WorldWideScience

Sample records for technologies including digital

  1. Digital security technology simplified.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scaglione, Bernard J

    2007-01-01

    Digital security technology is making great strides in replacing analog and other traditional security systems including CCTV card access, personal identification and alarm monitoring applications. Like any new technology, the author says, it is important to understand its benefits and limitations before purchasing and installing, to ensure its proper operation and effectiveness. This article is a primer for security directors on how digital technology works. It provides an understanding of the key components which make up the foundation for digital security systems, focusing on three key aspects of the digital security world: the security network, IP cameras and IP recorders.

  2. Digital Sensor Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, Ken D. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Quinn, Edward L. [Technology Resources, Dana Point, CA (United States); Mauck, Jerry L. [Technology Resources, Dana Point, CA (United States); Bockhorst, Richard M. [Technology Resources, Dana Point, CA (United States)

    2015-02-01

    The nuclear industry has been slow to incorporate digital sensor technology into nuclear plant designs due to concerns with digital qualification issues. However, the benefits of digital sensor technology for nuclear plant instrumentation are substantial in terms of accuracy and reliability. This paper, which refers to a final report issued in 2013, demonstrates these benefits in direct comparisons of digital and analog sensor applications. Improved accuracy results from the superior operating characteristics of digital sensors. These include improvements in sensor accuracy and drift and other related parameters which reduce total loop uncertainty and thereby increase safety and operating margins. An example instrument loop uncertainty calculation for a pressure sensor application is presented to illustrate these improvements. This is a side-by-side comparison of the instrument loop uncertainty for both an analog and a digital sensor in the same pressure measurement application. Similarly, improved sensor reliability is illustrated with a sample calculation for determining the probability of failure on demand, an industry standard reliability measure. This looks at equivalent analog and digital temperature sensors to draw the comparison. The results confirm substantial reliability improvement with the digital sensor, due in large part to ability to continuously monitor the health of a digital sensor such that problems can be immediately identified and corrected. This greatly reduces the likelihood of a latent failure condition of the sensor at the time of a design basis event. Notwithstanding the benefits of digital sensors, there are certain qualification issues that are inherent with digital technology and these are described in the report. One major qualification impediment for digital sensor implementation is software common cause failure (SCCF).

  3. Digital Sensor Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ted Quinn; Jerry Mauck; Richard Bockhorst; Ken Thomas

    2013-07-01

    The nuclear industry has been slow to incorporate digital sensor technology into nuclear plant designs due to concerns with digital qualification issues. However, the benefits of digital sensor technology for nuclear plant instrumentation are substantial in terms of accuracy, reliability, availability, and maintainability. This report demonstrates these benefits in direct comparisons of digital and analog sensor applications. It also addresses the qualification issues that must be addressed in the application of digital sensor technology.

  4. Digital Technology Entrepreneurship

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giones, Ferran; Brem, Alexander

    2017-01-01

    Technology entrepreneurship is an established concept in academia. However, recent developments in the context of digital entrepreneurship call for revision and advance- ment. The multiple possible combinations of technology and entrepreneurship have res- ulted in a diversity of phenomena...... with significantly different characteristics and socio-economic impact. This article is focused on the identification and description of technology entrepreneurship in times of digitization. Based on current examples, we identify and describe characterizations of technology entrepreneurship, digital techno- logy...... entrepreneurship, and digital entrepreneurship. With this new delineation of terms, we would like to foster discussion between researchers, entrepreneurs, and policy makers on the impact of digitization on entrepreneurship, and set a future research agenda....

  5. Digital Actuator Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ken Thomas; Ted Quinn; Jerry Mauck; Richard Bockhorst

    2014-09-01

    There are significant developments underway in new types of actuators for power plant active components. Many of these make use of digital technology to provide a wide array of benefits in performance of the actuators and in reduced burden to maintain them. These new product offerings have gained considerable acceptance in use in process plants. In addition, they have been used in conventional power generation very successfully. This technology has been proven to deliver the benefits promised and substantiate the claims of improved performance. The nuclear industry has been reluctant to incorporate digital actuator technology into nuclear plant designs due to concerns due to a number of concerns. These could be summarized as cost, regulatory uncertainty, and a certain comfort factor with legacy analog technology. The replacement opportunity for these types of components represents a decision point for whether to invest in more modern technology that would provide superior operational and maintenance benefits. Yet, the application of digital technology has been problematic for the nuclear industry, due to qualification and regulatory issues. With some notable exceptions, the result has been a continuing reluctance to undertake the risks and uncertainties of implementing digital actuator technology when replacement opportunities present themselves. Rather, utilities would typically prefer to accept the performance limitations of the legacy analog actuator technologies to avoid impacts to project costs and schedules. The purpose of this report is to demonstrate that the benefits of digital actuator technology can be significant in terms of plant performance and that it is worthwhile to address the barriers currently holding back the widespread development and use of this technology. It addresses two important objectives in pursuit of the beneficial use of digital actuator technology for nuclear power plants: 1. To demonstrate the benefits of digital actuator

  6. Science & Technology Digital Library

    OpenAIRE

    Solodovnik, Iryna

    2014-01-01

    This document contains information on the activities carried out within the project Science & Technology Digital Library and in particular, it describes the Metadata Core Reference Model. Metadata are strategic for semantic interoperability to and, from the repository. Metadata are essential for available and safe management of digital objects, and for their sustainability and preservation. For these reasons, the project needs to define a specific metadata model. The purpose of this document ...

  7. CCTV networking and digital technology

    CERN Document Server

    Damjanovski, Vlado

    2005-01-01

    Closed circuit television (CCTV) is experiencing a leap in technology using digital techniques, networking and the Internet. The new edition of this high-level professional reference retains the particulars that made the first edition a success, including the details of CCD cameras, lenses, coaxial cables, fiber-optics, and system design, but it is expanded to cover all video compression techniques used in the ever increasing assortment of digital video recorders (DVRs) available on the market today. This new edition of the book CCTV demystifies DVR technology. It also serves to clarify the te

  8. Implementation digital technologies in nuclear utilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiegand, C.; Maselli, A.J., E-mail: Tony.Maselli@Invensys.com [Invensys Operations Management, London (United Kingdom)

    2012-07-01

    The introduction of digital technologies into the nuclear industry has assisted in many ways and made many of the Life Extensions and Uprates a possibility. But with this introduction of digital technologies comes some potentially challenging issues which need to be addressed for ultimate project success. This presentation discusses what a nuclear utility should consider and establish when implementing digital technologies in their plant. Digital technologies have been employed in many safety critical industries such as Aerospace, Pharmaceutical, Oil and Gas, and Chemical. However, nuclear industry implementation of digital technologies has been slow and in many ways tenuous. There are even documented operating experience events in which plant trips/SCRAMs occurred during a digital system implementation. This presentation aims to prevent those issues drawing upon the lessons learned over the past 5 years. Considerations include general challenges to overcome when implementing Digital Technologies, how to justify and execute projects, evaluation of resource knowledge, and the new challenges of Cyber Security. (author)

  9. Implementation digital technologies in nuclear utilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiegand, C.; Maselli, A.J.

    2012-01-01

    The introduction of digital technologies into the nuclear industry has assisted in many ways and made many of the Life Extensions and Uprates a possibility. But with this introduction of digital technologies comes some potentially challenging issues which need to be addressed for ultimate project success. This presentation discusses what a nuclear utility should consider and establish when implementing digital technologies in their plant. Digital technologies have been employed in many safety critical industries such as Aerospace, Pharmaceutical, Oil and Gas, and Chemical. However, nuclear industry implementation of digital technologies has been slow and in many ways tenuous. There are even documented operating experience events in which plant trips/SCRAMs occurred during a digital system implementation. This presentation aims to prevent those issues drawing upon the lessons learned over the past 5 years. Considerations include general challenges to overcome when implementing Digital Technologies, how to justify and execute projects, evaluation of resource knowledge, and the new challenges of Cyber Security. (author)

  10. Incorporating digital technologies into science classes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilton, Annette; Hilton, Geoff

    2013-01-01

    The development of and increased accessibility to digital technologies in classrooms has many potential benefits for students and teachers; at the same time challenges exist for teachers to develop and maintain skills with digital technologies and to effectively use these skills to promote student...... learning. There is a need for research that examines the ways in which digital technologies impact on teaching practices and learning outcomes. This paper describes case studies from two larger studies that examined ways in which digital technologies could be used to promote students’ understanding...... in science. The first case study involved primary school students (12 years old) using digital video production to record and represent their learning in science. This study extended writing-to-learn approaches to include video production to learn. The second case study involved Year 11 chemistry students...

  11. Fast digitization and digital receiver technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimball, Ralph C.

    2002-01-01

    The potentially lucrative wireless market has led to technological advances in mixed signal devices such as high speed, high resolution A/D and D/A converters. This same market has also driven the development of high performance multi-channel digital receiver and digital transmitter ICs. Similarly, advances in semiconductor processes, coupled with the need for reduced time-to-market, has led to the development of large, enhanced performance, in-circuit programmable logic devices. A review of the key characteristics of these mixed-signal, signal processing and programmable logic devices is presented. The application of these devices and technologies to the instrumentation of Accelerators and Storage Rings is discussed and presented by way of examples. Issues relating to the requirements associated with real-time processing, I/O throughput, reconfigurability, reliability, maintainability and packaging requirements are also addressed

  12. Art Education Technology: Digital Storytelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Sheng Kuan

    2007-01-01

    The application of digital storytelling to art education is an interdisciplinary, inquiry-based, hands-on project that integrates the arts, education, local communities, technology, and storytelling. Through digital storytelling, students develop and apply multiliteracy skills, aesthetic sensitivities, and critical faculties to address greater…

  13. SCORE DIGITAL TECHNOLOGY: THE CONVERGENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chernyshov Alexander V.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Explores the role of digital scorewriters in today's culture, education, and music industry and media environment. The main principle of the development of software is not only publishing innovation (relating to the sheet music, and integration into the area of composition, arrangement, education, creative process for works based on digital technology (films, television and radio broadcasting, Internet, audio and video art. Therefore the own convergence of musically-computer technology is a total phenomenon: notation program combined with means MIDI-sequencer, audio and video editor. The article contains the unique interview with the creator of music notation processors.

  14. Interviewing Objects: Including Educational Technologies as Qualitative Research Participants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Catherine A.; Thompson, Terrie Lynn

    2011-01-01

    This article argues the importance of including significant technologies-in-use as key qualitative research participants when studying today's digitally enhanced learning environments. We gather a set of eight heuristics to assist qualitative researchers in "interviewing" technologies-in-use (or other relevant objects), drawing on concrete…

  15. Using digital technology to enhance restorative dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fasbinder, Dennis

    2012-10-01

    While there are many benefits for dental practices that incorporate digital systems into their workflow, the dental team must first master the learning curve involved in order to maximize their advantages for creating well-fitting restorations. This article describes the current systems-both digital impression systems and chairside CAD/CAM systems-including software and digital cameras and scanners. The author emphasizes that to consistently capture accurate impressions with this technology, the dental team must continue to rely on traditional skills such as achieving optimal soft-tissue retraction and maintaining moisture control and isolation.

  16. Digital Technologies as Education Innovation at Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kryukov, Vladimir; Gorin, Alexey

    2017-01-01

    This paper analyses the use of digital technology-based education innovations in higher education. It demonstrated that extensive implementation of digital technologies in universities is the main factor conditioning the acceleration of innovative changes in educational processes, while digital technologies themselves become one of the key…

  17. Integration of spatial information technology for digital urban planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, Anrong; Shi, Huizhen; He, Xindong; Li, Yongfu

    2007-06-01

    Integration of spatial information technology for digital urban planning (DUP) was studied in this paper based on analyzing the challenges of digital city upon current urban planning as well as its developing trend. Three subjects related to the spatial information technology and integration were discussed in this paper. First of all, the technology methodology system of digital urban planning was built up, and the position and functions of spatial information technology in digital urban planning were defined. Secondly, the technical integratation approaches of spatial information technology for digital urban planning was discussed in three levels, which include data level, function level, and platform level. Thirdly, the integrated application approaches of spatial information technology for digital urban planning were suggested according to the characteristics of master urban planning and detailed urban planning, which include three steps, such as DUP data preparation, DUP scheme creation, and DUP scheme submission.

  18. Current State of Digital Reference in Primary and Secondary Education; The Technological Challenges of digital Reference; Question Negotiation and the Technological Environment; Evaluation of Chat Reference Service Quality; Visual Resource Reference: Collaboration between Digital Museums and Digital Libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lankes, R. David; Penka, Jeffrey T.; Janes, Joseph; Silverstein, Joanne; White, Marilyn Domas; Abels, Eileen G.; Kaske, Neal; Goodrum, Abby A.

    2003-01-01

    Includes five articles that discuss digital reference in elementary and secondary education; the need to understand the technological environment of digital reference; question negotiation in digital reference; a pilot study that evaluated chat reference service quality; and collaborative digital museum and digital library reference services. (LRW)

  19. 76 FR 24914 - Digital River Education Services, Inc., a Division of Digital River, Inc., Including Workers...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-03

    ... Digital River Education Services acquired Journey Education Marketing (JEM) in August 2010. Some workers... DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Employment and Training Administration [TA-W-74,975] Digital River Education Services, Inc., a Division of Digital River, Inc., Including Workers Whose Unemployment Insurance (UI...

  20. Secondary School Teachers' Approaches to Teaching Composition Using Digital Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wise, Stuart

    2016-01-01

    The music industry in the 21 century uses digital technology in a wide range of applications including in performance, in composition and in recording and publishing. In this article, I consider how the impact of digital technologies may be affecting pedagogical processes adopted by secondary music teachers, particularly in the area of…

  1. Digital Technology and Student Cognitive Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavanaugh, J. Michael; Giapponi, Catherine C.; Golden, Timothy D.

    2016-01-01

    Digital technology has proven a beguiling, some even venture addictive, presence in the lives of our 21st century (millennial) students. And while screen technology may offer select cognitive benefits, there is mounting evidence in the cognitive neuroscience literature that digital technology is restructuring the way our students read and think,…

  2. Digital Natives: Creating Emergent Exhibitions through Digital Technologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smith, Rachel Charlotte; Iversen, Ole Sejer; Dindler, Christian

    2011-01-01

    Digital Technology can support the creation of dialogical spaces in the museum, both playful and reflective, that allow audiences to engage in the ongoing construction and reproduction of cultural heritage creating novel connections between self and others and between past, present and future...... as an integral part of the exhibition to encourage dialogue between audiences and the exhibition materials and thereby investigate how the exhibition emerge as a result of this dialogic co-construction inside the exhibition space. In short, the opportunities offered by digital technologies prompts us to consider....... In this way, digital technology can contribute to the creation of emergent exhibitions in which the exhibition is created in dialogue between audiences and the museum. We present experiences from a current research project, the Digital Natives exhibition, in which digital technology was designed...

  3. Optical Network Technologies for Future Digital Cinema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sajid Nazir

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Digital technology has transformed the information flow and support infrastructure for numerous application domains, such as cellular communications. Cinematography, traditionally, a film based medium, has embraced digital technology leading to innovative transformations in its work flow. Digital cinema supports transmission of high resolution content enabled by the latest advancements in optical communications and video compression. In this paper we provide a survey of the optical network technologies for supporting this bandwidth intensive traffic class. We also highlight the significance and benefits of the state of the art in optical technologies that support the digital cinema work flow.

  4. On the digital technology of microfilms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Zhihong

    2012-01-01

    The perfect combination of microfilm digital technology and computer technology not only shows the agility, the logicality and the convenience of the computer file management, but also shows the permanence, the authenticity and the legal validity of the microfilm technology. Therefore, the microfilm digital technology has a wide application prospect in the archives departments, and will further enhance the level of modernization of file management. (author)

  5. Digital Technologies: From Vision to Action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armistead, Stuart

    2016-01-01

    The interest and uptake in utilising digital technologies in education appears to be exponential. With the rollout of ultrafast broadband and the development of the Network for Learning in New Zealand, school leaders face the challenges and opportunity of deciding when, what and how they go about implementing digital technologies in their schools.…

  6. Digital health technology and diabetes management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cahn, Avivit; Akirov, Amit; Raz, Itamar

    2018-01-01

    Diabetes care is largely dependent on patient self-management and empowerment, given that patients with diabetes must make numerous daily decisions as to what to eat, when to exercise, and determine their insulin dose and timing if required. In addition, patients and providers are generating vast amounts of data from many sources, including electronic medical records, insulin pumps, sensors, glucometers, and other wearables, as well as evolving genomic, proteomic, metabolomics, and microbiomic data. Multiple digital tools and apps have been developed to assist patients to choose wisely, and to enhance their compliance by using motivational tools and incorporating incentives from social media and gaming techniques. Healthcare teams (HCTs) and health administrators benefit from digital developments that sift through the enormous amounts of patient-generated data. Data are acquired, integrated, analyzed, and presented in a self-explanatory manner, highlighting important trends and items that require attention. The use of decision support systems may propose data-driven actions that, for the most, require final approval by the patient or physician before execution and, once implemented, may improve patient outcomes. The digital diabetes clinic aims to incorporate all digital patient data and provide individually tailored virtual or face-to-face visits to those persons who need them most. Digital diabetes care has demonstrated only modest HbA1c reduction in multiple studies and borderline cost-effectiveness, although patient satisfaction appears to be increased. Better understanding of the barriers to digital diabetes care and identification of unmet needs may yield improved utilization of this evolving technology in a safe, effective, and cost-saving manner. © 2017 Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  7. Digitalization and the global technology trends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ignat, V.

    2017-08-01

    Digitalization, connected products and services, and shortening innovation cycles are widely discussed topics in management practice and theory and demand for new concepts. We analysed how companies innovated their business models and how are the new the technology trends. We found out, that have a positive approach to digitalization but the technology strategy still runs its original business model. Digitalization forces to new solution orientation. For companies it is necessary to master the digital transformation, new innovations have to be developed. Furthermore, digitalization / Industry 4.0 linking the real-life factory with virtual reality, will play an increasingly important role in global manufacturing. Companies have to obtain new digital capabilities, in order to make their company sustainable for the future. A long term growth and welfare in Europe could be guaranteed only by new technology innovation.

  8. [Progress in digital PCR technology and application].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jiaqi; Su, Guocheng; Su, Wenjin; Zhou, Changyi

    2017-02-25

    Digital PCR is an emerging analysis technology for absolute quantification after realtime-PCR. Through digital PCR, single DNA molecules are distributed into isolated reactions, and the product with fluorescence signal can be detected and analyzed after amplification. With the advantages of higher sensitivity and accuracy, digital PCR, independent of a standard curve, is developing rapidly and applied widely to the next generation sequencing and detection fields, such as gene mutation, copy number variation, microorganism, and genetically modified food. In this article, we reviewed the quantitative method and research progress of digital PCR technology in the main application fields.

  9. Digital technologies in the context of inclusion

    OpenAIRE

    Shemanov A.Yu.

    2016-01-01

    This paper discusses the application of digital technologies in the development of inclusive education from the point of view of collisions between individual and social models of inclusion, technological determinism and contextual approach. It examines the range of approaches to the educational integration. Following K. Иbbott, it examines three areas of research of digital technologies (concerning training and repetition, supporting the educational process and creating learning opportunitie...

  10. Technology Transfer in Digital Era: Legal Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Anatol’yevich Bliznets

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The spread of disruptive technology in the digital era is the ruling condition of modern sustainable development. The authors proceed from the fact that legal tools for the creation and use, protection of advanced technologies provide the technology transfer process from the owner to interested parties for further practical, commercial application or further improvement. The article analyzes the legal positions of the concept of technology, legal ways to use modern technologies, stages of their implementation and practical application. In the innovation process legal mechanism in combination with the modern means of innovative development stimulates the creation and transfer of new technologies and at the same time it is a key factor for sustainable development in the context of modern digital technology revolution. In the modern digital revolution, the technology transfer acquires new features and ways for the dissemination of technical innovation, which creates new challenges for legal theory and practice, and legal tools should meet the challenges of the time.

  11. Colloquium: Digital Technologies--Help or Hindrance for the Humanities?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, Elton; Bissell, Chris; Hardwick, Lorna; Jones, Allan; Ridge, Mia; Wolffe, John

    2012-01-01

    This article offers reflections arising from a recent colloquium at the Open University on the implications of the development of digital humanities for research in arts disciplines, and also for their interactions with computing and technology. Particular issues explored include the ways in which the digital turn in humanities research is also a…

  12. Digital technologies in Day-care institutions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schrøder, Vibeke; Søndergaard, Steen

    , in part by new technologies designed with an intuitive and inviting user interface. In a one-year research project ’Digital tools in day-care-institutions’ (2015) financed by The Danish Agency for Digitisation and The Ministry of Education we have investigated the role of digital technologies in relation...... to questions of learning and the agenda of Pedagogical quality in early childhood education. Our part of the project has had a special focus on relations between use of technology and children´s possibilities of participation in learning environments and childrens’ communities. The data in the project......Digital technologies are gaining an ever increasing access into the activities in Danish and Nordic day-care institutions. The traditional critical viewpoint of technologies as being opposed to the well-being of children is challenged in part by substantial access to digital tools in infant life...

  13. Digital Technologies and a Changing Profession

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plesner, Ursula; Raviola, Elena

    Digital technologies are profoundly disturbing not only news delivery, but also the whole organization of news work. The relationship between digital technologies and news has been investigated especially in media and journalism studies. Scholars in these fields have followed the introduction...... of digital technologies into news work (Ursell, 2001; Pavlik, 2000, 2013; Saltzis and Dickinson, 2008; Meikle and Redden, 2011, Plesner 2010), and dealt with a range of organizational consequences of this development. In studies of news organizations, it has been pointed out that the question of digital...... technology appropriation is not just important for technical or economic reasons, but because it affects organizational structures, work practices and representations (Boczkowski, 2004). For instance, reporters and editors must manage market pressures and time pressures in new ways (Klinenberg, 2005) due...

  14. Update on new technologies in digital mammography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patterson SK

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Stephanie K Patterson, Marilyn A Roubidoux Division of Breast Imaging, Department of Radiology, University of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor, MI, USA Abstract: Despite controversy regarding mammography's efficacy, it continues to be the most commonly used breast cancer-screening modality. With the development of digital mammography, some improved benefit has been shown in women with dense breast tissue. However, the density of breast tissue continues to limit the sensitivity of conventional mammography. We discuss the development of some derivative digital technologies, primarily digital breast tomosynthesis, and their strengths, weaknesses, and potential patient impact. Keywords: screening mammography, breast cancer, contrast media, digital breast tomosynthesis

  15. Digital signal processing - growth of a technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peek, J.B.H.

    1985-01-01

    The rapid development of microelectronics has led to an increasing extent in circuits and systems for digital signal processing. This happened first in professional applications, e.g. geophysics, astronomy and space flight, and now, with the Compact Disc player, these techniques have entered the consumer field. In the near future digital TV applications will undoubtedly follow. This article outlines a number of the developments behind the advancing 'digitization' of modern technology. The article also considers the main advantages and disadvantages of digital signal processing the main modules now used and some common applications. Particular attention is paid to medical applications. (Auth.)

  16. A review of digital radiography technology for valve inspection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoev, K.; Guerout, F.M.; Horn, D.

    2008-01-01

    There are thousands of valves in a nuclear power plant (NPP) used for control, safety and checks in various plant systems, so there is a well-identified need for fast and reliable inspection and diagnostics of valves. Digital radiography can provide considerable improvements to the inspection and testing procedures for valves in comparison to classical film radiography. These improvements can lead to significant financial advantages by providing real-time inspection results, significantly reduced inspection and decision-making time, and reduced operational cost. Digital image processing, including digital image enhancement, digital archiving, and digital communication of the images and the results, is also a considerable advantage over classical film radiography technology. Another advantage of digital radiography technology is the improved safety and the reduced environmental impact due to reduced exposure/test times, use of smaller exclusion zones, elimination of chemical processing, and absence of disposable materials. This paper reviews the existing technology and evaluates the potential of digital radiography for inspection and diagnostics of valves. Station needs and requirements are assessed, and the safety, environmental and economical constraints of digital radiography techniques estimated. The advantages and disadvantages of different digital radiography equipment are compared, and their limitations and characteristics studied. (author)

  17. A comparison of digital mammography detectors and emerging technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diffey, J.L.

    2015-01-01

    The overall diagnostic accuracy of digital mammography in the context of screening has been shown to be similar or slightly better than screen-film mammography. However, digital mammography encompasses both Computed Radiography (CR) and integrated Digital Radiography (DR) and there is increasing evidence to suggest that differences in detector technology are associated with variations in cancer detection rate, dose and image quality. These differences are examined in detail. Although digital mammography offers many advantages compared to screen-film, there are still some limitations with its use as a screening tool and reduced cancer detection in dense breasts remains an issue. Digital mammography detectors have paved the way for emerging technologies which may offer improvements. Taking the definition of mammography to only include X-ray imaging of the breast, this article focuses on tomosynthesis, contrast-enhanced digital mammography, stereoscopic mammography and dedicated breast computed tomography. Advanced software applications such as Computed Aided Detection (CAD) and quantitative breast density assessment are also presented. The benefits and limitations of each technique are discussed. - Highlights: • Digital detector technology affects cancer detection rate, dose and image quality. • Digital detectors have facilitated new technologies such as tomosynthesis. • 3-D techniques reduce superimposition and increase cancer detection in dense breasts. • Contrast-enhanced mammography demonstrates improved sensitivity and specificity.

  18. Tweens' Characterization of Digital Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brito, Pedro Quelhas

    2012-01-01

    The tweens are a transitional age group undergoing deep physical and psychological transformations. Based on a thirteen-focus group research design involving 103 students, and applying a tweens-centered approach, the characteristics of SMS, IM, Internet, digital photos, electronic games, and email were analyzed. Categories such as moral issues,…

  19. CONTEMPORARY DIGITAL TECHNOLOGIES AND INNOVATIONS IN HUMAN INTELLIGENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riabtseva, N.K.

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available New digital technologies not only “change language” (David Cristal, but also “upgrade” human intelligence making it perform new and uncommon operations. The present paper is an analysis and a survey of most prominent innovations in human intelligence, which are instigated by the latest digital information technologies. These innovations include, according to the point of view of outstanding specialists in contemporary digital technologies, such operations as multitasking, serendipity, connectivity, hypermodality, visuality, and cybersemiotic convergence of objective and virtual reality. The paper is based on the data presented in the publications of such outstanding “digital” specialists as Larry Rosen, Jay David Bolter, Steven Downes, Jay Lemke, Gunther Kress, Soren Brier, etc. In their works they particularly stress the impact of digital technologies and internet communication on all spheres of human activities, their role in the inner psychological and mental states, in professional and educational domain, as well as the importance of their investigation and a gap between the intensive development of digital technologies and their insufficient usage in scientific, didactic, social and cultural life. Special attention in the paper focuses on the tendency towards visualization in the global information flows and its role in information processing and knowledge transfer. The paper particularly stresses the fact that the impact of contemporary digital technologies on all spheres of human activities, including the intellectual one, needs further and profound investigation.

  20. Use of digital technology in addiction disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandawar, Mrunal; Narasimha, Venkata Lakshmi; Chand, Prabhat

    2018-02-01

    The expanding use of digital technology in mental health has widened the scope of emerging addiction interventions. This review focus on the use of technological advances in the field of addiction and mental health. We discuss about how these advances has been implemented in addiction treatment and research. Further, we also mention about the utilisation of these services in India.

  1. Leveraging Digital Technology in Social Studies Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundy, Sarah Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    Today's K-12 classrooms are increasingly comprised of students who accomplish much of their informal learning through digital media and technology. In response, a growing number of educators are considering how they might draw upon these informal learning experiences to support student engagement and learning in the classroom through technology.…

  2. How we cope with digital technology

    CERN Document Server

    Turner, Phil

    2013-01-01

    Digital technology has become a defining characteristic of modern life. Almost everyone uses it, we all rely on it, and many of us own a multitude of devices. What is more, we all expect to be able to use these technologies ""straight out the box."" This lecture discusses how we are able to do this without apparent problems. We are able to use digital technology because we have learned to cope with it. ""To cope"" is used in philosophy to mean ""absorbed engagement,"" that is, we use our smart phones and tablet computers with little or no conscious effort. In human-computer interaction this ki

  3. Physical aspects of digital mammography technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hermann, K.P.; Funke, M.; Grabbe, E.

    2002-01-01

    The establishment of digital mammography systems constitutes a slow process, the reason for this being the general need of particular image quality in mammography. This article provides an overview of the physical basis of digital mammography with high image quality and dose as low as reasonably achievable. The trade-off of high contrast resolution and effective quantum efficiency of the imaging system on the one hand, and the demand of high spatial resolution or very small pixel size on the other hand is discussed. The actual status of the available digital detector technology for mammography is described. The digital systems presently available are superior to conventional screen-film mammographic systems with respect to contrast resolution. An outlook on possible further developments in the field of digital mammography is presented. (orig.) [de

  4. Digital technology and the conservation of nature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arts, Koen; van der Wal, René; Adams, William M

    2015-11-01

    Digital technology is changing nature conservation in increasingly profound ways. We describe this impact and its significance through the concept of 'digital conservation', which we found to comprise five pivotal dimensions: data on nature, data on people, data integration and analysis, communication and experience, and participatory governance. Examining digital innovation in nature conservation and addressing how its development, implementation and diffusion may be steered, we warn against hypes, techno-fix thinking, good news narratives and unverified assumptions. We identify a need for rigorous evaluation, more comprehensive consideration of social exclusion, frameworks for regulation and increased multi-sector as well as multi-discipline awareness and cooperation. Along the way, digital technology may best be reconceptualised by conservationists from something that is either good or bad, to a dual-faced force in need of guidance.

  5. Digital terrestrial television broadcasting technology and system

    CERN Document Server

    2015-01-01

    Now under massive deployment worldwide, digital terrestrial television broadcasting (DTTB) offers one of the most attractive ways to deliver digital TV over the VHF/UHF band. Written by a team of experts for specialists and non-specialists alike, this book serves as a comprehensive guide to DTTB. It covers the fundamentals of channel coding and modulation technologies used in DTTB, as well as receiver technology for synchronization, channel estimation, and equalization. It also covers the recently introduced Chinese DTTB standard, using the SFN network in Hong Kong as an example.

  6. The Spanish audiovisual sector facing digital technologies

    OpenAIRE

    Teodoro, Emma

    2010-01-01

    The audiovisual sector is complex because it involves the activity of different industries related to content production, telecommunications, media, as well as the Internet and services of the Information Society. The emergence of new technological changes resulting from the digitization process and the convergence of information technologies and telecommunications in connection with the storage, processing and distribution of information are creating new challenges within this sector. The EU...

  7. Bridging storytelling traditions with digital technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cueva, Melany; Kuhnley, Regina; Revels, Laura J; Cueva, Katie; Dignan, Mark; Lanier, Anne P

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to learn how Community Health Workers (CHWs) in Alaska perceived digital storytelling as a component of the "Path to Understanding Cancer" curriculum and as a culturally respectful tool for sharing cancer-related health messages. A pre-course written application, end-of-course written evaluation, and internet survey informed this project. Digital storytelling was included in seven 5-day cancer education courses (May 2009-2012) in which 67 CHWs each created a personal 2-3 minute cancer-related digital story. Participant-chosen digital story topics included tobacco cessation, the importance of recommended cancer screening exams, cancer survivorship, loss, grief and end-of-life comfort care, and self-care as patient care providers. All participants completed an end-of-course written evaluation. In July 2012, contact information was available for 48 participants, of whom 24 completed an internet survey. All 67 participants successfully completed a digital story which they shared and discussed with course members. On the written post-course evaluation, all participants reported that combining digital storytelling with cancer education supported their learning and was a culturally respectful way to provide health messages. Additionally, 62 of 67 CHWs reported that the course increased their confidence to share cancer information with their communities. Up to 3 years post-course, all 24 CHW survey respondents reported they had shown their digital story. Of note, 23 of 24 CHWs also reported change in their own behavior as a result of the experience. All CHWs, regardless of computer skills, successfully created a digital story as part of the cancer education course. CHWs reported that digital stories enhanced their learning and were a culturally respectful way to share cancer-related information. Digital storytelling gave the power of the media into the hands of CHWs to increase their cancer knowledge, facilitate patient and community cancer

  8. Bridging storytelling traditions with digital technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melany Cueva

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The purpose of this project was to learn how Community Health Workers (CHWs in Alaska perceived digital storytelling as a component of the “Path to Understanding Cancer” curriculum and as a culturally respectful tool for sharing cancer-related health messages. Design. A pre-course written application, end-of-course written evaluation, and internet survey informed this project. Methods. Digital storytelling was included in seven 5-day cancer education courses (May 2009–2012 in which 67 CHWs each created a personal 2–3 minute cancer-related digital story. Participant-chosen digital story topics included tobacco cessation, the importance of recommended cancer screening exams, cancer survivorship, loss, grief and end-of-life comfort care, and self-care as patient care providers. All participants completed an end-of-course written evaluation. In July 2012, contact information was available for 48 participants, of whom 24 completed an internet survey. Results. All 67 participants successfully completed a digital story which they shared and discussed with course members. On the written post-course evaluation, all participants reported that combining digital storytelling with cancer education supported their learning and was a culturally respectful way to provide health messages. Additionally, 62 of 67 CHWs reported that the course increased their confidence to share cancer information with their communities. Up to 3 years post-course, all 24 CHW survey respondents reported they had shown their digital story. Of note, 23 of 24 CHWs also reported change in their own behaviour as a result of the experience. Conclusions. All CHWs, regardless of computer skills, successfully created a digital story as part of the cancer education course. CHWs reported that digital stories enhanced their learning and were a culturally respectful way to share cancer-related information. Digital storytelling gave the power of the media into the hands of CHWs

  9. Technological Integration of Acquisitions in Digital Industries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henningsson, Stefan; Toppenberg, Gustav

    2015-01-01

    Acquisitions have become essential tools to retain the technological edge in digital industries. This paper analyses the technological integration challenges in such acquisitions. Acquirers in digital industries are typically platform leaders in platform markets. They acquire (a) other platform...... providers to extend the platform core and to derive network effects by consolidating platform user groups, and (b) complement providers to create monopoly positions for the complements and for innovation complementarity. To enable these acquisition benefits, acquirers face technological integration...... challenges in process and product integration. Through a case study of Network Solutions Corp. (NSC), a Fortune 500 company that has acquired more than 175 business units, we develop four propositions explaining how the benefits of platform core and complement acquisitions are differently contingent...

  10. Handbook of digital games and entertainment technologies

    CERN Document Server

    Rauterberg, Matthias; Ciancarini, Paolo

    2017-01-01

    The topics treated in this handbook cover all areas of games and entertainment technologies, such as digital entertainment; technology, design/art, and sociology. The handbook consists of contributions from top class scholars and researchers from the interdisciplinary topic areas.  The aim of this handbook is to serving as a key reference work in the field and provides readers with a holistic picture of this interdisciplinary field covering technical issues, aesthetic/design issues, and sociological issues. At present, there is no reference work in the field that provides such a broad and complete picture of the field. Engineers and researchers who want to learn about this emerging area will be able to find adequate answers regarding technology issues on digital entertainment. Designers and artists can learn how their skills and expertise can contribute to this emerging area. Also researchers working in the field of sociology and psychology will find how their experience and knowledge are connected to other ...

  11. Digital Technology and the Interactive Television

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ozéias Teixeira de Souza

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available In this article it is analyzed the impact that the digital technology process causes in the way that television participates of the social life in Brazil. Trying a non-hermeneutic approach, it is proposed to think this new role of television, from the materiality existing on this media that can bring more interactivity and conducts the changes over people behavior. In our opinion, we realize that materiality can support the transposition of the nowadays analogical interaction form – the televiewer-television model – to a user-machine model in the digital television.

  12. Analog-digital converters for industrial applications including an introduction to digital-analog converters

    CERN Document Server

    Ohnhäuser, Frank

    2015-01-01

    This book offers students and those new to the topic of analog-to-digital converters (ADCs) a broad introduction, before going into details of the state-of-the-art design techniques for SAR and DS converters, including the latest research topics, which are valuable for IC design engineers as well as users of ADCs in applications. The book then addresses important topics, such as correct connectivity of ADCs in an application, the verification, characterization and testing of ADCs that ensure high-quality end products. Analog-to-digital converters are the central element in any data processing system and regulation loops such as modems or electrical motor drives. They significantly affect the performance and resolution of a system or end product. System development engineers need to be familiar with the performance parameters of the converters and understand the advantages and disadvantages of the various architectures. Integrated circuit development engineers have to overcome the problem of achieving high per...

  13. How Digital Health Technology Aids Physicians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nik Tehrani

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available There is so much health and medical information available today that physicians cannot be expected to know it all. Thus, advances in technology have become a necessity for doctors to track patient information and care, and add to patient databases for reference and to conduct research. It is important to understand the new language of digital health, such as Personal Health Record (PHR, Electronic Medical Record (EMR and Electronic Health Record (EHR, all of which sound similar, but are not interchangeable. The ideal comprehensive IT system would empower patients, advance healthcare delivery and transform patient data into life-saving research (Kaiser, 2015. OmniFluent Health is language translation software that will allow for better patient/practitioner communication and avoid errors. Digital technology employs the use of big data that is shared, accessed, compiled and applied using analytics. However, information transfer, especially as mandated by current ethics of use of technology, has resulted into breach of patient privacy. Improved digital technology is providing the health care field with upgrades that are necessary, electronic files and health records, from mobile apps, and remote monitoring devices.

  14. Application of Digital Music Technology in Music Pedagogy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peiwei Zhang

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper expounds the concept and current development of digital music technology in modern times by exploration and analysis around the music technology, in order to better develop music pedagogy. In allusion to the contemporary music pedagogy, a new instruction idea is proposed by analyzing the digital music technologies such as MIDI, digital audio and other new music carriers, namely, an instruction model which integrates the digital music technology and the traditional teaching mode and means in the music classroom of middle school. In order to validate the availability of digital music technology, this paper also contemplates the current development of digital music industry and demonstrates the importance of digital music in modern music pedagogy by drilling down the digital music characteristics. In the end, it is concluded that the digital music technology introduced in music classroom instruction of middle schools contributes to cultivating students' music learning capacity.

  15. Sustainability, cognitive technologies and the digital semiosphere

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruni, Luis Emilio

    2015-01-01

    The convergence of digital and multimodal cognitive technologies offers the possibility to interact in an ‘on-line’ cultural process mediated by new ways of representing our thoughts, emotions, ideas, beliefs, opinions and behaviours. Such technological integration not only alters and introduces...... innovations in the interactive and representational modes of networked media, perhaps inducing changes in our cognitive functions, but also conditions the global cultural dynamics by potentially organizing, funnelling, tagging and ‘semantically’ predigesting knowledge through the ‘intelligent’ digital...... technosphere. The ecology of ideas in such complex and accelerating semiotic space will present highly contradictory and dissonant tendencies in cultural processes. This may pose great difficulties for individuals, communities and whole cultural layers when trying to reconcile such tendencies...

  16. Applying Digital Technologies to Strengthen Nuclear Safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huffeteau, S.; Roy, C.

    2016-01-01

    Full text: The paper describes how the development of some information technologies can further contribute to the safety of nuclear facilities and their competitiveness. After repositioning the nuclear industry engineering practices in their historical and economic context, the paper describes five engineering practices or use cases widely developed especially in the aerospace industry: requirement management, business process enforcement by digitization of data and processes, facilities configuration management, engineering information unification, and digital licensing. Information technology (IT) plays a mandatory role for driving this change since IT is now mature enough to handle the level of complexity the nuclear industry requires. While the detailed evaluation of the expecting gains in cost decrease or safety increase can be difficult to quantify, the paper presents illustrative benefits reachable by a development of these practices. (author

  17. Preservice Teachers' Perceptions of Using Digital Technologies in Literacy Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierczynski, Melissa

    2015-01-01

    In order to best prepare our preservice teachers to incorporate digital technologies into future literacy instruction, we must first explore how they perceive implementation of digital technologies in literacy instruction. Limited research exists which examines the employment of digital technologies in literacy instruction, and even less considers…

  18. Digital technology and journalism: implications for Democracy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John V. Pavlik

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Digital technology has brought sweeping changes to journalism  and the social institutions it serves. Journalism has historically played a central role in the U.S. and other democracies, serving as a primary source of news and information for citizens on matters of public importance. This paper examines the implications of these changes for democracy. It explores the question of whether a more interactive form of journalism will produce a more engaged and informed electorate.

  19. DIGITAL TECHNOLOGY AND JOURNALISM: implications for Democracy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John V. Pavlik

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Digital technology has brought sweeping changes to journalism  and the social institutions it serves. Journalism has historically played a central role in the U.S. and other democracies, serving as a primary source of news and information for citizens on matters of public importance. This paper examines the implications of these changes for democracy. It explores the question of whether a more interactive form of journalism will produce a more engaged and informed electorate.

  20. Revolution of Nuclear Power Plant Design Through Digital Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, L.; Shi, J.; Chen, W.

    2015-01-01

    In the digital times, digital technology has penetrated into every industry. As the highest safety requirement standard, nuclear power industry needs digital technology more to breed high quality and efficiency. Digital power plant is derived from digital design and the digitisation of power plant transfer is an inevitable trend. This paper introduces the technical solutions and features of digital nuclear power plant construction by Shanghai Nuclear Engineering Research & Design Institute, points out the key points and technical difficulties that exist in the process of construction and can serve as references for further promoting construction of digital nuclear power plant. Digital technology is still flourishing. Although many problems will be encountered in construction, it is believed that digital technology will make nuclear power industry more safe, cost-effective and efficient. (author)

  1. Teachers' Use of Digital Technology in Secondary Music Education: Illustrations of Changing Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wise, Stuart; Greenwood, Janinka; Davis, Niki

    2011-01-01

    The music industry in the 21st century uses digital technology in a wide range of applications including performance, composition and in recording and publishing. Much of this digital technology is freely available via downloads from the internet, as part of software included with computers when they are purchased and via applications that are…

  2. Deconstructing Digital Natives: Young People, Technology, and the New Literacies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Michael, Ed.

    2011-01-01

    There have been many attempts to define the generation of students who emerged with the Web and new digital technologies in the early 1990s. The term "digital native" refers to the generation born after 1980, which has grown up in a world where digital technologies and the internet are a normal part of everyday life. Young people…

  3. Differentiating Digital Writing Instruction: The Intersection of Technology, Writing Instruction, and Digital Genre Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Nicole M.; Lambert, Claire

    2015-01-01

    U.S. adolescents' prior technology experiences and exposure to digital genres vary, but they will often write digital texts as they enter college and adulthood. We explored middle school students' digital writing instructional experience in the context of a university-based summer digital writing camp. The sixth- through eighth-grade adolescents…

  4. Classical Music, liveness and digital technologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steijn, Arthur

    2014-01-01

    Performances of classical composition music have seen a decline in their audiences for some years. Does the classical concert ritual scare people off? This notion has spurred off a development of design concepts directed at rethinking concert rituals in order to create new audience experiences...... of interrelated design experiments are presented which all share the ambition of integration digital technologies in life performances of classical music. A particular focus is put on the ongoing development of a design concept where interactive audio and visual experiences in an underground metro station shall...

  5. Developing Digital Technologies for Undergraduate University Mathematics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Triantafyllou, Eva; Timcenko, Olga

    2013-01-01

    adopt a participatory design method, involving collaboration with students and teachers. As a first step in our design, we developed in collaboration with teachers a set of visualization applets using GeoGebra for the “Mathematics for Multimedia Applications” course taught for Media Technology students...... during lectures and exercise time. During these observations we were able to investigate how the applets were used in practice but also to get insight in the challenges that the students face during mathematics learning. These findings together with student feedback inspire the next round of design...... requirements for the development of digital tools that support mathematics teaching and learning at university level....

  6. Utilising digital technology for dialogue and evaluation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærgaard, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    This article investigates how digital technology can enhance evaluation and eflection through dialogue in a theory lesson in the context of university college teaching. The pedagogical designs in the article vary from synchronous classroom evaluation on smartphones, to online discussion fora...... as dialogue facilitators. The article suggests methods for assessing enagement/disengagement instead of presence/absence in a theory lesson at a university college. The article compares and contrasts the practical use of Socrative and Online Discussions Forums in order to shed light on their different...

  7. Utilising digital technology for dialogue and evaluation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærgaard, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    This article investigates how digital technology can enhance evaluation and reflection through dialogue in a theory lesson in the context of university college teaching. The pedagogical designs in the article vary from synchronous classroom evaluation on smartphones, to online discussion fora...... as dialogue facilitators. The article suggests methods for assessing engagement/disengagement instead of presence/absence in a theory lesson at a university college. The article compares and contrasts the practical use of Socrative and Online Discussions Forums in order to shed light on their different...

  8. Digital Health Technologies to Promote Lifestyle Change and Adherence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Numan; Marvel, Francoise A; Wang, Jane; Martin, Seth S

    2017-08-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide with an estimated 17.5 million deaths annually, or 31% of all global deaths, according to the World Health Organization. The majority of these deaths are preventable by addressing lifestyle modification (i.e., smoking cessation, diet, obesity, and physical inactivity) and promoting medication adherence. At present, initiatives to develop cost-effective modalities to support self-management, lifestyle modification, and medication adherence are a leading priority. Digital health has rapidly emerged as technology with the potential to address this gap in cardiovascular disease self-management and transform the way healthcare has been traditionally delivered. However, limited evidence exists about the type of technologies available and how they differ in functionality, effectiveness, and application. We aimed to review the most important and relevant recent studies addressing health technologies to promote lifestyle change and medication adherence including text messaging, applications ("apps"), and wearable devices. The current literature indicates that digital health technologies will likely play a prominent role in future cardiovascular disease management, risk reduction, and delivery of care in both resource-rich and resource-limited settings. However, there is limited large-scale evidence to support adoption of existing interventions. Further clinical research and healthcare policy change are needed to move the promise of new digital health technologies towards reality.

  9. Digital Technology for Geological Field Mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rourke, Peter; Smith, Stuart; Vaughan, Alan; Ellis, Jenny

    2014-05-01

    The amount of time that students and professionals spend in the field has reduced over the past 25 years (Gibbs, 2012). Recent advances in technology are changing the way students and professionals are able to conduct geological field study. Applications such as Midland Valley Exploration's FieldMove Clino now allow the geologist to use their smartphone as a fast, georeferenced measuring device compared with a traditional compass-clinometer. Although we support the view that an understanding of field mapping and model building, taught at university level, is essential to give the geologist the ability to think in three and four dimensions, new technologies that automate the ability to digitise and visualise data in the field lead to a better appreciation of the geometry, scale, and evolution of geological structures and trapping mechanisms that will be encountered during a career in industry. The majority of future industry professionals own a smartphone or tablet device: A recent study found that four-fifths of new students own a smartphone and one-fifth own a tablet device (UCAS Media, 2013). This figure is increasing with each new intake of geoscience students. With the increased availability and affordability of smartphone and tablet devices, new techniques are being examined for digital data collection in the field. If the trend continues that geoscience students are likely to spend less time in the field than their predecessors, then the time available must be spent as effectively as possible. Digital devices allow students and professionals alike to optimise the time spent in the field, allowing more time to think about geological relationships, and highlighting areas of uncertainty that can be studied further. This poster will examine the use of new digital smartphone and tablet devices for the collection of geological field data.

  10. Digital technology to enable aging in place.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kwang-Il; Gollamudi, Shreya S; Steinhubl, Steven

    2017-02-01

    Aging, both of individuals and populations, presents challenges and opportunities. The multitude of morbidities and disabilities that are a too common component of aging represent significant challenges to individuals, their families and to healthcare systems. Aging in place is the ability to safely and comfortably maintain an independent and high quality of life in one's own home and community and is a highly desirable goal of most individuals with the additional benefit of significantly impacting the impending enormous healthcare burden. In order to make this possible, new care models that take advantage of novel technologies for tracking important physiologic and safety parameters need to be developed and implemented. By thoughtfully doing so, it can be possible to seamlessly provide preventative interventions when and as needed, detect the earliest signs of aggravation of chronic conditions, or identify and respond to any emergency situations, such as falls or cardiac arrest. In contrast to current approaches, caring for elderly individuals in their homes based on a digital technology infrastructure could be effective and cost-saving. In this review, we provide an overview of the characteristics of potential digital solutions applicable to creative aging along with the existing evidence supporting their ability to improve care, increase quality of life, and substantially decrease the emotional and financial costs associated with aging. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. [Digital surgical technology in reconstruction of orbital frame].

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Li-sheng; Shang, Hong-tao; Bai, Shi-zhu; Bo, Bin

    2011-08-01

    To evaluate the application of digital surgical technology in reconstruction of orbital frame and assess the treatment outcomes. Seven patients with post-traumatic orbital defect were included in this study. Images of the orbit were obtained for each individual through computed tomography (CT). Preoperative design was finished according to rapid prototyping, computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD-CAM) and other digital surgical techniques. Surgical fracture reductions with internal fixation and implant of Medpor were used in operation to reconstruct orbit as well as correct enophthalmos and diplopia. Accurate realignment of the displaced orbital rim was obtained in all the 7 patients, and enophthalmos and diplopia were corrected in 4 and 2 patients, respectively. Digital techniques provide a precise means for preoperative design and operation implementation during orbital reconstruction. As a result, complications can be reduced, and the patient's facial appearance can be maximally improved.

  12. Technological Improvements for Digital Fire Control Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-30

    Initiative Information Develop and fabricate next generation designs using advanced materials and processes. This will include but is not limited to...component fabrication ; process integration, configuration management, materials development, coatings technology, packaging technology and overall...systems engineering. Prototype and integrated system components shall be produced for developmental test units, production test units and

  13. Applying Digital Sensor Technology: A Problem-Solving Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seedhouse, Paul; Knight, Dawn

    2016-01-01

    There is currently an explosion in the number and range of new devices coming onto the technology market that use digital sensor technology to track aspects of human behaviour. In this article, we present and exemplify a three-stage model for the application of digital sensor technology in applied linguistics that we have developed, namely,…

  14. The application of digital technology in community health education

    OpenAIRE

    Wen Ren; Conglin Huang; Ying Liu; Jingjing Ren

    2015-01-01

    With the rapid development of the internet and information technologies, coupled with a variety of digital media, the digital technology has become a conventional method of health education for the general public and has the potential to influence health behaviors. Our aim was to conduct a review of how digital technology projects have been used in the health education and health promotion, as well as the disadvantages and barriers in the process.

  15. Beyond Techno-Utopia: Critical Approaches to Digital Health Technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deborah Lupton

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This editorial presents an overview of digital health technologies, discusses previous research and introduces the contributions to the special issue “Beyond Techno-Utopia: Critical Approaches to Digital Health Technologies”. It is argued that thus far, few critical analyses of digital health technologies have been published in the social science literature, particularly in relation to the newest technologies. While the articles collected here in this special issue have gone some way in offering a critical response to digital health technologies, they represent only a beginning. Many more compelling topics remain to be investigated. The editorial ends with outlining directions for future research in this area.

  16. Survey of student attitudes towards digital simulation technologies at a dental school in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Q; Wang, Y; Zheng, Q; Ye, L; Zhou, X D; Zhang, L L

    2017-08-01

    Digital simulation technologies have become widespread in healthcare education, especially in dentistry; these technologies include digital X-ray images, digital microscopes, virtual pathology slides and other types of simulation. This study aimed to assess students' attitudes towards digital simulation technologies at a large, top-ranked dental school in China, as well as find out how students compare the digital technologies with traditional training methods. In April 2015, a custom-designed questionnaire was distributed to a total of 389 students who had received digital technology and simulation-based training in West China Dental School during 2012-2014. Results of a cross-sectional survey show that most students accept digital simulation technology; they report that the technology is stimulating and facilitates self-directed and self-paced learning. These findings, together with the objective advantages of digital technology, suggest that digital simulation training offers significant potential for dental education, highlighting the need for further research and more widespread implementation. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Beyond Moore's Law: Harnessing spatial-digital disruptive technologies for Digital Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foresman, Timothy W.

    2016-11-01

    Moore's law will reach its plateau by 2020. Big data, however, will continue to increase as the Internet of Things and social media converge into the new era of ‘huge data’. Disruptive technologies, including big data and cloud computing are forces impacting business and government communities. The truth of our collective future is suggested to align with the Digital Earth (DE) vision. Benefits of technological advances will be manifested from business performance improvements based on capitalizing the locational attributes of corporate and government assets - the foundation of big data. Better governance and better business represents a key foundation for sustainability and therefore should be explicit DE guiding principles.

  18. Poaching Museum Collections using Digital 3D Technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Younan

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the creative engagement with digital 3D models of museum artefacts and gives insight into new uses of museum collections enabled by digital scanning, editing and 3D printing technologies. Digital 3D models of museum artefacts are malleable and increasingly easy to use. Additionally, freely available 3D software has made 3D scanning, editing and manufacturing possible for non-specialists. These technologies allow users to create new artworks through the creation and transformation of digital replicas of museum artefacts. Examples of creative works, taken from two case studies that involve the creative use of digital reproductions of museum artefacts are presented in this paper. These projects are illustrative of a larger trend: the digital ‘poaching’ of heritage artefacts. This paper examines how digital 3D technologies can foster creative forms of museum engagement, democratise access to museum collections and engage users with personal forms of museum experience.

  19. Digital Technology and Mental Health Interventions: Opportunities and Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aguilera, Adrian

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The growth of the Internet, mobile phones, social media and other digital technologies has changed our world in many ways. It has provided individuals with information that was previously only available to a select few. An example of the reach of technology is data that as of October 2012, there are over 6 billion phones worldwide (BBC, 2012. The availability of data in real time has presented hopes of intervening more efficiently and managing health problems by leveraging limited human resources. It also has an impact in changing the roles of providers and patients and in legal and ethical issues including privacy in digital health interactions. This paper will discuss why digital technology has received recent attention in the area of mental health, present some applications of technology for mental health to date, explore the challenges to full implementation in clinical settings, and present future opportunities for digital technologies.El crecimiento del Internet, los teléfonos móviles, las redes sociales y otras tecnologías digitales ha cambiado nuestro mundo de muchas maneras. Ha proporcionado a las personas con la información que antes sólo estaba disponible para un grupo selecto, por ejemplo a partir de octubre de 2012. Un ejemplo del alcance de la tecnología son los datos que dicen que hay más de 6 millones de teléfonos en todo el mundo (BBC, 2012. La disponibilidad de los datos en tiempo real a presentado la esperanza de intervenir de manera más eficiente y manejar los problemas de salud los recursos humanos limitados. También tiene un impacto en el cambio de los roles de los proveedores y los pacientes y en aspectos legales y éticos, incluyendo la privacidad en las interacciones de salud digital. Este artículo discutirá unas razones por cual la tecnología digital ha recibido atención recientemente en el área de salud mental, presentará algunas aplicaciones de la tecnología para mejorar la salud mental hasta la fecha

  20. [Impact of digital technology on clinical practices: perspectives from surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Y; Liu, X J

    2016-04-09

    Digital medical technologies or computer aided medical procedures, refer to imaging, 3D reconstruction, virtual design, 3D printing, navigation guided surgery and robotic assisted surgery techniques. These techniques are integrated into conventional surgical procedures to create new clinical protocols that are known as "digital surgical techniques". Conventional health care is characterized by subjective experiences, while digital medical technologies bring quantifiable information, transferable data, repeatable methods and predictable outcomes into clinical practices. Being integrated into clinical practice, digital techniques facilitate surgical care by improving outcomes and reducing risks. Digital techniques are becoming increasingly popular in trauma surgery, orthopedics, neurosurgery, plastic and reconstructive surgery, imaging and anatomic sciences. Robotic assisted surgery is also evolving and being applied in general surgery, cardiovascular surgery and orthopedic surgery. Rapid development of digital medical technologies is changing healthcare and clinical practices. It is therefore important for all clinicians to purposefully adapt to these technologies and improve their clinical outcomes.

  1. Digital Printing Quality Detection and Analysis Technology Based on CCD

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Ming; Zheng, Liping

    2017-12-01

    With the help of CCD digital printing quality detection and analysis technology, it can carry out rapid evaluation and objective detection of printing quality, and can play a certain control effect on printing quality. It can be said CDD digital printing quality testing and analysis of the rational application of technology, its digital printing and printing materials for a variety of printing equipments to improve the quality of a very positive role. In this paper, we do an in-depth study and discussion based on the CCD digital print quality testing and analysis technology.

  2. Creativity in the Age of Technology: Measuring the Digital Creativity of Millennials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Jessica; Ivcevic, Zorana; Brackett, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Digital technology and its many uses form an emerging domain of creative expression for adolescents and young adults. To date, measures of self-reported creative behavior cover more traditional forms of creativity, including visual art, music, or writing, but do not include creativity in the digital domain. This article introduces a new measure,…

  3. Digital Technology at the National Science Museum of Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lydens, Lois; Saito, Yasuji; Inoue, Tohru

    2007-01-01

    The National Science Museum (NSM) in Japan has recently completed a project using different types of visitor-oriented digital technologies. With sponsorship from the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (JSPS), the NSM team carried out a four-year study to examine how digital technologies can be used to enhance as well as educationally…

  4. Digital technology and human development: A charter for nature conservation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maffey, G.; Homans, H.; Banks, K.; Arts, K.A.J.

    2015-01-01

    The application of digital technology in conservation holds much potential for advancing the understanding of, and facilitating interaction with, the natural world. In other sectors, digital technology has long been used to engage communities and share information. Human development—which holds

  5. Digital Technology Entrepreneurship: A Definition and Research Agenda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferran Giones

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Technology entrepreneurship is an established concept in academia. However, recent developments in the context of digital entrepreneurship call for revision and advancement. The multiple possible combinations of technology and entrepreneurship have resulted in a diversity of phenomena with significantly different characteristics and socio-economic impact. This article is focused on the identification and description of technology entrepreneurship in times of digitization. Based on current examples, we identify and describe characterizations of technology entrepreneurship, digital technology entrepreneurship, and digital entrepreneurship. With this new delineation of terms, we would like to foster discussion between researchers, entrepreneurs, and policy makers on the impact of digitization on entrepreneurship, and set a future research agenda.

  6. Digital Citizenship: Addressing Appropriate Technology Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribble, Mike S.; Bailey, Gerald D.; Ross, Tweed W.

    2004-01-01

    Recently, the popular press has pointed to increasing evidence of misuse and abuse of emerging technologies in U.S. schools. Some examples include using Web sites to intimidate or threaten students, downloading music illegally from the Internet, plagiarizing information using the Internet, using cellular phones during class time, and playing games…

  7. HD Photo: a new image coding technology for digital photography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, Sridhar; Tu, Chengjie; Regunathan, Shankar L.; Sullivan, Gary J.

    2007-09-01

    This paper introduces the HD Photo coding technology developed by Microsoft Corporation. The storage format for this technology is now under consideration in the ITU-T/ISO/IEC JPEG committee as a candidate for standardization under the name JPEG XR. The technology was developed to address end-to-end digital imaging application requirements, particularly including the needs of digital photography. HD Photo includes features such as good compression capability, high dynamic range support, high image quality capability, lossless coding support, full-format 4:4:4 color sampling, simple thumbnail extraction, embedded bitstream scalability of resolution and fidelity, and degradation-free compressed domain support of key manipulations such as cropping, flipping and rotation. HD Photo has been designed to optimize image quality and compression efficiency while also enabling low-complexity encoding and decoding implementations. To ensure low complexity for implementations, the design features have been incorporated in a way that not only minimizes the computational requirements of the individual components (including consideration of such aspects as memory footprint, cache effects, and parallelization opportunities) but results in a self-consistent design that maximizes the commonality of functional processing components.

  8. Digital video technologies and their network requirements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R. P. Tsang; H. Y. Chen; J. M. Brandt; J. A. Hutchins

    1999-11-01

    Coded digital video signals are considered to be one of the most difficult data types to transport due to their real-time requirements and high bit rate variability. In this study, the authors discuss the coding mechanisms incorporated by the major compression standards bodies, i.e., JPEG and MPEG, as well as more advanced coding mechanisms such as wavelet and fractal techniques. The relationship between the applications which use these coding schemes and their network requirements are the major focus of this study. Specifically, the authors relate network latency, channel transmission reliability, random access speed, buffering and network bandwidth with the various coding techniques as a function of the applications which use them. Such applications include High-Definition Television, Video Conferencing, Computer-Supported Collaborative Work (CSCW), and Medical Imaging.

  9. Enhancing surgical safety using digital multimedia technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, Jennifer L; Mukhopadhyay, Dhriti; Hunt, Justin; Jupiter, Daniel; Smythe, William R; Papaconstantinou, Harry T

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine whether incorporating digital and video multimedia components improved surgical time-out performance of a surgical safety checklist. A prospective pilot study was designed for implementation of a multimedia time-out, including a patient video. Perceptions of the staff participants were surveyed before and after intervention (Likert scale: 1, strongly disagree to 5, strongly agree). Employee satisfaction was high for both time-out procedures. However, employees appreciated improved clarity of patient identification (P .001), there was significant improvement in performance of key safety elements. The multimedia time-out allows improved participation by the surgical team and is preferred to a standard time-out process. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. From Doing Digital to Being Digital: Exploring Workplace Adoption of Technology in the Age of Digital Disruption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murdoch, Donna; Fichter, Rachel

    2017-01-01

    In this article, it is explored how digital transformation is reshaping existing conceptions of technology adoption in the workplace and, as part of this, why the adoption of enterprise technology often lags behind consumer technology. The effect of business intractability towards technological advancement is examined. Also, the inability to…

  11. Composing the Layer of Knowledge of Digital Technology in Architecture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johanes Mikhael

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of digital tools in architectural practice has been evolving significantly. In following such developments, architectural practice has been incorporating digital technology not only to meet the current demand but also to pursue the vast amount of possibilities ahead. However, the integration of digital technology in architectural knowledge has been reasonably operative that produces uncritical understanding, and it tends to put architects as a passive user of technology. This paper argues that there are layers of knowledge that nees to be acknowledged and nourished accordingly in embracing the use of computation tools yet avoiding the overly simplistic.understanding. It attempts to explore the methods of digital technology in archietctural design practices as well as dicussions that follow to create a critical evaluation of its roles and potentials. The review is conducted theoretically in which the use of digital in the design process is explored in such a way to reveal its importance in architectural design methods. The review also crosses beyond the disciplines of architecture to construct more comprehensive understanding that bridges the logic of digital technology and architecture. The resulted map of methods of the digital thus can be used to develop a framework for digital discourse that bridge the operative knowledge of technology to the more critical perspectives.

  12. Can New Digital Technologies Support Parasitology Teaching and Learning?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabbar, Abdul; Gasser, Robin B; Lodge, Jason

    2016-07-01

    Traditionally, parasitology courses have mostly been taught face-to-face on campus, but now digital technologies offer opportunities for teaching and learning. Here, we give a perspective on how new technologies might be used through student-centred teaching approaches. First, a snapshot of recent trends in the higher education is provided; then, a brief account is given of how digital technologies [e.g., massive open online courses (MOOCs), flipped classroom (FC), games, quizzes, dedicated Facebook, and digital badges] might promote parasitology teaching and learning in digital learning environments. In our opinion, some of these digital technologies might be useful for competency-based, self-regulated, learner-centred teaching and learning in an online or blended teaching environment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Digital Technology Entrepreneurship:A Definition and Research Agenda

    OpenAIRE

    Giones, Ferran; Brem, Alexander

    2017-01-01

    Technology entrepreneurship is an established concept in academia. However, recent developments in the context of digital entrepreneurship call for revision and advance- ment. The multiple possible combinations of technology and entrepreneurship have res- ulted in a diversity of phenomena with significantly different characteristics and socio-economic impact. This article is focused on the identification and description of technology entrepreneurship in times of digitization. Based on current...

  14. Digital video technology - today and tomorrow: 11th office information technology conference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liberman, J.

    1994-10-01

    Digital video is probably computing`s fastest moving technology today. Just three years ago, the zenith of digital video technology on the PC was the successful marriage of digital text and graphics with analog audio and video by means of expensive analog laser disc players and video overlay boards. The state of the art involves two different approaches to fully digital video on computers: hardware-assisted and software-only solutions.

  15. Technological innovations in mental healthcare: harnessing the digital revolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollis, Chris; Morriss, Richard; Martin, Jennifer; Amani, Sarah; Cotton, Rebecca; Denis, Mike; Lewis, Shôn

    2015-04-01

    Digital technology has the potential to transform mental healthcare by connecting patients, services and health data in new ways. Digital online and mobile applications can offer patients greater access to information and services and enhance clinical management and early intervention through access to real-time patient data. However, substantial gaps exist in the evidence base underlying these technologies. Greater patient and clinician involvement is needed to evaluate digital technologies and ensure they target unmet needs, maintain public trust and improve clinical outcomes. Royal College of Psychiatrists.

  16. Augmented Ontologies: The Question Concerning Digital Technology and Projectual Humanism

    OpenAIRE

    Gualeni, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ The values of Western culture are conducive to spending a considerable amount of resources on the development of computer games, digital social networks, special effects for movies, et cetera (Bolter, 2003). With the increasingly more prominent role of digital media1 in the global economy as well as their progressively saturating involvement in social processes and practices, the study and development of digital technologies of representation and communication man...

  17. The Three-dimensional Digital Factory for Shipbuilding Technology Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Wei

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The three-dimensional digital factory technology research is the hotspot in shipbuilding recently. The three-dimensional digital factory technology not only focus on design the components of the product, but also discuss on the simulation and analyses of the production process.Based on the three-dimensional model, the basic data layer, application control layer and the presentation layer of hierarchical structure are established in the three-dimensional digital factory of shipbuilding in this paper. And the key technologies of three-dimensional digital factory of shipbuilding are analysed. Finally, a case study is applied and the results show that the three-dimensional digital factory will play an important role in the future.

  18. Debating Digital Childhoods: Questions Concerning Technologies, Economies and Determinisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbons, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    The learning child, the child that is the object of interest through modernity and into mutated modernity, in the knowledge economy, is a digital age identity of great interest. Talk about childhood and the digital age invokes a range of questions about what is happening at this time and with these technologies and that creates more or less of a…

  19. DISA: an African Perspective on Digital Technology | Pickover ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The lure of financial aid has, however, spawned what might be perceived as a new form of cultural imperialism in the guise of preservation and access: an imperialistic and colonising culture of digital technology. This paper defines an approach to building digital research resources that assesses both the strengths and ...

  20. Aligning Digital Video Technology with Game Pedagogy in Physical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koekoek, Jeroen; van der Mars, Hans; van der Kamp, John; Walinga, Wytse; van Hilvoorde, Ivo

    2018-01-01

    The rapid development of digital technology has expanded the prospects and promises for its application in physical education programs. Physical educators are becoming increasingly interested in technology but often remain inadequately equipped to effectively integrate these technological resources in their daily practice, and/or lack the…

  1. Comparison of Tibial Intramedullary Nailing Guided by Digital Technology Versus Conventional Method: A Prospective Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lin; Xu, Xian; Li, Xu; Wu, Wei; Cai, Junfeng; Lu, Qingyou

    2017-06-12

    BACKGROUND This prospective study aimed to compare clinical effects of intramedullary nailing guided by digital and conventional technologies in treatment of tibial fractures. MATERIAL AND METHODS Thirty-two patients (mean age 43 years, 18 males and 14 females) who were treated for tibial fractures from October 2010 to October 2012 were enrolled. They were sequentially randomized to receive intramedullary nailing guided by either digital technology (digital group, n=16) or conventional technology (conventional group, n=16). The operation time, fluoroscopy times, fracture healing time, distance between the actual and planned insertion point, postoperative lower limb alignment, and functional recovery were recorded for all patients. RESULTS The mean operation time in the digital group was 43.1±6.2 min compared with 48.7±8.3 min for the conventional technology (P=0.039). The fluoroscopy times and distance between the actual and planned insertion point were significantly lower in the digital group than in the conventional group (both Pdigital technology. No difference was found in fracture healing time and good postoperative lower limb alignment between the digital and conventional groups (P=0.083 and P=0.310), as well as the effective rate (100% vs. 87.50%, P=0.144). CONCLUSIONS Intramedullary nailing guided by digital technology has many advantages in treatment of tibial fractures compared to conventional technology, including shorter operation time, reduced fluoroscopy times, and decreased distance between the actual and planned insertion point of the intramedullary nail.

  2. Using High Spatial Resolution Digital Imagery

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Campbell, Michael V; Fischer, Robert L; Pangburn, Timothy; Hardenberg, Mark J

    2005-01-01

    .... The sources of remotely sensed data used in this research effort include digital airborne multispectral imaging technology, digital airborne hyperspectral imaging technology, and digital satellite multispectral images...

  3. Engaging, Designing and Making Digital Technologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vertesi, Janet; Ribes, David; Forlano, Laura

    2017-01-01

    Science and Technology Studies (STS) is a flourishing interdisciplinary field that examines the transformative power of science and technology to arrange and rearrange contemporary societies. The Handbook of Science and Technology Studies provides a comprehensive and authoritative overview...

  4. Digital photography technology offers unique capabilities, advantages, and challenges to dental practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, J; Beckler, G

    2001-10-01

    Digital photography technology has both advanced substantially in the past few years and decreased in price. Today, high-resolution cameras offer an attractive option to dentists ready to incorporate digital photography into their practices. This article begins with a technical explanation of how digital photography works as the basis for understanding how it compares and contrasts with film photography, as well as how it offers unique benefits to dental practices. It describes how digital camera design affects image characteristics such as resolution and color fidelity and provides dentists with suggested camera features they should consider. The article explores issues associated with the display and storage of images. It then provides guidelines to help dentists determine whether they are ready to adopt digital photography, including a discussion about the advantages of digital photography as well as suggested ways digital photography will affect office workflows and productivity.

  5. Effective Use of Digital Technologies of High School Teachers as Digital Immigrants in Six Rural Public Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pattee, Andy

    2012-01-01

    Problem: A widening experiential gap of effective use of technology in K-12 schools between "digital immigrants" and "digital natives" (Prensky, 2001) is becoming more evident as digital natives become classroom teachers and showcase pedagogical strategies with digital technologies. There is a dearth of research on digital…

  6. Accuracy of Intraoral Digital Impressions for Whole Upper Jaws, Including Full Dentitions and Palatal Soft Tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Ning; Xiong, Yaoyang; Jiao, Ting

    2016-01-01

    Intraoral digital impressions have been stated to meet the clinical requirements for some teeth-supported restorations, though fewer evidences were proposed for larger scanning range. The aim of this study was to compare the accuracy (trueness and precision) of intraoral digital impressions for whole upper jaws, including the full dentitions and palatal soft tissues, as well as to determine the effect of different palatal vault height or arch width on accuracy of intraoral digital impressions. Thirty-two volunteers were divided into three groups according to the palatal vault height or arch width. Each volunteer received three scans with TRIOS intraoral scanner and one conventional impression of whole upper jaw. Three-dimensional (3D) images digitized from conventional gypsum casts by a laboratory scanner were chose as the reference models. All datasets were imported to a specific software program for 3D analysis by "best fit alignment" and "3D compare" process. Color-coded deviation maps showed qualitative visualization of the deviations. For the digital impressions for palatal soft tissues, trueness was (130.54±33.95)μm and precision was (55.26±11.21)μm. For the digital impressions for upper full dentitions, trueness was (80.01±17.78)μm and precision was (59.52±11.29)μm. Larger deviations were found between intraoral digital impressions and conventional impressions in the areas of palatal soft tissues than that in the areas of full dentitions (pimpressions for palatal soft tissues was slightly better than that for full dentitions (p = 0.049). There was no significant effect of palatal vault height on accuracy of digital impressions for palatal soft tissues (p>0.05), but arch width was found to have a significant effect on precision of intraoral digital impressions for full dentitions (p = 0.016). A linear correlation was found between arch width and precision of digital impressions for whole upper jaws (r = 0.326, p = 0.034 for palatal soft tissues and r

  7. Digital management technology and its application to investment casting enterprises

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-yuan Ji

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available With the advent of Industry 4.0, more and more investment casting enterprises are implementing production manufacturing systems, especially in the last two years. This paper summarizes three new common requirements of the digital management aspect in precision casting enterprises, and puts forward three corresponding techniques. They are: the production process tracking card technology based on the main-sub card mode; the workshop site production process processing technology based on the barcode; and the equipment data integration technology. Then, this paper discusses in detail the principle, application and effect of these technologies; to provide the reference for enterprises to move towards digital casting and intelligent casting.

  8. Digital video and audio broadcasting technology a practical engineering guide

    CERN Document Server

    Fischer, Walter

    2010-01-01

    Digital Video and Audio Broadcasting Technology - A Practical Engineering Guide' deals with all the most important digital television, sound radio and multimedia standards such as MPEG, DVB, DVD, DAB, ATSC, T-DMB, DMB-T, DRM and ISDB-T. The book provides an in-depth look at these subjects in terms of practical experience. In addition it contains chapters on the basics of technologies such as analog television, digital modulation, COFDM or mathematical transformations between time and frequency domains. The attention in the respective field under discussion is focussed on aspects of measuring t

  9. Digital literacy and problem solving in technology-rich environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vesna Dolničar

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Rapid development and progress, as well as the growing presence of information and communications technologies dictate the need for more highly developed digital skills in individuals. The paper focuses on the concepts of digital skills and problem solving in technology-rich environments. It examines these on the basis of empirical data obtained in the international study PIAAC. The introductory part presents an overview of the literature and the results of previous research in the field of measurement of digital skills, and data on the use of information society services among the EU Member States. The second part of the article refers to the results obtained in the study PIAAC. The results, confirmed by the results of other studies, showed the impact of age and education level on the problem solving in technology-rich environments. Article concludes with suggestions for improving the current state of integration of all population groups in training programs in the field of digital skills.

  10. Advanced framework for digital forensic technologies and procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trček, Denis; Abie, Habtamu; Skomedal, Asmund; Starc, Iztok

    2010-11-01

    Recent trends in global networks are leading toward service-oriented architectures and sensor networks. On one hand of the spectrum, this means deployment of services from numerous providers to form new service composites, and on the other hand this means emergence of Internet of things. Both these kinds belong to a plethora of realms and can be deployed in many ways, which will pose serious problems in cases of abuse. Consequently, both trends increase the need for new approaches to digital forensics that would furnish admissible evidence for litigation. Because technology alone is clearly not sufficient, it has to be adequately supported by appropriate investigative procedures, which have yet become a subject of an international consensus. This paper therefore provides appropriate a holistic framework to foster an internationally agreed upon approach in digital forensics along with necessary improvements. It is based on a top-down approach, starting with legal, continuing with organizational, and ending with technical issues. More precisely, the paper presents a new architectural technological solution that addresses the core forensic principles at its roots. It deploys so-called leveled message authentication codes and digital signatures to provide data integrity in a way that significantly eases forensic investigations into attacked systems in their operational state. Further, using a top-down approach a conceptual framework for forensics readiness is given, which provides levels of abstraction and procedural guides embellished with a process model that allow investigators perform routine investigations, without becoming overwhelmed by low-level details. As low-level details should not be left out, the framework is further evaluated to include these details to allow organizations to configure their systems for proactive collection and preservation of potential digital evidence in a structured manner. The main reason behind this approach is to stimulate efforts

  11. A survey of contemporary enterprise storage technologies from a digital forensics perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory H. Carlton

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available As the proliferation of digital computational systems continue to expand, increasingly complex technologies emerge, including those regarding large, enterprise-wide, information storage and retrieval systems. Within this study, we examine four contemporary enterprise storage technologies. Our examination of these technologies is presented with an overview of the technological features of each offering and then followed with a discussion of the impact of these technologies on digital forensics methods, particularly regarding forensic data acquisition. We offer a general opinion concerning a recommended data acquisition method when faced with the task of obtaining a forensic image of data contained within these technologies, we discuss limitations of our study, and lastly, we suggest areas in which additional research would benefit the field of digital forensics.

  12. Digital airborne camera introduction and technology

    CERN Document Server

    Sandau, Rainer

    2014-01-01

    The last decade has seen great innovations on the airborne camera. This book is the first ever written on the topic and describes all components of a digital airborne camera ranging from the object to be imaged to the mass memory device.

  13. Integration of the digital technologies in the teaching of astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Macedo, J. A.; Voelzke, M. R.

    2014-08-01

    This study presents results of a survey conducted at the Federal Institution of Education, Science and Technology in the North of Minas Gerais (IFNMG), and aimed to investigate the potential uses of interactive materials in the teaching of astronomy. Despite being part of official documents, proposals included in the curriculum of several states, and having contributed to human and technological development, astronomy is rarely taught adequately in the Brazilian basic education. When it is taught, it is with unsatisfactory results as presented by students and teachers as shown by several studies, such as those carried out by (Voelzke and Gonzaga, 2013). Digital technologies are commonly used by youth, but neglected by the majority of teachers. In this sense, a survey with the aim of pointing out the potential use of digital technologies in teaching astronomy was developed. An advanced course in astronomy was offered for participants with the goal to help them understand astronomical phenomena. The following steps were to be taken: i) analysis of the pedagogical projects (PPC) of the licenciates at the IFNMG, with its Campus Januária as research locus; ii) analysis of students' preconceptions about astronomy and digital technologies, identified by the application of an initial questionnaire; iii) preparation of the course taking into account the students' previous knowledge; iv) application of the education proposal developed under part-time presence modality, using various interactive tools; v) application and analysis of the final questionnaire. The test consisted of thirty-two students of physics, mathematics and biology and was conducted with the qualitative and quantitative methodology, combined with a content analysis. Among other results, it was verified that: (i) In the IFNMG only the licenciate-course in physics includes astronomy content diluted in various subjects of the curriculum; (ii) the analysis of the initial questionnaire showed even that group

  14. Technological Implications for Assessment Ecosystems: Opportunities for Digital Technology to Advance Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrens, John T.; DiCerbo, Kristen E.

    2014-01-01

    Background: It would be easy to think the technological shifts in the digital revolution are simple incremental progressions in societal advancement. However, the nature of digital technology is resulting in qualitative differences in nearly all parts of daily life. Purpose: This paper investigates how the new possibilities for understanding,…

  15. Digital Technology – Understanding the Problems Posed by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In fact, it is rare to find any organization or government institution today that does not make use of digital technology at least in one way or another. The reasons for adopting ICTs are based on the advantages that are associated with modern information technology (IT). On the other hand, the justification for going the IT route ...

  16. New Digital Technologies: Educational Opportunities for Australian Indigenous Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Shalini

    2013-01-01

    This article presents a number of possibilities that digital technologies can offer to increase access for Indigenous people to higher education in Australia. Such technologies can assist Indigenous high school students acquire the knowledge and skills they require to be accepted into higher education courses. They can also assist Indigenous…

  17. After Virtual Archaeology: Rethinking Archaeological Approaches to the Adoption of Digital Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gareth Beale

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In the 1980s archaeologists embraced the rapidly expanding field of computer modelling and visualisation as a vehicle for data exploration. Against this backdrop 'virtual archaeology' was conceived. The term was originally intended to describe a multidimensional approach to the modelling of the (immaterial structures and processes of field archaeology. It described how technology could be harnessed in order to achieve new ways of documenting, interpreting and annotating primary archaeological discoveries and processes. Despite their initial promise, these digital technologies failed to have the impact upon archaeological fieldwork that might have been expected. Even with the prevalence of digital devices on all archaeological excavations, the documentation, interpretation and subsequent narration of archaeological processes have retained their analogue character. While the archaeological record is now primarily digital, its sections, plans, drawings and photographs are facsimiles of the analogue technologies that preceded them. This retention of analogue conventions is increasingly out of step with the general prevalence and diversity of digital technologies as mediators of professional and private life. It is also challenged by 21st-century advances towards technologies that allow for complex engagements with and representations of physical matter and facilitate the interplay between digital and material worlds. This article argues that emerging forms of archaeological practice including gaming, mixed reality, computational photography and additive manufacturing, reveal digital archaeology to be a creative process, blending computational thinking, technological opportunities and established disciplinary traditions. We go on to suggest that digital archaeology, conceived as a form of practice rather than as a toolset, represents a locus for theory generation and critical thinking. Failure to recognise the skills and ideas that have emerged in

  18. Next generation digital microfluidic technology: Electrophoresis of charged droplets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Im, Do Jin [Pukyong National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-15

    Contact charging of a conducting droplet in a dielectric medium is introduced as a novel and useful digital microfluidic technology as well as an interesting scientific phenomenon. The history of this phenomenon, starting from original observations to its interpretations and applications, is presented. The basic principle of the droplet contact charging is also presented. Several fundamental aspects of the droplet contact charging from view points of electrochemistry, surface science, electrocoalescence, and electrohydrodynamics are mentioned. Some promising results for future applications and potential features as a next generation digital microfluidic technology are discussed, especially for 3D organ printing. Finally, implications and significance of the proposed technology for chemical engineering community are discussed.

  19. Developing digital technologies for university mathematics by applying participatory design methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Triantafyllou, Eva; Timcenko, Olga

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents our research efforts to develop digital technologies for undergraduate university mathematics. We employ participatory design methods in order to involve teachers and students in the design of such technologies. The results of the first round of our design are included...

  20. Telling stories with digital technologies in corporative training context

    OpenAIRE

    Hack, Josias Ricardo; Ramos, Fernando; Santos, Arnaldo

    2012-01-01

    The art of telling stories in digital format is currently widely available due to the popularization of digital cameras, computers and other mobile devices. In this paper we discuss the use of collaborative learning strategies based on Digital Storytelling in corporative training. The text includes a concise review on theoretical and technical foundations about educational communication through the use of audiovisual products based on disciplines such as Communication, Educatio...

  1. Digital Technology, Schools and Teachers' Workplace Learning: Policy, Practice and Identity. Digital Education and Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Michael

    2016-01-01

    This book advances an alternative reading of the social, political and cultural issues surrounding schools and technology and develops a comprehensive overview of the interplay between policy, practice and identity in school workplaces. It explores how digital technologies have become an integral element of the politics and socially negotiated…

  2. Removable complete digital dentures: A workflow that integrates open technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo Russo, Lucio; Salamini, Angelo

    2017-09-28

    Digitalization of the design and manufacture of removable complete dentures has numerous advantages. The workflow as presented integrates current open digital technologies into a functional protocol, enabling complete dentures to be designed and fabricated without system-specific trays or instruments. This is done by using a conventional technique to acquire anatomic information. Copyright © 2017 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Integrating Digital Technologies in Teaching Learning Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagarajan, R.; Velmanirajan, K.; Kanna, K. Sankesh

    2013-01-01

    India has made impressive strides in the application of information and communication technology in recent years and this has reflected in a vibrant and fast growing economy. It is now an acknowledged world leader in the knowledge industry. In this paper an attempt is made to highlight the role of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) in…

  4. INCORPORATING DIGITAL TECHNOLOGY IN THE TEACHING ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The participants for this research are lecturers of French language who frequently use technology in their classroom to support FFL learning for all the levels. Findings illustrate the potential of technology integration in French classrooms for supporting students' French language learning in Technical University of Kenya.

  5. Digital Technologies Supporting Person-Centered Integrated Care - A Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Øvretveit, John

    2017-09-25

    Shared electronic health and social care records in some service systems are already showing some of the benefits of digital technology and digital data for integrating health and social care. These records are one example of the beginning "digitalisation" of services that gives a glimpse of the potential of digital technology and systems for building coordinated and individualized integrated care. Yet the promise has been greater than the benefits, and progress has been slow compared to other industries. This paper describes for non-technical readers how information technology was used to support integrated care schemes in six EU services, and suggests practical ways forward to use the new opportunities to build person-centered integrated care.

  6. Supporting Digital Natives to Learn Effectively with Technology Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keengwe, Jared; Georgina, David

    2013-01-01

    Majority of learners in our classrooms are digital natives or Millennials--a category of learners who tend toward independence and autonomy in their learning styles. The primary challenges then facing instructors include: How do digital natives learn and how do you teach them? The answers to these questions will help instructors to: (a) identify…

  7. Digital Technology in Preservation of Buddist Monastery Treasures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaftel, A.

    2017-08-01

    Treasure Caretaker Training (Digital Monastery Project), teaches Buddhist monks, nuns and community cultural caretakers to protect and preserve their own monastery sacred art treasures. Participants learn to create digital inventories by use of their own mobile phones. Included in this documentation is the video interview of elders who hold the oral history of many of the treasures. Risk assessment and disaster mitigation are taught.

  8. How do digital platforms for ideas, technologies, and knowledge transfer act as enablers for digital transformation?

    OpenAIRE

    Hossain, Mokter; Lassen, Astrid Heidemann

    2017-01-01

    Digital platforms, along with their supporting tools and features, have emerged as important enablers for firms to leverage distributed knowledge (Sedera et al., 2016), because they offer new ways for organizations to collaborate with the external environment for ideas, technologies, and knowledge. Indeed, studies have explored efforts to promote such collaboration on digital platforms with various popular names, such as crowdsourcing platforms (Afuah & Tucci, 2012), open innovation platf...

  9. Health behavior models for informing digital technology interventions for individuals with mental illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naslund, John A; Aschbrenner, Kelly A; Kim, Sunny Jung; McHugo, Gregory J; Unützer, Jürgen; Bartels, Stephen J; Marsch, Lisa A

    2017-09-01

    Theoretical models offer valuable insights for designing effective and sustainable behavioral health interventions, yet the application of theory for informing digital technology interventions for people with mental illness has received limited attention. We offer a perspective on the importance of applying behavior theories and models to developing digital technology interventions for addressing mental and physical health concerns among people with mental illness. In this commentary, we summarize prominent theories of human behavior, highlight key theoretical constructs, and identify opportunities to inform digital health interventions for people with mental illness. We consider limitations with existing theories and models, and examine recent theoretical advances that can specifically guide development of digital technology interventions. Established behavioral frameworks including health belief model, theory of planned behavior, transtheoretical model, and social cognitive theory consist of important and overlapping constructs that can inform digital health interventions for people with mental illness. As digital technologies continue to evolve and enable longitudinal data collection, real-time behavior monitoring, and adaptive features tailored to users' changing needs over time, there are new opportunities to broaden our understanding of health behaviors and mechanisms of behavior change. Recent advances include dynamic models of behavior, persuasive system design, the behavioral intervention technology model, and behavioral models for just-in-time adaptive interventions. Behavior theories offer advantages for guiding use of digital technologies. Future researchers must explore how theoretical models can effectively advance efforts to develop, evaluate, and disseminate digital health interventions targeting individuals with mental illness. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  10. Streaming and digital media understanding the business and technology

    CERN Document Server

    Rayburn, Dan

    2007-01-01

    Steaming and Digital Media gives you a concise and direct analysis to understand a scalable, profitable venture, as well as the common and hidden pitfalls to avoid in your business. By focusing on both the business implications and technical differences between online video and traditional broadcast distribution, you will learn how to gain significant time-to-market and cost-saving advantages by effectively using streaming and digital media technologies. As part of the NAB Executive Technology Briefing series, the book is geared towards the manager or executive and no technical prerequisite is

  11. Using immersive media and digital technology to communicate Earth Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapur, Ravi

    2016-04-01

    A number of technologies in digital media and interactivity have rapidly advanced and are now converging to enable rich, multi-sensoral experiences which create opportunities for both digital art and science communication. Techniques used in full-dome film-making can now be deployed in virtual reality experiences; gaming technologies can be utilised to explore real data sets; and collaborative interactivity enable new forms of public artwork. This session will explore these converging trends through a number of emerging and forthcoming projects dealing with Earth science, climate change and planetary science.

  12. Bringing Superconductor Digital Technology to the Market Place

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nisenoff, Martin

    The unique properties of superconductivity can be exploited to provide the ultimate in electronic technology for systems such as ultra-precise analogue-to-digital and digital-to-analogue converters, precise DC and AC voltage standards, ultra high speed logic circuits and systems (both digital and hybrid analogue-digital systems), and very high throughput network routers and supercomputers which would have superior electrical performance at lower overall electrical power consumption compared to systems with comparable performance which are fabricated using conventional room temperature technologies. This potential for high performance electronics with reduced power consumption would have a positive impact on slowing the increase in the demand for electrical utility power by the information technology community on the overall electrical power grid. However, before this technology can be successfully brought to the commercial market place, there must be an aggressive investment of resources and funding to develop the required infrastructure needed to yield these high performance superconductor systems, which will be reliable and available at low cost. The author proposes that it will require a concerted effort by the superconductor and cryogenic communities to bring this technology to the commercial market place or make it available for widespread use in scientific instrumentation.

  13. FCJ-172 Posthumanism, Technogenesis, and Digital Technologies: A Conversation with N. Katherine Hayles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holger Pötzsch

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available An interview with N. Katherine Hayles by Holger Pötzsch. Hayles discusses the arc of her work, from her book How We Became Posthuman to her current exploration of nonconscious cognition. She also discusses technogenesis, the digital humanities and digital technologies more generally, and more recent engagements with objects and the sciences, including the work of object oriented ontology and Karen Barad.

  14. "There's Not Enough Knowledge Out There": Examining Older Adults' Perceptions of Digital Technology Use and Digital Inclusion Classes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betts, Lucy R; Hill, Rowena; Gardner, Sarah E

    2017-10-01

    Older adults' definitions of digital technology, and experiences of digital inclusion sessions, were examined using qualitative approaches. Seventeen older adults (aged between 54 and 85 years) participated in two focus groups that each lasted approximately 90 min to explore how older adults understood technology within their lived experience. Interpretative phenomenological analysis yielded two main themes: thirst for knowledge and a wish list for digital technology sessions. A separate content analysis was performed to identify what technology older adults identified as digital technology. This analysis revealed that the older adults most frequently defined digital technology as computers and telephones. The findings support the conclusions that this group of older adults, some of whom were "successful users," have a wide knowledge of digital technology, are interested in gaining more skills, and desire knowledge acquisition through personalized one-to-one learning sessions.

  15. Where's the revolution? Digital technology and health care in the internet age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Edward Alan; West, Darrell M

    2009-04-01

    Despite the growing use of online resources, it is unclear how many Americans are using the World Wide Web for different health-related purposes and whether factors promoting use of the Internet in health care correspond with those affecting more traditional in-person and telemedicine encounters. This research uses a national public opinion survey to examine the degree to which health care consumers communicate through conventional, face-to-face consultation, telemedicine, or digital technology, and the relationship between these means of communication and respondent characteristics. Results indicate that few people are using digital technology to get information, communicate with health personnel, or make online medical purchases. Furthermore, less well educated, lower-income individuals living in rural areas tend to use the health care Internet less than others. Several policy measures need to be undertaken in order to accelerate the appropriate use of digital technology by health care consumers of all kinds. These include improving education and technological literacy and providing access to low-cost digital technology. Without a consumer complement to prevailing efforts to spur health information technology development and implementation on the part of providers, the promise of the digital revolution will continue to be limited to certain better-connected segments of the population.

  16. Digital Technology in Education: Towards New Inclusive Practices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jönsson, Lise Høgh

    and decision-making power, hold the potential to change opportunity structures in an inclusive direction . Research was carried out in kindergartens and special education facilities in Denmark. Building upon design-based research, the research aimed at testing and developing approaches to digital technology......Over the last two decades, digital technology has led to new ways to interact and communicate. This bring change to society and so also to daily practices in education. This research addresses some of these changes by investigating digital technology’s impact on participation and the potential...... for new inclusive practices. The main theoretical argument derives from the work of French sociologist Pierre Bourdieu. Bourdieu argues that we act upon the world with our habitus, i.e. dispositions created due to previous experiences working as a matrix of perceptions, assumptions and actions...

  17. Digital Waveform Technology and the Next Generation of Mass Spectrometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Nathan M.; Gotlib, Zachary P.; Opačić, Bojana; Huntley, Adam P.; Moon, Ashley M.; Donahoe, Katherine E. G.; Brabeck, Gregory F.; Reilly, Peter T. A.

    2018-02-01

    Ion traps and guides are integral parts of current commercial mass spectrometers. They are currently operated with sinusoidal waveform technology that has been developed over many years. Recently, digital waveform technology has begun to emerge and promises to supplant its older cousin because it presents new capabilities that result from the ability to instantaneously switch the frequency and duty cycle of the waveforms. This manuscript examines these capabilities and reveals their uses and effects on instrumentation.

  18. Supporting Student Research with Semantic Technologies and Digital Archives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Garcia, Agustina; Corti, Louise

    2012-01-01

    This article discusses how the idea of higher education students as producers of knowledge rather than consumers can be operationalised by means of student research projects, in which processes of research archiving and analysis are enabled through the use of semantic technologies. It discusses how existing digital repository frameworks can be…

  19. Composing with New Technology: Teacher Reflections on Learning Digital Video

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce, David L.; Chiu, Ming Ming

    2015-01-01

    This study explores teachers' reflections on their learning to compose with new technologies in the context of teacher education and/or teacher professional development. English language arts (ELA) teachers (n = 240) in 15 courses learned to use digital video (DV), completed at least one DV group project, and responded to open-ended survey…

  20. Digital Mindsets: Teachers' Technology Use in Personal Life and Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tour, Ekaterina

    2015-01-01

    Over the last few years there have been important calls for new literacies to become an integral part of language education. Yet traditional approaches to technology continue to persist in many contexts. Although the role of teachers in this problem has been acknowledged, little is known about how teachers' everyday digital literacy practices…

  1. Technology and Music Education in a Digitized, Disembodied, Posthuman World

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thwaites, Trevor

    2014-01-01

    Digital forms of sound manipulation are eroding traditional methods of sound development and transmission, causing a disjuncture in the ontology of music. Sound, the ambient phenomenon, is becoming disrupted and decentred by the struggles between long established controls, beliefs and desires as well as controls from within technologized contexts.…

  2. Educational Digital Technologies in Developing Countries Challenge Third Party Providers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passey, Don; Laferrière, Thérèse; Ahmad, Manal Yazbak-Abu; Bhowmik, Miron; Gross, Diana; Price, Janet; Resta, Paul; Shonfeld, Miri

    2016-01-01

    In this conceptual paper, we consider issues and challenges of third party and governmental organisations in planning and implementing access to and uses of digital technologies for learning and teaching in developing countries. We consider failures and weaknesses in the planning and implementation processes highlighted by research in developed…

  3. Bridging Divides through Technology Use: Transnationalism and Digital Literacy Socialization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogueron, Silvia Cecilia

    2011-01-01

    In this study, I investigate the digital literacy practices of adult immigrants, and their relationship with transnational processes and practices. Specifically, I focus on their conditions of access to information and communication technologies (ICTs) in their life trajectories, their conditions of learning in a community center, and their…

  4. "Digital Natives": An Asian Perspective for Using Learning Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, David M.; Fox, Bob

    2013-01-01

    Students entering universities in the 21st century have been described variously as digital natives, the millennial generation or the net generation. Considerable study has occurred around the world to determine the knowledge, skills, understanding and the purposes to which this group of individuals makes technology work for them. A number of…

  5. Animation, embodiment, and digital media human experience of technological liveliness

    CERN Document Server

    Chow, K

    2013-01-01

    Animation, Embodiment and Digital Media articulates the human experience of technology-mediated animated phenomena in terms of sensory perception, bodily action and imaginative interpretation, suggesting a new theoretical framework with analyses of exemplary user interfaces, video games and interactive artworks.

  6. Pre-Service Teacher Self-Efficacy in Digital Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemon, Narelle; Garvis, Susanne

    2016-01-01

    Self-efficacy is an important motivational construct for primary school teachers (teachers of children aged 5-12 years) within Australia. Teacher self-efficacy beliefs will determine the level of teacher confidence and competence to engage with a task. In this study, we explore engagement with digital technology and the associated learning and…

  7. Spatial analysis of digital technologies and impact on socio - cultural ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    At 5% level of significance, results showed that the advent of digital technologies have significant impact on socio - cultural values. The study reveals strong spatial dependence of households with television and mobile phone in Nigeria. The findings should enable the orientation of social transformation programmes geared ...

  8. Digital dance: (dis)entangling human and technology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gündüz, Z.

    2012-01-01

    This thesis extrapolates from three exemplary practices of staged digital dance created with real-time interactive technology operating with motion-tracking software, to consider theoretically such practices’ destabilization of human-centered conventions in dance. Dance’s assumed heritage of

  9. 75 FR 71464 - Metlife Technology, Operations, and Information Technology Groups Including On-Site Leased...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-23

    ... Employment and Training Administration Metlife Technology, Operations, and Information Technology Groups Including On-Site Leased Workers From Adecco, Cognizant, IBM, Infosys, Kana, Patni, Siemens, Tapfin, Veritas... Workers From At&T Solutions, Chimes, Cognizant, Patni, Siemens, Xerox Clarks Summit, PA; Notice of Revised...

  10. Exploration Technology Development including Surface Acoustic Wave RFID chips

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This project is focused on maturing future surface exploration technologies and instrumentation and working towards flight instrumentation and systems to support...

  11. Learning by Playing with Digital Technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benjaminsen, Nana

    2006-01-01

    Construction Games in Schools. The project is an exploration of how elements of play can be integrated in a technology-based learning environment. I will use examples of empirical data gathered during spring 2006 to demonstrate that play can function as a useful learning strategy, and also point out barriers...... strategy might lead to changes on three interrelated levels: the teaching material, the educational context (i.e. teaching style, use of the physical facilities and schools organisational structure) and the cultural-historical way schools function within Danish in society....

  12. Digital Technologies and performative pedagogies: Repositioning the visual

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathryn Grushka

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Images are becoming a primary means of information presentation in the digitized global media and digital technologies have emancipated and democratized the image. This allows for the reproduction and manipulation of images on a scale never seen before and opens new possibilities for teachers schooled in critical visuality. This paper reports on an innovative pre-service teacher training course in which a cross-curricula cohort of secondary teachers employed visual performative competencies to produce a series of learning objects on a digital platform. The resulting intertextual narratives demonstrate that the manipulation of image and text offered by digital technologies create a powerful vehicle for investigating knowledge and understandings, evolving new meaning and awakening latent creativity in the use of images for meaning making. This research informs the New Literacies and multimodal fields of enquiry and argues that visuality is integral to any pedagogy that purports to be relevant to the contemporary learner. It argues that the visual has been significantly under-valued as a conduit for knowledge acquisition and meaning making in the digital environment and supports the claim that critical literacy, interactivity, experimentation and production are vital to attaining the tenets of transformative education (Buckingham, 2007; Walsh, 2007; Cope & Kalantzis, 2008.

  13. Digital Technologies and a Changing Profession

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plesner, Ursula; Raviola, Elena

    2016-01-01

    following a more individual agenda. Originality/value: The articles’ originality lies in showing that profession and management are not opposed to each other, but can be seen as a continuum on which journalistic and managerial tasks become intertwined. This is in contrast to previous research on news work...... they produce new practices and power relationships. It is shown that the devices produce increased collaboration among journalists and interaction between managers and output journalists, that mundane work and power is delegated to technological devices and that news products are increasingly standardized....... Practical implications: The wider implications of these findings seems to be a change in the journalistic profession: TV news journalism is becoming less individualistic and more collective and professionalism becomes a matter of understanding and realizing the news organization’s strategy, rather than...

  14. Digital technology strengthens EDF's nuclear safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dupin, Ludovic

    2016-01-01

    This article proposes an overview of the development of the use of various and new digital technologies of information and communication by EDF to train its nuclear operators, field technicians who are maintaining nuclear power plants, personnel in charge of risk management, and so on. Trainees are using tablets with augmented reality software, serious games, virtual reality helmets, and also digital simulators to learn how to control a reactor. More practical training also exists: people are taught how to practically and correctly assemble tubes for example

  15. DIGITAL TECHNOLOGY IN PRESERVATION OF BUDDIST MONASTERY TREASURES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Shaftel

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Treasure Caretaker Training (Digital Monastery Project, teaches Buddhist monks, nuns and community cultural caretakers to protect and preserve their own monastery sacred art treasures. Participants learn to create digital inventories by use of their own mobile phones. Included in this documentation is the video interview of elders who hold the oral history of many of the treasures. Risk assessment and disaster mitigation are taught.

  16. Expanding Health Technology Assessments to Include Effects on the Environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marsh, Kevin; Ganz, Michael Lee; Hsu, John

    2016-01-01

    for incorporating environmental impacts into the health technology assessment (HTA) process and discusses the associated challenges. Two arguments favor incorporating environmental impacts into HTA: 1) environmental changes could directly affect people's health and 2) policy decision makers have broad mandates...

  17. Digital innovations and emerging technologies for enhanced recovery programmes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michard, F; Gan, T J; Kehlet, H

    2017-07-01

    Enhanced recovery programmes (ERPs) are increasingly used to improve post-surgical recovery. However, compliance to various components of ERPs-a key determinant of success-remains sub-optimal. Emerging technologies have the potential to help patients and caregivers to improve compliance with ERPs.Preoperative physical condition, a major determinant of postoperative outcome, could be optimized with the use of text messages (SMS) or digital applications (Apps) designed to facilitate smoking cessation, modify physical activity, and better manage hypertension and diabetes. Several non-invasive haemodynamic monitoring techniques and decision support tools are now available to individualize perioperative fluid management, a key component of ERPs. Objective nociceptive assessment may help to rationalize the use of pain medications, including opioids. Wearable sensors designed to monitor cardio-respiratory function may help in the early detection of clinical deterioration during the postoperative recovery and to address 'failure to rescue'. Activity trackers may be useful to monitor early mobilization, another major element of ERPs. Finally, electronic checklists have been developed to ensure that none of the above-mentioned ERP elements is omitted during the surgical journey.By optimizing compliance to the multiple components of ERPs, digital innovations, non-invasive techniques and wearable sensors have the potential to magnify the clinical and economic benefits of ERPs. Among the growing number of technical innovations, studies are needed to clarify which tools and solutions have real clinical value and are cost-effective. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Journal of Anaesthesia. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Digital technologies to generate health awareness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herman Adriaan van Wietmarschen

    2015-10-01

    A third use case for improving health awareness is the launch of a HealthCafé. The aim is to inspire people to measure their own health and measure the effects of interventions on their health, using all sorts of do-it-your-self technologies. The current version of the HealthCafé offers first of all a physical location where people can interact. It also offers devices such as activity trackers, glucose and cholesterol measurement devices, questionnaires, and a personal internet portal to store and analyse the data. The goal is to empower people and give people more control over their own health. Conclusions: Complexity science offers new opportunities to create health awareness. We have shown how a systems dynamics software tool can be used in group model building sessions to generate a shared understanding of a health problem among stakeholders. The resulted in a successful integrative overweight treatment program at a rehabilitation centre in the Netherlands. The HealthCafé was launched as a living lab which can be used by people to explore their own health and conduct studies on themselves. These activities are aiming for a transition in health care towards more awareness as the personal level, empowerment and thereby increasing the chances for successful life-style changes towards more health and happiness.

  19. Population health-based approaches to utilizing digital technology: a strategy for equity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Garth N; Ostrowski, MaryLynn; Sabina, Alyse B

    2016-11-01

    Health care disparities and high chronic disease rates burden many communities and disproportionally impact racial/ethnic populations in the United States. These disparities vary geographically, increase health care expenses, and result in shortened lifespans. Digital technologies may be one tool for addressing health disparities and improving population health by increasing individuals' access to health information-especially as most low-income U.S. residents gain access to smartphones. The Aetna Foundation partners with organizations to use digital technologies, including mobile applications, data collection, and related platforms, for learning and sharing. Projects range from the broad-childhood education, lifestyle modification, health IT training, and nutrition education, to the specific-local healthy foods, stroke rehabilitation, and collection of city-level data. We describe our approaches to grantmaking and discuss lessons learned and their implications. When combined with sound policy strategies, emerging, scalable, digital technologies will likely become powerful allies for improving health and reducing health disparities.

  20. Assessment of the usability of a digital learning technology prototype for monitoring intracranial pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lilian Regina de Carvalho

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: to assess the usability of a digital learning technology prototype as a new method for minimally invasive monitoring of intracranial pressure. Method: descriptive study using a quantitative approach on assessing the usability of a prototype based on Nielsen's ten heuristics. Four experts in the area of Human-Computer interaction participated in the study. Results: the evaluation delivered eight violated heuristics and 31 usability problems in the 32 screens of the prototype. Conclusion: the suggestions of the evaluators were critical for developing an intuitive, user-friendly interface and will be included in the final version of the digital learning technology.

  1. Digital Microdroplet Ejection Technology-Based Heterogeneous Objects Prototyping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Na Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available An integrate fabrication framework is presented to build heterogeneous objects (HEO using digital microdroplets injecting technology and rapid prototyping. The heterogeneous materials part design and manufacturing method in structure and material was used to change the traditional process. The net node method was used for digital modeling that can configure multimaterials in time. The relationship of material, color, and jetting nozzle was built. The main important contributions are to combine the structure, material, and visualization in one process and give the digital model for manufacture. From the given model, it is concluded that the method is effective for HEO. Using microdroplet rapid prototyping and the model given in the paper HEO could be gotten basically. The model could be used in 3D biomanufacturing.

  2. Bits of Homeland: Generational and Gender Transformations of Moroccan-Dutch Youth using digital technologies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leurs, K.H.A.; Ponzanesi, S.

    2013-01-01

    Generational and gendered specificities of digital technology use within migrant families remain understudied and undertheorized (Green & Kabir, 2012). Digital technologies are used among descendants of migrants to sustain and update networks while simultaneously they allow the younger generation to

  3. Digital technologies as truth-bearers in health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartlett, Ruth; Balmer, Andrew; Brannelly, Petula

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we explore the idea of digital technologies as truth-bearers in health care and argue that devices like SenseCam, which facilitate reflection and memory recall, have a potentially vital role in healthcare situations when questions of veracity are at stake (e.g., when best interest decisions are being made). We discuss the role of digital technologies as truth-bearers in the context of nursing people with dementia, as this is one area of health care in which the topic of truth-telling has been hotly debated. People with dementia have been excluded from research studies and decisions that affect their lives because they are not regarded as truth-bearers-that is, as being capable of giving truthful accounts of their experiences. Also, considerable research has focused on the ethics of lying to and deceiving people with dementia. Given their increasing prominence in healthcare settings, there has been surprisingly little discussion of what role digital technologies might play in relation to these questions of truth and deception. Drawing on theories from science and technology studies (STS), we explore their possible future role in some of the truth-making processes of health care. In particular, we discuss the potential value of constraints on use of SenseCam to support the accounts of people with dementia as part of their care. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Using the concept of hubots to understand the work entailed in using digital technologies in healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pope, Catherine; Turnbull, Joanne

    2017-08-21

    Purpose The purpose of this paper is to explore the human work entailed in the deployment of digital health care technology. It draws on imagined configurations of computers and machines in fiction and social science to think about the relationship between technology and people, and why this makes implementation of digital technology so difficult. The term hubots is employed as a metaphorical device to examine how machines and humans come together to do the work of healthcare. Design/methodology/approach This paper uses the fictional depiction of hubots to reconceptualise the deployment of a particular technology - a computer decision support system (CDSS) used in emergency and urgent care services. Data from two ethnographic studies are reanalysed to explore the deployment of digital technologies in health services. These studies used comparative mixed-methods case study approaches to examine the use of the CDSS in eight different English NHS settings. The data include approximately 900 hours of observation, with 64 semi-structured interviews, 47 focus groups, and surveys of some 700 staff in call centres and urgent care centres. The paper reanalyses these data, deductively, using the metaphor of the hubot as an analytical device. Findings This paper focuses on the interconnected but paradoxical features of both the fictional hubots and the CDSS. Health care call handling using a CDSS has created a new occupation, and enabled the substitution of some clinical labour. However, at the same time, the introduction of the technology has created additional work. There are more tasks, both physical and emotional, and more training activity is required. Thus, the labour has been intensified. Practical implications This paper implies that if we want to realise the promise of digital health care technologies, we need to understand that these technologies substitute for and intensify labour. Originality/value This is a novel analysis using a metaphor drawn from fiction. This

  5. Digital Technologies and Dance: Developing Connections between Artistic Practice, Pedagogy, and Future Higher Education Curricular Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alpert, Valerie

    2011-01-01

    As digital literacy increases in the world and as educational institutions respond, changes are occurring across disciplines, including dance. This study examines the current status of "integrated dance technology curricula" at two universities and one community college in the United States, all of which have differing pedagogical and…

  6. Current Issues and Trends in Multidimensional Sensing Technologies for Digital Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagata, Noriko; Ohki, Hidehiro; Kato, Kunihito; Koshimizu, Hiroyasu; Sagawa, Ryusuke; Fujiwara, Takayuki; Yamashita, Atsushi; Hashimoto, Manabu

    Multidimensional sensing (MDS) technologies have numerous applications in the field of digital media, including the development of audio and visual equipment for human-computer interaction (HCI) and manufacture of data storage devices; furthermore, MDS finds applications in the fields of medicine and marketing, i.e., in e-marketing and the development of diagnosis equipment.

  7. Between Assessments, Digital Technologies and Big Data: The Growing Influence of "Hidden" Data Mediators in Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartong, Sigrid

    2016-01-01

    The past few decades have witnessed a global enforcement of "governance by data" in education policy, including a significant increase of assessments and quantified evaluation. Within this context, this article focuses particularly on the intensifying evolvement of new (digital) information technologies and "mediated"…

  8. University students’ self-regulated learning using digital technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Yot-Domínguez

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Analysing the process by which students—whether at university or not—manage and facilitate their own learning has been a recurrent educational research problem. Recently, the question arises about how the development of strategies taking place during the aforementioned process could be made easier by using technologies. In an effort to know whether university students really use digital technologies to plan, organize and facilitate their own learning, we have proposed three research questions. Which technologies do university students use to self-regulate their learning? What self-regulated learning strategies do they develop using technologies? What profiles could be identified among students based on their use of self-regulation strategies with technology? To answer these questions, the “Survey of Self-regulated Learning with Technology at the University” was designed. Information from a sample group with 711 students from various universities located in the region of Andalusia (Spain was collected with this survey. The results indicate that university students, even when they are frequent users of digital technology, they tend not to use these technologies to regulate their own learning process. Of all technologies analysed, Internet information search and instant communication tools are used continually. In turn, the most generalised self-regulation learning strategies are those relative to social support. Nevertheless, students differ from each other regarding their use and frequency. There are groups of students who make use of self-regulation strategies when learning with technologies. In this regard, two distinctive groups of students have been identified, who show differentiated self-regulated levels.

  9. How do digital platforms for ideas, technologies, and knowledge transfer act as enablers for digital transformation?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hossain, Mokter; Lassen, Astrid Heidemann

    2017-01-01

    provide new possibilities and competence, they however also bring new challenges for organizations, which call for new ways of organizing in order to fully embrace their potential. Understanding the role of these platforms in digital transformation is therefore crucial. We must recognize equally......Digital platforms, along with their supporting tools and features, have emerged as important enablers for firms to leverage distributed knowledge (Sedera et al., 2016), because they offer new ways for organizations to collaborate with the external environment for ideas, technologies, and knowledge....... Indeed, studies have explored efforts to promote such collaboration on digital platforms with various popular names, such as crowdsourcing platforms (Afuah & Tucci, 2012), open innovation platforms (Frey et al., 2011), and online marketplaces (Dushnitsky & Klueter, 2011). Among others, the open...

  10. Primary school teachers' use of digital technology in mathematics: the complexities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loong, Esther Yook-Kin; Herbert, Sandra

    2018-02-01

    This paper seeks to theorise primary teachers' degree of integration of digital technology in the mathematics classroom. In an age where digital technology use is ubiquitous, the issues surrounding teachers' choice, and ultimately their uptake of digital technologies in the classroom, is an area that need to be further unpacked. Cross-case analysis of the two teachers' uptake of digital technologies in their classroom, their pedagogical approaches and the reason for their choices provide insight into teachers' technological, pedagogical and content knowledge (TPACK). Differences in the way the teachers use digital technology in their classroom seem to be connected to their TPACK developmental stage.

  11. 76 FR 10403 - Western Digital Technologies, Inc., Coporate Headquaters/Hard Drive Development Division, Lake...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-24

    ... Employment and Training Administration Western Digital Technologies, Inc., Coporate Headquaters/Hard Drive... for the workers and former workers of Western Digital Technologies, Inc., Corporate Headquarters/Hard... former workers of Western Digital Technologies, Inc., Corporate Headquarters/Hard Drive Development...

  12. [Application of three-dimensional digital technology in the diagnosis and treatment planning in orthodontics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Y X

    2016-06-01

    Three-dimensional(3D)digital technology has been widely used in the field of orthodontics in clinical examination, diagnosis, treatment and curative effect evaluation. 3D digital technology greatly improves the accuracy of diagnosis and treatment, and provides effective means for personalized orthodontic treatment. This review focuses on the application of 3D digital technology in the field of orthodontics.

  13. Expanding Health Technology Assessments to Include Effects on the Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, Kevin; Ganz, Michael L; Hsu, John; Strandberg-Larsen, Martin; Gonzalez, Raquel Palomino; Lund, Niels

    2016-01-01

    There is growing awareness of the impact of human activity on the climate and the need to stem this impact. Public health care decision makers from Sweden and the United Kingdom have started examining environmental impacts when assessing new technologies. This article considers the case for incorporating environmental impacts into the health technology assessment (HTA) process and discusses the associated challenges. Two arguments favor incorporating environmental impacts into HTA: 1) environmental changes could directly affect people's health and 2) policy decision makers have broad mandates and objectives extending beyond health care. Two types of challenges hinder this process. First, the nascent evidence base is insufficient to support the accurate comparison of technologies' environmental impacts. Second, cost-utility analysis, which is favored by many HTA agencies, could capture some of the value of environmental impacts, especially those generating health impacts, but might not be suitable for addressing broader concerns. Both cost-benefit and multicriteria decision analyses are potential methods for evaluating health and environmental outcomes, but are less familiar to health care decision makers. Health care is an important and sizable sector of the economy that could warrant closer policy attention to its impact on the environment. Considerable work is needed to track decision makers' demands, augment the environmental evidence base, and develop robust methods for capturing and incorporating environmental data as part of HTA. Copyright © 2016 International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. The role of technology and digital gaming in nurse education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Brian; Boyle, Liz; MacArthur, Ewan; Manion, Baltasar Fernandez

    2013-03-13

    There is growing evidence that using e-learning and digital gaming technology can support students in their learning. An international project, Continuing/Higher Education in Research Methods Using Games, funded by the European Commission's Lifelong Learning Programme and led by a team at the University of the West of Scotland, aims to develop interactive activities and games to support nursing and social science students. This article looks at the scope of the project in helping to deliver nurse education.

  15. Fast modified signal-digit (MSD) multiplication technology and system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, DeGui; He, Li-Ming; Wang, Na-Xin; Weng, Zhao-Heng

    1994-06-01

    In this paper, the carry-free property of modified-signed-digit (MSD) addition is analyzed with a space position logic encoding scheme. On this basis, MSD multiplication is discussed and a fast MSD multiplication system composed of optoelectronic logic technology and a multilayer optical interconnection architecture is propsed and studied. Finally, the effectivity of the fast MSD multiplication system is demostrated by using a 2X2 bit multiplication example and experimental results are given.

  16. Digital Technology in the protection of cultural heritage Bao Fan Temple mural digital mapping survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Y.

    2015-08-01

    Peng Xi county, Sichuan province, the Bao Fan temple mural digitization survey mapping project: we use three-dimensional laserscanning, multi-baseline definition digital photography, multi-spectral digital image acquisition and other technologies for digital survey mapping. The purpose of this project is to use modern mathematical reconnaissance mapping means to obtain accurate mural shape, color, quality and other data. Combined with field investigation and laboratory analysis results, and based on a comprehensive survey and study, a comprehensive analysis of the historical Bao Fan Temple mural artistic and scientific value was conducted. A study of the mural's many qualities (structural, material, technique, preservation environment, degradation, etc.) reveal all aspects of the information carried by the Bao Fan Temple mural. From multiple angles (archeology, architecture, surveying, conservation science and other disciplines) an assessment for the Bao Fan Temple mural provides basic data and recommendations for conservation of the mural. In order to achieve the conservation of cultural relics in the Bao Fan Temple mural digitization survey mapping process, we try to apply the advantages of three-dimensional laser scanning equipment. For wall murals this means obtaining three-dimensional scale data from the scan of the building and through the analysis of these data to help determine the overall condition of the settlement as well as the deformation of the wall structure. Survey analysis provides an effective set of conclusions and suggestions for appropriate mural conservation. But before data collection, analysis and research need to first to select the appropriate scanning equipment, set the appropriate scanning accuracy and layout position of stations necessary to determine the scope of required data. We use the fine features of the three-dimensional laser scanning measuring arm to scan the mural surface deformation degradation to reflect the actual state of

  17. Digital Technology in the protection of cultural heritage Bao Fan Temple mural digital mapping survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Zheng

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Peng Xi county, Sichuan province, the Bao Fan temple mural digitization survey mapping project: we use three-dimensional laserscanning, multi-baseline definition digital photography, multi-spectral digital image acquisition and other technologies for digital survey mapping. The purpose of this project is to use modern mathematical reconnaissance mapping means to obtain accurate mural shape, color, quality and other data. Combined with field investigation and laboratory analysis results, and based on a comprehensive survey and study, a comprehensive analysis of the historical Bao Fan Temple mural artistic and scientific value was conducted. A study of the mural’s many qualities (structural, material, technique, preservation environment, degradation, etc. reveal all aspects of the information carried by the Bao Fan Temple mural. From multiple angles (archeology, architecture, surveying, conservation science and other disciplines an assessment for the Bao Fan Temple mural provides basic data and recommendations for conservation of the mural. In order to achieve the conservation of cultural relics in the Bao Fan Temple mural digitization survey mapping process, we try to apply the advantages of three-dimensional laser scanning equipment. For wall murals this means obtaining three-dimensional scale data from the scan of the building and through the analysis of these data to help determine the overall condition of the settlement as well as the deformation of the wall structure. Survey analysis provides an effective set of conclusions and suggestions for appropriate mural conservation. But before data collection, analysis and research need to first to select the appropriate scanning equipment, set the appropriate scanning accuracy and layout position of stations necessary to determine the scope of required data. We use the fine features of the three-dimensional laser scanning measuring arm to scan the mural surface deformation degradation to reflect

  18. An ethical assessment model for digital disease detection technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denecke, Kerstin

    2017-09-20

    Digital epidemiology, also referred to as digital disease detection (DDD), successfully provided methods and strategies for using information technology to support infectious disease monitoring and surveillance or understand attitudes and concerns about infectious diseases. However, Internet-based research and social media usage in epidemiology and healthcare pose new technical, functional and formal challenges. The focus of this paper is on the ethical issues to be considered when integrating digital epidemiology with existing practices. Taking existing ethical guidelines and the results from the EU project M-Eco and SORMAS as starting point, we develop an ethical assessment model aiming at providing support in identifying relevant ethical concerns in future DDD projects. The assessment model has four dimensions: user, application area, data source and methodology. The model supports in becoming aware, identifying and describing the ethical dimensions of DDD technology or use case and in identifying the ethical issues on the technology use from different perspectives. It can be applied in an interdisciplinary meeting to collect different viewpoints on a DDD system even before the implementation starts and aims at triggering discussions and finding solutions for risks that might not be acceptable even in the development phase. From the answers, ethical issues concerning confidence, privacy, data and patient security or justice may be judged and weighted.

  19. Study on modeling technology in digital reactor system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Xiaoping; Luo Yuetong; Tong Lili

    2004-01-01

    Modeling is the kernel part of a digital reactor system. As an extensible platform for reactor conceptual design, it is very important to study modeling technology and develop some kind of tools to speed up preparation of all classical computing models. This paper introduces the background of the project and basic conception of digital reactor. MCAM is taken as an example for modeling and its related technologies used are given. It is an interface program for MCNP geometry model developed by FDS team (ASIPP and HUT), and designed to run on windows system. MCAM aims at utilizing CAD technology to facilitate creation of MCNP geometry model. There have been two ways for MCAM to utilize CAD technology: (1) Making use of user interface technology in aid of generation of MCNP geometry model; (2) Making use of existing 3D CAD model to accelerate creation of MCNP geometry model. This paper gives an overview of MCAM's major function. At last, several examples are given to demonstrate MCAM's various capabilities. (authors)

  20. Digital technology and clinical decision making in depression treatment: Current findings and future opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallgren, Kevin A; Bauer, Amy M; Atkins, David C

    2017-06-01

    Clinical decision making encompasses a broad set of processes that contribute to the effectiveness of depression treatments. There is emerging interest in using digital technologies to support effective and efficient clinical decision making. In this paper, we provide "snapshots" of research and current directions on ways that digital technologies can support clinical decision making in depression treatment. Practical facets of clinical decision making are reviewed, then research, design, and implementation opportunities where technology can potentially enhance clinical decision making are outlined. Discussions of these opportunities are organized around three established movements designed to enhance clinical decision making for depression treatment, including measurement-based care, integrated care, and personalized medicine. Research, design, and implementation efforts may support clinical decision making for depression by (1) improving tools to incorporate depression symptom data into existing electronic health record systems, (2) enhancing measurement of treatment fidelity and treatment processes, (3) harnessing smartphone and biosensor data to inform clinical decision making, (4) enhancing tools that support communication and care coordination between patients and providers and within provider teams, and (5) leveraging treatment and outcome data from electronic health record systems to support personalized depression treatment. The current climate of rapid changes in both healthcare and digital technologies facilitates an urgent need for research, design, and implementation of digital technologies that explicitly support clinical decision making. Ensuring that such tools are efficient, effective, and usable in frontline treatment settings will be essential for their success and will require engagement of stakeholders from multiple domains. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Changes in Everyday and Digital Health Technology Use Among Seniors in Declining Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, David M; Lipsitz, Stuart R; Linder, Jeffrey A

    2018-03-14

    U.S. seniors' digital health and everyday technology use when their health declines are unknown. Longitudinal cohort using the National Health and Aging Trends Study, a nationally representative, annually administered sample of community-dwelling Medicare beneficiaries (n = 4,037). We used difference-in-differences to assess the adjusted difference (AD) in technology use from 2011 to 2014 between those with and without health declines. Health decline measures included new-onset dementia; new-onset depression; decreases in activities of daily living (ADLs), short physical performance battery (SPPB), grip strength, and self-reported health; relocation to nursing facility; increased hospitalizations; and new-onset comorbidity. Digital health included use of the Internet to research health conditions, contact clinicians, fill prescriptions, and address insurance matters. Between 2011 and 2014, seniors experiencing health decline used various digital health technologies at low absolute rates (range: 1%-20%). Between 2011 and 2014, use of everyday technology decreased significantly among seniors with new-onset dementia (from 73% to 51%; AD, -26%), decreased ADLs (from 76% to 67%; AD, -10%), decreased SPPB (from 88% to 86%; AD, -3%), and relocation to a nursing facility (from 49% to 22%; AD, -31%) compared to seniors without comparable decline (all p digital health decreased significantly among seniors with new-onset probable dementia (from 9% to 4%; AD, -6%) and decreased SPPB (from 24% to 25%; AD, -4%; all p health decline a senior experiences predicts technology use, which may allow better targeting of digital health to specific seniors. Seniors with new dementia, relocation to a nursing home, and declining physical performance seem especially poor candidates for technology interventions.

  2. Including information technology project management in the nursing informatics curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sockolow, Paulina; Bowles, Kathryn H

    2008-01-01

    Project management is a critical skill for nurse informaticists who are in prominent roles developing and implementing clinical information systems. It should be included in the nursing informatics curriculum, as evidenced by its inclusion in informatics competencies and surveys of important skills for informaticists. The University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing includes project management in two of the four courses in the master's level informatics minor. Course content includes the phases of the project management process; the iterative unified process methodology; and related systems analysis and project management skills. During the introductory course, students learn about the project plan, requirements development, project feasibility, and executive summary documents. In the capstone course, students apply the system development life cycle and project management skills during precepted informatics projects. During this in situ experience, students learn, the preceptors benefit, and the institution better prepares its students for the real world.

  3. Discussion on the management system technology implementation of multimedia classrooms in the digital campus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bo

    2018-04-01

    Based on the digitized information and network, digital campus is an integration of teaching, management, science and research, life service and technology service, and it is one of the current mainstream construction form of campus function. This paper regarded the "mobile computing" core digital environment construction development as the background, explored the multiple management system technology content design and achievement of multimedia classrooms in digital campus and scientifically proved the technology superiority of management system.

  4. Digital Suicide Prevention: Can Technology Become a Game-changer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vahabzadeh, Arshya; Sahin, Ned; Kalali, Amir

    2016-01-01

    Suicide continues to be a leading cause of death and has been recognized as a significant public health issue. Rapid advances in data science can provide us with useful tools for suicide prevention, and help to dynamically assess suicide risk in quantitative data-driven ways. In this article, the authors highlight the most current international research in digital suicide prevention, including the use of machine learning, smartphone applications, and wearable sensor driven systems. The authors also discuss future opportunities for digital suicide prevention, and propose a novel Sensor-driven Mental State Assessment System.

  5. Factors that influence older people's engagement with digital health technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Katherine; Price, Kyle

    2017-11-30

    Digital health technology (DHT) encompasses a wide range of applications and interventions with the potential to address the health needs of an increasingly ageing population. Older people's engagement with DHT depends on many factors, and this article summarises understanding of the barriers and facilitators to DHT uptake and continued use among older people. Older people's confidence in using digital technology, their perceptions of personal benefit from DHT, its design, and the support they receive from health professionals and carers in using DHT all affect their level of engagement. Understanding these barriers and facilitators among the older population creates ways to enable greater numbers to benefit from DHT. This article provides information for those who work with, or design digital health interventions for, older people to help them to influence older people's engagement with these rapidly evolving healthcare innovations. ©2017 RCN Publishing Company Ltd. All rights reserved. Not to be copied, transmitted or recorded in any way, in whole or part, without prior permission of the publishers.

  6. Wireless Technologies Bridging the Digital Divide in Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerard Smyth

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this paper is to demonstrate how the latest wireless standards and technologies may overcome the digital divide in education in the developed and developing worlds. The concept of the digital divide is discussed in the traditional socio-economic sense and expanded in terms of the learner's location, age, culture and background. It is important that we understand the full extent and complexities of this division if we are to effectively bridge it. Why and how the digital divide may be bridged is examined. Apart from the inherent inequalities that need to be addressed from an ethical perspective, it is very much in the interests of governments and citizens globally that Information and Communications Technology (ICT is made available to all as quickly and cost-effectively as possible. New forms of wireless protocols are overcoming challenges of terrain, infrastructure and finance. It is proposed that, by leveraging open broadband wireless standards, like Wireless Fidelity (Wi-Fi* and Worldwide Interoperability for Microwave Access (WiMAX*, and implementing Mobile Computing architecture, it is now possible to make dramatic strides in this direction. The paper continues with a general overview of these wireless standards and technologies followed by an in-depth look at Wi-Fi and WiMAX. The paper goes on to give examples of the Innovation Centre's involvement in delivering solutions and new usage models for eLearning that utilize the latest wireless standards and technologies. The challenges and successes of these projects are outlined and metrics are presented where available.

  7. Improved Construction of Auricular Prosthesis by Digital Technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuseir, Amjad; Hatamleh, Muhanad; Watson, Jason; Al-Wahadni, Ahed M; Alzoubi, Firas; Murad, Mohammed

    2015-09-01

    Implant-retained auricular prostheses are a successful prosthetic treatment option for patients who are missing their ear(s) due to trauma, oncology, or birth defects. The prosthetic ear is aesthetically pleasing, composed of natural looking anatomical contours, shape, and texture along with good color that blends with surrounding existing skin. These outcomes can be optimized by the integration of digital technologies in the construction process. This report describes a sequential process of reconstructing a missing left ear by digital technologies. Two implants were planned for placement in the left mastoid region utilizing specialist biomedical software (Materialise, Belgium). The implant positions were determined underneath the thickest portion (of anti-helix area) left ear that is virtually simulated by means of mirror imaging of the right ear. A surgical stent recording the implant positions was constructed and used in implant fixtures placement. Implants were left for eight weeks, after which they were loaded with abutments and an irreversible silicone impression was taken to record their positions. The right existing ear was virtually segmented using the patient CT scan and then mirror imaged to produce a left ear, which was then printed using 3D printer (Z Corp, USA). The left ear was then duplicated in wax which was fitted over the defect side. Then, it was conventionally flasked. Skin color was digitalized using spectromatch skin color system (London, UK). The resultant silicone color was mixed as prescribed and then packed into the mold. The silicone was cured conventionally. Ear was trimmed and fitted and there was no need for any extrinsic coloring. The prosthetic ear was an exact match to the existing right ear in shape, skin color, and orientation due to the great advantages of technologies employed. Additionally, these technologies saved time and provided a base for reproducible results regardless of operator.

  8. Digital autoradiography using room temperature CCD and CMOS imaging technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cabello, Jorge; Bailey, Alexis; Kitchen, Ian; Prydderch, Mark; Clark, Andy; Turchetta, Renato; Wells, Kevin

    2007-01-01

    CCD (charged coupled device) and CMOS imaging technologies can be applied to thin tissue autoradiography as potential imaging alternatives to using conventional film. In this work, we compare two particular devices: a CCD operating in slow scan mode and a CMOS-based active pixel sensor, operating at near video rates. Both imaging sensors have been operated at room temperature using direct irradiation with images produced from calibrated microscales and radiolabelled tissue samples. We also compare these digital image sensor technologies with the use of conventional film. We show comparative results obtained with 14 C calibrated microscales and 35 S radiolabelled tissue sections. We also present the first results of 3 H images produced under direct irradiation of a CCD sensor operating at room temperature. Compared to film, silicon-based imaging technologies exhibit enhanced sensitivity, dynamic range and linearity

  9. Exploring virtual reality technology and the Oculus Rift for the examination of digital pathology slides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farahani, Navid; Post, Robert; Duboy, Jon; Ahmed, Ishtiaque; Kolowitz, Brian J; Krinchai, Teppituk; Monaco, Sara E; Fine, Jeffrey L; Hartman, Douglas J; Pantanowitz, Liron

    2016-01-01

    Digital slides obtained from whole slide imaging (WSI) platforms are typically viewed in two dimensions using desktop personal computer monitors or more recently on mobile devices. To the best of our knowledge, we are not aware of any studies viewing digital pathology slides in a virtual reality (VR) environment. VR technology enables users to be artificially immersed in and interact with a computer-simulated world. Oculus Rift is among the world's first consumer-targeted VR headsets, intended primarily for enhanced gaming. Our aim was to explore the use of the Oculus Rift for examining digital pathology slides in a VR environment. An Oculus Rift Development Kit 2 (DK2) was connected to a 64-bit computer running Virtual Desktop software. Glass slides from twenty randomly selected lymph node cases (ten with benign and ten malignant diagnoses) were digitized using a WSI scanner. Three pathologists reviewed these digital slides on a 27-inch 5K display and with the Oculus Rift after a 2-week washout period. Recorded endpoints included concordance of final diagnoses and time required to examine slides. The pathologists also rated their ease of navigation, image quality, and diagnostic confidence for both modalities. There was 90% diagnostic concordance when reviewing WSI using a 5K display and Oculus Rift. The time required to examine digital pathology slides on the 5K display averaged 39 s (range 10-120 s), compared to 62 s with the Oculus Rift (range 15-270 s). All pathologists confirmed that digital pathology slides were easily viewable in a VR environment. The ratings for image quality and diagnostic confidence were higher when using the 5K display. Using the Oculus Rift DK2 to view and navigate pathology whole slide images in a virtual environment is feasible for diagnostic purposes. However, image resolution using the Oculus Rift device was limited. Interactive VR technologies such as the Oculus Rift are novel tools that may be of use in digital pathology.

  10. Digital preservation for heritages

    CERN Document Server

    Lu, Dongming

    2011-01-01

    ""Digital Preservation for Heritages: Technologies and Applications"" provides a comprehensive and up-to-date coverage of digital technologies in the area of cultural heritage preservation, including digitalization, research aiding, conservation aiding, digital exhibition, and digital utilization. Processes, technical frameworks, key technologies, as well as typical systems and applications are discussed in the book. It is intended for researchers and students in the fields of computer science and technology, museology, and archaeology. Dr. Dongming Lu is a professor at College of Computer Sci

  11. Implementing Digital Storytelling as a Technology Integration Approach with Primary School Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuala Sweeney-Burt

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Irish educational policy acknowledges the importance of integrating technology meaningfully into teaching and learning at the primary level. Much remains to be done, however, in terms of developing, practically implementing and evaluating the use of technology in the Irish primary classroom. This paper describes a study on the use of a structured approach to digital storytelling as a tool for meaningful technology integration with children at primary level. In this study, the researcher developed a structured approach for implementing digital storytelling with primary school children, and collaborated with a class teacher in an Irish primary school to prepare to implement the approach. Multiple qualitative methods were used to evaluate the implementation, including interviews with the teacher, classroom observation, and focus group interviews with participating children. The results suggested that this structured approach to digital storytelling has the potential to be used successfully as a meaningful technology integration approach with this cohort. The findings also explored implications for the implementation of digital storytelling at primary level, and identified aspects on which further research should be undertaken to enhance and extend the approach that was used.

  12. Construction and Implementation of Teaching Mode for Digital Mapping based on Interactive Micro-course Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ning Gao

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The era of “Internet + education” has caused reforms in teaching ideas, teaching modes, and learning styles. The emergence of micro-course technology provides new strategies for integrating learning styles. Task-driven digital mapping teaching, known as traditional classroom organization, has poor teaching effect due to single learning style and strategy. A new teaching mode for digital mapping was constructed in this study based on micro-course technology by combining interactive micro-course technology and digital mapping teaching to adapt to the demands of modern teaching. This teaching mode mainly included four modules, namely, micro-courseware, micro-video, micro-exercise, and micro-examination. It realized the hierarchical teaching of knowledge points in digital mapping course, simplification of basic principles, simulation of engineering cases, and self-evaluation of learning outcomes. The teaching mode was applied to 114 students from the Mapping Engineering Department of Henan University of Urban Construction. Results indicate that the proposed teaching mode based on interactive micro-course technology promoting the independent after-class learning of the students, stimulating their learning enthusiasm, enhancing their practical abilities of the students, and improving the effect of teaching. This mode of teaching provides a new concept for the teaching mode reform of other courses in mapping engineering.

  13. Access to digital technology among families coming to urban pediatric primary care clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demartini, Tori L; Beck, Andrew F; Klein, Melissa D; Kahn, Robert S

    2013-07-01

    Digital technologies offer new platforms for health promotion and disease management. Few studies have evaluated the use of digital technology among families receiving care in an urban pediatric primary care setting. A self-administered survey was given to a convenience sample of caregivers bringing their children to 2 urban pediatric primary care centers in spring 2012. The survey assessed access to home Internet, e-mail, smartphone, and social media (Facebook and Twitter). A "digital technology" scale (0-4) quantified the number of available digital technologies and connections. Frequency of daily use and interest in receiving medical information digitally were also assessed. The survey was completed by 257 caregivers. The sample was drawn from a clinical population that was 73% African American and 92% Medicaid insured with a median patient age of 2.9 years (interquartile range 0.8-7.4). Eighty percent of respondents reported having Internet at home, and 71% had a smartphone. Ninety-one percent reported using e-mail, 78% Facebook, and 27% Twitter. Ninety-seven percent scored ≥1 on the digital technology scale; 49% had a digital technology score of 4. The digital technology score was associated with daily use of digital media in a graded fashion (P health care information supplied digitally if approved by their child's medical provider. Caregivers in an urban pediatric primary care setting have access to and frequently use digital technologies. Digital connections may help reach a traditionally hard-to-reach population.

  14. Digital Technology Use by the Students and English Teachers and Self-Directed Language Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sert, Nehir; Boynuegri, Ebru

    2017-01-01

    The digital era is a new challenge for teachers. While children get acquainted with the digital technology before the age of six, teachers, who have encountered with the digital world at a later time in their lives, struggle with it. Self-directed learning, which is crucial for lifelong learning, can be enhanced by the use technology particularly…

  15. Hybrid Placemaking in the Library: Designing Digital Technology to Enhance Users' On-Site Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilandzic, Mark; Johnson, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents research findings and design strategies that illustrate how digital technology can be applied as a tool for "hybrid" placemaking in ways that would not be possible in purely digital or physical spaces. Digital technology has revolutionised the way people learn and gather new information. This trend has challenged the…

  16. Advanced digital modulation: Communication techniques and monolithic GaAs technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, S. G.; Oliver, J. D., Jr.; Kot, R. C.; Richards, C. R.

    1983-01-01

    Communications theory and practice are merged with state-of-the-art technology in IC fabrication, especially monolithic GaAs technology, to examine the general feasibility of a number of advanced technology digital transmission systems. Satellite-channel models with (1) superior throughput, perhaps 2 Gbps; (2) attractive weight and cost; and (3) high RF power and spectrum efficiency are discussed. Transmission techniques possessing reasonably simple architectures capable of monolithic fabrication at high speeds were surveyed. This included a review of amplitude/phase shift keying (APSK) techniques and the continuous-phase-modulation (CPM) methods, of which MSK represents the simplest case.

  17. The Governance of Digital Technology, Big Data, and the Internet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Flyverbom, Mikkel; Deibert, Ronald; Matten, Dirk

    2017-01-01

    and business to the governance of the Internet and the adjacent technological spaces raises a host of ethical issues. The significance and challenges of the digital age have been further accentuated by a string of highly exposed cases of surveillance and a growing concern about issues of privacy and the power...... of this new industry. This special issue explores what some have referred to as the “Internet-industrial complex”—the intersections between business, states, and other actors in the shaping, development, and governance of the Internet....

  18. The application of digital surgical diagnosis and treatment technology: a promising strategy for surgical reconstruction of craniomaxillofacial defect and deformity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li-ya; Du, Hong-ming; Zhang, Gang; Tang, Wei; Liu, Lei; Jing, Wei; Long, Jie

    2011-12-01

    The craniomaxillofacial defect and deformity always leads to serious dysfunction in mastication and facial contour damage, significantly reducing patients' quality of life. However, surgical reconstruction of a craniomaxillofacial hard tissue defect or deformity is extremely complex and often does not result in desired facial morphology. Improving the result for patients with craniomaxillofacial defect and deformity remains a challenge for surgeons. Using digital technology for surgical diagnosis and treatment may help solve this problem. Computer-assisted surgical technology and surgical navigation technology are included in the accurate digital diagnosis and treatment system we propose. These technologies will increase the accuracy of the design of the operation plan. In addition, the intraoperative real-time navigating location system controlling the robotic arm or advanced intelligent robot will provide accurate, individualized surgical treatment for patients. Here we propose the hypothesis that a digital surgical diagnosis and treatment technology may provide a new approach for precise surgical reconstruction of complicated craniomaxillofacial defect and deformity. Our hypothesis involves modern digital surgery, a three-dimensional navigation surgery system and modern digital imaging technology, and our key aim is to establish a technological platform for customized digital surgical design and surgical navigation for craniomaxillofacial defect and deformity. If the hypothesis is proven practical, this novel therapeutic approach could improve the result of surgical reconstruction for craniomaxillofacial defect and deformity for many patients. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. A New Frontier: Integrating Behavioral and Digital Technology to Promote Health Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dallery, Jesse; Kurti, Allison; Erb, Philip

    2015-05-01

    Modifiable behavioral risk factors such as cigarette smoking, physical inactivity, and obesity contribute to over 40 % of premature deaths in the USA. Advances in digital and information technology are creating unprecedented opportunities for behavior analysts to assess and modify these risk factors. Technological advances include mobile devices, wearable sensors, biomarker detectors, and real-time access to therapeutic support via information technology. Integrating these advances with behavioral technology in the form of conceptually systematic principles and procedures could usher in a new generation of effective and scalable behavioral interventions targeting health behavior. In this selective review of the literature, we discuss how technological tools can assess and modify a range of antecedents and consequences of healthy and unhealthy behavior. We also describe practical, methodological, and conceptual advantages for behavior analysts that stem from the use of technology to assess and treat health behavior.

  20. Discussion on construction of scientific and technological digital library in nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yin Huilan

    2010-01-01

    With the rapid development of digital and network technology, traditional libraries have been unable to meet the needs of the times. Digital libraries will gradually take the place of traditional libraries. Under the circumstances, how will the libraries of the enterprises in nuclear industry face this transformation? This paper gives the brief descriptions and comparative analyses in the four aspects: the definition of the digital library, the meaning of nuclear scientific and technological digital library, the characteristics of the digital library, and major problems in the construction of nuclear scientific and technological digital library that should be solved. Therefore, setting up the digital library is very important. At the same time, it's very necessary and urgent for the libraries of the enterprises in nuclear industry to establish nuclear scientific and technological digital library. (author)

  1. Digital Technology for Construction Period Reduction of Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    You, Y. M.; Suh, K. Y.

    2009-01-01

    PHILOSOPHIA, Inc. and Seoul National University have jointly developed a first-of-a-kind engineering (FOAKE) solution. The solution lends itself to the four-plus-dimensional (4 + D) Technology TM resorting to three -dimensional (3D) computer-aided design (CAD) digital mockup (DMU). The aim is to minimize the working hours via process optimization by real-time exchange of design and process information in the ubiquitous system. The 4 + D Technology TM in the 3D virtual reality (VR) space and time plus cost coordinates, is developed to reduce the construction time as well as cost of nuclear power plants (NPPs) by optimizing the manufacturing procedure and construction process. The 4 + D Technology TM anchored to the 3D CAD DMU allows the interference of the NPP components to be checked upon early in the design stage, and the process sequences to be optimized. Moreover, its ergonomic and robotic technologies enable simulation of all the aspects of the workers, robots and machines involved in the construction process. One of the greatest advantages of the 4 + D Technology TM lies in that any change of the overall process procedures can virtually be tested. On the other hand, it shall financially be unbearable to alter the procedures consisting of plenty of structures and components, complicated detailed processes and long work hours in the physical space

  2. Inclusive Digital Technologies for People with Communication Disabilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Konnerup, Ulla

    2018-01-01

    story and to process inner thoughts. Consequently, it may affect the sufferer’s self-understanding and lead to psychological problems. If it is not possible to find alternatives and compensation strategies for telling your story, presenting who you are, and participating in meaningful dialogues......, it is likely that your intellectual level will gradually decrease. Advances in information and communication technologies (ICT), such as smartphones, tablets, and Internet connectivity, have contributed to the integration of many aspects of communication and learning strategies. Thus, new methods to enhance...... aphasia after a brain injury this chapter will demonstrate how digital technologies can support sufferer’s in acquiring some new ways to re-engage people in communicative relations and learning activities....

  3. Facilitating the adoption of digital technologies by the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loiseau, Séverine; Boog, César; Pelayo, Sylvia

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the major criteria needed to facilitate the adoption of a technology that aims to support elderly autonomy. A User Centered Design process was instigated to design a digital tablet-based application. The two first stages consisted of a literature review and two focus groups that aimed respectively: to specify interaction principles, and to define the needs and expectations of the elderly and collect their feedback on the application's usability. The results show that to be accepted the technology has to provide relevant and useful information on nearby services, aids and social activities. It also has to facilitate the controlled sharing of information and the communication with close family/relations, and residential home and external services to both empower the elderly and counter loneliness. A summative evaluation will be organised after taking into account the current guidelines to further validate the usability of the application with elderly people.

  4. Successful Teaching, Learning, and Use of Digital Mapping Technology in Mazvihwa, Rural Zimbabwe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eitzel Solera, M. V.; Madzoro, S.; Solera, J.; Mhike Hove, E.; Changarara, A.; Ndlovu, D.; Chirindira, A.; Ndlovu, A.; Gwatipedza, S.; Mhizha, M.; Ndlovu, M.

    2016-12-01

    Participatory mapping is now a staple of community-based work around the world. Particularly for indigenous and rural peoples, it can represent a new avenue for environmental justice and can be a tool for culturally appropriate management of local ecosystems. We present a successful example of teaching and learning digital mapping technology in rural Zimbabwe. Our digital mapping project is part of the long-term community-based participatory research of The Muonde Trust in Mazvihwa, Zimbabwe. By gathering and distributing local knowledge and also bringing in visitors to share knowledge, Muonde has been able to spread relevant information among rural farmers. The authors were all members of Muonde or were Muonde's visitors, and were mentors and learners of digital mapping technologies at different times. Key successful characteristics of participants included patience, compassion, openness, perseverance, respect, and humility. Important mentoring strategies included: 1) instruction in Shona and in English, 2) locally relevant examples, assignments, and analogies motivated by real needs, 3) using a variety of teaching methods for different learning modalities, 4) building on and modifying familiar teaching methods, and 5) paying attention to the social and relational aspects of teaching and learning. The Muonde mapping team has used their new skills for a wide variety of purposes, including: identifying, discussing, and acting on emerging needs; using digital mapping for land-use and agropastoral planning; and using mapping as a tool for recording and telling important historical and cultural stories. Digital mapping has built self-confidence as well as providing employable skills and giving Muonde more visibility to other local and national non-governmental organizations, utility companies, and educational institutions. Digital mapping, as taught in a bottom-up, collaborative way, has proven to be both accessible and of enormous practical use to rural Zimbabweans.

  5. An Ethics Whirlwind: A Perspective of the Digital Lifestyle of Digital Natives and Initial Thoughts on Ethics Education in Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Brian R.

    2012-01-01

    As digital natives continue rolling onto college campuses around the country, the questions surrounding digital ethics grow. Students do not know life without modern technology, computers, mobile devices, the Internet and their lifestyle has developed around this mass. Unlike their predecessors, they do not recognize a difference between the…

  6. 60 GHz 5-bit digital controlled phase shifter in a digital 40 nm CMOS technology without ultra-thick metals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gao, H.; Ying, K.; Matters-Kammerer, M.K.; Harpe, P.; Wang, B.; Liu, B.; Serdijn, W.A.; Baltus, P.G.M.

    2016-01-01

    A 5-bit digital controlled switch-type passive phase shifter realised in a 40 nm digital CMOS technology without ultra-thick metals for the 60 GHz Industrial, Scientific and Medical (ISM) band is presented. A patterned shielding with electromagnetic bandgap structure and a stacked metals method to

  7. Concurrent and Subsequent Associations between Daily Digital Technology Use and High-Risk Adolescents' Mental Health Symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Madeleine J.; Russell, Michael A.; Piontak, Joy R.; Odgers, Candice L.

    2018-01-01

    Adolescents are spending an unprecedented amount of time using digital technologies (especially mobile technologies), and there are concerns that adolescents' constant connectivity is associated with poor mental health, particularly among at-risk adolescents. Participants included 151 adolescents at risk for mental health problems (M[subscript…

  8. Technology and Technique Standards for Camera-Acquired Digital Dermatologic Images: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quigley, Elizabeth A; Tokay, Barbara A; Jewell, Sarah T; Marchetti, Michael A; Halpern, Allan C

    2015-08-01

    Photographs are invaluable dermatologic diagnostic, management, research, teaching, and documentation tools. Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) standards exist for many types of digital medical images, but there are no DICOM standards for camera-acquired dermatologic images to date. To identify and describe existing or proposed technology and technique standards for camera-acquired dermatologic images in the scientific literature. Systematic searches of the PubMed, EMBASE, and Cochrane databases were performed in January 2013 using photography and digital imaging, standardization, and medical specialty and medical illustration search terms and augmented by a gray literature search of 14 websites using Google. Two reviewers independently screened titles of 7371 unique publications, followed by 3 sequential full-text reviews, leading to the selection of 49 publications with the most recent (1985-2013) or detailed description of technology or technique standards related to the acquisition or use of images of skin disease (or related conditions). No universally accepted existing technology or technique standards for camera-based digital images in dermatology were identified. Recommendations are summarized for technology imaging standards, including spatial resolution, color resolution, reproduction (magnification) ratios, postacquisition image processing, color calibration, compression, output, archiving and storage, and security during storage and transmission. Recommendations are also summarized for technique imaging standards, including environmental conditions (lighting, background, and camera position), patient pose and standard view sets, and patient consent, privacy, and confidentiality. Proposed standards for specific-use cases in total body photography, teledermatology, and dermoscopy are described. The literature is replete with descriptions of obtaining photographs of skin disease, but universal imaging standards have not been developed

  9. Barriers and Facilitators to Using Digital Technologies in the Cooperative Learning Model in Physical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodsworth, Hannah; Goodyear, Victoria A.

    2017-01-01

    Background: The influence of technology on children's everyday lives is significant in today's society, with children described as digital natives and/or the iGeneration. There are also a range of digital technologies available for use in education and a number of pedagogical approaches reported to support technology integration and pupil learning…

  10. Digitized Educational Technology: A Learning Tool Using Remotely Sensed Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Love, Gloria Carter

    1999-01-01

    Digitized Educational software for different levels of instruction were developed and placed on the web (geocities). Students attending the Pre-Engineering Summer 1998 Camp at Dillard University explored the use of the software which included presentations, applications, and special exercises. Student comments were received and considered for adjustments. The second outreach program included students from Colton Junior High School and Natural Science Majors at Dillard University. The Natural Majors completed a second survey concerning reasons why students selected majors in the Sciences and Mathematics. Two student research assistants (DU) and faculty members/parents of Colton Junior High assisted.

  11. Using Information and Communication Technology (ICT) to the Maximum: Learning and Teaching Biology with Limited Digital Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Rooy, Wilhelmina S.

    2012-01-01

    Background: The ubiquity, availability and exponential growth of digital information and communication technology (ICT) creates unique opportunities for learning and teaching in the senior secondary school biology curriculum. Digital technologies make it possible for emerging disciplinary knowledge and understanding of biological processes…

  12. Clinical case in digital technology for nursing students' learning: An integrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hara, Cristina Yuri Nakata; Aredes, Natália Del Angelo; Fonseca, Luciana Mara Monti; Silveira, Renata Cristina de Campos Pereira; Camargo, Rosangela Andrade Aukar; de Goes, Fernanda Santos Nogueira

    2016-03-01

    This review aimed to analyze the available evidences in literature about clinical case studies inserted in digital technologies for nursing education, characterizing the technology resources and cognitive, procedural and attitudinal learnings. Integrative review of literature with the following steps: development of the research problem, data collection, data extraction and critic evaluation, data analysis and interpretation and presentation of results. The research question was: how does the clinical case study inserted in educational digital technology collaborate for cognitive, attitudinal and procedural learning of nursing students? data bases LILACS, PUBMED, CINAHL and Scopus. the search resulted in 437 studies: 136 from LILACS, 122 from PUBMED, 104 from Scopus and 75 from CINAHL. Of these, 143 did not meet the including criteria, 93 were duplicated and four studies were unavailable. After analyzing all abstracts based on inclusion and exclusion criteria, there were selected 197 studies and after full text analysis the final sample resulted in 21 primary studies. Case study use in educational digital technologies allowed the students to build different types of learning: cognitive learning (n 16 studies), attitudinal learning (n=12 studies) and procedural learning (n=8 studies). It is possible to conclude that case studies can collaborate with the students to develop different learnings which can be built integrate, continuous, informative and formative, aiming integral formation and aligned to policies of formation in nursing, both national and international. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Digital technologies for population health and health equity gains: the perspective of public health associations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauvin, James; Perera, Yoshith; Clarke, Michael

    2016-11-01

    Digital technology (DT) plays an increasingly important role in the health sector. This study explores how national public health associations (PHAs) use DT to achieve their mandate. The World Federation of Public Health Associations canvassed and conducted a semi-structured interview with its national public health association members about their use of DT, the challenges they encounter in using it, and their experiences and thoughts as to how to assess its impact, both organizationally as well as on population health and health equity. The study found that digital technology plays an important role in some PHAs, principally those in higher income countries. PHAs want to broaden their use within PHAs and to assess how DT enables PHAs to achieve their organizational mandates and goals, including improved public health and health equity.

  14. Sampled data CT system including analog filter and compensating digital filter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glover, G. H.; DallaPiazza, D. G.; Pelc, N. J.

    1985-01-01

    A CT scanner in which the amount of x-ray information acquired per unit time is substantially increased by using a continuous-on x-ray source and a sampled data system with the detector. An analog filter is used in the sampling system for band limiting the detector signal below the highest frequency of interest, but is a practically realizable filter and is therefore non-ideal. A digital filter is applied to the detector data after digitization to compensate for the characteristics of the analog filter, and to provide an overall filter characteristic more nearly like the ideal

  15. Digital and Collaborative Technologies for Smarter Distance Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    OLIVEIRA, E. A

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available With the integration of web 2.0 and social technologies into educational practices, researchers have been faced with the challenge of providing better online virtual learning environments, that engage students in the learning processes. This challenge entails using the massive amounts of knowledge we generate in our digital footprints to provide personalized learning contents. In our research group, we have tried to tackle this challenge by answering two questions: (i How to share, at the same time, the knowledge of a virtual course in a decentralized way in Social Networks, MOOC, VLE and others? (ii How to provide pedagogical practices in virtual learning environments that allow students to build their knowledge in an autonomous and reflective way? In this article we present the work we have carried out to answer both questions.

  16. Progress in Low-Power Digital Microwave Radiometer Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piepmeier, Jeffrey R.; Kim, Edward J.

    2004-01-01

    Three component technologies were combined into a digital correlation microwave radiometer. The radiometer comprises a dual-channel X-band superheterodyne receiver, low-power high-speed cross-correlator (HSCC), three-level ADCs, and a correlated noise source (CNS). The HSCC dissipates 10 mW and operates at 500 MHz clock speed. The ADCs are implemented using ECL components and dissipate more power than desired. Thus, a low-power ADC development is underway. The new ADCs arc predicted to dissipated less than 200 mW and operate at 1 GSps with 1.5 GHz of input bandwidth. The CNS provides different input correlation values for calibration of the radiometer. The correlation channel had a null offset of 0.0008. Test results indicate that the correlation channel can be calibrated with 0.09% error in gain.

  17. Digital innovations and emerging technologies for enhanced recovery programmes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michard, F; Gan, T J; Kehlet, H

    2017-01-01

    Enhanced recovery programmes (ERPs) are increasingly used to improve post-surgical recovery. However, compliance to various components of ERPs-a key determinant of success-remains sub-optimal. Emerging technologies have the potential to help patients and caregivers to improve compliance with ERPs......-respiratory function may help in the early detection of clinical deterioration during the postoperative recovery and to address 'failure to rescue'. Activity trackers may be useful to monitor early mobilization, another major element of ERPs. Finally, electronic checklists have been developed to ensure that none...... of the above-mentioned ERP elements is omitted during the surgical journey.By optimizing compliance to the multiple components of ERPs, digital innovations, non-invasive techniques and wearable sensors have the potential to magnify the clinical and economic benefits of ERPs. Among the growing number...

  18. 77 FR 8284 - Western Digital Technologies, Inc., Hard Drive Development Engineering Group Irvine (Formerly at...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-14

    ... that appear to relate to production and design work and one position advertised by Western Digital in... DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Employment and Training Administration [TA-W-72,949] Western Digital... Former Employees of Western Digital Technologies, Inc. v. United States Secretary of Labor (Court No. 11...

  19. A review of existing and emerging digital technologies to combat the global trade in fake medicines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackey, Tim K; Nayyar, Gaurvika

    2017-05-01

    The globalization of the pharmaceutical supply chain has introduced new challenges, chief among them, fighting the international criminal trade in fake medicines. As the manufacture, supply, and distribution of drugs becomes more complex, so does the need for innovative technology-based solutions to protect patients globally. Areas covered: We conducted a multidisciplinary review of the science/health, information technology, computer science, and general academic literature with the aim of identifying cutting-edge existing and emerging 'digital' solutions to combat fake medicines. Our review identified five distinct categories of technology including mobile, radio frequency identification, advanced computational methods, online verification, and blockchain technology. Expert opinion: Digital fake medicine solutions are unifying platforms that integrate different types of anti-counterfeiting technologies as complementary solutions, improve information sharing and data collection, and are designed to overcome existing barriers of adoption and implementation. Investment in this next generation technology is essential to ensure the future security and integrity of the global drug supply chain.

  20. A history of digit identification in the manus of theropods (including Aves)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kasper Lykke

    2010-01-01

    The identification of avian and dinosaurian digits remains one of the major controversies in vertebrate evolution. A long history of morphological interpretations of fossil forms and studies of limb development in embryos has been given as evidence for two differing points of view. From...

  1. A history of digit identification in the manus of theropods (including Aves)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kasper Lykke

    2010-01-01

    The identification of avian and dinosaurian digits remains one of the major controversies in vertebrate evolution. A long history of morphological interpretations of fossil forms and studies of limb development in embryos has been given as evidence for two differing points of view. From an origin...

  2. The Promises and Pitfalls of Digital Technology in Its Application to Alcohol Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muench, Frederick

    2014-01-01

    Individuals seeking to change their alcohol use form a heterogeneous group with varied treatment goals-including moderation and abstinence-that therefore requires flexible treatment options. The availability of alcohol in the United States, and the pervasive social pressure to drink, warrant treatments that support individuals outside the treatment environment and that foster coping and self-regulation in the face of these demands. Emerging digital technologies show promise for helping both to hone therapies to clients' individual needs and to support clients in settings beyond the clinic. In the broader health care arena, digital health technologies (DHTs) are transforming how health professionals assess, prevent, and treat both physical and mental health problems. DHTs include assessments and interventions delivered via computer, Internet, mobile phone, and wireless or wearable device technologies. The emerging literature examining within-treatment and mobile DHTs highlights an opportunity to create personalized alcohol treatments for every person seeking care. Despite the promises DHTs may hold, however, there still are many potential risks to using them and a number of challenges regarding how to integrate them into treatment successfully. This article will review the current and potential advantages of DHTs in alcohol treatment and the technological, personal, organizational, and systemic limitations of integrating various technology-based assessment and intervention programs into care.

  3. Teaching of the Microbiological Analysis of Water Using a Computer Simulation Program That Includes Digitalized Color Images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, A.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Describes microcomputer-based courseware designed for the simulation of the microbiological analysis of drinking water, including digitalized color images. The use of HyperCard is described and evaluation procedures are explained, including evaluation of the learning and of the class. The evaluation questionnaires are appended. (20 references)…

  4. Concurrent and Subsequent Associations Between Daily Digital Technology Use and High-Risk Adolescents' Mental Health Symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Madeleine J; Russell, Michael A; Piontak, Joy R; Odgers, Candice L

    2018-01-01

    Adolescents are spending an unprecedented amount of time using digital technologies (especially mobile technologies), and there are concerns that adolescents' constant connectivity is associated with poor mental health, particularly among at-risk adolescents. Participants included 151 adolescents at risk for mental health problems (M age  = 13.1) who completed a baseline assessment, 30-day ecological momentary assessment, and 18 month follow-up assessment. Results from multilevel regression models showed that daily reports of both time spent using digital technologies and the number of text messages sent were associated with increased same-day attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and conduct disorder (CD) symptoms. Adolescents' reported digital technology usage and text messaging across the ecological momentary assessment (EMA) period was also associated with poorer self-regulation and increases in conduct problem symptoms between the baseline and follow-up assessments. © 2017 The Authors. Child Development © 2017 Society for Research in Child Development, Inc.

  5. Dental practitioners and a digital future: an initial exploration of barriers and incentives to adopting digital technologies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Zande, M.M.; Gorter, R.C.; Wismeijer, D.

    2013-01-01

    Background Digital technologies are proliferating into dental practices. While their technical attributes have often been studied, it remains unclear why some dentists adopt and use these technologies more than others. Aim To explore the incentives for and barriers against accepting and using

  6. High Performance Low Cost Digitally Controlled Power Conversion Technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Lars Tønnes

    2008-01-01

    Digital control of switch-mode power supplies and converters has within the last decade evolved from being an academic subject to an emerging market in the power electronics industry. This development has been pushed mainly by the computer industry that is looking towards digital power management...... the execution time of the software algorithm that realises the digital control law will constitute a considerable delay in the control loop. Digital signal controllers are powerful devices capable of performing arithmetic functions much faster than a microcontroller can. Digital signal controllers are well...... and an analogue to digital converter with a short sampling time. A digital self-oscillating modulator is proposed in the present thesis. The modulator is a free-running modulator which operates without an external carrier signal. Customised digital control solutions offers the best performance for non-isolated DC...

  7. Battlefield Environment Technology Transfer During Digital Capstone Exercise II

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Barnes, Eugene S

    2002-01-01

    During Digital Capstone Exercise (DCX ) II, the 4th Infantry Division (4ID) employed the U.S. Army s first digitized heavy division enabled by modern warfighting doctrine, structure, and systems, such as the Army Battle Command System...

  8. Comic Relief: Graduate Students Address Multiple Meanings for Technology Integration with Digital Comic Creation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sockman, Beth Rajan; Sutton, Rhonda; Herrmann, Michele

    2016-01-01

    This study determined the usefulness of digital comic creation with 77 graduate students in a teacher technology course. Students completed an assigned reading and created digital comics that addressed technology integration concerns in the schools and society. Using practical action research, 77 student-created comics were analyzed. The findings…

  9. Teaching in a Digital Age: How Educators Use Technology to Improve Student Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKnight, Katherine; O'Malley, Kimberly; Ruzic, Roxanne; Horsley, Maria Kelly; Franey, John J.; Bassett, Katherine

    2016-01-01

    A successful digital conversion for classrooms, districts, and states is not determined by the technology, but by how technology enables teaching and learning. The purpose of our multisite case study was to document digital instructional strategies teachers use to enhance and transform student learning, and align that use with learning research.…

  10. Using Digital Technology to See Angles from Different Angles. Part 1: Corners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Host, Erin; Baynham, Emily; McMaster, Heather

    2014-01-01

    In Part 1 of their article, Erin Host, Emily Baynham and Heather McMaster use a combination of digital technology and concrete materials to explore the concept of "corners". They provide a practical, easy to follow sequence of activities that builds on students' understandings. [For "Using Digital Technology to See Angles from…

  11. The Impact of Digital Video Technology on Production: The Case of "American Gothic."

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fink, Edward J.

    1997-01-01

    Opines that the study of video production is important in better understanding the aural/visual aspects of television, especially since television production is undergoing a digital revolution. Assesses the impact of new technologies by examining a "cutting-edge" program, "American Gothic." Finds that digital technology offers…

  12. Organizational Influences in Technology Adoption Decisions: A Case Study of Digital Libraries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oguz, Fatih

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to understand the organizational level decision factors in technology adoption in the context of digital libraries. A qualitative case study approach was used to investigate the adoption of a specific technology, XML-based Web services, in digital libraries. Rogers' diffusion of innovations and Wenger's communities of…

  13. Embracing Digital Technologies in Classroom Practice: The Impact of Teacher Identity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, Rosemary

    2016-01-01

    It is often perceived that learning in 21st century classrooms will involve extensive use of digital technologies. This paper, based on a qualitative research investigation at a private girls' college in Melbourne, explores the impact of teacher subjectivities on the need to change through the integration of digital technologies into classroom…

  14. Analysis Approach to Identify Factors Influencing Digital Learning Technology Adoption and Utilization in Developing Countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abubaker Kashada

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The Internet has given learners the ability to learn anytime and anywhere at their own pace facilitated by interactive and adaptive software. Digital learning technology is more than just providing students with a laptop. Digital learning requires a combination of technology, digital content, and instruction. This study aims to identify and observe the impact and mediation of top management support in relation to the successful adoption of digital learning technologies in developing countries. A questionnaire was designed and distributed to rate the successful adoption and utilization of digital learning technologies in developing countries and data was analyzed using structural equation modeling. This study provides empirical evidence and explains many complex factors, such as user awareness, perceived usefulness, perceived ease of use, and information communication technology infrastructure, in the context of top management support to facilitate the effective utilization of a digital learning technology. Mediating the top management support between adoption of a digital learning technology and user awareness, perceived usefulness, and perceived ease of use provides clear and crucial evidence to support the effective adoption of a digital learning technology.

  15. iGeneration: The Social Cognitive Effects of Digital Technology on Teenagers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ives, Eugenia A.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine and better understand the social cognitive effects of digital technology on teenagers' brains and their socialization processes, as well as to learn best practices with regard to digital technology consumption. An extensive literature review was conducted on the social cognitive effects of digital…

  16. Digital Technologies and the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning in Sociology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, Denzel E.; Haney, Wava; Ore, Tracy E.; Persell, Caroline Hodges; Schulte, Aileen; Steele, James; Winfield, Idee

    2002-01-01

    Synthesizes the knowledge available and identifies the knowledge needed about how digital technologies may affect student learning, particularly in the study of sociology. Suggests sociological perspectives can inform the structural and cultural contexts that shape key aspects of teaching and learning with digital technologies. (Author/KDR)

  17. How do digital platforms for ideas, technologies, and knowledge transfer act as enablers for digital transformation?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hossain, Mokter; Lassen, Astrid Heidemann

    2017-01-01

    provide new possibilities and competence, they however also bring new challenges for organizations, which call for new ways of organizing in order to fully embrace their potential. Understanding the role of these platforms in digital transformation is therefore crucial. We must recognize equally...... the opportunities and challenges digital platforms provide for organizations, and we need to understand the mechanisms and potential outcomes of various digital platforms. Consequently, we should consider digital platforms as a mechanism for accelerating the digital transformation endeavours many organizations...... as enablers for digital transformation....

  18. Summary of: dental practitioners and a digital future: an initial exploration of barriers and incentives to adopting digital technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Addy, Liam

    2013-12-01

    Digital technologies are proliferating into dental practices. While their technical attributes have often been studied, it remains unclear why some dentists adopt and use these technologies more than others. AIM To explore the incentives for and barriers against accepting and using digital dental technologies. Eleven semi-structured qualitative interviews were conducted with experts in dentistry, dental technology and dental education in the Netherlands. Dentists' acceptance and use of digital technologies are to varying degrees driven by the perceived advantages over analogue methods, perceived influence on treatment quality, dentists' personal and professional orientation, and social influence from peers and external groups. These effects are complemented by personal and dental-practice characteristics. The findings suggest that there are large differences in motivation to adopt and use digital technologies between early adopters, late adopters and non-adopters, which should be examined in greater detail. We recommend that educators, dentists, and representatives of the dental industry who deal with the diffusion of these technologies take account of dentists' widely different attitudes to digitalisation.

  19. Dental practitioners and a digital future: an initial exploration of barriers and incentives to adopting digital technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Zande, M M; Gorter, R C; Wismeijer, D

    2013-12-01

    Digital technologies are proliferating into dental practices. While their technical attributes have often been studied, it remains unclear why some dentists adopt and use these technologies more than others. AIM To explore the incentives for and barriers against accepting and using digital dental technologies. Eleven semi-structured qualitative interviews were conducted with experts in dentistry, dental technology and dental education in the Netherlands. Dentists' acceptance and use of digital technologies are to varying degrees driven by the perceived advantages over analogue methods, perceived influence on treatment quality, dentists' personal and professional orientation, and social influence from peers and external groups. These effects are complemented by personal and dental-practice characteristics. The findings suggest that there are large differences in motivation to adopt and use digital technologies between early adopters, late adopters and non-adopters, which should be examined in greater detail. We recommend that educators, dentists, and representatives of the dental industry who deal with the diffusion of these technologies take account of dentists' widely different attitudes to digitalisation.

  20. A Strategic Necessity: Building Senior Leadership's Fluency in Digital Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolomitz, Kara; Cabellon, Edmund T.

    2016-01-01

    This chapter describes the opportunity for senior student affairs officers (SSAOs) to develop an increased digital fluency to meet the needs of various constituencies in the digital age. The authors explore what a digital fluency is, how it might impact SSAOs' leadership potential, and the benefits for their respective divisions.

  1. Exploring virtual reality technology and the Oculus Rift for the examination of digital pathology slides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Navid Farahani

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Digital slides obtained from whole slide imaging (WSI platforms are typically viewed in two dimensions using desktop personal computer monitors or more recently on mobile devices. To the best of our knowledge, we are not aware of any studies viewing digital pathology slides in a virtual reality (VR environment. VR technology enables users to be artificially immersed in and interact with a computer-simulated world. Oculus Rift is among the world′s first consumer-targeted VR headsets, intended primarily for enhanced gaming. Our aim was to explore the use of the Oculus Rift for examining digital pathology slides in a VR environment. Methods: An Oculus Rift Development Kit 2 (DK2 was connected to a 64-bit computer running Virtual Desktop software. Glass slides from twenty randomly selected lymph node cases (ten with benign and ten malignant diagnoses were digitized using a WSI scanner. Three pathologists reviewed these digital slides on a 27-inch 5K display and with the Oculus Rift after a 2-week washout period. Recorded endpoints included concordance of final diagnoses and time required to examine slides. The pathologists also rated their ease of navigation, image quality, and diagnostic confidence for both modalities. Results: There was 90% diagnostic concordance when reviewing WSI using a 5K display and Oculus Rift. The time required to examine digital pathology slides on the 5K display averaged 39 s (range 10-120 s, compared to 62 s with the Oculus Rift (range 15-270 s. All pathologists confirmed that digital pathology slides were easily viewable in a VR environment. The ratings for image quality and diagnostic confidence were higher when using the 5K display. Conclusion: Using the Oculus Rift DK2 to view and navigate pathology whole slide images in a virtual environment is feasible for diagnostic purposes. However, image resolution using the Oculus Rift device was limited. Interactive VR technologies such as the Oculus Rift are

  2. An Investigation of Pre-Service Primary School Teachers' Attitudes towards Digital Technology and Digital Citizenship Levels in Terms of Some Variables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çiftci, Serdar; Aladag, Soner

    2018-01-01

    This study aims at investigating the relationship between pre-service primary school teachers' attitudes towards digital technology and digital citizenship scale levels. The research was designed in descriptive survey model. The data collection tools were "Attitude Scale for Digital Technology" (ASDT) developed by Cabi (2016) and…

  3. 75 FR 20860 - Certain Display Devices, Including Digital Televisions and Monitors; Notice of Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-21

    ...) Co., Ltd., 10F, No. 230, Liancheng Road, Zhounghe City, Taipei County, Taiwan. TPV International (USA...., Unique No. 11 of Zhuankou Development, District of Economic Technological, Development Zone, Wuhan City...

  4. The Relationship Between Digital Technology Experience, Daily Media Exposure and Working Memory Capacity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhterem DİNDAR

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Today’s youngsters interact with digital technologies to a great extent which leads scholars to question the influence of this exposure on human cognitive structure. Through resorting to digital nativity assumptions, it is presumed that cognitive architecture of the youth may change in accordance with digital technology use. In this regard, the current study investigated the relationship between digital technology experience, daily media exposure and working memory capacity of so-called digital native participants. A total of 572 undergraduate students responded to self-report measures, which addressed years of experience for 7 different digital devices and the daily time spent for 14 different digital activities. Participants’ working memory capacity was measured through the Computation Span and the Dot Matrix Test. While the former was used to measure the phonological loop capacity, the latter was used to address the visuo-spatial sketchpad capacity. Correlational analyses revealed that neither the phonological loop capacity nor the visuo-spatial sketchpad capacity was related to digital technology experience and daily media exposure. Thus, the transformative contribution of digital technology experience to human cognitive architecture could not be observed through the current measures

  5. Rethinking Education in the Age of Technology: The Digital Revolution and Schooling in America. Technology, Education--Connections (TEC) Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Allan; Halverson, Richard

    2009-01-01

    The digital revolution has hit education, with more and more classrooms plugged into the whole wired world. But are schools making the most of new technologies? Are they tapping into the learning potential of today's Firefox/Facebook/cell phone generation? Have schools fallen through the crack of the digital divide? In "Rethinking Education in the…

  6. Satisfying personal needs at the museum: The role of digital technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Pina Myrczik

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates how museum visitors use digital technologies to mediate their general meaning-making process about artworks and other information they encounter throughout their museum experience. Concluding from a case study at the National Gallery of Denmark in Copenhagen, this study suggests that visitors use digital technologies as a vehicle for satisfying one or more personal needs. In order to gain control over their experience, visitors used not only digital technologies provided by the museum but also their personal technologies. The article argues that both museums and visitors will derive great benefits by understanding the ways in which people process multimedia messages and by implementing these principles of multimedia learning into the design of digital technologies at museums. The data also suggest that museums should especially support visitors in using technology with which they are already familiar and embed it in the museum experience.

  7. Toward high-performance digital logic technology with carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tulevski, George S; Franklin, Aaron D; Frank, David; Lobez, Jose M; Cao, Qing; Park, Hongsik; Afzali, Ali; Han, Shu-Jen; Hannon, James B; Haensch, Wilfried

    2014-09-23

    The slow-down in traditional silicon complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) scaling (Moore's law) has created an opportunity for a disruptive innovation to bring the semiconductor industry into a postsilicon era. Due to their ultrathin body and ballistic transport, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have the intrinsic transport and scaling properties to usher in this new era. The remaining challenges are largely materials-related and include obtaining purity levels suitable for logic technology, placement of CNTs at very tight (∼5 nm) pitch to allow for density scaling and source/drain contact scaling. This review examines the potential performance advantages of a CNT-based computing technology, outlines the remaining challenges, and describes the recent progress on these fronts. Although overcoming these issues will be challenging and will require a large, sustained effort from both industry and academia, the recent progress in the field is a cause for optimism that these materials can have an impact on future technologies.

  8. "Anything that makes life's journey better." Exploring the use of digital technology by people living with motor neurone disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobson, Esther V; Fazal, Saima; Shaw, Pamela J; McDermott, Christopher J

    2017-08-01

    Our aim was to explore the attitudes of those living with motor neuron disease towards digital technology. Postal and online questionnaires surveyed 83 people with MND (pwMND) and 54 friends and family members (fMND). Five pwMND and five fMND underwent semi-structured interviews. 82% of pwMND and 87% of fMND use technology every day with iPads and laptops being the devices most commonly used. pwMND used technology to help them continue to participate in everyday activities such as socialising, entertainment and accessing the internet. The internet provided peer support and information about MND but information could be distressing or unreliable. Participants preferred information from professionals and official organisations. Participants were generally supportive of using of technology to access medical care. Barriers to technology, such as lack of digital literacy skills and upper limb dysfunction, and potential solutions were identified. More challenging barriers included language and cognitive difficulties, and the fear of becoming dependent on technology. Addressing the barriers identified in this research could help pwMND access technology. However, as healthcare delivery becomes more reliant on digital technology, care should be taken to ensure that those who are unable or unwilling to use technology continue to have their needs met in alternative ways.

  9. 76 FR 22729 - Polaris Industries, Including On-Site Leased Workers From Westaff, Supply Technologies, Aerotek...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-22

    ... Industries, including on-site leased workers from Westaff, Supply Technologies, Aerotek, Securitas Security... DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Employment and Training Administration [TA-W-74,336] Polaris Industries, Including On-Site Leased Workers From Westaff, Supply Technologies, Aerotek, Securitas Security Services...

  10. 76 FR 6826 - Certain Display Devices Including Digital Televisions and Monitors; Notice of Commission...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-08

    ... Japan (``Sony''). 75 FR 20860-1. The complaint, as amended and supplemented, alleges violations of...,816,131; Re 38,055; and Re 40,468. The complaint further alleges the existence of a domestic industry... Corporation and Innolux Corporation (collectively ``CMI''); TPV Technology Limited; Top Victory Electronics...

  11. Using Digital Technologies in Clinical HIV Research: Real-World Applications and Considerations for Future Work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andriesen, Jessica; Bull, Sheana; Dietrich, Janan; Haberer, Jessica E; Van Der Pol, Barbara; Voronin, Yegor; Wall, Kristin M; Whalen, Christopher; Priddy, Frances

    2017-07-31

    Digital technologies, especially if used in novel ways, provide a number of potential advantages to clinical research in trials related to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) and may greatly facilitate operations as well as data collection and analysis. These technologies may even allow answering questions that are not answerable with older technologies. However, they come with a variety of potential concerns for both the participants and the trial sponsors. The exact challenges and means for alleviation depend on the technology and on the population in which it is deployed, and the rapidly changing landscape of digital technologies presents a challenge for creating future-proof guidelines for technology application. The aim of this study was to identify and summarize some common themes that are frequently encountered by researchers in this context and highlight those that should be carefully considered before making a decision to include these technologies in their research. In April 2016, the Global HIV Vaccine Enterprise surveyed the field for research groups with recent experience in novel applications of digital technologies in HIV clinical research and convened these groups for a 1-day meeting. Real-world uses of various technologies were presented and discussed by 46 attendees, most of whom were researchers involved in the design and conduct of clinical trials of biomedical HIV prevention and treatment approaches. After the meeting, a small group of organizers reviewed the presentations and feedback obtained during the meeting and categorized various lessons-learned to identify common themes. A group of 9 experts developed a draft summary of the findings that was circulated via email to all 46 attendees for review. Taking into account the feedback received, the group finalized the considerations that are presented here. Meeting presenters and attendees discussed the many successful applications of digital

  12. Social media and digital technology use among Indigenous young people in Australia: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Emma S; Haynes, Emma; Royce, Paul; Thompson, Sandra C

    2016-05-25

    The use of social media and digital technologies has grown rapidly in Australia and around the world, including among Indigenous young people who face social disadvantage. Given the potential to use social media for communication, providing information and as part of creating and responding to social change, this paper explores published literature to understand how Indigenous Australian youth use digital technologies and social media, and its positive and negative impacts. Online literature searches were conducted in three databases: PubMed, Google Scholar and Informit in August 2014; with further searches of additional relevant databases (Engineering Village; Communication & mass media complete; Computers & applied sciences complete; Web of Science) undertaken in May 2015. In addition, relevant literature was gathered using citation snowballing so that additional peer-reviewed and grey literature was included. Articles were deemed relevant if they discussed social media and/or digital technologies and Indigenous Australians. After reading and reviewing all relevant articles, a thematic analysis was used to identify overall themes and identify specific examples. A total of 22 papers were included in the review. Several major themes were identified about how and why Indigenous young people use social media: identity, power and control, cultural compatibility and community and family connections. Examples of marketing for health and health promotion approaches that utilize social media and digital technologies were identified. Negative uses of social media such as cyber bullying, cyber racism and the exchange of sexually explicit content between minors are common with limited approaches to dealing with this at the community level. Strong cultural identity and community and family connections, which can be enhanced through social media, are linked to improved educational and health outcomes. The confidence that Indigenous young people demonstrate when approaching the

  13. TESLA cavity modeling and digital implementation in FPGA technology for control system development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Czarski, T.; Pozniak, K.T.; Romaniuk, R.S. [Warsaw Univ. of Technology (Poland); Simrock, S. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany)

    2006-07-01

    The electromechanical model of the TESLA cavity has been implemented in FPGA technology for real-time testing of the control system. The model includes Lorentz force detuning and beam loading effects. Step operation and vector stimulus operation modes are applied for the evaluation of a FPGA cavity simulator operated by a digital controller. The performance of the cavity hardware model is verified by comparing with a software model of the cavity implemented in the MATLAB system. The numerical aspects are considered for an optimal DSP calculation. Some experimental results are presented for different cavity operational conditions. (orig.)

  14. Rethinking Teaching in STEM Education in a Community College: Role of Instructional Consultation and Digital Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurland, Shelley Chih-Hsian

    Community college faculty members educate almost half of all U.S. undergraduates, who are often more diverse and more academically underprepared when compared to undergraduate students who attend four-year institutions. In addition, faculty members in community colleges are facing increased accountability for meeting student learning outcomes, expectations to adjust their teaching practices to include active learning practices, and expectations to incorporate more technologies into the classroom. Faculty developers are one of the support structures that faculty members can look to in order to meet those challenges. A survey of literature in faculty development suggests that instructional consultation can play an important role in shaping and transforming teaching practices. Hence, this action research study examined my work using instructional consulting with four full-time STEM faculty colleagues in order to examine and shape their teaching practices with and without the use of digital technologies. The two foci of the research, examining shifts in faculty participants' teaching practices, and my instructional consulting practices, were informed by Thomas and Brown's (2011) social view of learning and the concept of teaching and learning in a "co-learning" environment. Two dominant factors emerged regarding faculty participants' shift in teaching practices. These factors concerned: 1) the perception of control and 2) individual faculty participant's comfort level, expectations, and readiness. In addition to these two dominant factors, the instructional consultation process also supported a range of shifts in either mindset and/or teaching practices. My analysis showed that the use of digital technologies was not an essential factor in shifting faculty participant mindset and/or teaching practices, instead digital technologies were used to enhance the teaching process and students' learning experiences.

  15. Augmented Ontologies: The Question Concerning Digital Technology and Projectual Humanism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Gualeni (Stefano)

    2014-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ The values of Western culture are conducive to spending a considerable amount of resources on the development of computer games, digital social networks, special effects for movies, et cetera (Bolter, 2003). With the increasingly more prominent role of digital media1

  16. Digital image technology and a measurement tool in physical models

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Phelp, David

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available to give useful information on the dynamics of waves, coastal structures and ship motions. The availability of digital cameras, at relatively low cost, has allowed easy transfer of digital images to the computer. This paper discusses recent advances of a...

  17. Digital maintenance field technology for the maintenance of nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Tomomasa; Asama, Hajime; Kita, Nobuyuki; Numano, Masayoshi

    2002-01-01

    This paper proposes a concept of 'Digital Maintenance Field Technology', which enables human beings and working robots making fully use of the necessary information for maintenance activity not only in any location of the maintenance field (seamless in location) but also in any moment from the past to the future (seamless in time) and in any format in presenting to human (seamless in semantics). The paper points out the following three essential components of the technology: 1) 'Digital Field Construction Technology', 2) 'Digital Field Archival Technology' and 3) 'Digital Field Presentation Technology'. The necessary capabilities are extracted and our approaches and state of the art of realizing these capabilities are introduced in addition to present the state of the art of home application example. The future extension is also illustrated. (author)

  18. Digital health technology for use in patients with serious mental illness: a systematic review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batra, Sonal; Baker, Ross A; Wang, Tao; Forma, Felicia; DiBiasi, Faith; Peters-Strickland, Timothy

    2017-01-01

    As the capabilities and reach of technology have expanded, there is an accompanying proliferation of digital technologies developed for use in the care of patients with mental illness. The objective of this review was to systematically search published literature to identify currently available health technologies and their intended uses for patients with serious mental illness. The Medline, Embase, and BIOSIS Previews electronic databases were searched to identify peer-reviewed English language articles that reported the use of digital, mobile, and other advanced technology in patients with schizophrenia/schizoaffective disorder, bipolar disorder, and major depressive disorder. Eligible studies were systematically reviewed based on Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines. Eighteen studies that met the inclusion criteria were identified. Digital health technologies (DHTs) assessed in the selected studies included mobile applications (apps), digital medicine, digital personal health records, and an electronic pill container. Smartphone apps accounted for the largest share of DHTs. The intended uses of DHTs could be broadly classified as monitoring to gain a better understanding of illness, clinical assessment, and intervention. Overall, studies indicated high usability/feasibility and efficacy/effectiveness, with several reporting validity against established clinical scales. Users were generally engaged with the DHT, and mobile assessments were deemed helpful in monitoring disease symptoms. Rapidly proliferating digital technologies seem to be feasible for short-term use in patients with serious mental illness; nevertheless, long-term effectiveness data from naturalistic studies will help demonstrate their usefulness and facilitate their adoption and integration into the mental health-care system.

  19. [Application of negative molds technology based on three-dimensional printing in digital maxillofacial prostheses].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, X Y; Chen, X B; Jiao, T; Zhang, F Q; Jiang, X Q

    2017-06-09

    Objective: To explore a digital negative molds technique based on three-dimensional (3D) printing to assist in the manufacture of maxillofacial prostheses, and to improve the deficiency of the current clinical treatment. Methods: Seventeen patients with maxillofacial defects (including nasal defects, orbital defects, cheek defects, auricle defect) were scanned by means of facial optical scanning and computer tomography (CT). The 3D models were then reconstructed and global registration was made to merge the reconstructed models into a new digital model for 3D design. The 3D design of the prostheses was implemented in software. The mechanical connection structure was designed by forward engineering technology for 3 patients with intra-oral defects in maxilla who needed to make removable partial dentures, so that the silicone prostheses and removable partial denture could be combined. The removable partial dentures were made by conventional method and connected with the prostheses. According to the 3D data of the prostheses, the digital negative molds were designed, and the 3D printing technology was used to finish the processing of the resin molds. Silicone for prostheses were filled and cured in the resin molds to fabricate the clinical restorations for the patients. The margin adaptation and retention of the prostheses was detected. Results: Twenty patients with varying degrees of maxillofacial defects were rehabilitated using the courses developed in the study. All patients reported no pain or discomfort during the treatment; and they were satisfied with the final prostheses of the shape, color, retention, stability, etc. Eighteen of the prostheses showed good marginal adaptation, and sixteen of the prostheses showed good retention effect. Conclusions: The digital negative molds technique used in this study could greatly reduce the intensity of manual operation and provided a good therapeutic effect for patients with maxillofacial defects.

  20. Digital Elevation Model from Non-Metric Camera in Uas Compared with LIDAR Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dayamit, O. M.; Pedro, M. F.; Ernesto, R. R.; Fernando, B. L.

    2015-08-01

    Digital Elevation Model (DEM) data as a representation of surface topography is highly demanded for use in spatial analysis and modelling. Aimed to that issue many methods of acquisition data and process it are developed, from traditional surveying until modern technology like LIDAR. On the other hands, in a past four year the development of Unamend Aerial System (UAS) aimed to Geomatic bring us the possibility to acquire data about surface by non-metric digital camera on board in a short time with good quality for some analysis. Data collectors have attracted tremendous attention on UAS due to possibility of the determination of volume changes over time, monitoring of the breakwaters, hydrological modelling including flood simulation, drainage networks, among others whose support in DEM for proper analysis. The DEM quality is considered as a combination of DEM accuracy and DEM suitability so; this paper is aimed to analyse the quality of the DEM from non-metric digital camera on UAS compared with a DEM from LIDAR corresponding to same geographic space covering 4 km2 in Artemisa province, Cuba. This area is in a frame of urban planning whose need to know the topographic characteristics in order to analyse hydrology behaviour and decide the best place for make roads, building and so on. Base on LIDAR technology is still more accurate method, it offer us a pattern for test DEM from non-metric digital camera on UAS, whose are much more flexible and bring a solution for many applications whose needs DEM of detail.

  1. Cyber Science, Biometrics and Digital Forensics: Workshop on Emerging Cyber Techniques and Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-07

    journals : Final Report Proceedings: Cyber Science, Biometrics and Digital Forensics: Workshop on Emerging Cyber Techniques and Technologies Report...and Digital Forensics. Through this one-day workshop, over fifteen feature presentations were made and the group held two Panels to discuss...09-2016 10-Jul-2015 9-Jul-2016 Final Report Proceedings: Cyber Science, Biometrics and Digital Forensics: Workshop on Emerging Cyber Techniques and

  2. Digital divide across borders : A cross-national study of adolescents’ use of digital technologies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Notten, N.; Peter, J.; Kraaykamp, G.; Valkenburg, P.M.

    2009-01-01

    In this study, we analyse digital divides in terms of social inequality in digital access and use patterns from a hierarchical perspective. Using data from the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) 2003 in 30 nations, we focus on social cleavages in mid-adolescents’ access and use of

  3. The promise of digital mood tracking technologies: are we heading on the right track?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malhi, Gin S; Hamilton, Amber; Morris, Grace; Mannie, Zola; Das, Pritha; Outhred, Tim

    2017-11-01

    The growing understanding that mood disorders are dynamic in nature and fluctuate over variable epochs of time has compelled researchers to develop innovative methods of monitoring mood. Technological advancement now allows for the detection of minute-to-minute changes while also capturing a longitudinal perspective of an individual's illness. Traditionally, assessments of mood have been conducted by means of clinical interviews and paper surveys. However, these methods are often inaccurate due to recall bias and compliance issues, and are limited in their capacity to collect and process data over long periods of time. The increased capability, availability and affordability of digital technologies in recent decades has offered a novel, non-invasive alternative to monitoring mood and emotion in daily life. This paper reviews the emerging literature addressing the use of digital mood tracking technologies, primarily focusing on the strengths and inherent limitations of using these new methods including electronic self-report, behavioural data collection and wearable physiological biosensors. This developing field holds great promise in generating novel insights into the mechanistic processes of mood disorders and improving personalised clinical care. However, further research is needed to validate many of these novel approaches to ensure that these devices are indeed achieving their purpose of capturing changes in mood. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  4. Telemedicine through the use of digital cell phone technology in pediatric neurosurgery: a case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirris, Stephen M; Monaco, Edward A; Tyler-Kabara, Elizabeth C

    2010-05-01

    Advances in medicine have largely followed advances in technology. Medical strides have been made when physicians and researchers have adapted growing science to target specific problems. A new medical field, telemedicine, has emerged that links physicians with colleagues and patients. Cell phone technology is affordable for almost everyone, and basic models include digital photography. We present a case series exhibiting the utility of digital pictures taken with patients' cell phones. Our patients had wound infections requiring daily intravenous antibiotics and dressing changes. In years past, these patients would have required prolonged hospitalizations. In the era of managed care, patients with these infections are discharged from the hospital, but close outpatient observation is required to monitor the wound. Our patients lived up to 8 hours away from the hospital. Daily appointments for wound checks in the clinic were not practical. Wounds were thus monitored via cell phone images without the inconvenience of travel and the expense of staying in a local hotel, along with leaving appointments in the clinic available for others with new neurosurgical issues. Wound evaluations were conducted with the cameras on patients' cell phones. These images were transmitted to the surgeon via text messaging and emails. This application of cell phone technology has been documented previously in the literature of other specialties and could attain greater stature as a legitimate method for close outpatient observation by neurosurgeons if medicolegal issues are addressed.

  5. Proposal for Implementation of Technological Resources Digital Touchscreen in Educational Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Jorgan Cabral Clarindo

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Concerned with innovation in education and the development of knowledge, educational institutions invest in advanced technologies such as touchscreen. Thus the objective of the proposed research show that there is a great lack of these resources in formal education ahead of technological advances, their influence on current teaching methodologies, models of handsets available on the market, the advantages, forms of acquisition, costs, benefits, barriers to their use in the educational environment and the need for its implementation in the educational environment. The project work included the model of the Institutional Program Initiation in Technological Development and Innovation PIBIC/IFGOIANO- 2013/2014 and had as field research unit at the Federal Institute Goiano (IFGOIANO- Campus Urutaí. The research methodology was emphasized in theoretical interpretations based bibliographic and a case study. Through inductive and deductive methods in observing technologies in the current market and society with respect to those found in this unit. Which were registered with interviews, discussions and testimonials. Actual results suggests that there is a shortage of these technologies, which are directly linked to lack of Management and Governance of Information Technology tools. The conclusion shows that the use of these tools will result in greater participation, digital inclusion and improving learning.

  6. Assessment of the usability of a digital learning technology prototype for monitoring intracranial pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Lilian Regina de; Évora, Yolanda Dora Martinez; Zem-Mascarenhas, Silvia Helena

    2016-08-29

    to assess the usability of a digital learning technology prototype as a new method for minimally invasive monitoring of intracranial pressure. descriptive study using a quantitative approach on assessing the usability of a prototype based on Nielsen's ten heuristics. Four experts in the area of Human-Computer interaction participated in the study. the evaluation delivered eight violated heuristics and 31 usability problems in the 32 screens of the prototype. the suggestions of the evaluators were critical for developing an intuitive, user-friendly interface and will be included in the final version of the digital learning technology. avaliar a usabilidade de um protótipo educacional digital sobre um novo método para monitoração da pressão intracraniana de forma minimamente invasivo para enfermeiros e médicos. estudo descritivo com abordagem quantitativa sobre a avaliação de usabilidade de um protótipo com base nas dez Heurísticas de Nielsen. Participaram quatro especialistas da área de Interação Humano Computador. a avaliação resultou em oito heurísticas violadas e 31 problemas de usabilidade nas 32 telas do protótipo. as sugestões dos avaliadores foram cruciais para o desenvolvimento de uma interface amigável e intuitiva e serão consideradas na versão final da tecnologia educacional digital. evaluar la usabilidad de un prototipo educacional digital sobre un nuevo método para monitorización de la presión intracraneal, de manera mínimamente invasiva. estudio descriptivo con abordaje cuantitativo sobre la evaluación de usabilidad de un prototipo con base en las diez reglas Heurísticas de Nielsen. Participaron cuatro especialistas del área de Interacción Humana Computador. la evaluación resultó en ocho reglas heurísticas violadas y 31 problemas de usabilidad en las 32 pantallas del prototipo. las sugestiones de los evaluadores fueron cruciales para el desarrollo de una interfaz amigable e intuitiva y éstas serán consideradas en la

  7. Digital Technology and Creative Arts Career Patterns in the UK Creative Economy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comunian, Roberta; Faggian, Alessandra; Jewell, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    In this article, we ask what role both digital and artistic human capital play in the creative economy by examining employment patterns of digital technology (DT) and creative arts and design (CAD) graduates. Using student micro-data collected by the Higher Education Statistical Agency (HESA) in the United Kingdom, we investigate the…

  8. Digi-teens: Media Literacies and Digital Technologies in the Secondary Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burn, Andrew; Reed, Kate

    1999-01-01

    Describes a course set up for Year 11 students using digital editing equipment to examine the audiovisual fabric of films of their choice. Investigates how the advent of digital technologies enables new kinds of reading of visual texts as well as new kinds of textual production. (NH)

  9. The Contributions of Digital Communications Technology to Human Rights Education: A Case Study of Amnesty International

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norlander, Rebecca Joy

    2013-01-01

    This dissertation addresses the need for critical assessment and evaluation of human rights education (HRE) programs and activities, especially newer initiatives that incorporate the use of digital information and communications technology (ICT). It provides an in-depth case study of the use of digital ICT in Amnesty International's HRE efforts,…

  10. Examining Student Digital Artifacts during a Year-Long Technology Integration Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Prisca M.; Frey, Chris; Dawson, Kara; Liu, Feng; Ritzhaupt, Albert D.

    2012-01-01

    This study was situated within a year-long, statewide technology integration initiative designed to support technology integration within science, technology, engineering, and math classrooms. It examined the elements used in student artifacts in an attempt to investigate trends in digital artifact creation. Among several conclusions, this…

  11. Making Sense of Young People, Education and Digital Technology: The Role of Sociological Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selwyn, Neil

    2012-01-01

    This paper considers the contribution of sociological theory to the academic study of young people, education and digital technology. First it discusses the shortcomings of the technological and socially determinist views of technology and education that prevail in current academic and policy discussions. Against this background the paper outlines…

  12. Performance of digital integrated circuit technologies at very high temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prince, J.L.; Draper, B.L.; Rapp, E.A.; Kromberg, J.N.; Fitch, L.T.

    1980-01-01

    Results of investigations of the performance and reliability of digital bipolar and CMOS integrated circuits over the 25 to 340/sup 0/C range are reported. Included in these results are both parametric variation information and analysis of the functional failure mechanisms. Although most of the work was done using commercially available circuits (TTL and CMOS) and test chips from commercially compatible processes, some results of experimental simulations of dielectrically isolated CMOS are also discussed. It was found that commercial Schottky clamped TTL, and dielectrically isolated, low power Schottky-clamped TTL, functioned to junction temperatures in excess of 325/sup 0/C. Standard gold doped TTL functioned only to 250/sup 0/C, while commercial, isolated I/sup 2/L functioned to the range 250/sup 0/C to 275/sup 0/C. Commercial junction isolated CMOS, buffered and unbuffered, functioned to the range 280/sup 0/C to 310/sup 0/C/sup +/, depending on the manufacturer. Experimental simulations of simple dielectrically isolated CMOS integrated circuits, fabricated with heavier doping levels than normal, functioned to temperatures in excess of 340/sup 0/C. High temperature life testing of experimental, silicone-encapsulated simple TTL and CMOS integrated circuits have shown no obvious life limiting problems to date. No barrier to reliable functionality of TTL bipolar or CMOS integrated ciruits at temperatures in excess of 300/sup 0/C has been found.

  13. 78 FR 8587 - Thomson Reuters, Finance Operations & Technology Division, Including On-Site Leased Workers From...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-06

    ... DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Employment and Training Administration [TA-W-81,755] Thomson Reuters, Finance... of Thomson Reuters, Finance Operations & Technology Division, including on-site leased workers from... administrative services. New findings show that workers of Thomson Reuters, Finance Operations & Technology...

  14. Investigation of Techno-Stress Levels of Teachers Who Were Included in Technology Integration Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çoklar, Ahmet Naci; Efilti, Erkan; Sahin, Yusef Levent; Akçay, Arif

    2016-01-01

    Techno-stress is defined as a modern adaptation disorder resulting from the failure in coping with new technologies in a healthy way. Techno-stress affects many occupational groups, including teachers. FATIH project and many other previous studies conducted in Turkey in recent years have necessitated the use of technology for teachers. The present…

  15. 76 FR 4724 - Polaris Industries, Including On-Site Leased Workers From Westaff and Supply Technologies...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-26

    ... from Supply Technologies were employed on-site at the Osceola, Wisconsin location of Polaris Industries... DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Employment and Training Administration [TA-W-74,336] Polaris Industries, Including On-Site Leased Workers From Westaff and Supply Technologies, Osceola, WI; Amended Certification...

  16. 75 FR 77666 - Polaris Industries, Including On-Site Leased Workers From Westaff and Supply Technologies...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-13

    ... from Supply Technologies were employed on-site at the Osceola, Wisconsin location of Polaris Industries... DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Employment and Training Administration [TA-W-74,336] Polaris Industries, Including On-Site Leased Workers From Westaff and Supply Technologies, Osceola, WI; Amended Certification...

  17. Information and communication technologies in tomorrow's digital classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogoeva, Asya

    2014-05-01

    Excellence at national level promote innovative approaches of teaching and learning environments including the active use of geo-media and GIS is started to develop. The main objectives of the Bulgarian Center of Excellence are to create in collaboration with teachers and ESRI organization learning materials for school education. Students learn how to use ArcGIS in order to create their own interactive maps related to the Bulgarian geography education. They have already used ArcGIS software to study and analyze changes in the Bulgarian geographical location, boundaries and border controls, as well as Pan European transport corridors and define positive and negative aspects of crossroad location of Bulgaria. There is also available software about the Bulgarian water resources as well as about the Bulgarian population and its demographic characteristics. During the classes students create their own map according to given tasks, analyze maps elicit certain information for decision making and in that way they develop their spatial thinking skills. Interdisciplinary approach in teaching geosciences at comprehensive school by using ICT is another innovative method that can be used in the classroom. Chemistry and geography as geosciences have common objects of investigation - minerals, rocks and ores as raw materials for industry. Subject objectives for both disciplines can be achieved in a binary lesson. Students make their own preliminary web-based investigation and in the classroom they discuss characteristics of a certain metallic ores, their global distribution and local deposits, their significance for economic development and environmental issues related to their extraction. Implementation of ICT in tomorrow's digital classroom will help students to understand the complexity of the world around us, show them different examples of our changing planet and develop their spatial thinking knowledge.

  18. Using digital technologies to engage with medical research: views of myotonic dystrophy patients in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coathup, Victoria; Teare, Harriet J A; Minari, Jusaku; Yoshizawa, Go; Kaye, Jane; Takahashi, Masanori P; Kato, Kazuto

    2016-08-24

    As in other countries, the traditional doctor-patient relationship in the Japanese healthcare system has often been characterised as being of a paternalistic nature. However, in recent years there has been a gradual shift towards a more participatory-patient model in Japan. With advances in technology, the possibility to use digital technologies to improve patient interactions is growing and is in line with changing attitudes in the medical profession and society within Japan and elsewhere. The implementation of an online patient engagement platform is being considered by the Myotonic Dystrophy Registry of Japan. The aim of this exploratory study was to understand patients' views and attitudes to using digital tools in patient registries and engagement with medical research in Japan, prior to implementation of the digital platform. We conducted an exploratory, cross-sectional, self-completed questionnaire with a sample of myotonic dystrophy (MD) patients attending an Open Day at Osaka University, Japan. Patients were eligible for inclusion if they were 18 years or older, and were diagnosed with MD. A total of 68 patients and family members attended the Open Day and were invited to participate in the survey. Of those, 59 % submitted a completed questionnaire (n = 40). The survey showed that the majority of patients felt that they were not receiving the information they wanted from their clinicians, which included recent medical research findings and opportunities to participate in clinical trials, and 88 % of patients indicated they would be willing to engage with digital technologies to receive relevant medical information. Patients also expressed an interest in having control over when and how they received this information, as well as being informed of how their data is used and shared with other researchers. Overall, the findings from this study suggest that there is scope to develop a digital platform to engage with patients so that they can receive

  19. A review of assistive listening device and digital wireless technology for hearing instruments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jin Sook; Kim, Chun Hyeok

    2014-12-01

    Assistive listening devices (ALDs) refer to various types of amplification equipment designed to improve the communication of individuals with hard of hearing to enhance the accessibility to speech signal when individual hearing instruments are not sufficient. There are many types of ALDs to overcome a triangle of speech to noise ratio (SNR) problems, noise, distance, and reverberation. ALDs vary in their internal electronic mechanisms ranging from simple hard-wire microphone-amplifier units to more sophisticated broadcasting systems. They usually use microphones to capture an audio source and broadcast it wirelessly over a frequency modulation (FM), infra-red, induction loop, or other transmission techniques. The seven types of ALDs are introduced including hardwire devices, FM sound system, infra-red sound system, induction loop system, telephone listening devices, television, and alert/alarm system. Further development of digital wireless technology in hearing instruments will make possible direct communication with ALDs without any accessories in the near future. There are two technology solutions for digital wireless hearing instruments improving SNR and convenience. One is near-field magnetic induction combined with Bluetooth radio frequency (RF) transmission or proprietary RF transmission and the other is proprietary RF transmission alone. Recently launched digital wireless hearing aid applying this new technology can communicate from the hearing instrument to personal computer, phones, Wi-Fi, alert systems, and ALDs via iPhone, iPad, and iPod. However, it comes with its own iOS application offering a range of features but there is no option for Android users as of this moment.

  20. A Review of Assistive Listening Device and Digital Wireless Technology for Hearing Instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Chun Hyeok

    2014-01-01

    Assistive listening devices (ALDs) refer to various types of amplification equipment designed to improve the communication of individuals with hard of hearing to enhance the accessibility to speech signal when individual hearing instruments are not sufficient. There are many types of ALDs to overcome a triangle of speech to noise ratio (SNR) problems, noise, distance, and reverberation. ALDs vary in their internal electronic mechanisms ranging from simple hard-wire microphone-amplifier units to more sophisticated broadcasting systems. They usually use microphones to capture an audio source and broadcast it wirelessly over a frequency modulation (FM), infra-red, induction loop, or other transmission techniques. The seven types of ALDs are introduced including hardwire devices, FM sound system, infra-red sound system, induction loop system, telephone listening devices, television, and alert/alarm system. Further development of digital wireless technology in hearing instruments will make possible direct communication with ALDs without any accessories in the near future. There are two technology solutions for digital wireless hearing instruments improving SNR and convenience. One is near-field magnetic induction combined with Bluetooth radio frequency (RF) transmission or proprietary RF transmission and the other is proprietary RF transmission alone. Recently launched digital wireless hearing aid applying this new technology can communicate from the hearing instrument to personal computer, phones, Wi-Fi, alert systems, and ALDs via iPhone, iPad, and iPod. However, it comes with its own iOS application offering a range of features but there is no option for Android users as of this moment. PMID:25566400

  1. 75 FR 65517 - Western Digital Technologies, Inc., Corporate Headquarters/Hard Drive Development Division, Lake...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-25

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Employment and Training Administration Western Digital Technologies, Inc., Corporate Headquarters/Hard Drive Development Division, Lake Forest, CA; Notice of Affirmative Determination Regarding Application for...

  2. Poor need knowledge not only technology to bridge digital divide: experts

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    "Developing countries need to gain knowledge rather than technology to latch onto the booming information society, experts said Monday ahead of a major conference on bridging the digital divide between rich and poor" (1/2 page).

  3. Analysis of the national scientific production on the utilization of digital technologies for nurses’ education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viviane Rolim de Holanda

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to seek evidence available in the national scientific literature regarding the utilization of digital teaching technologies in nurses’ education. The adopted research method was integrative literature review. The articles were selected on PubMed, LILACS, Medline, IBECS, and SciELO databases guided by the following question: what digital teaching technologies are used in nursing courses in Brazil? Eleven articles were selected. Results showed that the following were utilized: virtual learning environments, education software, interactive multimedia (CD-ROM, virtual simulations, hypertexts, digital games, websites, and virtual discussion groups (e-group/listservers. The evidence, in this study, shows that digital technologies are materials capable of optimizing knowledge acquisition complementary to traditional education, encouraging students to learning to learn. Descriptors: Education, Nursing; Teaching; Educational Technology; Nursing.

  4. Federal Agency Use of Public Key Technology for Digital Signatures and Authentication

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lyons-Burke, Kathy

    2000-01-01

    This guidance document was developed by the Federal Public Key Infrastructure Steering Committee to assist Federal agencies that are considering the use of public key technology for digital signatures...

  5. Genre, technology and embodied interaction: The evolution of digital game genres and motion gaming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Gregersen

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Technology has been given relatively little attention in genre theory, but this article argues that material technologies can be important components in genre development. The argument is based on a historically informed analysis of digital games, with special attention paid to home console video games and recent genre developments within this domain commonly referred to as motion gaming. The main point is that digital game genres imply structured embodied activity. A constitutive element of digital game mediation is a control interface geared to player embodiment, and I propose the concept of ‘interaction modes’ to describe the coupling of technology and player embodiment and show how this can be integrated with genre theory. The resulting framework allows for increased attention to continuity and change in game and communication genres, material and digital technologies, and the related interaction modes.

  6. The emergent role of digital technologies in the Circular Economy: A review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pagoropoulos, Aris; Pigosso, Daniela Cristina Antelmi; McAloone, Tim C.

    2017-01-01

    literature, is the concept of Circular Economy. Circular Economy is characterized as an economy that is restorative and regenerative by design and is attracting significant attention from researchers and policy makers alike. In light of the recent proliferation of digital technologies such as Big Data...... and the Internet of Things, this article attempts to identify how can digital technologies support the transition to Circular Economy. This article conducted a systematic review of the literature based on a review protocol, in an effort to evaluate the application of key digital technologies in Circular Economy....... The study concludes by identifying research gaps, reflecting on the application of digital technologies in the field of PSS and proposing suggestions for future research....

  7. Innovations in payment technologies and the emergence of digital currencies

    OpenAIRE

    Ali, Robleh; Barrdear, John; Clews, Roger; Southgate, James

    2014-01-01

    Modern electronic payment systems rely on trusted, central third parties to process payments securely. Recent developments have seen the creation of digital currencies like Bitcoin, which combine new currencies with decentralised payment systems. Although the monetary aspects of digital currencies have attracted considerable attention, the distributed ledger underlying their payment systems is a significant innovation. As with money held as bank deposits, most financial assets today exist as ...

  8. Addressing the Role of Risk Management and Digital Finance Technology on Financial Inclusion

    OpenAIRE

    Boskov, Tatjana; Drakulevski, Ljubomir

    2017-01-01

    Financial inclusion focuses on population which is “unbanked” to get into the formal financial system. The new patterns of financial inclusion rely on digital technologies, and “fin-tech” continues to revolutionize the nature of provision. Very important fact is that 78% of access on financial services in developing countries involves mobile money. Financial digital technologies improve data transmission, analysis and give the small companies the opportunity to develop low-cost di...

  9. Integrated High Resolution Digital Color Light Sensor in 130 nm CMOS Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drago Strle

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This article presents a color light detection system integrated in 130 nm CMOS technology. The sensors and corresponding electronics detect light in a CIE XYZ color luminosity space using on-chip integrated sensors without any additional process steps, high-resolution analog-to-digital converter, and dedicated DSP algorithm. The sensor consists of a set of laterally arranged integrated photodiodes that are partly covered by metal, where color separation between the photodiodes is achieved by lateral carrier diffusion together with wavelength-dependent absorption. A high resolution, hybrid, ∑∆ ADC converts each photo diode’s current into a 22-bit digital result, canceling the dark current of the photo diodes. The digital results are further processed by the DSP, which calculates normalized XYZ or RGB color and intensity parameters using linear transformations of the three photo diode responses by multiplication of the data with a transformation matrix, where the coefficients are extracted by training in combination with a pseudo-inverse operation and the least-mean square approximation. The sensor system detects the color light parameters with 22-bit accuracy, consumes less than 60 μA on average at 10 readings per second, and occupies approx. 0.8 mm2 of silicon area (including three photodiodes and the analog part of the ADC. The DSP is currently implemented on FPGA.

  10. A digital fly-by-wire technology development program using an F-8C test aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarvis, C. R.

    1974-01-01

    A digital fly-by-wire flight control system has been installed in an F-8C test airplane and has undergone extensive ground and flight testing as part of an overall program to develop digital fly-by-wire technology. This is the first airplane to fly with a digital fly-by-wire system as its primary means of control and with no mechanical reversion capability. Forty-two test flights were made for a total flight time of 57 hours. Six pilots participated in the evaluation. This paper presents an overview of the digital fly-by-wire program and discusses some of the flight-test results.

  11. The digital pen and paper technology: implementation and use in an existing clinical information system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Despont-Gros, Christelle; Bœuf, Christophe; Geissbuhler, Antoine; Lovis, Christian

    2005-01-01

    Evaluation of the technical feasibility of tight integration of the digital pen and paper technology in an existing computerized patient record.Technology: The digital pen is a normal pen able to record all actions of the user and to analyze a micro pattern printed on the paper. The digital paper is a normal paper printed with an almost invisible micro pattern of small dots encoding information such as position and identifiers. We report our experience in the implementation and the use of this technology in an existing large clinical information system for acquiring clinical information. It is possible to print uniquely identified forms using the digital paper technology. These forms can be pre-filled with clinical readable information about the patient. When care providers complete these forms using the digital pen, it is possible to acquire the data in a structured computerized patient record. The technology is easy to integrate in a component-based architecture based on Web Services. The digital pen and paper is a cost-effective technology that can be integrated in an existing clinical information system and allows fast and easy bedside clinical information acquisition without the need for an expensive infrastructure based on traditional portable devices or wireless devices.

  12. Review and evaluation of technology, equipment, codes and standards for digitization of industrial radiographic film

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-05-01

    This reports contains a review and evaluation of the technology, equipment, and codes and standards related to the digitization of industrial radiographic film. The report presents recommendations and equipment-performance specifications that will allow the digitization of radiographic film from nuclear power plant components in order to produce faithful reproductions of flaw images of interest on the films. Justification for the specifications selected are provided. Performance demonstration tests for the digitization process are required and criteria for such tests is presented. Also several comments related to implementation of the technology are presented and discussed

  13. Digital technology use in ELT classrooms and self-directed learning

    OpenAIRE

    Nehir Sert; Ebru Boynueğri

    2016-01-01

    The digital era is a new challenge for teachers. While children get acquainted with digital technology before the age of six, teachers, who have encountered the digital world at a later time in their lives, struggle with it. Self-directed learning, which is crucial for lifelong learning, can be enhanced by the use of technology within and beyond classroom settings. The aim of this study was to examine the difference between the perceptions of students in low- and high-income groups about thei...

  14. Using information and communication technology (ICT) to the maximum: learning and teaching biology with limited digital technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Rooy, Wilhelmina S.

    2012-04-01

    Background: The ubiquity, availability and exponential growth of digital information and communication technology (ICT) creates unique opportunities for learning and teaching in the senior secondary school biology curriculum. Digital technologies make it possible for emerging disciplinary knowledge and understanding of biological processes previously too small, large, slow or fast to be taught. Indeed, much of bioscience can now be effectively taught via digital technology, since its representational and symbolic forms are in digital formats. Purpose: This paper is part of a larger Australian study dealing with the technologies and modalities of learning biology in secondary schools. Sample: The classroom practices of three experienced biology teachers, working in a range of NSW secondary schools, are compared and contrasted to illustrate how the challenges of limited technologies are confronted to seamlessly integrate what is available into a number of molecular genetics lessons to enhance student learning. Design and method: The data are qualitative and the analysis is based on video classroom observations and semi-structured teacher interviews. Results: Findings indicate that if professional development opportunities are provided where the pedagogy of learning and teaching of both the relevant biology and its digital representations are available, then teachers see the immediate pedagogic benefit to student learning. In particular, teachers use ICT for challenging genetic concepts despite limited computer hardware and software availability. Conclusion: Experienced teachers incorporate ICT, however limited, in order to improve the quality of student learning.

  15. The never-ending digital journey creating new consumer experiences through technology

    CERN Document Server

    Angelani, Andres; Migoya, Martin

    2016-01-01

    The Never-Ending Digital Journey provides readers with the concepts and steps needed to create successful user experiences. The authors look ahead and explore digital scenarios of the future. They probe how technology is changing the way users interact with brands, and they address today's digital challenges with new ways of surprising consumers, integrating design and engineering. The authors leverage knowledge gleaned from working with renowned global companies to describe the recipe needed to build a Digital Journey. With a strong focus on Agile Pods, they dive into technolo- gies, processes, team building, motivation, and met- rics that enable businesses to construct and nurture the dynamic ecosystems necessary in this digital era to foster success. Over the last several years, customers, employees, and partners have become tech-savvy users whose expectations of “Give me more and deliver it faster" require manageable solutions. The desire to interact with digital ecosystems anywhere, anytime demands that...

  16. [Internet technology for clinical applications in a digital radiography department].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergh, B; Pietsch, M; Vogl, T J

    2000-04-01

    To provide an overview and to assess the clinical feasibility of Internet technology-based systems for hospital-wide image and report distribution as well as for video conferencing. The paper describes the theoretical concept behind, the various technical approaches and the experience gained from different systems. Image and report distribution: Advantages include the universal availability of images and reports inside and outside hospitals; ease of use; security features; image and report integration; cost savings by reducing support and training efforts and by optimising available hardware. The main critical issues are performance and workflow integration with RIS and PACS. Video conferencing: main advantages are the standardised, software-based approach and the low investments for hard- and software. Depending on the desired usage the communication performance can be seen as inappropriate. Today, Internet technology-based systems appear to satisfy the main clinical needs in radiology. The mentioned drawbacks could be eliminated by means of modified software implementation and focused standardisation efforts. Considering the numerous advantages of these systems a further distribution can be expected for the future.

  17. Internet technology for clinical application in a digital radiology department

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergh, B.; Pietsch, M.; Vogl, T.J.

    2000-01-01

    Problem: To provide an overview and to assess the clinical feasibility of internet technology-based systems for hospital-wide image and report distribution as well as for video conferencing. Methods: The paper describes the theoretical concept behind, the various technical approaches and the experience gained from different systems. Results: Image and report distribution: Advantages include the universal availability of images and reports inside and outside hospitals; ease of use; security features; image and report integration; cost savings by reducing support and training efforts and by optimising available hardware. The main critical issues are performance and workflow integration with RIS and PACS. Video conferencing: Main advantages are the standardised, software-based approach and the low investments for hard- and software. Depending on the desired usage the communication performance can be seen as inappropriate. Conclusion: Today, internet technology-based systems appear to satisfy the main clinical needs in radiology. The mentioned drawbacks could be eliminated by means of modified software implementation and focused standardisation efforts. Considering the numerous advantages of these systems a further distribution can be expected for the future. (orig.) [de

  18. Applying the Technology Acceptance Model in a Study of the Factors Affecting Usage of the Taiwan Digital Archives System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Jon-Chao; Hwang, Ming-Yueh; Hsu, Hsuan-Fang; Wong, Wan-Tzu; Chen, Mei-Yung

    2011-01-01

    The rapid development of information and communication technology and the popularization of the Internet have given a boost to digitization technologies. Since 2001, The National Science Council (NSC) of Taiwan has invested a large amount of funding in the National Digital Archives Program (NDAP) to develop digital content. Some studies have…

  19. Integration of Digital Technologies into Play-Based Pedagogy in Kuwaiti Early Childhood Education: Teachers' Views, Attitudes and Aptitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldhafeeri, Fayiz; Palaiologou, Ioanna; Folorunsho, Aderonke

    2016-01-01

    Scholars in the field of early childhood education are still debating the inclusion of digital technologies in play-based pedagogy and our understanding of digital play in early childhood education is still developing. This research paper examines early childhood education teachers' views, aptitudes and attitudes towards digital technologies in…

  20. Validation of Align Technology's Treat III digital model superimposition tool and its case application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, R J; Kuo, E; Choi, W

    2003-01-01

    An assessment of the efficacy and accuracy of three-dimensional computer-based predictive orthodontic systems requires that new methods of treatment analysis be developed and validated. Invisalign is a digitally fabricated, removable orthodontic appliance that has been commercially available since 1999. It is made up of two main components: 1) computerized graphical images of a patient's teeth moving through a series of stages from initial to final position; 2) pressure formed clear plastic appliances made from stereolithography models of the images in the first component. The manufacturer of Invisalign (Align Technology, Inc.) has created a software tool that can be used to superimpose digital models to evaluate treatment outcomes in three dimensions. Using this software, research was conducted to determine if a single operator could repeatedly superimpose two identical digital models using 12 selected points from the palatal rugae over 10 trials. The tool was then applied to one subject's orthodontic treatment. EXPERIMENT VARIABLES: The output from this tool includes rotations, translations and morphological changes. For this study, translations and rotations were chosen. The results showed that the digital superimposition was reproducible, and that after multiple trials, the superimposition error decreased. The average error in x, y, z, Rx, Ry and Rz after 10 trials was determined to approach approximately 0.2 mm in translation and less than 1 degree in rotation, with a standard deviation of 0.15 mm and 0.7 mm, respectively. The treatment outcome from a single Invisalign-treated bicuspid extraction case was also evaluated tooth-by-tooth in x, y, z, Rx, Ry and Rz dimensions. Using the palate, as a stable reference seemed to work well and the evaluation of the single case showed that many, but not all, of the planned movements occurred.

  1. Digital health technology and trauma: development of an app to standardize care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Jeremy M

    2015-04-01

    Standardized practice results in less variation, therefore reducing errors and improving outcome. Optimal trauma care is achieved through standardization, as is evidenced by the widespread adoption of the Advanced Trauma Life Support approach. The challenge for an individual institution is how does one educate and promulgate these standardized processes widely and efficiently? In today's world, digital health technology must be considered in the process. The aim of this study was to describe the process of developing an app, which includes standardized trauma algorithms. The objective of the app was to allow easy, real-time access to trauma algorithms, and therefore reduce omissions/errors. A set of trauma algorithms, relevant to the local setting, was derived from the best available evidence. After obtaining grant funding, a collaborative endeavour was undertaken with an external specialist app developing company. The process required 6 months to translate the existing trauma algorithms into an app. The app contains 32 separate trauma algorithms, formatted as a single-page flow diagram. It utilizes specific smartphone features such as 'pinch to zoom', jump-words and pop-ups to allow rapid access to the desired information. Improvements in trauma care outcomes result from reducing variation. By incorporating digital health technology, a trauma app has been developed, allowing easy and intuitive access to evidenced-based algorithms. © 2015 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.

  2. Creating a pandemic of health: What is the role of digital technologies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jadad, Alejandro R

    2016-11-01

    Imagine a world in which every human being is healthy until the last breath. Thanks to the fast penetration of digital technologies in every region of the planet, this seemingly utopian scenario is not only feasible but also potentially viable. Now that digital technologies have provided almost full interconnectivity among all humans, they should be used to meet key challenges to ensure that health is created and that it spreads to reach every person on earth. The objective of this article is to describe and trigger a serious discussion of such challenges, which include: adopting a new concept of health; positioning self-rated health as the main outcome of the system; creating a health-oriented model to guide service provision; facilitating the identification, scaling up, and sustaining of innovations that can create and spread health; promoting a culture of health promotion; and encouraging the emergence of Precision Health. Once these challenges are met, and health becomes pandemic, public health would have fulfilled its vision, a healthy life for all, at last.

  3. Strengthening Inclusion of Learners With Attention Difficulties Through Interventions With Digital Technology In Processes of Production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sorensen, Elsebeth Korsgaard; Voldborg, Hanne

    2017-01-01

    This paper investigates the potential of digital technologies for strengthening the participation and inclusion of learners with developmental and attention deficits (focus learners) into the mainstream classroom. The paper describes the authors’ approach to the challenge of researching the extent......, to which digital technologies may support the learning process of focus learners – in particular in those aspects of the learning process that deal with the construction of learning products and the communication and dissemination of knowledge to peers, teachers or others. On the basis of the actual...... analysis and a succeeding discussion, the paper concludes that in order to create ownership, pedagogic strategies and interventions with digital technologies (whether viewed from the perspective of teaching or the perspective of learning) should incorporate opportunities for developing digital multimodal...

  4. Adoption and use of digital technologies among general dental practitioners in the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Zande, Marieke M; Gorter, Ronald C; Aartman, Irene H A; Wismeijer, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    To investigate (1) the degree of digital technology adoption among general dental practitioners, and to assess (2) which personal and practice factors are associated with technology use. A questionnaire was distributed among a stratified sample of 1000 general dental practitioners in the Netherlands, to measure the use of fifteen administrative, communicative, clinical and diagnostic technologies, as well as personal factors and dental practice characteristics. The response rate was 31.3%; 65.1% replied to the questionnaire on paper and 34.9% online. Each specific digital technology was used by between 93.2% and 6.8% of the dentists. Administrative technologies were generally used by more dentists than clinical technologies. Dentists had adopted an average number of 6.3 ± 2.3 technologies. 22.5% were low technology users (0 to 4 technologies), 46.2% were intermediate technology users (5 to 7 technologies) and 31.3% were high technology users (8 to 12 technologies). High technology users more frequently had a specialization (ptechnology users, and invested more hours per year in professional activities (p=0.026) than intermediate technology users. High technology use was also more common for dentists working in practices with a higher average number of patients per year (ptechnologies. Technology use is associated with various patterns of person-specific factors, and is higher when working in larger dental practices. The findings provide insight into the current state of digital technology adoption in dental practices. Further exploration why some dentists are more reluctant to adopt technologies than others is valuable for the dental profession's agility in adjusting to technological developments.

  5. 76 FR 5833 - Polaris Industries, Including On-Site Leased Workers From Westaff, Supply Technologies, Aerotek...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-02

    ... DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Employment and Training Administration [TA-W-74,336] Polaris Industries, Including On-Site Leased Workers From Westaff, Supply Technologies, Aerotek, and Securitas Security Services..., applicable to workers of Polaris Industries, including on-site leased workers from Westaff, Osceola...

  6. Authentically Digital? Considering art knowledge in a technological age

    OpenAIRE

    Mckim, Joel

    2016-01-01

    This talk was provided upon invitation for Christie's Education Conference 2016: Creating Markets, Collecting Art London, 14 - 15 July 2016. Panel entitled: “Nothing like the real thing!” Connoisseurship; Dead or Alive in the Digital Age? organized by Elizabeth Herridge

  7. Using virtual reality technology to include field operators in simulation and training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nystad, E.; Strand, S.

    2006-01-01

    By using virtual reality technology, field operators can be included in simulator training. A study has been performed where field operators could perform their activities in a virtual plant and communicate with a control room operator who was placed in a physical control room simulator. This paper describes the use of VR technology in the study and how the operators experienced interacting with the virtual plant. (author)

  8. Indigenous Language Revitalization, Promotion, and Education: Function of Digital Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galla, Candace Kaleimamoowahinekapu

    2016-01-01

    Within the last two decades, there has been increased interest in how technology supports Indigenous language revitalization and reclamation efforts. This paper considers the effect technology has on Indigenous language learning and teaching, while conceptualizing how language educators, speakers, learners, and technology users holistically…

  9. Digital Dwelling: Technology in Couple and Family Relationships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hertlein, Katherine M.

    2012-01-01

    We are in an unprecedented age of technology. Few articles in family journals address online behavior, intimacy patterns, and influences on the ways couples and families communicate through technology. The purpose of this article is to use a multitheoretical model to describe the process of how technologies are affecting couple and family life.…

  10. Opening Digital Archives and Collections with Emerging Data Analytics Technology: A Research Agenda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Elragal

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available In the public sector, the EU legislation requires preservation and opening of increasing amounts of heterogeneous digital information that should be utilized by citizens and businesses. While technologies such as big data analytics (BDA have emerged, opening of digital archives and collections at a large scale is in its infancy. Opening archives and collections involve also particular requirements for recognizing and managing issues of privacy and digital rights. As well, ensuring the sustainability of the opened materials and economical appraisal of digital materials for preservation require robust digital preservation practices. We need to proceed beyond the state-of-the-art in opening digital archives and collections through the means of emerging big data analytics and validating a novel concept for analytics which then enables delivering of knowledge for citizens and the society. We set out an agenda for using BDA as our strategy for research and enquiry and for demonstrating the benefit of BDA for opening digital archives by civil servants and for citizens. That will – eventually - transform the preservation practices, and delivery and use opportunities of public digital archives. Our research agenda suggests a framework integrating four domains of inquiry, analytics-enhanced appraisal, analytics-prepared preservation, analytics-enhanced opening, and analytics-enhanced use, for utilizing the BDA technologies in the domain of digital archives and collections. The suggested framework and research agenda identifies initially particular BDA technologies to be utilized in each of the four domains, and contributes by highlighting a need for an integrated “public understanding of big data” in the domain of digital preservation.

  11. Technologies, Democracy and Digital Citizenship: Examining Australian Policy Intersections and the Implications for School Leadership

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathryn Moyle

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available There are intersections that can occur between the respective peak Australian school education policy agendas. These policies include the use of technologies in classrooms to improve teaching and learning as promoted through the Melbourne Declaration on Educational Goals for Young Australians and the Australian Curriculum; and the implementation of professional standards as outlined in the Australian Professional Standard for Principals and the Australian Professional Standards for Teachers. These policies create expectations of school leaders to bring about change in classrooms and across their schools, often described as bringing about ‘quality teaching’ and ‘school improvement’. These policies indicate that Australian children should develop ‘democratic values’, and that school principals should exercise ‘democratic values’ in their schools. The national approaches to the implementation of these policies however, is largely silent on promoting learning that fosters democracy through education, or about making connections between teaching and learning with technologies, school leadership and living in a democracy. Yet the policies promote these connections and alignments. Furthermore, understanding democratic values, knowing what is a democracy, and being able to use technologies in democratic ways, has to be learned and practiced. Through the lens of the use of technologies to build digital citizenship and to achieve democratic processes and outcomes in schools, these policy complexities are examined in order to consider some of the implications for school leadership.

  12. Innovating Education and Educating for Innovation: The Power of Digital Technologies and Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    OECD Publishing, 2016

    2016-01-01

    OECD's Innovation Strategy calls upon all sectors in the economy and society to innovate in order to foster productivity, growth and well-being. Education systems are critically important for innovation through the development of skills that nurture new ideas and technologies. However, whereas digital technologies are profoundly changing the way…

  13. Children Learning to Use Technologies through Play: A Digital Play Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bird, Jo; Edwards, Susan

    2015-01-01

    Digital technologies are increasingly acknowledged as an important aspect of early childhood education. A significant problem for early childhood education has been how to understand the pedagogical use of technologies in a sector that values play-based learning. This paper presents a new framework to understand how children learn to use…

  14. Heidegger, Digital Technology, and Postmodern Education: From Being in Cyberspace to Meeting on MySpace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walters, Patrick; Kop, Rita

    2009-01-01

    Digital technology is transforming life and is beginning to have a profound effect on individual psychic life and the wider social milieu. This article seeks to understand the nature of the new technology and its implications for personal life, culture, and education. The scene is set by comparing the introduction of printing to the revolution…

  15. Digital Disturbances, Disorders, and Pathologies: A Discussion of Some Unintended Consequences of Technology in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haughton, Noela A.; Yeh, Kuo-Chuan; Nworie, John; Romero, Liz

    2013-01-01

    As with any innovation, the adoption and diffusion of digital technologies in higher education have also brought unintended consequences. This article discusses the unintended misuse of these technologies in the higher education setting. Depending upon severity, these consequences discussed--distraction, addiction, academic dishonesty, and…

  16. Punctuated Equilibrium--Digital Technology in Schools' Teaching of the Mother Tongue (Swedish)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erixon, Per-Olof

    2016-01-01

    This article deals with how teachers and pupils in seventh to ninth grade in Sweden look upon and relate to the incorporation of new digital technology in mother tongue education (Swedish). The result shows that both the classification and framing of the subject is being challenged by new technology, but that the awareness of the impact seems to…

  17. Passport to Digital Citizenship: Journey toward Appropriate Technology Use at School and at Home

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribble, Mike

    2009-01-01

    Technology has changed people's lives. In fewer than 30 years, people have gone from barely hearing about cell phones, laptops, and MP3 players to almost not being able to live without them. Digital citizenship describes the norms of appropriate, responsible behavior with regard to technology use. In this article, the author presents nine elements…

  18. Digital Teaching Platforms: Customizing Classroom Learning for Each Student. Technology & Education, Connections (TEC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dede, Chris, Ed.; Richards, John, Ed.

    2012-01-01

    The Digital Teaching Platform (DTP) brings the power of interactive technology to teaching and learning in classrooms. In this authoritative book, top researchers in the field of learning science and educational technology examine the current state of design and research on DTPs, the principles for evaluating them, and their likely evolution as a…

  19. The Effect of the Digital Classroom on Academic Success and Online Technologies Self-Efficacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozerbas, Mehmet Arif; Erdogan, Bilge Has

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to observe whether the learning environment created by digital classroom technologies has any effect on the academic success and online technologies self-efficacy of 7th grade students. In this study, an experimental design with a pre-test/post-test control group was used. The research was conducted with 58 students in a secondary…

  20. The Sociology of Education and Digital Technology: Past, Present and Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selwyn, Neil; Facer, Keri

    2014-01-01

    During the past 15 years of his career, John Furlong's research and writing has focused--in part--on digital technologies and people's everyday experiences of education. While hardly a technology expert, his work has shown an acute awareness of the significance of computers, the internet and mobile telephony in making sociological sense…

  1. Education in a Digital Democracy: Leading the Charge for Learning about, with, and beyond Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milliron, Mark David; Miles, Cindy L.

    2000-01-01

    Education is playing an important role in the realization of our democratic ideals in this digital age. Educators need to be persuaded that the new technologies need to be embraced and utilized. Technology skills should be taught, but basic skills such as reading, writing and critical thinking are also more important than ever. (JM)

  2. The contributions of digital technologies in the teaching of nursing skills: an integrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silveira, Maurício de Souza; Cogo, Ana Luísa Petersen

    2017-07-13

    To analyze the contributions of digital educational technologies used in teaching nursing skills. Integrative literature review, search in five databases, from 2006 to 2015 combining the descriptors 'education, nursing', 'educational technology', 'computer-assisted instruction' or related terms in English. Sample of 30 articles grouped in the thematic categories 'technology in the simulation with manikin', 'incentive to learning' and 'teaching of nursing skills'. It was identified different formats of digital educational technologies used in teaching Nursing skills such as videos, learning management system, applications, hypertext, games, virtual reality simulators. These digital materials collaborated in the acquisition of theoretical references that subsidize the practices, enhancing the teaching and enable the use of active learning methods, breaking with the traditional teaching of demonstrating and repeating procedures.

  3. Development of Risk Assessment Technology for Low Power, Shutdown and Digital I and C Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jang, Seung Cheol; Kang, Hyung Gook; Lim, Ho Gon; Park, Jin Hee; Eom, Heung Sub; Kim, Tae Woon; Ha, Jae Joo

    2005-04-01

    There are two technical areas to deal with in the project; the low power and shutdown probabilistic safety assessment (PSA), and the digital I and C PSA. The scope and contents of each area could be summarized as follows: Quality assessment of a LPSD PSA model for a Korean Standard Nuclear Power Plant (KSNP), Quality improvement of the KSNP LPSD PSA model in the following four technical areas; plant operating status (POS), initiating event analysis, determination of success criteria, accident sequence analysis, Development of the LPSD risk management technologies, Unavailability analysis of Digital safety systems such as Digital Plant Protection System (DPPS) and Digital Engineered Safety Feature Actuation System (DESFAS), Impact analysis of the digital safety systems on plant risks throughout of the digital plant risk models for evaluating core damage frequency (CDF) and large early release frequency (LERF), Study on the methodologies for treating digital-specific problems in the digital I and C PSA such as reliability of safety-critical software, common cause failure (CCF) of digital components, fault coverage, etc

  4. Annual Technology Baseline (Including Supporting Data); NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blair, Nate; Cory, Karlynn; Hand, Maureen; Parkhill, Linda; Speer, Bethany; Stehly, Tyler; Feldman, David; Lantz, Eric; Augusting, Chad; Turchi, Craig; O' Connor, Patrick

    2015-07-08

    Consistent cost and performance data for various electricity generation technologies can be difficult to find and may change frequently for certain technologies. With the Annual Technology Baseline (ATB), National Renewable Energy Laboratory provides an organized and centralized dataset that was reviewed by internal and external experts. It uses the best information from the Department of Energy laboratory's renewable energy analysts and Energy Information Administration information for conventional technologies. The ATB will be updated annually in order to provide an up-to-date repository of current and future cost and performance data. Going forward, we plan to revise and refine the values using best available information. The ATB includes both a presentation with notes (PDF) and an associated Excel Workbook. The ATB includes the following electricity generation technologies: land-based wind; offshore wind; utility-scale solar PV; concentrating solar power; geothermal power; hydropower plants (upgrades to existing facilities, powering non-powered dams, and new stream-reach development); conventional coal; coal with carbon capture and sequestration; integrated gasification combined cycle coal; natural gas combustion turbines; natural gas combined cycle; conventional biopower. Nuclear laboratory's renewable energy analysts and Energy Information Administration information for conventional technologies. The ATB will be updated annually in order to provide an up-to-date repository of current and future cost and performance data. Going forward, we plan to revise and refine the values using best available information.

  5. New technologies for radiation-hardening analog to digital converters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gauthier, M.K.

    1982-12-01

    Surveys of available Analog to Digital Converters (ADC) suitable for precision applications showed that none have the proper combination of accuracy and radiation hardness to meet space and/or strategic weapon requirements. A development program which will result in an ADC device which will serve a number of space and strategic applications. Emphasis was placed on approaches that could be integrated onto a single chip within three to five years

  6. Dismantling and waste managing benefit from digital technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moitrier, C.

    2017-01-01

    Dismantling is a very important challenge for nuclear industry as its success will prove the ability of the industry to deal with all the stages of a nuclear power plant from design to the end. A dismantling project is constraint by costs, time, feasibility, safety and environment protection and all of this implies a perfect knowledge of both the initial state of the facility at the beginning of the dismantling and the supply chain to avoid delays and extra-costs. Digital tools have a very important role to play as a provider of a 3-dimensional digital twin of the facility. This digital model allows: a remote preparation of the dismantling actions, to assess and optimize the radiation exposure during the intervention, to simulate various scenarios and select the most adequate, to ease collaborative work between various teams, to assess the volume and kind of waste at a very early stage of the dismantling, and to train operators and workers for x. (A.C.)

  7. Digital technology shaping teaching practices in higher education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika eAkbar

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In their quest on being effective, educators have always experimented with the art of teaching. Teaching has evolved over centuries by adopting new approaches, methods, tools, and technologies to reach a wider audience. As technologies advance, educators should carefully use, evaluate, and adopt the changes to utilize the technologies and track of their impacts. This article provides a mini review to briefly describe some of the existing technical achievements that are used in higher education along with their challenges.

  8. Application of digital PWM technology in current transducers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Huifang; Hu Zhimin; Li Rui

    2012-01-01

    With the development of DSP technology and mature use of PID technology,, a new program for DC or AC signal measurement is proposed. Combined with the DSP chip timer module and PID algorithm, PWM signals are generated to control the feedback circuit for the compensation current. Finally the measured current value can be obtained according to the ampere-turns compensation current and the measured current. Studies have shown that this technology enables new current transducers have high stability. (authors)

  9. Blockchain for good? Digital ledger technology and sustainable development goals

    OpenAIRE

    Adams, R.; Kewell, B.; Parry, G.

    2017-01-01

    Blockchain technology (aka Distributed Ledger Technology or DLT) is a novel configuration of Peer-to-Peer, cryptographic and distributed computing technologies that have the potential to shift the internet from an internet of information to an internet of value network, with significant disruptive potential. To date, the cryptocurrency ‘bitcoin’ is the application of DLT that has attracted most attention, not all of it favourable. However, DLTs are about much more than cryptocurrencies and, a...

  10. Digital mammography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bick, Ulrich; Diekmann, Felix

    2010-01-01

    This state-of-the-art reference book provides in-depth coverage of all aspects of digital mammography, including detector technology, image processing, computer-aided diagnosis, soft-copy reading, digital workflow, and PACS. Specific advantages and disadvantages of digital mammography in comparison to screen-film mammography are thoroughly discussed. By including authors from both North America and Europe, the book is able to outline variations in the use, acceptance, and quality assurance of digital mammography between the different countries and screening programs. Advanced imaging techniques and future developments such as contrast mammography and digital breast tomosynthesis are also covered in detail. All of the chapters are written by internationally recognized experts and contain numerous high-quality illustrations. This book will be of great interest both to clinicians who already use or are transitioning to digital mammography and to basic scientists working in the field. (orig.)

  11. DIGITAL TRANSFORMATION OF UNIVERSITY EDUCATION IN UKRAINE: TRAJECTORIES OF DEVELOPMENT IN THE CONDITIONS OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL AND ECONOMIC ORDER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oleg Ye. Kaminskyi

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The article substantiates the role of the digital transformation of higher education in Ukraine in the era of the fourth industrial revolution. There was proven the need to develop the strategy of the university education digital transformation, as well as the formation of new information and communication competencies. According to the authors, the strategy of digital transformation of the university education system has to include the modernization of corporate IT architecture management, which should be implemented as a cloud-based platform. The authors analysed the main possible directions of the educational services transformation and the accompanying business processes. The use of blockchain technology for the educational content management module construction is proposed. The integration of the educational content management modules of different Ukrainian universities should become the basis for creating a global cloud-based platform for higher education.

  12. Analysis: including visually impaired participants in validation design studies of diabetes technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uslan, Mark; Blubaugh, Morgan

    2010-09-01

    In an article in this issue of Journal of Diabetes Science and Technology, Sherwyn Schwartz, M.D., presents a study to validate the design of the ClikSTAR® insulin pen from sanofi-aventis and demonstrates that the device can be used correctly by participants with diabetes. Concern with this article lies with the selection of participants, which was meant to reflect the intended audience for the insulin pen device but does not address the inclusion of visually impaired individuals, who comprise over 20% of the adult diabetes population. Visually impaired individuals need to be included as part of the intended audience for insulin administration technology, and manufacturers of these devices need to design their products for safe use by all people, including those who are visually impaired. The study demonstrated successful use of the ClikSTAR insulin pen in a population that did not include subjects with severe visual impairment. We believe that future validation studies for insulin administration technology should also include samples of visually impaired users and that visually impaired patients will embrace the use of insulin pens designed with their needs in mind. © 2010 Diabetes Technology Society.

  13. 76 FR 23812 - Reliability and Continuity of Communications Networks, Including Broadband Technologies; Effects...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-28

    ...] Reliability and Continuity of Communications Networks, Including Broadband Technologies; Effects on Broadband...: Effects on Broadband Communications Networks of Damage or Failure of Network Equipment or Severe Overload... Docket 10-92 (Effects on Broadband Communications Networks of Damage or Failure of Network Equipment or...

  14. 77 FR 13351 - Polaris Industries, Including On-site Leased Workers From Westaff, Supply Technologies, Aerotek...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-06

    ... DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Employment and Training Administration [TA-W-74,336] Polaris Industries, Including On-site Leased Workers From Westaff, Supply Technologies, Aerotek Securitas Security Services... for Worker Adjustment Assistance on August 26, 2010, applicable to workers of Polaris Industries...

  15. Search Engine Technology and Digital Libraries: Libraries Need to Discover the Academic Internet

    OpenAIRE

    Lossau, Norbert

    2004-01-01

    This article is the revised and elaborated version of a presentation that was delivered at the invitation of the American Digital Library Federation (DLF) at their Spring Forum meeting in New Orleans (http://www.diglib.org/forums/Spring2004/springforum04abs.htm). It will be followed by "Search engine technology and digital libraries: Moving from theory to praxis" as a collaborative article from this author and Friedrich Summann, Head of IT at Bielefeld University Library. With the development...

  16. New Technology's Surprising Security Threats. Building Digital Libraries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huwe, Terence

    2005-01-01

    In recent years, security issues have increasingly come to dominate the technological development process--although still in a more reactive than proactive mode. It now seems more important than ever to monitor security trends and policy developments, especially if technology is regarded as a potential community builder. This article suggests…

  17. [Digital Pen & Paper® technology to manage clinical risk and to prevent medical malpractice claims].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genovese, Umberto; Del Sordo, Sara; Gerosa, Camillo; Mobilia, Francesca; Raineri, Massimo

    2014-01-01

    The use of innovative technologies in the health sector can be a key element in clinical risk management. In order to reduce errors in medical recording and to provide medico-legal evidence, Digital Pen & Paper technology has been adopted by medical staff of a hospital in Milan. The Authors introduce the first results of this trial: notable advantages have been reported in compilation, transmission and storage of medical records. Furthermore, this technology could provide evidence in evaluating medical malpractice claims.

  18. Music technology, gender, and class: Digitization, educational and social change in Britain

    OpenAIRE

    Born, Georgina; Devine, Kyle

    2015-01-01

    Music technology undergraduate degree programmes are a relatively new phenomenon in British higher education, situated at the intersection of music, digital technologies, and sound art. Such degrees have exploded in popularity over the past fifteen years. Yet the social and cultural ramifications of this development have not yet been analysed. In looking comparatively at the demographics of both traditional music and music technology degrees, we highlight a striking bifurcation: traditional m...

  19. [Development of a digital EEG signal acquiring system based on virtual instrument technology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ying, Jun; Chen, Guang-Fei; He, Shi-Lin

    2009-09-01

    This paper introduces an 16-lead digital EEG signal acquisition system, which applies MCU MSP430 as central control unit with high performance analog devices and high speed multi-channel, multi-bit analog-to-digital converter as peripheral to retrench analog circuit. Data is transferred to PC by USART interface. Software on PC based on virtual instrument technology realizes real-time detection, display and storage. The system has many advantages such as high precision, stable performance, small volume and low power dissipation, thus provides a new means for digital EEG signal acquisition.

  20. On the Impact of Digital Technologies on Corruption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Thomas Barnebeck; Bentzen, Jeanet; Dalgaard, Carl-Johan Lars

    the interface between bureaucrats and the public. Using cross-country data and data for the U.S. states, we test this hypothesis. Data spans the period during which the Internet has been in operation. In order to address the potential endogeneity problem, we develop a novel identification strategy for Internet...... diffusion. Digital equipment is highly sensitive to power disruption: it leads to equipment failure and damage. Even very short disruptions (less than 1/60th of a second) can have such consequences. Accordingly, more frequent power failures will increase the user cost of IT capital; either directly, through...

  1. Digital Scientific-Technological Training in Higher Education

    OpenAIRE

    Fainholc, Beatriz

    2010-01-01

    Peer reviewed Els nous escenaris socioeconòmics i culturals de la societat del coneixement desafien un replantejament de la formació superior que ha de buscar respostes superadores no solament de diverses exclusions socials i culturals -en general, però encara més a l'Amèrica Llatina- sinó també de les contradiccions entre una cultura digital mundial i els perfils organitzacionals i professionals locals demanats. Per a un autèntic desenvolupament de capacitats que remoguin restriccions i r...

  2. Digital immigrants teaching digital natives: A phenomenological study of higher education faculty perspectives on technology integration with English core content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corey, Robert C.

    In the last two decades, technology use has escalated and educators grapple with its advances and integration into the classroom. Issues surrounding what constitutes a literate society, the clarion calls for educational reform emanating from US presidents to parent teacher organizations, and educators' ability to cope with advances in technology in the classroom demand attention. Therefore, the purpose of this qualitative study was to explore and understand the professional and educational experiences of six English faculty members teaching undergraduate courses at Midwest universities. Using the framework of Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge -- TPACK (Koehler and Mishra 2008), the major focus of the study was to determine how faculty members understood what characterized the nature of teaching with technology in undergraduate classrooms. Results of this study revealed five themes showing how the participants were introduced to technology, how they assimilated it into their pedagogy, and how they integrated it into teaching practice. This study has the potential to impact the nature of illustrating the methods and techniques used by the six participants as they merge technology, pedagogy, and content knowledge and set in motion classroom practices that assist faculty at all levels to develop and teach technology skills necessary for the 21st century and to better prepare students for thinking critically about how to use digital advances.

  3. Science Notebooks for the 21st Century. Going Digital Provides Opportunities to Learn "with" Technology Rather than "from" Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulton, Lori; Paek, Seungoh; Taoka, Mari

    2017-01-01

    Students of today are digital natives who for the most part come to school with experiences that may surpass those of their teachers. They use tablet computers and other devices in their personal lives and are eager to use them in the classroom. For teachers, this means they must integrate technology in ways that allow their students to learn with…

  4. Microwave technology for waste management applications including disposition of electronic circuitry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wicks, G.G.; Clark, D.E.; Schulz, R.L.; Folz, D.C.

    1995-01-01

    Microwave technology is being developed nationally and internationally for a variety of environmental remediation purposes. These efforts include treatment and destruction of a vast array of gaseous, liquid and solid hazardous wastes as well as subsequent immobilization of selected components. Microwave technology provides an important contribution to an arsenal of existing remediation methods that are designed to protect the public and environment from undesirable consequences of hazardous materials. Applications of microwave energy for environmental remediation will be discussed. Emphasized will be a newly developed microwave process designed to treat discarded electronic circuitry and reclaim the precious metals within for reuse

  5. Microwave Technology for Waste Management Applications Including Disposition of Electronic Circuitry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wicks, G.G.; Clark, D.E.; Schulz, R.L.

    1998-01-01

    Advanced microwave technology is being developed nationally and internationally for a variety of waste management and environmental remediation purposes. These efforts include treatment and destruction of a vast array of gaseous, liquid and solid hazardous wastes as well as subsequent immobilization of hazardous components into leach resistant forms. Microwave technology provides an important contribution to an arsenal of existing remediation methods that are designed to protect the public and environment from the undesirable consequences of hazardous materials. One application of special interest is the treatment of discarded electronic circuitry using a new hybrid microwave treatment process and subsequent reclamation of the precious metals within

  6. Developing the FARSEEING Taxonomy of Technologies: Classification and description of technology use (including ICT) in falls prevention studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulton, Elisabeth; Hawley-Hague, Helen; Vereijken, Beatrix; Clifford, Amanda; Guldemond, Nick; Pfeiffer, Klaus; Hall, Alex; Chesani, Federico; Mellone, Sabato; Bourke, Alan; Todd, Chris

    2016-06-01

    Recent Cochrane reviews on falls and fall prevention have shown that it is possible to prevent falls in older adults living in the community and in care facilities. Technologies aimed at fall detection, assessment, prediction and prevention are emerging, yet there has been no consistency in describing or reporting on interventions using technologies. With the growth of eHealth and data driven interventions, a common language and classification is required. The FARSEEING Taxonomy of Technologies was developed as a tool for those in the field of biomedical informatics to classify and characterise components of studies and interventions. The Taxonomy Development Group (TDG) comprised experts from across Europe. Through face-to-face meetings and contributions via email, five domains were developed, modified and agreed: Approach; Base; Components of outcome measures; Descriptors of technologies; and Evaluation. Each domain included sub-domains and categories with accompanying definitions. The classification system was tested against published papers and further amendments undertaken, including development of an online tool. Six papers were classified by the TDG with levels of consensus recorded. Testing the taxonomy with papers highlighted difficulties in definitions across international healthcare systems, together with differences of TDG members' backgrounds. Definitions were clarified and amended accordingly, but some difficulties remained. The taxonomy and manual were large documents leading to a lengthy classification process. The development of the online application enabled a much simpler classification process, as categories and definitions appeared only when relevant. Overall consensus for the classified papers was 70.66%. Consensus scores increased as modifications were made to the taxonomy. The FARSEEING Taxonomy of Technologies presents a common language, which should now be adopted in the field of biomedical informatics. In developing the taxonomy as an

  7. Facilitating continuity: exploring the role of digital technology in physical rehabilitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagalkot, Naveen L.; Nazzi, Elena; Sokoler, Tomas

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we report our early experiences on exploring if, and how, digital technology can help facilitate a stronger sense of continuity in the physical rehabilitation process, as experienced by the therapists and the senior citizens. We recognize four aspects of the design space offered......-through-design approach we have used sketching in a co-design setting with senior citizens and therapists, as the main vehicle for our research. With our MagicMirror and Walky design explorations, we aim to contribute on two levels: firstly, by providing two proof-of-concepts of designing digital technology...... for the physical rehabilitation of senior citizens. Secondly, and more importantly, we provide a pointer towards a new practice of physical rehabilitation: a practice where the role of digital technology is to support, through the facilitation of continuity, the collaboration between therapist and senior citizens...

  8. Digital Technologies Supporting Person-Centered Integrated Care – A Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Øvretveit

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Shared electronic health and social care records in some service systems are already showing some of the benefits of digital technology and digital data for integrating health and social care. These records are one example of the beginning “digitalisation” of services that gives a glimpse of the potential of digital technology and systems for building coordinated and individualized integrated care. Yet the promise has been greater than the benefits, and progress has been slow compared to other industries. This paper describes for non-technical readers how information technology was used to support integrated care schemes in six EU services, and suggests practical ways forward to use the new opportunities to build person-centered integrated care.

  9. Application of digital pattern-less molding technology to produce art casting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Li1

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Compared with the conventional casting process, digital pattern-less casting technology has many advantages such as good machining accuracy, a short processing cycle, and low production cost. It is a new rapid manufacturing technology for castings, integrated with CAD/CAM, casting, CNC machining and many other advanced technologies. With this digital casting technology, no pattern is needed for making molds; it is precise, flexible, and green. Usually, art castings have complex structures and are made in small batches or even made in a single-piece, especially for large-sized art castings. So it has the shortcomings of high cost, low efficiency and long time for making a pattern to produce art castings with the conventional casting processes. However, the digital pattern-less casting technology can be applied to fabricate art castings, since it can greatly shorten the manufacturing cycle and lower the production cost, thus having a very good prospect. In this study, based on the digital pattern-less casting technology, a plaque casting with artistic Chinese characters (a Chinese poem was designed and manufactured, and the production process was demonstrated in detail.

  10. Exploring How Usage-Focused Business Models Enable Circular Economy through Digital Technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianmarco Bressanelli

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies advocate that digital technologies are key enabling factors for the introduction of servitized business models. At the same time, these technologies support the implementation of the circular economy (CE paradigm into businesses. Despite this general agreement, the literature still overlooks how digital technologies enable such a CE transition. To fill the gap, this paper develops a conceptual framework, based on the literature and a case study of a company implementing a usage-focused servitized business model in the household appliance industry. This study focuses on the Internet of Things (IoT, Big Data, and analytics, and identifies eight specific functionalities enabled by such technologies (improving product design, attracting target customers, monitoring and tracking product activity, providing technical support, providing preventive and predictive maintenance, optimizing the product usage, upgrading the product, enhancing renovation and end-of-life activities. By investigating how these functionalities affect three CE value drivers (increasing resource efficiency, extending lifespan, and closing the loop, the conceptual framework developed in this paper advances knowledge about the role of digital technologies as an enabler of the CE within usage-focused business models. Finally, this study shows how digital technologies help overcome the drawback of usage-focused business models for the adoption of CE pointed out by previous literature.

  11. Performance comparison of digital microRNA profiling technologies applied on human breast cancer cell lines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik Knutsen

    Full Text Available MicroRNA profiling represents an important first-step in deducting individual RNA-based regulatory function in a cell, tissue, or at a specific developmental stage. Currently there are several different platforms to choose from in order to make the initial miRNA profiles. In this study we investigate recently developed digital microRNA high-throughput technologies. Four different platforms were compared including next generation SOLiD ligation sequencing and Illumina HiSeq sequencing, hybridization-based NanoString nCounter, and miRCURY locked nucleic acid RT-qPCR. For all four technologies, full microRNA profiles were generated from human cell lines that represent noninvasive and invasive tumorigenic breast cancer. This study reports the correlation between platforms, as well as a more extensive analysis of the accuracy and sensitivity of data generated when using different platforms and important consideration when verifying results by the use of additional technologies. We found all the platforms to be highly capable for microRNA analysis. Furthermore, the two NGS platforms and RT-qPCR all have equally high sensitivity, and the fold change accuracy is independent of individual miRNA concentration for NGS and RT-qPCR. Based on these findings we propose new guidelines and considerations when performing microRNA profiling.

  12. Gossamer Threads: Commentary on the Impact of Digital Technology on the Developing Brain and the Capacity for Empathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjorklund, Pamela

    2016-01-01

    This essay explores the impact of digital technology on brain development and other areas of human growth including the capacity for empathy, which is fundamental to successful relationships, is an essential survival skill, and is an important source of moral knowledge. Reflections on a teenaged daughter's immersion in technology, coupled with evidence for the mixed consequences of such, weave together the gossamer threads of disparate, sometimes conflicting information about the explosion of digital technology over the past few decades, the impossibility of multitasking, the mixed effects of digital technology on brain development, and what it all might mean for human development generally and the moral capacity for empathic response in particular. While the essence of the commentary is intentionally interdisciplinary and weaves together disparate threads of multidisciplinary knowledge, it has important implications for nursing-with its relational core, unique as well as shared bodies of moral and scientific knowledge, and interprofessional health care goals to maximize human growth and well-being across the life span in both health and illness.

  13. Gains from resistance: contesting a new digital technology in a service sector workplace

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shulzhenko, Elena; Holmgren, Jens

    2017-01-01

    Increasing expectations of efficiency enabled by new digital technology have led to renewed interest in spaces remaining for employee resistance to management power. The study contributes to this debate by analysing resistance to a new technology introduced in the home-nursing sector in Denmark....... Nurses succeeded in halting a technological change that allowed them to report data related to their visits online from inside patients’ homes and reduced their co-located working time. Work location became a central area of contestation between nurses and management. The study offers a nuanced analysis...... of power relations during the technological change. It shows that the capacity of IT management – a management actor uninhibited by a care ethos - to influence nursing workplaces rose along with the increasing significance of expertise in digital technologies in performing care work. Nurses’ alliances...

  14. Guidance, Navigation and Control Digital Emulation Technology Laboratory. Volume 1. Part 2. Task 1: Digital Emulation Technology Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-09-27

    Engineering Research Laboratory " Autnor: Stephen R. Wachtel extern int level; I extern char "list( vic. ca.. staterent ( identifier, opion...ENGINEERING RESEARCH LABORATORY Georgia Institute of Technology Atlanta, Georgia 30332 - 0540 Contract Data Requirements List Item A005 Period Covered: FY 91...COMPUTER ENGINEERING RESEARCH LABORATORY Georgia Institute of Technology Atlanta, Georgia 30332 - 0540 Eugene L. Sanders Cecil 0. Alford USASDC Georgia

  15. Review of innovations in digital health technology to promote weight control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, J Graham; Bond, Dale S

    2014-01-01

    Advances in technology have contributed to the obesity epidemic and worsened health by reducing opportunities for physical activity and by the proliferation of inexpensive calorie-dense foods. However, much of the same technology can be used to counter these troublesome trends by fostering the development and maintenance of healthy eating and physical activity habits. In contrast to intensive face-to-face treatments, technology-based interventions also have the potential to reach large numbers of individuals at low cost. The purpose of this review is to discuss studies in which digital technology has been used for behavioral weight control, report on advances in consumer technology that are widely adopted but insufficiently tested, and explore potential future directions for both. Web-based, mobile (eg, smartphone), virtual reality, and gaming technologies are the focus of discussion. The best evidence exists to support the use of digital technology for self-monitoring of weight-related behaviors and outcomes. However, studies are underway that will provide additional, important information regarding how best to apply digital technology for behavioral weight control.

  16. Digital mammography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Nariya; Cha, Joo Hee; Moon, Woo Kyung

    2005-01-01

    Mammography is the best imaging modality for the detection of early breast cancer in asymptomatic women. However, 10-30% of cases are missed with current film-screen mammography. Digital mammography allows for the separate optimization of image acquisition and display. In addition to the obvious data storage, retrieval, and transmission advantages that digital mammography allows, additional advances such as computer-aided diagnosis, tomosynthesis and dual energy mammography are in development. This review will discuss the technology of digital mammography including detectors and displays, the results of clinical trials comparing film-screen and digital mammography, and the use of computer-aided detection. Digital mammography is a promising new technology for breast cancer detection in the Korean women

  17. Digital fabrication as an instructional technology for supporting upper elementary and middle school science and mathematics education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tillman, Daniel

    The purpose of this three-paper manuscript dissertation was to study digital fabrication as an instructional technology for supporting elementary and middle school science and mathematics education. Article one analyzed the effects of digital fabrication activities that were designed to contextualize mathematics education at a summer mathematics enrichment program for upper elementary and middle school students. The primary dependent variables studied were the participants' knowledge of mathematics and science content, attitudes towards STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) and STEM-related careers. Based upon the data collected, three results were presented as having justifiable supporting empirical evidence: (1) The digital fabrication activities, combined with the other mathematics activities at the enrichment program, resulted in non-significant overall gains in students' mathematics test scores and attitudes towards STEM. (2) The digital fabrication activities, combined with the other mathematics activities at the enrichment program, resulted in noteworthy gains on the "Probability & Statistics" questions. (3) Some students who did poorly on the scored paper test on mathematics and science content were nonetheless nominated by their teachers as demonstrating meritorious distinction during the digital fabrication activities (termed "Great Thinkers" by the 5th-grade teachers). Article two focused on how an instructional technology course featuring digital fabrication activities impacted (1) preservice elementary teachers' efficacy beliefs about teaching science, and (2) their attitudes and understanding of how to include instructional technology and digital fabrication activities into teaching science. The research design compared two sections of a teaching with technology course featuring digital fabrication activities to another section of the same course that utilized a media cycle framework (Bull & Bell, 2005) that did not feature digital

  18. Development of the Licensing Support Technology for Digital I and C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, K. C.; Kim, J. Y.; Kang, H. K. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)] (and others)

    2008-06-15

    This research can provide the required safety and reliability of software for the use of nuclear digital safety systems, achieve the software quality sufficient to arrive at the level of the licensing agreement by the nuclear regulatory agency, and establish the rigorous software V and V procedure by the use of domestic technology. These results will provide independent safety software qualification techniques from, with the equivalent level of, the those acquired by advanced countries. The technologies obtained from this research will be able to be employed at advanced reactors such as super-critical fast reactors, high temperature gas-cooled reactors, and small modularized reactors that promote the use of digital systems.

  19. Digital gamma-ray spectroscopy based on FPGA technology

    CERN Document Server

    Bolic, M

    2002-01-01

    A digital pulse processing system convenient for high rate gamma-ray spectroscopy with NaI(Tl) detectors has been designed. The new programmable logic device has been used for implementation of dedicated high-speed pulse processor, as the central part of the system. The processor is capable to operate at the speed of fast ADC, preserving maximum throughput of the system. Special care has been taken to reduce the distortion of energy spectrum caused by pile-up at high-count rates. The developed system is highly flexible, and the parameters of its operation can be changed in software. The performance of the system was tested for high counting rate of 400000 s sup - sup 1.

  20. The role of digital health technologies in management of pain in older people: An integrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattarai, Priyanka; Phillips, Jane L

    Pain is one of the most distressing and debilitating health issues faced by older people. The burden of unrelieved pain experienced by older people and its associated high symptom and economic costs demands consideration of new strategies to better this condition. As the global uptake of digital technology increases, exploring its potential to impact positively on older peoples' pain self-management practices warrants investigation. This integrative review aimed to evaluate the use of digital health technology for management of older people's pain across care-settings. Searches were conducted to identify relevant English language studies published in CINHAL, Medline, Academic Search Complete, EMBASE, Cochrane library databases, and Google and Google Scholar websites. A total of 1003 papers were identified, 9 met the inclusion criteria. The highest level of evidence (Level II) was generated by three Phase II randomized controlled trials. These trials demonstrated the feasibility of computer based interactive or instructive video interventions however there was limited evidence to support their use for reduction of pain intensity and interference. Qualitative evidence demonstrated older people's willingness to use mobile technologies (iPhone or digital pen) to help manage their pain, however, the need of device-use training and connectedness with clinicians were highlighted. In conclusion, there is some evidence that integrating digital health technology into older peoples' pain self-management plan is feasible and acceptable. However, the provision of high-quality technological interventions informed by a thorough understanding of older people's digital technology pain management needs is required to ensure greater integration of this technology in clinical practice. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Research and implementation of the key technology of digital lock-in amplifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wei; You, Jia; Feng, Cheng; Li, Xisheng

    2017-08-01

    Lock-in amplifier technology is a very effective means of weak signal detection, with a center frequency stability, narrow pass band, high quality factor, which has been widely applied in physics, chemistry, biomedicine, remote sensing, materials science, etc. With the development of digital signal processing technology, digital phase-locked amplifier gradually replace analog lock-in amplifier, phase sensitive detector improved analog lock-in amplifier using analog method, by the way of the digital signal processing to achieve phase sensitive detector. FPGA has strong flexibility, can be programmed, and debugged, can be fully developed and verified. In this paper, we complete the construction of the digital lock-in amplifier based on the FPGA platform, using DSP Builder as design tool, using the ALTER's IP core to achieve rapid implementation. It is mainly divided into three modules: numerically controlled oscillator, Fast Fourier Transformation, digital phase sensitive detector. According to the process of MATLAB/Simulink/DSP Builder/Quartus II, it calls fft_v13_0 core, nco_v13_0 core provided by DSP Builder toolbox to build the model. The experimental results show that the designed digital phase-locked amplifier can effectively remove the noise interference and improve the detection accuracy.

  2. A Systematic Review of Technology-Based Dietary Intake Assessment Validation Studies That Include Carotenoid Biomarkers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burrows, Tracy L.; Rollo, Megan E.; Williams, Rebecca; Wood, Lisa G.; Garg, Manohar L.; Jensen, Megan; Collins, Clare E.

    2017-01-01

    Technological advances have allowed for the evolution of traditional dietary assessment methods. The aim of this review is to evaluate the accuracy of technology-based dietary assessment methods to determine carotenoid and/or fruit and vegetable intake when compared with carotenoid biomarkers. An online search strategy was undertaken to identify studies published in the English language up to July 2016. Inclusion criteria were adults ≥18 years, a measure of dietary intake that used information and communication technologies that specified fruit and/or vegetable intake or dietary carotenoid, a biomarker of carotenoid status and the association between the two. Sixteen articles from 13 studies were included with the majority cross-sectional in design (n = 9). Some studies used multiple dietary assessment methods with the most common: food records (n = 7), 24-h diet recalls (n = 5), food frequency questionnaires (n = 3) and diet quality assessed by dietary screener (n = 1). Two studies were directly web based, with four studies using technology that could be completed offline and data later transferred. Two studies utilised technology in the collection of dietary data, while the majority (n = 11) automated the collection in combination with nutrient analysis of the dietary data. Four studies provided correlation values between dietary carotenoids with biomarkers, ranging from r = 0.13 to 0.62 with the remaining studies comparing a measure of fruit and vegetable intake with biomarkers (r = 0.09 to 0.25). This review provides an overview of technology-based dietary assessment methods that have been used in validation studies with objectively measured carotenoids. Findings were positive with these dietary assessment measures showing mostly moderate associations with carotenoid biomarkers. PMID:28216582

  3. A Systematic Review of Technology-Based Dietary Intake Assessment Validation Studies That Include Carotenoid Biomarkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burrows, Tracy L; Rollo, Megan E; Williams, Rebecca; Wood, Lisa G; Garg, Manohar L; Jensen, Megan; Collins, Clare E

    2017-02-14

    Technological advances have allowed for the evolution of traditional dietary assessment methods. The aim of this review is to evaluate the accuracy of technology-based dietary assessment methods to determine carotenoid and/or fruit and vegetable intake when compared with carotenoid biomarkers. An online search strategy was undertaken to identify studies published in the English language up to July 2016. Inclusion criteria were adults ≥18 years, a measure of dietary intake that used information and communication technologies that specified fruit and/or vegetable intake or dietary carotenoid, a biomarker of carotenoid status and the association between the two. Sixteen articles from 13 studies were included with the majority cross-sectional in design ( n = 9). Some studies used multiple dietary assessment methods with the most common: food records ( n = 7), 24-h diet recalls ( n = 5), food frequency questionnaires ( n = 3) and diet quality assessed by dietary screener ( n = 1). Two studies were directly web based, with four studies using technology that could be completed offline and data later transferred. Two studies utilised technology in the collection of dietary data, while the majority ( n = 11) automated the collection in combination with nutrient analysis of the dietary data. Four studies provided correlation values between dietary carotenoids with biomarkers, ranging from r = 0.13 to 0.62 with the remaining studies comparing a measure of fruit and vegetable intake with biomarkers ( r = 0.09 to 0.25). This review provides an overview of technology-based dietary assessment methods that have been used in validation studies with objectively measured carotenoids. Findings were positive with these dietary assessment measures showing mostly moderate associations with carotenoid biomarkers.

  4. A Systematic Review of Technology-Based Dietary Intake Assessment Validation Studies That Include Carotenoid Biomarkers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tracy L. Burrows

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Technological advances have allowed for the evolution of traditional dietary assessment methods. The aim of this review is to evaluate the accuracy of technology-based dietary assessment methods to determine carotenoid and/or fruit and vegetable intake when compared with carotenoid biomarkers. An online search strategy was undertaken to identify studies published in the English language up to July 2016. Inclusion criteria were adults ≥18 years, a measure of dietary intake that used information and communication technologies that specified fruit and/or vegetable intake or dietary carotenoid, a biomarker of carotenoid status and the association between the two. Sixteen articles from 13 studies were included with the majority cross-sectional in design (n = 9. Some studies used multiple dietary assessment methods with the most common: food records (n = 7, 24-h diet recalls (n = 5, food frequency questionnaires (n = 3 and diet quality assessed by dietary screener (n = 1. Two studies were directly web based, with four studies using technology that could be completed offline and data later transferred. Two studies utilised technology in the collection of dietary data, while the majority (n = 11 automated the collection in combination with nutrient analysis of the dietary data. Four studies provided correlation values between dietary carotenoids with biomarkers, ranging from r = 0.13 to 0.62 with the remaining studies comparing a measure of fruit and vegetable intake with biomarkers (r = 0.09 to 0.25. This review provides an overview of technology-based dietary assessment methods that have been used in validation studies with objectively measured carotenoids. Findings were positive with these dietary assessment measures showing mostly moderate associations with carotenoid biomarkers.

  5. Digital Creativity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersson Brooks, Eva; Brooks, Anthony Lewis

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports on a study exploring the outcomes from children’s play with technology in early childhood learning practices. The paper addresses questions related to how digital technology can foster creativity in early childhood learning environments. It consists of an analysis of children......’s interaction with the KidSmart furniture focusing on digital creativity potentials and play values suggested by the technology. The study applied a qualitative approach and included125 children (aged three to five), 10 pedagogues, and two librarians. The results suggests that educators should sensitively...... consider intervening when children are interacting with technology, and rather put emphasize into the integration of the technology into the environment and to the curriculum in order to shape playful structures for children’s digital creativity....

  6. Investigating the pros and cons of digital technologies | IDRC ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Did you know that people in some countries sacrifice bread and milk to buy mobile phone credit?” asks 2015 IDRC Research Award recipient Katie Clancy. This is one of the insights she gained while investigating whether hackathons could generate long-term technological solutions to development issues. “There are really ...

  7. Inclusive Digital Technologies for People with Communication Disabilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Konnerup, Ulla

    2018-01-01

    inclusion and empowering people with communication difficulties are offered. However, more knowledge about how learners with special challenges benefit from ICT in their communication and learning and what kind of technology that qualify rehabilitation is needed. Based on research with people suffering from...

  8. Report on Disclosure Issues Related to the Use of Copy Control and Digital Rights Management Technologies. OECD Digital Economy Papers, No. 115

    Science.gov (United States)

    OECD Publishing (NJ1), 2006

    2006-01-01

    This report analyses the disclosure issues raised by technically-imposed restrictions on the use of digital content. It focuses on the application of copy control and digital rights management technologies in three areas: copy-protected CDs; online music, and DVD regional coding. In each of these areas, the report examines the kinds of…

  9. The application of digital image plane holography technology to identify Chinese herbal medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Huaying; Guo, Zhongjia; Liao, Wei; Zhang, Zhihui

    2012-03-01

    In this paper, the imaging technology of digital image plane holography to identify the Chinese herbal medicine is studied. The optical experiment system of digital image plane holography which is the special case of pre-magnification digital holography was built. In the record system, one is an object light by using plane waves which illuminates the object, and the other one is recording hologram by using spherical light wave as reference light. There is a Micro objective lens behind the object. The second phase factor which caus ed by the Micro objective lens can be eliminated by choosing the proper position of the reference point source when digital image plane holography is recorded by spherical light. In this experiment, we use the Lygodium cells and Onion cells as the object. The experiment results with Lygodium cells and Onion cells show that digital image plane holography avoid the process of finding recording distance by using auto-focusing approach, and the phase information of the object can be reconstructed more accurately. The digital image plane holography is applied to the microscopic imaging of cells more effectively, and it is suit to apply for the identify of Chinese Herbal Medicine. And it promotes the application of digital holographic in practice.

  10. A study on the quantitative evaluation for the software included in digital systems of nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, J. K.; Sung, T. Y.; Eom, H. S.; Jeong, H. S.; Kang, H. G.; Lee, K. Y.; Park, J. K. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejeon (Korea)

    2002-03-01

    In general, probabilistic safety analysis (PSA) has been used as one of the most important methods to evaluate the safety of NPPs. The PSA, because most of NPPs have been installed and used analog I and C systems, has been performed based on the hardware perspectives. In addition, since the tendency to use digital I and C systems including software instead of analog I and C systems is increasing, the needs of quantitative evaluation methods so as to perform PSA are also increasing. Nevertheless, several reasons such as software did not aged and it is very perplexed to estimate software failure rate due to its non-linearity, make the performance of PSA difficult. In this study, in order to perform PSA including software more efficiently, test-based software reliability estimation methods are reviewed to suggest a preliminary procedure that can provide reasonable guidances to quantify software failure rate. In addition, requisite activities to enhance applicability of the suggested procedure are also discussed. 67 refs., 11 figs., 5 tabs. (Author)

  11. Digital technologies, participatory learning and the transformation of students’ conduct of everyday life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schraube, Ernst

    The teaching and learning spaces at universities are in transformation. With the incorporation of electronic technologies like ipads, smart boards and electronic platforms like “moodle” new digital spaces are emerging in educational practices. These technological spaces are not only useful tools...... expanding human activities, they are also powerful socio-political “forms of life” (Langdon Winner) transforming fundamentally the practice of teaching and learning as well as the students’ conduct of everyday life. The paper explores the meaning of digital learning spaces at universities (especially......, the paper examines the contradictory forms of participation materialized in digital learning spaces and explores how they might relate to the development of expansive learning....

  12. Inclusive Digital Technologies for People with Communication Disabilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Konnerup, Ulla

    2018-01-01

    Suffering from communication disabilities limits a person’s ability to participate in communicative and social interactions, public democratic debates and learning activities. The possibility of trying out ideas and opinions is weakened and it might have an impact on the ability to tell one’s life......, it is likely that your intellectual level will gradually decrease. Advances in information and communication technologies (ICT), such as smartphones, tablets, and Internet connectivity, have contributed to the integration of many aspects of communication and learning strategies. Thus, new methods to enhance...... inclusion and empowering people with communication difficulties are offered. However, more knowledge about how learners with special challenges benefit from ICT in their communication and learning and what kind of technology that qualify rehabilitation is needed. Based on research with people suffering from...

  13. Subsystem of statistic indicators for characterizing the digital technology

    OpenAIRE

    Dana COLIBABA; Giani GRADINARU; Irina ISAIC MANIU

    2006-01-01

    The technology, in close connection with TIC, might constitute the main source of economic growth in Romania. It allows individuals as well as firms from the public and private sector to beneficiate from the opportunity of participating to socio-economic life, to gain the necessary abilities for evolving in the knowledge society, to develop new business strategies and to experiment the techniques provided by the electronic ruling

  14. Investigation of Virtual Digital Human and Robotic Device Technology Merger Complimented by Haptics and Autostereoscopic Displays, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed innovations conform precisely to the technology needs described in Subtopic T5.02, Robotics and Virtual Digital Human Technologies. ?Two potential areas...

  15. The Accessibility of Learning Content for All Students, Including Students with Disabilities, Must Be Addressed in the Shift to Digital Instructional Materials. SETDA Policy Brief

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, Geoff; Levin, Doug; Lipper, Katherine; Leichty, Reg

    2014-01-01

    This is a time of rapid technological advancement, with innovations in education holding great promise for improving teaching and learning, particularly for students with unique needs. High-quality digital educational materials, tools, and resources offer students relevant, up-to-date, and innovative ways to acquire knowledge and skills. Created…

  16. Object-Based Teaching and Learning for a Critical Assessment of Digital Technologies in Arts and Cultural Heritage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, M.; Garside, D.; Nelson, T.; Robson, S.; Weyrich, T.

    2017-08-01

    As cultural sector practice becomes increasingly dependent on digital technologies for the production, display, and dissemination of art and material heritage, it is important that those working in the sector understand the basic scientific principles underpinning these technologies and the social, political and economic implications of exploiting them. The understanding of issues in cultural heritage preservation and digital heritage begins in the education of the future stakeholders and the innovative integration of technologies into the curriculum. This paper gives an example of digital technology skills embedded into a module in the interdisciplinary UCL Bachelor of Arts and Sciences, named "Technologies in Arts and Cultural Heritage", at University College London.

  17. The Digital Economy: Social Interaction Technologies – an Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teófilo Redondo

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Social interaction technologies (SIT is a very broad field that encompasses a large list of topics: interactive and networked computing, mobile social services and the Social Web, social software and social media, marketing and advertising, various aspects and uses of blogs and podcasting, corporate value and web-based collaboration, e-government and online democracy, virtual volunteering, different aspects and uses of folksonomies, tagging and the social semantic cloud of tags, blog-based knowledge management systems, systems of online learning, with their ePortfolios, blogs and wikis in education and journalism, legal issues and social interaction technology, dataveillance and online fraud, neogeography, social software usability, social software in libraries and nonprofit organizations, and broadband visual communication technology for enhancing social interaction. The fact is that the daily activities of many businesses are being socialized, as is the case with Yammer (https://www.yammer.com/, the social enterprise social network. The leitmotivs of social software are: create, connect, contribute, and collaborate.

  18. Digital technology use in ELT classrooms and self-directed learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nehir Sert

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The digital era is a new challenge for teachers. While children get acquainted with digital technology before the age of six, teachers, who have encountered the digital world at a later time in their lives, struggle with it. Self-directed learning, which is crucial for lifelong learning, can be enhanced by the use of technology within and beyond classroom settings. The aim of this study was to examine the difference between the perceptions of students in low- and high-income groups about their use of technology in a general sense and their teachers’ use of technology in ELT classrooms. It also tested the correlation between the perceptions of their self-directed learning behaviours and their own/their teachers’ technology use. The population of the study consisted of 75 students from high- and 70 students from low-income groups. Causal comparative and correlational research methods were adopted in the study. The surveys to measure the students’ perceptions about technology use were developed by the researchers. A scale, established by Demirtas and Sert (2010, was used to identify the level of self-directed learning views of the students. The data were collected at the beginning of the first term of the 2015-2016 school year. The results indicated that there was no significant difference between perceptions of the low- and high-income students regarding their own technology use. Likewise, perceptions of the low- and high-income students did not differ regarding their teachers’ technology use. There was no correlation between the perceptions of the low-/high-income mixed group regarding their use of technology and their teachers’ use of technology. Lastly, self-directed learning perceptions of the low-/high-income mixed group did not correlate with their perceptions on any aspects of technology use. The educational implications of these results were discussed and suggestions were put forward in order to produce more effective learning

  19. Exploring the Digital Divide: The Use of Digital Technologies in Ontario Public Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bodong

    2015-01-01

    Combining data from a school principal survey with student demographics and achievement data, the present study aimed to develop a much needed understanding of ICT usage in Ontario's K-12 public schools. Results indicated equitable first-order access to technology for schools, early integration of ICT from the earliest grades, frequent application…

  20. Digital Technologies and the Mediation of Undergraduate Students' Collaborative Music Compositional Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobson, Elizabeth; Littleton, Karen

    2016-01-01

    Music education is supported by an increasing range of digital technologies that afford a remarkable divergence of opportunities for learning within the classroom. Musical creativities are not, however, limited to classroom situations; all musicians are engaged in work that traverses multiple social and physical settings. Guided by sociocultural…

  1. Using Digital Technologies to Support Self-Directed Learning for Preservice Teacher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bullock, Shawn Michael

    2013-01-01

    This article begins with the perspective that teacher education programmes are cultural institutions and are thus compelled to respond to the societal push for teachers to be conversant in so-called twenty-first-century skills, grounded primarily in the ability to use digital technologies for pedagogical purposes. The results of an attempt to…

  2. Young Children (0-8) and Digital Technology : A qualitative exploratory study across seven countries

    OpenAIRE

    CHAUDRON STEPHANE; LAGAE KAAT

    2015-01-01

    Key findings of the JRC's research Young Children (0-8) and Digital Technology : A qualitative exploratory study across seven countries for the Research Highlights series on behalf of the Evidence Group (EG) of the UK Council on Child Internet Safety

  3. Designing a Deeply Digital Science Curriculum: Supporting Teacher Learning and Implementation with Organizing Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leary, Heather; Severance, Samuel; Penuel, William R.; Quigley, David; Sumner, Tamara; Devaul, Holly

    2016-01-01

    This paper examines the impacts of technology (e.g., Chromebooks, Google Drive) on teacher learning and student activity in the development and implementation of a deeply digital high school biology unit. Using design-based implementation research, teachers co-designed with researchers and curriculum specialists a student-centered unit aligned to…

  4. Renewing the Debate: Digital Technology in Art Therapy and the Creative Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, Brian D.

    2009-01-01

    This viewpoint reviews several historical positions on the relationship between technology and creativity, and their implications for the practice of art therapy in the techno-digital age. The author posits that the question remains unanswered as to whether the profession will accept and become fully proficient in the use of the computer as a true…

  5. Digital Games as Educational Technology: Promise and Challenges in the Use of Games to Teach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobias, Sigmund; Fletcher, J. Dexter; Chen, Fei

    2015-01-01

    Digital games were reviewed as an emerging tool in educational technology. Factors such as instructional effectiveness, time on task, relationship to curricula, student socio-economic status, violence in games, and game mechanics were considered. Despite considerable variability among studies, larger overall effect sizes for the impact of games on…

  6. Digital Technology in the Visual Arts Classroom: An [un]Easy Partnership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilks, Judith; Cutcher, Alexandra; Wilks, Susan

    2012-01-01

    This article scrutinizes the dichotomy of the uneasy and easy partnerships that exist between digital technology and visual arts education. The claim that by putting computers into schools "we have bought 'one half of a product'... we've bought the infrastructure and the equipment but we haven't bought the educational…

  7. Learning in the Early Years: Social Interactions around Picturebooks, Puzzles and Digital Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eagle, Sarah

    2012-01-01

    This paper develops an approach to thinking about young children, digital technologies and learning, drawing on research literature that relates children's learning to the use of books, and on literature that discusses the nature of interaction between adults and children and its relationship to children's learning. An analysis is given of parents…

  8. Facilitating English-Language Learners' Oral Reading Fluency with Digital Pen Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chih-Ming; Tan, Chia-Chen; Lo, Bey-Jane

    2016-01-01

    Oral reading fluency is an indicator of overall reading competence. Many studies have claimed that repeated reading can promote oral reading fluency. Currently, novel Web- or computer-based reading technologies offer interactive digital materials that promote English oral reading fluency using the repeated reading strategy; however, paper-based…

  9. Digital technology and mid-adopting teachers’ professional development : a case study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drijvers, Paul|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/074302922; Tacoma, Sietske|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/411923080; Mol, Amy; Heuvel, C. van den; Doorman, Michiel|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/126974764; Boon, Peter|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/203374207

    2014-01-01

    The integration of digital technology into secondary mathematics education is not yet a widespread success. As teachers are crucial players in this integration, an important challenge is not only to attract early adopters, but also to support mid-adopting teachers in their professional development

  10. Investigating the Learning Challenges Presented by Digital Technologies to the College of Education in Kuwait University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldhafeeri, Fayiz; Male, Trevor

    2016-01-01

    There is now widespread recognition that digital technologies, particularly portable hand held devices capable of Internet connection, present opportunities and challenges to the way in which student learning is organized in schools, colleges and institutions of higher education in the 21st Century. Traxler, "Journal of the Research Centre…

  11. Investigating Parents' Attitudes towards Digital Technology Use in Early Childhood: A Case Study from Croatia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikelic Preradovic, Nives; Lešin, Gordana; Šagud, Mirjana

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate perceptions of parents in Croatia towards advantages and disadvantages of computer use in general as well as their children's computer use and to reveal parents' concerns and opinions about digital technology (DT) education in kindergarten. The paper reports on research findings from one of the large public…

  12. Exploring the Impact of Digital Technologies on Professional Responsibilities and Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenwick, Tara; Edwards, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Digital technologies in combination with "big" data and predictive analytics are having a significant impact upon professional practices at individual, organisational, national and international levels. The interplay of code, algorithms and big data are increasingly pervasive in the governing, leadership and practices of different…

  13. "Happy and Excited": Perceptions of Using Digital Technology and Social Media by Young People Who Use Augmentative and Alternative Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hynan, Amanda; Murray, Janice; Goldbart, Juliet

    2014-01-01

    Young people are using digital technology and online social media within their everyday lives to enrich their social relationships. The UK government believes that using digital technology can improve social inclusion. One well-recognized outcome measure for establishing social inclusion is to examine opportunities for self-determination.…

  14. Exploring the Digital Divide: The Use of Digital Technologies in Ontario Public Schools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bodong Chen

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Combining data from a school principal survey with student demographics and achievement data, the present study aimed to develop a much needed understanding of ICT usage in Ontario’s K-12 public schools. Results indicated equitable first-order access to technology for schools, early integration of ICT from the earliest grades, frequent application of ICT in teaching, and an enabling effect of ICT on additional access to learning resources and distance learning. However, challenges were also uncovered in building technology infrastructure for a small fraction of schools; ensuring home access for schools with lower family incomes, smaller size or from remote regions; and providing teachers with professional development for choosing online materials and adopting emerging ICT-enabled teaching practice. Furthermore, this study highlighted the importance of parent involvement in ICT usage and the potential beneficial linkage between ICT usage and student learning achievement.

  15. The effectiveness of technology-based strategies to promote engagement with digital interventions: a systematic review protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkhaldi, Ghadah; Hamilton, Fiona L; Lau, Rosa; Webster, Rosie; Michie, Susan; Murray, Elizabeth

    2015-04-28

    Digital interventions provide effective and potentially cost-effective models for improving health outcomes as they deliver health information and services that are widely disseminated, confidential, and can be tailored to needs of the individual user. Digital interventions have been used successfully for health promotion, mental health, and for enabling self-management of long-term conditions. However, their effectiveness is limited by low usage rates, with non-engagement a major challenge. Hence, it is crucial to find effective strategies to increase user engagement with digital interventions. This systematic review will aim to evaluate the effectiveness of technology-based strategies to promote engagement with digital interventions. We will follow Cochrane Collaboration guidelines on systematic review methodology. The search strategy will be executed across seven e-databases (including MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycINFO, CINAHL) using the concepts "digital intervention" and "engagement", limited by study type (randomized controlled trial). Grey literature and reference lists of included studies will be searched. Titles and abstracts will be independently screened by 2 authors. Then the full text of potentially eligible papers will be obtained and double screened. Data from eligible papers will be extracted by 1 author and checked for accuracy by another author. Bias will be assessed using the Cochrane bias assessment tool. Narrative synthesis will report on all included studies, and where appropriate, data will be pooled using meta-analysis. All findings will be reported according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses guidelines. Sources of heterogeneity will be further investigated if required. Our research is in progress. The final draft of the systematic review is being written and will be submitted before the end of 2015. The review findings will inform researchers and digital intervention providers about optimal use of technology

  16. Script of Healthcare Technology: Do Designs of Robotic Beds Exclude or Include Users?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brodersen, Søsser Grith Kragh; Hansen, Meiken; Lindegaard, Hanne

    2015-01-01

    of assistive technologies as design of socio-material assemblies , which include an analysis of the products already used in relation to multiple users, their practices and wishes. In the article we focus on the challenges in the implementation of two types of robotic beds used for disability care...... in a municipality in Denmark. We follow both the caregivers and disabled people’s daily practices. By using Actor Network Theory we explore the socio-material settings and the design challenges. The theoretical concept of ‘script’ is used to investigate how the artifacts (beds) and the multiple users go through...

  17. Contemporary Aspects of Marketing in Clinical Trials Including Segments of IT and Technology Transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamenovic, Milorad; Dobraca, Amra; Smajlovic, Mersiha

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to present the marketing strategy and the application of management (marketing management) and advertising in order to increase the efficiency of innovative approach in clinical trials that include and involve the use of new technologies and transfer of technologies. This paper has a descriptive character and represents a narrative review of the literature and new model implementation. Marketing models are primarily used to improve the inclusion of a larger (and appropriate) number of patients, but they can be credited for the stay and monitoring of patients in the trial. Regulatory mechanisms play an important role in the application of various marketing strategies within clinical trials. The value for the patient as the most important stakeholder is defined in the field of clinical trials according to Kotler's value model for the consumer. In order to achieve the best results it is important to adequately examine all the elements of clinical trials and apply this knowledge in creation of a marketing plan that will be made in accordance with the legal regulations defined globally and locally. In this paper, two challenges have been highlighted for the adequate application of marketing tools in the field of clinical trials, namely: defining business elements in order to provide an adequate marketing approach for clinical trials and technology transfer and ensuring uniformity and regulatory affirmation of marketing attitudes in clinical trials in all regions in which they are carried out in accordance with ICH-GCP and valid regulations.

  18. Ethical perspectives on recommending digital technology for patients with mental illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Michael; Glenn, Tasha; Monteith, Scott; Bauer, Rita; Whybrow, Peter C; Geddes, John

    2017-12-01

    The digital revolution in medicine not only offers exciting new directions for the treatment of mental illness, but also presents challenges to patient privacy and security. Changes in medicine are part of the complex digital economy based on creating value from analysis of behavioral data acquired by the tracking of daily digital activities. Without an understanding of the digital economy, recommending the use of technology to patients with mental illness can inadvertently lead to harm. Behavioral data are sold in the secondary data market, combined with other data from many sources, and used in algorithms that automatically classify people. These classifications are used in commerce and government, may be discriminatory, and result in non-medical harm to patients with mental illness. There is also potential for medical harm related to poor quality online information, self-diagnosis and self-treatment, passive monitoring, and the use of unvalidated smartphone apps. The goal of this paper is to increase awareness and foster discussion of the new ethical issues. To maximize the potential of technology to help patients with mental illness, physicians need education about the digital economy, and patients need help understanding the appropriate use and limitations of online websites and smartphone apps.

  19. Transitions in the wrong direction? Digital technologies and daily life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Røpke, Inge; Christensen, Toke Haunstrup

    2013-01-01

    . The purpose of this paper is to complement the existing research by applying a perspective in which everyday life takes centre stage. A theoretical framework for describing and analysing the energy impacts of everyday life is outlined, based on a combination of practice theory and time geography....... The framework is applied to a discussion of how ICT co-develops with changing everyday practices and energy-demanding features of everyday life. Based on empirical findings, we explore how the use of ICT affects practices in relation to time and space, and it is argued that observed changes may increase energy......The environmental implications of information and communication technology (ICT) have been the subject of study since the early 1990s. Although previous research covers energy issues quite extensively, the treatment of the energy impacts of ICT integration in everyday life is still inadequate...

  20. Digital Care in Epilepsy: A Conceptual Framework for Technological Therapies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rupert Page

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Epilepsy is associated with a significant increase in morbidity and mortality. The likelihood is significantly greater for those patients with specific risk factors. Identifying those at greatest risk of injury and providing expert management from the earliest opportunity is made more challenging by the circumstances in which many such patients present. Despite increasing recognition of the importance of earlier identification of those at risk, there is little or no improvement in outcomes over more than 30 years. Despite ever increasing sophistication of drug development and delivery, there has been no meaningful improvement in 1-year seizure freedom rates over this time. However, in the last few years, there has been an increase in patient-triggered interventions based on automated monitoring of indicators and risk factors facilitated by technological advances. The opportunities such approaches provide will only be realized if accompanied by current working practice changes. Replacing traditional follow-up appointments at arbitrary intervals with dynamic interventions, remotely and at the point and place of need provides a better chance of a substantial reduction in seizures for people with epilepsy. Properly implemented, electronic platforms can offer new opportunities to provide expert advice and management from first presentation thus improving outcomes. This perspective paper provides and proposes an informed critical opinion built on current evidence base of an outline techno-therapeutic approach to harnesses these technologies. This conceptual framework is generic, rather than tied to a specific product or solution, and the same generalized approach could be beneficially applied to other long-term conditions.

  1. Design of coordinated controller in nuclear power plant based on digital instrument and control technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng Shouyu; Peng Minjun; Liu Xinkai; Zhao Qiang; Deng Xiangxin

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear power plant (NPP) is a multi-input and multi-output, no-linear and time-varying complex system. The conventional PID controller is usually used in NPP control system which is based on analog instrument. The system parameters are easy to overshoot and the response time is longer in the control mode of the conventional PID. In order to improve this condition, a new coordinated control strategy which is based on expert system and the original controllers in the digital instrument and control technology was presented. In order to verify and validate it, the proposed coordinated control technology was tested by the full-scope real-time simulation system. The results prove that using digital instrument and control technology to achieve coordinated controller is feasible, the coordinated controller can effectively improve the dynamic operating characteristics of the system, and the coordinated controller is superior to the conventional PID controller in control performance. (authors)

  2. The place of digital technology on the IEA's energy road-maps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ben-Naceur, Kamel

    2017-01-01

    The International Energy Agency (IEA) has drafted road-maps for the next four decades in collaboration with public and private producers and consumers of energy. For each type of energy, these road-maps indicate the key elements for compliance with the objectives of the Paris Climate Agreement. They emphasize the role of digital technology, in particular smart grids, in the transition toward a more digital and more intelligent energy system. The conditions necessary for successfully transforming this sector are mapped out, while attention is called to the risks inherent in this transition

  3. Diagnostic imaging, a 'parallel' discipline. Can current technology provide a reliable digital diagnostic radiology department

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, C.J.; Eddleston, B.

    1985-01-01

    Only recently has any detailed criticism been voiced about the practicalities of the introduction of generalised, digital, imaging complexes in diagnostic radiology. Although attendant technological problems are highlighted the authors argue that the fundamental causes of current difficulties are not in the generation but in the processing, filing and subsequent retrieval for display of digital image records. In the real world, looking at images is a parallel process of some complexity and so it is perhaps untimely to expect versatile handling of vast image data bases by existing computer hardware and software which, by their current nature, perform tasks serially. (author)

  4. Digital educational technology for professional nursing education at the high-school level

    OpenAIRE

    Fernanda dos Santos Nogueira Góes; Rosângela Andrade Aukar de Camargo; Cristina Yuri Nakata Hara; Luciana Mara Monti Fonseca

    2014-01-01

    The current study identifies what has been produced in literature regarding the use of digital educational technology for professional nursing education at the high-school level. An integrative literature review was carried out using the descriptors “Computer Assisted Instruction,” “Software,” “Educational Technology,” “Professional Education” and “Nursing,” published between 2000 and 2013. We found 99 publications, out of which 08 were analyzed. We observed that technological development has...

  5. Parenting approaches and digital technology use of preschool age children in a Chinese community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Cynthia Sau Ting; Fowler, Cathrine; Lam, Winsome Yuk Yin; Wong, Ho Ting; Wong, Charmaine Hei Man; Yuen Loke, Alice

    2014-05-07

    Young children are using digital technology (DT) devices anytime and anywhere, especially with the invention of smart phones and the replacement of desktop computers with digital tablets. Although research has shown that parents play an important role in fostering and supporting preschoolers' developing maturity and decisions about DT use, and in protecting them from potential risk due to excessive DT exposure, there have been limited studies conducted in Hong Kong focusing on parent-child DT use. This study had three objectives: 1) to explore parental use of DTs with their preschool children; 2) to identify the DT content that associated with child behavioral problems; and 3) to investigate the relationships between approaches adopted by parents to control children's DT use and related preschooler behavioral problems. This exploratory quantitative study was conducted in Hong Kong with 202 parents or guardians of preschool children between the ages of 3 and 6 attending kindergarten. The questionnaire was focused on four aspects, including 1) participants' demographics; 2) pattern of DT use; 3) parenting approach to manage the child's DT use; and 4) child behavioral and health problems related to DT use. Multiple regression analysis was adopted as the main data analysis method for identifying the DT or parental approach-related predictors of the preschooler behavioral problems. In the multiple linear regression model, the 'restrictive approach score' was the only predictor among the three parental approaches (B:1.66, 95% CI: [0.21, 3.11], p parents play a crucial role in fostering appropriate and safe DT use. It is suggested that parents practice a combination of restrictive, instructive and co-using approaches, rather than a predominately restrictive approach, to facilitate their child's growth and development. Further studies are needed to explore the parent-child relationship and parents' self-efficacy when managing the parent-child DT use, to develop

  6. Practical virtue ethics: healthcare whistleblowing and portable digital technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolsin, S; Faunce, T; Oakley, J

    2005-10-01

    Medical school curricula and postgraduate education programmes expend considerable resources teaching medical ethics. Simultaneously, whistleblowers' agitation continues, at great personal cost, to prompt major intrainstitutional and public inquiries that reveal problems with the application of medical ethics at particular clinical "coalfaces". Virtue ethics, emphasising techniques promoting an agent's character and instructing their conscience, has become a significant mode of discourse in modern medical ethics. Healthcare whistleblowers, whose complaints are reasonable, made in good faith, in the public interest, and not vexatious, we argue, are practising those obligations of professional conscience foundational to virtue based medical ethics. Yet, little extant virtue ethics scholarship seriously considers the theoretical foundations of healthcare whistleblowing. The authors examine whether healthcare whistleblowing should be considered central to any medical ethics emphasising professional virtues and conscience. They consider possible causes for the paucity of professional or academic interest in this area and examine the counterinfluence of a continuing historical tradition of guild mentality professionalism that routinely places relationships with colleagues ahead of patient safety.Finally, it is proposed that a virtue based ethos of medical professionalism, exhibiting transparency and sincerity with regard to achieving uniform quality and safety of health care, may be facilitated by introducing a technological imperative using portable computing devices. Their use by trainees, focused on ethical competence, provides the practical face of virtue ethics in medical education and practice. Indeed, it assists in transforming the professional conscience of whistleblowing into a practical, virtue based culture of self reporting and personal development.

  7. Improving the Learning Experience by Harnessing Digital Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panagiota Koulouvari R.

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The paper will explore how a social media based E-learning 2.0 solution for formal learning (social IS can be implemented, focusing on the technology acceptance process. The paper aims to increase the knowledge on how the acceptance regarding social media based E-learning 2.0 information systems for formal learning can be increased and how the acceptance affects the social learning experience. To achieve this, the paper relies on both a qualitative and quantitative approach and is primarily inductive. The paper concludes that the acceptance cannot be seen as a linear process, as is common practice. Instead, one should see the process of acceptance as interlinked with the experience and external variables in a continuous process that can either ‘spiral’ upwards or downwards. Furthermore, the paper identifies the problem of innovation resistance. The paper then analyzes information gathered from industry experts, practitioners and a live case to find how one can improve acceptance and thereby the social learning experience. Once these variables have been identified the paper presents strategic advice. The paper ends by a discussion of the results, both regarding the impact and contrast to previous research as well as highlighting areas for further research

  8. Putting agricultural equipment and digital technologies at the cutting edge of agroecology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bellon Maurel Véronique

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The agro-ecological transition is an ambitious challenge. It can be met by implementing the fundamentals of agroecology (use of biodiversity, integration of agriculture in landscapes, closure of flow loops in the context of a broad and renewed offer of technologies: agro-equipment, biotechnology, digital technologies… This article explores the role that agro-equipment and digital services can play in this transition. These technologies contribute through various levers to the agro-ecological transition: by improving farming efficiency (more service rendered for the same environmental impact, by precision farming (adaptation of the operations to the needs of the plant or the animal based on a monitoring–diagnosis–recommendation cycle and by the development of specialized machinery helping the farmer to achieve “flow loop-closing” (at the plot level, by maintaining the soil quality, or at the farm level, with the recycling of organic effluents or to take advantage of biodiversity (e.g., with agro-equipment adapted to mixed crops. The technological bricks that are requested and for which advances are expected are: sensors (to measure plant or animal needs and associated digital technologies (information transfer, data processing, precision technologies for input application, robotics, specialized machines to manage soil cover and weeds, or for agroforestry. The brakes and engines for innovation in agro-equipment are studied. The brakes are the generally small structure of the farm manufacturing companies, the deficit of the demand from farmers and the complexity − either real or perceived − of these equipments. To encourage innovation, several levers are to be used: involving users in the design of agro-equipments, creating financial incentives for innovative equipment purchase, and training end-users, prescribers and dealers to the high potential of these new technologies. In conclusion, putting agro-equipment and digital technology

  9. Digital video technology and production 101: lights, camera, action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliot, Diane L; Goldberg, Linn; Goldberg, Michael J

    2014-01-01

    Videos are powerful tools for enhancing the reach and effectiveness of health promotion programs. They can be used for program promotion and recruitment, for training program implementation staff/volunteers, and as elements of an intervention. Although certain brief videos may be produced without technical assistance, others often require collaboration and contracting with professional videographers. To get practitioners started and to facilitate interactions with professional videographers, this Tool includes a guide to the jargon of video production and suggestions for how to integrate videos into health education and promotion work. For each type of video, production principles and issues to consider when working with a professional videographer are provided. The Tool also includes links to examples in each category of video applications to health promotion.

  10. NASA-LaRc Flight-Critical Digital Systems Technology Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meissner, C. W., Jr. (Editor); Dunham, J. R. (Editor); Crim, G. (Editor)

    1989-01-01

    The outcome is documented of a Flight-Critical Digital Systems Technology Workshop held at NASA-Langley December 13 to 15 1988. The purpose of the workshop was to elicit the aerospace industry's view of the issues which must be addressed for the practical realization of flight-critical digital systems. The workshop was divided into three parts: an overview session; three half-day meetings of seven working groups addressing aeronautical and space requirements, system design for validation, failure modes, system modeling, reliable software, and flight test; and a half-day summary of the research issues presented by the working group chairmen. Issues that generated the most consensus across the workshop were: (1) the lack of effective design and validation methods with support tools to enable engineering of highly-integrated, flight-critical digital systems, and (2) the lack of high quality laboratory and field data on system failures especially due to electromagnetic environment (EME).

  11. Digital Disconnect or Digital Difference? A Socio-Ecological Perspective on Young Children's Technology Use in the Home and the Early Childhood Centre

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Susan; Henderson, Michael; Gronn, Donna; Scott, Anne; Mirkhil, Moska

    2017-01-01

    A digital disconnect perspective is founded on an assumption that technology use in the home is frequent, creative and generative, and that technology use in the early childhood centre should be the same as that found in the home. However, such arguments divert our attention from understanding the nature of the setting and thereby from an…

  12. On the Brain Basis of Digital Daze in Millennial Minds: Rejoinder to "Digital Technology and Student Cognitive Development: The Neuroscience of the University Classroom"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Timothy T.

    2016-01-01

    In this issue, Cavanaugh, Giapponi, and Golden (2016) have discussed the new prominent role of digital devices in the lives of students; the possible impact of these widely-used technologies on developing, learning minds; and the relevance of new cognitive neuroscience research and technologies for better understanding the potential effects of…

  13. Investigating the Application of Semantic Technology to Organize Information in Digital Library Software Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simin Hajiahmadi

    2017-06-01

    The results indicated that digital libraries with respect to the application of semantic technology were not in good condition; therefore, they need to take all the weaknesses identified in this study into consideration. Software for IT architecture requires layers of meaning beyond their original design. In addition, regarding the languages implemented, semantic technology had very poor performance and none of the tools had this new technology to develop and implement. The majority of the tools employed were also in the initial stage of recognition. In many cases, information sources were kept outside of the databases and they had only text files for full-text search. On the whole, the software systems studied here were at the same level although they sometimes surpassed each other. The present study not only developed a checklist of the application of semantic technologies to organize information software digital library based on relevant literature and the experts, but also can make digital library software developers aware of their strengths and weaknesses, and the criteria and factors existing in this area in addition to the importance of each of them to help them in their own design and production in the future.

  14. Multimodal methodologies for analyzing preschool children’s engagements with digital technologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chimirri, Niklas Alexander

    Recent research on the role of technologies and specifically digital technologies in pedagogy has engaged in re-reading Vygotsky’s opus with a focus on the technological mediatedness of personal and collective development. Among other issues, it questions the differentiation between tools and signs...... and between reality and virtuality. In its stead, it suggests understanding technologies as mediating devices or artifacts, which offer the possibility to communicate with others for the sake of negotiating and actualizing imaginations together, for the sake of transforming pedagogical practice...... and the technologies it builds on collectively. Particularly when it comes to actively engaging in such a collective transformation as a researcher together with young children, the above conceptual reformulation poses a number of methodological challenges. For instance it remains unclear how the perspectives...

  15. Meeting the "Digital Natives": Understanding the Acceptance of Technology in Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Xiaoqing; Zhu, Yuankun; Guo, Xiaofeng

    2013-01-01

    The past few decades have witnessed the rapid development of information and communication technology around the world, as well as continuing efforts to introduce technology into K12 schools. To gauge the success of integrating technology into classrooms, how end users, including teachers and students, accept and use technology while overcoming a…

  16. 32 CFR 37.875 - Should my TIA include a provision concerning foreign access to technology?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... preclude the establishment of domestic sources of the technology for defense purposes. Financial and... foreign access to technology? 37.875 Section 37.875 National Defense Department of Defense OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE DoD GRANT AND AGREEMENT REGULATIONS TECHNOLOGY INVESTMENT AGREEMENTS Award Terms...

  17. 76 FR 2144 - Quest Diagnostics, Inc. Information Technology Help Desk Services Including On-Site Leased...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-12

    ... Employment and Training Administration Quest Diagnostics, Inc. Information Technology Help Desk Services...., Information Technology Help Desk Services, West Norriton, Pennsylvania. The workers are engaged in activities... Technology Help Desk ] Services. The Department has determined that these workers were sufficiently under the...

  18. Doing Age in a Digitized World—A Material Praxeology of Aging With Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Wanka

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Digital technologies have gained vast relevance in postmodern societies and digital infrastructures are substantially integrated into the everyday lives of older people. This digitization is reframing the norms and practices of later life as well as the social construct of age itself. Despite the increasing amount of studies in the field of aging and technologies, it still lacks theorizing. This paper addresses this deficit, suggesting that the study of aging and technologies could profit from a comprehensive integration of theories from the sociology of aging, critical gerontology, and science-and-technology studies. We aim to make a theoretical contribution to this issue, asking: how is age being done in a digitized world? Applying a praxeological approach to aging and technologies, we firstly examine how theoretical and empirical work has constructed aging with technologies so far and identify its shortcomings. Some of this work so far lacks a proper consideration of social inequalities within these processes, whereas other studies lack a thorough consideration of materialities. Secondly, in an attempt to equally “praxeologize” and “materialize” the study of aging and technologies we develop a theoretical model that aims to overcome these shortcomings. In what we frame as a material praxeology of aging with technology, we are concerned with how age is being done through discursive formations, set into practice through social and material practices and involved in the (reproduction of social inequalities. Enriching a Bordieuan terminology of social fields with notions of non-human agency, this praxeology is founded on three assumptions: (1 Social fields constitute the contexts in which age as a social phenomenon is being done with and through technologies (2 Human and non-human agents are equally involved in this process (3 The actions of the involved agents emerge from an agency distributed among them, and are structured through the

  19. Local markets and digital technologies: Among e-commerce and new forms of conviviality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Robles

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Virtual storefronts, online sales, the enhancement of short and agroecological circuits of production through effective communication policies in social networks, are strategies that many small businesses are now using to value their traditional expertise, paradoxically based on proximity and direct treatment. this article analyzes the role of digital technologies in the re-signification and re-activation of small businesses and traditional markets. the use of digital technologies challenges Internet as an agent of deterritorialization and creation of global culture, in front of the presence of new forms of localization based on the emergence of new forms of conviviality, agroecology and healthy eating.

  20. Application of FPGA technology in packed coding of coal mine digital communication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Y.; Zhang, S.; Wu, Z.; Di, J. [China University of Mining and Technology (China)

    1996-12-01

    According to the characteristics of the narrow frequency band in underground mine moving communication, this paper provides an application of FPGA technology to realise an audio packed plan with low digital code rate, and studied and designed a full digital DPCM-ADM compile code device. This plan is based on the distribution probability of different value signals to pack the signals with DPCM method. Then with the characteristics of the different value signal energy concentrated near DC, an ADM method is used to realise the secondary packing of the audio signals from 64K bit to 8k bit. With an advanced EPCM technology, computers can be used for a circuit design, adjustment and simulation output. The design will have a simple adjustment, small volume, low energy consumption, high reliability and other features. 4 refs., 3 figs.

  1. Teacher identity formation in nursing teacher training: reflection mediated by digital technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parigi, Dayane Mayara Gambini; Tomazelli, Priscila Caccer; Almeida, Denise Maria de; Vaz, Débora Rodrigues; Heimann, Candice; Prado, Cláudia

    2015-12-01

    Objective Analyze the teacher identity formation process from the perspective of the past, present and future in the training of nursing teachers through the integration of digital technologies. Method Descriptive, exploratory study, with a qualitative approach, conducted in the on-site class "Teacher Identity Formation" in 2012. Of the synchronous and asynchronous activities, four were analyzed using content analysis. Results In chat, positive and negative impressions and reflections on the formation of one's own identity were identified (six categories); in the "Time tunnel," the projection of future identity (four categories); in the "Portfolio," the perception of one's own identity (four categories); and in the evaluation of the class, the perception of the experiences lived in the class (two categories). Conclusion The integration of digital technologies promoted, in a collaborative way, discussion and understanding by students of how their identity is formed and the projection of their future identity, aligned with the profile and role of teachers demanded in the world of today.

  2. CYBER ADDICTION: THE ROLE OF EMOTIONS IN DEPENDENCE ON DIGITAL TECHNOLOGIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jefferson Cabral Azevedo

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This research apply concepts from different areas, aiming to provide a multicausal and dialogical perspective on the nosologic process of dependence upon digital technologies and the influences of motivational and emotional mechanisms on learning compulsive behaviors. The data is approached both qualitatively and quantitatively, since its analysis covers the conceptual factors obtained from literature review and the development of statistical results obtained from the questionnaires applied. This brief theoretical research pursues to reveal pathological behaviors in the use of digital technologies, especially in the actions of internet users in online social networks. The parameters of neuropsychology, psychology, psychiatry are combined with descriptions contained in the DSM V, Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, and the ICD 10, International Compendium of Diseases.

  3. Digital imaging in diagnostic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newell, J.D. Jr.; Kelsey, C.A.

    1990-01-01

    This monograph on digital imaging provides a basic overview of this field at the present time. This paper covers clinical application, including subtraction angiography; chest radiology; genitourinary, gastrointestinal, and breast radiology; and teleradiology. The chest section also includes an explanation of multiple beam equalization radiography. The remaining chapters discuss some of the technical aspects of digital radiology. It includes the basic technology of digital radiography, image compression, and reconstruction information on the economics of digital radiography

  4. Using Mobile Technology to Enhance Undergraduate Student Digital Information Literacy Skills: A Canadian Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alice Schmidt Hanbidge

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Learning essential information literacy skills through the use of mobile phones is an innovative mlearning pilot project that was collaboratively undertaken in a Canadian university college over the course of two academic terms by faculty and the library staff. The research pilot project involved ninety one undergraduate students in five different classes majoring in psychology, social work, education or social development studies in an attempt to determine the effectiveness of using mobile technology to enhance students’ information literacy skills and learning experiences. Pre and post-test measures, and survey questionnaires generated quantitative and qualitative data that was analyzed to determine the degree of changes in frequency of mobile device information literacy access and fluency in digital literacy skills. The article highlights the Mobile Information Literacy innovation and includes the development and design of the mobile lessons, interactive exercises, and its applications. The study’s main results and conclusions are also discussed. Additionally, the successes and challenges of the pilot to support anytime, anywhere student mobile information literacy eLearning training that engages mobile learners and enhances their learning experience are identified and critically reflected upon to improve the innovation for stage two of the project.

  5. Investigating Parents' Attitudes towards Digital Technology Use in Early Childhood: A Case Study from Croatia

    OpenAIRE

    Nives MIKELIĆ PRERADOVIĆ; Gordana LEŠIN; Mirjana ŠAGUD

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate perceptions of parents in Croatia towards advantages and disadvantages of computer use in general as well as their children's computer use and to reveal parents' concerns and opinions about digital technology (DT) education in kindergarten. The paper reports on research findings from one of the large public kindergartens in the capital city of Croatia. A total of 152 parents of the children aged 3 to 7 enrolled at this early childhood education institut...

  6. Tapping into Technology: Experiencing Music in a Child's Digital World

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajan, Rekha S.

    2014-01-01

    In our growing digital age, young children are inevitably exposed to a variety of technology and media devices. We see 2-year olds taking "selfies" on their parents' phones, iPads and e-readers filled with children's books and games, and thousands of songs stored on iPods for children to listen to and sing along. The ways in…

  7. Application of the Digital Image Technology in the Visual Monitoring and Prediction of Shuttering Construction Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ummin, Okumura; Tian, Han; Zhu, Haiyu; Liu, Fuqiang

    2018-03-01

    Construction safety has always been the first priority in construction process. The common safety problem is the instability of the template support. In order to solve this problem, the digital image measurement technology has been contrived to support real-time monitoring system which can be triggered if the deformation value exceed the specified range. Thus the economic loss could be reduced to the lowest level.

  8. CAD and digital technologies in development of new aesthetics for jewellery and small objects

    OpenAIRE

    Abramicheva, Anastasia

    2017-01-01

    This project investigates contemporary figurations of the Jungian archetype of the trickster. Through my research into various trickster characters, this figure has come to symbolise and highlight changes in contemporary society with a particular emphasis on current technology in the field of jewellery. The digital process of design (CAD) is employed to explore a personal vocabulary of these figures and to investigate the transformations in terms of the meaning that they are given within cont...

  9. A comparative analysis of Photovoltaic Technological Innovation Systems including international dimensions: the cases of Japan and The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vasseur, V.; Kamp, L.M.; Negro, S.O.

    2013-01-01

    This paper investigates the development and diffusion of photovoltaic (PV) technology in Japan and The Netherlands. Both cases are analysed with the Technological Innovation Systems (TIS) framework, which focuses on a particular technology and includes all those factors that influence the

  10. What are the current challenges of managing cancer pain and could digital technologies help?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam, Rosalind; de Bruin, Marijn; Burton, Christopher David; Bond, Christine M; Giatsi Clausen, Maria; Murchie, Peter

    2017-05-29

    Pain remains a problem for people with cancer despite effective treatments being available. We aimed to explore current pain management strategies used by patients, caregivers and professionals and to investigate opportunities for digital technologies to enhance cancer pain management. A qualitative study comprising semistructured interviews and focus groups. Patients with cancer pain, their caregivers and health professionals from Northeast Scotland were recruited from a purposive sample of general practices. Professionals were recruited from regional networks. Fifty one participants took part in 33 interviews (eight patients alone, six patient/caregiver dyads and 19 professionals) and two focus groups (12 professionals). Living with cancer was hard work for patients and caregivers and comparable to a 'full-time job'. Patients had personal goals which involved controlling pain intensity and balancing this with analgesic use, side effects, overall symptom burden and social/physical activities.Digital technologies were embraced by most patients, and made living life with advanced cancer easier and richer (eg, video calls with family). Technology was underutilised for pain and symptom management. There were suggestions that technology could support self-monitoring and communicating problems to professionals, but patients and professionals were concerned about technological monitoring adding to the work of managing illness. Cancer pain management takes place in the context of multiple, sometimes competing personal goals. It is possible that technology could be used to help patients share individual symptom experiences and goals, thus enhancing tailored care. The challenge is for digital solutions to add value without adding undue burden. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  11. Digital pathology in the diagnostic setting: beyond technology into best practice and service management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Chee Leong; Tan, Puay Hoon

    2017-05-01

    Digital pathology (DP) and whole-slide imaging (WSI) technology have matured substantially over the last few years and there is growing evidence from validation studies that WSI is comparable to glass slides for histopathology diagnosis, although with some limitations, which can be appropriately minimised. Whether the controlled environment of validation studies translates to the same level of robustness when WSI is used in the actual diagnostic setting depends on the technical quality of WSI acquisition and on factors that influence the pre-image acquisition variables including the quality of glass slide inputs, and postimage acquisition variables such as access and use of WSI. The concept of 'DP service management' is introduced to fulfil the holistic needs of a laboratory intending to use the DP solution incorporating WSI for diagnostic purposes. The DP service management team should be an integral part of the diagnostic laboratory as it plays a central role undertaking responsibility to address an extensive range of issues from technical and training to governance and accreditation, hence ensuring a viable and sustainable diagnostic DP integration and usage. The pathologist as a specialist in the field and key decision maker of histopathology diagnoses has the duty and responsibility to acquaint and familiarise with DP and WSI when using the technology, especially on their indications and limitations, so as to take full advantage of these tools to enhance diagnostic quality. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  12. The Intelsat digital communication systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phiel, John F., Jr.

    1990-08-01

    Intelsat international communication services resulting from the application of digital technology are summarized. Approximately 40 percent of the 140,000 terrestrial channels from the Public Switched Telephone Networks (PSTN) provided by the Intelsat network are now handled by digital systems. Digital technology for the interconnection of the PSTNs is discussed. Particular attention is paid to modulation and access techniques including the intermediate data rate (IDR) system, and the fixed and satellite switched TDMA systems. Digital compression techniques used with TDMA and IDR, such as digital speech interpolation and digital circuit multiplication, are also discussed. The Intelsat Business Service and the Intelnet Service are described in the framework of digital technology for private networks and business users. Communications for remote areas, international television services, and future opportunities through digital technologies are briefly presented.

  13. Taming Disruptive Technologies, or How To Remain Relevant in the Digital Age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackwell, Philip

    2001-01-01

    Discusses electronic books as a disruptive technology, that is, a technology that has appeal to its users but upsets the traditional models. Highlights include a history of print technology; types of electronic books; reader devices; stakeholders, including users, librarians, and publishers; and how vendors can remain relevant. (LRW)

  14. Professional Development and Use of Digital Technologies by Science Teachers: a Review of Theoretical Frameworks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Geraldo W. Rocha; Rodrigues, António M.; Ferreira, Carlos Alberto

    2018-03-01

    This article aims to characterise the research on science teachers' professional development programs that support the use of Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs) and the main trends concerning the theoretical frameworks (theoretical foundation, literature review or background) that underpin these studies. Through a systematic review of the literature, 76 articles were found and divided into two axes on training science teachers and the use of digital technologies with their categories. The first axis (characterisation of articles) presents the category key features that characterise the articles selected (major subjects, training and actions for the professional development and major ICT tools and digital resources). The second axis (trends of theoretical frameworks) has three categories organised in theoretical frameworks that emphasise the following: (a) the digital technologies, (b) prospects of curricular renewal and (c) cognitive processes. It also characterised a group of articles with theoretical frameworks that contain multiple elements without deepening them or that even lack a theoretical framework that supports the studies. In this review, we found that many professional development programs for teachers still use inadequate strategies for bringing about change in teacher practices. New professional development proposals are emerging with the objective of minimising such difficulties and this analysis could be a helpful tool to restructure those proposals.

  15. Virtual reality and interactive digital game technology: new tools to address obesity and diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skip Rizzo, Albert; Lange, Belinda; Suma, Evan A; Bolas, Mark

    2011-03-01

    The convergence of the exponential advances in virtual reality (VR)-enabling technologies with a growing body of clinical research and experience has fueled the evolution of the discipline of clinical VR. This article begins with a brief overview of methods for producing and delivering VR environments that can be accessed by users for a range of clinical health conditions. Interactive digital games and new forms of natural movement-based interface devices are also discussed in the context of the emerging area of exergaming, along with some of the early results from studies of energy expenditure during the use of these systems. While these results suggest that playing currently available active exergames uses significantly more energy than sedentary activities and is equivalent to a brisk walk, these activities do not reach the level of intensity that would match playing the actual sport, nor do they deliver the recommended daily amount of exercise for children. However, these results provide some support for the use of digital exergames using the current state of technology as a complement to, rather than a replacement, for regular exercise. This may change in the future as new advances in novel full-body interaction systems for providing vigorous interaction with digital games are expected to drive the creation of engaging, low-cost interactive game-based applications designed to increase exercise participation in persons at risk for obesity. © 2011 Diabetes Technology Society.

  16. English in the digital age information and communications technology (ICT) and the teaching of English

    CERN Document Server

    Goodwyn, Andrew

    1999-01-01

    New communications technology has been a boon to teaching and learning subjects of English, from reading and writing to literature such as Shakespeare. This book explores the ways that information and communications technology, or ICT, can be employed in teaching English and enriching the abilities of students. What are the advantages of ICT, and what are some of the concerns? Contributors from Europe, Australia, and North America address the use of media in teaching, from video, film, and audiotape to computer games and online resources. English in the Digital Age surveys the ways ICT is pres

  17. Using SecondLife Online Virtual World Technology to Introduce Educators to the Digital Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamison, John

    2008-01-01

    The rapidly changing culture resulting from new technologies and digital gaming has created an increasing language gap between traditional educators and today's learners (Natkin, 2006; Seely-Brown, 2000). This study seeks to use the online virtual world of SecondLife.com as a tool to introduce educators to this new environment for learning. This study observes the activities and perceptions of a group of educators given unscripted access to this virtual environment. The results 'suggest that although serious technology limitations do currently exist, the potential of this virtual world environment as a learning experience for educators is strong.

  18. The application of digital medical 3D printing technology on tumor operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jimin; Jiang, Yijian; Li, Yangsheng

    2016-04-01

    Digital medical 3D printing technology is a new hi-tech which combines traditional medical and digital design, computer science, bio technology and 3D print technology. At the present time there are four levels application: The printed 3D model is the first and simple application. The surgery makes use of the model to plan the processing before operation. The second is customized operation tools such as implant guide. It helps doctor to operate with special tools rather than the normal medical tools. The third level application of 3D printing in medical area is to print artificial bones or teeth to implant into human body. The big challenge is the fourth level which is to print organs with 3D printing technology. In this paper we introduced an application of 3D printing technology in tumor operation. We use 3D printing to print guide for invasion operation. Puncture needles were guided by printed guide in face tumors operation. It is concluded that this new type guide is dominantly advantageous.

  19. Empowering Children with Adaptive Technology Skills: Careful Engagement in the Digital Information Age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miftachul HUDA

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The technological advancement occurring in the world today has a potency to create positive and negative side effects especially on children. The positive side may entail increased empathy and acceptance of diversity through modelling the prosocial behaviours, while the negative can be manifest in aggressive behaviour, risky sexual behaviour, and substance abuse. These challenges pose a need to draw a particular attention to children’s rights of protection and care in relation to the use of technology. This paper sought to critically explore the way in which children adapt technology skills and the way they respond towards media influences. The findings revealed that the adaptive technology skills are needed in providing a considerable guidance for child protection and careful engagement towards digital information as part of their rights to natural growth and development.

  20. Evolving minimally invasive spine surgery: a surgeon's perspective on technological convergence and digital or control system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, John C; Maziad, Ali M; Rappard, George; Thacker, James T; Liu, Brent; Documet, Jorge

    2010-04-01

    Degenerated spinal disc and spinal stenosis are common problems requiring decompressive spinal surgery. Traditional open spinal discectomy is associated with significant tissue trauma, greater morbidity/complications, scarring, often longer term of convalescence, and even destabilization of the spine. Therefore, the pursuit of less traumatic minimally invasive spine surgery (MISS) began. The trend of spinal surgery is rapidly moving toward MISS. MISS is a technologically dependent surgery, and requires increased utilization of advanced endoscopic surgical instruments, imaging-video technology, and tissue modulation technology for performing spinal surgery in a digital operating room (DOR). It requires seamless connectivity and control to perform the surgical procedures in a precise and orchestrated manner. A new integrated DOR, the technological convergence and control system SurgMatix(R), was created in response to the need and to facilitate MISS with "organized control instead of organized chaos" in the endoscopic OR suite. It facilitates the performance, training, and further development of MISS.

  1. Multimodal methodologies for analyzing preschool children’s engagements with digital technologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chimirri, Niklas Alexander

    Recent research on the role of technologies and specifically digital technologies in pedagogy has engaged in re-reading Vygotsky’s opus with a focus on the technological mediatedness of personal and collective development. Among other issues, it questions the differentiation between tools and signs...... and the technologies it builds on collectively. Particularly when it comes to actively engaging in such a collective transformation as a researcher together with young children, the above conceptual reformulation poses a number of methodological challenges. For instance it remains unclear how the perspectives...... of how adults can meaningfully communicate with young children, who are not able to fully verbalize their premises and reasons for acting, and who therefore hold a relatively weak positioning when it comes to influencing the negotiation processes necessary for engaging in collective transformative...

  2. Utilities and Power - Sector Report. Malaysia: including electricity, gas, water, sewerage, telecommunications and information technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-10-01

    This report is one of a series designed to introduce British exporters to the opportunities offered by the Malaysian market. The Seventh Malaysia Plan, covering the five year period, 1996-2000, contains an ambitious menu of infrastructure projects. Total expenditure under the Plan is envisaged at RM450 billion, of which around RM380 billion will be sourced from the private sector. This is an indication of the wealth accumulated within the Malaysian economy. The infrastructure developments identified are designed to take the country towards Vision 2020. These infrastructure developments will continue to make the country highly attractive to foreign investors, who were the catalyst for Malaysia`s explosive growth over the last few years. Malaysian Corporations have also grown rapidly and are becoming international investors and traders in their own right, including in the United Kingdom. As they expand, seeking new markets, they are looking also for partners with whom they can share technology and jointly develop projects. Such companies are often ideal partners for UK companies wishing to enter the Malaysian and Asian market. Malaysia offers opportunities to companies prepared to make the small effort to know and understand the country and its people. This report will assist companies to develop a useful understanding of the market. (author)

  3. Implementing a Swedish regionalized medical program supported by digital technologies: possibilities and challenges from a management perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettersson, Fanny L M

    2013-01-01

    educating medical students. In addition, due to the use of digital technologies the implementation process helped to reveal existing problems and tensions in educational practice, not previously visible to management. These included contradictions such as a lack of alignment in how course goals, teaching practices, and examinations should be carried out. Further, obsolete course content and overlap between courses and subjects were identified, leading to an overhaul of all semesters, not only those regionalized. This study showed how contradictions in educational practice arose when the Swedish RMP, supported by digital technologies, was implemented. These contradictions involve both possibilities and challenges for management to improve how and with what quality the Swedish RMP is conducted. A challenge for management is to find the most effective way to enhance up-take and use of the more interactive and innovative TEL-solutions. However, a possibility is that the regionalization process and implemented improvements may also influence non-regionalized semesters, with the potential to eventually increase the quality of the entire program.

  4. 75 FR 60141 - International Business Machines (IBM), Global Technology Services Delivery Division, Including On...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-29

    ... DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Employment and Training Administration [TA-W-74,164] International Business... 25, 2010, applicable to workers of International Business Machines (IBM), Global Technology Services... hereby issued as follows: All workers of International Business Machines (IBM), Global Technology...

  5. Plasma-chemical technology of treatment of halogen-containing waste including polychlorinated biphenyls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gusarov, E. E.; Malkov, Yu. P.; Stepanov, S. G.; Troshchinenko, G. A.; Zasypkin, I. M.

    2010-12-01

    We consider the developed plasma-chemical technology of halogen-containing substances treatment. The paper contains the experimental plant schematic and the positive results obtained after the treatment of tetrafluoromethane, ozone-damaging freon 12, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB), the waste containing fluoride and chloride organics. The technology is proposed for industrial application.

  6. Solitude or co-existence – or learning-together-apart with digital dialogic technologies for kids with developmental and attention difficulties (accepted for publication in EAI-Journal, Special Issue - eds. Eva Brooks)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sorensen, Elsebeth Korsgaard; Voldborg, Hanne

    2017-01-01

    This study reports on research into the impact of digital technological interventions for including kids with attention and developmental deficits into school class contexts. It describes, how the authors have approached the challenge of researching inclusion of kids with attention and developmen......This study reports on research into the impact of digital technological interventions for including kids with attention and developmental deficits into school class contexts. It describes, how the authors have approached the challenge of researching inclusion of kids with attention...... and developmental deficits for communication, collaboration and knowledge sharing. The analysis assesses the potential of interventions with digital technology for acting as stimulating enzymes for life and learning. On the basis of a thorough discussion of the findings, the authors assess the degree to which...... interventions with digital technologies, e.g. Virtual Learning Environments (VLEs), may promote inclusion through stimulating the participation in life and learning of kids with attention and developmental deficits....

  7. Investigation of Virtual Digital Human and Robotic Device Technology Merger Complimented by Haptics and Autostereoscopic Displays, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — As expected, the STTR Phase I investigation confirmed that the Digital Virtual Human (DVH) and Robonaut technologies can be merged, and that haptic and...

  8. Contradictory directionalities of digital learning technology and its implications for the scope of imaginable possibilities for collaborating

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chimirri, Niklas Alexander

    Contradictory learning directionalities are immanent to digital learning technology: Any technology suggests a limited multiplicity of situated uses in a learning practice, of understandings of how to learn and of what learning should be about. Herewith any technology offers a scope of imaginable....... Next to offering opportunities to expand the learners’ scope of possibilities for transforming these learning directionalities together, digital learning technology thus also promotes the taken for grantedness of particular understandings of (most often instrumental) learning. They may consequently...... of young children’s learning processes by relating the proposed concepts to conflictual learning scenes from a pedagogical technology project enacting projected digital photographs in a daycare institution. The aim is to substantiate the claim that technology-enhanced learning requires a situated...

  9. Contradictory directionalities of digital learning technology and its implications for the scope of imaginable possibilities for collaborating

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chimirri, Niklas Alexander

    . Next to offering opportunities to expand the learners’ scope of possibilities for transforming these learning directionalities together, digital learning technology thus also promotes the taken for grantedness of particular understandings of (most often instrumental) learning. They may consequently...... the learning human being and her_his challenges and struggles in a situated practice are the point of departure of any investigation of meaningful digital technology enactments, I will argue that also the question of what learning technology is requires a clarification of what contradictory understandings......Contradictory learning directionalities are immanent to digital learning technology: Any technology suggests a limited multiplicity of situated uses in a learning practice, of understandings of how to learn and of what learning should be about. Herewith any technology offers a scope of imaginable...

  10. Digital Native Academic Librarians, Technology Skills, and Their Relationship with Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenny Emanuel

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available A new generation of academic librarians, who are a part of the Millennial Generation born between 1982 and 2001 are now of the age to either be in graduate school or embarking on their careers. This paper, as part of a larger study examining Millennial academic librarians, their career selection, their attitudes, and their technology skills, looks specifically at the technology skills and attitudes towards technology among a group of young librarians and library school students.  The author initially wanted to learn if the increasingly high tech nature of academic librarianship attracted Millennials to the career, but results showed that they had a much more complex relationship with technology than the author assumed.

  11. Review: Michael Crandall & Karen E. Fisher (Eds) Digital Inclusion: Measuring the Impact of Information and Community Technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pors, Niels Ole

    2010-01-01

    Review: Michael Crandall & Karen E. Fisher (Eds) Digital Inclusion: Measuring the Impact of Information and Community Technology. Medford. Information Today. ASIS&T Monographs, 2009. 185 pages. $ 59.50. ISBN 978-1-57387-373-4......Review: Michael Crandall & Karen E. Fisher (Eds) Digital Inclusion: Measuring the Impact of Information and Community Technology. Medford. Information Today. ASIS&T Monographs, 2009. 185 pages. $ 59.50. ISBN 978-1-57387-373-4...

  12. COMBATING DIGITAL PIRACY IN NIGERIA. AN ANALYSIS OF TECHNOLOGICAL PROTECTIVE MEASURES AND RIGHTS MANAGEMENT INFORMATION UNDER THE COPYRIGHT BILL

    OpenAIRE

    Kuti, Aishat Obadunni

    2016-01-01

    The adoption of digital technologies and creation of global internet infrastructure for the vast array of companies and individuals offering products and services that leverage its connectivity has transformed our world over the past two decades. The Internet has grown from a resource platform for individuals to an essential omnichannel medium for more than 2 billion users worldwide and with each facet of growth comes unprecedented challenges. The impact of digital technology on Nigerian crea...

  13. On-board digital signal processing technologies for present and future SCPC systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Shuzo; Ohtani, Kohichi; Kohri, Takehru; Morikura, Masahiro; Umehira, Masahiro

    1988-09-01

    This paper surveys trends in digital and analog ICs and LSICs, including radiation hardness performance. An optimal selection of devices and suitable architectures for SCPC multicarrier demodulators is discussed. The results show good and clear guidelines for device and architecture selection for on-board signal processing at the present time and toward the year 2000. It is shown that, for on-board SCPC multicarrier demodulation, a transmultiplexer type channel divider and digital common demodulator has a good performance with a medium number of channels for regeneration.

  14. Planning by Using Digital Technology in the Reconstruction of Cultural Heritage Sites - a Case Study of Qiong-Lin Settlement in Kinmen Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, W. B.; Ye, Y. N.

    2017-08-01

    ICOMOS Florence Declaration in 2014, encourages an in-depth reflection on human values through cultural heritage and landscapes, which emphasizes the importance of historical heritage sites, in order to achieve the application of cultural heritage records through the public participation, sharing new technology platform and facilitation tools for knowledge diffusion, for instance. Nikos adopted digitized intangible cultural heritage within i-Treasures project to create a novel digital platform in 2016. Nowadays, the display platform developed based on geographic information system has been gradually accepted and widely used to distribute cultural heritage information, aiming to combine geography, time, events, issues, trends with the interactive maps to show the context of data changes from the consideration of planarity; for example, Burnaby City in Canada has cooperated with the Columbia University to create a navigation platform for guidance of tangible cultural heritage based on story maps in order to provide public recognition function. In this study, Qiong-Lin Settlement in Kinmen Area was taken as an example to illustrate the developing process of an overall planning framework for reappearing the glory of historic settlements of cultural heritage sites with digital technology, which included tangible and intangible cultural heritage preservation and transmission planning, community participation and digital navigation programs. The digital technology with the GIS-based digital platform can provide more diverse and interesting information while using an intuitive, graphical user story mapping interface. So that tangible cultural heritage can be effectively understood, interpreted and preserved with the value-added methods, and also intangible cultural heritage can be continuously transmitted to establish a complete system of cultural heritage preservation. The main contents include several navigation technologies, such as 3D laser scanning, UAV images

  15. PLANNING BY USING DIGITAL TECHNOLOGY IN THE RECONSTRUCTION OF CULTURAL HERITAGE SITES – A CASE STUDY OF QIONG-LIN SETTLEMENT IN KINMEN AREA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. B. Yang

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available ICOMOS Florence Declaration in 2014, encourages an in-depth reflection on human values through cultural heritage and landscapes, which emphasizes the importance of historical heritage sites, in order to achieve the application of cultural heritage records through the public participation, sharing new technology platform and facilitation tools for knowledge diffusion, for instance. Nikos adopted digitized intangible cultural heritage within i-Treasures project to create a novel digital platform in 2016. Nowadays, the display platform developed based on geographic information system has been gradually accepted and widely used to distribute cultural heritage information, aiming to combine geography, time, events, issues, trends with the interactive maps to show the context of data changes from the consideration of planarity; for example, Burnaby City in Canada has cooperated with the Columbia University to create a navigation platform for guidance of tangible cultural heritage based on story maps in order to provide public recognition function. In this study, Qiong-Lin Settlement in Kinmen Area was taken as an example to illustrate the developing process of an overall planning framework for reappearing the glory of historic settlements of cultural heritage sites with digital technology, which included tangible and intangible cultural heritage preservation and transmission planning, community participation and digital navigation programs. The digital technology with the GIS-based digital platform can provide more diverse and interesting information while using an intuitive, graphical user story mapping interface. So that tangible cultural heritage can be effectively understood, interpreted and preserved with the value-added methods, and also intangible cultural heritage can be continuously transmitted to establish a complete system of cultural heritage preservation. The main contents include several navigation technologies, such as 3D laser scanning

  16. Digital technology for health sector governance in low and middle income countries: a scoping review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holeman, Isaac; Cookson, Tara Patricia; Pagliari, Claudia

    2016-12-01

    Poor governance impedes the provision of equitable and cost-effective health care in many low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). Although systemic problems such as corruption and inefficiency have been characterized as intractable, "good governance" interventions that promote transparency, accountability and public participation have yielded encouraging results. Mobile phones and other Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs) are beginning to play a role in these interventions, but little is known about their use and effects in the context of LMIC health care. Multi-stage scoping review: Research questions and scope were refined through a landscape scan of relevant implementation activities and by analyzing related concepts in the literature. Relevant studies were identified through iterative Internet searches (Google, Google Scholar), a systematic search of academic databases (PubMed, Web of Science), social media crowdsourcing (targeted LinkedIn and Twitter appeals) and reading reference lists and websites of relevant organizations. Parallel expert interviews helped to verify concepts and emerging findings and identified additional studies for inclusion. Results were charted, analyzed thematically and summarized. We identified 34 articles from a wide range of disciplines and sectors, including 17 published research articles and 17 grey literature reports. Analysis of these articles revealed 15 distinct ways of using ICTs for good governance activities in LMIC health care. These use cases clustered into four conceptual categories: 1) gathering and verifying information on services to improve transparency and auditability 2) aggregating and visualizing data to aid communication and decision making 3) mobilizing citizens in reporting poor practices to improve accountability and quality and 4) automating and auditing processes to prevent fraud. Despite a considerable amount of implementation activity, we identified little formal evaluative research

  17. Dynamic Clinical Algorithms: Digital Technology Can Transform Health Care Decision-Making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, David; Gachuhi, Noni; Assefi, Nassim

    2018-01-01

    Most health care in low-income countries is delivered at a primary care level by health workers who lack quality training and supervision, often distant from more experienced support. Lack of knowledge and poor communication result in a poor quality of care and inefficient delivery of health services. Although bringing great benefits in sectors such as finance and telecommunication in recent years, the Digital Revolution has lightly and inconsistently affected the health sector. These advances offer an opportunity to dramatically transform health care by increasing the availability and timeliness of information to augment clinical decision-making, based on improved access to patient histories, current information on disease epidemiology, and improved incorporation of data from point-of-care and centralized diagnostic testing. A comprehensive approach is needed to more effectively incorporate current digital technologies into health systems, bringing external and patient-derived data into the clinical decision-making process in real time, irrespective of health worker training or location. Such dynamic clinical algorithms could provide a more effective framework within which to design and integrate new digital health technologies and deliver improved patient care by primary care health workers.

  18. Virtual Reality and Interactive Digital Game Technology: New Tools to Address Obesity and Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    “Skip” Rizzo, Albert; Lange, Belinda; Suma, Evan A; Bolas, Mark

    2011-01-01

    The convergence of the exponential advances in virtual reality (VR)-enabling technologies with a growing body of clinical research and experience has fueled the evolution of the discipline of clinical VR. This article begins with a brief overview of methods for producing and delivering VR environments that can be accessed by users for a range of clinical health conditions. Interactive digital games and new forms of natural movement-based interface devices are also discussed in the context of the emerging area of exergaming, along with some of the early results from studies of energy expenditure during the use of these systems. While these results suggest that playing currently available active exergames uses significantly more energy than sedentary activities and is equivalent to a brisk walk, these activities do not reach the level of intensity that would match playing the actual sport, nor do they deliver the recommended daily amount of exercise for children. However, these results provide some support for the use of digital exergames using the current state of technology as a complement to, rather than a replacement, for regular exercise. This may change in the future as new advances in novel full-body interaction systems for providing vigorous interaction with digital games are expected to drive the creation of engaging, low-cost interactive game-based applications designed to increase exercise participation in persons at risk for obesity. PMID:21527091

  19. Digital imaging information technology for biospeckle activity assessment relative to bacteria and parasites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez-Miquet, Evelio E; Cabrera, Humberto; Grassi, Hilda C; de J Andrades, Efrén; Otero, Isabel; Rodríguez, Dania; Darias, Juan G

    2017-08-01

    This paper reports on the biospeckle processing of biological activity using a visualization scheme based upon the digital imaging information technology. Activity relative to bacterial growth in agar plates and to parasites affected by a drug is monitored via the speckle patterns generated by a coherent source incident on the microorganisms. We present experimental results to demonstrate the potential application of this methodology for following the activity in time. The digital imaging information technology is an alternative visualization enabling the study of speckle dynamics, which is correlated to the activity of bacteria and parasites. In this method, the changes in Red-Green-Blue (RGB) color component density are considered as markers of the growth of bacteria and parasites motility in presence of a drug. The RGB data was used to generate a two-dimensional surface plot allowing an analysis of color distribution on the speckle images. The proposed visualization is compared to the outcomes of the generalized differences and the temporal difference. A quantification of the activity is performed using a parameterization of the temporal difference method. The adopted digital image processing technique has been found suitable to monitor motility and morphological changes in the bacterial population over time and to detect and distinguish a short term drug action on parasites.

  20. Technology Transfer Programme In Reactor Digital Instrumentation And Control System (REDICS) Project: Knowledge, Experiences And Future Expectations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nurfarhana Ayuni Joha; Mohamad Puad Abu; Izhar Abu Hussin; Ridzuan Abdul Mutalib; Zareen Khan Abdul Jalil Khan; Mohd Khairulezwan Abdul Manan; Mohd Sabri Minhat; Mohd Idris Taib

    2013-01-01

    The PUSPATI TRIGA MARK II research reactor in Malaysia was commissioned in 1982. After 31 years of operation, Nuclear Malaysia is taking an approach for a better research and development in nuclear radiations as well as the technical services that provided. Reactor TRIGA PUSPATI (RTP) is currently upgrading its control console from analogue to digital system. The Reactor Digital Instrumentation and Control System (ReDICS) project is done on cooperation with Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI), Korea including the technical part from the design stage until commissioning as well as the Technology Transfer Program (TTP). TTP in this ReDICS project is a part of Human Resource and System Development Program. It was carried out from the design stage until the commissioning of the system. It covers all subjects related to the design on the digital system and the requirements for the operation of RTP. The objective of this paper is to share the knowledge and experiences gained through this ReDICS project. This paper will also discuss the future expectations from this ReDICS project for Nuclear Malaysia and its personnel, as well as to the country. (author)

  1. Development of Risk Assessment Technology for Low Power, Shutdown and Digital I and C System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jang, Seung Cheol; Kang, Hyun Gook; Lim, Ho Gon; Park, Jin Hee; Kang, Dae Il; Eom, Heung Sub; Kim, Man Cheol; Lee, Ho Joong; Kim, Jae Whan; Ha, Jae Joo

    2007-06-01

    There are two technical areas to deal with in the project: the low power and shutdown probabilistic safety assessment (PSA), and the digital I and C PSA. The scope and contents of each area could be summarized as follows: The LPSD PSA Area Ο Quality improvement of the KSNP LPSD PSA model in the following four technical areas; human reliability analysis (HR), system analysis (SY), data analysis (DA) and accident sequence quantification (QU) Ο Development of the LPSD configuration risk management(CRM) model - Study on the methodology for developing a CRM model, so-called ASLOC (Autonomous Shutdown LOgic Creation) - Development of the LPSD CRM model for the units of Ulchin 3 and 4 The Digital I and C PSA Area Ο Development of impact model of ESF-CCS on plant risks - Unavailability analysis of ESF-CCS for APR-1400 - Digital plant risk models for evaluating core damage frequency (CDF) Ο Study on the methodologies for treating digital-specific problems in the digital I and C PSA - Study on the methodology for evaluating safety-critical SW reliability by BBN techniques, including a feasibility study of reliability growth model - Study on the methodology for the safety-critical network system by Markov chain

  2. Preparation of safety regulatory requirements for new technology like digital system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Juichiro; Takita, Masami

    2011-01-01

    The current regulatory requirements on digital instrumentation and control system have been reviewed by JNES, considering international trend discussed in DICWG (Digital Instrumentation and Control Working Group) of MDEP (Multinational Design Evaluation Program). MDEP DICWG held in OECD/NEA (Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development/Nuclear Energy Agency) gives the opportunity to identify the convergence of applicable standards. The working group's activities include: identifying and prioritising the member countries' challenges, practices, and needs regarding standards and regulatory guidance regarding digital instrumentation and control; identifying areas of importance and needs for convergence of existing standards and guidance or development of new standards; sharing of information; and identifying common positions among the member countries for areas of particular importance and need. The DICWG drafted common positions on specific issues which are based on the existing standards, national regulatory guidance, best practices, and group inputs using an agreed upon process and framework. Five general common positions are under discussion in this fiscal year. Simplicity in Design, Software Common Cause Failures, Software Tools, Data communication, Verification and Validation throughout the life cycle of safety systems using digital computers. In addition, the technical evaluation of standards of the Japan Electric Association about digital system for safety was made to support NISA (Nuclear and Industrial Safety Agency). (author)

  3. Possible extensions of XIA's digital spectrometer technology to portable and remote monitoring instrumentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warburton, W.K.; Darknell, D.A.; Hubbard-Nelson, B.

    1998-01-01

    The XIA DXP-4C is a 4 channel, CAMAC based, X-ray spectrometer which digitally processes directly digitized preamplifier signals. The DXP-4C was designed for instrumenting multi-detector arrays for synchrotron radiation applications, and optimized for very high count rates at a low cost per detector channel. This produced a very compact and low power (3.4 W/channel) instrument for its count rate and MCA capabilities, which thus provides a strong basis for portable applications. Because all functions are digitally controlled, it can be readily adapted to various user interfaces, including remote access interfaces. Here the authors describe the design and examine approaches to lowering its power to 50 mW/channel. They then consider the issues in applying it to three typical portable or remote spectrometry applications

  4. ISO 19157 standard application in technological process of the production of digital topographic maps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drobnjak Siniša M.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Standardization in the field of geographical information related to the definition of the system of collection, preparation, storage, maintenance, presentation and sharing of geographic information. Quality information of available spatial data are vital in the process of selecting a dataset where data value is directly related to its quality. Users of spatial data can choose data from multiple datasets. Therefore. It is necessary to compare the quality of datasets and determine which best meet customer requirements. Digital topographic maps for its visuality, brevity and easy of use have a big advantage over other spatial datasets and is therefore fully justified request for the development of the system of determining, evaluating and impart their quality. The main objective of this paper is to describe the possibilities of application of ISO 19157 'Geographic information - Data quality' standard in technological process of the production of digital topographic maps.

  5. Digital Democracy in Knowledge Society: A Proposed Architecture Based on Cloud and Complementary Technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ovidiu TURCOANE

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper introduces some technologies that are fit for an architecture of digital democracy or E-democracy. It aims at proposing an architectural style emerged from tested and validated approaches, without relying on some radical innovation. Firstly, we propose an input-system-output model of E-democracy and knowledge society. This model is subject to permanent optimization following a trial and error paradigm similar to the artificial intelligence method of backpropagation. Secondly, we describe and advocate for some technologies and methodologies such as Cloud, Service-Oriented Architecture, Agile Development, Web-Oriented Architecture, Semantic Web and Linked Data. Finally, we assemble all these technologies and methodologies in an architectural style that follows several key concepts such as flexibility and adapability, citizen-oriented software development or abstract notions like participation, deliberation and inclusion.

  6. Design and implementation of Remote Digital Energy Meter (RDEM) based on GSM technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Muhammad Waseem; Wang, Jie; Irfan, Muhammad; Shiraz, M.; Khan, Ali Hassan

    2017-11-01

    Electric power is one of the basic requirement for socio economic and social prosperity of any country, which is mainly employs for domestic, industrial and agricultural sectors. The primary purpose of this research is to design and implement an energy meter which can remotely control and monitor through global system for mobile (GSM) communication technology. For this purpose, a single phase or three phase digital energy meters are used to add on different advanced modules. The energy meter can be activated and display power consumption information at the consumer premises on liquid crystal display and through a short message service (SMS) by using GSM technology. At the power sending end, an energy meter can be remotely control and monitor through GSM technology without any system disturbances. This study will lead to make the system easier, economical, reliable and efficient for the electrical department.

  7. Exploring the digital technology preferences of teenagers and young adults (TYA) with cancer and survivors: a cross-sectional service evaluation questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrol, Esha; Groszmann, Mike; Pitman, Alexandra; Hough, Rachael; Taylor, Rachel M; Aref-Adib, Golnar

    2017-12-01

    Digital technology has the potential to support teenagers and young adults (TYAs) with cancer from the onset of their disease into survivorship. We aimed to establish (1) the current pattern of use of TYA digital technologies within our service-user population, and (2) their preferences regarding digital information and support within the service. A cross-sectional survey was administered as a paper and online self-completed questionnaire to TYAs aged 13-24 accessing outpatient, inpatient, and day care cancer services at a regional specialist centre over a 4-week period. One hundred two TYAs completed the survey (55.7% male; 39.8% female; 83.3% paper; 16.7% online; mean age 18.5 years [SD = 3.51]). Of the TYAs, 41.6% rated the importance of digital communication as "essential" to their lives. Half (51.0%) kept in contact with other patients they had met during treatment, and 12.0% contacted patients they had not met in person. Respondents wanted to receive clinical information online (66.3%) and use online chat rooms (54.3%). Future online services desired included virtual online groups (54.3%), online counselling or psychological support (43.5%), and receiving (66.3%) and sharing (48.9%) clinical information online. Young people with cancer are digital natives. A significant subgroup expressed a desire for digital resources from oncology services, though existing resources are also highly valued. Digital resources have potential to improve patient experience and engagement. There is considerable scope to develop digital resources with which TYAs can receive information and connect with both professionals and fellow patients, following diagnosis, through treatment and survivorship.

  8. Using assistive technology adaptations to include students with learning disabilities in cooperative learning activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryant, D P; Bryant, B R

    1998-01-01

    Cooperative learning (CL) is a common instructional arrangement that is used by classroom teachers to foster academic achievement and social acceptance of students with and without learning disabilities. Cooperative learning is appealing to classroom teachers because it can provide an opportunity for more instruction and feedback by peers than can be provided by teachers to individual students who require extra assistance. Recent studies suggest that students with LD may need adaptations during cooperative learning activities. The use of assistive technology adaptations may be necessary to help some students with LD compensate for their specific learning difficulties so that they can engage more readily in cooperative learning activities. A process for integrating technology adaptations into cooperative learning activities is discussed in terms of three components: selecting adaptations, monitoring the use of the adaptations during cooperative learning activities, and evaluating the adaptations' effectiveness. The article concludes with comments regarding barriers to and support systems for technology integration, technology and effective instructional practices, and the need to consider technology adaptations for students who have learning disabilities.

  9. A Review of Digital, Social, and Mobile Technologies in Health Professional Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curran, Vernon; Matthews, Lauren; Fleet, Lisa; Simmons, Karla; Gustafson, Diana L; Wetsch, Lyle

    2017-01-01

    Digital, social, and mobile technologies (DSMTs) can support a wide range of self-directed learning activities, providing learners with diverse resources, information, and ways to network that support their learning needs. DSMTs are increasingly used to facilitate learning across the continuum of health professional education (HPE). Given the diverse characteristics of DSMTs and the formal, informal, and nonformal nature of health professional learning, a review of the literature on DSMTs and HPE could inform more effective adoption and usage by regulatory organizations, educators, and learners. A scoping review of the literature was performed to explore the effectiveness and implications of adopting and using DSMTs across the educational continuum in HPE. A data extraction tool was used to review and analyze 125 peer-reviewed articles. Common themes were identified by thematic analysis. Most articles (56.0%) related to undergraduate education; 31.2% to continuing professional development, and 52.8% to graduate/postgraduate education. The main DSMTs described include mobile phones, apps, tablets, Facebook, Twitter, and YouTube. Approximately half of the articles (49.6%) reported evaluative outcomes at a satisfaction/reaction level; 45.6% were commentaries, reporting no evaluative outcomes. Most studies reporting evaluative outcomes suggest that learners across all levels are typically satisfied with the use of DSMTs in their learning. Thematic analysis revealed three main themes: use of DSMTs across the HPE continuum; key benefits and barriers; and best practices. Despite the positive commentary on the potential benefits and opportunities for enhancing teaching and learning in HPE with DSMTs, there is limited evidence at this time that demonstrates effectiveness of DSMTs at higher evaluative outcome levels. Further exploration of the learning benefits and effectiveness of DSMTs for teaching and learning in HPE is warranted.

  10. The development of advanced instrumentation and control technology -The development of digital monitoring technique-

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jun, Jong Sun; Lee, Byung Sun; Han, Sang Joon; Shin, Yong Chul; Kim, Yung Baek; Kim, Dong Hoon; Oh, Yang Kyoon; Suh, Yung; Choi, Chan Duk; Kang, Byung Hun; Hong, Hyung Pyo; Shin, Jee Tae; Moon, Kwon Kee; Lee, Soon Sung; Kim, Sung Hoh; Koo, In Soo; Kim, Dong Wan; Huh, Sub [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-07-01

    A study has been performed for the advanced DSP technology for digital nuclear I and C systems and its prototype, and for the monitoring and diagnosing techniques for the highly-pressurized components in NSSS. In the DSP part, the DSP requirements for NPPs have been induced for the performance of the DSP systems and the functional analysis for Reactor Coolant System (RCS) has been performed as the embodied target system. Total quantities of the I and C signals, signal types, and signal functions were also investigated in Ulchin NPP units 3 and 4. From these basis, the prototype facility was configured for performance validation and algorithm implementation. In order to develop the methods of DSP techniques and algorithms, the current signal validation methods have been studied and analyzed. In the analysis for the communication networks in NPP, the basic technique for the configuration of communication networks and the important considerations for applying to NPPs have been reviewed. Test and experimental facilities have been set up in order to carry out the required tests during research activities on the monitoring techniques for abnormal conditions. Studies were concentrated on methods how to acquire vibration signals from the mechanical structures and equipment including rotating machinery and reactor, and analyses for the characteristics of the signals. Fuzzy logic was evaluated as a good technique to improve the reliability of the monitoring and diagnosing algorithm through the application of the theory such as the automatic pattern recognition algorithm of the vibration spectrum, the alarm detection and diagnosis for collisions of loose parts. 71 figs, 32 tabs, 64 refs. (Author).

  11. PREVALENCE OF DIABETIC RETINOPATHY IN A PRIMARY CARE SETTING USING DIGITAL RETINAL IMAGING TECHNOLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keah Say Hien

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of diabetic retinopathy in a primary care setting using digital retinal imaging technology and to quantify the degree of diabetic retinopathy using internationally accepted severity scales. Two hundred patients with type 2 diabetes were evaluated clinically followed by fundus photography. The prevalence of retinopathy and maculopathy was 47.4% and 59.2% respectively (both retinopathy and maculopathy 34.7%. The high prevalence of retinal abnormality in this study is a cause for concern as most patients had diabetes for only 5 years or less.

  12. AN ACTION RESEARCH IN ENGLISH LANGUAGE TEACHING AND LEARNING FOR CHILDREN WITH USE OF DIGITAL TECHNOLOGIES

    OpenAIRE

    Maria Carolina Coelho Chimenti; Heloísa Andreia de Matos Lins

    2016-01-01

    The present article is based on a field research that aimed to provide educational subsidies for the use of digital technologies in teaching and learning process of English language, in two classes of the fifth grade from the elementary school, at the public school located in Campinas, São Paulo, Brazil. Based on the perspective of childhood pedagogy, which conceives the child as the protagonist and also (re)productive of knowledge, activities were carried with YouTube videos, online games, m...

  13. New technology in dietary assessment: a review of digital methods in improving food record accuracy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stumbo, Phyllis J

    2013-02-01

    Methods for conducting dietary assessment in the United States date back to the early twentieth century. Methods of assessment encompassed dietary records, written and spoken dietary recalls, FFQ using pencil and paper and more recently computer and internet applications. Emerging innovations involve camera and mobile telephone technology to capture food and meal images. This paper describes six projects sponsored by the United States National Institutes of Health that use digital methods to improve food records and two mobile phone applications using crowdsourcing. The techniques under development show promise for improving accuracy of food records.

  14. On Reading and Digital Media: Rejoinder to "Digital Technology and Student Cognitive Development: The Neuroscience of the University Classroom"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams-Pierce, Caroline

    2016-01-01

    This commentary serves as an introduction to multiple scholarly fields about the value of digital media for providing contexts for and provoking learning. The author proposes that rather than considering a dichotomy between reading physical books and reading digital media, as encouraged by Cavanaugh et al. (2015), instead consider a scale of sorts…

  15. Integrating Digital Technologies in the German Language Classroom: A Critical Study of the Technology-Integration Experiences of Three Secondary German Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Orden, Stephen

    2010-01-01

    German language teachers are gaining increased access to smart classrooms and digital technologies that offer teachers and students greater access to authentic cultural and language materials and enable more student target language communication. Teaching with technology changes the teaching and learning environment in many ways. Little is known…

  16. Using digital photo technology to improve visualization of gastric lumen CT images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pyrgioti, M.; Kyriakidis, A.; Chrysostomou, S.; Panaritis, V.

    2006-01-01

    In order to evaluate the gastric lumen CT images better, a new method is being applied to images using an Image Processing software. During a 12-month period, 69 patients with various gastric symptoms and 20 normal (as far as it concerns the upper gastrointestinal system) volunteers underwent computed tomography of the upper gastrointestinal system. Just before the examination the patients and the normal volunteers underwent preparation with 40 ml soda water and 10 ml gastrografin. All the CT images were digitized with an Olympus 3.2 Mpixel digital camera and further processed with an Image Processing software. The administration per os of gastrografin and soda water resulted in the distension of the stomach and consequently better visualization of all the anatomic parts. By using an Image Processing software in a PC, all the pathological and normal images of the stomach were better diagnostically estimated. We believe that the photo digital technology improves the diagnostic capacity not only of the CT image but also in MRI and probably many other imaging methods

  17. [Michigan Technological University Pre-Service Teacher Enhancement Program]. [Includes a copy of the Student Guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, C.S.; Yarroch, W.L.

    1993-04-27

    The Michigan Technological University Teacher Education Program received funding from the US Department of Energy for the purpose of providing capable and suitably inclined, MTU Engineering and Science students a chance to explore high school level science and mathematics teaching as a career option. Ten undergraduate students were selected from nominations and were paired with mentor teachers for the study. This report covers the experience of the first ten nominees and their participation in the program.

  18. Testing the Digital Divide: Does Access to High-Quality Use of Technology in Schools Affect Student Achievement?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talley, Gregory Keith

    2012-01-01

    This study investigates the relationship between access, use of technology and student achievement in public middle schools in Maryland. The objective of this study was to determine whether a digital divide (differences in access and utilization of technology based on student characteristics of race, socioeconomic status, and gender) exists among…

  19. Do School-Level Factors Influence the Educational Benefits of Digital Technology? A Critical Analysis of Teachers' Perceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrotta, Carlo

    2013-01-01

    The supposed benefits of teachers' use of information and communications technology (digital technology) are well reported throughout the academic literature--most often involving issues of enhanced learning outcomes, increased pupil engagement and more efficient management and organisation of learning. This paper uses survey data from 683…

  20. Talk about a YouTube Video in Preschool: The Mutual Production of Shared Understanding for Learning with Digital Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Christina; Given, Lisa M.; Danby, Susan; Thorpe, Karen

    2014-01-01

    Much of what is written about digital technologies in preschool contexts focuses on young children's acquisition of skills rather than their meaning-making during use of technologies. In this paper, we consider how the viewing of a YouTube video was used by a teacher and children to produce shared understandings about it. Conversation analysis of…

  1. How and Why Digital Generation Teachers Use Technology in the Classroom: An Explanatory Sequential Mixed Methods Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lan; Worch, Eric; Zhou, YuChun; Aguiton, Rhonda

    2015-01-01

    While teachers' conservative attitude toward technology has been identified as a barrier to effective technology integration in classrooms, it is often optimistically assumed that this issue will resolve when the digital generation enters the teaching profession (Morris, 2012). Using a mixed methodology approach, this study aimed to examine the…

  2. "Power Corrupts, PowerPoint Corrupts Absolutely": Why Digital Technologies Did Not Change the Social Study's Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clare, Michael

    2006-01-01

    The dreams and predictions of a digital classroom never quite materialized in the social studies history area. For a variety of reasons teachers keep the technology just outside the door peeking in but never truly welcomed. Not welcomed because of the nature of courseware initially offered, not welcomed because the technology was advanced for the…

  3. A Social Practice Approach to Understanding Teachers' Learning to Use Technology and Digital Literacies in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalman, Judy; Guerrero, Elsa

    2013-01-01

    Current educational policy in Mexico, as in many other parts of the world, leans heavily on teachers to use computers in their classrooms. This article explores under what conditions teachers are willing to learn about and use digital technology in their work. The authors' central premise is that incorporating technology into teaching is a complex…

  4. Rebooting Learning for the Digital Age: What Next for Technology-Enhanced Higher Education? HEPI Report 93

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Sarah; Mullan, Joel; Feldman, Paul

    2017-01-01

    Learning and teaching practices within higher education have changed surprisingly little over the last 20 years. Other sectors, such as banking, music and publishing, have been turned upside down by digital technology, but the UK's research and education sector has yet to fully exploit the potential of new technologies. Pockets of innovation are…

  5. [Evaluation of digital educational student-technology interaction in neonatal nursing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Fernanda Salim Ferreira de; Dias, Danielle Monteiro Vilela; Higarashi, Ieda Harumi; Scochi, Carmen Gracinda Silvan; Fonseca, Luciana Mara Monti

    2015-02-01

    To assess the digital educational technology interface Caring for the sensory environment in the neonatal unit: noise, lighting and handling based on ergonomic criteria. Descriptive study, in which we used the guidelines and ergonomic criteria established by ISO 9241-11 and an online Likert scale instrument to identify problems and interface qualities. The instrument was built based on Ergolist, which follows the criteria of ISO 9141-11. There were 58 undergraduate study participants from the School of Nursing of Ribeirao Preto, University of Sao Paulo, who attended the classes about neonatal nursing content. All items were positively evaluated by more than 70% of the sample. Educational technology is appropriate according to the ergonomic criteria and can be made available for teaching nursing students.

  6. Advanced Reactor Licensing: Experience with Digital I&C Technology in Evolutionary Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wood, RT

    2004-09-27

    This report presents the findings from a study of experience with digital instrumentation and controls (I&C) technology in evolutionary nuclear power plants. In particular, this study evaluated regulatory approaches employed by the international nuclear power community for licensing advanced l&C systems and identified lessons learned. The report (1) gives an overview of the modern l&C technologies employed at numerous evolutionary nuclear power plants, (2) identifies performance experience derived from those applications, (3) discusses regulatory processes employed and issues that have arisen, (4) captures lessons learned from performance and regulatory experience, (5) suggests anticipated issues that may arise from international near-term deployment of reactor concepts, and (6) offers conclusions and recommendations for potential activities to support advanced reactor licensing in the United States.

  7. SOI Fully complementary BI-JFET-MOS technology for analog-digital applications with vertical BJT's

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delevoye, E.; Blanc, J.P.; Bonaime, J.; Pontcharra, J. de; Gautier, J.; Martin, F.; Truche, R.

    1993-01-01

    A silicon-on-insulator, fully complementary, Bi-JFET-MOS technology has been developed for realizing multi-megarad hardened mixed analog-digital circuits. The six different active components plus resistors and capacitors have been successfully integrated in a 25-mask process using SIMOX substrate and 1 μm thick epitaxial layer. Different constraints such as device compatibility, complexity not higher than BiCMOS technology and breakdown voltages suitable for analog applications have been considered. Several process splits have been realized and all the characteristics presented here have been measured on the same split. P + gate is used for PMOS transistor to get N and PMOST symmetrical characteristics. Both NPN and PNP vertical bipolar transistors with poly-emitters show f T > 5 GHz. 2-separated gate JFET's need no additional mask. (authors). 9 figs., 1 tab

  8. Digital Learning Network Education Events for the Desert Research and Technology Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Heather L.; Guillory, Erika R.

    2007-01-01

    NASA s Digital Learning Network (DLN) reaches out to thousands of students each year through video conferencing and webcasting. As part of NASA s Strategic Plan to reach the next generation of space explorers, the DLN develops and delivers educational programs that reinforce principles in the areas of science, technology, engineering and mathematics. The DLN has created a series of live education videoconferences connecting the Desert Research and Technology Studies (RATS) field test to students across the United States. The programs are also extended to students around the world via live webcasting. The primary focus of the events is the Vision for Space Exploration. During the programs, Desert RATS engineers and scientists inform and inspire students about the importance of exploration and share the importance of the field test as it correlates with plans to return to the Moon and explore Mars. This paper describes the events that took place in September 2006.

  9. Digital technology in mathematics education: Why it works (or doesn't [La tecnología digital en Educación Matemática: por qué funciona (o no

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Drijvers

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The integration of digital technology confronts teachers, educators and researchers with many questions. What is the potential of ICT for learning and teaching, and which factors are decisive in making it work in the mathematics classroom? To investigate these questions, six cases from leading studies in the field are described, and decisive success factors are identified. This leads to the conclusion that crucial factors for the success of digital technology in mathematics education include the design of the digital tool and corresponding tasks exploiting the tool’s pedagogical potential, the role of the teacher and the educational context.La integración de la tecnología digital enfrenta a profesores, formadores de profesores e investigadores a muchas preguntas. ¿Cuál es el potencial de las TIC en el aprendizaje y la enseñanza, y qué factores son determinantes al trabajar en clase de matemáticas? Para investigar estas cuestiones, se describen seis casos de estudio prominentes en el área, y se identifican los factores decisivos para el éxito. Esto lleva a la conclusión de que los factores cruciales para el éxito de la tecnología digital en la educación matemática incluyen el diseño de la herramienta digital y de las tareas apropiadas que exploren el potencial pedagógico de la herramienta, el papel del profesor y el contexto educativo.

  10. Technology of surface wastewater purification, including high-rise construction areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsyba, Anna; Skolubovich, Yury

    2018-03-01

    Despite on the improvements in the quality of high-rise construction areas and industrial wastewater treatment, the pollution of water bodies continues to increase. This is due to the organized and unorganized surface untreated sewage entry into the reservoirs. The qualitative analysis of some cities' surface sewage composition is carried out in the work. Based on the published literature review, the characteristic contamination present in surface wastewater was identified. The paper proposes a new technology for the treatment of surface sewage and presents the results of preliminary studies.

  11. Using Digital Technology to Engage and Communicate with Patients: A Survey of Patient Attitudes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenssen, Brian P; Mitra, Nandita; Shah, Anand; Wan, Fei; Grande, David

    2016-01-01

    As primary care moves toward a system of population health management, providers will need to engage patients outside traditional office-based interactions. We assessed patient attitudes regarding technology use to communicate with their primary care team or to engage with other patients outside typical office settings. Design/Participants/Main Measures We conducted a national survey using GfK KnowledgePanel(®) to examine attitudes on the use of digital technology (email, text messaging, and social media such as Facebook and Twitter) to communicate with primary care teams about health behavior goals and test results. We also assessed attitudes toward the use of digital technologies to engage with other patients in activities such as peer coaching. Of the 5119 panel members invited to participate, 3336 completed the survey (response rate, 65.2 %). Among respondents, more than half (58 %) reported using Facebook, and nearly two-thirds (64.1 %) used text messaging. Overall, few participants were willing to communicate about health goals via social media (3.1 %) or text messaging (13.3 %), compared to email (48.8 %) or phone (75.5 %) (results were similar for communication about test results). Among those that used text messaging, race/ethnicity was the only factor independently associated with greater support for text messaging [African American (OR 1.44; 95 % CI, 1.01-2.06) and Hispanic (OR 1.8; 95 % CI, 1.25-2.59)] in multivariate models. Participants interested in engaging in peer coaching through Facebook (11.7 %) were more likely to be younger (p tools for communicating with their physicians' practice. Participants were most supportive of using email for communication. Contrary to previous studies, among users of technology, low socioeconomic status and racial/ethnic minorities were equally or more likely to support use.

  12. Creation and transition of digital light processing technology to defense applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopper, Darrel G.

    2005-05-01

    A key challenge to defense science and technology programs is the identification of areas ripe for focused government investment so as to make impossible things possible on an accelerated schedule. The creation, transfer to commercial products, and transition to operational military systems of the Texas Instruments (TI) digital micromirror device (DMD) projection display technology from 1987-2005 is a case study in how DoD seeks invest in S&T for warfighting advantage while renewing the civil economy and enabling domestic production of key electronic components. The DoD investment in DMD reduced the risk enough to merit TI productization and resulted in the first VGA single ship color wheel prototype in 1992 (introduced as first commercial product in 1996) and in the first 2.36 Mpx 3-chip color demonstration system in 1995 (a resolution that is only now being introduced as a mass production product). The 1995 demonstrator was the world"s first 100% digital display system. The tenth anniversary of this 2005 achievement presents an appropriate occasion to review and document the success of this prior Air Force and DARPA investment as measured by the subsequent adoption in a wide range of civil and, especially, defense applications.

  13. Patient innovation: an analysis of patients' designs of digital technology support for everyday living with diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanstrup, Anne Marie; Bertelsen, Pernille; Nohr, Christian

    The aim of this paper is to identify characteristics of patients' contributions to innovation in health information technology (HIT). The paper outlines a theoretical definition of patient innovation and presents an analysis of four digital prototypes and 22 low-fidelity mock-ups designed by people affected by the chronic illness diabetes mellitus. Seventeen families (a total of 60 people) with one or more diabetic family members participated in design activities in a four-year research project focused on the design of digital support for everyday living with diabetes. Our analysis documented the originality of the analysed patient designs and identified three characteristics of patients' designs: socio-technical networks, objects with associated personal meanings and technology supporting the expression of identity. The paper concludes that patient innovation is defined by what is perceived as new by patients and/or others within the social system of adaptation. The analysed patient designs are original (as distinct from replications of or improvements on known products), and their characteristics are innovative contributions to the social system of everyday living with diabetes (i.e. they are perceived as new to the patients in the research study). The results of the analysis contribute to the credentials of patients as key actors in HIT innovation and call for participatory approaches in health informatics.

  14. AN ACTION RESEARCH IN ENGLISH LANGUAGE TEACHING AND LEARNING FOR CHILDREN WITH USE OF DIGITAL TECHNOLOGIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Carolina Coelho Chimenti

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The present article is based on a field research that aimed to provide educational subsidies for the use of digital technologies in teaching and learning process of English language, in two classes of the fifth grade from the elementary school, at the public school located in Campinas, São Paulo, Brazil. Based on the perspective of childhood pedagogy, which conceives the child as the protagonist and also (reproductive of knowledge, activities were carried with YouTube videos, online games, music, and many other learning objects. Likewise, observations, interviews and questionnaires were made with teachers and students involved in the research. Based on the action research, we analyzed aspects related to the contribution of some digital resources in teaching and learning of English at elementary school and we obtained many elements that allowed us to know the importance of learning a foreign language in the childhood nowadays, mainly English, and how new technologies can make learning more contextualized, meaningful, motivating children for language learning in a context in which they can be (criative.

  15. Digital Citizenship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isman, Aytekin; Canan Gungoren, Ozlem

    2014-01-01

    Era in which we live is known and referred as digital age.In this age technology is rapidly changed and developed. In light of these technological advances in 21st century, schools have the responsibility of training "digital citizen" as well as a good citizen. Digital citizens must have extensive skills, knowledge, Internet and …

  16. Integrating Digital Technologies in the German Language Classroom: A Critical Study of the Technology-Integration Experiences of Three Secondary German Teachers

    OpenAIRE

    Van Orden, Stephen

    2010-01-01

    German language teachers are gaining increased access to smart classrooms and digital technologies that offer teachers and students greater access to authentic cultural and language materials and enable more student target language communication. Teaching with technology changes the teaching and learning environment in many ways. Little is known about how integrating technology into the daily German-language-teaching curriculum changes the implicit power structures embedded in all classroom i...

  17. FCJ-192 Sand in the Information Society Machine: How Digital Technologies Change and Challenge the Paradigms of Civil Disobedience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theresa Züger

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Digital technologies have fostered the rise of new forms of civil disobedience that change and challenge established notions of this form of political action. This paper examines digital civil disobedience using the concept of friction to explore contested entanglements of this kind of protest and its new technological adaptations, as well as tensions on the conceptual level of civil disobedience. The paper is split into in three sections which offer analyses of (a the historical dimension of this form of protest, (b seven factors that represent some of the features of contemporary digital forms of civil disobedience, and (c the recurring motif of power of information within digital civil disobedience. The paper is centered on the notion that transformations of civil disobedience demand a reconsideration of traditional understandings of civil disobedience to meet the conditions of our current society.

  18. The impact of digital technology on health of populations affected by humanitarian crises: Recent innovations and current gaps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesmar, Sandra; Talhouk, Reem; Akik, Chaza; Olivier, Patrick; Elhajj, Imad H; Elbassuoni, Shady; Armoush, Sarah; Kalot, Joumana; Balaam, Madeline; Germani, Aline; Ghattas, Hala

    2016-11-01

    Digital technology is increasingly used in humanitarian action and promises to improve the health and social well-being of populations affected by both acute and protracted crises. We set out to (1) review the current landscape of digital technologies used by humanitarian actors and affected populations, (2) examine their impact on health and well-being of affected populations, and (3) consider the opportunities for and challenges faced by users of these technologies. Through a systematic search of academic databases and reports, we identified 50 digital technologies used by humanitarian actors, and/or populations affected by crises. We organized them according to the stage of the humanitarian cycle that they were used in, and the health outcomes or determinants of health they affected. Digital technologies were found to facilitate communication, coordination, and collection and analysis of data, enabling timely responses in humanitarian contexts. A lack of evaluation of these technologies, a paternalistic approach to their development, and issues of privacy and equity constituted major challenges. We highlight the need to create a space for dialogue between technology designers and populations affected by humanitarian crises.

  19. Social Media Use and Access to Digital Technology in US Young Adults in 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Amanda L; Ilakkuvan, Vinu; Jacobs, Megan A; Graham, Amanda L; Rath, Jessica M

    2017-01-01

    Background In 2015, 90% of US young adults with Internet access used social media. Digital and social media are highly prevalent modalities through which young adults explore identity formation, and by extension, learn and transmit norms about health and risk behaviors during this developmental life stage. Objective The purpose of this study was to provide updated estimates of social media use from 2014 to 2016 and correlates of social media use and access to digital technology in data collected from a national sample of US young adults in 2016. Methods Young adult participants aged 18-24 years in Wave 7 (October 2014, N=1259) and Wave 9 (February 2016, N=989) of the Truth Initiative Young Adult Cohort Study were asked about use frequency for 11 social media sites and access to digital devices, in addition to sociodemographic characteristics. Regular use was defined as using a given social media site at least weekly. Weighted analyses estimated the prevalence of use of each social media site, overlap between regular use of specific sites, and correlates of using a greater number of social media sites regularly. Bivariate analyses identified sociodemographic correlates of access to specific digital devices. Results In 2014, 89.42% (weighted n, 1126/1298) of young adults reported regular use of at least one social media site. This increased to 97.5% (weighted n, 965/989) of young adults in 2016. Among regular users of social media sites in 2016, the top five sites were Tumblr (85.5%), Vine (84.7%), Snapchat (81.7%), Instagram (80.7%), and LinkedIn (78.9%). Respondents reported regularly using an average of 7.6 social media sites, with 85% using 6 or more sites regularly. Overall, 87% of young adults reported access or use of a smartphone with Internet access, 74% a desktop or laptop computer with Internet access, 41% a tablet with Internet access, 29% a smart TV or video game console with Internet access, 11% a cell phone without Internet access, and 3% none of these

  20. Social Media Use and Access to Digital Technology in US Young Adults in 2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villanti, Andrea C; Johnson, Amanda L; Ilakkuvan, Vinu; Jacobs, Megan A; Graham, Amanda L; Rath, Jessica M

    2017-06-07

    In 2015, 90% of US young adults with Internet access used social media. Digital and social media are highly prevalent modalities through which young adults explore identity formation, and by extension, learn and transmit norms about health and risk behaviors during this developmental life stage. The purpose of this study was to provide updated estimates of social media use from 2014 to 2016 and correlates of social media use and access to digital technology in data collected from a national sample of US young adults in 2016. Young adult participants aged 18-24 years in Wave 7 (October 2014, N=1259) and Wave 9 (February 2016, N=989) of the Truth Initiative Young Adult Cohort Study were asked about use frequency for 11 social media sites and access to digital devices, in addition to sociodemographic characteristics. Regular use was defined as using a given social media site at least weekly. Weighted analyses estimated the prevalence of use of each social media site, overlap between regular use of specific sites, and correlates of using a greater number of social media sites regularly. Bivariate analyses identified sociodemographic correlates of access to specific digital devices. In 2014, 89.42% (weighted n, 1126/1298) of young adults reported regular use of at least one social media site. This increased to 97.5% (weighted n, 965/989) of young adults in 2016. Among regular users of social media sites in 2016, the top five sites were Tumblr (85.5%), Vine (84.7%), Snapchat (81.7%), Instagram (80.7%), and LinkedIn (78.9%). Respondents reported regularly using an average of 7.6 social media sites, with 85% using 6 or more sites regularly. Overall, 87% of young adults reported access or use of a smartphone with Internet access, 74% a desktop or laptop computer with Internet access, 41% a tablet with Internet access, 29% a smart TV or video game console with Internet access, 11% a cell phone without Internet access, and 3% none of these. Access to all digital devices with