WorldWideScience

Sample records for technologically literate citizen

  1. A ICT "Literacy" Revisited: or What the Literate Citizen Really Needs to Know

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Fleming

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Use of the term ‘literacy’ to describe various sorts of competence in information and communication technologies (ICTs has been widespread (e.g. digital literacy, media literacy but this is usually little more than a vaguely defined metaphorical usage. The paper revisits the notion of literacy and uses British educational sociologist BasilBernstein’s analysis of codes and of classification and framing practices in order to suggest that there is a desirable form of ICT literacy that is more than a metaphor for a general level of competence. This ICT literacy is characterized as an ability to graspboth the objects of ICT and their conditions of possibility (e.g. with reference to Open Source as a specific configuration of such conditions. Spinosa, Flores and Dreyfus’s concepts of articulation, reconfiguration and cross-appropriation are re-defined as framing practices and their strategic importance is argued for within the field of ‘conditions of possibility’ defining today’s ICTs. In making this case, the paper addresses the nature of the genuinely ‘elaborated code’ that, it is argued, must replace the pseudoelaborated code of general technical competence at the core of ICT literacy if the ICTliterate citizen is to be capable of meeting contemporary challenges.

  2. Effective citizen advocacy of beneficial nuclear technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKibben, J. Malvyn; Wood, Susan

    2007-01-01

    In 1991, a small group of citizens from communities near the Savannah River Site (SRS) formed a pro-nuclear education and advocacy group, Citizens for Nuclear Technology Awareness (CNTA). Their purpose was to: (1) counter nuclear misinformation that dominated the nation's news outlets, (2) provide education on nuclear subjects to area citizens, students, elected officials, and (3) provide informed citizen support for potential new missions for SRS when needed. To effectively accomplish these objectives it is also essential to establish and maintain good relations with community leaders and reporters that cover energy and nuclear subjects. The organization has grown considerably since its inception and has expanded its sphere of influence. We believe that our experiences over these fifteen years are a good model for effectively communicating nuclear subjects with the public. This paper describes the structure, operation and some of the results of CNTA. (authors)

  3. From the Field to the Classroom: Developing Scientifically Literate Citizens Using the Understanding Global Change Framework in Education and Citizen Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toupin, C.; Bean, J. R.; Gavenus, K.; Johnson, H.; Toupin, S.

    2017-12-01

    With the copious amount of science and pseudoscience reported on by non-experts in the media, it is critical for educators to help students develop into scientifically literate citizens. One of the most direct ways to help students develop deep scientific understanding and the skills to critically question the information they encounter is to bring science into their daily experiences and to contextualize scientific inquiry within the classroom. Our work aims to use a systems-based models approach to engage students in science, in both formal and informal contexts. Using the Understanding Global Change (UGC) and the Understanding Science models developed at the Museum of Paleontology at UC Berkeley, high school students from Arizona were tasked with developing a viable citizen science program for use at the Center for Alaskan Coastal Studies in Homer, Alaska. Experts used the UGC model to help students define why they were doing the work, and give context to the importance of citizen science. Empowered with an understanding of the scientific process, excited by the purpose of their work and how it could contribute to the scientific community, students whole-heartedly worked together to develop intertidal monitoring protocols for two locations while staying at Peterson Bay Field Station, Homer. Students, instructors, and scientists used system models to communicate and discuss their understanding of the biological, physical, and chemical processes in Kachemak Bay. This systems-based models approach is also being used in an integrative high school physics, chemistry, and biology curriculum in a truly unprecedented manner. Using the Understanding Global Change framework to organize curriculum scope and sequence, the course addresses how the earth systems work, how interdisciplinary science knowledge is necessary to understand those systems, and how scientists and students can measure changes within those systems.

  4. ICTs, Openness and Citizen Perceptions of Government: How Civic Technologies Can Facilitate External Citizen Efficacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca Rumbul

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This article examines whether civic technologies deliver an effective technique for developing the political efficacy of citizens and altering their perceived accountability of governments. Employing a survey-based methodology, a quantitative analysis was performed on the users of civic technology sites in the USA, UK, Kenya and South Africa. The primary question posed is whether the specific citizen monitoring actions facilitated by these sites cause a related effect in altering the extent to which citizens believe that governments are responsive to citizen-audit. The results indicate an enhancement in citizen efficacy and perceptions of government accountability. Notable differences detected in the user demographics between the countries studied demonstrate a wide spectrum of citizen usage; however, with common confidence displayed by respondents in the efficacy of the ICT. The findings indicate that the publication and citizen-audit of government information through civic technologies in developed and developing countries increases feelings of external efficacy and perceived government accountability.

  5. Technological utopia: political alibi, making citizen childish or brighter future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    A first set of contributions discusses the possibilities and opportunities some technological domains, innovations and concepts might give to energy: hydrogen, genetics, ITER, fourth generation nuclear reactors, decentralized photovoltaic energy in developing countries. Then, some authors propose critical and rather philosophical reflections about the blind trust in technology, about the relationship between scientists, journalists and citizens

  6. Mobilizing Senior Citizens in Co-Design of Mobile Technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malmborg, Lone; Gronvall, Erik; Messeter, Jörn

    2016-01-01

    . Based on the notions of design culture, communities of everyday practice and situated elderliness we present accounts from two European countries, and discuss methodological issues related to mobilizing senior citizens in co-design work as they have manifested themselves and influenced the Give......This paper disseminates work from the European Give&Take project, which aims at co-designing service sharing among senior citizens based on a mobile and distributed platform. With this project as a frame, our paper addresses methodological considerations of participation in co-design for ageing......&Take project. Challenges for mobilization are identified, based on an analysis of attitudes and values among design researchers and senior citizens. This analysis lead us to identify and discuss three strategies for mobilizing senior citizens in co-design of mobile technology: 1) Understanding being ‘elderly...

  7. Your Comments Here: Contextualizing Technologies, Seeking Records and Supporting Transparency for Citizen Engagement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grant Hurley

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Today, governments the world over are opening decision-making processes to citizen engagement as an aspect of open government. Citizen engagement initiatives may range from making information available and seeking feedback, to highly dynamic processes that transfer authority to communities and individuals. As part of these initiatives, governments are actively using digital technologies to gather, analyze, and store citizen input; activities that in turn create an array of records. My paper surveys a range of digital technologies used by Canadian citizen engagement case initiatives. In linking technologies, recordkeeping and citizen engagement, I present the combined frameworks of the IAP2 Spectrum and archival diplomatics as one method of understanding how recordkeeping and citizen engagement frameworks may be joined. I conclude with a discussion on defining and locating the records of citizen engagement initiatives and how records and recordkeeping may support transparency and trust in citizen engagement.

  8. Welfare technologies and surveillance in care work for elderly citizens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Agnete Meldgaard; Kamp, Annette; Grosen, Sidsel Lond

    ’ in an eldercare center. Virtual home care entails the performance of specific home care services by means of video conversations rather than physical visits in citizens’ homes (e.g. reminding citizens to take their pills). The eldercare center’s intelligent floors are equipped with sensors, which communicate...... the movements of residents to staff members through notifications on their smartphones (e.g. has a resident fallen down, or left his/her apartment). In line with other scholars (e.g. Oudshorn, 2009; Pols, 2010) we focus on how technologies, rather than simply replacing a human function or neutrally facilitate...

  9. Theoretical Propositions for the Citizen Formation Mediated by Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tania Margarita Martínez de Padrón

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The research presented emerges from the connotations concerning the formation of the citizenship by the information technology and communication. Be part of the conception of the current citizen and the influence that has emerged through the utility of the various social networks, as well as Canaima education project and the guidance provided to schoolchildren in this sense. The general objective was to generate propositions theoretical that guide the formation of citizenship mediated by ICT in the primary schools of Santa Teresa del Tuy. The methodology used was the qualitative paradigm, based on the interpretative phenomenological approach of Heidegger, which is interested in discovering and understanding the meanings, habits and practices of the human being. Castle (2000: 5. The researcher approached the field object of study to observe, describe and interpret a reality. As an instrument used the interview in depth. The information obtained was recorded in pictures which allowed to comply with the development of specific objectives through triangulation. On whose findings prevailed deviating from the use of technological tools and how these have formed the formation of citizenship in school children in their behavior and actions. At the same time, allowed know from educational technological approach, that sparing the teacher provides guidance that redirect the formation of citizenship. Also was the stated objective as it was the theoretical propositions that guide the formation of citizens ICT-mediated.

  10. Crowdsourcing Scientific Work: A Comparative Study of Technologies, Processes, and Outcomes in Citizen Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiggins, Andrea

    2012-01-01

    Citizen science projects involve the public with scientists in collaborative research. Information and communication technologies for citizen science can enable massive virtual collaborations based on voluntary contributions by diverse participants. As the popularity of citizen science increases, scientists need a more thorough understanding of…

  11. How Technology Transforms Journalism Business through Citizen-Reporters in Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aborisade, Olubunmi P.

    2010-01-01

    The use of technology and media modalities in digital technologies in today's media has created a new form of journalism. While some call it citizen-reporting, some dub it we media, or participatory news reporting. The new press evolves with the engagement of ordinary citizens in news gathering and distribution. Apart from helping to enhance the…

  12. Attitude of senior citizens towards smart home technologies:a literature review

    OpenAIRE

    Hamal Mishra, Binisha

    2015-01-01

    Smart home can be of significant importance for positive ageing allowing elderly to maintain independence, functionality, well-being and higher quality of life. Aim: The aim of this thesis is to study attitude of senior citizens towards smart home technologies. Understanding senior citizen's attitude towards current smart home technol-ogies is an important aspect in optimization of the existing technologies as well as in the design of new technologies. The review will aim to find the answe...

  13. Beyond technology : Identifying local government challenges for using digital platforms for citizen engagement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Falco, E.; Kleinhans, R.J.

    2018-01-01

    Previous research has highlighted that there is a lack of advanced technological solutions able to foster government-citizens collaboration. We argue that many examples of digital participatory platforms are already available and also ready to use for governments and citizens. Hence, causes for

  14. Welfare Technology and Surveillance in Care Work for Elderly Citizens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Agnete Meldgaard; Kamp, Annette; Grosen, Sidsel Lond

    ‘Welfare technologies’ are increasingly used in a variety of settings in the Danish welfare state (Mortensen 2015), where they are envisioned as leading to a new and smarter form of welfare state service delivery, promising increased efficiency, better quality, and citizen empowerment (Finansmini......‘Welfare technologies’ are increasingly used in a variety of settings in the Danish welfare state (Mortensen 2015), where they are envisioned as leading to a new and smarter form of welfare state service delivery, promising increased efficiency, better quality, and citizen empowerment...

  15. Cell broadcast trials in The Netherlands: Using mobile phone technology for citizens' alarming

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jagtman, H.M.

    2010-01-01

    In emergency situations authorities need to warn the public. The conventionally used method for warning citizens in The Netherlands is the use of a siren. Modern telecommunication technologies, especially the use of text-based features of mobile phones, have great potential for warning the public. In the years 2005-2007 cell broadcast was tested during several large-scale field trials with citizens in The Netherlands. One of the questions was to determine the penetration of cell broadcast for citizens' alarming. This article argues that the definition of penetration in the light of warning citizens in case of emergencies should include the citizens' responses to warning messages. In addition, the approach to determining the penetration, the data and validity issues regarding these data is discussed. The trials have shown cell broadcast has potential to become an effective citizens' alarming technology. This however requires the entire technological and organisational chain of the warning system to function correctly. Attention is required to network management, handset improvements and correct communication to the public about the conditions under which a cell broadcast message can be received. The latter includes managing realistic expectations including circumstances in which cell broadcast will not reach a citizen.

  16. CITIZEN JOURNALISM” AND THE MYTH OF REDEMPTIVE TECHNOLOGY

    OpenAIRE

    Sylvia Moretzsohn

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this article is to present a debate on the so called “citizen” journalism or “participatory journalism” and to demonstrate, among other points, the mistaken view of simply presenting a confrontation between “us” (citizens anxious to exercise freedom of expression) versus “them” (journalists trying hard to preserve their “privileged” role of informants). In this manner, I hope to contribute by off ering a new approach to this acclaimed revolution in journalism. If all of us co...

  17. Activating social strategies: Face-to-face interaction in technology-mediated citizen science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cappa, Francesco; Laut, Jeffrey; Nov, Oded; Giustiniano, Luca; Porfiri, Maurizio

    2016-11-01

    The use of crowds in research activities by public and private organizations is growing under different forms. Citizen science is a popular means of engaging the general public in research activities led by professional scientists. By involving a large number of amateur scientists, citizen science enables distributed data collection and analysis on a scale that would be otherwise difficult and costly to achieve. While advancements in information technology in the past few decades have fostered the growth of citizen science through online participation, several projects continue to fail due to limited participation. Such web-based projects may isolate the citizen scientists from the researchers. By adopting the perspective of social strategy, we investigate within a measure-manipulate-measure experiment if motivations to participate in a citizen science project can be positively influenced by a face-to-face interaction with the scientists leading the project. Such an interaction provides the participants with the possibility of asking questions on the spot and obtaining a detailed explanation of the citizen science project, its scientific merit, and environmental relevance. Social and cultural factors that moderate the effect brought about by face-to-face interactions on the motivations are also dissected and analyzed. Our findings provide an exploratory insight into a means for motivating crowds to participate in online environmental monitoring projects, also offering possible selection criteria of target audience. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Complexity and conundrums. Citizens' evaluations of potentially contentious novel food technologies using a deliberative discourse approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greehy, Gráinne M; McCarthy, Mary B; Henchion, Maeve M; Dillon, Emma J; McCarthy, Sinéad N

    2013-11-01

    This research considers the processes involved in the formation of attitudes by citizens on potentially contentious novel food technologies (NFTs). Observations of one-to-one deliberative discourses between food scientists and citizens, during which they discussed these technologies, form the basis of this enquiry. This approach enables an exploration of how individuals construct meaning around as well as interpret information about the technologies. Thematic analysis identifies key features that provide the frameworks for citizens' evaluations. How individuals make sense of these technologies is shaped by their beliefs, values and personal characteristics; their perceptions of power and control over the development and sale of NFT related products; and, the extent to which these products are relevant to their personal lives. Internal negotiations between these influences are evident, and evaluations are based on the relative importance of each influence to the individual. Internal conflicts and tensions are associated with citizens' evolving evaluative processes, which may in turn present as attitude ambivalence and instability. Many challenges are linked with engaging with the general public about these technologies, as levels of knowledge, understanding and interest vary. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. "Citizen Journalism" and the Myth of Redemptive Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvia Moretzsohn

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this article is to present a debate on the so called “citizen” journalism or “participatory journalism” and to demonstrate, among other points, the mistaken view of simply presenting a confrontation between “us” (citizens anxious to exercise freedom of expression versus “them” (journalists trying hard to preserve their “privileged” role of informants. In this manner, I hope to contribute by off ering a new approach to this acclaimed revolution in journalism. If all of us could take on the role of journalists, journalism itself would be “naturalized”, or dissolved into daily errands. However, if we imagine a new scenario with the potential to change all of us into sources of news coverage, we might see that journalism has actually become more complex. Consequently, there is a demand for applying more rigorous criteria when selecting news stories. This concept, in turn, contradicts the current logic of “real time” journalism. However, that is a topic for an alto-gether diff erent discussion.

  20. Citizen journalism” and the myth of redemptive technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvia Moretzsohn

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this article is to present a debate on the so called “citizen” journalism or “participatory journalism” and to demonstrate, among other points, the mistaken view of simply presenting a confrontation between “us” (citizens anxious to exercise freedom of expression versus “them” (journalists trying hard to preserve their “privileged” role of informants. In this manner, I hope to contribute by off ering a new approach to this acclaimed revolution in journalism. If all of us could take on the role of journalists, journalism itself would be “naturalized”, or dissolved into daily errands. However, if we imagine a new scenario with the potential to change all of us into sources of news coverage, we might see that journalism has actually become more complex. Consequently, there is a demand for applying more rigorous criteria when selecting news stories. This concept, in turn, contradicts the current logic of “real time” journalism. However, that is a topic for an alto-gether different discussion.

  1. CITIZEN JOURNALISM” AND THE MYTH OF REDEMPTIVE TECHNOLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvia Moretzsohn

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this article is to present a debate on the so called “citizen” journalism or “participatory journalism” and to demonstrate, among other points, the mistaken view of simply presenting a confrontation between “us” (citizens anxious to exercise freedom of expression versus “them” (journalists trying hard to preserve their “privileged” role of informants. In this manner, I hope to contribute by off ering a new approach to this acclaimed revolution in journalism. If all of us could take on the role of journalists, journalism itself would be “naturalized”, or dissolved into daily errands. However, if we imagine a new scenario with the potential to change all of us into sources of news coverage, we might see that journalism has actually become more complex. Consequently, there is a demand for applying more rigorous criteria when selecting news stories. This concept, in turn, contradicts the current logic of “real time” journalism. However, that is a topic for an alto-gether different discussion.

  2. Underprivileged citizens´use of technology for everyday health management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Jacob Østergaard

    In this doctoral thesis, I address the problem of inequality in health by focusing on how underprivileged citizens experience and manage health-related problems in their everyday lives. Particularly, I focus on the citizen’s use of technology for engaging in health-related occupation. The field...... of research for the thesis is occupational science (OS), while Deweyan pragmatism is called upon as a theoretical frame. The overall aim of this thesis is to develop conceptual knowledge on how to support underprivileged citizens’ engagement in health-related occupation, with attention to these citizens...

  3. Information and Communication Technologies, Genes, and Peer-Production of Knowledge to Empower Citizens' Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biggeri, Annibale; Tallacchini, Mariachiara

    2018-06-01

    The different and seemingly unrelated practices of Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) used to collect and share personal and scientific data within networked communities, and the organized storage of human genetic samples and information-namely biobanking-have merged with another recent epistemic and social phenomenon, namely scientists and citizens collaborating as "peers" in creating knowledge (or peer-production of knowledge). These different dimensions can be found in joint initiatives where scientists-and-citizens use genetic information and ICT as powerful ways to gain more control over their health and the environment. While this kind of initiative usually takes place only after rights have been infringed (or are put at risk)-as the two cases presented in the paper show-collaborative scientists-and-citizens' knowledge should be institutionally allowed to complement and corroborate official knowledge-supporting policies.

  4. Coproduction as an Approach to Technology-Mediated Citizen Participation in Emergency Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paloma Díaz

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Social and mobile computing open up new possibilities for integrating citizens’ information, knowledge, and social capital in emergency management (EM. This participation can improve the capacity of local agencies to respond to unexpected events by involving citizens not only as first line informants, but also as first responders. This participation could contribute to build resilient communities aware of the risks they are threatened by and able to mobilize their social capital to cope with them and, in turn, decrease the impact of threats and hazards. However for this participation to be possible organizations in charge of EM need to realize that involving citizens does not interfere with their protocols and that citizens are a valuable asset that can contribute to the EM process with specific skills and capabilities. In this paper we discuss the design challenges of using social and mobile computing to move to a more participatory EM process that starts by empowering both citizens and organizations in a coproduction service envisioned as a partnership effort. As an example, we describe a case study of a participatory design approach that involved professional EM workers and decision makers in an effort to understand the challenges of using technology-based solutions to integrate citizen skills and capabilities in their operation protocols. The case study made it possible to identify specific roles that citizens might play in a crisis or disaster and to envision scenarios were technologies could be used to integrate their skills into the EM process. In this way the paper contributes to the roles and the scenarios of theory-building about coproduction in EM services.

  5. Leveraging Citizen Science and Information Technology for Population Physical Activity Promotion

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Abby C.; Winter, Sandra J.; Sheats, Jylana L.; Rosas, Lisa G.; Buman, Matthew P.; Salvo, Deborah; Rodriguez, Nicole M.; Seguin, Rebecca A.; Moran, Mika; Garber, Randi; Broderick, Bonnie; Zieff, Susan G.; Sarmiento, Olga Lucia; Gonzalez, Silvia A.; Banchoff, Ann; Dommarco, Juan Rivera

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE While technology is a major driver of many of society’s comforts, conveniences, and advances, it has been responsible, in a significant way, for engineering regular physical activity and a number of other positive health behaviors out of people’s daily lives. A key question concerns how to harness information and communication technologies (ICT) to bring about positive changes in the health promotion field. One such approach involves community-engaged “citizen science,” in which local residents leverage the potential of ICT to foster data-driven consensus-building and mobilization efforts that advance physical activity at the individual, social, built environment, and policy levels. METHOD The history of citizen science in the research arena is briefly described and an evidence-based method that embeds citizen science in a multi-level, multi-sectoral community-based participatory research framework for physical activity promotion is presented. RESULTS Several examples of this citizen science-driven community engagement framework for promoting active lifestyles, called “Our Voice”, are discussed, including pilot projects from diverse communities in the U.S. as well as internationally. CONCLUSIONS The opportunities and challenges involved in leveraging citizen science activities as part of a broader population approach to promoting regular physical activity are explored. The strategic engagement of citizen scientists from socio-demographically diverse communities across the globe as both assessment as well as change agents provides a promising, potentially low-cost and scalable strategy for creating more active, healthful, and equitable neighborhoods and communities worldwide. PMID:27525309

  6. Measuring Translation Literality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carl, Michael; Schaeffer, Moritz

    2017-01-01

    Tirkkonen-Condit (2005: 407–408) argues that “It looks as if literal translation is [the result of] a default rendering procedure”. As a corollary, more literal translations should be easier to process, and less literal ones should be associated with more cognitive effort. In order to assess this...

  7. Envisioning the future of public lighting with citizens for upcoming technologies

    OpenAIRE

    Heiskanen, Olli; Acharya, Karthikeya

    2017-01-01

    Today’s cities yearn for new technological infrastructure to become cities of tomorrow. Sensor based intelligent street lighting by promising energy and financial savings are being provisioned to be a functional alternative to conventional street lighting. But involving citizens’ participation in planning such new urban infrastructure and its services is far from simple. In our project using constructive and user centred design research methods we engaged with city officials and citizens as u...

  8. Environmental information system and odour monitoring based on citizen and technology innovative sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ledent, Philippe [SPACEBEL S.A., Angleur (Belgium); Stevenot, Bernard [APS Technology, Namur (Belgium); Delva, Julien [ODOMETRIC SA, Meix-Devant-Virton (Belgium); and others

    2013-07-01

    The challenge is the integration of citizens as ''community-based'' observation providers, giving the odour perception and discomfort and getting feed-back in real time from a learning monitoring system. The level of annoyance depends on how odours are emitted and in what intensity, their dispersion under ambient atmospheric conditions and finally on citizens' exposure and perception. The Environmental Information System and Odour Monitoring developed in the project OMNISCIENTIS funded by the EU brings together state of the art technologies and open communication capabilities in order to mitigate odour annoyance. The project allows for citizen feedback, deepens knowledge on odour measurement and management and aims to support harmonised legislation at EU level. Moreover the project results can provide savings to industries. The core is an information system allowing inhabitants to serve as human sensors, acting according to sociological patterns, which influence odour perception, discomfort and nuisance. It provides a dedicated tool to consider odour acceptability, based on a community-based opinion. Due to the subjective nature of odour perception, odour monitoring and fast modelling is used to assist and adjust the information citizens provide via Smartphone and obtained by e-nose and modelling. Innovative in-situ sensors are improved to monitor ambient odour exposures. A specific odour dispersion model system is developed to obtain interrelated spatial odour exposure levels. This fast and innovative model system helps us to evaluate the performance of measures taken at the very moment odours are emitted and with respect to the way in which these occur. The Living Lab approach ensures stakeholder involvement, citizens' participation in decision-making and supports dissemination activities. The results are conveyed to stakeholders and general public. (orig.)

  9. Environmental information system and odour monitoring based on citizen and technology innovative sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ledent, Philippe; Stevenot, Bernard; Delva, Julien

    2013-01-01

    The challenge is the integration of citizens as ''community-based'' observation providers, giving the odour perception and discomfort and getting feed-back in real time from a learning monitoring system. The level of annoyance depends on how odours are emitted and in what intensity, their dispersion under ambient atmospheric conditions and finally on citizens' exposure and perception. The Environmental Information System and Odour Monitoring developed in the project OMNISCIENTIS funded by the EU brings together state of the art technologies and open communication capabilities in order to mitigate odour annoyance. The project allows for citizen feedback, deepens knowledge on odour measurement and management and aims to support harmonised legislation at EU level. Moreover the project results can provide savings to industries. The core is an information system allowing inhabitants to serve as human sensors, acting according to sociological patterns, which influence odour perception, discomfort and nuisance. It provides a dedicated tool to consider odour acceptability, based on a community-based opinion. Due to the subjective nature of odour perception, odour monitoring and fast modelling is used to assist and adjust the information citizens provide via Smartphone and obtained by e-nose and modelling. Innovative in-situ sensors are improved to monitor ambient odour exposures. A specific odour dispersion model system is developed to obtain interrelated spatial odour exposure levels. This fast and innovative model system helps us to evaluate the performance of measures taken at the very moment odours are emitted and with respect to the way in which these occur. The Living Lab approach ensures stakeholder involvement, citizens' participation in decision-making and supports dissemination activities. The results are conveyed to stakeholders and general public. (orig.)

  10. Nanotechnology as an experiment in democracy: how do citizens form opinions about technology and policy?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hornig Priest, Susanna; Greenhalgh, Ted

    2011-01-01

    This article analyzes nanotechnology as an experiment in democratic deliberation, one that seems motivated both by a desire to improve deliberative democracy and to protect the technology from undue public interference. However, rather than involving amplified (overstated) risks, nanotechnology appears to involve attenuated (understated) risks. Results from a 3-year panel study are presented to illustrate the ways in which citizens form opinions about nanotechnology, supporting the assertion that public opinion about complex technology can be both reasonable and stable. Nevertheless, the authors also voice concern that, in the absence of public pressure, risk regulation may not evolve as swiftly as it should to protect both society and industry.

  11. MIRA: internet, democracy and participation. New technologies and re-connection of the citizen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leydi Johanna Posada Amaya

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The deficit in the construction and consolidation of the Democratic Participation of citizens and, therefore, its continuos and constant distancing of the politics and politic affairs has led public institutions and political parties to own the tools that the Technologies of Communication offer with the main purpose of re-connecting the electorate with their representatives. The case study of the Movimiento Independiente de Renovación Absoluta (MIRA deals with identifying the type of participation and democracy that has constituted thanks to the tools offered by the Information and Comunication Tecnologies (TIC available in its web page.

  12. Assessing the Role of Technology in Citizen Science: A Volunteer's Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, J. H.; Force, A.

    2017-12-01

    From a volunteer's perspective, citizen science can provide a direct connection between outdoor enthusiasts and the scientists who study these natural environments. These experiences are both rewarding and engaging, as participants become aware of field sites, the scientific method, and their own environmental impacts. Recent technological advances (i.e. smart phones and mobile applications) have the potential to transform citizen science, specifically as technology can both enable and modernize the networks between a large community of potential volunteers and scientists using these data. By providing volunteers who venture into largely understudied and remote areas with an easy method for data collection and entry, it becomes easier to encourage volunteer engagement in science, while maintaining quality control over the data collection process. Participating in Adventure Scientists' projects demonstrates the application of technology as an effective engagement tool, especially when compared to traditional pen and paper surveys often conducted. Pairing volunteers with simple, familiar technology increases engagement, particularly for volunteers otherwise intimidated by the scientific process. When equipped with useful features, such as GPS functionality, smartphone apps offer a simple and standardized method of data collection and description. Yet a variety of factors can complicate field sampling; final choices are ultimately left to the judgment of the volunteer and perhaps could be guided by use of a phone/app. Importantly, Adventure Scientists conducts follow ups and volunteer surveys, which are critical to the continued evaluation of volunteer experiences and the sampling methods themselves. For future projects, creating a forum in which scientists and volunteers can interact (perhaps also through a phone app) could provide scientific context for volunteers, further investing them in the scientific process and their continued participation. Overall, the

  13. Flexible technologies and smart clothing for citizen medicine, home healthcare, and disease prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axisa, Fabrice; Schmitt, Pierre Michael; Gehin, Claudine; Delhomme, Georges; McAdams, Eric; Dittmar, André

    2005-09-01

    Improvement of the quality and efficiency of healthcare in medicine, both at home and in hospital, is becoming more and more important for patients and society at large. As many technologies (micro technologies, telecommunication, low-power design, new textiles, and flexible sensors) are now available, new user-friendly devices can be developed to enhance the comfort and security of the patient. As clothes and textiles are in direct contact with about 90% of the skin surface, smart sensors and smart clothes with noninvasive sensors are an attractive solution for home-based and ambulatory health monitoring. Moreover, wearable devices or smart homes with exosensors are also potential solutions. All these systems can provide a safe and comfortable environment for home healthcare, illness prevention, and citizen medicine.

  14. Citizen Science into Action - Robust Data with Affordable Technologies for Flood Risks Management in the Himalayas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandeya, B.; Uprety, M.; Paul, J. D.; Dugar, S.; Buytaert, W.

    2017-12-01

    With a robust and affordable monitoring system, a wealth of hydrological data can be generated which is fundamental to predict flood risks more accurately. Since the Himalayan region is characterized by data deficiency and unpredictable hydrological behaviour, a locally based participatory monitoring system is a necessity to deal with frequently occurring flooding incidents. A gap in hydrological data is the main bottleneck for establishing any effective flood early warning system. Therefore, an alternative and affordable technical solution can only overcome the situation and support flood risks management activities in the region. In coordination with local people, government authorities and NGOs, we have established a citizen science monitoring system, in which we tested two types of low-cost sensors, ultrasound and LiDAR, in the Karnali river basin of Nepal. The results confirm the robustness of sensor data when compared to conventional radar system based monitoring data. Additionally, our findings also confirmed that the ultrasound sensors are only useful to small rivers whereas the LiDAR sensors are suitable to large river basins with highly variable local climatic conditions. Since the collected sensor data can be directly used in operational flood early warning system in the basin, an opportunity has been created for integrating both affordable technology and citizen science into existing hydrological monitoring practice. Finally, a successful integration could become a testament for upscaling the practice and building flood risk resilient communities in the region.

  15. #DroneHackademy: Aerial countervisuality and citizen science for UAVS as social technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo de Soto Suárez

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Drones are a dark technology (Lichty. The military drones that kill civilians are unevenly distributed, geographically. The video "Our Drone Future" (Cornell imagines a scenario where UAVs (Unmanned Aerial Vehicles, with their technologies and capabilities, come to be pervasive in the skies of our future cities. The panoptic vision of the drone is a fundamental part of contemporary “complex of visuality” defined by the military-industrial complex, according to Mirzoeff. He proposes "the right to look" as a form of opposition to this alliance of visuality and power. The right to look from the skies as a practice of contravisuality using drones is claimed and exercised by an increasing number of hackers, artivists, social scientists, independent journalists and environmental activists, such as Mark Devries (FarmDrones or Lot Amorós (Guerilla Drone, Flone. In order to investigate and act in the present on "Our future drone", we propose the creation of a citizen laboratory and a learning community in the use of UAVs as social technology. Drone Hackademy joined for a week ten representatives of collectives from Rio de Janeiro and other Brazilian cities. Participants were teached how and why to protect themselves from UAVs. Activities included the construction of free hardware and software UAVs such as Flone; and the production of an aerial mapping of the local community resisting eviction in the area annex to the Olympic Park.

  16. Citizen Management of Technology: A Science and Technology Studies approach to wireless networks and urban governance trough guifi.net

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yann Bona Beauvois

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Thesis presented at the Departament de Psicologia Social de la UAB by Yann Bona on December, 2010. Directed by Dr. Joan Pujol Tarrés.This dissertation explores the many ways in which citizens aiming to manage technologies in urban scape relate to public administrations. To accomplish it's task, it brings forward certain STS notions such as cosmopolitics, hybrid composition or technical democracy. On a general level, this thesis seeks an answer to Bruno Latour concern with what does it mean to conceive the technical as political?. We offer a set of conclusions based on what we choose to name a Sociotechnique of Public Policy .Our work relies on a case study focused on a free and open wireless network (located in Catalunya for the most part and called guifi.net that emerged from the desire and will of Civil Society wich, up to date, turns out to be the world's biggest free wireless network.

  17. Literally better : Analyzing and improving the quality of literals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beek, Wouter; Ilievski, Filip; Debattista, Jeremy; Schlobach, Stefan; Wielemaker, Jan

    2018-01-01

    Quality is a complicated and multifarious topic in contemporary Linked Data research. The aspect of literal quality in particular has not yet been rigorously studied. Nevertheless, analyzing and improving the quality of literals is important since literals form a substantial (one in seven

  18. Everyday life innovation potential: when technology has to make sense. Citizens living in high-risk areas for health, using health-promoting technologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Jacob Østergaard

    2014-01-01

    ) to contribute, along with other health professionals, in dealing with the problem of inequality in health. In this study health promoting technologies for adult citizens living in high risk areas of health, is chosen as one particular area of interest for occupational therapists within the field of health...

  19. Literality and Cognitive Effort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lacruz, Isabel; Carl, Michael; Yamada, Masaru

    2018-01-01

    We introduce a notion of pause-word ratio computed using ranges of pause lengths rather than lower cutoffs for pause lengths. Standard pause-word ratios are indicators of cognitive effort during different translation modalities.The pause range version allows for the study of how different types...... remoteness. We use data from the CRITT TPR database, comparing translation and post-editing from English to Japanese and from English to Spanish, and study the interaction of pause-word ratio for short pauses ranging between 300 and 500ms with syntactic remoteness, measured by the CrossS feature, semantic...... remoteness, measured by HTra, and syntactic and semantic remoteness, measured by Literality....

  20. Citizen participation and citizen initiatives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matthoefer, H.

    1977-01-01

    Contents: Social conditions for citizen initiatives - technical change and employment - crisis behaviour - socio-psychological analysis of political planning; legitimation - presentation and criticism - conditions for citizen initiatives coming into being within the field of tension citizen : administration - legal problems of citizen initiatives - environmental protection in the energy discussion; participation; models. (HP) [de

  1. Harnessing Technology and Citizen Science to Support Neighborhoods that Promote Active Living in Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosas, Lisa G; Salvo, Deborah; Winter, Sandra J; Cortes, David; Rivera, Juan; Rodriguez, Nicole M; King, Abby C

    2016-12-01

    Middle- and low-income countries bear 80 % of the global chronic disease burden. Population-level, multi-sectoral approaches to promoting healthful lifestyles that take into local physical, socioeconomic, and sociocultural characteristics of both the environment and the population are needed. The "Nuestra Voz (Our Voice)" is one such approach that involves neighborhood residents acting as "citizen scientists" to systematically gather information on the barriers and facilitators of physical activity in their neighborhoods and then use their data to collectively advocate for local environmental- and policy-level changes to support active living. We pilot tested this approach in Cuernavaca, Mexico with adults and adolescents. This community-engaged and participatory approach is driven by residents, who utilize a GPS-enabled electronic tablet-based application with simple audio-based instructions to take photographs and record audio narratives of facets of their neighborhood that promote or hinder active living. After collecting these data, the citizen scientists come together in a community meeting and use their data to prioritize realistic, multi-level changes for promoting active living in their neighborhoods. A survey assessed participants' acceptability of the approach. Participating citizen scientists included 32 adults and 9 adolescents. The citizen scientists rated the acceptability of five of the nine acceptability survey items with an average of 4.0 or higher out of 5.0, indicating they thought it was "fun," were comfortable carrying the tablet, were likely to use it again, and would recommend it to friends and family. Items with average scores of less than 4 were all related to safety concerns. The most common barriers reported by citizen scientists using the tablet were poor sidewalk quality, presence of trash, negative characteristics of the streets, unpleasant aesthetics (e.g., graffiti), and presence of parks and recreational facilities. The Our Voice

  2. From the Literate Citizen to the Qualified Science Worker

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Jette Karen; Daugbjerg, Peer Schrøder; Sillasen, Martin Krabbe

    2015-01-01

    This article presents an analysis of the political framing of science education in Denmark from 1993 to 2009. Using critical discourse analysis the article builds an argument about how reforms have brought fundamental changes in the role of education, changes that resonate with an international d...... discourse of neoliberalism. The analysis illustrates how neoliberal ideas about individualisation, competencies and accountability have penetrated science educational policy and the curricular aims of primary school science.......This article presents an analysis of the political framing of science education in Denmark from 1993 to 2009. Using critical discourse analysis the article builds an argument about how reforms have brought fundamental changes in the role of education, changes that resonate with an international...

  3. Technological utopia: political alibi, making citizen childish or brighter future; Les utopies technologiques: Alibi politique, infantilisation du citoyen ou lendemains qui chantent?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2005-07-01

    A first set of contributions discusses the possibilities and opportunities some technological domains, innovations and concepts might give to energy: hydrogen, genetics, ITER, fourth generation nuclear reactors, decentralized photovoltaic energy in developing countries. Then, some authors propose critical and rather philosophical reflections about the blind trust in technology, about the relationship between scientists, journalists and citizens

  4. Oral perfomances in a (post-) literate society

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sanfratello, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    The attempt of the present paper is to introduce the following question: How is it possible to still talk about “oral performances” in a literate, indeed “postliterate” society? In order to stress the relevance of such a topic, I will examine some achievements in research fields both dealing...... with literary studies and musicological enquiry. Taking into account some instances of oral musical traditions gathered during ethnomusicological fieldwork, e.g. the singing of mandinàdhes (couplets of improvised rhymed verses) from Crete and the Byzantine liturgical chant of the Albanians of Sicily, I...... will analyse the process both of (re)writing a poetic-formulaic tradition by adapting itself to the modern multimedia technology (i.e. the “media literate poets” case on Crete) and developing techniques of oral safeguarding without the usage of musical notation (i.e. the case of the Sicilian-Albanian community...

  5. Meanings and experiences of assistive technologies in everyday lives of older citizens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahler, Anne Marie; Maling Rasmussen, Dorte; Andersen, Pernille Tanggaard

    2016-01-01

    . Results: Review of these studies show that older people generally have positive attitudes towards AT, but also that acceptance of technologies is a potentially stressful process where trust towards technologies and other people are of importance. Older people have ambivalent experiences with technology......Purpose: The purpose of this study was to synthesize the available qualitative studies on the meanings of assistive technologies (AT) in elderly people's everyday lives in order to identify central concepts, themes, and findings from existing research. Method: A systematic search of the literature...... was conducted, using predetermined search strategies. Exclusion criteria were, in accordance with the meta-interpretive approach, developed iteratively during the reading of abstracts and articles. Interpretations from the included studies were used as data for thematic analysis and synthesis of findings...

  6. Índice de Literal

    OpenAIRE

    Rubí, Eduardo

    2012-01-01

    Chronological index of Literal journal, which appeared only three numbers, irregular frequency, published in Buenos Aires, between 1973 and 1977. The intersections between literature, psychoanalysis, politics and culture, made ​​this publication was transformed into an element of unavoidable reference in the analysis of the complex society of the seventies Argentina.

  7. Citizen's Report

    Data.gov (United States)

    Office of Personnel Management — The fiscal year (FY) 2008 Citizen's Report is a summary of performance and financial results for the U.S. Office of Personnel Management (OPM). OPM chose to produce...

  8. Technological Solutions to Social and Citizen Problems. The Case of Civic and Public Challenges in Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Adalberto TENA-ESPINOZA-DE-LOS-MONTEROS

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the process of civic innovation that, based on technological solutions and open initiatives, the civic society’s organization Codeando México suggests for the attention and solution of social and civic problems in Mexico. The Retos Cívicos (Civic Challenges and Retos Públicos (Public Challenges initiatives are addressed and described as experiences of innovation in the implementation of technological strategies for the solution of social and civic problems. A reflection is made on the civic appropriation of the ICTs and its irruption in the processes of innovation, as well as on the impact that the ICTs have in the conformation of a new civic ecosystem. Last, the strategies of Hacking cívico (Civic Hacking and Comunidades Cívicas (Civic Communities that the Codeando México organization promotes as a model for the linkage and civic participation within the frame of civic innovation, are mentioned.

  9. The Public and Nanotechnology: How Citizens Make Sense of Emerging Technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scheufele, Dietram A. [University of Wisconsin, Madison School of Journalism and Mass Communication (United States)], E-mail: scheufele@wisc.edu; Lewenstein, Bruce V. [Cornell University, Department of Communication and Department of Science and Technology Studies (United States)

    2005-12-15

    We report findings from a national telephone survey on levels of knowledge about and attitudes toward nanotechnology that demonstrate how people make decisions about emerging technologies. Our findings confirm previous research that suggests that people form opinions and attitudes even in the absence of relevant scientific or policy-related information. In fact, our data show that cognitive shortcuts or heuristics - often provided by mass media - are currently a key factor in influencing how the public thinks about nanotechnology and about its risks and benefits, and in determining the level of support among the public for further funding for research in this area.

  10. The Public and Nanotechnology: How Citizens Make Sense of Emerging Technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scheufele, Dietram A.; Lewenstein, Bruce V.

    2005-01-01

    We report findings from a national telephone survey on levels of knowledge about and attitudes toward nanotechnology that demonstrate how people make decisions about emerging technologies. Our findings confirm previous research that suggests that people form opinions and attitudes even in the absence of relevant scientific or policy-related information. In fact, our data show that cognitive shortcuts or heuristics - often provided by mass media - are currently a key factor in influencing how the public thinks about nanotechnology and about its risks and benefits, and in determining the level of support among the public for further funding for research in this area

  11. Challenge of the new information technologies: the need to respond to citizens' information needs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, M.G.

    1983-01-01

    Initiatives have been undertaken in several sectors of society (corporations, universities, associations, government) to apply various information technologies to better meet the needs of institutions and the citizenry. Through pilot projects and modularly developed operational systems, the diverse information requirements of users are being fulfilled in ways only possible through computer and telecommunications support. Selective descriptions are provided of leading videotex, teletext, and home computer systems, including commentary on the educational and informational aspects of these services, with special attention to provisions for rural communities and other disadvantaged societal elements not well served by the existing information infrastructure. 12 references.

  12. Improving human welfare through appropriate technology: government responsibility, citizen duty or customer choice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, M; Franceys, R

    1995-05-01

    This paper explores recent attempts to improve the effectiveness of environmental health programmes and projects by reference to the International Drinking Water Supply and Sanitation Decade (1980-1990) and beyond. Reference is made to how water and sanitation as technical interventions have drawn upon the natural sciences, notably concepts of race and sex, and the social sciences including culture and gender, for their authority and legitimacy. A new and apparently progressive movement, the Water Decade sought to challenge the powerful and enduring high tech image of development on which much western environmental and social transformations have been based. Beginning as a critique of modernism with a commitment to basic needs as human rights, it was driven by a recognition that sophisticated technology could not satisfy human health needs. Alternative technologies would, by contrast, cater for a more extensive and varied market and would promote participatory approaches to service delivery. The paper demonstrates how, during the course of the Decade, sections of the aid community began to redefine basic needs as commodities involving the efficient marketing and delivery of a product with minimal state intervention. Within a shifting international political and economic context, it examines the changing role of the expert and the links being forged between large donors, non-governmental organisations and the private sector. The significance of this reformulated progressivism for the development debate is then considered, notably in relation to concepts of citizenship, consumer choice and the role of the state.

  13. Technology: An Integral Part of Students' Learning and Lives

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Joseph

    2008-01-01

    In an effort to assist with the preparation of "citizens who are globally aware, civically engaged, and capable of managing their lives and careers, and young people who are economically and financially literate and fluent in information, media and technology skills," a host of businesses, educational organizations, and civic groups…

  14. Educating Digital Citizens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Digital citizenship is how educators, citizens, and parents can teach where the lines of cyber safety and ethics are in the interconnected online world their students will inhabit. Aside from keeping technology users safe, digital citizenship also prepares students to survive and thrive in an environment embedded with information, communication,…

  15. Science knowledge and biblical literalism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zigerell, L J

    2012-04-01

    Biblical literalists are often described as scientific illiterates, but little if any empirical research has tested this claim. Analysis of a sixteen-item battery from the 2008 US General Social Survey revealed that literalists possess less science knowledge than those with other views of Scripture, but that much of this deficit can be attributed to demographic factors and unequal educational attainment. The marginal direct effect of biblical belief suggests that literalism is not incompatible with knowledge of science and, therefore, the best avenue for increasing science knowledge among literalists may be to foster interest in science and design science courses to attenuate any perceived conflict between science and religion.

  16. SASWeave: Literate Programming Using SAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Russell V. Lenth

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available SASweave is a collection of scripts that allow one to embed SAS code into a LATEX document, and automatically incorporate the results as well. SASweave is patterned after Sweave, which does the same thing for code written in R. In fact, a document may contain both SAS and R code. Besides the convenience of being able to easily incorporate SAS examples in a document, SASweave facilitates the concept of “literate programming”: having code, documentation, and results packaged together. Among other things, this helps to ensure that the SAS output in the document is in concordance with the code.

  17. SASWeave: Literate Programming Using SAS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lenth, Russell V; Højsgaard, Søren

    2007-01-01

    SASweave is a collection of scripts that allow one to embed SAS code into a LATEX document, and automatically incorporate the results as well. SASweave is patterned after Sweave, which does the same thing for code written in R. In fact, a document may contain both SAS and R code. Besides...... the convenience of being able to easily incorporate SAS examples in a document, SASweave facilitates the concept of "literate programming": having code, documentation, and results packaged together. Among other things, this helps to ensure that the SAS output in the document is in concordance with the code...

  18. Creating a testing field where delta technology and water innovations are tested and demonstrated with the help of citizen science methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vries, Sandra; Rutten, Martine; de Vries, Liselotte; Anema, Kim; Klop, Tanja; Kaspersma, Judith

    2017-04-01

    In highly populated deltas, much work is to be done. Complex problems ask for new and knowledge driven solutions. Innovations in delta technology and water can bring relief to managing the water rich urban areas. Testing fields form a fundamental part of the knowledge valorisation for such innovations. In such testing fields, product development by start-ups is coupled with researchers, thus supplying new scientific insights. With the help of tests, demonstrations and large-scale applications by the end-users, these innovations find their way to the daily practices of delta management. More and more cities embrace the concept of Smart Cities to tackle the ongoing complexity of urban problems and to manage the city's assets - such as its water supply networks and other water management infrastructure. Through the use of new technologies and innovative systems, data are collected from and with citizens and devices - then processed and analysed. The information and knowledge gathered are keys to enabling a better quality of life. By testing water innovations together with citizens in order to find solutions for water management problems, not only highly spatial amounts of data are provided by and/or about these innovations, they are also improved and demonstrated to the public. A consortium consisting of a water authority, a science centre, a valorisation program and two universities have joined forces to create a testing field for delta technology and water innovations using citizen science methods. In this testing field, the use of citizen science for water technologies is researched and validated by facilitating pilot projects. In these projects, researchers, start-ups and citizens work together to find the answer to present-day water management problems. The above mentioned testing field tests the use of crowd-sourcing data as for example hydrological model inputs, or to validate remote sensing applications, or improve water management decisions. Currently the

  19. Citizen Journalism and Digital Voices: Instituting a Collaborative Process between Global Youth, Technology and Media for Positive Social Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worley, Robin

    2011-01-01

    Millions of youths in developing countries are described by UNICEF as "invisible and excluded." They live at the margins of society, facing challenges to their daily existence, powerless to make positive changes. But the emergence of citizen journalism and digital storytelling may offer these youths a chance to share their voices and…

  20. The Nexus of Information Technology and Democracy: Theorizing e-Democracy and Citizen Participation in Sub-Saharan Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nchise, Abinwi C.

    2012-01-01

    The exponential growth of the Internet and mobile phone usage in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) within the last decade has created many different platforms for citizens' political participation. This appears to be changing the political landscape of most countries within the region as governments are increasingly held responsible for their actions.…

  1. Citizen Sensing for Improved Urban Environmental Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qijun Jiang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Citizen science is increasingly being used in diverse research domains. With the emergence and rapid development of sensor technologies, citizens potentially have more powerful tools to collect data and generate information to understand their living environment. Although sensor technologies are developing fast, citizen sensing has not been widely implemented yet and published studies are only a few. In this paper, we analyse the practical experiences from an implementation of citizen sensing for urban environment monitoring. A bottom-up model in which citizens develop and use sensors for environmental monitoring is described and assessed. The paper focuses on a case study of Amsterdam Smart Citizens Lab using NO2 sensors for air quality monitoring. We found that the bottom-up citizen sensing is still challenging but can be successful with open cooperation and effective use of online and offline facilities. Based on the assessment, suggestions are proposed for further implementations and research.

  2. Literal/non literal and the processing of verbal irony

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Yus Ramos

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 21 false false false ES X-NONE X-NONE MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Tabla normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin-top:0cm; mso-para-margin-right:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:10.0pt; mso-para-margin-left:0cm; line-height:115%; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;} En el presente artículo se propone una distinción terminológica entre 'proposición expresada 'evitada y 'proposición expresada' Contemplada, desde una perspectiva cognitiva (sobre todo desde la teoría de la relevancia, En esta propuesta terminológica subyace la afirmación de que la identificación rápida, lenta o inexistente de la ironía depende del número de incompatibilidades detectado por el destinatario en múltiples activaciones mentales de las fuentes contextuales disponibles, Esta visión de la comprensión de la ironía intenta arrojar luz sobre debates, aún por  dilucidar, como por ejemplo el que se centra en el papel del significado literal en el procesamiento de la ironía verbal. o sobre si el procesamiento de la ironía necesariamente exige más esfuerzo de procesamiento que el procesamiento de enunciados explícitos.

  3. Visual truths of citizen reportage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Allan, Stuart; Peters, Chris

    2015-01-01

    In striving to better understand issues associated with citizen contributions to newsmaking in crisis situations, this article identifies and elaborates four specific research problematics – bearing witness, technologies of truth-telling, mediating visualities and affectivities of othering...... – in order to recast more familiar modes of enquiry. Specifically, it provides an alternative heuristic to theorize the journalistic mediation of citizen imagery, and the myriad ways this process of negotiation maintains, repairs and at times disrupts the interstices of professional–amateur boundaries...

  4. Using Food Science Demonstrations to Engage Students of All Ages in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Shelly J.; Bohn, Dawn M.; Rasmussen, Aaron J.; Sutherland, Elizabeth A.

    2012-01-01

    The overarching goal of the Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) Education Initiative is to foster effective STEM teaching and learning throughout the educational system at the local, state, and national levels, thereby producing science literate citizens and a capable STEM workforce. To contribute to achieving this goal, we…

  5. Citizen Seismology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bossu, Rémy; Gilles, Sébastien; Mazet-Roux, Gilles; Kamb, Linus; Frobert, Laurent

    2010-05-01

    In science, projects which involve volunteers for observations, measurements, computation are grouped under the term, Citizen Science. They range from bird or planet census to distributing computing on volonteers's computer. Over the last five years, the EMSC has been developing tools and strategy to collect information on earthquake's impact from the first persons to be informed, i.e. the witnesses. By extension, it is named Citizen Seismology. The European Mediterranean Seismological Centre (EMSC), a scientific not-for-profit NGO, benefits from the high visibility of its rapid earthquake information services (www.emsc-csem.org) which attract an average of more than half a million visits a month from 160 countries. Witnesses converge to its site within a couple of minutes of earthquake's occurrence to find out information about the cause of the shaking they have just been through. The convergence generates brutal increases of hit rate which can be automatically detected. They are often the first indication about the occurrence of a felt event. Witnesses' locations are determined from their IP addresses. Localities exhibiting statistically significant increase of traffic are mapped to produce the "felt map". This map available within 5 to 8 minutes of the earthquake's occurrence represents the area where the event was felt. It is the fastest way to collect in-situ information on the consequences of an earthquake. Widespread damage region are expected to be mapped through a significant lack or absence of visitors. A second tool involving the visitors is an online macroseismic questionnaire available in 21 languages. It complements the felt maps as it can describes the level of shaking or damage, but is only available in 90 to 120 minutes. Witnesses can also share their pictures of damage. They used it also to provide us exceptional pictures of transient phenomena. With the University of Edinburgh, we are finalising a prototype named ShakemApple, linking Apple

  6. Computerized 50 liter volume calibration system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proffitt, T.H.

    1990-01-01

    A system has been designed for the Savannah River Site that will be used to calibrate product shipping containers. For accountability purposes, it is necessary that these containers be calibrated to a very high precision. The Computerized 50 Liter Volume Calibration System (CVCS), which is based on the Ideal Gas Law (IGL), will use reference volumes with precision of no less ±0.03%, and helium to calibrate the containers to have a total error of no greater than ±0.10%. A statistical interpretation of the system has given a theoretical total calculated error of ±0.08%. Tests with the system will be performed once fabrication is complete to experimentally verify the calculated error. Since the total error was calculated using the worst case scenario, the actual error should be significantly less than the calculated value. The computer controlled, totally automated system is traceable to the National Institute of Standards and Technology. The design, calibration procedure, and statistical interpretation of the system will be discussed. 1 ref

  7. Legislative and ethical aspects of introducing new technologies in medical care for senior citizens in developed countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kacetl J

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Jaroslav Kacetl,1 Petra Maresova2 1Department of Applied Linguistics, 2Department of Economics, Faculty of Informatics and Management, University of Hradec Kralove, Hradec Kralove, Czech Republic Introduction: The majority of developed countries are currently experiencing demographic aging. The most frequently expressed concerns related to the changing age structure are the increased costs of social and medical care, a lack of labor force in the job market, and financial sustainability of the pension system. These concerns are often based on the pessimistic view of population aging. This view understands aging as a prolonged period of illness and suffering. On the other hand, optimists believe that a longer life span is a result of increased quality of life and better health care. The quality of life may be improved not only by medicaments, but also by rapidly developing area of medical devices, which allow better care for seniors in many areas.Aim: This contribution aims to assess the legislative environment and ethical questions related to the use of medical devices, especially medical devices, in medical care for senior citizens.Methods: The methods used in this study are literature reviews of legislative and ethical environment in the European Union (EU and the US.Results: Main findings of this study result from assessing the state of medical device regulations in Europe and the US. Namely, the US regulation seems to be better arranged, which is probably due to the fact that there is only one responsible body – the US Food and Drug Administration, which is responsible for all medical device regulations. On the other hand, in the EU, talks about new legislation are led by ministers from all the EU member states and it may take a long time before all the EU countries come to an agreement. Keywords: senior citizen, medical devices, legislation, ethical aspects

  8. Geography literation to improve spatial intelligence of high school student

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utami, WS; Zain, IM

    2018-01-01

    Spatial intelligence is deeply related to success in the STEM disciplines (science,technology, engineering, and math). spatial intelligence as a transversal capacity which is useful for everyday life but which cannot be characterized in any specific and distinctive way, as are, for example, linguistic or mathematical ability. The ability of geographical literacy relates to spatial intelligence. test results prove that the ability of high-liter geography of high school students found in students who have a good spatial intelligence score

  9. Crowdsourcing, citizen sensing and Sensor Web technologies for public and environmental health surveillance and crisis management: trends, OGC standards and application examples

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kamel Boulos, Maged N

    2011-12-21

    Abstract \\'Wikification of GIS by the masses\\' is a phrase-term first coined by Kamel Boulos in 2005, two years earlier than Goodchild\\'s term \\'Volunteered Geographic Information\\'. Six years later (2005-2011), OpenStreetMap and Google Earth (GE) are now full-fledged, crowdsourced \\'Wikipedias of the Earth\\' par excellence, with millions of users contributing their own layers to GE, attaching photos, videos, notes and even 3-D (three dimensional) models to locations in GE. From using Twitter in participatory sensing and bicycle-mounted sensors in pervasive environmental sensing, to creating a 100,000-sensor geo-mashup using Semantic Web technology, to the 3-D visualisation of indoor and outdoor surveillance data in real-time and the development of next-generation, collaborative natural user interfaces that will power the spatially-enabled public health and emergency situation rooms of the future, where sensor data and citizen reports can be triaged and acted upon in real-time by distributed teams of professionals, this paper offers a comprehensive state-of-the-art review of the overlapping domains of the Sensor Web, citizen sensing and \\'human-in-the-loop sensing\\' in the era of the Mobile and Social Web, and the roles these domains can play in environmental and public health surveillance and crisis\\/disaster informatics. We provide an in-depth review of the key issues and trends in these areas, the challenges faced when reasoning and making decisions with real-time crowdsourced data (such as issues of information overload, "noise", misinformation, bias and trust), the core technologies and Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) standards involved (Sensor Web Enablement and Open GeoSMS), as well as a few outstanding project implementation examples from around the world.

  10. Crowdsourcing, citizen sensing and sensor web technologies for public and environmental health surveillance and crisis management: trends, OGC standards and application examples

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    'Wikification of GIS by the masses' is a phrase-term first coined by Kamel Boulos in 2005, two years earlier than Goodchild's term 'Volunteered Geographic Information'. Six years later (2005-2011), OpenStreetMap and Google Earth (GE) are now full-fledged, crowdsourced 'Wikipedias of the Earth' par excellence, with millions of users contributing their own layers to GE, attaching photos, videos, notes and even 3-D (three dimensional) models to locations in GE. From using Twitter in participatory sensing and bicycle-mounted sensors in pervasive environmental sensing, to creating a 100,000-sensor geo-mashup using Semantic Web technology, to the 3-D visualisation of indoor and outdoor surveillance data in real-time and the development of next-generation, collaborative natural user interfaces that will power the spatially-enabled public health and emergency situation rooms of the future, where sensor data and citizen reports can be triaged and acted upon in real-time by distributed teams of professionals, this paper offers a comprehensive state-of-the-art review of the overlapping domains of the Sensor Web, citizen sensing and 'human-in-the-loop sensing' in the era of the Mobile and Social Web, and the roles these domains can play in environmental and public health surveillance and crisis/disaster informatics. We provide an in-depth review of the key issues and trends in these areas, the challenges faced when reasoning and making decisions with real-time crowdsourced data (such as issues of information overload, "noise", misinformation, bias and trust), the core technologies and Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) standards involved (Sensor Web Enablement and Open GeoSMS), as well as a few outstanding project implementation examples from around the world. PMID:22188675

  11. Crowdsourcing, citizen sensing and sensor web technologies for public and environmental health surveillance and crisis management: trends, OGC standards and application examples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamel Boulos Maged N

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract 'Wikification of GIS by the masses' is a phrase-term first coined by Kamel Boulos in 2005, two years earlier than Goodchild's term 'Volunteered Geographic Information'. Six years later (2005-2011, OpenStreetMap and Google Earth (GE are now full-fledged, crowdsourced 'Wikipedias of the Earth' par excellence, with millions of users contributing their own layers to GE, attaching photos, videos, notes and even 3-D (three dimensional models to locations in GE. From using Twitter in participatory sensing and bicycle-mounted sensors in pervasive environmental sensing, to creating a 100,000-sensor geo-mashup using Semantic Web technology, to the 3-D visualisation of indoor and outdoor surveillance data in real-time and the development of next-generation, collaborative natural user interfaces that will power the spatially-enabled public health and emergency situation rooms of the future, where sensor data and citizen reports can be triaged and acted upon in real-time by distributed teams of professionals, this paper offers a comprehensive state-of-the-art review of the overlapping domains of the Sensor Web, citizen sensing and 'human-in-the-loop sensing' in the era of the Mobile and Social Web, and the roles these domains can play in environmental and public health surveillance and crisis/disaster informatics. We provide an in-depth review of the key issues and trends in these areas, the challenges faced when reasoning and making decisions with real-time crowdsourced data (such as issues of information overload, "noise", misinformation, bias and trust, the core technologies and Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC standards involved (Sensor Web Enablement and Open GeoSMS, as well as a few outstanding project implementation examples from around the world.

  12. Crowdsourcing, citizen sensing and sensor web technologies for public and environmental health surveillance and crisis management: trends, OGC standards and application examples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamel Boulos, Maged N; Resch, Bernd; Crowley, David N; Breslin, John G; Sohn, Gunho; Burtner, Russ; Pike, William A; Jezierski, Eduardo; Chuang, Kuo-Yu Slayer

    2011-12-21

    'Wikification of GIS by the masses' is a phrase-term first coined by Kamel Boulos in 2005, two years earlier than Goodchild's term 'Volunteered Geographic Information'. Six years later (2005-2011), OpenStreetMap and Google Earth (GE) are now full-fledged, crowdsourced 'Wikipedias of the Earth' par excellence, with millions of users contributing their own layers to GE, attaching photos, videos, notes and even 3-D (three dimensional) models to locations in GE. From using Twitter in participatory sensing and bicycle-mounted sensors in pervasive environmental sensing, to creating a 100,000-sensor geo-mashup using Semantic Web technology, to the 3-D visualisation of indoor and outdoor surveillance data in real-time and the development of next-generation, collaborative natural user interfaces that will power the spatially-enabled public health and emergency situation rooms of the future, where sensor data and citizen reports can be triaged and acted upon in real-time by distributed teams of professionals, this paper offers a comprehensive state-of-the-art review of the overlapping domains of the Sensor Web, citizen sensing and 'human-in-the-loop sensing' in the era of the Mobile and Social Web, and the roles these domains can play in environmental and public health surveillance and crisis/disaster informatics. We provide an in-depth review of the key issues and trends in these areas, the challenges faced when reasoning and making decisions with real-time crowdsourced data (such as issues of information overload, "noise", misinformation, bias and trust), the core technologies and Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) standards involved (Sensor Web Enablement and Open GeoSMS), as well as a few outstanding project implementation examples from around the world.

  13. Digital citizens Digital nations: the next agenda

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.W. (Bert) Mulder; M.W. (Martijn) Hartog

    2015-01-01

    DIGITAL CITIZENS CREATE A DIGITAL NATION Citizens will play the lead role as they – in the next phase of the information society – collectively create a digital nation. Personal adoption of information and communication technology will create a digital infrastructure that supports individual and

  14. 21st-Century Citizen Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nugent, Jill; Smith, Walter; Cook, Linda; Bell, Meredith

    2015-01-01

    With rapidly evolving technology, the world is more connected than ever, and citizens around the globe can contribute to science like never before (Dickinson and Bonney 2012). Reflecting the growing capacity of citizen science, this article presents a science education continuum that moves from global awareness to global contribution. At each…

  15. An Empirical Analysis of Citizens' Acceptance Decisions of Electronic-Government Services: A Modification of the Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology (UTAUT) Model to Include Trust as a Basis for Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awuah, Lawrence J.

    2012-01-01

    Understanding citizens' adoption of electronic-government (e-government) is an important topic, as the use of e-government has become an integral part of governance. Success of such initiatives depends largely on the efficient use of e-government services. The unified theory of acceptance and use of technology (UTAUT) model has provided a…

  16. The relevance of citizen involvement in Health Technology Assessment. A concrete application in the assessment of HPV co-testing in the Autonomous Province of Trento

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiara Francesca Dalle Fratte

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundSpecific programs have been developed in the latest decades to involve patients in Health Technology Assessments (HTAs. However, there are no structured practises in Italy and citizen’ perspective is rarely included in HTA reports. Aim of this study is to explore citizen’ opinions about cervical cancer screening with Human Papillomavirus (HPV co-testing in the Autonomous Province of Trento (PAT.MethodsTwo focus groups were conducted: one with representatives of patients’ associations, the other one with women between 31 and 64 years and their family members. Following aspects were investigated: the importance of cervical cancer screening programs; the impact of HPV test on women’ and their partners’ life; needs, expectations, and critical aspects of the new screening method.ResultsOrganised screening programs are very important for all participants. HPV co-testing screening is preferred to cytology for its higher sensitivity, but different opinions came out regarding the longer screening interval after normal HPV and Pap test results. Citizen stressed that correct, clear, and unambiguous information have to be provided to the whole population (men included. A cardinal role plays the patient-doctor relationship in informing and taking care, also emotionally, of women, their partners and relatives in case of positive HPV test.ConclusionIn order to facilitate the introduction of the new screening method, various media must be used to spread clear and unambiguous information, as well as informative and educational meetings with doctors and caregivers. Citizen perspective was included in the report for the Health Trust and played an important role in the decision process.

  17. Meanings and experiences of assistive technologies in everyday lives of older citizens: a meta-interpretive review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahler, Anne Marie; Rasmussen, Dorte Malig; Andersen, Pernille Tanggaard

    2016-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to synthesize the available qualitative studies on the meaning of assistive technologies (AT) in elderly people's everyday lives in order to identify central concepts, themes, and findings from existing research. A systematic search of the literature was conducted, using predetermined search strategies. Exclusion criteria were, in accordance with the meta-interpretive approach, developed iteratively during the reading of abstracts and articles. Interpretations from the studies were used as data for thematic analysis and synthesis of findings. Review of these studies show that older people not only have positive attitude towards AT, but also that acceptance of technologies is a potentially stressful process where trust towards technologies and other people are of importance. Older people have ambivalent experiences with technology, as it gives rise to possibilities as well as constraints, and safety as well as worries. AT enact sometimes conflicting values related to self and society. Although AT seem to support societal discourses on active aging, the empirical studies in this field show that the technologies enter older people's lives in complex ways, enacting social values and ambivalences and interact with caretakers, relatives and other actors, within specific institutional settings. Implications for rehabilitation In implementing AT, attention should be paid to ambivalences and conflicting values enacted by AT in older people's lives In implementing AT, attention should be paid not only to independency but also to the eventually dependencies, created by the use of AT.

  18. Mobile phone technology identifies and recruits trained citizens to perform CPR on out-of-hospital cardiac arrest victims prior to ambulance arrival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ringh, Mattias; Fredman, David; Nordberg, Per; Stark, Tomas; Hollenberg, Jacob

    2011-12-01

    In a two-parted study, evaluate a new concept were mobile phone technology is used to dispatch lay responders to nearby out-of-hospital cardiac arrests (OHCAs). Mobile phone positioning systems (MPS) can geographically locate selected mobile phone users at any given moment. A mobile phone service using MPS was developed and named Mobile Life Saver (MLS). Simulation study: 25 volunteers named mobile responders (MRs) were connected to MLS. Ambulance time intervals from 22 consecutive OHCAs in 2005 were used as controls. The MRs randomly moved in Stockholm city centre and were dispatched to simulated OHCAs (identical to controls) if they were within a 350 m distance. Real life study: during 25 weeks 1271-1801 MRs trained in CPR were connected to MLS. MLS was activated at the dispatch centre in parallel with ambulance dispatch when an OHCA was suspected. The MRs were dispatched if they were within 500 m from the suspected OHCA. Simulation study: mean response time for the MRs compared to historical ambulance time intervals was reduced by 2 min 20s (44%), pMobile phone technology can be used to identify and recruit nearby CPR-trained citizens to OHCAs for bystander CPR prior to ambulance arrival. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. On Literal Translation of English Idioms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Linli

    2009-01-01

    There are six translation tactics in translating English idioms into Chinese: literal translation, compensatory translation, free translation, explanational translation, borrowing, integrated approach. Each tactic should be reasonably employed in the process of translating, so as to keep the flavor of the original English idioms as well as to…

  20. Crowdsourcing, citizen sensing and Sensor Web technologies for public and environmental health surveillance and crisis management: trends, OGC standards and application examples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamel Boulos, Maged; Resch, Bernd; Crowley, David N.; Breslin, John G.; Sohn, Gunho; Burtner, Edwin R.; Pike, William A.; Jeziersk, Eduardo; Slayer Chuang, Kuo Yu

    2011-12-21

    The PIE Activity Awareness Environment is designed to be an adaptive data triage and decision support tool that allows role and activity based situation awareness through a dynamic, trainable filtering system. This paper discusses the process and methodology involved in the application as well as some of its capabilities. 'Wikification of GIS by the masses' is a phrase-term first coined by Kamel Boulos in 2005, two years earlier than Goodchild's term 'Volunteered Geographic Information'. Six years later (2005-2011), OpenStreetMap and Google Earth (GE) are now full-fledged, crowdsourced 'Wikipedias of the Earth' par excellence, with millions of users contributing their own layers to GE, attaching photos, videos, notes and even 3-D (three dimensional) models to locations in GE. From using Twitter in participatory sensing and bicycle-mounted sensors in pervasive environmental sensing, to creating a 100,000-sensor geo-mashup using Semantic Web technology, to the 3-D visualisation of indoor and outdoor surveillance data in real-time and the development of next-generation, collaborative natural user interfaces that will power the spatially-enabled public health and emergency situation rooms of the future, where sensor data and citizen reports can be triaged and acted upon in real-time by distributed teams of professionals, this paper offers a comprehensive state-of-the-art review of the overlapping domains of the Sensor Web, citizen sensing and 'human-in-the-loop sensing' in the era of the Mobile and Social Web, and the roles these domains can play in environmental and public health surveillance and crisis/disaster informatics. We provide an in-depth review of the key issues and trends in these areas, the challenges faced when reasoning and making decisions with real-time crowdsourced data (such as issues of information overload, 'noise', misinformation, bias and trust), the core technologies and Open Geospatial

  1. The Internet of Citizens. A lawyer’s view on some technological developments in the United Kingdom and India

    OpenAIRE

    Noto La Diega, Guido

    2017-01-01

    This article is a useful tool for both Asian and European readers as regards some of the state-of-the-art technologies revolving around the Internet of Things (‘IoT’) and their intersection with cloud computing (the Clouds of Things, ‘CoT’) in both the continents. The main legal issues will be presented, with a focus on intellectual property, consumer protection, and privacy. India and the United Kingdom are selected because they are at the forefront of the IoT innovation in their respective ...

  2. GLOBE Observer and the Association of Science & Technology Centers: Leveraging Citizen Science and Partnerships for an International Science Experiment to Build Climate Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riebeek Kohl, H.; Chambers, L. H.; Murphy, T.

    2016-12-01

    For more that 20 years, the Global Learning and Observations to Benefit the Environment (GLOBE) Program has sought to increase environment literacy in students by involving them in the process of data collection and scientific research. In 2016, the program expanded to accept observations from citizen scientists of all ages through a relatively simple app. Called GLOBE Observer, the new program aims to help participants feel connected to a global community focused on advancing the scientific understanding of Earth system science while building climate literacy among participants and increasing valuable environmental data points to expand both student and scientific research. In October 2016, GLOBE Observer partnered with the Association of Science & Technology Centers (ASTC) in an international science experiment in which museums and patrons around the world collected cloud observations through GLOBE Observer to create a global cloud map in support of NASA satellite science. The experiment was an element of the International Science Center and Science Museum Day, an event planned in partnership with UNESCO and ASTC. Museums and science centers provided the climate context for the observations, while GLOBE Observer offered a uniform experience and a digital platform to build a connected global community. This talk will introduce GLOBE Observer and will present the results of the experiment, including evaluation feedback on gains in climate literacy through the event.

  3. IMPLICATIONS OF CITIZEN PARTICIPATION IN LOCAL PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION UPON CITIZENS SATISFACTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bente Florina Maria

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The satisfaction of citizens considering public services depends on the way the authorities identify and offer solutions to fulfil citizens expectations, which are at least identical or even superior to the services offered in private domain. In addition, the worldwide governments are forced to adapt to the pressure exercised by the changes that appear in the demographic, technologic and economic environment, by the growing expectations of citizens and the necessity of lowering the taxes. As a consequence, the public system is starting to adopt the solutions that the citizens identified for the developing of the public policies, implying and making the community responsible in the act of governing.

  4. Motor activation in literal and non literal sentences: does time matter?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina eCacciari

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Despite the impressive amount of evidence showing involvement of the sensorimotor systems in language processing, important questions remain unsolved among which the relationship between non literal uses of language and sensorimotor activation. The literature did not yet provide a univocal answer on whether the comprehension of non literal, abstract motion sentences engages the same neural networks recruited for literal sentences. A previous TMS study using the same experimental materials of the present study showed activation for literal, fictive and metaphoric motion sentences but not for idiomatic ones. To evaluate whether this may depend on insufficient time for elaborating the idiomatic meaning, we conducted a behavioural experiment that used a sensibility judgment task performed by pressing a button either with a hand finger or with a foot. Motor activation is known to be sensitive to the action-congruency of the effector used for responding. Therefore, all other things being equal, significant differences between response emitted with an action-congruent or incongruent effector (foot vs. hand may be attributed to motor activation. Foot-related action verbs were embedded in sentences conveying literal motion, fictive motion, metaphoric motion or idiomatic motion. Mental sentences were employed as a control condition. Foot responses were significantly faster than finger responses but only in literal motion sentences. We hypothesize that motor activation may arise in early phases of comprehension processes (i.e. upon reading the verb for then decaying as a function of the strength of the semantic motion component of the verb.

  5. The Citizen Science Landscape: From Volunteers to Citizen Sensors and Beyond

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina L. Catlin-Groves

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Within conservation and ecology, volunteer participation has always been an important component of research. Within the past two decades, this use of volunteers in research has proliferated and evolved into “citizen science.” Technologies are evolving rapidly. Mobile phone technologies and the emergence and uptake of high-speed Web-capable smart phones with GPS and data upload capabilities can allow instant collection and transmission of data. This is frequently used within everyday life particularly on social networking sites. Embedded sensors allow researchers to validate GPS and image data and are now affordable and regularly used by citizens. With the “perfect storm” of technology, data upload, and social networks, citizen science represents a powerful tool. This paper establishes the current state of citizen science within scientific literature, examines underlying themes, explores further possibilities for utilising citizen science within ecology, biodiversity, and biology, and identifies possible directions for further research. The paper highlights (1 lack of trust in the scientific community about the reliability of citizen science data, (2 the move from standardised data collection methods to data mining available datasets, and (3 the blurring of the line between citizen science and citizen sensors and the need to further explore online social networks for data collection.

  6. Citizen Participation in Deliberative Global Governance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jæger, Birgit

    of the voting and the many recommendations were presented to the decision-makers at the summit as well as to the NGOs and other participants at the alternative forum running at the same time in Copenhagen. Unfortunately, the decision-makers did not listen to the ‘global citizen voice’ and in this way......The global event World Wide Views on Global Warming (WWViews), initiated by the Danish Board of Technology (DBT), took place on September 26, 2009, and was an attempt to gather a united citizen voice on a global scale. The purpose of WWViews was to pass on the opinions of ordinary citizens...... to political decision-makers at The United Nations Climate Summit, COP 15, in Copenhagen in December 2009. As such the WWViews was an innovative experiment with public engagement in science and technology, aiming to create a ‘global citizen voice’ on climate change. The deliberation took place at 44 different...

  7. Citizen's reactions to technological change

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, T.R.

    1993-01-01

    Less than a decade ago, in a similar situation to this, it would have been necessary to begin by referring to the incomprehensible gap between the risk assessments made by nuclear scientists and technologists and the anxious attitudes prevalent in society at large. This at least is no longer necessary. Chernobyl has narrowed the gap and research has increased our understanding of it. We know the problem, even if it is still there. The gap is not one between correct and incorrect, between knowledge and ignorance, or least of all between rational and irrational. It is one between two mind-sets, two totally different approaches to risk assessment, each being used for different purposes

  8. Citizen Astronomy in China: An Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Quan-Zhi

    2018-01-01

    Citizen astronomers have benefited from technological advancements in the recent decades as they fill the scientific gaps left by professional astronomers, in the areas such as time domain observations, visual classification and data mining. Here I present an overview of the current status of citizen astronomy in China. Chinese citizen astronomers have made a visible contribution in the discoveries of new objects; however, comparing to their counterparts in the western world, they appear to be less interested in researches that do not involve making new discovery, such as visual classification, long-term monitoring of objects, and data mining. From a questionnaire survey that aimed to investigate the motivation of Chinese citizen astronomers, we find that this population is predominantly male (92%) who mostly reside in economically developed provinces. A large fraction (69%) of the respondents are students and young professionals younger than the age of 25, which differs significantly from the occupation and age distribution of typical Chinese Internet users as well as the user distribution of large international citizen science projects such as the Galaxy Zoo. This suggests that youth generation in China is more willing to participate citizen astronomy research than average generation. Additionally, we find that interests in astronomy, desire to learn new knowledges, have a fun experience and meet new friends in the community are all important driving factors for Chinese citizen astronomers to participate research. This also differs from their counterparts in western countries. With a large youth population that is interested in astronomy as well as a number of large astronomical facilities that are being planned or built, we believe that citizen astronomy in China has a vast potential. Timely and proper guidance from the professionals will be essential to help citizen astronomers to fulfill this potential.

  9. Citizens' actions and environmental impact statements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waelde, T.

    1975-01-01

    Above all, two kinds of citizens' participation in environmental decisions are to be considered: on the one hand the suit for damages and compensation for the purpose of internalization of external effects, and on the other hand the actions with the aim to influence character and content of public final decision cases. This is where cooperation and contributions towards state activities with more concern for the environment come into it. This sphere is investigated. Combined are the possibility of judicially arranged citizens' participation and a modern instrument of public decision: environmental impact statements. At the moment these appear to become exclusively an instrument for internal administration management. However, it is possible - this can be confirmed in comparative law - to couple this for the purpose of administration created instrument of technology assessment with citizens' actions. Therefore, the article aims to point to a solution how modern administration management through judicial mediation can orientate itself according to citizens' interests. (orig./LN) [de

  10. Novos paradigmas literários

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise Azevedo Duarte Guimarães

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available O artigo estuda a emergência de novos paradigmas literários, procurando refletir acerca das textualidades contemporâneas. Focaliza os hipertextos informatizados e a poesia multimídia, com o intuito de desvendar como estão sendo criados novos procedimentos expressivos e em que medida eles podem ser identificados com reflexões teóricas anteriores acerca do texto literário impresso. Remete a questões ligadas à leitura dos diferentes tipos de signos e aos modos como eles se integram para a constituição dessas novíssimas linguagens híbridas em novos suportes.El artículo estudia la emergencia de nuevos paradigmas literarios, procurando reflejar acerca de las textualidades contemporáneas. Enfoca los hipertextos informatizados y la poesía multimedia, intentando desvendar cómo están siendo creados nuevos procedimientos expresivos y en qué medida ellos pueden ser identificados a reflexiones teóricas anteriores acerca del texto literario impreso. Remite a cuestiones ligadas a la lectura de los diferentes tipos de signos y a los modos cómo ellos se interaccionan para la constitución de los novísimos lenguajes híbridos en nuevos supuestos.This article investigates the emergence of new literary paradigms as it tries to understand new contemporary textualities. It analyses some hypertexts and multimedia poetry trying to trace how new expressive procedures are being created. How can these new languages be identified and what are their relations to previous theories which dealt with the literary printed text? This study approaches questions linked to the reading of different types of signs and the modes they function towards the fabrication of these new hybrid languages.

  11. DEVELOPING CITIZEN SAFETY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VRABIE Catalin

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Is it possible to involve citizens in the process of increasing public safety? Police used, even from its beginnings, the help of citizens, otherwise they would encounter problems in performing its duty - many of its successes were due to the unification of Police forces with the citizens. How citizens get involved? (1 They may be directly asked by the Police officers (a time consuming method because many police officers needs to go on the field to speak with the potential witnesses or (2 by using the mass-media channels (television can address to a large number of potential witnesses in a very short time. We still can see on TV portraits of missing persons, or some other kind of images with which the Police is trying to solve some of its cases (thieves, robbers or burglars surprised by surveillance cameras – why not Internet software application?!

  12. Introducing citizen inquiry

    OpenAIRE

    Herodotou, Christothea; Sharples, Mike; Scanlon, Eileen

    2017-01-01

    The term ‘citizen inquiry’ was coined to describe ways that members of the public can learn by initiating or joining shared inquiry-led scientific investigations (Sharples et al., 2013). It merges learning through scientific investigation with mass collaborative participation exemplified in citizen science activities, altering the relationship most people have with research from being passive recipients to becoming actively engaged, and the relationship between scholarship and public understa...

  13. Shark Citizen Science

    OpenAIRE

    Bear, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Traditionally, academic science has used graduate students to collect data in many cases, but community science, the term by which citizen science is also known, has revolutionized the process by which large amounts of data can be collected accurately by large numbers of non-scientists under the training and mentorship of scientists. There has been some discussion in the scientific community about whether the data collected by citizen scientists is as scientifically valid as data collected by...

  14. Risk Communication and Citizen Engagement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Merkelsen, Henrik

    2011-01-01

    Despite the last few decades’ devotion to deliberative methods in risk communication, many studies point to how important challenges arise when citizens are engaged in public dialogue. Since the era of enlightenment public dialogue has occupied a position as a normative ideal for political...... governance. But ideals are social constructions that have a tendency to direct attention away from underlying conflicts. The concept of dialogue is no exception, and exemplified by the Danish solution to dealing with public scepticism in relation to technological controversies, the internationally acclaimed...

  15. Aplikasi Citizen Journalism di Era Konvergensi Media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahmat Edi Irawan

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Citizen journalism has now become one of the most developed television program concepts. If the concept was initially more widely used in radio and online media, this time with easier and cheaper technology coverage and delivery of images, it is a concept that provides a place for people to become amateur journalist that can also be easily applied in the medium of television. Research raised the issue on how the concept and implementation of citizen journalism on television in the era of media convergence. The purpose of this study is to explain concepts and demonstrate the implementation of citizen journalism on television in the era of media convergence. Research used qualitative method in which data were obtained using literature study. Results of the study showed that the implementation of citizen journalism on television is also increasingly facilitated by the entry of the television in the era of media convergence, or different media mingle, such as television with printed, radio, and Internet media. The era of media convergence makes the concept of citizen journalism can be more developed, because the platform or media distribution is also increasingly varied for amateur journalist. However, the system equipment that must be provided, human resources that must be owned, as well as huge capital to be owned make a few television stations open a lot of platforms to provide space for amateur journalist in citizen journalism. 

  16. Sample Based Unit Liter Dose Estimates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    JENSEN, L.

    2000-01-01

    The Tank Waste Characterization Program has taken many core samples, grab samples, and auger samples from the single-shell and double-shell tanks during the past 10 years. Consequently, the amount of sample data available has increased, both in terms of quantity of sample results and the number of tanks characterized. More and better data is available than when the current radiological and toxicological source terms used in the Basis for Interim Operation (BIO) (FDH 1999a) and the Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR) (FDH 1999b) were developed. The Nuclear Safety and Licensing (NS and L) organization wants to use the new data to upgrade the radiological and toxicological source terms used in the BIO and FSAR. The NS and L organization requested assistance in producing a statistically based process for developing the source terms. This report describes the statistical techniques used and the assumptions made to support the development of a new radiological source term for liquid and solid wastes stored in single-shell and double-shell tanks. The results given in this report are a revision to similar results given in an earlier version of the document (Jensen and Wilmarth 1999). The main difference between the results in this document and the earlier version is that the dose conversion factors (DCF) for converting μCi/g or μCi/L to Sv/L (sieverts per liter) have changed. There are now two DCFs, one based on ICRP-68 and one based on ICW-71 (Brevick 2000)

  17. Acting green elicits a literal warm glow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taufik, Danny; Bolderdijk, Jan Willem; Steg, Linda

    2015-01-01

    Environmental policies are often based on the assumption that people only act environmentally friendly if some extrinsic reward is implicated, usually money. We argue that people might also be motivated by intrinsic rewards: doing the right thing (such as acting environmentally friendly) elicits psychological rewards in the form of positive feelings, a phenomenon known as warm glow. Given the fact that people's psychological state may affect their thermal state, we expected that this warm glow could express itself quite literally: people who act environmentally friendly may perceive the temperature to be higher. In two studies, we found that people who learned they acted environmentally friendly perceived a higher temperature than people who learned they acted environmentally unfriendly. The underlying psychological mechanism pertains to the self-concept: learning you acted environmentally friendly signals to yourself that you are a good person. Together, our studies show that acting environmentally friendly can be psychologically rewarding, suggesting that appealing to intrinsic rewards can be an alternative way to encourage pro-environmental actions.

  18. Systems Thinking for an Economically Literate Society

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael F. Reber

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available In the US a dismal truth exists about the citizenry’s lack of understanding of economic fundamentals whether it is amongst our political leaders or our university graduates. This then leads one to ask, “What can be done to help people become literate in economics?” Perhaps the answer lies in the area of systems thinking, which is a way of thinking about the interconnections between the parts of a system and their synthesis into a unified view of the whole system. More specifically, this means incorporating systems thinking and design in primary, secondary, and tertiary curricula. In this paper, the author gives a cursory review of General Systems Theory (GST as developed by Ludwig von Bertalanffy and extended by others in the systems thinking field to illustrate the confluences of thought among Ludwig von Mises and systems scientists. From this the author argues the need for systems thinking and design in curricula and makes reference to non-prescriptive teaching and learning applications for the fostering of economic literacy.

  19. Citizen Science and the Modern Web

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2014-01-01

    Beginning as a research project to help scientists communicate, the Web has transformed into a ubiquitous medium. As the sciences continue to transform, new techniques are needed to analyze the vast amounts of data being produced by large experiments. The advent of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey increased throughput of astronomical data, giving rise to Citizen Science projects such as Galaxy Zoo. The Web is no longer exclusively used by researchers, but rather, a place where anyone can share information, or even, partake in citizen science projects. As the Web continues to evolve, new and open technologies enable web applications to become more sophisticated. Scientific toolsets may now target the Web as a platform, opening an application to a wider audience, and potentially citizen scientists. With the latest browser technologies, scientific data may be consumed and visualized, opening the browser as a new platform for scientific analysis.

  20. AIDS education for a low literate audience in Zambia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Msimuko, A K

    1988-04-01

    A workshop funded by the USA Program for Appropriate Technology in Health (PATH) was an effort by Zambia toward prevention and control of AIDS. The lack of educational materials about AIDS for a low-literate audience was the major problem addressed by the workshop. Other problems include the lack of collaborative effort in the development of materials on AIDS, and the lack of skills needed in the development of such materials in Zambia. 1 of the objectives of the workshop was to launch the Planned Parenthood Association of Zambia's (PPAZ) materials development project. The scope of this project includes the production of educational materials on AIDS for low-literate audiences and a counseling handbook for family planning workers. Print materials should be simply written, using words, idioms, and graphics that are familiar to the target audience. Other workshop objectives included the establishment of collaborative relationships between organizations involved in existing AIDS educational activities in Zambia, and the development of practical skills needed to produce print materials. Education was identified as the most important strategy for the prevention and control of AIDS, and PPAZ should be the executing agency of the print materials project. Audience research, using focus group techniques, focus group discussions, behavioral messages, and pretesting of messages, should be the most effective means of reaching targeted audiences. PPAZ is contracted by PATH to begin development of educational materials, and 2 committees have formed to implement the project and to establish interagency collaboration. Audience research was begun between January and March of 1988, focusing on people's beliefs, practices, and ideas about AIDS. The final phase of the project will be the printing, distribution, and use of the AIDS materials and the training of family planning field workers in the proper use of these materials.

  1. Cultivating Political Morality for Deliberative Citizens--Rawls and Callan Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Cheuk-Hang

    2016-01-01

    In this article, I will argue that the implementation of deliberative democracy needs to be supplemented by a specific political morality in order to cultivate free and equal citizens in exercising public reason for achieving a cooperative and inclusive liberal society. This cultivation of personality is literally an educational project with a…

  2. Influencing citizen behavior: experiences from multichannel marketing pilot projects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Wijngaert, Lidwien; Pieterson, Willem Jan; Teerling, Marije L.

    2011-01-01

    Information technology allows national and local governments to satisfy the needs of citizens in a cost effective way. Unfortunately, citizens still tend to prefer traditional, more costly channels, such as the front desk, phone and mail. Through pilot projects government agencies attempt to

  3. Different Grade Students' Use and Interpretation of Literal Symbols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celik, Derya; Gunes, Gonul

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the study was to determine and compare 7th, 8th, and 9th grades students' level of use and interpret the literal symbols. In addition, students' responses to questions that require use of different roles of literal symbol were examined to identify the errors. For this purpose, Chelsea Diagnostics Algebra test developed by The Concepts…

  4. Researcher or Fellow Citizen?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Alex Young; Caviglia, Francesco

    2018-01-01

    The idea of a team of researchers working at advancing knowledge represents a strong role model for STEM education. The article suggests that an alternative role model – a community of fellow citizens engaged in solving problems of how to better live together – can be an equally compelling model...... for the Humanities. Mode 1 knowledge building rooted in learning within the disciplines is compared with a mode 2 focusing on context-specific knowledge, transdisciplinarity and collaborative rationality as essential ingredients of a new role model for the humanities: The fellow citizen. Two cases – a collaborative...

  5. Open data for citizens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Götzen, Amalia De; Morelli, Nicola

    2016-01-01

    A large quantity of open data is now available to institutions, business and citizens. The potential of such new resource, though, has not been explored yet, also because of a lack of perspectives and scenarios on how open data can be used. The workshop aims at broadening the perspectives...... on the use of open data by investigating new scenarios for a wide use of open data, where citizens without any IT skills can be involved in a co-design session with the relevant stakeholders....

  6. The Citizen Cyberscience Lectures - 1) Mobile phones and Africa: a success story 2) Citizen Problem Solving

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva; Bingham, Alpheus

    2009-01-01

    Dr. Alpheus Bingham, InnoCentive The Citizen Cyberscience Lectures are hosted by the partners of the Citizen Cyberscience Centre, CERN, The UN Institute of Training and Research and the University of Geneva. The goal of the Lectures is to provide an inspirational forum for participants from the various international organizations and academic institutions in Geneva to explore how information technology is enabling greater citizen participation in tackling global development challenges as well as global scientific research. The first Citizen Cyberscience Lectures will welcome two speakers who have both made major innovative contributions in this area. Dr. Mo Ibrahim, founder of Celtel International, one of Africa’s most successful mobile network operators, will talk about “Mobile phones and Africa: a success story”. Dr. Alpheus Bingham, founder of InnoCentive, a Web-based community that solves indus...

  7. Who are the active citizens?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agger, Annika

    group. This article argues that there are no `ordinary´ citizens, and claims that citizens are very different and participate in various ways. A criticism raised in relation to participatory processes is that these often tend to favour certain modes of communication based on an implicit ideal...... of the citizen as being resourceful, mastering political skills and know-how and time. However, many citizens do not `fit´ this stereotype, and thus there is a risk that many citizens are biased by the way the institutional settings for participation are designed. A characterization of active citizens...

  8. Democratic Theory and Citizen Participation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Biegelbauer, Peter; Hansen, Janus

    2011-01-01

    Citizen participation in terms of participatory technology assessment (PTA) has caused a lot of debate in science and technology policy. However, there are still many open questions: What is the actual impact of PTA on policy-making? On which normative theory of democracy is the evaluation of PTA...... based and does it make a difference which theory is used? Which framework is appropriate to evaluate the often fuzzy impact of PTA on policy-making? Is PTA actually a central element for policy-making or are other factors much more relevant such as politicians' involvement or the presence of industry...... interests? What is the ‘nature’ of the public in different national and institutional contexts? How are expectations of policy-makers played out in the perceived need for regulation? These issues are addressed in a series of comparative papers in this issue which focus on the regulation...

  9. Citizens and Handicaps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Stanley B., Jr.

    In a speech delivered at the National Easter Seal Society's Annual Convention (1974), the author discusses progress toward full citizenship for the handicapped focusing on the roles of the Department of Health, Education, and Welfare (DHEW) and the Office for the Handicapped, Constitutional guarantees of equal rights for all citizens, and national…

  10. Revolutionising citizen journalism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mollerup, Nina Grønlykke

    Citizen journalism has played a crucial role in the Egyptian revolution by providing documentation of events journalists were unable to document and by challenging and influencing the mainstream media. One of the most prominent examples of this is Rassd News Network (RNN). RNN is until now entirely...

  11. CitizenAID.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-25

    CitizenAID is an easy-to-use app that informs users how to provide care in mass casualty situations, including shootings, knife attacks and bomb incidents. The authors are well known and respected specialists in trauma care and disaster management.

  12. Inspiring Glocal Citizens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tichnor-Wagner, Ariel

    2017-01-01

    In an era when overlapping, intersecting national and cultural identities are a reality for many K-12 students in the United States, it is schools' responsibility to nurture skills and attitudes that help students feel empowered as citizens of their local area or country as well as of other cultural groups they identify with--and of the world.…

  13. Citizens' action group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andritzky, W.

    1978-01-01

    For the first empirical study of citizens' action groups 331 such groups were consulted. Important information was collected on the following aspects of these groups: their self-image, areas and forms of activities, objectives and their extent, how long the group has existed, successes and failures and their forms of organisation. (orig.) [de

  14. Masked or Informed Citizens?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Kim Normann; Medaglia, Rony

    2012-01-01

    The diffusion of social media is having profound impacts on the relationship between government and citizens in many areas of government service provision. In the area of healthcare the emergence of new venues of interaction between patients and between patients and doctors is challenging the gov....... In the conclusion, we suggest venues of future research on this emerging trend....

  15. Tocqueville's Christian Citizen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ossewaarde, Marinus R.R.

    2005-01-01

    Tocqueville's Christian Citizen Marinus Ossewaarde Introduction Alexis De Tocqueville is well known for his critique of democracy. A French statesman, he was left with the legacy of the French Revolution that had torn his fatherland and had changed the course of human history for good. Tocqueville,

  16. Beyond Literal Translation | Nginye | Journal of Language ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Journal of Language, Technology & Entrepreneurship in Africa ... This article reviews some of the challenges and options that translators have to contend with in the dicey game of reconstructing intended ... AJOL African Journals Online.

  17. Citizen participation in public accountability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damgaard, Bodil; Lewis, Jenny

    2014-01-01

    In this chapter we offer an analytical framework sensitive to the quality of citizen participation, which is measured in terms of transferred power from the governors to the citizens, and in terms of the degree to which citizens have access to accountability measures. We do this by combining...... Arnstein’s (1969) classic ladder of participation with a focus on citizen participation in regard to bureaucratic accountability, centered on efficiency and learning (cf. Bovens et al. 2008)....

  18. Uncertainty in Citizen Science observations: from measurement to user perception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahoz, William; Schneider, Philipp; Castell, Nuria

    2016-04-01

    Citizen Science activities concern general public engagement in scientific research activities when citizens actively contribute to science either with their intellectual effort or surrounding knowledge or with their tools and resources. The advent of technologies such as the Internet and smartphones, and the growth in their usage, has significantly increased the potential benefits from Citizen Science activities. Citizen Science observations from low-cost sensors, smartphones and Citizen Observatories, provide a novel and recent development in platforms for observing the Earth System, with the opportunity to extend the range of observational platforms available to society to spatio-temporal scales (10-100s m; 1 hr or less) highly relevant to citizen needs. The potential value of Citizen Science is high, with applications in science, education, social aspects, and policy aspects, but this potential, particularly for citizens and policymakers, remains largely untapped. Key areas where Citizen Science data start to have demonstrable benefits include GEOSS Societal Benefit Areas such as Health and Weather. Citizen Science observations have many challenges, including simulation of smaller spatial scales, noisy data, combination with traditional observational methods (satellite and in situ data), and assessment, representation and visualization of uncertainty. Within these challenges, that of the assessment and representation of uncertainty and its communication to users is fundamental, as it provides qualitative and/or quantitative information that influences the belief users will have in environmental information. This presentation will discuss the challenges in assessment and representation of uncertainty in Citizen Science observations, its communication to users, including the use of visualization, and the perception of this uncertainty information by users of Citizen Science observations.

  19. From "Stranger" to "Arrived": The Citizens' Library in England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyers, Arthur S.

    1998-01-01

    Discusses studies of public library multicultural services in England. Describes multicultural programs in Birmingham and Brent that involve the citizens in planning and implementing these services. Access to electronic technology will affect the provision of these services. (MMU)

  20. Citizen Goals Online

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catalin Vrabie

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to give to public institution Web designers a better understanding of the citizens’ objectives when accessing a Web page. Understanding citizen online goals is critical because it gets to the heart of what the public institution website should or could “do.” Approach: The challenge for e-marketers is that for most agencies/institutions, there are likely to be multiple goals that represent the “reason why” citizens could come to the website. For example, a national theatre website might be very effective for people who have already been there, they know effectively what place is the best, who are the actors, etc. Research limitations: The nature of a public institution activity almost dictates the different types of goals that consumers have when visiting the site. It is clear that a citizen has a different goal when accessing a theatre Web page or when he’s accessing a municipality Web page. This is the biggest impediment for drawing a good conceptual model for a public institution Web page. Practical implications: there are likely to be many other goals that could lead people to visit the site, like receiving customer service or leaving a remark. Value: Since citizen online goals represent the starting point for Web design efforts (for public institutions, this article has attempted to highlight the nature and types of goals that e-marketers might consider when planning what their website should do in order to create. Findings: The goal a site visitor has when arriving at a website tends to be very action oriented. If the visitor has never visited the site before, the goal may simply be to evaluate the website and figure out what the site is and if it will help him. On the other hand, if the visitor has reached the site as the result of a directed search or is a repeat visitor, the user goal is likely to be specific and functional. If important citizen goals are not supported by the website, the public

  1. Citizen Goals Online

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catalin Vrabie

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to give to public institution Web designers a better understanding of the citizens’ objectives when accessing a Web page. Understanding citizen online goals is critical because it gets to the heart of what the public institution website should or could “do.”Approach: The challenge for e-marketers is that for most agencies/institutions, there are likely to be multiple goals that represent the “reason why” citizens could come to the website. For example, a national theatre website might be very effective for people who have already been there, they know effectively what place is the best, who are the actors, etc.Research limitations: The nature of a public institution activity almost dictates the different types of goals that consumers have when visiting the site. It is clear that a citizen has a different goal when accessing a theatre Web page or when he’s accessing a municipality Web page. This is the biggest impediment for drawing a good conceptual model for a public institution Web page.Practical implications: there are likely to be many other goals that could lead people to visit the site, like receiving customer service or leaving a remark.Value: Since citizen online goals represent the starting point for Web design efforts (for public institutions, this article has attempted to highlight the nature and types of goals that e-marketers might consider when planning what their website should do in order to create.Findings: The goal a site visitor has when arriving at a website tends to be very action oriented. If the visitor has never visited the site before, the goal may simply be to evaluate the website and figure out what the site is and if it will help him. On the other hand, if the visitor has reached the site as the result of a directed search or is a repeat visitor, the user goal is likely to be specific and functional. If important citizen goals are not supported by the website, the public

  2. Active audiencies and journalism: Involved citizens or motivated consumers?

    OpenAIRE

    Masip, Pere; Guallar, Javier; Peralta, Miquel; Ruiz-Caballero, Carlos; Suau, Jaume

    2015-01-01

    Audience participation, in any of its forms and names (public journalism, citizen journalism, participatory journalism, UGC), appears to revitalise democracy, thanks to the opportunities for public debate opened up by information and communications technology. On the other hand, however, there are many authors who question whether interactive technologies really encourage democracy or the market, empower the citizen or strengthen the consumer. In this context, we still have little information...

  3. Active audiences and journalism: Involved citizens or motivated consumers?

    OpenAIRE

    Masip, Pere; Guallar, Javier; Peralta, Miquel; Ruiz, Carles; Suau, Jaume

    2015-01-01

    Audience participation, in any of its forms and names (public journalism, citizen journalism, participatory journalism, UGC), appears to revitalise democracy, thanks to the opportunities for public debate opened up by information and communications technology. On the other hand, however, there are many authors who question whether interactive technologies really encourage democracy or the market, empower the citizen or strengthen the consumer. In this context, we still have little information...

  4. The Journey to Become a Health Literate Organization: A Snapshot of Health System Improvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    BRACH, Cindy

    2017-01-01

    A health literate health care organization is one that makes it easy for people to navigate, understand, and use information and services to take care of their health. This chapter explores the journey that a growing number of organizations are taking to become health literate. Health literacy improvement has increasingly been viewed as a systems issue, one that moves beyond siloed efforts by recognizing that action is required on multiple levels. To help operationalize the shift to a systems perspective, members of the National Academies Roundtable on Health Literacy defined ten attributes of health literate health care organizations. External factors, such as payment reform in the U.S., have buoyed health literacy as an organizational priority. Health care organizations often begin their journey to become health literate by conducting health literacy organizational assessments, focusing on written and spoken communication, and addressing difficulties in navigating facilities and complex systems. As organizations’ efforts mature, health literacy quality improvement efforts give way to transformational activities. These include: the highest levels of the organization embracing health literacy, making strategic plans for initiating and spreading health literate practices, establishing a health literacy workforce and supporting structures, raising health literacy awareness and training staff system-wide, expanding patient and family input, establishing policies, leveraging information technology, monitoring policy compliance, addressing population health, and shifting the culture of the organization. The penultimate section of this chapter highlights the experiences of three organizations that have explicitly set a goal to become health literate: Carolinas Healthcare System (CHS), Intermountain Healthcare, and Northwell Health. These organizations are pioneers that approached health literacy in a systematic fashion, each exemplifying different routes an

  5. The Journey to Become a Health Literate Organization: A Snapshot of Health System Improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brach, Cindy

    2017-01-01

    A health literate health care organization is one that makes it easy for people to navigate, understand, and use information and services to take care of their health. This chapter explores the journey that a growing number of organizations are taking to become health literate. Health literacy improvement has increasingly been viewed as a systems issue, one that moves beyond siloed efforts by recognizing that action is required on multiple levels. To help operationalize the shift to a systems perspective, members of the U.S. National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, Medicine Roundtable on Health Literacy defined ten attributes of health literate health care organizations. External factors, such as payment reform in the U.S., have buoyed health literacy as an organizational priority. Health care organizations often begin their journey to become health literate by conducting health literacy organizational assessments, focusing on written and spoken communication, and addressing difficulties in navigating facilities and complex systems. As organizations' efforts mature, health literacy quality improvement efforts give way to transformational activities. These include: the highest levels of the organization embracing health literacy, making strategic plans for initiating and spreading health literate practices, establishing a health literacy workforce and supporting structures, raising health literacy awareness and training staff system-wide, expanding patient and family input, establishing policies, leveraging information technology, monitoring policy compliance, addressing population health, and shifting the culture of the organization. The penultimate section of this chapter highlights the experiences of three organizations that have explicitly set a goal to become health literate: Carolinas Healthcare System (CHS), Intermountain Healthcare, and Northwell Health. These organizations are pioneers that approached health literacy in a systematic fashion, each

  6. Utilization of Agricultural Information Among Literate Women in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study x-rayed the utilization of agricultural information among women in Ihiagwa ... The findings revealed that literate women in Ihiagwa autonomous community ..... reduce the constraints of travelling far to ... perception and utilization of.

  7. Citizen (Dis)satisfaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Asmus Leth

    2015-01-01

    This article introduces the importance of equivalence framing for understanding how satisfaction measures affect citizens’ evaluation of public services. Does a 90 percent satisfaction rate have a different effect than a logically equivalent 10 percent dissatisfaction rate? Two experiments were...... conducted on citizens’ evaluations of hospital services in a large, nationally representative sample of Danish citizens. Both experiments found that exposing citizens to a patient dissatisfaction measure led to more negative views of public service than exposing them to a logically equivalent satisfaction...... metric. There is some support for part of the shift in evaluations being caused by a negativity bias: dissatisfaction has a larger negative impact than satisfaction has a positive impact. Both professional experience at a hospital and prior exposure to satisfaction rates reduced the negative response...

  8. Citizen Journalism & Public Interfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brynskov, Martin; Strøbech, Kristian; Bang, Jørgen

    2011-01-01

    of views or plain information dissemination. Form the media institution’s point of view the goal was to create a platform for hyper local journalism as a source for journalistic coverage in commercial media. The group investigating civic communication within the Digital Urban Living project...... followed the upstart of Dinby.dk in 2008 and has returned to the experiment in 2010. Our main interest is to explore the condition in which it is possible to create hyper local citizens produced digital content. And, furthermore, to understand which incitements are needed to make local actors or groups act...... as digital providers of their own activities. In the paper we present our findings and reflect them in relation to the design of the web-portal and the profile of the users. Finally we discuss the further perspectives of this form of user/citizens involvement in public communication....

  9. Citizens in sustainable transitions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoffmann, Birgitte; Agger, Annika

    2013-01-01

    The paper explores how local public authorities can support and facilitate citizens’ participa-tion and learning in sustainable transition in urban neighbourhoods, by supporting local in-termediaries. The role of intermediaries can be performed by a variety of actors such as public housing...... associations; NGO´s, or semi public institutions. Our claim is that intermediary actors have the potential to facilitate new platforms for citizens’ participation in urban sustainable transition due to their particular role in between public authorities and civil society. The key question of the paper is how...... the intermediary actors facilitate citizens' participatory processes in sustainable urban transitions, and the paper explores the concept of institutional capacity building as a way to develop learning processes and new practises? The aim is to analyse approaches of creating platforms for involving citizens...

  10. So to Speak: A Computational and Empirical Investigation of Lexical Cohesion of Non-Literal and Literal Expressions in Text

    OpenAIRE

    Palmer, Alexis; Sporleder, Caroline; Li, Linlin

    2013-01-01

    Lexical cohesion is an important device for signaling text organization. In this paper, we investigate to what extent a particular class of expressions which can have a non-literal interpretation participates in the cohesive structure of a text. Specifically, we look at five expressions headed by a verb which – depending on the context – can have either a literal or a non-literal meaning: bounce off the wall (“to be excited and full of n...

  11. Safeguards for informed citizens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Augustin, Bernard

    1980-01-01

    The author runs through the regulations and procedures to which the construction of nuclear facilities are subjected in France. Concurrently with this technical and administrative control, an 'evident and difficult' objective must be achieved, namely that of informing the citizens. After discussing the difficulties lying in the path of such an undertaking, the author considers the major operations and approaches undertaken in this respect [fr

  12. FRIENDSHIP OF CITIZENS

    OpenAIRE

    Ottmann, Henning

    2011-01-01

    The author advocates a modernization of the antique doctrine of friendship. Friendship understood in the political sense is the friendship of citizens, as a regulative idea of ideal political community. Such friendship is above justice, it implies a permanent and stable mutual benevolence, living together, harmony, mutuality and equality, involvement and compassion, mutual openness in words and deeds, a culture of voluntary cooperation and a spirit of selfaware and self-resp...

  13. Citizen Candidates Under Uncertainty

    OpenAIRE

    Eguia, Jon X.

    2005-01-01

    In this paper we make two contributions to the growing literature on "citizen-candidate" models of representative democracy. First, we add uncertainty about the total vote count. We show that in a society with a large electorate, where the outcome of the election is uncertain and where winning candidates receive a large reward from holding office, there will be a two-candidate equilibrium and no equilibria with a single candidate. Second, we introduce a new concept of equilibrium, which we te...

  14. One-liter Hg ion clock for space and ground applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prestage, John D.; Chung, Sang; Le, Thanh; Beach, Maggie; Maleki, Lute; Tjoelker, Robert L.

    2003-01-01

    We describe the development of a small Hg ion clock suitable for space use. A small clock occupying 1-2 liters volume and producing stability of 10 to the power negative twelve, divided by square root pi would significantly advance the state of space-qualified atomic clocks. Based on recent measurements, this technology should produce long-term stability as good as 10 to the power negative fifteen.

  15. Senior citizens retrofits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1985-02-01

    The Seniors' Residential Retrofitting Project was Yukon's most ambitious CREDA, funded demonstration with a total cost of $460,000. The project undertook to demonstrate energy-efficient retrofitting techniques in 38 homes and two apartment complexes for senior citizens. At the same time, the project strove to train Yukon tradesmen in retrofitting techniques, thus creating a local industry and employment within this industry. To this end, two training courses were given for local tradesmen and contractors, the first of their kind in Canada. The training part of the project was given equal importance as the actual demonstration part. Three levels of retrofit work were done on the homes of senior citizens. Level one included caulking, weatherstripping, furnace servicing, and installation of water flow restrictors, water heater blankets and timers. The level two retrofit included the treatment in level one, plus upgrading windows and the insulation levels in walls and ceilings. A level three retrofit involved a total rewrap of the building shell with some of the features in levels one and two incorporated. The demonstration program included the following steps: initial contact with senior citizens; energy audit on each house; determination of level of retrofit work based on individual audit results; contract packages drawn up and put to tender; monitoring of fuel records and air-tightness tests both before and after retrofit; and tabulation of data and information transfer. 10 figs., 4 tabs.

  16. Twitteratura: aproximando letramento literário e letramento digital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinicius Carvalho Pereira

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available As práticas de letramento literário da escola brasileira voltam-se majoritariamente para textos em suporte impresso, embora parte significativa da produção literária contemporânea em língua portuguesa venha sendo feita em suporte eletrônico ou digital. Tal disjunção se deve, entre outros fatores, à predominância de obras canônicas no currículo escolar, à natureza impressa do livro didático e a um entendimento restrito do que seja o texto literário. Por outro lado, assistimos ao uso crescente de aparelhos celulares e smartphones em sala de aula, raramente articulado ao processo de ensino-aprendizagem, ainda que esses dispositivos possam integrar práticas de letramento literário na esfera digital. No presente artigo, discutem-se questões teórico-metodológicas acerca do uso, em sala de aula, de celulares e smartphones para o trabalho com um gênero literário emergente: a Twitteratura. Da página à tela, do ponto ao pixel, novos entendimentos do literário podem ser introduzidos no currículo escolar, propiciando uma compreensão mais ampla sobre as relações sobredeterminantes entre linguagem, sociedade e tecnologia.

  17. Digital citizenship and neoliberalization: governing digital citizens in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou, Jannick; Hjelholt, Morten

    2018-01-01

    Digital citizenship is becoming increasingly normalized within advanced democratic states. As society and governmental institutions become reliant on digital technologies, citizens are expected to be and act digitally. This article examines the governance of digital citizens through a case study...... this case study, the article contributes to current critical perspectives on the digital citizen as a new political figure. It adds new insights into digital citizenship by connecting this figure to wider processes of neoliberalization and state restructuring, pushing for a more pronounced focus...... of digitalization efforts in Denmark. Drawing on multiple forms of data, the article showcases how digital citizens are governed through a combination of discursive, legal and institutional means. The article highlights the political, but also institutional work that goes into making citizens digital. Providing...

  18. Citizen voices performing public participation in science and environment communication

    CERN Document Server

    Carvalho, Anabela; Doyle, Julie

    2012-01-01

    How is "participation" ascribed meaning and practised in science and environment communication? And how are citizen voices articulated, invoked, heard, marginalised or silenced in those processes? Citizen Voices takes its starting point in the so-called dialogic or participatory turn in scientific and environmental governance in which practices claiming to be based on principles of participation, dialogue and citizen involvement have proliferated. The book goes beyond the buzzword of "participation" in order to give empirically rich, theoretically informed and critical accounts of how citizen participation is understood and enacted in mass mediation and public engagement practices. A diverse series of studies across Europe and the US are presented, providing readers with empirical insights into the articulation of citizen voices in different national, cultural and institutional contexts. Building bridges across media and communication studies, science and technology studies, environmental studies and urban pl...

  19. Citizen Science for public health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Den Broeder, Lea; Devilee, Jeroen; Van Oers, Hans; Schuit, A Jantine; Wagemakers, Annemarie

    2016-12-23

    Community engagement in public health policy is easier said than done. One reason is that public health policy is produced in a complex process resulting in policies that may appear not to link up to citizen perspectives. We therefore address the central question as to whether citizen engagement in knowledge production could enable inclusive health policy making. Building on non-health work fields, we describe different types of citizen engagement in scientific research, or 'Citizen Science'. We describe the challenges that Citizen Science poses for public health, and how these could be addressed. Despite these challenges, we expect that Citizen Science or similar approaches such as participatory action research and 'popular epidemiology' may yield better knowledge, empowered communities, and improved community health. We provide a draft framework to enable evaluation of Citizen Science in practice, consisting of a descriptive typology of different kinds of Citizen Science and a causal framework that shows how Citizen Science in public health might benefit both the knowledge produced as well as the 'Citizen Scientists' as active participants. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press.

  20. Citizen-science, Geoethics and Human Niche

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohle, Martin

    2017-04-01

    researching know-how and deploying it, i.e. needs 'citizen geo-scientists' to maintain the human niche. (B) Regarding knowledge-based societies: The rapidly increasing human knowledge base accelerates the scientific-technical revolution. Its industrial-societal implementation confronts societies with numerous change processes. Their speed and scope is a risk as well as the mutual interferences of different change processes that often only get obvious within everyday societal doings. This vigour of change requires robust two-way linkages between research and technological development on one side and societal activities on the other side. Research and development undertaken in cooperation with citizen scientists would improve such linkages, e.g. through increased transparency of research and development or strengthening the sense of belonging of people for their environments. Citizen scientists are a resource, because they are complementary partner to the professional researcher. On one side citizen scientists provide experiences that are rooted in everyday practices and on the other side they facilitate uptake of new practices. Both features are needed in societies that face anthropogenic global change. Summarizing, geoethics affiliates geosciences and 'citizen science' in a particular relationship, i.e. 'citizen geo-science', which is beneficial for knowledge-based societies that are functioning under conditions of anthropogenic global change. [1] http://www.geoethics.org/ (accessed: 8th November 2016) Disclaimer: The views expressed engage the author only, not the employer.

  1. Health data cooperatives - citizen empowerment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafen, E; Kossmann, D; Brand, A

    2014-01-01

    This article is part of a Focus Theme of Methods of Information in Medicine on Health Record Banking. Healthcare is often ineffective and costs are steadily rising. This is in a large part due to the inaccessibility of medical and health data stored in multiple silos. Furthermore, in most cases molecular differences between individuals that result in different susceptibilities to drugs and diseases as well as targeted interventions cannot be taken into account. Technological advances in genome sequencing and the interaction of 'omics' data with environmental data on one hand and mobile health on the other, promise to generate the longitudinal health data that will form the basis for a more personalized, precision medicine. For this new medicine to become a reality, however, millions of personal health data sets have to be aggregated. The value of such aggregated personal data has been recognized as a new asset class and many commercial entities are competing for this new asset (e.g. Google, Facebook, 23andMe, PatientsLikeMe). The primary source and beneficiary of personal health data is the individual. As a collective, society should be the beneficiary of both the economic and health value of these aggregated data and (health) information. We posit that empowering citizens by providing them with a platform to safely store, manage and share their health-related data will be a necessary element in the transformation towards a more effective and efficient precision medicine. Such health data platforms should be organized as cooperatives that are solely owned and controlled by their members and not by shareholders. Members determine which data they want to share for example with doctors or to contribute to research for the benefit of their health and that of society. Members will also decide how the revenues generated by granting third parties access to the anonymized data that they agreed to share, should be invested in research, information or education. Currently no

  2. Citizen Journalism as Conceptual Practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blaagaard, Bolette

    itizen Journalism as Conceptual Practice provides a conceptualization of citizen journalism as a political practice developed through analyses of an historical and postcolonial case. Arguing that citizen journalism is first and foremost situated, embodied and political rather than networked...... and formulates a critical reading of citizens’ and subjects’ mediated political engagements then as well as now. The book discusses current approaches to citizen journalism before turning to The Herald, which is then read against the grain in an attempt to show the embodied politics of colonial history...... and cultural forms of citizen engagement as these politics evolve in this particular case of journalism...

  3. THE CITIZEN CLIENT PROFILE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ângela Cristina Bueno Vieira

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: In our experience and work in the Medical Clinic at the Federal University of Goiás Clinical Hospital (HC/UFG, we observe that in despite of the most patients get orientations about their pathology by the health team, they don’t accomplish these orientations. For the continuous self-care promotion was implanted project "Citizen Client", with intention to contribute to patient citizenship rescue, guiding and strengthening its rights and duties while carrying on pathology. This article is an experience related by a qualitative approach with a group of patients interned in the Medical Clinic of the HC/UFG that rambles, their familiars and that ones who participates in the project Citizen Client during their internment in the year of 2003. On the meeting we work with lectures, workshops and groups by the multi-professional team and coordinated by a Nurse. The subjects had been diverse, approaching some pathology and its cares, social and spiritual assistance. The client participation in its recovery has extreme importance and, so that this occurs, it is necessary health education understood in its extended form, recognizing the client’s life reality, their day-by-day, providing mechanisms for them to become an asset subject with autonomy to act in favor of own health. KEYWORDS: Health Education; Self Care; Quality of Life.

  4. Citizen Science Initiatives: Engaging the Public and Demystifying Science

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Van Vliet

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The Internet and smart phone technologies have opened up new avenues for collaboration among scientists around the world. These technologies have also expanded citizen science opportunities and public participation in scientific research (PPSR. Here we discuss citizen science, what it is, who does it, and the variety of projects and methods used to increase scientific knowledge and scientific literacy. We describe a number of different types of citizen-science projects. These greatly increase the number of people involved, helping to speed the pace of data analysis and allowing science to advance more rapidly. As a result of the numerous advantages of citizen-science projects, these opportunities are likely to expand in the future and increase the rate of novel discoveries.

  5. Just how literal is the King James Version?

    OpenAIRE

    Jan (JH) Kroeze; Manie (CM) van den Heever; Bertus (AJ) van Rooy

    2010-01-01

    Many scholars have the perception that the King James Version (KJV) is a literal translation. However, it is not so easy to define the concept of "literal translation". The simplest definition may be to regard it as word-for-word translation. However, when one compares the KJV carefully with the original Hebrew Bible, there are numerous instances where lexical items are changed to adapt the idiom to that of the target language. In this article, a measuring instrument will be proposed and u...

  6. New Media, New Citizens?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ohme, Jakob

    as for different age groups, the thesis shows that digital and especially social media use can be a strong driver of citizen participation. Besides looking at immediate mobilizing effects, the book sheds light on how digital media use may shape participation patterns through a long-term change in citizenship......The use of news media is regarded as a driver for citizens’ engagement with society and their political participation. But as news media use increasingly shifts to digital platforms, it is crucial to understand the interplay between a changing media environment and recent patterns of political...... participation. Against the background of citizens’ diverse possibilities for receiving political information and being politically active nowadays, the book focuses on the impact of digital media on political participation in Denmark. By examining this relationship in election- and non-election times as well...

  7. Experience with citizens panels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selwyn, J.

    2002-01-01

    In May 1999, 200 delegates attended a four-day UK Consensus Conference on radioactive waste management, which was organised by the UK Centre for Economic and Environmental Development (UK CEED) and supported by the government, industry and environmental groups. The event brought together a Citizens' Panel of fifteen people, randomly selected to represent a cross section of the British public, together with the major players in the debate. The four-day conference saw the panel cross-examine expert witnesses from organisations such as NIREX, British Nuclear Fuels Limited, the Ministry of Defence, Greenpeace and Friends of the Earth. The findings of their investigations were put together in a report containing detailed recommendations for government and industry and presented to the Minister on the final day. (author)

  8. Citizen centered design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingrid Mulder

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Today architecture has to design for rapidly changing futures, in a citizen-centered way. That is, architecture needs to embrace meaningful design. Societal challenges ask for a new paradigm in city-making, which combines top-down public management with bottom-up social innovation to reach meaningful design. The biggest challenge is indeed to embrace a new collaborative attitude, a participatory approach, and to have the proper infrastructure that supports this social fabric. Participatory design and transition management are future-oriented, address people and institutions. Only through understanding people in context and the corresponding dynamics, one is able to design for liveable and sustainable urban environments, embracing the human scale.

  9. Citizen Science for public health

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broeder, Den Lea; Devilee, Jeroen; Oers, Van Hans; Schuit, A.J.; Wagemakers, Annemarie

    2016-01-01

    Community engagement in public health policy is easier said than done. One reason is that public health policy is produced in a complex process resulting in policies that may appear not to link up to citizen perspectives. We therefore address the central question as to whether citizen engagement in

  10. Citizen Science for public health

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Den Broeder, Lea; Devilee, Jeroen; Van Oers, J.A.M.; Schuit, A.J.; Wagemakers, Annemarie

    2017-01-01

    Community engagement in public health policy is easier said than done. One reason is that public health policy is produced in a complex process resulting in policies that may appear not to link up to citizen perspectives. We therefore address the central question as to whether citizen engagement in

  11. Citizen empowerment using healthcare and welfare cards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheshire, Paul

    2006-01-01

    Cards are used in health and welfare to establish the identity of the person presenting the card; to prove their entitlement to a welfare or healthcare service; to store data needed within the care process; and to store data to use in the administration process. There is a desire to empower citizens - to give them greater control over their lives, their health and wellbeing. How can a healthcare and welfare card support this aim? Does having a card empower the citizen? What can a citizen do more easily, reliably, securely or cost-effectively because they have a card? A number of possibilities include: Choice of service provider; Mobility across regional and national boundaries; Privacy; and Anonymity. But in all of these possibilities a card is just one component of a total system and process, and there may be other solutions--technological and manual. There are risks and problems from relying on a card; and issues of Inclusion for people who are unable use a card. The article concludes that: cards need to be viewed in the context of the whole solution; cards are not the only technological mechanism; cards are not the best mechanism in all circumstances; but cards are very convenient method in very many situations.

  12. Library Services For Neo-Literates: Some Challenges | Adjah ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    It looks at the illiteracy situation in Ghana, and attempts made by the government to eradicate illiteracy by the establishment of the Non-Formal Education Division of the Ministry of Education, Science and Sports. The paper argues that libraries have an essential role to play to help neo-literates sustain literacy skills.

  13. Extending the Literate Community: Reading and Writing with Families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shockley, Betty

    1993-01-01

    Describes a first grade teacher's efforts to expand the boundaries of her literate classroom community and include the families of her students. Describes how all students' families participated, each in their own way, in reading and journaling together, and in the "Family Stories" project. (SR)

  14. Metaphors are Embodied, and so are Their Literal Counterparts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santana, Eduardo; de Vega, Manuel

    2011-01-01

    This study investigates whether understanding up/down metaphors as well as semantically homologous literal sentences activates embodied representations online. Participants read orientational literal sentences (e.g., she climbed up the hill), metaphors (e.g., she climbed up in the company), and abstract sentences with similar meaning to the metaphors (e.g., she succeeded in the company). In Experiments 1 and 2, participants were asked to perform a speeded upward or downward hand motion while they were reading the sentence verb. The hand motion either matched or mismatched the direction connoted by the sentence. The results showed a meaning-action effect for metaphors and literals, that is, faster hand motion responses in the matching conditions. Notably, the matching advantage was also found for homologous abstract sentences, indicating that some abstract ideas are conceptually organized in the vertical dimension, even when they are expressed by means of literal sentences. In Experiment 3, participants responded to an upward or downward visual motion associated with the sentence verb by pressing a single key. In this case, the facilitation effect for matching visual motion-sentence meaning faded, indicating that the visual motion component is less important than the action component in conceptual metaphors. Most up and down metaphors convey emotionally positive and negative information, respectively. We suggest that metaphorical meaning elicits upward/downward movements because they are grounded on the bodily expression of the corresponding emotions.

  15. Professional Bandwagons and Local Discursive Effects: Reporting the Literate Student.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comber, Barbara

    Despite the considerable attention given to literacy assessment, there has been very little examination of one of the most common assessment and reporting practices; namely, the teacher written report card. What kinds of literate subjects are constructed in teachers' written assessments of students and what are the effects for different students?…

  16. Utilization of agricultural information among literate women in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study x-rayed the utilization of agricultural information among women in Ihiagwa Autonomous Community (IHC), Owerri West Local Government Area, Imo State, Nigeria. The study population comprised of literate women in the communities studied and data was collected using questionnaire. A total of 160 women were ...

  17. Metaphors are embodied, and so are their literal counterparts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo eSantana

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates whether understanding up/down metaphors as well as semantically homologous literal sentences activates embodied representations online. Participants read orientational literal sentences (e.g. she climbed up the hill, metaphors (e.g. she climbed up in the company, and abstract sentences with similar meaning to the metaphors (e.g. she succeeded in the company. In Experiments 1 and 2, participants were asked to perform a speeded upward or downward hand motion while they were reading the sentence verb. The hand motion either matched or mismatched the direction connoted by the sentence. The results showed a meaning-action effect for metaphors and literals, that is faster hand motion responses in the matching conditions. Notably, the matching advantage was also found for homologous abstract sentences, indicating that some abstract ideas are conceptually organized in the vertical dimension, even when they are expressed by means of literal sentences. In Experiment 3, participants responded to an upward or downward visual motion associated with the sentence verb by pressing a single key. In this case, the facilitation effect for matching visual motion-sentence meaning faded, indicating that the visual motion component is less important than the action component in conceptual metaphors. Most up and down metaphors convey emotionally positive and negative information, respectively. We suggest that metaphorical meaning elicits upward/downward movements because they are grounded on the bodily expression of the corresponding emotions.

  18. O letramento literário na Prova Brasil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Débora Sodré Ésper

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available http://dx.doi.org/10.5007/2175-795X.2014v32n3p1101 Este artigo apoia-se nos Novos Estudos sobre Letramento (STREET, 2003, 2010 segundo os quais letramento é compreendido como um conjunto de práticas sociais de uso da escrita Ao mesmo tempo, leva em conta o conceito de leitura literária (CÂNDIDO, 1981; AGUIAR, 2000; HANSEN, 2005, como uma dentre as muitas práticas letradas das quais os indivíduos participam. A partir de tais conceitos, este artigo tem como objetivos caracterizar a prática de letramento literário proposto na Prova Brasil e analisar como a proposta se aproxima dos conceitos de leitura literária. O corpus da investigação é constituído por exemplos de atividades da disciplina de língua portuguesa da Prova Brasil, destinadas ao 9o ano, disponibilizadas no site do Inep. Os resultados mostraram que na prova há um apagamento da literatura enquanto arte, uma vez que o gênero ficcional é utilizado, na maioria das vezes, para a análise gramatical ou como objeto para leitura na qual a especi# cidade do texto literário não é contemplada.

  19. An Empirical Investigation of the Role of Information Quality in Citizens' Trust in E-Government Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ally

    2011-01-01

    Over the past decade, there has been a change in the citizen-government relationship. Citizens have moved from a traditional face-to-face communication with their government, to an electronic interaction through the use of e-government systems. Emerging technology has enabled citizens to communicate with their government remotely. However, trust…

  20. The Internet and Increased Citizen Participation in Government

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael E. Milakovich

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available What roles do communication systems, information technologies and the internet play in fostering citizen participation and influencing the electoral and administrative decisions of government? The internet is simultaneously a world-wide broadcasting network, a mechanism for information dissemination, and a medium for collaboration and interaction between individuals and their computers without regard for geographic boundaries or time zones. This article describes the origins of participatory democracy, discusses how modern concepts of democracy link to citizen participation, and describes the ways that newly-created spaces on the internet referred to as “polispheres” are being used by political activists and candidates to facilitate wider collaboration and citizen participation. The following questions are addressed: What role does the internet play in fostering and aiding citizen participation in government? Does increased involvement lead to greater trust and confidence in government? What role did the internet play in apparently reversing downward trends in citizen apathy and drawing 8 million new voters to the United States 2008 presidential election? The article suggests that information technology facilitates broader citizen participation and identifies the challenges facing governments in adopting internet-based ICT strategies.

  1. Citizen involvement in future drug R&D

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møldrup, Claus; Morgall, Janine Marie; Almarsdóttir, Anna Birna

    2000-01-01

    This article adopts a prospective approach in an attempt to explore the potential benefit of citizen involvement in decision making concerning future drug R&D. This is one of the first Delphi studies to fully utilize internet technology to collect and process data. The results show an increasing...... individual autonomy among respondents, which also affects the drug R&D process in general. Human, liberal and ethical values are reported as crucial values to citizens. On this basis, respondents reported that patient organizations, representative citizen groups and ethical councils can contribute...... with important input to ensure these values in decision making concerning future drug R&D. Paying attention to citizen needs, demands and ideas may protect the research, development and eventual marketing of unacceptable drugs on a societal and ethical level....

  2. User interaction in smart ambient environment targeted for senior citizen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulli, Petri; Hyry, Jaakko; Pouke, Matti; Yamamoto, Goshiro

    2012-11-01

    Many countries are facing a problem when the age-structure of the society is changing. The numbers of senior citizen are rising rapidly, and caretaking personnel numbers cannot match the problems and needs of these citizens. Using smart, ubiquitous technologies can offer ways in coping with the need of more nursing staff and the rising costs of taking care of senior citizens for the society. Helping senior citizens with a novel, easy to use interface that guides and helps, could improve their quality of living and make them participate more in daily activities. This paper presents a projection-based display system for elderly people with memory impairments and the proposed user interface for the system. The user's process recognition based on a sensor network is also described. Elderly people wearing the system can interact the projected user interface by tapping physical surfaces (such as walls, tables, or doors) using them as a natural, haptic feedback input surface.

  3. So to Speak: A Computational and Empirical Investigation of Lexical Cohesion of Non-Literal and Literal Expressions in Text

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexis Palmer

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Lexical cohesion is an important device for signaling text organization. In this paper, we investigate to what extent a particular class of expressions which can have a non-literal interpretation participates in the cohesive structure of a text. Specifically, we look at five expressions headed by a verb which – depending on the context – can have either a literal or a non-literal meaning: bounce off the wall (“to be excited and full of nervous energy”, get one’s feet wet (“to start a new activity or job”, rock the boat (“to disturb the balance or routine of a situation”, break the ice (“to start to get to know people, to overcome initial shyness”, and play with fire (“to take part in a dangerous or risky undertaking”. We look at the problem both from an empirical and a computational perspective. The results from our empirical study suggest that both literal and non-literal expressions exhibit cohesion with their textual context, but that the latter appear to do so to a lesser extent. We also show that an automatically computable semantic relatedness measure based on search engine page counts correlates well with human intuitions about the cohesive structure of a text and can therefore be used to determine the cohesive structure of a text automatically with a reasonable degree of accuracy. This investigation is undertaken from the perspective of computational linguistics. We aim both to model this cohesion computationally and to support our approach to computational modeling with empirical data.

  4. Citizen observations contributing to flood modelling: opportunities and challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. H. Assumpção

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Citizen contributions to science have been successfully implemented in many fields, and water resources is one of them. Through citizens, it is possible to collect data and obtain a more integrated decision-making process. Specifically, data scarcity has always been an issue in flood modelling, which has been addressed in the last decades by remote sensing and is already being discussed in the citizen science context. With this in mind, this article aims to review the literature on the topic and analyse the opportunities and challenges that lie ahead. The literature on monitoring, mapping and modelling, was evaluated according to the flood-related variable citizens contributed to. Pros and cons of the collection/analysis methods were summarised. Then, pertinent publications were mapped into the flood modelling cycle, considering how citizen data properties (spatial and temporal coverage, uncertainty and volume are related to its integration into modelling. It was clear that the number of studies in the area is rising. There are positive experiences reported in collection and analysis methods, for instance with velocity and land cover, and also when modelling is concerned, for example by using social media mining. However, matching the data properties necessary for each part of the modelling cycle with citizen-generated data is still challenging. Nevertheless, the concept that citizen contributions can be used for simulation and forecasting is proved and further work lies in continuing to develop and improve not only methods for collection and analysis, but certainly for integration into models as well. Finally, in view of recent automated sensors and satellite technologies, it is through studies as the ones analysed in this article that the value of citizen contributions, complementing such technologies, is demonstrated.

  5. Citizen observations contributing to flood modelling: opportunities and challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assumpção, Thaine H.; Popescu, Ioana; Jonoski, Andreja; Solomatine, Dimitri P.

    2018-02-01

    Citizen contributions to science have been successfully implemented in many fields, and water resources is one of them. Through citizens, it is possible to collect data and obtain a more integrated decision-making process. Specifically, data scarcity has always been an issue in flood modelling, which has been addressed in the last decades by remote sensing and is already being discussed in the citizen science context. With this in mind, this article aims to review the literature on the topic and analyse the opportunities and challenges that lie ahead. The literature on monitoring, mapping and modelling, was evaluated according to the flood-related variable citizens contributed to. Pros and cons of the collection/analysis methods were summarised. Then, pertinent publications were mapped into the flood modelling cycle, considering how citizen data properties (spatial and temporal coverage, uncertainty and volume) are related to its integration into modelling. It was clear that the number of studies in the area is rising. There are positive experiences reported in collection and analysis methods, for instance with velocity and land cover, and also when modelling is concerned, for example by using social media mining. However, matching the data properties necessary for each part of the modelling cycle with citizen-generated data is still challenging. Nevertheless, the concept that citizen contributions can be used for simulation and forecasting is proved and further work lies in continuing to develop and improve not only methods for collection and analysis, but certainly for integration into models as well. Finally, in view of recent automated sensors and satellite technologies, it is through studies as the ones analysed in this article that the value of citizen contributions, complementing such technologies, is demonstrated.

  6. Advertising Citizen Science: A Trailer for the Citizen Sky Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyatt, Ryan; Price, A.

    2012-01-01

    Citizen Sky is a multi-year, NSF funded citizen science project involving the bright and mysterious variable star epsilon Aurigae. The project was conceived by the IYA 2009 working group on Research Experiences for Students, Teachers, and Citizen-Scientists. Citizen Sky goes beyond simple observing to include a major data analysis component, introducing participants to the full scientific process from background research to paper writing for a peer-reviewed journal. As a means of generating interest in the project, the California Academy of Sciences produced a six-minute "trailer” formatted for both traditional and fulldome planetariums as well as HD and web applications. This talk will review the production process for the trailer as well as the methods of distribution via planetariums, social media, and other venues_along with an update on the Citizen Sky Project as a whole. We will show how to use a small, professionally-produced planetarium trailer to help spread word on a citizen science project. We will also show preliminary results on a study about how participation level/type in the project affects science learning.

  7. Reconnoitering the role of citizen journalism ethics in the emerging networked public sphere

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mutsvairo, Bruce; Columbus, Simon; Leijendekker, Iris

    2014-01-01

    Citizen journalism is emerging as a powerful phenomenon across Africa. The rise of digitally networked technologies is reshaping reporting across the continent. This change is technological (with social media platforms enabling new forms of publishing, receiving and discussing stories) \\r\

  8. Environmental protection belongs to the public: A vision for citizen science at EPA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, A.; Dosemagen, S.

    2017-12-01

    As a collaborative and open approach to science, citizen science has the potential make science more actionable, applicable, and usable, especially when designed with scientists, communities and decision-makers as partners. In response to recent interest in citizen science from the US Environmental Protection Agency, the National Advisory Council for Environmental Policy and Technology provided EPA with advice and recommendations on how to integrate citizen science into the core work of EPA. The Council's 28 members—representatives of academia; business and industry; nongovernmental organizations; and state, local and tribal governments—identifies citizen science as an invaluable opportunity for EPA to strengthen public support for EPA's mission and the best approach for the Agency to connect with the public on environmental protection. The report recommends that EPA embrace citizen science as a core tenet of environmental protection, invest in citizen science for communities, partners, and the Agency, enable the use of citizen science data at the Agency, integrate citizen science into the full range of work of EPA. This presentation will outline principles and strategy for integrating citizen science into science and policy at the national level, increasing the usability of citizen science data for decision-making and policy, and leveraging citizen science for environmental protection.

  9. Citizen utilities: The emerging power paradigm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, Jemma; Newman, Peter

    2017-01-01

    The emergence of citizen-based power systems in an integrated grid has been anticipated for decades. We can reveal how this is emerging in practice due to the significant uptake of solar photovoltaics (solar PV) and now battery storage in Perth, Australia. The high cost of electricity, high radiant energy levels and easy access to cheap Chinese technology, has led to dramatic buying during Perth's recent boomtown years. The traditional uni-directional power system is rapidly disrupting and this paper assesses where this may lead and what it means for the grid. Results of detailed monitoring in a solar powered house along with the impact of a battery storage system show the impact on the traditional grid is substantial but it will still be needed and must therefore adapt to the new distributed, bi-directional energy system. Surveys and price trajectories reveal how the trends to solar power storage will continue and how a citizen utility paradigm will emerge as the future grid building block using new blockchain support systems. Responses from utilities are then see to be fight, flight or innovate. - Highlights: • Citizen based power systems are emerging in Perth, Western Australia. • Solar power and battery storage systems are disrupting traditional utilities. • The grid will still have a role in the new, distributed power system. • The new system will lead to economic localism and the democratisation of power.

  10. Comparing cognitive performance in illiterate and literate children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matute, Esmeralda; Montiel, Teresita; Pinto, Noemí; Rosselli, Monica; Ardila, Alfredo; Zarabozo, Daniel

    2012-02-01

    While it is known that the process of becoming literate begins in early childhood and usually involves several years of schooling, research related to cognitive characteristics has been done mostly on illiterate adults, and information concerning illiterate children is therefore limited. The aim of the present study, involving 21 illiterate and 22 literate Mexican children aged 6 to 13, was to investigate the effects of literacy on neuropsychological characteristics during childhood. The children's performance on 16 cognitive domains of the Evaluación Neuropsicológica Infantil (ENI, Child Neuropsychological Assessment) was examined in three mixed within- and between-groups profile analyses. The results suggest that the effect of literacy observed in adults is already evident in children in almost every task analysed. Moreover, the fact that an age effect was detected for the calculation abilities suggests that maths learning is school- and environment-dependent.

  11. Citizens Integrity Pledge ######################### I believe

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    I believe that all stakeholders such as governrnent , citizens and the private sector need to work together to eradicate corruption. I realise that ... maintaining highest standards of integrity, transparency and good governance in all aspects of our.

  12. Language-Agnostic Reproducible Data Analysis Using Literate Programming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vassilev, Boris; Louhimo, Riku; Ikonen, Elina; Hautaniemi, Sampsa

    2016-01-01

    A modern biomedical research project can easily contain hundreds of analysis steps and lack of reproducibility of the analyses has been recognized as a severe issue. While thorough documentation enables reproducibility, the number of analysis programs used can be so large that in reality reproducibility cannot be easily achieved. Literate programming is an approach to present computer programs to human readers. The code is rearranged to follow the logic of the program, and to explain that logic in a natural language. The code executed by the computer is extracted from the literate source code. As such, literate programming is an ideal formalism for systematizing analysis steps in biomedical research. We have developed the reproducible computing tool Lir (literate, reproducible computing) that allows a tool-agnostic approach to biomedical data analysis. We demonstrate the utility of Lir by applying it to a case study. Our aim was to investigate the role of endosomal trafficking regulators to the progression of breast cancer. In this analysis, a variety of tools were combined to interpret the available data: a relational database, standard command-line tools, and a statistical computing environment. The analysis revealed that the lipid transport related genes LAPTM4B and NDRG1 are coamplified in breast cancer patients, and identified genes potentially cooperating with LAPTM4B in breast cancer progression. Our case study demonstrates that with Lir, an array of tools can be combined in the same data analysis to improve efficiency, reproducibility, and ease of understanding. Lir is an open-source software available at github.com/borisvassilev/lir.

  13. Challenges of citizen science contributions to modelling hydrodynamics of floods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assumpção, Thaine Herman; Popescu, Ioana; Jonoski, Andreja; Solomatine, Dimitri P.

    2017-04-01

    Citizen science is an established mechanism in many fields of science, including ecology, biology and astronomy. Citizen participation ranges from collecting and interpreting data towards designing experiments with scientists and cooperating with water management authorities. In the environmental sciences, its potential has begun to be explored in the past decades and many studies on the applicability to water resources have emerged. Citizen Observatories are at the core of several EU-funded projects such as WeSenseIt, GroundTruth, GroundTruth 2.0 and SCENT (Smart Toolbox for Engaging Citizens into a People-Centric Observation Web) that already resulted in valuable contributions to the field. Buytaert et al. (2014) has already reviewed the role of citizen science in hydrology. The work presented here aims to complement it, reporting and discussing the use of citizen science for modelling the hydrodynamics of floods in a variety of studies. Additionally, it highlights the challenges that lie ahead to utilize more fully the citizen science potential contribution. In this work, focus is given to each component of hydrodynamic models: water level, velocity, flood extent, roughness and topography. It is addressed how citizens have been contributing to each aspect, mainly considering citizens as sensors and citizens as data interpreters. We consider to which kind of model (1D or 2D) the discussed approaches contribute and what their limitations and potential uses are. We found that although certain mechanisms are well established (e.g. the use of Volunteer Geographic Information for soft validation of land-cover and land-use maps), the applications in a modelling context are rather modest. Also, most studies involving models are limited to replacing traditional data with citizen data. We recommend that citizen science continue to be explored in modelling frameworks, in different case studies, taking advantage of the discussed mechanisms and of new sensor technologies

  14. The diversity and evolution of ecological and environmental citizen science.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael J O Pocock

    Full Text Available Citizen science-the involvement of volunteers in data collection, analysis and interpretation-simultaneously supports research and public engagement with science, and its profile is rapidly rising. Citizen science represents a diverse range of approaches, but until now this diversity has not been quantitatively explored. We conducted a systematic internet search and discovered 509 environmental and ecological citizen science projects. We scored each project for 32 attributes based on publicly obtainable information and used multiple factor analysis to summarise this variation to assess citizen science approaches. We found that projects varied according to their methodological approach from 'mass participation' (e.g. easy participation by anyone anywhere to 'systematic monitoring' (e.g. trained volunteers repeatedly sampling at specific locations. They also varied in complexity from approaches that are 'simple' to those that are 'elaborate' (e.g. provide lots of support to gather rich, detailed datasets. There was a separate cluster of entirely computer-based projects but, in general, we found that the range of citizen science projects in ecology and the environment showed continuous variation and cannot be neatly categorised into distinct types of activity. While the diversity of projects begun in each time period (pre 1990, 1990-99, 2000-09 and 2010-13 has not increased, we found that projects tended to have become increasingly different from each other as time progressed (possibly due to changing opportunities, including technological innovation. Most projects were still active so consequently we found that the overall diversity of active projects (available for participation increased as time progressed. Overall, understanding the landscape of citizen science in ecology and the environment (and its change over time is valuable because it informs the comparative evaluation of the 'success' of different citizen science approaches. Comparative

  15. Bilinguals' Plausibility Judgments for Phrases with a Literal vs. Non-literal Meaning: The Influence of Language Brokering Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belem G. López

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Previous work has shown that prior experience in language brokering (informal translation may facilitate the processing of meaning within and across language boundaries. The present investigation examined the influence of brokering on bilinguals' processing of two word collocations with either a literal or a figurative meaning in each language. Proficient Spanish-English bilinguals classified as brokers or non-brokers were asked to judge if adjective+noun phrases presented in each language made sense or not. Phrases with a literal meaning (e.g., stinging insect were interspersed with phrases with a figurative meaning (e.g., stinging insult and non-sensical phrases (e.g., stinging picnic. It was hypothesized that plausibility judgments would be facilitated for literal relative to figurative meanings in each language but that experience in language brokering would be associated with a more equivalent pattern of responding across languages. These predictions were confirmed. The findings add to the body of empirical work on individual differences in language processing in bilinguals associated with prior language brokering experience.

  16. Preconditions for Citizen Journalism: A Sociological Assessment

    OpenAIRE

    Hayley Watson

    2011-01-01

    The rise of the citizen journalist and increased attention to this phenomenon requires a sociological assessment that seeks to develop an understanding of how citizen journalism has emerged in contemporary society. This article makes a distinction between two different subcategories of citizen journalism, that is independent and dependent citizen journalism. The purpose of this article is to present four preconditions for citizen journalism to emerge in contemporary society: advanced technolo...

  17. The Management of the Citizen Oriented Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Ion IVAN; Bogdan VINTILĂ

    2010-01-01

    The context of the knowledge based society is presented. The new user requirements in the context of the new society are analyzed. Basic concepts regarding the citizen oriented applications are presented. Issues specific to the citizen oriented applications are presented. The development cycle of the citizen oriented applications is analyzed. The particular elements for developing citizen oriented applications are described. The quality concept for the citizen oriented applications is defined...

  18. Design processes of a citizen inquiry community

    OpenAIRE

    Aristeidou, Maria; Scanlon, Eileen; Sharples, Mike

    2017-01-01

    As with other online communities, it is important to design elements of citizen inquiry projects that will attract and engage members. This chapter describes the process of designing an online community for citizen inquiry. It builds on design principles of inquiry learning, citizen inquiry and other online communities. The ‘Weather-it’ citizen inquiry community is intended to engage and support people in initiating and joining sustainable citizen-led investigations. The findings indicate som...

  19. Academics and Citizens Working Together

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogen, D., Jr.

    2017-12-01

    Traditionally Academics and citizens have contributed to each other lives but friction has always existed between the two. When there is a hostile relationship between community members and Academics, the collection of data suffers, which in returns hurts the potential solutions to community problems. Combining Community Based Participatory Research and the BISCO Community Organizing Model, {Listens, Identify, Research, offer solution}, these frictions can be limited, creating better working environments, and producing better data. Helping create and participating in workgroups, including NGO's, Academics and Citizens leaders, have produce better working environments. Using these methods within the work groups I observed, relationships being form between Academics and Citizens. Some of the relationships were both public and private. The workgroups that created space for professional and personal stories telling produced the most relationships. Listening and understand each other, before research have proven to be successful in producing trust between Academics and Citizens. When Academics and Citizens developed trust between themselves, each party respects the other limitation. Knowing each limitation is perhaps the most key element in working together, which eliminates over promises and culture hindrance within the community. It's amazing like getting the answers to the test before you take it. The project becomes richer in design, when there is trust in the process before it begins. Working together to eliminating potential road blocks ahead of time, enhance the project chances to produce, richer data.Academics cannot produce good data if citizens withhold information and citizens cannot solve their social ills if they do not have good data, in short we need each other.

  20. Active audiences and journalism: Involved citizens or motivated consumers?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pere Masip

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Audience participation, in any of its forms and names (public journalism, citizen journalism, participatory journalism, UGC, appears to revitalise democracy, thanks to the opportunities for public debate opened up by information and communications technology. On the other hand, however, there are many authors who question whether interactive technologies really encourage democracy or the market, empower the citizen or strengthen the consumer. In this context, we still have little information on the motivations that drive citizens to actively participate through the mechanisms that the media make available to them on their own websites or through social networks. There is a similar lack of information on the role that users attribute to their involvement in the functioning of the media and whether it contributes to improving their democratic function. This article aims to shed some light on this subject.

  1. Addressing the social dimensions of citizen observatories: The Ground Truth 2.0 socio-technical approach for sustainable implementation of citizen observatories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wehn, Uta; Joshi, Somya; Pfeiffer, Ellen; Anema, Kim; Gharesifard, Mohammad; Momani, Abeer

    2017-04-01

    Owing to ICT-enabled citizen observatories, citizens can take on new roles in environmental monitoring, decision making and co-operative planning, and environmental stewardship. And yet implementing advanced citizen observatories for data collection, knowledge exchange and interactions to support policy objectives is neither always easy nor successful, given the required commitment, trust, and data reliability concerns. Many efforts are facing problems with the uptake and sustained engagement by citizens, limited scalability, unclear long-term sustainability and limited actual impact on governance processes. Similarly, to sustain the engagement of decision makers in citizen observatories, mechanisms are required from the start of the initiative in order to have them invest in and, hence, commit to and own the entire process. In order to implement sustainable citizen observatories, these social dimensions therefore need to be soundly managed. We provide empirical evidence of how the social dimensions of citizen observatories are being addressed in the Ground Truth 2.0 project, drawing on a range of relevant social science approaches. This project combines the social dimensions of citizen observatories with enabling technologies - via a socio-technical approach - so that their customisation and deployment is tailored to the envisaged societal and economic impacts of the observatories. The projects consists of the demonstration and validation of six scaled up citizen observatories in real operational conditions both in the EU and in Africa, with a specific focus on flora and fauna as well as water availability and water quality for land and natural resources management. The demonstration cases (4 EU and 2 African) cover the full 'spectrum' of citizen-sensed data usage and citizen engagement, and therefore allow testing and validation of the socio-technical concept for citizen observatories under a range of conditions.

  2. Citizen Observatories: A Standards Based Architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonis, Ingo

    2015-04-01

    built-in sensing technologies, automates the upload of the raw data, and handles conflation services to match quality requirements and analysis challenges. The strict implementation of all components using internationally adopted standards ensures maximal interoperability and reusability of all components. The Citizen Observatory Toolkit is currently developed as part of the COBWEB research project. COBWEB is partially funded by the European Programme FP7/2007-2013 under grant agreement n° 308513; part of the topic ENV.2012.6.5-1 "Developing community based environmental monitoring and information systems using innovative and novel earth observation applications.

  3. Development of radiological concentrations and unit liter doses for TWRS FSAR radiological consequence calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cowley, W.L.

    1996-01-01

    The analysis described in this report develops the Unit Liter Doses for use in the TWRS FSAR. The Unit Liter Doses provide a practical way to calculate conservative radiological consequences for a variety of potential accidents for the tank farms

  4. Telemedicine in Greenland: Citizens' Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Lasse O; Krebs, Hans J; Albert, Nancy M; Anderson, Nick; Catz, Sheryl; Hale, Timothy M; Hansen, John; Hounsgaard, Lise; Kim, Tae Youn; Lindeman, David; Spindler, Helle; Marcin, James P; Nesbitt, Thomas; Young, Heather M; Dinesen, Birthe

    2017-05-01

    Telemedicine may have the possibility to provide better access to healthcare delivery for the citizens. Telemedicine in arctic remote areas must be tailored according to the needs of the local population. Therefore, we need more knowledge about their needs and their view of telemedicine. The aim of this study has been to explore how citizens living in the Greenlandic settlements experience the possibilities and challenges of telemedicine when receiving healthcare delivery in everyday life. Case study design was chosen as the overall research design. Qualitative interviews (n = 14) were performed and participant observations (n = 80 h) carried out in the local healthcare center in the settlements and towns. A logbook was kept and updated each day during the field research in Greenland. Observations were made of activities in the settlements. Data collected on citizens' views about the possibilities of using telemedicine in Greenland revealed the following findings: Greenlandic citizens are positive toward telemedicine, and telemedicine can help facilitate improved access to healthcare for residents in these Greenlandic settlements. Regarding challenges in using telemedicine in Greenland, the geographical and cultural context hinders accessibility to the Greenlandic healthcare system, and telemedicine equipment is not sufficiently mobile. Greenlandic citizens are positive toward telemedicine and regard telemedicine as a facilitator for improved access for healthcare in the Greenlandic settlements. We have identified challenges, such as geographical and cultural context, that hinder accessibility to the Greenlandic healthcare system.

  5. Place Branding and Citizen Involvement: Participatory Approach to Building and Managing City Brands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hereźniak Marta

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This article examines the role of citizens in the process of building and managing city brands. A multidisciplinary approach is applied to explain the multifaceted nature of territorial brands and citizen involvement. To this end, theoretical concepts from marketing and corporate branding, public management, and human geography are applied. By conceptualising place branding as a public policy and a governance process, and drawing from the concept of participatory place branding, the author discusses a variety of methods and instruments used to involve citizens. Special attention is given to the importance of modern technologies for effective citizen involvement.

  6. Science and the Citizen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scientific American, 1978

    1978-01-01

    Reports on the following topics: (1) a national science and technology plan for China, (2) operable nuclear power plants in the U.S., (3) the university presidents' report on scientific research, (4) the pluperfect square, (5) test tube potatoes, and (6) Russian research of paranormal phenomena a century ago. (MA)

  7. I-space: Designing for and with Citizens with Special Needs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helms, Niels Henrik; Tellerup, Susanne; Jensen Bryderup, Karin

    This paper presents I-Space. The purpose of this project is to improve the wellbeing and life quality of mentally impaired citizens through the development of new technologies, which could enhance learning and motivation. The project is used as reference to a discussion on structures within design...... and innovation processes for citizens with special needs....

  8. Citizen science in hydrology and waterresources: opportunities for knowledge generation, ecosystem service management, and sustainable development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buytaert, W.; Zulkafi, Z.; Grainger, S.; Acosta, L.; Alemie, T.C.; Bastiaensen, J.; Bièvre, de B.; Bhusal, J.; Clark, J.; Dewulf, A.R.P.J.; Foggin, M.; Hannah, D.M.; Hergarten, C.; Isaeva, A.; Karpouzoglou, T.D.; Pandeya, B.; Paudel, D.; Sharma, K.; Steenhuis, T.S.; Tilahun, S.; Hecken, van G.; Zhumanova, M.

    2014-01-01

    The participation of the general public in the research design, data collection and interpretation process together with scientists is often referred to as citizen science. While citizen science itself has existed since the start of scientific practice, developments in sensing technology, data

  9. Innovative forms of citizen participation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nyseth, Torill; Ringholm, Toril; Agger, Annika

    in practice. Some scholars claim that a reason is due to rigid and formal procedures and that the ways citizen meetings are structured tend to appeal to a limited amount of the population. At the same time, we are witnessing a proliferation in novel and more experimental ways of how citizens and authorities...... interact within the field of urban governance. This is for example seen in urban regeneration projects in Denmark and planning experiments in Norway where we are witnessing more inclusive and bottom-up initiated interactions between public authorities and local actors. The key question in this paper is......: What characterises the new and innovative forms of citizen participation in urban planning in terms of innovation? And in what ways and to what degree is input from these processes fed into the formal planning processes? Theoretically, the paper is inspired by the concept of: ‘planning...

  10. Citizen involvement in green transition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Horsbøl, Anders

    2017-01-01

    a deficit model of public communication towards participatory ambitions of engaging citizens in more open-ended decision making (Lassen et al. 2011, Phillips et. al, 2012). However, there is often a tension between the participatory ambitions on the one hand and predetermined environmental goal...... consumption, replacement of oil-fired boilers, higher distribution of electric cars, and installation of solar panels. These goals all affect private decisions of individual citizens or families, where the municipality has no legislative competence. In a series of 4 two-day workshops in 2016, representatives...... and discussions. The current paper will focus on the process of developing a common framework and will pay particular attention to the tension between the predetermined environmental goals and the ambition of citizen participation. Applying an emic discourse perspective and drawing on Critical Discourse Analysis...

  11. Fiscal State-citizen Alignment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Celik, Tim Holst

    2016-01-01

    The 2008 crisis ended the growth bubble of the 2000s, which Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) governments facilitated through the normative/political-regulatory promotion of household indebtedness. Historically contextualizing this state-citizen relationship, this arti......The 2008 crisis ended the growth bubble of the 2000s, which Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) governments facilitated through the normative/political-regulatory promotion of household indebtedness. Historically contextualizing this state-citizen relationship...... fiscal attentiveness to ordinary consumer-citizens. By uncovering the sociohistorical conditions governing the dominant precrisis regime, it not only nuances our understanding of the crisis but also of neoliberalism and suggests the implausibility of returning to “Golden Age” democratic capitalism....

  12. Public information strategies: Making government information available to citizens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, A.J.; Thaens, M.

    2009-01-01

    New technological opportunities and increasing demands make it imperative for government agencies to make the information they gather available to citizens. How should they go about this? This paper presents a conceptual framework for analyzing the strategic options open to agencies which have

  13. First experiences with a novel farmer citizen science approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Etten, van Jacob; Beza, Eskender; Calderer, Lluís; Duijvendijk, van Kees; Fadda, Carlo; Fantahun, Basazen; Kidane, Yosef Gebrehawaryat; Gevel, van de Jeske; Gupta, Arnab; Mengistu, Dejene Kassahun

    2016-01-01

    Rapid climatic and socio-economic changes challenge current agricultural R&D capacity. The necessary quantum leap in knowledge generation should build on the innovation capacity of farmers themselves. A novel citizen science methodology, triadic comparisons of technologies or tricot, was

  14. Nuclear risk and citizen information

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charbonneau, S.

    1999-01-01

    This issue studies the citizen information relative to the nuclear risk. If the regulation about the information and the participation of the citizen on the nuclear risk is relatively complete, the industrial and administrative practice is marked by the habits of information retention. The official caution has for motive the fact to provoke the unjustified anxiety of the populations. An opposite strategy is actually experimented with the operators of nuclear industry in informing the public opinion with the slightest technical incidents. (N.C.)

  15. Citizen participation in nuclear waste repository siting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howell, R.E.; Olsen, D.

    1982-12-01

    The following study presents a proposed strategy for citizen participation during the planning stages of nuclear waste repository siting. It discusses the issue from the general perspective of citizen participation in controversial issues and in community development. Second, rural institutions and attitudes toward energy development as the context for developing a citizen participation program are examined. Third, major citizen participation techniques and the advantages and disadvantages of each approach for resolving public policy issues are evaluated. Fourth, principles of successful citizen participation are presented. Finally, a proposal for stimulating and sustaining effective responsible citizen participation in nuclear waste repository siting and management is developed

  16. Comparison of 200-liter and 40-milliliter leach tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Westsik, J.H. Jr.; Harvey, C.O.; Roberts, F.P.; Ross, W.A.; Thornhill, R.E.

    1982-01-01

    During the past year we have conducted a modified MCC-1 leach test on a 145 kg block of a cast cement waste form. The leach vessel was a 200 liter Teflon-lined drum and contained 97.5 liters of deionized water. The results of this large-scale leach test were compared with the results of standard MC-1 tests (40 ml) on smaller samples of the same waste form. The ratio of leachate volumes between the large and small scale tests was 2500 and the ratio of sample masses was 150,000. The cast cement samples for both tests contained plutonium-doped incinerator ash. The leachates from these tests were analyzed for both plutonium and the matrix elements. Evaluation of plutonium plateout in the large-scale test indicated that the majority of the plutonium leached from the samples deposits onto vessel walls and little ( -12 /sub M/) remains in solution. Comparison of elemental concentrations in the leachates indicates some differences up to 5X in the concentration in the large- and small-scale tests. The differences are attributed to differences in the solubilities of Ca, Si, and Fe at pH 11.5 and at pH 12.5. The higher pH observed for the large-scale test is a result of the larger quantities of sodium in the large block of cement

  17. Half-liter supernatant sampler system engineering work plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ritter, G.A.

    1995-01-01

    The Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) pretreatment facility project W-236B, known as the Initial Pretreatment Module (IPM), requires samples of supernatants and sludges from 200 Area tank farms for planned hot testing work in support of IPM design. The IPM project has proposed the development of several new sampler systems. These systems include a 0.5-l supernatant sampler, 3-l and 25-l supernatant and sludge samplers, and a 4,000-l sampler system. The 0.5-l sampler will support IPM sampling needs in the 1 to 3 l range starting in late fiscal year 1995. This sampler is intended to be used in conjunction with the existing 100 ml bottle-on-a-string. The 3-l and 25-l systems will be based on the Savannah River Site's sampler system and will support IPM sampling needs in the 3 to 100 liter range. Most of the hot testing required for design of the IPM must be accomplished in the next 3 years. This work plan defines the tasks associated with the development of a 0.5-l sampler system. This system will be referred to as the Half-Liter Supernatant Sampler System (HLSSS). Specifically, this work plan will define the scope of work, identify organizational responsibilities, identify major technical requirements, describe configuration control and verification requirements, and provide estimated costs and schedule. The sampler system will be fully operational, including trained staff and operating procedures, upon completion of this task

  18. A paucity of strategies for developing health literate organisations: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd, Jane E; Song, Hyun J; Dennis, Sarah M; Dunbar, Nicola; Harris, Elizabeth; Harris, Mark F

    2018-01-01

    People with low health literacy are more likely to delay seeking care and experience adverse outcomes. While health literacy is the product of individuals' capacities, it is also affected by the complexities of the health care system. System-level changes are needed to align health care demands better with the public's skills and abilities. We aimed to identify the evidence base for effective strategies for creating health literate organisations. A systematic review and narrative synthesis of empirical studies was performed. Medline, Embase, PsychInfo and CINHAL databases were searched for empirical studies from OECD countries published from 2008 onwards, focusing on health literacy interventions at the organisational level. Analysis of the findings was informed by the National Academies' five-dimensional framework for the attributes of a health literate organisation, which include: organisational commitment, accessible education and technology infrastructure, augmented workforce, embedded policies and practices, and effective bidirectional communication. The title and abstract of 867 records were screened according to the selection criteria, leading to full text review of 125 articles. Seven studies were identified in the peer review literature. Adapting health literacy guidelines and tools was the most common approach to addressing organisational health literacy. While the use of health literacy tools proved important for raising awareness of health literacy issues within organisations, these tools were insufficient for generating the organisational changes necessary to improve organisational health literacy.

  19. Citizen Dialogues on Public Acceptance of Innovative Cars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lienin, S.F.; Kasemir, B. [PSI and sustainserv GmbH (Switzerland); Gassmann, F.; Wokaun, A.

    2004-03-01

    Studying acceptance of citizens concerning innovative technology is a central element in developing effective strategies to attain a more sustainable future. To this aim, a method based on discussions in small focus groups has been developed. In the framework of the programme '2000-Watt-Society: Pilot Region Basel' and the novatlantis project 'Mobility Module', this method was used to assess public attitudes to-wards natural gas, biogas , and hydrogen as alternative fuels for cars. The setup of respective citizen dialogues and some results are presented. (author)

  20. Online citizen science games: Opportunities for the biological sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Vickie

    2014-12-01

    Recent developments in digital technologies and the rise of the Internet have created new opportunities for citizen science. One of these has been the development of online citizen science games where complex research problems have been re-imagined as online multiplayer computer games. Some of the most successful examples of these can be found within the biological sciences, for example, Foldit, Phylo and EteRNA. These games offer scientists the opportunity to crowdsource research problems, and to engage with those outside the research community. Games also enable those without a background in science to make a valid contribution to research, and may also offer opportunities for informal science learning.

  1. Citizen Science International Pellet Watch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dohrenwend, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Like Tokyo, other cities, both small and large, typically have numerous universities with dedicated faculties of scientists. By using portals such as Citizen Science and SciStarter, teachers can reach beyond the four walls of their classroom. The incredible experience of forging a relationship with a local scientist can easily begin via a cordial…

  2. The Fabrication of Qualified Citizens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andrade-Molina, Melissa

    2017-01-01

    a rhizomatic analytical move, a historization of the present is deployed to map the fabrication of the desired qualified citizen in Chile. The analysis evidences the (re)production of dominant narratives about the “qualified citizen” are and have been entangled with the functioning of school geometry...

  3. Three dimensional reconstruction of activity profiles in 220 liters radioactive waste packages containing super-compacted 100 liters drums

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Velzen, L.P.M.; Maes, J.

    2007-01-01

    The 3DRedact project's main objective is the development of a non-destructive assay (NDA) system that can replace emission computer tomography (ECT) and transmission computer tomography (TCT) for the routine characterization of decayed radioactive waste 220 liters drums. The existing fast NDA scan system has been extended with a transmission system that fulfils the requirements of fast scan measurements. The design parameters and engineering are described. As a consequence of this extension the analyze program HOLIS had to be updated, so that HOLIS can make full advantage of the transmission data generated by the analysis of a 220 liters waste drum, containing different super compacted drums. The achievements of the new HOLIS version are presented. As a first assessment, based on the presented tests results, the accuracy of the calculated coordinates of hotspots can be assessed for all coordinates ± 1 cm and for the activity of the hot-spot ± 5 %. These accuracies are within the predefined requirements e.g. coordinates uncertainty ± 2 cm and activity less than 10 %. Further, additional safety systems have been installed to improve a healthy and save working environment. (authors)

  4. Emerging ICT for Citizens' Veillance: Theoretical and Practical Insights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boucher, Philip; Nascimento, Susana; Tallacchini, Mariachiara

    2018-02-28

    In ubiquitous surveillance societies, individuals are subjected to observation and control by authorities, institutions, and corporations. Sometimes, citizens contribute their own knowledge and other resources to their own surveillance. In addition, some of "the watched" observe "the watchers" "through" sous-veillant activities, and various forms of self-surveillance for different purposes. However, information and communication technologies are also increasingly used for social initiatives with a bottom up structure where citizens themselves define the goals, shape the outcomes and profit from the benefits of watching activities. This model, which we define as citizens' veillance and explore in this special issue, may present opportunities for individuals and collectives to be more prepared to meet the challenges they face in various domains including environment, health, planning and emergency response.

  5. Research on a Scania 11 liter ethanol fueled bus engine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Egebaeck, K E; Pettersson, E

    1996-05-01

    This report presents research carried out on an alcohol fueled bus engine. The engine used was a six cylinder 11 liter compression ignition turbo-charged engine with an inter cooler. The research program included studies of the impact on the emissions when changing different engine components and different settings of the engine. A study of the impact on the engine performance and emissions when using different fuel compositions was also carried out. During the course of the work, the engine was equipped with oxidation catalysts of two different types, one of which was more efficient than the other concerning the oxidation of unburnt fuel related components. One of the main purposes of the research was to improve the emission characteristics of the engine by an optimization of the engine and its setting. The exhaust emissions were thoroughly characterized with respect to both regulated and unregulated emissions. 13 refs, figs, tabs

  6. Do 'literate' pigeons (Columba livia) show mirror-word generalization?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarf, Damian; Corballis, Michael C; Güntürkün, Onur; Colombo, Michael

    2017-09-01

    Many children pass through a mirror stage in reading, where they write individual letters or digits in mirror and find it difficult to correctly utilize letters that are mirror images of one another (e.g., b and d). This phenomenon is thought to reflect the fact that the brain does not naturally discriminate left from right. Indeed, it has been argued that reading acquisition involves the inhibition of this default process. In the current study, we tested the ability of literate pigeons, which had learned to discriminate between 30 and 62 words from 7832 nonwords, to discriminate between words and their mirror counterparts. Subjects were sensitive to the left-right orientation of the individual letters, but not the order of letters within a word. This finding may reflect the fact that, in the absence of human-unique top-down processes, the inhibition of mirror generalization may be limited.

  7. The Literal Translation Hypothesis in ESP Teaching/Learning Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro A. Fuertes-Olivera

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Research on the characteristics of specialized vocabulary usually replicates studies that deal with general words, e.g. they typically describe frequent terms and focus on their linguistic characteristics to aid in the learning and acquisition of the terms. We dispute this practise, as we believe that the basic characteristic of terms is that they are coined to restrict meaning, i.e. to be as precise and as specific as possible in a particular context. For instance, around 70% of English and Spanish accounting terms are multi-word terms, most of which contain more than three orthographic words that syntactically behave in a way that is very different from the syntactic behaviour of the node on which they are formed (Fuertes-Olivera and Tarp, forthcoming. This has prompted us to propose a research framework that investigates whether or not the literal translation hypothesis, which has been addressed in several areas of translation studies, can also be applied in ESP teaching/learning environments. If plausible, the assumptions on which this hypothesis is based can shed light on how learners disambiguate terms they encounter. Within this framework, this paper presents evidence that the literal translation hypothesis is possible in ESP; it offers the results of a pilot study that sheds light on how this hypothesis may work, and also discusses its usability in the context of ESP learning. In particular, this paper presents strategies for teaching multi-word terms that are different from those currently based on corpus data. We believe that exercises such as “cloze”, “fill in” and similar “guessing” exercises must be abandoned in ESP teaching/learning environments. Instead, we propose exercises that reproduce L1 teaching and learning activities, i.e., exercises that are typically used when acquiring specialised knowledge and skills in any domain, e.g. taking part in meetings and giving presentations in a business context.

  8. Developing Citizen Leaders through Action Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foley, Dolores

    2006-01-01

    This is an account of a programmer utilizing the application of action learning to the development of capacities of citizens. The Citizen Leadership for Democratic Governance is designed to equip citizens with the skills to get involved and handle the difficult tasks of governance in their communities in South Africa. After a history of apartheid…

  9. The Development of Citizen Oriented Informatics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ion IVAN

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We define the concept of citizen-oriented computer application. Quality characteristics are set for computer applications developed in the conditions of citizen-oriented computing and outline the development cycle for these applications. It defines the conditions of existence for citizen-oriented applications. Average and long-term strategies are elaborated.

  10. CITIZEN JOURNALISM MELAWAN MAINSTREAM MEDIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Senja Yustitia

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The importance of mass media tend to described as the fourth pillar of a nation, that represents democration, after the existence of nation sets of government forces. In line with teori agenda setting thesis emphasize media force to influence society agenda, and in the end will brought particular change towards. Post-reformation, media tend to isolate themselves from society needs although society is their biggest and the most loyal audiences. Thus called mainstream media consider economic importance as the most important aspect, this fact encouraging media to deviate from their main purpose as the provider of idea and knowledge, whether to give out information or to accomodate various needs and interest. This condition known as ”the end of media”, related with this condition the emergence an alternate known as citizen journalism really needed to balance out information current. The existence of citizen journalism encourage audience to participate as subject and object to control journalistic mechanism.

  11. Memory training with senior citizens

    OpenAIRE

    CHOVANCOVÁ, Lenka

    2014-01-01

    This is a theoretical work. It deals with the topics of senior citizens and the aging process in an abbreviated conception, periodization of old age, and active life of seniors. It describes forms of social work with seniors in medical facilities, home environments and communities, and in old people's homes. Further, it describes memory: its definition, types of memory, memory loss, reasons why people forget, work with memory and advice on memory improvement from the medical point of view. Th...

  12. How deliberation makes better citizens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kasper Møller; Normann Andersen, Vibeke

    2007-01-01

    This article presents results from a Danish national Deliberative Poll on the single European currency. A representative sample of 364 Danish citizens assembled to deliberate on Denmark's participation in the single currency. As a quasi-experiment, the Deliberative Poll is an example of deliberat...... emphasizes the need for further elaboration of the theory of deliberative democracy so that it better reflects these features of ‘real-life' politics....

  13. Citizen science for water quality monitoring: Data implications of citizen perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jollymore, Ashlee; Haines, Morgan J; Satterfield, Terre; Johnson, Mark S

    2017-09-15

    Citizen science, where citizens play an active role in the scientific process, is increasingly used to expand the reach and scope of scientific research while also achieving engagement and educational goals. Despite the emergence of studies exploring data outcomes of citizen science, the process and experience of engaging with citizens and citizen-lead groups through participatory science is less explored. This includes how citizen perspectives alter data outcomes, a critical upshot given prevalent mistrust of citizen versus scientist data. This study uses a citizen science campaign investigating watershed impacts on water quality to interrogate the nature and implications of citizen involvement in producing scientifically and societally relevant data. Data representing scientific outcomes are presented alongside a series of vignettes that offer context regarding how, why, and where citizens engaged with the project. From these vignettes, six specific lessons are examined towards understanding how integration of citizen participation alters data outcomes relative to 'professional' science. In particular, elements of participant social identity (e.g., their motivation for participation), and contextual knowledge (e.g., of the research program itself) can shape participation and resulting data outcomes. Such scientific outcomes are particularly relevant given continued concerns regarding the quality of citizen data, which could hinder scientific acceptance of citizen sciences. Importantly, the potential for meaningful engagement with citizen and participants within citizen groups - given significant capacity within the community - represents a substantial and under-realized opportunity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. KOMODIFIKASI WARGA DALAM RUANG CITIZEN JOURNALISM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rulli Nasrullah

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The citizen journalism has been inuenced not only by organization culture of media and news criteria, but also the position of citizens. This entire time citizens are merely a consumers and their position is passive to information produced by traditional media. With the emergence of citizen journalism, now the citizens not only become news consumers but also act as news producers and consumers at the same time (produsage. The commodication of citizen journalism is a phenomenon of counter commidication done by the companies of traditional media. This shown that there are symptoms of attracting each other in the room (market of citizen journalism that the citizens do not always react passively to the exposure of media and become a commodity by traditional media companies or the advertiser, but they also commodify anything as whatever they want to reach. Thus, this research is a rebutting the denition of citizen journalism popularized by Curt Chandler and Jesse Hicks from Penn State University who said that citizen journalism is citizens activities in publishing a content because of their interest to a case without economic motive or personal gain.

  15. For a citizen energy transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geze, Patrick; Bernon, Francoise; Alphandery, Claude; Albizzati, Amandine; Ballandras, Marc; Berland, Olivier; Peullemeulle, Justine; Causse, Laurent; Olivier, Dominique; Damerval, Francois; Lepage, Corinne; Dughera, Jacques; Bouchart, Christiane; Duracka, Nicolas; Ferrari, Albert; Noe, Julien; Soulias, Emmanuel; Gaspard, Albane; Greenwood, Marianne; Guy, Lionel; Kretzschmar, Cyril; Lalu, Delphine; Naett, Caroline; Raguet, Alex; Rouchon, Jean-Philippe; Ruedinger, Andreas; Sautter, Christian; Tudor, Ivan; Vaquie, Pierre-Francois; Vernier, Christophe; Youinou, Jean-Michel; Verny, Emmanuel; Claustre, Raphael; Leclercq, Michel

    2015-09-01

    This publication by a think tank specialised in social and solidarity economy first outlines that energy transition means a transition from the present energy model to a new model based on three pillars: a drastic reduction of energy consumption through sobriety (energy saving, struggle against wastage), an improvement of energy efficiency, and an energy mix based on renewable and sustainable resources. A first part proposes a discussion of what 'citizen' energy transition can be: general framework of energy transition, pioneering examples in Europe, citizen empowerment, importance of a decentralised model which is anchored in territories, general interest as a priority. Each of these issues and aspects is illustrated by examples. Then, as this evolution towards a citizen-based model requires a change of scale, the authors discuss how to involve public authorities and to adapt regulation, how to develop financing tools, how to support the emergence and development of projects, and how to be part of international dynamics. The author then discuss what their think tank can do to accelerate energy transition. Proposals made in the different chapters are then summarized

  16. Citizen Satisfaction: Political Voice and Cognitive Biases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Morten Hjortskov

    in the first place? Do irrelevant influences affect the citizens’ evaluations of performance? Can we raise the representativeness of citizen satisfaction surveys by engaging citizens in the production of the public services? The dissertation addresses these questions using a wide range of experimental......Citizen satisfaction is increasingly being used as a measure of public service performance. It offers a performance measure that potentially encompasses many of the important attributes of the services that public managers would like to evaluate, some of which are not easily captured by other...... performance measures. At the same time, citizen satisfaction represents a citizen-centered approach to public management. But is citizen satisfaction in fact strongly related to performance and are satisfaction surveys representative of the citizens? By drawing on theories from classic public administration...

  17. Citizen Science in the Age of Surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henden, Arne A.

    2014-06-01

    Paid professional astronomers are a new phenomenon - most of astronomical history has been written by amateurs. Modern technology has again leveled the playing field, with quality equipment, computers, software and the Internet giving amateurs the ability to match or exceed the data quality and quantity achievable by professionals. The Internet in particular has come into play, with crowd-sourcing through projects like Zooniverse, worldwide installation of private robotic observatories, and rapid dissemination of information leading the way.The future only shows more of these collaborative activities ahead, as all proposed surveys will require significant input from citizen scientists in order to achieve their goals. How the public is currently helping professional astronomers, how researchers can get involved, and some of the future opportunities will be presented.

  18. Beyond technocracy science, politics and citizens

    CERN Document Server

    Bucchi, Massimiano

    2010-01-01

    Nuclear energy, stem cell technology, GMOs: the more science advances, the more society seems to resist. But are we really watching a death struggle between opposing forces, as so many would have it? Can today’s complex technical policy decisions coincide with the needs of a participatory democracy? Are the two sides even equipped to talk to each other? Beyond Technocracy: Science, Politics and Citizens answers these questions with clarity and vision. Drawing upon a broad range of data and events from the United States and Europe, and noting the blurring of the expert/lay divide in the knowledge base, the book argues that these conflicts should not be dismissed as episodic, or the outbursts of irrationality and ignorance, but recognized as a critical opportunity to discuss the future in which we want to live.

  19. Energy stakes. From geopolitics to the citizen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iacona, E.; Taine, J.; Tamain, B.

    2009-01-01

    This book deals with some of the main questions that any responsible citizen should ask: what will be the usable energy resources in the coming 20 or 30 years? At these dates what will be the renewable energies contribution? What energy vectors will be associated to its main uses in the domestic, transportation and industry sectors? Will research allow to master the new electricity and hydrogen technologies? The book is organized in three parts: the first part makes a status of the energy question in most countries in the world, the second part analyses the constraints and challenges to take up in the coming decades in order to manage energy in an optimal way. Finally, the last part is a prospective study about the mastery of energy consumption and about the future technical solutions of energy production and utilisation. (J.S.)

  20. Citizen Science for Traffic Planning: A Practical Example

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieke, Matthes; Stasch, Christoph; Autermann, Christian; de Wall, Arne; Remke, Albert; Wulffius, Herwig; Jirka, Simon

    2017-04-01

    Measures affecting traffic flows in urban areas, e.g. changing the configuration of traffic lights, are often causing emotional debates by citizens who are affected by these measures. Up to now, citizens are usually not involved in traffic planning and the evaluation of the decisions that were taken. The enviroCar project provides an open platform for collecting and analyzing car sensor data with GPS position data. On the hardware side, enviroCar relies on using Android smartphones and OBD-II Bluetooth adapters. A Web server component collects and aggregates the readings from the cars, anonymizes them and publishes the data as open data which scientists, public administrations or other third parties can utilize for further analysis. In this work, we provide a general overview on the enviroCar project and present a project in a mid-size city in Germany. The city's administration utilized the enviroCar platform with the help of a traffic system consultancy for including citizens in the evaluation process of different traffic light configurations along major traffic axes. Therefore, a public campaign was started including local workshops to engage the citizens. More than 150 citizens were actively collecting more about 9.500 tracks including about 2.5 million measurements. Dedicated evaluation results for the different traffic axes were computed based on the collected data set. Because the data is publicly available as open data, others may prove and reproduce the evaluation results contributing to an objective discussion of traffic planning measures. In summary, the project illustrates how Citizen Science methods and technologies improve traffic planning and related discussions.

  1. The Use of Online Citizen-Science Projects to Provide Experiential Learning Opportunities for Nonmajor Science Students?

    OpenAIRE

    Kridelbaugh, Donna M.

    2016-01-01

    Citizen science is becoming even more accessible to the general public through technological advances in the development of mobile applications, facilitating information dissemination and data collection. With the advent of “big data,” many citizen-science projects designed to help researchers sift through piles of research data now exist entirely online, either in the form of playing a game or via other digital avenues. Recent trends in citizen science have also focused on “crowdsourcing” so...

  2. Gestión Ciudadana de la Tecnología: Una aproximación desde los Science and Technology Studies a las redes wifi y la governance urbana a través de guifi.net Citizen Management of Technology: A Science and Technology Studies approach to wireless networks and urban governance trough guifi.net

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yann Bona Beauvois

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available

    Tesis doctoral a cargo de Yann Bona presentada en el Departamento de Psicología Social de la Univesriddad Autónoma de Barcelona (UAB en diciembre del 2010. Dirigida por el Dr. Joan Pujol Tarrés.

    La tesis trata de ahondar en las formas en las que iniciativas ciudadanas que tienen por objeto la gestión de la tecnología en el espacio urbano se relacionan con las administraciones públicas. Lo hace a partir de nociones y conceptos de los STS tales como cosmopolítica, composición híbrida o democracia técnica. En síntesis, podemos decir que la tesis responde a la pregunta formulada por Bruno Latour de ¿qué significa hacer pasar la política del lado lo de la técnica?. Nosotros ofrecemos una propuesta centrada en lo que denominamos una sociotécnica de las políticas públicas.

    La tesis se basa en un estudio de caso centrado una red sin hilos libre y abierta (ubicada principalmente en Cataluña y llamada guifi.net surgida del deseo e iniciativa de la sociedad civil y que, hasta la fecha, es la más grande del mundo.

    Thesis presented at the Departament de Psicologia Social de la UAB by Yann Bona on December, 2010. Directed by Dr. Joan Pujol Tarrés.

    This dissertation explores the many ways in which citizens aiming to manage technologies in urban scape relate to public administrations. To accomplish it's task, it brings forward certain STS notions such as cosmopolitics, hybrid composition or technical democracy. On a general level, this thesis seeks an answer to Bruno Latour concern with what does it mean to conceive the technical as political?. We offer a set of conclusions based on what we choose to name a Sociotechnique of Public Policy .

    Our work relies on a case study focused on a free and open wireless network (located in Catalunya for the most part and called guifi.net that emerged from the desire and will of Civil Society wich, up to date, turns out to be the world's biggest free

  3. An Analysis Of Non-Literal Meaning Used In Reader Digest Magazines Advertisement

    OpenAIRE

    Simanjuntak, Lenni

    2015-01-01

    The object of this study is the Non-literal meaning found in the Reader’s Digest Magazines Advertisements. The objective of the study is to describe the types of non-literal meaning and to expose the meanings of the non-literal meaning in the Reader’s Digest Magazines Advertisement published on July-August 2012, October 2012 and February 2013. The data were analyzed based on the theoretical concept by Leech (1981) and Palmer (1979) which concerned about types and the meanings of non-literal m...

  4. An Analysis of Non-literal Meaning Used in Reader Digest Magazines

    OpenAIRE

    Simanjuntak, Lenni

    2015-01-01

    The object of this study is the Non-literal meaning found in the Reader’s Digest Magazines Advertisements. The objective of the study is to describe the types of non-literal meaning and to expose the meanings of the non-literal meaning in the Reader’s Digest Magazines Advertisement published on July-August 2012, October 2012 and February 2013. The data were analyzed based on the theoretical concept by Leech (1981) and Palmer (1979) which concerned about types and the meanings of non-literal m...

  5. Blog literário: alguns comentários

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alamir Aquino Corrêa

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available http://dx.doi.org/10.5007/1807-9288.2015v11n1p420 Se o conceito de literatura é marcado por discussões e reformulações ao longo da história, parece-nos importante partir da ideia que “as escritas de si” presentes na pós-modernidade apontam para a revisão de algumas noções a respeito do ficcional e da literariedade presentes em textos que são veiculados na internet, especificamente o blog. A escrita de autoria feminina, tradicional espaço de expressão subjetiva recolhida muitas vezes apenas em diários íntimos, encontrou na internet um meio para fazer ecoar vozes antes silenciadas devido à condição da mulher na sociedade e, portanto, também terá destaque dentre os assuntos aqui discutidos, ao lado de reflexões sobre a canonicidade de textos e da configuração do blog como espaço de autorreferencialidade e de publicidade da escrita literária.

  6. The Management of the Citizen Oriented Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ion IVAN

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The context of the knowledge based society is presented. The new user requirements in the context of the new society are analyzed. Basic concepts regarding the citizen oriented applications are presented. Issues specific to the citizen oriented applications are presented. The development cycle of the citizen oriented applications is analyzed. The particular elements for developing citizen oriented applications are described. The quality concept for the citizen oriented applications is defined. Quality characteristics and the costs of quality are defined and analyzed. A system of indicators for the quantification of the quality of the citizen oriented applications is developed. Ways of increasing the quality of the applications are analyzed. Issues as improving the users’ training level, implementing new development techniques, advanced testing techniques and the requirement of audit are approached. The concept of optimization is defined. Optimum criteria are defined and analyzed. Ways of optimizing applications are described. Security requirements are enumerated and described. The particularities of the security requirements for the citizen oriented applications are analyzed. Measures for ensuring the security of the citizen oriented applications are described. A citizen oriented application for the analysis of the structured entities is developed. The application collects data regarding the behavior of the users. The collected data are used for verifying the hypotheses regarding the quality characteristics if the citizen oriented informatics applications.

  7. Citizen empowerment and innovation in the data-rich city

    CERN Document Server

    Dyer, Mark; Pocatilu, Lorena; Rizzi, Francesco

    2017-01-01

    This book analyzes the ongoing transformation in the “smart city” paradigm and explores the possibilities that technological innovations offer for the effective involvement of ordinary citizens in collective knowledge production and decision-making processes within the context of urban planning and management. To so, it pursues an interdisciplinary approach, with contributions from a range of experts including city managers, public policy makers, Information and Communication Technology (ICT) specialists, and researchers. The first two parts of the book focus on the generation and use of data by citizens, with or without institutional support, and the professional management of data in city governance, highlighting the social connectivity and livability aspects essential to vibrant and healthy urban environments. In turn, the third part presents inspiring case studies that illustrate how data-driven solutions can empower people and improve urban environments, including enhanced sustainability. The book wi...

  8. Improving Data Quality in Citizen Science Apps for Conservation Biology

    OpenAIRE

    Stenhouse,Alan; Roetman,Philip; Grützner,Frank; Perry,Tahlia; Koh,Lian Pin

    2018-01-01

    Field data collection by Citizen Scientists has been hugely assisted by the rapid development and spread of smart phones as well as apps that make use of the integrated technologies contained in these devices. We can improve the quality of the data by increasing utilisation of the device in-built sensors and improving the software user-interface. Improvements to data timeliness can be made by integrating directly with national and international biodiversity repositories, such as the Atlas of ...

  9. Direct Citizen Participation: Building a Theory

    OpenAIRE

    Robert, Nancy C.

    2003-01-01

    The subject of citizen participation has a long lineage dating back to the Greek city-states. Two questions have been central to its history: Who is a citizen and how should the citizen participate in governance? Responses to these questions have varied depending on the political and administrative theory one champions. Those who value indirect citizenship participation, or representative democracy, cite the dangers, costs, and logistical difficulties of involving all members of a society. Th...

  10. Amateur knowledge: public art and citizen science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Hannah

    2011-01-01

    The science studies literatures on amateurs and citizen science have remained largely unconnected despite similarities between the two categories. The essay connects amateur knowledge and citizen science through examples from public art. Through an analysis of the use of the term "amateur" by contemporary artists working to engage the public in critiques of science, connections in the ideals of democratic knowledge making by amateurs and citizen scientists are further explored.

  11. Suppression of Literal Meanings in L2 Idiom Processing: Does Context Help?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cieslicka, Anna B.

    2011-01-01

    Most current idiom processing models acknowledge, after Gernsbacher and Robertson (1999) that deriving an idiomatic meaning entails suppression of contextually inappropriate, literal meanings of idiom constituent words. While embedding idioms in the rich disambiguating context can promote earlier suppression of incompatible literal meanings,…

  12. Electrophysiological and Behavioral Measures of the Influence of Literal and Figurative Contextual Constraints on Proverb Comprehension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferretti, Todd R.; Schwint, Christopher A.; Katz, Albert N.

    2007-01-01

    Proverbs tend to have meanings that are true both literally and figuratively (i.e., Lightning really doesn't strike the same place twice). Consequently, discourse contexts that invite a literal reading of a proverb should provide more conceptual overlap with the proverb, resulting in more rapid processing, than will contexts biased towards a…

  13. Involvement. Senior citizens' recreational activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregersen, U B

    1992-06-01

    During the last 18 years, senior citizens in Viborg, Denmark, have participated in study circles based on the theory of impression pedagogy and socially relevant activities. They arrange excursions at home and abroad and make films about the trips. They teach schoolchildren, students at folk high schools, and nurses, as well as occupational therapists and physiotherapists. They publish poems and books, write role plays, stage musicals, sing in choirs, and function as tour guides in town. They set up educational color slide programmes on preventing bone fractures, dealing with the problem of reduced hearing, and the importance of healthy food and exercise. They travel abroad and talk about Denmark and the conditions for senior citizens in our country. With the support of the Danish Ministry for Social Affairs, they produce videos about their activities as a source of inspiration to others. The use of drugs by the participants in the study circles has declined, while the level of activities has increased, and none of the participants has ever had to enter residential care.

  14. Project Citizen: Promoting Action-Oriented Citizen Science in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Carie; Medina-Jerez, William

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, citizen science projects have emerged as a means to involve students in scientific inquiry, particularly in the fields of ecology and environmental science. A citizen scientist is "a volunteer who collects and/or processes data as part of a scientific inquiry" (Silverton 2009, p. 467). Participation in citizen science…

  15. NEON Citizen Science: Planning and Prototyping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, S. J.; Henderson, S.; Gardiner, L. S.; Ward, D.; Gram, W.

    2011-12-01

    The National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) will be a national resource for ecological research and education. NEON citizen science projects are being designed to increase awareness and educate citizen scientists about the impacts of climate change, land-use change, and invasive species on continental-scale ecological processes as well as expand NEON data collection capacity by enabling laypersons to collect geographically distributed data. The citizen science area of the NEON web portal will enable citizen scientists to collect, contribute, interpret, and visualize scientific data, as well as access training modules, collection protocols and targeted learning experiences related to citizen science project topics. For NEON, citizen science projects are a means for interested people to interact with and contribute to NEON science. Investigations at vast spatial and temporal scales often require rapid acquisition of large amounts of data from a geographically distributed population of "human sensors." As a continental-scale ecological observatory, NEON is uniquely positioned to develop strategies to effectively integrate data collected by non-scientists into scientific databases. Ultimately, we plan to work collaboratively to transform the practice of science to include "citizens" or non-scientists in the process. Doing science is not limited to scientists, and breaking down the barriers between scientists and citizens will help people better understand the power of using science in their own decision making. In preparation for fully developing the NEON citizen science program, we are partnering with Project BudBurst (PBB), a citizen science project focused on monitoring plant phenology. The educational goals of PBB are to: (1) increase awareness of climate change, (2) educate citizen scientists about the impacts of climate change on plants and the environment, and (3) increase science literacy by engaging participants in the scientific process. Phenology was

  16. [Citizens' veillance on environmental health through ICT and Genomics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tallacchini, Mariachiara; Biggeri, Annibale

    2014-01-01

    In the last decade three different phenomena have merged: the widespread use of ICT devices to collect and potentially share personal and scientific data, and to build networked communities; biobanking for genomics, namely the organized storage of human biological samples and information; and the collaboration between scientists and citizens in creating knowledge, namely peer-production of knowledge, for shared social goals. These different forms of knowledge, technical tools, and skills have merged in community based scientific and social, as well as legal, initiatives, where scientists and citizens use genetic information and ICT as powerful ways to gain more control over their health and the environment. These activities can no longer be simply qualified as epidemiological research and surveillance. Instead, they can be framed as new forms of citizens' participatory "veillance:" an attitude of cognitive proactive alertness towards the protection of common goods. This paper illustrates two Italian case-studies where citizens and scientists, by making use of both ICT and biobanking, have joined with the goal of protecting environmental health in highly polluted contexts. The statute of these initiatives still needs to be defined as to both the validity of the underlying citizen science and the lack of adequate legal tools for structuring them. However, as to their scientific quality and use of sophisticated technologies, these activities cannot be compared to previous experiences, such as those inspired by so-called popular epidemiology. Moreover, the deep awareness towards the data to be transparent, reliable, and accessible, as well as towards funding mechanisms to be crowdsourced, allows these experiences to go beyond the mere confrontation with institutional knowledge, and to represent a potential model for knowledge production for institutional implementation.

  17. Citizen Observatories and the New Earth Observation Science

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan Grainger

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Earth observation is diversifying, and now includes new types of systems, such as citizen observatories, unmanned aerial vehicles and wireless sensor networks. However, the Copernicus Programme vision of a seamless chain from satellite data to usable information in the hands of decision makers is still largely unrealized, and remote sensing science lacks a conceptual framework to explain why. This paper reviews the literatures on citizen science, citizen observatories and conceptualization of remote sensing systems. It then proposes a Conceptual Framework for Earth Observation which can be used in a new Earth observation science to explain blockages in the chain from collecting data to disseminating information in any Earth observation system, including remote sensing systems. The framework differs from its predecessors by including social variables as well as technological and natural ones. It is used here, with evidence from successful citizen science projects, to compare the factors that are likely to influence the effectiveness of satellite remote sensing systems and citizen observatories. The paper finds that constraints on achieving the seamless “Copernicus Chain” are not solely technical, as assumed in the new Space Strategy for Europe, but include social constraints too. Achieving the Copernicus Chain will depend on the balance between: (a the ‘forward’ momentum generated by the repetitive functioning of each component in the system, as a result of automatic operation or human institutions, and by the efficiency of interfaces between components; and (b the ‘backward’ flow of information on the information needs of end users. Citizen observatories will face challenges in components which for satellite remote sensing systems are: (a automatic or straightforward, e.g., sensor design and launch, data collection, and data products; and (b also challenging, e.g., data processing. Since citizen observatories will rely even more on

  18. Citizen's dosimeter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klemic, Gladys [Naperville, IL; Bailey, Paul [Chicago, IL; Breheny, Cecilia [Yonkers, NY

    2008-09-02

    The present invention relates to a citizen's dosimeter. More specifically, the invention relates to a small, portable, personal dosimetry device designed to be used in the wake of a event involving a Radiological Dispersal Device (RDD), Improvised Nuclear Device (IND), or other event resulting in the contamination of large area with radioactive material or where on site personal dosimetry is required. The card sized dosimeter generally comprises: a lower card layer, the lower card body having an inner and outer side; a upper card layer, the layer card having an inner and outer side; an optically stimulated luminescent material (OSLM), wherein the OSLM is sandwiched between the inner side of the lower card layer and the inner side of the upper card layer during dosimeter radiation recording, a shutter means for exposing at least one side of the OSLM for dosimeter readout; and an energy compensation filter attached to the outer sides of the lower and upper card layers.

  19. The making of citizen science

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brodersen, Søsser

    This dissertation is the result of a PhD project entitled The Making of Citizen Science – Network Alliances between Science Shops and CSOs Engaging in Science and Air Pollution. The PhD project was carried out at Department of Management Engineering, Section for Innovation and Sustainability...... of effects: effects on the CSOs’ original problems, and/or other forms of effects. It is interesting to note that these other forms of effects can result in both cases that affected the CSOs’ original problems as well as cases that failed to do so. It can be concluded that CSOs can influence such actors...... as industry and local authorities and their practices through alliances with Science Shops and scientists. It is further concluded that the Science Shops’ role can have decisive impact on whether networks succeed in influencing the problems experienced by the CSOs. When the Science Shops apply an impact...

  20. The citizens in E-participation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Henning Sten; Reinau, Kristian Hegner

    2006-01-01

    focus on the citizens. Equal opportunities to express their opinions and an open debate between people are the basic foundation for democracy. Therefore the design of participatory processes must take outset in the citizens and their knowledge and commitment concerning the issue to be debated...

  1. Creating Global Citizens through Study Abroad

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellamy, Carol; Weinberg, Adam

    2006-01-01

    One of the greatest challenges for a student today is how to live as a responsible citizen in a globalizing world. Today's interconnected world cannot afford bystanders or passive participants. It demands confident, skilled citizens who will make responsible choices that take into consideration how educators allocate resources and what impact…

  2. Experienced discrimination amongst European old citizens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Heuvel, Wim J. A.; van Santvoort, Marc M.

    2011-01-01

    This study analyses the experienced age discrimination of old European citizens and the factors related to this discrimination. Differences in experienced discrimination between old citizens of different European countries are explored. Data from the 2008 ESS survey are used. Old age is defined as

  3. Citizen Science Terminology Matters: Exploring Key Terms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eitzel, M.V.; Cappadonna, Jessica L.; Santos-Lang, Chris; Duerr, Ruth Ellen; Virapongse, Arika; West, Sarah Elizabeth; Kyba, Christopher Conrad Maximillian; Bowser, Anne; Cooper, Caren Beth; Sforzi, Andrea; Metcalfe, Anya Nova; Harris, Edward S.; Thiel, Martin; Haklay, Mordechai; Ponciano, Lesandro; Roche, Joseph; Ceccaroni, Luigi; Shilling, Fraser Mark; Dörler, Daniel; Heigl, Florian; Kiessling, Tim; Davis, Brittany Y.; Jiang, Qijun

    2017-01-01

    Much can be at stake depending on the choice of words used to describe citizen science, because terminology impacts how knowledge is developed. Citizen science is a quickly evolving field that is mobilizing people’s involvement in information development, social action and justice, and large-scale

  4. Climate change discourses and citizen participation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, Inger; Horsbøl, Anders; Bonnen, Kersten

    2011-01-01

    of Denmark. We analyze how central actors are called upon to act, and how citizens are addressed in the call for action in the two sets of data. Paving the way for the empirical analysis, the first part of the article gives a review of contemporary literature on climate change typologies and discourses......Citizen participation is a recurrent and democratically important issue in the ongoing debate about climate change. However, different meanings are ascribed to citizen participation in different contexts and discourses, ranging from top-down involvement to bottom-up engagement. This article...... within different research fields, assessing how citizen participation is articulated within these discourses. Finally, we address some needs for increased citizen participation in the climate change debate....

  5. Citizen Expectations and Satisfaction Over Time

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjortskov, Morten

    2018-01-01

    Expectations are thought to affect how citizens form their attitudes and behavior toward public services. Such attitudes may include citizen satisfaction, where expectations play a fundamental role, and relevant behaviors include choice of services and the decision to voice opinions about them....... However, there are few investigations into what drives citizen expectations and even fewer that consider these relationships across time. This article tests whether prior expectations, perceived performance, and citizen satisfaction influence future expectations, using a unique dataset that follows...... individual citizens across two subsequent school satisfaction surveys from 2011 and 2013. The results show that prior expectations have a large and consistent influence on future expectations, as predicted by the literature, whereas the influence from prior perceived performance seems less consistent. Prior...

  6. The affordances and use of green citizen engagement web tools

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scheele, Christian Elling; Hoff, Jens Villiam

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to analyse if and how three different green web applications create the basis for different levels of environmental citizen participation. This is relevant in both an e-governance context and an environmental policy context, as it is normally assumed that ICT...... that differences in affordance translates into differences in use. Theoretically, the paper departs from Contextual New Medium Theory. This theory focuses on technological practices, and demonstrates how these are created in interplay between technology, policy ideas and actor skills. Empirically, the paper...

  7. Social Inclusion of Senior Citizens by a Teleoperated Android

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yamazaki, Ryuji; Nishio, Shuichi; Ishiguro, Hiroshi

    As populations continue to age, there is a growing need for assistive technologies that help senior citizens maintain their autonomy and enjoy their lives. We explore the potential of teleoperated androids, which are embodied telecommunication media with humanlike appearances. Our exploratory study...... focused on the social aspects of Telenoid, a teleoperated android designed as a minimalistic human, which might facilitate communica- tion between senior citizens and its operators. We con- ducted cross-cultural field trials in Japan and Denmark by introducing Telenoid into care facilities and the pri......- vate homes of seniors to observe how they responded to it. In Japan, we set up a teleoperation system in an elemen- tary school and investigated how it shaped communica- tion through the internet between the elderly in a care facility and the children who acted as teleoperators. In both countries...

  8. FDTD simulation of microwave sintering in large (500/4000 liter) multimode cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Subirats, M.; Iskander, M.F.; White, M.J. [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States). Electrical Engineering Dept.; Kiggans, J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1996-12-31

    To help develop large-scale microwave-sintering processes and to explore the feasibility of the commercial utilization of this technology, the authors used the recently developed multi-grid 3D Finite-Difference Time-Domain (FDTD) code and the 3D Finite-Difference Heat-Transfer (FDHT) code to determine the electromagnetic (EM) fields, the microwave power deposition, and temperature-distribution patterns in layers of samples processed in large-scale multimode microwave cavities. This paper presents results obtained from the simulation of realistic sintering experiments carried out in both 500 and 4,000 liter furnaces operating at 2.45 GHz. The ceramic ware being sintered is placed inside a cubical crucible box made of rectangular plates of various ceramic materials with various electrical and thermal properties. The crucible box can accommodate up to 5 layers of ceramic samples with 16 to 20 cup-like samples per layer. Simulation results provided guidelines regarding selection of crucible-box materials, crucible-box geometry, number of layers, shelf material between layers, and the fraction volume of the load vs. that of the furnace. Results from the FDTD and FDHT simulations will be presented and various tradeoffs involved in designing an effective microwave-processing system will be compared graphically.

  9. How anchoring and adjusting influence citizens' acceptance of video-mediated crime reporting : A narrative approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoefnagel, R.J.M.; Oerlemans, L.A.G.; Goedee, J.

    2014-01-01

    This study aims to deepen our understanding of specific processes influencing technology acceptance. To reach this goal, we developed a process model from 36 narrative interviews taken from citizens who had their first experience with crime reporting through video-mediated communication technology.

  10. Advice and Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) for Citizen-Science Environmental Health Assessments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barzyk, Timothy M; Huang, Hongtai; Williams, Ronald; Kaufman, Amanda; Essoka, Jonathan

    2018-05-11

    Citizen science provides quantitative results to support environmental health assessments (EHAs), but standardized approaches do not currently exist to translate findings into actionable solutions. The emergence of low-cost portable sensor technologies and proliferation of publicly available datasets provides unparalleled access to supporting evidence; yet data collection, analysis, interpretation, visualization, and communication are subjective approaches that must be tailored to a decision-making audience capable of improving environmental health. A decade of collaborative efforts and two citizen science projects contributed to three lessons learned and a set of frequently asked questions (FAQs) that address the complexities of environmental health and interpersonal relations often encountered in citizen science EHAs. Each project followed a structured step-by-step process in order to compare and contrast methods and approaches. These lessons and FAQs provide advice to translate citizen science research into actionable solutions in the context of a diverse range of environmental health issues and local stakeholders.

  11. Juno Outreach and Citizen Participation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, T.

    2017-12-01

    NASA's Juno spacecraft to the planet Jupiter was launched August 5, 2011, and went into a polar orbit about Jupiter on July 4, 2016. Besides the science, high level objectives of the Juno mission are outreach and citizen participation, which form the theme of this proposed talk. The outreach component includes a Power Point presentation, "Juno, The Cultural Connection," which briefly unveils the history, literature, music, art and visualization experiences that Juno embodies. This will include relating how its very name ties in profoundly with its scientific mission, through its embodiment of the literature of classical mythology and timeless masterpieces of the Renaissance and Baroque periods. In addition to the Power Point presentation, the model of the Juno orbital trajectory at Jupiter will be set up and displayed, configured for the day and time of the talk. The model was effectively displayed during the Fall AGU 2016. Citizen participation includes active involvement of attendees in proposing "Points of Interest" (POIs) on Jupiter for the Juno Camera to record images of. This will be accomplished through the Science in a Fishbowl program set up by Juno staff for this objective. After a brief tutorial on the Program, we will jointly select potential JunoCam POIs on Jupiter from an updated map of Jupiter projected on the screen, name them, and write brief rationales, generally one sentence, for why JunoCam should take pictures of the POIs. We will direct our attention to potential POIs that lie along the longitudes covered by JunoCam during its eleventh passage by Jupiter, referred to as Perijove 11 (PJ11), which will occur February 2, 2018. During a similar program at the International Multidisciplinary Scientific Geoconference (SGEM) 2017 held last summer in Albena, Bulgaria, we identified three POIs, named them, and wrote brief reasons why the selected POIs should be imaged by JunoCam. These named POIs were all in the JunoCam field of view during PJ8, which

  12. Correlates of sexual faithfulness among low-literate rural males in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    efficacy and social norms pertaining to faithfulness, sexual abstinence and condom use are needed to halt the spread of HIV among low-literate males in rural Amhara. Keywords: attitudes, behaviour, East Africa, HIV prevention, men, ...

  13. O espaço político aberto pela leitura literária

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Pinto de Almeida

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available O presente artigo se propõe questionar sobre o espaço político aberto pela leitura literária. Especificando a literatura como uma tentativa de compreensão de problemas relacionados à existência, sublinhamos como a leitura literária coloca em questão nossas convicções e verdades defendidas cotidianamente. Para tanto, compreendemos as relações tecidas entre a linguagem, o poder e a resistência no seio da experiência literária. Concluímos que a leitura literária é atravessada por formas de resistência às palavras de ordem que circulam de forma hegemônica em nossa sociedade, disponibilizando assim uma transformação em nossa rede afetiva e cognitiva.

  14. Effects of Icon Design and Styles On Human-Mobile Interaction: Case Study on e-Literate vs. Non e-Literate user

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zulfiqar A. Memon

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Cell phones have turn out to be the most central communication gadget in our daily life. This results in an enormously intense competition between almost all the mobile phone vendors. Despite of manufacturer’s diverse types of advertising strategies such as exceptional price cut offers or modern attractive functions, what really matter is whether this everyday communication gadget has been designed according to the preference and requirements of all types of users. The miniature type screen interface design is one of the recent research themes of the Human-Computer Interaction domain. Because of the restricted screen size, “icons” have been considered as the prevailing style in the functional course of action of a cell phone. This article investigates the effects of icon designs and styles employed by different vendors on the perception of both the e-literate users and non e-literate users. We have explored various articles from the literature, summarizing their results of experimental validations and a comparative analysis is described at the end. It was found that designers of mobile phone icons have to balance a trade-off between the need, requirements and understanding of both e-literate and non e-literate users.

  15. SUPPORTING SENIOR CITIZENS TO LEARN IT SKILLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shigeki Yokoi

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Digital divide owing to age has become a major concern around the world, even in developed country, Japan. To combat the digital divide, a project named “e-namokun” aiming to help senior citizens use the Internet was started in Nagoya, Japan, which was a national first joint project run through government, universities, and NPO cooperation. In the project, nearly 2000 senior citizens have taken course of the software we developed. In relation with this project, we have been developing useful tools to support senior IT beginners. In the paper, we introduce the outline of the project and explain developed tools for senior citizens.

  16. NEON Citizen Science: Planning and Prototyping (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gram, W.

    2010-12-01

    The National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) will be a national resource for ecological research and education. NEON citizen science projects are being designed to increase awareness and educate citizen scientists about the impacts of climate change, land-use change, and invasive species on continental-scale ecological processes as well as expand NEON data collection capacity by enabling laypersons to collect geographically distributed data. The citizen science area of the NEON web portal will enable citizen scientists to collect, contribute, interpret, and visualize scientific data, as well as access training modules, collection protocols and targeted learning experiences related to citizen science project topics. For NEON, citizen science projects are a means for interested people to interact with and contribute to NEON science. Investigations at vast spatial and temporal scales often require rapid acquisition of large amounts of data from a geographically distributed population of “human sensors.” As a continental-scale ecological observatory, NEON is uniquely positioned to develop strategies to effectively integrate data collected by non-scientists into scientific databases. Ultimately, we plan to work collaboratively to transform the practice of science to include “citizens” or non-scientists in the process. Doing science is not limited to scientists, and breaking down the barriers between scientists and citizens will help people better understand the power of using science in their own decision making. In preparation for fully developing the NEON citizen science program, we are partnering with Project BudBurst (PBB), a citizen science project focused on monitoring plant phenology. The educational goals of PBB are to: (1) increase awareness of climate change, (2) educate citizen scientists about the impacts of climate change on plants and the environment, and (3) increase science literacy by engaging participants in the scientific process

  17. Language-mediated visual orienting behavior in low and high literates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Falk eHuettig

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The influence of formal literacy on spoken language-mediated visual orienting was investigated by using a simple look and listen task (cf. Huettig & Altmann, 2005 which resembles every day behavior. In Experiment 1, high and low literates listened to spoken sentences containing a target word (e.g., 'magar', crocodile while at the same time looking at a visual display of four objects (a phonological competitor of the target word, e.g., 'matar', peas; a semantic competitor, e.g., 'kachuwa', turtle, and two unrelated distractors. In Experiment 2 the semantic competitor was replaced with another unrelated distractor. Both groups of participants shifted their eye gaze to the semantic competitors (Experiment 1. In both experiments high literates shifted their eye gaze towards phonological competitors as soon as phonological information became available and moved their eyes away as soon as the acoustic information mismatched. Low literates in contrast only used phonological information when semantic matches between spoken word and visual referent were impossible (Experiment 2 but in contrast to high literates these phonologically-mediated shifts in eye gaze were not closely time-locked to the speech input. We conclude that in high literates language-mediated shifts in overt attention are co-determined by the type of information in the visual environment, the timing of cascaded processing in the word- and object-recognition systems, and the temporal unfolding of the spoken language. Our findings indicate that low literates exhibit a similar cognitive behavior but instead of participating in a tug-of-war among multiple types of cognitive representations, word-object mapping is achieved primarily at the semantic level. If forced, for instance by a situation in which semantic matches are not present (Experiment 2, low literates may on occasion have to rely on phonological information but do so in a much less proficient manner than their highly literate

  18. Citizen Relationship Management System Users’ Contact Channel Choices: Digital Approach or Call Approach?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Ning Wu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Many municipal governments adopted 311 decades ago and have advocated access equality in citizens’ use of 311. However, the role of citizens in the development and usage of 311 remains limited. Channel choices have been discussed in various types of governmental information and communication technologies (ICTs, especially when the innovative technology has just been adopted. Much has supported the idea that 311 is viewed as a method of digital civic engagement that many municipal governments adopt to maintain citizen relationship management and the capacity for government service delivery. However, we are still unclear about how citizens use it. This study applies the theory of channel expansion to examine how San Francisco residents use the 311 system, and how citizens’ technology experiences impact their 311 digital contact channel choices rather than the 311 hotline contact channel choice. In addition, we discuss major issues in citizens’ 311 contact choices, so that 311 municipal governments may draw lessons from the San Francisco experience.

  19. A conceptual approach to a citizens' observatory--supporting community-based environmental governance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hai-Ying; Kobernus, Mike; Broday, David; Bartonova, Alena

    2014-12-12

    In recent years there has been a trend to view the Citizens' Observatory as an increasingly essential tool that provides an approach for better observing, understanding, protecting and enhancing our environment. However, there is no consensus on how to develop such a system, nor is there any agreement on what a Citizens' Observatory is and what results it could produce. The increase in the prevalence of Citizens' Observatories globally has been mirrored by an increase in the number of variables that are monitored, the number of monitoring locations and the types of participating citizens. This calls for a more integrated approach to handle the emerging complexities involved in this field, but before this can be achieved, it is essential to establish a common foundation for Citizens' Observatories and their usage. There are many aspects to a Citizens' Observatory. One view is that its essence is a process that involves environmental monitoring, information gathering, data management and analysis, assessment and reporting systems. Hence, it requires the development of novel monitoring technologies and of advanced data management strategies to capture, analyse and survey the data, thus facilitating their exploitation for policy and society. Practically, there are many challenges in implementing the Citizens' Observatory approach, such as ensuring effective citizens' participation, dealing with data privacy, accounting for ethical and security requirements, and taking into account data standards, quality and reliability. These concerns all need to be addressed in a concerted way to provide a stable, reliable and scalable Citizens' Observatory programme. On the other hand, the Citizens' Observatory approach carries the promise of increasing the public's awareness to risks in their environment, which has a corollary economic value, and enhancing data acquisition at low or no cost. In this paper, we first propose a conceptual framework for a Citizens' Observatory

  20. Technological Literacy Education and Technological and Vocational Education in Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Lung-Sheng Steven

    2010-01-01

    Technology education in Taiwan is categorized into the following two types: (1) technological literacy education (TLE)--the education for all people to become technological literates; and (2) technological specialty education (TSE)--the education for specific people to become technicians and professionals for technology-related jobs. This paper…

  1. Leadership Profiles. Introduction; Robert J. Casey, Jr.: Professor, Humanitarian, Tinker; Tribute to Kent L. Gustafson: Professor of Instructional Technology, The University of Georgia; Tjeerd Plomp: A Citizen of the World; Allow Me To Introduce Walter Dick.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orey, Michael; Kwinn, Ann; Reeves, Thomas C.; Ely, Donald P.; Russell, James D.

    2002-01-01

    This section of "Educational Media and Technology Yearbook" profiles individuals who have made significant contributions to the field of instructional technology. Leaders profiled in the "Yearbook" have either held prominent offices, written important works, or made significant contributions that have in some way influenced the contemporary vision…

  2. Maui Citizen Science Coastal Water Quality Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A network of citizen science volunteers periodically monitors water quality at several beaches across the island of Maui in the State of Hawaii. This community-based...

  3. Citizens for new Europe / Erkki Vedder

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Vedder, Erkki

    2004-01-01

    Peipsi Koostöö Keskus osales partnerina Aktiivsete Kodanike Võrgustiku (Active Citizens Network) algatatud üleeuroopalises projektis, kus uuriti kodanikeühenduste olukorda ning kolmandat sektorit puudutavat seadusandlust erinevates riikides

  4. Democratic innovations: designing institutions for citizen participation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Smith, Graham

    2009-01-01

    At a time when there is growing disillusionment with the institutions of advanced industrial democracies, there is also increasing interest in new ways of involving citizens in the democratic process...

  5. Making Waves: Marine Citizen Science for Impact

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie-Lise Schläppy

    2017-05-01

    Demonstrating citizen science data quality through a precision study on data and analysis of 15 years of standardized Reef Check (RC reef health data in Queensland, Australia.Identifying and responding to data gaps through volunteer monitoring of sub-tropical rocky reefs in South East Queensland, Australia.Adapting citizen science protocols to enhance capacity building, partnerships and strategic natural resource management applications through reef habitat mapping.Tailoring new pathways for sharing citizen science findings and engaging volunteers with the community via a Reef Check Australia Ambassadors community outreach program.These case studies offer insights into considerations for developing targeted and flexible citizen science projects, showcasing the work of volunteers and project stakeholders, and collaborating with partners for applications beneficial to research, management and education.

  6. The formation of citizens: the pediatrician's role

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dioclécio Campos Júnior

    2016-05-01

    Conclusion: In the light of the disclosed scientific evidence, the pediatrician emerges as the most differentiated professional to provide preventive and curative care indispensable to the skilled formation of a healthy citizen.

  7. Valuing future citizens' values regarding risk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fleming, Patricia

    2006-01-01

    Valuing present citizen's values regarding the risks they face is an important aspect of risk assessment and risk acceptability. Conferences like VALDOR are held for this reason. Governments like Sweden have national referendums on various risk-prone enterprises. The results of these referendums can determine the future of these programs. In the United States, when guidelines are set for determining acceptable levels of risk, the relevant federal agencies are often required to provide a comment period regarding proposed guidelines in order to ascertain the judgments, including the weights place on certain values, of individual members of society as well as stakeholder groups. After the comment period ends, the agency decides on the acceptable level of risk, taking into account the comments from present citizens. Do we also have a duty to value the not-yet-existing values of future citizens, especially if the risks created by the activities of present citizens extend into the future to citizens not yet living? If so, are there any circumstances which entitle us to de-value those not-yet-existing values. In this paper, I ground my discussion of the question of valuing future citizens' values in one of the areas of focus of the VALDOR conference: nuclear waste management and specifically the question facing the United States' program regarding an acceptable dose standard associated with the release of radioactivity into the biosphere from an underground repository. The underlying conference theme to which this discussion may be attached is community environmental justice as it applies to future citizens. I focus on the role that uncertainty plays is providing justice between present and future citizens

  8. Valuing future citizens' values regarding risk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fleming, Patricia [Creighton Univ., Omaha (United States). College of Arts and Sciences/Philosophy

    2006-09-15

    Valuing present citizen's values regarding the risks they face is an important aspect of risk assessment and risk acceptability. Conferences like VALDOR are held for this reason. Governments like Sweden have national referendums on various risk-prone enterprises. The results of these referendums can determine the future of these programs. In the United States, when guidelines are set for determining acceptable levels of risk, the relevant federal agencies are often required to provide a comment period regarding proposed guidelines in order to ascertain the judgments, including the weights place on certain values, of individual members of society as well as stakeholder groups. After the comment period ends, the agency decides on the acceptable level of risk, taking into account the comments from present citizens. Do we also have a duty to value the not-yet-existing values of future citizens, especially if the risks created by the activities of present citizens extend into the future to citizens not yet living? If so, are there any circumstances which entitle us to de-value those not-yet-existing values. In this paper, I ground my discussion of the question of valuing future citizens' values in one of the areas of focus of the VALDOR conference: nuclear waste management and specifically the question facing the United States' program regarding an acceptable dose standard associated with the release of radioactivity into the biosphere from an underground repository. The underlying conference theme to which this discussion may be attached is community environmental justice as it applies to future citizens. I focus on the role that uncertainty plays is providing justice between present and future citizens.

  9. Citizen enforcement and the smoking gun

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Unterberger, G.L.

    1991-01-01

    This article addresses the provisions for private citizens to bring lawsuits in federal court against regulated parties violating federal air pollution-control laws and the steps that operators of facilities subject to air pollution-control laws need to take to help avoid significant enforcement liabilities. The topics of the article include a look at citizen enforcement since 1970, the 1990 amendments to the Clean Air Act, construction and management with these regulations

  10. Assessing for Technological Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engstrom, Daniel E.

    2004-01-01

    Designing standards-based assessment is a key component of a quality technology education program. For students to become technologically literate, it is important that the teacher understands how to measure student understandings and abilities in the study of technology. This article is written to help teachers and teacher educators recognize the…

  11. Creating informed public opinion: citizen deliberation about nanotechnologies for human enhancements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cobb, Michael D.

    2011-01-01

    Many people believe that ordinary citizens should influence scientific and technological developments, but the American public is routinely uninformed about these issues. As a solution, some scholars advocate creating informed public opinions by encouraging citizens to deliberate about the issues. Although this idea is currently widely applauded in the science and technology literature, deliberative outcomes are infrequently measured and the practice of deliberation is routinely criticized in other disciplines. This research contributes to our understanding of the effectiveness of citizen deliberation as a method for increasing public engagement with science. I report data measuring results of deliberation in a national citizens’ technology forum (NCTF) about nanotechnologies for human enhancement. The NCTF was a month-long process involving six groups of 9–15 ordinary citizens who deliberated in different locations across the United States with the goal of reaching consensus about policy recommendations within their groups. I find that structured deliberation generated informed opinions, sometimes meaningful shifts in preferences, and increased trust and internal efficacy among the participants. Nevertheless, the NCTF has important shortcomings, and it is not obvious that consensus conferences should be preferred over other mechanisms for creating informed opinions. Future research is needed to corroborate the findings of this study and to systematically compare outcomes of structured citizen deliberation to other less resource intensive forms of engagement.

  12. Building new university hospital--what citizens know and policy makers should be aware of.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oresković, S; Letica, S; Mastilica, M; Babić-Bosanac, S; Civljak, M; Bozicević, I; Borovecki, A

    2002-12-01

    Survey of citizens' attitudes in the process of strategic decision making is one of the most important methods for determining health care priorities. We describe the results of a survey carried out in December 2001, with an aim to collect and analyze the attitudes of the citizens and health care professionals toward the possibilities and strategies of construction of the University Hospital in Blato, Zagreb. The first referendum on the construction of the new hospital was conducted among Zagreb citizens in 1982, when they agreed that the new University Hospital was much needed. Zagreb citizens confirmed once again their attitudes toward and opinions on the need to continue the construction of new hospital in the city outskirts. By 1992, when the construction of the hospital was halted due to insufficient financial means, Zagreb citizens had already invested over 150 epsilon million in the project. It is interesting that today, 89.4% of the citizens and 74.5% of physicians agree that the new hospital building should be completed. Also, 66.7% of the citizens and 88% of physicians think that this hospital should be a University hospital that could offer the most complex treatments and medical education. To finish the construction of the new hospital further 200 epsilon million needs to be invested. Survey showed that 71% of citizens and 82.2% of physicians think that funds should be raised from some form of credit or budget rather than by special local tax, additional tax or voluntary tax. This project will significantly determine the future of hospital and health care system in Croatia due to its capacities in terms of space, technology, and staff. Before the decision to continue with the new hospital construction be made, the expected future needs, demands, and supply of the health care services in hospital sector in Zagreb and Croatia should be provided using SWOT analysis for each of existing the facilities.

  13. A design-based study of Citizen Inquiry for geology

    OpenAIRE

    Aristeidou, Maria; Scanlon, Eileen; Sharples, Mike

    2013-01-01

    Citizen Inquiry forms a new method of informal science learning and aims to enable the engagement of citizens in online scientific investigations. Citizen Inquiry combines aspects from Citizen Science and Inquiry-based learning and is implemented through a community of practice where people having a shared interest interact and exchange knowledge and methods supported and guided by online systems and tools within a web-based inquiry environment. To explore the potential of Citizen Inquiry, a ...

  14. Musical metaphors: evidence for a spatial grounding of non-literal sentences describing auditory events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolter, Sibylla; Dudschig, Carolin; de la Vega, Irmgard; Kaup, Barbara

    2015-03-01

    This study investigated whether the spatial terms high and low, when used in sentence contexts implying a non-literal interpretation, trigger similar spatial associations as would have been expected from the literal meaning of the words. In three experiments, participants read sentences describing either a high or a low auditory event (e.g., The soprano sings a high aria vs. The pianist plays a low note). In all Experiments, participants were asked to judge (yes/no) whether the sentences were meaningful by means of up/down (Experiments 1 and 2) or left/right (Experiment 3) key press responses. Contrary to previous studies reporting that metaphorical language understanding differs from literal language understanding with regard to simulation effects, the results show compatibility effects between sentence implied pitch height and response location. The results are in line with grounded models of language comprehension proposing that sensory motor experiences are being elicited when processing literal as well as non-literal sentences. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. The Effects of the Literal Meaning of Emotional Phrases on the Identification of Vocal Emotions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shigeno, Sumi

    2018-02-01

    This study investigates the discrepancy between the literal emotional content of speech and emotional tone in the identification of speakers' vocal emotions in both the listeners' native language (Japanese), and in an unfamiliar language (random-spliced Japanese). Both experiments involve a "congruent condition," in which the emotion contained in the literal meaning of speech (words and phrases) was compatible with vocal emotion, and an "incongruent condition," in which these forms of emotional information were discordant. Results for Japanese indicated that performance in identifying emotions did not differ significantly between the congruent and incongruent conditions. However, the results for random-spliced Japanese indicated that vocal emotion was correctly identified more often in the congruent than in the incongruent condition. The different results for Japanese and random-spliced Japanese suggested that the literal meaning of emotional phrases influences the listener's perception of the speaker's emotion, and that Japanese participants could infer speakers' intended emotions in the incongruent condition.

  16. Citizen Science for Mining the Biomedical Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ginger Tsueng

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Biomedical literature represents one of the largest and fastest growing collections of unstructured biomedical knowledge. Finding critical information buried in the literature can be challenging. To extract information from free-flowing text, researchers need to: 1. identify the entities in the text (named entity recognition, 2. apply a standardized vocabulary to these entities (normalization, and 3. identify how entities in the text are related to one another (relationship extraction. Researchers have primarily approached these information extraction tasks through manual expert curation and computational methods. We have previously demonstrated that named entity recognition (NER tasks can be crowdsourced to a group of non-experts via the paid microtask platform, Amazon Mechanical Turk (AMT, and can dramatically reduce the cost and increase the throughput of biocuration efforts. However, given the size of the biomedical literature, even information extraction via paid microtask platforms is not scalable. With our web-based application Mark2Cure (http://mark2cure.org, we demonstrate that NER tasks also can be performed by volunteer citizen scientists with high accuracy. We apply metrics from the Zooniverse Matrices of Citizen Science Success and provide the results here to serve as a basis of comparison for other citizen science projects. Further, we discuss design considerations, issues, and the application of analytics for successfully moving a crowdsourcing workflow from a paid microtask platform to a citizen science platform. To our knowledge, this study is the first application of citizen science to a natural language processing task.

  17. Citizen advisory groups: Improving their effectiveness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peelle, E.

    1990-01-01

    In an age of citizen distrust of government and intense not-in-my-backyard activity when waste management facilities are proposed, the potential of citizen advisory groups (CAGS) to aid the decision-making process is worth exploring. This paper reviews findings from case studies by the author and others to assess the various purposes, pitfalls, advantages and outcomes of CAGs in influencing decisions about controversial waste management actions and facilities. Advantages and disadvantages of the CAG are evaluated as one of several public participation mechanisms. The paper outlines ways in which CAGs can aid the waste management decision process and develop minimum requirements for the successful functioning of citizen advisory groups in decision processes with significant technical components, such as those involving nuclear and hazardous wastes

  18. Educating Citizens in Late Modern Societies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Torben Spanget

    2011-01-01

    One way or the other democratic states need to take on the task of educating its rising generation in governmental affairs, societal matters and citizenship in order to sustain the democracy itself. This article presents a model for analysing civic education in late modern, globalised world....... The model is based on the fundamental belief that the overall aim of civic education in democratic, late modern and global societies is empowerment of the citizen in order to establish a self governing citizen who simultaneous is capable of managing and keeping together partly contradictory citizens tasks...... studies and evaluations of the Danish upper secondary school completed at my department at University of Southern Denmark in recent years, especially connected to a quite far reaching curriculum reform from 2005. It is assumed that this Danish development is an expression of a more general phenomenon...

  19. Citizen advisory groups: Improving their effectiveness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peelle, E.

    1990-01-01

    In an age of citizen distrust of government and intense NIMBY (not-in-my-backyard) activity when waste management facilities are proposed, the potential of citizen advisory groups (CAGs) to aid the decision-making process is worth exploring. This paper reviews findings from case studies by the author and others to assess the various purposes, pitfalls, advantages and outcomes of CAGs in influencing decisions about controversial waste management actions and facilities. Advantages and disadvantages of the CAG are evaluated as one of several public participation mechanisms. We outline ways in which CAGs can aid the waste management decision process and develop minimum requirements for the successful functioning of citizen advisory groups in decision processes with significant technical components, such as those involving nuclear and hazardous wastes. 18 refs., 1 tab.

  20. Growing Global Citizens: Young Children's Lived Experiences with the Development of Their Own Social World

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twigg, Danielle; Pendergast, Donna; Twigg, Justin

    2015-01-01

    As the result of an increasingly technologically "connected" world, citizens are finding it difficult to effectively exercise civic responsibilities in relation to global issues such as climate change, poverty, and warfare (Tully, 2009). New understandings of the concept of "citizenship" are being extended beyond traditional…

  1. Mapping atmospheric aerosols with a citizen science network of smartphone spectropolarimeters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snik, F.; Rietjens, J.H.H.; Apituley, A.; Volten, H.; Mijling, B.; Di Noia, A.; Heikamp, S.; Heinsbroek, R.C.; Hasekamp, O.P.; Smit. , J.M.; Vonk, J.; Stam, D.M.; van Harten, G.; de Boer, J.; Keller, C.U.; iSPEX citizen scientists; Stuut, J.B.W.; Wernand, M.R.; Philippart, C.J.M.

    2014-01-01

    To assess the impact of atmospheric aerosols on health, climate, and air traffic, aerosol properties must be measured with fine spatial and temporal sampling. This can be achieved by actively involving citizens and the technology they own to form an atmospheric measurement network. We establish this

  2. The Open Gates of the Fourth Estate: Civic Literacy Meets Citizen Journalism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leake, Eric

    2012-01-01

    Technological and economic change within the business and social function of journalism are moving civic literacy practices ever closer to those of citizen journalism. In this article, I survey the changes underway as journalism becomes less a profession and more a practice, a way of reading and writing about society. I draw from journalism…

  3. Librarians Lead the Growth of Information Literacy and Global Digital Citizens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crockett, Lee Watanabe

    2018-01-01

    Librarians are leaders in growing global digital citizens. The libraries of the future are more than just housing centers for books and media. They are invigorating meeting places and communities where truly meaningful learning and discovery take place. As technology has transformed reading and learning, it has also transformed the vision of the…

  4. Citizen journalism in a time of crisis: lessons from a large-scale California wildfire

    Science.gov (United States)

    S. Gillette; J. Taylor; D.J. Chavez; R. Hodgson; J. Downing

    2007-01-01

    The accessibility of news production tools through consumer communication technology has made it possible for media consumers to become media producers. The evolution of media consumer to media producer has important implications for the shape of public discourse during a time of crisis. Citizen journalists cover crisis events using camera cell phones and digital...

  5. 'Privacy lost - and found?' : the information value chain as a model to meet citizens' concerns

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Pas, John; van Bussel, Geert-Jan

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we explore the extent to which privacy enhancing technologies (PETs) could be effective in providing privacy to citizens. Rapid development of ubiquitous computing and ‘the internet of things’ are leading to Big Data and the application of Predictive Analytics, effectively merging the

  6. [Can tobacco companies be good corporate citizens?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palazzo, G; Mena, S

    2009-07-01

    Tobacco companies have jumped on the Corporate social responsibility (CSR) bandwagon as a tentative to be societally accepted as responsible actors and good corporate citizens. This is however not possible for two reasons. First, the product they sell is lethal and thus not compatible with the precondition of doing no harm to be a good corporate citizen. Second, the behavior of tobacco firms is not responsible, being illustrated by four examples: junk science versus sound science strategy, seducing young smokers, political lobbying and getting customers on new markets. To conclude, three implications for regulating the activities of the tobacco industry are given.

  7. Citizen-based environmental radiation monitoring network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alemayehu, B.; Mckinzie, M.; Cochran, T.; Sythe, D.; Randrup, R.; Lafargue, E.

    2017-01-01

    This paper discusses a Citizen Radiation Monitoring project designed and implemented by the Natural Resources Defense Council . The goal of the project was to implement a radiation monitoring system that provides radiation data accessible to the public. The monitoring system consisted of usage of a radiation detector integrated with near real-time data collection and visualization. The monitoring systems were installed at five different locations and background radiation measurements were taken. The developed monitoring system demonstrated that citizen-based monitoring system could provide accessible radiation data to the general public and relevant to the area where they live. (author)

  8. The citizen as datasupplier in E-government

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arleth, Mette; Schrøder, Anne Lise; Staunstrup, Jan K.

    2006-01-01

    This paper reports on an ongoing study of how to mobilise and utilize the citizen as data supplier in e-government. The role of the citizen is seen in the context of public participation, and a number of possible application areas for online tools where the citizen can serve the public administra......This paper reports on an ongoing study of how to mobilise and utilize the citizen as data supplier in e-government. The role of the citizen is seen in the context of public participation, and a number of possible application areas for online tools where the citizen can serve the public...

  9. Art : accessible, renewable technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Middleton, C.D.

    2004-01-01

    This paper focuses on the role of non-governmental organization (NGO) citizen groups in Ontario in the use and production of electricity. NGOs have the potential to act both directly on their own accord, and indirectly by pressuring government and others. Current demand for electricity is divided between industrial, commercial and residential users. Citizens have an important role to play in reducing energy demand. On the supply side, there is a revival of interest in renewable energy based on wind, photovoltaic and local-hydro technologies as a result of the escalating environmental and economic costs of coal and nuclear generation. However, citizen groups have greater interest and enthusiasm than technical expertise, creating a mismatch between technological solutions and human need or use of them. This paper discusses how this mismatch applies to renewable-energy technologies, many of which are not especially user-friendly, or accessible. While alternative technologies are increasingly welcomed by government, industry is developing a large and growing array of technological devices. In between this is the citizen, who, despite keen interest, can be overwhelmed by the complexity of the situation. This paper links the theoretical perspective to the real world with a discussion of the dynamics between people and renewable energy in citizen groups and makes particular reference to one group, Citizens for Renewable Energy, that has been making renewable energy technology more accessible to its members for over a decade

  10. Empowered citizen 'health hackers' who are not waiting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omer, Timothy

    2016-08-17

    Due to the easier access to information, the availability of low cost technologies and the involvement of well educated, passionate patients, a group of citizen 'Health Hackers', who are building their own medical systems to help them overcome the unmet needs of their conditions, is emerging. This has recently been the case in the type 1 diabetes community, under the movement #WeAreNotWaiting, with innovative use of current medical devices hacked to access data and Open-Source code producing solutions ranging from remote monitoring of diabetic children to producing an Artificial Pancreas System to automate the management and monitoring of a patient's condition. Timothy Omer is working with the community to utilise the technology already in his pocket to build a mobile- and smartwatch-based Artificial Pancreas System.

  11. Hemispheric differences in processing the literal interpretation of idioms: converging evidence from behavioral and fMRI studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mashal, Nira; Faust, Miriam; Hendler, Talma; Jung-Beeman, Mark

    2008-01-01

    The present study examined the role of the left (LH) and right (RH) cerebral hemispheres in processing alternative meanings of idiomatic sentences. We conducted two experiments using ambiguous idioms with plausible literal interpretations as stimuli. In the first experiment we tested hemispheric differences in accessing either the literal or the idiomatic meaning of idioms for targets presented to either the left or the right visual field. In the second experiment, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to define regional brain activation patterns in healthy adults processing either the idiomatic meaning of idioms or the literal meanings of either idioms or literal sentences. According to the Graded Salience Hypothesis (GSH, Giora, 2003), a selective RH involvement in the processing of nonsalient meanings, such as literal interpretations of idiomatic expressions, was expected. Results of the two experiments were consistent with the GSH predictions and show that literal interpretations of idioms are accessed faster than their idiomatic meanings in the RH. The fMRI data showed that processing the idiomatic interpretation of idioms and the literal interpretations of literal sentences involved LH regions whereas processing the literal interpretation of idioms was associated with increased activity in right brain regions including the right precuneus, right middle frontal gyrus (MFG), right posterior middle temporal gyrus (MTG), and right anterior superior temporal gyrus (STG). We suggest that these RH areas are involved in semantic ambiguity resolution and in processing nonsalient meanings of conventional idiomatic expressions.

  12. Metaphorical and literal readings of aphorisms in the Book of Proverbs

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    As a corollary, illustrations of the many instances where literal readings are necessary, so that such an overriding hermeneutical perspective cannot be convincing. Interpreting a metaphor is one thing, reading metaphorically is another, notably a creative act independent of whether its “correctness” can be demonstrated by ...

  13. Effect of Home Video on the Reading Habit of Literate Nigerian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study investigated the effects of home-video on the reading habit of a hundred (100) randomly selected literate house-wives in one of the 752 local government areas of Nigeria. The descriptive survey method was used to field the views of the respondents on the use of home made video with reference to their reading ...

  14. User requirement analysis of social conventions learning applications for Non-natives and low-literates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schouten, D.; Smets, N.; Driessen, M.; Hanekamp, M.; Cremers, A.H.M.; Neerincx, M.A.

    2013-01-01

    Learning and acting on social conventions is problematic for low-literates and non-natives, causing problems with societal participation and citizenship. Using the Situated Cognitive Engineering method, requirements for the design of social conventions learning software are derived from demographic

  15. A Digital Coach That Provides Affective and Social Learning Support to Low-Literate Learners

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schouten, D.G.M.; Venneker, F.; Bosse, T.; Neerincx, M.; Cremer, A.H.M.

    In this study, we investigate if a digital coach for low-literate learners that provides cognitive learning support based on scaffolding can be improved by adding affective learning support based on motivational interviewing, and social learning support based on small talk. Several knowledge gaps

  16. Osmá studentská literárněvědná konference

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kořínek, Pavel

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 57, č. 5 (2009), s. 767-769 ISSN 0009-0468. [Literární historie, sémiotika a fikce. Praha, 29.04.2009-30.04.2009] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z90560517 Keywords : Czech literature * literary theory * Macura, Vladimír Subject RIV: AJ - Letters, Mass-media, Audiovision

  17. A Digital Coach That Provides Affective and Social Learning Support to Low-Literate Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schouten, Dylan G. M.; Venneker, Fleur; Bosse, Tibor; Neerincx, Mark A.; Cremers, Anita H. M.

    2018-01-01

    In this study, we investigate if a digital coach for low-literate learners that provides cognitive learning support based on scaffolding can be improved by adding affective learning support based on motivational interviewing, and social learning support based on small talk. Several knowledge gaps are identified: motivational interviewing and small…

  18. Teachers' Literal and Inferential Talk in Early Childhood and Special Education Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sembiante, Sabrina F.; Dynia, Jaclyn M.; Kaderavek, Joan N.; Justice, Laura M.

    2018-01-01

    Research Findings: This study examined preschool teachers' literal talk (LT) and inferential talk (IT) during shared book readings in early childhood education (ECE) and early childhood special education (ECSE) classrooms. We aimed to characterize and compare teachers' LT and IT in these 2 classroom contexts and determine whether differences in LT…

  19. Talking About the Non-Literal: Internal States and Explanations in Child-Constructed Narratives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veneziano Edy

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Non-literal language most often permeates interesting and informative narratives. These are the non-perceptible, inferential aspects of a story, such as the explanation of events, the attribution of internal, particularly mental, states to the characters of the story, or the evaluation of events by the participants and/or the narrator. The main aim of this paper is to examine whether non-literal uses can be promoted in 7-year-old French-speaking children’s narratives through the use of a short conversational intervention (SCI which focuses the children’s attention on the causes of events. The results show that, after the SCI, the expression of non-literal aspects, even higher-order ones, may make their appearance or significantly increase in children’s stories. The reasons for the effectiveness of the SCI in the promotion of non-literal uses of language and narrative skills in general, as well as the importance of using the SCI as an evaluative instrument, are discussed.

  20. Living Technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2010-01-01

    This book is aimed at anyone who is interested in learning more about living technology, whether coming from business, the government, policy centers, academia, or anywhere else. Its purpose is to help people to learn what living technology is, what it might develop into, and how it might impact...... our lives. The phrase 'living technology' was coined to refer to technology that is alive as well as technology that is useful because it shares the fundamental properties of living systems. In particular, the invention of this phrase was called for to describe the trend of our technology becoming...... increasingly life-like or literally alive. Still, the phrase has different interpretations depending on how one views what life is. This book presents nineteen perspectives on living technology. Taken together, the interviews convey the collective wisdom on living technology's power and promise, as well as its...

  1. Citizen Science in the Digital Age: examples of Innovative Projects that are Saving Lives across the United States and Internationally.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haines-Stiles, G.; Abdalati, W.; Akuginow, E.

    2017-12-01

    Citizen science and crowdsourcing can literally save lives, whether responding to natural or human-caused disasters, and their effectiveness is all the more enhanced when volunteer observers collaborate with professional researchers. The NSF-funded THE CROWD & THE CLOUD public television series premiered on PBS stations in April 2017, and is hosted by former NASA Chief Scientist Waleed Abdalati: it continues streaming at CrowdAndCloud.org. Its four episodes feature examples directly relevant to this session, vividly demonstrating the power and potential of "Citizen Science in the Digital Age." In "Citizens + Scientists" a peer-reviewed journal article, authored by a respected MD but based on Bucket Brigade citizen science data on air quality surrounding oil and gas developments, features prominently in New York State's ban on fracking. In the wake of the Flint disaster, Virginia Tech scientists support community monitoring of lead in Philadelphia's drinking water. Citizens begin to appreciate the arcane scientific and technical details of EPA's Lead and Copper Rule, and STEM is seen to be of vital, daily significance. In "Even Big Data Starts Small" OpenStreetMap volunteers digitize satellite data to help first responders following the devastating 2015 Nepal earthquake, and Public Lab members—enthusiastic Makers and Millennials—fly modified off-the-shelf cameras beneath balloons and kites to track the BP oil spill, continuing their environmental watchdog work up through the present. CoCoRaHS observers (the Community Collaborative Rain, Hail and Snow Network) submit high quality data that has come to be trusted by NOAA's NWS and other federal agencies, enhancing flash flood warnings while project volunteers begin to appreciate the extreme variabity of local weather. Today's citizen science is much more than birds, bees and butterflies, although all those are also being protected by volunteered citizen data that helps shape state and federal conservation policies

  2. Design principles for engaging and retaining virtual citizen scientists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wald, Dara M; Longo, Justin; Dobell, A R

    2016-06-01

    Citizen science initiatives encourage volunteer participants to collect and interpret data and contribute to formal scientific projects. The growth of virtual citizen science (VCS), facilitated through websites and mobile applications since the mid-2000s, has been driven by a combination of software innovations and mobile technologies, growing scientific data flows without commensurate increases in resources to handle them, and the desire of internet-connected participants to contribute to collective outputs. However, the increasing availability of internet-based activities requires individual VCS projects to compete for the attention of volunteers and promote their long-term retention. We examined program and platform design principles that might allow VCS initiatives to compete more effectively for volunteers, increase productivity of project participants, and retain contributors over time. We surveyed key personnel engaged in managing a sample of VCS projects to identify the principles and practices they pursued for these purposes and led a team in a heuristic evaluation of volunteer engagement, website or application usability, and participant retention. We received 40 completed survey responses (33% response rate) and completed a heuristic evaluation of 20 VCS program sites. The majority of the VCS programs focused on scientific outcomes, whereas the educational and social benefits of program participation, variables that are consistently ranked as important for volunteer engagement and retention, were incidental. Evaluators indicated usability, across most of the VCS program sites, was higher and less variable than the ratings for participant engagement and retention. In the context of growing competition for the attention of internet volunteers, increased attention to the motivations of virtual citizen scientists may help VCS programs sustain the necessary engagement and retention of their volunteers. © 2016 Society for Conservation Biology.

  3. [Local and citizen participation and representation strategies in Healthcare Administration].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sancho Serena, Francesc; Grané Alsina, Montserrat; Olivet, Miquel

    2015-11-01

    The public as a whole are the rightful owners and beneficiaries of the public healthcare system in our country. As such, they collaborate in its maintenance and upkeep through payment of taxes. The government is accountable to the public as to how the ever-scarce resources are allocated. When it comes to the area of healthcare, this represents an added factor of complexity and specificity which makes the issue a particularly sensitive one. In the field of healthcare, both the General Health Law and the Law of Catalan Healthcare Code define the actors responsible for the public representation of its citizens. Nevertheless, their inclusion does not necessarily guarantee the perception of participation by its citizens or that of a greater democratic quality. The model must be understood as the intermediary link between a legally regulated framework and the actual debate, which in a globalized world with such an immense volume of information available to citizens and with the current online social networking sites, occurs at the heart of society in general, even though government has no such incorporation channel. The system will need to be developed as new technologies enable this, towards a more direct and more global models for participation. Participation is a flexible concept which, as far as possible, needs to adapt to the different problems as well as the different regions. Legislative regulation must therefore provide the mechanisms and stable frameworks for participation. In turn however, it must also establish dynamic systems capable of adapting to and incorporating the varying demands and methods of participation coming from the public in response to disparate processes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  4. Energy policy - dialogue with the citizen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zillessen, H.

    1977-01-01

    The attempt made by the Federal government to enter a dialogne with the citizen on prerequisites and objectives of energy policy has met with a conflicting response. On the one hand a lot of citizens have welcomed the fact that the sector of energy policy being socially as relevant as that is being discussed in detail and in public. On the other hand, especially representatives of citizens' initiatives fear that the dialogne will be degradaded to a mere hearing unless it leads to a bitter participation of the citizen in the process of will formation concerning decisions being socially obligatory. The confrontations on energy policy have clearly shown that new forms of the formation of political will are being demanded with an increasing emphasis. In the meantime risks involved in industrial civilization are being recognized as being dangerous to their lives by many people, and doubts concerning the ability of traditional institutions and procedures to meet present and future challenges are increasing. Simultaneously there is resistance against bureaucratic patronizing as well as against party dependence being too strong and dependent interest of the state. Many of those who are affected by a faulty development and by unbearable things - due to the way in which governmental and private economic problems are tackled - demand new forms of will formation concerning the mediation of social needs and political responsibilities. (orig.) [de

  5. Exploring Sources of Punitiveness among German Citizens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cochran, Joshua C.; Piquero, Alex R.

    2011-01-01

    Prior research examining punitive attitudes has typically focused on the United States and citizens' support for the death penalty or American "get-tough" criminal policies. Yet, little is known as to how punitive attitudes and their sources vary internationally. Using Germany as a case study, this article expands the scope of…

  6. Mass Incarceration and the Making of Citizens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Justice, Benjamin

    2014-01-01

    Like laws for formal education, laws for crime and punishment shape the relationship between the citizen and the state. They could, in fact, be equally powerful in building or breaking the civic spirit. In the past three decades, a revolution has occurred in the United States that is as insidious as it is unprecedented: the rise of the American…

  7. Cable Television: Citizen Participation After the Franchise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Monroe E.; Botein, Michael

    The Federal Communications Commission (FCC) has incorporated several allowances in its regulations pertaining to cable television. Some of these enable citizen groups and communities to intervene in the cable franchise after the final issuance in order to correct deficiencies in the franchising process and the administration of the franchise.…

  8. Sorting Citizens: Differentiated Citizenship Education in Singapore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Li-Ching

    2012-01-01

    Using Singapore as a case study, this paper examines how the discourses of democratic elitism and meritocracy help allocate different citizen roles to students and define the nature of the social studies citizenship education programmes for different educational tracks. While the Singapore education system is not unique in its stratification of…

  9. A Citizen's guide to climate refugees

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyd, T.

    2005-06-01

    Friends of the Earth Australia is commemorating World Refugee Day in 2005 by publishing a 'Citizens Guide to Climate Refugees'. This publication gives the basic facts on climate change, greenhouse gas emissions; why people could become climate refugees, how many and where are they likely to come from; and what can be done about it

  10. Risk factors for falls of older citizens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boelens, C.; Hekman, E. E. G.; Verkerke, G. J.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Fall prevention is a major issue in the ageing society. This study provides an overview of all risk factors for falls of older citizens. METHOD: A literature search was conducted to retrieve studies of the past 25 years. All participants from the studies lived in the community or

  11. Participatory Design of Citizen Science Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senabre, Enric; Ferran-Ferrer, Nuria; Perelló, Josep

    2018-01-01

    This article describes and analyzes the collaborative design of a citizen science research project through co-creation. Three groups of secondary school students and a team of scientists conceived three experiments on human behavior and social capital in urban and public spaces. The study goal is to address how interdisciplinary work and attention…

  12. Fuel reprocessing: Citizens' questions and experts' answers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-10-01

    In connection with the intention of DWK to erect a fuel reprocessing plant in the Oberpfalz, citizens have asked a great number of questions which are of interest to the general public. They have been collected, grouped into subject categories and answered by experts. (orig./HSCH) [de

  13. The citizens in E-participation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Henning Sten; Reinau, Kristian Hegner

    2006-01-01

    . The current paper presents the results of a survey among actively involved citizens in Northern Jutland County. Our analysis shows a high degree of involvement among middle-age well-educated males with a higher education and income above average. It seems that contrary to the planner's vision of an open...

  14. Digital Citizen Participation within Schools in the United Kingdom and Indonesia: An Actor–Network Theory (ANT Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Yusuf

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Citizen engagement and participation are a key focus for government and government agencies, and with the advent of Internet technologies questions arise about the role and impact of technology on citizen participation. This paper aims to explore the role of technology in citizen participation within schools. This research used in-depth comparative case studies using examples from two different schools and school systems, one in the United Kingdom and one in Indonesia. The wider school systems are complex and dynamic environments with multiple stakeholders, media, and supporting systems, and the schools operate under geopolitical and social influences. This paper provides a framework, based on Actor-Network Theory (ANT, for capturing e-participation in schools, particularly identifying the influence of technology as a conduit for enabling, engaging, and empowering stakeholders.

  15. Conceptualizing Biopolitics: Citizen-State Interactions in the Securing of Water Services in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulled, Nicola

    2015-01-01

    Despite constitutional obligations to provide clean water to all citizens in South Africa, access to water and related services remains highly contested. The discord between constitutional promises and lived realities of water access, particularly through national infrastructure, provides a platform on which to examine Foucauldian notions of biopolitics, the control of populations through technologies of governing. Drawing on the situations of residents in the rural Vhembe district in the north eastern corner of the country, I examine how individuals conceptualize the relationship that exists between citizen and state and the responsibilities of each in post-Apartheid South Africa as it relates to water access. In addition, I describe strategies employed throughout South Africa to voice rights to water and how these approaches are perceived. Finally, I consider how the three primary forms of 'water citizenship'-citizen, agent, and subject-influence the current and future health of vulnerable residents.

  16. Old citizens, new logics: Digital literacy and elderly citizens in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stald, Gitte Bang

    2016-01-01

    and The Danage Association. Theoretically, the article discusses definitions of digital literacy respectively digital citizenship; and it draws on theories on mediatization, media ecologies, and digital governance. REFERENCES (selected) Borchorst, D.S. et al (2016). ”Digitalisering af ældre menneskers hverdag......Old citizens, new logics: Digital literacy and elderly citizens in Denmark Many my age have problems with IT. We are now reasonably informed and we have had computers for many years but our competences are still not tiptop and that is definitely a problem. This 79-year old man talks about...... the challenges he encounters with mastering IT in general and NemID in particular. NemID is the Danish, digital system for interaction between public institutions and citizens. The system was implemented by law in December 2015. The paper focuses on the relation between age, digitization, and citizen self...

  17. Danish Citizens and General Practitioners' Use of ICT for their Mutual Communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertelsen, Pernille; Stub Petersen, Lone

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports on selected findings from a Danish national survey of citizens' perception and use of information and communication technology (ICT) for their health care [1]. Focus is on citizens' use of ICT and on communication with their General Practitioner (GP). It also focuses on citizens' experience of their GPs' ICT use and no use during medical consultations. The responsibility for medical service in Denmark is to a large extent handed over to the primary sector where the GP is the gatekeeper. Our data display that 65% of the adult citizens or their relatives have been using ICT to communicate with their GP. Twenty-two percent have experienced their GP use a computer screen to actively show them something while they have a consultation. Further, our data supports the assumption that the higher the education people have, the more likely they are to use ICT for their health care. The understanding of the use of ICT in communication with the GP is central to monitoring and developing an ICT that supports all citizens and considers new ways in which to enhance quality of care.

  18. Citizens Science for Sustainability (SuScit) Project Briefing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eames, Malcolm; Mortensen, Jonas Egmose; Adebowale, Maria

    This project briefing gives a short overview of the Citizens Science for Sustainability (SuScit) Project.......This project briefing gives a short overview of the Citizens Science for Sustainability (SuScit) Project....

  19. global turbulence and nigeria's citizen diplomacy: 2007-2016

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    strategic diplomatic post as Nigeria's High ... envisaged to participate in the formulation and practice of 'citizen .... spread of epidemic diseases, financial instability, organized crime .... chapter of his book Nigeria's Citizen Diplomacy: ... Page 7 ...

  20. Technological risk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dierkes, M; Coppock, R; Edwards, S

    1980-01-01

    The book begins with brief statements from representatives of political organizations. Part II presents an overview of the discussion about the control and management of technological progress. Parts III and IV discuss important elements in citizens' perception of technological risks and the development of consensus on how to deal with them. In Part V practical problems in the application of risk assessment and management, and in Part VI additional points are summarized.

  1. Technological risk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dierkes, M.; Coppock, R.; Edwards, S.

    1980-01-01

    The book begins with brief statements from representatives of political organizations. Part II presents an overview of the discussion about the control and management of technological progress. Parts III and IV discuss important elements in citizens' perception of technological risks and the development of consensus on how to deal with them. In Part V practical problems in the application of risk assessment and management, and in Part VI additional points are summarized. (DG)

  2. Management of Innovation in a Flat World: Growing Complexity, Globalisation and Citizen Participation

    OpenAIRE

    Mulder, K.F.

    2016-01-01

    Innovation is not what it was in the 20th century; the classic century of R & D based innovation. The nature of innovation is changing, only in part because different technologies dominate innovation. This paper identifies three main societal trends that are of major importance for strategic management of innovation in industry and for government industrial- and technology policies. These trends are: - Growing complexity - Globalisation - Citizen participation As a result, innovation strategy...

  3. The Role Of New Media In Advancing Citizen Diplomacy Roundtable

    OpenAIRE

    Nassar, David; Tatevossian, Anoush Rima; U.S. Center for Citizen Diplomacy

    2010-01-01

    This Roundtable evaluates the importance of new media in citizen diplomacy.   Published in conjunction with the U.S. Center for Citizen Diplomacy’s U.S. Summit & Initiative for Global Citizen Diplomacy November 16–19, 2010, Washington DC. Materials included in this document are the views of the roundtable authors and are meant to serve as a tool for discussion. © November 2010 | U.S. Center for Citizen Diplomacy

  4. Empowering citizens or mining resources? The contested domain of citizen engagement in professional care services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glimmerveen, Ludo; Ybema, Sierk; Nies, Henk

    2018-04-01

    When studying individual attempts to foster citizen engagement, scholars have pointed to the coexistence of competing rationales. Thus far, however, current literature barely elaborates on the socio-political processes through which employees of professional organizations deal with such disparate considerations. To address this gap, this article builds on an ethnographic study, conducted in the Netherlands between 2013 and 2016, of a professional care organization's attempts to engage local citizens in one of its elderly care homes. To investigate how citizen engagement is 'done' in the context of daily organizing, we followed employees as they gradually created and demarcated the scope for such engagement by approaching citizens as either strategic partners (pursuing 'democratic' rationales) or as operational volunteers (pursuing 'instrumental' rationales). In order to deal with such potentially incongruent orientations, we found that employees used discursive strategies to influence the balance that was struck between competing rationales; either through depoliticization-i.e., the downplaying of incongruities and the framing of disparate considerations as being complementary within the pursuit of a shared, overarching goal-or through politicization, i.e., the active challenging of how their colleagues prioritized one consideration over another. By showing how the successful conveyance of such (de)politicized accounts helped employees either defend or redraw the boundaries of what citizen engagement was (not) about, we contribute to extant theorization by (1) developing a processual approach to studying citizen engagement that (2) is sensitive to organizational politics. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. The reading teacher as a trainer of citizens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennie Brand Barajas

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The present is a qualitative study by theorizing, from the approach of the problem of reading as a basic resource for the formation of citizens through education. It starts from the definition of the reading capacity, followed by the revision of the general characteristics of the reading brain proposed by Stalisnas Dehaene (2014, as well as the revolutions in the materials and devices used for the writing, besides the changes in the form of reading, from Sumerian tablets to digital technologies. The process of Education for Development and the distinctive features of digital citizenship are presented, which are: immediacy in the production, transmission and reception of messages; interactivity between receiver and producer; the multi-authoritarian, which gives birth to “the prosumers”; the accessibility of the environment; freedom of expression; the democratization of access and the appropriation of a public space. All this allows contextualizing new forms of reading and new profiles of readers, as well as the generation of virtual reading spaces where communities of dialogue and exchange are formed. The study reaches the teachers and their reading biographies, which largely define their competence to encourage reading among their students and their ability to mobilize them towards citizen responsibility through reading.

  6. Visualization and characterization of users in a citizen science project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morais, Alessandra M. M.; Raddick, Jordan; Coelho dos Santos, Rafael D.

    2013-05-01

    Recent technological advances allowed the creation and use of internet-based systems where many users can collaborate gathering and sharing information for specific or general purposes: social networks, e-commerce review systems, collaborative knowledge systems, etc. Since most of the data collected in these systems is user-generated, understanding of the motivations and general behavior of users is a very important issue. Of particular interest are citizen science projects, where users without scientific training are asked for collaboration labeling and classifying information (either automatically by giving away idle computer time or manually by actually seeing data and providing information about it). Understanding behavior of users of those types of data collection systems may help increase the involvement of the users, categorize users accordingly to different parameters, facilitate their collaboration with the systems, design better user interfaces, and allow better planning and deployment of similar projects and systems. Behavior of those users could be estimated through analysis of their collaboration track: registers of which user did what and when can be easily and unobtrusively collected in several different ways, the simplest being a log of activities. In this paper we present some results on the visualization and characterization of almost 150.000 users with more than 80.000.000 collaborations with a citizen science project - Galaxy Zoo I, which asked users to classify galaxies' images. Basic visualization techniques are not applicable due to the number of users, so techniques to characterize users' behavior based on feature extraction and clustering are used.

  7. A New Approach in Public Budgeting: Citizens' Budget

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilge, Semih

    2015-01-01

    Change and transformation in the understanding and definition of citizenship has led to the emergence of citizen-oriented public service approach. This approach also raised a new term and concept in the field of public budgeting because of the transformation in the processes of public budgeting: citizens' budget. The citizens' budget which seeks…

  8. Evaluation of Student Outcomes in Materials Science and Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piippo, Steven

    1996-01-01

    This paper specifies 14 benchmarks and exit standards for the introduction of Materials Science and Technology in a secondary school education. Included is the standard that students should be able to name an example of each category of technological materials including metals, glass/ceramics, polymers (plastics) and composites. Students should know that each type of solid material has specific properties that can be measured. Students will learn that all solid materials have either a long range crystalline structure or a short range amorphous structure (i.e., glassy). They should learn the choice of materials for a particular application depends on the properties of the material, and the properties of the material depends on its crystal structure and microstructure. The microstructure may be modified by the methods by which the material is processed; students should explain this by the example of sintering a ceramic body to reduce its porosity and increase its densification and strength. Students will receive exposure to the world of work, post secondary educational opportunities, and in general a learning that will lead to a technologically literate intelligent citizen.

  9. Science experiences of citizen scientists in entomology research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Louise I.

    Citizen science is an increasingly popular collaboration between members of the public and the scientific community to pursue current research questions. In addition to providing researchers with much needed volunteer support, it is a unique and promising form of informal science education that can counter declining public science literacy, including attitudes towards and understanding of science. However, the impacts of citizen science programs on participants' science literacy remains elusive. The purpose of this study was to balance the top-down approach to citizen science research by exploring how adult citizen scientists participate in entomology research based on their perceptions and pioneer mixed methods research to investigate and explain the impacts of citizen science programs. Transference, in which citizen scientists transfer program impacts to people around them, was uncovered in a grounded theory study focused on adults in a collaborative bumble bee research program. Most of the citizen scientists involved in entomology research shared their science experiences and knowledge with people around them. In certain cases, expertise was attributed to the individual by others. Citizen scientists then have the opportunity to acquire the role of expert to those around them and influence knowledge, attitudinal and behavioral changes in others. An intervention explanatory sequential mixed methods design assessed how entomology-based contributory citizen science affects science self-efficacy, self-efficacy for environmental action, nature relatedness and attitude towards insects in adults. However, no statistically significant impacts were evident. A qualitative follow-up uncovered a discrepancy between statistically measured changes and perceived influences reported by citizen scientists. The results have important implications for understanding how citizen scientists learn, the role of citizen scientists in entomology research, the broader program impacts and

  10. Citizen science in hydrology and water resources: opportunities for knowledge generation, ecosystem service management, and sustainable development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wouter eBuytaert

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The participation of the general public in the research design, data collection and interpretation process together with scientists is often referred to as citizen science. While citizen science itself has existed since the start of scientific practice, developments in sensing technology, data processing and visualisation, and communication of ideas and results, are creating a wide range of new opportunities for public participation in scientific research. This paper reviews the state of citizen science in a hydrological context and explores the potential of citizen science to complement more traditional ways of scientific data collection and knowledge generation for hydrological sciences and water resources management. Although hydrological data collection often involves advanced technology, the advent of robust, cheap and low-maintenance sensing equipment provides unprecedented opportunities for data collection in a citizen science context. These data have a significant potential to create new hydrological knowledge, especially in relation to the characterisation of process heterogeneity, remote regions, and human impacts on the water cycle. However, the nature and quality of data collected in citizen science experiments is potentially very different from those of traditional monitoring networks. This poses challenges in terms of their processing, interpretation, and use, especially with regard to assimilation of traditional knowledge, the quantification of uncertainties, and their role in decision support. It also requires care in designing citizen science projects such that the generated data complement optimally other available knowledge. Lastly, we reflect on the challenges and opportunities in the integration of hydrologically-oriented citizen science in water resources management, the role of scientific knowledge in the decision-making process, and the potential contestation to established community institutions posed by co-generation of

  11. Deslocamentos e configurações do letramento literário na escola

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graça Paulino

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Aobservação direta de uma turma de jovens e adultos do ensino médio numa escola da rede estadual em Belo Horizonte permitiu traçar o perfil desses alunos enquanto leitores, verificar suas preferências literárias, analisar o funcionamento e a organização da biblioteca, verificando a adequação do acervo de literatura brasileira e estrangeira. O conjunto desses dados compôs um quadro de letramento literário que se afasta da tradicional narrativa de crise da escola pública brasileira, pois os problemas localizados se situam em circunstâncias específicas daquele estabelecimento escolar, afastandose da muito alegada falta de livros, já que estes existem em bom número e qualidade na biblioteca.

  12. Associations for Citizen Science: Regional Knowledge, Global Collaboration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Storksdieck

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Since 2012, three organizations advancing the work of citizen science practitioners have arisen in different regions: The primarily US-based but globally open Citizen Science Association (CSA, the European Citizen Science Association (ECSA, and the Australian Citizen Science Association (ACSA. These associations are moving rapidly to establish themselves and to develop inter-association collaborations. We consider the factors driving this emergence and the significance of this trend for citizen science as a field of practice, as an area of scholarship, and for the culture of scientific research itself.

  13. Governments and citizens before nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ballestero, F.

    2008-01-01

    The citizens fear to anything labelled as nuclear and the potential that the different positions on the use of nuclear energy have as electoral tools have prevented some of these countries from engaging in a real public debate. Citizens are as reluctant to tolerate the accumulation of residues or operation of nuclear plants in their territory as they are to reduce the use of energy for domestic purposes or assume an increase in the cost of fuel or electricity. We are immersed in a political and economical dilemma for which an optimal solution is not yet available. In the short term, it is compelling that we opt for a second best choice that allows us to respond to the challenges that the world, and our country in particular, will face in the next decade. (Author)

  14. Facebooking Citizen Science with the Zooniverse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Joseph; Gay, P. L.; Hogan, K.; Lintott, C.; Impey, C.; Watson, C.

    2011-01-01

    While fully online citizen science projects like Galaxy Zoo and Moon Zoo are able to garner participation by tens to hundreds of thousands of people, this success pales next to the number of people who use Facebook. With a population well over half a billion, Facebook is, at the time of this writing, the largest single online community. As an experiment in social science-engagement, we have created Facebook fan pages for Zooniverse science tasks, social-sharing apps for Moon Zoo and Galaxy Zoo, and a novel galaxy-related citizen science project all within Facebook. In this poster we present early analysis on how these engagements attract both old and new users, and how users choose to share and interact through these pages.

  15. Citizen Environmental Science in Support of Educatio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, D. M.; Cavalier, D.; Potter, S.; Wagner, R.; Wegner, K.; Hammonds, J.

    2016-12-01

    Through two grants, a partnership among SciStarter, ECO-Schools, the GLOBE Program, and Youth Learning as Citizen Environmental Scientists has recruited, trained, and equipped over 100 US schools, youth groups and other citizen scientists to take several environmental measurements - surface soil moisture and temperature, precipitation, and clouds. Implementation by some has begun but many more will start implementation in the fall. These local measurements may be compared with data from the Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP), Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM), and other satellite missions. The measurement protocols of GLOBE specify how these data are collected so as to produce reliable data that are intercomparable across space and time. GLOBE also provides the information infrastructure for storing these data and making them openly available. This presentation will examine the initial results of this effort in terms of participation, student and professional data use, and educational benefits.

  16. The Description Of 1 Liter Of Tears Written By Aya Kito

    OpenAIRE

    Yendie, Rizka

    2011-01-01

    Tulisan ini membahas arti dari judul novel 1 liter of Tears. Novel ini dibuat berdasarkan diary sang penulis Aya Kito dalam berjuang melawan penyakit yang tidak ada obatnya yaitu Spinocerebellar Ataxia (SCA), penyakit yang menyerang sel-sel penopang sel saraf. Awalnya penderita merasakan tubuhnya melemah. Berangsur-angsur kemampuan motorik penderita menurun. Sampai-sampai Aya-chan mengalami kesulitan menelan makanan, berbicara dan bahkan tersenyum. Aya-chan mulai merasakan gejala penyakit...

  17. ’n Literêr-estetiese benadering van homiletiek in ’n veranderende kultuur

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cas J.A. Vos

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Die artikel belig homiletiek vanuit ’n literêr-estetiese benadering in ’n veranderende kultuur. In hierdie benadering word sekere sleutelkonsepte toegelig. Hermeneutiek sowel as intertekstualiteit is met die literêre konsep verweef. Die estetiese benadering is soos ’n net waarin vorme van kuns ingetrek word. Visuele kuns, poësie, teater en film word bespreek. Die uniekheid van hierdie benadering is dat ’n homiletiese model uit ’n literêr-estiese perspektief in ’n veranderende kultuur ontwikkel word. Die verband tussen homiletiek, ’n literêr-estetiese homiletiek en die veranderende kultuur word deur die begrip inkulturasie gelê. Dit lei daartoe dat die belangrike wederkerige interaksie tussen die preek en die wisselende kultuur steeds in ag geneem moet word. This article deals with homiletics from a literary-aesthetic approach in a changing culture. Within this approach several concepts are defined. Hermeneutics as well as intertextuality are connected to the literary aspect. A cluster of notions form part of the aesthetic concept. In this regard different forms of art are explored. Visual arts, poetry, theatre and film are discussed. The unique contribution of this approach is specifically the development of a homiletic model from a literary-aesthetic perspective in a changing culture. With regard to the latter, the concept of inculturation is utilised. In the process of homiletical inculturation, the critical reciprocal interaction between the sermon and the surrounding cultures is taken into account.

  18. Literally experts: expertise and the processing of analogical metaphors in pharmaceutical advertising.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delbaere, Marjorie; Smith, Malcolm C

    2014-01-01

    This research examined differences between novices and experts in processing analogical metaphors appearing in prescription drug advertisements. In contrast to previous studies on knowledge transfer, no evidence of the superiority of experts in processing metaphors was found. The results from an experiment suggest that expert consumers were more likely to process a metaphor in an ad literally than novices. Our findings point to a condition in which the expertise effect with processing analogies is not the linear relationship assumed in previous studies.

  19. Participatory design of citizen science experiments

    OpenAIRE

    Senabre, Enric; Ferran Ferrer, Núria; Perelló, Josep, 1974-

    2018-01-01

    This article describes and analyzes the collaborative design of a citizen science research project through cocreation. Three groups of secondary school students and a team of scientists conceived three experiments on human behavior and social capital in urban and public spaces. The study goal is to address how interdisciplinary work and attention to social concerns and needs, as well as the collective construction of research questions, can be integrated into scientific research. The 95 stude...

  20. South Africa: The Good International Nuclear Citizen?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maitre, Emmanuelle

    2016-01-01

    Since South Africa destroyed its nuclear arsenal, it has claimed the status of 'good international nuclear citizen', a position confirmed by its engagement in the nonproliferation regime. Pretoria plays a bridge-building role between states with and without nuclear weapons as well as in instances of proliferation. Recent changes have raised doubts around its position, a movement which could threaten South Africa's nuclear diplomacy

  1. Citizen's initiatives and the representative system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guggenberger, B.; Kempf, U.

    1978-01-01

    This anthology containing contributions of 19 sociologists is a systematic investigation of the locality, the possibilities and the effective radius of citizen's initiatives under the functional conditions of the parliamentary - representative system. The intellectual and political surroundings, the sociologic context, the institutional, political and judical overall conditions as well as the consequences of this movement for the whole political system of the Federal Republic of Germany. (orig.) [de

  2. [Comments on Nigel Wiseman's "A Practical Sictionary of Chinese Medicine"--on Wiseman' s literal translation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Zhu-fan; Liu, Gan-zhong; Lu, Wei-bo; Fang, Tingyu; Zhang, Qingrong; Wang, Tai; Wang, Kui

    2005-10-01

    Comments were made on the word-for-word literal translation method used by Mr. Nigel Wiseman in A Practical Dictionary of Chinese Medicine. He believes that only literal translation can reflect Chinese medical concepts accurately. The so-called "word-for-word" translation is actually "English-word-for-Chinese-character" translation. First, he made a list of Single Characters with English Equivalents, and then he replaced each character of Chinese medical terms with the assigned English equivalent. Many English terms thus produced are confusing. The defect of the word-for-word literal translation stems from the erroneous idea that the single character constitutes the basic element of meaning corresponding to the notion of "word" in English, and the meaning of a disyllabic or polysyllabic Chinese word is simply the addition of the meanings of the two or more characters. Another big mistake is the negligence of the polysemy of Chinese characters. One or two English equivalents can by no means cover all the various meanings of a polysemous character as a monosyllabic word. Various examples were cited from this dictionary to illustrate the mistakes.

  3. Conference: photovoltaic energy - local authorities - Citizen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belon, Daniel; Witte, Sonja; Simonet, Luc; Waldmann, Lars; Fouquet, Doerte; Dupassieux, Henri; Longo, Fabio; Brunel, Arnaud; Kruppert, Andreas; Vachette, Philippe

    2012-01-01

    The French-German office for Renewable energies (OFAEnR) organised a conference on the role of photovoltaic energy, local authorities and Citizens as pillars of the energy transition. In the framework of this French-German exchange of experience, about 100 participants exchanged views on the role of local authorities and Citizens in the implementation of the energy transition. This document brings together the available presentations (slides) made during this event: 1 - Solar photovoltaics, local communities and citizens - Cornerstones of the energy revolution. Franco-German viewpoints (Daniel Belon); 2 - Structure and management of the distribution system operators in Germany. efficient, innovative and reliable: Local public enterprises in Germany (Sonja Witte); 3 - Photovoltaic energy: technical challenges for power grids - A distribution network operator's (DNO) point-of-view (Luc Simonet); 4 - The sun and the grid - challenges of the energy transition (Lars Waldmann); 5 - The role of local public authorities in the networks management: legal situation in France, Germany and in the EU (Doerte Fouquet); 6 - Towards energy transition: challenges for renewable energies - Urban solar planning tools (Henri Dupassieux); 7 - The local energy supply as a municipal task - solar land-use planning in practice in Germany (Fabio Longo); 8 - Supporting and facilitating the financing of photovoltaic projects at a community level (Arnaud Brunel); 9 - Photovoltaics in the municipality VG Arzfeld (Andreas Kruppert); 10 - For the energy revolution to be a success: Invest into renewable energy. Local, controllable and renewable 'shared energy' that is grassroots (Philippe Vachette)

  4. Birding 2.0: Citizen Science and Effective Monitoring in the Web 2.0 World

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yolanda F. Wiersma

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The amateur birding community has a long and proud tradition of contributing to bird surveys and bird atlases. Coordinated activities such as Breeding Bird Atlases and the Christmas Bird Count are examples of "citizen science" projects. With the advent of technology, Web 2.0 sites such as eBird have been developed to facilitate online sharing of data and thus increase the potential for real-time monitoring. However, as recently articulated in an editorial in this journal and elsewhere, monitoring is best served when based on a priori hypotheses. Harnessing citizen scientists to collect data following a hypothetico-deductive approach carries challenges. Moreover, the use of citizen science in scientific and monitoring studies has raised issues of data accuracy and quality. These issues are compounded when data collection moves into the Web 2.0 world. An examination of the literature from social geography on the concept of "citizen sensors" and volunteered geographic information (VGI yields thoughtful reflections on the challenges of data quality/data accuracy when applying information from citizen sensors to research and management questions. VGI has been harnessed in a number of contexts, including for environmental and ecological monitoring activities. Here, I argue that conceptualizing a monitoring project as an experiment following the scientific method can further contribute to the use of VGI. I show how principles of experimental design can be applied to monitoring projects to better control for data quality of VGI. This includes suggestions for how citizen sensors can be harnessed to address issues of experimental controls and how to design monitoring projects to increase randomization and replication of sampled data, hence increasing scientific reliability and statistical power.

  5. Citizen Sky, An Update on the AAVSO's New Citizen Science Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Rebecca; Price, A.; Henden, A.; Stencel, R.; Kloppenborg, B.

    2011-01-01

    Citizen Sky is a multi-year, NSF-funded, citizen science project focusing on the bright variable star, epsilon Aurigae. Citizen Sky goes beyond simple observing to include a major data analysis component. The goal is to introduce the participant to the full scientific process from background research to paper writing for a peer-reviewed journal. The first year of the project, 2009-10, was dedicated to developing project infrastructure, educating participants about epsilon Aurigae, and training these participants to observe the star and report their data. Looking forward, years two and three of the project will focus on assembling teams of participants to work on their own analysis and research. Results will be published in a special issue of the peer-reviewed Journal of the AAVSO. This project has been made possible by the National Science Foundation.

  6. Technological Literacy for All: A Course Designed to Raise the Technological Literacy of College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baskette, Kimberly G.; Fantz, Todd D.

    2013-01-01

    Understanding what technology is, and is not, is the first step in becoming technologically literate. One should also understand how technology is created, how it works, how it shapes society, and how society shapes technology. This study was designed to gauge the ability of a single-semester course to raise students' technological literacy as…

  7. Vahid Online: Post-2009 Iran and the Politics of Citizen Media Convergence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babak Rahimi

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available An attempt is made to study the social network site, Vahid Online, pseudonym of a leading Iranian activist who has the largest social media followership online. Vahid Online is Iran’s leading distributor of information about social and political news about Iran, a source of information used by citizens and journalists. Similar to Twitter, Vahid Online posts, shares, and communicates news in short messages with hyperlinks, hashtags, or internet slang for multimedia purposes. In this networking media space, citizen journalism is assumed the civic responsibility of news and information dissemination with a perceived conception of internet as an agency of change. Vahid Online, I argue, is representative of an individuated networking activism in the new technology for information production. Technology, likewise, is imagined as a political agency and, in turn, citizenship is redefined through technology that carries the promise of change. It is also argued that Vahid Online’s conception of citizen journalism is directly born out of the Green Movement in 2009, a protest movement against the 2009 presidential elections with a self-image of networked citizenship with a relative reliance on a weak tie model of civic association. The notion of citizen journalism examined here is one of civic participatory activism in archiving the collection, reporting, and dissemination of news through the merging of diverse media technologies in an attempt to create and distribute the most impact spreading news. The paper finally offers a critical analysis and argues that Vahid Online is more about individuated network framing of a privileged politics through practice of new technology.

  8. Worldwide Engagement for Digitizing Biocollections (WeDigBio): The Biocollections Community's Citizen-Science Space on the Calendar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellwood, Elizabeth R; Kimberly, Paul; Guralnick, Robert; Flemons, Paul; Love, Kevin; Ellis, Shari; Allen, Julie M; Best, Jason H; Carter, Richard; Chagnoux, Simon; Costello, Robert; Denslow, Michael W; Dunckel, Betty A; Ferriter, Meghan M; Gilbert, Edward E; Goforth, Christine; Groom, Quentin; Krimmel, Erica R; LaFrance, Raphael; Martinec, Joann Lacey; Miller, Andrew N; Minnaert-Grote, Jamie; Nash, Thomas; Oboyski, Peter; Paul, Deborah L; Pearson, Katelin D; Pentcheff, N Dean; Roberts, Mari A; Seltzer, Carrie E; Soltis, Pamela S; Stephens, Rhiannon; Sweeney, Patrick W; von Konrat, Matt; Wall, Adam; Wetzer, Regina; Zimmerman, Charles; Mast, Austin R

    2018-02-01

    The digitization of biocollections is a critical task with direct implications for the global community who use the data for research and education. Recent innovations to involve citizen scientists in digitization increase awareness of the value of biodiversity specimens; advance science, technology, engineering, and math literacy; and build sustainability for digitization. In support of these activities, we launched the first global citizen-science event focused on the digitization of biodiversity specimens: Worldwide Engagement for Digitizing Biocollections (WeDigBio). During the inaugural 2015 event, 21 sites hosted events where citizen scientists transcribed specimen labels via online platforms (DigiVol, Les Herbonautes, Notes from Nature, the Smithsonian Institution's Transcription Center, and Symbiota). Many citizen scientists also contributed off-site. In total, thousands of citizen scientists around the world completed over 50,000 transcription tasks. Here, we present the process of organizing an international citizen-science event, an analysis of the event's effectiveness, and future directions-content now foundational to the growing WeDigBio event.

  9. Partnering for science: proceedings of the USGS Workshop on Citizen Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hines, Megan; Benson, Abigail; Govoni, David; Masaki, Derek; Poore, Barbara; Simpson, Annie; Tessler, Steven

    2013-01-01

    What U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) programs use citizen science? How can projects be best designed while meeting policy requirements? What are the most effective volunteer recruitment methods? What data should be collected to ensure validation and how should data be stored? What standard protocols are most easily used by volunteers? Can data from multiple projects be integrated to support new research or existing science questions? To help answer these and other questions, the USGS Community of Data Integration (CDI) supported the development of the Citizen Science Working Group (CSWG) in August 2011 and funded the working group’s proposal to hold a USGS Citizen Science Workshop in fiscal year 2012. The stated goals for our workshop were: raise awareness of programs and projects in the USGS that incorporate citizen science, create a community of practice for the sharing of knowledge and experiences, provide a forum to discuss the challenges of—and opportunities for—incorporating citizen science into USGS projects, and educate and support scientists and managers whose projects may benefit from public participation in science.To meet these goals, the workshop brought together 50 attendees (see appendix A for participant details) representing the USGS, partners, and external citizen science practitioners from diverse backgrounds (including scientists, managers, project coordinators, and technical developers, for example) to discuss these topics at the Denver Federal Center in Colorado on September 11–12, 2012. Over two and a half days, attendees participated in four major plenary sessions (Citizen Science Policy and Challenges, Engaging the Public in Scientific Research, Data Collection and Management, and Technology and Tools) comprised of 25 invited presentations and followed by structured discussions for each session designed to address both prepared and ad hoc "big questions." A number of important community support and infrastructure needs were identified

  10. Rehousing homeless citizens with assertive community treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benjaminsen, Lars

    professionals including a psychiatrist, a nurse, an addiction councilor, and social workers with administrative authority from the social office and the job center. In the international research literature ACT has been shown in randomized controlled trials to be a very effective method in bringing individuals...... out of homelessness and into a stable housing situation. The study is based on quantitative outcome measurement on about 80 citizens who have been assigned to the programme and who have received both a housing solution and support from the ACT-team. The study is not a randomized controlled trial...

  11. Public citizen slams NRC on nuclear inspections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newman, P.

    1993-01-01

    Charging the Nuclear Regulatory Commission with open-quotes abandoning tough regulation of the nuclear power industry,close quotes Public Citizen's Critical Mass Energy Project on Wednesday released a report asserting that NRC is shielding sensitive internal nuclear industry self-evaluations from public scrutiny. Based on their review of 56 Institute of Nuclear Power Operations reports and evaluations and comparing these to the NRC's Systematic Assessment of Licensee Performance reports for the same plants, it was concluded that the NRC failed to address issues raised in all eight areas evaluated by the INPO reports

  12. Drought Information Supported by Citizen Scientists (DISCS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molthan, A.; Maskey, M.; Hain, C.; Meyer, P.; Nair, U. S.; Handyside, C. T.; White, K.; Amin, M.

    2017-12-01

    Each year, drought impacts various regions of the United States on time scales of weeks, months, seasons, or years, which in turn leads to a need to document these impacts and inform key decisions on land management, use of water resources, and disaster response. Mapping impacts allows decision-makers to understand potential damage to agriculture and loss of production, to communicate and document drought impacts on crop yields, and to inform water management decisions. Current efforts to collect this information includes parsing of media reports, collaborations with local extension offices, and partnerships with the National Weather Service cooperative observer network. As part of a NASA Citizen Science for Earth Systems proposal award, a research and applications team from Marshall Space Flight Center, the University of Alabama in Huntsville, and collaborators within the NWS have developed a prototype smartphone application focused on the collection of citizen science observations of crop health and drought impacts, along with development of innovative low-cost soil moisture sensors to supplement subjective assessments of local soil moisture conditions. Observations provided by citizen scientists include crop type and health, phase of growth, soil moisture conditions, irrigation status, along with an optional photo and comment to provide visual confirmation and other details. In exchange for their participation, users of the app also have access to unique land surface modeling data sets produced at MSFC such as the NASA Land Information System soil moisture and climatology/percentile products from the Short-term Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) Center, assessments of vegetation health and stress from NASA and NOAA remote sensing platforms (e.g. MODIS/VIIRS), outputs from a crop stress model developed at the University of Alabama in Huntsville, recent rainfall estimates from the NOAA/NWS network of ground-based weather radars, and other observations made

  13. Mapping classroom experiences through the eyes of enlace students: The development of science literate identities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oemig, Paulo Andreas

    The culture of a science classroom favors a particular speech community, thus membership requires students becoming bilingual and bicultural at the same time. The complexity of learning science rests in that it not only possesses a unique lexicon and discourse, but it ultimately entails a way of knowing. My dissertation examined the academic engagement and perceptions of a group (N=30) of high school students regarding their science literate practices. These students were participating in an Engaging Latino Communities for Education (ENLACE) program whose purpose is to increase Latino high school graduation rates and assist them with college entrance requirements. At the time of the study, 19 students were enrolled in different science classes to fulfill the science requirements for graduation. The primary research question: What kind of science classroom learning environment supports science literate identities for Latino/a students? was addressed through a convergent parallel mixed research design (Creswell & Plano Clark, 2011). Over the course of an academic semester I interviewed all 30 students arranged in focus groups and observed in their science classes. ENLACE students expressed interest in science when it was taught through hands-on activities or experiments. Students also stressed the importance of having teachers who made an effort to get to know them as persons and not just as students. Students felt more engaged in science when they perceived their teachers respected them for their experiences and knowledge. Findings strongly suggest students will be more interested in science when they have opportunities to learn through contextualized practices. Science literate identities can be promoted when inquiry serves as a vehicle for students to engage in the language of the discipline in all its modalities. Inquiry-based activities, when carefully planned and implemented, can provide meaningful spaces for students to construct knowledge, evaluate claims

  14. Theme--Achieving 2020. Goal 3: All Students Are Conversationally Literate in Agriculture, Food, Fiber, and Natural Resource Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trexler, Cary, Ed.

    2000-01-01

    Nine theme articles focus on the need for students to be conversationally literate about agriculture, food, fiber, and natural resources systems. Discusses the definition of conversational literacy, the human and institutional resources needed, and exemplary models for promoting literacy. (JOW)

  15. Visual interfaces as an approach for providing mobile services and mobile content to low literate users in South Africa

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Matyila, M

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Mobile services and mobile content is available to diverse users in possession of the necessary mobile phones. However, some of the mobile services and mobile content is text intensive and this discounts low literate users in participation...

  16. As fontes literárias no ensino de História

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joan Pagès Blanch

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Existem muitos recursos para levar aos alunos do ensino fundamental e médio o conhecimento e a compreensão do passado, boa parte deles são habitualmente utilizados nas salas de aula. Provavelmente um dos recursos com mais potencialidades educativas é a literatura e, em especial, o romance. Neste artigo propomos que a literatura pode contribuir para a aprendizagem do passado e qual é o valor educativo das fontes literárias no ensino de história e a sugestão de algumas ideias para o seu tratamento na prática.

  17. O cheiro das palavras: o olfato na narrativa literária

    OpenAIRE

    Gomes, Cristina

    2009-01-01

    Este trabalho, de natureza teórica e criativa, pretende realizar uma investigação para uma teoria do olfato na literatura. Para isso, deve analisar em que situação encontra-se a narrativa contemporânea quando lida com o olfato. Que papel desempenha o sentido do olfato na literatura? Quais são os métodos de escrita sobre o olfato? Como pode o cheiro ser capturado no papel? O trabalho consiste de um capítulo teórico seguido da novela literária A Rua das Laranjeiras. Ce travail, de nature thé...

  18. Solidão, fascismo e literalidade Solitude, fascism and literality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Pál Pelbart

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Discuto algumas questões levantadas por François Zourabichvili em "Deleuze e a questão da literalidade", publicado neste mesmo dossiê. Pergunto, primeiramente, por possíveis equivalências entre a literalidade e a potência do falso que Nietzsche apresenta já em "Sobre verdade e mentira no sentido extramoral". Em segundo lugar, pergunto em que medida um exercício filosófico da literalidade nos libera de uma assertividade e de uma gregariedade crescentes. Em terceiro lugar, pergunto: "O que numa aula é a face atual, e qual é a face virtual?", ou, em outros termos, "qual é a relação entre a pedagogia interna à filosofia e a pedagogia não-filosófica?". Finalmente, pergunto se devemos tomar literalmente a tese de Zourabichvili de que todos os que falam de ontologia a propósito de Deleuze ou cometem um contra-senso completo ou não sabem o que significa ontologia.I discuss some of the questions raised by François Zourabichvili in his "Deleuze and the question of literality", also in this collection. I thus ask three questions: 1 Can we find equivalences between the notion of "literality" and the idea of "power of the false" which Nietzsche develops earlier in his "On Truth and Lie in an Extra-Moral Sense"? 2 To what extent would a philosophical exercise of literality liberate us from increasing assertiveness and gregariousness? 3 In a class, what would be the actual face and what would be the virtual one? In other words, what is the relationship between a pedagogy internal to philosophy and a non-philosophical pedagogy? I Finally ask whether we should take literally the thesis of Zourabichvili that whoever mentions the notion of ontology when talking about the work of Deleuze either talks utter nonsense or does not know what ontology means.

  19. Communication perspectives on social networking and citizen journalism challenges to traditional newspapers

    OpenAIRE

    Katz, James E.

    2011-01-01

    Communication perspectives are presented on the challenges posed to traditional newspapers by social media and citizen journalism, with special reference to the United States. This is an important topic given the critical role investigative reporting, long the domain of newspapers, plays in fostering democratic practices. New Media and social networking technology are evaluated in terms of their impact on the newspaper enterprise. Alternative scenarios for future developments are examined as ...

  20. The Problem of Citizens: E-Democracy for Actually Existing Democracy

    OpenAIRE

    Daniel Kreiss

    2015-01-01

    This article argues that many contemporary e-democracy projects, particularly in the United States, have at their heart a model of atomistic, independent, rational, and general-interest citizens. As such, these projects, variously grouped under the labels of e-governance, online deliberation, open government, and civic technology, often assume a broad shared consensus about collective definitions of “public problems” that both does not exist and sidesteps debates over what these problems are ...

  1. Fictional citizens and real effects: accountability to citizens in competitive and monopolistic markets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, A.J.; Schillemans, T.

    2009-01-01

    This paper evaluates the influence of market conditions – (semi) competitive versus monopolistic markets –on (the effects of) citizen accountability on public sector organisations. Empirical material from case studies in education, healthcare, social security and land registry in the Netherlands is

  2. Inventing Citizens During World War I: Suffrage Cartoons in "The Woman Citizen."

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsey, E. Michele

    2000-01-01

    Contributes to scholarship advancing the understanding of human communication by examining the rhetorical invention strategies of suffrage rhetoric in the cultural context of World War I. Shows how the political cartoons published in the mainstream Suffrage Movement's "The Woman Citizen" constructed women as strong, competent, and…

  3. Logistics and logistics support in crisis management and citizen protection

    OpenAIRE

    HOLEJŠOVSKÝ, Jan

    2010-01-01

    ABSTRAKT LOGISTICS AND LOGISTICS SUPPORT IN CRISIS MANAGEMENT AND CITIZEN PROTECTION The graduation thesis on topic "Logistics and logistics support in crisis management and citizen protection" is divided into several chapters, which in summary are a material presenting information about logistics and logistics support in crisis management and citizen protection. This was one of the aims at this work. Chapters I., II., III., IV. describe logistics and logistics support, crisis management, cit...

  4. CULTURAL ADAPTATION OF CZECH CITIZENS IN THE REPUBLIC OF TURKEY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiří Čeněk

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This article relates to the process of adaptation of Czech citizens to Turkish culture. The article explores the perception of Turkish culture by Czech citizens, problems they encounter in the Turkish society and the ways of their adjustment to the host culture. The empirical research on 10 Czech citizens was conducted using the method of semi-structured interviews. The article addresses the most important issues connected with the process of cultural adaptation.

  5. CITIZEN PROTECTION IN FRONT OF PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION. COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    POPESCU Maria

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to analyze the legal instruments available to the citizen to fight against government abuses. These tools, some of them published and recently developed, is a natural part of the evolution of government and the relationship between administration and citizens. Increasing citizen involvement in administration is reflected precisely by giving increasing importance in legal research to this phenomenon.

  6. The Assessment of Literal Ornaments in Persian Badiâ Books from the linguistic, Phonetic and Phonologic Viewpoint

    OpenAIRE

    Morteza Heidari

    2016-01-01

    AbstractThe literal rhetoric (scheme) is a most important branch of Persian language aesthetics. The purpose of the knowledge is studying and evaluating the verbal music with applying the instruments that called Ornaments. Ornament as is obvious from its name is all devices that writers using them for making their art fine. With historical skimming over Badi` books, we understand our rhetoricians have gave and dedicated useless names and titles to the literal ornaments rather than analyzing t...

  7. The Open Format and Citizen Participation in Transportation Planning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Flyvbjerg, Bent

    1984-01-01

    Recent developments in transportation planning and policy indicate that citizen participation and openness may receive less emphasis in the future in favor of more closed methods of decision making and control. Have the merits and drawbacks of citizen participation and openness changed significan......Recent developments in transportation planning and policy indicate that citizen participation and openness may receive less emphasis in the future in favor of more closed methods of decision making and control. Have the merits and drawbacks of citizen participation and openness changed...... with the trend for considering social, environmental, and ethical issues in transportation planning and policy....

  8. The formation of citizens: the pediatrician's role

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dioclécio Campos Júnior

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: This review article aims to define the fundamental role of the pediatrician in the formation of citizens in the 21st century. Source of data: Significant bibliographical contributions produced by neuroscience, ecology, and epigenetics in the early childhood scenario. Synthesis of data: Many diseases that impair the lives of adults result from severe and often uncontrollable disorders that occur in early childhood, an irreplaceable period for the safe construction of the human brain, personality, and intelligence. There is noteworthy scientific evidence that has become unquestionable, according to which abuse and neglect and other forms of violence to which children are exposed during the the course of their lives, are the genesis of many physical ailments and other mental diseases, including depressive morbidity and schizophrenia. Conversely, it is also emphasized that healthy practices such as reading and listening to/playing music are able to intensively contribute to the exercise of cognitive capacity inherent to this period of life, as a prerequisite for the acquisition of learning indispensable to the high educational performance during the schooling period. Conclusion: In the light of the disclosed scientific evidence, the pediatrician emerges as the most differentiated professional to provide preventive and curative care indispensable to the skilled formation of a healthy citizen.

  9. Microplastic distribution in global marine surface waters: results of an extensive citizen science study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrows, A.; Petersen, C.

    2017-12-01

    Plastic is a major pollutant throughout the world. The majority of the 322 million tons produced annually is used for single-use packaging. What makes plastic an attractive packaging material: cheap, light-weight and durable are also the features that help make it a common and persistent pollutant. There is a growing body of research on microplastic, particles less than 5 mm in size. Microfibers are the most common microplastic in the marine environment. Global estimates of marine microplastic surface concentrations are based on relatively small sample sizes when compared to the vast geographic scale of the ocean. Microplastic residence time and movement along the coast and sea surface outside of the gyres is still not well researched. This five-year project utilized global citizen scientists to collect 1,628 1-liter surface grab samples in every major ocean. The Artic and Southern oceans contained highest average of particles per liter of surface water. Open ocean samples (further than 12 nm from land, n = 686) contained a higher particle average (17 pieces L-1) than coastal samples (n = 723) 6 pieces L-1. Particles were predominantly 100 µm- 1.5 mm in length (77%), smaller than what has been captured in the majority of surface studies. Utilization of citizen scientists to collect data both in fairly accessible regions of the world as well as from areas hard to reach and therefore under sampled, provides us with a wider perspective of global microplastics occurrence. Our findings confirm global microplastic accumulation zone model predictions. The open ocean and poles have sequestered and trapped plastic for over half a century, and show that not only plastics, but anthropogenic fibers are polluting the environment. Continuing to fill knowledge gaps on microplastic shape, size and color in remote ocean areas will drive more accurate oceanographic models of plastic accumulation zones. Incorporation of smaller-sized particles in these models, which has previously

  10. THE CREATION OF IMAGERY THROUGH POETIC DICTION IN POETRY TRANSLATION: LITERAL OR IDIOMATIC?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I Gusti Agung Sri Rwa Jayantini

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims at investigating the creation of imagery in the translation of the Indonesian poem entitled Batas into Borders as found in the poem anthology of the Indonesian poet, M. Aan Mansyur. It is interesting to reveal how the images of ‗borders‘ created by the poet are transferred by the translator considering that poetic diction may influence the whole message intended in both Indonesian and English poems. The question is how the naturalness in poetry translation is made. Is it done through literal or idiomatic translation? Imagery that is understood as the presentation of images through words is the picture that the readers can get by observing line by line expressed through poetic diction in the poem. Having done the analysis, it is found that some images are literally transferred that can be clearly seen from the diction in the translation version. However, some images are also idiomatically transferred through the appropriate lexical choices to maintain the atmosphere established in the poem.

  11. Cisplatin-Induced Renal Salt Wasting Requiring over 12 Liters of 3% Saline Replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phuong-Chi Pham

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Cisplatin is known to induce Fanconi syndrome and renal salt wasting (RSW. RSW typically only requires transient normal saline (NS support. We report a severe RSW case that required 12 liters of 3% saline. A 57-year-old woman with limited stage small cell cancer was admitted for cisplatin (80 mg/m2 and etoposide (100 mg/m2 therapy. Patient’s serum sodium (SNa decreased from 138 to 133 and 125 mEq/L within 24 and 48 hours of cisplatin therapy, respectively. A diagnosis of syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion (SIADH was initially made. Despite free water restriction, patient’s SNa continued to decrease in association with acute onset of headaches, nausea, and dizziness. Three percent saline (3%S infusion with rates up to 1400 mL/day was required to correct and maintain SNa at 135 mEq/L. Studies to evaluate Fanconi syndrome revealed hypophosphatemia and glucosuria in the absence of serum hyperglycemia. The natriuresis slowed down by 2.5 weeks, but 3%S support was continued for a total volume of 12 liters over 3.5 weeks. Attempts of questionable benefits to slow down glomerular filtration included the administration of ibuprofen and benazepril. To our knowledge, this is the most severe case of RSW ever reported with cisplatin.

  12. Visual communication with non-literates: a review of current knowledge including research in northern India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moynihan, M; Mukherjee, U

    1981-01-01

    In this article previous research on the perception of visual aids by non-literates in Kenya, Zambia, Ghana, Papua New Guinea, Mexico, as well as among immigrant groups in London and Paris, in Nepal and, by the authors in northern India, is reviewed. Recognition of pictures is affected by the particular culture of each group. In Africa, photos are better understood and liked: in the Indian subcontinent, line drawings are well recognized and appreciated. Recognition can be reduced by inaccurate detail, stylization and perspective. The authors found that overall size could be kept small if the pictures were simple. Complicated pictures, or a group of interrelated pictures, are not usually well recognized. Familiarity, realism and simplicity seem the most important components for a successful picture. Ways of attaching value ("good" or "bad", for example) have not in the past been very successful, but the authors found that a "vocabulary" of fourteen signs were, once explained, well understood. The values of colours in the culture must be understood and utilized. To be successful, visual materials for non-literates must start from the local culture and not come untested from behind a desk in the capital city.

  13. Citizen surveillance for environmental monitoring: combining the efforts of citizen science and crowdsourcing in a quantitative data framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welvaert, Marijke; Caley, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Citizen science and crowdsourcing have been emerging as methods to collect data for surveillance and/or monitoring activities. They could be gathered under the overarching term citizen surveillance . The discipline, however, still struggles to be widely accepted in the scientific community, mainly because these activities are not embedded in a quantitative framework. This results in an ongoing discussion on how to analyze and make useful inference from these data. When considering the data collection process, we illustrate how citizen surveillance can be classified according to the nature of the underlying observation process measured in two dimensions-the degree of observer reporting intention and the control in observer detection effort. By classifying the observation process in these dimensions we distinguish between crowdsourcing, unstructured citizen science and structured citizen science. This classification helps the determine data processing and statistical treatment of these data for making inference. Using our framework, it is apparent that published studies are overwhelmingly associated with structured citizen science, and there are well developed statistical methods for the resulting data. In contrast, methods for making useful inference from purely crowd-sourced data remain under development, with the challenges of accounting for the unknown observation process considerable. Our quantitative framework for citizen surveillance calls for an integration of citizen science and crowdsourcing and provides a way forward to solve the statistical challenges inherent to citizen-sourced data.

  14. Citizen Preparedness Campaign: Information Campaigns Increasing Citizen Preparedness to Support Creating a ̀Culture of Preparedness

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bloom, Paula

    2007-01-01

    .... There are currently readiness programs being conducted through the Citizen Corps, Department of Homeland Security and the Federal Emergency Management Agency but they are not coordinated across...

  15. Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Online-Offline, 1998

    1998-01-01

    Focuses on technology, on advances in such areas as aeronautics, electronics, physics, the space sciences, as well as computers and the attendant progress in medicine, robotics, and artificial intelligence. Describes educational resources for elementary and middle school students, including Web sites, CD-ROMs and software, videotapes, books,…

  16. Realizing the Value of Citizen Science Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdalati, W.

    2015-12-01

    Typical data sources for both basic and mission-focused environmental research include satellite sensors, in situ observations made by scientists, and data from well established and often government-sponsored networks. While these data sources enable substantial advances in understanding our environment, they are not always complete in the picture they present. By incorporating citizen science into our portfolio of observations, we gain a powerful complement to these traditional data sources, drawing on the enthusiasm and commitment of volunteer observers. While such data can be more difficult to calibrate or quality check, these challenges can be overcome by clear and simple protocols and consistent instrumentation. One such example is the Community Collaborative Rain, Hail and Snow Network (CoCoRaHS) in which thousands of volunteers in the United States and Canada use low-cost equipment to make point-measurements of rain, hail and snowfall near their homes or workplaces. All participants in CoCoRaHS make these measurements with the same $30 rain gauges and follow a well-established protocol in which they are trained. These observations feed into National Weather Service forecast models, sometimes directly influencing the issuing of alerts and warnings, and are used to both validate and improve these models. In other cases, observations can be more subjective, such as Buddhist monks in the Catskills documenting leaf fall, or the Audubon Society's Christmas Bird Count in which birds are surveyed annually as their habitats change. The uncertainty associated with such subjective measurements is far outweighed by the value of the data, and it can be reduced by increasing the numbers of observers and encouraging participation by the same observers year after year for consistent inputs. These citizen science efforts, and many others like them, provide tremendous scientific opportunities for complementing big-picture science with local variability, resulting in a more

  17. Ozone Gardens for the Citizen Scientist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pippin, Margaret; Reilly, Gay; Rodjom, Abbey; Malick, Emily

    2016-01-01

    NASA Langley partnered with the Virginia Living Museum and two schools to create ozone bio-indicator gardens for citizen scientists of all ages. The garden at the Marshall Learning Center is part of a community vegetable garden designed to teach young children where food comes from and pollution in their area, since most of the children have asthma. The Mt. Carmel garden is located at a K-8 school. Different ozone sensitive and ozone tolerant species are growing and being monitored for leaf injury. In addition, CairClip ozone monitors were placed in the gardens and data are compared to ozone levels at the NASA Langley Chemistry and Physics Atmospheric Boundary Layer Experiment (CAPABLE) site in Hampton, VA. Leaf observations and plant measurements are made two to three times a week throughout the growing season.

  18. So watt? Energy: a citizens' affair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dessus, B.; Gassin, H.; Testart, J.

    2005-02-01

    This book proposes a clear and well documented analysis of the energy debate, from the energy crisis to the climatic change. The authors explain that there is no possible CO 2 emissions abatement without energy mastery. The energy mastery must be decentralized, while the French energy policy, based on nuclear energy, is at the opposite. According to the authors, the energy independence of France is an utopia and France is dependent of fossil fuels like any other western country. Moreover, if the energy policy of some European countries is changing, the one of France remains the same. They try to analyze the reasons why our society is developing unsuitable and risky systems, and show how it would be possible to proceed differently. The key word of this demonstration is 'democracy' and a change is possible only if everyone acts as a citizen of a common world. (J.S.)

  19. Energy in Solid Waste: A Citizen Guide to Saving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Citizens Advisory Committee on Environmental Quality.

    This booklet contains information for citizens on solid wastes. It discusses the possible energy available in combustible and noncombustible trash. It suggests how citizens can reduce waste at home through discriminating buying practices and through recycling and reuse of resources. Recommendations are given for community action along with state…

  20. Examining citizen participation: local participatory policymaking and democracy revisited

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Michels, A.M.B.; de Graaf, Laurens

    2017-01-01

    This article discusses developments in citizen participation and its contribution to democracy since the publication of the original article. It evaluates the continued relevance of the use of a normative framework to assess different forms of citizen participation, nuances some of the conclusions

  1. Examining Citizen Participation: Local Participatory Policy Making and Democracy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Michels, A.M.B.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/11124501X; de Graaf, L.J.

    2010-01-01

    Citizen participation is usually seen as a vital aspect of democracy. Many theorists claim that citizen participation has positive effects on the quality of democracy. This article examines the probability of these claims for local participatory policymaking projects in two municipalities in the

  2. Examining Citizen Participation : Local participatory Policymaking and Democracy revisted

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ank Michels; Laurens de Graaf

    2017-01-01

    This article discusses developments in citizen participation and its contribution to democracy since the publication of the original article. It evaluates the continued relevance of the use of a normative framework to assess different forms of citizen participation, nuances some of the conclusions

  3. Group dynamics in the Citizens' Assembly on Electoral Reform

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jongh, M.S. de

    2013-01-01

    In 2006, the Dutch Ministry of the Interior and Kingdom Relations set up a national citizen assembly on electoral reform. One hundred and forty Dutch citizens were asked to work together for nine months to investigate various electoral systems for choosing members of the Parliament, and eventually

  4. Citizen Review Panels for Child Protective Services: A National Profile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Blake L.; Royse, David

    2008-01-01

    Citizen Review Panels (CRPs) for Child Protective Services are groups of citizen-volunteers throughout the United States who are federally mandated to evaluate local and state child protection systems. This study presents a profile of 332 CRP members in 20 states with regards to their demographic information, length of time on the panel, and …

  5. Educating Global Citizens: A Good "Idea" or an Organisational Practice?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lilley, Kathleen; Barker, Michelle; Harris, Neil

    2015-01-01

    Higher education emphasises training and skills for employment, yet while the "idea" of educating global citizens appears in university discourse, there is limited evidence demonstrating how the "idea" of the global citizen translates into practice. Recent research emphasises a desire for graduates to be local and global…

  6. Active Life of the Senior Citizens through Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taziev, Saljakhutdin Fardievich

    2015-01-01

    The paper presents reasons for including the senior citizens into educational process, as well as active age model. Education, communication and leisure system for the senior citizens, implemented by Yelabuga municipal district, is presented as a requirement for model realization. A core of the paper is the Active Age Institute. Its program…

  7. Critical Thinking of Young Citizens towards News Headlines in Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernier, Matthieu; Cárcamo, Luis; Scheihing, Eliana

    2018-01-01

    Strengthening critical thinking abilities of citizens in the face of news published on the web represents a key challenge for education. Young citizens appear to be vulnerable in the face of poor quality news or those containing non-explicit ideologies. In the field of data science, computational and statistical techniques have been developed to…

  8. Chapter 8: The "Citizen" in Youth Civic Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roholt, Ross VeLure; Hildreth, R. W.; Baizerman, Michael

    2007-01-01

    The concept of citizenship is a central, necessary, and defining feature of youth civic engagement. Any effort to educate young people for citizenship entails an implicit idea of what a "good citizen" is. There are a number of different and sometimes competing versions of what is a "good citizen." This chapter reviews "standard" accounts of…

  9. Astroclimate, a Citizen Science Climate Awareness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asorey, H.; Balaguera-Rojas, A.; Martínez-Méndez, A.; Núñez, L. A.; Peña-Rodríguez, J.; Salgado-Meza, P.; Sarmiento-Cano, C.; Suárez-Durán, M.

    2017-07-01

    Exploration and searching for life in other stellar systems have shown that its development and sustainability depend of very specific environment conditions. Due to that, preservation of the equilibrium of this conditions in our planet is very important, because small changes on it can generate high repercussions in its habitability. This work shows some preliminary results from an environmental monitoring network (RACIMO, Red Ambiental Ciudadana de Monitoreo) conformed by automatic meteorologic stations located on seven high-schools at metropolitan zone of Bucaramanga, Colombia. Data recorded by monitoring network are stored in an open web repository which can be accessed by citizens from any place with internet connection. These stations called UVAs, were developed under creative commons license, that is to say, software, hardware and data free, besides these can be built by students due to its flexibility. The UVAs are modular and re-programmable, that is, any sensor can be added to the stations and then re-configure its firmware remotely. Besides, UVAs work in automatic way, after the first setup, they will be self-sufficient and won't depend of human intervention. The data, of each UVA, are recorded with a temporal synchrony and then are upload at central repository by means of WiFi, ethernet or GSM connection. The stations can be power supplied by a solar system or the electrical grid. Currently, UVA record variables such as: pressure, temperature, humidity, irradiance, iluminance, ambient noise, rain, cloudiness, CO2 and NO2 concentration, lighting, seismic movements and its geographic position. On other hand, a calibration system has been developed to validate the data recorded by RACIMO. This project, started from an astroclimate an exoplanets habitability conditions, became an independent citizen science project to rise awareness about the very particular conditions enjoyed in our Earth planet.

  10. Dreamers, Poets, Citizens, and Scientists: Motivations for Engaging in GalaxyZoo Citizen Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slater, S. J.; Mankowski, T.; Slater, T. F.; CenterAstronomy; Physics Education Research Caper Team

    2010-12-01

    A particularly successful effort to engage the public in science has been to move the nearly countless galaxies imaged by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey to citizen scientists in a project known widely as Galaxy Zoo (URL; http://www.galaxyzoo.org). To everyone’s surprise, the unexpectedly large participation in the website has caused the data set, numbering over a million images, to be classified multiple times, quicker than the project leader anticipated, and continues to boast a high hit count on the website (15 classifications per second). Within 24 hours of launch, the site was receiving 70,000 classifications an hour, and more than 50 million classifications were received by the project during its first year, from almost 150,000 people. In a parallel effort, the Galaxy Zoo forum was created to handle the flood of emails that occurred alongside the flood of classifications, the team hoping that it would encourage the participants to handle each others' questions. By examining the motivations, methods and appeal of Galaxy Zoo to the participating public, other models of citizen science might be purposefully formulated to take advantage of the success exhibited in Galaxy Zoo. In addition, we want to understand the reasons people engage in science in informal settings in order to better enhance teaching methods in formal settings. Although in the past citizen science has primarily been used as a data collection method, there are many new opportunities contained in citizen science motivations and methods that we can use in future applications. This new and innovative method of online citizen science creates data for researchers of galaxies, but there is a parallel set of underlying data that has not yet been deeply analyzed: the motivations and underlying themes within the population of citizen scientists that could lead us to improve future citizen science projects. To address this, we pursued an investigation of the underlying reasons for the success of Galaxy Zoo

  11. eButterfly: Leveraging Massive Online Citizen Science for Butterfly Conservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prudic, Kathleen L.; McFarland, Kent P.; Oliver, Jeffrey C.; Hutchinson, Rebecca A.; Long, Elizabeth C.; Kerr, Jeremy T.; Larrivée, Maxim

    2017-01-01

    Data collection, storage, analysis, visualization, and dissemination are changing rapidly due to advances in new technologies driven by computer science and universal access to the internet. These technologies and web connections place human observers front and center in citizen science-driven research and are critical in generating new discoveries and innovation in such fields as astronomy, biodiversity, and meteorology. Research projects utilizing a citizen science approach address scientific problems at regional, continental, and even global scales otherwise impossible for a single lab or even a small collection of academic researchers. Here we describe eButterfly an integrative checklist-based butterfly monitoring and database web-platform that leverages the skills and knowledge of recreational butterfly enthusiasts to create a globally accessible unified database of butterfly observations across North America. Citizen scientists, conservationists, policy makers, and scientists are using eButterfly data to better understand the biological patterns of butterfly species diversity and how environmental conditions shape these patterns in space and time. eButterfly in collaboration with thousands of butterfly enthusiasts has created a near real-time butterfly data resource producing tens of thousands of observations per year open to all to share and explore. PMID:28524117

  12. Energy revolution and citizens' protests. A study of the communication of citizens' initiatives concerning grid expension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braeuer, Marco

    2017-01-01

    The extension of the German high voltage power grid has recently caused intense resistance in the affected regions. Publicly visible protests are mainly organised by citizen action groups. These groups act from the position of the periphery of the political system. Hence, they need to communicate their concerns and aims in order to influence the political and administrative decision-making system. In general they have the option to gain access to the mass media agenda. In addition protest groups can also create own media products (from leaflets to social media represenations). The theoretical points of departure of this study are social movement theories and the theory of the public sphere. An inclusive theoretical model, explaining the choice of protest repertories by citizen action groups, is developed. Furthermore, eight comprehensive case studies of citizen action groups in the conflict field of the extension of the German high voltage power grid were conducted. The results of the case studies reveal that the citizen action groups act strategically. They observe and assess the political and mass-mediated discourses and respectively develop their own frames. Although critical and sceptical towards the institutional practices and the actions of political representatives, the political system is perceived as legitimate and remains the main addressee. In addition, the mass media system is in general accepted, even though a (at least partially deliberate) negative bias and sometimes oven hostility against their own position is perceived. The creation of alternative media products is not a mere reaction with regard to the perceived mass media bias. It can be better understood as a result of the integration of the protest groups in local and regional communication structures (neighbourhoods, hobby networks, professional networks etc.). The study closes with recommendations for the improvement of consultation processes in the field of infrastructure protests.

  13. Technology Education and Societal Change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilberti, Anthony F.

    1994-01-01

    Citizens in a democracy should understand the relationship of technological development to societal change. The rationale for universal technological education stems from the ideals of cultural education, the responsibilities of democratic life, and the need for economic security. Technology education furthers understanding of our technological…

  14. Assessing Motivations and Use of Online Citizen Science Astronomy Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nona Bakerman, Maya; Buxner, Sanlyn; Bracey, Georgia; Gugliucci, Nicole

    2018-01-01

    The exponential proliferation of astronomy data has resulted in the need to develop new ways to analyze data. Recent efforts to engage the public in the discussion of the importance of science has led to projects that are aimed at letting them have hands-on experiences. Citizen science in astronomy, which has followed the model of citizen science in other scientific fields, has increased in the number and type of projects in the last few years and poses captivating ways to engage the public in science.The primary feature of this study was citizen science users’ motivations and activities related to engaging in astronomy citizen science projects. We report on participants’ interview responses related to their motivations, length and frequency of engagement, and reasons for leaving the project. From May to October 2014, 32 adults were interviewed to assess their motivations and experiences with citizen science. In particular, we looked at if and how motivations have changed for those who have engaged in the projects in order to develop support for and understandparticipants of citizen science. The predominant reasons participants took part in citizen science were: interest, helping, learning or teaching, and being part of science. Everyone interviewed demonstrated an intrinsic motivation to do citizen science projects.Participants’ reasons for ending their engagement on any given day were: having to do other things, physical effects of the computer, scheduled event that ended, attention span or tired, computer or program issues. A small fraction of the participants also indicated experiencing negative feedback. Out of the participants who no longer took part in citizen science projects, some indicated that receiving negative feedback was their primary reason and others reported the program to be frustrating.Our work is helping us to understand participants who engage in online citizen science projects so that researchers can better design projects to meet their

  15. Why Citizen Science Without Usability Testing Will Underperform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romano, C.; Gay, P.; Owens, R.; Burlea, G.

    2017-12-01

    Citizen science projects must undergo usability testing and optimization if they are to meet their stated goals. This presentation will include video of usability tests conducted upon citizen science websites. Usability testing is essential to the success of online interaction, however, citizen science projects have just begun to include this critical activity. Interaction standards in citizen science lag behind those of commercial interests, and published research on this topic is limited. Since online citizen science is by definition, an exchange of information, a clear understanding of how users experience an online project is essential to informed decision-making. Usability testing provides that insight. Usability testing collects data via direct observation of a person while she interacts with a digital product, such as a citizen science website. The test participant verbalizes her thoughts while using the website or application; the moderator follows the participant and captures quantitative measurement of the participant's confidence of success as she advances through the citizen science project. Over 15 years of usability testing, we have observed that users who do not report a consistent sense of progress are likely to abandon a website after as few as three unrewarding interactions. Since citizen science is also a voluntary activity, ensuring seamless interaction for users is mandatory. Usability studies conducted on citizen science websites demonstrate that project teams frequently underestimate a user's need for context and ease of use. Without usability testing, risks to online citizen science projects include high bounce rate (users leave the website without taking any action), abandonment (of the website, tutorials, registration), misunderstanding instructions (causing disorientation and erroneous conclusions), and ultimately, underperforming projects.

  16. Lessons learnt from recent citizen science initiatives to document floods in France, Argentina and New Zealand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Le Coz Jérôme

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available New communication and digital image technologies have enabled the public to produce and share large quantities of flood observations. Valuable hydraulic data such as water levels, flow rates, inundated areas, etc., can be extracted from photos and movies taken by citizens and help improve the analysis and modelling of flood hazard. We introduce recent citizen science initiatives which have been launched independently by research organisations to document floods in some catchments and urban areas of France, Argentina and New Zealand. Key drivers for success appear to be: a clear and simple procedure, suitable tools for data collecting and processing, an efficient communication plan, the support of local stakeholders, and the public awareness of natural hazards.

  17. Spherical ionization chamber of 14 liter for precise measurement of environmental radiation dose rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagaoka, Toshi; Saito, Kimiaki; Moriuchi, Shigeru

    1991-05-01

    A spherical ionization chamber of 14 liter filled with 1 atm. nitrogen gas was arranged aiming at precise measurement of dose rate due to environmental gamma rays and cosmic rays. Ionization current-dose rate conversion factor for this ionization chamber was derived from careful consideration taking into account the attenuation by chamber wall, ionization current due to alpha particles and so on. Experiments at calibrated gamma ray fields and intercomparison with NaI(Tl) scintillation detector were also performed, which confirmed this ionization chamber using the conversion factor can measure the dose rate with an error of only a few percent. This ionization chamber will be used for measurement of environmental gamma ray and cosmic ray dose rate. (author)

  18. Strange Words: Autistic Traits and the Processing of Non-Literal Language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenna, Peter E; Glass, Alexandra; Rajendran, Gnanathusharan; Corley, Martin

    2015-11-01

    Previous investigations into metonymy comprehension in ASD have confounded metonymy with anaphora, and outcome with process. Here we show how these confounds may be avoided, using data from non-diagnosed participants classified using Autism Quotient. Participants read sentences containing target words with novel or established metonymic senses (e.g., Finland, Vietnam) in literal- or figurative-supporting contexts. Participants took longer to read target words in figurative contexts, especially where the metonymic sense was novel. Importantly, participants with higher AQs took longer still to read novel metonyms. This suggests a focus for further exploration, in terms of potential differences between individuals diagnosed with ASD and their neurotypical counterparts, and more generally in terms of the processes by which comprehension is achieved.

  19. A Escrita Feminina e a Tradição Literária

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdala França Vianna

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Duas escritoras do Canadá contemporâneo, Audrey Thomas e Mary di Michele, reescrevendo o logos narrativo patriarcal—marca ocidental de exercício do poder— inscrevem por transgressão o lugar do feminino na textualidade tradicional codificada pelos interditos culturais do discurso masculino. A rasura praticada na matriz narrativa se evidencia pela prática de uma política literária de desvelamento do texto feminino latente, inscrito mas não escrito na ordem cultural produtora de uma história de exclusões. A adoção do modo confessional de narrar, permitindo a intertextualidade do autobiográfico e do ficcional, interfere no conceito que limita os espaços entre ficção e realidade e anula o hiato entre arte e vida, entre o mundo escrito e o não-escrito.

  20. Linking Consumer Rights with Citizen Roles: An Opportunity for Consumer Educators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Georgia L.

    1994-01-01

    Consumer educators can help students develop consumer/citizen roles through curricula linking consumer rights with citizen responsibilities. Dialogue about issues, community needs assessment, and community volunteer service enable students to practice citizen roles. (SK)

  1. [Attention deficit and understanding of non-literal meanings: the interpretation of indirect speech acts and idioms].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crespo, N; Manghi, D; García, G; Cáceres, P

    To report on the oral comprehension of the non-literal meanings of indirect speech acts and idioms in everyday speech by children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). The subjects in this study consisted of a sample of 29 Chilean schoolchildren aged between 6 and 13 with ADHD and a control group of children without ADHD sharing similar socio-demographic characteristics. A quantitative method was utilised: comprehension was measured individually by means of an interactive instrument. The children listened to a dialogue taken from a cartoon series that included indirect speech acts and idioms and they had to choose one of the three options they were given: literal, non-literal or distracter. The children without ADHD identified the non-literal meaning more often, especially in idioms. Likewise, it should be pointed out that whereas the children without ADHD increased their scores as their ages went up, those with ADHD remained at the same point. ADHD not only interferes in the inferential comprehension of non-literal meanings but also inhibits the development of this skill in subjects affected by it.

  2. Trio of terror (pregnancy, menstruation, and breastfeeding): an existential function of literal self-objectification among women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Kasey Lynn; Goldenberg, Jamie L; Heflick, Nathan A

    2014-07-01

    Research and theorizing suggest that objectification entails perceiving a person not as a human being but, quite literally, as an object. However, the motive to regard the self as an object is not well understood. The current research tested the hypothesis that literal self-objectification can serve a terror management function. From this perspective, the female body poses a unique existential threat on account of its role in reproduction, and regarding the self as an object is posited to shield women from this threat because objects, in contrast to humans, are not mortal. Across 5 studies, 3 operationalizations of literal self-objectification were employed (a denial of essentially human traits to the self, overlap in the explicit assignment of traits to the self and objects, and implicit associations between self and objects using an implicit association test) in response to 3 aspects of women's bodies involved in reproduction (pregnancy, menstruation, and breastfeeding). In each study, priming mortality led women (but not men, included in Studies 1, 3, 4, and 5) to literally self-objectify in conditions where women's reproductive features were salient. In addition, literal self-objectification was found to mediate subsequent responsiveness to death-related stimuli (Study 4). Together, these findings are the first to demonstrate a direct link between mortality salience, women's role in reproduction, and their self-objectification, supporting an existential function of self-objectification in women.

  3. Lights, camera…citizen science: assessing the effectiveness of smartphone-based video training in invasive plant identification.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jared Starr

    Full Text Available The rapid growth and increasing popularity of smartphone technology is putting sophisticated data-collection tools in the hands of more and more citizens. This has exciting implications for the expanding field of citizen science. With smartphone-based applications (apps, it is now increasingly practical to remotely acquire high quality citizen-submitted data at a fraction of the cost of a traditional study. Yet, one impediment to citizen science projects is the question of how to train participants. The traditional "in-person" training model, while effective, can be cost prohibitive as the spatial scale of a project increases. To explore possible solutions, we analyze three training models: 1 in-person, 2 app-based video, and 3 app-based text/images in the context of invasive plant identification in Massachusetts. Encouragingly, we find that participants who received video training were as successful at invasive plant identification as those trained in-person, while those receiving just text/images were less successful. This finding has implications for a variety of citizen science projects that need alternative methods to effectively train participants when in-person training is impractical.

  4. The Use of Online Citizen-Science Projects to Provide Experiential Learning Opportunities for Nonmajor Science Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donna M. Kridelbaugh

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Citizen science is becoming even more accessible to the general public through technological advances in the development of mobile applications, facilitating information dissemination and data collection. With the advent of “big data,” many citizen-science projects designed to help researchers sift through piles of research data now exist entirely online, either in the form of playing a game or via other digital avenues. Recent trends in citizen science have also focused on “crowdsourcing” solutions from the general public to help solve societal issues, often requiring nothing more than brainstorming and a computer to submit ideas. Online citizen science thus provides an excellent platform to expand the accessibility of experiential learning opportunities for a broad range of nonmajor science students at institutions with limited resources (e.g., community colleges. I created an activity for a general microbiology lecture to engage students in hands-on experiences via participation in online citizen-science projects. The objectives of the assignment were for students to: 1 understand that everyone can be a scientist; 2 learn to be creative and innovative in designing solutions to health and science challenges; and 3 further practice science communication skills with a written report. This activity is designed for introductory science courses with nonmajor science students who have limited opportunities to participate in undergraduate research experiences.

  5. Developing visual images for communicating information aboutantiretroviral side effects to a low-literate population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowse, Ros; Ramela, Thato; Barford, Kirsty-Lee; Browne, Sara

    2010-09-01

    The side effects of antiretroviral (ARV) therapy are linked to altered quality of life and adherence. Poor adherence has also been associated with low health-literacy skills, with an uninformed patient more likely to make ARV-related decisions that compromise the efficacy of the treatment. Low literacy skills disempower patients in interactions with healthcare providers and preclude the use of existing written patient information materials, which are generally written at a high reading level. Visual images or pictograms used as a counselling tool or included in patient information leaflets have been shown to improve patients' knowledge, particularly in low-literate groups. The objective of this study was to design visuals or pictograms illustrating various ARV side effects and to evaluate them in a low-literate South African Xhosa population. Core images were generated either from a design workshop or from posed photos or images from textbooks. The research team worked closely with a graphic artist. Initial versions of the images were discussed and assessed in group discussions, and then modified and eventually evaluated quantitatively in individual interviews with 40 participants who each had a maximum of 10 years of schooling. The familiarity of the human body, its facial expressions, postures and actions contextualised the information and contributed to the participants' understanding. Visuals that were simple, had a clear central focus and reflected familiar body experiences (e.g. vomiting) were highly successful. The introduction of abstract elements (e.g. fever) and metaphorical images (e.g. nightmares) presented problems for interpretation, particularly to those with the lowest educational levels. We recommend that such visual images should be designed in collaboration with the target population and a graphic artist, taking cognisance of the audience's literacy skills and culture, and should employ a multistage iterative process of modification and

  6. CHARACTERIZATION AND ALUMINUM DISSOLUTION DEMONSTRATION WITH A 3 LITER TANK 51H SAMPLE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hay, M; John Pareizs, J; Cj Bannochie, C; Michael Stone, M; Damon Click, D; Daniel McCabe, D

    2008-01-01

    A 3-liter sludge slurry sample was sent to SRNL for demonstration of a low temperature aluminum dissolution process. The sludge was characterized before and after the aluminum dissolution. Post aluminum dissolution sludge settling and the stability of the decanted supernate were also observed. The characterization of the as-received 3-liter sample of Tank 51H sludge slurry shows a typical high aluminum HM sludge. The XRD analysis of the dried solids indicates Boehmite is the predominant crystalline form of aluminum in the sludge solids. However, amorphous phases of aluminum present in the sludge would not be identified using this analytical technique. The low temperature (55 C) aluminum dissolution process was effective at dissolving aluminum from the sludge. Over the three week test, ∼42% of the aluminum was dissolved out of the sludge solids. The process appears to be selective for aluminum with no other metals dissolving to any appreciable extent. At the termination of the three week test, the aluminum concentration in the supernate had not leveled off indicating more aluminum could be dissolved from the sludge with longer contact times or higher temperatures. The slow aluminum dissolution rate in the test may indicate the dissolution of the Boehmite form of aluminum however; insufficient kinetic data exists to confirm this hypothesis. The aluminum dissolution process appears to have minimal impact on the settling rate of the post aluminum dissolution sludge. However, limited settling data were generated during the test to quantify the effects. The sludge settling was complete after approximately twelve days. The supernate decanted from the settled sludge after aluminum dissolution appears stable and did not precipitate aluminum over the course of several months. A mixture of the decanted supernate with Tank 11 simulated supernate was also stable with respect to precipitation

  7. Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Jing

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The traditional answer card reading method using OMR (Optical Mark Reader, most commonly, OMR special card special use, less versatile, high cost, aiming at the existing problems proposed a method based on pattern recognition of the answer card identification method. Using the method based on Line Segment Detector to detect the tilt of the image, the existence of tilt image rotation correction, and eventually achieve positioning and detection of answers to the answer sheet .Pattern recognition technology for automatic reading, high accuracy, detect faster

  8. Crowd-Sourcing with K-12 citizen scientists: The Continuing Evolution of the GLOBE Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, T.; Wegner, K.; Andersen, T. J.

    2016-12-01

    Twenty years ago, the Internet was still in its infancy, citizen science was a relatively unknown term, and the idea of a global citizen science database was unheard of. Then the Global Learning and Observations to Benefit the Environment (GLOBE) Program was proposed and this all changed. GLOBE was one of the first K-12 citizen science programs on a global scale. An initial large scale ramp-up of the program was followed by the establishment of a network of partners in countries and within the U.S. Now in the 21st century, the program has over 50 protocols in atmosphere, biosphere, hydrosphere and pedosphere, almost 140 million measurements in the database, a visualization system, collaborations with NASA satellite mission scientists (GPM, SMAP) and other scientists, as well as research projects by GLOBE students. As technology changed over the past two decades, it was integrated into the program's outreach efforts to existing and new members with the result that the program now has a strong social media presence. In 2016, a new app was launched which opened up GLOBE and data entry to citizen scientists of all ages. The app is aimed at fresh audiences, beyond the traditional GLOBE K-12 community. Groups targeted included: scouting organizations, museums, 4H, science learning centers, retirement communities, etc. to broaden participation in the program and increase the number of data available to students and scientists. Through the 20 years of GLOBE, lessons have been learned about changing the management of this type of large-scale program, the use of technology to enhance and improve the experience for members, and increasing community involvement in the program.

  9. Risk analysis by citizens? Analysis of the first consensus conference held in France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marris, C.; Joly, P.B.

    1998-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: the French Parliamentary Office for the evaluation of scientific and technological choices (OPECST) is currently organizing a consensus conference. Following the model developed by the Danish Board of Technology, a panel of 15 French citizens is being asked to evaluate the use of genetically modified organisms in agriculture and food. This Danish model for direct citizen participation in technology assessment has gained growing support in other European countries and even further afield, such as Japan and Australia. This is, however, a novel experience for France, which has very little tradition for participatory technology assessment. The final and public phase of the 'conference citoyenne' will take place in Paris on 20-22 June 1998, therefore it is too early to outline our results in this abstract. Our paper will present an analysis of the impact and role of this conference in the wider public debate in France about agricultural bio-technologies. This will be based on interviews with key actors in this debate (scientists, consumer and environmental organisations, politicians), media reports, and video footage of the entire procedure of the consensus conference. (authors)

  10. Citizen's Charter in a primary health-care setting of Nepal: An accountability tool or a "mere wall poster"?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurung, Gagan; Gauld, Robin; Hill, Philip C; Derrett, Sarah

    2018-02-01

    Despite some empirical findings on the usefulness of citizen's charters on awareness of rights and services, there is a dearth of literature about charter implementation and impact on health service delivery in low-income settings. To gauge the level of awareness of the Charter within Nepal's primary health-care (PHC) system, perceived impact and factors affecting Charter implementation. Using a case study design, a quantitative survey was administered to 400 participants from 22 of 39 PHC facilities in the Dang District to gauge awareness of the Charter. Additionally, qualitative interviews with 39 key informants were conducted to explore the perceived impact of the Charter and factors affecting its implementation. Few service users (15%) were aware of the existence of the Charter. Among these, a greater proportion were literate, and there were also differences according to ethnicity and occupational group. The Charter was usually not properly displayed and had been implemented with no prior public consultation. It contained information that provided awareness of health facility services, particularly the more educated public, but had limited potential for increasing transparency and holding service providers accountable to citizens. Proper display, consultation with stakeholders, orientation or training and educational factors, follow-up and monitoring, and provision of sanctions were all lacking, negatively influencing the implementation of the Charter. Poor implementation and low public awareness of the Charter limit its usefulness. Provision of sanctions and consultation with citizens in Charter development are needed to expand the scope of Charters from information brochures to tools for accountability. © 2017 The Authors Health Expectations Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Citizen science: a new direction in canine behavior research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hecht, Julie; Spicer Rice, Eleanor

    2015-01-01

    Researchers increasingly rely on members of the public to contribute to scientific projects-from collecting or identifying, to analyzing and disseminating data. The "citizen science" model proves useful to many thematically distinctive fields, like ornithology, astronomy, and phenology. The recent formalization of citizen science projects addresses technical issues related to volunteer participation--like data quality--so that citizen scientists can make longstanding, meaningful contributions to scientific projects. Since the late 1990s, canine science research has relied with greater frequency on the participation of the general public, particularly dog owners. These researchers do not typically consider the methods and technical issues that those conducting citizen science projects embrace and continue to investigate. As more canine science studies rely on public input, an in-depth knowledge of the benefits and challenges of citizen science can help produce relevant, high-quality data while increasing the general public's understanding of canine behavior and cognition as well as the scientific process. We examine the benefits and challenges of current citizen science models in an effort to enhance canine citizen science project preparation, execution, and dissemination. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Canine Behavior. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Legal and institutional frameworks for government relations with citizens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caddy, J.

    2000-01-01

    Unacceptably low or declining confidence in public institutions in OECD Member countries has led governments to view the issue of government-citizen relations with growing concern and to take initiatives to strengthen this fundamental relationship. Governments have begun to realize that they can better anticipate citizens' evolving and multiple needs by pro-actively involving them in the policy-making process in order to develop solutions to issues as they first appear, and not when they become pressing problems. When government succeeds in anticipating citizens' needs and aspirations, it earns currency in the form of trust. The price of failure is a loss of legitimacy. The conditions for trust in government include a well-educated citizenry, transparent processes and accountability. Government needs to establish a 'level playing field' so that citizens can see that their interests are being treated fairly. Citizens, for their part, need to learn to value fairness in government over special favours for well-connected groups. Transparency in government helps to assure citizens that they are being treated fairly. Accountability helps ensure that government failures are corrected and that public services meet expectations. Governments increasingly realize that they will not be able to conduct and effectively implement policies, as good as they may be, if their citizens do not support them. (author)

  13. The Peruvian Citizen Perception and Expectation toward the e-Government. The Electronic Tax Payment as a Successful e-Gov Project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Cardona

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available In this chapter, the authors try to stand out how the Latin American governments, specifically the Peruvian government, can evaluate its efforts implementing electronic administration initiatives, identifying what the citizen expects from the electronic administration and how he or she perceives it, applying an evaluation model to the electronic tax payment service implemented, as a successful initiative at Latin-America. The proposed model to achieve this, was developed by one of the authors during his doctoral dissertation (Cardona, 2004 and evaluated by the other one as dissertation judge. It includes five different independent and latent constructs, Attitude, Aptitude, Trust, Relevance and Satisfaction that affect two dependent and latent constructs, the Citizen Perception and the Citizen Expectative towards its relationship with the Public Administration through the use of Information and Communication Technologies - ICT, under the effect of illustrative variables related with citizen, institutions and context.

  14. Citizen awareness level of the peaceful uses of atomic energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elfawairs, Kh.; Elammari, M.

    2015-01-01

    This paper aims to know the level of public awareness of different types of people, about the peaceful application of nuclear energy. A questionnaire about this subject was distributed randomly in different cities in Libya; the questionnaire was targeting males and females with different educational levels. From data obtained and which was analyzed statistically comparing the educational level with the level of awareness. It was found that the highest contribution was for those holding university degrees 43%. Data analysis showed that 50.5% of the total number do not know what is meant by the peaceful uses of atomic energy and this significantly related to the educational level at significance level ∝=0.01. Concerning the assessment of environmental awareness of the Libyan citizens, 83.3% said that it is weak and the relation is not signification. Concerning the best ways of making people more aware of atomic energy and its peaceful uses 63.9% said all possible means should be used and 21.3% said practical application is the best way, where 13.9% said that they don't know. About the uses of nuclear technology in different fields, the participants had different views. From this study it was concluded that a%. Warnaco programs concerning the peaceful uses of atomic energy should be intensified.(author)

  15. Action verbs are processed differently in metaphorical and literal sentences depending on the semantic match of visual primes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa eTroyer

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Language comprehension requires rapid and flexible access to information stored in long-term memory, likely influenced by activation of rich world knowledge and by brain systems that support the processing of sensorimotor content. We hypothesized that while literal language about biological motion might rely on neurocognitive representations of biological motion specific to the details of the actions described, metaphors rely on more generic representations of motion. In a priming and self-paced reading paradigm, participants saw video clips or images of (a an intact point-light walker or (b a scrambled control and read sentences containing literal or metaphoric uses of biological motion verbs either closely or distantly related to the depicted action (walking. We predicted that reading times for literal and metaphorical sentences would show differential sensitivity to the match between the verb and the visual prime. In Experiment 1, we observed interactions between the prime type (walker or scrambled video and the verb type (close or distant match for both literal and metaphorical sentences, but with strikingly different patterns. We found no difference in the verb region of literal sentences for Close-Match verbs after walker or scrambled motion primes, but Distant-Match verbs were read more quickly following walker primes. For metaphorical sentences, the results were roughly reversed, with Distant-Match verbs being read more slowly following a walker compared to scrambled motion. In Experiment 2, we observed a similar pattern following still image primes, though critical interactions emerged later in the sentence. We interpret these findings as evidence for shared recruitment of cognitive and neural mechanisms for processing visual and verbal biological motion information. Metaphoric language using biological motion verbs may recruit neurocognitive mechanisms similar to those used in processing literal language but be represented in a less

  16. Who are the citizens in public participation GIS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Henning Sten; Reinau, Kristian Hegner

    2006-01-01

    to face discussions between the citizens. Equal opportunities to express their opinions and an open debate between people are the basic foundation for democracy. Therefore the design of participatory processes must take outset in the citizens and their knowledge and commitment concerning the issue...... stakeholders among a broader group of citizens, and ask for their opinion. Especially women and younger generations are much more needed in the participatory process. Therefore the county administration must consider these findings to make the participation tools more targeted in the future....

  17. CosmoQuest MoonMappers: Citizen Lunar Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gay, P. L.; Antonenko, I.; Robbins, S. J.; Bracey, G.; Lehan, C.; Moore, J.; Huang, D.

    2012-09-01

    The MoonMappers citizen science project is part of CosmoQuest, a virtual research facility designed for the public. CosmoQuest seeks to take the best aspects of a research center - research, seminars, journal clubs, and community discussions - and provide them to a community of citizen scientists through a virtual facility. MoonMappers was the first citizen science project within CosmoQuest, and is being used to define best practices in getting the public to effectively learn and do science.

  18. Citizen radiation monitoring program for the TMI area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baratta, A.J.; Gricar, B.G.; Jester, W.A.

    1981-07-01

    The purpose of the program was to develop a system for citizens to independently measure radiation levels in and around their communities. This report describes the process by which the Program was developed and operated. It also presents the methods used to select and train the citizens in making and interpreting the measurements. The test procedures used to select the equipment for the program are described as are the results of the testing. Finally, the actual monitoring results are discussed along with the citizens' reactions to the program

  19. Citizen radiation monitoring program for the TMI area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baratta, A.J.; Gricar, B.G.; Jester, W.A.

    1981-07-01

    The purpose of the program was to develop a system for citizens to independently measure radiation levels in and around their communities. This report describes the process by which the Program was developed and operated. It also presents the methods used to select and train the citizens in making and interpreting the measurements. The test procedures used to select the equipment for the program are described as are the results of the testing. Finally, the actual monitoring results are discussed along with the citizens' reactions to the program.

  20. Recommendations for citizen-oriented risk communication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fertmann, R.

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of recommendations for citizen-oriented risk communication should be to provide ''banisters'' which leave the players their freedom of action and allow them to adapt communicative structures to the situation at hand. Uncertainty and controversial issues at the levels of information, participation and assessment are identified as potential stumbling blocks in risk communication. The experiences gained in Hamburg shed a light on a diversity of processes in risk communication, which the present paper proceeds to evaluate. One of its essential recommendations is to have dialogic processes develop into forms of participation. A guide on risk communication which was formulated in the USA has been adapted to conditions as they prevail in Germany. The adapted version is more practically oriented than the rules of the EPA or the more recent CDC recommendations. Suitable success criteria include a fair procedure, a common baseline of what is known and not known, the acceptance of different assessment criteria, and the exchange of the pros and cons of different options

  1. Galaxy Zoo: Motivations of Citizen Scientists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raddick, Jordan; Lintott, C.; Bamford, S.; Land, K.; Locksmith, D.; Murray, P.; Nichol, B.; Schawinski, K.; Slosar, A.; Szalay, A.; Thomas, D.; Vandenberg, J.; Andreescu, D.

    2008-05-01

    We have developed Galaxy Zoo, a citizen science project in which volunteers classify images of galaxies by shape. The site has been hugely successful in reaching large numbers of people - more than 125,000 people have signed up. As a result, each galaxy has been classified more than 30 times, resulting in high-quality science results. We are studying the motivations of these volunteers to determine what about our site made it so captivating. We have some ideas - people enjoy helping science, looking at beautiful galaxy images, and the "game" nature of the interface. But we want to study the motivations systematically, to learn who thinks what, and how this affects what they do. We have designed a methodology in which we begin with interviews, asking open-ended questions of volunteers about their motivation. Then, we design a survey to collect motivation data for a larger sample. Lastly, for volunteers who agreed to give us their site username, we examine how they classified galaxies to look for correlations between motivation and behavior. In this poster, we describe our methodology and present preliminary results of our research.

  2. Citizen scientist lepidopterists exposed to potential carcinogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vainio, Petri J; Vahlberg, Tero; Liesivuori, Jyrki

    2016-05-01

    Lepidopterists use substantial volumes of solvents, such as chloroform, 1,1,2,2-tetrachloroethane and xylene, in their traps when collecting faunistic and phenological data. A majority of them are citizen scientists and thus in part not identified by occupational healthcare as being at risk due to solvent handling. We surveyed the extent of solvent use, the frequency and extent of potential exposure and the safety precautions taken in trapping and catch handling by Finnish lepidopterists. Chloroform and 1,1,2,2-tetrachloroethane were the most frequently used anaesthetics. Potential for exposure prevailed during trap maintenance and exploration and catch sorting. Adequate protection against vapours or spills was worn by 17% during trap exploration. Subjects completed a median of 100 trap explorations per season. Dermal or mucosal spills were recorded at a median rate of one spill per ten (chloroform) to 20 (1,1,2,2-tetrachloroethane and xylene) trap explorations. Median annual cumulative durations of 8 and 20 h of exposure to chloroform and 1,1,2,2-tetrachloroethane at levels above odour detection threshold were reported. Subjective adverse findings possibly related solvents had been noticed by 24 (9.8%) lepidopterists. All the events had been mild to moderate. No factor predicting unsafe procedures or adverse reactions was recorded despite thorough statistical testing. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. KONVERGENSI DALAM PROGRAM NET CITIZEN JOURNALISM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rhafidilla Vebrynda

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Di dalam artikel ini, peneliti ingin melihat perkembangan teknologi di Indonesia sebagai sebuah peluang untuk menjalankan sebuah program berita berbasis video kiriman masyarakat. Perkembangan teknologi tersebut adalah teknologi penyiaran, teknologi sosial media dan teknologi dalam proses produksi sebuah video. Di Indonesia, jumlah televisi semakin banyak. Setiap stasiun televisi harus bersaing untuk dapat bertahan hidup. Net TV merupakan sebuah stasiun televisi baru di Indonesia yang harus memiliki berbagai program unggulan baru agar dapat bersaing dengan televisi lainnya yang sudah ada. Net TV menggunakan berbagai platform media untuk menjalankan program Net Citizen Journalism (Net CJ. Penggunaan berbagai platform media dikenal dengan istilah multiplatform dan secara teoritis dikenal dengan istilah konvergensi. Konvergensi yaitu saat meleburnya domain-domain dalam berbagai media komunikasi. Artikel ini menggunakan metode studi kasus untuk melihat bagaimana konvergensi terjadi dalam proses pengelolaan program Net CJ. Teknik pengumpulan data adalah dengan wawancara mendalam, observasi dan studi dokumen. Wawancara mendalam dilakukan dari tiga sudut pandang yaitu dari pengelola program, pengguna/audience dan pengamat media. Penelitian ini menemukan bahwa dengan menggunakan berbagai platform media yang fungsinya berbeda, memiliki satu tujuan yang sama yaitu untuk menjalankan program Net CJ. Adapun berbagai platform dalam proses produksi program yaitu tayangan TV konvensional, streaming TV, website, aplikasi Net CJ, facebook, twitter, instagram dan path. Konvergensi media dijalankan dalam dua proses, yaitu proses produksi dan proses promosi program berita.

  4. [Senior citizen's physical activity and welfare].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santana, Maria da Silva; Chaves Maia, Eulália M

    2009-01-01

    This work analysed senior citizens' perception of needs and social values involved in taking physical activity for their own benefit. This study's main aim was to investigate social representations of 3rd age physical activity. This was a cross-sectional, interdisciplinary qualitative study, underpinned by theoretical-methodological social representation theory. A convenience, non-probabilistic, census-dependent method was used for obtaining the sam-ple of 62 people aged 50 to 78 from north-eastern Brazil. The data were collected by using the free word association technique and analysed by EVOC/2000 software. Analysing the replies led to three types of elements being identified which were related to the social representation of physical activity as attributed by the elderly: a psychological dimension (represented by happiness, well-being), a social dimension (dancing) and a biophysical dimension (gymnastics, water-gymnastics and health). The term 'happiness' stood out most in the word recall tests. When relating old age to the sample's social representation of physical activity, the study showed that physical activity assumed a preponderant role in the life of the elderly through cyclical appreciation-depreciation, social representation simultaneously and gradually acquiring 'life having more health and quality' from social representation. The subjects reported a positive association between physical activity, social interaction and well-being. The elderly also believed in physical activity's effects on physical-motor aspects and health. The social representation of physical activity by the group being studied was close to the physical activity's biopsychosocial dimension.

  5. [SZCZECIN CITIZENS' KNOWLEDGE ABOUT RARE DISEASES].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walat, Anna; Skoczylas, Michal Marian; Welnicka, Agnieszka; Kulig, Malgorzata; Rodak, Przemyslaw; Walczak, Zuzanna; Jablońska, Agata

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the study was to assess knowledge about rare diseases among citizens of Szczecin (Poland). The study was performed by questioning 242 adult customers of Turzyn Shopping Centre in Szczecin (149 females and 93 males). The survey was conducted in the shopping mall on 23 February 2013 (control group) and during the celebration of Rare Disease Day and the 12th Polish Nationwide Cystic Fibrosis Week ("Dolina Mukolinków") on 2 March 2013 (research group). The research tool was a questionnaire devised by the authors and filled out by the writing authors interviewer's answers. In the study group more people knew about the existence of Rare Disease Day than in the control group (86.02% vs 57.72%, chi-square test χ2 > χ2(1); 0.001, p χ2(1); 0.001, p < 0.001). The respondents from the research group knew more about Rare Disease Day and defined the idea of it as closed in a significantly higher degree than the control group. There was no significant difference in the detailed knowledge about rare diseases in either group. This might indicate the need to educate society and patients, along with their families.

  6. Bridging the Expert and Citizen Divide: Integrating Public Deliberation to Inform NASA's Asteroid Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farooque, M.; Tomblin, D. C.; Sittenfeld, D.

    2017-12-01

    The demand for public engagement in upstream science and technology is fast becoming mainstream. From the National Academies to the European Commission, from geoengineering to gene editing, from artificial intelligence to synthetic biology—there is a growing recognition of the socio-technical nature of the inherent challenges and a variety of calls for earlier and sustained engagement with diverse stakeholders and the general public. Despite a significant increase in the number and sophistication of approaches, institutional and cultural barriers remain, particularly in linking techno-scientific discourse with socio-political discourse. We will report on a 2014 study to use Participatory Technology Assessment (pTA), a method for eliciting informed, deliberative, diverse, and representative citizen views prior to making decisions about science and technology, to inform upstream decisions concerning NASA's Asteroid Initiative. In partnership with NASA, the Expert and Citizen Assessment of Science and Technology (ECAST) network conducted pTA forums in Boston and Phoenix to assess citizens' preferences and values about potential options for asteroid detection, mitigation, and retrieval and the deployment of the Capability Driven Framework as a planning instrument for a journey to Mars. We describe the three-step trans-disciplinary research process applied for (a) issue framing and deliberation design, (b) content development and participant recruitment, and (c) value assessments and results integration. We present result highlights, describe how they were used, and what kind of impact they had on decisions made by NASA. We discuss the influence this project had on subsequent initiatives by NOAA for climate resilience planning and by DOE for nuclear waste management. We conclude with our thoughts on (i) a new institutional model and (ii) research, application and adaptation opportunities going forward focusing on the role pTA can play to bridge the divide between

  7. Assessment by citizens of the level of confidence of police and protection from criminal entry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna A. Glukhova

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective on the basis of sociological research to determine the level of confidence in police among the population of Nizhny Novgorod region and to measure the subjective assessment by citizens of the degree of protection from criminal attacks. Methods general scientific analysis systemicstructural approach to the analysis of research object comparativelegal as well as logical methods and the special scientific method questionnaire method ndash questioning of residents of Nizhny Novgorod region. Results the characteristics of the process of actual interaction between citizens and police are identified and classified the attitude to police and the level of trust in police in general and in certain areas of their work in various categories of the population are identified the typology of population groups depending on their concepts about police functioning is carried out. Scientific novelty for the first time the article discusses public opinion of the Nizhny Novgorod region residents about police officers the actual characteristics and interaction between citizens and police are revealed proposals and practical recommendations were formulated for adjustment of the work of territorial bodies of the Ministry of Interior with the aim of increasing the level of their credibility with the population. Among them are a to improve the efficiency of propaganda of the police work results in mass media including the work with citizensrsquo claims disclosure and investigation of crimes especially those which caused a broad public resonance b to inform citizens and police officers about the social importance of the activities of Internal Affairs bodies and internal troops for ensuring public order prevention suppression disclosure of crimes and offences c to expand the number of journalists specializing in lawenforcement issues d to simplify the procedure for receiving claims from citizens about small and medium crimes with the use of modern technologies

  8. Information beyond the forum: Motivations, strategies, and impacts of citizen participants seeking information during a consensus conference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Ashley A; Delborne, Jason; Kleinman, Daniel Lee

    2013-11-01

    During traditional consensus conferences, organizers control the formal information available to participants-by compiling structured background materials and recruiting expert panelists. Less formally, however, participants are encouraged to bring their own experiences into the deliberations, and in doing so, they often seek outside information. We explore this heretofore understudied phenomenon of information seeking during a deliberative event: the U.S. National Citizens' Technology Forum (2008), which addressed the convergence of nanotechnology, biotechnology, information technology, and cognitive science on the potential development of human-enhancement technologies. Through interviews with participants and observation of in-person and online deliberations, we identify outside information-seeking strategies and motivations. Our study demonstrates that conceptualizing models of deliberation as standalone settings of communication exchange ignores the reality of the complex information environment from which deliberative participants draw when making sense of technical issues. Future citizen deliberations must incorporate outside information seeking in the design of the exercises.

  9. A Coastal Citizen Science Project - How to run an international Citizen Science Project?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruse, K.; Knickmeier, K.; Thiel, M.; Gatta, M.

    2016-02-01

    "Searching for plastic garbage" is an international Citizen Science project that aims to participate school students in the public discussion on the topic "plastic pollution in the ocean". For this, young people apply various research methods, evaluate their data, communicate and publish their results and investigate solutions solving this problem. The project will be carried out in Chile and Germany at the same time, which allows the participating students to share and compare their results and discuss their ideas with an international partner. This takes place on the website www.save-ocean.org. The project promotes intercultural and scientific skills of the students. They get insights into scientific research, get into another culture and experiences plastic pollution as an important global problem. Since May 2015, 450 pupils aged 10 to 15 years and 20 teachers in Germany and Chile have explored the plastic garbage on beaches. Where are the largest plastic garbage deposits? Which items of plastic are mostly found in Germany and Chile? Or where does this garbage comes from? These and other research questions are being answered by an international network between students, teachers and scientists. After completing the first Citizen Science pilot study successfully in summer 2015, the entire German and Chilean coast will be explored in spring 2016 by around 2500 participating school students. The project "Searching for plastic garbage" is the first international Citizen Science project that is a cooperation between the ocean:lab of Kiel Science Factory and the "Cientificos de la Basura", a project of the department of marine biology at University Catolica del Norte in Coquimbo, Chile. The project is supported by the Cluster of Excellence "The Future Ocean", the Leibniz Institute for Science Education and Mathematics (IPN), the Ministry of School and Professional Education of Land Schleswig-Holstein and the University Catolica del Norte in Coquimbo, Chile

  10. Citizen CATE: Evaluating Outcomes of a Solar Eclipse Citizen Science Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penn, M. J.; Haden, C.

    2017-12-01

    On August 21, 2017, a total solar eclipse will be visible along a path of totality from Oregon to South Carolina. The Citizen Continental-America Telescopic Eclipse Experiment (CATE) will use scientists, students and volunteers to take images of the solar corona using 68 identical telescopes, software and instrument packages along the 2,500-mile path of totality. CATE partners include National Solar Observatory scientists, university faculty and students, high school students, and professional and amateur astronomers. NASA funded CATE educational components including training undergraduates and volunteers on solar imaging software and equipment. The National Science Foundation and corporations including DayStar, MathWorks, Celestron and ColorMaker funded equipment. Undergraduates participated in summer research experiences to build their capacity for gathering eclipse data, and subsequently trained volunteers across the U.S. Aligned to NASA education goals, CATE goals range from providing an authentic research experience for students and lifelong learners, to making state-of-the-art solar coronal observations, to increasing scientific literacy of the public. While project investigators are examining the wealth of scientific data that will come from CATE, evaluators are examining impacts on participants. Through mixed methods, evaluators are examining outcomes related to changes in volunteers' knowledge, skills and attitudes. Additionally, the study will examine how citizen science astronomy using CATE equipment will continue after the eclipse to sustain project impacts. Preliminary findings for undergraduates indicate that they are gaining knowledge and skills related to studying solar coronal phenomena, conducting rigorous scientific research, and interfacing with the public to conduct outreach. Preliminary findings for citizen scientists indicate a high level of engagement in the research, and that they are gaining new knowledge and skills related to solar

  11. Mobile and static sensors in a citizen-based observatory of water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brauchli, Tristan; Weijs, Steven V.; Lehning, Michael; Huwald, Hendrik

    2014-05-01

    Understanding and forecasting water resources and components of the water cycle require spatially and temporally resolved observations of numerous water-related variables. Such observations are often obtained from wireless networks of automated weather stations. The "WeSenseIt" project develops a citizen- and community-based observatory of water to improve the water and risk management at the catchment scale and to support decision-making of stakeholders. It is implemented in three case studies addressing various questions related to flood, drought, water resource management, water quality and pollution. Citizens become potential observers and may transmit water-related measurements and information. Combining the use of recent technologies (wireless communication, internet, smartphone) with the development of innovative low cost sensors enables the implementation of heterogeneous observatories, which (a) empower citizens and (b) expand and complement traditional operational sensing networks. With the goal of increasing spatial coverage of observations and decreasing cost for sensors, this study presents the examples of measuring (a) flow velocity in streams using smartphones and (b) sensible heat flux using simple sensors at the nodes of wireless sensor networks.

  12. Continuity vs. the Crowd-Tradeoffs Between Continuous and Intermittent Citizen Hydrology Streamflow Observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davids, Jeffrey C; van de Giesen, Nick; Rutten, Martine

    2017-07-01

    Hydrologic data has traditionally been collected with permanent installations of sophisticated and accurate but expensive monitoring equipment at limited numbers of sites. Consequently, observation frequency and costs are high, but spatial coverage of the data is limited. Citizen Hydrology can possibly overcome these challenges by leveraging easily scaled mobile technology and local residents to collect hydrologic data at many sites. However, understanding of how decreased observational frequency impacts the accuracy of key streamflow statistics such as minimum flow, maximum flow, and runoff is limited. To evaluate this impact, we randomly selected 50 active United States Geological Survey streamflow gauges in California. We used 7 years of historical 15-min flow data from 2008 to 2014 to develop minimum flow, maximum flow, and runoff values for each gauge. To mimic lower frequency Citizen Hydrology observations, we developed a bootstrap randomized subsampling with replacement procedure. We calculated the same statistics, and their respective distributions, from 50 subsample iterations with four different subsampling frequencies ranging from daily to monthly. Minimum flows were estimated within 10% for half of the subsample iterations at 39 (daily) and 23 (monthly) of the 50 sites. However, maximum flows were estimated within 10% at only 7 (daily) and 0 (monthly) sites. Runoff volumes were estimated within 10% for half of the iterations at 44 (daily) and 12 (monthly) sites. Watershed flashiness most strongly impacted accuracy of minimum flow, maximum flow, and runoff estimates from subsampled data. Depending on the questions being asked, lower frequency Citizen Hydrology observations can provide useful hydrologic information.

  13. Open source hardware solutions for low-cost, do-it-yourself environmental monitoring, citizen science, and STEM education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, S. D.; Aufdenkampe, A. K.; Horsburgh, J. S.; Arscott, D. B.; Muenz, T.; Bressler, D. W.

    2016-12-01

    The explosion in DIY open-source hardware and software has resulted in the development of affordable and accessible technologies, like drones and weather stations, that can greatly assist the general public in monitoring environmental health and its degradation. It is widely recognized that education and support of audiences in pursuit of STEM literacy and the application of emerging technologies is a challenge for the future of citizen science and for preparing high school graduates to be actively engaged in environmental stewardship. It is also clear that detecting environmental change/degradation over time and space will be greatly enhanced with expanded use of networked, remote monitoring technologies by watershed organizations and citizen scientists if data collection and reporting are properly carried out and curated. However, there are few focused efforts to link citizen scientists and school programs with these emerging tools. We have started a multi-year program to develop hardware and teaching materials for training students and citizen scientists about the use of open source hardware in environmental monitoring. Scientists and educators around the world have started building their own dataloggers and devices using a variety of boards based on open source electronics. This new hardware is now providing researchers with an inexpensive alternative to commercial data logging and transmission hardware. We will present a variety of hardware solutions using the Arduino-compatible EnviroDIY Mayfly board (http://envirodiy.org/mayfly) that can be used to build and deploy a rugged environmental monitoring station using a wide variety of sensors and options, giving the users a fully customizable device for making measurements almost anywhere. A database and visualization system is being developed that will allow the users to view and manage the data their devices are collecting. We will also present our plan for developing curricula and leading workshops to various

  14. Impact of ICTs on Local Democracy : Transparency and Citizen ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Impact of ICTs on Local Democracy : Transparency and Citizen Participation in the ... is characterized by great socioeconomic diversity and strong social networks ... of the population has access to computers, 25.9% of which use the Internet.

  15. Federal Community of Practice for Crowdsourcing and Citizen Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    The community of practice includes agencies from across the federal government who convene to discuss ideas, activities, barriers, and ethics related to citizen science and crowdsourcing including scientific research, data management, and open innovation.

  16. Citizen science projects for non-science astronomy students

    OpenAIRE

    Barmby, Pauline; Gallagher, S. C.; Cami, J.

    2014-01-01

    A poster from the 2011 Western Conference on Science Education, describing the use of citizen science project Galaxy Zoo in a non-majors astronomy course. Lots more on this topic at https://www.zooniverse.org/education  

  17. Different Children, Equal Citizens and a Diverse Team of Teachers ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Different Children, Equal Citizens and a Diverse Team of Teachers: A Safe Space for ... articulated in order to stimulate the development of an authentic worldview of pupils ... The collaboration with Cornelia Roux made me aware of the huge ...

  18. Research uncovers what citizens' think about the security sector in ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2015-07-27

    Jul 27, 2015 ... Here, direct experience with security services leads to more negative opinions, and perceptions of personal and family safety play a critical role in citizens' ... sector and the justice system as perceived by the general public.

  19. Enhancing citizen engagement in cancer screening through deliberative democracy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rychetnik, Lucie; Carter, Stacy M; Abelson, Julia; Thornton, Hazel; Barratt, Alexandra; Entwistle, Vikki A; Mackenzie, Geraldine; Salkeld, Glenn; Glasziou, Paul

    2013-03-20

    Cancer screening is widely practiced and participation is promoted by various social, technical, and commercial drivers, but there are growing concerns about the emerging harms, risks, and costs of cancer screening. Deliberative democracy methods engage citizens in dialogue on substantial and complex problems: especially when evidence and values are important and people need time to understand and consider the relevant issues. Information derived from such deliberations can provide important guidance to cancer screening policies: citizens' values are made explicit, revealing what really matters to people and why. Policy makers can see what informed, rather than uninformed, citizens would decide on the provision of services and information on cancer screening. Caveats can be elicited to guide changes to existing policies and practices. Policies that take account of citizens' opinions through a deliberative democracy process can be considered more legitimate, justifiable, and feasible than those that don't.

  20. Rethinking Political Legitimacy: Citizen Inclusion and Social Digital ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    documenting the practices that users of social media develop to influence the public sphere; ... political parties, and mass communication media) perceive and respond to citizen-based actions generated by social media. ... Related content ...

  1. Democratizing Process Innovation? On Citizen Involvement in Public Sector BPM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niehaves, Björn; Malsch, Robert

    ‘Open Innovation’ has been heavily discussed for product innovations; however, an information systems (IS) perspective on ‘process innovation’ has not yet been taken. Analyzing the example of the public sector in Germany, the paper seeks to investigate the factors that hinder and support ‘open process innovation’, a concept we define as the involvement of citizens in business process management (BPM) activities. With the help of a quantitative study (n=358), six factors are examined for their impact on citizen involvement in local government BPM initiatives. The results show that citizen involvement in reform processes is not primarily motivated by the aim of cost reduction, but rather related to legitimacy reasons and the intent to increase employee motivation. Based on these findings, implications for (design) theory and practice are discussed: Instead of detailed collaborative business processes modeling, the key of citizen involvement in public sector BPM lies in communication and mutual understanding.

  2. Can a Diary Encourage Others to be Citizen Scientists?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerry H. Kavouras

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Review of: Diary of a Citizen Scientist Chasing Tiger Beetles and Other New Ways of Engaging the World; Sharman Apt Russell; (2014. Oregon State University Press, Corvallis, OR. 222 pages.

  3. Student Attitudes Towards and Impressions of Project Citizen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Winstead FRY

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Project Citizen is a civic education curriculum used across the United States and internationally, yet research about its impact on students is lacking in the literature. This article reports the results of a preliminary study designed to answer the following questions: What are students’ attitudes toward and perceptions of Project Citizen? How do their attitudes and perceptions compare to those of students who completed senior projects? Tenhigh school students and 23 first-year college students completed a questionnaire designed for this study. Our findings indicate that the high school students had positive perceptions of Project Citizen, and they self-reported anunderstanding and high levels of efficacy regarding civic responsibility. In contrast, the first-year college students had lower levels of efficacy regarding civic responsibility. Our findings suggest the importance of specific learning experiences to help students develop civic knowledge, skills, and dispositions, and indicate the need for further research into civic programs such as Project Citizen

  4. Urban Violence Reduction and Citizen Security in Brazil, Colombia ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Urban Violence Reduction and Citizen Security in Brazil, Colombia, Mexico, and ... The work will be conducted in Brazil, Colombia, Mexico, and South Africa, which are ... Minister Bibeau announces appointments of IDRC's President and new ...

  5. Citizen science on a smartphone: Participants' motivations and learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Land-Zandstra, Anne M; Devilee, Jeroen L A; Snik, Frans; Buurmeijer, Franka; van den Broek, Jos M

    2016-01-01

    Citizen science provides researchers means to gather or analyse large datasets. At the same time, citizen science projects offer an opportunity for non-scientists to be part of and learn from the scientific process. In the Dutch iSPEX project, a large number of citizens turned their smartphones into actual measurement devices to measure aerosols. This study examined participants' motivation and perceived learning impacts of this unique project. Most respondents joined iSPEX because they wanted to contribute to the scientific goals of the project or because they were interested in the project topics (health and environmental impact of aerosols). In terms of learning impact, respondents reported a gain in knowledge about citizen science and the topics of the project. However, many respondents had an incomplete understanding of the science behind the project, possibly caused by the complexity of the measurements. © The Author(s) 2015.

  6. The political constitution of the EU citizen rights regime

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Tore Vincents

    2011-01-01

    Reactions to decisions by the European Court of Justice (ECJ) demonstrate that the political institutions in the Union should take responsibility for the development of the structure of the European Union's (EU) citizen rights regime. This article analyses different political views on the EU...... communities and institutions to the good life of citizens, both individually and collectively. Taking the contestation between the different views seriously, the article argues in favour of political constitutionalism, according to which the development of the EU citizen rights regime is the responsibility...... citizen rights regime. It argues that the disagreement between them is largely a disagreement between ‘reasonable views’. The disagreement is mainly based on different views about the levels (European, national) at which individuals are to be seen as equals and about the contribution of different...

  7. Grass-root Mobilisation and Citizen Participation: Issues and Challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasoo, S.

    1991-01-01

    Mobilization of citizen participation in grassroots organizations can be adversely affected when grassroots leaders perceive a lack of support. Periodic organizational diagnosis can lead to more equitable division of responsibilities and recruitment of more leaders and skilled participants. (SK)

  8. Mobilizing Senior Citizens in Co-design Work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malmborg, Lone; Werner, Katharina; Gronvall, Erik

    2015-01-01

    This paper addresses methodological considerations of participation in design for ageing. Based on the notions of design culture, communities of everyday practice and situated elderliness we present accounts from two settings and discuss methodological issues related to mobilizing senior citizens...

  9. Quiet living. Challenges of citizen participation in digitized society

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stald, Gitte Bang

    Quiet living. Challenges of citizen participation in digitized society The aim of this paper is to present and address challenges that citizens may encounter in the intersecting questions of democracy, digitization, and participation. Empirically, the paper draws on findings from an extensive study......, and perceptions of citizenship. From 2011 and forwards a new digitization strategy for public systems has been implemented in Denmark. According to the strategy, all interactions between the system and the citizen in its multiple contexts are now by default digital and online. The logic is that Denmark is among...... media and media content from their private sphere as well as from their work or education. Denmark can therefore be characterized as a digital society. The following quotes from the media literacy study illustrate two different situations and experiences with digitization of citizen life: “Before .. You...

  10. European citizen and consumer attitudes and preferences regarding beef and pork.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verbeke, Wim; Pérez-Cueto, Federico J A; Barcellos, Marcia D de; Krystallis, Athanasios; Grunert, Klaus G

    2010-02-01

    This paper presents the combined mid-term findings of the consumer research components of two EU Sixth Framework Programme integrated projects concerning meat, ProSafeBeef and Q-PorkChains. The consumer pillar of ProSafeBeef carried out eight focus group discussions in May 2008, in France, Germany, Spain and the UK. Q-PorkChains conducted a large-scale, web-based, consumer survey in January 2008 in Belgium, Denmark, Germany, Greece and Poland. The first project provides a set of qualitative data from a small cohort of focus groups and the second a set of quantitative data from a larger consumer sample. This paper draws together the main findings of both projects and provides a comprehensive overview of European citizens' and consumers' attitudes towards and preferences regarding beef and pork. In general, consumers consider meat to be a healthy and important component of the diet. Consumers support the development of technologies that can improve the health attributes of meat products and guarantee eating quality, but they have a negative view of what they see to be excessive manipulation and lack of naturalness in the production and processing of beef products. In the Q-PorkChains study consumer and citizen segments are identified and profiled. Consumer segments were built upon the frequency and variety of pork consumption. The citizen segments were built upon their attitudes towards pig production systems. Overall, the relationship between individuals' views as citizens and their behaviour as consumers was found to be quite weak and did not appear to greatly or systematically influence meat-buying habits. Future studies in both projects will concentrate on consumers' acceptance of innovative meat product concepts and products, with the aim of boosting consumer trust and invigorating the European beef and pork industries.

  11. Can Low Frequency Measurements Be Good Enough? - A Statistical Assessment of Citizen Hydrology Streamflow Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davids, J. C.; Rutten, M.; Van De Giesen, N.

    2016-12-01

    Hydrologic data has traditionally been collected with permanent installations of sophisticated and relatively accurate but expensive monitoring equipment at limited numbers of sites. Consequently, the spatial coverage of the data is limited and costs are high. Achieving adequate maintenance of sophisticated monitoring equipment often exceeds local technical and resource capacity, and permanently deployed monitoring equipment is susceptible to vandalism, theft, and other hazards. Rather than using expensive, vulnerable installations at a few points, SmartPhones4Water (S4W), a form of Citizen Hydrology, leverages widely available mobile technology to gather hydrologic data at many sites in a manner that is repeatable and scalable. However, there is currently a limited understanding of the impact of decreased observational frequency on the accuracy of key streamflow statistics like minimum flow, maximum flow, and runoff. As a first step towards evaluating the tradeoffs between traditional continuous monitoring approaches and emerging Citizen Hydrology methods, we randomly selected 50 active U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) streamflow gauges in California. We used historical 15 minute flow data from 01/01/2008 through 12/31/2014 to develop minimum flow, maximum flow, and runoff values (7 year total) for each gauge. In order to mimic lower frequency Citizen Hydrology observations, we developed a bootstrap randomized subsampling with replacement procedure. We calculated the same statistics, along with their respective distributions, from 50 subsample iterations with four different subsampling intervals (i.e. daily, three day, weekly, and monthly). Based on our results we conclude that, depending on the types of questions being asked, and the watershed characteristics, Citizen Hydrology streamflow measurements can provide useful and accurate information. Depending on watershed characteristics, minimum flows were reasonably estimated with subsample intervals ranging from

  12. Citizen expectations of 'academic entrepreneurship' in health research: public science, practical benefit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Fiona A; Painter-Main, Michael; Axler, Renata; Lehoux, Pascale; Giacomini, Mita; Slater, Barbara

    2015-12-01

    Responsiveness to citizens as users of technological innovation helps motivate translational research and commercial engagement among academics. Yet, retaining citizen trust and support for research encourages caution in pursuit of commercial science. We explore citizen expectations of the specifically academic nature of commercial science [i.e. academic entrepreneurship (AE)] and the influence of conflict of interest concerns, hopes about practical benefits and general beliefs. We conducted a cross-sectional national opinion survey of 1002 Canadians online in 2010. Approval of AE was moderate (mean 3.2/5, SD 0.84), but varied by entrepreneurial activity. Concern about conflict of interests (COI) was moderate (mean 2.9/5, SD 0.86) and varied by type of concern. An ordinary least-squares regression showed that expectations of practical benefits informed support for AE, specifically that academic-industry collaboration can better address real-world problems; conflict of interest concerns were insignificant. These findings suggest that citizens support AE for its potential to produce practical benefits, but enthusiasm varies and is reduced for activities that may prioritize private over public interests. Further, support exists despite concern about COI, perhaps due to trust in the academic research context. For user engagement in research priority setting, these findings suggest the need to attend to the commercial nature of translational science. For research policy, they suggest the need for governance arrangements for responsible innovation, which can sustain public trust in academic research, and realize the practical benefits that inform public support for AE. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Oxidation and combustion of fuel-rich N-butane-oxygen mixture in a standard 20-liter explosion vessel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frolov, S.M.; Basevich, V.Y.; Smetanyuk, V.A.; Belyaev, A.A.; Pasman, H.J.

    2006-01-01

    Experiments on forced ignition of extremely fuel-rich n-butane-oxygen mixture with the equivalence ratio of 23 in the standard 20-liter spherical vessel at elevated initial pressure (4.1 bar) and temperature (500 K) reveal the nonmonotonic influence of the forced ignition delay time on the maximum

  14. Breves considerações acerca da poesia, da filosofia e da crítica literária

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Affonso Henrique Vieira da Costa

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available O trabalho se constitui diante de uma indagação: É possível falar sobre a arte? Ele tem por objetivo tecer considerações em torno da relação existente entre poesia, filosofia e crítica literária.

  15. Effects of Working Memory Capacity and Content Familiarity on Literal and Inferential Comprehension in L2 Reading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alptekin, Cem; Ercetin, Gulcan

    2011-01-01

    This study examines the effects of working memory capacity and content familiarity on literal and inferential comprehension in second language (L2) reading. Participants were 62 Turkish university students with an advanced English proficiency level. Working memory capacity was measured through a computerized version of a reading span test, whereas…

  16. What Does "Literate in English" Mean?: Divergent Literacy Practices for Vernacular- vs. English-Medium Students in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramanathan, Vai

    2002-01-01

    Offers a close analysis of how English is presented and taught in state-mandated vernacular- and English-medium textbooks used in Grades K-12 in Gujarat, India. Argues that the divergent English instruction as presented in the textbooks contribute to producing two different cultural models regarding being "literate in English."…

  17. Chip-Oriented Fluorimeter Design and Detection System Development for DNA Quantification in Nano-Liter Volumes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Da-Sheng Lee

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The chip-based polymerase chain reaction (PCR system has been developed in recent years to achieve DNA quantification. Using a microstructure and miniature chip, the volume consumption for a PCR can be reduced to a nano-liter. With high speed cycling and a low reaction volume, the time consumption of one PCR cycle performed on a chip can be reduced. However, most of the presented prototypes employ commercial fluorimeters which are not optimized for fluorescence detection of such a small quantity sample. This limits the performance of DNA quantification, especially low experiment reproducibility. This study discusses the concept of a chip-oriented fluorimeter design. Using the analytical model, the current study analyzes the sensitivity and dynamic range of the fluorimeter to fit the requirements for detecting fluorescence in nano-liter volumes. Through the optimized processes, a real-time PCR on a chip system with only one nano-liter volume test sample is as sensitive as the commercial real-time PCR machine using the sample with twenty micro-liter volumes. The signal to noise (S/N ratio of a chip system for DNA quantification with hepatitis B virus (HBV plasmid samples is 3 dB higher. DNA quantification by the miniature chip shows higher reproducibility compared to the commercial machine with respect to samples of initial concentrations from 103 to 105 copies per reaction.

  18. Childish Pleasures and Adult Fears: Reflections on becoming Literate in the Twentieth and Twenty-First Centuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Cath

    2010-01-01

    With the Skills for Life strategy came new professional qualifications for teachers of literacy to adults. Having learned to be literate themselves in the mid-to-late twentieth century, how ready are these teachers to take on the challenges of preparing their learners for the literacies of the new millennium? This paper comes out of doctoral…

  19. (Un)taming Citizen Science – Policies, Practices, People

    OpenAIRE

    Van Oudheusden, Michiel; Van Hoyweghen, Ine

    2017-01-01

    We are presently witnessing a global explosion of citizen science initiatives covering a wide range of topics, from counting hummingbirds to actively researching new medical treatments, to the use of smartphones to measuring radioactivity in the environment. European policymakers and societal stakeholders hail citizen science as a means of (re)building trust in science, which may in turn lead to “more democratic research based on evidence and informed decision-making” and more responsible inn...

  20. Righting Wrongs: Citizen Journalism and Miscarriages of Justice

    OpenAIRE

    Greer, C.; McLaughlin, E.

    2014-01-01

    This chapter demonstrates the agenda-setting power of citizen journalism in a context of miscarriages of justice. Our empirical analysis focuses on the interaction of media, political and judicial forces following the death of newspaper vendor, Ian Tomlinson, shortly after being struck by a police officer at the G20 Protests in London 2009. We examine the rise of citizen journalism as a key challenge to those institutions that traditionally have been able to control the information environmen...

  1. Public services between the citizen need and administration potential

    OpenAIRE

    Grigorescu, Adriana

    2010-01-01

    This paper aims at the balance between the citizen and the public authorities with public services as an interface. Public services place themselves at the crossroads of many elements such as: needs of the citizen, social need, public will, public resources, private availability, and civic sense. Without claiming to have identified all factors that converge to defining / structuring the SP / GIS, the paper tried to highlight some of the most important. The social need is covered at the macro ...

  2. Valuing future citizens' values regarding risk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fleming, Patricia [Creighton Univ., Omaha (United States). College of Arts and Sciences/Philosophy

    2006-09-15

    Valuing present citizen's values regarding the risks they face is an important aspect of risk assessment and risk acceptability. Conferences like VALDOR are held for this reason. Governments like Sweden have national referendums on various risk-prone enterprises. The results of these referendums can determine the future of these programs. In the United States, when guidelines are set for determining acceptable levels of risk, the relevant federal agencies are often required to provide a comment period regarding proposed guidelines in order to ascertain the judgments, including the weights place on certain values, of individual members of society as well as stakeholder groups. After the comment period ends, the agency decides on the acceptable level of risk, taking into account the comments from present citizens. Do we also have a duty to value the not-yet-existing values of future citizens, especially if the risks created by the activities of present citizens extend into the future to citizens not yet living? If so, are there any circumstances which entitle us to de-value those not-yet-existing values. In this paper, I ground my discussion of the question of valuing future citizens' values in one of the areas of focus of the VALDOR conference: nuclear waste management and specifically the question facing the United States' program regarding an acceptable dose standard associated with the release of radioactivity into the biosphere from an underground repository. The underlying conference theme to which this discussion may be attached is community environmental justice as it applies to future citizens. I focus on the role that uncertainty plays is providing justice between present and future citizens.

  3. A health literate approach to the prevention of childhood overweight and obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Richard O; Thompson, Jessica R; Rothman, Russell L; McDougald Scott, Amanda M; Heerman, William J; Sommer, Evan C; Barkin, Shari L

    2013-12-01

    To describe a systematic assessment of patient educational materials for the Growing Right Onto Wellness (GROW) trial, a childhood obesity prevention study targeting a low health literate population. Process included: (1) expert review of educational content, (2) assessment of the quality of materials including use of the Suitability Assessment of Materials (SAM) tool, and (3) material review and revision with target population. 12 core modules were developed and assessed in an iterative process. Average readability was at the 6th grade reading level (SMOG Index 5.63 ± 0.76, and Fry graph 6.0 ± 0.85). SAM evaluation resulted in adjustments to literacy demand, layout & typography, and learning stimulation & motivation. Cognitive interviews with target population revealed additional changes incorporated to enhance participant's perception of acceptability and feasibility for behavior change. The GROW modules are a collection of evidence-based materials appropriate for parents with low health literacy and their preschool aged children, that target the prevention of childhood overweight/obesity. Most trials addressing the treatment or prevention of childhood obesity use written materials. Due to the ubiquitous prevalence of limited health literacy, our described methods may assist researchers in ensuring their content is both understood and actionable. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Preliminary three-dimensional potential flow simulation of a five-liter flask air injection experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, J.E.

    1977-01-01

    The preliminary results of an unsteady three-dimensional potential flow analysis of a five-liter flask air injection experiment (small-scale model simulation of a nuclear reactor steam condensation system) are presented. The location and velocity of the free water surface in the flask as a function of time are determined during pipe venting and bubble expansion processes. The analyses were performed using an extended version of the NASA-Ames Three-Dimensional Potential Flow Analysis System (POTFAN), which uses the vortex lattice singularity method of potential flow analysis. The pressure boundary condition at the free water surface and the boundary condition along the free jet boundary near the pipe exit were ignored for the purposes of the present study. The results of the analysis indicate that large time steps can be taken without significantly reducing the accuracy of the solutions and that the assumption of inviscid flow should not have an appreciable effect on the geometry and velocity of the free water surface. In addition, the computation time required for the solutions was well within acceptable limits

  5. O literal e a surpresa: os "estágios preliminares do chiste"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Beatriz Freire

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Vai-se discorrer sobre a função que as intervenções humorísticas podem desempenhar no tratamento de psicóticos, ao apaziguar a incidência do pulsional e suscitar a tomada de palavra por aqueles cuja existência não é balizada pelo falo. Para tanto, partiu-se da referência ao "chiste", efeito humorístico freudiano por excelência. A hipótese que aqui se desenha é a de que as vicissitudes econômicas relacionadas ao chiste, mesmo em seus estágios preliminares, podem esclarecer se e como tais intervenções podem ser efetivas num tratamento possível da psicose.The literal and the surprise: the preliminary stages of the wit. The target of this text is to explain in which way some humoristic interventions could help in the treatment of psychotic patients, pacifying the incidence of the "pulsional" and making the person, whose existence is not limited by the phallus, to start using speech. With this aim, our starting point was the mentioning of a "wit", or joke, the humoristic effect, which is Freudian by excellence. The hypothesis that we foresee is that the economic mishaps related to the wit, even on their preliminary stages, could clarify if and how such interventions could be effective in a possible treatment of psychosis.

  6. Leitura cultural na reportagem literária de Nicolau (1987-1996

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scheyla Joanne Horst

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available O jornal cultural Nicolau circulou no Brasil entre 1987 e 1996, como um projeto viabilizado pela Secretaria de Estado da Cultura do Paraná. Interessa-nos aqui o gênero textual reportagem inserido no meio de comunicação em sua fase inicial. Como recorte neste estudo, analisamos cinco textos assinados pela jornalista Adélia Maria Lopes que pretendem, entre outros aspectos, revelar aos habitantes da capital paranaense, Curitiba, a cultura produzida nos subúrbios da cidade e também nos municípios longínquos. Nosso objetivo é discutir essas produções entendendo que o Jornalismo Literário promove uma união entre força comunicativa e qualidade estética em relatos de não ficção, o que promove uma leitura cultural mais eficiente. Para a análise documental utilizamos autores como Edvaldo Pereira Lima, Sergio Vilas Boas, Rogério Borges,Marcelo Bulhões e Cremilda Medina.

  7. Becoming a health literate organization: Formative research results from healthcare organizations providing care for undeserved communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adsul, Prajakta; Wray, Ricardo; Gautam, Kanak; Jupka, Keri; Weaver, Nancy; Wilson, Kristin

    2017-11-01

    Background Integrating health literacy into primary care institutional policy and practice is critical to effective, patient centered health care. While attributes of health literate organizations have been proposed, approaches for strengthening them in healthcare systems with limited resources have not been fully detailed. Methods We conducted key informant interviews with individuals from 11 low resourced health care organizations serving uninsured, underinsured, and government-insured patients across Missouri. The qualitative inquiry explored concepts of impetus to transform, leadership commitment, engaging staff, alignment to organization wide goals, and integration of health literacy with current practices. Findings Several health care organizations reported carrying out health literacy related activities including implementing patient portals, selecting easy to read patient materials, offering community education and outreach programs, and improving discharge and medication distribution processes. The need for change presented itself through data or anecdotal staff experience. For any change to be undertaken, administrators and medical directors had to be supportive; most often a champion facilitated these changes in the organization. Staff and providers were often resistant to change and worried they would be saddled with additional work. Lack of time and funding were the most common barriers reported for integration and sustainability. To overcome these barriers, managers supported changes by working one on one with staff, seeking external funding, utilizing existing resources, planning for stepwise implementation, including members from all staff levels and clear communication. Conclusion Even though barriers exist, resource scarce clinical settings can successfully plan, implement, and sustain organizational changes to support health literacy.

  8. Hibridismos Narrativos: recursos literários na grande reportagem contemporânea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renato Essenfelder

    Full Text Available Resumo O artigo mapeia e identifica a existência de recursos expressivos típicos da literatura em uma grande reportagem jornalística veiculada por um veículo nativo digital – no caso, o site Brio, especializado em jornalismo de longo formato. O método utilizado, de Análise Pragmática da Narrativa Jornalística, permitiu identificar as estratégias de subjetivação do texto, pelas quais o repórter alcança efeitos poéticos e induz seus leitores a diversos tipos e graus de comoção. O trabalho analisa reportagem sobre a tragédia ambiental ocorrida em Mariana (MG em 2016 e aponta os recursos poéticos em uso para concluir que linguagem, estrutura de texto e personagens são o tripé sobre o qual se constitui o jornalismo literário praticado pelo Brio. Este trabalho é resultado de projeto conduzido no âmbito do Grupo de Pesquisa Produção de Conteúdo, do Mestrado Profissional em Produção Jornalística e Mercado da ESPM-SP.

  9. Analysis of krypton-85 and krypton-81 in a few liters of air.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Le-Yi; Yang, Guo-Min; Cheng, Cun-Feng; Liu, Gu-Liang; Zhang, Xiang-Yang; Hu, Shui-Ming

    2014-04-15

    Long-lived radioactive krypton isotopes, (81)Kr (t1/2 = 229,000 year) and (85)Kr (t1/2 = 10.76 year), are ideal tracers. (81)Kr is cosmogenic and can be used for dating groundwater beyond the (14)C age. (85)Kr is a fission product and can be applied in atmospheric studies, nuclear safety inspections, and dating young groundwater. It has long been a challenge to analyze radio-krypton in small samples, in which the total number of such isotopes can be as low as 1 × 10(5). This work presents a system developed to analyze (81)Kr and (85)Kr from a few liters of air samples. A separation system based on cryogenic distillation and gas chromatographic separation is used to extract krypton gas with an efficiency of over 90% from air samples of 1-50 L. (85)Kr/Kr and (81)Kr/Kr ratios in krypton gases are determined from single-atom counting using a laser-based atom trap. In order to test the performance of the system, we have analyzed various samples collected from ambient air and extracted from groundwater, with a minimum size of 1 L. The system can be applied to analyze (81)Kr and (85)Kr in environmental samples including air, groundwater, and ices.

  10. A leitura e a escrita do literário em meio eletrônico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adair de Aguiar Neitzel

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available El artículo presenta los resultados de unade las etapas de la investigación titulada: Autores, obras e acervos literários catarinenses em meio digital, en colaboración con veintidós docentes del sistema educativo de Santa Catarina, Joinville (Brasil. El objetivo del proyecto fue indagar sobre los posibles usos en la clase de textospublicados en medios electrónicos, para ampliar las prácticas de lectura. La metodología seguida fue un curso dado a los docentes de Lengua y Literatura portuguesa de escuelas estatales de Joinville, estructurado en torno a la exploración de la biblioteca digital Nupill y el cd producido por el mismo grupo: “Relógio de Ouro –Machado de Assis”. En este artículo proponemos examinar algunas de las posibilidades pedagógicas de estos materiales y discutir algunas de las estrategias de enseñanza empleadas por los docentes con sus estudiantes de escuela media, las que fueron estructuradas en tres ejes: lectura, investigación y producción.

  11. Uso de textos literários no ensino de língua italiana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amarilis Gallo Coelho

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Resumo: O emprego de textos literários no ensino de língua e cultura italiana a estrangeiros comprova sua eficiência na medida em que favorece a aproximação entre alunos e contextos sociolingüísticos narrados. A aplicabilidade deste corpus tão variado é ainda definida pela necessidade de romper, durante o ensino do idioma, as barreiras que dificultam a compreensão do repertório lingüístico italiano, principalmente no tocante às peculiaridades espaço-temporais tais como dialetos e regionalismos.Palavras-chave: Língua italiana; lingüística aplicada; ensino e aprendizagem de língua estrangeira; literatura.Abstract: L’importanza dei testi letterari utilizzati come metodo didattico nell’insegnamento della lingua italiana viene afermata dall’avvicinamento riuscito tra gli studenti ed i contesti sociolinguistici diversi. Oltre a questo, l’analisi di un corpus così vario, rende possibile una maggior facilità nella comprensione dei fatti linguistici peculiari, come i dialetti ed i regionalismi.Parole chiave: Lingua italiana; linguistica applicata; insegnamento ed apprendimento delle lingue straniere; letteratura.Keywords: Italian; applied linguistics; foreign language teanching and learning; literature.

  12. Standards for Technological Literacy: Past, Present, and Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugger, William E., Jr; Moye, Johnny J.

    2018-01-01

    "Standards for Technological Literacy: Content for the Study of Technology (STL)" provides the content for what every technologically literate student should know and be able to do. It "defines what the study of technology in Grades K-12 should be, but it does not lay out a curriculum" (ITEA/ITEEA, 2000/2002/2007, p. 200).…

  13. Creating an Intentional Web Presence: Strategies for Every Educational Technology Professional

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowenthal, Patrick R.; Dunlap, Joanna C.; Stitson, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    Educators are pushing for students, specifically graduates, to be digitally literate in order to successfully read, write, contribute, and ultimately compete in the global market place. Educational technology professionals, as a unique type of learning professional, need to be not only digitally literate--leading and assisting teachers and…

  14. Citizen Science in the Classroom: Perils and Promise of the New Web

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loughran, T.; Dirksen, R.

    2010-12-01

    Classroom citizen science projects invite students to generate, curate, post, query, and analyze data, publishing and discussing results in potentially large collaborative contexts. The new web offers a rich palette of such projects for any STEM educator to select from or create. This easy access to citizen science in the classroom is full of both promise and peril for science education. By offering examples of classroom citizen science projects in particle physics, earth and environmental sciences, each supported by a common mashup of technologies available to ordinary users, we will illustrate something of the promise of these projects for science education, and point to some of the challenges and failure modes--the peril--raised by easy access and particularly easy publication of data. How one sensibly responds to this promise and peril depends on how one views the goals of science (or more broadly, STEM) education: either as the equipping of individual students with STEM knowledge and skills so as to empower them for future options, or as the issuing of effective invitations into STEM communities. Building on the claim that these are complementary perspectives, both of value, we will provide an example of a classroom citizen science project analyzed from both perspectives. The BOSCO classroom-to-classroom water source mapping project provides students both in Northern Uganda and in South Dakota a collaborative platform for analyzing and responding to local water quality concerns. Students gather water quality data, use Google Forms embedded in a project wiki to enter data in a spreadsheet, which then automatically (through Mapalist, a free web service) gets posted to a Google Map, itself embedded in the project wiki. Using these technologies, data is thus collected and posted for analysis in a collaborative environment: the stage is set for classroom citizen science. In the context of this project we will address the question of how teachers can take advantage

  15. Beyond empowerment: building a company of citizens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manville, Brook; Ober, Josiah

    2003-01-01

    We live in a knowledge economy. The core assets of the modern business enterprise aren't its buildings, machinery, and real estate, but the intelligence, understanding, skills, and experience of its employees. Harnessing the capabilities and commitment of knowledge workers is arguably the central managerial challenge of our time. Unfortunately, it is a challenge that has not yet been met. Corporate ownership structures, governance systems, and incentive programs--despite the enlightened rhetoric of business leaders--remain firmly planted in the industrial age. In this article, the authors draw on history to lay out a model for a democratic business organization suited to the knowledge economy. Some 2,500 years ago, the city-state of ancient Athens rose to unprecedented political and economic power by giving its citizens a direct voice and an active role in civic governance. The city's uniquely participative system of democracy helped unleash the creativity of the Athenian people and channel it to produce the greatest good for society. The system succeeded in bringing individual initiative and common cause into harmony. And that is precisely the synthesis today's companies need to achieve if they're to realize the full power of their people and thrive in the knowledge economy. The Athenian model of organizational democracy is just that--a model. It does not provide a simple set of prescriptions for modern managers. What it offers is a window into how sizable groups of people can, in an atmosphere of dignity and trust, successfully govern themselves without resorting to a stifling bureaucracy.

  16. Citizen Sky, IYA 2009 and What's To Come

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Rebecca; Price, A.; Henden, A.

    2010-01-01

    Citizen Sky is a multi-year, NSF funded citizen science project involving the bright and mysterious variable star eps Aur. The project was conceived by the IYA 2009 working group on Research Experiences for Students, Teachers, and Citizen-Scientists. Citizen Sky is going beyond simple observing to include a major data analysis component. The goal is to introduce the participant to the full scientific process from background research to paper writing for a peer-reviewed journal. During IYA 2009 the Citizen Sky team was fully assembled, the website was developed and put online, and the first of two participant workshops was held. However, Citizen Sky does not stop or even slow down with the conclusion of IYA 2009. The project will continue to grow in the coming years. New participants are being recruited and trained as the observing phase of the project continues, a second participant workshop is planned for 2010, and the data analysis phase of the project will begin in earnest.

  17. Can citizen science enhance public understanding of science?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonney, Rick; Phillips, Tina B; Ballard, Heidi L; Enck, Jody W

    2016-01-01

    Over the past 20 years, thousands of citizen science projects engaging millions of participants in collecting and/or processing data have sprung up around the world. Here we review documented outcomes from four categories of citizen science projects which are defined by the nature of the activities in which their participants engage - Data Collection, Data Processing, Curriculum-based, and Community Science. We find strong evidence that scientific outcomes of citizen science are well documented, particularly for Data Collection and Data Processing projects. We find limited but growing evidence that citizen science projects achieve participant gains in knowledge about science knowledge and process, increase public awareness of the diversity of scientific research, and provide deeper meaning to participants' hobbies. We also find some evidence that citizen science can contribute positively to social well-being by influencing the questions that are being addressed and by giving people a voice in local environmental decision making. While not all citizen science projects are intended to achieve a greater degree of public understanding of science, social change, or improved science -society relationships, those projects that do require effort and resources in four main categories: (1) project design, (2) outcomes measurement, (3) engagement of new audiences, and (4) new directions for research. © The Author(s) 2015.

  18. CosmoQuest: A Glance at Citizen Science Building

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Matthew; Grier, Jennifer; Gay, Pamela; Lehan, Cory; Buxner, Sanlyn; CosmoQuest Team

    2018-01-01

    CosmoQuest is a virtual research facility focused on engaging people - citizen scientists - from across the world in authentic research projects designed to enhance our knowledge of the cosmos around us. Using image data acquired by NASA missions, our citizen scientists are first trained to identify specific features within the data and then requested to identify those features across large datasets. Responses submitted by the citizen scientists are then stored in our database where they await for analysis and eventual publication by CosmoQuest staff and collaborating professional research scientists.While it is clear that the driving power behind our projects are the eyes and minds of our citizen scientists, it is CosmoQuest’s custom software, Citizen Science Builder (CSB), that enables citizen science to be accomplished. On the front end, CosmoQuest’s CSB software allows for the creation of web-interfaces that users can access to perform image annotation through both drawing tools and questions that can accompany images. These tools include: using geometric shapes to identify regions within an image, tracing image attributes using freeform line tools, and flagging features within images. Additionally, checkboxes, dropdowns, and free response boxes may be used to collect information. On the back end, this software is responsible for the proper storage of all data, which allows project staff to perform periodic data quality checks and track the progress of each project. In this poster we present these available tools and resources and seek potential collaborations.

  19. Benefits and challenges of incorporating citizen science into university education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Nicola; Triska, Maggie; Liberatore, Andrea; Ashcroft, Linden; Weatherill, Richard; Longnecker, Nancy

    2017-01-01

    A common feature of many citizen science projects is the collection of data by unpaid contributors with the expectation that the data will be used in research. Here we report a teaching strategy that combined citizen science with inquiry-based learning to offer first year university students an authentic research experience. A six-year partnership with the Australian phenology citizen science program ClimateWatch has enabled biology students from the University of Western Australia to contribute phenological data on plants and animals, and to conduct the first research on unvalidated species datasets contributed by public and university participants. Students wrote scientific articles on their findings, peer-reviewed each other's work and the best articles were published online in a student journal. Surveys of more than 1500 students showed that their environmental engagement increased significantly after participating in data collection and data analysis. However, only 31% of students agreed with the statement that "data collected by citizen scientists are reliable" at the end of the project, whereas the rate of agreement was initially 79%. This change in perception was likely due to students discovering erroneous records when they mapped data points and analysed submitted photographs. A positive consequence was that students subsequently reported being more careful to avoid errors in their own data collection, and making greater efforts to contribute records that were useful for future scientific research. Evaluation of our project has shown that by embedding a research process within citizen science participation, university students are given cause to improve their contributions to environmental datasets. If true for citizen scientists in general, enabling participants as well as scientists to analyse data could enhance data quality, and so address a key constraint of broad-scale citizen science programs.

  20. Gauging citizen support for a low carbon fuel standard

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rhodes, Ekaterina; Axsen, Jonn; Jaccard, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Since 2007, several variations of a low carbon fuel standard (LCFS) have been implemented around the world. While emerging research tends to focus on greenhouse gas emission reductions from an LCFS, no studies have assessed the policy's political acceptability—a critical component of implementation. We elicit public support for an existing LCFS in British Columbia and a hypothetical (proposed) LCFS for the rest of Canada using survey data collected from a representative sample of Canadian citizens (n=1306). Specifically, we assess: (1) citizen awareness of British Columbia's LCFS, (2) stated citizen support for the LCFS, and (3) how individual characteristics relate to levels of citizen support. We find that British Columbia's LCFS is almost unknown among British Columbia respondents, but once explained, 90% of respondents support it. We refer to this combination of low knowledge and high support as “passive support.” We find similarly broad support in all other Canadian provinces, implying that citizen opposition is unlikely in jurisdictions considering an LCFS. Statistical analysis identifies some individual characteristics associated with LCFS support, including attitudes, demographics, and contextual factors. Results indicate where policymakers might anticipate opposition if it arises due to increased policy stringency or media coverage. - Highlights: • Most citizens are unaware of British Columbia's low carbon fuel standard (LCFS). • We observe passive support: low awareness and high support of the policy. • An LCFS achieves broad support among British Columbia's and Canadian citizens. • Households relying on single occupancy vehicles are less likely to support an LCFS

  1. Improving Environmental Literacy through GO3 Citizen Science Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkening, B.

    2011-12-01

    In the Global Ozone (GO3) Project students measure ground-level ozone on a continuous basis and upload their results to a global network used by atmospheric scientists and schools. Students learn important concepts such as chemical measurement methods; instrumentation; calibration; data acquisition using computers; data quality; statistics; data analysis and graphing; posting of data to the web; the chemistry of air pollution; stratospheric ozone depletion and global climate change. Students collaborate with researchers and other students globally in the GO3 network. Wilson K-8 School is located in a suburban area in Pima County, Arizona. Throughout the year we receive high ozone alert days. Prior to joining the GO3 project, my students were unaware of air pollution alerts, risks and causes. In the past when Pima County issued alerts to the school, they were posted on signs around the school. No explanation was provided to the students and the signs were often left up for days. This discounted the potential health effects of the situation, resulting in the alerts effectively being ignored. The GO3 project is transforming both my students and our school community. Now my students are: Performing science research Utilizing technology and increasing their skills Collaborating in a responsible manner on the global GO3 social network Communicating their work to the community Issuing their own ozone alerts to their school Advocating for actions that will improve air quality My students participation in this citizen science project is creating a more cognizant and active community in regards to air pollution.

  2. Mobile Phones and Social Media Empower the Citizen Seismologist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bray, J.; Dashti, S.; Reilly, J.; Bayen, A. M.; Glaser, S. D.

    2014-12-01

    Emergency responders must "see" the effects of an earthquake clearly and rapidly for effective response. Mobile phone and information technology can be used to measure ground motion intensity parameters and relay that information to emergency responders. However, the phone sensor is an imperfect device and has a limited operational range. Thus, shake table tests were performed to evaluate their reliability as seismic monitoring instruments. Representative handheld devices, either rigidly connected to the table or free to move, measured shaking intensity parameters well. Bias in 5%-damped spectral accelerations measured by phones was less than 0.05 and 0.2 [log(g)] during one-dimensional (1-D) and three-dimensional (3-D) shaking in frequencies ranging from 1 Hz to 10 Hz. They did tend to over-estimate the Arias Intensity, but this error declined for stronger motions with larger signal-to-noise ratios. Additionally, much of the data about infrastructure performance and geotechnical effects of an earthquake are lost soon after an earthquake occurs as efforts move to the recovery phase. A better methodology for reliable and rapid collection of perishable hazards data will enhance scientific inquiry and accelerate the building of disaster-resilient cities. Post-earthquake reconnaissance efforts can be aided through the strategic collection and reuse of social media data and other remote sources of information. This is demonstrated through their use following the NSF-sponsored GEER response to the September 2013 flooding in Colorado. With these ubiquitous measurement devices in the hands of the citizen seismologist, a more accurate and rapid portrayal of the damage distribution during an earthquake may be provided to emergency responders and to the public.

  3. Franchise and Electoral Participation of Third Country Citizens Residing in the European Union and of European Union Citizens Residing in Third Countries

    OpenAIRE

    Arrighi, Jean-Thomas; Bauböck, Rainer; Collyer, Michael; Hutecheson, Derek; Moraru, Madalina; Khadar, Lamin; Shaw, Jo

    2013-01-01

    This Study analyses some key trans-border situations in which citizens may finddifficulties in exercising their electoral rights – both to vote in elections, and to stand as candidates. It focuses on the electoral rights of EU citizens when resident outside the state where they are citizens, and on the electoral rights of third country citizens resident in the EU Member States. It also covers several complementary issues by examining the consular representation of EU citizensoutside the terri...

  4. Addendum 1 to CSERs 94-007 and 94-008: Use of 2.2 liter boats in muffle furnace operations at PFP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hess, A.L.

    1996-01-01

    This criticality safety review justifies raising the container size limit in CPS-Z-165-80621 and CPS-165-80622 to 2.3 liters, thereby allowing the use of 2.2-liter furnace boats in the Pu stabilization activities covered by these specifications

  5. The role of citizen public-interest groups in the decision-making process of a science-intensive culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinclair, M.P.

    1991-01-01

    This study explores how concerns about the environment have escalated in the past three decades from being peripheral to that of a mainstream social movement. Most environmental concerns stem from the deployment of technologies where technical expertise is essential to effective participation in the decision-making process. The manner in which the current policy for the disposal of low-level radioactive waste was devised and passed by Congress provides the information base through which the role of citizen groups in the decision-making process in a science-intensive culture is explored, as they seek to overcome the adverse environmental impacts and economic inequities of this Act. The actual process by which citizens have confronted this current flawed policy is described, which includes how technical expertise from various sources made the citizens' case credible and effective. Several existing and theoretical models of citizen participation are described. Recommendations and conclusions are presented briefly, and a recommended model based on the concept of sustainable development is proposed

  6. Citizen Science to Support Community-based Flood Early Warning and Resilience Building

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, J. D.; Buytaert, W.; Allen, S.; Ballesteros-Cánovas, J. A.; Bhusal, J.; Cieslik, K.; Clark, J.; Dewulf, A.; Dhital, M. R.; Hannah, D. M.; Liu, W.; Nayaval, J. L.; Schiller, A.; Smith, P. J.; Stoffel, M.; Supper, R.

    2017-12-01

    In Disaster Risk Management, an emerging shift has been noted from broad-scale, top-down assessments towards more participatory, community-based, bottom-up approaches. Combined with technologies for robust and low-cost sensor networks, a citizen science approach has recently emerged as a promising direction in the provision of extensive, real-time information for flood early warning systems. Here we present the framework and initial results of a major new international project, Landslide EVO, aimed at increasing local resilience against hydrologically induced disasters in western Nepal by exploiting participatory approaches to knowledge generation and risk governance. We identify three major technological developments that strongly support our approach to flood early warning and resilience building in Nepal. First, distributed sensor networks, participatory monitoring, and citizen science hold great promise in complementing official monitoring networks and remote sensing by generating site-specific information with local buy-in, especially in data-scarce regions. Secondly, the emergence of open source, cloud-based risk analysis platforms supports the construction of a modular, distributed, and potentially decentralised data processing workflow. Finally, linking data analysis platforms to social computer networks and ICT (e.g. mobile phones, tablets) allows tailored interfaces and people-centred decision- and policy-support systems to be built. Our proposition is that maximum impact is created if end-users are involved not only in data collection, but also over the entire project life-cycle, including the analysis and provision of results. In this context, citizen science complements more traditional knowledge generation practices, and also enhances multi-directional information provision, risk management, early-warning systems and local resilience building.

  7. The V in VGI: Citizens or Civic Data Sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suthee Sangiambut

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Volunteered geographic information (VGI, delivered via mobile and web apps, offers new potentials for civic engagement. If framed in the context of open, transparent and accountable governance then presumably VGI should advance dialogue and consultation between citizen and government. If governments perceive citizens as consumers of services then arguably such democratic intent elide when municipalities use VGI. Our empirical research shows how assumptions embedded in VGI drive the interaction between citizens and government. We created a typology that operationalises VGI as a potential act of citizenship and an instance of consumption. We then selected civic apps from Canadian cities that appeared to invoke these VGI types. We conducted interviews with developers of the apps; they were from government, private sector, and civil society. Results from qualitative semi-structured interviews indicate a blurring of consumer and citizen-centric orientations among respondents, which depended on motivations for data use, engagement and communication objectives, and sector of the respondent. Citizen engagement, an analogue for citizenship, was interpreted multiple ways. Overall, we found that government and developers may increase choice by creating consumer-friendly apps but this does not ensure VGI offers an act of civic participation. The burden is placed on the contributor to make it so. Apps and VGI could potentially further a data-driven and neoliberal government. Planners should be mindful of the dominance of a consumer-centric view even as they assume VGI invariably improves democratic participation.

  8. Hobbesova literární technologie závaznosti rozumu

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Maršálek, Jan

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 39, č. 1 (2017), s. 7-29 ISSN 1210-0250 Institutional support: RVO:67985955 Keywords : Hobbes * Leviathan * Literary technology * Shapin * Schaffer * Skinner Subject RIV: AA - Philosophy ; Religion OBOR OECD: Philosophy, History and Philosophy of science and technology

  9. Using Digital Comics to Develop Digital Literacy: Fostering Functionally, Critically, and Rhetorically Literate Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirchoff, Jeff

    2017-01-01

    Literacy scholarship has established the importance of teaching, supporting, and facilitating digital literacy education for 21st century students. Stuart Selber goes a step further, arguing that students must be functionally (using digital technology), critically (questioning digital technology), and rhetorically (producing effective digital…

  10. From Internet User to Cyberspace Citizen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakabayashi, Ippei

    1997-01-01

    Discusses social and cultural challenges that Internet technology raises. Highlights include preserving the freedom in cyberspace, the information distribution scheme of the Internet, two-way interactivity, search engines as marketing tools, the insecurity of cyberspace, online safety rules for children, educating children to "walk…

  11. Raising Global Citizens: Focus on Cultural Competency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koprucu, Sirin

    2009-01-01

    Corporate leaders of high-growth initiative employment sectors, such as advanced manufacturing, aerospace, automotive, biotechnology, health care, hospitality, information technology, and homeland security, are not the only ones who list intercultural communication and management skills as business requisites. The entrepreneurs who are expected to…

  12. Unemployed citizen or 'at risk' client?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Jørgen Elm; Caswell, Dorte; Marston, Greg

    2010-01-01

    The paper explores recent developments in Australian and Danish unemployment policies with a special focus on the technologies used to classify and categorize unemployed people on government benefits. Using governmentality as our theoretical framework, we consider the implications of reducing com...

  13. Optimum method to determine gamma activity in 200 liter drums. In-toto measurement or extracting a sample

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bronson, Frazier

    2008-01-01

    In the process of decommissioning contaminated facilities, and in the conduct of normal operations involving radioactive material, it is frequently required to measure radioactivity in large containers such as 200 liter drums. For solid material, it is quite unusual for the radioactivity to be homogeneously distributed throughout the container. One way to derive the concentration of radioactivity within the container is to extract a sample for subsequent measurement in the laboratory. Another way is to use gamma spectroscopy and assay the entire container, or in-toto measurement. This paper examines the process of determining the best way to estimate the activity within the container, and gives quantitative estimates of measurement uncertainty for various conditions of radioactivity contained within 200 liter drums. When the contents of the container are not homogeneous, the sampling uncertainty is likely to be larger than the in-toto measurement uncertainty. (author)

  14. One-Handed Thumb Use on Smart Phones by Semi-literate and Illiterate Users in India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katre, Dinesh

    There is a tremendous potential for developing mobile-based productivity tools and occupation specific applications for the semi-literate and illiterate users in India. One-handed thumb use on the touchscreen of smart phone or touch phone is considered as an effective alternative than the use of stylus or index finger, to free the other hand for supporting the occupational activity. In this context, usability research and experimental tests are conducted to understand the role of fine motor control, usability of thumb as the interaction apparatus and the ergonomic needs of users. The paper also touches upon cultural, racial and anthropometric aspects, which need due consideration while designing the mobile interface. Design recommendations are evolved to enhance the effectiveness of one-handed thumb use on smart phone, especially for the benefit of semi-literate and illiterate users.

  15. How vertical hand movements impact brain activity elicited by literally and metaphorically related words: an ERP study of embodied metaphor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardolph, Megan; Coulson, Seana

    2014-01-01

    Embodied metaphor theory suggests abstract concepts are metaphorically linked to more experientially basic ones and recruit sensorimotor cortex for their comprehension. To test whether words associated with spatial attributes reactivate traces in sensorimotor cortex, we recorded EEG from the scalp of healthy adults as they read words while performing a concurrent task involving either upward- or downward- directed arm movements. ERPs were time-locked to words associated with vertical space—either literally (ascend, descend) or metaphorically (inspire, defeat)—as participants made vertical movements that were either congruent or incongruent with the words. Congruency effects emerged 200–300 ms after word onset for literal words, but not until after 500 ms post-onset for metaphorically related words. Results argue against a strong version of embodied metaphor theory, but support a role for sensorimotor simulation in concrete language. PMID:25566041

  16. Ohlédnutí za Studentskou literárněvědnou konferencí 2014

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Svobodová, Barbora

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 62, č. 4 (2014), s. 681-683 ISSN 0009-0468. [Studentská literárněvědná konference. Psaní jako (tvůrčí) proces. Praha, 24042014-25042014] Institutional support: RVO:68378068 Keywords : Writing as a creative process * Czech literature * The Students’ Literary Studies Conference 2014 Subject RIV: AJ - Letters, Mass-media, Audiovision

  17. Manifestasi Kebutuhan Bertingkat Tokoh Aya Kito Dalam Novel One Liter of Tears Melalui Pendekatan Psikologi Humanistik Abraham Maslow

    OpenAIRE

    RACHMAWATI, DEVI SHINTA

    2013-01-01

    Novel is one of literary fiction exciting and in demand by today's society. Novel One Liter of Tears can be analyzed through a variety of approaches one through the psychological approach, in this case the approach of humanistic psychology of Abraham Maslow. This study answers the formulation of the problem, namely, how the needs of multilevel manifestation Aya character in the novel One Litre of Tears through the approach of humanistic psychology of Abraham Maslow. Analyzed from the humanist...

  18. V. kongres světové literárněvědné bohemistiky

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Holanová, Markéta; Jareš, Michal; Pišna, Jan; Segi, Stefan; Soukupová, K.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 63, č. 5 (2015), s. 793-807 ISSN 0009-0468. [V. kongres světové literárněvědné bohemistiky: Válka a konflikt v české literatuře. Praha, 29.06.2015-04.07.2015] Institutional support: RVO:68378068 Keywords : Czech literature * war and conflict * congress * literary studies Subject RIV: AJ - Letters, Mass-media, Audiovision

  19. Professoras dialogam com o texto literário Dialogues between teachers and literary texts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Julia Martins Dietzsch

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste artigo é discutir as concepções de linguagem e as maneiras pelas quais professores organizam sua sala de aula para o trabalho com a leitura e a escrita. Foram realizados, entre 1997 e 1998, seminários em que professoras de escolas públicas da cidade de São Paulo tiveram oportunidade de falar de sua prática pedagógica, partilhando, no grupo, suas dúvidas, acertos e propostas de trabalho. A leitura de textos literários e teóricos foi enriquecida com anotações feitas no caderno de escrita, com imagens do cinema e música. Com humor, tentou-se desconstruir palavras e rótulos que dissimulam preconceitos e limitam as interações em sala de aula. Estabeleceu-se correspondência com os alunos dos professores, tornando mais efetivos os projetos didáticos conduzidos pelos docentes em suas classes. As cartas, desenhos e postais trocados com as crianças estimularam a atividade intelectual e reavivaram o trabalho pedagógico.The aim of this paper is to discuss teachers' conceptions of language and ways through which they organize their classroom in order to provide reading and writing. Workshops were held with teachers from public schools of São Paulo City, Brazil. In these meetings, the attendants were free to speak about their practices and to share doubts, improvements and proposals with colleagues. The reading of literary and theoretical texts during the seminars were enriched by the teachers' own writings, movies and musical rhythms. With humor, it was tried to disconstruct words and labels which convey prejudices, restricting interactios and learning among students and their teachers in the classrooms. In addiction, letters were exchanged with students, giving birth to didatic projects that made classrooms' practices more effectives. These letters, drawings and postcards exchanged with children incentivated intelectual activities and pedagogical work.

  20. Some alternatives? Event-related potential investigation of literal and pragmatic interpretations of 'some' presented in isolation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecile Barbet

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In sentence verification tasks involving under-informative statements such as 'Some elephants are mammals', some adults appear more tolerant to pragmatic violations than others. The underlying causes of such inter-individual variability remain however essentially unknown. Here, we investigated inter-individual variation in adults deriving the scalar inference not all triggered by the quantifier 'some'. We first assessed the individual intolerance to pragmatic violations in adult participants presented with under-informative some-statements (e.g., Some infants are young. We then recorded event-related brain potentials in the same participants using an oddball paradigm where an ambiguous deviant word 'some' presented in isolation had to be taken either as a match (in its literal interpretation at least some or as a mismatch (in its pragmatic interpretation some but not all and where an unambiguous deviant target word 'all' was featured as control. Mean amplitude modulation of the classic P3b provided a measure of the ease with which participants considered 'some' and 'all' as deviants within each experimental block. We found that intolerance to pragmatic violations was associated with a reduction in the magnitude of the P3b effect elicited by the target 'some' when it was to be considered a literal match. However, we failed to replicate a straightforward literal interpretation facilitation effect in our experiment which offers a control for task demands. We propose that the derivation of scalar inferences also relies on general, but flexible, mismatch resolution processes.