreceptor cells, retinal pigment epithelium cells, as well as microscopic capillary vessels, or the nerve fiber layer. Over the past few years, the technique has evolved to develop several different applications not only in the clinic but also in different animal models, thanks to technological developments in the field. These developments have specific applications to different fields of investigation, which are not limited to the study of retinal diseases but also to the understanding of the retinal function and vision science. This review is an attempt to summarize these developments in an understandable and brief manner in order to guide the reader into the possibilities that AO scanning laser ophthalmoscopy offers, as well as its limitations, which should be taken into account when planning on using it. Keywords: high-resolution, in vivo retinal imaging, AOSLO

  7. Control of electron injection and acceleration in laser-wakefield accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guillaume, E.

    2015-01-01

    Laser-plasma accelerators provide a promising compact alternative to conventional accelerators. Plasma waves with extremely strong electric fields are generated when a high intensity laser is focused into an underdense gas target. Electrons that are trapped in these laser-driven plasma waves can be accelerated up to energies of a few GeVs. Despite their great potential, laser-wakefield accelerators face some issues, regarding notably the stability and reproducibility of the beam when electrons are injected in the accelerating structure. In this manuscript, different techniques of electron injection are presented and compared, notably injection in a sharp density gradient and ionization injection. It is shown that combining these two methods allows for the generation of stable and tunable electron beams. We have also studied a way to manipulate the electron bunch in the phase-space in order to accelerate the bunch beyond the dephasing limit. Such a technique was used with quasi-monoenergetic electron beams to enhance their energy. Moreover, the origin of the evolution of the angular momentum of electrons observed experimentally was investigated. Finally, we demonstrated experimentally a new method - the laser-plasma lens - to strongly reduce the divergence of the electron beam. This laser-plasma lens consists of a second gas jet placed at the exit of the accelerator. The laser pulse drives a wakefield in this second jet whose focusing forces take advantage to reduce the divergence of the trailing electron bunch. A simple analytical model describing the principle is presented, underlining the major importance of the second jet length, density and distance from the first jet. Experimental demonstration of the laser-plasma lens shows a divergence reduction by a factor of 2.6 for electrons up to 300 MeV, in accordance with the model predictions

  8. TECHNOLOGY FOR DEVELOPMENT OF ELECTRONIC TEXTBOOK ON HANDICRAFTS METHODOLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iryna V. Androshchuk

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The main approaches to defining the concept of electronic textbook have been analyzed in the article. The main advantages of electronic textbooks in the context of future teachers’ training have been outlined. They are interactivity, feedback provision, availability of navigation and search engine. The author has presented and characterized the main stages in the technology of development of an electronic textbook on Handicraft and Technology Training Methodology: determination of its role and significance in the process of mastering the discipline; justification of its structure; outline of the stages of its development in accordance with the defined structure. The characteristic feature of the developed electronic textbook is availability of macro- and microstructure. Macrostructure is viewed as a sequence of components of the electronic textbook that are manifested in its content; microstructure is considered to be an internal pattern of each component of macrostructure.

  9. In-situ investigation of laser surface modifications of WC-Co hard metals inside a scanning electron microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, H.; Wetzig, K.; Schultrich, B.; Pompe, Wolfgang; Chapliev, N. I.; Konov, Vitaly I.; Pimenov, S. M.; Prokhorov, Alexander M.

    1989-05-01

    The investigation of laser interaction with solid surfaces and of the resulting mechanism of surface modification are of technical interest to optimize technological processes, and they are also of fundamental scientific importance. Most instructive indormation is available with the ail of the in-situ techniques. For instance, measuring of the photon emission of the irradiated surface ane the plasma torch (if it is produced) simultaneously to laser action, makes it possible to gain a global characterization of the laser-solid interaction. In order to obtain additional information about surface and structure modifications in microscopic detail , a laser and scanning electron microscope were combined in to a tandem equipment (LASEM). Inside this eqiipment the microscopic observation is carried out directly at the laser irradiated area without any displacement of the sample. In this way, the stepwise development of surface modification during multipulse irradiation is visible in microscopic details and much more reliable information about the surface modification process is obtainable in comparison to an external laser irradiation. Such kind of equipments were realized simultaneously and independently in the Institut of General Physics (Moscow) and the Central Institute of Solid State Physics and Material Research (Dresden) using a CO2 and a LTd-glass-laser, respectively. In the following the advantages and possibilities of a LASEM shall be demonstrated by some selected investigations of WC-CO hardmeta. The results were obtained in collaboration by both groups with the aid of the pulsed CO2-laser. The TEA CO2 laser was transmitted through a ZnSe-window into the sample chamber of the SEM and focused ofAo tfte sample surface. It was operated in TEM - oo mode with a repetition rate of about 1 pulse per second. A peak power density of about 160 MW/cm2 was achieved in front of the sample surface.

  10. Small compact pulsed electron source for radiation technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korenev, Sergey

    2002-01-01

    The small compact pulsed electron source for radiation technologies is considered in the report. The electron source consists of pulsed high voltage Marx generator and vacuum diode with explosive emission cathode. The main parameters of electron source are next: kinetic energy is 100-150 keV, beam current is 5-200 A and pulse duration is 100-400 nsec. The distribution of absorbed doses in irradiated materials is considered. The physical feasibility of pulsed low energy electron beam for applications is considered

  11. Parametric study of transport beam lines for electron beams accelerated by laser-plasma interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scisciò, M.; Lancia, L.; Migliorati, M.; Mostacci, A.; Palumbo, L.; Papaphilippou, Y.; Antici, P.

    2016-03-01

    In the last decade, laser-plasma acceleration of high-energy electrons has attracted strong attention in different fields. Electrons with maximum energies in the GeV range can be laser-accelerated within a few cm using multi-hundreds terawatt (TW) lasers, yielding to very high beam currents at the source (electron bunches with up to tens-hundreds of pC in a few fs). While initially the challenge was to increase the maximum achievable electron energy, today strong effort is put in the control and usability of these laser-generated beams that still lack of some features in order to be used for applications where currently conventional, radio-frequency (RF) based, electron beam lines represent the most common and efficient solution. Several improvements have been suggested for this purpose, some of them acting directly on the plasma source, some using beam shaping tools located downstream. Concerning the latter, several studies have suggested the use of conventional accelerator magnetic devices (such as quadrupoles and solenoids) as an easy implementable solution when the laser-plasma accelerated beam requires optimization. In this paper, we report on a parametric study related to the transport of electron beams accelerated by laser-plasma interaction, using conventional accelerator elements and tools. We focus on both, high energy electron beams in the GeV range, as produced on petawatt (PW) class laser systems, and on lower energy electron beams in the hundreds of MeV range, as nowadays routinely obtained on commercially available multi-hundred TW laser systems. For both scenarios, our study allows understanding what are the crucial parameters that enable laser-plasma accelerators to compete with conventional ones and allow for a beam transport. We show that suitable working points require a tradeoff-combination between low beam divergence and narrow energy spread.

  12. Free-electron laser emission architecture impact on extreme ultraviolet lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosler, Erik R.; Wood, Obert R.; Barletta, William A.

    2017-10-01

    Laser-produced plasma (LPP) EUV sources have demonstrated ˜125 W at customer sites, establishing confidence in EUV lithography (EUVL) as a viable manufacturing technology. However, for extension to the 3-nm technology node and beyond, existing scanner/source technology must enable higher-NA imaging systems (requiring increased resist dose and providing half-field exposures) and/or EUV multipatterning (requiring increased wafer throughput proportional to the number of exposure passes). Both development paths will require a substantial increase in EUV source power to maintain the economic viability of the technology, creating an opportunity for free-electron laser (FEL) EUV sources. FEL-based EUV sources offer an economic, high-power/single-source alternative to LPP EUV sources. Should FELs become the preferred next-generation EUV source, the choice of FEL emission architecture will greatly affect its operational stability and overall capability. A near-term industrialized FEL is expected to utilize one of the following three existing emission architectures: (1) self-amplified spontaneous emission, (2) regenerative amplifier, or (3) self-seeding. Model accelerator parameters are put forward to evaluate the impact of emission architecture on FEL output. Then, variations in the parameter space are applied to assess the potential impact to lithography operations, thereby establishing component sensitivity. The operating range of various accelerator components is discussed based on current accelerator performance demonstrated at various scientific user facilities. Finally, comparison of the performance between the model accelerator parameters and the variation in parameter space provides a means to evaluate the potential emission architectures. A scorecard is presented to facilitate this evaluation and provides a framework for future FEL design and enablement for EUVL applications.

  13. Electron-hydrogen collisions with dressed target and Volkov projectile states in a laser field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, P.H.G.; Flannery, M.R.

    1992-01-01

    Cross sections for the 1S-2S and 1S-2P O transitions in laser-assisted e - -H(1S) collisions are calculated in both the multi-channel eikonal treatment and the Born wave approximation, as a function of impact energy and laser field intensity. The laser considered is a monotonic, plane-polarized CO 2 laser (photon energy = 0.117 eV) with the polarization direction parallel to the initial projectile velocity. The first part of this paper confines the laser perturbation to the bound electrons of the atom. The second part extends the laser perturbation to the projectile electron, and the familiar Volkov dressed states are used. (author)

  14. Space Solar Power Technology Demonstration for Lunar Polar Applications: Laser-Photovoltaic Wireless Power Transmission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henley, M. W.; Fikes, J. C.; Howell, J.; Mankins, J. C.; Howell, Joe T. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Space Solar Power technology offers unique benefits for near-term NASA space science missions, which can mature this technology for other future applications. "Laser-Photo-Voltaic Wireless Power Transmission" (Laser-PV WPT) is a technology that uses a laser to beam power to a photovoltaic receiver, which converts the laser's light into electricity. Future Laser-PV WPT systems may beam power from Earth to satellites or large Space Solar Power satellites may beam power to Earth, perhaps supplementing terrestrial solar photo-voltaic receivers. In a near-term scientific mission to the moon, Laser-PV WPT can enable robotic operations in permanently shadowed lunar polar craters, which may contain ice. Ground-based technology demonstrations are proceeding, to mature the technology for this initial application, in the moon's polar regions.

  15. High resolution simulation of beam dynamics in electron linacs for x-ray free electron lasers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Qiang

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we report on large-scale high resolution simulations of beam dynamics in electron linacs for the next-generation x-ray free electron lasers (FELs. We describe key features of a parallel macroparticle simulation code including three-dimensional (3D space-charge effects, short-range structure wakefields, coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR wakefields, and treatment of radio-frequency (rf accelerating cavities using maps obtained from axial field profiles. We present a study of the microbunching instability causing severe electron beam fragmentation in the longitudinal phase space which is a critical issue for future FELs. Using parameters for a proposed FEL linac at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL, we show that a large number of macroparticles (beyond 100 million is generally needed to control the numerical macroparticle shot noise and avoid overestimating the microbunching instability. We explore the effect of the longitudinal grid on simulation results. We also study the effect of initial uncorrelated energy spread on the final uncorrelated energy spread of the beam for the FEL linac.

  16. Initial source of microbunching instability studies in a free electron laser injector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Seletskiy

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available We present the first experimental studies of the initial source of electron beam microbunching instability in a free electron laser (FEL injector. By utilizing for the studies a transform-limited laser pulse at the photocathode, we eliminated laser-induced microbunching at the National Synchrotron Light Source Source Development Laboratory (SDL. The detailed measurements of the resulting electron beam led us to conclude that, at SDL, microbunching arising from shot noise is not amplified to any significant level, thereby allowing us to set an upper limit on the initial modulation depth of microbunching arising from shot noise. Our analysis demonstrated that the only significant source of microbunching instability under normal operational conditions at SDL is the longitudinal modulation of the photocathode laser pulse. Our work shows that assuring a longitudinally smoothed photocathode laser pulse allows mitigating microbunching instability at a typical FEL injector with a moderate microbunching gain.

  17. Fusion technologies for Laser Inertial Fusion Energy (LIFE∗

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kramer K.J.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The Laser Inertial Fusion-based Energy (LIFE engine design builds upon on going progress at the National Ignition Facility (NIF and offers a near-term pathway to commercial fusion. Fusion technologies that are critical to success are reflected in the design of the first wall, blanket and tritium separation subsystems. The present work describes the LIFE engine-related components and technologies. LIFE utilizes a thermally robust indirect-drive target and a chamber fill gas. Coolant selection and a large chamber solid-angle coverage provide ample tritium breeding margin and high blanket gain. Target material selection eliminates the need for aggressive chamber clearing, while enabling recycling. Demonstrated tritium separation and storage technologies limit the site tritium inventory to attractive levels. These key technologies, along with the maintenance and advanced materials qualification program have been integrated into the LIFE delivery plan. This describes the development of components and subsystems, through prototyping and integration into a First Of A Kind power plant.

  18. Fusion technologies for Laser Inertial Fusion Energy (LIFE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, K. J.; Latkowski, J. F.; Abbott, R. P.; Anklam, T. P.; Dunne, A. M.; El-Dasher, B. S.; Flowers, D. L.; Fluss, M. J.; Lafuente, A.; Loosmore, G. A.; Morris, K. R.; Moses, E.; Reyes, S.

    2013-11-01

    The Laser Inertial Fusion-based Energy (LIFE) engine design builds upon on going progress at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) and offers a near-term pathway to commercial fusion. Fusion technologies that are critical to success are reflected in the design of the first wall, blanket and tritium separation subsystems. The present work describes the LIFE engine-related components and technologies. LIFE utilizes a thermally robust indirect-drive target and a chamber fill gas. Coolant selection and a large chamber solid-angle coverage provide ample tritium breeding margin and high blanket gain. Target material selection eliminates the need for aggressive chamber clearing, while enabling recycling. Demonstrated tritium separation and storage technologies limit the site tritium inventory to attractive levels. These key technologies, along with the maintenance and advanced materials qualification program have been integrated into the LIFE delivery plan. This describes the development of components and subsystems, through prototyping and integration into a First Of A Kind power plant. This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  19. Conductors, semiconductors and insulators irradiated with short-wavelength free-electron laser

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Krzywinski, J.; Sobierajski, R.; Jurek, M.; Nietubyc, R.; Pelka, J. B.; Juha, Libor; Bittner, Michal; Létal, V.; Vorlíček, Vladimír; Andrejczuk, A.; Feldhaus, J.; Keitel, B.; Saldin, E.; Schneidmiller, E.A.; Treusch, R.; Yurkov, M. V.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 101, č. 4 (2007), 043107/1-043107/4 ISSN 0021-8979 R&D Projects: GA MŠk 1P04LA235; GA MŠk LC510; GA MŠk(CZ) LC528 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100523 Keywords : free-electron laser * extreme ultraviolet * ablation * laser-matter interaction Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 2.171, year: 2007

  20. Study of laser induced ablation with focused ion beam/scanning electron microscope devices

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bussoli, M.; Batani, D.; Desai, T.; Canova, F.; Milani, M.; Trtica, M.; Gakovic, B.; Krouský, Eduard

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 25, - (2007), s. 121-125 ISSN 0263-0346 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC528 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100523 Keywords : electron emission relaxation region * ion flux * laser plasma generation * laser power * plasma heating * plasma interaction * target heating Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Laser s Impact factor: 4.696, year: 2007